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1

Queen mandibular pheromone: questions that remain to be resolved  

E-print Network

Queen mandibular pheromone: questions that remain to be resolved David JARRIAULT, Alison R. MERCER', and the subsequent identification and synthesis of key components of queen mandibular pheromone, has been appreciation of the importance and complexity of queen pheromones, but many mysteries remain about

2

Suppression of queen rearing in European and Africanized honey bees Apis mellifera L. by synthetic queen mandibular gland pheromone  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Queen rearing is suppressed in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) by pheromones, particularly the queen's mandibular gland pheromone. In this study we compared this pheromonally-based inhibition between temperate and tropically-evolved honey bees. Colonies of European and Africanized bees were exposed to synthetic queen mandibular gland pheromone (QMP) for ten days following removal of resident queens, and their queen rearing

J. S. Pettis; M. L. Winston; A. M. Collins

1995-01-01

3

Honeybee response to queen mandibular pheromone in laboratory bioassays  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantitative laboratory biosassays measuring short-range attraction of worker honeybees to pheromone-treated pipets or glass pseudo-queens are described. Each replicate involves only 15 workers, allowing a single colony to provide sufficient individuals for a complete study as well as for between-colony comparisons. The more sensitive pseudo-queen bioassay provides a measurable response at levels of queen mandibular extract of 10-7 than that

Lori-Ann Kaminski; Keith N. Slessor; Mark L. Winston; Nairn W. Hay; John H. Borden

1990-01-01

4

Production and transmission of honey bee queen ( Apis mellifera L.) mandibular gland pheromone  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social cohesiveness of eusocial insect colonies is maintained primarily through the utilization of pheromones. In this study we quantitatively elucidated the production, secretion, and transmission of 9-keto2(E)-decenoic acid (9-ODA), one of the components of the mandibular gland pheromone of the honey bee queen Apis mellifera; this is the only identified primer pheromone complex in the eusocial insects. Mated queens

Ken Naumann; Mark L. Winston; Keith N. Slessor; Glenn D. Prestwich; Francis X. Webster

1991-01-01

5

The role of queen mandibular pheromone and colony congestion in honey bee ( Apis mellifera L.) reproductive swarming (Hymenoptera: Apidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The roles of honey bee queen mandibular pheromone and colony congestion in the inhibition of swarming were investigated. Two colony siz.es were used: small, congested colonies and large, uncongested colonies. Both groups of colonies were treated with various dosages of the five-component, synthetic queen mandibular pheromone in the spring, and the extent and timing of swarming were followed. Most treatment

Mark L. Winston; Heather A. Higo; Simon J. Colley; Tanya Pankiw; Keith N. Slessor

1991-01-01

6

cGMP modulates responses to queen mandibular pheromone in worker honey bees  

PubMed Central

Responses to social cues, such as pheromones, can be modified by genotype, physiology, or environmental context. Honey bee queens produce a pheromone (queen mandibular pheromone; QMP) which regulates aspects of worker bee behavior and physiology. Forager bees are less responsive to QMP than young bees engaged in brood care, suggesting that physiological changes associated with behavioral maturation modulate response to this pheromone. Since 3?, 5?-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a major regulator of behavioral maturation in workers, we examined its role in modulating worker responses to QMP. Treatment with a cGMP analog resulted in significant reductions in both behavioral and physiological responses to QMP in young caged workers. Treatment significantly reduced attraction to QMP and inhibited the QMP-mediated increase in vitellogenin RNA levels in the fat bodies of worker bees. Genome-wide analysis of brain gene expression patterns demonstrated that cGMP has a larger effect on expression levels than QMP, and that QMP has specific effects in the presence of cGMP, suggesting that some responses to QMP may be dependent on an individual bees' physiological state. Our data suggest that cGMP-mediated processes play a role in modulating responses to QMP in honey bees at the behavioral, physiological, and molecular levels. PMID:21626397

Fussnecker, Brendon L.; McKenzie, Alexander M.; Grozinger, Christina M.

2013-01-01

7

Queen pheromones  

PubMed Central

Group-living species produce signals that alter the behavior and even the physiology of their social partners. Social insects possess especially sophisticated chemical communication systems that govern every aspect of colony life, including the defining feature of eusociality: reproductive division of labor. Current evidence hints at the central importance of queen pheromones, but progress has been hindered by the fact that such pheromones have only been isolated in honeybees. In a pair of papers on the ant Lasius niger, we identified and investigated a queen pheromone regulating worker sterility. The cuticular hydrocarbon 3-methylhentriacontane (3-MeC31) is correlated with queen maturity and fecundity and workers are also more likely to execute surplus queens that have low amounts of this chemical. Experiments with synthetic 3-MeC31 found that it inhibits ovarian development in queenless workers and lowers worker aggression towards objects coated with it. Production of 3-MeC31 by queens was depressed by an experimental immune challenge, and the same chemical was abundant on queenlaid eggs, suggesting that the workers' responses to the queen are conditional on her health and fecundity. Together with other studies, these results indicate that queen pheromones are honest signals of quality that simultaneously regulate multiple social behaviors. PMID:21331238

2010-01-01

8

How flies respond to honey bee pheromone: the role of the foraging gene on reproductive response to queen mandibular pheromone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study we test one central prediction from sociogenomic theory—that social and non-social taxa share common genetic toolkits that regulate reproduction in response to environmental cues. We exposed Drosophila females of rover ( for R) and sitter ( for s) genotypes to an ovary-suppressing pheromone derived from the honeybee Apis mellifera. Surprisingly, queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) affected several measures of fitness in flies, and in a manner comparable to the pheromone's normal effect on bee workers. QMP-treated sitter flies had smaller ovaries that contained fewer eggs than did untreated controls. QMP-treated rover flies, by contrast, showed a more variable pattern that only sometimes resulted in ovary inhibition, while a third strain of fly that contains a sitter mutant allele in a rover background ( for s2) showed no ovarian response to QMP. Taken together, our results suggest that distinctly non-social insects have some capacity to respond to social cues, but that this response varies with fly genotype. In general, the interspecific response is consistent with a conserved gene set affecting reproductive physiology. The differential response among strains in particular suggests that for is itself important for modulating the fly's pheromonal response.

Camiletti, Alison L.; Awde, David N.; Thompson, Graham J.

2014-01-01

9

Semiochemicals of the honeybee queen mandibular glands  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ontogeny of the five queen mandibular gland semiochemicals that initiate and maintain the retinue behavior of worker honeybees was investigated by quantitative splitless capillary gas chromatography. No detectable pheromone is present at the time of eclosion, but decenoic acid levels build up rapidly during the first week of the queen's life. Two aromatic components attain detectable levels later, with

Keith N. Slessor; Lori-Ann Kaminski; G. G. S. King; Mark L. Winston

1990-01-01

10

Original article Effect of queen pheromone  

E-print Network

Original article Effect of queen pheromone on worker bees of different ages: behavioural worker bees to queen pheromonal blends were studied in a 4-field airflow olfactometer. The effects were elicited by both pheromonal signals; the queen-head extract induced higher responses than

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

11

Juvenile Hormone Enhances Aversive Learning Performance in 2-Day Old Worker Honey Bees while Reducing Their Attraction to Queen Mandibular Pheromone  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have shown that exposing young worker bees (Apis mellifera) to queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) reduces their aversive learning performance, while enhancing their attraction to QMP. As QMP has been found to reduce the rate of juvenile hormone (JH) synthesis in worker bees, we examined whether aversive learning in 2-day old workers exposed to QMP from the time of adult emergence could be improved by injecting JH (10 µg in a 2 µl volume) into the haemolymph. We examined in addition, the effects of JH treatment on worker attraction to QMP, and on the levels of expression of amine receptor genes in the antennae, as well as in the mushroom bodies of the brain. We found that memory acquisition and 1-hour memory recall were enhanced by JH. In contrast, JH treatment reduced the bees’ attraction towards a synthetic strip impregnated with QMP (Bee Boost). Levels of expression of the dopamine receptor gene Amdop1 were significantly lower in the mushroom bodies of JH-treated bees than in bees treated with vehicle alone (acetone diluted with bee ringer). Expression of the octopamine receptor gene, Amoa1, in this brain region was also affected by JH treatment, and in the antennae, Amoa1 transcript levels were significantly lower in JH-treated bees compared to controls. The results of this study suggest that QMP’s effects on JH synthesis may contribute to reducing aversive learning performance and enhancing attraction to QMP in young worker bees. PMID:25390885

McQuillan, H. James; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Mercer, Alison R.

2014-01-01

12

Chemical Profiles of Two Pheromone Glands Are Differentially Regulated by Distinct Mating Factors in Honey Bee Queens (Apis mellifera L.)  

PubMed Central

Pheromones mediate social interactions among individuals in a wide variety of species, from yeast to mammals. In social insects such as honey bees, pheromone communication systems can be extraordinarily complex and serve to coordinate behaviors among many individuals. One of the primary mediators of social behavior and organization in honey bee colonies is queen pheromone, which is produced by multiple glands. The types and quantities of chemicals produced differ significantly between virgin and mated queens, and recent studies have suggested that, in newly mated queens, insemination volume or quantity can affect pheromone production. Here, we examine the long-term impact of different factors involved during queen insemination on the chemical composition of the mandibular and Dufour's glands, two of the major sources of queen pheromone. Our results demonstrate that carbon dioxide (an anesthetic used in instrumental insemination), physical manipulation of genital tract (presumably mimicking the act of copulation), insemination substance (saline vs. semen), and insemination volume (1 vs. 8 µl) all have long-term effects on mandibular gland chemical profiles. In contrast, Dufour's gland chemical profiles were changed only upon insemination and were not influenced by exposure to carbon dioxide, manipulation, insemination substance or volume. These results suggest that the chemical contents of these two glands are regulated by different neuro-physiological mechanisms. Furthermore, workers responded differently to the different mandibular gland extracts in a choice assay. Although these studies must be validated in naturally mated queens of varying mating quality, our results suggest that while the chemical composition of Dufour's gland is associated with mating status, that of the mandibular glands is associated with both mating status and insemination success. Thus, the queen appears to be signaling both status and reproductive quality to the workers, which may impact worker behavior and physiology as well as social organization and productivity of the colony. PMID:24236028

Niño, Elina L.; Malka, Osnat; Hefetz, Abraham; Tarpy, David R.; Grozinger, Christina M.

2013-01-01

13

Bumblebee size polymorphism and worker response to queen pheromone  

PubMed Central

Queen pheromones are chemical signals produced by reproductive individuals in social insect colonies. In many species they are key to the maintenance of reproductive division of labor, with workers beginning to reproduce individually once the queen pheromone disappears. Recently, a queen pheromone that negatively affects worker fecundity was discovered in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris, presenting an exciting opportunity for comparisons with analogous queen pheromones in independently-evolved eusocial lineages such as honey bees, ants, wasps and termites. I set out to replicate this discovery and verify its reproducibility. Using blind, controlled experiments, I found that n-pentacosane (C25) does indeed negatively affect worker ovary development. Moreover, the pheromone affects both large and small workers, and applies to workers from large, mature colonies as well as young colonies. Given that C25 is readily available and that bumblebees are popular study organisms, I hope that this replication will encourage other researchers to tackle the many research questions enabled by the discovery of a queen pheromone. PMID:25289189

2014-01-01

14

Identification of an ant queen pheromone regulating worker sterility  

PubMed Central

The selective forces that shape and maintain eusocial societies are an enduring puzzle in evolutionary biology. Ordinarily sterile workers can usually reproduce given the right conditions, so the factors regulating reproductive division of labour may provide insight into why eusociality has persisted over evolutionary time. Queen-produced pheromones that affect worker reproduction have been implicated in diverse taxa, including ants, termites, wasps and possibly mole rats, but to date have only been definitively identified in the honeybee. Using the black garden ant Lasius niger, we isolate the first sterility-regulating ant queen pheromone. The pheromone is a cuticular hydrocarbon that comprises the majority of the chemical profile of queens and their eggs, and also affects worker behaviour, by reducing aggression towards objects bearing the pheromone. We further show that the pheromone elicits a strong response in worker antennae and that its production by queens is selectively reduced following an immune challenge. These results suggest that the pheromone has a central role in colony organization and support the hypothesis that worker sterility represents altruistic self-restraint in response to an honest quality signal. PMID:20591861

Holman, Luke; Jørgensen, Charlotte G.; Nielsen, John; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

2010-01-01

15

Selection on worker honeybee responses to queen pheromone (Apis mellifera L.)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Disruptive selection for responsiveness to queen mandibular gland pheromone (QMP) in the retinue bioassay resulted in the production of high and low QMP responding strains of honeybees (Apis mellifera L.). Strains differed significantly in their retinue response to QMP after one generation of selection. By the third generation the high strain was on average at least nine times more responsive than the low strain. The strains showed seasonal phenotypic plasticity such that both strains were more responsive to the pheromone in the spring than in the fall. Directional selection for low seasonal variation indicated that phenotypic plasticity was an additional genetic component to retinue response to QMP. Selection for high and low retinue responsiveness to QMP was not an artifact of the synthetic blend because both strains were equally responsive or non-responsive to whole mandibular gland extracts compared with QMP. The use of these strains clearly pointed to an extra-mandibular source of retinue pheromones (Pankiw et al. 1995; Slessor et al. 1998; Keeling et al. 1999).

Pankiw, T.; Winston, Mark L.; Fondrk, M. Kim; Slessor, Keith N.

16

Binding interaction between a queen pheromone component HOB and pheromone binding protein ASP1 of Apis cerana.  

PubMed

The honeybee's social behavior is closely related to the critical response to pheromone, while pheromone binding proteins (PBPs) play an important role in binding and transferring those pheromones. Here we report one known PBP, antennal special protein 1(ASP1), which has high affinity with a queen mandibular pheromone component, methyl-p-hydroxybenzoate (HOB). In this study, multiple fluorescent spectra, UV absorption spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra and molecular docking analysis were combined to clarify the binding process. Basically, fluorescence intensity of ASP1 could be considerably quenched by HOB with an appropriate interaction distance (3.1 nm), indicating that a complex, which is more stable in lower temperature, was formed. The fact ?H < 0, ?S < 0, by thermodynamic analysis, indicated the van der Waals and hydrogen bond as main driving force. Moreover, synchronous fluorescence spectra and CD spectra analysis showed the change of partial hydrophilicity of ASP1 and the increase of ?-helix after HOB addition. In conclusion, ASP1 can strongly and spontaneously interact with HOB. But the binding ability decreases with the rise of temperature, which may be necessary for sufficient social stability of hives. This study provides elucidation of the detailed binding mechanism and potential physicochemical basis of thermal stability to the social behavior of honeybee. PMID:25195542

Weng, Chen; Fu, Yuxia; Jiang, Hongtao; Zhuang, Shulin; Li, Hongliang

2015-01-01

17

Single class of queen pheromones stops worker reproduction in ants, bees and wasps  

E-print Network

Single class of queen pheromones stops worker reproduction in ants, bees and wasps A new study pheromones in wasps, ants and some bees is strikingly similar, even though these insects are separated that queen pheromones used by divergent groups of social insects evolved from conserved signals of a common

Wenseleers, Tom

18

Pheromonal contest between honeybee workers ( Apis mellifera capensis)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Queenless workers of the Cape honeybee ( Apis mellifera capensis) can develop into reproductives termed pseudoqueens. Although they morphologically remain workers they become physiologically queenlike, produce offspring, and secrete mandibular gland pheromones similar to those of true queens. However, after queen loss only very few workers gain pseudoqueen status. A strong intracolonial selection governs which workers start oviposition and which remain sterile. The "queen substance", 9-keto-2(E)-decenoic acid (9-ODA), the dominant compound of the queen's mandibular gland pheromones, suppresses the secretion of queenlike mandibular gland pheromones in workers. It may act as an important signal in pseudoqueen selection. By analysing the mandibular gland pheromones of workers kept in pairs, we found that A. m. capensis workers compete to produce the strongest queen-like signal.

Moritz, R. F. A.; Simon, U. E.; Crewe, R. M.

2000-10-01

19

Social parasitism by honeybee workers ( Apis mellifera capensis Esch.): evidence for pheromonal resistance to host queen’s signals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social parasites exploit their host’s communication system to usurp resources and reproduce. In the honeybee, Apis mellifera, worker reproduction is regulated by pheromones produced by the queen and the brood. Workers usually reproduce when the queen\\u000a is removed and young brood is absent. However, Cape honeybee workers, Apis mellifera capensis, are facultative intraspecific social parasites and can take over reproduction

Vincent Dietemann; Jochen Pflugfelder; Stephan Härtel; Peter Neumann; Robin M. Crewe

2006-01-01

20

Pheromone-mediated gene expression in the honey Christina M. Grozinger*  

E-print Network

Colloquium Pheromone-mediated gene expression in the honey bee brain Christina M. Grozinger­Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 We tested the hypothesis that queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) causes changes in gene in the field, demonstrating robust gene regulation by pheromone. To evaluate the second hypothesis, we focused

Robinson, Gene E.

21

Pheromone-mediated reproductive dominance hierarchies among pseudo-clonal honeybee workers  

E-print Network

Pheromone-mediated reproductive dominance hierarchies among pseudo-clonal honeybee workers (Apis-like pheromones. Their offspring, however, had much lower levels of ovary activation (3.1%), yet 89% showed fatty workers. Our data show that despite the absence of genetic diversity, residual queen mandibular pheromone

22

Honey bee primer pheromones and colony organization: gaps in our knowledge  

E-print Network

Review Honey bee primer pheromones and colony organization: gaps in our knowledge Mark L. Winstona knowledge concerning how honey bee primer pheromones mediate worker activities and colony functions. We first review the chemical structure and functions of queen mandibular pheromone (QMP), but then focus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

23

Queen signals in a stingless bee: suppression of worker ovary activation and spatial distribution of active compounds  

PubMed Central

In most species of social insect the queen signals her presence to her workers via pheromones. Worker responses to queen pheromones include retinue formation around the queen, inhibition of queen cell production and suppression of worker ovary activation. Here we show that the queen signal of the Brazilian stingless bee Friesella schrottkyi is a mixture of cuticular hydrocarbons. Stingless bees are therefore similar to ants, wasps and bumble bees, but differ from honey bees in which the queen's signal mostly comprises volatile compounds originating from the mandibular glands. This shows that cuticular hydrocarbons have independently evolved as the queen's signal across multiple taxa, and that the honey bees are exceptional. We also report the distribution of four active queen-signal compounds by Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging. The results indicate a relationship between the behavior of workers towards the queen and the likely site of secretion of the queen's pheromones. PMID:25502598

Nunes, Túlio M.; Mateus, Sidnei; Favaris, Arodi P.; Amaral, Mônica F. Z. J.; von Zuben, Lucas G.; Clososki, Giuliano C.; Bento, José M. S.; Oldroyd, Benjamin P.; Silva, Ricardo; Zucchi, Ronaldo; Silva, Denise B.; Lopes, Norberto P.

2014-01-01

24

Queen signals in a stingless bee: suppression of worker ovary activation and spatial distribution of active compounds.  

PubMed

In most species of social insect the queen signals her presence to her workers via pheromones. Worker responses to queen pheromones include retinue formation around the queen, inhibition of queen cell production and suppression of worker ovary activation. Here we show that the queen signal of the Brazilian stingless bee Friesella schrottkyi is a mixture of cuticular hydrocarbons. Stingless bees are therefore similar to ants, wasps and bumble bees, but differ from honey bees in which the queen's signal mostly comprises volatile compounds originating from the mandibular glands. This shows that cuticular hydrocarbons have independently evolved as the queen's signal across multiple taxa, and that the honey bees are exceptional. We also report the distribution of four active queen-signal compounds by Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging. The results indicate a relationship between the behavior of workers towards the queen and the likely site of secretion of the queen's pheromones. PMID:25502598

Nunes, Túlio M; Mateus, Sidnei; Favaris, Arodi P; Amaral, Mônica F Z J; von Zuben, Lucas G; Clososki, Giuliano C; Bento, José M S; Oldroyd, Benjamin P; Silva, Ricardo; Zucchi, Ronaldo; Silva, Denise B; Lopes, Norberto P

2014-01-01

25

A queen pheromone induces workers to kill sexual larvae in colonies of the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We conducted five bioassays to study how queens control the execution of sexual larvae by workers in colonies of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. In each assay, subset colonies were made from many large polygyne colonies, and the 20 sexual larvae they contained were monitored over time. Sexual larvae mostly survived in queenless colonies, but were mostly killed in colonies with a single dealated queen, regardless of whether or not the queen was fertilized. The larvae were also killed when fresh corpses of queens were added to queenless colonies. Whereas acetone extracts of queens did not produce a significant increase in killings, extracts in buffered saline induced workers to execute most sexual larvae, indicating successful extraction of an execution pheromone. We identified the probable storage location of the chemical as the poison sac, and found both fresh (1 day) and old (21 day) extracts of poison sacs to be equally effective in inducing executions. The pheromone is stable at room temperature, perhaps because venom alkaloids also present in the extracts keep the pheromone from degrading. It is apparently either proteinaceous or associated with a proteinaceous molecule, a novel finding, as no queen pheromone of a proteinaceous nature has been previously demonstrated in ants.

Klobuchar, Emily; Deslippe, Richard

2002-05-01

26

Cloning and Expression of a Queen Pheromone-Binding Protein in the Honeybee: an Olfactory-Specific, Developmentally Regulated Protein  

Microsoft Academic Search

Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are small abundant extracel- lular proteins thought to participate in perireceptor events of odor-pheromone detection by carrying, deactivating, and\\/or selecting odor stimuli. The honeybee queen pheromone is known to play a crucial role in colony organization, in addition to drone sex attraction. We identified, for the first time in a social insect, a binding protein called antennal-specific

Emmanuelle Danty; Loic Briand; Christine Michard-Vanhee; Valerie Perez; Gerard Arnold; Odile Gaudemer; Dominique Huet; Jean-Claude Huet; Christian Ouali; Claudine Masson; Jean-Claude Pernollet

1999-01-01

27

Synthesis of carrier-free tritium-labeled queen bee pheromone  

SciTech Connect

A short synthesis of (4,5-/sup 3/H/sub 2/) (E)-9-oxo-2-decenoic acid (ODA), a high-specific-activity tritium-containing isotopomer of the queen bee pheromone, is described. Catalytic tritiation of the ketal of ethyl 9-oxo-4-decenoate introduces tritium into two positions, one of which is completely unactivated. Subsequent transformation by selenation, oxidation, and hydrolysis affords the labeled 9-ODA at >60 Ci/mmol. The material is suitable for biochemical studies of binding and catabolism in ovarian, antennal, and other target tissues.

Webster, F.X.; Prestwich, G.D.

1988-03-01

28

Effects of Insemination Quantity on Honey Bee Queen Physiology  

PubMed Central

Mating has profound effects on the physiology and behavior of female insects, and in honey bee (Apis mellifera) queens, these changes are permanent. Queens mate with multiple males during a brief period in their early adult lives, and shortly thereafter they initiate egg-laying. Furthermore, the pheromone profiles of mated queens differ from those of virgins, and these pheromones regulate many different aspects of worker behavior and colony organization. While it is clear that mating causes dramatic changes in queens, it is unclear if mating number has more subtle effects on queen physiology or queen-worker interactions; indeed, the effect of multiple matings on female insect physiology has not been broadly addressed. Because it is not possible to control the natural mating behavior of queens, we used instrumental insemination and compared queens inseminated with semen from either a single drone (single-drone inseminated, or SDI) or 10 drones (multi-drone inseminated, or MDI). We used observation hives to monitor attraction of workers to SDI or MDI queens in colonies, and cage studies to monitor the attraction of workers to virgin, SDI, and MDI queen mandibular gland extracts (the main source of queen pheromone). The chemical profiles of the mandibular glands of virgin, SDI, and MDI queens were characterized using GC-MS. Finally, we measured brain expression levels in SDI and MDI queens of a gene associated with phototaxis in worker honey bees (Amfor). Here, we demonstrate for the first time that insemination quantity significantly affects mandibular gland chemical profiles, queen-worker interactions, and brain gene expression. Further research will be necessary to elucidate the mechanistic bases for these effects: insemination volume, sperm and seminal protein quantity, and genetic diversity of the sperm may all be important factors contributing to this profound change in honey bee queen physiology, queen behavior, and social interactions in the colony. PMID:17912357

Richard, Freddie-Jeanne; Tarpy, David R.; Grozinger, Christina M.

2007-01-01

29

Queen substances from the abdomen of the honey bee queen  

Microsoft Academic Search

The secretion of the mandibular glands of a honey bee queen enables the worker bees to react to the presence of their queen. Extirpating the mandibular glands of the queen does not prevent that she is accepted by her colony. Hitherto this was attributed to contamination of the queen's body by mandibular gland substances during or preceding the extirpation. When,

H. H. W. Velthuis

1970-01-01

30

Differential combinatorial coding of pheromones in two olfactory subsystems of the honey bee brain.  

PubMed

Neural coding of pheromones has been intensively studied in insects with a particular focus on sex pheromones. These studies favored the view that pheromone compounds are processed within specific antennal lobe glomeruli following a specialized labeled-line system. However, pheromones play crucial roles in an insect's life beyond sexual attraction, and some species use many different pheromones making such a labeled-line organization unrealistic. A combinatorial coding scheme, in which each component activates a set of broadly tuned units, appears more adapted in this case. However, this idea has not been tested thoroughly. We focused here on the honey bee Apis mellifera, a social insect that relies on a wide range of pheromones to ensure colony cohesion. Interestingly, the honey bee olfactory system harbors two central parallel pathways, whose functions remain largely unknown. Using optophysiological recordings of projection neurons, we compared the responses of these two pathways to 27 known honey bee pheromonal compounds emitted by the brood, the workers, and the queen. We show that while queen mandibular pheromone is processed by l-ALT (lateral antennal lobe tract) neurons and brood pheromone is mainly processed by m-ALT (median antennal lobe tract) neurons, worker pheromones induce redundant activity in both pathways. Moreover, all tested pheromonal compounds induce combinatorial activity from several AL glomeruli. These findings support the combinatorial coding scheme and suggest that higher-order brain centers reading out these combinatorial activity patterns may eventually classify olfactory signals according to their biological meaning. PMID:25762663

Carcaud, Julie; Giurfa, Martin; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

2015-03-11

31

Uncoupling primer and releaser responses to pheromone in honey bees  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pheromones produce dramatic behavioral and physiological responses in a wide variety of species. Releaser pheromones elicit rapid responses within seconds or minutes, while primer pheromones produce long-term changes which may take days to manifest. Honeybee queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) elicits multiple distinct behavioral and physiological responses in worker bees, as both a releaser and primer, and thus produces responses on vastly different time scales. In this study, we demonstrate that releaser and primer responses to QMP can be uncoupled. First, treatment with the juvenile hormone analog methoprene leaves a releaser response (attraction to QMP) intact, but modulates QMP’s primer effects on sucrose responsiveness. Secondly, two components of QMP (9-ODA and 9-HDA) do not elicit a releaser response (attraction) but are as effective as QMP at modulating a primer response, downregulation of foraging-related brain gene expression. These results suggest that different responses to a single pheromone may be produced via distinct pathways.

Grozinger, Christina M.; Fischer, Patrick; Hampton, Jacob E.

2007-05-01

32

Aggressive reproductive competition among hopelessly queenless honeybee workers triggered by pheromone signaling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the honeybee, Apis mellifera, the queen monopolizes reproduction, while the sterile workers cooperate harmoniously in nest maintenance. However, under queenless (QL) conditions, cooperation collapses and reproductive competition among workers ensues. This is mediated through aggression and worker oviposition, as well as shifts in pheromones, from worker to queen-like composition. Many studies suggest a dichotomy between conflict resolution through aggression or through pheromonal signaling. In this paper, we demonstrate that both phenomena comprise essential components of reproductive competition and that pheromone signaling actually triggers the onset of aggression. We kept workers as QL groups until first aggression was observed and subsequently determined the contestants’ reproductive status and content of the mandibular (MG) and Dufour’s glands (DG). In groups in which aggression occurred early, the attacked bee had consistently more queen-like pheromone in both the MG and DG, although both contestants had undeveloped ovaries. In groups with late aggression, the attacked bee had consistently larger oocytes and more queen-like pheromone in the DG, but not the MG. We suggest that at early stages of competition, the MG secretion is utilized to establish dominance and that the DG provides an honest fertility signal. We further argue that it is the higher amount of DG pheromone that triggers aggression.

Malka, O.; Shnieor, S.; Katzav-Gozansky, T.; Hefetz, A.

2008-06-01

33

Pathological effects of the microsporidium Nosema ceranae on honey bee queen physiology (Apis mellifera).  

PubMed

Nosema ceranae, a microsporidian parasite originally described in the Asian honey bee Apis cerana, has recently been found to be cross-infective and to also parasitize the European honey bee Apis mellifera. Since this discovery, many studies have attempted to characterize the impact of this parasite in A. mellifera honey bees. Nosema species can infect all colony members, workers, drones and queens, but the pathological effects of this microsporidium has been mainly investigated in workers, despite the prime importance of the queen, who monopolizes the reproduction and regulates the cohesion of the society via pheromones. We therefore analyzed the impact of N. ceranae on queen physiology. We found that infection by N. ceranae did not affect the fat body content (an indicator of energy stores) but did alter the vitellogenin titer (an indicator of fertility and longevity), the total antioxidant capacity and the queen mandibular pheromones, which surprisingly were all significantly increased in Nosema-infected queens. Thus, such physiological changes may impact queen health, leading to changes in pheromone production, that could explain Nosema-induced supersedure (queen replacement). PMID:21156180

Alaux, Cédric; Folschweiller, Morgane; McDonnell, Cynthia; Beslay, Dominique; Cousin, Marianne; Dussaubat, Claudia; Brunet, Jean-Luc; Le Conte, Yves

2011-03-01

34

Differential expression of odorant-binding proteins in the mandibular glands of the honey bee according to caste and age.  

PubMed

Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs) mediate both perception and release of chemical stimuli in insects. The genome of the honey bee contains 21 genes encoding OBPs and 6 encoding CSPs. Using a proteomic approach, we have investigated the expression of OBPs and CSPs in the mandibular glands of adult honey bees in relation to caste and age. OBP13 is mostly expressed in young individuals and in virgin queens, while OBP21 is abundant in older bees and is prevalent in mated queens. OBP14, which had been found in larvae, is produced in hive workers' glands. Quite unexpectedly, the mandibular glands of drones also contain OBPs, mainly OBP18 and OBP21. We have expressed three of the most represented OBPs and studied their binding properties. OBP13 binds with good specificity oleic acid and some structurally related compounds, OBP14 is better tuned to monoterpenoid structures, while OBP21 binds the main components of queen mandibular pheromone as well as farnesol, a compound used as a trail pheromone in the honey bee and other hymenopterans. The high expression of different OBPs in the mandibular glands suggests that such proteins could be involved in solubilization and release of semiochemicals. PMID:21707107

Iovinella, Immacolata; Dani, Francesca Romana; Niccolini, Alberto; Sagona, Simona; Michelucci, Elena; Gazzano, Angelo; Turillazzi, Stefano; Felicioli, Antonio; Pelosi, Paolo

2011-08-01

35

Original article Are there pheromonal dominance signals  

E-print Network

Original article Are there pheromonal dominance signals in the bumblebee Bombus hypnorum L- ponents (Michener, 1977). In primitively eusocial halictine bees, pheromonal queen recognition has been of specific queen pheromones might coincide with the devel- opment of a larger worker population inside

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

36

Sensory reception of the primer pheromone ethyl oleate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social work force distribution in honeybee colonies critically depends on subtle adjustments of an age-related polyethism. Pheromones play a crucial role in adjusting physiological and behavioral maturation of nurse bees to foragers. In addition to primer effects of brood pheromone and queen mandibular pheromone—both were shown to influence onset of foraging—direct worker-worker interactions influence adult behavioral maturation. These interactions were narrowed down to the primer pheromone ethyl oleate, which is present at high concentrations in foragers, almost absent in young bees and was shown to delay the onset of foraging. Based on chemical analyses, physiological recordings from the antenna (electroantennograms) and the antennal lobe (calcium imaging), and behavioral assays (associative conditioning of the proboscis extension response), we present evidence that ethyl oleate is most abundant on the cuticle, received by olfactory receptors on the antenna, processed in glomeruli of the antennal lobe, and learned in olfactory centers of the brain. The results are highly suggestive that the primer pheromone ethyl oleate is transmitted and perceived between individuals via olfaction at close range.

Muenz, Thomas S.; Maisonnasse, Alban; Plettner, Erika; Le Conte, Yves; Rössler, Wolfgang

2012-05-01

37

Volatiles in the mandibular gland of Tetraponera penzigi: A plant ant of the whistling thorn acacia  

E-print Network

Volatiles in the mandibular gland of Tetraponera penzigi: A plant ant of the whistling thorn acacia; accepted 11 January 2006 Keywords: Tetraponera penzigi; Hymenoptera; Formicidae; Pseudomyrmecinae; Acacia drepanolobium; Whistling thorn acacia; Mandibular gland; Alarm pheromone 1. Subject and source Workers

Palmer, Todd M.

38

QUEENS COLLEGE Queens College  

E-print Network

QUEENS COLLEGE EMERGENCY RESPONSE GUIDE Queens College City University of NewYork Department, and we are grateful to Lehman for allowing us to adapt it for use at Queens College. #12;EMERGENCY HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS DISABLED PERSONS EVACUATION PROCEDURES CAMPUS MAP PAGE 3 PAGE 4 PAGE 5 PAGE 6 PAGE 7

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

39

Caste-Selective Pheromone Biosynthesis in Honeybees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Queen and worker honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) produce a caste-related blend of functionalized 8- and 10-carbon fatty acids in their mandibular glands. The biological functions of these compounds match the queen's reproductive and the worker's nonreproductive roles in the colony. Studies with deuterated substrates revealed that the biosynthesis of these acids begins with stearic acid, which is hydroxylated at the

Erika Plettner; Keith N. Slessor; Mark L. Winston; James E. Oliver

1996-01-01

40

Pheromone Signalling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Pheromones are chemicals used to communicate with members of the same species. First described in insects, pheromones are often used to attract mates but in social insects, such as ants and bees, pheromone use is much more sophisticated. For example, ants use pheromones to make foraging trails and the chemical and physical properties of the…

Hart, Adam G.

2011-01-01

41

Pheromonal regulation of starvation resistance in honey bee workers ( Apis mellifera)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most animals can modulate nutrient storage pathways according to changing environmental conditions, but in honey bees nutrient storage is also modulated according to changing behavioral tasks within a colony. Specifically, bees involved in brood care (nurses) have higher lipid stores in their abdominal fat bodies than forager bees. Pheromone communication plays an important role in regulating honey bee behavior and physiology. In particular, queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) slows the transition from nursing to foraging. We tested the effects of QMP exposure on starvation resistance, lipid storage, and gene expression in the fat bodies of worker bees. We found that indeed QMP-treated bees survived much longer compared to control bees when starved and also had higher lipid levels. Expression of vitellogenin RNA, which encodes a yolk protein that is found at higher levels in nurses than foragers, was also higher in the fat bodies of QMP-treated bees. No differences were observed in expression of genes involved in insulin signaling pathways, which are associated with nutrient storage and metabolism in a variety of species; thus, other mechanisms may be involved in increasing the lipid stores. These studies demonstrate that pheromone exposure can modify nutrient storage pathways and fat body gene expression in honey bees and suggest that chemical communication and social interactions play an important role in altering metabolic pathways.

Fischer, Patrick; Grozinger, Christina M.

2008-08-01

42

Pheromones affecting ovary activation and ovariole loss in the Asian honey bee Apis cerana.  

PubMed

The Asian hive bee Apis cerana has similar queen mandibular pheromones (QMP) to the Western honey bee Apismellifera. However the effects of individual QMP components have never been tested to determine their effects on the reproductive physiology of A. cerana workers. We fed one queen equivalent of each of the major components of A. cerana QMP to groups of c.a. 500day-old, caged, workers twice a day until the workers were 10days old. Half of the cages were also provided with 10% royal jelly in the food. Workers were sampled each day and dissected to determine the number of ovarioles and the degree of ovary activation (egg development). In cages treated with 9-carbon fatty acids ovary activation was minimal, whereas the 10-carbon acids suppressed ovary activation very little. Royal jelly enhanced ovary activation, especially in cages treated with 10-carbon acids. The number of ovarioles declined with bee age, but the rate of decline was slowed by the 9-carbon acids in particular. The results show conservation of the composition and function of QMP between A. cerana and A. mellifera and support the hypothesis that QMP is an honest signal of queen fecundity rather than a chemical castrator of workers. PMID:25614964

Tan, Ken; Liu, Xiwen; Dong, Sihao; Wang, Chao; Oldroyd, Benjamin P

2015-03-01

43

Identification of a pheromone regulating caste differentiation in termitesQ:1  

E-print Network

PNAS proof Embargoed Identification of a pheromone regulating caste differentiation in termitesQ:1 for colony growth and survival. Pheromones produced by reining queens have long been believed to be the prime little progress in the chemical identification of such inhibitory pheromones. Here we report

Vargo, Ed

44

that hydrolyze royal jelly proteins from queen bee larvae of the honeybee, Apis mellifera  

E-print Network

that hydrolyze royal jelly proteins from queen bee larvae of the honeybee, Apis mellifera Takuma and mandibular glands of worker bees that serves as the only food on which honeybee queen larvae and adults activity of enzymes from the homogenates of honeybee queen larvae on royal jelly proteins. Homogenates of 3

45

Identification of a pheromone regulating caste differentiation in termites.  

PubMed

The hallmark of social insects is their caste system: reproduction is primarily monopolized by queens, whereas workers specialize in the other tasks required for colony growth and survival. Pheromones produced by reigning queens have long been believed to be the prime factor inhibiting the differentiation of new reproductive individuals. However, there has been very little progress in the chemical identification of such inhibitory pheromones. Here we report the identification of a volatile inhibitory pheromone produced by female neotenics (secondary queens) that acts directly on target individuals to suppress the differentiation of new female neotenics and identify n-butyl-n-butyrate and 2-methyl-1-butanol as the active components of the inhibitory pheromone. An artificial pheromone blend consisting of these two compounds had a strong inhibitory effect similar to live neotenics. Surprisingly, the same two volatiles are also emitted by eggs, playing a role both as an attractant to workers and an inhibitor of reproductive differentiation. This dual production of an inhibitory pheromone by female reproductives and eggs probably reflects the recruitment of an attractant pheromone as an inhibitory pheromone and may provide a mechanism ensuring honest signaling of reproductive status with a tight coupling between fertility and inhibitory power. Identification of a volatile pheromone regulating caste differentiation in a termite provides insights into the functioning of social insect colonies and opens important avenues for elucidating the developmental pathways leading to reproductive and nonreproductive castes. PMID:20615972

Matsuura, Kenji; Himuro, Chihiro; Yokoi, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Yuuka; Vargo, Edward L; Keller, Laurent

2010-07-20

46

Mammalian Pheromones  

PubMed Central

Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d ) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors. PMID:23988175

Liberles, Stephen D.

2015-01-01

47

Mammalian pheromones.  

PubMed

Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors. PMID:23988175

Liberles, Stephen D

2014-01-01

48

Caste-Selective Pheromone Biosynthesis in Honeybees  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Queen and worker honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) produce a caste-related blend of functionalized 8- and 10-carbon fatty acids in their mandibular glands. The biological functions of these compounds match the queen's reproductive and the worker's nonreproductive roles in the colony. Studies with deuterated substrates revealed that the biosynthesis of these acids begins with stearic acid, which is hydroxylated at the 17th or 18th position. The 18-carbon hydroxy acid chains are shortened, and the resulting 10-carbon hydroxy acids are oxidized in a caste-selective manner, thereby determining many of the functional differences between queens and workers.

Plettner, Erika; Slessor, Keith N.; Winston, Mark L.; Oliver, James E.

1996-03-01

49

Queen bee  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There are three kinds of bees in a colony: the queen, workers, and drones. The queen bee is the largest bee and her only purpose is to mate with the drone bees and lay eggs. Drones are male bees and their sole job is to mate with the queen. Workers are sterile females, meaning they can't lay eggs. Worker bees collect nectar and food for the queen and her developing larvae and protect the hive. Bees perform dances to tell other bees where and how far away food is located.

Alle Bilder (None; )

2007-05-10

50

Surface lipids of queen-laid eggs do not regulate queen production in a fission-performing ant  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In animal societies, most collective and individual decision making depends on the presence of reproductive individuals. The efficient transmission of information among reproductive and non-reproductive individuals is therefore a determinant of colony organization. In social insects, the presence of a queen modulates multiple colonial activities. In many species, it negatively affects worker reproduction and the development of diploid larvae into future queens. The queen mostly signals her presence through pheromone emission, but the means by which these chemicals are distributed in the colony are still unclear. In several ant species, queen-laid eggs are the vehicle of the queen signal. The aim of this study was to investigate whether queen-laid eggs of the ant Aphaenogaster senilis possess queen-specific cuticular hydrocarbons and/or Dufour or poison gland compounds, and whether the presence of eggs inhibited larval development into queens. Our results show that the queen- and worker-laid eggs shared cuticular and Dufour hydrocarbons with the adults; however, their poison gland compounds were not similar. Queen-laid eggs had more dimethylalkanes and possessed a queen-specific mixture of cuticular hydrocarbons composed of 3,11 + 3,9 + 3,7-dimethylnonacosane, in higher proportions than did worker-laid eggs. Even though the queen-laid eggs were biochemically similar to the queen, their addition to experimentally queenless groups did not prevent the development of new queens. More studies are needed on the means by which queen ant pheromones are transmitted in the colony, and how these mechanisms correlates with life history traits.

Ruel, Camille; Lenoir, Alain; Cerdá, Xim; Boulay, Raphaël

2013-01-01

51

Queen Bee  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

The bee marked in yellow is this hive's queen. There is usually only one queen in a hive, which the worker honeybees feed, follow, and protect. Society needs healthy bees and other insects to pollinate crops, but land use changes that decrease flower abundance can affect bee health and pollination ...

52

Pheromone Robotics  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe techniques for coordinating the actions of large numbers of small-scale robots to achieve useful large-scale results in surveillance, reconnaissance, hazard detection, and path finding. We exploit the biologically inspired notion of a “virtual pheromone,” implemented using simple transceivers mounted atop each robot. Unlike the chemical markers used by insect colonies for communication and coordination, our virtual pheromones are

David Payton; Mike Daily; Regina Estowski; Mike Howard; Craig Lee

2001-01-01

53

Identification and source of a queen-specific chemical in the pharaoh's ant,Monomorium pharaonis (L.).  

PubMed

Fertile queens of the antMonomorium pharaonis produce a chemical substance which is not present in worker ants or in young, alate (virgin) queens. The material has been identified as (E,E,E)-1-isopropenyl-4,8,12-trimethylcyclotetradeca-3,7,11-triene (neocembrene). This chemical is produced in the Dufour's gland of fertile queens and may serve as a queen-recognition pheromone. PMID:24318430

Edwards, J P; Chambers, J

1984-12-01

54

Pheromone Robotic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract:We describe techniques for coordinating the actions of large numbers,of small-scale robots to achieve useful large-scale results in surveillance, reconnaissance, hazard detection, and path finding. Weexploit the biologically inspired notion of a “virtual pheromone,” implemented using simple transceivers mounted ,atop each robot. Unlike ,the chemical ,markers ,used by insect ,colonies for communication and coordination, our virtual pheromones are symbolic messages

David W. Payton; Mike Daily; Regina Estkowski; Mike Howard; Craig Lee

2001-01-01

55

Queen volatiles as a modulator of Tetragonisca angustula drone behavior.  

PubMed

Tetragonisca angustula mating occurs during the virgin queen nuptial flight, usually in the presence of a drone congregation area (DCA). The presence of virgin queen pheromone is considered the trigger for DCA establishment, although this has not been demonstrated experimentally. We established meliponaries, in different habitats, with T. angustula virgin queens during the main drone reproduction period. Eight DCAs were observed in urban areas, and all established outside or near colonies containing at least one virgin queen. The accumulation of drones in the DCAs occurred from 08:00 to 18:00 h and over 3-35 days. The number of drones in DCAs ranged from 60 to 2,000. In field trials, drones were attracted to virgin queens and also, unexpectedly, to physogastric queens. Volatiles collected from both virgin and physogastric queens elicited strong electoantennogram (EAG) responses from drones. Virgin and physogastric queen volatiles were qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different, in chemical composition. The queen's abdomen was the principal source of these compounds. Isopropyl hexanoate (IPH), the most abundant compound in virgin queen volatiles and one of the most abundant in physogastric queen volatiles, was identified as one of the compounds that elicited EAG responses and was demonstrated to attract drones in a field test. PMID:22081302

Fierro, Macario M; Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Sánchez, Daniel; Villanueva-Gutiérrez, Rogel; Vandame, Remy

2011-11-01

56

Bifid Hyperplastic Mandibular Condyle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Condylar hyperplasia is a rare non-neoplastic pathology associated with overgrowth of the mandibular condyle. Presentation\\u000a of condylar hyperplasia with bifid mandibular condyle has never been reported in literature. Early management of the hyperplastic\\u000a disorders of the mandibular condyle can prevent occlusal canting and developing asymmetric deformities. We report a case of\\u000a ‘Bifid Hyperplastic Mandibular Condyle’ in a 14-year-old male with

R. S. Neelakandan; Darpan Bhargava

57

Alternative mating behaviors of the queen polymorphic ant Temnothorax longispinosus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mating behaviors of ants fall into two categories: female calling, in which a female alate releases pheromones that attract males, and male swarming, in which large male aggregations attract females. Female calling is common in species with queens that return to their natal nest to found colonies dependently after mating, while male swarming is common in species with queens that disperse to found independently. In some species that display both founding strategies, a queen-size polymorphism has evolved in which dependent-founding queens are smaller than independent-founding queens. Dependent founding is likely difficult if gynes (virgin queens) are mating in distant swarms. Therefore, a queen may adopt one or the other mating strategy based on its size and founding behavior. We investigated mating behaviors in the queen-polymorphic ant, Temnothorax longispinosus. Observations in laboratory mating arenas indicated that small gynes exhibited significantly lower flight activity than large gynes. Both forms mated in male swarms, and neither form exhibited female calling. The reduced flight activity of the small morph may facilitate returning to the natal nest after mating, provided the mating swarm is located nearby. Therefore, alternative colony-founding behaviors may be possible without the evolution of female-calling behavior; however, the reduced flight activity of small morphs may require that mating swarms are not distant from the natal nest.

Howard, Kenneth J.; Kennedy, David

2007-11-01

58

Splinted mandibular protraction appliance  

PubMed Central

Advancement of mandible rather than tooth movement is an ideal treatment for the correction of Class II malocclusion resulting from mandibular retrusion. In growing patients, forward repositioning of mandible by mandibular repositioning appliances is considered as a treatment of choice. Correction of mandibular retrusion by the conventional mandibular protraction appliances (MPAs) is mainly due to dento-alveolar changes and by altering the design of original MPAs, these limitations were minimized. The modified design enhanced the mandibular growth and contributed for the better skeletal correction of Class II malocclusion as compared to the conventional MPAs. This article highlights the design and fabrication of a splinted MPA for the correction of Class II malocclusion due to mandibular retrusion and also describes a patient managed by this appliance.

Jena, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Satinder Pal

2015-01-01

59

Sustainability Framework 1 Queen's University  

E-print Network

Sustainability Framework 1 Queen's University Sustainability Strategic Framework #12;Sustainability Framework 2 Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 2 Queen's Sustainability Mission

Abolmaesumi, Purang

60

Pheromone-Induced \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 14-mer -pheromone peptide of Candida albicans was chemically synthesized and used to analyze the role of white-opaque switching in the mating process. The -pheromone peptide blocked cell multiplication and induced \\

Shawn R. Lockhart; Rui Zhao; Karla J. Daniels; David R. Soll

2003-01-01

61

Insect Pheromones: Useful Lessons for Crustacean Pheromone Programs?  

E-print Network

Chapter 27 Insect Pheromones: Useful Lessons for Crustacean Pheromone Programs? Thomas C. Baker Abstract Insect pheromones, especially sex pheromones, have successfully con- tributed to pest management programs around the world since the 1970s. In this chapter I examine some of the ways in which pheromones

62

Alkylpyrazines: Alarm pheromone components of the little fire ant, Wasmannia auropunctata (Roger) (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The previous identification of 2,5-dimethyl-3-(3-methylbutyl) pyrazine as the mandibular alarm pheromone of the little fire ant, Wasmannia auropunctata (Roger), has been found to be incorrect. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of ant extracts suggested the correct structure to be the reg...

63

Differential antennal proteome comparison of adult honeybee drone, worker and queen (Apis mellifera L.).  

PubMed

To understand the olfactory mechanism of honeybee antennae in detecting specific volatile compounds in the atmosphere, antennal proteome differences of drone, worker and queen were compared using 2-DE, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. Therefore, 107 proteins were altered their expressions in the antennae of drone, worker and queen bees. There were 54, 21 and 32 up-regulated proteins in the antennae of drone, worker and queen, respectively. Proteins upregulated in the drone antennae were involved in fatty acid metabolism, antioxidation, carbohydrate metabolism and energy production, protein folding and cytoskeleton. Proteins upregulated in the antennae of worker and queen bees were related to carbohydrate metabolism and energy production while molecular transporters were upregulated in the queen antennae. Our results explain the role played by the antennae of drone is to aid in perceiving the queen sexual pheromones, in the worker antennae to assist for food search and social communication and in the queen antennae to help pheromone communication with the worker and the drone during the mating flight. This first proteomic study significantly extends our understanding of honeybee olfactory activities and the possible mechanisms played by the antennae in response to various environmental, social, biological and biochemical signals. PMID:21982827

Fang, Yu; Song, Feifei; Zhang, Lan; Aleku, Dereje Woltedji; Han, Bin; Feng, Mao; Li, Jianke

2012-01-01

64

THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE STAFF HANDBOOK  

E-print Network

will be issued from time to time. #12;Issue 04 A BRIEF HISTORY OF QUEEN'S The `hall of the Queen's scholars page 2 Introduction 3 A brief history of Queen's 4 Joining the College 5 Wages and salaries, etc. 6

Capdeboscq, Yves

65

Effect of pheromones, hormones, and handling on sucrose response thresholds of honey bees ( Apis mellifera L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The responsiveness of bees to sucrose is an important indicator of honey bee foraging decisions. Correlated with sucrose responsiveness is forage choice behavior, age of first foraging, and conditioned learning response. Pheromones and hormones are significant components in social insect systems associated with the regulation of colony-level and individual foraging behavior. Bees were treated to different exposure regimes of queen

T. Pankiw; R. E. Page Jr

2003-01-01

66

Pheromones and Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Chemical communication is widely used by crustaceans, for example, in sexual interactions, larval release, and planktonic\\u000a settlement. However, we know the identity of very few of the molecules involved. In this chapter, I introduce pheromones and\\u000a contrast them with signature mixtures. Pheromones are molecules that are evolved signals, in defined ratios in the case of\\u000a multiple component pheromones, which are

Tristram D. Wyatt

67

Using Generic Pheromone Lures to Expedite Identification of Aggregation Pheromones  

E-print Network

Using Generic Pheromone Lures to Expedite Identification of Aggregation Pheromones of longhorned beetles in the subfamily Cerambycinae produce sex or aggregation pheromones consisting of 2,3-hexanediols and/or hydroxyhex- anones. We tested the hypothesis that this diol/hydroxyketone pheromone motif

Hanks, Lawrence M.

68

Neonatal mandibular distraction osteogenesis.  

PubMed

Mandibular distraction has revolutionized the treatment of Robin sequence associated with severe airway obstruction. The distraction technique remains the only intervention that directly corrects mandibular hypoplasia and the retropositioned tongue, providing efficient relief of airway stenosis. Multiple studies have demonstrated the efficacy of distraction in avoiding tracheostomy and decreasing the severity airway obstruction in this patient population. The benefit to avoiding tracheostomy and relieving airway obstruction is superior to that of tongue-lip adhesion. It is, therefore, not surprising that mandibular distraction has become the first-line intervention at many centers for the surgical treatment of Robin sequence. The complication profile associated with mandibular distraction appears low; the most common complication is infection, which can be treated by antibiotics alone. The severity of airway obstruction can be quantified by polysomnogram: This tool has become one of the most widely used objective metrics in the Robin sequence population. Therefore indications for surgery, timing of palatoplasty and long-term assessment of airway function should be performed in conjunction with sleep study analysis. The effects of mandibular lengthening on feeding difficulty in Robin sequence patient remains a topic of controversy. Studies have demonstrated conflicting results: This can be an area of future study. Agreed-upon indications for surgery and definitive protocols of care have yet to be formulized; future research should focus on achieving these goals. Such studies would require agreed-upon terminology for Robin sequence, an increase in comparative and prospective analysis, and the use of quantifiable metrics of clinical results. PMID:25383055

Flores, Roberto L

2014-11-01

69

Inquiry@Queen's Undergraduate  

E-print Network

Queen's Learning Commons Stauffer Library #12;2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Welcome From the I@Q Steering: Leadership & Motivation ------------------------------------------------ 26 Session XI: Words and Language of the Inquiry@Queen's Steering Committee, Co-Chair, Jackie Druery Co-Chair, Vicki Remenda Acting Head, Academic

Graham, Nick

70

Queens College Nutrition and Dietetics  

E-print Network

1 Queens College Nutrition and Dietetics Student Handbook Students accepted into Queens College/Pages/Dietetics.aspx #12;2 Queens College Didactic Program in Dietetics DEPARTMENT and PROGRAM MISSIONS Family, Nutrition The Department of Family, Nutrition, and Exercise Sciences of Queens College of The City University of New York

Engel, Robert

71

Stereochemical studies on pheromonal communications  

PubMed Central

Pheromonal communications are heavily dependent on the stereochemistry of pheromones. Their enantioselective syntheses could establish the absolute configuration of the naturally occurring pheromones, and clarified the unique relationships between absolute configuration and bioactivity. For example, neither the (R)- nor (S)-enantiomer of sulcatol, the aggregation pheromone of an ambrosia beetle, is behaviorally active, while their mixture is bioactive. Recent results as summarized in the present review further illustrate the unique and diverse relationships between stereochemistry and bioactivity of pheromones. PMID:25504227

MORI, Kenji

2014-01-01

72

Transmigration of Mandibular Canines  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this paper is to present the first case of unusual reverse oblique (110 degrees to midsagittal plane) migration of mandibular right canine crossing the jaw midline and piercing the lower border of the mandible at the level of the opposite canine and also to report two more cases of transmigrated mandibular canine and one case of transmigrating mandibular canine. Mandibular canines are “cornerstone” of dental arch; their importance is manifested by their efficiency in masticatory function, stability of dental arch, and aid in maintaining natural facial expression. Early detection of this anomaly can help preserving these canines by orthodontic intervention or by surgical transplantation. This developmental anomaly is properly diagnosed by radiographic evaluation, which is primarily based on the panoramic radiograph. In patients with overretained deciduous canines or missing permanent canines, an intraoral radiograph should be supplemented with panoramic radiograph. This paper discusses the importance of early diagnosis of canine transmigration in treatment planning and reviews the various possible treatment options. PMID:23606992

Umashree, N.; Kumar, Avinash; Nagaraj, Tejavathi

2013-01-01

73

Measuring mandibular motions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mandibular motion along three axes is measured by three motion transducers on floating yoke that rests against mandible. System includes electronics to provide variety of outputs for data display and processing. Head frame is strapped to test subject's skull to provide fixed point of reference for transducers.

Dimeff, J.; Rositano, S.; Taylor, R. C.

1977-01-01

74

Effects of instrumental insemination and insemination quantity on Dufour's gland chemical profiles and vitellogenin expression in honey bee queens (Apis mellifera).  

PubMed

Honey bee queens (Apis mellifera) mate in their early adult lives with a variable number of males (drones). Mating stimulates dramatic changes in queen behavior, physiology, gene expression, and pheromone production. Here, we used virgin, single drone- (SDI), and multi-drone- (MDI) inseminated queens to study the effects of instrumental insemination and insemination quantity on the pheromone profiles of the Dufour's gland, and the expression of the egg-yolk protein, vitellogenin, in the fat body. Age, environmental conditions, and genetic background of the queens were standardized to specifically characterize the effects of these treatments. Our data demonstrate that insemination and insemination quantity significantly affect the chemical profiles of the Dufour's gland secretion. Moreover, workers were more attracted to Dufour's gland extract from inseminated queens compared to virgins, and to the extract of MDI queens compared to extract of SDI queens. However, while there were differences in the amounts of some esters between MDI queens and the other groups, it appears that the differences in behavioral responses were elicited by subtle changes in the overall chemical profiles rather than dramatic changes in specific individual chemicals. We also found a decrease in vitellogenin gene expression in the fat body of the MDI queens, which is negatively correlated with the quantities of Dufour's gland content. The possible explanations of this reduction are discussed. PMID:21786084

Richard, Freddie-Jeanne; Schal, Coby; Tarpy, David R; Grozinger, Christina M

2011-09-01

75

To b or not to b: a pheromone-binding protein regulates colony social organization in fire ants.  

PubMed

A major distinction in the social organization of ant societies is the number of reproductive queens that reside in a single colony. The fire ant Solenopsis invicta exists in two distinct social forms, one with colonies headed by a single reproductive queen and the other containing several to hundreds of egg-laying queens. This variation in social organization has been shown to be associated with genotypes at the gene Gp-9. Specifically, single-queen colonies have only the B allelic variant of this gene, whereas multiple-queen colonies always have the b variant as well. Subsequent studies revealed that Gp-9 shares the highest sequence similarity with genes encoding pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs). In other insects, PBPs serve as central molecular components in the process of chemical recognition of conspecifics. Fire ant workers regulate the number of egg-laying queens in a colony by accepting queens that produce appropriate chemical signals and destroying those that do not. The likely role of GP-9 in chemoreception suggests that the essential distinction in colony queen number between the single and multiple-queen form originates from differences in workers' abilities to recognize queens. Other, closely related fire ant species seem to regulate colony social organization in a similar fashion. PMID:15612031

Krieger, Michael J B

2005-01-01

76

RESEARCH PAPER Field bioassays of cerambycid pheromones reveal widespread  

E-print Network

RESEARCH PAPER Field bioassays of cerambycid pheromones reveal widespread parsimony of pheromone similar pheromone components. This article summarizes research that evaluated attraction of ceram- bycids to individual pheromone components, blends of pheromone components, and combinations of pheromones with host

Hanks, Lawrence M.

77

The Red Queen  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An example of the Red Queen hypothesis, the sexual population of Mexican Poeciliid fish are able to keep up with a changing environment, while the asexual populations are not as successful. From Evolution: Why Sex?

2003-09-26

78

Ant Queen Egg-Marking Signals: Matching Deceptive Laboratory Simplicity with Natural Complexity  

PubMed Central

Background Experiments under controlled laboratory conditions can produce decisive evidence for testing biological hypotheses, provided they are representative of the more complex natural conditions. However, whether this requirement is fulfilled is seldom tested explicitly. Here we provide a lab/field comparison to investigate the identity of an egg-marking signal of ant queens. Our study was based on ant workers resolving conflict over male production by destroying each other's eggs, but leaving queen eggs unharmed. For this, the workers need a proximate cue to discriminate between the two egg types. Earlier correlative evidence indicated that, in the ant Pachycondyla inversa, the hydrocarbon 3,11-dimethylheptacosane (3,11-diMeC27) is more abundant on the surface of queen-laid eggs. Methodology We first tested the hypothesis that 3,11-diMeC27 functions as a queen egg-marking pheromone using laboratory-maintained colonies. We treated worker-laid eggs with synthetic 3,11-diMeC27 and found that they were significantly more accepted than sham-treated worker-laid eggs. However, we repeated the experiment with freshly collected field colonies and observed no effect of treating worker-laid eggs with 3,11-diMeC27, showing that this compound by itself is not the natural queen egg-marking pheromone. We subsequently investigated the overall differences of entire chemical profiles of eggs, and found that queen-laid eggs in field colonies are more distinct from worker-laid eggs than in lab colonies, have more variation in profiles, and have an excess of longer-chain hydrocarbons. Conclusions Our results suggest that queen egg-marking signals are significantly affected by transfer to the laboratory, and that this change is possibly connected to reduced queen fertility as predicted by honest signaling theory. This change is reflected in the worker egg policing response under field and laboratory conditions. PMID:19262683

van Zweden, Jelle S.; Heinze, Jürgen; Boomsma, Jacobus J.; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

2009-01-01

79

Osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle.  

PubMed

Osteochondroma is one of the most common benign tumors of the axial skeleton, but is rarely found in the facial bones. When present, the tumor is most often reported to affect the mandibular coronoid process. Osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle is extremely rare. A case is presented of a massive osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle leading to facial asymmetry and disturbed occlusion. The diagnosis was confirmed by radiological and histological examination. PMID:12682692

Ongole, Ravikiran; Pillai, Rajeev S; Ahsan, Auswaf K; Pai, Keerthilatha M

2003-02-01

80

The Synthesis of Lepidoptera Pheromones  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The review surveys the data in numerous publications of the synthesis of the pheromones of scale-winged insects (Lepidoptera). Attention is concentrated on problems of the sterospecific synthesis of pheromones. The bibliography includes 217 references.

Matveeva, Elena D.; Kurts, A. L.; Bundel', Yurii G.

1986-07-01

81

Volatile Hydrocarbon Pheromones from Beetles  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This chapter reviews literature about hydrocarbons from beetles that serve as long-range pheromones. The most thoroughly studied beetles that use volatile hydrocarbon pheromones belong to the family Nitidulidae in the genera Carpophilus and Colopterus. Published pheromone research deals with behav...

82

THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE STAFF HANDBOOK  

E-print Network

page 2 Introduction 3 A brief history of Queen's 4 Joining the College 5 Wages and salaries, etc. 6 A BRIEF HISTORY OF QUEEN'S The `hall of the Queen's scholars at Oxford' was founded in 1341 by Robert de in disciplinary action. General amendments to the Employee Handbook will be issued from time to time. #12;Issue 34

Capdeboscq, Yves

83

Pheromone production in bark beetles.  

PubMed

The first aggregation pheromone components from bark beetles were identified in 1966 as a mixture of ipsdienol, ipsenol and verbenol. Since then, a number of additional components have been identified as both aggregation and anti-aggregation pheromones, with many of them being monoterpenoids or derived from monoterpenoids. The structural similarity between the major pheromone components of bark beetles and the monoterpenes found in the host trees, along with the association of monoterpenoid production with plant tissue, led to the paradigm that most if not all bark beetle pheromone components were derived from host tree precursors, often with a simple hydroxylation producing the pheromone. In the 1990 s there was a paradigm shift as evidence for de novo biosynthesis of pheromone components began to accumulate, and it is now recognized that most bark beetle monoterpenoid aggregation pheromone components are biosynthesized de novo. The bark beetle aggregation pheromones are released from the frass, which is consistent with the isoprenoid aggregation pheromones, including ipsdienol, ipsenol and frontalin, being produced in midgut tissue. It appears that exo-brevocomin is produced de novo in fat body tissue, and that verbenol, verbenone and verbenene are produced from dietary ?-pinene in fat body tissue. Combined biochemical, molecular and functional genomics studies in Ips pini yielded the discovery and characterization of the enzymes that convert mevalonate pathway intermediates to pheromone components, including a novel bifunctional geranyl diphosphate synthase/myrcene synthase, a cytochrome P450 that hydroxylates myrcene to ipsdienol, and an oxidoreductase that interconverts ipsdienol and ipsdienone to achieve the appropriate stereochemistry of ipsdienol for pheromonal activity. Furthermore, the regulation of these genes and their corresponding enzymes proved complex and diverse in different species. Mevalonate pathway genes in pheromone producing male I. pini have much higher basal levels than in females, and feeding induces their expression. In I. duplicatus and I. pini, juvenile hormone III (JH III) induces pheromone production in the absence of feeding, whereas in I. paraconfusus and I. confusus, topically applied JH III does not induce pheromone production. In all four species, feeding induces pheromone production. While many of the details of pheromone production, including the site of synthesis, pathways and knowledge of the enzymes involved are known for Ips, less is known about pheromone production in Dendroctonus. Functional genomics studies are under way in D. ponderosae, which should rapidly increase our understanding of pheromone production in this genus. This chapter presents a historical development of what is known about pheromone production in bark beetles, emphasizes the genomic and post-genomic work in I. pini and points out areas where research is needed to obtain a more complete understanding of pheromone production. PMID:20727970

Blomquist, Gary J; Figueroa-Teran, Rubi; Aw, Mory; Song, Minmin; Gorzalski, Andrew; Abbott, Nicole L; Chang, Eric; Tittiger, Claus

2010-10-01

84

Queen's Garden Formations  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Views along the Queen's Garden Trail in Bryce Canyon National Park. Bryce Canyon is a unique sandstone formation in southern Utah. It is home to a large number of hoodoos, which are oddly shaped pillars of rock that formed due to different erosion rates for the dolomite that caps them and the sands...

85

Queen's Garden Hoodoos  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Views along the Queen's Garden Trail in Bryce Canyon National Park. Bryce Canyon is a unique sandstone formation in southern Utah. It is home to a large number of hoodoos, which are oddly shaped pillars of rock that formed due to different erosion rates for the dolomite that caps them and the sands...

86

Queen's Garden Trail  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Views along the Queen's Garden Trail in Bryce Canyon National Park. Bryce Canyon is a unique sandstone formation in southern Utah. It is home to a large number of hoodoos, which are oddly shaped pillars of rock that formed due to different erosion rates for the dolomite that caps them and the sands...

87

Program description Queen's University  

E-print Network

for the program is $100,000 with a maximum of 21 summer fellowships to be awarded for 2014. Up to two of the 21 is $6,000 (includes $1000 contribution by faculty researcher) Fellowships at the Bader InternationalProgram description Queen's University Undergraduate Student Summer Research Fellowship (USSRF

Abolmaesumi, Purang

88

COMMENCEMENT QUEENS COLLEGE  

E-print Network

not let the joy you feel in your own achievements blind you to the fact that the world is waiting for your a Queens College graduate. You should be as proud of yourself as we are of you. With degrees in hand, you every possible success in the future. Eighty-eighth Commencement THURSDAY, MAY 31, 2012 THE QUADRANGLE 9

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

89

with Queen's February 2014  

E-print Network

ENGAGE with Queen's February 2014 Welcome to ENGAGE our first employer newsletter. This first that you can engage with the University and recruit our students. This year we have launched our brand new account management system where we now offer a range of services and tailored support to employers to help

90

'Snow Queen' Animation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This animation consists of two close-up images of 'Snow Queen,' taken several days apart, by the Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

Snow Queen is the informal name for a patch of bright-toned material underneath the lander.

Thruster exhaust blew away surface soil covering Snow Queen when Phoenix landed on May 25, 2008, exposing this hard layer comprising several smooth rounded cavities beneath the lander. The RAC images show how Snow Queen visibly changed between June 15, 2008, the 21st Martian day, or sol, of the mission and July 9, 2008, the 44th sol.

Cracks as long as 10 centimeters (about four inches) appeared. One such crack is visible at the left third and the upper third of the Sol 44 image. A seven millimeter (one-third inch) pebble or clod appears just above and slightly to the right of the crack in the Sol 44 image. Cracks also appear in the lower part of the left third of the image. Other pieces noticeably shift, and some smooth texture has subtly roughened.

The Phoenix team carefully positioned and focused RAC the same way in both images. Each image is about 60 centimeters, or about two feet, wide. The object protruding in from the top on the right half of the images is Phoenix's thermal and electrical conductivity probe.

Snow Queen and other ice exposed by Phoenix landing and trenching operations on northern polar Mars is the first time scientists have been able to monitor Martian ice at a place where temperatures are cold enough that the ice doesn't immediately sublimate, or vaporize, away.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

2008-01-01

91

Original article Morphometric and pheromonal analyses  

E-print Network

Original article Morphometric and pheromonal analyses of Apis mellifera L along a transect from 1996) Summary — Pheromones and morphological characteristics of worker honeybees from Morocco, but no pheromone clusters. Inter-colonial variances for all characteristics formed significant asymmetries within

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

92

Molarization of Mandibular Second Premolar  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Macrodontia (megadontia, megalodontia, mac rodontism) is a rare shape anomaly that has been used to describe dental gigantism. Mandibular second premolars show an elevated variability of crown morphology, as are its eruptive potential and final position in the dental arch. To date, only eight cases of isolated macrodontia of second premolars have been reported in the literature. This case report presents clinical and radiographic findings of unusual and rare case of isolated unilateral molarization of left mandibular second premolar. How to cite this article: Mangla N, Khinda VIS, Kallar S, Brar GS. Molarization of Mandibular Second Premolar. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):137-139. PMID:25356014

Singh Khinda, Vineet Inder; Kallar, Shiminder; Singh Brar, Gurlal

2014-01-01

93

Molarization of mandibular second premolar.  

PubMed

Macrodontia (megadontia, megalodontia, mac rodontism) is a rare shape anomaly that has been used to describe dental gigantism. Mandibular second premolars show an elevated variability of crown morphology, as are its eruptive potential and final position in the dental arch. To date, only eight cases of isolated macrodontia of second premolars have been reported in the literature. This case report presents clinical and radiographic findings of unusual and rare case of isolated unilateral molarization of left mandibular second premolar. How to cite this article: Mangla N, Khinda VIS, Kallar S, Brar GS. Molarization of Mandibular Second Premolar. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):137-139. PMID:25356014

Mangla, Neha; Singh Khinda, Vineet Inder; Kallar, Shiminder; Singh Brar, Gurlal

2014-05-01

94

SOCIAL INSECT PHEROMONES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Social insects include the social Hymenoptera (Formicidae, ants; Apidae, bees; Vespidae, wasps) and Isoptera (Termitidae, termites). Social interactions are required for effective food retrieval, brood and queen care, regulation of caste (sexuals/workers), recognition and exclusion of non-nestmates,...

95

Ridge augmentation using mandibular tori.  

PubMed

A 19-year-old female was referred by her dental practitioner for the restoration of missing maxillary lateral incisors and canines. Ridge augmentation was required. This was undertaken using mandibular tori as the sites for harvesting bone. The grafting was successful and the spaces were subsequently restored using resin-bonded bridgework. The case reports that mandibular tori provide a local and convenient source of bone for ridge augmentation procedures. PMID:11384020

Barker, D; Walls, A W; Meechan, J G

2001-05-12

96

Mandibular shape and skeletal divergency.  

PubMed

Pre-treatment lateral cephalograms of 41 skeletal Class I girls aged 11 to 15 were divided according to MP-SN angle: lower than 28 degrees (hypodivergent, 10 girls), between 31 and 34 degrees (normodivergent, 18 girls), or larger than 37 degrees (hyperdivergent, 13 girls). The mandibular outlines were traced and digitized, and differences in shape were quantified using the elliptic Fourier series. Size differences were measured from the areas enclosed by the mandibular outlines. Shape differences were assessed by calculating a morphological distance (MD) between the size-independent mean mathematical reconstructions of the mandibular outlines of the three divergency classes. Mandibular shape was different in the three classes: large variations were found in hyperdivergent girls versus normodivergent girls (MD = 4.61), while smaller differences were observed in hypodivergent girls (MD versus normodivergent 2.91). Mean size-independent mandibular shapes were superimposed on an axis passing through the centres of gravity of the condyle and of the chin. Normodivergent and hyperdivergent mandibles differed mostly at gonion, the coronoid process, sigmoid notch, alveolar process, posterior border of the ramus, and along the mandibular plane. A significant size effect was also found, with smaller mandibles in the hyperdivergent girls. PMID:10327738

Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; De Franco, D J

1999-04-01

97

Queen production and instrumental insemination of Apis florea queens  

E-print Network

. Thirty queens were inseminated, each with a pool of about 3.12�106 spermatozoa derived from 8 drones. Six reaching the spermatheca of inseminated queens was 0.74� 106 ±0.45 (=24% of the drone's spermatozoa honeybees. This insemination is of special interest because the number of spermato- zoa per drone (0

98

QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY ANNUAL REPORT 2007 QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY ANNUAL REPORT 2007  

E-print Network

's University has evolved and developed in response to the needs of its students and its many communities: QUEEN'S IN 2007 AND BEYOND #12;LOOKING AHEAD In the years ahead, Queen's will continue to be dedicated also continue to be an institution that renews and reinvents itself in response to the changing

Abolmaesumi, Purang

99

QUEENS' COLLEGE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE  

E-print Network

QUEENS' COLLEGE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE THE TILEY COLLEGE LECTURESHIP IN LAW Generations of Queens the supervision system ­ the hallmark of a Cambridge education. The Senior Tutor's priority subject within,000. The College would welcome four, five and six figure gifts towards this total, either as single gifts

Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

100

Queen Mary, University of London  

E-print Network

students love Queen Mary so much? 01 Why study at the University of London? 05 Accommodation at Queen Mary living with other people 39 Staying at home? Make it work for you 41 #12;Just why do our students love. Never underestimate the value of a healthy social life at university! The Union also has a brand new

Chittka, Lars

101

Interactions of insect pheromones and plant semiochemicals  

E-print Network

Interactions of insect pheromones and plant semiochemicals Gadi V.P. Reddy1 and Angel Guerrero2 1 and use them as sex pheromones or sex pheromone precursors. Other insects produce or release sex pheromones in response to specific host plant cues, and chemicals from host plants often synergistically

Reddy, Gadi VP

102

Solution Biases and Pheromone Representation Selection  

E-print Network

Solution Biases and Pheromone Representation Selection in Ant Colony Optimisation Erin James pheromones. ACO's artificial pheromone represents a model of the solution components that its artificial ants use to construct solutions. De- veloping an appropriate pheromone representation is a key aspect

Montgomery, James

103

Mandibular conservation in oral cancer.  

PubMed

Surgery is one of the established modes of initial definitive treatment for a majority of oral cancers. Invasion of bony or cartilaginous structures by advanced upper aero-digestive tract cancer has been considered an indication for primary surgery on the basis of historic experience of poor responsiveness to radiation therapy [1]. The mandible is a key structure both in the pathology of intra-oral tumours and their surgical management. It bars easy surgical access to the oral cavity, yet maintaining its integrity is vital for function and cosmesis. Management of tumours that involve or abut the mandible requires specific understanding of the pattern of spread and routes of tumour invasion into the mandible. This facilitates the employment of mandibular sparing approaches like marginal mandibulectomy and mandibulotomy, as opposed to segmental or hemimandibulectomy which causes severe functional problems, as the mandibular continuity is lost. Accurate preoperative assessment that combines clinical examination and imaging along with the understanding of the pattern of spread and routes of invasion is essential in deciding the appropriate level and extent of mandibular resection in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Studies have shown that local control rates achieved with marginal mandibulectomy are comparable with that of segmental mandibulectomy. In carefully selected patients, marginal mandibulectomy is an oncologically safe procedure to achieve good local control and provides a better quality of life. This article aims to review the mechanism of spread, evaluation and prognosis of mandibular invasion, various techniques and role of mandibular conservation in oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:21856149

Rao, Latha P; Shukla, Mridula; Sharma, Vinay; Pandey, Manoj

2012-06-01

104

A plant factory for moth pheromone production  

PubMed Central

Moths depend on pheromone communication for mate finding and synthetic pheromones are used for monitoring or disruption of pheromone communication in pest insects. Here we produce moth sex pheromone, using Nicotiana benthamiana as a plant factory, by transient expression of up to four genes coding for consecutive biosynthetic steps. We specifically produce multicomponent sex pheromones for two species. The fatty alcohol fractions from the genetically modified plants are acetylated to mimic the respective sex pheromones of the small ermine moths Yponomeuta evonymella and Y. padella. These mixtures are very efficient and specific for trapping of male moths, matching the activity of conventionally produced pheromones. Our long-term vision is to design tailor-made production of any moth pheromone component in genetically modified plants. Such semisynthetic preparation of sex pheromones is a novel and cost-effective way of producing moderate to large quantities of pheromones with high purity and a minimum of hazardous waste. PMID:24569486

Ding, Bao-Jian; Hofvander, Per; Wang, Hong-Lei; Durrett, Timothy P.; Stymne, Sten; Löfstedt, Christer

2014-01-01

105

The Antibacterial Protein Lysozyme Identified as the Termite Egg Recognition Pheromone  

PubMed Central

Social insects rely heavily on pheromone communication to maintain their sociality. Egg protection is one of the most fundamental social behaviours in social insects. The recent discovery of the termite-egg mimicking fungus ‘termite-ball’ and subsequent studies on termite egg protection behaviour have shown that termites can be manipulated by using the termite egg recognition pheromone (TERP), which strongly evokes the egg-carrying and -grooming behaviours of workers. Despite the great scientific and economic importance, TERP has not been identified because of practical difficulties. Herein we identified the antibacterial protein lysozyme as the TERP. We isolated the target protein using ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and the MALDI-TOF MS analysis showed a molecular size of 14.5 kDa. We found that the TERP provided antibacterial activity against a gram-positive bacterium. Among the currently known antimicrobial proteins, the molecular size of 14.5 kDa limits the target to lysozyme. Termite lysozymes obtained from eggs and salivary glands, and even hen egg lysozyme, showed a strong termite egg recognition activity. Besides eggs themselves, workers also supply lysozyme to eggs through frequent egg-grooming, by which egg surfaces are coated with saliva containing lysozyme. Reverse transcript PCR analysis showed that mRNA of termite lysozyme was expressed in both salivary glands and eggs. Western blot analysis confirmed that lysozyme production begins in immature eggs in queen ovaries. This is the first identification of proteinaceous pheromone in social insects. Researchers have focused almost exclusively on hydrocarbons when searching for recognition pheromones in social insects. The present finding of a proteinaceous pheromone represents a major step forward in, and result in the broadening of, the search for recognition pheromones. This novel function of lysozyme as a termite pheromone illuminates the profound influence of pathogenic microbes on the evolution of social behaviour in termites. PMID:17726543

Matsuura, Kenji; Tamura, Takashi; Kobayashi, Norimasa; Yashiro, Toshihisa; Tatsumi, Shingo

2007-01-01

106

Bilateral Molariform Mandibular Second Premolars  

PubMed Central

Macrodontia is a rare dental anomaly that refers to teeth that appear larger than normal. Generalised macrodontia can be associated with certain medical conditions and syndromes. This case report presents clinical and radiographic findings of isolated bilateral macrodontia in a 14-year-old child. The patient was referred to the clinic with local crowding of maxillary and mandibular teeth. Radiographic findings revealed the presence of impacted macrodont mandibular second premolar on one side and erupted macrodontic premolar on the other side and their distinct morphological appearance, characterized by large, multitubercular, and molariform crowns and tapering, single roots. PMID:25685564

Acharya, Sonu; Kumar Mandal, Pradip; Ghosh, Chiranjit

2015-01-01

107

RESEARCH PAPER Field bioassays of cerambycid pheromones reveal widespread  

E-print Network

RESEARCH PAPER Field bioassays of cerambycid pheromones reveal widespread parsimony of pheromone Cerambycidae, with closely related species producing the same or very similar pheromone components. This article summarizes research that evaluated attraction of ceram- bycids to individual pheromone components

Hanks, Lawrence M.

108

Treatment of mandibular odontogenic keratocysts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The purpose of this study was to report our experience with surgical treatment of 31 mandibular odontogenic keratocysts, with special reference to their recurrence, and to review the literature on this subject.Study design. A retrospective analysis was conducted of all odontogenic cysts treated in the Department of Oral Surgery and Oral Medicine at Jordan University of Science and Technology

Anwar B Bataineh; Mansour A Al Qudah

1998-01-01

109

Queen's University School of Computing  

E-print Network

............................................................................................................................................................................6 3.0 Software testing overviewQueen's University School of Computing Depth Area: Software Testing Depth Topic: Web Applications pages and dynamic pages. In this survey paper, we review how the existing web application testing

Graham, Nick

110

The joy of sex pheromones  

PubMed Central

Sex pheromones provide an important means of communication to unite individuals for successful reproduction. Although sex pheromones are highly diverse across animals, these signals fulfil common fundamental roles in enabling identification of a mating partner of the opposite sex, the appropriate species and of optimal fecundity. In this review, we synthesize both classic and recent investigations on sex pheromones in a range of species, spanning nematode worms, insects and mammals. These studies reveal comparable strategies in how these chemical signals are produced, detected and processed in the brain to regulate sexual behaviours. Elucidation of sex pheromone communication mechanisms both defines outstanding models to understand the molecular and neuronal basis of chemosensory behaviours, and reveals how similar evolutionary selection pressures yield convergent solutions in distinct animal nervous systems. EMBO reports advance online publication 13 September 2013; doi:10.1038/embor.2013.140 PMID:24030282

Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Benton, Richard

2013-01-01

111

Analysis and evaluation of relative positions of mandibular third molar and mandibular canal impacts  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study used cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to categorize the relationships between the mandibular canal and the roots and investigated the prevalence of nerve damage. Materials and Methods Through CBCT images, contact and three-dimensional positional relationships between the roots of the mandibular third molar and the mandibular canal were investigated. With this data, prevalence of nerve damage according to the presence of contact and three-dimensional positional relationships was studied. Other factors that affected the prevalence of nerve damage were also investigated. Results When the mandibular third molar and the mandibular canal were shown to have direct contact in CBCT images, the prevalence of nerve damage was higher than in other cases. Also, in cases where the mandibular canal was horizontally lingual to the mandibular third molar and the mandibular canal was vertically at the cervical level of the mandibular third molar, the prevalence of nerve damage was higher than in opposite cases. The percentage of mandibular canal contact with the roots of the mandibular third molar was higher when the mandibular canal was horizontally lingual to the mandibular third molar. Finally, the prevalence of nerve damage was higher when the diameter of the mandibular canal lumen suddenly decreased at the contact area between the mandibular canal and the roots, as shown in CBCT images. Conclusion The three-dimensional relationship of the mandibular third molar and the mandibular canal can help predict nerve damage and can guide patient expectations of the possibility and extent of nerve damage. PMID:25551092

Kim, Hang-Gul

2014-01-01

112

Neurogenic and Neuroendocrine Effects of Goldfish Pheromones  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Goldfish (Carassius auratus) use reproductive hormones as endocrine signals to synchronize sexual behavior with gamete maturation, and as exogenous signals (pheromones) to mediate spawning interactions between conspecifics. We examined the differential effects of two hormonal pheromones, prostagland...

113

Sex Pheromone and Trail Pheromone of the Sand Termite Psammotermes hybostoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within the complex network of chemical signals used by termites, trail pheromones and sex pheromones are among the best known.\\u000a Numerous recent papers map the chemical identity and glandular origin of these pheromones in nearly all major isopteran taxa.\\u000a In this study, we aimed to describe the sex pheromone and the trail pheromone of a poorly known sand termite, Psammotermes

David Sillam-Dussès; Robert Hanus; Ashraf Oukasha Abd El-Latif; Pavel Jiroš; Jana Krasulová; Blanka Kalinová; Irena Valterová; Jan Šobotník

2011-01-01

114

Queen regulates biogenic amine level and nestmate recognition in workers of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nestmate recognition is a critical element in social insect organization, providing a means to maintain territoriality and close the colony to parasites and predators. Ants detect the colony chemical label via their antennae and respond to the label mismatch of an intruder with aggressive behavior. In the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, worker ability to recognize conspecific nonnestmates decreases if the colony queen is removed, such that they do not recognize conspecific nonnestmates as different. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the presence of the colony queen influences the concentration of octopamine, a neuromodulator, in worker ants, which in turn has an effect on nestmate recognition acuity in workers. We demonstrate that queenless workers exhibit reduced brain octopamine levels and reduced discriminatory acuteness; however, feeding queenless workers octopamine restored both. Dopamine levels are influenced by honeybee queen pheromones; however, levels of this biogenic amine were unchanged in our experiments. This is the first demonstration of a link between the presence of the colony queen, a worker biogenic amine, and conspecific nestmate recognition, a powerful expression of colony cohesion and territoriality.

Vander Meer, Robert K.; Preston, Catherine A.; Hefetz, Abraham

2008-12-01

115

21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Mandibular condyle prosthesis. 872.3960 Section 872.3960... § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

2011-04-01

116

21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-04-01 false Mandibular condyle prosthesis. 872.3960 Section 872.3960... § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

2014-04-01

117

The Status of Queen Conch, Strombus gigas, History of Queen Conch Research  

E-print Network

The Status of Queen Conch, Strombus gigas, History of Queen Conch Research Today there are approximately 230 published scientific papers on queen conch, Strombus gigas. Publication on this species began was made in under standing processes related to growth, mortality, and reproduction in queen conch. Third

118

Communication using pheromone field for multiple robots  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we consider a issue that the reliable and the inexpensive communication method in swarm robotics. The ants forage for preys by using pheromone trails. They lay down the pheromone trails between preys and a nest. By detecting the trail pheromone, they can find the preys. Though they do not have excellent intelligence, they can communicate with each

Ryusuke Fujisawa; Hikaru Imamura; Takashi Hashimoto; Fumitoshi Matsuno

2008-01-01

119

Interactions of insect pheromones and plant semiochemicals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plant semiochemicals are known to produce a wide range of behavioral responses in insects. Some insects sequester or acquire host plant compounds and use them as sex pheromones or sex pheromone precursors. Other insects produce or release sex pheromones in response to specific host plant cues, and chemicals from host plants often synergistically enhance the response of an insect to

Gadi V. P. Reddy; Angel Guerrero

2004-01-01

120

Ultrasensitive pheromone detection by mammalian vomeronasal neurons  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is a chemoreceptive organ that is thought to transduce pheromones into electrical responses that regulate sexual, hormonal and reproductive function in mammals. The characteristics of pheromone signal detection by vomeronasal neurons remain unclear. Here we use a mouse VNO slice preparation to show that six putative pheromones evoke excitatory responses in single vomeronasal neurons, leading to

Trese Leinders-Zufall; Adam C. Puche; Weidong Ma; Milos V. Novotny; Michael T. Shipley; Frank Zufall

2000-01-01

121

Queen Angelfish Hides in Mangrove Prop Roots  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

A Queen Angelfish peers through the safety of the mangrove roots across the rich colors and textures of corals, sponges, urchins, and algae. Queen Angelfish feed almost exclusively on sponges, which are abundant in these mangroves....

122

Marine Fisheries On the cover: The queen  

E-print Network

Marine Fisheries ~~WD~~ On the cover: The queen conch, Strombus gigas. Il- lustration by Harold L. Spiess. Articles July 1981, 43(7) The Biology, Fisheries, and Management of the Queen Conch, Strombus

123

December 2012 Queen's University Alcohol Policy  

E-print Network

December 2012 1 Queen's University Alcohol Policy Introduction Queen's University is committed. The university recognizes that the misuse of alcohol can create risks, threaten individual health, compromise and promotes healthy decisions related to alcohol use by all members of the Queen's community. POLICY

Abolmaesumi, Purang

124

THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Race  

E-print Network

THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Race INTRODUCTION This document provides a general overview of legislation relating to race and The Queen's College response as it endeavours to ensure that discrimination on the grounds of race or ethnic background does not take place. The Queen's College welcomes

Capdeboscq, Yves

125

THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Race  

E-print Network

June 2014 THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Race INTRODUCTION This document provides a general overview of legislation relating to race and The Queen's College response as it endeavours to ensure that discrimination on the grounds of race or ethnic background does not take place. The Queen

Capdeboscq, Yves

126

THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Policy  

E-print Network

. The college aims to provide an inclusive environment which values diversity and maintains a working, learning be the primary consideration. In relation to students, The Queen's College aims to provide education of excellentTHE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Policy THE COLLEGE'S AIMS The Queen's College welcomes

Capdeboscq, Yves

127

Queen's University School of Computing  

E-print Network

; -- -- -- -- #12; #12; 6 Chapter Three 3.0 Software testing overview testing requires deep professional knowledgeQueen's University School of Computing Depth Area: Software Testing Depth Topic: Web Applications pages and dynamic pages. In this survey paper, we review how the existing web application testing

Graham, Nick

128

Moon over the Queen's Garden  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Views along the Queen's Garden Trail in Bryce Canyon National Park. Bryce Canyon is a unique sandstone formation in southern Utah. It is home to a large number of hoodoos, which are oddly shaped pillars of rock that formed due to different erosion rates for the dolomite that caps them and the sands...

129

Hoodoos of the Queens Garden  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Views along the Queen's Garden Trail in Bryce Canyon National Park. Bryce Canyon is a unique sandstone formation in southern Utah. It is home to a large number of hoodoos, which are oddly shaped pillars of rock that formed due to different erosion rates for the dolomite that caps them and the sands...

130

Panorama of the Queen's Garden  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Views along the Queen's Garden Trail in Bryce Canyon National Park. Bryce Canyon is a unique sandstone formation in southern Utah. It is home to a large number of hoodoos, which are oddly shaped pillars of rock that formed due to different erosion rates for the dolomite that caps them and the sands...

131

Queen's University The Principal's Commission  

E-print Network

the risk of harm associated with mental healthharm associated with mental health issues; and ­ What1 Queen's University The Principal's Commission M t l H lthon Mental Health Lynann Clapham, Roy · Consider national and international trends in mental health issues among post- secondary aged students

Ellis, Randy

132

Queen's University Belfast School Offices  

E-print Network

Nursing and Midwifery Q Pharmacy R Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering S Politics, International Festival Office 1 Finance 3 Great Hall 1 Harty Room, School of Creative Arts 5 Health Sciences Building 26Queen's University Belfast Campus Map School Offices Biological Sciences A Chemistry and Chemical

Müller, Jens-Dominik

133

Managing Jamaica's queen conch resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jamaica's industrial fishery for queen conch (Strombus gigas) has produced a substantial amount of much-needed foreign exchange and for at least 10 years has been the most valuable component of all commercial marine fisheries activities. Since its inception in 1990 it has grown tremendously and may now be at some risk of collapse, due to problems including, among other factors,

Karl Aiken; Andre Kong; Stephen Smikle; Richard Appeldoorn; George Warner

2006-01-01

134

Queen Mary, University of London  

E-print Network

for student employability; we also offer a friendly campus-based lifestyle in the heart of east London. www.qmul.ac.uk/film #12;Welcome 3 In today's competitive job market a good degree from a top university like Queen Mary

Wright, Francis

135

QUEENS COLLEGE Graduate Bulletin20122013  

E-print Network

environment. Further, the Education Trust recently rated us as one of only five schools in the nation thrives in the college's environment of scholarly exchange. Our students acquire first-rate professionalQUEENS COLLEGE Graduate Bulletin2012­2013 #12;Graduate Bulletin 2 0 12 ­ 2 0 13 James L. Muyskens

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

136

Volatile pheromone signalling in Drosophila  

PubMed Central

Once captured by the antenna, 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA) binds to an extracellular binding protein called LUSH that undergoes a conformational shift upon cVA binding. The stable LUSH–cVA complex is the activating ligand for pheromone receptors present on the dendrites of the aT1 neurones, comprising the only neurones that detect cVA pheromone. This mechanism explains the single molecule sensitivity of insect pheromone detection systems. The receptor that recognizes activated LUSH consists of a complex of several proteins, including Or67d, a member of the tuning odourant receptor family, Orco, a co-receptor ion channel, and SNMP, a CD36 homologue that may be an inhibitory subunit. In addition, genetic screens and reconstitution experiments reveal additional factors that are important for pheromone detection. Identification and functional dissection of these factors in Drosophila melanogaster Meigen should permit the identification of homologous factors in pathogenic insects and agricultural pests, which, in turn, may be viable candidates for novel classes of compounds to control populations of target insect species without impacting beneficial species. PMID:24347807

Smith, Dean P.

2013-01-01

137

Vomeronasal organ and human pheromones.  

PubMed

For many organisms, pheromonal communication is of particular importance in managing various aspects of reproduction. In tetrapods, the vomeronasal (Jacobson's) organ specializes in detecting pheromones in biological substrates of congeners. This information triggers behavioral changes associated, in the case of certain pheromones, with neuroendocrine correlates. In human embryos, the organ develops and the nerve fibers constitute a substrate for the migration of GnRH-secreting cells from the olfactory placode toward the hypothalamus. After this essential step for subsequent secretion of sex hormones by the anterior hypophysis, the organ regresses and the neural connections disappear. The vomeronasal cavities can still be observed by endoscopy in some adults, but they lack sensory neurons and nerve fibers. The genes which code for vomeronasal receptor proteins and the specific ionic channels involved in the transduction process are mutated and nonfunctional in humans. In addition, no accessory olfactory bulbs, which receive information from the vomeronasal receptor cells, are found. The vomeronasal sensory function is thus nonoperational in humans. Nevertheless, several steroids are considered to be putative human pheromones; some activate the anterior hypothalamus, but the effects observed are not comparable to those in other mammals. The signaling process (by neuronal detection and transmission to the brain or by systemic effect) remains to be clearly elucidated. PMID:21377439

Trotier, D

2011-09-01

138

Threshold hypothesis for pheromone perception  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field results have shown that male moths of some species are not always trapped by the ratio of pheromone components produced by the female moths. For cases involving a binary mixture of geometrical or positional isomers, this phenomenon may be explained by use of a threshold diagram in which the isomer ratio in the mixture is plotted against release rate

W. L. Roelofs

1978-01-01

139

Identifying the C. cactorum Pheromone  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg), is an invasive pest of Opuntia spp. Since its arrival in the Florida Keys in 1989, it has moved rapidly up the east and west coasts of Florida, threatening to invade the southwestern United States and Mexico. Female moths produce a sex pheromone that ...

140

PHEROMONE BIOSYNTHESIS IN SOCIAL INSECTS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Social insects produce and use a very large number of organic molecules as pheromones to communicate both intra- and interspecifically, and to regulate their social interactions. This review provides an overview of the chemical nature of these compounds and where they are made in the insects, and th...

141

Automated Selection of Appropriate Pheromone Representations in Ant Colony Optimisation  

E-print Network

Automated Selection of Appropriate Pheromone Representations in Ant Colony Optimisation James an analogue of ant trail pheromones to learn about good features of solutions. ACO implementations. In this paper, we present a novel system for automatically generating appropriate parsimonious pheromone

Montgomery, James

142

Automated Selection of Appropriate Pheromone Representations in Ant Colony Optimisation  

E-print Network

Automated Selection of Appropriate Pheromone Representations in Ant Colony Optimisation James of ant trail pheromones to learn about good features of solutions. Critically, the phero- mone solutions. In this article, we present a novel system for automatically generating appropriate pheromone

Montgomery, James

143

Evaporation rate of emulsion and oil-base emulsion pheromones  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Knowledge of pheromone evaporation rate is critical to distribute pheromone containers effectively in the forest, orchard and field. There are several factors influencing the pheromone evaporation rate that include wind speed, container size and porosity, release area, temperature, humidity, pherom...

144

Olfactory attraction of the hornet Vespa velutina to honeybee colony odors and pheromones.  

PubMed

Since the beginning of the last century, the number of biological invasions has continuously increased worldwide. Due to their environmental and economical consequences, invasive species are now a major concern. Social wasps are particularly efficient invaders because of their distinctive biology and behavior. Among them, the yellow-legged hornet, Vespa velutina, is a keen hunter of domestic honeybees. Its recent introduction to Europe may induce important beekeeping, pollination, and biodiversity problems. Hornets use olfactory cues for the long-range detection of food sources, in this case the location of honeybee colonies, but the exact nature of these cues remains unknown. Here, we studied the orientation behavior of V. velutina workers towards a range of hive products and protein sources, as well as towards prominent chemical substances emitted by these food sources. In a multiple choice test performed under controlled laboratory conditions, we found that hornets are strongly attracted to the odor of some hive products, especially pollen and honey. When testing specific compounds, the honeybee aggregation pheromone, geraniol, proved highly attractive. Pheromones produced by honeybee larvae or by the queen were also of interest to hornet workers, albeit to a lesser extent. Our results indicate that V. velutina workers are selectively attracted towards olfactory cues from hives (stored food, brood, and queen), which may signal a high prey density. This study opens new perspectives for understanding hornets' hunting behavior and paves the way for developing efficient trapping strategies against this invasive species. PMID:25549358

Couto, Antoine; Monceau, Karine; Bonnard, Olivier; Thiéry, Denis; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

2014-01-01

145

Queen Mary, University of London Wolfram Just: Folding fractals Queen Mary, University of London Wolfram Just: Folding fractals  

E-print Network

Queen Mary, University of London Wolfram Just: Folding fractals 1 #12;Queen Mary, University of London Wolfram Just: Folding fractals 2 #12;Queen Mary, University of London Wolfram Just: Folding fractals 3 #12;Queen Mary, University of London Wolfram Just: Folding fractals 4 #12;Queen Mary, University

Wright, Francis

146

Immediate mandibular distraction in mandibular hypoplasia and upper airway obstruction.  

PubMed

Distraction osteogenesis of the mandible has become an alternative to tracheostomy in infants and children who present with upper airway obstruction due to micrognathia. To avoid prolonged intubation during distraction, we have implemented a protocol of immediate distraction at the time of distractor placement, which results in acute airway improvement. Over 2 years, 22 patients with micrognathia and severe airway obstruction have undergone mandibular distractor placement. Indications for surgery were apnea and desaturations with feeding. Resorbable distraction devices were placed bilaterally and activated to 5 to 8 mm. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 was placed in the gap. Distraction was implemented at postoperative day 2 at 2 mm/d. Forty-four distraction devices were placed in 22 patients (68% male, 32% female) with a mean age of 24.1 months (range, 3 days to 5.5 years). The average distance of distraction performed in the operating room was 5 mm. The average total distraction was 24 mm performed over 12 days. Overall, 89% of patients were extubated after distractor placement in the operating room. Two patients with difficult intubations were extubated 7 days later in the operating room with otolaryngology. Of the 4 tracheostomy patients, 1 patient was decannulated, whereas 3 patients are pending postoperative sleep studies. One patient had a minor wound complication. Tracheostomy and prolonged intubation in patients with mandibular hypoplasia have significant morbidity and mortality. We have implemented a successful protocol of immediate distraction in the operating room with placement of bone morphogenetic protein. Immediate distraction appears to be an effective method of avoiding postoperative intubation and tracheostomy. PMID:23154361

Schoemann, Mark B; Burstein, Fernando D; Bakthavachalam, Sivi; Williams, Joseph K

2012-11-01

147

Selective manipulation of predators using pheromones: responses to frontalin and ipsdienol pheromone components of bark beetles  

E-print Network

Selective manipulation of predators using pheromones: responses to frontalin and ipsdienol pheromone components of bark beetles in the Great Lakes region Brian H. Aukema* and Kenneth F. Raffa manipulation is impeded by attraction of both predators and pests to bark beetle pheromones. 2 The primary bark

Aukema, Brian

148

New Therapeutics in Promoting and Modulating Mandibular Growth in Cases with Mandibular Hypoplasia  

PubMed Central

Children with mandibular growth deficiency may develop airway obstruction. The standard treatment of severe airway obstruction involves invasive procedures such as tracheostomy. Mandibular distraction osteogenesis has been proposed in neonates with mandibular deficiency as a treatment option to avoid tracheostomy procedure later in life. Both tracheostomy and distraction osteogenesis procedures suffer from substantial shortcomings including scarring, unpredictability, and surgical complications. Forward jaw positioning appliances have been also used to enhance mandible growth. However, the effectiveness of these appliances is limited and lacks predictability. Current and future approaches to enhance mandibular growth, both experimental and clinical trials, and their effectiveness are presented and discussed. PMID:23819121

Alhadlaq, Adel

2013-01-01

149

Synthesis and metabolism of pheromones and pheromone analogues  

SciTech Connect

(9, 10-/sup 3/H/sub 2/)Z9-14:Ac was synthesized at high specific activity (/sup 3/H, 58 Ci/mmole) by partial tritiation of the corresponding alkyne and was converted to the labeled Z9-14:OH and Z9-14:Al to study tissue specificity of acetate esterase (E), alcohol oxidase (OX), and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in male and female Heliothis virescens. Soluble and membrane-associated enzyme activities were determined by radio-TLC assays. Compounds of the tritium-labeled Z11-16 series were synthesized and their in vitro fates examined as well. In order to achieve an alternative approach in which (1) pheromone receptor proteins would be stoichiometrically and irreversibly modified, or (2) pheromone-catabolizing enzymes are inactivated by tight-binding or irreversible inhibitors, we have designed analogues of pheromones of lepidopterous insect pests and assayed their biological activity in vitro and in vivo. Various fluorinated molecules such as acyl fluorides, fluoroolefins, 2-fluoro aldehydes, 2,2-difluoro aldehydes and trifluoromethyl ketones were synthesized. The synthesis of some other functional groups such as cyclopropanones, cyclopropanols, cyclopropyl carbinols, cyclopropyl aldehydes and Michael acceptors will also be discussed.

Ding, Y.S.

1987-01-01

150

Acceptance of mated Queens and Queen Cells in Colonies of Russian and Italian Honey Bees  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Requeening colonies is a standard beekeeping practice with both mated queens and queen cells. More beekeepers are requeening with Russian honey bees queens because of their significantly higher resistance to varroa and tracheal mites, their good honey production and their overwintering abilities. ...

151

Pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail integrity  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Disruption of Argentine ant trail following and reduced ability to forage (measured by bait location success) was achieved after presentation of an oversupply of trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal. Experiments tested single pheromone point sources and dispersion of a formulation in small field plots. Ant walking behavior was recorded and digitized by using video tracking, before and after presentation of trail pheromone. Ants showed changes in three parameters within seconds of treatment: (1) Ants on trails normally showed a unimodal frequency distribution of walking track angles, but this pattern disappeared after presentation of the trail pheromone; (2) ants showed initial high trail integrity on a range of untreated substrates from painted walls to wooden or concrete floors, but this was significantly reduced following presentation of a point source of pheromone; (3) the number of ants in the pheromone-treated area increased over time, as recruitment apparently exceeded departures. To test trail disruption in small outdoor plots, the trail pheromone was formulated with carnuba wax-coated quartz laboratory sand (1 g quartz sand/0.2 g wax/1 mg pheromone). The pheromone formulation, with a half-life of 30 h, was applied by rotary spreader at four rates (0, 2.5, 7.5, and 25 mg pheromone/m2) to 1- and 4-m2 plots in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. Ant counts at bait cards in treated plots were significantly reduced compared to controls on the day of treatment, and there was a significant reduction in ant foraging for 2 days. These results show that trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ants is possible, but a much more durable formulation is needed before nest-level impacts can be expected. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Manning, L.M.; Stringer, L.D.; Cappadonna, J.; El-Sayed, A. M.

2008-01-01

152

Peptide pheromones in female Nereis succinea.  

PubMed

Female specimen of the ragworm, Nereis succinea, employs a tetra-peptide, cysteinyl-glutathione (CSSG) as mate recognition and gamete release pheromone during reproduction. In the present study we review the role of peptide-based pheromones in Nereid worms focusing on pheromone production in females. New results demonstrate that the female ragworms produce the pheromone in the course of the oocyte maturation directly correlated to the oocyte diameter. Nevertheless, CSSG production is significantly increasing during the reproductive process, the nuptial dance, itself. The concentrations of the pheromone, nereithione (CSSG) and those of the possible precursors, reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), in the coelomic fluid were determined by HPLC showing that during spawning the female worms excrete 68.5 +/- 12.5 microg/h of the pheromone. GSH is mobilized, or synthesized and continuously converted into the pheromone enabling female N. succinea to maintain a constant level of pheromone release until the GSH reserves are depleted. Upon release CSSG induces not only gamete release in males but in doses as low as 10(-8) to 10(-9) M also significantly increases male swimming activity and as such may guide males towards the slower swimming females. PMID:15374652

Hardege, Jörg D; Bartels-Hardege, Helga; Müller, Carsten T; Beckmann, Manfred

2004-09-01

153

Sex Pheromone in the Lobster, Homarus americanus  

Microsoft Academic Search

SEXUAL recognition and attraction in many insects have been shown to involve chemical communicants called pheromones1, and these results are widely applied in agriculture2. In contrast very little is known about (sex) pheromones in crustaceans, the only experimental verification being that of Ryan3 who observed that males of the Pacific crab, Portunus sanguinolentus, displayed towards water from premoult females. No

Jelle Atema; DAVID G. ENGSTROM

1971-01-01

154

Pheromonal Influences on Sociosexual Behavior in Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study tested whether synthesized human male pheromones increase the sociosexual behavior of men. Thirty-eight heterosexual men, ages 26-42, completed a 2-week baseline period and 6-week placebo-controlled, double-blind trial testing a pheromone \\

Winnifred B. Cutler; Erika Friedmann; Norma L. Mccoy

1998-01-01

155

ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR Pheromone Combination Lures for Carpophilus (Coleoptera  

E-print Network

7 4 2 0 ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR Pheromone Combination Lures for Carpophilus (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae Econ Entomol 88(4):864-869 (1995) ABSTRACT Combinations of aggregation pheromones for 3 nitidulid with the single pheromones; fermentingwhole wheat bread dough was present with all pheromone treatments

156

AntReckoning: Dead Reckoning using Interest Modeling by Pheromones  

E-print Network

AntReckoning: Dead Reckoning using Interest Modeling by Pheromones Amir Yahyavi McGill University, these points of interest generate pheromones, which fade and spread in the game world, and are a source to the generation of pheromones that fade and spread in the world; · Pheromones in the vicinity of an avatar exert

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

157

Mathematics and Engineering at Queen's University  

E-print Network

Mathematics and Engineering at Queen's University In response to the need in industrial research and development for engineers with a greater knowledge of applied mathematics and modelling techniques, Queen's Univer- sity offers a unique program in Mathematics and Engineering. This program, the only one of its

Linder, Tamás

158

The Queen Mary Magazine Summer 2006  

E-print Network

Queen Mary's contribution to the 2012 Olympic Games A pan-London marketing campaign promotes the capital as the place to study 18 New medical research centre in the heart of the City QM is produced by: Communications's city The Principal, Professor Adrian Smith, considers ways in which Queen Mary can contribute to London

Chittka, Lars

159

Original article The insemination of queen honeybees  

E-print Network

complete mixing of the semen collected from several drones. queen honeybee / instrumental insemination / diluted semen INTRODUCTION During natural mating the queen honeybee collects the semen from 8-10 drones in the spermatheca. In the case of instrumental insemination, the semen is collected from a similar number of drones

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

160

Original article Numbers of spermatozoa in queens  

E-print Network

Original article Numbers of spermatozoa in queens and drones indicate multiple mating of queens, Makandura, Gonawila (NWP), Sri Lanka (Received 24 November 1989; accepted 3 May 1990) Summary — Drones.67•106 spermatozoa in their spermathecae. In A adreniformis, drones had an average of 0.13•106

Boyer, Edmond

161

Original article Physiography influences honeybee queen's choice  

E-print Network

of the area Cordovan (cd) drones were kept, while black drones were flying in the periphery. The virgin queens the orientation of queens demonstrated in these experiments and the orientation of drones underline the validity and drones and their mating dis- tance is important for breeding programs using open mating. The thorough

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

162

DAVID MACINTOSH SAUNDERS Queen's School of Business  

E-print Network

1 DAVID MACINTOSH SAUNDERS Queen's School of Business Queen's University Goodes Hall 143 Union of the MBA Program, 1995-1998 #12;2 EDUCATION: Ph.D. University of Western Ontario (Major: Social Psychology), 1984 M.A. University of Western Ontario (Major: Social Psychology), 1980 B.A. York University (Major

Graham, Nick

163

FOOD SUSTAINABILITY REPORT QUEEN'S HOSPITALITY SERVICES  

E-print Network

FOOD SUSTAINABILITY REPORT QUEEN'S HOSPITALITY SERVICES May 2008 #12;In recent years, a sustainability movement has taken root at Queen's. The impacts of the movement can be seen across campus sustainability position within the their student government ­The AMS, The Engineer Society open the Tea Room

Ellis, Randy

164

Queens College 10 Year Sustainability Plan  

E-print Network

buildings with a goal of reducing energy consumption. We will encourage our faculty, students, and staffQueens College 10 Year Sustainability Plan #12;1. Campus Mission Statement Queens College sustainable practices in our dining services. We will train our students to be good stewards

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

165

Pheromone Deactivation Catalyzed by Receptor Molecules: a Quantitative Kinetic Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

A quantitative model of pheromone-receptor interaction and pheromone deactivation, the supposed rate-limiting processes underlying the receptor potential kinetics, is worked out for the moth Antheraea polyphemus. In this model, the pheromone interacts with the receptor molecule while bound to the reduced form of the pheromone binding protein. The receptor molecules—besides their receptor function—catalyze the observed shift of the pheromone-binding protein

Karl-Ernst Kaissling

1998-01-01

166

21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis...

2012-04-01

167

21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular implant...

2012-04-01

168

21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis...

2010-04-01

169

21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis...

2013-04-01

170

21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular implant...

2011-04-01

171

50 CFR 622.493 - Landing Caribbean queen conch intact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-10-01 false Landing Caribbean queen conch intact. 622.493 Section 622.493...OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Queen Conch Resources of Puerto Rico and the U.S... § 622.493 Landing Caribbean queen conch intact. (a) A Caribbean queen...

2014-10-01

172

50 CFR 622.493 - Landing Caribbean queen conch intact.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Landing Caribbean queen conch intact. 622.493 Section 622.493...OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Queen Conch Resources of Puerto Rico and the U.S... § 622.493 Landing Caribbean queen conch intact. (a) A Caribbean queen...

2013-10-01

173

Composition of aphid alarm pheromones  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of single cornicle droplets from six species of aphid showed the presence of volatile components in addition to (E)-ß-farnesene. Compounds identified included (Z,E)-a- and (E,E)-a-farnesene forMyzus persicae and a- and ß-pinene forMegoura viciae. WithMegoura viciae, (-)-a-pinene was most important for alarm activity. The major component of the alarm pheromone ofPhorodon humuli was (E)-ß-farnesene even though farnesenes are present in

J. A. Pickett; D. C. Griffiths

1980-01-01

174

Complaints related to mandibular function impairment after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle.  

PubMed

This study analysed the relationship between complaints and mandibular function after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle in a prospective study. In a 1-year follow-up, complaints were assessed during physical examination and function was assessed using the mandibular function impairment questionnaire (MFIQ), scoring range 0-68. Data from 114 patients (41 women, 73 men), mean age 28.1 years (SD 13.3), were available. On average the MFIQ scores were low 3.4 (SD 7.3). Ten patients (9%) experienced pain and 45 (39%) patients had a MFIQ score > 0. Mean mouth opening was 51.9 mm (SD 8.4). Occlusion was perceived as moderate or poor by 24% of the patients. In the logistic regression analysis mandibular function impairment (MFIQ score > 0) was entered as a dependent variable. Risk factors for mandibular function impairment were: pain, perceived occlusion (moderate or poor), absolute difference between left and right horizontal movements and age. A protective factor was mouth opening. The results of this study show that complaints (i.e. pain, perceived occlusion, reduced mouth opening, difference between left and right lateral movements and increased age) are predictors of mandibular function impairment after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle. PMID:20430584

Niezen, E T; Bos, R R M; de Bont, L G M; Stegenga, B; Dijkstra, P U

2010-07-01

175

Pheromone Based Swarming for Positionless MAVs Sabine Hauert, Laurent Winkler, Jean-Christophe Zufferey, Dario Floreano  

E-print Network

Pheromone Based Swarming for Positionless MAVs Sabine Hauert, Laurent Winkler, Jean and local communication with neighbors (situated communication [6]). In­air virtual pheromone Inspiration pheromone and navigate by sensing it (stigmergy). Pheromone based MAV deployments were investigated in [9

Floreano, Dario

176

Pheromone binding and inactivation by moth antennae.  

PubMed

The antennae of male silk moths are extremely sensitive to the female sex pheromone such that a male moth can find a female up to 4.5 km away. This remarkable sensitivity is due to both the morphological and biochemical design of these antennae. Along the branches of the plumose antennae are the sensilla trichodea, each consisting of a hollow cuticular hair containing two unbranched dendrites bathed in a fluid, the receptor lymph ,3. The dendrites and receptor lymph are isolated from the haemolymph by a barrier of epidermal cells which secreted the cuticular hair. Pheromone molecules are thought to diffuse down 100 A-wide pore tubules through the cuticular wall and across the receptor lymph space to receptors located in the dendritic membrane. To prevent the accumulation of residual stimulant and hence sensory adaptation, the pheromone molecules are subsequently inactivated in an apparent two-step process of rapid 'early inactivation' followed by much slower enzymatic degradation. The biochemistry involved in this sequence of events is largely unknown. We report here the identification of three proteins which interact with the pheromone of the wild silk moth Antheraea polyphemus: a pheromone-binding protein and a pheromone-degrading esterase, both uniquely located in the pheromone-sensitive sensilla; and a second esterase common to all cuticular tissues except the sensilla. PMID:18074618

Vogt, R G; Riddiford, L M

177

Pheromone Static Routing Strategy for Complex Networks  

E-print Network

In this paper, we adopt the concept of pheromone to generate a set of static paths that can reach the performance of global dynamic routing strategy [Phys. Rev. E 81, 016113(2010)]. In the test stage, pheromone is dropped to the nodes by packets forwarded by the global dynamic routing strategy. After that, static paths are generated according to the density of pheromone. The output paths can greatly improve traffic systems' overall capacity on different network structures, including scale-free networks, small-world networks and random graphs. Because the paths are static, the system needs much less computational resource than the global dynamic routing strategy.

Ling, Xiang; Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin

2011-01-01

178

Sex pheromone and trail pheromone of the sand termite Psammotermes hybostoma.  

PubMed

Within the complex network of chemical signals used by termites, trail pheromones and sex pheromones are among the best known. Numerous recent papers map the chemical identity and glandular origin of these pheromones in nearly all major isopteran taxa. In this study, we aimed to describe the sex pheromone and the trail pheromone of a poorly known sand termite, Psammotermes hybostoma. We identified (3Z,6Z,8E)-dodeca-3,6,8-trien-1-ol (dodecatrienol) as the sex pheromone released by tergal and sternal glands of female imagos and, at the same time, as the trail pheromone secreted from the sternal gland of workers. We conclude that chemical communication in Psammotermes does not differ from that of most other Rhinotermitidae, such as Reticulitermes, despite the presence of a diterpene as a major component of the trail pheromone of Prorhinotermes to which Psammotermes is presumed to be phylogenetically close. Our findings underline once again the conservative nature of chemical communication in termites, with dodecatrienol being a frequent component of pheromonal signals in trail following and sex attraction and, at the same time, a tight evolutionary relationship between the trail following of working castes and the sex attraction of imagos. PMID:21318399

Sillam-Dussès, David; Hanus, Robert; Abd El-Latif, Ashraf Oukasha; Jiroš, Pavel; Krasulová, Jana; Kalinová, Blanka; Valterová, Irena; Sobotník, Jan

2011-02-01

179

Dens invaginatus (dilated odontome) in mandibular canine  

PubMed Central

Dens invaginatus is a developmental malformation of teeth related to shape of the teeth. Affected teeth show a deep infolding of enamel and dentin starting from the tip of the cusps and may extend deep into the root. It results from the invagination of the enamel organ into the dental papilla before calcification has occurred. Teeth most affected are maxillary lateral incisors. The presence of dens invaginatus in mandibular canine is extremely rare. The tooth was symptomatic in that it was mobile and was oriented horizontally. This article presents a case of symptomatic dens invaginatus in mandibular canine. PMID:25364169

Halawar, Sangamesh S; Satyakiran, GVV; Krishnanand, PS; Prashanth, R

2014-01-01

180

Supplemental mandibular mesiodens: a diagnostic challenge.  

PubMed

Developmental anomalies affecting the number of teeth are occasionally encountered clinically. The incidence of supernumerary teeth is approximately 1-3%. Among these are the maxillary anterior teeth, the maxillary molars, and the maxillo-mandubular premolars, in terms of descending order of occurrence. Supernumeraries occur rarely in the mandibular anterior teeth region. They may be either supplemental or rudimentary. We are reporting case of a supplemental type of supernumerary tooth in the mandibular anterior region and steps which were followed to distinguish supernumerary tooth from the normal series. PMID:24551732

Naganahalli, Manjunath; Honnappa, Adarsh; Chaitanya, Nallan Csk

2013-12-01

181

Supplemental Mandibular Mesiodens: A Diagnostic Challenge  

PubMed Central

Developmental anomalies affecting the number of teeth are occasionally encountered clinically. The incidence of supernumerary teeth is approximately 1–3%. Among these are the maxillary anterior teeth, the maxillary molars, and the maxillo-mandubular premolars, in terms of descending order of occurrence. Supernumeraries occur rarely in the mandibular anterior teeth region. They may be either supplemental or rudimentary. We are reporting case of a supplemental type of supernumerary tooth in the mandibular anterior region and steps which were followed to distinguish supernumerary tooth from the normal series. PMID:24551732

Naganahalli, Manjunath; Honnappa, Adarsh; Chaitanya, Nallan CSK

2013-01-01

182

Pheromonal control: reconciling physiological mechanism with signalling theory.  

PubMed

Pheromones are intraspecific chemical signals. They can have profound effects on the behaviour and/or physiology of the receiver, and it is still common to hear pheromones described as controlling of the behaviour of the receiver. The discussion of pheromonal control arose initially from a close association between hormones and pheromones in the comparative physiological literature, but the concept of a controlling pheromone is at odds with contemporary signal evolution theory, which predicts that a manipulative pheromonal signal negatively affecting the receiver's fitness should not be stable over evolutionary time. Here we discuss the meaning of pheromonal control, and the ecological circumstances by which it might be supported. We argue that in discussing pheromonal control it is important to differentiate between control applied to the effects of a pheromone on a receiver's physiology (proximate control), and control applied to the effects of a pheromone on a receiver's fitness (ultimate control). Critically, a pheromone signal affecting change in the receiver's behaviour or physiology need not necessarily manipulate the fitness of a receiver. In cases where pheromonal signalling does lead to a reduction in the fitness of the receiver, the signalling system would be stable if the pheromone were an honest signal of a social environment that disadvantages the receiver, and the physiological and behavioural changes observed in the receiver were an adaptive response to the new social circumstances communicated by the pheromone. PMID:24925630

Peso, Marianne; Elgar, Mark A; Barron, Andrew B

2015-05-01

183

Identification and Characterization of Pheromone Receptors and Interplay between Receptors and Pheromone Binding Proteins in the Diamondback Moth, Plutella xyllostella  

PubMed Central

Moths depend on olfactory cues such as sex pheromones to find and recognize mating partners. Pheromone receptors (PRs) and Pheromone binding proteins (PBPs) are thought to be associated with olfactory signal transduction of pheromonal compounds in peripheral olfactory reception. Here six candidate pheromone receptor genes in the diamondback moth, Plutella xyllostella were identified and cloned. All of the six candidate PR genes display male-biased expression, which is a typical characteristic of pheromone receptors. In the Xenopus-based functional study and in situ hybridization, PxylOR4 is defined as another pheromone receptor in addition to the previously characterized PxylOR1. In the study of interaction between PRs and PBPs, PxylPBPs could increase the sensitivity of the complex expressing oocyte cells to the ligand pheromone component while decreasing the sensitivity to pheromone analogs. We deduce that activating pheromone receptors in olfactory receptor neurons requires some role of PBPs to pheromone/PBP complex. If the chemical signal is not the pheromone component, but instead, a pheromone analog with a similar structure, the complex would have a decreased ability to activate downstream pheromone receptors. PMID:23626773

Sun, Mengjing; Liu, Yang; Walker, William B.; Liu, Chengcheng; Lin, Kejian; Gu, Shaohua; Zhang, Yongjun; Zhou, Jingjiang; Wang, Guirong

2013-01-01

184

Bed bug aggregation pheromone finally identified.  

PubMed

Bed bugs have become a global epidemic and current detection tools are poorly suited for routine surveillance. Despite intense research on bed bug aggregation behavior and the aggregation pheromone, which could be used as a chemical lure, the complete composition of this pheromone has thus far proven elusive. Here, we report that the bed bug aggregation pheromone comprises five volatile components (dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, (E)-2-hexenal, (E)-2-octenal, 2-hexanone), which attract bed bugs to safe shelters, and one less-volatile component (histamine), which causes their arrestment upon contact. In infested premises, a blend of all six components is highly effective at luring bed bugs into traps. The trapping of juvenile and adult bed bugs, with or without recent blood meals, provides strong evidence that this unique pheromone bait could become an effective and inexpensive tool for bed bug detection and potentially their control. PMID:25529634

Gries, Regine; Britton, Robert; Holmes, Michael; Zhai, Huimin; Draper, Jason; Gries, Gerhard

2015-01-19

185

Pheromone Static Routing Strategy for Complex Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We adopt the concept of using pheromones to generate a set of static paths that can reach the performance of global dynamic routing strategy [Phys. Rev. E 81 (2010) 016113]. The path generation method consists of two stages. In the first stage, a pheromone is dropped to the nodes by packets forwarded according to the global dynamic routing strategy. In the second stage, pheromone static paths are generated according to the pheromone density. The output paths can greatly improve traffic systems' overall capacity on different network structures, including scale-free networks, small-world networks and random graphs. Because the paths are static, the system needs much less computational resources than the global dynamic routing strategy.

Hu, Mao-Bin; Henry, Y. K. Lau; Ling, Xiang; Jiang, Rui

2012-12-01

186

PHEROMONES AND FLIGHT BEHAVIOR T. C. Baker  

E-print Network

, is partly due to the need for entomologists to know how their attractant blends affect moths to optimize resemblance to the same transition made by males losing the sex pheromone plume Adult Drosophila hydei fly

187

PRACTICAL SYNTHESES OF SELECTED INSECT PHEROMONES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Practical examples of insect pheromone synthesis, from our laboratory will be presented. Examples of key reactions in synthetic pathways include: Regiospecific epoxidation (cereal leaf beetle), kinetic vs. thermodynamic control of cycloheptanone dimethylation (Aphthona flea beetles), in situ oxida...

188

Nurses recognised in Queen's New Year Honours.  

PubMed

The RCN's director in Wales, who has run intensive care units and hospitals for the armed forces in Kosovo, Iraq and Afghanistan, is among those recognised in the Queen's New Year Honours. PMID:25563092

2015-01-13

189

Rapid inactivation of a moth pheromone  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have isolated, cloned, and expressed a male antennae-specific pheromone-degrading enzyme (PDE) [Antheraea polyphemus PDE (ApolPDE), formerly known as Sensillar Esterase] from the wild silkmoth, A. polyphemus, which seems essential for the rapid inactivation of pheromone during flight. The onset of enzymatic activity was detected at day 13 of the pupal stage with a peak at day 2 adult stage.

Yuko Ishida; Walter S. Leal

2005-01-01

190

Moth Sex Pheromone Receptors and Deceitful Parapheromones  

PubMed Central

The insect's olfactory system is so selective that male moths, for example, can discriminate female-produced sex pheromones from compounds with minimal structural modifications. Yet, there is an exception for this “lock-and-key” tight selectivity. Formate analogs can be used as replacement for less chemically stable, long-chain aldehyde pheromones, because male moths respond physiologically and behaviorally to these parapheromones. However, it remained hitherto unknown how formate analogs interact with aldehyde-sensitive odorant receptors (ORs). Neuronal responses to semiochemicals were investigated with single sensillum recordings. Odorant receptors (ORs) were cloned using degenerate primers, and tested with the Xenopus oocyte expression system. Quality, relative quantity, and purity of samples were evaluated by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We identified olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) housed in trichoid sensilla on the antennae of male navel orangeworm that responded equally to the main constituent of the sex pheromone, (11Z,13Z)-hexadecadienal (Z11Z13-16Ald), and its formate analog, (9Z,11Z)-tetradecen-1-yl formate (Z9Z11-14OFor). We cloned an odorant receptor co-receptor (Orco) and aldehyde-sensitive ORs from the navel orangeworm, one of which (AtraOR1) was expressed specifically in male antennae. AtraOR1•AtraOrco-expressing oocytes responded mainly to Z11Z13-16Ald, with moderate sensitivity to another component of the sex pheromone, (11Z,13Z)-hexadecadien-1-ol. Surprisingly, this receptor was more sensitive to the related formate than to the natural sex pheromone. A pheromone receptor from Heliothis virescens, HR13 (?=?HvirOR13) showed a similar profile, with stronger responses elicited by a formate analog than to the natural sex pheromone, (11Z)-hexadecenal thus suggesting this might be a common feature of moth pheromone receptors. PMID:22911835

Xu, Pingxi; Garczynski, Stephen F.; Atungulu, Elizabeth; Syed, Zainulabeuddin; Choo, Young-Moo; Vidal, Diogo M.; Zitelli, Caio H. L.; Leal, Walter S.

2012-01-01

191

Sex pheromone source location by garter snakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Male plains garter snakes,Thamnophis radix, tested in a 240-cm-long arena can detect directional information from a female pheromone trail only when the female is allowed to push against pegs while laying the trail. The female's normal locomotor activity apparently deposits pheromone on the anterolateral surfaces of vertical structures in her environment. The male sensorily assays the sides of these objects

Neil B. Ford; James R. Low

1984-01-01

192

Behavioral analysis of pheromones in fish.  

PubMed

Pheromones are chemicals that pass between members of the same species which have inherent meaning. Because most fish pheromones are mixtures, and their actions can be complex, behavioral assays are required to identify them. This chapter describes a few strategies and two specific methods (one for measuring attraction and another for sexual arousal) that can serve this purpose in fishes that live in nonflowing water such as the carps. PMID:24014371

Sorensen, Peter W

2013-01-01

193

SEX PHEROMONE COMPONENTS OF ORGYIA DETRITA  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

(Z,Z)-6,9-(S)-11-Heneicosadienol (Z6Z9-11S-o1-C21) and (Z,Z)-6,9-(R)-11-heneicosadienol (Z6Z9-11R-o1-C21) are major sex pheromone components of female tussock moths, Orgyia detrita Guerin-Meneville (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae). This conclusion is based on: 1) analyses of pheromone glad extracts of f...

194

Mandibular stiffness in humans: Numerical predictions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The chin is a feature unique to humans. This study evaluates the effect of mandibular symphyseal design on biomechanical masticatory effectiveness as determined by structural stiffness and stress developed under flexural and torsional loading. A simple model of three symphyseal shapes (chin, flat symphysis and lingual buttress), was built to represent human, Neanderthal and higher primate symphyses and these were

I. Ichim; M. V. Swain; J. A. Kieser

2006-01-01

195

Incidence of mandibular fractures in eastern Libya  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this retrospective study is to evaluate the incidence of mandibular fractures in the eastern part of Libya and to present our experience in treating this type of facial fracture. We analyzed factors such as the inci- dence of age, sex, time distribution, cause and site of the fracture and the associated injuries in 493 patients present- ing

Rafa-Abdelsalam Elgehani; Maraai-Idris Orafi

2009-01-01

196

Orthodontic extrusion of horizontally impacted mandibular molars  

PubMed Central

Objective: To introduce and evaluate a novel approach in treating horizontally impacted mandibular second and third molars. Materials and methods: An orthodontic technique was applied for treatment of horizontally impacted mandibular second and third molars, which included a push-type spring for rotation first, and then a cantilever for extrusion. There were 8 mandibular third molars (M3s) and 2 second molars (M2s) in this study. Tooth mobility, extraction time, the inclination and parallelism of the impacted tooth, alveolar bone height of the adjacent tooth, and the relationship of impacted M3 and the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) were evaluated. Results: Two horizontally impacted M2s could be upright in the arch and good occlusal relationships were obtained after treatment. All impacted M3s were successfully separated from the IAN, without any neurologic consequences. The average extraction time was 5 minutes. There was a significant change in the inclination and parallelism of the impacted tooth after treatment. A new bone apposition with the average height of 3.2 mm was noted distal to the adjacent tooth. Conclusions: This two-step orthodontic technique as presented here may be a safe and feasible alternative in management of severely horizontally impacted mandibular molars, which achieves a successful separation of M3s from the IAN and an excellent position for M2s. PMID:25419364

Ma, Zhigui; Yang, Chi; Zhang, Shanyong; Xie, Qianyang; Shen, Yuqing; Shen, Pei

2014-01-01

197

Mandibular contouring surgery for purely aesthetic reasons  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mandible's contour determines the shape of the lower part of the face and thus influences the appearance of the face and neck. There are two types of operative procedures that can be used on mandibular contour and they do not require orthodontic treatment: mandible angle reduction and genioplasty. We divided the mandible angle reduction group into Types A, B,

Doo Byung Yang; Chul Gyoo Park

1991-01-01

198

Aggregation Pheromone System: A Real-parameter Optimization Algorithm using Aggregation Pheromones as the Base Metaphor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper proposes an aggregation pheromone system (APS) for solving real-parameter optimization problems using the collective behavior of individuals which communicate using aggregation pheromones. APS was tested on several test functions used in evolutionary computation. The results showed APS could solve real-parameter optimization problems fairly well. The sensitivity analysis of control parameters of APS is also studied.

Tsutsui, Shigeyosi

199

Evolved differences in larval social behavior mediated by novel pheromones.  

PubMed

Pheromones, chemical signals that convey social information, mediate many insect social behaviors, including navigation and aggregation. Several studies have suggested that behavior during the immature larval stages of Drosophila development is influenced by pheromones, but none of these compounds or the pheromone-receptor neurons that sense them have been identified. Here we report a larval pheromone-signaling pathway. We found that larvae produce two novel long-chain fatty acids that are attractive to other larvae. We identified a single larval chemosensory neuron that detects these molecules. Two members of the pickpocket family of DEG/ENaC channel subunits (ppk23 and ppk29) are required to respond to these pheromones. This pheromone system is evolving quickly, since the larval exudates of D. simulans, the sister species of D. melanogaster, are not attractive to other larvae. Our results define a new pheromone signaling system in Drosophila that shares characteristics with pheromone systems in a wide diversity of insects. PMID:25497433

Mast, Joshua D; De Moraes, Consuelo M; Alborn, Hans T; Lavis, Luke D; Stern, David L

2014-01-01

200

Pervasive pheromone-based interaction with RFID tags  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the growing interest in pheromone-based interaction to enforce adaptive and context-aware coordination, the number of deployed systems exploiting digital pheromones to coordinate the activities of application agents is very limited. In this paper, we present a real-world, low-cost and general- purpose, implementation of pheromone-based interaction. This is realized by making use of RFID tags to store digital pheromones, and

Marco Mamei; Franco Zambonelli

2007-01-01

201

Neuropeptide-mediated stimulation of pheromone biosynthesis in an ant  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Pheromones are well known to initiate behavioral or physiological responses in members of the same species. The chemistry and behaviors elicited by pheromones have advanced tremendously in the 50+ years since the first pheromone identification from the silkworm moth. However, the regulation of phero...

202

Evolutionary deterioration of the vomeronasal pheromone transduction pathway in  

E-print Network

Evolutionary deterioration of the vomeronasal pheromone transduction pathway in catarrhine primates, and approved May 9, 2003 (received for review March 25, 2003) Pheromones are water-soluble chemicals released to detect pheromones, a phe- nomenon not well understood at the molecular level. Here we show that genes

Zhang, Jianzhi

203

Is the vomeronasal system really specialized for detecting pheromones?  

E-print Network

Is the vomeronasal system really specialized for detecting pheromones? Kosha N. Baxi1 , Kathleen M assume that vomeronasal processing is equivalent to pheromone processing. We review the abundant data concerning the roles of both the olfactory and the vomeronasal systems in the processing of both pheromones

Eisthen, Heather L.

204

Higher Order Pheromone Models in Ant Colony Optimisation  

E-print Network

Higher Order Pheromone Models in Ant Colony Optimisation James Montgomery Faculty of Information problem-specific components. A pa- rameterised model known as pheromone--an analogue of the trail phero. Keywords: Ant colony optimisation, pheromone model, model-based search. 1 Introduction Ant colony

Montgomery, James

205

Large Pheromones: A Case Study with Multiagent Physical A*  

E-print Network

Large Pheromones: A Case Study with Multi­agent Physical A* Ariel Felner 12 , Yaron Shoshani 2 pheromones, where agents communicate by writing and reading data at nodes of the graph that constitutes their environment. Unlike small pheromones where only a limited amount of data can be written at each node

Felner, Ariel

206

Autonomous Control of Production Networks using a Pheromone Approach  

E-print Network

Autonomous Control of Production Networks using a Pheromone Approach D. Armbruster 1 , C. de Beer 2 network with an autonomously controlled flow of parts based on backward propagated information (pheromone concept). Key words: Production Networks, Autonomous Control, Pheromones, DES Models, Fluid Models 1

Ringhofer, Christian

207

FOREST ENTOMOLOGY Blending Synthetic Pheromones of Cerambycid Beetles to Develop  

E-print Network

FOREST ENTOMOLOGY Blending Synthetic Pheromones of Cerambycid Beetles to Develop Trap Lures pheromones to determine whether such blends could be used as effective trap lures for detecting and monitoring multiple species simultaneously. Pheromone-baited traps captured 1,358 cerambycid beetles of which

Hanks, Lawrence M.

208

Chemical Entomology Phylogeny and sexual pheromones of Corsican bumblebees  

E-print Network

Chemical Entomology Phylogeny and sexual pheromones of Corsican bumblebees T. Lecocq1* , A. Coppée1 pheromones; 245 specimens) and see if a speciation can take place in a period of 13 000 years. We collected and continental bumblebees' sexual pheromones and we sequenced two genes nearly from the same specimens (COI

Rasmont, Pierre

209

Understanding the Pheromone System within Ant Colony Optimization  

E-print Network

Understanding the Pheromone System within Ant Colony Optimization Stephen Gilmour and Mark Dras are good parameters for ACO algorithms, little research has been done as to how the ACO pheromone system) pheromone system in this direction. It is difficult to apply ACS to new problems when the variables within

Dras, Mark

210

Encoding Pheromonal Signals in the Accessory Olfactory Bulb of  

E-print Network

Encoding Pheromonal Signals in the Accessory Olfactory Bulb of Behaving Mice Minmin Luo,1 * Michale S. Fee,2 Lawrence C. Katz1 Many mammalian species rely on pheromones--semiochemicals produced how the central nervous system integrates the complex repertoire of pheromones, we recorded from

Fee, Michale S.

211

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Predicted taxonomic patterns in pheromone production  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Predicted taxonomic patterns in pheromone production by longhorned beetles Ann M of three tribes in the long- horned beetle subfamily Cerambycinae produce volatile pheromones that share, or ten carbons). Pheromone gland pores are present on the prothoraces of males, but are absent in females

Hanks, Lawrence M.

212

MARKING PHEROMONES OF MEGABOMBUS SYLVARUM (L.) AND M. RUDERARIUS (MULLER)  

E-print Network

MARKING PHEROMONES OF MEGABOMBUS SYLVARUM (L.) AND M. RUDERARIUS (MULLER) MALES (HYMENOPTERA as a marking pheromone, were isolated by extraction and then identified oy capmary gas chromatography, mass with a pheromone produced in the cephalic part of the labial gland (AGREN et al., 1979 ; Sv!rrssoN, 1980 a

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

213

Robust Spatial Sensing of Mating Pheromone Gradients by Yeast Cells  

E-print Network

Robust Spatial Sensing of Mating Pheromone Gradients by Yeast Cells Travis I. Moore1,2 , Ching of the mating pheromone a-factor produced in a microfluidics chamber; the focus was on bar1D strains, which do not degrade the pheromone input. The yeast cells exhibited good accuracy with the mating projection typically

Nie, Qing

214

ORIGINAL PAPER High individual variation in pheromone production  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL PAPER High individual variation in pheromone production by tree-killing bark beetles # Springer-Verlag 2007 Abstract Aggregation via pheromone signalling is essen- tial for tree-killing bark beetles to overcome tree defenses and reproduce within hosts. Pheromone production is a trait

Ayres, Matthew.P.

215

Molecular Basis of Pheromone Detection in Insects Richard G. Vogt  

E-print Network

Molecular Basis of Pheromone Detection in Insects Richard G. Vogt Department of Biological Sciences). 3.1.2 Insect Pheromones/Odor molecules are detected by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). 3.1.3Gustatory neurons detect chemostimulants using GPCRs. 3.2 Second Messenger Pathways. 3.2.1 Pheromone

Vogt, Richard G.

216

3 TRPC2 and the Molecular Biology of Pheromone  

E-print Network

45 3 TRPC2 and the Molecular Biology of Pheromone Detection in Mammals Emily R. Liman University..............................................................................................................45 The Molecular Biology of Pheromone Sensing in Mammals................................46 TRPC2 and the Evolution of Pheromone Sensing .....................................49 From VNO Activation to Behavioral

Liman, Emily

217

Original article Effects of honey-bee alarm pheromone compounds  

E-print Network

Original article Effects of honey-bee alarm pheromone compounds on the behaviour of Varroa. In addition, 6 out of 9 alarm pheromone compounds were significantly repellent. Next to isopentyl-acetate, which showed no ef- fect, 1-octanol is the most quantitatively important alarm pheromone compound

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

218

Biosynthesis and detection of pheromones and plant volatiles  

E-print Network

by Silverstein on bark beetles, in which three terpenes were identified as a synergistic pheromone blend for Ips of pheromone production has evolved from identifying biochemical pathways towards unraveling the molecular that a particular hormone increased pheromone production in a few species to developing an understanding of which

Vogt, Richard G.

219

How is pheromone specificity encoded in proteins?  

PubMed

Pheromone specificity in the Lepidoptera is encoded in protein components of the antennal sensillum lymph and dendritic membrane. In this paper, we highlight recent work on the molecular determinants of pheromone binding affinity of pheromone binding proteins (PBPs) of three genera. First, we describe new cDNA sequences for Lymantria dispar (Lymantriidae) and Agrotis segetum (Noctuidae). These data enrich the conclusions derived from our functional studies. Secondly, we indicate how preparation of multimilligram quantities of the recombinant PBP 'Apol-3' (originally from Antheraea polyphemus) has provided a platform (i) to determine the ligand binding sites using photoaffinity labeling, (ii) to conduct structural analysis by CD and NMR, and (iii) to measure binding affinities using a new binding assay. Thirdly, we describe the use of expression-cassette PCR technology to prepare two related PBPs from Antheraea perneyi to test binding affinities of naturally-occurring homologous PBPs. Our results support a model in which ligand specificity for chain length, double bond position, and terminal functionality is partially encoded in the PBPs. We propose that the final decoding is accomplished when the PBP-pheromone complex activates a G-protein coupled seven-transmembrane domain receptor that contains recognition sites for both the presented pheromone and the presenting PBP. PMID:8590031

Prestwich, G D; Du, G; LaForest, S

1995-08-01

220

Unraveling the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) signal transduction cascade that regulates sex pheromone production in moths  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Studies over the past three decades have demonstrated that female moths usually produce sex pheromones as multi-component blends in which the ratios of the individual components are precisely controlled, making it possible to generate species-specific pheromone blends. Most moth pheromone component...

221

Intraosseous schwannoma of mandibular symphysis: case report.  

PubMed

Schwannoma (neurilemmoma) is a benign neoplasm originated from the neural sheath and occurring most frequently in the head and neck. Intraosseous schwannomas are rare. The mandible is the most common site of occurrence for these lesions. This article reports the case of an intraosseous schwannoma located in the mandibular symphysis of an 11-year-old boy. The lesion was surgically removed and no radiographic evidence of recurrence was observed after 5 years. PMID:17262135

de Lacerda, Suzie Aparecida; Brentegani, Luiz Guilherme; Rosa, Adalberto Luiz; Vespúcio, Marcelo Vinícius Oliveira; Salata, Luiz Antônio

2006-01-01

222

Minimally invasive approaches to mandibular fractures.  

PubMed

Excellence in mandibular fracture repair requires anatomic restoration of the displaced bone segments, maintenance of the reduction until bone union has been confirmed, and minimization of surgical stigmata. Repairs should ideally be cost-effective, reproducible, adaptable, and expeditiously executed. Fractures of two subregions of the mandible, the condylar neck and the symphysis, can benefit from minimally invasive surgical techniques. The use of these techniques in the mandible is reviewed. PMID:11457709

Lee, C; Mankani, M H; Kellman, R M; Forrest, C R

2001-08-01

223

QUEEN'S COLLEGE GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS 2015 Entry Please note that highlighted scholarship are administered centrally, rather than through The Queen's College  

E-print Network

QUEEN'S COLLEGE GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS 2015 Entry Please note that highlighted scholarship are administered centrally, rather than through The Queen's College Title of Scholarship Criteria Value Duration Nationality Number Closing date for applications

Capdeboscq, Yves

224

The composition and diagenesis of the Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian) at Virey and Moose Queen fields, Midland County, Texas  

E-print Network

and its sandstone reservoirs at the Moose and Virey Queen fields. The second purpose is to investigate the depositional and diagenetic processes that control the formation, size and quality of the sandstone reservoirs and non-reservoirs. The Queen...

Voncannon, Jennifer Catherine

1999-01-01

225

2014 Queen Mary Annual Fund Telephone Campaign Annual Fund Caller  

E-print Network

of the campaign is to keep alumni (former students) in touch with news about Queen Mary and Barts and The London and Professional Services; providing money to increase student opportunities across Queen Mary and Barts and talk about their memories and experiences during their time at Queen Mary, Westfield and Barts

Chittka, Lars

226

Advancing Queen's and the School of Graduate Studies  

E-print Network

;...and this The Honourable John Ross Matheson, Arts'40, dedicates a tree in City Park to honour the GaelsQueen's, and Queen's News and Media website ­ News and Media Services ­ pitching faculty to national and units by audience ­ Electronic communications: website development, videos, blogs, etc. · Queen

Ellis, Randy

227

Ontogenetic shift in habitat by early juvenile queen conch,  

E-print Network

Ontogenetic shift in habitat by early juvenile queen conch, Strombus gigas:. patterns and potential of young-of-the-year juvenile queen conch, Strombus gigas L., in the southern Exuma Cays, Bahamas. during (80-140mml conch were observed in adjacent, deeper seagrass beds, suggesting that queen conch make

228

Early identification and management of mandibular canine ectopia.  

PubMed

Mandibular canine impaction and transmigration have serious consequences for the patient, as removal of the tooth or teeth in question is often the only solution. The loss of one or both mandibular canines complicates orthodontic treatment. Early warning signs of mandibular canine ectopia are explored in this paper as well as how to assess the potential for displacement, impaction and/or transmigration. This paper highlights the value of interceptive treatment once the early signs of an aberrant mandibular canine have been detected. PMID:23193881

Hudson, A P G; Harris, A M P; Mohamed, N

2011-11-01

229

Pheromone Signaling Pathways in Yeast  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The actions of many extracellular stimuli are elicited by complexes of cell surface receptors, heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding proteins (G proteins), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) complexes. Analysis of haploid yeast cells and their response to peptide mating pheromones has produced important advances in the understanding of G protein and MAPK signaling mechanisms. Many of the components, their interrelationships, and their regulators were first identified in yeast. Examples include definitive demonstration of a positive signaling role for G protein ?? subunits, the discovery of a three-tiered structure of the MAPK module, development of the concept of a kinase-scaffold protein, and the discovery of the first regulator of G protein signaling protein. New and powerful genomic, proteomic, and computational approaches available in yeast are beginning to uncover new pathway components and interactions and have revealed their presence in unexpected locations within the cell. This updated Connections Map in the Database of Cell Signaling includes several major revisions to this prototypical signal response pathway.

Henrik G. Dohlman (University of North Carolina; Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics REV)

2006-12-05

230

Reconstruction of Beagle Hemi-Mandibular Defects with Allogenic Mandibular Scaffolds and Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells  

PubMed Central

Objective Massive bone allografts are frequently used in orthopedic reconstructive surgery, but carry a high failure rate of approximately 25%. We tested whether treatment of graft with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can increase the integration of massive allografts (hemi-mandible) in a large animal model. Methods Thirty beagle dogs received surgical left-sided hemi-mandibular defects, and then divided into two equal groups. Bony defects of the control group were reconstructed using allografts only. Those of the experimental group were reconstructed using allogenic mandibular scaffold-loaded autologous MSCs. Beagles from each group were killed at4 (n?=?4), 12 (n?=?4), 24 (n?=?4) or 48 weeks (n?=?3) postoperatively. CT and micro-CT scans, histological analyses and the bone mineral density (BMD) of transplants were used to evaluate defect reconstruction outcomes. Results Gross and CT examinations showed that the autologous bone grafts had healed in both groups. At 48 weeks, the allogenic mandibular scaffolds of the experimental group had been completely replaced by new bone, which has a smaller surface area to that of the original allogenic scaffold, whereas the scaffold in control dogs remained the same size as the original allogenic scaffold throughout. At 12 weeks, the BMD of the experimental group was significantly higher than the control group (p<0.05), and all micro-architectural parameters were significantly different between groups (p<0.05). Histological analyses showed almost all transplanted allogeneic bone was replaced by new bone, principally fibrous ossification, in the experimental group, which differed from the control group where little new bone formed. Conclusions Our study demonstrated the feasibility of MSC-loaded allogenic mandibular scaffolds for the reconstruction of hemi-mandibular defects. Further studies are needed to test whether these results can be surpassed by the use of allogenic mandibular scaffolds loaded with a combination of MSCs and osteoinductive growth factors. PMID:25153673

Luo, JinChao; Liu, HuaWei; Hu, Min; Yue, Wen

2014-01-01

231

Behavioral Plasticity in Ant Queens: Environmental Manipulation Induces Aggression among Normally Peaceful Queens in the Socially Polymorphic Ant Leptothorax acervorum  

PubMed Central

The behavioral traits that shape the structure of animal societies vary considerably among species but appear to be less flexible within species or at least within populations. Populations of the ant Leptothorax acervorum differ in how queens interact with other queens. Nestmate queens from extended, homogeneous habitats tolerate each other and contribute quite equally to the offspring of the colony (polygyny: low reproductive skew). In contrast, nestmate queens from patchy habitats establish social hierarchies by biting and antennal boxing, and eventually only the top-ranking queen of the colony lays eggs (functional monogyny: high reproductive skew). Here we investigate whether queen-queen behavior is fixed within populations or whether aggression and high skew can be elicited by manipulation of socio-environmental factors in colonies from low skew populations. An increase of queen/worker ratio and to a lesser extent food limitation elicited queen-queen antagonism in polygynous colonies from Nürnberger Reichswald similar to that underlying social and reproductive hierarchies in high-skew populations from Spain, Japan, and Alaska. In manipulated colonies, queens differed more in ovarian status than in control colonies. This indicates that queens are in principle capable of adapting the magnitude of reproductive skew to environmental changes in behavioral rather than evolutionary time. PMID:24743352

Trettin, Jürgen; Seyferth, Thomas; Heinze, Jürgen

2014-01-01

232

Pheromones in marine algae: A technical approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is now well known that many marine organisms use low-molecular volatile substances as signals, in order to coordinate activities between different individuals. The study of such pheromones requires the isolation and enrichment of the secretions from undisturbed living cells or organisms over extended periods of time. The Grob-Hersch extraction device, which we describe here, avoids adverse factors for the biological materials such as strong water currents, rising gas bubbles or chemical solvents. Furthermore, the formation of sea-water spray is greatly reduced. The application of this technique for the isolation of pheromones of marine algae and animals is described.

Gassmann, G.; Müller, D. G.; Fritz, P.

1995-03-01

233

Sex in the night: fatty acid-derived sex pheromones and corresponding membrane pheromone receptors in insects.  

PubMed

The moth sex pheromone communication is one of the most striking examples of chemical communication in the animal kingdom. Investigating the molecular mechanisms of pheromone biosynthesis in the female pheromone gland and of pheromone reception in the male antennae not only defines new concepts in signalling research but also opens new perspectives for insect control. In this mini-review, we use the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis as a guideline to illustrate the recent advances gained in the understanding of moth sex pheromone communication. PMID:25066916

Koutroumpa, Fotini A; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle

2014-12-01

234

Pheromonal cross-attraction in true bugs (Heteroptera): attraction of Piezodorus hybneri (Pentatomidae) to its pheromone versus the pheromone of Riptortus pedestris (Alydidae).  

PubMed

We investigated the attractiveness of a synthetic form of the pheromone of the soybean stink bug, Piezodorus hybneri (Gmelin), under field conditions, and compared it with that of (E)-2-hexenyl (E)-2-hexenoate, a pheromone component of a competitor, Riptortus pedestris (Fabricius). Many adult stink bugs were attracted to traps baited with 100 mg of the synthetic pheromone (1: 1: one mixture of ?-sesquiphellandrene, (R)-15-hexadecanolide, and methyl (Z)-8-hexadecenoate), but few were attracted to 1 or 10 mg. More than twice as many females as males were attracted to this male-produced pheromone. None of the individual pheromone components (30 mg) attracted conspecifics. In summer (June-July), when field P. hybneri were not in diapause, (E)-2-hexenyl (E)-2-hexenoate was more attractive to P. hybneri than the synthetic pheromone. The sex ratio of the adults attracted to the synthetic pheromone was highly female-biased, yet almost equal numbers of both sexes were attracted to (E)-2-hexenyl (E)-2-hexenoate. Most females attracted to both attractants were mated and had mature ovaries. However, adults attracted to (E)-2-hexenyl (E)-2-hexenoate were likely to have less food in their stomach than those attracted to the synthetic pheromone. In late autumn (October-November), when the bugs were in reproductive diapause, both attractants attracted many sexually immature female and male adults that had well-developed fat body. The synthetic pheromone also attracted a large number of conspecific nymphs. These results suggest that P. hybneri pheromone and R. pedestris pheromone component, respectively, have different functions for P. hybneri. The male-produced pheromone system of P. hybneri seems to be sex-related but to have other roles. PMID:22182564

Endo, N; Sasaki, R; Muto, S

2010-12-01

235

Discrimination of pheromone enantiomers by two pheromone binding proteins from the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar.  

PubMed

The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, uses (7R, 8S)-cis-2-methyl-7, 8-epoxyoctadecane, (+)-disparlure, as a sex pheromone. The (-) enantiomer of the pheromone is a strong behavioral antagonist. Specialized sensory hairs, sensillae, on the antennae of male moths detect the pheromone. Once the pheromone enters a sensillum, the very abundant pheromone binding protein (PBP) transports the odorant to the sensory neuron. We have expressed the two PBPs found in gypsy moth antennae, PBP1 and PBP2, and we have studied the affinity of these recombinant PBPs for the enantiomers of disparlure. To study pheromone binding under equilibrium conditions, we developed and validated a binding assay. We have addressed the two major problems with hydrophobic ligands in aqueous solution: (1) concentration-dependent adsorption of the ligand on vial surfaces and (2) separation of the protein-bound ligand from the material remaining free in solution. We used this assay to demonstrate for the first time that pheromone binding to PBP is reversible and that the two PBPs from L. dispar differ in their enantiomer binding preference. PBP1 has a higher affinity for the (-) enantiomer, while PBP2 has a higher affinity for the (+) enantiomer. The PBP from the wild silk moth, Antheraea polyphemus (Apol-3) bound the disparlure enantiomers more weakly than either of the L. dispar PBPs, but Apol-3 was also able to discriminate the enantiomers. We have observed extensive aggregation of both L. dispar PBPs and an increase in pheromone binding at high (>2 microM) PBP concentrations. We present a model of disparlure binding to the two PBPs. PMID:10913308

Plettner, E; Lazar, J; Prestwich, E G; Prestwich, G D

2000-08-01

236

Assessing the mating 'health' of commercial honey bee queens.  

PubMed

Honey bee queens mate with multiple males, which increases the total genetic diversity within colonies and has been shown to confer numerous benefits for colony health and productivity. Recent surveys of beekeepers have suggested that 'poor queens' are a top management concern, thus investigating the reproductive quality and mating success of commercially produced honey bee queens is warranted. We purchased 80 commercially produced queens from large queen breeders in California and measured them for their physical size (fresh weigh and thorax width), insemination success (stored sperm counts and sperm viability), and mating number (determined by patriline genotyping of worker offspring). We found that queens had an average of 4.37 +/- 1.446 million stored sperm in their spermathecae with an average viability of 83.7 +/- 13.33%. We also found that the tested queens had mated with a high number of drones (average effective paternity frequency: 17.0 +/- 8.98). Queen "quality" significantly varied among commercial sources for physical characters but not for mating characters. These findings suggest that it may be more effective to improve overall queen reproductive potential by culling lower-quality queens rather than systematically altering current queen production practices. PMID:22420250

Tarpy, David R; Keller, Jennifer J; Caren, Joel R; Delaney, Deborah A

2012-02-01

237

Immune priming and pathogen resistance in ant queens  

PubMed Central

Growing empirical evidence indicates that invertebrates become more resistant to a pathogen following initial exposure to a nonlethal dose; yet the generality, mechanisms, and adaptive value of such immune priming are still under debate. Because life-history theory predicts that immune priming and large investment in immunity should be more frequent in long-lived species, we here tested for immune priming and pathogen resistance in ant queens, which have extraordinarily long life span. We exposed virgin and mated queens of Lasius niger and Formica selysi to a low dose of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana, before challenging them with a high dose of the same pathogen. We found evidence for immune priming in naturally mated queens of L. niger. In contrast, we found no sign of priming in virgin queens of L. niger, nor in virgin or experimentally mated queens of F. selysi, which indicates that immune priming in ant queens varies according to mating status and mating conditions or species. In both ant species, mated queens showed higher pathogen resistance than virgin queens, which suggests that mating triggers an up-regulation of the immune system. Overall, mated ant queens combine high reproductive output, very long life span, and elevated investment in immune defense. Hence, ant queens are able to invest heavily in both reproduction and maintenance, which can be explained by the fact that mature queens will be protected and nourished by their worker offspring. PMID:24963375

Gálvez, Dumas; Chapuisat, Michel

2014-01-01

238

A pheromone-binding protein from the cockroach Leucophaea maderae: cloning, expression and pheromone binding.  

PubMed Central

Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are thought to transport volatile compounds from air to their receptors through the sensillary lymph. In this protein family, the subgroup of pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) is specifically tuned to the perception of the sexual pheromone. To date, the description of OBPs has been restricted to Endopterygota and Paraneoptera. Their expression in Orthopteroid has been hypothesized, but no evidence of OBP has been produced in this assemblage to date. In the present study, we describe the first OBP from a Dictyopteran insect that belongs to the cockroach Leucophaea maderae. The PBP of L. maderae (PBPLma) shares all the hallmarks of the OBP family and is expressed specifically in the female adult antennae, the sex that perceives the sexual pheromone. The affinity of the recombinant PBPLma produced in the Escherichia coli periplasm for the pheromonal compounds has been tested by displacement of a fluorophore, 8-anilino-1-naphtalenesulphonic acid (ANS). Our results suggest that two chemically close compounds of the pheromonal blend (3-hydroxy-butan-2-one and butane-2,3-diol) are capable of displacing ANS, whereas two other pheromone components (E-2-octenoic acid and senecioic acid) and other alkyl volatile compounds are not capable of displacing ANS, indicating a certain filtering of binding, which can be correlated with the putative function. PMID:12529170

Rivière, Stéphane; Lartigue, Audrey; Quennedey, Brigitte; Campanacci, Valérie; Farine, Jean-Pierre; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian; Brossut, Rémy

2003-01-01

239

A new class of mealybug pheromones: a hemiterpene ester in the sex pheromone of Crisicoccus matsumotoi  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mealybugs, which include several agricultural pests, are small sap feeders covered with a powdery wax. They exhibit clear sexual dimorphism; males are winged but fragile and short lived, whereas females are windless and less mobile. Thus, sex pheromones emitted by females facilitate copulation and reproduction by serving as a key navigation tool for males. Although the structures of the hitherto known mealybug pheromones vary among species, they have a common structural motif; they are carboxylic esters of monoterpene alcohols with irregular non-head-to-tail linkages. However, in the present study, we isolated from the Matsumoto mealybug, Crisicoccus matsumotoi (Siraiwa), a pheromone with a completely different structure. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we identified the pheromone as 3-methyl-3-butenyl 5-methylhexanoate. Its attractiveness to males was confirmed in a series of field trapping experiments involving comparison between the isolated natural product and a synthetic sample. This is the first report of a hemiterpene mealybug pheromone. In addition, the acid moiety (5-methylhexanoate) appears to be rare in insect pheromones.

Tabata, Jun; Narai, Yutaka; Sawamura, Nobuo; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Sugie, Hajime

2012-07-01

240

Osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle: Resection and reconstruction using vertical sliding osteotomy of the mandibular ramus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteochondroma is one of the most common benign bone tumours, although not in the craniofacial region. More than half of these appear in the coronoid process. It can appear on the mandibular condyle, especially in its medial half, and mainly affects women aged around forty years. We present the case of a 51-year-old woman with pain of several months' duration

Sergio González-Otero; Carlos Navarro-Cuéllar; Margarita Escrig-de Teigeiro; Javier Fernández-Alba; Carlos Navarro-Vila; Servicio de Cirugía Maxilofacial

241

Queen Margaret University College's Sustainable, Community Campus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The new campus of Queen Margaret University College in the United Kingdom is designed to be a sustainable educational and community resource. Early consultation with students and staff on the campus design revealed a strong desire for a sustainable environment, with plenty of green space for all to enjoy. In response to this, the design focuses on…

Woodman, Susan

2006-01-01

242

The Queen Mary Magazine Autumn 2007  

E-print Network

into higher education. Simultaneously it aims to convey something of the history of Queen Mary, University developments such as the Equal Pay Act and the Sex Discrimination Act were introduced. These and other social to an end the gender `quotas' in subjects such as medicine and hastened the change to co

Chittka, Lars

243

The Queen Mary Magazine Summer 2003  

E-print Network

includes students with disabilities; Queen Mary shows how. 12 The East End has been home to a variety of Medicine and Dentistry provides a good example of this. Our links with local NHS teaching hospitals for healthcare professionals and widening participation in medicine, dentistry, nursing, midwifery and allied

Chittka, Lars

244

Form Updated March 29, 2010 Queen's University  

E-print Network

Placement and Internship Courses in Athletic Therapy and Strength & Conditioning Student Number Surname Given Name Kingston Phone Home (Cell) Phone Queen's Email Program (Circle) Level in Program Calendar) KNPE 330* Athletic Therapy KNPE 346* Strength & Conditioning KNPE 430* Athletic Therapy KNPE 446

Abolmaesumi, Purang

245

October 5, 2010 QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY AT KINGSTON  

E-print Network

: Jeffery 234 Principal Wolfe will visit during the departmental meeting time. Time permitting, the normal department meeting will start immediately following Principal Wolfe's visit. Friday, October 8 Number Theory Seminar Time: 11:30 a.m. ­ 12:20 p.m. Place: Jeffery 422 Speaker: Andrew Droll, Queen's University Title

Offin, Dan

246

September 14, 2010 QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY AT KINGSTON  

E-print Network

Time: 3:30 p.m. Place: Jeffery 225 Speaker: Professor Alison Wolf, King's College London Title:00 p.m. Place: Jeffery 319 Speaker: Tony Geramita, Queen's University Abstract Attached Friday, September 17 Number Theory Seminar Time: 11:30 a.m. ­ 12:20 p.m. Place: Jeffery 422 Speaker: Michael Dewar

Offin, Dan

247

THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Disability  

E-print Network

accessible to individuals with disabilities, and also provides a more general overview of legislation and our at a substantial disadvantage compared with a non-disabled person. Examples of reasonable adjustments might includeTHE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Disability INTRODUCTION This document provides

Capdeboscq, Yves

248

THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Disability  

E-print Network

accessible to individuals with disabilities, and also provides a more general overview of legislation and our "provision, criterion or practice", which places a disabled person at a substantial disadvantage comparedTHE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Disability INTRODUCTION This document provides

Capdeboscq, Yves

249

November 23, 2010 QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY AT KINGSTON  

E-print Network

: Hester Graves, Queen's University Title: Generalizing Jacobi's Four Square Theorem Abstract Attached Title: Applications of Optimal Control Theory to Infectious Disease Modeling Supervisor: T. Day Friday points" Friday, November 26, 11:30 a.m. Jeffery 422 Number Theory Seminar Speaker: Hester Graves Title

Offin, Dan

250

Women in History--Queen Liliuokalani  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article profiles Queen Liliuokalani, Hawaii's last monarch. Liliuokalani was born in Hawaii in 1838 into the family of a high chief. She attended the Royal School, run by American missionaries, and received a high quality education and learned to love music, writing and politics. Liliuokalani was given the Christian name "Lydia" as a child.…

Koeppe, Tina

2007-01-01

251

Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website from the Metropolitan Museum accompanies their retrospective exhibition of the work of couturier Alexander McQueen, who committed suicide at age 40 in 2010. McQueen was known for his lavishly staged runway shows, for example his spring 2003 collection, "Irere", featured a recreation of a shipwreck complete with pirates and amazons, and models falling overboard. "It's only a game" in 2005, was a human chess game, with models dressed as chess pieces, such a knight in a horsehairs skirt. On the exhibition's website, visitors can view selected objects including McQueen's extremely low-slung trousers, "bumsters" or the Spine Corset, a silver exoskeleton, worn over a dress. Narration is provided by Andrew Bolton, the British curator of the Metropolitan Museum's Costume Institute, Michelle Olly, who wore one of the dresses, and McQueen himself. There is also a section of online videos available here, where visitors can watch a model in a chiffon dress drop into the ocean, and see the chess pieces move.

252

THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Gender  

E-print Network

June 2014 THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Gender INTRODUCTION This document provides to individuals regardless of gender and gender-related issues, and also provides a general overview of the legal, actual or associated; gender reassignment ­ which includes someone who is transgendered, or who has

Capdeboscq, Yves

253

THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Gender  

E-print Network

THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Gender INTRODUCTION This document provides information to individuals regardless of gender and gender-related issues, and also provides a general overview of the legal this is perceived, actual or associated; · gender reassignment ­ which includes someone who is transgendered, or who

Capdeboscq, Yves

254

Sensory nerve impairment following mandibular third molar surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: This prospective study reports the rate and factors influencing sensory impairment of the inferior alveolar and lingual nerves after the removal of impacted mandibular third molars under local anesthesia. Patients and Methods: There were 741 patients with 741 mandibular third molars removed under local anesthesia during a 3-year period from 1994 to 1997. Standardized data collection included the patient's

Anwar B Bataineh

2001-01-01

255

Immediate and late mandibular fractures after third molar removal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: In this retrospective study, we analyzed immediate and late mandibular fractures after impacted lower third molar surgery. Patients and Methods: One hundred fifty oral and maxillofacial surgeons in the north of- France were questioned about their experience with intraoperative and late mandibular fracture after third molar surgery. Cases were examined clinically and radiographically. Results: Thirty-seven fractures were reported in

Philippe Libersa; David Roze; Thierry Cachart; Jean-Claude Libersa

2002-01-01

256

Mandibular trauma treatment: A comparison of two protocols  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment of mandibular fractures treated in two European centre in 10 years. Study Design: This study is based on 2 systematic computer-assisted databases that have continuously recorded patients hospitalized with maxillofacial fractures in two centers in Turin, Italy and in Amsterdam, the Netherlands for ten years. Only patients who were admitted for mandibular fractures were considered for this study. Results: Between 2001 and 2010, a total of 752 patients were admitted at Turin hospital with a total of 1167 mandibular fractures not associated with further maxillofacial fractures, whereas 245 patients were admitted at Amsterdam hospital with a total of 434 mandibular fractures. At Amsterdam center, a total of 457 plates (1.5 - 2.7 mm) were used for the 434 mandibular fracture lines, whereas at Turin center 1232 plates (1.5 – 2.5 mm) were used for the management of the 1167 mandibular fracture lines. At Turin center, 190 patients were treated primarily with IMF, whereas 35 patients were treated with such treatment option at Amsterdam center. Conclusions: Current protocols for the management of mandibular fractures are quite efficient. It is difficult to obtain a uniform protocol, because of the difference of course of each occurring fracture and because of surgeons’ experiences and preferences. Several techniques can still be used for each peculiar fracture of the mandible. Key words:Mandibular fracture, facial trauma, maxillofacial, treatment, multicentre, database. PMID:25475782

Kommers, Sofie C.; Roccia, Fabio; Forouzanfar, Tymour

2015-01-01

257

Rapid inactivation of a moth pheromone.  

PubMed

We have isolated, cloned, and expressed a male antennae-specific pheromone-degrading enzyme (PDE) [Antheraea polyphemus PDE (ApolPDE), formerly known as Sensillar Esterase] from the wild silkmoth, A. polyphemus, which seems essential for the rapid inactivation of pheromone during flight. The onset of enzymatic activity was detected at day 13 of the pupal stage with a peak at day 2 adult stage. De novo sequencing of ApolPDE, isolated from day 2 male antennae by multiple chromatographic steps, led to cDNA cloning. Purified recombinant ApolPDE, expressed by baculovirus, migrated with the same mobility as the native protein on both native polyacrylamide and isoelectric focusing gel electrophoresis. Concentration of ApolPDE (0.5 microM) in the sensillar lymph is approximately 20,000 lower than that of a pheromone-binding protein. Native and recombinant ApolPDE showed comparable kinetic parameters, with turnover number similar to that of carboxypeptidase and substrate specificity slightly lower than that of acetylcholinesterase. The rapid inactivation of pheromone, even faster than previously estimated, is kinetically compatible with the temporal resolution required for sustained odorant-mediated flight in moths. PMID:16172410

Ishida, Yuko; Leal, Walter S

2005-09-27

258

Evolution of Moth Sex Pheromone Desaturases  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Moth sex pheromone communication has evolved to make use of complex blends of relatively simple long-chain fatty acid precursors. Species specificity is derived from the unique stereochemistry of double bonds introduced into exact locations along the hydrocarbon backbone of fatty acids, which are r...

259

Insect Control (1): Use of Pheromones  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses current research relating to the use of pheromones as a means of controlling insect pests. These chemicals, which are secreted by insects to affect the behavior of other individuals of the same species, may be used to eliminate pests without destroying their predators and other beneficial insects. (JR)

Marx, Jean L.

1973-01-01

260

Tales of conjugation and sex pheromones  

PubMed Central

This review covers highlights of the author's experience becoming and working as a plasmid biologist. The account chronicles a progression from studies of ColE1 DNA in Escherichia coli to Gram-positive bacteria with an emphasis on conjugation in enterococci. It deals with gene amplification, conjugative transposons and sex pheromones in the context of bacterial antibiotic resistance. PMID:22016844

2011-01-01

261

Bark Beetle Infestation Investigation: Estimation and Pheromones  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity investigates how bark beetles can threaten forests by having learners estimate the number of infected trees from a photo. Learners also think about how pheromones could be used to trap the beetles. The activity is written for a kit that can be checked out of a library, but the kit is not necessary.

Maisie Shaw

2010-01-01

262

Pheromone deactivation catalyzed by receptor molecules: a quantitative kinetic model.  

PubMed

A quantitative model of pheromone-receptor interaction and pheromone deactivation, the supposed rate-limiting processes underlying the receptor potential kinetics, is worked out for the moth Antheraea polyphemus. In this model, the pheromone interacts with the receptor molecule while bound to the reduced form of the pheromone binding protein. The receptor molecules--besides their receptor function--catalyze the observed shift of the pheromone-binding protein from the reduced to the oxidized form (Ziegelberger, G., Eur. J. Biochem., 232, 706-711, 1995), which deactivates the pheromone bound to pheromone binding protein. With the following parameters, the model fits morphological, radiometric, electrophysiological and biochemical data: a maximum estimate of 1.7 x 10(7) receptor molecules/cell (with 40,000 units/micron 2 of receptor cell membrane), rate constants k1 = 0.2/(s.microM) for the association, k2 = 10/s for the dissociation of the ternary complex of binding protein, pheromone and receptor, and k3 = 10/s for the deactivation via the redox shift. With these parameters, the duration of elementary receptor potentials elicited by single pheromone molecules (approximately 50 ms) reflects the lifetime of the ternary complex, tau = 1/(k2 + k3). The receptor occupancy produced by the model for threshold stimuli fits the sensitivity of the receptor cell to single pheromone molecules. PMID:9759524

Kaissling, K E

1998-08-01

263

Distraction osteogenesis for correction of mandibular abnormalities  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Management of mandibular deformities is challenging. Distraction osteogenesis is a relatively new technique with promising results. Materials and Methods: We selected 12 patients. The osteotomy site decided was proximal to the antegonial notch. Latency time was five to seven days. Consolidation period was eight weeks in eleven cases and six weeks in one case. Results: In all the patients, appreciable lengthening of mandible was achieved. Discussion: The greatest advantage of distraction osteogenesis is growth of soft tissue along with the growth of hard tissue. This increases post operative stability PMID:24665178

Karun, Vinayak; Agarwal, Navneet; Singh, Virendra

2013-01-01

264

Mandibular distraction in neonates: indications, technique, results  

PubMed Central

Background The Pierre Robin Sequence features were first described by Robin in 1923 and include micrognathia, glossoptosis and respiratory distress with an incidence estimated as 1:8,500 to 1:20,000 newborns. Upper airway obstruction and feeding difficulties are the main concerns related to the pathology. Mandibular distraction should be considered a treatment option (when other treatments result inadequate). Patiants and methods Ten patients between the ages of 1 month and 2 years with severe micrognathia and airway obstruction were treated with Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis (MDO). All patients underwent fibroscopic examination of the upper airway and a radiographic imaging and/or computed tomography scans to detect malformations and to confirm that the obstruction was caused by posterior tongue displacement. All patients were evaluated by a multidisciplinary team. Indications for surgery included frequent apneic episodes with severe desaturation (70%). Gavage therapy was employed in all patients since oral feeding was not possible. The two tracheotomy patients were 5 months and 2 years old respectively, and the distraction procedure was performed to remove the tracheotomy tube. All patients were treated with bilateral mandibular distraction: two cases with an external multivector distraction device, six cases with an internal non-resorbable device and two cases with an internal resorbable device. In one case, the patient with Goldenhar's Syndrome, the procedure was repeated. Results The resolution of symptoms was obtained in all patients, and, when present, tracheotomy was removed without complications. Of the two patients with pre-existing tracheotomies, in the younger patient (5 months old) the tracheotomy was removed 7 days postoperatively. In the Goldenhar's syndrome case (2 years old) a Montgomery device was necessary for 6 months due to the presence of tracheotomy-inducted tracheomalacia. Patients were discharged when the endpoint was obtained: symptoms and signs of airway obstruction were resolved, PAS and maxillomandibular relationship improved, and tracheotomy, when present, removed. During the follow-up, no injury to the inferior alveolar nerve was noted and scarring was significant in only the two cases treated with external devices. Conclusion Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis is a good solution in solving respiratory distress when other procedures are failed in paediatric patients with severe micrognatia. PMID:22300418

2012-01-01

265

40 CFR 180.1080 - Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of... § 180.1080 Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of...pentadecatriene, and decatriene and the pheromone...

2012-07-01

266

40 CFR 180.1080 - Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of... § 180.1080 Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of...pentadecatriene, and decatriene and the pheromone...

2014-07-01

267

40 CFR 180.1124 - Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement...Tolerances § 180.1124 Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Arthropod pheromones, as described in §...

2013-07-01

268

40 CFR 180.1124 - Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement...Tolerances § 180.1124 Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Arthropod pheromones, as described in §...

2014-07-01

269

40 CFR 180.1080 - Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of... § 180.1080 Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of...pentadecatriene, and decatriene and the pheromone...

2011-07-01

270

40 CFR 180.1124 - Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement...Tolerances § 180.1124 Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Arthropod pheromones, as described in §...

2012-07-01

271

Relationship between Euschistus conspersus (Hem., Pentatomidae) pheromone trap catch and canopy  

E-print Network

Relationship between Euschistus conspersus (Hem., Pentatomidae) pheromone trap catch and canopy significant, and practically important, seasonal pheromone trap response dynamics of Euschistus conspersus monitored weekly using traps baited with Euschistus spp. pheromone and direct canopy shake samples

Sheridan, Jennifer

272

40 CFR 180.1080 - Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of... § 180.1080 Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of...pentadecatriene, and decatriene and the pheromone...

2010-07-01

273

40 CFR 180.1080 - Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of... § 180.1080 Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of...pentadecatriene, and decatriene and the pheromone...

2013-07-01

274

Tetrafid mandibular condyle: a unique case report and review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Morphological changes such as bifid and trifid mandibular condyle are rare entities. The aim of the present report is to describe a unique morphological variation of the mandibular condyle which has four separate condylar heads (tetrafid mandibular condyle) and to discuss clinical and radiological differential diagnosis of tetrafid mandibular condyle with advanced imaging techniques. PMID:22065803

?ahman, H; Etöz, OA; ?ekerci, AE; Etöz, M; ?i?man, Y

2011-01-01

275

Evolution of the mandibular mesh implant.  

PubMed

Between 1960 and 1972, the Dallas Veterans Administration Hospital Maxillofacial Research Laboratory developed and made over 150 cast-mesh implants. Successive designs were ovoid, circular, and double-lumened in cross section to improve implant strength, surface area for bioattachment, and adjustability. Sleeves, collars, and bows were employed in the assembly of these implants, with an acrylic condylar head attached when indicated. In 1972, our laboratory developed a mandibular mesh tray, cast in one piece on a single sprue, with preservation of the vertically adjustable ramus. Stainless steel replaced Vitallium because of its greater malleability. Essentially, a lost-wax technique is used to cast the mesh tray. The model of a mandibular segment is duplicated as a refractory model. Mesh wax, made in our own custom-made die, is adapted to the refractory model. The unit is then sprued and invested. The wax is fired our of the mold in a gas furnace. Casting is done by the transferral of molten stainless steel from the crucible to the mold by centrifugal force in an electro-induction casting machine. Other mesh implants that have been developed are made from wire mesh, Dacron mesh, cast Ticonium, and hydroformed titanium. PMID:326787

Salyer, K E; Johns, D F; Holmes, R E; Layton, J G

1977-07-01

276

Management of a transmigrated mandibular canine  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this article is to report the management of a transmigrated mandibular canine with emphasis on saving the tooth as natural part rather than surgical removal of the transmigrated tooth. There are several treatment options proposed for impacted mandibular canines including surgical removal, exposure and orthodontic alignment, intra-alveolar tooth transplantation (surgical repositioning of a tooth in its alveolar socket) and observation. The technique, surgical repositioning of a tooth involves the surgical extraction of impacted tooth and fixation in the correct position in the dental arch after surgical preparation (correction) of the alveolar socket. It is especially valuable in cases of difficult-to-treat impaction. A repositioned tooth is better substitute than fixed or removable prostheses, and the technique is more cost effective than other methods. Patients with excellent oral hygiene should be considered as preferred candidates for surgical repositioning of tooth. Disadvantages include the invasiveness of surgery, the difficulty of projecting long term stability due to chances of root resorption and loss of gingival attachment. PMID:24987621

Verma, Sneh Lata; Sharma, V. P.; Singh, Gyan P.

2012-01-01

277

Transmigration of mandibular canine – case report  

PubMed Central

Summary Background Transmigration is a phenomenon of movement of an unerupted tooth in the bone across the midline. This anomaly is not often found. Transmigration is more prevalent in females than in males, and more often encountered in the mandible than maxilla, it affects mostly canines. Case Report The aim of this study was to present a case report of a mandibular canine transmigration in a patient aged 12. Intraoral examination determined hypodontia of right second premolar and delayed eruption of left second premolar in maxilla, as well as persistent deciduous teeth: right second molar, left canine and second molar. The patient was referred for a Cone-Beam CT examination, which allowed precise visualization of the transmigrating canine as well as ruled out resorption of roots of mandibular incisors. Results The treatment with a maxillary fixed orthodontic appliance was finished after obtaining a satisfactory result. Proper alignment of the incisors in the anterior-posterior plane and correct midline position were accepted by the patient. Transmigrating canine after consultation with the surgeon was designed to further radiological observation. PMID:24520309

Gruszka, Katarzyna; Ró?y?o, T. Katarzyna; Ró?y?o-Kalinowska, Ingrid; Denkiewicz, Katarzyna; Mas?owska, Klaudia

2014-01-01

278

Pheromonal communication involved in courtship behavior in Diptera.  

PubMed

Sex pheromones are known for many dipteran species and play an important role in courtship behavior, together with visual, tactile, acoustic and other factors. Pheromones for a number of dipterans have been recently identified. This survey covers a number of species in all the families that have been studied. The review discusses diverse courtship behaviors in Diptera, with a special focus on the sex pheromones involved. In the Nematocera suborder, pheromones are volatile components, which act at a distance. They are derived from short-chain alkanes with acetoxy groups (Cecidomyidae) or terpenes (Psychodidae). In the Cyclorrhapha, pheromones may be volatile, derived from alkanes (Tephritidae) or terpenes (Agromyzidae), or non-volatile, unsaturated or methyl-branched hydrocarbons, which act by contact (the other subgenera). The behavioral roles and regulation of these pheromones are described, and their importance in species recognition is discussed. PMID:17706665

Wicker-Thomas, Claude

2007-11-01

279

Sex Pheromone of the Scarab Beetle Phyllophaga ( Phytalus) georgiana (Horn)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sex pheromone of Phyllophaga (Phytalus) georgiana was characterized as valine methyl ester, tentatively the l-enantiomer. This is the first sex pheromone identified from the Phyllophaga subgenus Phytalus. The pheromone was extracted from female glands, the active component isolated by coupled gas chromatography–electroantennogram\\u000a detection analysis, characterized by mass spectrometry, and shown to be active in field tests. The seasonal flight

Paul S. Robbins; Satoshi Nojima; Sridhar Polavarapu; Albrecht M. Koppenhöfer; Cesar Rodriguez-Saona; Robert J. Holdcraft; Nancy H. Consolie; Daniel C. Peck; Wendell L. Roelofs

2009-01-01

280

Immunocytochemical localization of pheromone-binding protein in moth antennae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Odorant-binding proteins are supposed to play an important role in stimulus transport and\\/or inactivation in olfactory sense organs. In an attempt to precisely localize pheromone-binding protein in the antenna of moths, post-embedding immunocytochemistry was performed using an antiserum against purified pheromone-binding protein of Antheraea polyphemus. In immunoblots of antennal homogenates, the antiserum reacted exclusively with pheromone-binding protein of A. polyphemus,

R. A. Steinbrecht; M. Ozaki; G. Ziegelberger

1992-01-01

281

Aggregation pheromone of Drosophila mauritiana, Drosophila yakuba , and Drosophila rajasekari  

Microsoft Academic Search

(Z)-11-Octadecenyl acetate (Z11–18:Ac) was identified as the aggregation pheromone ofDrosophila mauritiana, D. yakuba, andD. rajasekari. The amount of pheromone in the ejaculatory bulb of male flies increased with age, reaching plateau levels of ca. 240, 800, and 1100 ng\\/fly forD. mauritiana, D. yakuba, andD. rajasekari, respectively. Thirty to 50% of the pheromone in the ejaculatory bulb was transferred to the

Angela M. Schaner; Annette M. Benner; Russell D. Leu; Larry L. Jackson

1989-01-01

282

Pheromonal influences on sociosexual behavior in young women  

Microsoft Academic Search

A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of a synthesized putative female pheromone was conducted with regularly menstruating, university women (N=36, mean age=27.8). The pheromone formula was derived from earlier work investigating the underarm secretions of fertile, sexually active, heterosexual women. A vial of either synthesized pheromone or placebo was selected blindly and added to a subject's perfume. Subjects recorded seven sociosexual behaviors

Norma L. McCoy; Lisa Pitino

2002-01-01

283

Molecular switches for pheromone release from a moth pheromone-binding protein  

SciTech Connect

Pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) are involved in the uptake of pheromones from pores on the antennae, transport through an aqueous environment surrounding the olfactory receptor neurons, and fast delivery to pheromone receptors. We tested the hypothesis that a C-terminal segment and a flexible loop are involved in the release of pheromones to membrane-bound receptors. We expressed in Escherichia coli 11 mutants of the PBP from the silkworm moth, BmorPBP, taking into consideration structural differences between the forms with high and low binding affinity. The N-terminus was truncated and His-69, His-70 and His-95 at the base of a flexible loop, and a cluster of acidic residues at the C-terminus were mutated. Binding assays and circular dichroism analyses support a mechanism involving protonation of acidic residues Asp-132 and Glu-141 at the C-terminus and histidines, His-70 and His-95, in the base of a loop covering the binding pocket. The former leads to the formation of a new {alpha}-helix, which competes with pheromone for the binding pocket, whereas positive charge repulsion of the histidines opens the opposite side of the binding pocket.

Xu Wei [Maeda-Duffey Laboratory, Department of Entomology, University of California, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Leal, Walter S. [Maeda-Duffey Laboratory, Department of Entomology, University of California, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)], E-mail: wsleal@ucdavis.edu

2008-08-08

284

A yeast pheromone-based inter-species communication system.  

PubMed

We report on a pheromone-based inter-species communication system, allowing for a controlled cell-cell communication between the two species Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a proof of principle. It exploits the mating response pathways of the two yeast species employing the pheromones, ?- or P-factor, as signaling molecules. The authentic and chimeric pheromone-encoding genes were engineered to code for the P-factor in S. cerevisiae and the ?-factor in S. pombe. Upon transformation of the respective constructs, cells were enabled to express the mating pheromone of the opposite species. The supernatant of cultures of S. pombe cells expressing ?-factor were able to induce a G1 arrest in the cell cycle, a change in morphology to the typical shmoo effect and expression driven by the pheromone-responsive FIG1 promoter in S. cerevisiae. The supernatant of cultures of S. cerevisiae cells expressing P-factor similarly induced cell cycle arrest in G1, an alteration in morphology typical for mating as well as the activation of the pheromone-responsive promoters of the rep1 and sxa2 genes in a pheromone-hypersensitive reporter strain of S. pombe. Apparently, both heterologous pheromones were correctly processed and secreted in an active form by the cells of the other species. Our data clearly show that the species-specific pheromone systems of yeast species can be exploited for a controlled inter-species communication. PMID:25331280

Hennig, Stefan; Clemens, André; Rödel, Gerhard; Ostermann, Kai

2015-02-01

285

The Trail Pheromone of the Venomous Samsum Ant, Pachycondyla sennaarensis  

PubMed Central

Ant species use branching networks of pheromone trails for orientation between nest and resources. The current study demonstrated that workers of the venomous samsum ant, Pachycondyla sennaarensis (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Ponerinae), employ recruitment trail pheromones discharged from the Dufour's gland. Secretions of other abdomen complex glands, as well as hindgut gland secretions, did not evoke trail following. The optimum concentration of trail pheromone was found to be 0.1 gland equivalent/40 cm trail. This concentration demonstrated effective longevity for about one hour. This study also showed that P. sennaarensis and Tapinoma simrothi each respond to the trail pheromones of the other species as well as their own. PMID:21529253

Mashaly, Ashraf Mohamed Ali; Ahmed, Ashraf Mohamed; Al—Abdullah, Mosa Abdullah; Al—Khalifa, Mohamed Saleh

2011-01-01

286

Surgical extraction of mandibular third molar in pterygomandibular space: a case report  

PubMed Central

Impacted mandibular third molars are located between the second mandibular molar and mandibular ramus. However, ectopic mandibular third molars with heterotopic positions are reported in the subcondylar or pterygomandibular space. The usual cause of malposition is a cyst or tumor, and malposition without a pathology is rare. This case report described an impacted mandibular third molar in the pterygomandibular space without any associated pathology. PMID:24471052

Lee, Young-Kyu; Park, Sung-Soo

2013-01-01

287

The Solution NMR Structure of Antheraea polyphemus PBP Provides New Insight into Pheromone Recognition by Pheromone-binding Proteins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) located in the antennae of male moth species play an important role in olfaction. They are carrier proteins, believed to transport volatile hydrophobic pheromone molecules across the aqueous sensillar lymph to the membrane-bound G protein-coupled olfactory receptor proteins. The roles of PBPs in molecular recognition and the mechanisms of pheromone binding and release are poorly understood. Here,

Smita Mohanty; Sergey Zubkov; Angela M. Gronenborn

2004-01-01

288

Lingual Guttering Technique for Removal of Impacted Mandibular Third Molars  

PubMed Central

Background: To assess the clinical feasibility of lingual bone guttering technique for surgical extraction of mandibular third molars. Materials and Methods: 20 patients with thick lingual cortical plate were included in the study. Surgical extraction of mandibular third molars by lingual bone guttering technique was performed in all the subjects. These subjects were evaluated for integrity of lingual cortical plate and sensation of lingual nerve postoperatively. Results: All extractions done by lingual bone guttering technique were clinically feasible to perform and no complications were seen. Conclusion: Lingual bone guttering technique can be used safely in extraction of mandibular third molars with thick lingual cortical plate. PMID:25214725

Kale, Tejraj P; Pandit, Vikram S; Patil, Shankargouda; Pawar, Vivek; Shetty, Nisha

2014-01-01

289

A simple method to locate mandibular foramen: preliminary radiological study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  The position of mandibular foramen is variable at the medial aspect of mandibular ramus. Nevertheless its location is useful\\u000a for the oral and maxillofacial surgeon in orthognatic surgery, especially in vertical ramus osteotomy (VRO) procedure. The\\u000a aim of our study is to analyse the position of mandibular foramen in order to provide simple and reliable surgical landmarks.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  A

Olivier Trost; Vivien Salignon; Nicolas Cheynel; Gabriel Malka; Pierre Trouilloud

2010-01-01

290

Endodontic management of four rooted mandibular first premolar  

PubMed Central

Mandibular premolars have earned the reputation for having aberrant anatomy. The literature is replete with reports of extra canals in mandibular first premolars, but reports about the incidence of extra roots in these teeth are quite rare. This paper attempts at explaining a rare case of successful endodontic management of a four-rooted mandibular first premolar with diagnostic, interoperative and postoperative radiographic records along with a substantial data on the incidence of extra roots in these teeth. The standard method of radiographic appraisal was maintained as the criteria for determining the presence of extra roots. PMID:23349585

Vaghela, Dakshita Joy; Sinha, Ashish Amit

2013-01-01

291

Patterns of endothermy in bumblebee queens, drones and workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.The thoracic temperatures (TTh) of captiveBombus edwardsii queens and drones from the current year approached ambient temperatures (TA) at night, but warm-up was frequent throughout the day.2.ABombus vosnesenskii queen which had initiated nest building maintained TTh nearly continuously between 37.4 and 38.8 °C at night and in the daytime. On the other hand, the TTh of an overwintered queen which

Bernd Heinrich

1972-01-01

292

Deferoxamine Expedites Consolidation during Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis  

PubMed Central

Background A limitation of mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis (DO) is the length of time required for consolidation. This drawback subjects patients to possible pin-site infections, as well as a prolonged return to activities of normal daily living. Developing innovative techniques to abridge consolidation periods could be immensely effective in preventing these problematic morbidities. Deferoxamine (DFO) is an angiogenic activator that triggers the HIF-1? pathway through localized iron depletion. We previously established the effectiveness of DFO in enhancing regenerate vascularity at a full consolidation period (28 days) in a murine mandibular DO model. To investigate whether this augmentation in vascularity would function to accelerate consolidation, we progressively shortened consolidation periods prior to ?CT imaging and biomechanical testing (BMT). Materials and Methods Three time points (14d, 21d and 28d) were selected and six groups of Sprague-Dawley rats (n=60) were equally divided into control (C) and experimental (E) groups for each time period. Each group underwent external fixator placement, mandibular osteotomy, and a 5.1mm distraction. During distraction, the experimental groups were treated with DFO injections into the regenerate gap. After consolidation, mandibles were imaged and tension tested to failure. ANOVA was conducted between groups, and p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results At 14 days of consolidation the experimental group demonstrated significant increases in Bone Volume Fraction (BVF), Bone Mineral Density (BMD) and Ultimate Load (UL) in comparison to non-treated controls. The benefit of treatment was further substantiated by a striking 100% increase in the number of bony unions at this early time-period (C:4/10 vs. E:8/10). Furthermore, metrics of BVF, BMD, Yield and UL at 14 days with treatment demonstrated comparable metrics to those of the fully consolidated 28d control group. Conclusion Based on these findings, we contend that augmentation of vascular density through localized DFO injection delivers an efficient means for accelerating bone regeneration without significantly impacting bone quality or strength. PMID:23598047

Donneys, Alexis; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N.; Johnson, Kelsey L.; Blough, Jordan T.; Perosky, Joseph E.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Felice, Peter A.; Nelson, Noah S.; Farberg, Aaron S.; Levi, Benjamin; Buchman, Steven R.

2014-01-01

293

Queen Mary, University of London Wolfram Just: The mathematics of a paper strip Queen Mary, University of London Wolfram Just: The mathematics of a paper strip  

E-print Network

Queen Mary, University of London Wolfram Just: The mathematics of a paper strip 1 #12;Queen Mary, University of London Wolfram Just: The mathematics of a paper strip 2 #12;Queen Mary, University of London Wolfram Just: The mathematics of a paper strip 3 #12;Queen Mary, University of London Wolfram Just

Wright, Francis

294

Periodicity of sex pheromone biosynthesis, release and degradation in the lightbrown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker).  

PubMed

Pheromone titer in moths is a product of three processes occurring in or at the surface of the pheromone gland: biosynthesis, release, and intraglandular degradation, of pheromone. Changes in titers of sex pheromone, the fatty acyl pheromone analog (FAPA), and tetradecanoate, a pheromone biosynthetic intermediate, were studied in detail in the lightbrown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker). Although changes in the pheromone titers in a day were relatively small, with the peak titer being 2-3 times greater than that at the trough, pheromone titer did show a distinct diel periodicity. Titer of the FAPA showed a similar, but less variable, diel pattern, but tetradecanoate titer showed little or no diel pattern. The pattern of pheromone titer suggested that females biosynthesize pheromone at two different rates during the photoperiod: a high rate during the latter half of the photophase and most of the scotophase, which is associated with a high pheromone titer, and a low rate throughout the first half of the photophase, which is associated with a low titer. Consistent with data on commencement of copulation, pheromone was released from the second hour of the scotophase through to the eighth hour. Pheromone release rate during this period appeared to be similar to the rate of pheromone biosynthesis. In contrast to the other two processes, pheromone degradation did not appear to have a diel pattern. Females decapitated at different times of the photoperiod showed a similar decline in pheromone titer, consistent with the reaction kinetics being first order in pheromone titer. PMID:10685100

Foster, S P

2000-03-01

295

Quantitative GC analysis of secondary alcohol pheromones: determination of release rate of red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, pheromone from lures.  

PubMed

Aliphatic secondary alcohols are components of several aggregation pheromones of important beetle and weevil pests. Some of these pheromones are used frequently for the monitoring and mass trapping of the relevant insects. We encountered severe difficulties in direct GC quantitative analysis of these compounds. Therefore, we developed a simple GC analysis of secondary alcohols convening them to trifluoroacetyl derivatives and using secondary alcohol acetates as internal standards. This method was applied for the quantitative analysis of several secondary alcohols, including the aggregation pheromone components of the almond bark beetle and the red palm weevil. The release rate of the latter pheromone from commercial lures was also determined. PMID:12523569

Zada, A; Soroker, V; Harel, M; Nakache, J; Dunkelblum, E

2002-11-01

296

QUEENS COLLEGE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH PROFESSIONS REQUEST FOR AN EVALUATION  

E-print Network

of the student's personality, character, and intellectual capacity. According to your experience, please comment Building, Room B338 Queens College Flushing, NY 11367 Suggested sample for faculty: http

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

297

Odor and pheromone sensing via chemoreceptors.  

PubMed

Evolutionally, chemosensation is an ancient but yet enigmatic sense. All organisms ranging from the simplest unicellular form to the most advanced multicellular creature possess the capability to detect chemicals in the surroundings. Conversely, all living things emit some forms of smells, either as communicating signals or as by-products of metabolism. Many species (from worms, insects to mammals) rely on the olfactory systems which express a large number of chemoreceptors to locate food and mates and to avoid danger. Most chemoreceptors expressed in olfactory organs are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and can be classified into two major categories: odorant receptors (ORs) and pheromone receptors, which principally detect general odors and pheromones, respectively. In vertebrates, these two types of receptors are often expressed in two distinct apparatuses: The main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), respectively. Each olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) in the MOE typically expresses one type of OR from a large repertoire. General odors activate ORs and their host OSNs (ranging from narrowly- to broadly-tuned) in a combinatorial manner and the information is sent to the brain via the main olfactory system leading to perception of smells. In contrast, pheromones stimulate relatively narrowly-tuned receptors and their host VNO neurons and the information is sent to the brain via the accessory olfactory system leading to behavioral and endocrinological changes. Recent studies indicate that the functional separation between these two systems is blurred in some cases and there are more subsystems serving chemosensory roles. This chapter focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying odor and pheromone sensing in rodents, the best characterized vertebrate models. PMID:22399397

Ma, Minghong

2012-01-01

298

21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant facial prosthesis...device is made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based alloy,...

2014-04-01

299

21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant facial prosthesis...device is made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based alloy,...

2013-04-01

300

21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant facial prosthesis...device is made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based alloy,...

2010-04-01

301

Speech and lingual behavior before and after mandibular osteotomy.  

PubMed

A procedure was applied to compare the oral behavior of five patients before and after mandibular osteotomy for correction of Class III malocclusions. It was found that observable changes in oral behavior do occur after mandibular osteotomy. Fewer errors were found in sibilant articulation, while more maladaptive lingual behaviors were found in lingual diadochokinetic tasks. Changes were also found in swallowing behaviors. Performance tasks of speech, diadochokinetics, and swallowing were recorded on audio-videotape. PMID:264502

Glass, L; Knapp, J; Bloomer, H H

1977-02-01

302

Case reportRidge augmentation using mandibular tori  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 19-year-old female was referred by her dental practitioner for the restoration of missing maxillary lateral incisors and canines. Ridge augmentation was required. This was undertaken using mandibular tori as the sites for harvesting bone. The grafting was successful and the spaces were subsequently restored using resin-bonded bridgework. The case reports that mandibular tori provide a local and convenient source

A W G Walls; J G Meechan; D Barker

2001-01-01

303

Mandibular premolars with aberrant canal morphology: An endodontic challenge  

PubMed Central

Complete cleaning and shaping is the key to successful endodontic treatment. A thorough understanding of the internal anatomy and morphology of the root canal system is an important consideration when performing cleaning and shaping procedures. Mandibular premolars are one of the most difficult teeth to treat endodontically because of aberrant root canal anatomy. This article describes case series of mandibular premolars with variations in root canal anatomy treated successfully by conventional endodontic treatment. PMID:25298656

Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Mittal, Shifali; Sharma, Jyotika

2014-01-01

304

Perireceptor Events in Pheromone Perception in Scarab Beetles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the remarkable diversity of the sex pheromone chemistry in scarab beetles, various species utilize a common type of ?-lactones in their chemical communication channels. These compounds differ primarily in length of the alkenyl side chain and the stereochemistry at the chiral center. Two species, Anomala osakana and Popillia japonica, utilize the opposite enantiomers of japonilure as sex pheromones. Each

W. S. Leal; H. Wojtasek; Jean-Francois Picimbon; S. Kuwaharat; H. Saito; M. Hasegawa

1998-01-01

305

Localization and Morphology of Sex Pheromone Glands in Scarab Beetles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sex pheromone glands of female Anomala albopilosa albopilosa have been localized by extracting various parts of the body and analyzing the extracts by GC-MS and by histological and morphological studies. Female-specific epithelial cells line the inner surfaces of anal plates and two apical sternites; these cells are connected through many pores to the cuticle surface. The sex pheromones of

Shigeo Tada; Walter Soares Leal

1997-01-01

306

Brood pheromone regulates foraging activity of honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae).  

PubMed

Brood pheromone modulated the foraging behavior of commercial honey bee, Apis mellifera L., colonies pollinating a 10-ha market garden of cucumber, Cucurbita pepo L., and zucchini, Cucumis saticus L., in Texas in late autumn. Six colonies were randomly selected to receive 2000 larval equivalents of brood pheromone and six received a blank control. The ratio of pollen to nonpollen foragers entering colonies was significantly greater in pheromone-treated colonies 1 h after treatment. Pheromone-treated foragers returned with pollen load weights that were significantly heavier than controls. Pollen returned by pheromone-treated foragers was 43% more likely to originate from the target crop. Number of pollen grains washed from the bodies of nonpollen foragers from pheromone-treated colonies was significantly greater than controls and the pollen was 54% more likely to originate from the target crop. Increasing the foraging stimulus environment with brood pheromone increased colony-level foraging and individual forager efforts. Brood pheromone is a promising technology for increasing the pollination activity and efficiency of commercial honey bee colonies. PMID:15279247

Pankiw, Tanya

2004-06-01

307

Insect pheromones—an overview of biosynthesis and endocrine regulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This overview describes, compares, and attempts to unify major themes related to the biosynthetic pathways and endocrine regulation of insect pheromone production. Rather than developing and dedicating an entirely unique set of enzymes for pheromone biosynthesis, insects appear to have evolved to add one or a few tissue-specific auxiliary or modified enzymes that transform the products of “normal” metabolism to

Julie A Tillman; Steven J Seybold; Russell A Jurenka; Gary J Blomquist

1999-01-01

308

Anatomical localization and stereoisomeric composition of Tribolium castaneum aggregation pheromones  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

We report that the abdomen and associated tissues are the predominant sources of male-produced pheromones in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and for the first time describe the stereoisomeric composition of the natural blend of isomers of the aggregation pheromone 4,8-dimethyldecanal (DMD...

309

Pheromones cause disease: the exocrinology of anorexia nervosa  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aetiology of anorexia nervosa is exocrinological. This notion is supported by physical evidence in animal models with directly comparable symptomatology. Anorexia nervosa (AN) syndrome would be a puberty delay caused by reception and autoreception of conspecific pheromone emissions: a pheromone-induced puberty delay (PIPD). As such, it would be amenable to medical treatment drawing from forty years of research in

B Nicholson

2000-01-01

310

Evolved differences in larval social behavior mediated by novel pheromones  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Pheromones, chemical signals that convey social information, mediate many insect social behaviors in both adult and immature stages. Multiple pheromones and neural pathways that underlie adult social behavior have been described in the genetic model organism, Drosophila melanogaster, but there is no...

311

ANTENNAL FEEDBACK LOOP REGULATES PHEROMONE RELEASE IN BEETLES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Regulation of pheromone release is critical for intraspecific communication and avoidance of predators release is critical for intraspecific communication and avoidance of predators or parasites dependent on such messages. Pheromone production is under endocrine control in insects (1,2). However, ...

312

The mode of pheromone evolution: evidence from bark beetles.  

PubMed Central

Sex and aggregation pheromones consist of species-specific blends of chemicals. The way in which different species' blends have evolved has been the subject of some debate. Theoretical predictions suggest that differences between species have arisen not through the accruing of small changes, but through major shifts in chemical composition. Using data on the aggregation pheromones of 34 species of bark beetle from two genera, Dendroctonus and Ips, we investigated how the distributions of the chemical components of their pheromone blends mirror their phylogenetic relationships. We tested whether there were consistent patterns that could be used to help elucidate the mode of pheromone evolution. Although there were obvious differences in pheromone blends between the two genera, the differences between species within each genus followed a less clear phylogenetic pattern. In both genera, closely related species are just as different as more distantly related species. Within Dendroctonus, particularly, most chemical components were distributed randomly across the phylogeny. Indeed, for some chemicals, closely related species may actually be more different than would be expected from a random distribution of chemical components. This argues strongly against the idea of minor shifts in pheromone evolution. Instead, we suggest that, within certain phylogenetic constraints, pheromone evolution in bark beetles is characterized by large saltational shifts, resulting in sibling species being substantially phenotypically (i.e. pheromonally) different from one another, thus agreeing with theoretical predictions. PMID:15255103

Symonds, Matthew R. E.; Elgar, Mark A.

2004-01-01

313

Early quality assessment lessens pheromone specificity in a moth  

PubMed Central

Pheromone orientation in moths is an exemplar of olfactory acuity. To avoid heterospecific mating, males respond to female-produced blends with high specificity and temporal resolution. A finely tuned sensory to projection neuron network secures specificity, and this network is thought to assess pheromone quality continually during orientation. We tested whether male moths do indeed evaluate each pheromone encounter and surprisingly found that male European corn borer moths instead generalize across successive encounters. Although initially highly ratio specific, once “locked on” to the pheromone plume the acceptable ratio can vary widely, and even unattractive blends can become attractive. We further found that this “mental shortcut” may be a consequence of the fact that sensory neurons exposed to frequent encounters do not reliably encode blend ratios. Neurons tuned to either of the two pheromone components adapt differentially in plumes containing the preferred blend ratio (97:3) and cause the olfactory sensory signal to “evolve,” even in narrowly tuned pheromonal circuits. However, apparently the brain interprets these shifting signals as invariant “gestalts.” Generalization in pheromone perception may mitigate stabilizing selection and allow introgression between sympatric strains, such as in the European corn borer, that otherwise appear isolated by pheromonal differences. Generalization may also be important in responses to general odorants, as circuits underlying these display vast sensitivity differences, complex interactions, and temporal intricacies. PMID:23589889

Kárpáti, Zsolt; Tasin, Marco; Cardé, Ring T.; Dekker, Teun

2013-01-01

314

Finite Element Reconstruction of a Mandibular First Molar  

PubMed Central

Introduction Mandibular first molar is the most important tooth with complicated morphology. In finite element (FE) studies, investigators usually prefer to model anterior teeth with a simple and single straight root; it makes the results deviate from the actual case. The most complicated and time-consuming step in FE studies is modeling of the desired tooth, thus this study was performed to establish a finite element method (FEM) of reconstructing a mandibular first molar with the greatest precision. Materials and Methods An extracted mandibular first molar was digitized, and then radiographed from different aspects to achieve its outer and inner morphology. The solid model of tooth and root canals were constructed according to this data as well as the anatomy of mandibular first molar described in the literature. Result A three-dimensional model of mandibular first molar was created, giving special consideration to shape and root canal system dimensions. Conclusion This model may constitute a basis for investigating the effect of different clinical situations on mandibular first molars in vitro, especially on its root canal system. The method described here seems feasible and reasonably precise foundation for investigations. PMID:23717327

Ehsani, Sara; Mirhashemi, Fatemeh Sadat; Asgary, Saeed

2013-01-01

315

Relationship of the lingual frenum to the mandibular central incisors  

PubMed Central

Clinical implication The purpose of this study is to record the vertical distance between anterior attachment of lingual frenum and incisal edge of mandibular central incisors in dentulous subjects and then determine the mean vertical distance and to suggest guidelines for positioning of mandibular central incisors in complete dentures. Method In this study, 150 dentulous subjects (75 males and 75 females) were chosen based on predecided inclusion criteria. A mandibular cast was obtained from irreversible hydrocolloid impression in modified stock trays for each subject. All subjects were instructed to elevate the tongue while the impressions were made. The vertical distance between the anterior attachment of the lingual frenum and incisal edges of mandibular central incisors was measured on the casts and then the values were statistically analyzed. Result The distance between anterior attachment of lingual frenum (AALF) mesioincisal edge of mandibular central incisor (CI) in male, female and total (male + female) subjects was measured. In males it ranged from 7.3 to 8.9 mm with mean (±SD) 8.29 ± 0.36 mm while in females it ranged from 7.1 to 9.0 mm with mean (±SD) 8.21 ± 0.38 mm. Conclusion It is believed that the application of this anatomic relation can provide a reliable point for arranging and checking the position of the mandibular central incisors for complete dentures in patients with class I ridge relationship.

Gupta, Swati; Garg, Sanchit; Tandan, Amrit; Dwivedi, Ravi; Gupta, Narendra Kumar; Agarwal, Garima

2015-01-01

316

ORIGIN OF COURTSHIP AND SEX PHEROMONES OF THE ORIENTAL FRUIT MOTH AND A DISCUSSION  

E-print Network

ORIGIN OF COURTSHIP AND SEX PHEROMONES OF THE ORIENTAL FRUIT MOTH AND A DISCUSSION r j OF THE ROLE-distance female-emitted sex pheromone that attracts males, and a shorter -range male-emitted courtship pheromone that attracts females Typical of le- pidopterous communication, the female-emitted sex pheromone components

317

Combining two Pheromone Structures for Solving the Car Sequencing Problem with Ant  

E-print Network

Combining two Pheromone Structures for Solving the Car Sequencing Problem with Ant Colony) algorithm for solving this problem, and we introduce two different pheromone structures for this algorithm: the first pheromone structure aims at learn- ing for "good" sequences of cars, whereas the second pheromone

Solnon, Christine

318

Male-Produced Aggregation Pheromone of the Cerambycid Beetle Rosalia funebris  

E-print Network

Male-Produced Aggregation Pheromone of the Cerambycid Beetle Rosalia funebris Ann M. Ray & Jocelyn in field bioassays using traps baited with this compound. This pheromone structure is unprecedented in the literature of cerambycid pheromones and distinct from the more common diol/hydroxyketone pheromone motif

Hanks, Lawrence M.

319

Pheromone-based Heuristic Column Generation for Vehicle Routing Problems with Black Box Feasibility  

E-print Network

Pheromone-based Heuristic Column Generation for Vehicle Routing Problems with Black Box Feasibility by pheromones. To find an integer solution we solve an integer Set Partitioning Problem defined on the set guided by pheromone deposits stemming from an external oracle. This oracle computes pheromone deposits

Deville, Yves

320

Male-Produced Aggregation Pheromones of the Cerambycid Beetles Xylotrechus colonus and Sarosesthes fulminans  

E-print Network

Male-Produced Aggregation Pheromones of the Cerambycid Beetles Xylotrechus colonus and Sarosesthes the biological activity of the synthesized pheromones: (1) enantiomerically enriched pheromone components were, for which pheromones had previously been identified, were caught: Neoclytus a. acuminatus (F.) and its

Hanks, Lawrence M.

321

An Enhanced Aggregation Pheromone System for Real-Parameter Optimization in the ACO  

E-print Network

An Enhanced Aggregation Pheromone System for Real-Parameter Optimization in the ACO Metaphor. In previous papers we proposed an algorithm for real pa- rameter optimization called the Aggregation Pheromone System (APS). The APS replaces pheromone trails in traditional ACO with aggrega- tion pheromones

Tsutsui, Shigeyoshi

322

Regulation of behavioral maturation by a primer pheromone produced by adult worker honey bees  

E-print Network

Regulation of behavioral maturation by a primer pheromone produced by adult worker honey bees animal species communicate via pheromones. Re- leaser pheromones cause rapid, transient changes in be- havior, whereas primer pheromones cause more long-term changes in both behavior and physiology (1

Huang, Zachary

323

Identification and Synthesis of a Female-Produced Sex Pheromone for the Cerambycid Beetle Prionus californicus  

E-print Network

Identification and Synthesis of a Female-Produced Sex Pheromone for the Cerambycid Beetle Prionus cerambycid beetle Prionus californicus produce a powerful sex pheromone that attracts males. The pheromone by coupled gas chromatography- electroantennogram detection and GC-mass spectrometry. The pheromone

Hanks, Lawrence M.

324

A Pheromone-Based Utility Model for Collaborative Foraging Liviu Panait  

E-print Network

A Pheromone-Based Utility Model for Collaborative Foraging Liviu Panait Department of Computer of pheromones as a joint communication mechanism. In this paper we propose two pheromone-based algorithms in this area has focused on biologically-plausible but ad-hoc single pheromone models, we have developed

George Mason University

325

Modification of Streptococcus faecalis Sex Pheromones after Acquisition of Plasmid DNA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recipient strains of Streptococcus faecalis excrete multiple, peptide sex pheromones that induce mating responses in donors harboring certain conjugative plasmids. Acquisition of plasmid DNA leads to a ``shutting off'' of pheromone excretion, and such cells become responsive to exogenous pheromone. Data are presented showing that donors excrete low levels of a modified, inactive form of the pheromone. This substance, when

Yasuyoshi Ike; Ronald A. Craig; Bryan A. White; Yoshihiko Yagi; Don B. Clewell

1983-01-01

326

Roles of sex and gonadal steroids in mammalian pheromonal communication.  

PubMed

A brain circuit (the accessory olfactory system) that originates in the vomeronasal organ (VNO) and includes the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) plus additional forebrain regions mediates many of the effects of pheromones, typically comprised of a variety of non-volatile and volatile compounds, on aspects of social behavior. A second, parallel circuit (the main olfactory system) that originates in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and includes the main olfactory bulb (MOB) has also been shown to detect volatile pheromones from conspecifics. Studies are reviewed that point to specific roles of several different steroids and their water-soluble metabolites as putative pheromones. Other studies are reviewed that establish an adult, 'activational' role of circulating sex hormones along with sex differences in the detection and/or processing of non-steroidal pheromones by these two olfactory circuits. Persisting questions about the role of sex steroids in pheromonal processing are posed for future investigation. PMID:23872334

Baum, Michael J; Bakker, Julie

2013-10-01

327

Efficient Management of Fruit Pests by Pheromone Nanogels  

PubMed Central

Environment-friendly management of fruit flies involving pheromones is useful in reducing the undesirable pest populations responsible for decreasing the yield and the crop quality. A nanogel has been prepared from a pheromone, methyl eugenol (ME) using a low-molecular mass gelator. This was very stable at open ambient conditions and slowed down the evaporation of pheromone significantly. This enabled its easy handling and transportation without refrigeration, and reduction in the frequency of pheromone recharging in the orchard. Notably the involvement of the nano-gelled pheromone brought about an effective management of Bactrocera dorsalis, a prevalent harmful pest for a number of fruits including guava. Thus a simple, practical and low cost green chemical approach is developed that has a significant potential for crop protection, long lasting residual activity, excellent efficacy and favorable safety profiles. This makes the present invention well-suited for pest management in a variety of crops. PMID:23416455

Bhagat, Deepa; Samanta, Suman K.; Bhattacharya, Santanu

2013-01-01

328

THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Old Members' Office The Queen's College Oxford OX1 4AW  

E-print Network

.queens.ox.ac.uk--Registered Charity (1142553) MAY 2012 THE PROVOST invites you to THE PREMIèRE of DREAMS OF LONGING A SONG CYCLE Dove: Vast Ocean of Light and Seek him that maketh the seven stars followed by madrigals and part

Capdeboscq, Yves

329

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/ants/queen.html BEING QUEEN BY PETER TYSON  

E-print Network

kinds of social animals--ants and termites, certain species of bees and wasps, and the sole social off inside the queen, rupturing its abdomen and killing it.) A single fertilization supplies shelter out of their interlocked bodies. This elliptical mass may be three feet across and hold up to 700

Wenseleers, Tom

330

Maxillary anterior and mandibular posterior residual ridge resorption in patients wearing a mandibular implant-retained overdenture.  

PubMed

The mandibular implant-retained overdenture could improve masticatory function compared to the conventional complete denture. However, increased forces exerted by the overdenture could increase residual ridge resorption of the maxillary anterior and mandibular posterior areas. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the mandibular implant-retained overdenture using two or four dental implants, or the conventional complete denture on resorption of the residual ridge of the maxillary anterior and mandibular posterior areas over a period of 10 years. In total, 120 patients, 30 patients treated with an overdenture on two implants (two-implant group), 30 patients with an overdenture on four implants (four-implant group) and 60 patients treated with a conventional full denture (conventional group), participated in this study. On panoramic radiographs, made before and 10 years after treatment, proportional area measurements were applied to determine changes in bone height. After 10 years, a statistically significant amount of bone resorption had occurred in the anterior maxilla in the two-implant group and in the four-implant group. A significant amount of bone resorption had occurred in the posterior mandible in all three groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in both areas. Patients presented large individual differences. It is concluded that patients rehabilitated with implant-retained mandibular overdentures are not subjected to more residual ridge resorption in the anterior maxilla when compared to patients wearing a conventional full denture. Regarding the mandibular posterior residual ridge, resorption was irrespective of wearing an implant-retained mandibular overdenture or a conventional mandibular denture. PMID:21092056

Tymstra, N; Raghoebar, G M; Vissink, A; Meijer, H J A

2011-07-01

331

NOSEMA DISEASE OF HONEYBEE QUEENS (APIS MELLIFICA L.)  

E-print Network

NOSEMA DISEASE OF HONEYBEE QUEENS (APIS MELLIFICA L.) J. LOSKOTOVA, M. PEROUTKA V. VESELY of coprological examination for nosema disease was studied in 442 young queens. Possible age-linked resistance days old inoculated with nosema spores showed no indication of age-linked resistance to the disease

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

332

Queen's University SingleUse Bottled Water Policy POLICY STATEMENT  

E-print Network

Queen's University SingleUse Bottled Water Policy POLICY STATEMENT The Queen's University SingleUse Bottled Water Policy requires that, subject to certain exceptions, the purchase, sale, or distribution of singleuse bottled water shall not be permitted on campus. DEFINITION SingleUse Bottled Water A water

Abolmaesumi, Purang

333

Queen's University Single-Use Bottled Water Policy POLICY STATEMENT  

E-print Network

Queen's University Single-Use Bottled Water Policy POLICY STATEMENT The Queen's University Single-Use Bottled Water Policy requires that, subject to certain exceptions, the purchase, sale, or distribution of single-use bottled water shall not be permitted on campus. DEFINITION Single-Use Bottled Water - A water

Abolmaesumi, Purang

334

44 16'N 76 30'W Welcome to Queen's  

E-print Network

#12;Queen's is a Canadian leader in translating university- generated research into commercial benefit and the Queen's Molecular Library. · The Faculty of Health Science's Glaxo Wellcome Clinical Education Centre offers students in nursing, medicine and rehabilitation the opportunity to work with volunteer patients

Abolmaesumi, Purang

335

The Queen Mary newsletter for teachers and careers advisers  

E-print Network

, Design and Music? Our Multimedia and Arts Technology students learn the core skills for new media design and production in our recording studio, listen to world experts on social networks and learn how Fundamentals of Web Technology and Queen Mary to offer Global Health degree Queen Mary University of London has

Wright, Francis

336

Queen's University Mass Spectrometry & Proteomics Unit Terms of Reference  

E-print Network

1 Queen's University Mass Spectrometry & Proteomics Unit Terms of Reference Approved by the MSPU executive board on February 17, 2011 Preamble The Queen's University Mass Spectrometry & Proteomics Unit CFI-funded mass spectrometry facilities. The Terms of Reference for the MSPU include terms agreed upon

Abolmaesumi, Purang

337

The Queen's College Library Issue 4, Trinity Term 2014  

E-print Network

The Queen's College Library Insight Issue 4, Trinity Term 2014 Refurbishment Special Edition #12;THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE LIBRARY INSIGHT1 I am delighted to be writing the introduction to Issue Four of Insight, which, as predicted last year, is a "buildings special" concentrat- ing on the refurbishment

Capdeboscq, Yves

338

NEST ODOR CHANGES FOLLOWING QUEEN LOSS IN APIS MELLIFERA L.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This manuscript investigates the effects of queen loss on the nest odor of honey bee colonies. I sampled the nest odor (using solid-phase microextraction fibers which were then injected into a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer) of 15 colonies immediately after removing their queens a...

339

THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Religion and Belief  

E-print Network

THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Religion and Belief INTRODUCTION This document provides a general overview of legislation relating to religion and belief and The Queen's College response as it endeavours to ensure that discrimination on the grounds of religion or belief does not take place. CURRENT

Capdeboscq, Yves

340

Original article Honeybee queen tergal gland secretion affects  

E-print Network

Original article Honeybee queen tergal gland secretion affects ovarian development in caged workers 1998; accepted 9 March 1999) Abstract - The inhibitory effects of honeybee queen tergal gland secretion on worker ovarian devel- opment was studied using a laboratory bioassay with the honeybee races Apis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

341

Sex and the Red Queen Maurine Neiman and Britt Koskella  

E-print Network

. Neiman and B. Koskella forces underlying the persistence of sex and outcrossing1 in natural systemsChapter 7 Sex and the Red Queen Maurine Neiman and Britt Koskella The essence of sex in our theory. Even so, the extent to which the Red Queen can and does provide an advantage to sex in nature

Neiman, Maurine

342

TheQueens,theDrones and theWorkers  

E-print Network

TheQueens,theDrones and theWorkers Phil's Peace By Phil starks If I sit still long enough and a few hundred drones. The queen is mother to them all, and is respected accordingly. The drones are brothers, and as a boy with three sisters of my own, I can empathize with their plight: Drones

Starks, Philip

343

The honeybee queen influences the regulation of colony drone production  

E-print Network

The honeybee queen influences the regulation of colony drone production Katie E. Wharton,a Fred C and regu- lation of males (drones). We examined whether honeybee queens can influence drone regulation by either allowing or prevent- ing them from laying drone eggs for a period of time and then examining

Huang, Zachary

344

PROGENY TESTING AND SELECTING ITALIAN QUEENS FOR BROOD AREA AND  

E-print Network

production. The regression of honey production of daughter queens on that of their mothers was 0.27 + 0.7 kg honey per 1 000 brood cells. The regression of brood cells and honey production of daughters on brood cells of mothers was very slight and non-significant. Therefore, the fertility of Italian queens

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

345

Distribution and Behavior of Queen Conch Strombus gigas  

E-print Network

Distribution and Behavior of Queen Conch Strombus gigas Relative to Seagrass Standing Crop Allan W Stocking Island, Bahamas, to deter- mine habitat associations of queen conch Strombus gigas L. within sea- grass meadows of Thalassia testudi- num. Transect data showed that conch density and biomass increased

346

Teaching Online at Queens College DRAFT, JAN2009  

E-print Network

Teaching Online at Queens College DRAFT, JAN2009 A variety of courses offered at Queens College, identity of participants, and teaching evaluations. Using Internet-based technologies for teaching delivery, to better exploit the unique resources offered by the Internet.) d. Does the instructor have

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

347

School of Nursing Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen's University  

E-print Network

School of Nursing Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen's University MARCH OPEN HOUSE The School of Nursing is pleased to welcome all prospective students and their families to the March Break Open House on Saturday, March 15, 2014. We have planned a variety of events designed to introduce you to Nursing at Queen

Ellis, Randy

348

Pregnancy in a unilaterally ovariohysterectomised queen.  

PubMed

A 4-year-old female Russian Blue cat presented with signs of right-sided abdominal distension, anorexia and a mucoid vaginal discharge. On the basis of clinical and ultrasonographical findings a tentative diagnosis of uterine torsion was made. Exploratory coeliotomy revealed a 900º right uterine torsion along the longitudinal axis. Unilateral ovariohysterectomy was performed. Subsequently, the cat had two successful and uneventful pregnancies. To our knowledge this is the first case report of pregnancy in a unilaterally ovariohysterectomised queen. PMID:25414240

Jurka, Piotr; Kacprzak, Kamil J; Degórska, Beata

2015-04-01

349

Control of human mandibular posture during locomotion  

PubMed Central

Mandibular movements and masseter muscle activity were measured in humans during hopping, walking and running to determine whether reflexes contribute to the maintenance of jaw position during locomotion. In initial experiments, subjects hopped so that they landed either on their toes or on their heel. Landing on the toes provoked only small mandibular movements and no reflex responses in the masseter electromyogram (EMG). Landing on the heels with the jaw muscles relaxed caused the mandible to move vertically downwards relative to the maxilla, and evoked a brisk reflex response in the masseter at monosynaptic latency. Neither this relative movement of the mandible nor the reflex was seen when the teeth were clenched: hence the reflex is not the result of vestibular activation during head movement. The same variables were measured in a second series of experiments while subjects stood, walked and ran at various speeds and at various inclinations on a treadmill. During walking, the vertical movements of the head and therefore the mandible were slow and small, and there was no tonic masseter EMG or gait-related activity in the jaw-closing muscles. When subjects ran, the vertical head and jaw movement depended on the running speed and the inclination of the treadmill. Landing on the heels induced larger movements than landing on the toes. About 10 ms after each foot-strike, the mandible moved downwards relative to the maxilla, thereby stretching the jaw-closing muscles and activating them at segmental reflex latency. This caused the mandible to move back upwards. The strength of the reflex response was related to the speed and amplitude of the vertical jaw movement following landing. It is concluded that, during walking, the small, slow movements of the mandible relative to the maxilla are subthreshold for stretch reflexes in the jaw muscles: i.e. the mandible is supported by visco-elasticity of the soft tissues in the masticatory system. However, the brisker downward movements of the mandible after heel-landing during hopping and running evoke segmental reflex responses which contribute to the active maintenance of the posture of the mandible. This is a unique demonstration of how a stretch reflex operates to maintain posture under entirely natural conditions. PMID:14678503

Miles, Timothy S; Flavel, Stanley C; Nordstrom, Michael A

2004-01-01

350

Patterns of viral infection in honey bee queens  

PubMed Central

The well-being of a colony and replenishment of the workers depends on a healthy queen. Diseases in queens are seldom reported, and our knowledge on viral infection in queens is limited. In this study, 86 honey bee queens were collected from beekeepers in Denmark. All queens were tested separately by two real-time PCRs: one for the presence of deformed wing virus (DWV), and one that would detect sequences of acute bee-paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus and Israeli acute paralysis virus (AKI complex). Worker bees accompanying the queen were also analysed. The queens could be divided into three groups based on the level of infection in their head, thorax, ovary, intestines and spermatheca. Four queens exhibited egg-laying deficiency, but visually all queens appeared healthy. Viral infection was generally at a low level in terms of AKI copy numbers, with 134/430 tissues (31?%) showing the presence of viral infection ranging from 101 to 105 copies. For DWV, 361/340 tissues (84?%) showed presence of viral infection (DWV copies ranging from 102 to 1012), with 50 tissues showing viral titres >107 copies. For both AKI and DWV, the thorax was the most frequently infected tissue and the ovaries were the least frequently infected. Relative to total mass, the spermatheca showed significantly higher DWV titres than the other tissues. The ovaries had the lowest titre of DWV. No significant differences were found among tissues for AKI. A subsample of 14 queens yielded positive results for the presence of negative-sense RNA strands, thus demonstrating active virus replication in all tissues. PMID:23223622

Francis, Roy Mathew; Nielsen, Steen Lykke

2013-01-01

351

Insect Pheromones: Mastering Communication to Control Pests  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Web site contains an interesting, in-depth article on the use of insect pheromones in pest management. The article is one of many from Beyond Discovery: The Path from Research to Human Benefit; a NAS-sponsored series designed to demonstrate "how science works by illustrating how basic research produces knowledge that can lead to practical results of human benefit." No formal lesson plans are provided, but the article comes with a helpful glossary, related Web links, and a timeline of events.

352

QUEEN'SUNIVERSITYANNUALREPORT2005 A FRESH APPROACH TO THIS YEAR'S REPORT  

E-print Network

Integrated Learning Centre within the Faculty of Applied Science · Recruited over 70 exceptional tenure Herzberg Canada Gold Medal, Canada's top science prize, the second consecutive year a Queen's researcher QUEEN'S HISTORY Queen's University was established in 1841 by Royal Charter of Queen Victoria

Abolmaesumi, Purang

353

The influence of worker behavior and paternity on the development and emergence of honey bee queens  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary. The interactions of worker honey bees with queens cells could influence the outcome of the queen re- placement process, and could potentially contribute to the spread of the African honey bee in the New World if workers exhibit racial preferences during queen rearing. We examined worker-queen cell interactions in hybrid colonies that con- tained African and European patrilines. Worker

S. S. Schneider; G. DeGrandi-Hoffman

2002-01-01

354

Piping by queens of Apis cerana Fabricius 1793 and Apis koschevnikovi v Buttel-Reepen 1906  

E-print Network

Short note Piping by queens of Apis cerana Fabricius 1793 and Apis koschevnikovi v Buttel Tenom, Sabah, Malaysia (Received 1 February 1993; accepted 1 August 1994) Summary — Piping queens.39 quacks/s vs 3.0 quacks/s). queen piping / Apis cerana / Apis koschevnikovi INTRODUCTION Queen piping

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

355

July /August 2005 Confounding Queens Formic Acid Safety Combs Build Themselves  

E-print Network

____________________________________________________________________________________ Confounding Queens Formic Acid Safety Combs Build Themselves UK Queen Problems Percentage Ingredients Labeling performance due to Varroa infestation: reduced sperm count in drones; reduced queen mating success; reduced queens laying variable amounts of drone eggs in worker cells; 5. Good egg laying pattern, at first

Ferrara, Katherine W.

356

Click here to print Worker bees cheat on queen behind her back  

E-print Network

Click here to print Worker bees cheat on queen behind her back so they can have an easier life of the hive, the queen of all she surveys. But behind her back, the queen bee's control might be slipping. For amid all the buzzing, some worker bees cheat on their queen by reproducing for themselves to prolong

Wenseleers, Tom

357

Herbal remedies for mandibular fracture healing  

PubMed Central

Purpose: When a bone is fractured it is usually necessary to employ a mechanical means to reduce and maintain the fragments in position. However, healing of the fracture is governed by biological principles, with which the mechanical measures must be coordinated to the end, such that a satisfactory bony union and restoration of form and function are obtained. We have studied the effect of Cissus quadrangularis (Harjor) and Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi), in the healing of mandibular fractures. Materials and Methods: A total of 29 cases having a fracture in the body of the mandible were included in the study and divided into three groups. Groups A and B were treated with Ocimum sanctum and Cissus quadrangularis, respectively, and fracture healing was assessed with biochemical markers and the bite force. Group C was the control group. Results: The period of immobilization was the lowest in the Group A followed by Group B. A significant increase in alkaline phosphatase and serum calcium was seen in Group B. The tensile strength in terms of the biting force was the maximum in cases of Group B. Conclusion: We conclude that Cissus quadrangularis and Ocimum sanctum help in fracture healing, and use of such traditional drugs will be a breakthrough in the management and early mobilization of facial fractures. PMID:25298715

Mohammad, Shadab; Pal, U.S.; Pradhan, R.; Singh, Nimisha

2014-01-01

358

Mandibular osteosarcoma in a nutria (Myocastor coypus).  

PubMed

A four-year-old neutered male nutria (Myocastor coypus) was presented for a one-day history of lethargy and anorexia. A right-sided facial swelling and loose right mandibular fourth molar that exuded caseous exudate from the root were noted; however, the animal continued to decline despite removal of the affected tooth and antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapy. Radiographs showed a lytic proliferative bony lesion on the right mandible that appeared to expand in size over the course of a week. Due to its declining clinical condition and poor response to therapy, the animal was euthanized. Necropsy revealed an invasive bony neoplasm of the right mandible, histologically consistent with an osteosarcoma, that was invading the mandible and dental arcade, likely contributing to tooth root infection and osteomyelitis. Endocardiosis of the tricuspid valve was incidentally found as well with early cardiac remodeling of the right ventricle. This is the first report of an osteosarcoma and endocardiosis in a nutria. PMID:25314853

Johnson, James G; Kim, Kenneth; Serio, Jacqueline; Paulsen, Daniel; Rademacher, Nathalie; Pirie, Gordon

2014-09-01

359

Innervation and Neural Regulation of the Sex Pheromone Gland in Female Heliothis Moths TA Christensen, H Itagaki, PEA Teal, RD Jasensky, JH Tumlinson, and JG Hildebrand  

E-print Network

Innervation and Neural Regulation of the Sex Pheromone Gland in Female Heliothis Moths TA pheromone gland in female Heliothis moths (electrophysiology/octopamine/pheromone biosynthesis activating Heliothis moths normally produce their species-specific male attractant (sex pheromone blend) during

Itagaki, Haruhiko

360

Temperature limits trail following behaviour through pheromone decay in ants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Mediterranean habitats, temperature affects both ant foraging behaviour and community structure. Many studies have shown that dominant species often forage at lower temperature than subordinates. Yet, the factors that constrain dominant species foraging activity in hot environments are still elusive. We used the dominant ant Tapinoma nigerrimum as a model species to test the hypothesis that high temperatures hinder trail following behaviour by accelerating pheromone degradation. First, field observations showed that high temperatures (> 30°C) reduce the foraging activity of T. nigerrimum independently of the daily and seasonal rhythms of this species. Second, we isolated the effect of high temperatures on pheromone trail efficacy from its effect on worker physiology. A marked substrate was heated during 10 min (five temperature treatments from 25°C to 60°C), cooled down to 25°C, and offered in a test choice to workers. At hot temperature treatments (>40°C), workers did not discriminate the previously marked substrate. High temperatures appeared therefore to accelerate pheromone degradation. Third, we assessed the pheromone decay dynamics by a mechanistic model fitted with Bayesian inference. The model predicted ant choice through the evolution of pheromone concentration on trails as a function of both temperature and time since pheromone deposition. Overall, our results highlighted that the effect of high temperatures on recruitment intensity was partly due to pheromone evaporation. In the Mediterranean ant communities, this might affect dominant species relying on chemical recruitment, more than subordinate ant species, less dependent on chemical communication and less sensitive to high temperatures.

van Oudenhove, Louise; Billoir, Elise; Boulay, Raphaël; Bernstein, Carlos; Cerdá, Xim

2011-12-01

361

Analysis of Male Pheromones That Accelerate Female Reproductive Organ Development  

PubMed Central

Male odors can influence a female's reproductive physiology. In the mouse, the odor of male urine results in an early onset of female puberty. Several volatile and protein pheromones have previously been reported to each account for this bioactivity. Here we bioassay inbred BALB/cJ females to study pheromone-accelerated uterine growth, a developmental hallmark of puberty. We evaluate the response of wild-type and mutant mice lacking a specialized sensory transduction channel, TrpC2, and find TrpC2 function to be necessary for pheromone-mediated uterine growth. We analyze the relative effectiveness of pheromones previously identified to accelerate puberty through direct bioassay and find none to significantly accelerate uterine growth in BALB/cJ females. Complementary to this analysis, we have devised a strategy of partial purification of the uterine growth bioactivity from male urine and applied it to purify bioactivity from three different laboratory strains. The biochemical characteristics of the active fraction of all three strains are inconsistent with that of previously known pheromones. When directly analyzed, we are unable to detect previously known pheromones in urine fractions that generate uterine growth. Our analysis indicates that pheromones emitted by males to advance female puberty remain to be identified. PMID:21347429

Flanagan, Kelly A.; Webb, William; Stowers, Lisa

2011-01-01

362

Nutrient-dependent/pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution: a model  

PubMed Central

Background The prenatal migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurosecretory neurons allows nutrients and human pheromones to alter GnRH pulsatility, which modulates the concurrent maturation of the neuroendocrine, reproductive, and central nervous systems, thus influencing the development of ingestive behavior, reproductive sexual behavior, and other behaviors. Methods This model details how chemical ecology drives adaptive evolution via: (1) ecological niche construction, (2) social niche construction, (3) neurogenic niche construction, and (4) socio-cognitive niche construction. This model exemplifies the epigenetic effects of olfactory/pheromonal conditioning, which alters genetically predisposed, nutrient-dependent, hormone-driven mammalian behavior and choices for pheromones that control reproduction via their effects on luteinizing hormone (LH) and systems biology. Results Nutrients are metabolized to pheromones that condition behavior in the same way that food odors condition behavior associated with food preferences. The epigenetic effects of olfactory/pheromonal input calibrate and standardize molecular mechanisms for genetically predisposed receptor-mediated changes in intracellular signaling and stochastic gene expression in GnRH neurosecretory neurons of brain tissue. For example, glucose and pheromones alter the hypothalamic secretion of GnRH and LH. A form of GnRH associated with sexual orientation in yeasts links control of the feedback loops and developmental processes required for nutrient acquisition, movement, reproduction, and the diversification of species from microbes to man. Conclusion An environmental drive evolved from that of nutrient ingestion in unicellular organisms to that of pheromone-controlled socialization in insects. In mammals, food odors and pheromones cause changes in hormones such as LH, which has developmental affects on pheromone-controlled sexual behavior in nutrient-dependent reproductively fit individuals across species of vertebrates. PMID:24693353

Kohl, James Vaughn

2013-01-01

363

Evaluation of mandibular condyles in children with unilateral posterior crossbite.  

PubMed

The relationship of mandibular condyle dimensions and its association with unilateral posterior crossbite (UPXB) has been suggested in the literature. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate mandibular condyles on the left and right sides and between crossed and non-crossed sides in the sagittal and coronal planes, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Twenty CBCT images of 40 temporo mandibular joints (TMJs) in individuals in mixed dentition phase, which included 9 males (mean 7.9 years) and 11 females (mean 8.2 years), with unilateral posterior crossbite without premature contacts and functional mandibular shifts and with transverse maxillary deficiency. The criteria for sample exclusion included the presence of painful symptoms, facial trauma history, systemic diseases such as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, mouth opening limitation (< 40 mm), congenital or genetic anomalies, and skeletal asymmetries that may result in TMJ disorders. Dimensional measurements of the condyles between the right and left sides and crossed and non-crossed sides in sagittal and coronal view were made. There was no significant difference between the measurements of the crossed and non-crossed sides in both sagittal and coronal view. These findings suggest that the presence of unilateral posterior crossbite in children with UPXB did not result in changes between the mandibular condyles in the right and left sides or between the crossed and non-crossed sides in the coronal or sagittal plane. PMID:25760067

Illipronti-Filho, Edson; Fantini, Solange Mongelli; Chilvarquer, Israel

2015-03-01

364

Adjunctive techniques for enhancing mandibular growth in Class II malocclusion.  

PubMed

Class II malocclusions are generally characterized by mandible retrusion. For this reason, forward bite jumping appliances, also known as functional appliances were originally designed to enhance mandibular forward projection. However, there is still insufficient evidence to support the effectiveness, predictability and stability of functional appliances in modifying mandibular growth. This article was aimed at presenting evidences and hypotheses that mandibular growth may be enhanced through the use of adjunctive methods in conjunction with functional appliances. In formulating our hypothesis, we considered relevant data, mostly derived from animal studies, concerning alternative methods, such as low-intensity ultrasound and light-emitting diode, as well as their related cellular and molecular mechanisms. According to the evidences covered in this article, we suggest that both methods are potentially effective, and theoretically able to act in synergistic way to enhance functional appliances treatment on mandibular and condylar additional growth. The rationale for the use of these methods as adjunctive therapies for mandibular underdevelopment is attributed to their abilities on stimulating angiogenesis, cell differentiation, proliferation, and hypertrophy, as well as enhancing matrix production and endochondoral bone formation, especially on the condyle of growing animals. This article also proposed a study design which would be able to either prove or refute our hypothesis. If ratified, it would represent a significant scientific accomplishment which provides support for further investigations to be carried out on well-designed clinical trials. PMID:25648662

Feres, M F N; Alhadlaq, A; El-Bialy, T

2015-04-01

365

Sex pheromone of the scarab beetle Phyllophaga (Phytalus) georgiana (horn).  

PubMed

The sex pheromone of Phyllophaga (Phytalus) georgiana was characterized as valine methyl ester, tentatively the L-enantiomer. This is the first sex pheromone identified from the Phyllophaga subgenus Phytalus. The pheromone was extracted from female glands, the active component isolated by coupled gas chromatography-electroantennogram detection analysis, characterized by mass spectrometry, and shown to be active in field tests. The seasonal flight pattern was determined for P. georgiana as well as for three other species, P. anxia (both northern and southern genitalic forms), P. gracilis, and P. postrema. The latter three species were captured in traps baited with L-isoleucine methyl ester. PMID:19247715

Robbins, Paul S; Nojima, Satoshi; Polavarapu, Sridhar; Koppenhöfer, Albrecht M; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Holdcraft, Robert J; Consolie, Nancy H; Peck, Daniel C; Roelofs, Wendell L

2009-03-01

366

Worker honey bee pheromone regulation of foraging ontogeny  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The evolution of sociality has configured communication chemicals, called primer pheromones, which play key roles in regulating the organization of social life. Primer pheromones exert relatively slow effects that fundamentally alter developmental, physiological, and neural systems. Here, I demonstrate how substances extracted from the surface of foraging and young pre-foraging worker bees regulated age at onset of foraging, a developmental process. Hexane-extractable compounds washed from foraging workers increased foraging age compared with controls, whereas extracts of young pre-foraging workers decreased foraging age. This represents the first known direct demonstration of primer pheromone activity derived from adult worker bees.

Pankiw, Tanya

367

Variable queen number in ant colonies: no impact on queen turnover, inbreeding, and population genetic differentiation in the ant Formica selysi.  

PubMed

Variation in queen number alters the genetic structure of social insect colonies, which in turn affects patterns of kin-selected conflict and cooperation. Theory suggests that shifts from single- to multiple-queen colonies are often associated with other changes in the breeding system, such as higher queen turnover, more local mating, and restricted dispersal. These changes may restrict gene flow between the two types of colonies and it has been suggested that this might ultimately lead to sympatric speciation. We performed a detailed microsatellite analysis of a large population of the ant Formica selysi, which revealed extensive variation in social structure, with 71 colonies headed by a single queen and 41 by multiple queens. This polymorphism in social structure appeared stable over time, since little change in the number of queens per colony was detected over a five-year period. Apart from queen number, single- and multiple-queen colonies had very similar breeding systems. Queen turnover was absent or very low in both types of colonies. Single- and multiple-queen colonies exhibited very small but significant levels of inbreeding, which indicates a slight deviation from random mating at a local scale and suggests that a small proportion of queens mate with related males. For both types of colonies, there was very little genetic structuring above the level of the nest, with no sign of isolation by distance. These similarities in the breeding systems were associated with a complete lack of genetic differentiation between single- and multiple-queen colonies, which provides no support for the hypothesis that change in queen number leads to restricted gene flow between social forms. Overall, this study suggests that the higher rates of queen turnover, local mating, and population structuring that are often associated with multiple-queen colonies do not appear when single- and multiple-queen colonies still coexist within the same population, but build up over time in populations consisting mostly of multiple-queen colonies. PMID:15212387

Chapuisat, Michel; Bocherens, Samuel; Rosset, Hervé

2004-05-01

368

Pheromone signaling during sexual reproduction in algae.  

PubMed

Algae are found in all aquatic and many terrestrial habitats. They are dominant in phytoplankton and biofilms thereby contributing massively to global primary production. Since algae comprise photosynthetic representatives of the various protoctist groups their physiology and appearance is highly diverse. This diversity is also mirrored in their characteristic life cycles that exhibit various facets of ploidy and duration of the asexual phase as well as gamete morphology. Nevertheless, sexual reproduction in unicellular and colonial algae usually has as common motive that two specialized, sexually compatible haploid gametes establish physical contact and fuse. To guarantee mating success, processes during sexual reproduction are highly synchronized and regulated. This review focuses on sex pheromones of algae that play a key role in these processes. Especially, the diversity of sexual strategies as well as of the compounds involved are the focus of this contribution. Discoveries connected to algal pheromone chemistry shed light on the role of key evolutionary processes, including endosymbiotic events and lateral gene transfer, speciation and adaptation at all phylogenetic levels. But progress in this field might also in the future provide valid tools for the manipulation of aquaculture and environmental processes. PMID:24597605

Frenkel, Johannes; Vyverman, Wim; Pohnert, Georg

2014-08-01

369

Pheromones in birds: myth or reality?  

PubMed Central

Birds are anosmic or at best microsmatic… This misbelief persisted until very recently and has strongly influenced the outcome of communication studies in birds, with olfaction remaining neglected as compared to acoustic and visual channels. However, there is now clear empirical evidence showing that olfaction is perfectly functional in birds and birds use olfactory information in a variety of ethological contexts. Although the existence of pheromones has never been formally demonstrated in this vertebrate class, different groups of birds, such as petrels, auklets and ducks have been shown to produce specific scents that could play a significant role in within-species social interactions. Behavioral experiments have indeed demonstrated that these odors influence the behavior of conspecifics. Additionally, in quail, deprivation of olfactory inputs decreases neuronal activation induced by sexual interactions with a female. It seems therefore well established that birds enjoy a functional sense of smell and a fast growing body of experimental evidence suggests that they use this channel of olfactory communication to control their social life. The unequivocal identification of an avian pheromone is, however, still ahead of us but there are now many exciting opportunities to unravel the behavioral and physiological particularities of chemical communication in birds. PMID:20490809

Caro, Samuel P.; Balthazart, Jacques

2012-01-01

370

Suppression pheromone and cockroach rank formation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although agonistic behaviors in the male lobster cockroach ( Nauphoeta cinerea) are well known, the formation of an unstable hierarchy has long been a puzzle. In this study, we investigate how the unstable dominance hierarchy in N. cinerea is maintained via a pheromone signaling system. In agonistic interactions, aggressive posture (AP) is an important behavioral index of aggression. This study showed that, during the formation of a governing hierarchy, thousands of nanograms of 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (3H-2B) were released by the AP-adopting dominant in the first encounter fight, then during the early domination period and that this release of 3H-2B was related to rank maintenance, but not to rank establishment. For rank maintenance, 3H-2B functioned as a suppression pheromone, which suppressed the fighting capability of rivals and kept them in a submissive state. During the period of rank maintenance, as the dominant male gradually decreased his 3H-2B release, the fighting ability of the subordinate gradually developed, as shown by the increasing odds of a subordinate adopting an AP (OSAP). The OSAP was negatively correlated with the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant and positively correlated with the number of domination days. The same OSAP could be achieved earlier by reducing the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant indicates that whether the subordinate adopts an offensive strategy depends on what the dominant is doing.

Kou, Rong; Chang, Huan-Wen; Chen, Shu-Chun; Ho, Hsiao-Yung

2009-06-01

371

Queen replacement in orphaned colonies of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.When field colonies of Solenopsis invicta Buren were orphaned by removing the functioning queen, re-collection 8–10 weeks later showed that 61% had replacement queens that were physogastric and attractive to workers. The weight of the original colony queens increases with the colony mound volume. The weight of replacement queens is inversely related to the number of such queens in the

Walter R. Tschinkel; Dennis F. Howard

1978-01-01

372

Yeast pheromone pathway modeling using Petri nets  

PubMed Central

Background Our environment is composed of biological components of varying magnitude. The relationships between the different biological elements can be represented as a biological network. The process of mating in S. cerevisiae is initiated by secretion of pheromone by one of the cells. Our interest lies in one particular question: how does a cell dynamically adapt the pathway to continue mating under severe environmental changes or under mutation (which might result in the loss of functionality of some proteins known to participate in the pheromone pathway). Our work attempts to answer this question. To achieve this, we first propose a model to simulate the pheromone pathway using Petri nets. Petri nets are directed graphs that can be used for describing and modeling systems characterized as concurrent, asynchronous, distributed, parallel, non-deterministic, and/or stochastic. We then analyze our Petri net-based model of the pathway to investigate the following: 1) Given the model of the pheromone response pathway, under what conditions does the cell respond positively, i.e., mate? 2) What kinds of perturbations in the cell would result in changing a negative response to a positive one? Method In our model, we classify proteins into two categories: core component proteins (set ?) and additional proteins (set ?). We randomly generate our model's parameters in repeated simulations. To simulate the pathway, we carry out three different experiments. In the experiments, we simply change the concentration of the additional proteins (?) available to the cell. The concentration of proteins in ? is varied consistently from 300 to 400. In Experiment 1, the range of values for ? is set to be 100 to 150. In Experiment 2, it is set to be 151 to 200. In Experiment 3, the set ? is further split into ? and ?, with the idea that proteins in ? are more important than those in ?. The range of values for ? is set to be between 151 to 200 while that of ? is 100 to 150. Decision trees were derived from each of the first two experiments to allow us to more easily analyze the conditions under which the pheromone is expressed. Conclusion The simulation results reveal that a cell can overcome the detrimental effects of the conditions by using more concentration of additional proteins in ?. The first two experiments provide evidence that employing more concentration of proteins might be one of the ways that the cell uses to adapt itself in inhibiting conditions to facilitate mating. The results of the third experiment reveal that in some case the protein set ? is sufficient in regulating the response of the cell. Results of Experiments 4 and 5 reveal that there are certain conditions (parameters) in the model that are more important in determining whether a cell will respond positively or not. PMID:25080237

2014-01-01

373

Heritable Variation of Sex Pheromone Composition and the Potential for Evolution of Resistance to Pheromone-Based Control of the Indian Meal Moth, Plodia Interpunctella  

Microsoft Academic Search

The short-term evolutionary effect of pheromone-based mating disruption on the mating ability of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, was investigated. Three independent selection lines were established, and the mating ability of moths in plastic tents treated with high doses of pheromone and in control tents was compared for two consecutive generations. In addition, the heritability of the sex pheromone

Glenn P. Svensson; Camilla Ryne; Christer Löfstedt

2002-01-01

374

Prevalence of Three-rooted Mandibular First Molars among Taiwanese Individuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of mandibular first molars featuring a distolingual root among a Taiwanese population. A total of 731 patients’ periapical radiographs were screened and examined to obtain 166 samples for this study. The gender, symmetry, and frequencies of occurrence of three-rooted mandibular first molars were recorded. The prevalence of three-rooted mandibular first

Ming-Gene Tu; Chi-Cheng Tsai; Ming-Jia Jou; Wil-Lie Chen; Yu-Fang Chang; San-Yue Chen; Hui-Wen Cheng

2007-01-01

375

Mandibular condylectomy in a cow with a chronic luxation of the temporomandibular joint  

PubMed Central

A cow, presented after being struck by a motor vehicle, continued to have difficulty eating after mandibular fracture repair. Imaging showed a temporomandibular luxation and a mandibular condylectomy was performed. Mastication improved greatly but the cow was euthanized due to infection. This is the first report of mandibular condylectomy in cattle. PMID:24891643

Sparks, Holly D.; Roquet, Imma; MacKay, Angela; Barber, Spencer

2014-01-01

376

Isolated bilateral macrodontia of mandibular second premolars: A case report  

PubMed Central

Isolated bilateral macrodontia of mandibular second premolars is an extremely rare dental anomaly with only 5 cases reported to date. This case report presents clinical and radiographic findings of isolated bilateral macrodontia in a 12-year-old child. The patient was referred to the clinic with local crowding of mandibular posterior teeth. Radiographic findings revealed the presence of impacted macrodont mandibular second premolars and their distinct morphological appearance, characterized by large, multitubercular, molariform crowns, and tapering, single roots. Following surgical removal of the impacted premolars, orthodontic therapy was initiated to correct the malocclusion. Along with the features and treatment of this rare anomaly, this case report also illustrates the benefits, in terms of treatment planning and surgical technique, of supplementing conventional radiography with cone-beam computed tomography to localize the macrodont premolars and accurately establish their relationship with the neighboring roots and anatomic structures. PMID:22904663

Canoglu, Ebru; Canoglu, Harun; Aktas, Alper; Cehreli, Zafer C.

2012-01-01

377

[Surgical and prosthetic treatment of large mandibular cysts].  

PubMed

This paper presents a combined surgical-prosthetic procedure of reconstructing mandibular bone defect in a 53 year old patient, following enucleation of a mandibular cyst (Cystectomy Partsch II). After a thorough diagnostic evaluation, a surgical procedure was planned with the particular attention to the nature of the disease, patient's condition, size and extension of the cyst, tissue loss, and the possibilities of prosthetic management of a mandibular bone defect with partial postresection dental prosthesis. It is of great importance to point to the significance of teamwork of a maxillofacial surgeon and a specialist in prosthodontics. This kind of cooperation provided very effective and less risky soft tissue, as well as bone tissue regeneration (osteogenesis). The patient's recovery was fast, and he could return to his daily activities and work without significant changes regarding quality of life after surgery and prosthetic treatment. PMID:12891734

Dzambas, Ljubisa; Dzolev, Asen

2003-01-01

378

Three Cases of Elongated Mandibular Coronoid Process with Different Presentations  

PubMed Central

Abnormal elongation of the mandibular coronoid process is rare and its etiology is not yet elucidated. The aim of this report is to demonstrate and discuss the relationship between elongated mandibular coronoid process and limitation of mouth opening with cone beam computed tomography. Although the clinical characteristic of elongation of the coronoid process is mandibular limitation, in this report, one case had problem with mouth opening. Axial scans revealed that the distance between the coronoid process and the inner face of the frontal part of the zygomatic bone may cause limitation in mouth opening. In conclusion, instead of the length, the distance between the coronoid process and the inner face of the frontal part of the zygomatic bone may be the actual reason for limitation of mouth opening. This may prevent misdiagnosis. PMID:24693298

Ilguy, Mehmet; Kursoglu, Pinar; Ilguy, Dilhan

2014-01-01

379

Dentigerous Cyst associated with Horizontally Impacted Mandibular Second Premolar  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Dentigerous Cyst/developmental cyst of benign odontogenic origin are ones that surround the crown of impacted, embedded, unerupted or developing teeth. Dentigerous cyst is second most common cyst of the oral cavity after radicular cyst. They are usually solitary in occurrence and mostly associated with the mandibular third molars. Dentigerous cysts involving impacted second premolars are rarely reported in the literatures. We present a rare case of dentigerous cyst in a 12-year-old female patient associated with an impacted mandibular second premolar. How to cite this article: Mishra R, Tripathi AM, Rathore M. Dentigerous Cyst associated with Horizontally Impacted Mandibular Second Premolar. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(1): 54-57. PMID:25206240

Tripathi, Abhay Mani; Rathore, Monika

2014-01-01

380

Treatment options for the replacement of missing mandibular incisors.  

PubMed

The replacement of a mandibular incisor is a dental treatment warranting special consideration. Some of the challenges associated with the anterior mandible are limited space, challenging surrounding anatomy, and tough esthetic requirements. Proper diagnosis and treatment planning may require a multidisciplinary approach to successfully meet the demands of replacing a missing tooth in this sextant. Several treatment options currently exist for mandibular incisor replacement. These options include (1) resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs), (2) orthodontic treatment, (3) full-veneer fixed dental prostheses (FDPs), (4) dental implants for single-tooth replacement, (5) possible extraction of one or more incisors and restoration with implant-supported FDPs, (6) possible extraction of one or more teeth and restoration with FDPs from #22 to 27, (7) possible extraction of one or more teeth and restoration with removable dental prostheses (RDPs). This manuscript outlines the various treatment options for the replacement of mandibular incisors and discusses benefits and drawbacks of each. PMID:21631631

Fleigel, Jeffrey D; Salmon, Cade A; Piper, James M

2011-07-01

381

Osteochondroma of mandibular condyle: A clinic-radiographic correlation  

PubMed Central

Osteochondroma (OC) of temporo mandibular joint is a rare, slow growing, benign tumor that causes a progressive enlargement of the condyle, usually resulting in facial asymmetry, temporo mandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction, limited mouth opening and malocclusion. Pain is rarely associated with this tumor. OC is composed of cartilaginous and osseous tissues. Radiographically, there is unilaterally enlarged condyle usually with an exophytic outgrowth of the tumor from the condylar head. We present a rare case of osteochondroma of right mandibular condyle in a 45-year-old male who reported with painless swelling over TMJ area and progressive limited mouth opening. Panoramic radiograph and computed tomography (CT) was performed for better evaluation of the pathological condition. This paper describes the clinico-radiographic features and differential diagnosis of OC. PMID:24082753

More, Chandramani B.; Gupta, Swati

2013-01-01

382

Histological Estimates of Ovariole Number in Honey Bee Queens, Apis mellifera, Reveal Lack of Correlation with other Queen Quality Measures  

PubMed Central

Published estimates of the number of ovarioles found in the ovaries of honey bee, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) queens range from 100 to 180 per ovary. Within the context of a large-scale study designed to assay the overall quality of queens obtained from various commercial sources, a simple histology-based method for accurate determination of ovariole number was developed and then applied to a sample of 75 queens. Although all 10 commercial sources evaluated provided queens with ovariole numbers within the expected range, ovariole number was found to vary significantly across sources. Overall, and within most of the individual samples, there was no correlation of ovariole number with other morphological attributes such as thoracic width, wing length, or wet weight. Queens from two of the sources, however, displayed a significant negative relationship between wet weight and ovariole number. This study provides baseline data on ovariole number in commercial honey bee queens in the United States at a time when honey bee populations are declining; the method described can be used in studies relating ovariole number in queens to egg production and behavior. PMID:21870968

Jackson, Jeffrey T.; Tarpy, David R.; Fahrbach, Susan E.

2011-01-01

383

Application of a Sex Pheromone, Pheromone Analogs, and Verticillium lecanii for Management of Heterodera glycines  

PubMed Central

A mutant strain of the fungus Verticillium lecanii and selected bioregulators of Heterodera glycines were evaluated for their potential to reduce population densities of the nematode on soybean under greenhouse conditions. The bioregulators tested were the H. glycines sex pheromone vanillic acid and the pheromone analogs syringic acid, isovanillic acid, ferulic acid, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzonitrile, and methyl vanillate. A V. lecanii-vanillic acid combination and a V. lecanii-syringic acid combination were also applied as treatments. Syringic acid, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzonitrile, V. lecanii, V. lecanii-vanillic acid, and V. lecanii-syringic acid significantly reduced nematode population densities in the greenhouse tests. Results with vanillic acid, isovanillic acid, and ferulic acid treatments were variable. Methyl vanillate did not significantly reduce cyst nematode population densities in the greenhouse tests. PMID:19277343

Meyer, S. L. F.; Huettel, R. N.

1996-01-01

384

Unisex Pheromone Detectors and Pheromone-binding Proteins in Scarab Beetles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Olfaction was studied in two species of scarab beetle, Anomala octiescostata and Anomala cuprea (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Rutelinae), which are temporarily isolated and use the same sex pheromone compounds, (R)-buibuilactone and (R)-japonilure. Single sensillum recordings in A. octiescostata revealed highly sensitive olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) (threshold <1 pg) that were tuned to the detection of the green leaf volatile compound (Z)-3-hexenyl

Alexander Alexeevich Nikonov; Guihong Peng; Galina Tsurupa; Walter Soares Leal

2002-01-01

385

Temporal bone resorption: an uncommon complication after mandibular distraction.  

PubMed

Temporal bone absorption is a very infrequent complication following a intraoral mandibular distraction. We present a case of severe temporal bone absorption with skull base bone destruction in a child who experienced the mandibular distraction operation. In her follow-up of the 6th month, it was observed that the implanted distraction device drilled to the temporal bone and stretch into the middle cranial fossa. We recommend to optimize the positioning of the osteotomy and the design of the distraction to avoid the otential risk of adjacent skull destruction. PMID:25748940

Feng, Shi; Zhang, Zhiyong; Shi, Lei; Tang, Xiaojun; Liu, Wei; Yin, Lin; Yang, Bin

2015-03-01

386

Pheromone-based mating disruption in Wisconsin cranberries  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Pheromone-based mating disruption is a promising method of pest control in cranberries. Three moth species, cranberry fruitworm, Acrobasis vaccinii Riley (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), Sparganothis fruitworm, Sparganothis sulfureana Clemens (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), and black-headed fireworm, Rhopobota...

387

Automated selection of appropriate pheromone representations in ant colony optimization.  

PubMed

Ant colony optimization (ACO) is a constructive metaheuristic that uses an analogue of ant trail pheromones to learn about good features of solutions. Critically, the pheromone representation for a particular problem is usually chosen intuitively rather than by following any systematic process. In some representations, distinct solutions appear multiple times, increasing the effective size of the search space and potentially misleading ants as to the true learned value of those solutions. In this article, we present a novel system for automatically generating appropriate pheromone representations, based on the characteristics of the problem model that ensures unique pheromone representation of solutions. This is the first stage in the development of a generalized ACO system that could be applied to a wide range of problems with little or no modification. However, the system we propose may be used in the development of any problem-specific ACO algorithm. PMID:16053571

Montgomery, James; Randall, Marcus; Hendtlass, Tim

2005-01-01

388

The boar-pheromone steroid identified in vegetables.  

PubMed

The steroid 5 a-androst-16-en-3-one, known as a boar pheromone, was identified in parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) and celery (Apium graveolens). Concentrations are in the range of 8 ng/g plant. PMID:520500

Claus, R; Hoppen, H O

1979-12-15

389

Pheromone Chemistry of the Smaller European Elm Bark Beetle.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the aggregation pheromone of the smaller European elm bark beetle, Scolytus multistriatus (Marsham), with emphasis on information that could be used in the classroom as a practical application of organic chemistry. (Author/GA)

Beck, Keith

1978-01-01

390

Directional Bias and Pheromone for Discovery and Coverage on Networks  

SciTech Connect

Natural multi-agent systems often rely on “correlated random walks” (random walks that are biased toward a current heading) to distribute their agents over a space (e.g., for foraging, search, etc.). Our contribution involves creation of a new movement and pheromone model that applies the concept of heading bias in random walks to a multi-agent, digital-ants system designed for cyber-security monitoring. We examine the relative performance effects of both pheromone and heading bias on speed of discovery of a target and search-area coverage in a two-dimensional network layout. We found that heading bias was unexpectedly helpful in reducing search time and that it was more influential than pheromone for improving coverage. We conclude that while pheromone is very important for rapid discovery, heading bias can also greatly improve both performance metrics.

Fink, Glenn A.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

2012-09-11

391

Temporal coding of pheromone pulses and trains in Manduca sexta  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the ability of pheromone-sensitive olfactory receptors of male Manduca sexta to respond to 20-ms pulses of bombykal, the major component of the conspecific pheromonal blend. Isolated pulses of bombykal elicited a burst of activity which decreased exponentially with a time constant of 160–250 ms. Trains of pulses delivered at increasing frequencies (0.5–10 Hz) elicited temporally modulated responses at

F. Marion-Poll; T. R. Tobin

1992-01-01

392

A New Multigene Family of Putative Pheromone Receptors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vomeronasal organ (VNO) mediates detection of pheromones related to social and reproductive behavior in most terrestrial vertebrates. We have identified a new multigene family of G protein–linked receptors (V2Rs) that are specifically expressed in the VNO. V2Rs have no significant homology to other putative pheromone receptors (V1Rs) or to olfactory receptors but are related to the Ca2+-sensing receptor and

Nicholas J. P Ryba; Roberto Tirindelli

1997-01-01

393

Aggregation pheromones in Drosophila borealis and Drosophila littoralis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mature males ofDrosophila borealis andD. littoralis (Diptera: Drosophilidae) produce pheromones that attract both males and females in a wind-tunnel bioassay. Ethyl tiglate is a major pheromone component in both species. Isopropyl tiglate is a minor component, as active as ethyl tiglate on an equal-weight basis, but less abundant in the flies. Both species respond to (Z)-9-heneicosene, a compound they do

Robert J. Bartelt; Angela M. Schaner; Larry L. Jackson

1988-01-01

394

Acp70A regulates Drosophila pheromones through juvenile hormone induction.  

PubMed

Mated Drosophila melanogaster females show a decrease in mating receptivity, enhanced ovogenesis, egg-laying and activation of juvenile hormone (JH) production. Components in the male seminal fluid, especially the sex peptide ACP70A stimulate these responses in females. Here we demonstrate that ACP70A is involved in the down-regulation of female sex pheromones and hydrocarbon (CHC) production. Drosophila G10 females which express Acp70A under the control of the vitellogenin gene yp1, produced fewer pheromones and CHCs. There was a dose-dependent relationship between the number of yp1-Acp70A alleles and the reduction of these compounds. Similarly, a decrease in CHCs and diene pheromones was observed in da > Acp70A flies that ubiquitously overexpress Acp70A. Quantitative-PCR experiments showed that the expression of Acp70A in G10 females was the same as in control males and 5 times lower than in da > Acp70A females. Three to four days after injection with 4.8 pmol ACP70A, females from two different strains, exhibited a significant decrease in CHC and pheromone levels. Similar phenotypes were observed in ACP70A injected flies whose ACP70A receptor expression was knocked-down by RNAi and in flies which overexpress ACP70A N-terminal domain. These results suggest that the action of ACP70A on CHCs could be a consequence of JH activation. Female flies exposed to a JH analog had reduced amounts of pheromones, whereas genetic ablation of the corpora allata or knock-down of the JH receptor Met, resulted in higher amounts of both CHCs and pheromonal dienes. Mating had negligible effects on CHC levels, however pheromone amounts were slightly reduced 3 and 4 days post copulation. The physiological significance of ACP70A on female pheromone synthesis is discussed. PMID:25484200

Bontonou, Gwénaëlle; Shaik, Haq Abdul; Denis, Béatrice; Wicker-Thomas, Claude

2015-01-01

395

Updated: September 9, 2013 Queen's University Faculty of Education  

E-print Network

Updated: September 9, 2013 Queen's University Faculty of Education Aboriginal Teacher Education Program Community-based Practicum Review Form Candidate: Faculty Liaison: School: Associate Teacher: Grade) after the initial Recommendations for Improvement are made, and (2) again after the Outcomes

Abolmaesumi, Purang

396

Queen's Geography Workshops and Summer Camp Assistant Counselor Application  

E-print Network

Queen's Geography Workshops and Summer Camp Assistant Counselor Application Do you like kids? Enjoy postal code)____________________________________________________________ Email______________________________ Phone Number (including area code) ____________________ Have you worked as an Explore Assistant

Graham, Nick

397

QUEEN'S UNDERGRADUATE INTERNSHIP PROGRAM 1213 School of Business REGISTRATION FORM  

E-print Network

QUEEN'S UNDERGRADUATE INTERNSHIP PROGRAM 1213 School of Business REGISTRATION FORM Student: ______________________ Department: ___________________ Currently in: 2nd or 3rd year International Student: yes no FIRST ROUND REGISTRATION DEADLINE: November 2, 2012 SECOND ROUND REGISTRATION

Graham, Nick

398

Mandibular corpus bone strain in goats and alpacas: Implications for understanding the biomechanics of mandibular form in selenodont artiodactyls  

PubMed Central

The goal of this study is to clarify the functional and biomechanical relationship between jaw morphology and in vivo masticatory loading in selenodont artiodactyls. We compare in vivo strains from the mandibular corpus of goats and alpacas to predicted strain patterns derived from biomechanical models for mandibular corpus loading during mastication. Peak shear strains in both species average 600–700 µ? on the working side and approximately 450 µ? on the balancing side. Maximum principal tension in goats and alpacas is directed at approximately 30° dorsocaudally relative to the long axis of the corpus on the working side and approximately perpendicular to the long axis on the balancing side. Strain patterns in both species indicate primarily torsion of the working-side corpus about the long axis and parasagittal bending and/or lateral transverse bending of the balancing-side corpus. Interpretation of the strain patterns is consistent with comparative biomechanical analyses of jaw morphology suggesting that in goats, the balancing-side mandibular corpus is parasagittally bent whereas in alpacas it experiences lateral transverse bending. However, in light of higher working-side corpus strains, biomechanical explanations of mandibular form also need to consider that torsion influences relative corpus size and shape. Furthermore, the complex combination of loads that occur along the selenodont artiodactyl mandibular corpus during the power stroke has two implications. First, added clarification of these loading patterns requires in vivo approaches for elucidating biomechanical links between mandibular corpus morphology and masticatory loading. Second, morphometric approaches may be limited in their ability to accurately infer masticatory loading regimes of selenodont artiodactyl jaws. PMID:19166474

Williams, Susan H; Vinyard, Christopher J; Wall, Christine E; Hylander, William L

2009-01-01

399

Trail Pheromone Disruption of Argentine Ant Trail Formation and Foraging  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Trail pheromone disruption of invasive ants is a novel tactic that builds on the development of pheromone-based pest management in other insects. Argentine ant trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal, was formulated as a micro-encapsulated sprayable particle and applied against Argentine ant populations in 400 m2 field plots in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. A widely dispersed point source strategy for trail pheromone disruption was used. Traffic rates of ants in bioassays of treated filter paper, protected from rainfall and sunlight, indicated the presence of behaviorally significant quantities of pheromone being released from the formulation for up to 59 days. The proportion of plots, under trade wind conditions (2-3 m s-1), with visible trails was reduced for up to 14 days following treatment, and the number of foraging ants at randomly placed tuna-bait cards was similarly reduced. The success of these trail pheromone disruption trials in a natural ecosystem highlights the potential of this method for control of invasive ant species in this and other environments. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010.

Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Stringer, L.D.; Snook, K.; Banko, P.C.

2010-01-01

400

Pheromones and their effect on women's mood and sexuality.  

PubMed

Pheromones are substances which are secreted to the outside by an individual and received by a second individual of the same species. Many examples exist in animals but their role in humans remains uncertain since adults have no functioning vomeronasal organ, which processes pheromone signals in animals. Yet pheromones can be detected by the olfactory system although humans under develop and underrate their smelling sense. Pheromones may be present in all bodily secretions but most attention has been geared toward axillary sweat which contains the odorous 16-androstenes. One of these steroidal compounds, androstadienone, is present at much higher concentrations in male sweat and can be detected by women, albeit with wide variation in sensitivity. Upper-lip application of a pharmacological dose of androstadienonein women results in improved mood and heightened focus - particularly to capture emotional information. A positive mood is known to facilitate women's sexual response, and -increased focus improves sexual satisfaction. Indeed, some studies showed a beneficial effect of androstadienone on sexual desire and arousal. However, these effects were dependent on the context of the experiment, for example, on the presence of a male attendant. Pheromones may also play a role in mate selection which is "disassortative" regarding the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-genotype. Preliminary evidence suggests that exposure to androstadienone in women promotes attractiveness ratings of potential mates. In conclusion, some data indicate that 16-androstene pheromones, in particular androstadienone, play a beneficial role in women's mood, focus and sexual response, and perhaps also in mate selection. PMID:24753944

Verhaeghe, J; Gheysen, R; Enzlin, P

2013-01-01

401

[A study on individual mandibular prostheses according to 3D reconstruction of CT images and CNC simulation method].  

PubMed

The new method of manufacturing individual mandibular prostheses, in combination with CT data and CNC technique, can duplicate bone tissues accurately, and can have the individual mandibular prosthesis made to order, and repair the mandibular defect (especially the lager mandibular segmental defect). PMID:17552166

Pan, Liu-guo; Sun, Li-qun

2007-03-01

402

Management of mandibular body fractures in pediatric patients: A case report with review of literature  

PubMed Central

Mandibular fractures are relatively less frequent in children when compared to adults, which may be due to the child's protected anatomic features and infrequent exposure of children to alcohol related traffic accidents. Treatment principles of mandibular fractures differ from that of adults due to concerns regarding mandibular growth and development of dentition. A case of a 4.5-year-old boy with fractured body of mandible managed by closed reduction using open occlusal acrylic splint and circum mandibular wiring is presented. This article also provides a review of literature regarding the management of mandibular body fracture in young children. PMID:22114443

John, Baby; John, Reena R.; Stalin, A.; Elango, Indumathi

2010-01-01

403

Pheromone interruption of pine engraver, Ips pini, by pheromones of mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosne (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of pheromones of Dendroc~onzl.~ poriderosae Hopkins on the attraction of Ipspini (Say) to its pheromone, ipsdienol, was investigated in stands of lodgepole pine. The mixture of cis- and trans-verbenol significantly reduced catches of I pin; in traps baited with ipsdienol at three locations in British Columbia. exo-Brevicomi~~ had no effect on catches of 1 pini, irrespective of the

DANIEL R. MILLER; JOHN H. BORDEN

404

Trigeminocardiac Reflex by Mandibular Extension on Rat Pial Microcirculation: Role of Nitric Oxide  

PubMed Central

In the present study we have extended our previous findings about the effects of 10 minutes of passive mandibular extension in anesthetized Wistar rats. By prolonging the observation time to 3 hours, we showed that 10 minutes mandibular extension caused a significant reduction of the mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate respect to baseline values, which persisted up to 160 minutes after mandibular extension. These effects were accompanied by a characteristic biphasic response of pial arterioles: during mandibular extension, pial arterioles constricted and after mandibular extension dilated for the whole observation period. Interestingly, the administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone abolished the vasoconstriction observed during mandibular extension, while the administration of N?-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, abolished the vasodilation observed after mandibular extension. Either drug did not affect the reduction of mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate induced by mandibular extension. By qRT-PCR, we also showed that neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene expression was significantly increased compared with baseline conditions during and after mandibular extension and endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene expression markedly increased at 2 hours after mandibular extension. Finally, western blotting detected a significant increase in neuronal and endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expression. In conclusion mandibular extension caused complex effects on pial microcirculation involving opioid receptor activation and nitric oxide release by both neurons and endothelial vascular cells at different times. PMID:25551566

Lapi, Dominga; Federighi, Giuseppe; Fantozzi, M. Paola; del Seppia, Cristina; Ghione, Sergio; Colantuoni, Antonio; Scuri, Rossana

2014-01-01

405

Trigeminocardiac reflex by mandibular extension on rat pial microcirculation: role of nitric oxide.  

PubMed

In the present study we have extended our previous findings about the effects of 10 minutes of passive mandibular extension in anesthetized Wistar rats. By prolonging the observation time to 3 hours, we showed that 10 minutes mandibular extension caused a significant reduction of the mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate respect to baseline values, which persisted up to 160 minutes after mandibular extension. These effects were accompanied by a characteristic biphasic response of pial arterioles: during mandibular extension, pial arterioles constricted and after mandibular extension dilated for the whole observation period. Interestingly, the administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone abolished the vasoconstriction observed during mandibular extension, while the administration of N?-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, abolished the vasodilation observed after mandibular extension. Either drug did not affect the reduction of mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate induced by mandibular extension. By qRT-PCR, we also showed that neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene expression was significantly increased compared with baseline conditions during and after mandibular extension and endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene expression markedly increased at 2 hours after mandibular extension. Finally, western blotting detected a significant increase in neuronal and endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expression. In conclusion mandibular extension caused complex effects on pial microcirculation involving opioid receptor activation and nitric oxide release by both neurons and endothelial vascular cells at different times. PMID:25551566

Lapi, Dominga; Federighi, Giuseppe; Fantozzi, M Paola; Del Seppia, Cristina; Ghione, Sergio; Colantuoni, Antonio; Scuri, Rossana

2014-01-01

406

Factors contributing to mandibular anterior crowding in the early mixed dentition.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to uncover the possible factors contributing to mandibular anterior crowding in the early mixed dentition. Mandibular dental casts of 60 children in the early mixed dentition were divided into two groups according to the severity of mandibular anterior crowding. The space available for the mandibular permanent incisors, total incisor width, deciduous intercanine width, deciduous intermolar widths, permanent intermolar width, interalveolar width, and total arch length were compared between the crowded group (CG) and noncrowded group (NCG), and correlations with crowding were investigated. The mandibular deciduous intercanine width, mandibular deciduous intermolar widths, mandibular permanent intermolar width, mandibular interalveolar width, space available for the mandibular permanent incisors, and total arch length were significantly larger in the NCG. The total width of the four mandibular incisors did not differ significantly between CG and NCG. Significant inverse correlations were found between crowding and available space, deciduous intercanine width, deciduous intermolar widths, permanent intermolar width, and interalveolar width. Total incisor width was directly correlated with crowding. No significant correlation was found between crowding and total arch length. The results of this study suggested that individual variations play an important role in treatment planning. However, one must not overlook arch length discrepancies and transverse discrepancies in patients with mandibular anterior crowding. PMID:15673136

Sayin, M Ozgür; Türkkahraman, Hakan

2004-12-01

407

Transcriptome comparison of the sex pheromone glands from two sibling Helicoverpa species with opposite sex pheromone components  

PubMed Central

Differences in sex pheromone component can lead to reproductive isolation. The sibling noctuid species, Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa assulta, share the same two sex pheromone components, Z9-16:Ald and Z11-16:Ald, but in opposite ratios, providing an typical example of such reproductive isolation. To investigate how the ratios of the pheromone components are differently regulated in the two species, we sequenced cDNA libraries from the pheromone glands of H. armigera and H. assulta. After assembly and annotation, we identified 108 and 93 transcripts putatively involved in pheromone biosynthesis, transport, and degradation in H. armigera and H. assulta, respectively. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR, qRT-PCR, phylogenetic, and mRNA abundance analyses suggested that some of these transcripts involved in the sex pheromone biosynthesis pathways perform. Based on these results, we postulate that the regulation of desaturases, KPSE and LPAQ, might be key factor regulating the opposite component ratios in the two sibling moths. In addition, our study has yielded large-scale sequence information for further studies and can be used to identify potential targets for the bio-control of these species by disrupting their sexual communication. PMID:25792497

Li, Zhao-Qun; Zhang, Shuai; Luo, Jun-Yu; Wang, Chun-Yi; Lv, Li-Min; Dong, Shuang-Lin; Cui, Jin-Jie

2015-01-01

408

Transcriptome comparison of the sex pheromone glands from two sibling Helicoverpa species with opposite sex pheromone components.  

PubMed

Differences in sex pheromone component can lead to reproductive isolation. The sibling noctuid species, Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa assulta, share the same two sex pheromone components, Z9-16:Ald and Z11-16:Ald, but in opposite ratios, providing an typical example of such reproductive isolation. To investigate how the ratios of the pheromone components are differently regulated in the two species, we sequenced cDNA libraries from the pheromone glands of H. armigera and H. assulta. After assembly and annotation, we identified 108 and 93 transcripts putatively involved in pheromone biosynthesis, transport, and degradation in H. armigera and H. assulta, respectively. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR, qRT-PCR, phylogenetic, and mRNA abundance analyses suggested that some of these transcripts involved in the sex pheromone biosynthesis pathways perform. Based on these results, we postulate that the regulation of desaturases, KPSE and LPAQ, might be key factor regulating the opposite component ratios in the two sibling moths. In addition, our study has yielded large-scale sequence information for further studies and can be used to identify potential targets for the bio-control of these species by disrupting their sexual communication. PMID:25792497

Li, Zhao-Qun; Zhang, Shuai; Luo, Jun-Yu; Wang, Chun-Yi; Lv, Li-Min; Dong, Shuang-Lin; Cui, Jin-Jie

2015-01-01

409

Mandibular alveolar ridge augmentation in the dog using distraction osteogenesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: This study investigated the use of distraction osteogenesis for alveolar ridge augmentation.Materials and Methods: Four dogs each had two superior and two inferior implants placed horizontally into an edentulous mandibular quadrant and, after integration, a distraction device was applied. An osteotomy was made to allow the ridge to be distracted vertically. After 10 mm vertical distraction, the device was

Michael S Block; Andrew Chang; Craig Crawford

1996-01-01

410

Canal configuration of mandibular first premolars in an Egyptian population.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to investigate canal configuration of mandibular first premolars in an Egyptian population. Two hundred fifty human extracted mandibular first premolars were collected from Egyptian patients and a small hole in the center of the occlusal surface of each tooth was made perforating the roof of the pulp chamber. Teeth were decalcified by immersing in nitric acid and dehydrated in ascending concentrations of ethyl alcohol. A waterproof black ink was passively injected from the occlusal hole into pulp system and stained teeth were immersed in methyl salicylate solution for clearing. Standardized pictures of the cleared teeth were obtained and anatomical features of the root canal were observed. The average length of the mandibular first premolar teeth was 22.48 ± 1.74 mm, one-rooted teeth were 96.8% and the two-rooted were 3.2%. Vertucci Type I canal configuration represented the highest percentage (61.2%) followed by Type V (16.4%), Type IV (13.2%), Type II (5.6%) and Type III (2.8%). Vertucci Type VI canal configuration represented the lowest percentage (0.4%) and a complex configuration was found in one tooth. Accessory canals were detected in 22.8% and inter-canal connections were observed in 24.8% while 54% showed apical delta. Such knowledge is clinically useful for localization and negotiation of canals of mandibular first premolar, as well as their subsequent management in Egyptian population. PMID:25685409

Alhadainy, Hatem A

2013-03-01

411

Fusion of complex odontome with permanent mandibular molar.  

PubMed

Odontomas are malformation of the dental tissue, arising during normal tooth development. They are usually asymptomatic, but often associated with tooth eruption disturbance. This article reports a case of complex odontome in a 23-year-male, which hampered the eruption of mandibular right second molar as well devitalization of first molar. PMID:23066237

Talari, Bharathi H; Ananda, Divya; Prince, Christo N; Annaporna, Chandrakala S; Pranavadhyani

2012-08-01

412

Epithelial odontogenic ghost cell tumour of the mandibular gingiva  

Microsoft Academic Search

The epithelial odontogenic ghost cell tumour (EOGCT) is considered as a solid `neoplastic' variant of the calcifying odontogenic cyst and is an uncommon lesion for which various names have been proposed over the years. We describe here an extraosseous case occurring on the edentulous mandibular gingiva in the right bicuspid area of a 70-year-old woman. The lesion was a painless

T Lombardi; R Küffer; R Di Felice; J Samson

1999-01-01

413

Management of mandibular fracture in a medically compromised pediatric patient.  

PubMed

Maxillofacial injuries in pediatric population warrant special attention because of anatomic considerations, potential for growth disturbances and rapidity of healing. We report a case of displaced mandibular fracture in a child who tested positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg) and, therefore, was managed conservatively by closed reduction stabilized with acrylic dental splints fabricated on reduced dental models. PMID:22442585

Gupta, Hemant; Pradhan, R; Sinha, V P; Gupta, Sumit; Mehra, Hemant; Singh, Abhijit

2010-07-01

414

An Epidemiological Study on Pattern and Incidence of Mandibular Fractures  

PubMed Central

Mandible is the second most common facial fracture. There has been a significant increase in the number of cases in recent years with the advent of fast moving automobiles. Mandibular fractures constitute a substantial proportion of maxillofacial trauma cases in Lucknow. This study was undertaken to study mandibular fractures clinicoradiologically with an aim to calculate incidence and study pattern and the commonest site of fractures in population in and around Lucknow. Patient presenting with history of trauma at various centers of maxillofacial surgery in and around Lucknow were included in this study. Detailed case history was recorded followed by thorough clinical examination, and radiological interpretation was done for establishing the diagnosis and the data obtained was analyzed statistically. Out of 66 patients with mandibular fractures, highest percentage was found in 21–30 years of age with male predominance. Road traffic accidents were the most common cause of fracture with parasymphysis being commonest site. Commonest combination was parasymphysis with subcondyle. There was no gender bias in etiology with number of fracture sites. The incidence and causes of mandibular fracture reflect trauma patterns within the community and can provide a guide to the design of programs geared toward prevention and treatment. PMID:23227327

Natu, Subodh S.; Pradhan, Harsha; Gupta, Hemant; Alam, Sarwar; Gupta, Sumit; Pradhan, R.; Mohammad, Shadab; Kohli, Munish; Sinha, Vijai P.; Shankar, Ravi; Agarwal, Anshita

2012-01-01

415

Ultrastructure of the platypus and echidna mandibular glands.  

PubMed

The secretory units of the platypus and echidna mandibular glands consist of a single serous cell type. Secretory granules within the cells of the platypus mandibular gland stained intensely with the periodic acid-Schiff staining procedure but failed to stain with Alcian Blue, suggesting the granules contained neutral glycoproteins. Secretory granules within the mandibular glands of the echidna failed to stain with the methods used indicating little if any glycoprotein was associated with the secretory granules. Ultrastructurally, secretory granules of the platypus mandibular gland were electron dense with a central core of less electron-dense material and were membrane bound. In contrast, those of the echidna presented a lamellated appearance and also were limited by a membrane. These secretory granules appeared to form as a result of concentric layering of lamellae within cisternae of the Golgi membranes. The intralobular ductal system of the platypus was more extensively developed than that of the echidna. The striated ducts of both species were characterized by elaborate infoldings of the basolateral plasmalemma and an abundance of associated mitochondria. PMID:21671995

Krause, W J

2011-10-01

416

Open versus closed reduction: mandibular condylar fractures in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to review the literature regarding the evolution of current thoughts on management of mandibular condylar fractures (MCFs) in children. Methods: An electronic search in PubMed was undertaken in May 2012. The titles and abstracts from these results were read to identify studies within the selection criteria. Eligibility criteria included studies published in English

Bruno Ramos Chrcanovic

2012-01-01

417

Management of Six Root Canals in Mandibular First Molar  

PubMed Central

Success in root canal treatment is achieved after thorough cleaning, shaping, and obturation of the root canal system. This clinical case describes conventional root canal treatment of an unusual mandibular first molar with six root canals. The prognosis for endodontic treatment in teeth with abnormal morphology is unfavorable if the clinician fails to recognize extra root canals. PMID:25685156

Gomes, Fabio de Almeida; Sousa, Bruno Carvalho

2015-01-01

418

Refinement in aesthetic contouring of the prominent mandibular angle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oriental women, in general, greatly desire a more delicate and feminine facial shape. This can be obtained by contouring the prominent mandibular aangles that give a strong, masculine image. Western authors regarded masseteric muscular hypertrophy the main cause of a square facial appearance, so they usually corrected it by partially excising the masseter muscle. In the authors' view, a square

Se-Min Baek; Rong-Min Baek; Myoung-Soo Shin

1994-01-01

419

The application of the Risdon approach for mandibular condyle fractures  

PubMed Central

Background Many novel approaches to mandibular condyle fracture have been reported, but there is a relative lack of reports on the Risdon approach. In this study, the feasibility of the Risdon approach for condylar neck and subcondylar fractures of the mandible is demonstrated. Methods A review of patients with mandibular condylar neck and subcondylar fractures was performed from March 2008 to June 2012. A total of 25 patients, 19 males and 6 females, had 14 condylar neck fractures and 11 subcondylar fractures. Results All of the cases were reduced using the Risdon approach. For subcondylar fractures, reduction and fixation with plates was done under direct vision. For condylar neck fractures, reduction and fixation was done with the aid of a trochar in adults and a percutaneous threaded Kirschner wire in children. There were no malunions or nonunions revealed in follow-up care. Mild transient neuropraxia of the marginal mandibular nerve was seen in 4 patients, which was resolved within 1–2 months. Conclusions The Risdon approach is a technique for reducing the condylar neck and subcondylar fractures that is easy to perform and easy to learn. Its value in the reduction of mandibular condyle fractures should be emphasized. PMID:23829537

2013-01-01

420

76 FR 3596 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Queen Conch Fishery of Puerto...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Queen Conch Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Queen Conch Management Measures AGENCY: National Marine...address overfishing of Caribbean queen conch in the U.S. Caribbean. If...

2011-01-20

421

76 FR 23907 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Queen Conch Fishery of Puerto...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Queen Conch Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Queen Conch Management Measures AGENCY: National Marine...address overfishing of Caribbean queen conch in the U.S. Caribbean. This rule...

2011-04-29

422

Genetic Variation in Myosin 1H Contributes to Mandibular Prognathism  

PubMed Central

Introduction Several candidate loci have been suggested as influencing mandibular prognathism (1p22.1, 1p22.2, 1p36, 3q26.2, 5p13-p12, 6q25, 11q22.2-q22.3, 12q23, 12q13.13, and 19p13.2). The goal of this study was to replicate these results in a well-characterized homogeneous sample set. Methods Thirty-three single nucleotide polymorphisms spanning all candidate regions were studied in 44 prognathic and 35 Class I subjects from the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine Dental Registry and DNA Repository. The 44 mandibular prognathism subjects had an average age of 18.4 years, 31 were females and 13 males, and 24 were White, 15 African American, two Hispanic, and three Asian. The 35 Class I subjects had an average age of 17.6 years, 27 were females and 9 males, and 27 were White, six African Americans, one Hispanic, and two Asian. Skeletal mandibular prognathism diagnosis included cephalometric values indicative of Class III such as ANB smaller than two degrees, negative Witts appraisal, and positive A–B plane. Additional mandibular prognathism criteria included negative OJ and visually prognathic (concave) profile as determined by the subject's clinical evaluation. Orthognathic subjects without jaw deformations were used as a comparison group. Mandibular prognathism and orthognathic subjects were matched based on race, sex and age. Genetic markers were tested by polymerase chain reaction using TaqMan chemistry. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to determine overrepresentation of marker allele with alpha of 0.05. Results An association was unveiled between a marker in MYO1H (rs10850110) and the mandibular prognathism phenotype (p=0.03). MYO1H is a Class-I myosin that is in a different protein group than the myosin isoforms of muscle sarcomeres, which are the basis of skeletal muscle fiber typing. Class I myosins are necessary for cell motility, phagocytosis and vesicle transport. Conclusions More strict clinical definitions may increase homogeneity and aid the studies of genetic susceptibility to malocclusions. We provide evidence that MYO1H may contribute to mandibular prognathism. PMID:22196185

Tassopoulou-Fishell, Maria; Deeley, Kathleen; Harvey, Erika M.; Sciote, James; Vieira, Alexandre R.

2013-01-01

423

Evidence of chemical exchange in recombinant Major Urinary Protein and quenching thereof upon pheromone binding  

E-print Network

upon pheromone binding Chiara Perazzolo Æ Mariachiara Verde Æ Steve W. Homans Æ Geoffrey Bodenhausen pheromones that have important effects on the mouse physiology and behaviour, like acceleration of female

424

Pheromonic Representation of User Quests by Digital Endre Boros, Paul B. Kantor, Dave J. Neu  

E-print Network

Pheromonic Representation of User Quests by Digital Structures Endre Boros, Paul B. Kantor, Dave J,000 bytes, which we call a Digital Information Pheromone" DIP. The principles for determining the DIP

425

Female sex pheromone of a wandering spider (Cupiennius salei): identification and sensory reception.  

PubMed

Females of the wandering spider Cupiennius salei attach a sex pheromone to their dragline. Males encountering the female dragline examine the silk thread with their pedipalps and then typically initiate reciprocal vibratory courtship with the sexual partner. The female pheromone was identified as (S)-1,1'-dimethyl citrate. The male pheromone receptive sensory cells are located in tip pore sensilla and respond to touching the sensillum tip with female silk or pieces of filter paper containing the synthetic pheromone. PMID:11318380

Tichy, H; Gingl, E; Ehn, R; Papke, M; Schulz, S

2001-02-01

426

Comparative analysis between direct Conventional Mandibular nerve block and Vazirani-Akinosi closed mouth Mandibular nerve block technique  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introduction: Over the years different techniques have been developed for achieving mandibular nerve anaesthesia. The main aim of our study was to carry out comparison and clinical efficacy of mandibular nerve anaesthesia by Direct Conventional technique with that of Vazirani-Akinosi mandibular nerve block technique.Materials and Methods: 50 adult patients requiring surgical extraction of premolars, mandibular first, second and third molars were selected randomly to receive Direct Conventional technique and Vazirani- Akinosi technique for nerve block alternatively.Results: No statistically significant differences were observed regarding complete lip anaesthesia at 5 minutes and 10 minutes, nerves anaesthetized with single injection, effectiveness of anaesthesia, supplementary injections and complications in both the techniques. However, onset of lip anaesthesia was found to be faster in Vazirani-Akinosi technique, patients experienced less pain during the Vazirani-Akinosi technique as compared to the Direct Conventional technique. Post injection complication complications were less in the VaziraniAkinosi Technique.Conclusions: Except for faster onset of lip anaesthesia, less pain during injection and fewer post injection complications in Vazirani-Akinosi technique all other parameters were of same efficacy as Direct Conventional technique. This has strong clinical applications as in cases with limited mouth opening, apprehensive patients Vazirani-Akinosi technique is the indicated technique of choice.

Mishra, Sobhan; Tripathy, Ramanupam; Sabhlok, Samrat; Panda, Pankaj Kumar; Patnaik, Satyabrata

2012-11-01

427

Panoramic radiographs do not accurately detect curvature of or close association with the mandibular canal of mandibular third molar roots  

Microsoft Academic Search

Original ArticleBell GW, Rodgers JM, Grime RJ, Edwards KL, Hahn MR, Dorman ML, et al. The accuracy of dental panoramic tomographs in determining the root morphology of mandibular third molar teeth before surgery. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2003;95(1):119–25.

S. Thomas Deahl

2003-01-01

428

Identification of aggregation substances of Enterococcus faecalis cells after induction by sex pheromones  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sex pheromone system of Enterococcus faecalis is responsible for the clumping response of a plasmid carrying donor strain with a corresponding plasmid free recipient strain due to the production of sex pheromones by the recipient strain. The clumping response is mediated by a surface material (called aggregation substance) which is synthesized upon addition of sex pheromones to the cultures.

Dominique Galli; Reinhard Wirth; Gerhard Wanner

1989-01-01

429

Evolutionary shifts in courtship pheromone composition revealed by EST analysis of plethodontid salamander mental glands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Courtship behavior in salamanders of the family Plethodontidae can last more than an hour. During courtship, males use stereotyped behaviors to repeatedly deliver a variety of proteinaceous pheromones to the female. These pheromones are produced and released from a specialized gland on the male's chin (the mental gland). Several pheromone components are well characterized and represented by high frequency transcripts

Karen M. Kiemnec-Tyburczy; Richard A. Watts; Ronald G. Gregg; Donald von Borstel; Stevan J. Arnold

2009-01-01

430

Sex pheromone gland of the female tiger moth Holomelina lamae (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae)  

E-print Network

1916 Sex pheromone gland of the female tiger moth Holomelina lamae (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) Lucy R pheromone gland of the female tiger moth Holomelina lamae (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae). Can. J. Zool. 69: 1916. T. 1991. Sex pheromone gland of the female tiger moth Holomelina lamae (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae). Can

431

Antennal-specific Pheromone-degrading Aldehyde Oxidases from the Moths Antheraea polyphemus and Bombyx mori  

Microsoft Academic Search

Female moths produce blends of odorant chemicals, called pheromones. These precise chemical mixtures both attract males and elicit appropriate mating be- haviors. To locate females, male moths must rapidly detect changes in environmental pheromone concen- tration. Therefore, the regulation of pheromone con- centration within antennae, their chief organ of smell, is important. We describe antennal-specific aldehyde oxidases from the moths

R. Rybczynski; R. G. Vogt; M. R. LernerS

432

Moth pheromone binding proteins contribute to the excitation of olfactory receptor cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pheromone binding proteins (PBPs) occur in high concentrations in the sensillum lymph surrounding the sensory dendrites of moth pheromone-sensitive sensilla. They were shown to transport the lipophilic odorants through the aqueous sensillum lymph to the receptor cells. The sensilla trichodea of the silkmoth Antheraea polyphemus are supplied with three types of receptor cells responding specifically to three pheromone components. The

Blanka Pophof

2002-01-01

433

A Complex Set of Sex Pheromones Identified in the Cuttlefish Sepia officinalis  

E-print Network

A Complex Set of Sex Pheromones Identified in the Cuttlefish Sepia officinalis Je´re´my Enault1 migrations. Using transcriptomic and peptidomic approaches, we aim to identify peptide sex pheromones the identification of sex pheromones, 576 59-expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were sequenced from a single cDNA library

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

434

The species, sex, and stage specificity of a Caenorhabditis sex pheromone  

E-print Network

The species, sex, and stage specificity of a Caenorhabditis sex pheromone J. R. Chasnov*, W. K. So chemotaxis assays, we demonstrate that females secrete a potent sex pheromone that attracts males from a distance, whereas hermaphrodites do not. The female sex pheromone is not species-specific, with males

Chasnov, Jeffrey R.

435

CHEMICAL ECOLOGY Dose-Dependent Pheromone Responses of Mountain Pine Beetle in  

E-print Network

mountain pine beetle pheromones. Clerids respond to bark bee- tle pheromones and may exert selectionCHEMICAL ECOLOGY Dose-Dependent Pheromone Responses of Mountain Pine Beetle in Stands of Lodgepole Pine DANIEL R. MILLER,1 B. STAFFAN LINDGREN,2 AND JOHN H. BORDEN3 USDA Forest Service, Southern

Lindgren, Staffan

436

Updating ACO Pheromones Using Stochastic Gradient Ascent and Cross-Entropy Methods  

E-print Network

Updating ACO Pheromones Using Stochastic Gradient Ascent and Cross-Entropy Methods Marco Dorigo1 algorithm and the cross-entropy method, for deriving the pheromone update rules in the Ant colony new solutions using local information, called pheromone,1 stored in the construction graph. 2

Libre de Bruxelles, Université

437

Chromatographic Fractionation of Aggregation and Sex Pheromones of Nippostrongy/us brasiliensis (Nematoda)  

E-print Network

Chromatographic Fractionation of Aggregation and Sex Pheromones of Nippostrongy/us brasiliensis Nippostrongylus brasiliensis revealed two fractions with pheromonal activity. One active fraction with a suggested sexes by in vitro bioassay. A second re- gion of pheromone activity was found in only female

Hammock, Bruce D.

438

Intraspecific sex-pheromone variability in the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis Hbn. (Lepidoptera, Pyrali-  

E-print Network

Intraspecific sex-pheromone variability in the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis Hbn of intraspecific pheromone variability in Ostrinia nubilalis Hbn (ECB) in Europe and North America (KLUN). In the palearctic region, the ECB populations exhibited pheromone polymorphism. The Z phenotype was the only one

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

439

Nuclear export of Far1p in response to pheromones requires the export  

E-print Network

Nuclear export of Far1p in response to pheromones requires the export receptor Msn5p/Ste21p Marc predominantly in the nucleus but accumulates in the cytoplasm in cells exposed to pheromones. Here we show. Cells deleted for Msn5p/Ste21p failed to export Far1p in response to pheromones, whereas overexpression

Shaham, Shai

440

Proceedings of the 2005 IEEE CEC, Vol. 1880 Performance of Aggregation Pheromone System on Unimodal and  

E-print Network

Proceedings of the 2005 IEEE CEC, Vol. 1880 Performance of Aggregation Pheromone System on Unimodal, India ash@isical.ac.in Abstract- This paper describes and analyzes the aggregation pheromone system (APS behavior of individuals that communicate using aggregation of pheromones. Two variants of APS

Tsutsui, Shigeyoshi

441

Physiological Entomology (1984) 9, 341-358 Effects of intermittent and continuous pheromone stimulationon  

E-print Network

Physiological Entomology (1984) 9, 341-358 Effects of intermittent and continuous pheromone in clean air entered an airstream permeated with pheromone their flight tracks changed immediately on initial contact with pheromone, but after a few secondsreturned to casting asif in clean air. The degree

1984-01-01

442

Genetic Evidence for the Coexistence of Pheromone Perception and Full Trichromatic Vision in Howler Monkeys  

E-print Network

Genetic Evidence for the Coexistence of Pheromone Perception and Full Trichromatic Vision in Howler, Universidad Veracruzana, Veracruz, Me´xico Vertebrate pheromones are water-soluble chemicals perceived mainly functional genes responsible for the pheromone signal transduction and are generally insensitive

Zhang, Jianzhi

443

Spatial and temporal variation in pheromone composition of ant foraging trails  

E-print Network

Spatial and temporal variation in pheromone composition of ant foraging trails Duncan E. Jackson, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S1 4DP, UK Many social insects use pheromones to communicate and coordinate their activities. Investigation of intraspecific differences in pheromone use is a new area

Holcombe, Mike

444

Multimodal signalling: structural ultraviolet reflectance predicts male mating success better than pheromones in the butterfly  

E-print Network

pheromones in the butterfly Colias eurytheme L. (Pieridae) RANDI S. PAPKE, DARRELL J. KEMP & RONALD L ultraviolet (UV) reflectance and pheromones in the butterfly Colias eurytheme. Both traits are important in mediating interspecific interactions and pheromones have been implicated in intra- specific mate choice. UV

Rutowski, Ronald L.

445

Anti-pheromone as a Tool for Better Exploration of Search Space  

E-print Network

Anti-pheromone as a Tool for Better Exploration of Search Space James Montgomery and Marcus Randall. Many animals use chemical substances known as pheromones to induce behavioural changes in other members of the same species. The use of pheromones by ants in particular has lead to the development of a number

Montgomery, James

446

Abstract Predators and parasitoids are known to exploit both plant volatiles and herbivore pheromones to locate  

E-print Network

pheromones to locate their insect prey. However, the interaction of these chem- ical cues in prey location to the pheromones and plant sig- nals associated with two species of common bark beetle prey. Thanasimus dubius grandicollis. The aggregation pheromone of Wisconsin I. pini contains ipsdienol, which occurs

Erbilgin, Nadir

447

Diaprepes mating pheromone The Diaprepes root weevil (Diaprepes abbreviatus) from the Caribbean is  

E-print Network

Diaprepes mating pheromone ­ The Diaprepes root weevil (Diaprepes abbreviatus) from the Caribbean, dispersal when food goes down, or mate finding. These chemical odors, or social cues, are called pheromones. Such a pheromone for mating has long been sought for the Diaprepes root weevil. The discovery of the mating

448

COMPARISON OF NEW PHEROMONE DISPENSING TECHNOLOGIES FOR MATING DISRUPTION OF INTERNAL-FEEDING LEPIDOPTERA IN APPLES  

E-print Network

COMPARISON OF NEW PHEROMONE DISPENSING TECHNOLOGIES FOR MATING DISRUPTION OF INTERNAL­10-acre plots on three farms, to assess the efficacy of three different multi-species pheromone products-OFM Duel membranes; and Suterra CM/OFM Puffers. Pheromone treatments were used as a complement

Agnello, Arthur M.

449

Solution Bias in Ant Colony Optimisation: Lessons for Selecting Pheromone Models  

E-print Network

Solution Bias in Ant Colony Optimisation: Lessons for Selecting Pheromone Models James Montgomery solutions are built probabilisti- cally influenced by the parameters of a pheromone model--an analogue of the trail pheromones used by real ants when foraging for food. Recent studies have uncovered the presence

Montgomery, James

450

Identification and Synthesis of a Female-Produced Sex Pheromone for the Cerambycid Beetle Prionus californicus  

E-print Network

Identification and Synthesis of a Female-Produced Sex Pheromone for the Cerambycid Beetle Prionus.com Abstract Females of the large cerambycid beetle Prionus californicus produce a powerful sex pheromone that attracts males. The pheromone was adsorbed on solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers inserted

Hanks, Lawrence M.

451

Alice in Pheromone Land: An Experimental Setup for the Study of Ant-like Robots  

E-print Network

Alice in Pheromone Land: An Experimental Setup for the Study of Ant-like Robots Simon Garniera - Tannenstrasse 3 - CH-8092 Zürich - SWITZERLAND Abstract - The pheromone trail laying and trail following be of the chemical nature of pheromones. In this paper we present a new experimental setup which allows to inves

Garnier, Simon

452

Multi-agent Physical A* with Large Pheromones Ariel Felner1  

E-print Network

Multi-agent Physical A* with Large Pheromones Ariel Felner1 , Yaron Shoshani2 , Yaniv Altshuler3 large pheromones, where agents communicate by writing and reading data at nodes of the graph that constitutes their environment. Previous works on pheromones usually as- sumed that only a limited amount

Felner, Ariel

453

Pheromone-based Column Generation for the Vehicle Routing Problem with Black Box Feasibility  

E-print Network

Pheromone-based Column Generation for the Vehicle Routing Problem with Black Box Feasibility of a Set Covering Problem is solved on the column pool. The Collector Ants are guided by pheromone deposits on the edges of the problem graph. Those pheromones are up- dated each iteration in function of the current

Deville, Yves

454

Chemoecology 1 (1990) 63-68 63 Aphid sex pheromone components: age-dependent release  

E-print Network

Chemoecology 1 (1990) 63-68 63 Aphid sex pheromone components: age-dependent release by females Sex pheromone released by Megoura viciae oviparae was collected and analysed for the quantity and re- lative amounts of each of the two biologically active compo- nents. Pheromone was not produced until

Holyoak, Marcel

1990-01-01

455

Trail formation based on directed pheromone Emmanuel Boissard(1,2)  

E-print Network

Trail formation based on directed pheromone deposition Emmanuel Boissard(1,2) Pierre Degond(1-propelled particles which deposit directed pheromones and interact with them through alignment interaction. The directed pheromones intend to model pieces of trails, while the alignment interaction translates

Boyer, Edmond

456

Video Article Imaging Pheromone Sensing in a Mouse Vomeronasal Acute Tissue Slice  

E-print Network

Video Article Imaging Pheromone Sensing in a Mouse Vomeronasal Acute Tissue Slice Preparation://www.jove.com/video/3311/ DOI: 10.3791/3311 Keywords: Neuroscience, Issue 58, Vomeronasal organ, VNO, pheromone, calcium Pheromone Sensing in a Mouse Vomeronasal Acute Tissue Slice Preparation. J. Vis. Exp. (58), e3311, DOI : 10

Citi, Sandra

457

PHYSIOLOGY, BIOCHEMISTRY, AND TOXICOLOGY Site of Pheromone Production in Female Supella longipalpa  

E-print Network

PHYSIOLOGY, BIOCHEMISTRY, AND TOXICOLOGY Site of Pheromone Production in Female Supella longipalpa. 85(5): 605-611 (1992) ABSTRACT The site of sex pheromone production in female Supella longipalpa (F in pheromone production and in its release while the female engages in calling behavior. KEY WORDS sex

458

A scientific note on trail pheromone communication in a stingless bee, Scaptotrigona pectoralis (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini)  

E-print Network

A scientific note on trail pheromone communication in a stingless bee, Scaptotrigona pectoralis communication / trail pheromone / labial glands / nest specificity Foragers of eusocial stingless bees use to food sources at specific locations is particularly effective in species that use pheromones deposited

459

Single mutation to a sex pheromone receptor provides adaptive specificity between closely related  

E-print Network

Single mutation to a sex pheromone receptor provides adaptive specificity between closely related of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, and approved July 18, 2012 (received for review March 19, 2012) Sex pheromone pheromone, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that underlie the evolution of phero- mone

Nachman, Michael

460

Use of pheromones and other semiochemicals in integrated production IOBC wprs Bulletin Vol. 25() 2002  

E-print Network

Use of pheromones and other semiochemicals in integrated production IOBC wprs Bulletin Vol. 25(·) 2002 pp. ·-· Pentatomid bug pheromones in IPM: possible applications and limitations J. G. Millar, H. L-produced pheromone components have been identified from several species of agriculturally important stink bugs

Sheridan, Jennifer

461

POPULATION ECOLOGY Geographical Variation in Pheromone Response of the European Corn  

E-print Network

POPULATION ECOLOGY Geographical Variation in Pheromone Response of the European Corn Borer University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7630 Environ. Entomol. 34(5): 1057Ð1062 (2005) ABSTRACT Pheromone traps were used to assess the distribution of two pheromone races of European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hu

462

QoS-aware Ant Routing with Colored Pheromones in Wireless Mesh Networks  

E-print Network

QoS-aware Ant Routing with Colored Pheromones in Wireless Mesh Networks Martina Umlauft Institute work by deploying artificial pheromone at the network paths, which is then used for fu- ture routing. Therefore, we propose a concept for ant routing with col- ored pheromones (CPANT), where a color corresponds

463

MANAGEMENT OF ORIENTAL FRUIT MOTH IN APPLES USING DIFFERENT PHEROMONE DISPENSER TECHNOLOGIES AND  

E-print Network

MANAGEMENT OF ORIENTAL FRUIT MOTH IN APPLES USING DIFFERENT PHEROMONE DISPENSER TECHNOLOGIES AND IN apples on five commercial farms in Wayne, Orleans and Niagara Counties, NY. A low-density pheromone three different pheromone dispensing technologies, as well as a modified fruit sampling procedure

Agnello, Arthur M.

464

Absolute Configuration of Chiral Terpenes in Marking Pheromones of Bumblebees and  

E-print Network

Absolute Configuration of Chiral Terpenes in Marking Pheromones of Bumblebees and Cuckoo Bumblebees marking pheromones of seven species of bumblebees and cuckoo bumblebees were determined on the absolute configuration of terpenes in marking pheromones of bumblebees. Chirality 16:228­233, 2004. A 2004

Rasmont, Pierre

465

FOREST ENTOMOLOGY Identification of a Male-Produced Aggregation Pheromone for  

E-print Network

FOREST ENTOMOLOGY Identification of a Male-Produced Aggregation Pheromone for MonochamusÞcation and Þeld testing of 2-(undecyloxy)-ethanol (monochamol) as a sex-speciÞc, aggregation pheromone component. scutellatus, also was attracted to this compound in Þeld trials, suggesting it may be a pheromone component

Hanks, Lawrence M.

466

COMPARISON OF MECHANICALLY APPLIED PHEROMONE DISPENSING TECHNOLOGIES FOR MATING DISRUPTION OF TREE FRUIT PEST LEPIDOPTERA  

E-print Network

COMPARISON OF MECHANICALLY APPLIED PHEROMONE DISPENSING TECHNOLOGIES FOR MATING DISRUPTION OF TREE­23-acre plots on five farms, to assess the efficacy of two different pheromone dispensing systems against): Checkmate Puffers (against CM, OFM, and LAW), and SPLAT (against CM, OFM, LAW and OBLR). Pheromone

Agnello, Arthur M.

467

Mating and Dauer Pheromones from Caenorhabditis elegans National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

E-print Network

Mating and Dauer Pheromones from Caenorhabditis elegans National High Magnetic Field Laboratory) of one of the pheromones (lower left). Previous studies utilized over 300 L to identify the first dauer pheromone. #12;C. elegans is one of the best-studied model organisms. Important discoveries using this small

Weston, Ken

468

Dramatic variation of the vomeronasal pheromone receptor gene repertoire among five orders  

E-print Network

Dramatic variation of the vomeronasal pheromone receptor gene repertoire among five orders 25, 2005 (received for review January 15, 2005) Pheromones are chemicals emitted and sensed by the vomeronasal organ (VNO). Pheromone receptors in the mammalian VNO are encoded by the V1R and V2R gene

Zhang, Jianzhi

469

Timed, Metered Spraysof Pheromone Disrupt Mating of Cadra cautella (Lepidoptera:Pyra1idae)l  

E-print Network

Timed, Metered Spraysof Pheromone Disrupt Mating of Cadra cautella (Lepidoptera:Pyra1idae)l A Entomol 13(2): 149-168 (April 1996) ABSTRACT A controlled release system for dispensing insect pheromones Large quantities of pheromone were stored in pressurized canisters of metered semiochemical timed

470

Communication via sex pheromones within and among Arrenurus spp. mites (Acari: Hydrachnida;  

E-print Network

-1 Communication via sex pheromones within and among Arrenurus spp. mites (Acari: Hydrachnida-607-274-1131) Key words: Arrenuridae, Mating behaviour, Sex pheromone, Water mite Abstract. We present direct experimental evidence of pheromone use in six species of Arrenurus and indirect evidence for four species

471

their pheromone. The (E,Z) -isomer apparently had less effect on the re-  

E-print Network

their pheromone. The (E,Z) -isomer apparently had less effect on the re- sponse of S. exitiosa males to their pheromone but it seemed to reduce the attractiveness of the (Z,Z) -isomer when the two that contained the synthetic pheromone caught 1335 male S. pictipes; the traps containing females caught 114

Stanley, H. Eugene

472

Swarm Approaches for the Patrolling Problem, Information Propagation vs. Pheromone Evaporation  

E-print Network

Swarm Approaches for the Patrolling Problem, Information Propagation vs. Pheromone Evaporation of performances, we define a first algorithm based only on the evaporation of a pheromone dropped by reactive: Multi-agent patrolling, reactive multi- agents system, digital pheromones. 1. Introduction Patrolling

Simonin, Olivier -Département Informatique, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon

473

Genes Involved in Sex Pheromone Discrimination in Drosophila melanogaster and Their Background-  

E-print Network

Genes Involved in Sex Pheromone Discrimination in Drosophila melanogaster and Their Background of the sensory quality of potential mating partners, and sex pheromones play an important role in this process. In Drosophila melanogaster, contact pheromones differ between male and female in their content

Boyer, Edmond

474

Causes and Consequences of Variability in Peptide Mating Pheromones of Ascomycete Fungi  

E-print Network

Causes and Consequences of Variability in Peptide Mating Pheromones of Ascomycete Fungi Simon H and speciation. Ascomycetes produce two classes of mating type­specific peptide pheromones. These are required or the extent of species specificity in pheromone peptides among these fungi. We compared the putative protein

475

Patterns of Gene Duplication in Lepidopteran Pheromone Binding Proteins Thomas J.S. Merritt,1  

E-print Network

Patterns of Gene Duplication in Lepidopteran Pheromone Binding Proteins Thomas J.S. Merritt,1 Siana and characterized cDNAs representing two distinct pheromone binding proteins (PBPs) from the gypsy moth, Lymantria: Lepidopteran pheromone binding pro- teins -- Molecular evolution -- Gene duplication -- Lymantria dispar

Vogt, Richard G.

476

CHEMICAL ECOLOGY (R)-3-Hydroxyhexan-2-one Is a Major Pheromone Component of  

E-print Network

CHEMICAL ECOLOGY (R)-3-Hydroxyhexan-2-one Is a Major Pheromone Component of Anelaphus inflaticollis of a major component of the male- produced aggregation pheromone of Anelaphus inflaticollis Chemsak,3-hexanediols. Field trials with baited bucket traps determined that the reconstructed synthetic pheromone blend

Hanks, Lawrence M.

477

SEX PHEROMONE ACTIVITY OF THE MOLTING HORMONE, CRUSTECDYSONE, ON MALE CRABS  

E-print Network

SEX PHEROMONE ACTIVITY OF THE MOLTING HORMONE, CRUSTECDYSONE, ON MALE CRABS (Pa~hygrapsus ~rassipes' ABSTRACT The pheromone released by premolt female Pachygrapsu8 cras.~ipes is a heat stable non-ionic polar lipid. The coincidence of the release of the pheromone and the nubial molt suggested that the molting

478

Fus3-triggered Tec1 degradation modulates mating transcriptional output during the pheromone response  

E-print Network

REPORT Fus3-triggered Tec1 degradation modulates mating transcriptional output during the pheromone transcription factor Ste12 controls both mating and filamentation pathways. Upon pheromone induction complex through Tec1-binding sites. The two Ste12 complexes are mutually exclusive. During pheromone

Nie, Qing

479

Molecular and neural mechanisms of sex pheromone reception and processing in the silkmoth Bombyx mori  

PubMed Central

Male moths locate their mates using species-specific sex pheromones emitted by conspecific females. One striking feature of sex pheromone recognition in males is the high degree of specificity and sensitivity at all levels, from the primary sensory processes to behavior. The silkmoth Bombyx mori is an excellent model insect in which to decipher the underlying mechanisms of sex pheromone recognition due to its simple sex pheromone communication system, where a single pheromone component, bombykol, elicits the full sexual behavior of male moths. Various technical advancements that cover all levels of analysis from molecular to behavioral also allow the systematic analysis of pheromone recognition mechanisms. Sex pheromone signals are detected by pheromone receptors expressed in olfactory receptor neurons in the pheromone-sensitive sensilla trichodea on male antennae. The signals are transmitted to the first olfactory processing center, the antennal lobe (AL), and then are processed further in the higher centers (mushroom body and lateral protocerebrum) to elicit orientation behavior toward females. In recent years, significant progress has been made elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the detection of sex pheromones. In addition, extensive studies of the AL and higher centers have provided insights into the neural basis of pheromone processing in the silkmoth brain. This review describes these latest advances, and discusses what these advances have revealed about the mechanisms underlying the specific and sensitive recognition of sex pheromones in the silkmoth. PMID:24744736

Sakurai, Takeshi; Namiki, Shigehiro; Kanzaki, Ryohei

2014-01-01

480

Using an electronic nose to rapidly assess grandlure content in boll weevil pheromone lures  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Samples of pheromone lures used in boll weevil eradication programs are routinely analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) to ensure lures are adequately dosed with grandlure, the synthetic aggregation pheromone produced by male weevils. Although this approach accurately quantifies the pheromone content...

481

EFFECT OF PBAN ON PHEROMONE PRODUCTION BY MATED Heliothis virescens AND Heliothis subflexa FEMALES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mated female Heliothis virescens and H. subflexa were induced to produce sex pheromone during the photophase by injection of pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN). When injected with 1 pmol Hez-PBAN, the total amount of pheromone that could be extracted from glands of mated females during the photophase was similar to that extracted from virgin females in the scotophase. The PBAN-induced

ASTRID T. GROOT; YONGLIANG FAN; CAVELL BROWNIE; RUSSELL A. JURENKA; FRED GOULD; COBY SCHAL

2005-01-01

482

Eddies off the Queen Charlotte Islands  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The bright red, green, and turquoise patches to the west of British Columbia's Queen Charlotte Islands and Alaska's Alexander Archipelago highlight the presence of biological activity in the ocean. These colors indicate high concentrations of chlorophyll, the primary pigment found in phytoplankton. Notice that there are a number of eddies visible in the Pacific Ocean in this pseudo-color scene. The eddies are formed by strong outflow currents from rivers along North America's west coast that are rich in nutrients from the springtime snowmelt running off the mountains. This nutrient-rich water helps stimulate the phytoplankton blooms within the eddies. (For more details, read Tracking Eddies that Feed the Sea.) To the west of the eddies in the water, another type of eddy-this one in the atmosphere-forms the clouds into the counterclockwise spiral characteristic of a low pressure system in the Northern Hemisphere. (Click on the image above to see it at full resolution; or click to see the scene in true-color.) The snow-covered mountains of British Columbia are visible in the upper righthand corner of the image. This scene was constructed using SeaWiFS data collected on June 13, 2002. SeaWiFS image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

2002-01-01

483

Quantitative analysis of pheromone-binding protein specificity  

PubMed Central

Many pheromones have very low water solubility, posing experimental difficulties for quantitative binding measurements. A new method is presented for determining thermodynamically valid dissociation constants for ligands binding to pheromone-binding proteins (OBPs), using ?-cyclodextrin as a solubilizer and transfer agent. The method is applied to LUSH, a Drosophila OBP that binds the pheromone 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA). Refolding of LUSH expressed in E. coli was assessed by measuring N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN) binding and Förster resonance energy transfer between LUSH tryptophan 123 (W123) and NPN. Binding of cVA was measured from quenching of W123 fluorescence as a function of cVA concentration. The equilibrium constant for transfer of cVA between ?-cyclodextrin and LUSH was determined from a linked equilibria model. This constant, multiplied by the ?-cyclodextrin-cVA dissociation constant, gives the LUSH-cVA dissociation constant: ~100 nM. It was also found that other ligands quench W123 fluorescence. The LUSH-ligand dissociation constants were determined to be ~200 nM for the silk moth pheromone bombykol and ~90 nM for methyl oleate. The results indicate that the ligand-binding cavity of LUSH can accommodate a variety ligands with strong binding interactions. Implications of this for the pheromone receptor model proposed by Laughlin et al. (Cell 133: 1255–65, 2008) are discussed. PMID:23121132

Katti, S.; Lokhande, N.; González, D.; Cassill, A.; Renthal, R.

2012-01-01

484

Octopamine modulates the sensitivity of silkmoth pheromone receptor neurons.  

PubMed

Effects of octopamine and its antagonist epinastine on electrophysiological responses of receptor neurons of Antheraea polyphemus specialised to the pheromone components (E,Z)-6,11-hexadecadienyl acetate and (E,Z)-6,11-hexadecadienal were investigated. Injections of octopamine and epinastine into the moths had no effect on the transepithelial potential of the antennal-branch preparation nor on the spontaneous nerve impulse frequency in either type of receptor neuron. However, in the presence of continuous low-intensity pheromone stimulation, octopamine significantly increased the nerve impulse frequency in the acetate receptor neuron, but not in the aldehyde receptor neuron. Octopamine and epinastine had no significant effect on the receptor potential amplitudes elicited in both receptor neuron types by pheromone stimulation. However, the peak nerve impulse frequency in the response of both receptor neuron types to pheromone was significantly affected: decreased by epinastine and increased by octopamine over a broad range of pheromone concentrations. In control experiments, injection of physiological saline did not significantly alter the peak nerve impulse frequency. The effect of octopamine was established within 1 h after injection and persisted for about 4 h. The possibility of a direct action of octopamine on the nerve impulse generation by the receptor neurons is discussed. PMID:10757246

Pophof, B

2000-03-01

485

The mothematics of female pheromone signaling: strategies for aging virgins.  

PubMed

Abstract Although females rarely experience strong mate limitation, delays or lifelong problems of mate acquisition are detrimental to female fitness. In systems where males search for females via pheromone plumes, it is often difficult to assess whether female signaling is costly. Direct costs include the energetics of pheromone production and attention from unwanted eavesdroppers, such as parasites, parasitoids, and predators. Suboptimal outcomes are also possible from too many or too few mating events or near-simultaneous arrival of males who make unwanted mating attempts (even if successfully thwarted). We show that, in theory, even small costs can lead to a scenario where young females signal less intensely (lower pheromone concentration and/or shorter time spent signaling) and increase signaling effort only as they age and gather evidence (while still virgin) on whether sperm limitation threatens their reproductive success. Our synthesis of the empirical data available on Lepidoptera supports this prediction for one frequently reported component of signaling-time spent calling (often reported as the time of onset of calling at night)-but not for another, pheromone titer. This difference is explicable under the plausible but currently untested assumption that signaling earlier than other females each night is a more reliable way of increasing the probability of acquiring at least one mate than producing a more concentrated pheromone plume. PMID:25674695

Umbers, Kate D L; Symonds, Matthew R E; Kokko, Hanna

2015-03-01

486

Predicted taxonomic patterns in pheromone production by longhorned beetles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Males of five species of three tribes in the longhorned beetle subfamily Cerambycinae produce volatile pheromones that share a structural motif (hydroxyl or carbonyl groups at carbons two and three in straight-chains of six, eight, or ten carbons). Pheromone gland pores are present on the prothoraces of males, but are absent in females, suggesting that male-specific gland pores could provide a convenient morphological indication that a species uses volatile pheromones. In this article, we assess the taxonomic distribution of gland pores within the Cerambycinae by examining males and females of 65 species in 24 tribes using scanning electron microscopy. Gland pores were present in males and absent in females of 49 species, but absent in both sexes of the remaining 16 species. Pores were confined to indentations in the cuticle. Among the species that had male-specific gland pores were four species already known to produce volatile compounds consistent with the structural motif. These findings support the initial assumption that gland pores are associated with the production of pheromones by males. There were apparently no taxonomic patterns in the presence of gland pores. These findings suggest that volatile pheromones play an important role in reproduction for many species of the Cerambycinae, and that the trait is evolutionarily labile.

Ray, Ann M.; Lacey, Emerson S.; Hanks, Lawrence M.

2006-11-01

487

2,3-Hexanediols as Sex Attractants and a Female-produced Sex Pheromone for Cerambycid Beetles in the Prionine  

E-print Network

2,3-Hexanediols as Sex Attractants and a Female-produced Sex Pheromone for Cerambycid Beetles ceramby- cid species often share pheromone components, or even pro- duce pheromone blends of identical composition. However, little is known of the pheromones of species in the subfamily Prioninae. During field

Hanks, Lawrence M.

488

cis-Vaccenyl Acetate, A Female-Produced Sex Pheromone Component of Ortholeptura valida, A Longhorned Beetle  

E-print Network

cis-Vaccenyl Acetate, A Female-Produced Sex Pheromone Component of Ortholeptura valida of a female-produced sex attractant pheromone component of the cerambycid beetle Ortholeptura valida (Le with this compound. The pheromone represents a new structural class of cerambycid pheromones, and is the first

Hanks, Lawrence M.

489

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions  

E-print Network

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 Advisor Center Navigation: Login #12;Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

490

Presence of Nosema ceranae associated with honeybee queen introductions.  

PubMed

Microsporidiosis caused by Nosema species is one of the factors threatening the health of the honeybee (Apis mellifera), which is an essential element in agriculture mainly due to its pollination function. The dispersion of this pathogen may be influenced by many factors, including various aspects of beekeeping management such as introduction of queens with different origin. Herein we study the relation of the presence and distribution of Nosema spp. and the replacement of queens in honeybee populations settled on the Atlantic Canary Islands. While Nosema apis has not been detected, an increase of the presence and distribution of Nosema ceranae during the last decade has been observed in parallel with a higher frequency of foreign queens. On the other hand, a reduction of the number of N. ceranae positive colonies was observed on those islands with continued replacement of queens. We suggest that such replacement could help maintaining low rates of Nosema infection, but healthy queens native to these islands should be used in order to conserve local honeybee diversity. PMID:24568841

Muñoz, Irene; Cepero, Almudena; Pinto, Maria Alice; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Higes, Mariano; De la Rúa, Pilar

2014-04-01

491

Mating with Stressed Males Increases the Fitness of Ant Queens  

PubMed Central

Background According to sexual conflict theory, males can increase their own fitness by transferring substances during copulation that increase the short-term fecundity of their mating partners at the cost of the future life expectancy and re-mating capability of the latter. In contrast, sexual cooperation is expected in social insects. Mating indeed positively affects life span and fecundity of young queens of the male-polymorphic ant Cardiocondyla obscurior, even though males neither provide nuptial gifts nor any other care but leave their mates immediately after copulation and die shortly thereafter. Principal Findings Here, we show that mating with winged disperser males has a significantly stronger impact on life span and reproductive success of young queens of C. obscurior than mating with wingless fighter males. Conclusions Winged males are reared mostly under stressful environmental conditions, which force young queens to disperse and found their own societies independently. In contrast, queens that mate with wingless males under favourable conditions usually start reproducing in the safety of the established maternal nest. Our study suggests that males of C. obscurior have evolved mechanisms to posthumously assist young queens during colony founding under adverse ecological conditions. PMID:18596983

Schrempf, Alexandra; Heinze, Jürgen

2008-01-01

492

Queen fertility, egg marking and colony size in the ant Camponotus floridanus  

Microsoft Academic Search

In ant societies, workers do not usually reproduce but gain indirect fitness benefits from raising related offspring produced\\u000a by the queen. One of the preconditions of this worker self-restraint is sufficient fertility of the queen. The queen is, therefore,\\u000a expected to signal her fertility. In Camponotus floridanus, workers can recognize the presence of a highly fertile queen via her eggs,

Annett Endler; Jürgen Liebig; Bert Hölldobler

2006-01-01

493

Three queen morphs with alternative nest-founding behaviors in the ant, Temnothorax longispinosus  

Microsoft Academic Search

.  In many ant species, multiple modes of founding new colonies occur in the same population. These modes include dependent founding,\\u000a independent founding by haplometrosis (single queen), and independent founding by pleometrosis (multiple queens). In several\\u000a cases, a dimorphism in queen size has been found, such that each morph specializes in a particular nest-founding behavior.\\u000a I investigated queen size in the

K. J. Howard

2006-01-01

494

Comparison studies of instrumentally inseminated and naturally mated honey bee queens and factors affecting their performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Instrumental insemination, a reliable method to control honey bee mating, is an essential tool for research and stock improvement.\\u000a A review of studies compare colony performance of instrumentally inseminated queens, IIQs, and naturally mated queens, NMQs.\\u000a Factors affecting queen performance are also reviewed. The collective results of the data demonstrate that the different methodologies\\u000a used, in the treatment of queens,

Susan W. Cobey

2007-01-01

495

Absence of nepotism toward imprisoned young queens during swarming in the honey bee  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nepotism is an important potential conflict in animal societies. However, clear evidence of nepotism in the rearing of queens in social insects is limited and controversial. In the honey bee, Apis mellifera, multiple mating by queens leads to the presence of many patrilines within each colony. When the colonies reproduce through swarming, workers rear a number of new queens, only

Nicolas Chaline; Stephen J. Martin; Francis L. W. Ratnieks

2004-01-01

496

The effects of pesticides on queen rearing and virus titers in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The effects of sublethal pesticide exposure on queen emergence and virus titers were examined. Queen rearing colonies were fed pollen with chlorpyrifos (CPF) alone (pollen-1) and with CPF and the fungicide Pristine® (pollen-2). Fewer queens emerged when larvae from open foraging (i.e., outside) colo...

497

Queen movement during colony emigration in the facultatively polygynous ant Pachycondyla obscuricornis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In ants, nest relocations are frequent but nevertheless perilous, especially for the reproductive caste. During emigrations, queens are exposed to predation and face the risk of becoming lost. Therefore the optimal strategy should be to move the queen(s) swiftly to a better location, while maintaining maximum worker protection at all times in the new and old nests. The timing of that event is a crucial strategic issue for the colony and may depend on queen number. In monogynous colonies, the queen is vital for colony survival, whereas in polygynous colonies a queen is less essential, if not dispensable. We tested the null hypothesis that queen movement occurs at random within the sequence of emigration events in both monogynous and polygynous colonies of the ponerine ant Pachycondyla obscuricornis. Our study, based on 16 monogynous and 16 polygynous colony emigrations, demonstrates for the first time that regardless of the number of queens per colony, the emigration serial number of a queen occurs in the middle of all emigration events and adult ant emigration events, but not during brood transport events. It therefore appears that the number of workers in both nests plays an essential role in the timing of queen movement. Our results correspond to a robust colony-level strategy since queen emigration is related neither to colony size nor to queen number. Such an optimal strategy is characteristic of ant societies working as highly integrated units and represents a new instance of group-level adaptive behaviors in social insect colonies.

Pezon, Antoine; Denis, Damien; Cerdan, Philippe; Valenzuela, Jorge; Fresneau, Dominique

2005-01-01

498

Effects of coumaphos on queen rearing in the honey bee, Apis mellifera  

Microsoft Academic Search

Young honey bee larvae were transferred into the queen cups containing known concentrations (0 to 1000 mg\\/kg) of the organophosphate pesticide coumaphos. These larvae were placed in queenless colonies and examined ten days later to determine the rate of rejection or acceptance as indicated by a mature sealed queen cell. All queens failed to develop at 1000 mg\\/kg, and greater

Jeffery S. Pettis; Anita M. Collins; Reg. Wilbanks; Mark. F. Feldlaufer

2004-01-01

499

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions  

E-print Network

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 DegreeWorks 4.09 Student Manual Degree is the same account you used when applying to Queens College. #12;Training & Technology Solutions Queens

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

500

Queens College Student Technology Fee Plan A Summary of the Plans for Student Technology Fee  

E-print Network

for Teaching & Learning Michelle Fraboni, Lecturer, Department of Elementary & Early Childhood Education#12;Queens College Student Technology Fee Plan A Summary of the Plans for Student Technology Fee 2012-2013 Prepared by the Queens College Office of Converging Technologies -and- The Queens College

Johnson Jr.,, Ray