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Sample records for queen mandibular pheromone

  1. How flies respond to honey bee pheromone: the role of the foraging gene on reproductive response to queen mandibular pheromone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camiletti, Alison L.; Awde, David N.; Thompson, Graham J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we test one central prediction from sociogenomic theory—that social and non-social taxa share common genetic toolkits that regulate reproduction in response to environmental cues. We exposed Drosophila females of rover ( for R) and sitter ( for s) genotypes to an ovary-suppressing pheromone derived from the honeybee Apis mellifera. Surprisingly, queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) affected several measures of fitness in flies, and in a manner comparable to the pheromone's normal effect on bee workers. QMP-treated sitter flies had smaller ovaries that contained fewer eggs than did untreated controls. QMP-treated rover flies, by contrast, showed a more variable pattern that only sometimes resulted in ovary inhibition, while a third strain of fly that contains a sitter mutant allele in a rover background ( for s2) showed no ovarian response to QMP. Taken together, our results suggest that distinctly non-social insects have some capacity to respond to social cues, but that this response varies with fly genotype. In general, the interspecific response is consistent with a conserved gene set affecting reproductive physiology. The differential response among strains in particular suggests that for is itself important for modulating the fly's pheromonal response.

  2. Queen pheromone blocks aversive learning in young worker bees.

    PubMed

    Vergoz, Vanina; Schreurs, Haley A; Mercer, Alison R

    2007-07-20

    Queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) has profound effects on dopamine signaling in the brain of young worker honey bees. As dopamine in insects has been strongly implicated in aversive learning, we examined QMP's impact on associative olfactory learning in bees. We found that QMP blocks aversive learning in young workers, but leaves appetitive learning intact. We postulate that QMP's effects on aversive learning enhance the likelihood that young workers remain in close contact with their queen by preventing them from forming an aversion to their mother's pheromone bouquet. The results provide an interesting twist to a story of success and survival. PMID:17641204

  3. Sex pheromone of queens of the slave-making ant, Polyergus breviceps.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Les; Aliabadi, Ali; McElfresh, J Stephen; Topoff, Howard; Millar, Jocelyn G

    2004-06-01

    The sex attractant pheromone produced in mandibular glands of queens of the slave-making ant Polyergus breviceps has been identified as a blend of methyl 6-methylsalicylate and 3-ethyl-4-methylpentanol. In field trials, each compound alone was completely unattractive to males, whereas blends of the two compounds attracted hundreds of males within a couple of hours. PMID:15303331

  4. Dual effect of wasp queen pheromone in regulating insect sociality.

    PubMed

    Oi, Cintia A; Van Oystaeyen, Annette; Caliari Oliveira, Ricardo; Millar, Jocelyn G; Verstrepen, Kevin J; van Zweden, Jelle S; Wenseleers, Tom

    2015-06-15

    Eusocial insects exhibit a remarkable reproductive division of labor between queens and largely sterile workers [1, 2]. Recently, it was shown that queens of diverse groups of social insects employ specific, evolutionarily conserved cuticular hydrocarbons to signal their presence and inhibit worker reproduction [3]. Workers also recognize and discriminate between eggs laid by the queen and those laid by workers, with the latter being destroyed by workers in a process known as "policing" [4, 5]. Worker policing represents a classic example of a conflict-reducing mechanism, in which the reproductive monopoly of the queen is maintained through the selective destruction of worker-laid eggs [5, 6]. However, the exact signals used in worker policing have thus far remained elusive [5, 7]. Here, we show that in the common wasp, Vespula vulgaris, the pheromone that signals egg maternity and enables the workers to selectively destroy worker-laid eggs is in fact the same as one of the sterility-inducing queen signals that we identified earlier [3]. These results imply that queen pheromones regulate insect sociality in two distinct and complementary ways, i.e., by signaling the queen's presence and inhibiting worker reproduction, and by facilitating the recognition and policing of worker-laid eggs. PMID:25959967

  5. Nectar Attracts Foraging Honey Bees with Components of Their Queen Pheromones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fanglin; Gao, Jie; Di, Nayan; Adler, Lynn S

    2015-11-01

    Floral nectar often contains chemicals that are deterrent to pollinators, presenting potential challenges to outcrossing plant species. Plants may be able to co-opt pollinator chemical signals to mitigate the negative effects of nectar deterrent compounds on pollination services. We found that buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) and Mexican sunflower (Tithonia diversifolia) produce nectar with abundant phenolics, including three components of the Apis honeybee queen mandibular pheromone (QMP). In addition, these nectars contain a non-pheromonal phenolic, chlorogenic acid (CA), which was toxic to honeybees, and T. diversifolia nectar also contained isochlorogenic acid (IA). Fresh nectar or solutions containing nectar phenolics reduced Apis individual feeding compared to sucrose solutions. However, freely foraging bees preferred solutions with QMP components to control solutions, and QMP components over-rode or reversed avoidance of CA and IA. Furthermore, prior exposure to the presence or just the odor of QMP components removed the deterrent effects of CA and IA. By mimicking the honey bee pheromone blend, nectar may maintain pollinator attraction in spite of deterrent nectar compounds. PMID:26511862

  6. A conserved class of queen pheromones? Re-evaluating the evidence in bumblebees (Bombus impatiens).

    PubMed

    Amsalem, Etya; Orlova, Margarita; Grozinger, Christina M

    2015-10-22

    The regulation of reproductive division of labour is a key component in the evolution of social insects. Chemical signals are important mechanisms to regulate worker reproduction, either as queen-produced pheromones that coercively inhibit worker reproduction or as queen signals that honestly advertise her fecundity. A recent study suggested that a conserved class of hydrocarbons serve as queen pheromones across three independent origins of eusociality. In bumblebees (Bombus terrestris), pentacosane (C25) was suggested to serve as a queen pheromone. Here, we repeat these studies using a different species of bumblebee (Bombus impatiens) with a more controlled experimental design. Instead of dequeened colonies, we used same-aged, three-worker queenless groups comprising either experienced or naive workers (with/without adult exposure to queen pheromone). We quantified three hydrocarbons (C23, C25 and C27) on the cuticular surfaces of females and tested their effects on the two worker types. Our results indicate differences in responses of naive and experienced workers, genetic effects on worker reproduction, and general effects of hydrocarbons and duration of egg laying on ovary resorption rates. However, we found no evidence to support the theory that a conserved class of hydrocarbons serve as queen pheromones or queen signals in Bombus impatiens. PMID:26490791

  7. Queen sex pheromone of the slave-making ant, Polyergus breviceps.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Les; Tröger, Armin G; Francke, Wittko; McElfresh, J Steven; Topoff, Howard; Aliabadi, Ali; Millar, Jocelyn G

    2007-05-01

    Workers of the slave-making ant, Polyergus breviceps, raid nests of Formica ants and return with Formica pupae that mature into worker ants in the slave-makers' colony. These Formica workers then tend the Polyergus brood, workers, and reproductives. During raids in the mating season, winged virgin Polyergus queens accompany the workers in the raiding columns. During the raid, the virgin queens release a pheromone that attracts males that quickly mate with the queens. We report the identification, synthesis, and bioassay of the sex attractant pheromone of the queens as an approximately 1:6 ratio of (R)-3-ethyl-4-methylpentan-1-ol and methyl 6-methylsalicylate. The ants produce exclusively the (R)-enantiomer of the alcohol, and the (S)-enantiomer has no biological activity, neither inhibiting nor increasing attraction to blends of methyl 6-methylsalicylate with the (R)-enantiomer. PMID:17393281

  8. Effects of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) queen insemination volume on worker behavior and physiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Honey bee colonies consist of tens of thousands of workers and a single reproductive queen that produces a pheromone blend which maintains colony organization. Previous studies indicated that the insemination quantity and volume alter queen mandibular pheromone profiles. In our 11-month long field s...

  9. Synthesis of carrier-free tritium-labeled queen bee pheromone

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, F.X.; Prestwich, G.D.

    1988-03-01

    A short synthesis of (4,5-/sup 3/H/sub 2/) (E)-9-oxo-2-decenoic acid (ODA), a high-specific-activity tritium-containing isotopomer of the queen bee pheromone, is described. Catalytic tritiation of the ketal of ethyl 9-oxo-4-decenoate introduces tritium into two positions, one of which is completely unactivated. Subsequent transformation by selenation, oxidation, and hydrolysis affords the labeled 9-ODA at >60 Ci/mmol. The material is suitable for biochemical studies of binding and catabolism in ovarian, antennal, and other target tissues.

  10. Differential combinatorial coding of pheromones in two olfactory subsystems of the honey bee brain.

    PubMed

    Carcaud, Julie; Giurfa, Martin; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2015-03-11

    Neural coding of pheromones has been intensively studied in insects with a particular focus on sex pheromones. These studies favored the view that pheromone compounds are processed within specific antennal lobe glomeruli following a specialized labeled-line system. However, pheromones play crucial roles in an insect's life beyond sexual attraction, and some species use many different pheromones making such a labeled-line organization unrealistic. A combinatorial coding scheme, in which each component activates a set of broadly tuned units, appears more adapted in this case. However, this idea has not been tested thoroughly. We focused here on the honey bee Apis mellifera, a social insect that relies on a wide range of pheromones to ensure colony cohesion. Interestingly, the honey bee olfactory system harbors two central parallel pathways, whose functions remain largely unknown. Using optophysiological recordings of projection neurons, we compared the responses of these two pathways to 27 known honey bee pheromonal compounds emitted by the brood, the workers, and the queen. We show that while queen mandibular pheromone is processed by l-ALT (lateral antennal lobe tract) neurons and brood pheromone is mainly processed by m-ALT (median antennal lobe tract) neurons, worker pheromones induce redundant activity in both pathways. Moreover, all tested pheromonal compounds induce combinatorial activity from several AL glomeruli. These findings support the combinatorial coding scheme and suggest that higher-order brain centers reading out these combinatorial activity patterns may eventually classify olfactory signals according to their biological meaning. PMID:25762663

  11. Uncoupling primer and releaser responses to pheromone in honey bees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozinger, Christina M.; Fischer, Patrick; Hampton, Jacob E.

    2007-05-01

    Pheromones produce dramatic behavioral and physiological responses in a wide variety of species. Releaser pheromones elicit rapid responses within seconds or minutes, while primer pheromones produce long-term changes which may take days to manifest. Honeybee queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) elicits multiple distinct behavioral and physiological responses in worker bees, as both a releaser and primer, and thus produces responses on vastly different time scales. In this study, we demonstrate that releaser and primer responses to QMP can be uncoupled. First, treatment with the juvenile hormone analog methoprene leaves a releaser response (attraction to QMP) intact, but modulates QMP’s primer effects on sucrose responsiveness. Secondly, two components of QMP (9-ODA and 9-HDA) do not elicit a releaser response (attraction) but are as effective as QMP at modulating a primer response, downregulation of foraging-related brain gene expression. These results suggest that different responses to a single pheromone may be produced via distinct pathways.

  12. Aggressive reproductive competition among hopelessly queenless honeybee workers triggered by pheromone signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malka, O.; Shnieor, S.; Katzav-Gozansky, T.; Hefetz, A.

    2008-06-01

    In the honeybee, Apis mellifera, the queen monopolizes reproduction, while the sterile workers cooperate harmoniously in nest maintenance. However, under queenless (QL) conditions, cooperation collapses and reproductive competition among workers ensues. This is mediated through aggression and worker oviposition, as well as shifts in pheromones, from worker to queen-like composition. Many studies suggest a dichotomy between conflict resolution through aggression or through pheromonal signaling. In this paper, we demonstrate that both phenomena comprise essential components of reproductive competition and that pheromone signaling actually triggers the onset of aggression. We kept workers as QL groups until first aggression was observed and subsequently determined the contestants’ reproductive status and content of the mandibular (MG) and Dufour’s glands (DG). In groups in which aggression occurred early, the attacked bee had consistently more queen-like pheromone in both the MG and DG, although both contestants had undeveloped ovaries. In groups with late aggression, the attacked bee had consistently larger oocytes and more queen-like pheromone in the DG, but not the MG. We suggest that at early stages of competition, the MG secretion is utilized to establish dominance and that the DG provides an honest fertility signal. We further argue that it is the higher amount of DG pheromone that triggers aggression.

  13. Sensory reception of the primer pheromone ethyl oleate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenz, Thomas S.; Maisonnasse, Alban; Plettner, Erika; Le Conte, Yves; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2012-05-01

    Social work force distribution in honeybee colonies critically depends on subtle adjustments of an age-related polyethism. Pheromones play a crucial role in adjusting physiological and behavioral maturation of nurse bees to foragers. In addition to primer effects of brood pheromone and queen mandibular pheromone—both were shown to influence onset of foraging—direct worker-worker interactions influence adult behavioral maturation. These interactions were narrowed down to the primer pheromone ethyl oleate, which is present at high concentrations in foragers, almost absent in young bees and was shown to delay the onset of foraging. Based on chemical analyses, physiological recordings from the antenna (electroantennograms) and the antennal lobe (calcium imaging), and behavioral assays (associative conditioning of the proboscis extension response), we present evidence that ethyl oleate is most abundant on the cuticle, received by olfactory receptors on the antenna, processed in glomeruli of the antennal lobe, and learned in olfactory centers of the brain. The results are highly suggestive that the primer pheromone ethyl oleate is transmitted and perceived between individuals via olfaction at close range.

  14. RESEARCH PAPER Age-dependent attractivity of males' sexual pheromones

    E-print Network

    Rasmont, Pierre

    RESEARCH PAPER Age-dependent attractivity of males' sexual pheromones in Bombus terrestris (L) secretions containing sexual pheromones to attract conspecific virgin queens. The changes in chemical containing sexual pheromones to attract conspecific virgin queens in order to mate (Calam 1969; Kullenberg et

  15. Beyond 9-ODA: sex pheromone communication in the European honey bee Apis mellifera L.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Axel; Dietz, Daniel; Spaethe, Johannes; Tautz, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    The major component of the mandibular gland secretion of queen honeybees (Apis mellifera L.), 9-ODA ((2E)-9-oxodecenoic acid), has been known for more than 40 yr to function as a long-range sex pheromone, attracting drones at congregation areas and drone flyways. Tests of other mandibular gland components failed to demonstrate attraction. It remained unclear whether these components served any function in mating behavior. We performed dual-choice experiments, using a rotating drone carousel, to test the attractiveness of 9-ODA compared to mixtures of 9-ODA with three other most abundant components in virgin queen mandibular gland secretions: (2E)-9-hydroxydecenoic acid (9-HDA), (2E)-10-hydroxydecenoic acid (10-HDA), and p-hydroxybenzoate (HOB). We found no differences in the number of drones attracted to 9-ODA or the respective mixtures over a distance. However, adding 9-HDA and 10-HDA, or 9-HDA, 10-HDA, and HOB to 9-ODA increased the number of drones making contact with the baited dummy. On the basis of these results, we suggest that at least 9-HDA and 10-HDA are additional components of the sex pheromone blend of A. mellifera. PMID:16586035

  16. Volatiles in the mandibular gland of Tetraponera penzigi: A plant ant of the whistling thorn acacia

    E-print Network

    Palmer, Todd M.

    Volatiles in the mandibular gland of Tetraponera penzigi: A plant ant of the whistling thorn acacia; accepted 11 January 2006 Keywords: Tetraponera penzigi; Hymenoptera; Formicidae; Pseudomyrmecinae; Acacia drepanolobium; Whistling thorn acacia; Mandibular gland; Alarm pheromone 1. Subject and source Workers

  17. Pheromone Signalling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Adam G.

    2011-01-01

    Pheromones are chemicals used to communicate with members of the same species. First described in insects, pheromones are often used to attract mates but in social insects, such as ants and bees, pheromone use is much more sophisticated. For example, ants use pheromones to make foraging trails and the chemical and physical properties of the…

  18. Pheromonal regulation of starvation resistance in honey bee workers ( Apis mellifera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Patrick; Grozinger, Christina M.

    2008-08-01

    Most animals can modulate nutrient storage pathways according to changing environmental conditions, but in honey bees nutrient storage is also modulated according to changing behavioral tasks within a colony. Specifically, bees involved in brood care (nurses) have higher lipid stores in their abdominal fat bodies than forager bees. Pheromone communication plays an important role in regulating honey bee behavior and physiology. In particular, queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) slows the transition from nursing to foraging. We tested the effects of QMP exposure on starvation resistance, lipid storage, and gene expression in the fat bodies of worker bees. We found that indeed QMP-treated bees survived much longer compared to control bees when starved and also had higher lipid levels. Expression of vitellogenin RNA, which encodes a yolk protein that is found at higher levels in nurses than foragers, was also higher in the fat bodies of QMP-treated bees. No differences were observed in expression of genes involved in insulin signaling pathways, which are associated with nutrient storage and metabolism in a variety of species; thus, other mechanisms may be involved in increasing the lipid stores. These studies demonstrate that pheromone exposure can modify nutrient storage pathways and fat body gene expression in honey bees and suggest that chemical communication and social interactions play an important role in altering metabolic pathways.

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE Clinging to royalty: Ropalidia marginata queens can employ

    E-print Network

    Gadagkar, Raghavendra

    monopoly by rubbing their abdomen and applying a pheromone to the nest surface. We argued that the queen monopoly Á Pheromones Á Aggression Introduction Ropalidia marginata is a primitively eusocial wasp reproductive monopoly (Kardile and Gadagkar, 2002; Pardi, 1948; Ro¨seler et al., 1986; West-Eberhard, 1969

  20. Identification of a pheromone regulating caste differentiation in termites

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Kenji; Himuro, Chihiro; Yokoi, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Yuuka; Vargo, Edward L.; Keller, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    The hallmark of social insects is their caste system: reproduction is primarily monopolized by queens, whereas workers specialize in the other tasks required for colony growth and survival. Pheromones produced by reining queens have long been believed to be the prime factor inhibiting the differentiation of new reproductive individuals. However, there has been very little progress in the chemical identification of such inhibitory pheromones. Here we report the identification of a volatile inhibitory pheromone produced by female neotenics (secondary queens) that acts directly on target individuals to suppress the differentiation of new female neotenics and identify n-butyl-n-butyrate and 2-methyl-1-butanol as the active components of the inhibitory pheromone. An artificial pheromone blend consisting of these two compounds had a strong inhibitory effect similar to live neotenics. Surprisingly, the same two volatiles are also emitted by eggs, playing a role both as an attractant to workers and an inhibitor of reproductive differentiation. This dual production of an inhibitory pheromone by female reproductives and eggs probably reflects the recruitment of an attractant pheromone as an inhibitory pheromone and may provide a mechanism ensuring honest signaling of reproductive status with a tight coupling between fertility and inhibitory power. Identification of a volatile pheromone regulating caste differentiation in a termite provides insights into the functioning of social insect colonies and opens important avenues for elucidating the developmental pathways leading to reproductive and nonreproductive castes. PMID:20615972

  1. Surface lipids of queen-laid eggs do not regulate queen production in a fission-performing ant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruel, Camille; Lenoir, Alain; Cerdá, Xim; Boulay, Raphaël

    2013-01-01

    In animal societies, most collective and individual decision making depends on the presence of reproductive individuals. The efficient transmission of information among reproductive and non-reproductive individuals is therefore a determinant of colony organization. In social insects, the presence of a queen modulates multiple colonial activities. In many species, it negatively affects worker reproduction and the development of diploid larvae into future queens. The queen mostly signals her presence through pheromone emission, but the means by which these chemicals are distributed in the colony are still unclear. In several ant species, queen-laid eggs are the vehicle of the queen signal. The aim of this study was to investigate whether queen-laid eggs of the ant Aphaenogaster senilis possess queen-specific cuticular hydrocarbons and/or Dufour or poison gland compounds, and whether the presence of eggs inhibited larval development into queens. Our results show that the queen- and worker-laid eggs shared cuticular and Dufour hydrocarbons with the adults; however, their poison gland compounds were not similar. Queen-laid eggs had more dimethylalkanes and possessed a queen-specific mixture of cuticular hydrocarbons composed of 3,11 + 3,9 + 3,7-dimethylnonacosane, in higher proportions than did worker-laid eggs. Even though the queen-laid eggs were biochemically similar to the queen, their addition to experimentally queenless groups did not prevent the development of new queens. More studies are needed on the means by which queen ant pheromones are transmitted in the colony, and how these mechanisms correlates with life history traits.

  2. Queen Bee

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The bee marked in yellow is this hive's queen. There is usually only one queen in a hive, which the worker honeybees feed, follow, and protect. Society needs healthy bees and other insects to pollinate crops, but land use changes that decrease flower abundance can affect bee health and pollination ...

  3. A honey bee odorant receptor for the queen substance 9-oxo-2-decenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Kevin W; Nichols, Andrew S; Walden, Kimberly K O; Brockmann, Axel; Luetje, Charles W; Robertson, Hugh M

    2007-09-01

    By using a functional genomics approach, we have identified a honey bee [Apis mellifera (Am)] odorant receptor (Or) for the queen substance 9-oxo-2-decenoic acid (9-ODA). Honey bees live in large eusocial colonies in which a single queen is responsible for reproduction, several thousand sterile female worker bees complete a myriad of tasks to maintain the colony, and several hundred male drones exist only to mate. The "queen substance" [also termed the queen retinue pheromone (QRP)] is an eight-component pheromone that maintains the queen's dominance in the colony. The main component, 9-ODA, acts as a releaser pheromone by attracting workers to the queen and as a primer pheromone by physiologically inhibiting worker ovary development; it also acts as a sex pheromone, attracting drones during mating flights. However, the extent to which social and sexual chemical messages are shared remains unresolved. By using a custom chemosensory-specific microarray and qPCR, we identified four candidate sex pheromone Ors (AmOr10, -11, -18, and -170) from the honey bee genome based on their biased expression in drone antennae. We assayed the pheromone responsiveness of these receptors by using Xenopus oocytes and electrophysiology. AmOr11 responded specifically to 9-ODA (EC50=280+/-31 nM) and not to any of the other seven QRP components, other social pheromones, or floral odors. We did not observe any responses of the other three Ors to any of the eight QRP pheromone components, suggesting 9-ODA is the only QRP component that also acts as a long-distance sex pheromone. PMID:17761794

  4. A honey bee odorant receptor for the queen substance 9-oxo-2-decenoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Kevin W.; Nichols, Andrew S.; Walden, Kimberly K. O.; Brockmann, Axel; Luetje, Charles W.; Robertson, Hugh M.

    2007-01-01

    By using a functional genomics approach, we have identified a honey bee [Apis mellifera (Am)] odorant receptor (Or) for the queen substance 9-oxo-2-decenoic acid (9-ODA). Honey bees live in large eusocial colonies in which a single queen is responsible for reproduction, several thousand sterile female worker bees complete a myriad of tasks to maintain the colony, and several hundred male drones exist only to mate. The “queen substance” [also termed the queen retinue pheromone (QRP)] is an eight-component pheromone that maintains the queen's dominance in the colony. The main component, 9-ODA, acts as a releaser pheromone by attracting workers to the queen and as a primer pheromone by physiologically inhibiting worker ovary development; it also acts as a sex pheromone, attracting drones during mating flights. However, the extent to which social and sexual chemical messages are shared remains unresolved. By using a custom chemosensory-specific microarray and qPCR, we identified four candidate sex pheromone Ors (AmOr10, -11, -18, and -170) from the honey bee genome based on their biased expression in drone antennae. We assayed the pheromone responsiveness of these receptors by using Xenopus oocytes and electrophysiology. AmOr11 responded specifically to 9-ODA (EC50 = 280 ± 31 nM) and not to any of the other seven QRP components, other social pheromones, or floral odors. We did not observe any responses of the other three Ors to any of the eight QRP pheromone components, suggesting 9-ODA is the only QRP component that also acts as a long-distance sex pheromone. PMID:17761794

  5. Queen volatiles as a modulator of Tetragonisca angustula drone behavior.

    PubMed

    Fierro, Macario M; Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Sánchez, Daniel; Villanueva-Gutiérrez, Rogel; Vandame, Remy

    2011-11-01

    Tetragonisca angustula mating occurs during the virgin queen nuptial flight, usually in the presence of a drone congregation area (DCA). The presence of virgin queen pheromone is considered the trigger for DCA establishment, although this has not been demonstrated experimentally. We established meliponaries, in different habitats, with T. angustula virgin queens during the main drone reproduction period. Eight DCAs were observed in urban areas, and all established outside or near colonies containing at least one virgin queen. The accumulation of drones in the DCAs occurred from 08:00 to 18:00 h and over 3-35 days. The number of drones in DCAs ranged from 60 to 2,000. In field trials, drones were attracted to virgin queens and also, unexpectedly, to physogastric queens. Volatiles collected from both virgin and physogastric queens elicited strong electoantennogram (EAG) responses from drones. Virgin and physogastric queen volatiles were qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different, in chemical composition. The queen's abdomen was the principal source of these compounds. Isopropyl hexanoate (IPH), the most abundant compound in virgin queen volatiles and one of the most abundant in physogastric queen volatiles, was identified as one of the compounds that elicited EAG responses and was demonstrated to attract drones in a field test. PMID:22081302

  6. Queen's Law Celebrating Queen's Law at 50

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    REPORTS Queen's Law Celebrating Queen's Law at 50 ISSUE 2006 #12;This summer marks the completion of my first year as Dean of the Faculty of Law at Queen's. It has been an exciting and exhilarating time Strategic Framework 2005-2010. We articulated ambitious mission and vision statements for Queen's Law

  7. Queens College Undergraduate Science

    E-print Network

    Engel, Robert

    Queens College Undergraduate Science Research Day! ! Organized by the Division of Math & Natural Sciences, Queens College, CUNY! ! ! ! Queens College is proud of the outstanding research conducted by our College! To participate or learn more, visit:! http://www

  8. Queens College Undergraduate Science

    E-print Network

    Engel, Robert

    Queens College Undergraduate Science Research Day ! Organized by the Division of Math & Natural Sciences, Queens College, CUNY ! ! ! Queens College is proud of the outstanding research conducted by our College To participate or learn more, visit: http://www

  9. GLOBETROTTER THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    GLOBETROTTER THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE JUNE 2012 Old Members' Office · The Queen's College · Oxford · OX1 next week for a Queen's College reunion event, details as follows: Venue: ZUMA Level 5 & 6 between 6 pm and 9 pm Ask for the Queen's College table when you arrive. Please email emily

  10. Sustainability Framework 1 Queen's University

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    Sustainability Framework 1 Queen's University Sustainability Strategic Framework #12;Sustainability Framework 2 Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 2 Queen's Sustainability Mission

  11. Alkylpyrazines: Alarm pheromone components of the little fire ant, Wasmannia auropunctata (Roger) (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The previous identification of 2,5-dimethyl-3-(3-methylbutyl) pyrazine as the mandibular alarm pheromone of the little fire ant, Wasmannia auropunctata (Roger), has been found to be incorrect. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of ant extracts suggested the correct structure to be the reg...

  12. Differential antennal proteome comparison of adult honeybee drone, worker and queen (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu; Song, Feifei; Zhang, Lan; Aleku, Dereje Woltedji; Han, Bin; Feng, Mao; Li, Jianke

    2012-01-01

    To understand the olfactory mechanism of honeybee antennae in detecting specific volatile compounds in the atmosphere, antennal proteome differences of drone, worker and queen were compared using 2-DE, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. Therefore, 107 proteins were altered their expressions in the antennae of drone, worker and queen bees. There were 54, 21 and 32 up-regulated proteins in the antennae of drone, worker and queen, respectively. Proteins upregulated in the drone antennae were involved in fatty acid metabolism, antioxidation, carbohydrate metabolism and energy production, protein folding and cytoskeleton. Proteins upregulated in the antennae of worker and queen bees were related to carbohydrate metabolism and energy production while molecular transporters were upregulated in the queen antennae. Our results explain the role played by the antennae of drone is to aid in perceiving the queen sexual pheromones, in the worker antennae to assist for food search and social communication and in the queen antennae to help pheromone communication with the worker and the drone during the mating flight. This first proteomic study significantly extends our understanding of honeybee olfactory activities and the possible mechanisms played by the antennae in response to various environmental, social, biological and biochemical signals. PMID:21982827

  13. Stereochemical studies on pheromonal communications

    PubMed Central

    MORI, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Pheromonal communications are heavily dependent on the stereochemistry of pheromones. Their enantioselective syntheses could establish the absolute configuration of the naturally occurring pheromones, and clarified the unique relationships between absolute configuration and bioactivity. For example, neither the (R)- nor (S)-enantiomer of sulcatol, the aggregation pheromone of an ambrosia beetle, is behaviorally active, while their mixture is bioactive. Recent results as summarized in the present review further illustrate the unique and diverse relationships between stereochemistry and bioactivity of pheromones. PMID:25504227

  14. COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT BETWEEN QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY AND THE CANADIAN UNION OF PUBLIC EMPLOYEES AND ITS LOCAL 254: KINGSTON TECHNICIANS' UNION #12;Collective Agreement - July1, 2010 ­ June 30, 2014 CUPE 254 Page 2 COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT BETWEEN QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY AND THE CANADIAN UNION OF PUBLIC EMPLOYEES

  15. Effects of instrumental insemination and insemination quantity on Dufour's gland chemical profiles and vitellogenin expression in honey bee queens (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Richard, Freddie-Jeanne; Schal, Coby; Tarpy, David R; Grozinger, Christina M

    2011-09-01

    Honey bee queens (Apis mellifera) mate in their early adult lives with a variable number of males (drones). Mating stimulates dramatic changes in queen behavior, physiology, gene expression, and pheromone production. Here, we used virgin, single drone- (SDI), and multi-drone- (MDI) inseminated queens to study the effects of instrumental insemination and insemination quantity on the pheromone profiles of the Dufour's gland, and the expression of the egg-yolk protein, vitellogenin, in the fat body. Age, environmental conditions, and genetic background of the queens were standardized to specifically characterize the effects of these treatments. Our data demonstrate that insemination and insemination quantity significantly affect the chemical profiles of the Dufour's gland secretion. Moreover, workers were more attracted to Dufour's gland extract from inseminated queens compared to virgins, and to the extract of MDI queens compared to extract of SDI queens. However, while there were differences in the amounts of some esters between MDI queens and the other groups, it appears that the differences in behavioral responses were elicited by subtle changes in the overall chemical profiles rather than dramatic changes in specific individual chemicals. We also found a decrease in vitellogenin gene expression in the fat body of the MDI queens, which is negatively correlated with the quantities of Dufour's gland content. The possible explanations of this reduction are discussed. PMID:21786084

  16. Laboratory Syntheses of Insect Pheromones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cormier, Russell A.; Hoban, James N.

    1984-01-01

    Provides background information and procedures for the multi-step synthesis of tiger moth and boll weevil pheromones (sex attractants). These syntheses require several laboratory periods. The tiger moth pheromone synthesis is suitable for introductory organic chemistry while the boll weevil pheromone is recommended for an advanced laboratory…

  17. Measuring mandibular motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Rositano, S.; Taylor, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Mandibular motion along three axes is measured by three motion transducers on floating yoke that rests against mandible. System includes electronics to provide variety of outputs for data display and processing. Head frame is strapped to test subject's skull to provide fixed point of reference for transducers.

  18. Pheromone processing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Johannes; Huoviala, Paavo; Jefferis, Gregory Sxe

    2015-10-01

    Understanding how sensory stimuli are processed in the brain to instruct appropriate behavior is a fundamental question in neuroscience. Drosophila has become a powerful model system to address this problem. Recent advances in characterizing the circuits underlying pheromone processing have put the field in a position to follow the transformation of these chemical signals all the way from the sensory periphery to decision making and motor output. Here we describe the latest advances, outline emerging principles of pheromone processing and discuss future questions. PMID:26143522

  19. COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT BETWEEN QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY AND THE CANADIAN UNION OF PUBLIC EMPLOYEES AND ITS...................................................................................................................................35 ARTICLE 26 TOOLS, EQUIPMENT AND ALLOWANCES ................................................37;Collective Agreement - July1, 2010 ­ June 30, 2014 CUPE Local 229 Page 2 ARTICLE 29 DISCIPLINE

  20. Cuticular Hydrocarbon Pheromones for Social Behavior and Their Coding in the Ant Antenna.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kavita R; Enzmann, Brittany L; Schmidt, Yvonne; Moore, Dani; Jones, Graeme R; Parker, Jane; Berger, Shelley L; Reinberg, Danny; Zwiebel, Laurence J; Breit, Bernhard; Liebig, Jürgen; Ray, Anandasankar

    2015-08-25

    The sophisticated organization of eusocial insect societies is largely based on the regulation of complex behaviors by hydrocarbon pheromones present on the cuticle. We used electrophysiology to investigate the detection of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) by female-specific olfactory sensilla basiconica on the antenna of Camponotus floridanus ants through the utilization of one of the largest family of odorant receptors characterized so far in insects. These sensilla, each of which contains multiple olfactory receptor neurons, are differentially sensitive to CHCs and allow them to be classified into three broad groups that collectively detect every hydrocarbon tested, including queen and worker-enriched CHCs. This broad-spectrum sensitivity is conserved in a related species, Camponotus laevigatus, allowing these ants to detect CHCs from both nestmates and non-nestmates. Behavioral assays demonstrate that these ants are excellent at discriminating CHCs detected by the antenna, including enantiomers of a candidate queen pheromone that regulates the reproductive division of labor. PMID:26279569

  1. EFFECTIVE USE OF PHEROMONES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective integrated pest management programs are needed for food processing and storage facilities and this requires improvements in our ability to monitor pest populations and use this information to target management tactics in both time and space. The use of pheromone traps to detect pests is i...

  2. 14. Hell Gate Bridge south abutment tower. Queens, Queens Co., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Hell Gate Bridge south abutment tower. Queens, Queens Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 7.29. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York, New York County, NY

  3. Irradiated mandibular autografts

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaker, R.C.; Singer, M.I.; Shockley, W.W.; Pugh, N.; Shidnia, H.

    1983-09-15

    The cosmetic and functional disability associated with mandibular resection has been a major problem to the patient with direct invasion of the mandible by oral cancer. Marginal resections with combined postoperative radiation therapy have frequently been substituted for the more preferred segmental resections and resultant deformities. Presented are 15 cases of oral cavity cancer involving resection of the mandible, immediate radiation to 10,000 rad, and primary reconstruction as irradiated mandibular autografts. The longest following is 4 years and 3 months, with a success rate of 66%. Morbidity is minimal as compared to autogenous bone grafting. Tumor size, previous radiation, or use of regional flaps have not been a factor in the success of this method in reconstruction of the mandible primarily.

  4. The magazine of Queen's University

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Peter

    Issue , Queen's Nobel laureate The evolution of Queen's Library Magna Carta and women's rights to the editor 5 From the principal 6 Quid Novi News from campus 8 Magna Carta and women's rights 16 Jacqueline

  5. Do pheromones reveal male immunocompetence?

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, Markus J; Jokinen, Ilmari; Kortet, Raine; Vainikka, Anssi; Suhonen, Jukka

    2002-01-01

    Pheromones function not only as mate attractors, but they may also relay important information to prospective mates. It has been shown that vertebrates can distinguish, via olfactory mechanisms, major histocompatibility complex types in their prospective mates. However, whether pheromones can transmit information about immunocompetence is unknown. Here, we show that female mealworm beetles (Tenebrio molitor) prefer pheromones from males with better immunocompetence, indicated by a faster encapsulation rate against a novel antigen, and higher levels of phenoloxidase in haemolymph. Thus, the present study indicates that pheromones could transmit information about males' parasite resistance ability and may work as a reliable sexual ornament for female choice. PMID:12204128

  6. The evolution of pheromonal communication.

    PubMed

    Swaney, William T; Keverne, Eric B

    2009-06-25

    Small-brained rodents have been the principle focus for pheromonal research and have provided comprehensive insights into the chemosensory mechanisms that underpin pheromonal communication and the hugely important roles that pheromones play in behavioural regulation. However, pheromonal communication does not start or end with the mouse and the rat, and work in amphibians reveals much about the likely evolutionary origins of the chemosensory systems that mediate pheromonal effects. The dual olfactory organs (the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ), their receptors and their separate projection pathways appear to have ancient evolutionary origins, appearing in the aquatic ancestors of all tetrapods during the Devonian period and so pre-dating the transition to land. While the vomeronasal organ has long been considered an exclusively pheromonal organ, accumulating evidence indicates that it is not the sole channel for the transduction of pheromonal information and that both olfactory systems have been co-opted for the detection of different pheromone signals over the course of evolution. This has also led to great diversity in the vomeronasal and olfactory receptor families, with enormous levels of gene diversity and inactivation of genes in different species. Finally, the evolution of trichromacy as well as huge increases in social complexity have minimised the role of pheromones in the lives of primates, leading to the total inactivation of the vomeronasal system in catarrhine primates while the brain increased in size and behaviour became emancipated from hormonal regulation. PMID:18977248

  7. Public Safety Department Queens College

    E-print Network

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    Public Safety Department Queens College PUBLIC SAFETY 718 997-5912/11 DEPARTMENT FAX: 718 997-5932 Queens College Incident Report Request These steps must be followed in order to obtain a copy of a Queens College Incident Report. If you are a member of the college community, you must make this request using

  8. Queens College Nutrition and Dietetics

    E-print Network

    Engel, Robert

    1 Queens College Nutrition and Dietetics Student Handbook Students accepted into Queens College must also apply for acceptance into the Nutrition and Dietetics Program. Please go to our webpage/Pages/Dietetics.aspx #12;2 Queens College Didactic Program in Dietetics DEPARTMENT and PROGRAM MISSIONS Family, Nutrition

  9. SOCIAL INSECT PHEROMONES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Social insects include the social Hymenoptera (Formicidae, ants; Apidae, bees; Vespidae, wasps) and Isoptera (Termitidae, termites). Social interactions are required for effective food retrieval, brood and queen care, regulation of caste (sexuals/workers), recognition and exclusion of non-nestmates,...

  10. [Subcondylar mandibular fracture].

    PubMed

    Marsot-Dupuch, K; Pierard, E

    1992-01-01

    Mandibular fractures are frequent lesions which are classified into 6 groups according to the site of the fracture. Condylar fractures are primarily due to a direct blow to the symphysis menti. Medical imaging must be able to identify the type of fracture, its intra- or extra-articular site and the associated displacement of the condyle, the fundamental element in deciding treatment. The action of the masticatory muscles on one of the bone fragments may be responsible for an unstable fracture, leading to disturbances of consolidation (pseudarthrosis). Anterior bilateral fractures can be life-threatening due to ptosis of the tongue. PMID:1642427

  11. QUEENS COLLEGE Undergraduate Bulletin

    E-print Network

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    --skills that the top companies and leading graduate schools are looking for. If you are a high-achieving student, you Cooperative Education & Internships 156 Drama,Theatre & Dance 157 Earth & Environmental Sciences, School.qc.cuny.edu #12;In 1937, undaunted by the Great Depression, Queens College welcomed its first students, many

  12. Queen's Garden Hoodoos

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Views along the Queen's Garden Trail in Bryce Canyon National Park. Bryce Canyon is a unique sandstone formation in southern Utah. It is home to a large number of hoodoos, which are oddly shaped pillars of rock that formed due to different erosion rates for the dolomite that caps them and the sands...

  13. Queen's Garden Trail

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Views along the Queen's Garden Trail in Bryce Canyon National Park. Bryce Canyon is a unique sandstone formation in southern Utah. It is home to a large number of hoodoos, which are oddly shaped pillars of rock that formed due to different erosion rates for the dolomite that caps them and the sands...

  14. Queen's Garden Formations

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Views along the Queen's Garden Trail in Bryce Canyon National Park. Bryce Canyon is a unique sandstone formation in southern Utah. It is home to a large number of hoodoos, which are oddly shaped pillars of rock that formed due to different erosion rates for the dolomite that caps them and the sands...

  15. 'Snow Queen' Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This animation consists of two close-up images of 'Snow Queen,' taken several days apart, by the Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    Snow Queen is the informal name for a patch of bright-toned material underneath the lander.

    Thruster exhaust blew away surface soil covering Snow Queen when Phoenix landed on May 25, 2008, exposing this hard layer comprising several smooth rounded cavities beneath the lander. The RAC images show how Snow Queen visibly changed between June 15, 2008, the 21st Martian day, or sol, of the mission and July 9, 2008, the 44th sol.

    Cracks as long as 10 centimeters (about four inches) appeared. One such crack is visible at the left third and the upper third of the Sol 44 image. A seven millimeter (one-third inch) pebble or clod appears just above and slightly to the right of the crack in the Sol 44 image. Cracks also appear in the lower part of the left third of the image. Other pieces noticeably shift, and some smooth texture has subtly roughened.

    The Phoenix team carefully positioned and focused RAC the same way in both images. Each image is about 60 centimeters, or about two feet, wide. The object protruding in from the top on the right half of the images is Phoenix's thermal and electrical conductivity probe.

    Snow Queen and other ice exposed by Phoenix landing and trenching operations on northern polar Mars is the first time scientists have been able to monitor Martian ice at a place where temperatures are cold enough that the ice doesn't immediately sublimate, or vaporize, away.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. A plant factory for moth pheromone production

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Bao-Jian; Hofvander, Per; Wang, Hong-Lei; Durrett, Timothy P.; Stymne, Sten; Löfstedt, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Moths depend on pheromone communication for mate finding and synthetic pheromones are used for monitoring or disruption of pheromone communication in pest insects. Here we produce moth sex pheromone, using Nicotiana benthamiana as a plant factory, by transient expression of up to four genes coding for consecutive biosynthetic steps. We specifically produce multicomponent sex pheromones for two species. The fatty alcohol fractions from the genetically modified plants are acetylated to mimic the respective sex pheromones of the small ermine moths Yponomeuta evonymella and Y. padella. These mixtures are very efficient and specific for trapping of male moths, matching the activity of conventionally produced pheromones. Our long-term vision is to design tailor-made production of any moth pheromone component in genetically modified plants. Such semisynthetic preparation of sex pheromones is a novel and cost-effective way of producing moderate to large quantities of pheromones with high purity and a minimum of hazardous waste. PMID:24569486

  17. Reoperative mandibular trauma: management of posttraumatic mandibular deformities.

    PubMed

    Vega, Luis G

    2011-02-01

    Mandibular fractures are one the most common maxillofacial injuries. Diagnostic errors, poor surgical technique, healing disorders, or complications may lead to the establishment of posttraumatic mandibular deformities. Nonunion, malunion/malocclusion, or facial asymmetry can be found early during the healing process or as long-term sequelae after the initial mandibular fracture repair. Although occasionally these problems can be solved in a nonsurgical manner, reoperations play an important role in the management of these untoward outcomes. This article discusses the reoperative techniques used for the management of these deformities. PMID:21272766

  18. Molarization of Mandibular Second Premolar

    PubMed Central

    Singh Khinda, Vineet Inder; Kallar, Shiminder; Singh Brar, Gurlal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Macrodontia (megadontia, megalodontia, mac rodontism) is a rare shape anomaly that has been used to describe dental gigantism. Mandibular second premolars show an elevated variability of crown morphology, as are its eruptive potential and final position in the dental arch. To date, only eight cases of isolated macrodontia of second premolars have been reported in the literature. This case report presents clinical and radiographic findings of unusual and rare case of isolated unilateral molarization of left mandibular second premolar. How to cite this article: Mangla N, Khinda VIS, Kallar S, Brar GS. Molarization of Mandibular Second Premolar. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):137-139. PMID:25356014

  19. 13. New York Connecting RR: Hell Gate Bridge. Queens, Queens ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. New York Connecting RR: Hell Gate Bridge. Queens, Queens Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 7.29. (See HAER No. NY-88 for further documentation on this site). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York, New York County, NY

  20. 11. New York Connecting RR: Hell Gate Bridge. Queens, Queens ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. New York Connecting RR: Hell Gate Bridge. Queens, Queens Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 7.29. (See HAER No. NY-88 for further documentation on this site). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York, New York County, NY

  1. 12. New York Connecting RR: Hell Gate Bridge. Queens, Queens ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. New York Connecting RR: Hell Gate Bridge. Queens, Queens Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 7.29. (See HAER No. NY-88 for further documentation on this site). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York, New York County, NY

  2. THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE The Queen's College Religion and Belief Policy

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE The Queen's College Religion and Belief Policy Current Legal Position People are protected against discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation under the Employment Equality (Religion. It is not necessary for the religion or belief to be a well-known major world religion. The Regulations outlaw

  3. The joy of sex pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Benton, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Sex pheromones provide an important means of communication to unite individuals for successful reproduction. Although sex pheromones are highly diverse across animals, these signals fulfil common fundamental roles in enabling identification of a mating partner of the opposite sex, the appropriate species and of optimal fecundity. In this review, we synthesize both classic and recent investigations on sex pheromones in a range of species, spanning nematode worms, insects and mammals. These studies reveal comparable strategies in how these chemical signals are produced, detected and processed in the brain to regulate sexual behaviours. Elucidation of sex pheromone communication mechanisms both defines outstanding models to understand the molecular and neuronal basis of chemosensory behaviours, and reveals how similar evolutionary selection pressures yield convergent solutions in distinct animal nervous systems. EMBO reports advance online publication 13 September 2013; doi:10.1038/embor.2013.140 PMID:24030282

  4. Chiral methyl-branched pheromones.

    PubMed

    Ando, Tetsu; Yamakawa, Rei

    2015-07-01

    Insect pheromones are some of the most interesting natural products because they are utilized for interspecific communication between various insects, such as beetles, moths, ants, and cockroaches. A large number of compounds of many kinds have been identified as pheromone components, reflecting the diversity of insect species. While this review deals only with chiral methyl-branched pheromones, the chemical structures of more than one hundred non-terpene compounds have been determined by applying excellent analytical techniques. Furthermore, their stereoselective syntheses have been achieved by employing trustworthy chiral sources and ingenious enantioselective reactions. The information has been reviewed here not only to make them available for new research but also to understand the characteristic chemical structures of the chiral pheromones. Since biosynthetic studies are still limited, it might be meaningful to examine whether the structures, particularly the positions and configurations of the branched methyl groups, are correlated with the taxonomy of the pheromone producers and also with the function of the pheromones in communication systems. PMID:25849023

  5. Mandibular torus morphology.

    PubMed

    Sellevold, B J

    1980-11-01

    The morphology of the mandibular torus was examined, and comparisons were made between a Medieval Norse skeletal population from Greenland and a 14th to 17th century Greenland Eskimo skeletal series. Three parameters were analyzed: degree of development (on a 4-point scale), position and length, and surface morphology according to the number of knobs, or lobuli. It was found that the Eskimos have a high frequency of weakly developed tori and no cases of the extreme development, while over 20% of the Norsemen had tori in the "extreme" category. The Norse torus was generally found to be longer than that of the Eskimos, and both groups exhibited a slight asymmetry between the sides, the torus on the left side tending to be longer and more forward in position than the right. A great difference was found in surface morphology. The Norse torus is in general very irregular, while the Eskimo torus is rather smooth. These differences are believed to be genetically determined. PMID:7468791

  6. Bilateral Molariform Mandibular Second Premolars

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Sonu; Kumar Mandal, Pradip; Ghosh, Chiranjit

    2015-01-01

    Macrodontia is a rare dental anomaly that refers to teeth that appear larger than normal. Generalised macrodontia can be associated with certain medical conditions and syndromes. This case report presents clinical and radiographic findings of isolated bilateral macrodontia in a 14-year-old child. The patient was referred to the clinic with local crowding of maxillary and mandibular teeth. Radiographic findings revealed the presence of impacted macrodont mandibular second premolar on one side and erupted macrodontic premolar on the other side and their distinct morphological appearance, characterized by large, multitubercular, and molariform crowns and tapering, single roots. PMID:25685564

  7. Management of mandibular angle fracture.

    PubMed

    Braasch, Daniel Cameron; Abubaker, A Omar

    2013-11-01

    Fractures through the angle of the mandible are one of the most common facial fractures. The management of such fractures has been controversial, however. This controversy is related to the anatomic relations and complex biomechanical aspects of the mandibular angle. The debate has become even more heated since the evolution of rigid fixation and the ability to provide adequate stability of the fractured segments. This article provides an overview of the special anatomic and biomechanical features of the mandibular angle and their impact on the management of these fractures. PMID:24183373

  8. Beyond cuticular hydrocarbons: evidence of proteinaceous secretion specific to termite kings and queens.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Robert; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Hrdý, Ivan; Cvacka, Josef; Sobotník, Jan

    2010-04-01

    In 1959, P. Karlson and M. Lüscher introduced the term 'pheromone', broadly used nowadays for various chemicals involved in intraspecific communication. To demonstrate the term, they depicted the situation in termite societies, where king and queen inhibit the reproduction of nest-mates by an unknown chemical substance. Paradoxically, half a century later, neither the source nor the chemical identity of this 'royal' pheromone is known. In this study, we report for the first time the secretion of polar compounds of proteinaceous origin by functional reproductives in three termite species, Prorhinotermes simplex, Reticulitermes santonensis and Kalotermes flavicollis. Aqueous washes of functional reproductives contained sex-specific proteinaceous compounds, virtually absent in non-reproducing stages. Moreover, the presence of these compounds was clearly correlated with the age of reproductives and their reproductive status. We discuss the putative function of these substances in termite caste recognition and regulation. PMID:19939837

  9. Sex Pheromone of Anastrepha striata.

    PubMed

    Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Malo, Edi A; Rojas, Julio C

    2015-05-01

    The guava fruit fly, Anastrepha striata, is a pest of several cultivated species of Myrtaceae in the American tropics and subtropics. During calling, A. striata males release numerous volatiles. This study was conducted to identify which of the male volatiles function as the A. striata sex pheromone and to investigate the effects of age and time of day on the emission of pheromone components. Analysis of the volatiles from males collected by solid phase microextraction using gas chromatography coupled to electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) showed that three volatile compounds elicited repeatable responses from the antennae of females. The EAD-active compounds were identified by GC/mass spectrometry as ethyl hexanoate, linalool, and ethyl octanoate. In two-choice tests using Multilure traps placed in field cages, traps baited with live males, ethyl hexanoate, or the three-component blend captured more females than unbaited traps. However, there was no difference in catches when traps baited with live males were compared against traps baited with ethyl hexanoate. Although traps baited with the three-component blend caught more females than traps baited with live males, the difference was not significant. Analyses of pheromonal components released by A. striata males 8 to 26 days old showed that there was an effect of age on pheromone production and also a significant effect of time of day on pheromone emission. Release of the volatile compounds occurred from 14.00 to 18.00 hr, although traces of linalool were detected from 08.00 hr. Peak emission of pheromone compounds occurred at 14.00 hr. PMID:25912228

  10. Pediatric maxillary and mandibular tumors.

    PubMed

    Trosman, Samuel J; Krakovitz, Paul R

    2015-02-01

    Pediatric maxillary and mandibular tumors offer considerable challenges to otolaryngologists, oral surgeons, pathologists, and radiologists alike. Because of the close proximity to vital structures, appropriate steps toward a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan are of paramount importance. This article reviews the most common causes of pediatric jaw masses and discusses diagnostic and therapeutic considerations and recommendations. PMID:25442129

  11. Queen regulates biogenic amine level and nestmate recognition in workers of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Meer, Robert K.; Preston, Catherine A.; Hefetz, Abraham

    2008-12-01

    Nestmate recognition is a critical element in social insect organization, providing a means to maintain territoriality and close the colony to parasites and predators. Ants detect the colony chemical label via their antennae and respond to the label mismatch of an intruder with aggressive behavior. In the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, worker ability to recognize conspecific nonnestmates decreases if the colony queen is removed, such that they do not recognize conspecific nonnestmates as different. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the presence of the colony queen influences the concentration of octopamine, a neuromodulator, in worker ants, which in turn has an effect on nestmate recognition acuity in workers. We demonstrate that queenless workers exhibit reduced brain octopamine levels and reduced discriminatory acuteness; however, feeding queenless workers octopamine restored both. Dopamine levels are influenced by honeybee queen pheromones; however, levels of this biogenic amine were unchanged in our experiments. This is the first demonstration of a link between the presence of the colony queen, a worker biogenic amine, and conspecific nestmate recognition, a powerful expression of colony cohesion and territoriality.

  12. Identifying the C. cactorum Pheromone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg), is an invasive pest of Opuntia spp. Since its arrival in the Florida Keys in 1989, it has moved rapidly up the east and west coasts of Florida, threatening to invade the southwestern United States and Mexico. Female moths produce a sex pheromone that ...

  13. PHEROMONE BIOSYNTHESIS IN SOCIAL INSECTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Social insects produce and use a very large number of organic molecules as pheromones to communicate both intra- and interspecifically, and to regulate their social interactions. This review provides an overview of the chemical nature of these compounds and where they are made in the insects, and th...

  14. Identification of a pheromone regulating caste differentiation in termites

    E-print Network

    Keller, Laurent

    Identification of a pheromone regulating caste differentiation in termites Kenji Matsuuraa,1 power. Identification of a volatile pheromone regulating caste differentiation in a termite provides verylittleprogressinthechemicalidentificationofinhibitoryqueen pheromones. In termites, which evolved eusociality independently of Hymenoptera, the existence

  15. Hormones and pheromones in regulation of insect behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both pheromones and hormones are well recognized regulators of insect biology. However, the interactions between hormones and pheromones in coordinating insect biology are less well understood. We have studied the interactions between juvenile hormone, its precursor methyl farnesoate, and pheromon...

  16. Evaporation rate of emulsion and oil-base emulsion pheromones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of pheromone evaporation rate is critical to distribute pheromone containers effectively in the forest, orchard and field. There are several factors influencing the pheromone evaporation rate that include wind speed, container size and porosity, release area, temperature, humidity, pherom...

  17. Targeted disruption of a single sex pheromone receptor gene completely abolishes in vivo pheromone response in the silkmoth

    E-print Network

    Sakurai, Takeshi

    Male moths use species-specific sex pheromones to identify and orientate toward conspecific females. Odorant receptors (ORs) for sex pheromone substances have been identified as sex pheromone receptors in various moth ...

  18. Queen Angelfish Hides in Mangrove Prop Roots

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A Queen Angelfish peers through the safety of the mangrove roots across the rich colors and textures of corals, sponges, urchins, and algae. Queen Angelfish feed almost exclusively on sponges, which are abundant in these mangroves....

  19. Pearls of Mandibular Trauma Management

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, John C.; Feldman, Evan M.; Chike-Obi, Chuma J.; Bullocks, Jamal M.

    2010-01-01

    Mandibular trauma is a common problem seen by plastic surgeons. When fractures occur, they have the ability to affect the patient's occlusion significantly, cause infection, and lead to considerable pain. Interventions to prevent these sequelae require either closed or open forms of reduction and fixation. Physicians determining how to manage these injuries should take into consideration the nature of the injury, background information regarding the patient's health, and the patient's comorbidities. Whereas general principles guide the management of the majority of injuries, special consideration must be paid to the edentulous patient, complex and comminuted fractures, and pediatric patients. These topics are discussed in this article, with a special emphasis on pearls of mandibular trauma management. PMID:22550460

  20. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. 874...NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular implant facial prosthesis is a...

  1. Reflections on the "N" + "k" Queens Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatham, Doug

    2009-01-01

    The "N" queens problem is a classic puzzle. It asks for an arrangement of "N" mutually non-attacking queens on an "N" x "N" chessboard. We discuss a recent variation called the "N" + "k" queens problem, where pawns are added to the chessboard to allow a greater number of non-attacking queens to be placed on it. We describe some of what is known…

  2. Olfactory Attraction of the Hornet Vespa velutina to Honeybee Colony Odors and Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Antoine; Monceau, Karine; Bonnard, Olivier; Thiéry, Denis; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the last century, the number of biological invasions has continuously increased worldwide. Due to their environmental and economical consequences, invasive species are now a major concern. Social wasps are particularly efficient invaders because of their distinctive biology and behavior. Among them, the yellow-legged hornet, Vespa velutina, is a keen hunter of domestic honeybees. Its recent introduction to Europe may induce important beekeeping, pollination, and biodiversity problems. Hornets use olfactory cues for the long-range detection of food sources, in this case the location of honeybee colonies, but the exact nature of these cues remains unknown. Here, we studied the orientation behavior of V. velutina workers towards a range of hive products and protein sources, as well as towards prominent chemical substances emitted by these food sources. In a multiple choice test performed under controlled laboratory conditions, we found that hornets are strongly attracted to the odor of some hive products, especially pollen and honey. When testing specific compounds, the honeybee aggregation pheromone, geraniol, proved highly attractive. Pheromones produced by honeybee larvae or by the queen were also of interest to hornet workers, albeit to a lesser extent. Our results indicate that V. velutina workers are selectively attracted towards olfactory cues from hives (stored food, brood, and queen), which may signal a high prey density. This study opens new perspectives for understanding hornets’ hunting behavior and paves the way for developing efficient trapping strategies against this invasive species. PMID:25549358

  3. Olfactory attraction of the hornet Vespa velutina to honeybee colony odors and pheromones.

    PubMed

    Couto, Antoine; Monceau, Karine; Bonnard, Olivier; Thiéry, Denis; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the last century, the number of biological invasions has continuously increased worldwide. Due to their environmental and economical consequences, invasive species are now a major concern. Social wasps are particularly efficient invaders because of their distinctive biology and behavior. Among them, the yellow-legged hornet, Vespa velutina, is a keen hunter of domestic honeybees. Its recent introduction to Europe may induce important beekeeping, pollination, and biodiversity problems. Hornets use olfactory cues for the long-range detection of food sources, in this case the location of honeybee colonies, but the exact nature of these cues remains unknown. Here, we studied the orientation behavior of V. velutina workers towards a range of hive products and protein sources, as well as towards prominent chemical substances emitted by these food sources. In a multiple choice test performed under controlled laboratory conditions, we found that hornets are strongly attracted to the odor of some hive products, especially pollen and honey. When testing specific compounds, the honeybee aggregation pheromone, geraniol, proved highly attractive. Pheromones produced by honeybee larvae or by the queen were also of interest to hornet workers, albeit to a lesser extent. Our results indicate that V. velutina workers are selectively attracted towards olfactory cues from hives (stored food, brood, and queen), which may signal a high prey density. This study opens new perspectives for understanding hornets' hunting behavior and paves the way for developing efficient trapping strategies against this invasive species. PMID:25549358

  4. WELCOME TO QUEEN'S FACULTY OF EDUCATION

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    WELCOME TO QUEEN'S FACULTY OF EDUCATION #12;Jessica Pickles @pickadilly7 I don't know what was more exciting, getting into #queensu the first time or the 2nd time for #QueensEduc! ena holtermann @enaholtermann I love that @QueensEduc is "all about meeting the needs of our students" Very heartening

  5. December 2012 Queen's University Alcohol Policy

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    December 2012 1 Queen's University Alcohol Policy Introduction Queen's University is committed. The university recognizes that the misuse of alcohol can create risks, threaten individual health, compromise and promotes healthy decisions related to alcohol use by all members of the Queen's community. POLICY

  6. QUEENS COLLEGE 65-30 KISSENA BLVD

    E-print Network

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    1 2014 QUEENS COLLEGE 65-30 KISSENA BLVD FLUSHING, NY 11367 MR. PEDRO PINEIRO DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC SAFETY 718-997-4443 College Overview Annual Security and Fire Report College Overview Queens College that occurred on campus; in certain off-campus buildings owned or controlled by Queens College; and on public

  7. QUEENS COLLEGE 65-30 KISSENA BLVD

    E-print Network

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    1 2015 QUEENS COLLEGE 65-30 KISSENA BLVD FLUSHING, NY 11367 MR. PEDRO PINEIRO DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC SAFETY 718-997-4443 College Overview Annual Security and Fire Report College Overview Queens College that occurred on campus; in certain off-campus buildings owned or controlled by Queens College; and on public

  8. THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Policy

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    discrimination. The Equality Act 2010 covers nine "protected characteristics": age, disability, genderJune 2014 THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Policy THE COLLEGE'S AIMS The Queen's College a wide range of backgrounds and experiences. The Queen's College will work to remove any barriers which

  9. Pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail integrity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Manning, L.M.; Stringer, L.D.; Cappadonna, J.; El-Sayed, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Disruption of Argentine ant trail following and reduced ability to forage (measured by bait location success) was achieved after presentation of an oversupply of trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal. Experiments tested single pheromone point sources and dispersion of a formulation in small field plots. Ant walking behavior was recorded and digitized by using video tracking, before and after presentation of trail pheromone. Ants showed changes in three parameters within seconds of treatment: (1) Ants on trails normally showed a unimodal frequency distribution of walking track angles, but this pattern disappeared after presentation of the trail pheromone; (2) ants showed initial high trail integrity on a range of untreated substrates from painted walls to wooden or concrete floors, but this was significantly reduced following presentation of a point source of pheromone; (3) the number of ants in the pheromone-treated area increased over time, as recruitment apparently exceeded departures. To test trail disruption in small outdoor plots, the trail pheromone was formulated with carnuba wax-coated quartz laboratory sand (1 g quartz sand/0.2 g wax/1 mg pheromone). The pheromone formulation, with a half-life of 30 h, was applied by rotary spreader at four rates (0, 2.5, 7.5, and 25 mg pheromone/m2) to 1- and 4-m2 plots in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. Ant counts at bait cards in treated plots were significantly reduced compared to controls on the day of treatment, and there was a significant reduction in ant foraging for 2 days. These results show that trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ants is possible, but a much more durable formulation is needed before nest-level impacts can be expected. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  10. Neonicotinoid pesticides severely affect honey bee queens

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Geoffrey R.; Troxler, Aline; Retschnig, Gina; Roth, Kaspar; Yañez, Orlando; Shutler, Dave; Neumann, Peter; Gauthier, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Queen health is crucial to colony survival of social bees. Recently, queen failure has been proposed to be a major driver of managed honey bee colony losses, yet few data exist concerning effects of environmental stressors on queens. Here we demonstrate for the first time that exposure to field-realistic concentrations of neonicotinoid pesticides during development can severely affect queens of western honey bees (Apis mellifera). In pesticide-exposed queens, reproductive anatomy (ovaries) and physiology (spermathecal-stored sperm quality and quantity), rather than flight behaviour, were compromised and likely corresponded to reduced queen success (alive and producing worker offspring). This study highlights the detriments of neonicotinoids to queens of environmentally and economically important social bees, and further strengthens the need for stringent risk assessments to safeguard biodiversity and ecosystem services that are vulnerable to these substances. PMID:26459072

  11. Neonicotinoid pesticides severely affect honey bee queens.

    PubMed

    Williams, Geoffrey R; Troxler, Aline; Retschnig, Gina; Roth, Kaspar; Yañez, Orlando; Shutler, Dave; Neumann, Peter; Gauthier, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Queen health is crucial to colony survival of social bees. Recently, queen failure has been proposed to be a major driver of managed honey bee colony losses, yet few data exist concerning effects of environmental stressors on queens. Here we demonstrate for the first time that exposure to field-realistic concentrations of neonicotinoid pesticides during development can severely affect queens of western honey bees (Apis mellifera). In pesticide-exposed queens, reproductive anatomy (ovaries) and physiology (spermathecal-stored sperm quality and quantity), rather than flight behaviour, were compromised and likely corresponded to reduced queen success (alive and producing worker offspring). This study highlights the detriments of neonicotinoids to queens of environmentally and economically important social bees, and further strengthens the need for stringent risk assessments to safeguard biodiversity and ecosystem services that are vulnerable to these substances. PMID:26459072

  12. Study Abroad at Queen Mary

    E-print Network

    Chittka, Lars

    London ­ the world in one city 26 www.qmul.ac.uk/international #12;4 Queen Mary University of London #12 2012 Olympic Park. The campus is served by two underground stations ­ Mile End and Stepney Green size in the world with 40% of the city green space · 37% per cent of London's population were born

  13. Hoodoos of the Queens Garden

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Views along the Queen's Garden Trail in Bryce Canyon National Park. Bryce Canyon is a unique sandstone formation in southern Utah. It is home to a large number of hoodoos, which are oddly shaped pillars of rock that formed due to different erosion rates for the dolomite that caps them and the sands...

  14. 'Queen of Hearts' Oakleaf Hydrangea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A late-blooming oakleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia) cultivar was released by the U.S. National Arboretum. ‘Queen of Hearts’ has grown 6.5 feet high and 11 feet wide in 11 years. In early summer, it is covered with 11-inch-long inflorescences that are held upright above the foliage. Flowers ...

  15. Moon over the Queen's Garden

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Views along the Queen's Garden Trail in Bryce Canyon National Park. Bryce Canyon is a unique sandstone formation in southern Utah. It is home to a large number of hoodoos, which are oddly shaped pillars of rock that formed due to different erosion rates for the dolomite that caps them and the sands...

  16. Panorama of the Queen's Garden

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Views along the Queen's Garden Trail in Bryce Canyon National Park. Bryce Canyon is a unique sandstone formation in southern Utah. It is home to a large number of hoodoos, which are oddly shaped pillars of rock that formed due to different erosion rates for the dolomite that caps them and the sands...

  17. Pediatric Mandibular Fractures: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunil; Vashistha, Abhishek; Chugh, Ankita; Kumar, Dinesh; Bihani, Urvashi; Trehan, Mridula; Nigam, Anant G

    2009-01-01

    The pattern of craniomaxillofacial fractures seen in children and adolescents varies with evolving skeletal anatomy and socioenvironmental factors. The general principles of treating mandibular fractures are the same in children and adults: Anatomic reduction is combined with stabilization adequate to maintain it until bone union has occurred. But recognition of some of the differences between children and their adult counterparts is important in long-term esthetic and functional facial rehabilitation as effect of injury, treatment provided has a great influence on their ensuing growth. PMID:25206104

  18. Acceptance of mated Queens and Queen Cells in Colonies of Russian and Italian Honey Bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Requeening colonies is a standard beekeeping practice with both mated queens and queen cells. More beekeepers are requeening with Russian honey bees queens because of their significantly higher resistance to varroa and tracheal mites, their good honey production and their overwintering abilities. ...

  19. Queen's Research Information System (Pure) Policy 28/04/2015 Queen's University Belfast

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    1 Queen's Research Information System (Pure) Policy 28/04/2015 Queen's University Belfast Policy on the population and maintenance of Queen's Research Information System (Pure) Date: 28/04/2015 1. Context Research Framework (REF) performance. To help facilitate these goals a research information system has been selected

  20. Dear Member of the Queen's University Community, Queen's University Library is surveying the Queen's community to learn more about our users'

    E-print Network

    Murty, Ram

    Dear Member of the Queen's University Community, Queen's University Library is surveying the Queen's community to learn more about our users' perceptions and expectations of the Library. The survey is called and identify best practices. Previous iterations of this survey have been conducted at Queen's in 2004, 2007

  1. PRACTICAL SYNTHESES OF SELECTED INSECT PHEROMONES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Practical examples of insect pheromone synthesis, from our laboratory will be presented. Examples of key reactions in synthetic pathways include: Regiospecific epoxidation (cereal leaf beetle), kinetic vs. thermodynamic control of cycloheptanone dimethylation (Aphthona flea beetles), in situ oxida...

  2. Visualization of Ant Pheromone Based Path Following 

    E-print Network

    Sutherland, Benjamin T.

    2010-07-14

    OF ANT PHEROMONE BASED PATH FOLOWING A Thesis by Benjamin Sutherland Submited to the O?ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degre of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 2009 Major Subject: Visualization Sciences VISUALIZATION OF ANT PHEROMONE BASED PATH FOLOWING A Thesis by Benjamin Sutherland Submited to the O?ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfilment...

  3. Multiple functions of fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, mandibular gland products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : Alarm pheromones are an essential part of a complex of pheromone interactions that contribute to the maintenance of colony integrity and sociality in social insects. Recently, we identified 2-ethyl-3,6-dimethylpyrazine as an alarm pheromone component of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. We continu...

  4. THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Sexual Orientation

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Sexual Orientation INTRODUCTION This document provides a general overview of legislation relating to sexual orientation and The Queen's College response as it endeavours to ensure that discrimination on the grounds of an individual's sexual orientation or gender

  5. Queen Mary University of London Fundraising pack

    E-print Network

    Chittka, Lars

    way to get involved and support our students is by making a personal donation. Making a gift is quickQueen Mary University of London Fundraising pack Help our students, help our society! www.qmul.ac.uk/alumni/supportingqm/ 1 #12;Thank you for choosing to fundraise for Queen Mary University of London students

  6. Selective manipulation of predators using pheromones: responses to frontalin and ipsdienol pheromone components of bark beetles

    E-print Network

    Aukema, Brian

    pheromone components of bark beetles in the Great Lakes region Brian H. Aukema* and Kenneth F. Raffa One proposed approach to improving biological control of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae; alt manipulation is impeded by attraction of both predators and pests to bark beetle pheromones. 2 The primary bark

  7. Rotational Distraction for the Treatment of Severe Mandibular Retrognathia

    PubMed Central

    Mitsugi, Masaharu; Alcalde, Rafael E.; Yano, Tomoyuki; Uemura, Noriko; Okazaki, Mutsumi

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds: The main problem with intraoral distraction of the mandible is the inability to achieve the three-dimensional mandibular correction as planned preoperatively. We developed a technique that allows spontaneous changes in the direction of mandibular elongation using an intraoral distractor. Methods: After mandibular osteotomy, the distractor is fixed to the distal segment of the mandible using a single bicortical screw, allowing anterior-posterior, vertical and limited lateromedial changes in the vector of distraction. Mandibular lengthening is performed while keeping the maxilla and mandible in class I occlusion with intermaxillary fixation. Results: As the distraction device is activated allowing mandibular elongation, the proximal segment, guided by the surrounding soft tissues, moves and rotates posterosuperiorly. Mandibular lengthening is continued until the condylar head reaches an adequate position in the mandibular fossa as confirmed clinically and radiographically. Conclusion Thirty-three patients with mandibular retrognathia received this treatment and good results were obtained. PMID:26301156

  8. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...temporary reconstruction of the mandibular condyle in patients who have undergone resective procedures to remove malignant or benign tumors, requiring the removal of the mandibular condyle. See § 870.3 of this chapter. [59 FR 65478, Dec. 20, 1994,...

  9. Mandibular osteonecrosis due to bisphosphonate use

    PubMed Central

    ?alvarc?, Ahmet; Alt?nay, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Due to their efficient osteoclastic inhibitor effect in bone metabolism and antiangiogenic activity, bisphosphonates are widely used in many cancer diseases particularly in prostate cancers with bone metastasis, lung cancer, breast cancer and multiple myeloma, as well as in systemic diseases such as osteoporosis, osteopenia, Paget disease and osteogenesis imperfect for the last 13 years. Prostate cancer is a common cancer in males and it is the leading cause of bone metastasis. Mandibular metastasis is rarely encountered during the course of prostate cancer. Mandibular osteonecrosis as well has begun to be observed along with the availability of more efficient and stronger formulations developed following the use of bisphosphonates. Zolendronic acid, which has been used also by our patient, has widely come into practice as a 3rd generation bisphosphonate. Because of prostate cancer and widespread bone metastases, our patient has been receiving zolendronic acid with maximum androgen blockage for 4 years. Tomography of the patient, who has undergone intensive treatment because of submandibular abscess, demonstrated extensive osteonecrosis in the fovea sublingual region of the mandible corpus. In large series, although, mandibular osteonecrosis was widely seen due to bisphosphonate use for the metastases of lung and breast cancers, this rate was between 9.6% and 11% for prostate cancer within the series. Although our patient had no mandibular metastasis before, mandibular necrosis was observed due to long-term bisphosphonate use. We are going to present our patient who had this rare complication with his clinical picture. PMID:26328198

  10. Long Term Stability and Relapse Following Mandibular Advancement and Mandibular Setback Surgeries: A Cephalometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Darshan, S Vinay; Ronad, Yusuf Ahammed; Kishore, M S V; Shetty, K Sadashiva; Rajesh, M; Suman, S D

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim was to evaluate the long-term hard and soft tissue changes following mandibular advancement and setback surgeries. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 subjects each were selected who underwent bilateral sagittal split osteotomy mandibular advancement and mandibular setback groups. Pre-surgical (T1), immediate post-surgical (T2) and long-term post-surgical (T3) cephalograms were compared for hard and soft tissue changes. After cephalometric measurements, the quantity of changes between T1-T2 and T1-T3 were determined for each patient. The mean difference between T1-T2 and T1-T3 was compared with assess the long-term changes and stability. Results: In mandibular advancement the mean difference between immediate post-surgical and long term post-surgical is 7%, which accounts for a relapse of 7%. In mandibular setback, the mean difference between immediate post-surgical and long-term post-surgical is 29%, which accounts for a relapse of 29%. Conclusion: Mandibular advancement remained stable over the long period when compared to mandibular setback. PMID:25395792

  11. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle...prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw to replace the mandibular...mandibular condyle prosthesis intended to be implanted in the human jaw for temporary...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle...prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw to replace the mandibular...mandibular condyle prosthesis intended to be implanted in the human jaw for temporary...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle...prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw to replace the mandibular...mandibular condyle prosthesis intended to be implanted in the human jaw for temporary...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mandibular condyle prosthesis. 872.3960 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mandibular condyle prosthesis. 872.3960 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mandibular condyle prosthesis. 872.3960 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mandibular condyle prosthesis. 872.3960 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mandibular condyle prosthesis. 872.3960 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw...

  19. ACTIVATED ZINC REDUCTION OF ENYNES TO CONJUGATED DIENE LEPIDOPTERA PHEROMONES, AND FIELD CAPTURE OF SIBERIAN MOTHS WITH SYNTHETIC PHEROMONE MIXTURES.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract Efficient syntheses of (Z,E)-5,7-dodecadienol, a pheromone component of the Siberian moth, Dendrolimus superans sibiricus, and (E,Z)-10,12-hexadecadienol, a pheromone component of various Lepidopteran pheromones, were accomplished by cis-reduction of the corresponding enynols with activate...

  20. Unraveling the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) signal transduction cascade that regulates sex pheromone production in moths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies over the past three decades have demonstrated that female moths usually produce sex pheromones as multi-component blends in which the ratios of the individual components are precisely controlled, making it possible to generate species-specific pheromone blends. Most moth pheromone component...

  1. Does Patriline Composition Change over a Honey Bee Queen’s Lifetime?

    PubMed Central

    Brodschneider, Robert; Arnold, Gérard; Hrassnigg, Norbert; Crailsheim, Karl

    2012-01-01

    A honey bee queen mates with a number of drones a few days after she emerges as an adult. Spermatozoa of different drones are stored in her spermatheca and used for the rest of the queen’s life to fertilize eggs. Sperm usage is thought to be random, so that the patriline distribution within a honey bee colony would remain constant over time. In this study we assigned the progeny of a naturally mated honey bee queen to patrilines using microsatellite markers at the queen’s age of two, three and four years. No significant changes in patriline distribution occurred within each of two foraging seasons, with samples taken one and five months apart, respectively. Overall and pair-wise comparisons between the three analyzed years reached significant levels. Over the three-year period we found a trend for patrilines to become more equally represented with time. It is important to note that this study was performed with a single queen, and thus individual and population variation in sperm usage patterns must be assessed. We discuss long-term changes in patriline composition due to mixing processes in the queen’s spermatheca, following incomplete mixing of different drones’ sperm after mating. PMID:26466632

  2. Dens invaginatus (dilated odontome) in mandibular canine

    PubMed Central

    Halawar, Sangamesh S; Satyakiran, GVV; Krishnanand, PS; Prashanth, R

    2014-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a developmental malformation of teeth related to shape of the teeth. Affected teeth show a deep infolding of enamel and dentin starting from the tip of the cusps and may extend deep into the root. It results from the invagination of the enamel organ into the dental papilla before calcification has occurred. Teeth most affected are maxillary lateral incisors. The presence of dens invaginatus in mandibular canine is extremely rare. The tooth was symptomatic in that it was mobile and was oriented horizontally. This article presents a case of symptomatic dens invaginatus in mandibular canine. PMID:25364169

  3. Pheromones: a new ergogenic aid in sport?

    PubMed

    Papaloucas, Marios; Kyriazi, Kyriaki; Kouloulias, Vassilis

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays, antidoping laboratories are improving detection methods to confirm the use of forbidden substances. These tests are based both on direct identification of new substances or their metabolites and on indirect evaluation of changes in gene, protein, or metabolite patterns (genomics, proteomics, or metabolomics). The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) officially monitors anabolic steroids, hormones, growth factors, ?-agonists, hormone and metabolic modulators, masking agents, street drugs, manipulation of blood and blood components, chemical and physical manipulation, gene doping, stimulants, narcotics, glucocorticosteroids, and ?-blockers. However, several other substances are under review by WADA. Pheromones accomplish the structure and function of life from its first step, while they have an impact on the body's performance. Both testosterone and pheromones have an ergogenic effect that could potentially affect an athlete's performance. The authors share their questions concerning the potential impact of pheromones in sports. PMID:25710097

  4. THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Disability

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Disability INTRODUCTION This document provides response to that legislation. CURRENT LEGAL POSITION Discrimination on the grounds of disability. In addition, it is illegal to discriminate for a disability-related reason. Discrimination by association

  5. THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Disability

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Disability INTRODUCTION This document provides response to that legislation. CURRENT LEGAL POSITION Discrimination on the grounds of disability to discriminate for a disability-related reason. Discrimination by association is also prohibited, and therefore

  6. International Hall s Journal'Queen

    E-print Network

    International Hall s Journal'Queen Harkness C agear Housing ing GkarP oundgrUnder Centre Community'Queen 44 Albert St.1 54 Albert St.1 52 Albert St.1 indall SutherlandHall ank TrF rt Robert land DunningHall Hall yHall MacdonaldHall Richardson SirJohnA. (Stewa llock( Library Gordon Hall art-Pollock( Douglas

  7. Pheromonal cross-attraction in true bugs (Heteroptera): attraction of Piezodorus hybneri (Pentatomidae) to its pheromone versus the pheromone of Riptortus pedestris (Alydidae).

    PubMed

    Endo, N; Sasaki, R; Muto, S

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the attractiveness of a synthetic form of the pheromone of the soybean stink bug, Piezodorus hybneri (Gmelin), under field conditions, and compared it with that of (E)-2-hexenyl (E)-2-hexenoate, a pheromone component of a competitor, Riptortus pedestris (Fabricius). Many adult stink bugs were attracted to traps baited with 100 mg of the synthetic pheromone (1: 1: one mixture of ?-sesquiphellandrene, (R)-15-hexadecanolide, and methyl (Z)-8-hexadecenoate), but few were attracted to 1 or 10 mg. More than twice as many females as males were attracted to this male-produced pheromone. None of the individual pheromone components (30 mg) attracted conspecifics. In summer (June-July), when field P. hybneri were not in diapause, (E)-2-hexenyl (E)-2-hexenoate was more attractive to P. hybneri than the synthetic pheromone. The sex ratio of the adults attracted to the synthetic pheromone was highly female-biased, yet almost equal numbers of both sexes were attracted to (E)-2-hexenyl (E)-2-hexenoate. Most females attracted to both attractants were mated and had mature ovaries. However, adults attracted to (E)-2-hexenyl (E)-2-hexenoate were likely to have less food in their stomach than those attracted to the synthetic pheromone. In late autumn (October-November), when the bugs were in reproductive diapause, both attractants attracted many sexually immature female and male adults that had well-developed fat body. The synthetic pheromone also attracted a large number of conspecific nymphs. These results suggest that P. hybneri pheromone and R. pedestris pheromone component, respectively, have different functions for P. hybneri. The male-produced pheromone system of P. hybneri seems to be sex-related but to have other roles. PMID:22182564

  8. From The Tutor for Graduates: Professor Simon Aldridge The Queen's College Oxford OX1 4AW

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    From The Tutor for Graduates: Professor Simon Aldridge The Queen's College · Oxford OX1 4AW.queens.ox.ac.uk The Queen's College · Oxford OX1 4AW Scholarships & Financial Support The Queen's College provides financial

  9. [Facial nerve paralysis and mandibular fracture].

    PubMed

    Salonna, I; Fanizzi, P; Quaranta, A

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe three cases of peripheral facial nerve paralysis in patients with a mandibular fracture. In two cases, in which the onset of palsy was uncertain, the facial nerve injury was contralateral to the fractured side. Topodiagnostic tests showed neural damage at the third intrapetrosal portion and at the genicular ganglion. In one of the two patients tomography revealed a fracture line through the anterio-superior wall of the external auditory canal homolateral to the facial palsy. In the third subject palsy set in immediately after the trauma and was ipsilateral to the mandibular fracture; the facial lesion was localized at the genicular ganglion. In the first two cases, functional recovery was spontaneous (40 and 0 days after the trauma respectively). In the third subject, the nerve was decompressed surgically with a complete functional recovery two months later. The functional and clinical findings of these three cases show that a contralateral facial palsy secondary to a mandibular fracture resolves spontaneously while the traumatic displacement of the mandibular condyle may determine a temporal bone fracture sometimes followed by a lesion in the intratemporal portion of the facial nerve. An event such as the latter may delay functional recovery and thus warrant surgery such as in cases of Bell's palsy. PMID:1298156

  10. A new class of mealybug pheromones: a hemiterpene ester in the sex pheromone of Crisicoccus matsumotoi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabata, Jun; Narai, Yutaka; Sawamura, Nobuo; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Sugie, Hajime

    2012-07-01

    Mealybugs, which include several agricultural pests, are small sap feeders covered with a powdery wax. They exhibit clear sexual dimorphism; males are winged but fragile and short lived, whereas females are windless and less mobile. Thus, sex pheromones emitted by females facilitate copulation and reproduction by serving as a key navigation tool for males. Although the structures of the hitherto known mealybug pheromones vary among species, they have a common structural motif; they are carboxylic esters of monoterpene alcohols with irregular non-head-to-tail linkages. However, in the present study, we isolated from the Matsumoto mealybug, Crisicoccus matsumotoi (Siraiwa), a pheromone with a completely different structure. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we identified the pheromone as 3-methyl-3-butenyl 5-methylhexanoate. Its attractiveness to males was confirmed in a series of field trapping experiments involving comparison between the isolated natural product and a synthetic sample. This is the first report of a hemiterpene mealybug pheromone. In addition, the acid moiety (5-methylhexanoate) appears to be rare in insect pheromones.

  11. Pheromone binding proteins enhance the sensitivity of olfactory receptors to sex pheromones in Chilo suppressalis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hetan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Ting; Pelosi, Paolo; Dong, Shuanglin; Wang, Guirong

    2015-01-01

    Sexual communication in moths offers a simplified scenario to model and investigate insect sensory perception. Both PBPs (pheromone-binding proteins) and PRs (pheromone receptors) are involved in the detection of sex pheromones, but the interplay between them still remains largely unknown. In this study, we have measured the binding affinities of the four recombinant PBPs of Chilo suppressalis (CsupPBPs) to pheromone components and analogs and characterized the six PRs using the Xenopus oocytes expression system. Interestingly, when the responses of PRs were recorded in the presence of PBPs, we measured in several combinations a dramatic increase in signals as well as in sensitivity of such combined systems. Furthermore, the discrimination ability of appropriate combinations of PRs and PBPs was improved compared with the performance of PBPs or PRs alone. Besides further supporting a role of PBPs in the pheromone detection and discrimination, our data shows for the first time that appropriate combinations of PRs and PBPs improved the discrimination ability of PBPs or PRs alone. The variety of responses measured with different pairing of PBPs and PRs indicates the complexity of the olfaction system, which, even for the relatively simple task of detecting sex pheromones, utilises a highly sophisticated combinatorial approach. PMID:26310773

  12. Pheromone binding proteins enhance the sensitivity of olfactory receptors to sex pheromones in Chilo suppressalis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hetan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Ting; Pelosi, Paolo; Dong, Shuanglin; Wang, Guirong

    2015-01-01

    Sexual communication in moths offers a simplified scenario to model and investigate insect sensory perception. Both PBPs (pheromone-binding proteins) and PRs (pheromone receptors) are involved in the detection of sex pheromones, but the interplay between them still remains largely unknown. In this study, we have measured the binding affinities of the four recombinant PBPs of Chilo suppressalis (CsupPBPs) to pheromone components and analogs and characterized the six PRs using the Xenopus oocytes expression system. Interestingly, when the responses of PRs were recorded in the presence of PBPs, we measured in several combinations a dramatic increase in signals as well as in sensitivity of such combined systems. Furthermore, the discrimination ability of appropriate combinations of PRs and PBPs was improved compared with the performance of PBPs or PRs alone. Besides further supporting a role of PBPs in the pheromone detection and discrimination, our data shows for the first time that appropriate combinations of PRs and PBPs improved the discrimination ability of PBPs or PRs alone. The variety of responses measured with different pairing of PBPs and PRs indicates the complexity of the olfaction system, which, even for the relatively simple task of detecting sex pheromones, utilises a highly sophisticated combinatorial approach. PMID:26310773

  13. Lagerstroemia speciosa ‘Big Pink’, an improved pink flowered queen’s crape myrtle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract Lagerstroemia speciosa (L.) Pers., commonly called Pride-of-India, queen’s or giant crape myrtle, is a large shrub or small tree widely used as a tropical ornamental, with landscape utility limited to USDA Hardiness Zones 10-11. This paper describes a pink-flowered seedling selec...

  14. Evolution of Moth Sex Pheromone Desaturases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moth sex pheromone communication has evolved to make use of complex blends of relatively simple long-chain fatty acid precursors. Species specificity is derived from the unique stereochemistry of double bonds introduced into exact locations along the hydrocarbon backbone of fatty acids, which are r...

  15. Moth pheromone receptors and deceitful parapheromones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The insect’s olfactory system is so selective that male moths, for example, can discriminate female-produced sex pheromones from compounds with minimal structural modifications. Yet, there is an exception for this “lock-and-key” tight selectivity. Formate analogs can be used as replacement for less ...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1064 - Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the requirement...Tolerances § 180.1064 Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the requirement...of both components of the tomato pinworm insect pheromone (E...

  17. Targeted disruption of a single sex pheromone receptor gene completely abolishes in vivo pheromone response in the silkmoth

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Mikami, Akihisa; Uchino, Keiro; Tabuchi, Masashi; Zhang, Feng; Sezutsu, Hideki; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2015-01-01

    Male moths use species-specific sex pheromones to identify and orientate toward conspecific females. Odorant receptors (ORs) for sex pheromone substances have been identified as sex pheromone receptors in various moth species. However, direct in vivo evidence linking the functional role of these ORs with behavioural responses is lacking. In the silkmoth, Bombyx mori, female moths emit two sex pheromone components, bombykol and bombykal, but only bombykol elicits sexual behaviour in male moths. A sex pheromone receptor BmOR1 is specifically tuned to bombykol and is expressed in specialized olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the pheromone sensitive long sensilla trichodea of male silkmoth antennae. Here, we show that disruption of the BmOR1 gene, mediated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), completely removes ORN sensitivity to bombykol and corresponding pheromone-source searching behaviour in male moths. Furthermore, transgenic rescue of BmOR1 restored normal behavioural responses to bombykol. Our results demonstrate that BmOR1 is required for the physiological and behavioural response to bombykol, demonstrating that it is the receptor that mediates sex pheromone responses in male silkmoths. This study provides the first direct evidence that a member of the sex pheromone receptor family in moth species mediates conspecific sex pheromone information for sexual behaviour. PMID:26047360

  18. Targeted disruption of a single sex pheromone receptor gene completely abolishes in vivo pheromone response in the silkmoth.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Mikami, Akihisa; Uchino, Keiro; Tabuchi, Masashi; Zhang, Feng; Sezutsu, Hideki; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2015-01-01

    Male moths use species-specific sex pheromones to identify and orientate toward conspecific females. Odorant receptors (ORs) for sex pheromone substances have been identified as sex pheromone receptors in various moth species. However, direct in vivo evidence linking the functional role of these ORs with behavioural responses is lacking. In the silkmoth, Bombyx mori, female moths emit two sex pheromone components, bombykol and bombykal, but only bombykol elicits sexual behaviour in male moths. A sex pheromone receptor BmOR1 is specifically tuned to bombykol and is expressed in specialized olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the pheromone sensitive long sensilla trichodea of male silkmoth antennae. Here, we show that disruption of the BmOR1 gene, mediated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), completely removes ORN sensitivity to bombykol and corresponding pheromone-source searching behaviour in male moths. Furthermore, transgenic rescue of BmOR1 restored normal behavioural responses to bombykol. Our results demonstrate that BmOR1 is required for the physiological and behavioural response to bombykol, demonstrating that it is the receptor that mediates sex pheromone responses in male silkmoths. This study provides the first direct evidence that a member of the sex pheromone receptor family in moth species mediates conspecific sex pheromone information for sexual behaviour. PMID:26047360

  19. Queen's University Library inspires learning, sparks creativity and

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    1 OUR VISION Queen's University Library inspires learning, sparks creativity and builds community. The Library strives to inspire learning, spark creativity and build community, to help Queen's be the Canadian

  20. The composition and diagenesis of the Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian) at Virey and Moose Queen fields, Midland County, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Voncannon, Jennifer Catherine

    1999-01-01

    and its sandstone reservoirs at the Moose and Virey Queen fields. The second purpose is to investigate the depositional and diagenetic processes that control the formation, size and quality of the sandstone reservoirs and non-reservoirs. The Queen...

  1. QUEEN'S COLLEGE GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS 2015 Entry Please note that highlighted scholarship are administered centrally, rather than through The Queen's College

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    QUEEN'S COLLEGE GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS 2015 Entry Please note that highlighted scholarship are administered centrally, rather than through The Queen's College Title of Scholarship Criteria Value Duration Nationality Number Closing date for applications

  2. 5. NEW YORK CONNECTING RR VIADUCT CROSSING BROOKLYNQUEENS EXPRESSWAY. QUEENS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. NEW YORK CONNECTING RR VIADUCT CROSSING BROOKLYN-QUEENS EXPRESSWAY. QUEENS, QUEENS CO., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 5.99. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York, New York County, NY

  3. Complicated canal morphology of mandibular first premolar.

    PubMed

    Pallavi, Vyapaka; Kumar, Janga Ravi; Mandava, Ramesh Babu; Rao, Subramanian Hari

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this article was to report an unusual anatomic variation of mandibular first premolar, with one root and three distinct canals, which leave pulp chamber and merge short of apex to exit as two separate apical foramina. The incidence of three canals existing as two apical foramina has only been documented in the literature by a few case reports. To achieve successful endodontic treatment, the clinician has to identify the different canal configurations and treat them properly. PMID:26538977

  4. Mandibular metastasis of cholangiocarcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    You, Tae Min; Kim, Kee-Deog; Jeong, Ho-Gul

    2015-01-01

    Tumors metastasizing from distant regions to the oral and maxillofacial region are uncommon, comprising only 1%-2% of all malignancies. Cholangiocarcinoma is a malignancy that arises from cholangiocytes, which are epithelial cells that line the bile ducts. These cancers are difficult to diagnose and have a poor prognosis. In this paper, we report a rare case of mandibular metastasis of cholangiocarcinoma diagnosed at the primary site and discuss the radiographic findings observed in this case.

  5. Complicated canal morphology of mandibular first premolar

    PubMed Central

    Pallavi, Vyapaka; Kumar, Janga Ravi; Mandava, Ramesh Babu; Rao, Subramanian Hari

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article was to report an unusual anatomic variation of mandibular first premolar, with one root and three distinct canals, which leave pulp chamber and merge short of apex to exit as two separate apical foramina. The incidence of three canals existing as two apical foramina has only been documented in the literature by a few case reports. To achieve successful endodontic treatment, the clinician has to identify the different canal configurations and treat them properly. PMID:26538977

  6. Benomyl treatment decreases fecundity of ant queens.

    PubMed

    Pech, Pavel; Heneberg, Petr

    2015-09-01

    Methyl benzimidazole carbamate fungicides, including benomyl, are widely used in agriculture, and to eliminate entomopathogenic infections. We treated queens of Myrmica rubra (Hymenoptera:Formicidae) infected or not by Rickia wasmannii (Laboulbeniales:Laboulbeniaceae) with benomyl, 1mg/ml p.o. for six weeks. Benomyl did not treat the infection, and the treatment alone caused strong decrease in the fecundity of control healthy queens from 18.0±8.4 to 3.7±5.2eggs per healthy queen. This is the first evidence on severe adverse effects of methyl benzimidazole carbamate fungicide on the fecundity of insects, which might be responsible for altered species composition of ant assemblages in the cultural landscape. PMID:26149821

  7. Molecular switches for pheromone release from a moth pheromone-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Wei; Leal, Walter S.

    2008-08-08

    Pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) are involved in the uptake of pheromones from pores on the antennae, transport through an aqueous environment surrounding the olfactory receptor neurons, and fast delivery to pheromone receptors. We tested the hypothesis that a C-terminal segment and a flexible loop are involved in the release of pheromones to membrane-bound receptors. We expressed in Escherichia coli 11 mutants of the PBP from the silkworm moth, BmorPBP, taking into consideration structural differences between the forms with high and low binding affinity. The N-terminus was truncated and His-69, His-70 and His-95 at the base of a flexible loop, and a cluster of acidic residues at the C-terminus were mutated. Binding assays and circular dichroism analyses support a mechanism involving protonation of acidic residues Asp-132 and Glu-141 at the C-terminus and histidines, His-70 and His-95, in the base of a loop covering the binding pocket. The former leads to the formation of a new {alpha}-helix, which competes with pheromone for the binding pocket, whereas positive charge repulsion of the histidines opens the opposite side of the binding pocket.

  8. The Trail Pheromone of the Venomous Samsum Ant, Pachycondyla sennaarensis

    PubMed Central

    Mashaly, Ashraf Mohamed Ali; Ahmed, Ashraf Mohamed; Al—Abdullah, Mosa Abdullah; Al—Khalifa, Mohamed Saleh

    2011-01-01

    Ant species use branching networks of pheromone trails for orientation between nest and resources. The current study demonstrated that workers of the venomous samsum ant, Pachycondyla sennaarensis (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Ponerinae), employ recruitment trail pheromones discharged from the Dufour's gland. Secretions of other abdomen complex glands, as well as hindgut gland secretions, did not evoke trail following. The optimum concentration of trail pheromone was found to be 0.1 gland equivalent/40 cm trail. This concentration demonstrated effective longevity for about one hour. This study also showed that P. sennaarensis and Tapinoma simrothi each respond to the trail pheromones of the other species as well as their own. PMID:21529253

  9. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant... made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based...

  10. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant... made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based...

  11. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant... made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based...

  12. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant... made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based...

  13. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant... made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based...

  14. Reconstruction of Beagle Hemi-Mandibular Defects with Allogenic Mandibular Scaffolds and Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, JinChao; Liu, HuaWei; Hu, Min; Yue, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Objective Massive bone allografts are frequently used in orthopedic reconstructive surgery, but carry a high failure rate of approximately 25%. We tested whether treatment of graft with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can increase the integration of massive allografts (hemi-mandible) in a large animal model. Methods Thirty beagle dogs received surgical left-sided hemi-mandibular defects, and then divided into two equal groups. Bony defects of the control group were reconstructed using allografts only. Those of the experimental group were reconstructed using allogenic mandibular scaffold-loaded autologous MSCs. Beagles from each group were killed at4 (n?=?4), 12 (n?=?4), 24 (n?=?4) or 48 weeks (n?=?3) postoperatively. CT and micro-CT scans, histological analyses and the bone mineral density (BMD) of transplants were used to evaluate defect reconstruction outcomes. Results Gross and CT examinations showed that the autologous bone grafts had healed in both groups. At 48 weeks, the allogenic mandibular scaffolds of the experimental group had been completely replaced by new bone, which has a smaller surface area to that of the original allogenic scaffold, whereas the scaffold in control dogs remained the same size as the original allogenic scaffold throughout. At 12 weeks, the BMD of the experimental group was significantly higher than the control group (p<0.05), and all micro-architectural parameters were significantly different between groups (p<0.05). Histological analyses showed almost all transplanted allogeneic bone was replaced by new bone, principally fibrous ossification, in the experimental group, which differed from the control group where little new bone formed. Conclusions Our study demonstrated the feasibility of MSC-loaded allogenic mandibular scaffolds for the reconstruction of hemi-mandibular defects. Further studies are needed to test whether these results can be surpassed by the use of allogenic mandibular scaffolds loaded with a combination of MSCs and osteoinductive growth factors. PMID:25153673

  15. Mandibular osteonecrosis following herpes zoster infection in the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster virus (HZV) infections are caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus. Reactivation symptoms commonly affect the thoracolumbar trunk, and rarely affect the mandibular branches of the trigeminal nerve. When the mandibular branches are involved, lesions appear proximal to the innervation area. This condition may be associated with exfoliation of the teeth and osteonecrosis of the jawbone. We report a case of mandibular osteomyelitis after herpes zoster infection and we present a review of the literature on mandibular-branch involvement of HZV-related osteonecrosis.

  16. Mandibular osteonecrosis following herpes zoster infection in the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Min; Seo, Jeong-Seok; Lee, Jae-Yeol

    2015-12-01

    Herpes zoster virus (HZV) infections are caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus. Reactivation symptoms commonly affect the thoracolumbar trunk, and rarely affect the mandibular branches of the trigeminal nerve. When the mandibular branches are involved, lesions appear proximal to the innervation area. This condition may be associated with exfoliation of the teeth and osteonecrosis of the jawbone. We report a case of mandibular osteomyelitis after herpes zoster infection and we present a review of the literature on mandibular-branch involvement of HZV-related osteonecrosis. PMID:26733193

  17. Basidiomycete Mating Type Genes and Pheromone Signaling?

    PubMed Central

    Raudaskoski, Marjatta; Kothe, Erika

    2010-01-01

    The genome sequences of the basidiomycete Agaricomycetes species Coprinopsis cinerea, Laccaria bicolor, Schizophyllum commune, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and Postia placenta, as well as of Cryptococcus neoformans and Ustilago maydis, are now publicly available. Out of these fungi, C. cinerea, S. commune, and U. maydis, together with the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have been investigated for years genetically and molecularly for signaling in sexual reproduction. The comparison of the structure and organization of mating type genes in fungal genomes reveals an amazing conservation of genes regulating the sexual reproduction throughout the fungal kingdom. In agaricomycetes, two mating type loci, A, coding for homeodomain type transcription factors, and B, encoding a pheromone/receptor system, regulate the four typical mating interactions of tetrapolar species. Evidence for both A and B mating type genes can also be identified in basidiomycetes with bipolar systems, where only two mating interactions are seen. In some of these fungi, the B locus has lost its self/nonself discrimination ability and thus its specificity while retaining the other regulatory functions in development. In silico analyses now also permit the identification of putative components of the pheromone-dependent signaling pathways. Induction of these signaling cascades leads to development of dikaryotic mycelia, fruiting body formation, and meiotic spore production. In pheromone-dependent signaling, the role of heterotrimeric G proteins, components of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, and cyclic AMP-dependent pathways can now be defined. Additionally, the pheromone-dependent signaling through monomeric, small GTPases potentially involved in creating the polarized cytoskeleton for reciprocal nuclear exchange and migration during mating is predicted. PMID:20190072

  18. Chirality determines pheromone activity for flour beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, H. Z.; Mori, K.

    1983-04-01

    Olfactory perception and orientation behaviour of female and male flour beetles ( Tribolium castaneum, T. confusum) to single stereoisomers of their aggregation pheromone revealed maximal receptor potentials and optimal attraction in response to 4R,8R-(-)-dimethyldecanal, whereas its optical antipode 4S,8S-(+)-dimethyldecanal was found to be inactive in this respect. Female flour beetles of both species were ? 103 times less attracted to 4R,8S-(+)- and 4S,8R-(-)-dimethyldecanal than to 4R,8R-(-)-dimethyldecanal, while male flour beetles failed to respond to the R,S-(+)- and S,R-(-)-stereoisomers. Pheromone extracts of prothoracic femora from unmated male flour beetles elicited higher receptor potentials in the antennae of females than in those of males. The results suggest that the aggregation pheromone emitted by male T. castaneum as well as male T. confusum has the stereochemical structure of 4R,8R-(-)-dimethyl-decanal, which acts as sex attractant for the females and as aggregant for the males of both species.

  19. Assessing the mating 'health' of commercial honey bee queens.

    PubMed

    Tarpy, David R; Keller, Jennifer J; Caren, Joel R; Delaney, Deborah A

    2012-02-01

    Honey bee queens mate with multiple males, which increases the total genetic diversity within colonies and has been shown to confer numerous benefits for colony health and productivity. Recent surveys of beekeepers have suggested that 'poor queens' are a top management concern, thus investigating the reproductive quality and mating success of commercially produced honey bee queens is warranted. We purchased 80 commercially produced queens from large queen breeders in California and measured them for their physical size (fresh weigh and thorax width), insemination success (stored sperm counts and sperm viability), and mating number (determined by patriline genotyping of worker offspring). We found that queens had an average of 4.37 +/- 1.446 million stored sperm in their spermathecae with an average viability of 83.7 +/- 13.33%. We also found that the tested queens had mated with a high number of drones (average effective paternity frequency: 17.0 +/- 8.98). Queen "quality" significantly varied among commercial sources for physical characters but not for mating characters. These findings suggest that it may be more effective to improve overall queen reproductive potential by culling lower-quality queens rather than systematically altering current queen production practices. PMID:22420250

  20. Immune priming and pathogen resistance in ant queens

    PubMed Central

    Gálvez, Dumas; Chapuisat, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Growing empirical evidence indicates that invertebrates become more resistant to a pathogen following initial exposure to a nonlethal dose; yet the generality, mechanisms, and adaptive value of such immune priming are still under debate. Because life-history theory predicts that immune priming and large investment in immunity should be more frequent in long-lived species, we here tested for immune priming and pathogen resistance in ant queens, which have extraordinarily long life span. We exposed virgin and mated queens of Lasius niger and Formica selysi to a low dose of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana, before challenging them with a high dose of the same pathogen. We found evidence for immune priming in naturally mated queens of L. niger. In contrast, we found no sign of priming in virgin queens of L. niger, nor in virgin or experimentally mated queens of F. selysi, which indicates that immune priming in ant queens varies according to mating status and mating conditions or species. In both ant species, mated queens showed higher pathogen resistance than virgin queens, which suggests that mating triggers an up-regulation of the immune system. Overall, mated ant queens combine high reproductive output, very long life span, and elevated investment in immune defense. Hence, ant queens are able to invest heavily in both reproduction and maintenance, which can be explained by the fact that mature queens will be protected and nourished by their worker offspring. PMID:24963375

  1. Neurophysiological mechanisms underlying sex- and maturation-related variation in pheromone responses in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Villar, Gabriel; Baker, Thomas C; Patch, Harland M; Grozinger, Christina M

    2015-07-01

    In the honey bee (Apis mellifera), social organization is primarily mediated by pheromones. Queen-produced 9-oxo-2-decenoic acid (9-ODA) functions as both a social and sex pheromone, eliciting attraction in both female workers and male drones, but also affecting other critical aspects of worker physiology and behavior. These effects are also maturation related, as younger workers and sexually mature drones are most receptive to 9-ODA. While changes in the peripheral nervous system drive sex-related differences in sensitivity to 9-ODA, the mechanisms driving maturation-related shifts in receptivity to 9-ODA remain unknown. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that changes at the peripheral nervous system may be mediating plastic responses to 9-ODA by characterizing expression levels of AmOR11 (the olfactory receptor tuned to 9-ODA) and electrophysiological responses to 9-ODA. We find that receptor expression correlates significantly with behavioral receptivity to 9-ODA, with nurses and sexually mature drones exhibiting higher levels of expression than foragers and immature drones, respectively. Electrophysiological responses to 9-ODA were not found to correlate with behavioral receptivity or receptor expression, however. Thus, while receptor expression at the periphery exhibits a level of plasticity that correlates with behavior, the mechanisms driving maturation-dependent responsiveness to 9-ODA appear to function primarily in the central nervous system. PMID:25840687

  2. The Revised Pension Plan Queen's University

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    to a monthly pension using annuity factors provided by the Plan's actuary. b) Pensions The Plan providesThe Revised Pension Plan Of Queen's University Statement of Investment Policies and Procedures May 8, 2015 #12;Section 1 ­ Overview 1 1.01 Purpose of Statement 1 1.02 Background of the Plan 1 1

  3. Intellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's University

    E-print Network

    with a general overview of what intellectual property is, what you should know and how to find out more and PARTEQ Innovations, you will find practical guidance about issues associated with intellectual property (IP). I hope that these guidelines will be of use to the broader Queen's community on matters

  4. January 27, 2015 QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY AT KINGSTON

    E-print Network

    Wehlau, David

    Speaker: Ivan Dimitrov, Queen's University Title: Benford's Law Abstract Attached Friday, January 30.m. Jeffery 118 Math Club Speaker: Ivan Dimitrov Title: Benford's Law Abstract: In 1881 Newcomb noticed is known as Bedford's Law. I will give various examples of data sets for which Benford's Law holds

  5. THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Gender

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    June 2014 THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Gender INTRODUCTION This document provides to individuals regardless of gender and gender-related issues, and also provides a general overview of the legal, actual or associated; gender reassignment ­ which includes someone who is transgendered, or who has

  6. THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Gender

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Gender INTRODUCTION This document provides information to individuals regardless of gender and gender-related issues, and also provides a general overview of the legal this is perceived, actual or associated; · gender reassignment ­ which includes someone who is transgendered, or who

  7. Women in History--Queen Liliuokalani

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koeppe, Tina

    2007-01-01

    This article profiles Queen Liliuokalani, Hawaii's last monarch. Liliuokalani was born in Hawaii in 1838 into the family of a high chief. She attended the Royal School, run by American missionaries, and received a high quality education and learned to love music, writing and politics. Liliuokalani was given the Christian name "Lydia" as a child.…

  8. Queen Margaret University College's Sustainable, Community Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodman, Susan

    2006-01-01

    The new campus of Queen Margaret University College in the United Kingdom is designed to be a sustainable educational and community resource. Early consultation with students and staff on the campus design revealed a strong desire for a sustainable environment, with plenty of green space for all to enjoy. In response to this, the design focuses on…

  9. The Queen's College BROWNE RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    The Queen's College BROWNE RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES OR BIOCHEMISTRY The Governing Body proposes to elect to a post-doctoral Browne Research Fellowship in Biological Sciences the Fellowship on 1st October 2016. The basic stipend of the Fellowship, which is pensionable under

  10. Marine Fisheries On the cover: The queen

    E-print Network

    Marine Fisheries ~~WD~~ On the cover: The queen conch, Strombus gigas. Il- lustration by Harold L, Albacore Landings, Marine Anglers, and Sea Turtle Protection 25 Peru's Fisheries, New Zealand Fisheries, Administrator National Marine Fisheries Service Editor: W. Hobart Marine Fisheries Review (USPS 090-0ROl is pub

  11. Finding Children's Literature @ Queen's Education Library

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    Finding Children's Literature @ Queen's Education Library Browsing in the Education Library You is shelved Searching for Children's Books in QCAT: By Title Leave out the and a if they begin words. You can for Children's Books in QCAT: By Topic If you want to do a topic search, use the More Search Limits feature

  12. Anatomical localization and stereoisomeric composition of Tribolium castaneum aggregation pheromones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report that the abdomen and associated tissues are the predominant sources of male-produced pheromones in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and for the first time describe the stereoisomeric composition of the natural blend of isomers of the aggregation pheromone 4,8-dimethyldecanal (DMD...

  13. 4 Pheromone-modulated movements of flying moths

    E-print Network

    , not to the wind at all, in successfully flying up a pheromone plume to the source in zero wind In their view source in wind. Onset and offsetof odour merely served to switch on these steering responses to wind), and 'primary' and 'secondary7 pheromone components (Roelofs and Card6 1977) to statements about 'close-range7

  14. Evolutionary deterioration of the vomeronasal pheromone transduction pathway in

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jianzhi

    and some related primates possess only vestigial VNOs and have no or significantly reduced ability occurred in evolution, how it occurred, and why it occurred. Vomeronasal pheromone perception begins the best genetic markers for a study of the evolution of VNO pheromone perception. We here use both

  15. ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR Pheromone Combination Lures for Carpophilus (Coleoptera

    E-print Network

    fermenting bread dough or decom- et al 1990a) Prophylactic application of pesticides posing fruit (Bartelt et with the single pheromones; fermentingwhole wheat bread dough was present with all pheromone treatments as a synergist, and dough by itself was the experimental control Each specieswas strongly attracted to its own

  16. Pheromones/attractants as tools for leafminer and

    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    -canopy height · Male moth catch is greater on the grove edge than in the grove interior · Check traps weekly/11 5/25 6/8 6/22 CLMmalespertrap Male catch Moth catch in pheromone-baited traps Peak catch; and 3. I said it was a good idea all along!" -- Arthur C. Clarke · Male moths follow pheromone plume

  17. ANTENNAL FEEDBACK LOOP REGULATES PHEROMONE RELEASE IN BEETLES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regulation of pheromone release is critical for intraspecific communication and avoidance of predators release is critical for intraspecific communication and avoidance of predators or parasites dependent on such messages. Pheromone production is under endocrine control in insects (1,2). However, ...

  18. COMPOSITION, QUANTIFICATION, AND PERIODICITY OF SEX PHEROMONE GLAND

    E-print Network

    as pheromone components appeared consistently in the volatile collections: 14:Ald, Z9-14:Ald, 16:Ald, and Z l l-16:Ald The female glands did not emit the same amounts of these compounds throughout a 24-hi period, Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Zll-16:Ald, 16:Ald, 29-14:Ald, 14:Ald, sex pheromone emission, gland volatiles, blend

  19. Robust Spatial Sensing of Mating Pheromone Gradients by Yeast Cells

    E-print Network

    Nie, Qing

    Robust Spatial Sensing of Mating Pheromone Gradients by Yeast Cells Travis I. Moore1,2 , Ching not degrade the pheromone input. The yeast cells exhibited good accuracy with the mating projection typically caused defects in both sensing and response. Interestingly, yeast cells employed adaptive mechanisms

  20. Evolution of mating pheromone and receptor genes in Pucciniomycotina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mating pheromones and their receptors act as a switch controlling phenotypic changes required for successful mating in fungi. Although basidiomycete mating pheromones and their processing were first described in Rhodosporidium toruloides a “red yeast” in the Sporidiobolales, the receptor gene was ne...

  1. Evolved differences in larval social behavior mediated by novel pheromones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pheromones, chemical signals that convey social information, mediate many insect social behaviors in both adult and immature stages. Multiple pheromones and neural pathways that underlie adult social behavior have been described in the genetic model organism, Drosophila melanogaster, but there is no...

  2. STORED-PRODUCT Pheromone Production by Male Tribolium castaneum

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Sara

    STORED-PRODUCT Pheromone Production by Male Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae, MA 02155, USA J. Econ. Entomol. 103(5): 1915Ð1919 (2010); DOI: 10.1603/EC10110 ABSTRACT Tribolium to identify and quantify the Tribolium aggregation pheromone 4, 8-dimethyldecanal (DMD). Males kept on high

  3. Isolation of a pyrazine alarm pheromone component from the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alarm pheromones in social insects are an essential part of a complex of pheromone interactions that contribute to the maintenance of colony integrity and sociality. The alarm pheromones of ants were among the first chemical ecology examples, primarily due to the large amount of pheromone produced a...

  4. Mandibular trauma treatment: A comparison of two protocols

    PubMed Central

    Kommers, Sofie C.; Roccia, Fabio; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment of mandibular fractures treated in two European centre in 10 years. Study Design: This study is based on 2 systematic computer-assisted databases that have continuously recorded patients hospitalized with maxillofacial fractures in two centers in Turin, Italy and in Amsterdam, the Netherlands for ten years. Only patients who were admitted for mandibular fractures were considered for this study. Results: Between 2001 and 2010, a total of 752 patients were admitted at Turin hospital with a total of 1167 mandibular fractures not associated with further maxillofacial fractures, whereas 245 patients were admitted at Amsterdam hospital with a total of 434 mandibular fractures. At Amsterdam center, a total of 457 plates (1.5 - 2.7 mm) were used for the 434 mandibular fracture lines, whereas at Turin center 1232 plates (1.5 – 2.5 mm) were used for the management of the 1167 mandibular fracture lines. At Turin center, 190 patients were treated primarily with IMF, whereas 35 patients were treated with such treatment option at Amsterdam center. Conclusions: Current protocols for the management of mandibular fractures are quite efficient. It is difficult to obtain a uniform protocol, because of the difference of course of each occurring fracture and because of surgeons’ experiences and preferences. Several techniques can still be used for each peculiar fracture of the mandible. Key words:Mandibular fracture, facial trauma, maxillofacial, treatment, multicentre, database. PMID:25475782

  5. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. 874.3695 Section 874.3695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular...

  6. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. 874.3695 Section 874.3695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular...

  7. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. 874.3695 Section 874.3695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular...

  8. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. 874.3695 Section 874.3695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular...

  9. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. 874.3695 Section 874.3695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular...

  10. Spider sex pheromones: emission, reception, structures, and functions.

    PubMed

    Gaskett, A C

    2007-02-01

    Spiders and their mating systems are useful study subjects with which to investigate questions of widespread interest about sexual selection, pre- and post-copulatory mate choice, sperm competition, mating strategies, and sexual conflict. Conclusions drawn from such studies are broadly applicable to a range of taxa, but rely on accurate understanding of spider sexual interactions. Extensive behavioural experimentation demonstrates the presence of sex pheromones in many spider species, and recent major advances in the identification of spider sex pheromones merit review. Synthesised here are the emission, transmission, structures, and functions of spider sex pheromones, with emphasis on the crucial and dynamic role of sex pheromones in female and male mating strategies generally. Techniques for behavioural, chemical and electrophysiological study are summarised, and I aim to provide guidelines for incorporating sex pheromones into future studies of spider mating. In the spiders, pheromones are generally emitted by females and received by males, but this pattern is not universal. Female spiders emit cuticular and/or silk-based sex pheromones, which can be airborne or received via contact with chemoreceptors on male pedipalps. Airborne pheromones primarily attract males or elicit male searching behaviour. Contact pheromones stimulate male courtship behaviour and provide specific information about the emitter's identity. Male spiders are generally choosy and are often most attracted to adult virgin females and juvenile females prior to their final moult. This suggests the first male to mate with a female has significant advantages, perhaps due to sperm priority patterns, or mated female disinterest. Both sexes may attempt to control female pheromone emission, and thus dictate the frequency and timing of female mating, reflecting the potentially different costs of female signalling and/or polyandry to both sexes. Spider sex pheromones are likely to be lipids or lipid soluble, may be closely related to primary metabolites, and are not necessarily species specific, although they can still assist with species recognition. Newer electrophysiological techniques coupled with chemical analyses assist with the identification of sex pheromone compounds. This provides opportunities for more targeted behavioural experimentation, perhaps with synthetic pheromones, and for theorising about the biosynthesis and evolution of chemical signals generally. Given the intriguing biology of spiders, and the critical role of chemical signals for spiders and many other animal taxa, a deeper understanding of spider sex pheromones should prove productive. PMID:17313523

  11. Efficient Management of Fruit Pests by Pheromone Nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Deepa; Samanta, Suman K.; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    Environment-friendly management of fruit flies involving pheromones is useful in reducing the undesirable pest populations responsible for decreasing the yield and the crop quality. A nanogel has been prepared from a pheromone, methyl eugenol (ME) using a low-molecular mass gelator. This was very stable at open ambient conditions and slowed down the evaporation of pheromone significantly. This enabled its easy handling and transportation without refrigeration, and reduction in the frequency of pheromone recharging in the orchard. Notably the involvement of the nano-gelled pheromone brought about an effective management of Bactrocera dorsalis, a prevalent harmful pest for a number of fruits including guava. Thus a simple, practical and low cost green chemical approach is developed that has a significant potential for crop protection, long lasting residual activity, excellent efficacy and favorable safety profiles. This makes the present invention well-suited for pest management in a variety of crops. PMID:23416455

  12. Efficient management of fruit pests by pheromone nanogels.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Deepa; Samanta, Suman K; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    Environment-friendly management of fruit flies involving pheromones is useful in reducing the undesirable pest populations responsible for decreasing the yield and the crop quality. A nanogel has been prepared from a pheromone, methyl eugenol (ME) using a low-molecular mass gelator. This was very stable at open ambient conditions and slowed down the evaporation of pheromone significantly. This enabled its easy handling and transportation without refrigeration, and reduction in the frequency of pheromone recharging in the orchard. Notably the involvement of the nano-gelled pheromone brought about an effective management of Bactrocera dorsalis, a prevalent harmful pest for a number of fruits including guava. Thus a simple, practical and low cost green chemical approach is developed that has a significant potential for crop protection, long lasting residual activity, excellent efficacy and favorable safety profiles. This makes the present invention well-suited for pest management in a variety of crops. PMID:23416455

  13. Insect pheromones: An overview of function, form, and discovery.

    PubMed

    Yew, Joanne Y; Chung, Henry

    2015-07-01

    For many species of insects, lipid pheromones profoundly influence survival, reproduction, and social organization. Unravelling the chemical language of insects has been the subject of intense research in the field of chemical ecology for the past five decades. Characterizing the forms, functions, and biosynthesis of lipid pheromones has led not only to the development of strategies for controlling agricultural pests but has also provided insights into fundamental questions in evolutionary biology. Despite the enormous variety of chemical structures that are used as pheromones, some common themes in function and biosynthetic pathways have emerged across studies of diverse taxa. This review will offer a general overview of insect lipid pheromone function and biochemical synthesis, describe analytical methods for pheromone discovery, and provide perspectives on the contribution of chemical ecology to pest control and understanding evolutionary processes. PMID:26080085

  14. Mandibular kinematics after orthognathic surgical treatment a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Ugolini, Alessandro; Rocchetta, Davide; Galante, Domenico; Mapelli, Andrea; Giannì, Aldo Bruno

    2010-03-01

    We recorded three-dimensional mandibular movements, while the mouth was being opened and closed, using an optoelectronic motion analyser in 14 patients (5 skeletal Class II, 9 skeletal Class III) who were being assessed 7-49 months after orthognathic operations, and in 44 healthy subjects. All 14 patients had satisfactory healing on clinical examination, and function had been restored. Mandibular movement was divided into its rotational and translational components. On maximum mouth opening, the patients had significantly less total displacement of the mandibular interincisor point (p=0.05), and more mandibular movement that was explained by pure condylar rotation (p=0.006), than control subjects. There was no significant relation between maximum mouth opening and percentage rotation. While mandibular motion was well restored clinically by orthognathic surgery, the kinematics of the joint were modified. Larger studies and longitudinal investigations are necessary to appreciate the clinical relevance of the variations in condylar rotational and translational components. PMID:18938000

  15. (6R,10S)-Pallantione: the first ketone identified as sex pheromone in stink bugs.

    PubMed

    Fávaro, Carla F; Soldi, Rafael A; Ando, Tetsu; Aldrich, Jeffrey R; Zarbin, Paulo H G

    2013-04-19

    This work describes the structural elucidation of the sex pheromone of the soybean stink bug, Pallantia macunaima. The biological activity of the synthetic pheromone was demonstrated by behavioral and EAD experiments. Furthermore, the absolute configuration of the natural pheromone was determined as (6R,10S)-6,10,13-trimethyltetradecan-2-one. This is the first ketone identified as a male-produced sex pheromone in Pentatomidae, and the trivial name, pallantione, was assigned to this novel pheromone molecule. PMID:23545064

  16. Arsenic Trioxide-Induced Mandibular Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pei-Chen; Wu, Ju-Hui; Chen, Chun-Ming; Du, Je-Kang

    2015-09-01

    Previously, arsenic was a popular devitalizing agent used to necrotize inflamed dental pulp to lower the pulp sensitivity owing to the unavailability of appropriate anesthesia. However, leakage from the apical foramen, lateral or accessory canals, or cracks in the tooth is common. This can be dangerous because of the reportedly high toxic effects of arsenic in both hard and soft tissues, leading to gingival and osseous necrosis and, consequently, osteomyelitis. Therefore, arsenic can prove fatal for both bones and teeth and is no longer used. We encountered a case involving a 50-year-old man who had developed mandibular osteomyelitis with lower lip paresthesia caused by arsenic trioxide used during endodontic treatment. The patient was treated with appropriate antibiotics, adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and adequate surgical debridement. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy can induce neovascularization in necrosed tissues and improve bone and soft tissue healing. At a 4-year follow-up visit, bone healing was observed, with restoration of periodontal health, although the paresthesia had persisted. We describe this case, present a review of the relevant published data, and discuss the possible causes, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up protocol of mandibular osteomyelitis caused by arsenic trioxide. PMID:25896568

  17. Management of a transmigrated mandibular canine

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sneh Lata; Sharma, V. P.; Singh, Gyan P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to report the management of a transmigrated mandibular canine with emphasis on saving the tooth as natural part rather than surgical removal of the transmigrated tooth. There are several treatment options proposed for impacted mandibular canines including surgical removal, exposure and orthodontic alignment, intra-alveolar tooth transplantation (surgical repositioning of a tooth in its alveolar socket) and observation. The technique, surgical repositioning of a tooth involves the surgical extraction of impacted tooth and fixation in the correct position in the dental arch after surgical preparation (correction) of the alveolar socket. It is especially valuable in cases of difficult-to-treat impaction. A repositioned tooth is better substitute than fixed or removable prostheses, and the technique is more cost effective than other methods. Patients with excellent oral hygiene should be considered as preferred candidates for surgical repositioning of tooth. Disadvantages include the invasiveness of surgery, the difficulty of projecting long term stability due to chances of root resorption and loss of gingival attachment. PMID:24987621

  18. Mandibular fractures in iraq: an epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Bede, Salwan

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the epidemiological characteristics of the mandibular fractures relating to gender, age, the etiology of injury, and the rendered treatment modalities and complications. The data of the patients who sustained mandibular fractures were retrieved and were analyzed retrospectively, and based on these data a descriptive analysis was conducted. A total of 112 patients were included in this study; the most common cause was road traffic accidents (RTAs) followed by assaults and missile injuries. The most frequently involved age group was 11 to 20 years, treatment modalities included conservative, closed reduction and indirect fixation, and open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) in 11.6, 79.5, and 8.9% of the cases, respectively. Most of the major complications were injury related. This study showed RTAs to be the most frequent cause followed by assaults, it also showed that a high percentage of assault victims were females mainly of low socioeconomic status. Another distinguishing feature in this study was the high incidence of missile injuries in the form of bullets and blasts. Closed reduction still has an important role in the treatment of fractures of mandible especially when the necessary equipments for ORIF are not readily available. A higher complication rate was observed in patients diagnosed with multiple and comminuted fractures as well as those caused by violence in the form of missile and assault injuries. PMID:25709754

  19. Pheromone-inducible conjugation in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowicz, Briana K.; Dworkin, Martin; Dunny, Gary M.

    2009-01-01

    Pheromone-inducible transfer of the plasmid pCF10 in Enterococcus faecalis is regulated using a complicated network of proteins and RNAs. The plasmid itself has been assembled from parts garnered from a variety of sources, and many aspects of the system resemble a biological kluge. Recently several new functions of various pCF10 gene products that participate in regulation of plasmid transfer have been identified. The results indicate that selective pressures controlling the evolution of the plasmid have produced a highly complex regulatory network with multiple biological functions that may serve well as a model for the evolution of biological complexity. PMID:16503196

  20. Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions

    E-print Network

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718;Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology

  1. Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions

    E-print Network

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training #12;Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training Notification Result. #12;Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies

  2. Surgical extraction of mandibular third molar in pterygomandibular space: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Kyu; Park, Sung-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Impacted mandibular third molars are located between the second mandibular molar and mandibular ramus. However, ectopic mandibular third molars with heterotopic positions are reported in the subcondylar or pterygomandibular space. The usual cause of malposition is a cyst or tumor, and malposition without a pathology is rare. This case report described an impacted mandibular third molar in the pterygomandibular space without any associated pathology. PMID:24471052

  3. Nutrient-dependent/pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution: a model

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, James Vaughn

    2013-01-01

    Background The prenatal migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurosecretory neurons allows nutrients and human pheromones to alter GnRH pulsatility, which modulates the concurrent maturation of the neuroendocrine, reproductive, and central nervous systems, thus influencing the development of ingestive behavior, reproductive sexual behavior, and other behaviors. Methods This model details how chemical ecology drives adaptive evolution via: (1) ecological niche construction, (2) social niche construction, (3) neurogenic niche construction, and (4) socio-cognitive niche construction. This model exemplifies the epigenetic effects of olfactory/pheromonal conditioning, which alters genetically predisposed, nutrient-dependent, hormone-driven mammalian behavior and choices for pheromones that control reproduction via their effects on luteinizing hormone (LH) and systems biology. Results Nutrients are metabolized to pheromones that condition behavior in the same way that food odors condition behavior associated with food preferences. The epigenetic effects of olfactory/pheromonal input calibrate and standardize molecular mechanisms for genetically predisposed receptor-mediated changes in intracellular signaling and stochastic gene expression in GnRH neurosecretory neurons of brain tissue. For example, glucose and pheromones alter the hypothalamic secretion of GnRH and LH. A form of GnRH associated with sexual orientation in yeasts links control of the feedback loops and developmental processes required for nutrient acquisition, movement, reproduction, and the diversification of species from microbes to man. Conclusion An environmental drive evolved from that of nutrient ingestion in unicellular organisms to that of pheromone-controlled socialization in insects. In mammals, food odors and pheromones cause changes in hormones such as LH, which has developmental affects on pheromone-controlled sexual behavior in nutrient-dependent reproductively fit individuals across species of vertebrates. PMID:24693353

  4. Mandibular first molar with single root and single root canal

    PubMed Central

    Munavalli, Anil; Kambale, Sharnappa; Ramesh, Sachhi; Ajgaonkar, Nishant

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular molars demonstrate considerable anatomic complexities and abnormalities with respect to number of roots and root canals. Clinicians should be aware that there is a possibility of the existence of a fewer number of roots and root canals than the normal root canal anatomy. Mandibular first molar with a single root and single canal was diagnosed with the aid of dental operating microscope and multiple angled radiographs. This case report presents a rare case of successful endodontic management of mandibular first molar with a single root and root canal. PMID:26180424

  5. Deferoxamine Expedites Consolidation during Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Donneys, Alexis; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N.; Johnson, Kelsey L.; Blough, Jordan T.; Perosky, Joseph E.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Felice, Peter A.; Nelson, Noah S.; Farberg, Aaron S.; Levi, Benjamin; Buchman, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Background A limitation of mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis (DO) is the length of time required for consolidation. This drawback subjects patients to possible pin-site infections, as well as a prolonged return to activities of normal daily living. Developing innovative techniques to abridge consolidation periods could be immensely effective in preventing these problematic morbidities. Deferoxamine (DFO) is an angiogenic activator that triggers the HIF-1? pathway through localized iron depletion. We previously established the effectiveness of DFO in enhancing regenerate vascularity at a full consolidation period (28 days) in a murine mandibular DO model. To investigate whether this augmentation in vascularity would function to accelerate consolidation, we progressively shortened consolidation periods prior to ?CT imaging and biomechanical testing (BMT). Materials and Methods Three time points (14d, 21d and 28d) were selected and six groups of Sprague-Dawley rats (n=60) were equally divided into control (C) and experimental (E) groups for each time period. Each group underwent external fixator placement, mandibular osteotomy, and a 5.1mm distraction. During distraction, the experimental groups were treated with DFO injections into the regenerate gap. After consolidation, mandibles were imaged and tension tested to failure. ANOVA was conducted between groups, and p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results At 14 days of consolidation the experimental group demonstrated significant increases in Bone Volume Fraction (BVF), Bone Mineral Density (BMD) and Ultimate Load (UL) in comparison to non-treated controls. The benefit of treatment was further substantiated by a striking 100% increase in the number of bony unions at this early time-period (C:4/10 vs. E:8/10). Furthermore, metrics of BVF, BMD, Yield and UL at 14 days with treatment demonstrated comparable metrics to those of the fully consolidated 28d control group. Conclusion Based on these findings, we contend that augmentation of vascular density through localized DFO injection delivers an efficient means for accelerating bone regeneration without significantly impacting bone quality or strength. PMID:23598047

  6. Suppression pheromone and cockroach rank formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Rong; Chang, Huan-Wen; Chen, Shu-Chun; Ho, Hsiao-Yung

    2009-06-01

    Although agonistic behaviors in the male lobster cockroach ( Nauphoeta cinerea) are well known, the formation of an unstable hierarchy has long been a puzzle. In this study, we investigate how the unstable dominance hierarchy in N. cinerea is maintained via a pheromone signaling system. In agonistic interactions, aggressive posture (AP) is an important behavioral index of aggression. This study showed that, during the formation of a governing hierarchy, thousands of nanograms of 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (3H-2B) were released by the AP-adopting dominant in the first encounter fight, then during the early domination period and that this release of 3H-2B was related to rank maintenance, but not to rank establishment. For rank maintenance, 3H-2B functioned as a suppression pheromone, which suppressed the fighting capability of rivals and kept them in a submissive state. During the period of rank maintenance, as the dominant male gradually decreased his 3H-2B release, the fighting ability of the subordinate gradually developed, as shown by the increasing odds of a subordinate adopting an AP (OSAP). The OSAP was negatively correlated with the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant and positively correlated with the number of domination days. The same OSAP could be achieved earlier by reducing the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant indicates that whether the subordinate adopts an offensive strategy depends on what the dominant is doing.

  7. Reconstruction of mandibular defects in irradiated patients

    SciTech Connect

    Klotch, D.W.; Gump, J.; Kuhn, L. )

    1990-10-01

    In this prospective study, mandibular reconstruction using titanium plates was evaluated in 31 patients treated between July 1988 and January 1990. Sixteen patients had prior surgery; 13 had prior radiotherapy. In 11 patients, prior radiation and surgery had failed. Sixteen patients received postoperative radiotherapy either in standard or accelerated fractions. Twelve patients had complications of either intraoral (8), extraoral (5), or combined (1) plate exposure or fistula formation (2). Factors significantly related to complications were poor nutrition, accelerated radiation, and recurrence. Sixty-one percent of all patients healed uneventfully. When patients with complications secondary to recurrence who subsequently died were excluded, the success rate was 73%. Only one patient had an unacceptable result that produced a cosmetic and functional deformity despite secondary repair.

  8. Spring-mediated mandibular distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mofid, Mehrdad M; Inoue, Nozomu; Tufaro, Anthony P; Vander Kolk, Craig A; Manson, Paul N

    2003-09-01

    Successful performance of distraction osteogenesis requires rigorous patient compliance with a daily activation regimen of a percutaneous screw. Previous clinical studies have found that failure of patient compliance with this regimen is the most common complication leading to technical failure of the distraction process. The authors have developed an internalized spring-mediated device for mandibular distraction osteogenesis that can potentially abrogate the risks associated with patient compliance by allowing for automated distraction across an osteotomy. Twenty adult New Zealand White rabbits underwent unilateral mandibular osteotomy. A segment of nickel-titanium shape memory alloy reinforced at both ends with a pinball was fashioned into an inferiorly based arc and secured to the mandible with stainless steel wire. On postoperative day 12, spring activation commenced by cutting a wire binding the two pinballs to one another. Animals were observed for 6 weeks before they were killed. Radiographic studies and decalcified histologic analysis were performed on extracted mandibles. Temperature- and displacement-dependent properties of the shape memory alloy were also examined. Five animals were excluded from the study due to infection, nonunion, or device failure. A mean distraction of 1.2 mm in the distracted hemimandible relative to the nonoperated hemimandible was found (P <.001, two-tailed paired t test). The maximum distraction achieved in an experimental specimen using the spring distractor was 3.7 mm. There were no other histologic or radiographic differences found between study specimens and specimens subjected to traditional distraction methods. Biomechanical testing of the shape memory alloy revealed a temperature-dependent increase in force at body temperature compared with room temperature and a reduction in force with increased displacement of the spring. This study demonstrates the feasibility of spring-mediated distraction osteogenesis across an osteotomy. As the field of distraction osteogenesis matures, the next level of sophistication in the clinical development of devices will incorporate technology that permits fully internalized and automated distraction to occur. PMID:14501343

  9. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...in the functional reconstruction of mandibular deficits. The device is made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based alloy, polytetrafluoroethylene, silicone elastomer, polyethylene, polyurethane, or...

  10. Mandibular advancement device for obstructive sleep apnea: An overview.

    PubMed

    Jayesh, S Raghavendra; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of mandibular advancement device (MAD). The primary purpose of MAD is to move the mandible forwards relative to maxilla in ordered to widen the airway to prevent to closure. PMID:26015718

  11. Mandibular advancement device for obstructive sleep apnea: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Jayesh, S. Raghavendra; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of mandibular advancement device (MAD). The primary purpose of MAD is to move the mandible forwards relative to maxilla in ordered to widen the airway to prevent to closure. PMID:26015718

  12. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant facial prosthesis...device is made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based alloy,...

  13. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant facial prosthesis...device is made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based alloy,...

  14. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant facial prosthesis...device is made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based alloy,...

  15. Pheromone Chemistry of the Smaller European Elm Bark Beetle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Keith

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the aggregation pheromone of the smaller European elm bark beetle, Scolytus multistriatus (Marsham), with emphasis on information that could be used in the classroom as a practical application of organic chemistry. (Author/GA)

  16. Pheromone-based mating disruption in Wisconsin cranberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pheromone-based mating disruption is a promising method of pest control in cranberries. Three moth species, cranberry fruitworm, Acrobasis vaccinii Riley (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), Sparganothis fruitworm, Sparganothis sulfureana Clemens (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), and black-headed fireworm, Rhopobota...

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Species-specific attraction to pheromonal analogues

    E-print Network

    Eltz, Thomas

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Species-specific attraction to pheromonal analogues in orchid bees Yvonne 2006 / Published online: 19 July 2006 # Springer-Verlag 2006 Abstract Male orchid bees (Euglossini . Euglossini . Fragrance Introduction Male neotropical orchid bees (Euglossini) have enlarged hind tibiae

  18. Directional Bias and Pheromone for Discovery and Coverage on Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, Glenn A.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2012-09-11

    Natural multi-agent systems often rely on “correlated random walks” (random walks that are biased toward a current heading) to distribute their agents over a space (e.g., for foraging, search, etc.). Our contribution involves creation of a new movement and pheromone model that applies the concept of heading bias in random walks to a multi-agent, digital-ants system designed for cyber-security monitoring. We examine the relative performance effects of both pheromone and heading bias on speed of discovery of a target and search-area coverage in a two-dimensional network layout. We found that heading bias was unexpectedly helpful in reducing search time and that it was more influential than pheromone for improving coverage. We conclude that while pheromone is very important for rapid discovery, heading bias can also greatly improve both performance metrics.

  19. Interspecific Pheromone Plume Interference Among Sympatric Heliothine Moths: A Wind

    E-print Network

    . Pheromone blend . Behavioral antagonist . Z11-16:Ald . Z9-16:Ald . Z11-16:OH . Z9-14:Ald . Flight behavior major pheromone blend component, (Z)-11-hexadecenal (Z11-16:Ald), but differ in the other components of their respective blends. In H. virescens, the secondary component is (Z)-9-tetradecenal (Z9-14:Ald; Roelofs et al

  20. Mandibular Ramus Fracture: An Overview of Rare Anatomical Subsite

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Anendd; Mundada, Bhushan; Deshmukh, Rahul; Bhutekar, Umesh; Kala, Atul; Waghwani, Kapil; Mishra, Apoorva

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The present study aims at exemplifying the incidence, and aetiology and analyses the outcomes of open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) over closed treatment of mandibular ramus fractures. Patients and Method. In the present retrospective analysis of mandibular fracture patients, variables analysed were age, sex, cause of injury, pretreatment occlusion, treatment given, period of maxillo-mandibular fixation (MMF), and posttreatment occlusion. Results. Out of 388 mandibular fractures treated, ramus fractures were 12 (3.09%). In the present study, predominant cause of mandibular ramus fracture was road traffic accident (RTA) n = 07 (58.33%) followed by fall n = 04 (33.33%) and assault n = 1 (8.33%). The average age was 35.9 years with a male predilection. Of these, 9 patients were treated with ORIF while remaining 3 with closed treatment. The average MMF after closed treatment was 21 days and 3 to 5 days after ORIF. There was improvement in occlusion in all 12 patients posttreatment with no major complication except for reduced mouth opening in cases treated with ORIF which recovered with physiotherapy and muscle relaxants. Conclusion. Mandibular ramus fractures accounted for 3.09% with RTA as a common aetiology. ORIF of ramus fractures facilitated adequate functional and anatomic reduction with early return of function. PMID:26613050

  1. Factors influencing survival duration and choice of virgin queens in the stingless bee Melipona quadrifasciata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärcher, Martin H.; Menezes, Cristiano; Alves, Denise A.; Beveridge, Oliver S.; Imperatriz-Fonseca, Vera-Lucia; Ratnieks, Francis L. W.

    2013-06-01

    In Melipona quadrifasciata, about 10 % of the females develop into queens, almost all of which are killed. Occasionally, a new queen replaces or supersedes the mother queen or heads a new colony. We investigated virgin queen fate in queenright and queenless colonies to determine the effects of queen behaviour, body mass, nestmate or non-nestmate status, queenright or queenless colony status, and, when queenless, the effect of the time a colony had been queenless, on survival duration and acceptance. None of 220 virgin queens observed in four observation hives ever attacked another virgin queen nor did any of 88 virgin queens introduced into queenright colonies ever attack the resident queen. A new queen was only accepted in a queenless colony. Factors increasing survival duration and acceptance of virgin queens were to emerge from its cell at 2 h of queenlessness, to hide, and to avoid fights with workers. In this way, a virgin queen was more likely to be available when a colony chooses a new queen, 24-48 h after resident queen removal. Running, walking or resting, antennating or trophallaxis, played little or no role, as did the factors body mass or nestmate. "Queen choice" took about 2 h during which time other virgin queens were still being killed by workers. During this agitated process, the bees congregated around the new queen. She inflated her abdomen and some of the workers deposited a substance on internal nest surfaces including the glass lid of the observation hive.

  2. TheQueens,theDrones and theWorkers

    E-print Network

    Starks, Philip

    TheQueens,theDrones and theWorkers Phil's Peace By Phil starks If I sit still long enough and a few hundred drones. The queen is mother to them all, and is respected accordingly. The drones are brothers, and as a boy with three sisters of my own, I can empathize with their plight: Drones

  3. Ferns of Queen's University Biological Station February 2011

    E-print Network

    Martin, Paul R.

    Ferns of Queen's University Biological Station February 2011 Mark A. Conboy and Jim S. Pringle This checklist covers 47 species of ferns (division Pteridophyta) that are found or expected to be found at Queen generally follow Cody and Britton (1989; Ferns and Fern Allies of Canada) but where they are not given

  4. SURVIVAL AND FUNCTION OF QUEENS REARED IN BEESWAX CONTAINING COUMAPHOS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Young honey bee larvae were transferred into wax queen cups containing known concentrations (0 to 1000 ppm) of the organophosphate coumaphos. These larvae were placed in queenless colonies and examined ten days later to determine the rate of acceptance as indicated by a mature sealed queen cell. A...

  5. The Queen's College A NON-STIPENDIARY JUNIOR RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    The Queen's College Oxford A NON-STIPENDIARY JUNIOR RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP IN PHYSICS The Governing Body of The Queen's College Oxford proposes to elect a Non-Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship (technically known as Extraordinary Junior Research Fellowships) in Physics. The successful candidate

  6. The Queen's College A NON-STIPENDIARY JUNIOR RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    The Queen's College Oxford A NON-STIPENDIARY JUNIOR RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP IN CHEMISTRY The Governing Body of The Queen's College Oxford proposes to elect a Non-Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship (technically known as Extraordinary Junior Research Fellowships) in Chemistry. The successful candidate

  7. THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Religion and Belief

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Religion and Belief INTRODUCTION This document provides a general overview of legislation relating to religion and belief and The Queen's College response as it endeavours to ensure that discrimination on the grounds of religion or belief does not take place. CURRENT

  8. On Sex, Mate Selection and the Red Queen Gabriela Ochoa

    E-print Network

    Qu, Rong

    On Sex, Mate Selection and the Red Queen Gabriela Ochoa School of Cognitive and Computing Sciences Queen' hypothesis, states that sex is an adaptation to escape from parasites. A more recent hypothesis, the mate selection hypothesis, assumes that non-random mating, possible only with sex, accelerates

  9. Decrypting Cryptic Click Beetle Species by Analysis of Sex Pheromones.

    PubMed

    König, Christian; Steidle, Johannes L M; Tolasch, Till

    2015-08-01

    Despite sex pheromones being highly species specific, their use as phylogenetic characters and a tool for the verification of species status are still relatively few compared to use of morphological and molecular characters. Earlier studies revealed that within the click beetle species Idolus picipennis, two types can be separated based on pheromone composition. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of pheromone from a third type of Idolus revealed the presence of geranyl hexanoate and geranyl octanoate in a ratio of ca. 1:9. Neryl esters and farnesyl esters, present in the glands of the other two species, are absent in this type. In field experiments, males of all three types were attracted specifically to synthetic mixtures of pheromone resembling their own females. This suggests that cross attraction among different types is unlikely and indicates that they are likely distinct species. Using the large numbers of male beetles caught in pheromone traps, morphological differences between the species were studied and an identification key derived. This study highlights the role of sex pheromones as a powerful tool in integrative taxonomy and systematics to study the phylogenetic position and evolution of taxa and to determine the taxonomic status of cryptic species. PMID:26238957

  10. Unexpected plant odor responses in a moth pheromone system

    PubMed Central

    Rouyar, Angéla; Deisig, Nina; Dupuy, Fabienne; Limousin, Denis; Wycke, Marie-Anne; Renou, Michel; Anton, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Male moths rely on olfactory cues to find females for reproduction. Males also use volatile plant compounds (VPCs) to find food sources and might use host-plant odor cues to identify the habitat of calling females. Both the sex pheromone released by conspecific females and VPCs trigger well-described oriented flight behavior toward the odor source. Whereas detection and central processing of pheromones and VPCs have been thought for a long time to be highly separated from each other, recent studies have shown that interactions of both types of odors occur already early at the periphery of the olfactory pathway. Here we show that detection and early processing of VPCs and pheromone can overlap between the two sub-systems. Using complementary approaches, i.e., single-sensillum recording of olfactory receptor neurons, in vivo calcium imaging in the antennal lobe, intracellular recordings of neurons in the macroglomerular complex (MGC) and flight tracking in a wind tunnel, we show that some plant odorants alone, such as heptanal, activate the pheromone-specific pathway in male Agrotis ipsilon at peripheral and central levels. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a plant odorant with no chemical similarity to the molecular structure of the pheromone, acting as a partial agonist of a moth sex pheromone. PMID:26029117

  11. Trail Pheromone Disruption of Argentine Ant Trail Formation and Foraging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Stringer, L.D.; Snook, K.; Banko, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Trail pheromone disruption of invasive ants is a novel tactic that builds on the development of pheromone-based pest management in other insects. Argentine ant trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal, was formulated as a micro-encapsulated sprayable particle and applied against Argentine ant populations in 400 m2 field plots in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. A widely dispersed point source strategy for trail pheromone disruption was used. Traffic rates of ants in bioassays of treated filter paper, protected from rainfall and sunlight, indicated the presence of behaviorally significant quantities of pheromone being released from the formulation for up to 59 days. The proportion of plots, under trade wind conditions (2-3 m s-1), with visible trails was reduced for up to 14 days following treatment, and the number of foraging ants at randomly placed tuna-bait cards was similarly reduced. The success of these trail pheromone disruption trials in a natural ecosystem highlights the potential of this method for control of invasive ant species in this and other environments. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010.

  12. Pheromones mediating copulation and attraction in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dweck, Hany K M; Ebrahim, Shimaa A M; Thoma, Michael; Mohamed, Ahmed A M; Keesey, Ian W; Trona, Federica; Lavista-Llanos, Sofia; Svatoš, Aleš; Sachse, Silke; Knaden, Markus; Hansson, Bill S

    2015-05-26

    Intraspecific olfactory signals known as pheromones play important roles in insect mating systems. In the model Drosophila melanogaster, a key part of the pheromone-detecting system has remained enigmatic through many years of research in terms of both its behavioral significance and its activating ligands. Here we show that Or47b-and Or88a-expressing olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) detect the fly-produced odorants methyl laurate (ML), methyl myristate, and methyl palmitate. Fruitless (fru(M))-positive Or47b-expressing OSNs detect ML exclusively, and Or47b- and Or47b-expressing OSNs are required for optimal male copulation behavior. In addition, activation of Or47b-expressing OSNs in the male is sufficient to provide a competitive mating advantage. We further find that the vigorous male courtship displayed toward oenocyte-less flies is attributed to an oenocyte-independent sustained production of the Or47b ligand, ML. In addition, we reveal that Or88a-expressing OSNs respond to all three compounds, and that these neurons are necessary and sufficient for attraction behavior in both males and females. Beyond the OSN level, information regarding the three fly odorants is transferred from the antennal lobe to higher brain centers in two dedicated neural lines. Finally, we find that both Or47b- and Or88a-based systems and their ligands are remarkably conserved over a number of drosophilid species. Taken together, our results close a significant gap in the understanding of the olfactory background to Drosophila mating and attraction behavior; while reproductive isolation barriers between species are created mainly by species-specific signals, the mating enhancing signal in several Drosophila species is conserved. PMID:25964351

  13. Pheromones mediating copulation and attraction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dweck, Hany K. M.; Ebrahim, Shimaa A. M.; Thoma, Michael; Mohamed, Ahmed A. M.; Keesey, Ian W.; Trona, Federica; Lavista-Llanos, Sofia; Svatoš, Aleš; Sachse, Silke; Knaden, Markus; Hansson, Bill S.

    2015-01-01

    Intraspecific olfactory signals known as pheromones play important roles in insect mating systems. In the model Drosophila melanogaster, a key part of the pheromone-detecting system has remained enigmatic through many years of research in terms of both its behavioral significance and its activating ligands. Here we show that Or47b-and Or88a-expressing olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) detect the fly-produced odorants methyl laurate (ML), methyl myristate, and methyl palmitate. Fruitless (fruM)-positive Or47b-expressing OSNs detect ML exclusively, and Or47b- and Or47b-expressing OSNs are required for optimal male copulation behavior. In addition, activation of Or47b-expressing OSNs in the male is sufficient to provide a competitive mating advantage. We further find that the vigorous male courtship displayed toward oenocyte-less flies is attributed to an oenocyte-independent sustained production of the Or47b ligand, ML. In addition, we reveal that Or88a-expressing OSNs respond to all three compounds, and that these neurons are necessary and sufficient for attraction behavior in both males and females. Beyond the OSN level, information regarding the three fly odorants is transferred from the antennal lobe to higher brain centers in two dedicated neural lines. Finally, we find that both Or47b- and Or88a-based systems and their ligands are remarkably conserved over a number of drosophilid species. Taken together, our results close a significant gap in the understanding of the olfactory background to Drosophila mating and attraction behavior; while reproductive isolation barriers between species are created mainly by species-specific signals, the mating enhancing signal in several Drosophila species is conserved. PMID:25964351

  14. Transcriptome comparison of the sex pheromone glands from two sibling Helicoverpa species with opposite sex pheromone components

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao-Qun; Zhang, Shuai; Luo, Jun-Yu; Wang, Chun-Yi; Lv, Li-Min; Dong, Shuang-Lin; Cui, Jin-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Differences in sex pheromone component can lead to reproductive isolation. The sibling noctuid species, Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa assulta, share the same two sex pheromone components, Z9-16:Ald and Z11-16:Ald, but in opposite ratios, providing an typical example of such reproductive isolation. To investigate how the ratios of the pheromone components are differently regulated in the two species, we sequenced cDNA libraries from the pheromone glands of H. armigera and H. assulta. After assembly and annotation, we identified 108 and 93 transcripts putatively involved in pheromone biosynthesis, transport, and degradation in H. armigera and H. assulta, respectively. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR, qRT-PCR, phylogenetic, and mRNA abundance analyses suggested that some of these transcripts involved in the sex pheromone biosynthesis pathways perform. Based on these results, we postulate that the regulation of desaturases, KPSE and LPAQ, might be key factor regulating the opposite component ratios in the two sibling moths. In addition, our study has yielded large-scale sequence information for further studies and can be used to identify potential targets for the bio-control of these species by disrupting their sexual communication. PMID:25792497

  15. 40 CFR 180.1080 - Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Plant volatiles and pheromone...PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1080 Plant volatiles and pheromone...established for residues of the plant volatiles cyclic...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1080 - Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Plant volatiles and pheromone...PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1080 Plant volatiles and pheromone...established for residues of the plant volatiles cyclic...

  17. 40 CFR 180.1080 - Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Plant volatiles and pheromone...PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1080 Plant volatiles and pheromone...established for residues of the plant volatiles cyclic...

  18. 40 CFR 180.1080 - Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Plant volatiles and pheromone...PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1080 Plant volatiles and pheromone...established for residues of the plant volatiles cyclic...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1080 - Plant volatiles and pheromone; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Plant volatiles and pheromone...PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1080 Plant volatiles and pheromone...established for residues of the plant volatiles cyclic...

  20. The use of the sex pheromone as an evolutionary solution to food source selection in caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Poivet, Erwan; Rharrabe, Kacem; Monsempes, Christelle; Glaser, Nicolas; Rochat, Didier; Renou, Michel; Marion-Poll, Frédéric; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle

    2012-01-01

    Sex pheromones are released by adults of a species to elicit a sexual interaction with the other sex of the same species. Here we report an unexpected effect of a moth sex pheromone on the caterpillars of the same species. We demonstrate that larvae of the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis are attracted by the moth sex pheromone and that this phenomenon is independent of sex determination. In addition, we show that the olfactory sensilla carried by the caterpillar antennae are sensitive to the pheromone and that the caterpillar sensilla express pheromone-binding proteins that are used by adult antennae to bind pheromone components. Finally, we demonstrate that the larvae are preferentially attracted to a food source when it contains the sex pheromone main component. A possible interpretation of these results is that the sex pheromone is used to promote food search in caterpillars, opening potential new routes for insect pest management. PMID:22948829

  1. Variation in and Responses to Brood Pheromone of the Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) 

    E-print Network

    Metz, Bradley N.

    2011-02-22

    of brood pheromone from deprived and?non deprived larvae, to measure how changes in brood pheromone blend changed pollen foraging behavior and if such changes could account for the pollen foraging differences between Africanized and European bees...

  2. Behavioral Evidence for a Contact Sex Pheromone Component of the Emerald Ash Borer, Agrilus Planipennis Fairmaire

    E-print Network

    Behavioral Evidence for a Contact Sex Pheromone Component of the Emerald Ash Borer, Agrilus Abstract The cuticular hydrocarbon profiles of emerald ash borers, Agrilus planipennis, were examined. Keywords Agrilus planipennis . Contact pheromone . 3-Methyltricosane . Emerald ash borer. Mating system

  3. Prevalence and pattern of mandibular fracture in Central India

    PubMed Central

    Barde, Dhananjay; Mudhol, Anupama; Madan, Ramnik

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The etiology and pattern of mandibular fracture vary considerably among different study populations. Despite many reports about the incidence, diagnosis and treatment of mandibular fracture there is limited knowledge about the specific type or pattern of mandibular fractures in South Asian countries. This study attempts to delineate predictable patterns of fracture based on patient demographics and mechanism of injury in central part of India. Materials and Methods: The medical records of patients with mandibular fractures treated over a 3 years period were identified and analyzed based on age, sex, mechanism of trauma, seasonal variation, drug/alcohol abuse, number and anatomic location. Results: We reviewed 464 patients having mandibular fractures with age ranging from 7 to 89 years. Male (343, 79%) to female (91, 21%) ratio was 3.7:1, significantly higher for males. The highest incidence (37.5%) of mandibular fractures was in the age group of 21–30 years. The main cause was road traffic accidents (RTAs, 68.8%) followed by falls (16.8%), assaults (11%) and other reasons (3.8%). Parasymphyseal fractures were the most frequent 331 (41.1%), followed by condyle (135) and angle (124) fractures in occurrence. Mandibular angle fractures were found mostly to be associated with assault victims. Conclusion: The mechanism of injury correlates significantly with the anatomic location of fracture and knowledge of these associations should guide the surgeons for appropriate and timely management. Because RTAs are most frequent, good traffic sense needs to be imbibed and developed by the government as well as the public. PMID:25937725

  4. Mandibular fractures in children: long term results.

    PubMed

    Rémi, Marianowski; Christine, Martins Carvalho; Gael, Potard; Soizick, Pondaven; Joseph-André, Jézéquel

    2003-01-01

    Mandibular fractures in children treated in our department between March 1994 and January 2001 were retrospectively studied. Age, sex, type of fracture, etiology and evolution after treatment, functional mobility and maximal mouth opening were recorded. The population consisted of 19 patients who sustained 30 fractures. The patients ages ranged from 1.5 to 18 years. The mean time of follow up was 28 months. The male to female ratio was 1.7:1. Traffic and bicycle accidents were the main causes of the fractures. The condyle was involved in 16% of the cases, the subcondylar region in 28%. Fractures were multiple in half of the cases. Isolated fractures of the condyloid joint were treated conservatively. For isolated subcondylar fractures, maxillomandibular fixation was the treatment in 40% of the cases. Otherwise, conservative functional treatment was used. Children with a combination of body and condyle fractures were treated by open reduction and maxillomandibular fixation. Neither infection nor retarded facial growth was observed. Only one case of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and one case of temporomandibular pain syndrome were recorded. Associated lesions might concern the extremities, the brain and the cervical spine. PMID:12560146

  5. Estimation of bumblebee queen dispersal distances using sibship reconstruction method.

    PubMed

    Lepais, Olivier; Darvill, Ben; O'Connor, Stephanie; Osborne, Juliet L; Sanderson, Roy A; Cussans, John; Goffe, Louis; Goulson, Dave

    2010-02-01

    Dispersal ability is a key determinant of the propensity of an organism to cope with habitat fragmentation and climate change. Here we quantify queen dispersal in two common bumblebee species in an arable landscape. Dispersal was measured by taking DNA samples from workers in the spring and summer, and from queens in the following spring, at 14 sites across a landscape. The queens captured in the spring must be full sisters of workers that were foraging in the previous year. A range of sibship reconstruction methods were compared using simulated data sets including or no genotyping errors. The program Colony gave the most accurate reconstruction and was used for our analysis of queen dispersal. Comparison of queen dispersion with worker foraging distances was used to take into account an expected low level of false identification of sister pairs which might otherwise lead to overestimates of dispersal. Our data show that Bombus pascuorum and B. lapidarius queens can disperse by at least 3 and 5 km, respectively. These estimates are consistent with inferences drawn from studies of population structuring in common and rare bumblebee species, and suggest that regular gene flow over several kilometres due to queen dispersal are likely to be sufficient to maintain genetic cohesion of ubiquitous species over large spatial scales whereas rare bumblebee species appear unable to regularly disperse over distances greater than 10 km. Our results have clear implications for conservation strategies for this important pollinator group, particularly when attempting to conserve fragmented populations. PMID:20089127

  6. Molecular and neural mechanisms of sex pheromone reception and processing in the silkmoth Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Namiki, Shigehiro; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2014-01-01

    Male moths locate their mates using species-specific sex pheromones emitted by conspecific females. One striking feature of sex pheromone recognition in males is the high degree of specificity and sensitivity at all levels, from the primary sensory processes to behavior. The silkmoth Bombyx mori is an excellent model insect in which to decipher the underlying mechanisms of sex pheromone recognition due to its simple sex pheromone communication system, where a single pheromone component, bombykol, elicits the full sexual behavior of male moths. Various technical advancements that cover all levels of analysis from molecular to behavioral also allow the systematic analysis of pheromone recognition mechanisms. Sex pheromone signals are detected by pheromone receptors expressed in olfactory receptor neurons in the pheromone-sensitive sensilla trichodea on male antennae. The signals are transmitted to the first olfactory processing center, the antennal lobe (AL), and then are processed further in the higher centers (mushroom body and lateral protocerebrum) to elicit orientation behavior toward females. In recent years, significant progress has been made elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the detection of sex pheromones. In addition, extensive studies of the AL and higher centers have provided insights into the neural basis of pheromone processing in the silkmoth brain. This review describes these latest advances, and discusses what these advances have revealed about the mechanisms underlying the specific and sensitive recognition of sex pheromones in the silkmoth. PMID:24744736

  7. Using an electronic nose to rapidly assess grandlure content in boll weevil pheromone lures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Samples of pheromone lures used in boll weevil eradication programs are routinely analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) to ensure lures are adequately dosed with grandlure, the synthetic aggregation pheromone produced by male weevils. Although this approach accurately quantifies the pheromone content...

  8. Timed, Metered Spraysof Pheromone Disrupt Mating of Cadra cautella (Lepidoptera:Pyra1idae)l

    E-print Network

    placed in 3 m X 3 m X 3 m rooms disrupted up to 100% of the mating attempts of the almond moth, Cadra the male population was dead after 24 h KEY WORDS Lepidoptera, Pyralidae, almond moth, sex pheromone attracted by the pheromone, The sex pheromone of the almond moth, Cadra cautella (Walker) (Lepidoptera

  9. Relative abundance and flight phenology of two pheromone types of Acrobasis nuxvorella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Hartfield, E A; Harris, M K; Medina, R F

    2011-08-01

    Two synthetic sex pheromones have been developed and are currently used to detect the flight of the pecan nut casebearer, Acrobasis nuxvorella Neunzig, the most damaging pest of pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch]. One pheromone (referred to as standard) is attractive to moths in the southern United States, but not in Mexico. The other pheromone (referred to as Mexican) is attractive to moths in the southern United States and in Mexico. These two pheromones have been implemented by producers as an important tool in monitoring the activity of this pest and have allowed for more efficient pesticide use. In the future, these pheromones could be used as a means of population reduction through pheromone based control methods. Trapping data taken over a 3-yr period were used to determine if phenological differences exist between pheromone types of pecan nut casebearer. The relative abundance of each pheromone type at several locations in the United States also was evaluated. Results of this study indicate that no phenological differences exist between the two pheromone types studied in the United States and that significantly more males are attracted to field-deployed pheromone traps baited with the standard pheromone than to traps baited with the Mexican pheromone. PMID:22251690

  10. Sex pheromone gland of the female tiger moth Holomelina lamae (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae)

    E-print Network

    1916 Sex pheromone gland of the female tiger moth Holomelina lamae (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) Lucy R pheromone gland of the female tiger moth Holomelina lamae (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae). Can. J. Zool. 69: 1916. T. 1991. Sex pheromone gland of the female tiger moth Holomelina lamae (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae). Can

  11. Disruption of Gypsy Moth1Male Sex Pheromone Behavior by High Frequency Sound2

    E-print Network

    Disruption of Gypsy Moth1Male Sex Pheromone Behavior by High Frequency Sound2 T.C.BAKER AND R. T 48824 Reprinted from the ENVIRONMENTALENTOMOLOGY #12;Disruption of Gypsy Moth1 Male Sex Pheromone Lymantria dispar L. (gypsy moth), while flying upwind toward a pheromone source, respond to high frequency

  12. Ontogeny of Alarm pheromone production in the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alarm pheromones are an essential part of a complex of pheromone interactions that contribute to the maintenance of colony integrity and sociality in social insects. Recently, we identified 2-ethyl-3,6-dimethylpyrazine as an alarm pheromone component of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. We continued...

  13. The species, sex, and stage specificity of a Caenorhabditis sex pheromone

    E-print Network

    Chasnov, Jeffrey R.

    The species, sex, and stage specificity of a Caenorhabditis sex pheromone J. R. Chasnov*, W. K. So chemotaxis assays, we demonstrate that females secrete a potent sex pheromone that attracts males from a distance, whereas hermaphrodites do not. The female sex pheromone is not species-specific, with males

  14. Swarm Approaches for the Patrolling Problem, Information Propagation vs. Pheromone Evaporation

    E-print Network

    Simonin, Olivier -Département Informatique, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon

    Swarm Approaches for the Patrolling Problem, Information Propagation vs. Pheromone Evaporation of performances, we define a first algorithm based only on the evaporation of a pheromone dropped by reactive and the evaporation of information (pheromone's quantity). The diffusion process enables the propagation

  15. Mandibular Incisor Extraction Treatment of a Class I Malocclusion with Bolton Discrepancy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, Mehmet; Özer, Mete

    2007-01-01

    Many approaches for crowded mandibular anterior teeth are currently employed: distal movement of posterior teeth, lateral movement of canines, labial movement of incisors, interproximal enamel reduction, removal of premolars, removal of one or two incisors, and various combinations of the above. Selecting the best treatment is often difficult, and all guidelines do not apply to every case. Treatment by extraction of one single mandibular incisor is not popular in the orthodontic profession despite the apparent advantages of the extraction in the region of crowding. A case report is presented one mandibular incisor extraction treatment of a 16 year-old female with a Class I malocclusion that shows a significant mandibular arch length deficiency and mandibular tooth-size excess. In this case, the degree of mandibular anterior dental crowding, existing mandibular tooth-size excess, and the dental midline discrepancy were indicated the extraction of one mandibular incisor. PMID:19212499

  16. Pathological mandibular fracture: A severe complication of periimplantitis

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Campo, Francisco; Naval-Parra, Beatriz; Sastre-Pérez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, dental implant treatment is a very common option for patients even in medical compromised conditons. Some complications related to them have been described. Periimplantitis (PI) is one of the biggest concerns complications of these kind of treatments, probably has a multifactorial aethiology. Usually the consequences of PI are the loss of the implants and prostheses, expenses of money and time for dentists and patients. Very often PI implies the necesity of repeating the treatment . Pathological mandibular fracture due to PI is a severe but infrequent complication after dental implant treatment, especially after PI. In this study we present three cases of mandibular pathologic fractures among patients with different medical and dental records but similar management: two of them had been treated years ago of oral squamous cell carcinoma with surgery and radiotherapy, the other patient received oral bisphosphonates for osteoporosis some years after implantation. We analized the causes, consequences and posible prevention of these fractures as well as the special features of this kind of mandibular fractures and the different existing treatments. Key words:Periimplantitis, pathological mandibular fracture, mandibular atrophy, bicortical implants. PMID:26155355

  17. Influence of occlusal plane inclination and mandibular deviation on esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Corte, Cristiane Cherobini Dalla; da Silveira, Bruno Lopes; Marquezan, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the degree of perception of occlusal plane inclination and mandibular deviation in facial esthetics, assessed by laypeople, dentists and orthodontists. Methods: A woman with 5.88° of inclination and 5.54 mm of mandibular deviation was selected and, based on her original photograph, four new images were created correcting the deviations and creating more symmetric faces and smiles. Examiners assessed the images by means of a questionnaire. Their opinions were compared by qualitative and quantitative analyses. Results: A total of 45 laypeople, 27 dentists and 31 orthodontists filled out the questionnaires. All groups were able to perceive the asymmetry; however, orthodontists were more sensitive, identifying asymmetries as from 4.32° of occlusal plane inclination and 4.155 mm of mandibular deviation (p< 0.05). The other categories of evaluators identified asymmetries and assigned significantly lower grades, starting from 5.88° of occlusal plane inclination and 5.54 mm of mandibular deviation (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Occlusal plane inclination and mandibular deviation were perceived by all groups, but orthodontists presented higher perception of deviations. PMID:26560821

  18. Feasibility of purely endoscopic intramedullary fixation of mandibular condyle fractures.

    PubMed

    Frake, Paul C; Goodman, Joseph F; Joshi, Arjun S

    2015-01-01

    The investigators of this study hypothesized that fractures of the mandibular condyle can be repaired using short-segment intramedullary implants and purely endoscopic surgical technique, using a basic science, human cadaver model in an academic center. Endoscopic instrumentation was used through a transoral mucosal incision to place intramedullary implants of 2 cm in length into osteotomized mandibular condyles. The surgical maneuvers that required to insert these implants, including condyle positioning, reaming, implant insertion, and seating of the mandibular ramus, are described herein. Primary outcome was considered as successful completion of the procedure. Ten cadaveric mandibular condyles were successfully repaired with rigid intramedullary internal fixation without the use of external incisions. Both insertion of a peg-type implant and screwing a threaded implant into the condylar head were possible. The inferior portion of the implant remained exposed, and the ramus of the mandible was manipulated into position on the implant using retraction at the sigmoid notch. The results of this study suggest that purely endoscopic repair of fractures of the mandibular condyle is possible by using short-segment intramedullary titanium implants and a transoral endoscopic approach without the need for facial incisions or punctures. The biomechanical advantages of these intramedullary implants, including improved strength and resistance to mechanical failure compared with miniplates, have been recently established. The combination of improved implant design and purely endoscopic technique may allow for improved fixation and reduced surgical- and implant-related morbidity in the treatment of condylar fractures. PMID:25534058

  19. Mandibular asymmetry in patients with the crouzon or apert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elmi, P; Reitsma, J H; Buschang, P H; Wolvius, E B; Ongkosuwito, E M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe directional and fluctuating mandibular asymmetry over time in children with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. Mandibular asymmetry of children between 7.5 and 14 years of age with Crouzon syndrome (n = 35) and Apert syndrome (n = 24) were compared with controls (n = 327). From panoramic radiographs, mandibular directional and fluctuating asymmetry was determined for the three groups. Multilevel statistical techniques were used to describe mandibular asymmetry changes over time. Patients with Crouzon and Apert syndromes showed statistically significant more fluctuating asymmetry for mandibular measures than did controls. Between the Crouzon and Apert syndromes groups, no statistical differences were found in directional and fluctuating asymmetry. The control group showed statistically significantly more directional asymmetry than did patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. The controls showed no change over time for the directional asymmetry of condylar-ramal height; however, the directional asymmetry of the gonial angle increased. Patients with Crouzon syndrome showed side dominance for only condylar-ramal height; whereas, patients with Apert syndrome did not show dominance for any of the measurements. Apert and Crouzon syndromes showed developmental instability, in contrast to the controls. No statistically significant longitudinal differences were found for either the directional or the fluctuating asymmetry between Crouzon and Apert syndromes. Findings for fluctuating and directional asymmetry for both syndromes may indicate an inability to cope with genetic and environmental stress during development and treatment, compared with untreated nonsyndromic individuals. PMID:24878346

  20. Refining the dual olfactory hypothesis: pheromone reward and odour experience.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Fernando; Martínez-Ricós, Joana; Agustín-Pavón, Carmen; Martínez-Hernández, Jose; Novejarque, Amparo; Lanuza, Enrique

    2009-06-25

    In rodents, sexual advertisement and gender recognition are mostly (if not exclusively) mediated by chemosignals. Specifically, there is ample evidence indicating that female mice are 'innately' attracted by male sexual pheromones that have critical non-volatile components and are detected by the vomeronasal organ. These pheromones can only get access to the vomeronasal organ by active pumping mechanisms that require close contact with the source of the stimulus (e.g. urine marks) during chemoinvestigation. We have hypothesised that male sexual pheromones are rewarding to female mice. Indeed, male-soiled bedding can be used as a reinforcer to induce conditioned place preference, provided contact with the bedding is allowed. The neural mechanisms of pheromone reward seem, however, different from those employed by other natural reinforcers, such as the sweetness or postingestive effects of sucrose. In contrast to vomeronasal-detected male sexual pheromones, male-derived olfactory stimuli (volatiles) are not intrinsically attractive to female mice. However, after repeated exposure to male-soiled bedding, intact female mice develop an acquired preference for male odours. On the contrary, in females whose accessory olfactory bulbs have been lesioned, exposure to male-soiled bedding induces aversion to male odorants. These considerations, together with data on the different properties of olfactory and vomeronasal receptors, lead us to make a proposal for the complementary roles that the olfactory and vomeronasal systems play in intersexual attraction and in other forms of intra- or inter-species communication. PMID:18977394

  1. The mothematics of female pheromone signaling: strategies for aging virgins.

    PubMed

    Umbers, Kate D L; Symonds, Matthew R E; Kokko, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Although females rarely experience strong mate limitation, delays or lifelong problems of mate acquisition are detrimental to female fitness. In systems where males search for females via pheromone plumes, it is often difficult to assess whether female signaling is costly. Direct costs include the energetics of pheromone production and attention from unwanted eavesdroppers, such as parasites, parasitoids, and predators. Suboptimal outcomes are also possible from too many or too few mating events or near-simultaneous arrival of males who make unwanted mating attempts (even if successfully thwarted). We show that, in theory, even small costs can lead to a scenario where young females signal less intensely (lower pheromone concentration and/or shorter time spent signaling) and increase signaling effort only as they age and gather evidence (while still virgin) on whether sperm limitation threatens their reproductive success. Our synthesis of the empirical data available on Lepidoptera supports this prediction for one frequently reported component of signaling-time spent calling (often reported as the time of onset of calling at night)-but not for another, pheromone titer. This difference is explicable under the plausible but currently untested assumption that signaling earlier than other females each night is a more reliable way of increasing the probability of acquiring at least one mate than producing a more concentrated pheromone plume. PMID:25674695

  2. Mandibular condylectomy in a cow with a chronic luxation of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Holly D.; Roquet, Imma; MacKay, Angela; Barber, Spencer

    2014-01-01

    A cow, presented after being struck by a motor vehicle, continued to have difficulty eating after mandibular fracture repair. Imaging showed a temporomandibular luxation and a mandibular condylectomy was performed. Mastication improved greatly but the cow was euthanized due to infection. This is the first report of mandibular condylectomy in cattle. PMID:24891643

  3. Isolated bilateral macrodontia of mandibular second premolars: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Canoglu, Ebru; Canoglu, Harun; Aktas, Alper; Cehreli, Zafer C.

    2012-01-01

    Isolated bilateral macrodontia of mandibular second premolars is an extremely rare dental anomaly with only 5 cases reported to date. This case report presents clinical and radiographic findings of isolated bilateral macrodontia in a 12-year-old child. The patient was referred to the clinic with local crowding of mandibular posterior teeth. Radiographic findings revealed the presence of impacted macrodont mandibular second premolars and their distinct morphological appearance, characterized by large, multitubercular, molariform crowns, and tapering, single roots. Following surgical removal of the impacted premolars, orthodontic therapy was initiated to correct the malocclusion. Along with the features and treatment of this rare anomaly, this case report also illustrates the benefits, in terms of treatment planning and surgical technique, of supplementing conventional radiography with cone-beam computed tomography to localize the macrodont premolars and accurately establish their relationship with the neighboring roots and anatomic structures. PMID:22904663

  4. Dentigerous Cyst associated with Horizontally Impacted Mandibular Second Premolar

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Abhay Mani; Rathore, Monika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dentigerous Cyst/developmental cyst of benign odontogenic origin are ones that surround the crown of impacted, embedded, unerupted or developing teeth. Dentigerous cyst is second most common cyst of the oral cavity after radicular cyst. They are usually solitary in occurrence and mostly associated with the mandibular third molars. Dentigerous cysts involving impacted second premolars are rarely reported in the literatures. We present a rare case of dentigerous cyst in a 12-year-old female patient associated with an impacted mandibular second premolar. How to cite this article: Mishra R, Tripathi AM, Rathore M. Dentigerous Cyst associated with Horizontally Impacted Mandibular Second Premolar. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(1): 54-57. PMID:25206240

  5. Open reduction-fixation of mandibular subcondylar fractures. A review.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, C J; Donald, P J; Knowles, J; Moore, H C

    1993-04-01

    From 1973 to 1990, 392 mandibular subcondylar fractures were treated at the University of California, Davis, by the Otolaryngology Department. Of these, 17% were handled by open reduction and internal fixation. Twenty-one patients from this group were located for follow-up at an average interval of 64 months. Retrospective review shows the operation to be safe, with few complications and no permanent sequelae. Patient examination often revealed abnormalities of occlusion and mandibular function; however, these objective findings did not correlate well with patients' relative lack of subjective complaints. An 86% incidence of roentgenographic evidence of condylar disease after open reduction and internal fixation was found. We question the long-term efficacy of open reduction and internal fixation in restoring fracture alignment and maintaining mandibular height given the high rate (86%) of condylar disease in our patient population. PMID:8457303

  6. Early Experience with Biodegradable Fixation of Pediatric Mandibular Fractures.

    PubMed

    Mazeed, Ahmed Salah; Shoeib, Mohammed Abdel-Raheem; Saied, Samia Mohammed Ahmed; Elsherbiny, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    This clinical study aims to evaluate the stability and efficiency of biodegradable self-reinforced poly-l/dl-lactide (SR-PLDLA) plates and screws for fixation of pediatric mandibular fractures. The study included 12 patients (3-12 years old) with 14 mandibular fractures. They were treated by open reduction and internal fixation by SR-PLDLA plates and screws. Maxillomandibular fixation was maintained for 1?week postoperatively. Clinical follow-up was performed at 1?week, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 12 months postoperatively. Radiographs were done at 1?week, 3 months, and 12 months postoperatively to observe any displacement and fracture healing. All fractures healed both clinically and radiologically. No serious complications were reported in the patients. Normal occlusion was achieved in all cases. Biodegradable osteofixation of mandibular fractures offers a valuable clinical solution for pediatric patients getting the benefit of avoiding secondary surgery to remove plates, decreasing the hospital stay, further painful procedures, and psychological impact. PMID:26269728

  7. Orthodontic Treatment of a Mandibular Incisor Extraction Case with Invisalign

    PubMed Central

    Zawawi, Khalid H.

    2014-01-01

    Mandibular incisor extraction for orthodontic treatment is considered an unusual treatment option because of the limited number of patients that meet the criteria for such treatment. Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning is essential to achieve the desired results. Adult orthodontic patients are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations and reject the idea of conventional fixed appliances. In recent years, Invisalign appliances have gained tremendous attention for orthodontic treatment of adult patients to meet their esthetic demands. In this case report, a case of Class I malocclusion was treated with mandibular incisor extraction using the Invisalign appliance system. Successful tooth alignment of both arches was achieved. The use of Invisalign appliance is an effective treatment option in adult patients with Class I malocclusion that requires incisor extraction due to moderate to severe mandibular anterior crowding. PMID:25024852

  8. Experience with mandibular reconstruction using transport-disc-distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pingarrón-Martín, Lorena; Otero, T González; Gallo, L J Arias

    2015-06-01

    The goal of transport-disc-distraction osteogenesis (TDDO) is to restore bone continuity by using in-situ bone. It may be useful following trauma, gunshot injuries, or tumor ablation, especially when there may be contraindications at the donor site or for prolonged surgery. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first time TDDO has been used for mandibular reconstruction reporting additional procedures, which include osseointegrated dental implants rehabilitation and orthognathic surgery. A retrospective study is performed analyzing all mandibular reconstruction cases that may be suitable for distraction from January 2006 to December 2011. A thorough description of the documented cases includes details about sex, gender, complications, duration of hospitalization, etiology, size, and location of the defect. Eight cases of mandibular reconstruction were included. Six cases correspond to mandibular ameloblastoma. The remaining two cases were mandibular gunshot comminuted fractures. Range of the defects was from 45 to 60 mm. Length of the transport disc was 15 to 20 mm. Protocolized technique consisted of 5 days of latency period, 19 to 45 days of activation term (average 30 days), and 8 to 12 weeks for consolidation. Mean distraction length achieved was 40.45 mm. We can conclude that TDDO is an alternative to conventional and more invasive procedures, when we face severe segmental mandibular defects reconstruction. It shows the potential to restore a better anatomical bone regeneration, also providing soft tissues and reducing donor-site morbidity. Patients' education and awareness about the proper use of the transport-disc-distraction device is important to optimize functional outcomes. PMID:26000082

  9. Mandibular asymmetry: a three-dimensional quantification of bilateral condyles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The shape and volume of the condyle is considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of the mandibular deviation. Curvature analysis is informative for objectively assess whether the shape of the condyles matches that of the glenoid fossa. In this study, a three-dimensional (3-D) quantification of bilateral asymmetrical condyles was firstly conducted to identify the specific role of 3-D condylar configuration for mandibular asymmetry. Methods 55 adult patients, 26 males (26?±?5 yrs) and 29 females (26?±?5 yrs), diagnosed with mandibular asymmetry were included. The examination of deviation of chin point, deviation of dental midlines, inclination of occlusal plane, and depth of the mandibular occlusal plane were conducted. After the clinical investigation, computed tomography images from the patients were used to reconstruct the 3-D mandibular models. Then the condylar volume, surface size, surface curvature and bone mineral density were evaluated independently for each patient on non-deviated and deviated sides of temporomandibular joint. Results Both the condylar surface size and volume were significantly larger on deviated side (surface size: 1666.14?±?318.3 mm2, volume: 1981.5?±?418.3 mm3). The anterior slope of the condyle was flatter (0.12?±?0.06) and the posterior slope (0.39?±?0.08) was prominently convex on the deviated side. The corresponding bone mineral density values were 523.01 ±118.1 HU and 549.07 ±120. 6 HU on anterior and posterior slopes. Conclusions The incongruence presented on the deviated side resulted in a reduction in contact areas and, thus, an increase in contact stresses and changes of bone density. All aforementioned results suggest that the difference existing between deviated and non-deviated condyles correlates with facial asymmetrical development. In mandibular asymmetry patients, the 3-D morphology of condyle on deviated side differ from the non-deviated side, which indicates the association between asymmetrical jaw function and joint remodeling. PMID:24354862

  10. Sex pheromone of orange wheat blossom midge, Sitodiplosis mosellana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gries, Regine; Gries, G.; Khaskin, Grigori; King, Skip; Olfert, Owen; Kaminski, Lori-Ann; Lamb, Robert; Bennett, Robb

    Pheromone extract of the female orange wheat blossom midge, Sitodiplosis mosellana (Géhin) (SM) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), was analyzed by coupled gas chromatographic-electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) and GC-mass spectrometry (MS), employing fused silica columns coated with DB-5, DB-210, DB-23 or SP-1000. These analyses revealed a single, EAD-active candidate pheromone which was identified as 2,7-nonanediyl dibutyrate. In experiments in wheat fields in Saskatchewan, traps baited with (2S,7S)-2,7-nonanediyl dibutyrate attracted significant numbers of male SM. The presence of other stereoisomers did not adversely affect trap captures. Facile synthesis of stereoisomeric 2,7-nonanediyl dibutyrate will facilitate the development of pheromone-based monitoring or even control of SM populations.

  11. Mammalian pheromones: emerging properties and mechanisms of detection.

    PubMed

    Stowers, Lisa; Kuo, Tsung-Han

    2015-10-01

    The concept of mammalian pheromones was established decades before the discovery of any bioactive ligands. Therefore, their molecular identity, native sources, and the meaning of their detection has been largely speculative. There has been recent success in identifying a variety of candidate mouse pheromones and other specialized odors. These discoveries reveal that mammalian pheromones come in a variety of ligand types and they are detected by sensory neurons that are pre-set to promote an array of social and survival behaviors. Importantly, recent findings show that they activate molecularly diverse sensory neurons that differ from canonical odorant detectors. These novel sensory neurons hold future promise to unlock the mystery of how their detection is hardwired to generate behavior. PMID:25747731

  12. Sex pheromone receptor proteins. Visualization using a radiolabeled photoaffinity analog

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.G.; Prestwich, G.D.; Riddiford, L.M.

    1988-03-15

    A tritium-labeled photoaffinity analog of a moth pheromone was used to covalently modify pheromone-selective binding proteins in the antennal sensillum lymph and sensory dendritic membranes of the male silk moth, Antheraea polyphemus. This analog, (E,Z)-6,11-(/sup 3/H)hexadecadienyl diazoacetate, allowed visualization of a 15-kilodalton soluble protein and a 69-kilodalton membrane protein in fluorescence autoradiograms of electrophoretically separated antennal proteins. Covalent modification of these proteins was specifically reduced when incubation and UV irradiation were conducted in the presence of excess unlabeled pheromone, (E,Z)-6,11-hexadecadienyl acetate. These experiments constitute the first direct evidence for a membrane protein of a chemosensory neuron interacting in a specific fashion with a biologically relevant odorant.

  13. THE GOVERNANCE OF QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY Board of Trustees

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    THE GOVERNANCE OF QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY Board of Trustees Oversees the management of University and Risk Committee Capital Assets and Finance External Relations and Development Governance Educational Equity Governance and Nominating Honorary Degrees Library Non-Academic Discipline Orientation

  14. QUEEN REPLACEMENT IN DEQUEENED COLONIES OF THE ARGENTINE ANT

    E-print Network

    Keller, Laurent

    QUEEN REPLACEMENT IN DEQUEENED COLONIES OF THE ARGENTINE ANT IRIDOMYRMEX HUMILIS (MAYR) BY Luc of Iridomyrmex humilis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Large societies of the Argentine ant were collected in December 1985

  15. A Critical Look at the Queen Bee Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Jane; Kushner, Richard

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the popular "Queen Bee" stereotype of successful female executives, and concludes that the stereotype is too narrow in focus and fails to take into account complex psychological and experiential variables. (Author/EJT)

  16. QUEEN MARY, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON MTH6115 Cryptography

    E-print Network

    St Andrews, University of

    QUEEN MARY, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON MTH6115 Cryptography Course Information Winter/Spring 2011. (Introductory.) Dominic Welsh. Codes and Cryptography. Oxford University Press. Paul Douglas Stinson. Cryptography: Theory and Practice. Chapman and Hall. Assignment Information: I intend to produce approximately

  17. Nonodontogenic mandibular lesions: differentiation based on CT attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Özgür, An?l; Kara, Engin; Arpac?, Rabia; Arpac?, Taner; Esen, Kaan; Kara, Taylan; Duce, Meltem Nass; Apayd?n, Feramuz Demir

    2014-01-01

    Mandibular lesions are classified as odontogenic and nonodontogenic based on the cell of origin. Odontogenic lesions are frequently encountered at head and neck imaging. However, several nonodontogenic pathologies may also involve mandible and present further diagnostic dilemma. Awareness of the imaging features of nonodontogenic lesions is crucial in order to guide clinicians in proper patient management. Computed tomography (CT) may provide key information to narrow diagnostic considerations. Nonodontogenic mandibular lesions may have lytic, sclerotic, ground-glass, or mixed lytic and sclerotic appearances on CT. In this article, our aim is to present various nonodontogenic lesions of the mandible by categorizing them according to their attenuations on CT. PMID:25297390

  18. Nonodontogenic mandibular lesions: differentiation based on CT attenuation.

    PubMed

    Özgür, An?l; Kara, Engin; Arpac?, Rabia; Arpac?, Taner; Esen, Kaan; Kara, Taylan; Duce, Meltem Nass; Apayd?n, Feramuz Demir

    2014-11-01

    Mandibular lesions are classified as odontogenic and nonodontogenic based on the cell of origin. Odontogenic lesions are frequently encountered at head and neck imaging. However, several nonodontogenic pathologies may also involve mandible and present further diagnostic dilemma. Awareness of the imaging features of nonodontogenic lesions is crucial in order to guide clinicians in proper patient management. Computed tomography (CT) may provide key information to narrow diagnostic considerations. Nonodontogenic mandibular lesions may have lytic, sclerotic, ground-glass, or mixed lytic and sclerotic appearances on CT. In this article, our aim is to present various nonodontogenic lesions of the mandible by categorizing them according to their attenuations on CT. PMID:25297390

  19. Bilateral mandibular subcondylar fractures contributing to airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Bavitz, J B; Collicott, P E

    1995-08-01

    Bilateral mandibular fracture contributing to airway obstruction is a well-understood phenomenon. This is typically described as a rather immediate or acute process. After trauma, the production of a "flail mandible" with concomitant loss of support of tongue muscles is thought to result in obstruction of the upper airway. An unusual case in which the bilateral mandibular fractures contributed to an airway obstruction 10 days after the initial trauma is described. The cause is explained and methods of prevention and treatment are presented. PMID:7490488

  20. Occlusion for maxillary dentures opposing osseointegrated mandibular prostheses.

    PubMed

    Denissen, H W; Kalk, W; van Waas, M A; van Os, J H

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a combination of several occlusal concepts designed to contribute to the successful use of maxillary dentures in opposition to osseointegrated mandibular prostheses. To ensure a positive outcome when designing such an occlusion, three factors must be considered: patient satisfaction, maxillary anterior bone preservation, and mandibular arch shortening. It is recommended that for centric occlusion the molars have a lingual contact occlusion, the premolars have a buccal contact occlusion, and the anterior teeth have an open occlusal relationship. For an eccentric occlusion, a balanced articulation is favored instead of mutually protected occlusion. PMID:8297454

  1. [The retromandibular approach in fractures of the mandibular condyle].

    PubMed

    Cheynet, F; Aldegheri, A; Chossegros, C; Bourezak, Z; Blanc, J L

    1997-12-01

    Various approaches have been proposed for surgical treatment of displaced condylar fractures included submandibular approach, preauricular approach, rhytidectomy approach or intraoral approach. Since 1992, we used a short retromandibular approach to treat displaced subcondylar fractures with a miniplate. When open reduction and osteosynthesis are required, the retro-mandibular approach is an easy and safe technique for displaced condylar fractures. The aim of this article was to describe the short retro-mandibular approach. Indications for surgical treatment, surgical approach and techniques of osteosynthesis for condylar fractures are discussed. PMID:9471672

  2. High-level plasmid-mediated gentamicin resistance and pheromone response of plasmids present in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Shiojima, M; Tomita, H; Tanimoto, K; Fujimoto, S; Ike, Y

    1997-01-01

    Eleven pheromone-responding plasmids encoding erythromycin or gentamicin resistance were isolated from multiresistant clinical Enterococcus faecalis isolates. The plasmids were classified into six types with respect to their pheromone responses. The three erythromycin resistance plasmids responded to different pheromones. Of the eight gentamicin resistance plasmids, four plasmids responded to same pheromone. Southern hybridization studies showed that the genes involved in regulation of the pheromone response were conserved in the drug resistance plasmids. PMID:9056018

  3. Contact: Phyllis Cohen-Stevens Maria Matteo QUEENS COLLEGE

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    .cohen-stevens@qc.cuny.edu maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu (718) 997-5597 (718) 997-5593 FIRST-TIME BIO BLITZ TO DOCUMENT JAMAICA BAY AREA, notebooks, and insect repellent, Queens College researchers will descend on the wildest reaches of New York--of the Jamaica Bay area. Queens College is the lead institution for the event, sponsored by the college

  4. Queen Mary, University of London Mid-term Test

    E-print Network

    Chu, Cho-Ho

    Queen Mary, University of London Mid-term Test MAS111 Convergence and Continuity Duration: 1 hour of a calculator constitutes an examination offence. c Queen Mary, University of London 2004 MAS111 1 TURN OVER #12 of the following equation: anxn + an-1xn-1 + · · · + a1x + a0 = 0 where a0, a1, . . . , an are integers, an = 0

  5. Queen attractivity in the Argentine ant Iridomyrmex humilis (Mayr).

    PubMed

    Cariou-Etienne, A; Aron, S; Passera, L

    1992-01-01

    The origin of queen attractivity in the Argentine ant was estimated by presenting body parts (head, thorax, abdomen) of dead queens to workers. Whatever the preparation, crushed or intact, the thorax was always significantly more attractive than other parts of the body. The legs seemed to be highly attractive to the workers, mainly through lactile stimuli. The results are discussed with regards to the occurrence of thoracic glands. PMID:24924611

  6. Asexual queen succession in the higher termite Embiratermes neotenicus.

    PubMed

    Fougeyrollas, Romain; Dolejšová, Klára; Sillam-Dussès, David; Roy, Virginie; Poteaux, Chantal; Hanus, Robert; Roisin, Yves

    2015-06-22

    Asexual queen succession (AQS), in which workers, soldiers and dispersing reproductives are produced sexually while numerous non-dispersing queens arise through thelytokous parthenogenesis, has recently been described in three species of lower termites of the genus Reticulitermes. Here, we show that AQS is not an oddity restricted to a single genus of lower termites, but a more widespread strategy occurring also in the most advanced termite group, the higher termites (Termitidae). We analysed the genetic structure in 10 colonies of the Neotropical higher termite Embiratermes neotenicus (Syntermitinae) using five newly developed polymorphic microsatellite loci. The colonies contained one primary king accompanied either by a single primary queen or by up to almost 200 neotenic queens. While the workers, the soldiers and most future dispersing reproductives were produced sexually, the non-dispersing neotenic queens originated through thelytokous parthenogenesis of the founding primary queen. Surprisingly, the mode of thelytoky observed in E. neotenicus is most probably automixis with central fusion, contrasting with the automixis with terminal fusion documented in Reticulitermes. The occurrence of AQS based on different mechanisms of ploidy restoration raises the hypothesis of an independent evolutionary origin of this unique reproductive strategy in individual lineages of lower and higher termites. PMID:26019158

  7. Does Patriline Composition Change over a Honey Bee Queen's Lifetime?

    PubMed

    Brodschneider, Robert; Arnold, Gérard; Hrassnigg, Norbert; Crailsheim, Karl

    2012-01-01

    A honey bee queen mates with a number of drones a few days after she emerges as an adult. Spermatozoa of different drones are stored in her spermatheca and used for the rest of the queen's life to fertilize eggs. Sperm usage is thought to be random, so that the patriline distribution within a honey bee colony would remain constant over time. In this study we assigned the progeny of a naturally mated honey bee queen to patrilines using microsatellite markers at the queen's age of two, three and four years. No significant changes in patriline distribution occurred within each of two foraging seasons, with samples taken one and five months apart, respectively. Overall and pair-wise comparisons between the three analyzed years reached significant levels. Over the three-year period we found a trend for patrilines to become more equally represented with time. It is important to note that this study was performed with a single queen, and thus individual and population variation in sperm usage patterns must be assessed. We discuss long-term changes in patriline composition due to mixing processes in the queen's spermatheca, following incomplete mixing of different drones' sperm after mating. PMID:26466632

  8. Effects of natural and synthetic alarm pheromone and individual pheromone components on foraging behavior of the giant Asian honey bee, Apis dorsata.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianjun; Wang, Zhengwei; Tan, Ken; Qu, Yufeng; Nieh, James C

    2014-10-01

    Social pollinators such as honey bees face attacks from predators not only at the nest, but also during foraging. Pollinating honey bees can therefore release alarm pheromones that deter conspecifics from visiting dangerous inflorescences. However, the effect of alarm pheromone and its chemical components upon bee avoidance of dangerous food sources remains unclear. We tested the responses of giant honey bee foragers, Apis dorsata, presented with alarm pheromone at a floral array. Foragers investigated the inflorescence with natural alarm pheromone, but 3.3-fold more foragers preferred to land on the 'safe' inflorescence without alarm pheromone. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, we identified eight chemical components in the alarm pheromone, of which three components (1-octanol, decanal and gamma-octanoic lactone) have not previously been reported in this species. We bioassayed six major compounds and found that a synthetic mixture of these compounds elicited behaviors statistically indistinguishable from responses to natural alarm pheromone. By testing each compound separately, we show that gamma-octanoic lactone, isopentyl acetate and (E)-2-decen-1-yl acetate are active compounds that elicit significant alarm responses. Gamma-octanoic lactone elicited the strongest response to a single compound and has not been previously reported in honey bee alarm pheromone. Isopentyl acetate is widely found in the alarm pheromones of sympatric Asian honey bee species, and thus alarmed A. dorsata foragers may produce information useful for conspecifics and heterospecifics, thereby broadening the effects of alarm information on plant pollination. PMID:25104758

  9. Trigeminocardiac Reflex by Mandibular Extension on Rat Pial Microcirculation: Role of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Lapi, Dominga; Federighi, Giuseppe; Fantozzi, M. Paola; del Seppia, Cristina; Ghione, Sergio; Colantuoni, Antonio; Scuri, Rossana

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we have extended our previous findings about the effects of 10 minutes of passive mandibular extension in anesthetized Wistar rats. By prolonging the observation time to 3 hours, we showed that 10 minutes mandibular extension caused a significant reduction of the mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate respect to baseline values, which persisted up to 160 minutes after mandibular extension. These effects were accompanied by a characteristic biphasic response of pial arterioles: during mandibular extension, pial arterioles constricted and after mandibular extension dilated for the whole observation period. Interestingly, the administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone abolished the vasoconstriction observed during mandibular extension, while the administration of N?-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, abolished the vasodilation observed after mandibular extension. Either drug did not affect the reduction of mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate induced by mandibular extension. By qRT-PCR, we also showed that neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene expression was significantly increased compared with baseline conditions during and after mandibular extension and endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene expression markedly increased at 2 hours after mandibular extension. Finally, western blotting detected a significant increase in neuronal and endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expression. In conclusion mandibular extension caused complex effects on pial microcirculation involving opioid receptor activation and nitric oxide release by both neurons and endothelial vascular cells at different times. PMID:25551566

  10. Management of Six Root Canals in Mandibular First Molar

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Fabio de Almeida; Sousa, Bruno Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Success in root canal treatment is achieved after thorough cleaning, shaping, and obturation of the root canal system. This clinical case describes conventional root canal treatment of an unusual mandibular first molar with six root canals. The prognosis for endodontic treatment in teeth with abnormal morphology is unfavorable if the clinician fails to recognize extra root canals. PMID:25685156

  11. The application of the Risdon approach for mandibular condyle fractures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many novel approaches to mandibular condyle fracture have been reported, but there is a relative lack of reports on the Risdon approach. In this study, the feasibility of the Risdon approach for condylar neck and subcondylar fractures of the mandible is demonstrated. Methods A review of patients with mandibular condylar neck and subcondylar fractures was performed from March 2008 to June 2012. A total of 25 patients, 19 males and 6 females, had 14 condylar neck fractures and 11 subcondylar fractures. Results All of the cases were reduced using the Risdon approach. For subcondylar fractures, reduction and fixation with plates was done under direct vision. For condylar neck fractures, reduction and fixation was done with the aid of a trochar in adults and a percutaneous threaded Kirschner wire in children. There were no malunions or nonunions revealed in follow-up care. Mild transient neuropraxia of the marginal mandibular nerve was seen in 4 patients, which was resolved within 1–2 months. Conclusions The Risdon approach is a technique for reducing the condylar neck and subcondylar fractures that is easy to perform and easy to learn. Its value in the reduction of mandibular condyle fractures should be emphasized. PMID:23829537

  12. Minimally invasive mandibular bone augmentation using injectable hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sanz, Elena; Varghese, Oommen P; Kisiel, Marta; Engstrand, Thomas; Reich, Karoline M; Bohner, Marc; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Kohler, Thomas; Müller, Ralph; Ossipov, Dmitri A; Hilborn, Jöns

    2012-12-01

    Hyaluronic acid-based hydrogels are proven biocompatible materials and excellent carriers of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) that have been successfully tested for bone generation in vivo. Different formulations, with or without nanohydroxyapatite, have shown promise for craniofacial applications. In this study, 28 rats were used to investigate whether it is possible to achieve mandibular bone augmentation upon injection of novel hyaluronic acid-based hydrogels containing nanohydroxyapatite and different concentrations of BMP-2 (0, 5 and 150 µg/ml). The biomaterials were injected subperiosteally through fine needles into the innate mandibular diastema, imitating a clinical procedure for resorbed mandibles. No incisions, flaps or sutures were necessary. After 8 weeks the mandibles were evaluated by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), micro-computed tomography (?CT), histology, immunohistochemistry and fluorochrome labelling. As a result, engineered bone was observed in all treated mandibles, with a statistically significant increase in mandibular bone volume correlated with the amount of BMP-2 loaded in the hydrogel formula. We therefore demonstrated that minimally invasive mandibular bone augmentation is possible upon injection in rats, when using the appropriate injectable scaffolds. This represents an attractive clinical alternative for oral implantology patients. PMID:22941759

  13. Reinforcement of a mandibular complete denture with internal metal framework.

    PubMed

    Balch, J Heath; Smith, Pamela D; Marin, Mark A; Cagna, David R

    2013-03-01

    Metal framework reinforcement is used in complete dentures to improve the fracture resistance, dimensional stability, accuracy, weight, and retention of a definitive prosthesis. A novel technique for suspending a metal framework within the denture base of mandibular complete dentures is described. PMID:23522371

  14. Ultrastructure of the platypus and echidna mandibular glands.

    PubMed

    Krause, W J

    2011-10-01

    The secretory units of the platypus and echidna mandibular glands consist of a single serous cell type. Secretory granules within the cells of the platypus mandibular gland stained intensely with the periodic acid-Schiff staining procedure but failed to stain with Alcian Blue, suggesting the granules contained neutral glycoproteins. Secretory granules within the mandibular glands of the echidna failed to stain with the methods used indicating little if any glycoprotein was associated with the secretory granules. Ultrastructurally, secretory granules of the platypus mandibular gland were electron dense with a central core of less electron-dense material and were membrane bound. In contrast, those of the echidna presented a lamellated appearance and also were limited by a membrane. These secretory granules appeared to form as a result of concentric layering of lamellae within cisternae of the Golgi membranes. The intralobular ductal system of the platypus was more extensively developed than that of the echidna. The striated ducts of both species were characterized by elaborate infoldings of the basolateral plasmalemma and an abundance of associated mitochondria. PMID:21671995

  15. The effectiveness of articaine in mandibular facial infiltrations

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Dennis F

    2016-01-01

    Four percent articaine local anesthetic has been successfully used to attain local anesthesia for dental procedures. Mandibular block anesthesia may consume longer time to attain and have a higher failure of local anesthesia compared to infiltration. Mandibular facial infiltration has been reported to successfully attain effective local anesthesia for dental procedures. This study involved only several tooth sites and found that 1.8 cc of 4% articaine facial infiltration in the mandible may be effective when the facial mandibular cortex is <2.0–3.0 mm. A waiting time of 5–10 minutes may be required for effective anesthesia. An additional 1.8 cc of dose may be required to attain anesthesia if an initial 1.8 cc of dose fails. The need for additional anesthetic may be predicted by a measurement of the facial cortex using cone beam computerized tomography. A study of mandibular sites is needed to delineate the anatomical dimensions, density of cortical bone, and apical neural location for ensuring successful local anesthetic infiltration.

  16. Orthodontic spring guidance of bilateral mandibular distraction in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yen, S L; Shang, W; Shuler, C; Yamashita, D D

    2001-10-01

    Although distraction osteogenesis can lengthen congenitally small mandibles, the distraction procedure can be difficult to control. To study the efficacy and safety of orthodontic spring guidance on bilateral mandibular distraction, an 8-mm anterior open bite was experimentally produced and corrected during bilateral mandibular distraction in rabbits. Orthodontic springs were attached to the anterior maxilla and mandible to redirect an ongoing distraction procedure. Sixteen rabbits underwent mandibular distraction: 6 rabbits received heavy springs (8 oz), 6 rabbits received light force springs (2 oz), and 4 rabbits served as control animals with anterior open bites without spring guidance. Nickel-titanium springs were applied during the last week of osseous distraction and the first week of consolidation. Distractors were left in place throughout a 2-month consolidation period. None of the animals developed fibrous union as a result of spring guidance. The 8-mm open bite did not close in the control group or in the light spring group after 2 weeks of spring wear or during the consolidation period. Heavy springs completely closed the experimental open bites within 2 weeks (P <.01, analysis of variance). Bite corrections did not change during the consolidation period. This study indicated that the addition of an orthodontic spring to a mandibular distraction procedure did not impair bone healing. With the distraction device in place, heavy spring forces redirected an ongoing mandibular distraction procedure and corrected an open bite, distraction side effect. Direct measurements, radiographic measurements, and tissue histologic factors described changes in segment position and shape of the distraction site. PMID:11606970

  17. The value of oviposition timing, queen presence and kinship in a social insect

    PubMed Central

    Ozan, Martina; Helanterä, Heikki; Sundström, Liselotte

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive cooperation confers benefits, but simultaneously creates conflicts among cooperators. Queens in multi-queen colonies of ants share a nest and its resources, but reproductive competition among queens often results in unequal reproduction. Two mutually non-exclusive factors may produce such inequality in reproduction: worker intervention or queen traits. Workers may intervene by favouring some queens over others, owing to either kinship or queen signals. Queens may differ in their intrinsic fecundity at the onset of oviposition or in their timing of the onset of oviposition, leading to their unequal representation in the brood. Here, we test the role of queen kin value (relatedness) to workers, timing of the onset of oviposition and signals of presence by queens in determining the maternity of offspring. We show that queens of the ant Formica fusca gained a significantly higher proportion of sexuals in the brood when ovipositing early, and that the presence of a caged queen resulted in a significant increase in both her share of sexual brood and her overall reproductive share. Moreover, the lower the kin value of the queen, the more the workers invested in their own reproduction by producing males. Our results show that both kinship and breeding phenology influence the outcome of reproductive conflicts, and the balance of direct and indirect fitness benefits in the multi-queen colonies of F. fusca. PMID:23843391

  18. Fitness cost of pheromone production in signaling female moths.

    PubMed

    Harari, Ally R; Zahavi, Tirtza; Thiéry, Denis

    2011-06-01

    A secondary sexual character may act as an honest signal of the quality of the individual if the trait bears a cost and if its expression is phenotypically condition dependent. The cost of increasing the trait should be tolerable for individuals in good condition but not for those in a poor condition. The trait thus provides an honest signal of quality that enables the receiver to choose higher quality mates. Evidence for sex pheromones, which play a major role in shaping sexual evolution, inflicting a signaling cost is scarce. Here, we demonstrate that the amount of the major component of the pheromone in glands of Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera) females at signaling time was significantly greater in large than in small females, that male moths preferred larger females as mates when responding to volatile signals, and small virgin females, but not large ones, exposed to conspecific pheromone, produced, when mated, significantly fewer eggs than nonexposed females. The latter indicates a condition-dependent cost of signaling. These results are in accordance with the predictions of condition-dependent honest signals. We therefore suggest that female signaling for males using sex pheromones bears a cost and thus calling may serve as honest advertisement for female quality. PMID:21644949

  19. Efficient sex pheromone trapping: catching the sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G V P; Gadi, Nirupa; Taianao, Anthony J

    2012-07-01

    The sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Brentidae), is the most serious pest of sweetpotato around the world, damaging sweetpotatoes in the field and in storage, as well as being a quarantine pest. Because the larval period is spent within vines or tubers, and the adults are nocturnal, chemical control frequently is not effective. In addition, there are few natural enemies, and pheromone-based trapping does not appear to reduce the damage level. In the present study, we evaluated a number of parameters that affect pheromone-based trap catch, including trap design, trap size, trap color, and height at which the traps are placed. Pherocon unitraps caught higher numbers than ground, funnel water, or delta traps. Medium-sized traps (13?×?17.5 cm) were more effective than larger or smaller traps. In a color-choice test, C. formicarius preferred red over gray, brown, blue, white, yellow, black, or red traps; light red was more attractive than other shades of red. Maximum catches were obtained when the traps were set 50 cm above the crop canopy. Light-red unitraps with pheromone lures caught more adults than identical traps without lures, suggesting that C. formicarius is influenced by both visual and olfactory cues. Pheromone-baited light-red unitraps, 13?×?17.5 cm, installed 50 cm above the crop canopy, were the most effective at catching C. formicarius adults, and they appear to have the greatest potential for use in trap-and-kill strategies and eradication programs. PMID:22782300

  20. Taste and pheromone perception in mammals and flies

    PubMed Central

    Matsunami, Hiroaki; Amrein, Hubert

    2003-01-01

    The olfactory systems of insects and mammals have analogous anatomical features and use similar molecular logic for olfactory coding. The molecular underpinnings of the chemosensory systems that detect taste and pheromone cues have only recently been characterized. Comparison of these systems in Drosophila and mouse uncovers clear differences and a few surprising similarities. PMID:12844351

  1. Sex Pheromone Investigation of Anastrepha serpentina (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Attraction of virgin females to odor of calling males was demonstrated. This sex pheromone mediated attraction occurred during the latter half of a 13-h photophase but not during the first half of the day. Two major components of emissions of calling males, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine (DMP) and 2,5-dihyd...

  2. PHYSIOLOGICALAND CHEMICALECOLOGY Responses to Aggregation Pheromones for Five Carpophilns

    E-print Network

    synergized by volatiles from fermenting whole-wheat bread dough; pheromones alone attracted only 10-29% as many beetles as the combinations with dough, and dough alone attracted only 0-2 9%as many with dough H luteolus was attracted only to the dough. Adult beetles were present in the dates on the ground

  3. Pheromonic Representation of User Quests by Digital Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boros, Endre; Kantor, Paul B.; Neu, Dave J.

    1999-01-01

    In the "Ant World" project, items to be retrieved are "quests" represented by entire collections of judged documents. To save space and time, methods were developed for representing these complex entities in a short string of about 1,000 bytes, called a Digital Information Pheromone (DIP). Principles are presented for determining the DIP for a…

  4. Molecular Basis of Pheromone Detection in Insects Richard G. Vogt

    E-print Network

    Vogt, Richard G.

    Molecular Basis of Pheromone Detection in Insects Richard G. Vogt Department of Biological Sciences. INTRODUCTION 2. MOLECULAR BASIS OF INSECT CHEMODETECTION ­ GENERAL SCHEMES. 3. TRANSDUCTION EVENTS 3.1. Receptors 3.1.1 Among non-insect species, odor molecules are detected by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs

  5. Calcium Imaging of Pheromone Responses in the Insect Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Susy M.; Wang, Jing W.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium imaging is a powerful technique that permits the visual monitoring of neural responses to pheromones and other odors in large ensembles of neurons. Here, we describe a method that permits the monitoring of Drosophila antennal lobe responses to odors using the genetically encoded calcium monitor GCaMP. PMID:24014361

  6. PHEROMONES OF MILKWEED BUGS ( HETEROPTERA: LYGAEIDAE) ATTRACT WAYWARD PLANT BUGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The synthetically reconstructed aggregation pheromone of the large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas) (Lygaeinae), revealed thatalso attractsed males of the plant bug, Phytocoris difficilis Knight (Miridae)in mid-summer and early fall males of the mirid bug, Phytocoris difficilis Knight., w...

  7. Pheromones, male lures and trapping of tephritid fruit flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dipteran family of Tephritidae consists of many genera, of which several namely, Anastrepha, Bactrocera, Ceratitis, Dacus, Rhagoletis and Toxotrypana possess species of high economic importance as major pests of fruits and vegetables. Hitherto, pheromones isolated and identified for possible use...

  8. HOUSEHOLDANDSTRUCTURALINSECTS Field and Laboratory Evaluation of Female Sex Pheromone for

    E-print Network

    , Monitoring, and Management of Brownbanded Cockroaches (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae) DANCSHENC LIANC,I AIJUN sex pheromone of the female brownbanded cockroach, Supella longi- palpa (F.), was highly attractive more total cockroaches than the other 2 trap types. Two commercial baits that presumably contain

  9. REFINING THE PHEROMONE-BASED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR DOGWOOD BORER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dogwood borer (DWB), Synanthedon scitula Harris is an increasingly important pest of apple grown on size-controlling rootstocks in eastern North America. Many apple producers monitor populations of the key pests of apple using sex pheromone traps, and may base their management decisions on pher...

  10. SEX PHEROMONE FOR CRANBERRY BLOSSOM WORM, EPIGLAE APIATA.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cranberry blossom worm, Epiglaea apiata (Grote) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a major pest of cranberries, Vaccinium macrocarpon (Aitan), in New Jersey. The sex pheromone of this insect was identified to be a blend of (Z)-9-hexadecenyl acetate (Z9-16:Ac), (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetate (Z9-14:Ac), a...

  11. Development of a pheromone elution rate physical model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A first principle modeling approach is applied to available data describing the elution of semiochemicals from pheromone dispensers. These data include field data for 27 products developed by several manufacturers, including homemade devices, as well as laboratory data collected on three semiochemi...

  12. Trail pheromone disruption of red imported fire ant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is one of the most aggressive and invasive species in the world but toxic bait systems affect non-target ant species and can not be used in sensitive ecosystems. The fire ant uses recruitment pheromones to organize the retrieval of food resources back to the colony....

  13. Evaluation of Pheromone Traps for Monitoring Sweetpotato Weevils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten types of pheromone traps for monitoring sweetpotato weevils, Cylas formicarius (F.) were evaluated in sweetpotato fields at the US Vegetable Laboratory (USVL), Charleston, SC, during 2001 and 2002. A funnel trap, a modification of a water-pan trap, and the Pherocon sticky trap were the most eff...

  14. Sex Pheromone Components of Pink Gypsy Moth, Lymantria mathura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gries, Gerhard; Gries, Regine; Schaefer, Paul W.; Gotoh, Tadao; Higashiura, Yasutomo

    Pheromone extract of female pink gypsy moth, Lymantria mathura, was analyzed by coupled gas chromatographic-electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) and coupled GC-mass spectrometry (MS), employing fused silica columns coated with DB-5, DB-210, or DB-23 and a custom-made GC column that separated enantiomers of unsaturated epoxides. These analyses revealed (9R,10S)-cis-9,10-epoxy-Z3,Z6-nonadecadiene [termed here (+)-mathuralure] and (9S,10R)-cis-9,10-epoxy-Z3,Z6-nonadecadiene [termed here (-)-mathuralure] at a 1 : 4 ratio as major candidate pheromone components. In field experiments in northern Japan (Morioka, Iwate Prefecture and Bibai, Hokkaido Prefecture), (+)- and (-)-mathuralure at a ratio of 1 : 4, but not 1 : 1 or singly, were attractive to male L. mathura. This is the first demonstration that attraction of male moths required the very same ratio of pheromone enantiomers as produced by conspecific females. Whether L. mathura employ different blend ratios in different geographic areas, and the role of five additional candidate pheromone components identified in this study remains to be investigated.

  15. Identification of a pheromone that increases anxiety in rats

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Tamogami, Shigeyuki; Watanabe, Hidenori; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Chemical communication plays an important role in the social lives of various mammalian species. Some of these chemicals are called pheromones. Rats release a specific odor into the air when stressed. This stress-related odor increases the anxiety levels of other rats; therefore, it is possible that the anxiety-causing molecules are present in the stress-related odorants. Here, we have tried to identify the responsible molecules by using the acoustic startle reflex as a bioassay system to detect anxiogenic activity. After successive fractionation of the stress-related odor, we detected 4-methylpentanal and hexanal in the final fraction that still possessed anxiogenic properties. Using synthetic molecules, we found that minute amounts of the binary mixture, but not either molecule separately, increased anxiety in rats. Furthermore, we determined that the mixture increased a specific type of anxiety and evoked anxiety-related behavioral responses in an experimental model that was different from the acoustic startle reflex. Analyses of neural mechanisms proposed that the neural circuit related to anxiety was only activated when the two molecules were simultaneously perceived by two olfactory systems. We concluded that the mixture is a pheromone that increases anxiety in rats. To our knowledge, this is the first study identifying a rat pheromone. Our results could aid further research on rat pheromones, which would enhance our understanding of chemical communication in mammals. PMID:25512532

  16. Sex-specific mating pheromones in the nematode Panagrellus redivivus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite advances in medicine and crop genetics, nematodes remain significant human pathogens and agricultural pests. This warrants investigation of alternative strategies for pest control, such as interference with pheromone-mediated reproduction. Because only two nematode species have had their phe...

  17. Pheromone trap for the eastern tent caterpillar moth.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Kenneth F; McLaughlin, John; Stamper, Shelby; Rucker, Charlene; Webster, Francis X; Czokajlo, Darek; Kirsch, Philipp

    2007-10-01

    The discovery that the eastern tent caterpillar Malacosoma americanum (F.) causes mare reproductive loss syndrome (MRLS), and thus has the potential to continue to result in major economic losses to the equine industry of Kentucky, has resulted in an intensive effort to identify practical means to monitor and control this defoliator, including these experiments to optimize a sex pheromone trap for this pest. A pheromone-baited delta trap with a large opening, such as InterceptST Delta, was more effective than other tested traps. Orange delta traps caught more moths than other tested colors. ETC males are caught at all tested heights within the tree canopy. For monitoring flights, setting traps at 1.5 m would allow easy counting of moths. A 9:1 blend of (E,Z)-5,7-dodecadienal (ETC-Ald) and (E,Z)-5,7-dodecadienol (ETC-OH) was most effective in capturing males. Increasing loading doses of a 3:1 blend (Ald:OH) resulted in the capture of increasing numbers of moths, but a 9:1 blend was more effective than 3:1 blend even at a nine-fold lower loading rate. Pheromone-impregnated white septa caught more moths than gray septa at the same loading dose. The advantages and limitations of using pheromone traps for monitoring M. americanum are discussed. PMID:18284745

  18. Biomechanical Evaluation of a Mandibular Spanning Plate Technique Compared to Standard Plating Techniques to Treat Mandibular Symphyseal Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Matthew; Hayes, Jonathan; Jordan, J. Randall; Puckett, Aaron; Fort, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study is to compare the biomechanical behavior of the spanning reconstruction plate compared to standard plating techniques for mandibular symphyseal fractures. Materials and Methods. Twenty-five human mandible replicas were used. Five unaltered synthetic mandibles were used as controls. Four experimental groups of different reconstruction techniques with five in each group were tested. Each synthetic mandible was subjected to a splaying force applied to the mandibular angle by a mechanical testing unit until the construct failed. Peak load and stiffness were recorded. The peak load and stiffness were analyzed using ANOVA and the Tukey test at a confidence level of 95% (P < 0.05). Results. The two parallel plates' group showed statistically significant lower values for peak load and stiffness compared to all other groups. No statistically significant difference was found for peak load and stiffness between the control (C) group, lag screw (LS) group, and the spanning plate (SP1) group. Conclusions. The spanning reconstruction plate technique for fixation of mandibular symphyseal fractures showed similar mechanical behavior to the lag screw technique when subjected to splaying forces between the mandibular gonial angles and may be considered as an alternative technique when increased reconstructive strength is needed. PMID:26649332

  19. Comparative analysis between direct Conventional Mandibular nerve block and Vazirani-Akinosi closed mouth Mandibular nerve block technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sobhan; Tripathy, Ramanupam; Sabhlok, Samrat; Panda, Pankaj Kumar; Patnaik, Satyabrata

    2012-11-01

    Introduction: Over the years different techniques have been developed for achieving mandibular nerve anaesthesia. The main aim of our study was to carry out comparison and clinical efficacy of mandibular nerve anaesthesia by Direct Conventional technique with that of Vazirani-Akinosi mandibular nerve block technique.Materials and Methods: 50 adult patients requiring surgical extraction of premolars, mandibular first, second and third molars were selected randomly to receive Direct Conventional technique and Vazirani- Akinosi technique for nerve block alternatively.Results: No statistically significant differences were observed regarding complete lip anaesthesia at 5 minutes and 10 minutes, nerves anaesthetized with single injection, effectiveness of anaesthesia, supplementary injections and complications in both the techniques. However, onset of lip anaesthesia was found to be faster in Vazirani-Akinosi technique, patients experienced less pain during the Vazirani-Akinosi technique as compared to the Direct Conventional technique. Post injection complication complications were less in the VaziraniAkinosi Technique.Conclusions: Except for faster onset of lip anaesthesia, less pain during injection and fewer post injection complications in Vazirani-Akinosi technique all other parameters were of same efficacy as Direct Conventional technique. This has strong clinical applications as in cases with limited mouth opening, apprehensive patients Vazirani-Akinosi technique is the indicated technique of choice.

  20. Eddies off the Queen Charlotte Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The bright red, green, and turquoise patches to the west of British Columbia's Queen Charlotte Islands and Alaska's Alexander Archipelago highlight the presence of biological activity in the ocean. These colors indicate high concentrations of chlorophyll, the primary pigment found in phytoplankton. Notice that there are a number of eddies visible in the Pacific Ocean in this pseudo-color scene. The eddies are formed by strong outflow currents from rivers along North America's west coast that are rich in nutrients from the springtime snowmelt running off the mountains. This nutrient-rich water helps stimulate the phytoplankton blooms within the eddies. (For more details, read Tracking Eddies that Feed the Sea.) To the west of the eddies in the water, another type of eddy-this one in the atmosphere-forms the clouds into the counterclockwise spiral characteristic of a low pressure system in the Northern Hemisphere. (Click on the image above to see it at full resolution; or click to see the scene in true-color.) The snow-covered mountains of British Columbia are visible in the upper righthand corner of the image. This scene was constructed using SeaWiFS data collected on June 13, 2002. SeaWiFS image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  1. Sex Pheromones and Reproductive Isolation in Five Mirid Species

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chang Yeol; Kim, Se-Jin; Kim, Junheon; Kang, Taek-Jun; Ahn, Seung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Mate location in many mirid bugs (Heteroptera: Miridae) is mediated by female-released sex pheromones. To elucidate the potential role of the pheromones in prezygotic reproductive isolation between sympatric species, we investigated differences in the pheromone systems of five mirid species, Apolygus lucorum, Apolygus spinolae, Orthops campestris, Stenotus rubrovittatus and Taylorilygus apicalis. GC/MS analyses of metathoracic scent gland extracts of virgin females showed that all five species produced mixtures of hexyl butyrate, (E)-2-hexenyl butyrate and (E)-4-oxo-2-hexenal, but in quite different ratios. (E)-2-hexenyl butyrate was the major component of A. spinolae, while hexyl butyrate was the most abundant component in the pheromone blends of the other four species. In addition to the three compounds, a fourth component, (E)-2-octenyl butyrate, was present in the gland extracts of A. lucorum and T. apicalis females. Field tests suggest that the ternary blends of hexyl butyrate, (E)-2-hexenyl butyrate and (E)-4-oxo-2-hexenal as found in the extracts of the females of each species do not inhibit attraction of conspecific males but ensure species-specificity of attraction between A. lucorum, O. campestris and T. apicalis. Furthermore, (E)-2-octenyl butyrate was essential for attraction of A. lucorum and T. apicalis males, but strongly inhibited attraction of male A. spinolae, O. campestris and S. rubrovittatus. The combined results from this study and previous studies suggest that the minor component and pheromone dose in addition to the relative ratio of the major components play an important role in reproductive isolation between mirid species. PMID:25973902

  2. Anatomical localization and stereoisomeric composition of Tribolium castaneum aggregation pheromones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yujie; Beeman, Richard W.; Campbell, James F.; Park, Yoonseong; Aikins, Michael J.; Mori, Kenji; Akasaka, Kazuaki; Tamogami, Shigeyuki; Phillips, Thomas W.

    2011-09-01

    We report that the abdominal epidermis and associated tissues are the predominant sources of male-produced pheromones in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum and, for the first time, describe the stereoisomeric composition of the natural blend of isomers of the aggregation pheromone 4,8-dimethyldecanal (DMD) in this important pest species. Quantitative analyses via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry showed that the average amount of DMD released daily by single feeding males of T. castaneum was 878 ± 72 ng (SE). Analysis of different body parts identified the abdominal epidermis as the major source of aggregation pheromone; the thorax was a minor source, while no DMD was detectable in the head. No internal organs or obvious male-specific glands were associated with pheromone deposition. Complete separation of all four stereoisomers of DMD was achieved following oxidation to the corresponding acid, derivatization with (1 R, 2 R)- and (1 S, 2 S)-2-(anthracene-2,3-dicarboximido)cyclohexanol to diastereomeric esters, and their separation on reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography at -54°C. Analysis of the hexane eluate from Porapak-Q-collected volatiles from feeding males revealed the presence of all four isomers (4 R,8 R)/(4 R,8 S)/(4 S,8 R)/(4 S,8 S) at a ratio of approximately 4:4:1:1. A walking orientation bioassay in a wind tunnel with various blends of the four synthetic isomers further indicated that the attractive potency of the reconstituted natural blend of 4:4:1:1 was equivalent to that of the natural pheromone and greater than that of the 1:1 blend of (4 R,8 R)/(4 R,8 S) used in commercial lures.

  3. Evidence for two-step regulation of pheromone biosynthesis by the pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide in the moth Heliothis virescens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The control of pheromone biosynthesis by the neuropeptide PBAN was investigated in the moth Heliothis virescens. When decapitated females were injected with [2-14C] acetate, females co-injected with PBAN produced significantly greater quantities of radiolabeled fatty acids in their pheromone gland t...

  4. Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Information Technology ~ Training & Technology Solutions

    E-print Network

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Information Technology ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 Faculty Center Verification & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Information Technology ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718

  5. THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE THIS ACCOMMODATION LICENCE AGREEMENT together with the College's Information Booklet and College

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE OXFORD THIS ACCOMMODATION LICENCE AGREEMENT together with the College's Information Booklet and College Regulations create legally binding obligations between the College Name Address College The Queen's College, Oxford, OX1 4AW Accommodation A single College room

  6. Queens College Dashboard 2013-2014 Numbers in bracket show prior year data

    E-print Network

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    Queens College Dashboard 2013-2014 Numbers in bracket show prior year data Retention & Graduation 1.82) 0.82 (3,063) 3,207 Higher: Lower: None: #12;Queens College Dashboard 2013-2014 Numbers in bracket

  7. Queen Elizabeth Scholarship for Graduate Student Fieldwork & Internships Application Guidelines UBC Faculty of Forestry (Summer 2015)

    E-print Network

    British Columbia, University of

    for Graduate Student Fieldwork & Internships Application Guidelines UBC Faculty of Forestry (Summer 20151 Queen Elizabeth Scholarship for Graduate Student Fieldwork & Internships Application Guidelines UBC Faculty of Forestry (Summer 2015) Queen Elizabeth Visiting Scholarship for students from India

  8. Aggregation pheromone ofCarpophilus dimidiatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) and responses toCarpophilus pheromones in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Bartelt, R J; Weaver, D K; Arbogast, R T

    1995-11-01

    The major component of the male-produced aggregation pheromone ofCarpophilus dimidiatus (F.) is (3E, 5E, 7E, 9E)-6,8-diethyl-4-methyl-3,5,7,9-dodecatetraene. It attracts beetles of both sexes in the field and is synergized by odors from fermenting bread dough; mean trap catches for the tetraene alone, tetraene plus dough, dough alone, and control were 24.5, 48.3, 0.02, and 0.00, respectively. In the laboratory, individual males produced 0.58 µg±0.35 µg (SD) of the tetraene per day, but males in groups of 10-50 produced <2% as much per beetle. A second male-specific compound, (3E, 5E, 7E, 9E)-5,7-diethyl-9-methyl-3,5,7,9-tridecatetraene, was also identified fromC. dimidiatus and is about 5% as abundant as the major pheromone component.Carpophilus flight activity was monitored for one year in South Carolina corn fields with the pheromones forC. dimidiatus, C. freemani Dobson,C. mutilatus Erichson,C. hemipterus (L.),C. lugubris Murray, andC. obsoletus Erichson, all in combination with bread dough. The first four of these species accounted for 18, 70, 5.7, and 0.03%, respectively, of the totalCarpophilus trapped, but noC. lugubris orC. obsoletus were captured. Captures ofC. freemani were as high as 11,400/trap/week. Species specificity for the first four pheromones was high, except that a synthetic impurity in theC. dimidiatus pheromone was somewhat attractive toC. freemani andC. mutilatus. Three other species captured.C. antiques Melsheimer,C. marginellus Motschulsky, andC. humeralis (F.), accounted for 0.005, 5.0, and 1.3% of the total catch, respectively.C. antiquus was attracted primarily to the pheromone ofC. dimidiatus, butC. marginellus andC. humeralis responded to most of the test pheromones. There were two major periods ofCarpophilus flight activity: February through June and September through November. PMID:24233828

  9. Antennally mediated negative feedback regulation of pheromone production in the pine engraver beetle, Ips pini.

    PubMed

    Ginzel, Matthew D; Bearfield, Jeremy C; Keeling, Christopher I; McCormack, Colin C; Blomquist, Gary J; Tittiger, Claus

    2007-01-01

    Bark beetles use monoterpenoid aggregation pheromones to coordinate host colonization and mating. These chemical signals are produced de novo in midgut cells via the mevalonate pathway, and pheromone production may be regulated by a negative feedback system mediated through the antennae. In this study, we explored the effect of antennectomy on pheromone production and transcript levels of key mevalonate pathway genes in juvenile hormone III-treated male pine engraver beetles, Ips pini (Say). Antennectomized males produced significantly greater amounts of pheromone than podectomized males and those with intact antennae. Likewise, mRNA levels of three mevalonate pathway genes important in pheromone biosynthesis were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and found to be induced to a greater extent with antennectomy, suggesting a transcriptional regulation of pheromone production. PMID:17093975

  10. Antennally mediated negative feedback regulation of pheromone production in the pine engraver beetle, Ips pini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzel, Matthew D.; Bearfield, Jeremy C.; Keeling, Christopher I.; McCormack, Colin C.; Blomquist, Gary J.; Tittiger, Claus

    2007-01-01

    Bark beetles use monoterpenoid aggregation pheromones to coordinate host colonization and mating. These chemical signals are produced de novo in midgut cells via the mevalonate pathway, and pheromone production may be regulated by a negative feedback system mediated through the antennae. In this study, we explored the effect of antennectomy on pheromone production and transcript levels of key mevalonate pathway genes in juvenile hormone III-treated male pine engraver beetles, Ips pini (Say). Antennectomized males produced significantly greater amounts of pheromone than podectomized males and those with intact antennae. Likewise, mRNA levels of three mevalonate pathway genes important in pheromone biosynthesis were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and found to be induced to a greater extent with antennectomy, suggesting a transcriptional regulation of pheromone production.

  11. Visible and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Detects Honey Bee Queen Insemination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The abdomens of honey bee queens, the heads of worker bees, and the ventriculi of worker bees were analyzed by visible and near-infrared spectroscopy. Mated honey bee queens could be distinguished from virgin queens by their spectra with 100% accuracy. Also, the heads of worker bees taken from the ...

  12. Brittle Faults of the Queens Tunnel Complex, NYC Water Tunnel #3 Charles Merguerian

    E-print Network

    Merguerian, Charles

    Between 1996 and 1999, a high-performance tunnel-boring machine (TBM) excavated a 7 m wide, 7.7 km longBrittle Faults of the Queens Tunnel Complex, NYC Water Tunnel #3 Charles Merguerian Geology and associated rocks of the Queens Tunnel Complex. Faults in the Queens Tunnel vary from early ductile faults

  13. Visible and near-infrared spectroscopy detects queen honey bee insemination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The abdomens of honey bee queens, the heads of worker bees, and the ventriculi of worker bees were analyzed by visible and near-infrared spectroscopy. Mated honey bee queens could be distinguished from virgin queens by their spectra with 100% accuracy. Also, the heads of worker bees taken from the...

  14. The effects of pesticides on queen rearing and virus titers in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of sublethal pesticide exposure on queen emergence and virus titers were examined. Queen rearing colonies were fed pollen with chlorpyrifos (CPF) alone (pollen-1) and with CPF and the fungicide Pristine® (pollen-2). Fewer queens emerged when larvae from open foraging (i.e., outside) colo...

  15. Selection against aerial dispersal in ants: two non-flying queen phenotypes in Pogonomyrmex laticeps.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Christian; Keller, Roberto A; Johnson, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    The South American seed-harvester ant Pogonomyrmex laticeps has dimorphic queens: ergatoid (permanently wingless) and brachypterous (short, non-functional wings). Surveys in western Argentina indicated that colonies near Chilecito, La Rioja Province, produced only ergatoid queens, while those near Punta Balasto, Catamarca Province (263 km away), produced only brachypterous queens. Brachypterous queens were significantly larger than ergatoid queens for 10 of 11 external characters, but both phenotypes had comparable reproductive potential, i.e., a spermatheca and a similar number of ovarioles. Using normal winged queens of the closely related P. uruguayensis for comparison, we determined that both queen phenotypes in P. laticeps had a full set of dorsal thoracic sclerites, albeit each sclerite was much reduced, whereas workers had a thorax without distinct dorsal sclerites. Sclerites were fused and immobile in ergatoid queens, while they were separable and fully articulated in brachypterous queens. Both phenotypes lacked the big indirect flight muscles, but brachypterous queens retained the tiny direct flight muscles. Overall, this dimorphism across populations indicates that there are alternative solutions to selective pressures against flying queens. We lack field data about colony founding strategy (independent or dependent) for either queen phenotype, but colonies at both sites produced numerous gynes, and we infer that all foundresses initiate colonies independently and are obligate foragers. PMID:23110094

  16. The role of tyramine and octopamine in the regulation of reproduction in queenless worker honeybees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, Mor; Malka, Osnat; Meer, Robert K. Vander; Hefetz, Abraham

    2012-02-01

    In honeybees, workers under queenless condition compete for reproduction and establish reproductive dominance hierarchy. Ovary activation is generally accompanied by the expression of queen-like pheromones. Biogenic amines (BAs), in particular dopamine, are believed to be involved in this process by regulating ovarian development. However, the role of BAs in establishing reproductive dominance or their effect on queen-like pheromone production was not investigated. Here, we explored the effect of octopamine (OA) and tyramine (TA) oral treatments on the propensity of treated bees to become reproductively dominant and produce queen-like pheromones in Dufour's and mandibular glands. One bee in a pair was treated with either OA or TA while the other was fed sugar solution. TA was found to enhance ovary development and the production of esters in the Dufour's gland and 9HDA (queen component) in the mandibular glands, thus facilitating worker reproductive dominance. OA, on the other hand, did not enhance ovarian development or ester production, but increased the production of 10HDA (worker major component) in the mandibular glands of their sugar-paired mates. OA is known to induce foraging behavior by workers, while increased production of 10HDA characterizes nursing workers. Therefore, we suggest that TA induces reproductive division of labor, while OA treatment results in caste differentiation of workers to foragers and nurses.

  17. Field trials of aggregation pheromones for the stink bugs Chlorochroa uhleri and Chlorochroa sayi (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae).

    PubMed

    Millar, Jocelyn G; McBrien, Heather M; McElfresh, J Steven

    2010-10-01

    In field trials, adult Chlorochroa uhleri (Stål) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) of both sexes were caught in significant numbers in cylindrical screen traps baited with gray rubber septum lures loaded with the main component of the male-produced pheromone, methyl (E)-6-2,3-dihydrofarnesoate. Addition of the two possible minor components of the pheromone, methyl (E)-5-2,6,10-trimethyl-5,9-undecadienoate and methyl (2E,6E)-farnesoate, did not affect attraction. Combining the pheromone with different concentrations of volatiles mimicking the odors of a known host plant, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), had no significant effect on attraction of adult bugs, whereas combining the pheromone with the pheromones of two sympatric stink bug species, Chlorochroa sayi (Stål) and Euschistus conspersus Uhler, decreased trap captures, suggesting interference between the pheromones. Small numbers of Chlorochroa ligata (Say) adults also were attracted, but numbers caught were too low to allow statistical comparisons between lure blends. In field trials with C. sayi, all three of the male-specific pheromone compounds [methyl geranate, methyl citronellate, and methyl (E) -6-2,3-dihydrofarnesoate] were required for optimal attraction. As with C. uhleri, adults of both sexes were attracted to pheromone lures in approximately equal numbers. Because of the decreased volatility (=release rate) of methyl (E)-6-2,3-dihydrofarnesoate in comparison with the other two, lower molecular weight pheromone components, lures needed to be loaded with a disproportionately high amount of methyl (E)-6-2,3-dihydrofarnesoate to obtain the best trap catch. There was no indication that the pheromone components of C. uhleri or E. conspersus interfered with the attractiveness of the C. sayi pheromone in lures containing a blend of all three pheromones. PMID:21061959

  18. Female Sex Pheromone in the Skin and Circulation of a Garter Snake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garstka, William R.; Crews, David

    1981-11-01

    Serums and extracts of tissues from the female garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis) each act as a pheromone and elicit male courtship behavior when applied to the back of another male. Since pheromonal activity is present in yolk and liver tissue of untreated females and can be induced with estrogen treatment in the serums and livers of males, the pheromone may be associated with the circulating yolk lipoprotein, vitellogenin.

  19. Red Queen Dynamics with Non-Standard Fitness Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Engelstädter, Jan; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    Antagonistic coevolution between hosts and parasites can involve rapid fluctuations of genotype frequencies that are known as Red Queen dynamics. Under such dynamics, recombination in the hosts may be advantageous because genetic shuffling can quickly produce disproportionately fit offspring (the Red Queen hypothesis). Previous models investigating these dynamics have assumed rather simple models of genetic interactions between hosts and parasites. Here, we assess the robustness of earlier theoretical predictions about the Red Queen with respect to the underlying host-parasite interactions. To this end, we created large numbers of random interaction matrices, analysed the resulting dynamics through simulation, and ascertained whether recombination was favoured or disfavoured. We observed Red Queen dynamics in many of our simulations provided the interaction matrices exhibited sufficient ‘antagonicity’. In agreement with previous studies, strong selection on either hosts or parasites favours selection for increased recombination. However, fast changes in the sign of linkage disequilibrium or epistasis were only infrequently observed and do not appear to be a necessary condition for the Red Queen hypothesis to work. Indeed, recombination was often favoured even though the linkage disequilibrium remained of constant sign throughout the simulations. We conclude that Red Queen-type dynamics involving persistent fluctuations in host and parasite genotype frequencies appear to not be an artefact of specific assumptions about host-parasite fitness interactions, but emerge readily with the general interactions studied here. Our results also indicate that although recombination is often favoured, some of the factors previously thought to be important in this process such as linkage disequilibrium fluctuations need to be reassessed when fitness interactions between hosts and parasites are complex. PMID:19680432

  20. Patients' Priorities and Attitudes Towards Their Temporo-Mandibular Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Martin; Ray-Chaudhuri, Arijit; Khawaja, Noman

    2015-08-01

    The diagnosis and appropriate management of temporo-mandibular disorders (TMDs) remains controversial. Current scientific evidence highlights the importance of psychosocial factors in sufferers and the reducing emphasis on occlusal or dental/prosthetic factors. This paper describes the findings of a survey of 211 patients reporting pain from their temporo-mandibular joint area and associated structures. This article offers busy primary dental care practitioners a cost effective questionnaire for obtaining relevant information from patients about the history of their condition and highlights what patients hope to achieve through the management of their disorder. It also emphasises the importance of communicating effectively with patients and offers practical tips for the management of TMDs in primary care. PMID:26556513

  1. Free greater omental flap for treatment of mandibular osteoradionecrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, W.J.; Panje, W.R.

    1987-04-01

    Osteoradionecrosis can involve the mandible following radical irradiation for treatment of oral cavity cancer. The radionecrosis of the mandible is often associated with severe intractable pain, local or extensive deformity, including pathologic fracture, orocutaneous fistula formation, and frequent loss of function. Treatment has ranged from analgesia and antibiotics to hyperbaric oxygen treatments to local or extensive sequestrectomies with partial or total mandibulectomy and restoration of tissue losses with unirradiated tissue. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the successful use of a free greater omental flap for immediate treatment of mandibular osteoradionecrosis and concomitant reconstruction. We found the omentum to be an excellent vascular bed that rapidly resolved the osteoradionecrosis and pain, promoted healing, and restored mandibular function with minimal discomfort to the patient.

  2. Management of bulbous exophytic malformations of permanent mandibular incisors.

    PubMed

    Kotsanos, Nikolaos; Velonis, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the diagnosis and management of a rare case of bulbous exophytic malformation of three permanent mandibular incisors. An 8-year-old Caucasian girl presented with concerns on the appearance of these teeth. Medical history was noncontributory, and there was no recall of relevant past trauma. Upon clinical examination, 3 permanent mandibular incisors exhibited hard bulbous protuberances in the crown's middle and cervical areas. Radiographic examination assisted by dental computed tomography revealed that these were continuous with the tooth structure, contained no pulpal tissue, and the teeth displayed normal root development. They were excised and the teeth were restored with a thin composite facing. They remained asymptomatic with acceptable esthetics for 4 years. Scanning electron microscopy and histology of the biopsied hard tissue revealed a nonhomogeneous structure resembling anomalously intertwined enamel with predentin and dentin. The etiology of this disturbance of dental development remains unknown. PMID:23265170

  3. A rare case of dens invaginatus in a mandibular canine.

    PubMed

    George, Roy; Moule, Alexander J; Walsh, Laurence J

    2010-08-01

    Dens invaginatus (dens in dente) is a common dental anomaly with a reported prevalence of between 0.04% and 10%. It typically affects permanent maxillary lateral incisors, central incisors and premolars. These developmental lesions are less common in mandibular teeth and are extremely rare in canines and molars. This report describes a rare case of dens invaginatus (Oehlers type II) in a permanent mandibular canine. The tooth was mature with a closed apex and showed apical pathosis. The tooth was treated endodontically using a non-surgical technique with hand endodontic files, and then followed up after a period of 8 months. A follow-up radiograph showed some healing of the lesion. PMID:20666755

  4. Transalveolar repositioning of an impacted immature permanent mandibular canine.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir-Ozenen, Didem; Guler, Nurhan; Sungurtekin-Ekci, Elif; Sandalli, Nuket

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to discuss the four-year follow-up of a transalveolar transplantation of an impacted immature permanent mandibular left canine. A nine year-old-boy was referred to the dental school because of a mandibular swelling associated with the impacted canine. Under local anesthesia, the tooth was extracted and transplanted in its own space, followed by a two-week orthodontic fixation. The radiographic examination two months later revealed the presence of external inflammatory root resorption, which was treated with an apexification. The overall status of the transplanted tooth and the surrounding hard and soft tissues four years post-treatment indicates a successful outcome. PMID:25514261

  5. Modeling the suppression of sea lamprey populations by use of the male sex pheromone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klassen, Waldemar; Adams, Jean V.; Twohey, Michael B.

    2005-01-01

    The suppression of sea lamprey populations, Petromyzon marinus (Linnaeus), was modeled using four different applications of the male sex pheromone: (1) pheromone-baited traps that remove females from the spawning population, (2) pheromone-baited decoys that exhaust females before they are able to spawn, (3) pheromone-enhanced sterile males that increase the proportion of non-fertile matings, and (4) camouflaging of the pheromone emitted by calling males to make it difficult for females to find a mate. The models indicated that thousands of traps or hundreds of thousands of decoys would be required to suppress a population of 100,000 animals. The potential efficacy of pheromone camouflages is largely unknown, and additional research is required to estimate how much pheromone is needed to camouflage the pheromone plumes of calling males. Pheromone-enhanced sterile males appear to be a promising application in the Great Lakes. Using this technique for three generations each of ca. 7 years duration could reduce sea lamprey populations by 90% for Lakes Huron and Ontario and by 98% for Lake Michigan, based on current trapping operations that capture 20 to 30% of the population each year.

  6. Sexy DEG/ENaC channels involved in gustatory detection of fruit fly pheromones.

    PubMed

    Pikielny, Claudio W

    2012-01-01

    Hydrocarbon pheromones on the cuticle of Drosophila melanogaster modulate the complex courtship behavior of males. Recently, three members of the degenerin/epithelial Na+ channel (DEG/ENaC) family of sodium channel subunits, Ppk25, Ppk23, and Ppk29 (also known as Nope), have been shown to function in gustatory perception of courtship-modulating contact pheromones. All three proteins are required for the activation of male courtship by female pheromones. Specific interactions between two of them have been demonstrated in cultured cells, suggesting that, in a subset of cells where they are coexpressed, these three subunits function within a common heterotrimeric DEG/ENaC channel. Such a DEG/ENaC channel may be gated by pheromones, either directly or indirectly, or alternatively may control the excitability of pheromone-sensing cells. In addition, these studies identify taste neurons that respond specifically to courtship-modulating pheromones and mediate their effects on male behavior. Two types of pheromone-sensing taste neurons, F and M cells, have been defined on the basis of their specific response to either female or male pheromones. These reports set the stage for the dissection of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that mediate gustatory detection of contact pheromones. PMID:23131844

  7. Gingival enlargement associated with a partially erupted mandibular molar.

    PubMed

    Flaitz, C M

    2001-01-01

    Odontogenic lesions may present as enlarged opercula and result in the delayed eruption of teeth. This case report describes the clinical and microscopic features of a peripheral odontogenic fibroma in a 13-year-old boy that involved the overlying gingiva of a partially erupted, mandibular second molar. A differential diagnosis and treatment for lesions presenting as gingival enlargements in the molar region are discussed. PMID:11699171

  8. Masticatory efficiency after rehabilitation of acquired maxillary and mandibular defects

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, N. Vasantha; Ramesh, Ganesh; Thareja, Amit; Patil, Seema

    2015-01-01

    The effect of oral cancer with its therapeutic intervention involves significant facial and functional disabilities. It is customary to rehabilitate these patients by surgical or prosthetic means. Studies have been done to assess mastication and other functions after rehabilitation. A review of these studies for assessing masticatory function has been done under separate sections for maxillary and mandibular defects. Different masticatory tests are mentioned. Further scope for research has been highlighted. PMID:26392731

  9. Docile sitters and active fighters in paper wasps: a tale of two queens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardile, Sujata; Gadagkar, Raghavendra

    2002-02-01

    Ropalidia marginata and Ropalidia cyathiformis are sympatric, primitively eusocial paper wasps widely distributed in peninsular India. We compare the two species, especially their queens, in an attempt to begin to understand the role of the power of queens over their workers, in social organisation and evolution. Queens of R. marginata have lower levels of activity, rates of interactions and dominance behaviour, compared with queens of R. cyathiformis. For the same variables, R. marginata queens are either indistinguishable from or have lower values than their workers, while R. cyathiformis queens have higher values than their workers. R. marginata queens never occupy the top rank while R. cyathiformis queens are always at the top of the behavioural dominance hierarchies of their colonies. R. marginata queens thus do not appear to use dominance behaviour to suppress reproduction by their workers, while R. cyathiformis queens appear to do so. These different mechanisms used by the two queens to regulate worker reproduction give them different powers over their workers, because R. marginata queens are completely successful in suppressing reproduction by their nestmates while in R. cyathiformis colonies, other individuals also sometimes lay eggs. There is also some evidence that the different powers of the queens result in different mechanisms of regulation of worker foraging in the two species - decentralised, self-regulation in R. marginata and relatively more centralised regulation by the queen in R. cyathiformis. Thus we show here, perhaps for the first time, that the power of the queens over their workers can have important consequences for social organisation and evolution.

  10. The ADAMTS1 Gene Is Associated with Familial Mandibular Prognathism.

    PubMed

    Guan, X; Song, Y; Ott, J; Zhang, Y; Li, C; Xin, T; Li, Z; Gan, Y; Li, J; Zhou, S; Zhou, Y

    2015-09-01

    Mandibular prognathism is a facial skeletal malocclusion. Until now, the genetic mechanism has been unclear. The goal of this study was to identify candidate genes or genomic regions directly associated with mandibular prognathism development, by employing whole genome sequencing. A large Chinese family was recruited, composed of 9 affected and 12 unaffected individuals, and the inheritance pattern of this family tends to be autosomal dominant. A single-nucleotide missense mutation in the ADAMTS1 gene (c. 742I>T) was found to segregate in the family, given that the affected individuals must be heterozygous for the mutation. For mutation validation, we screened this candidate mutation and 15 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the coding sequence of ADAMTS1 among 230 unrelated cases and 196 unrelated controls using Sequenom Massarray and found that 3 in 230 cases carried this mutation and none of the controls did. Final results suggested that 2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rs2738, rs229038) of ADAMTS1 were significantly associated with mandibular prognathism. PMID:26124221

  11. Individualized treatment for the mandibular segmental defect: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Pan, Juli; Huang, Xin; Chen, Su

    2015-04-01

    Ameloblastomas are slowly growing, locally invasive tumors with high recurrence rate and more common in the mandible, if not treated they can grow to enormous size. Radical resection is the only predictable form of treatment for ameloblastomas. However, mandibular resection can lead to dysfunctions in appearance, speech, mastication, and deglutition, which severely impair the patients' quality of life. The reconstruction of extensive bone defects in the maxillofacial area is still challenging. To meet the demands of functional reconstruction, minimizing the negative influence of mandibular malformation, and disability on patients, the individualized systematic treatment plans highlight denture prosthodontics and require much consideration of multidisciplinary cooperation, with such related fields as maxillofacial surgery, oral implantology, prosthodontics, and radiology taken into account. In this report, we will present a case of reconstructing the mandibular segmental defect after the resection of a rarely giant ameloblastoma. In the case, we took the restoration of the missing teeth and the rehabilitation of the masticatory function as well as restoring bony continuities and facial appearance into consideration, communicated well with prosthodontists and implantologists before surgery, making the individualized systematic treatment plan more effective and efficient. PMID:25972644

  12. Interforaminal hemorrhage during anterior mandibular implant placement: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Kusum, Chandan Kumar; Mody, Pranav V.; Indrajeet; Nooji, Deviprasad; Rao, Suhas K.; Wankhade, Bhushan Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Implant surgery in mandibular anterior region may turn from an easy minor surgery into a complicated one for the surgeon, due to inadequate knowledge of the anatomy of the surgical area and/or ignorance toward the required surgical protocol. Hence, the purpose of this article is to present an overview on the: (a) Incidence of massive bleeding and its consequences after implant placement in mandibular anterior region. (b) Its etiology, the precautionary measures to be taken to avoid such an incidence in clinical practice and management of such a hemorrhage if at all happens. An inclusion criterion for selection of article was defined, and an electronic Medline search through different database using different keywords and manual search in journals and books was executed. Relevant articles were selected based upon inclusion criteria to form the valid protocols for implant surgery in the anterior mandible. Further, from the selected articles, 21 articles describing case reports were summarized separately in a table to alert the dental surgeons about the morbidity they could come across while operating in this region. If all the required adequate measures for diagnosis and treatment planning are taken and appropriate surgical protocol is followed, mandibular anterior region is no doubt a preferable area for implant placement. PMID:26288617

  13. Predicting Agenesis of the Mandibular Second Premolar from Adjacent Teeth

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis of agenesis of the mandibular second premolar (P2) enhances management of the dental arch in the growing child. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship in the development of the mandibular first molar (M1) and first premolar (P1) at early stages of P2 (second premolar). Specifically, we ask if the likelihood of P2 agenesis can be predicted from adjacent developing teeth. We selected archived dental panoramic radiographs with P2 at crown formation stages (N = 212) and calculated the likelihood of P2 at initial mineralisation stage ‘Ci’ given the tooth stage of adjacent teeth. Our results show that the probability of observing mandibular P2 at initial mineralisation stage ‘Ci’ decreased as both the adjacent P1 and M1 matured. The modal stage at P2 ‘Ci’ was P1 ‘Coc’ (cusp outline complete) and M1 ‘Crc’ (crown complete). Initial mineralisation of P2 was observed up to P1 ‘Crc’ and M1 stage ‘R½’ (root half). The chance of observing P2 at least ‘Coc’ (coalescence of cusps) was considerably greater prior to these threshold stages compared to later stages of P1 and M1. These findings suggest that P2 is highly unlikely to develop if P1 is beyond ‘Crc’ and M1 is beyond ‘R½’. PMID:26673218

  14. Interforaminal hemorrhage during anterior mandibular implant placement: An overview.

    PubMed

    Kusum, Chandan Kumar; Mody, Pranav V; Indrajeet; Nooji, Deviprasad; Rao, Suhas K; Wankhade, Bhushan Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Implant surgery in mandibular anterior region may turn from an easy minor surgery into a complicated one for the surgeon, due to inadequate knowledge of the anatomy of the surgical area and/or ignorance toward the required surgical protocol. Hence, the purpose of this article is to present an overview on the: (a) Incidence of massive bleeding and its consequences after implant placement in mandibular anterior region. (b) Its etiology, the precautionary measures to be taken to avoid such an incidence in clinical practice and management of such a hemorrhage if at all happens. An inclusion criterion for selection of article was defined, and an electronic Medline search through different database using different keywords and manual search in journals and books was executed. Relevant articles were selected based upon inclusion criteria to form the valid protocols for implant surgery in the anterior mandible. Further, from the selected articles, 21 articles describing case reports were summarized separately in a table to alert the dental surgeons about the morbidity they could come across while operating in this region. If all the required adequate measures for diagnosis and treatment planning are taken and appropriate surgical protocol is followed, mandibular anterior region is no doubt a preferable area for implant placement. PMID:26288617

  15. Maxillary palatal ramp prosthesis: A prosthodontic solution to manage mandibular deviation following surgery

    PubMed Central

    (Bhattacharya), Sampa Ray; Majumdar, Dibyendu; Singh, Dilip K.; Islam, M. D. Rabiul; Ray, Pradip K.; Saha, Nilanjana

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular resection following surgical treatment for neoplastic lesions of the oral cavity leads to numerous complications including altered mandibular movements, disfigurement, difficult in swallowing, impaired speech and articulation, and deviation of the mandible towards the resected site. Various prosthetic methods are employed to reduce or minimize mandibular deviation and improve and restore the lost functions and esthetic, like maxillomandibular fixation, implant supported prosthesis, removable mandibular guide flange prosthesis, and palatal based guidance restoration. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of a patient following segmental mandibulectomy using palatal ramp prosthesis. PMID:25821361

  16. Surgical management of mandibular malposition after malunited condylar fractures in adults.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, W J; Vanderborght, G; Dumbach, J

    1997-04-01

    Fourteen patients who had occlusal disturbance and mandibular malposition following malunited condylar fractures are presented, to demonstrate the variety of surgical corrective procedures used. In order to achieve an anatomically correct mandibular position, a subcondylar osteotomy was performed in 2 patients, and in 11 patients a uni- or bilateral sagittal split osteotomy was carried out. In 1 patient, a Le Fort I osteotomy was the method of choice. In all patients, it was possible to correct the occlusal and mandibular imbalance, as well as to facilitate normal mandibular movement. PMID:9174891

  17. Do flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges improve retention of mandibular complete dentures?

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed Elmorsy, Ayman Elmorsy; Ahmed Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa; Ela, Alaa Aboul; Fahmy, Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the retention of conventional mandibular complete dentures with that of mandibular complete dentures having lingual flanges constructed with flexible acrylic resin “Versacryl.” Materials and Methods: The study sample comprised 10 completely edentulous patients. Each patient received one maxillary complete denture and two mandibular complete dentures. One mandibular denture was made of conventional heat-cured acrylic resin and the other had its lingual flanges made of flexible acrylic resin Versacryl. Digital force-meter was used to measure retention of mandibular dentures at delivery and at 2 weeks and 45 days following denture insertion. Results: The statistical analysis showed that at baseline and follow-up appointments, retention of mandibular complete dentures with flexible lingual flanges was significantly greater than retention of conventional mandibular dentures (P < 0.05). In both types of mandibular dentures, retention of dentures increased significantly over the follow-up period (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The use of flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges in the construction of mandibular complete dentures improved denture retention. PMID:26539387

  18. Regenerative Approach to Bilateral Rostral Mandibular Reconstruction in a Case Series of Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Arzi, Boaz; Cissell, Derek D.; Pollard, Rachel E.; Verstraete, Frank J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive rostral mandibulectomy in dogs typically results in instability of the mandibles that may lead to malocclusion, difficulty in prehension, mastication, and pain of the temporomandibular joint. Large rostral mandibular defects are challenging to reconstruct due to the complex geometry of this region. In order to restore mandibular continuity and stability following extensive rostral mandibulectomy, we developed a surgical technique using a combination of intraoral and extraoral approaches, a locking titanium plate, and a compression resistant matrix (CRM) infused with rhBMP-2. Furthermore, surgical planning that consisted of computed tomographic (CT) scanning and 3D model printing was utilized. We describe a regenerative surgical technique for immediate or delayed reconstruction of critical-size rostral mandibular defects in five dogs. Three dogs had healed with intact gingival covering over the mandibular defect and had immediate return to normal function and occlusion. Two dogs had the complication of focal plate exposure and dehiscence, which was corrected with mucosal flaps and suturing; these dogs have since healed with intact gingival covering over the mandibular defect. Mineralized tissue formation was palpated clinically within 2?weeks and solid bone formation within 3?months. CT findings at 6?months postoperatively demonstrated that the newly regenerated mandibular bone had increased in mineral volume with evidence of integration between the native bone, new bone, and CRM compared to the immediate postoperative CT. We conclude that rostral mandibular reconstruction using a regenerative approach provides an excellent solution for restoring mandibular continuity and preventing mandibular instability in dogs. PMID:26664933

  19. Reidentification of pheromone composition of Sparganothis sulfureana (Clemens) and evidence of geographic variation in male responses from two US states

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gas chromatographic – electroantennagraphic analyses of pheromone gland extracts of calling female Sparganothis sulfureana revealed at least 6 compounds that consistently elicited electroantennographic responses from male antennae. In addition to the major pheromone compound, (E)-11-tetradecenyl ace...

  20. Exposure to Female Fertility Pheromones Influences Men’s Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Robin; Goldman, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Research shows that humans consciously use alcohol to encourage sexual activity. The current study investigated whether decision-making about alcohol use and sex can be cued outside of awareness by recently revealed sexual signaling mechanisms. Specifically, we examined if males exposed without their knowledge to pheromones emitted by fertile females would increase their alcohol consumption, presumably via neurobehavioral information pathways that link alcohol to sex and mating. We found that men who smelled a T-shirt worn by a fertile female drank significantly more (non-alcoholic) beer, and exhibited significantly greater approach behavior toward female cues, than those who smelled a T-shirt worn by a non-fertile female. These findings reveal previously unknown influences on human alcohol consumption, augment the research base for pheromone cuing of sexual behavior in humans, and raise the possibility that other, as yet unknown, pathways of behavioral influence may be operating hidden from view. PMID:26053321

  1. Antennal lobe organization and pheromone usage in bombycid moths

    PubMed Central

    Namiki, Shigehiro; Daimon, Takaaki; Iwatsuki, Chika; Shimada, Toru; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the neuroanatomy of the macroglomerular complex (MGC), which is involved in sex pheromone processing, in five species in the subfamily Bombycinae, including Ernolatia moorei, Trilocha varians, Rondotia menciana, Bombyx mandarina and Bombyx mori. The glomerulus located at the dorsal-most part of the olfactory centre shows the largest volume in moth species examined to date. Such normal glomerular organization has been observed in E. moorei and T. varians, which use a two-component mixture and includes the compound bombykal as a mating signal. By contrast, the other three species, which use another component as a single attractant, exhibited a modified arrangement of the MGC. This correlation between pheromone usage and neural organization may be useful for understanding the process of speciation. PMID:24759369

  2. Processing of Pheromone Information in Related Species of Heliothine Moths.

    PubMed

    Berg, Bente G; Zhao, Xin-Cheng; Wang, Guirong

    2014-01-01

    In heliothine moths, the male-specific olfactory system is activated by a few odor molecules, each of which is associated with an easily identifiable glomerulus in the primary olfactory center of the brain. This arrangement is linked to two well-defined behavioral responses, one ensuring attraction and mating behavior by carrying information about pheromones released by conspecific females and the other inhibition of attraction via signal information emitted from heterospecifics. The chance of comparing the characteristic properties of pheromone receptor proteins, male-specific sensory neurons and macroglomerular complex (MGC)-units in closely-related species is especially intriguing. Here, we review studies on the male-specific olfactory system of heliothine moths with particular emphasis on five closely related species, i.e., Heliothis virescens, Heliothis subflexa, Helicoverpa zea, Helicoverpa assulta and Helicoverpa armigera. PMID:26462937

  3. Pheromonal divergence between two strains of Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Unbehend, Melanie; Hänniger, Sabine; Meagher, Robert L; Heckel, David G; Groot, Astrid T

    2013-03-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda consists of two genetically and behaviorally different strains, the corn- and the rice-strain, which seem to be in the process of sympatric speciation. We investigated the role of strain-specific sexual communication as a prezygotic mating barrier between both strains by analyzing strain-specific variation in female pheromone composition of laboratory and field strains, and also male attraction in wind tunnel and field experiments. Laboratory-reared and field-collected females from Florida exhibited strain-specific differences in their relative amount of (Z)-7-dodecenyl acetate (Z7-12:OAc) and (Z)-9-dodecenyl acetate (Z9-12:OAc). In wind tunnel assays, we did not find strain-specific attraction of males to females. However, in field experiments in Florida, we observed some differential attraction to synthetic pheromone blends. In a corn field, the corn-strain blend attracted more males of both strains than the rice-strain blend, but both blends were equally attractive in a grass field. Thus, habitat-specific volatiles seemed to influence male attraction to pheromones. In dose-response experiments, corn-strain males were more attracted to 2 % Z7-12:OAc than other doses tested, while rice-strain males were attracted to a broader range of Z7-12:OAc (2-10 %). The attraction of corn-strain males to the lowest dose of Z7-12:OAc corresponds to the production of this compound by females; corn-strain females produced significantly smaller amounts of Z7-12:OAc than rice-strain females. Although corn-strain individuals are more restricted in their production of and response to pheromones than rice-strain individuals, it seems that differences in sexual communication between corn- and rice-strain individuals are not strong enough to cause assortative mating. PMID:23456344

  4. Similar policing rates of eggs laid by virgin and mated honey-bee queens.

    PubMed

    Beekman, Madeleine; Martin, Caroline G; Oldroyd, Benjamin P

    2004-12-01

    Worker-policing is a well-documented mechanism that maintains functional worker sterility in queen-right honey-bee colonies. Unknown, however, is the source of the egg-marking signal that is thought to be produced by the queen and used by policing workers to discriminate between queen- and worker-laid eggs. Here we investigate whether mating is necessary for the queen to produce the egg-marking signal. We compare the removal rate of eggs laid by virgin queens and compare this rate with that of eggs laid by mated queens. Our results show that mating does not affect the acceptability of eggs, suggesting that physiological changes linked to the act of mating do not play a role in the production of the queen's egg-marking signal. PMID:15502902

  5. First Evidence of a Volatile Sex Pheromone in Lady Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Fassotte, Bérénice; Fischer, Christophe; Durieux, Delphine; Lognay, Georges; Haubruge, Eric; Francis, Frédéric; Verheggen, François J.

    2014-01-01

    To date, volatile sex pheromones have not been identified in the Coccinellidae family; yet, various studies have suggested that such semiochemicals exist. Here, we collected volatile chemicals released by virgin females of the multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), which were either allowed or not allowed to feed on aphids. Virgin females in the presence of aphids, exhibited “calling behavior”, which is commonly associated with the emission of a sex pheromone in several Coleoptera species. These calling females were found to release a blend of volatile compounds that is involved in the remote attraction (i.e., from a distance) of males. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses revealed that (–)-?-caryophyllene was the major constituent of the volatile blend (ranging from 80 to 86%), with four other chemical components also being present; ?-elemene, methyl-eugenol, ?-humulene, and ?-bulnesene. In a second set of experiments, the emission of the five constituents identified from the blend was quantified daily over a 9-day period after exposure to aphids. We found that the quantity of all five chemicals significantly increased across the experimental period. Finally, we evaluated the activity of a synthetic blend of these chemicals by performing bioassays which demonstrated the same attractive effect in males only. The results confirm that female H. axyridis produce a volatile sex pheromone. These findings have potential in the development of more specific and efficient biological pest-control management methods aimed at manipulating the behavior of this invasive lady beetle. PMID:25514321

  6. Biofilm growth alters regulation of conjugation by a bacterial pheromone

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Laura; Barnes, Aaron; Dunny, Gary; Chatterjee, Anushree; Hu, Wei-Shou; Yarwood, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Conjugation is an important mode of horizontal gene transfer in bacteria, enhancing the spread of antibiotic resistance. In clinical settings, biofilms are likely locations for antibiotic resistance transfer events involving nosocomial pathogens such as Enterococcus faecalis. Here we demonstrate that growth in biofilms alters the induction of conjugation by a sex pheromone in E. faecalis. Mathematical modeling suggested that a higher plasmid copy number in biofilm cells would enhance a switch-like behavior in the pheromone response of donor cells with a delayed, but increased response to the mating signal. Alterations in plasmid copy number, and a bimodal response to induction of conjugation in populations of plasmid-containing donor cells were both observed in biofilms, consistent with the predictions of the model. The pheromone system may have evolved such that donor cells in biofilms are only induced to transfer when they are in extremely close proximity to potential recipients in the biofilm community. These results may have important implications for development of chemotherapeutic agents to block resistance transfer and treat biofilm-related clinical infections. PMID:21843206

  7. Sexual selection drives the evolution of antiaphrodisiac pheromones in butterflies.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Catalina; Schulz, Stefan; Yildizhan, Selma; Gilbert, Lawrence E

    2011-10-01

    Competition for mates has resulted in sophisticated mechanisms of male control over female reproduction. Antiaphrodisiacs are pheromones transferred from males to females during mating that reduce attractiveness of females to subsequent courting males. Antiaphrodisiacs generally help unreceptive females reduce male harassment. However, lack of control over pheromone release by females and male control over the amount transferred provides males an opportunity to use antiaphrodisiacs to delay remating by females that have returned to a receptive state. We propose a model for the evolution of antiaphrodisiacs under the influence of intrasexual selection, and determine whether changes in this signal in 11 species of Heliconius butterflies are consistent with two predictions of the model. First, we find that as predicted, male-contributed chemical mixtures are complex and highly variable across species, with limited phylogenetic signal. Second, differences in rates of evolution in pheromone composition between two major clades of Heliconius are as expected: the clade with a greater potential for male-male competition (polyandrous) shows a faster rate of divergence than the one with typically monoandrous mating system. Taken together, our results provide evidence that for females, antiaphrodisiacs can be both honest signals of receptivity (helping reduce harassment) and chastity belts (a male-imposed reduction in remating). PMID:21967426

  8. Queen Mary's `Media & Arts Technology Studios' Audio System Design

    E-print Network

    Reiss, Josh

    and are recorded by engineers in the Control Room. This will require high quality multi- channel audio recordingQueen Mary's `Media & Arts Technology Studios' Audio System Design Martin J. Morrell1 , Christopher discusses our design philosophy for our given brief to create a world-class audio recording

  9. The Queen's College Oxford OX1 4AW DEGREE DAYS

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    The Queen's College · Oxford OX1 4AW DEGREE DAYS Congregation will be held in the Sheldonian Theatre for the purpose of granting graces and conferring degrees on the days shown below. Date Places' notice before the Degree Day, although in the case of Trinity Term and the Long Vacation it is wise

  10. The Queen's Two Bodies: Sor Juana and New Spain's Vicereines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, George Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The work of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz contains many examples of positive representations of the Queens of Spain and the Vicereines of New Spain. These poetic portraits serve to counter the primarily misogynistic portrayals of ruling women of the seventeenth century. Most importantly, Sor Juana increased the visibility of the vicereine in colonial…

  11. The Imperial Style: Rhetorical Depiction and Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, James R.

    2000-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship advancing the understanding of human communication by examining a powerful set of imperialist symbols that have a lingering impact on the British national psyche. Investigates the Queen's Diamond Jubilee speech and the performative rhetoric of the Jubilee celebration itself, to illustrate how rhetorical depiction may…

  12. Queen Quality Eric C. Mussen, Extension Apiculturist, UC Davis

    E-print Network

    Ishida, Yuko

    in brood rearing, drone layers, and queenlessness seem to be more frequent. In this article, I will try that the larvae are placed into an abundant population of nurse bees that are far enough away from a queen that they will attempt to rear all the cells. Nurse bees range in age from 9 to 12 days post emergence. Thus, replacement

  13. 40. GARRET TRUSS DETAIL. The south queen post (called 'king ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. GARRET TRUSS DETAIL. The south queen post (called 'king post' in the 1755 account for scantling for the Greater Meeting House) of the third truss from the east end. Note the numerals for assembling the truss members and the plaster marks from the 1755 Monthly Meeting Room. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. Non-transferable signals on ant queen eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ettorre, Patrizia; Tofilski, Adam; Heinze, Jürgen; Ratnieks, Francis L. W.

    2006-03-01

    How biological systems resolve internal conflicts is a major evolutionary question. Social insect workers cooperate but also pursue individual interests, such as laying male eggs. The rewards of this individual selfishness can be reduced by policing, such as by killing worker-laid eggs. However, selfish individuals may evade policing. What factors prevent individuals from being able to evade policing? In the ant Pachycondyla inversa, workers kill (police) worker-laid eggs. Because the colony keeps eggs in piles and worker-laid and queen-laid eggs are chemically distinct, worker-laid eggs might become more acceptable once placed in the egg pile by odour transfer from touching queen-laid eggs. Here, we show that such “cue scrambling” does not occur. Worker-laid eggs that were sandwiched between three queen-laid eggs for 45 min were not more acceptable in a policing bioassay than control worker-laid eggs. Chemical analyses also showed that the surface hydrocarbon profile of these eggs was unchanged. Policing, therefore, is stable against this potential cheating mechanism probably because queen-laid eggs are made chemically distinct using chemicals, that are not easily transferred by physical contact.

  15. Artificial diets for juvenile queen conch: Studies examine algae content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute at Florida Atlantic University found juvenile queen conch fed diets containing added macroalgae had higher survival than a control given catfish feed only, but saw no significant difference in overall growth rates among the treatments. In a secon...

  16. GENE-EXPRESSION DIFFERENCES IN HONEY BEE WORKERS AND QUEENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are important for agriculture worldwide. We have identified genes whose expression varies between developing queen and worker honey bees during caste determination. Here we describe the expression patterns of these genes over time to deterimine 1)the persistence of caste...

  17. Queen Mary, University of London Mid-term Test

    E-print Network

    Chu, Cho-Ho

    Queen Mary, University of London Mid-term Test MAS111 Convergence and Continuity Duration: 1 hour) Let (an) be a sequence which converges to . Given a sequence (xn) satisfying xn an for all n N, show that |xn - | |an - | for all n N. Hence show that (xn) converges to . (c) Find the following

  18. Effects of Varroa destructor Infestation on Honey Bee Queen Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The varroa mite (Varroa destructor) is very detrimental to honey bee, Apis mellifera, colonies that are not genetically resistant. Italian colonies are known to be susceptible to mites, and queen introduction has been reported to be more difficult in Italian colonies in recent years. This study comp...

  19. 65. Receiving gold numbers on her designation as "Queen of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. Receiving gold numbers on her designation as "Queen of the Fleet," serving as the oldest Coast Guard Cutter in active service when U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Ingham was decommissioned on May 27, 1988. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter FIR, Puget Sound Area, Seattle, King County, WA

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Winged queens replaced by reproductives smaller

    E-print Network

    Danchin, Etienne

    of the female adults belong to a wingless `intermorph' caste smaller and allometrically distinct from. Intermorphs care for brood and a few mate and reproduce making them an all-purpose caste that takes charge investment in reproduction has shifted from producing expensive winged queens to more numer- ous helpers. M

  1. Parasite local adaptation: Red Queen versus Suicide King

    E-print Network

    Storfer, Andrew

    and higher mutation rates. This greater evolutionary potential of parasites led to the general predictionParasite local adaptation: Red Queen versus Suicide King Mark F. Dybdahl and Andrew Storfer School of Biological Sciences, PO Box 644236, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4236, USA Parasites

  2. How to Comment like a King--or Queen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Vicki

    2007-01-01

    Blogging, if you truly inhale its essence, will give you a calling, renewal, and purpose as you have never seen before. Here, the author shows how to blog like a king or a queen. These techniques include: (1) Write a meaningful comment; (2) If you have written about it, hyperlink to your post; (3) If you have a blog, share some information about…

  3. Queen's University Library Development of a Learning Commons

    E-print Network

    Murty, Ram

    sources ensuring effective and efficient access to knowledge Support independent and interactive learning1 Queen's University Library Development of a Learning Commons What is a Learning Commons ? A core library facility for the provision of information resources and technologies to facilitate the learning

  4. Nurturer or Queen Bee? Models of Women's Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malveaux, Julianne

    2005-01-01

    This document describes an informal chat of about 30 students, faculty, staff, and administrators, mostly African-American women, with a couple of White and Latina sisters thrown in. One woman asked why African-American women were so mean to each other. The author retreated into a conversation about two models of women's leadership--Queen Bee or…

  5. Killer Queens: screen representations of the gay psychopath.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, Daniel J

    2009-06-01

    Killer Queen is a well-known term with a developing definition. Over the last century attitudes have changed considerably towards both homosexuality and mental illness but in rather different ways. In exploring the depiction of this characterization in film and how it has evolved, consideration is given to whether or which of these changes might be responsible. PMID:19459106

  6. Wild carrot (Queen Anne's lace) Daucus carota L.

    E-print Network

    Wild carrot (Queen Anne's lace) Daucus carota L. Life cycle Erect, fernlike biennial. Leaves First-wide, flat-topped clusters. Fernlike leaf of wild carrot. Apiaceae (Carrot family) Back to identifying, flattened on one side and ridged with barbed spines. Reproduction Seeds. Wild carrot flower cluster. Wild

  7. Health Services Queen's University Policy on Verification of Illness

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    Health Services Queen's University Policy on Verification of Illness Health Counselling and Disability Services (HCDS) first developed a policy on issuing Verification of Illness (VOI) documentation Verification of Illness ("sick notes") 1. A "Verification of Illness" should only be required in situations

  8. Queens University Declaration of Illness Form Name: Student Number

    E-print Network

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    Queens University Declaration of Illness Form Date: Name: Student Number: I, the above named, do declare that as a result of a recent temporary illness, my academic performance was significantly and adversely affected. The illness was not longstanding or of a severe nature and therefore did not qualify me

  9. Connecting Math & Children's Literature @Queen's U Education Library

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    Connecting Math & Children's Literature @Queen's U Education Library Find books: http. Math Solutions with Marilyn Burns http/MATHFICT/search.php?go=yes&genre=chi&orderby=title A web site that offers extensive lists of fiction with math connections for children to adults. The Miss

  10. Sex and the Red Queen Maurine Neiman and Britt Koskella

    E-print Network

    Neiman, Maurine

    combination, waiting for the time when the focus of disadvantage has moved elsewhere ­ Hamilton et al. (1990 you can do, to keep in the same place." This was the Red Queen's explanation to a confused Alice began, as noted by Hamilton (1980), with Haldane (1949), and was revisited by Clarke (1976), both

  11. Bulletin no.4: February 2009 The Queen's College

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    and offers from performers most welcome. Joint concert with the choir of Girton College, Cambridge Saturday 14 February 8 pm, Trinity College Chapel, Cambridge Email anne.bevan@queens.ox.ac.uk Telephone 01865, Oxford and Girton College, Cambridge. Concert - Seven Last Words from the Cross Thursday 5 March 8:15 pm

  12. Adult Education and Social Sustainability: Harnessing the "Red Queen Effect"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, Peter

    2007-01-01

    In 1973, the evolutionary biologist Leigh Van Valen of the University of Chicago devised what he called the "Red Queen Effect" to describe the growth and development of species. It stipulated that an evolutionary system must continue to develop just to maintain its fitness relative to others evolving in its environment. The literary reference is…

  13. Find Children's & Teen Literature @ Queen's U Education Library

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    Find Children's & Teen Literature @ Queen's U Education Library Browse the Children's & Young Adult search to the Education Library. Select Title Exact as your Search by method. Search QCAT for children ­ Children's & Young Adult Books But keep in mind... ...that QCAT is not a good place to start when you want

  14. DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY, NUTRITION & EXERCISE SCIENCES QUEENS COLLEGE

    E-print Network

    Engel, Robert

    DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY, NUTRITION & EXERCISE SCIENCES QUEENS COLLEGE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN NUTRITION & EXERCISE SCIENCES Dear Student: Thank you for your interest in our Bachelor of Science (BS) degree program in Nutrition and Exercise Sciences, one of many programs offered by the Department

  15. Queens College Department of Family, Nutrition, and Exercise

    E-print Network

    Engel, Robert

    Queens College Department of Family, Nutrition, and Exercise Major: Family and Consumer Sciences. * FNES 153: Family Resource Management 3 cr. (L) FNES 163: General Nutrition OR 3 cr. FNES 263 (CHEM 102.3&102 Prereq.) and 264 Nutrition (FNES 263 Prereq.) 6 cr. * FNES 248: Problems in Marriage and Family (FNES 147

  16. Constitution of the Middle Common Room of The Queen's

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    Constitution of the Middle Common Room of The Queen's College, Oxford Preamble: This Constitution repeals the existing constitution and shall come into force from the date it is passed. All acts validly undertaken under the previous constitution shall remain valid and cannot be called into question as being

  17. Re-evaluation of the PBAN receptor molecule: characterization of PBANR variants expressed in the pheromone glands of moths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex pheromone production in most moths is initiated following pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR) activation. PBANR was initially cloned from pheromone glands (PGs) of Helicoverpa zea and Bombyx mori. The B. mori PBANR is characterized by a relatively long C-terminus that...

  18. 2,3-Hexanediols as Sex Attractants and a Female-produced Sex Pheromone for Cerambycid Beetles in the Prionine

    E-print Network

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    ). Fuscumol and its acetate also attract both sexes of many other lamiine species (e.g., Mitchell et al., 20112,3-Hexanediols as Sex Attractants and a Female-produced Sex Pheromone for Cerambycid Beetles that the pheromone glands are located in the prothorax of females. This is the second sex attractant pheromone

  19. From release to absorption: Elucidating the effects of a desert locust pheromone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used a glass-vial bioassay to test the contact effect of the desert locust pheromone phenylacetonitrile (PAN) on nymphs and adults after 2 hand 4 h respectively, and quantified the amount of the pheromone absorbed and released by the nymphs after 2 h and 12 h. We also monitored the knockdown effe...

  20. The volatilization of SPLAT® for use in pheromone mating disruption of cranberry pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The paraffin-based pheromone carrier, SPLAT, was tested for its volatilization rate. A multi-factorial study was initiated to examine the interactive effects of point-source size, shape, and duration. The study showed that tremendous amounts of the pheromone were released early, followed by a gradua...

  1. Identification and synthesis of a male-produced pheromone for the neotropical root weevil Diaprepes abbreviatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An unsaturated hydroxy ester pheromone collected from the headspace and feces of male Diaprepes abbreviatus was isolated, identified and synthesized. The pheromone, methyl (E)-3-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methyl-2-pentenoate, was discovered by gas chromatography-coupled electroantennogram detection (GC-EAD...

  2. Synthetic pheromones and plant volatiles alter the expression of chemosensory genes in Spodoptera exigua

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xinlong; Qian, Kai; Du, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Pheromone and plant odorants are important for insect mating, foraging food sources and oviposition. To understand the molecular mechanisms regulating pheromone and odorant signaling, we employed qRT-PCR to study the circadian rhythms of ABP, OBP, PBP, and OR gene expression in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua and their responses after a pre-exposure to sex pheromone compounds or plant volatiles. The neuronal responses of male S. exigua to 20 chemical compounds were recorded at three specific time periods using the electroantennogram. The results showed a circadian rhythm in the expression profiles of some chemosensory genes in the antennae similar to their behavioral rhythm. The expression profiles of OR3, OR6, OR11, OR13, OR16, OR18, Orco, ABP2, OBP1, OBP7, and PBP1, and EAG responses to chemical compounds, as well as their circadian rhythm were significantly affected after exposure to synthetic sex pheromones and plant volatiles. These findings provide the first evidence that the gene expression of chemosensory genes and olfactory sensitivity to sex pheromones are affected by pre-exposing insects to pheromone compounds and plant volatiles. It helps to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying pheromone activity, and the application of sex pheromones and plant volatiles in mating disruption or mass trapping. PMID:26611815

  3. New Contact Sex Pheromone Components of the German Cockroach, Blattella germanica, Predicted from the Proposed

    E-print Network

    New Contact Sex Pheromone Components of the German Cockroach, Blattella germanica, Predicted from female, a male German cockroach exhibits a characteristic courtship behavior: he turns away from of the two predicted pheromone components, we showed that the epicuticle of the German cockroach does indeed

  4. SEX PHEROMONE OF THE PLANT BUG, PHYTOCORTIS conspurcatus Knight (HETEROPTERA: MIRIDAE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Female Phytocoris sp. produce a sex pheromone from metathoracic scent glands. The pheromone consists of hexyl acetate (HA; present in both sexes), with the female-specific compounds, (E)-2-hexenyl acetate (E2HA), octyl acetate (OA) and (E)-2-octenyl acetate (E2OA). HA and E2OA are key components of ...

  5. Spotted cutworm, Xestia c-nigrum (L.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) responses to sex pheromone and blacklight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traps baited with the sex pheromone blend of (Z7)- and (Z5)-tetradecenyl acetate captured significant numbers of male spotted cutworm moths, Xestia c-nigrum (L.). Nearly no males were captured in traps baited with (Z7)-tetradecenyl acetate, the major pheromone component. Antennae of spotted cutworm ...

  6. Management of oriental fruit moth with ground ULV spray applications of a microencapsulated sex pheromone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex pheromones have been widely used to manage oriental fruit moth (OFM) in stone fruits for 30 years. Microencapsulated formulations of sex pheromone have been developed and have proven to be an effective tactic. Recently, we developed the use of ultra low volume (ULV) ground applications of these ...

  7. SEX ATTRACTANT PHEROMONE FROM THE RICE STALK STINK BUG, TIBRACA LIMBATIVENTRIS STAL (HEMIPTERA: PENTATOMIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The male-produced sex pheromone from the Brazilian rice stalk stink bug is reported. Olfactometer bioassays with sexually mature males and females showed that males attracted females, suggesting that males release a sex pheromone for this species. Males were not attracted to either sex, nor were fe...

  8. Sex-Pairing Pheromone in the Asian Termite Pest Species Odontotermes formosanus

    E-print Network

    Danchin, Etienne

    Sex-Pairing Pheromone in the Asian Termite Pest Species Odontotermes formosanus Ping Wen & Bao Abstract The sex-pairing pheromone of the black winged subterranean termite, Odontotermes formosanus is considered one of the most harmful termite species in Southeast Asia. Keywords Sternal gland . (Z)-dodec-3-en

  9. Pheromone-based mating disruption to control the historical top three insect pests of Wisconsin cranberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2012, the first 3-species pheromone mating disruption program was tested in Wisconsin cranberries. Preliminary data suggest that there was substantial disruption of blackheaded fireworm and Sparganothis fruitworm mating. The pheromone of cranberry fruitworm only contained a single component, and ...

  10. COMPARISON OF MECHANICALLY APPLIED PHEROMONE DISPENSING TECHNOLOGIES FOR MATING DISRUPTION OF TREE FRUIT PEST LEPIDOPTERA

    E-print Network

    Agnello, Arthur M.

    COMPARISON OF MECHANICALLY APPLIED PHEROMONE DISPENSING TECHNOLOGIES FOR MATING DISRUPTION OF TREE in mixed plantings of fresh and processing apples on five commercial farms in Wayne, Orleans and Tompkins of a plastic cabinet enclosing an aerosol canister containing the pheromone blends: for CM, 69.35 g of (E,E)-8

  11. Identification and Expression Profiles of Sex Pheromone Biosynthesis and Transport Related Genes in Spodoptera litura

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-Nan; Zhu, Xiu-Yun; Fang, Li-Ping; He, Peng; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Geng; Sun, Liang; Ye, Zhan-Feng; Deng, Dao-Gui; Li, Jin-Bu

    2015-01-01

    Although the general pathway of sex pheromone synthesis in moth species has been established, the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. The common cutworm Spodoptera litura is an important agricultural pest worldwide and causes huge economic losses annually. The female sex pheromone of S. litura comprises Z9,E11-14:OAc, Z9,E12-14:OAc, Z9-14:OAc, and E11-14:OAc. By sequencing and analyzing the transcriptomic data of the sex pheromone glands, we identified 94 candidate genes related to pheromone biosynthesis (55 genes) or chemoreception (39 genes). Gene expression patterns and phylogenetic analysis revealed that two desaturase genes (SlitDes5 and SlitDes11) and one fatty acyl reductase gene (SlitFAR3) showed pheromone gland (PG) biased or specific expression, and clustered with genes known to be involved in pheromone synthesis in other moth species. Furthermore, 4 chemoreception related genes (SlitOBP6, SlitOBP11, SlitCSP3, and SlitCSP14) also showed higher expression in the PG, and could be additional candidate genes involved in sex pheromone transport. This study provides the first solid background information that should facilitate further elucidation of sex pheromone biosynthesis and transport, and indicates potential targets to disrupt sexual communication in S. litura for a novel pest management strategy. PMID:26445454

  12. Synthetic pheromones and plant volatiles alter the expression of chemosensory genes in Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xinlong; Qian, Kai; Du, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Pheromone and plant odorants are important for insect mating, foraging food sources and oviposition. To understand the molecular mechanisms regulating pheromone and odorant signaling, we employed qRT-PCR to study the circadian rhythms of ABP, OBP, PBP, and OR gene expression in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua and their responses after a pre-exposure to sex pheromone compounds or plant volatiles. The neuronal responses of male S. exigua to 20 chemical compounds were recorded at three specific time periods using the electroantennogram. The results showed a circadian rhythm in the expression profiles of some chemosensory genes in the antennae similar to their behavioral rhythm. The expression profiles of OR3, OR6, OR11, OR13, OR16, OR18, Orco, ABP2, OBP1, OBP7, and PBP1, and EAG responses to chemical compounds, as well as their circadian rhythm were significantly affected after exposure to synthetic sex pheromones and plant volatiles. These findings provide the first evidence that the gene expression of chemosensory genes and olfactory sensitivity to sex pheromones are affected by pre-exposing insects to pheromone compounds and plant volatiles. It helps to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying pheromone activity, and the application of sex pheromones and plant volatiles in mating disruption or mass trapping. PMID:26611815

  13. Geometric isomers of sex pheromone components do not affect attractancy of Conopomorpha cramerella in cocoa plantations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex pheromone of cocoa pod borer (CPB), Conopomorpha cramerella, has previously been identified as a blend of (E,Z,Z)- and (E,E,Z)-4,6,10-hexadecatrienyl acetates and the corresponding alcohols. These pheromone components have been synthesized with modification of the existing method and relative at...

  14. STRUCTURE ACTIVITY STUDIES WITH PHEROMONE BINDING PROTEINS OF THE GYPSY MOTH, LYMANTRIA DISPAR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pheromone olfaction in the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, involves accurate distinction of compounds with similar structure and polarity. The identified pheromone is (7R, 8S)-cis-2-methyl-7, 8-epoxyoctadecane, 1a, and a known antagonist is (7Z) 2-methyloctadec-7-ene, 4a. The first step in olfaction...

  15. Revisiting an old question: Is the natural blend best for disruption of pheromone communication in moths?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Short-lived microlepidoptera must, by force, be very good at finding their mate and reproducing. Insects are very good at this and moths, in particular, are highly evolved to use volatile signals (pheromones) to communicate and locate conspecifics. The chemical structures of many pheromones of moths...

  16. Attractiveness of a Four-Component Pheromone Blend to Male Navel Orangeworm Moths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The attractiveness of the various combinations of the four component pheromone of the female navel orangeworm moth, Amyelois transitella, was measured in a wind-tunnel bioassay. Upwind flight along the pheromone plume and landing on the odor source required the simultaneous presence of two componen...

  17. Absolute Configuration of Chiral Terpenes in Marking Pheromones of Bumblebees and

    E-print Network

    Rasmont, Pierre

    Absolute Configuration of Chiral Terpenes in Marking Pheromones of Bumblebees and Cuckoo Bumblebees-TBDMS)-b-cyclodextrin in polysiloxane PS 268. Pure (­)-S-enantiomers of all three terpenes were found in the labial glands of all on the absolute configuration of terpenes in marking pheromones of bumblebees. Chirality 16:228­233, 2004. A 2004

  18. Journal of Insect Physiology 54 (2008) 663671 Incomplete electrical isolation of sex-pheromone responsive olfactory

    E-print Network

    2008-01-01

    -emitted major pheromone com- ponent, (Z)-11-hexadecenal (Z11-16:Ald) (Roelofs et al., 1974; Klun et al., 1979 that responds only to (Z)-9-tetradecenal (Z9-14:Ald). The remaining 20% of long trichoid sensilla (type. zea secondary pheromone component (Z)-9- hexadecenal (Z9-16:Ald) as well as to Z9-14:Ald. The second

  19. FIRE ANT, SOLENOPSIS INVICTA, WORKER ALARM PHEROMONES ATTRACT PSEUDACTEON PHORID FLIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The parasitic phorid fly, Pseudacteon tricuspis was found to be attracted to the volatile compounds released by shaken fire ant workers. Among the compounds released were alarm pheromones, venom alkaloids, and recruitment pheromones. In subsequent bioassays we eliminated poison sac contents and recr...

  20. ISOLATION, IDENTIFICATION AND SYNTHESIS OF SEX PHEROMONE COMPONENTS OF THE CAROB MOTH, ECTOHYELOIS CERATOSIAE

    E-print Network

    ISOLATION, IDENTIFICATION AND SYNTHESIS OF SEX PHEROMONE COMPONENTS OF THE CAROB MOTH, ECTOHYELOIS/OSU, Booster, Ohio, USA Summary: The sex pheromone of females of the carob moth, Ectomyelois ceratoniae)-9-tetradecenal in the ratio of 10:l:l. A synthetic blend proved to be attractive. The carob moth, Ectomyelois

  1. Does the queen win it all? Queen-worker conflict over male production in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaux, Cédric; Savarit, Fabrice; Jaisson, Pierre; Hefetz, Abraham

    Social insects provide a useful model for studying the evolutionary balance between cooperation and conflict linked to genetic structure. We investigated the outcome of this conflict in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, whose annual colony life cycle is characterized by overt competition over male production. We established artificial colonies composed of a queen and unrelated workers by daily exchange of callow workers between colony pairs of distinct genetic make-up. Using microsatellite analysis, this procedure allowed an exact calculation of the proportion of worker-derived males. The development and social behavior of these artificial colonies were similar to those of normal colonies. Despite a high worker reproduction attempt (63.8% of workers had developed ovaries and 38.4% were egg-layers), we found that on average 95% of the males produced during the competition phase (CPh) were queen-derived. However, in four colonies, queen death resulted in a considerable amount of worker-derived male production. The different putative ultimate causes of this efficient control by the queen are discussed, and we suggest a possible scenario of an evolutionary arms race that may occur between these two female castes.

  2. Innervation and Neural Regulation of the Sex Pheromone Gland in Female Heliothis Moths TA Christensen, H Itagaki, PEA Teal, RD Jasensky, JH Tumlinson, and JG Hildebrand

    E-print Network

    Itagaki, Haruhiko

    Innervation and Neural Regulation of the Sex Pheromone Gland in Female Heliothis Moths TA pheromone gland in female Heliothis moths (electrophysiology/octopamine/pheromone biosynthesis activating abdominal ganglion to the pheromone gland in the tip of the abdomen. Electron microscopy further revealed

  3. Primer Effects of a Brood Pheromone on Honeybee Behavioural Development Author(s): Yves Le Conte, Arezki Mohammedi, Gene E. Robinson

    E-print Network

    Robinson, Gene E.

    Primer Effects of a Brood Pheromone on Honeybee Behavioural Development Author(s): Yves Le Conte of a brood pheromone on honeybee behavioural development Yves Le Contel*, Arezki Mohammedil and Gene E on the cuticles of honeybee larvae, already known as a kairomone, releaser pheromone and primer pheromone, also

  4. Responses to Pheromones in a Complex Odor World: Sensory Processing and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Deisig, Nina; Dupuy, Fabienne; Anton, Sylvia; Renou, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Insects communicating with pheromones, be it sex- or aggregation pheromones, are confronted with an olfactory environment rich in a diversity of volatile organic compounds of which plants are the main releaser. Certain of these volatiles can represent behaviorally relevant information, such as indications about host- or non-host plants; others will provide essentially a rich odor background out of which the behaviorally relevant information needs to be extracted. In an attempt to disentangle mechanisms of pheromone communication in a rich olfactory environment, which might underlie interactions between intraspecific signals and a background, we will summarize recent literature on pheromone/plant volatile interactions. Starting from molecular mechanisms, describing the peripheral detection and central nervous integration of pheromone-plant volatile mixtures, we will end with behavioral output in response to such mixtures and its plasticity. PMID:26462691

  5. Differential Octopaminergic Modulation of Olfactory Receptor Neuron Responses to Sex Pheromones in Heliothis virescens

    PubMed Central

    Hillier, N. Kirk; Kavanagh, Rhys M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Octopamine is an important neuromodulator of neural function in invertebrates. Octopamine increases male moth sensitivity to female sex pheromones, however, relatively little is known as to the role of octopamine in the female olfactory system, nor its possible effects on the reception of non-pheromone odorants. The purpose of this study was to determine relative effects of octopamine on the sensitivity of the peripheral olfactory system in male and female Heliothis virescens. Single sensillum recording was conducted in both sexes following injection with octopamine or Ringer solution, and during odorant stimulation with conspecific female sex pheromone or host plant volatiles. Results indicate that octopamine plays a significant modulatory role in female sex pheromone detection in female moths; and that male and female pheromone detection neurons share distinct pharmacological and physiological similarities in H. virescens despite sexual dimorphism at the antennal level. PMID:26650832

  6. Lip closing force of Class III patients with mandibular prognathism: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To compare the lip closing force of patients with mandibular prognathism to that of patients without dentofacial anomalies. Methods The subject group included 62 female patients of Class III relationship with mandibular prognathism. The control group been comprised of 71 patients of Class I relationships without skeletal deformities. Maximum lip closing force and average lip closing force were measured using a Y-meter. Student’s t-test was carried out to analyse the differences between the groups. Correlation and stepwise multiple linear regression analyses were performed to analyse the relationship between lip closing force and craniofacial morphology. Results The lower lip closing force of subjects with mandibular prognathism was significantly greater than that of patients in the control group (P??0.05). The lower lip closing force of patients with mandibular prognathism was strongly correlated with IMPA (Lower Incisor - Mandibular Plane angle, P?Mandibular Plane angle, P?mandibular prognathism and was strongly correlated with lower incisor position and mandibular plane angle. PMID:25159036

  7. Reconstruction of the Lateral Mandibular Defect: A Review and Treatment Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Shnayder, Yelizaveta; Lin, Derrick; Desai, Shaun C; Nussenbaum, Brian; Sand, Jordan P; Wax, Mark K

    2015-09-01

    Reconstruction of the lateral mandibular defect presents a complex challenge to the reconstructive surgeon, often involving interconnected soft-tissue and bone requirements. This review examines the current literature on functional outcomes of lateral mandibular reconstruction and presents an algorithm on selecting an optimal reconstructive choice for patients with lateral mandibular defects resulting from oncologic ablative surgery or trauma. PubMed and Medline searches on reconstructing lateral mandibular defect were performed of the English literature. Search terms included lateral mandibular defect, outcomes of mandibular reconstruction, and free flap reconstruction of mandible. Although most of the articles presented are retrospective reviews, priority was given to the articles with high-quality level of evidence. Restoration of function, including speech and swallow, and acceptable cosmetic result are the primary objectives of lateral mandibular reconstruction. When reconstructing the mandible in a patient following tumor extirpation, the patient's overall prognosis, medical comorbidities, and need for adjuvant therapy should be considered. In the patient with aggressive malignant disease and a poor prognosis, a less complex reconstruction, such as soft-tissue flap with or without a reconstruction plate, may be adequate. In a dentate patient with favorable prognosis, a durable reconstruction, such as osseocutaneous microvascular free flap, is often preferred. Various reconstructive options are available for patients with lateral mandibular defects. Depending on the predominance of the soft-tissue or bony components of the defect, with consideration of the patient's characteristics and functional and aesthetic goals, the surgeon can wisely select from these reconstructive possibilities. PMID:26204563

  8. Endodontic Treatment of a Mandibular Second Premolar with Three Roots and Three Canals

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Bonny; Dube, Kavita

    2014-01-01

    Complex root canal system with atypical variations is a common finding among mandibular premolars. Endodontic treatment in these teeth may not be successful due to the failure to recognise and treat multiple canals. This paper presents endodontic treatment of a mandibular second premolar with three roots and three canals. PMID:25431692

  9. Root canal treatment of maxillary and mandibular three-rooted premolars: case reports.

    PubMed

    Shalavi, Sousan; Mohammadi, Zahed; Abdolrazzaghi, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Familiarity with the normal and abnormal anatomy of the root canal system is essential for successful root canal treatment. The possibility of concomitant three-rooted and three- canalled maxillary and mandibular premolars are extremely rare. The purpose of this paper was to report a case with a three-rooted maxillary first premolar and two three-rooted mandibular premolars. PMID:23056137

  10. [Mandibular metastasis of a cutaneous melanoma or metachronous amelanotic melanoma of the oral cavity? A case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Vierne, C; Hardy, H; Guichard, B; Barat, M; Péron, J-M; Trost, O

    2014-08-01

    Primary and metastatic mandibular melanoma are extremely rare. We report the original case of a 55-year-old woman treated 16 years before for a cutaneous melanoma, and now presenting with a huge mandibular amelanotic melanoma. Was it an histologically different mandibular metastasis of the previous cutaneous melanoma, or a metachronous oral amelanotic melanoma? PMID:24503521

  11. The Effects of Pesticides on Queen Rearing and Virus Titers in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.)

    PubMed Central

    DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Chen, Yanping; Simonds, Roger

    2013-01-01

    The effects of sublethal pesticide exposure on queen emergence and virus titers were examined. Queen rearing colonies were fed pollen with chlorpyrifos (CPF) alone (pollen-1) and with CPF and the fungicide Pristine® (pollen-2). Fewer queens emerged when larvae from open foraging (i.e., outside) colonies were reared in colonies fed pollen-1 or 2 compared with when those larvae were reared in outside colonies. Larvae grafted from and reared in colonies fed pollen-2 had lower rates of queen emergence than pollen-1 or outside colonies. Deformed wing virus (DWV) and black queen cell virus were found in nurse bees from colonies fed pollen-1 or 2 and in outside colonies. The viruses also were detected in queen larvae. However, we did not detect virus in emerged queens grafted from and reared in outside colonies. In contrast, DWV was found in all emerged queens grafted from colonies fed pollen-1 or 2 either reared in outside hives or those fed pollen-1 or 2. The results suggest that sublethal exposure of CPF alone but especially when Pristine® is added reduces queen emergence possibly due to compromised immunity in developing queens. PMID:26466796

  12. No evidence of volatile chemicals regulating reproduction in a multiple queen ant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coston, Duncan J.; Gill, Richard J.; Hammond, Robert L.

    2011-07-01

    Efficient cooperation in eusocial insect colonies requires effective communication, and there is abundant evidence of non-volatile chemicals playing a role in regulating reproduction within colonies. In contrast, there have been fewer studies investigating the role of volatile chemicals. This study investigated the potential role of volatile chemicals in regulating queen reproduction either by directly inhibiting queen reproduction or by honestly signalling queen fecundity to workers. We tested this using multiple queen colonies of the ant ( Leptothorax acervorum) from a functionally monogynous population where one queen monopolizes all reproduction. Nine colonies, each with an established laying queen, were split to produce two colony fragments—one containing the reproducing queen (group 1) and one containing only previously non-reproducing queens (group 2). Each group was separated by a fine wire mesh preventing physical contact, but allowing volatile chemical contact. In each group 2 fragment, we found that a single formerly non-reproductive queen commenced reproduction and that the rate of egg laying and maximum number of eggs recorded did not significantly differ between groups 1 and 2, results that do not support volatile chemicals as playing a role in regulating queen reproduction. Instead, our findings suggest that physical contact is necessary to maintain functional monogyny.

  13. Treatment of extensive comminuted mandibular fracture between both mandibular angles with bilateral condylar fractures using a reconstruction plate: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwonwoo; Yoon, Kyuho; Cheong, Jeongkwon; Shin, Jaemyung; Bae, Jungho; Ko, Inchan; Park, Hyungkoo

    2014-01-01

    This following case report describes the open reduction, internal fixation and the reconstruction of an extensive comminuted mandibular fracture with bilateral condylar fractures in a 19-year-old male patient with an intellectual disability and autistic disorder. He suffered fall trauma, resulting in shattered bony fragments of the alveolus and mandibular body between both mandibular rami, the fracture of both condyles and the avulsion or dislocation of every posterior tooth of the mandible. The patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation between both mandibular rami using a reconstruction plate, open reduction and internal fixation of the shattered fragments using miniplates and screws, and the closed reduction of the bilateral condylar fractures. PMID:25045641

  14. Treatment of extensive comminuted mandibular fracture between both mandibular angles with bilateral condylar fractures using a reconstruction plate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwonwoo; Yoon, Kyuho; Park, Kwan-Soo; Cheong, Jeongkwon; Shin, Jaemyung; Bae, Jungho; Ko, Inchan; Park, Hyungkoo

    2014-06-01

    This following case report describes the open reduction, internal fixation and the reconstruction of an extensive comminuted mandibular fracture with bilateral condylar fractures in a 19-year-old male patient with an intellectual disability and autistic disorder. He suffered fall trauma, resulting in shattered bony fragments of the alveolus and mandibular body between both mandibular rami, the fracture of both condyles and the avulsion or dislocation of every posterior tooth of the mandible. The patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation between both mandibular rami using a reconstruction plate, open reduction and internal fixation of the shattered fragments using miniplates and screws, and the closed reduction of the bilateral condylar fractures. PMID:25045641

  15. Two regulatory mechanisms of monoterpenoid pheromone production in Ips spp. of bark beetles.

    PubMed

    Bearfield, Jeremy C; Henry, Anastasia G; Tittiger, Claus; Blomquist, Gary J; Ginzel, Matthew D

    2009-06-01

    Bark beetles use aggregation pheromones to coordinate host colonization and mating. These monoterpenoid chemical signals are produced de novo in midgut cells via the mevalonate pathway, and pheromone production is induced when an adult beetle feeds on phloem of a host tree. In Ips pini, juvenile hormone (JH) III influences key regulatory enzymes along the mevalonate pathway that leads to pheromone production. In fact, topically applied JH III is sufficient to stimulate pheromone production in unfed males. In this study, we explore the influence of feeding and JH III treatment on pheromone production in male Ips confusus, the pinyon Ips. We also characterize the influence of feeding and JH III treatment on transcript levels and activity of three key enzymes involved in pheromone biosynthesis: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG) synthase (HMGS), HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) and geranyl diphosphate synthase (GPPS). We also extend the current understanding of the regulation of pheromone biosynthesis in I. pini, by measuring the influence of feeding and JHIII treatment on enzymatic activity of HMGS and GPPS. Feeding on host phloem alone strongly induces pheromone production in male I. confusus, while JH III treatment has no effect. However, feeding and JH III both significantly up-regulate mRNA levels of key mevalonate pathway genes. Feeding up-regulates these genes to a maximum at 32 h, whereas with JH III-treatment, they are up-regulated at 4, 8, and 16 h, but return near to non-treatment levels at 32 h. Feeding, but not JH III treatment, also increases the activity of all three enzymes in I. confusus, while both feeding or treatment with JH III increase HMGS and GPPS activity in I. pini. Our data suggest that pheromone production in Ips is not uniformly controlled by JH III and feeding may stimulate the release of some other regulatory factor, perhaps a brain hormone, required for pheromone production. PMID:19554371

  16. Single mutation to a sex pheromone receptor provides adaptive specificity between closely related moth species

    PubMed Central

    Leary, Greg P.; Allen, Jean E.; Bunger, Peggy L.; Luginbill, Jena B.; Linn, Charles E.; Macallister, Irene E.; Kavanaugh, Michael P.; Wanner, Kevin W.

    2012-01-01

    Sex pheromone communication, acting as a prezygotic barrier to mating, is believed to have contributed to the speciation of moths and butterflies in the order Lepidoptera. Five decades after the discovery of the first moth sex pheromone, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that underlie the evolution of pheromone communication between closely related species. Although Asian and European corn borers (ACB and ECB) can be interbred in the laboratory, they are behaviorally isolated from mating naturally by their responses to subtly different sex pheromone isomers, (E)-12- and (Z)-12-tetradecenyl acetate and (E)-11- and (Z)-11-tetradecenyl acetate (ACB: E12, Z12; ECB; E11, Z11). Male moth olfactory systems respond specifically to the pheromone blend produced by their conspecific females. In vitro, ECB(Z) odorant receptor 3 (OR3), a sex pheromone receptor expressed in male antennae, responds strongly to E11 but also generally to the Z11, E12, and Z12 pheromones. In contrast, we show that ACB OR3, a gene that has been subjected to positive selection (? = 2.9), responds preferentially to the ACB E12 and Z12 pheromones. In Ostrinia species the amino acid residue corresponding to position 148 in transmembrane domain 3 of OR3 is alanine (A), except for ACB OR3 that has a threonine (T) in this position. Mutation of this residue from A to T alters the pheromone recognition pattern by selectively reducing the E11 response ?14-fold. These results suggest that discrete mutations that narrow the specificity of more broadly responsive sex pheromone receptors may provide a mechanism that contributes to speciation. PMID:22891317

  17. Asymmetric muscle function in patients with developmental mandibular asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Dong, Y; Wang, X M; Wang, M Q; Widmalm, S E

    2008-01-01

    The aim was to test the hypothesis that developmental mandibular asymmetry is associated with increased asymmetry in muscle activity. Patients with mandibular condylar and/or ramus hyperplasia having unilateral cross-bite were compared with healthy subjects with normal occlusion. Muscle activity was recorded with surface electrodes in the masseter, suprahyoid, sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) and upper trapezius areas during jaw opening-closing-clenching, head-neck flexion-extension, and elevation-lowering of shoulders. Root mean square (RMS) and mean power frequency (MPF) values were calculated and analysed using anova and t-tests with P < 0.05 chosen as significance level. The SCM and masseter muscles showed co-activation during jaw and head movements, significantly more asymmetric in the patients than in the healthy subjects. The RMS and MPF values were higher in the patients than in the controls in the SCM and suprahyoid areas on both sides during jaw opening-closing movement. The results indicate that the ability to perform symmetric jaw and neck muscle activities is disturbed in patients with developmental mandibular asymmetry. This is of clinical interest because asymmetric activity may be an etiologic factor in temporomandibular joint and cervical pain. The results support that co-activation occurs between jaw and neck muscles during voluntary jaw opening and indicate that postural antigravity reflex activity occurs in the masseter area during head extension. Further studies, where EMG recordings are made from the DMA patients at early stages are motivated to verify activity sources and test if the asymmetric activity is associated with muscle and joint pain in the jaw and cervical areas. PMID:18190358

  18. A mandibular second premolar with three canals and atypical orifices.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Mehrdad; Vosoughhosseini, Sepideh; Zand, Vahid; Fatemi, Ali; Shyezadeh, Vahab; Ranjkesh, Bahram

    2008-09-01

    Mandibular second premolars with three canals (Type V, Vertucci) and separate foramina are very rare. The anatomy of the pulp chamber floor in these premolars usually reveals one lingual and two buccal orifices at the same level. This case report describes a second premolar with three canals and an unusual pulpal floor anatomy with one distobuccal and one distolingual orifice at the same level and an orifice on the mesiolingual wall. Very careful examination of the pulpal space, preferably with an optical device, is recommended to locate any unusual orifices. PMID:18818477

  19. Mandibular Movements Identify Respiratory Effort in Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Martinot, Jean-Benoît; Senny, Fréderic; Denison, Stéphane; Cuthbert, Valérie; Gueulette, Emmanuelle; Guénard, Hervé; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea (OAH) diagnosis in children is based on the quantification of flow and respiratory effort (RE). Pulse transit time (PTT) is one validated tool to recognize RE. Pattern analysis of mandibular movements (MM) might be an alternative method to detect RE. We compared several patterns of MM to concomittant changes in PTT during OAH in children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy. Methods: Participants: 33 consecutive children with snoring and symptoms/signs of OAH. Measurements: MMs were measured during polysomnography with a magnetometer device (Brizzy Nomics, Liege, Belgium) placed on the chin and forehead. Patterns of MM were evaluated representing peak to peak fluctuations > 0.3 mm in mandibular excursion (MML), mandibular opening (MMO), and sharp MM (MMS), which closed the mouth on cortical arousal (CAr). Results: The median (95% CI) hourly rate of at least 1 MM (MML, or MMO, or MMS) was 18.1 (13.2–36.3) and strongly correlated with OAHI (p = 0.003) but not with central apnea-hypopnea index (CAHI; p = 0.292). The durations when the MM amplitude was > 0.4 mm and PTT > 15 ms were strongly correlated (p < 0.001). The mean (SD) of MM peak to peak amplitude was larger during OAH than CAH (0.9 ± 0.7 mm and 0.2 ± 0.3 mm; p < 0.001, respectively). MMS at the termination of OAH had larger amplitude compared to MMS with CAH (1.5 ± 0.9 mm and 0.5 ± 0.7 mm, respectively, p < 0.001). Conclusions: MM > 0.4 mm occurred frequently during periods of OAH and were frequently terminated by MMS corresponding to mouth closure on CAr. The MM findings strongly correlated with changes in PTT. MM analysis could be a simple and accurate promising tool for RE characterization and optimization of OAH diagnosis in children. Citation: Martinot JB, Senny F, Denison S, Cuthbert V, Gueulette E, Guénard H, Pépin JL. Mandibular movements identify respiratory effort in pediatric obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):567–574. PMID:25766710

  20. Anaplastic mandibular carcinoma in a meerkat (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Dadone, Liza I; Garner, Michael M; Klaphake, Eric; Johnston, Matthew S; Han, Sushan

    2014-06-01

    An 8-yr-old female slender-tailed meerkat (Suricata suricatta) presented with a necrotic sublingual mass and osteolysis of the mandible. After 1 mo of palliative care, the meerkat was euthanized. The mass was diagnosed histologically as an anaplastic carcinoma with extensive rostral mandibular destruction. Immunohistochemistry for vimentin and cytokeratin was validated in this nontypical species and showed that neoplastic cells expressed both mesenchymal and epithelial characteristics, suggestive of a primitive and poorly differentiated tumor. A review of 150 adult slender-tailed meerkat histopathology reports showed a 2% prevalence of orofacial neoplasia, suggesting that oral neoplasms are uncommon in meerkats. PMID:25000710

  1. Bilateral dens invaginatus in the mandibular premolars – Diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kharangate, Nupur; Figueiredo, Nigel R.; Fernandes, Marina; Lambor, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    Dens invaginatus (DI) is a developmental anomaly that results from an infolding of the dental papilla during tooth development and simulates the appearance of a tooth within another tooth. It shows a wide spectrum of variations in morphology and usually affects the maxillary lateral incisors. This study presents an unusual case of an Oehlers’ Type I DI involving the bilateral mandibular first and second premolars, which presented as an incidental radiographic finding in the first premolars and was associated with a periapical lesion in the second premolars which was successfully treated using nonsurgical endodontics. PMID:26321850

  2. SOLVING THE SHUGART QUEEN SAND PENASCO UNIT DECLINING PRODUCTION PROBLEM

    SciTech Connect

    Lowell Deckert

    2000-08-25

    The Penasco Shugart Queen Sand Unit located in sections 8, 9, 16 & 17, T18S, 31E Eddy County New Mexico is operated by MNA Enterprises Ltd. Co. Hobbs, NM. The first well in the Unit was drilled in 1939 and since that time the Unit produced 535,000 bbl of oil on primary recovery and 375,000 bbl of oil during secondary recovery operations that commenced in 1973. The Unit secondary to primary ratio is 0.7, but other Queen waterfloods in the area had considerably larger S/P ratios. On June 25 1999 MNA was awarded a grant under the Department of Energy's ''Technology Development with Independents'' program. The grant was used to fund a reservoir study to determine if additional waterflood reserves could be developed. A total of 14 well bores that penetrate the Queen at 3150 ft are within the Unit boundaries. Eleven of these wells produced oil during the past 60 years. Production records were pieced together from various sources including the very early state production records. One very early well had a resistivity log, but nine of the wells had no logs, and four wells had gamma ray-neutron count-rate perforating logs. Fortunately, recent offset deep drilling in the area provided a source of modern logs through the Queen. The logs from these wells were used to analyze the four old gamma ray-neutron logs within the Unit. Additionally the offset well log database was sufficient to construct maps through the unit based on geostatistical interpolation methods. The maps were used to define the input parameters required to simulate the primary and secondary producing history. The history-matched simulator was then used to evaluate four production scenarios. The best scenario produces 51,000 bbl of additional oil over a 10-year period. If the injection rate is held to 300 BWPD the oil rate declines to a constant 15 BOPD after the first year. The projections are reasonable when viewed in the context of the historical performance ({approx}30 BOPD with a {approx}600 BWPD injection rate during 1980-1990). If an additional source of water is developed, increasing the injection rate to 600 BWPD will double the oil-producing rate. During the log evaluation work the presence of a possibly productive Penrose reservoir about 200 ft below the Queen was investigated. The Penrose zone exists throughout the Unit, but appears to be less permeable than the Queen. The maps suggest that either well 16D or 16C are suitable candidates for testing the Penrose zone.

  3. Semi–Selective Fatty Acyl Reductases from Four Heliothine Moths Influence the Specific Pheromone Composition

    PubMed Central

    Hagström, Åsa K.; Liénard, Marjorie A.; Groot, Astrid T.; Hedenström, Erik; Löfstedt, Christer

    2012-01-01

    Background Sex pheromones are essential in moth mate communication. Information on pheromone biosynthetic genes and enzymes is needed to comprehend the mechanisms that contribute to specificity of pheromone signals. Most heliothine moths use sex pheromones with (Z)–11–hexadecenal as the major component in combination with minor fatty aldehydes and alcohols. In this study we focus on four closely related species, Heliothis virescens, Heliothis subflexa, Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa assulta, which use (Z)–11–hexadecenal, (Z)–9–tetradecanal, and (Z)–9–hexadecenal in different ratios in their pheromone blend. The components are produced from saturated fatty acid precursors by desaturation, ?–oxidation, reduction and oxidation. Results We analyzed the composition of fatty acyl pheromone precursors and correlated it to the pheromone composition. Next, we investigated whether the downstream fatty–acyl reduction step modulates the ratio of alcohol intermediates before the final oxidation step. By isolating and functionally characterizing the Fatty Acyl Reductase (pgFAR) from each species we found that the pgFARs were active on a broad set of C8 to C16 fatty acyl substrates including the key pheromone precursors, Z9–14, Z9–16 and Z11–16:acyls. When presenting the three precursors in equal ratios to yeast cultures expressing any of the four pgFARs, all reduced (Z)–9–tetradecenoate preferentially over (Z)–11–hexadecenoate, and the latter over (Z)–9–hexadecenoate. Finally, when manipulating the precursor ratios in vitro, we found that the pgFARs display small differences in the biochemical activity on various substrates. Conclusions We conclude that a pgFAR with broad specificity is involved in heliothine moth pheromone biosynthesis, functioning as a semi–selective funnel that produces species–specific alcohol product ratios depending on the fatty–acyl precursor ratio in the pheromone gland. This study further supports the key role of these in pheromone biosynthesis and emphasizes the interplay between the pheromone fatty acyl precursors and the Lepidoptera specific pgFARs in shaping the pheromone composition. PMID:22615947

  4. Cloning and characterization of a region of Enterococcus faecalis plasmid pPD1 encoding pheromone inhibitor (ipd), pheromone sensitivity (traC), and pheromone shutdown (traB) genes.

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, J; Yoshida, K; Kobayashi, H; Isogai, A; Clewell, D B; Suzuki, A

    1995-01-01

    Bacteriocin plasmid pPD1 in Enterococcus faecalis encodes a mating response to recipient-produced sex pheromone cPD1. Once a recipient acquires pPD1, transconjugants apparently shut off cPD1 activity in broth culture and no longer behave as recipients for pPD1. This event is performed by synthesis of the pheromone inhibitor iPD1 and also by repression of cPD1 production, the so-called "pheromone shutdown." A 5.4-kb EcoRV-HincII segment of pPD1, which expressed iPD1 in Escherichia coli, was sequenced and found to be organized as traC-traB-traA-ipd; each open reading frame is analogous to that found in other pheromone plasmids, pAD1 and pCF10, and thus is designated in accordance with the nomenclature in pAD1. The ipd gene encodes a peptide consisting of 21 amino acids, in which the C-terminal eight residues correspond to iPD1. The putative TraC product has a strong similarity to oligopeptide-binding proteins found in other bacterial species, as do pheromone-binding proteins of pCF10 and pAD1. A strain carrying traC-disrupted pPD1 required a concentration of cPD1 fourfold higher than that needed by the wild-type strain for induction of sexual aggregation. These results suggest that the TraC product contributes to pheromone sensitivity as a pheromone-binding protein. A strain transformed with traB-disrupted pPD1 produced a high level of cPD1 similar to that produced by plasmid-free recipients and underwent self-induction. Thus, the TraB product contributes to cPD1 shutdown. PMID:7559344

  5. Sex-pairing pheromone of Ancistrotermes dimorphus (Isoptera: Macrotermitinae).

    PubMed

    Wen, Ping; Mo, Jianchu; Lu, Chunwen; Tan, Ken; Šobotník, Jan; Sillam-Dussès, David

    2015-12-01

    Ancistrotermes dimorphus is a common Macrotermitinae representative, facultative inquiline by its life-style, occurring in South-East China. Sex pheromone is used for couple formation and maintenance, and it is produced by and released from the female sternal gland and is highly attractive to males. Based on our combined behavioral, chemical and electrophysiological analyses, we identified (3Z,6Z)-dodeca-3,6-dien-1-ol as the female sex pheromone of A. dimorphus as it evoked the tandem behavior at short distance, and the active quantities ranged from 0.01ng to 10ng. Interestingly, GC-MS analyses of SPME extracts showed another compound specific to the female sternal gland, (3Z)-dodec-3-en-1-ol, which showed a clear GC-EAD response. However, this compound has no behavioral function in natural concentrations (0.1ng), while higher amounts (1ng) inhibit the attraction achieved by (3Z,6Z)-dodeca-3,6-dien-1-ol. The function of (3Z)-dodec-3-en-1-ol is not fully understood, but might be linked to recognition from sympatric species using the same major compound, enhancing the long-distance attraction, or informing about presence of other colonies using the compound as a trail-following pheromone. The sternal gland secretion of Ancistrotermes females contains additional candidate compounds, namely (3E,6Z)-dodeca-3,6-dien-1-ol and (6Z)-dodec-6-en-1-ol, which are not perceived by males' antennae in biologically relevant amounts. PMID:26549129

  6. Computational Model of the Insect Pheromone Transduction Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yuqiao; Lucas, Philippe; Rospars, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    A biophysical model of receptor potential generation in the male moth olfactory receptor neuron is presented. It takes into account all pre-effector processes—the translocation of pheromone molecules from air to sensillum lymph, their deactivation and interaction with the receptors, and the G-protein and effector enzyme activation—and focuses on the main post-effector processes. These processes involve the production and degradation of second messengers (IP3 and DAG), the opening and closing of a series of ionic channels (IP3-gated Ca2+ channel, DAG-gated cationic channel, Ca2+-gated Cl? channel, and Ca2+- and voltage-gated K+ channel), and Ca2+ extrusion mechanisms. The whole network is regulated by modulators (protein kinase C and Ca2+-calmodulin) that exert feedback inhibition on the effector and channels. The evolution in time of these linked chemical species and currents and the resulting membrane potentials in response to single pulse stimulation of various intensities were simulated. The unknown parameter values were fitted by comparison to the amplitude and temporal characteristics (rising and falling times) of the experimentally measured receptor potential at various pheromone doses. The model obtained captures the main features of the dose–response curves: the wide dynamic range of six decades with the same amplitudes as the experimental data, the short rising time, and the long falling time. It also reproduces the second messenger kinetics. It suggests that the two main types of depolarizing ionic channels play different roles at low and high pheromone concentrations; the DAG-gated cationic channel plays the major role for depolarization at low concentrations, and the Ca2+-gated Cl? channel plays the major role for depolarization at middle and high concentrations. Several testable predictions are proposed, and future developments are discussed. PMID:19300479

  7. Pheromone attraction and cross-attraction of Nezara, Acrosternum, and Euschistus spp. stink bugs (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in the field.

    PubMed

    Tillman, P G; Aldrich, J R; Khrimian, A; Cottrell, T E

    2010-04-01

    Detecting infestations of stink bugs (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) using pheromones remains problematic, particularly so in the United States for the exotic stink bug, Nezara viridula L., and our native stink bug, Acrosternum hilare (Say). Therefore, we conducted a 2-yr on-farm study to examine the attractiveness and possible cross-attraction of the reported pheromones for N. viridula and A. hilare and those previously discovered for Euschistus servus (Say) and Plautia stali Scott to N. viridula, A. hilare, and E. servus. The attractiveness of selected pentatomid pheromones to tachinid parasitoids of stink bugs was also examined. We showed for the first time under field conditions that N. viridula can be trapped with its reported pheromone, a 3:1 trans- to cis-(Z)-alpha-bisabolene epoxide blend. In fact, attraction of N. viridula increased with higher pheromone doses. Traps baited with a 5:95 trans- to cis-(Z)-alpha-bisabolene epoxide blend, the reported male-produced A. hilare attractant pheromone, failed to attract significantly more A. hilare than did unbaited control traps. Instead A. hilare was significantly cross-attracted to the P. stali pheromone [methyl (E,E,Z)-2,4,6-decatrienoate]. The E. servus pheromone [methyl (E,Z)-2,4-decadienoate], either alone or in combination with P. stali pheromone, was more attractive to E. servus than to N. viridula, P. stali, or A. hilare pheromones. In general, tachinid parasitoids were found responsive to the male-specific volatiles of their known hosts, including the attractiveness of Trichopoda pennipes (F.) to sesquiterpenoid blends characteristic of A. hilare and N. viridula. A tachinid parasitoid of E. servus, Cylindromyia sp., seemed to be attracted to E. servus pheromone. In conclusion, our results indicate that stink bug traps baited with lures containing N. viridula pheromone blend, P. stali pheromone, and E. servus pheromone have the greatest potential for detecting populations of N. viridula, A. hilare, and E. servus, respectively, in diversified agricultural landscapes. PMID:20388294

  8. Chemical profiles, division of labor and social status in Pachycondyla queens (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tentschert, J.; Kolmer, K.; Hölldobler, B.; Bestmann, H.-J.; Delabie, J. H. C.; Heinze, J.

    2001-03-01

    Queens of the neotropical ponerine ant Pachycondyla cf. 'inversa' may co-operate during colony founding. One of several co-founding queens specializes in foraging, whereas the others remain in the nest and guard the brood. Division of labor is achieved by aggressive interactions, which result in the formation of dominance hierarchies. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry of cuticular hydrocarbons obtained from live queens by SPME revealed consistent differences between the patterns of cuticular hydrocarbons of queens with high versus low rank: only high-ranking queens showed considerable amounts of cuticular pentadecane (n-C15) and heptadecene (n-C17:1). These two substances presumably originate from the queens' Dufour glands.

  9. Depression of brain dopamine and its metabolite after mating in European honeybee (Apis mellifera) queens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harano, Ken-Ichi; Sasaki, Ken; Nagao, Takashi

    2005-07-01

    To explore neuro-endocrinal changes in the brain of European honeybee (Apis mellifera) queens before and after mating, we measured the amount of several biogenic amines, including dopamine and its metabolite in the brain of 6- and 12-day-old virgins and 12-day-old mated queens. Twelve-day-old mated queens showed significantly lower amounts of dopamine and its metabolite (N-acetyldopamine) than both 6- and 12-day-old virgin queens, whereas significant differences in the amounts of these amines were not detected between 6- and 12-day-old virgin queens. These results are explained by down-regulation of both synthesis and secretion of brain dopamine after mating. It is speculated that higher amounts of brain dopamine in virgin queens might be involved in activation of ovarian follicles arrested in previtellogenic stages, as well as regulation of their characteristic behaviors.

  10. Functional outcomes following surgical treatment of bilateral mandibular condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-T; Feng, C-H; Tsay, P-K; Lai, J-P; Chen, Y-R

    2011-01-01

    Debate continues regarding unilateral or bilateral treatment for mandibular condylar fractures. This retrospective study evaluates the functional outcomes of bilateral condylar process fractures after surgical intervention. From May 1994 to December 2004, 51 adult patients with bilateral mandibular condylar process fractures were studied. There were 33 cases of bilateral condylar fractures (type I); 12 cases of condylar-subcondylar fractures (type II); and six cases of bilateral subcondylar fractures (type III). All patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation. Four patients had chin deviation, six had malocclusion, three had poor chewing function and eight had limited mouth opening. Type I patients had a significantly higher incidence of limited mouth opening (P=0.039) and associated maxillary fractures (n=12) and psychiatric disease (n=6) which yielded significantly poor functional outcomes. Complications included transient facial paresis (n=4), fracture and loosening of postoperative plates (n=3) and surgical wound infections (n=2). Open reduction with rigid fixation for bilateral condylar fractures provided satisfactory functional outcomes in this study. Concomitant maxillary fractures and underlying psychiatric problems are poor outcome factors. Aggressive rehabilitation in the first 9 months is important for early functional recovery. PMID:20961735

  11. Overexpressed TGF-? in subchondral bone leads to mandibular condyle degradation.

    PubMed

    Jiao, K; Zhang, M; Niu, L; Yu, S; Zhen, G; Xian, L; Yu, B; Yang, K; Liu, P; Cao, X; Wang, M

    2014-02-01

    Emerging evidence has implied that subchondral bone plays an important role during osteoarthritis (OA) pathology. This study was undertaken to investigate whether abnormalities of the condylar subchondral bone lead to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) OA. We used an osteoblast-specific mutant TGF-?1 transgenic mouse, the CED mouse, in which high levels of active TGF-?1 occur in bone marrow, leading to abnormal bone remodeling. Subchondral bone changes in the mandibular condyles were investigated by micro-CT, and alterations in TMJ condyles were confirmed by histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis. Abnormalities in the condylar subchondral bone, characterized as fluctuant bone mineral density and microstructure and increased but uncoupled activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts, were apparent in the 1- and 4-month CED mouse groups, while obvious cartilage degradation, in the form of cell-free regions and proteoglycan loss, was observed in the 4-month CED group. In addition, increased numbers of apoptotic chondrocytes and MMP9- and VEGF-positive chondrocytes were observed in the condylar cartilage in the 4-month CED group, but not in the 1-month CED group, compared with their respective age-matched controls. This study demonstrated that progressive degradation of mandibular condylar cartilage could be induced by the abnormal remodeling of the underlying subchondral bone during TMJOA progression. PMID:24309371

  12. Effects of experimentally deviated mandibular position on stress response.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Ai; Takeda, Tomotaka; Nakajima, Kazunori; Ishigami, Keiichi; Tsujii, Takeo; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of stress on -prefrontal cortex (PFC), emotion (using visual analogue scale, VAS, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, STAI), and the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Two types of stress were applied: (1) malocclusion-induced physical stress and (2) mental stress induced by an arithmetic task. Malocclusion was induced using an experimentally deviated mandibular device (EDMD) to obtain an experimentally deviated mandibular position (EDMP). A total of 11 healthy volunteers participated in the study. On day 1 they performed a pretrial arithmetic task followed by a 10-min rest, after which they performed a posttrial EDMD + arithmetic task or rest device + arithmetic task. These two tasks were selected at random and assigned at the rate of one per day. Activity in the PFC tended to show an increase in the pretrial arithmetic tasks and rest device + arithmetic task, but a decrease in the EDMD + arithmetic task compared with the rest device + arithmetic task. Heart rate significantly increased during the rest device + arithmetic task, whereas no significant difference was observed during the EDMD + arithmetic task. The EDMD + arithmetic task significantly increased STAI scores (p = 0.0047), and the significant decrease in VAS indicated "unpleasant" (p = 0.035). These findings suggest that EDMP-induced reduction in the level of PFC activity was a response to discomfort, indicating that EDMP affects systemic function such as that of the ANS as an unpleasant stressor. PMID:22879007

  13. 39. GARRET TRUSS DETAIL. Connection of a queen post (called ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. GARRET TRUSS DETAIL. Connection of a queen post (called 'king post' in the 1755 account for scantling for the Greater Meeting House) and the bottom chord at the south side of the second truss from the east end. Note the rose head nails and plaster stains from the walls of the 1755 Monthly Meeting Room. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. Queen Mary, University of London Mid-Term Test

    E-print Network

    Chu, Cho-Ho

    Queen Mary, University of London Mid-Term Test MAS111 Convergence and Continuity Duration: 1 hour. Given that p q is a root of the following equation: anxn + an-1xn-1 + · · · + a1x + a0 = 0 where a0, a1, . . . , an are integers, an = 0 and n 1, show that q divides an. (b) Explain what is meant by a transcendental number

  15. Avoid mistakes when choosing a new home: Nest choice and adoption of Leptothorax ant queens.

    PubMed

    Bernadou, Abel; Ruther, Joachim; Heinze, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    In ants, mating and colony founding are critical steps in the life of ant queens. Outside of their nests, young queens are exposed to intense predation. Therefore, they are expected to have evolved behavior to accurately and quickly locate a nesting place. However, data on the early life history of female reproductives are still lacking. Leptothorax gredleri is a suitable model organism to study the behavior of young queens. Reproductives can be reared under artificial conditions and readily mate in the laboratory. After mating, L. gredleri queens have the options to found solitarily, seek adoption into another colony, or return into their natal nest. In this study, we investigated the decision-making processes of female sexuals before and after mating. In particular, we tested whether female sexuals use chemical cues to find their way back to the nest, studied if they prefer their own nest over other nesting sites and followed the adoption dynamics of mated queens over 8 weeks (plus hibernation and spring). We showed that female sexuals and freshly mated queens spent more time on substrate previously used by workers from their own colony and from another colony than on a blank substrate. This discriminatory capability of queens appears to be lost in old, reproductive queens. Nest choice experiments showed that female sexuals and freshly mated queens can distinguish their own nest while old mated queens do not. When reintroduced in their maternal colony, young queens were readily adopted, but a few weeks later aggression against young queens led to their emigration from the maternal nest and eventually also death. PMID:26086676

  16. Demonstration and Characterization of a Persistent Pheromone Lure for the Navel Orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    PubMed Central

    Higbee, Bradley S.; Burks, Charles S.; Larsen, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    The lack of an effective pheromone lure has made it difficult to monitor and manage the navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), in the economically important crops in which it is the primary insect pest. A series of experiments was conducted to demonstrate and characterize a practical synthetic pheromone lure for capturing navel orangeworm males. Traps baited with lures prepared with 1 or 2 mg of a three- or four-component formulation captured similar numbers of males. The fluctuation over time in the number of males captured in traps baited with the pheromone lure correlated significantly with males captured in female-baited traps. Traps baited with the pheromone lure usually did not capture as many males as traps baited with unmated females, and the ratio of males trapped with pheromone to males trapped with females varied between crops and with abundance. The pheromone lure described improves the ability of pest managers to detect and monitor navel orangeworm efficiently and may improve management and decrease insecticide treatments applied as a precaution against damage. Awareness of differences between male interaction with the pheromone lure and calling females, as shown in these data, will be important as further studies and experience determine how best to use this lure for pest management. PMID:26462827

  17. Demonstration and Characterization of a Persistent Pheromone Lure for the Navel Orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Higbee, Bradley S; Burks, Charles S; Larsen, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    The lack of an effective pheromone lure has made it difficult to monitor and manage the navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), in the economically important crops in which it is the primary insect pest. A series of experiments was conducted to demonstrate and characterize a practical synthetic pheromone lure for capturing navel orangeworm males. Traps baited with lures prepared with 1 or 2 mg of a three- or four-component formulation captured similar numbers of males. The fluctuation over time in the number of males captured in traps baited with the pheromone lure correlated significantly with males captured in female-baited traps. Traps baited with the pheromone lure usually did not capture as many males as traps baited with unmated females, and the ratio of males trapped with pheromone to males trapped with females varied between crops and with abundance. The pheromone lure described improves the ability of pest managers to detect and monitor navel orangeworm efficiently and may improve management and decrease insecticide treatments applied as a precaution against damage. Awareness of differences between male interaction with the pheromone lure and calling females, as shown in these data, will be important as further studies and experience determine how best to use this lure for pest management. PMID:26462827

  18. Factors Affecting Pheromone Production by the Pepper Weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Collection Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Fred J.; Palmquist, Debra E.

    2014-01-01

    Several factors affecting pheromone production by male pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) as well as collection efficiency were investigated. Factors studied included: porous polymer adsorbents (Tenax versus Super Q), male age, time of day, male density, and male diet. Super Q was found to be a superior adsorbent for the male-produced alcohols and geranic acid as well as the plant-produced E-?-ocimene. Pheromone production increased with male age up to about age 15 days old and then tapered off. Male pepper weevils produced the highest amount of pheromone between noon and 2 pm (i.e., 4 to 6 h after “lights on”) and were producing ca. 800 ng/h during this period. Thereafter, pheromone production decreased and was extremely low during the scotophase (i.e., ca. 12 ng/h). Male pepper weevil density had a significant effect on both release rate and pheromone composition. Pheromone production on a per male basis was highest for individual males and the percentage of geranic acid in the blend was lowest for individual males. Male pepper weevils produced only extremely low amounts of pheromone when feeding on artificial diet; however, they produced very high amounts when on fresh peppers. Together, this information will be useful in designing better attractant lures for pepper weevils. PMID:26462948

  19. Ancient Trans-specific Polymorphism at Pheromone Receptor Genes in Basidiomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Devier, Benjamin; Aguileta, Gabriela; Hood, Michael E.; Giraud, Tatiana

    2009-01-01

    In the majority of sexual organisms, reproduction occurs almost exclusively through the combination of distinct and alternate forms, called sexes or mating types. In some fungi, there can be dozens to hundreds of alternate alleles that determine compatible mating types. Such extensive polymorphism is expected to be maintained by balancing selection, and in extreme cases may give rise to trans-specific polymorphism. Here, we analyzed sequences of two pheromone receptors in the Microbotryum fungal species complex (Basidiomycota), which has only two alternate mating types. Several lines of evidence strongly suggest that the pheromone receptors are two allelic sequences acting to determine the alternate A1 and A2 mating types required for mating in Microbotryum. Phylogenetic trees of pheromone receptors in the Microbotryum species complex indicated a trans-specific polymorphism: the Microbotryum sequences from a given mating type were all more similar to the pheromone receptors of distantly related classes of fungi than to the alternate pheromone receptor in the Microbotryum species. A phylogenetic tree built using other known pheromone receptors from basidiomycetes showed that trans-specific polymorphism is widespread. The pheromone receptor alleles from Microbotryum appeared as the oldest, being at least 370 million years old. This represents the oldest known trans-specific polymorphism known in any organism so far, which may be due to the existence of sex chromosomes, obligate sexuality, mitochondrial inheritance linked to the mating type, and a highly selfing mating system in Microbotryum. PMID:19001292

  20. Genes Involved in Sex Pheromone Discrimination in Drosophila melanogaster and Their Background-Dependent Effect

    PubMed Central

    Houot, Benjamin; Fraichard, Stéphane; Greenspan, Ralph J.; Ferveur, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Mate choice is based on the comparison of the sensory quality of potential mating partners, and sex pheromones play an important role in this process. In Drosophila melanogaster, contact pheromones differ between male and female in their content and in their effects on male courtship, both inhibitory and stimulatory. To investigate the genetic basis of sex pheromone discrimination, we experimentally selected males showing either a higher or lower ability to discriminate sex pheromones over 20 generations. This experimental selection was carried out in parallel on two different genetic backgrounds: wild-type and desat1 mutant, in which parental males showed high and low sex pheromone discrimination ability respectively. Male perception of male and female pheromones was separately affected during the process of selection. A comparison of transcriptomic activity between high and low discrimination lines revealed genes not only that varied according to the starting genetic background, but varied reciprocally. Mutants in two of these genes, Shaker and quick-to-court, were capable of producing similar effects on discrimination on their own, in some instances mimicking the selected lines, in others not. This suggests that discrimination of sex pheromones depends on genes whose activity is sensitive to genetic context and provides a rare, genetically defined example of the phenomenon known as “allele flips,” in which interactions have reciprocal effects on different genetic backgrounds. PMID:22292044

  1. Endogenous fatty acids in olfactory hairs influence pheromone binding protein structure and function in Lymantria dispar.

    PubMed

    Nardella, Jason; Terrado, Mailyn; Honson, Nicolette S; Plettner, Erika

    2015-08-01

    The gypsy moth utilizes a pheromone, (7R,8S)-2-methyl-7,8-epoxyoctadecane, for mate location. The pheromone is detected by sensory hairs (sensilla) on the antennae of adult males. Sensilla contain the dendrites of olfactory neurons bathed in lymph, which contains pheromone binding proteins (PBPs). We have extracted and identified free fatty acids from lymph of sensory hairs, and we demonstrate that these function as endogenous ligands for gypsy moth PBP1 and PBP2. Homology modeling of both PBPs, and docking of fatty acids reveal multiple binding sites: one internal, the others external. Pheromone binding assays suggest that these fatty acids increase PBP-pheromone binding affinity. We show that fatty acid binding causes an increase in ?-helix content in the N-terminal domain, but not in the C-terminal peptide of both proteins. The C-terminal peptide was shown to form a ?-helix in a hydrophobic, homogeneous environment, but not in the presence of fatty acid micelles. Through partition assays we show that the fatty acids prevent adsorption of the pheromone on hydrophobic surfaces and facilitate pheromone partition into an aqueous phase. We propose that lymph is an emulsion of fatty acids and PBP that influence each other and thereby control the partition equilibria of hydrophobic odorants. PMID:26032337

  2. Electrophysiological and behavioral responses of Diaphania glauculalis males to female sex pheromone.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tao; Liu, Zhi Tao; Zhang, Yuan Yuan; Sun, Zhao Hui; Li, Yi Zhen; Wen, Xiu Jun; Chen, Xiao Yang

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the pheromone active component of female moths, Diaphania glauculalis, an important pest of Anthocephalus chinensis in China. The sex pheromone was extracted from sex pheromone gland extracts of virgin female moth of D. glauculalis using n-hexane, and the pheromone gland extracts of females were analyzed using coupled gas chromatography-electroantennogram detection (GC-EAD) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The sex pheromone active components were based on the comparison the retention time and mass spectrum, with suitable synthetic compounds. (E)-11-hexadecenal (E11-16:Ald) and (E,E)-10,12-hexadecadienal (E10E12-16:Ald) were identified as the major sex pheromone components in the females. Their biological activities were evaluated in a series of electroantennogram (EAG) experiments and four-arm olfactometer assays using synthetic compounds. D. glauculalis males could be attracted by any single component, but a mixture of the E11-16:Ald and E10E12-16:Ald in a ratio of 5:5 elicited a substantial response, demonstrating that the binary blend is essential in male attraction. We therefore conclude that the aldehyde compounds, a mixture of E11-16:Ald and E10E12-16:Ald, comprise the sex pheromone components of D. glauculalis, which might be applied for insect field trapping. PMID:26002369

  3. Fungal lipopeptide mating pheromones: a model system for the study of protein prenylation.

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, G A; Naider, F; Becker, J M

    1995-01-01

    In a variety of fungal species, mating between haploid cells is initiated by the action of peptide pheromones. The identification and characterization of several fungal pheromones has revealed that they have common structural features classifying them as lipopeptides. In the course of biosynthesis, these pheromones undergo a series of posttranslational processing events prior to export. One common modification is the attachment of an isoprenoid group to the C terminus of the pheromone precursor. Genetic and biochemical investigations of this biosynthetic pathway have led to the elucidation of genes and enzymes which are responsible for isoprenylation of other polypeptides including the nuclear lamins, several vesicular transport proteins, and the oncogene product Ras. The alpha-factor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae serves as a model for studying the biosynthesis, export, and bioactivity of lipopeptide pheromones. In addition to being isoprenylated with a farnesyl group, the alpha-factor is secreted by a novel peptide export pathway utilizing a yeast homolog of the mammalian multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein. The identification of putative lipopeptide-encoding loci within other fungi, including the human immunodeficiency virus-associated opportunistic pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans and the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis, has stimulated much interest in understanding possible roles for pheromones in fungal proliferation and pathogenicity. Knowledge of variations within the processing, export, and receptor-mediated signal transduction pathways associated with different fungal lipopeptide pheromones will continue to provide insights into similar mechanisms which exist in higher eukaryotes. PMID:7565412

  4. Thelytokous parthenogenesis by queens in the dacetine ant Pyramica membranifera (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Fuminori; Touyama, Yoshifumi; Gotoh, Ayako; Kitahiro, Shungo; Billen, Johan

    2010-08-01

    Thelytokous parthenogenesis in which diploid females are produced from unfertilized eggs, was recently reported for some ant species. Here, we document thelytokous reproduction by queens in the polygynous species Pyramica membranifera. Queens that emerged in the laboratory were kept with or without workers under laboratory conditions. Independent colony founding was successful for a few queens if prey was provided. All artificial colonies, which started with a newly emerged queen and workers produced new workers and some of the colonies also produced female sexuals. Some of the female sexuals shed their wings in the laboratory and started formation of new polygynous colonies. Workers had no ovaries and thus, were obligatorily sterile.

  5. 78 FR 77772 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “A Royal Passion: Queen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... Photography'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the following determinations: Pursuant to the authority... ``A Royal Passion: Queen Victoria and Photography,'' imported from abroad for temporary...

  6. Interference of plant volatiles on pheromone receptor neurons of male Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    PubMed

    Ammagarahalli, Byrappa; Gemeno, César

    2015-10-01

    In moths, sex pheromone components are detected by pheromone-specific olfactory receptor neurons (ph-ORNs) housed in sensilla trichodea in the male antennae. In Grapholita molesta, ph-ORNs are highly sensitive and specific to the individual sex pheromone components, and thus help in the detection and discrimination of the unique conspecific pheromone blend. Plant odors interspersed with a sub-optimal pheromone dose are reported to increase male moth attraction. To determine if the behavioral synergism of pheromone and plant odors starts at the ph-ORN level, single sensillum recordings were performed on Z8-12:Ac and E8-12:Ac ph-ORNs (Z-ORNs and E-ORNs, respectively) stimulated with pheromone-plant volatile mixtures. First, biologically meaningful plant-volatile doses were determined by recording the response of plant-specific ORNs housed in sensilla auricillica and trichodea to several plant odorants. This exploration provided a first glance at plant ORNs in this species. Then, using these plant volatile doses, we found that the spontaneous activity of ph-ORNs was not affected by the stimulation with plant volatiles, but that a binary mixture of sex pheromone and plant odorants resulted in a small (about 15%), dose-independent, but statistically significant, reduction in the spike frequency of Z-ORNs with respect to stimulation with Z8-12:Ac alone. The response of E-ORNs to a combination of E8-12:Ac and plant volatiles was not different from E8-12:Ac alone. We argue that the small inhibition of Z-ORNs caused by physiologically realistic plant volatile doses is probably not fully responsible for the observed behavioral synergism of pheromone and plant odors. PMID:26188269

  7. [Effects of deltamethrin on pheromone perception in male Asian corn borer (Ostrinia furnacalis)].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongchun; Du, Jiawei; Huang, Yongping

    2003-05-01

    To investigate the effects of deltamethrin on male Asian corn borer (Ostrinia furnacalis) to perceive sex pheromone, the electro-physiological and behavioral response of topically treated male Asian corn borer to sex pheromone were tested with EAG sets and wind tunnel. The results showed that the summit response of male moths to varied ratios of pheromone blends was at E/Z = 1/9, 5/5 and 9/1, which was similar to that of control, but the EAG values were only 0.25 mV to 0.45 mV, which were significant lower than control by 0.15 mV to 0.35 mV. The low threshold dose of pheromone for treated males to perception was 1 ng, and the highest was 10,000 ng, which was also similar to control, but low by 0.1 mV to 0.5 mV in EAG values. This suggested that deltamethrin mainly affected the sensibility of peripheral reception system, while the preliminary recognition to the ratio of pheromone blends by peripheral reception system are not disturbed heavily. In wind tunnel test, a relative higher amount of males shifted to response to pheromone with E/Z ratios of 7/3 from E/Z = 1/1 of control males, and keep on response at this level to blends with more E12-14: OAc. The lowest dosage of pheromone effectively elicited response of males also shifted from 10 ng to 100 ng, and the highest doses for response declined to about 50,000 ng from 100,000 ng of control, which might result in a narrower band of effective doses. It is suggested that the sublethal dosage of deltamethrin not only affected the sensibility of male moth to perceive the pheromone, but also affected the specificity of pheromone perception. PMID:12924127

  8. Prevalence and features of distolingual roots in mandibular molars analyzed by cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mi-Ree; Moon, Young-Mi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the prevalence of distolingual roots in mandibular molars among Koreans, the root canal system associated with distolingual roots, and the concurrent appearance of a distolingual root in the mandibular first molar and a C-shaped canal in the mandibular second molar. Materials and Methods Cone-beam computed tomographic images of 264 patients were screened and examined. Axial sections of 1056 mandibular molars were evaluated to determine the number of roots. The interorifice distances from the distolingual canal to the distobuccal canal were also estimated. Using an image analysis program, the root canal curvature was calculated. Pearson's chi-square test, the paired t-test, one-way analysis of variance, and post-hoc analysis were performed. Results Distolingual roots were observed in 26.1% of the subjects. In cases where a distolingual root was observed in the mandibular molar, a significant difference was observed in the root canal curvature between the buccolingual and mesiodistal orientations. The maximum root canal curvature was most commonly observed in the mesiodistal orientation in the coronal portion, but in the apical portion, maximum root canal curvature was most often observed in the buccolingual orientation. Conclusion The canal curvature of distolingual roots was found to be very complex, with a different direction in each portion. No correlation was found between the presence of a distolingual root in the mandibular first molar and the presence of a C-shaped canal in the mandibular second molar.

  9. Mandibular ramus: An indicator for sex determination - A digital radiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Indira, Annamalai Ponnuswamy; Markande, Archana; David, Maria P

    2012-01-01

    Background: The identification of skeletal remains is of paramount importance in medico-legal investigations. The skeletal components most often investigated for gender determination are the pelvis and skull, with the mandible being a practical element to analyze sexual dimorphism in the fragmented bones. Presence of a dense layer of compact bone makes it very durable and well preserved than many other bones. Mandibular ramus can be used to differentiate between sexes and it also expresses strong univariate sexual dimorphism. When skeleton sex determination is considered, metric analyses on the radiographs are often found to be of superior value owing to their objectivity, accuracy, and reproducibility. Aims and Objectives: (1) To measure, compare, and evaluate the various measurements of mandibular ramus as observed on orthopantomographs. (2) To assess the usefulness of mandibular ramus as an aid in sex determination. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted using orthopantomographs of 50 males and 50 females, which were taken using Kodak 8000C Digital Panoramic and Cephalometric System (73 kVp, 12 mA, 13.9 s). Mandibular ramus measurements were carried out using Master View 3.0 software. The measurements of the mandibular ramus were subjected to discriminant function analysis. Results: We observed each variable of the mandibular ramus to be a significant predictor in classifying a given sample (P < 0.001). Conclusion: This study on mandibular ramus measurements using orthopantomograph shows strong evidence suggesting that the ramus can be used for gender determination for forensic analysis. PMID:23741142

  10. Identification of trail pheromone of larva of eastern tent caterpillarMalacosoma americanum (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae).

    PubMed

    Crump, D; Silverstein, R M; Williams, H J; Fitzgerald, T D

    1987-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that larvae of the eastern tent caterpillar (Malacosoma americanum F.) mark trails, leading from their tent to feeding sites on host trees, with a pheromone secreted from the posterior tip of the abdominal sternum. 5?-Cholestane-3,24-dione (1) has been identified as an active component of the trail. The larvae have a threshold sensitivity to the pheromone of 10(-11) g/mm of trail. Several related compounds elicit the trail-following response. Two other species of tent caterpillars also responded positively to the pheromone in preliminary laboratory tests. PMID:24301883

  11. Feeding regulates sex pheromone attraction and courtship in Drosophila females.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, Sébastien; Trona, Federica; Borrero-Echeverry, Felipe; Bilz, Florian; Grabe, Veit; Becher, Paul G; Carlsson, Mikael A; Nässel, Dick R; Hansson, Bill S; Sachse, Silke; Witzgall, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, gender-specific behavioural responses to the male-produced sex pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA) rely on sexually dimorphic, third-order neural circuits. We show that nutritional state in female flies modulates cVA perception in first-order olfactory neurons. Starvation increases, and feeding reduces attraction to food odour, in both sexes. Adding cVA to food odour, however, maintains attraction in fed females, while it has no effect in males. Upregulation of sensitivity and behavioural responsiveness to cVA in fed females is paralleled by a strong increase in receptivity to male courtship. Functional imaging of the antennal lobe (AL), the olfactory centre in the insect brain, shows that olfactory input to DA1 and VM2 glomeruli is also modulated by starvation. Knocking down insulin receptors in neurons converging onto the DA1 glomerulus suggests that insulin-signalling partly controls pheromone perception in the AL, and adjusts cVA attraction according to nutritional state and sexual receptivity in Drosophila females. PMID:26255707

  12. Drosophila adult and larval pheromones modulate larval food choice

    PubMed Central

    Farine, Jean-Pierre; Cortot, Jérôme; Ferveur, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Insects use chemosensory cues to feed and mate. In Drosophila, the effect of pheromones has been extensively investigated in adults, but rarely in larvae. The colonization of natural food sources by Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila simulans species may depend on species-specific chemical cues left in the food by larvae and adults. We identified such chemicals in both species and measured their influence on larval food preference and puparation behaviour. We also tested compounds that varied between these species: (i) two larval volatile compounds: hydroxy-3-butanone-2 and phenol (predominant in D. simulans and D. buzzatii, respectively), and (ii) adult cuticular hydrocarbons (CHs). Drosophila buzzatii larvae were rapidly attracted to non-CH adult conspecific cues, whereas D. simulans larvae were strongly repulsed by CHs of the two species and also by phenol. Larval cues from both species generally reduced larval attraction and pupariation on food, which was generally—but not always—low, and rarely reflected larval response. As these larval and adult pheromones specifically influence larval food search and the choice of a pupariation site, they may greatly affect the dispersion and survival of Drosophila species in nature. PMID:24741012

  13. A Putative Human Pheromone, Androstadienone, Increases Cooperation between Men

    PubMed Central

    Huoviala, Paavo; Rantala, Markus J.

    2013-01-01

    Androstadienone, a component of male sweat, has been suggested to function as a human pheromone, an airborne chemical signal causing specific responses in conspecifics. In earlier studies androstadienone has been reported to increase attraction, affect subjects' mood, cortisol levels and activate brain areas linked to social cognition, among other effects. However, the existing psychological evidence is still relatively scarce, especially regarding androstadienone's effects on male behaviour. The purpose of this study was to look for possible behavioural effects in male subjects by combining two previously distinct branches of research: human pheromone research and behavioural game theory of experimental economics. Forty male subjects participated in a mixed-model, double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment. The participants were exposed to either androstadienone or a control stimulus, and participated in ultimatum and dictator games, decision making tasks commonly used to measure cooperation and generosity quantitatively. Furthermore, we measured participants' salivary cortisol and testosterone levels during the experiment. Salivary testosterone levels were found to positively correlate with cooperative behaviour. After controlling for the effects of participants' baseline testosterone levels, androstadienone was found to increase cooperative behaviour in the decision making tasks. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that androstadienone directly affects behaviour in human males. PMID:23717389

  14. Brain response to putative pheromones in lesbian women

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Hans; Lindström, Per; Savic, Ivanka

    2006-01-01

    The progesterone derivative 4,16-androstadien-3-one (AND) and the estrogen-like steroid estra-1,3,5(10),16-tetraen-3-ol (EST) are candidate compounds for human pheromones. In previous positron emission tomography studies, we found that smelling AND and EST activated regions primarily incorporating the sexually dimorphic nuclei of the anterior hypothalamus, that this activation was differentiated with respect to sex and compound, and that homosexual men processed AND congruently with heterosexual women rather than heterosexual men. These observations indicate involvement of the anterior hypothalamus in physiological processes related to sexual orientation in humans. We expand the information on this issue in the present study by performing identical positron emission tomography experiments on 12 lesbian women. In contrast to heterosexual women, lesbian women processed AND stimuli by the olfactory networks and not the anterior hypothalamus. Furthermore, when smelling EST, they partly shared activation of the anterior hypothalamus with heterosexual men. These data support our previous results about differentiated processing of pheromone-like stimuli in humans and further strengthen the notion of a coupling between hypothalamic neuronal circuits and sexual preferences. PMID:16705035

  15. Feeding regulates sex pheromone attraction and courtship in Drosophila females

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, Sébastien; Trona, Federica; Borrero-Echeverry, Felipe; Bilz, Florian; Grabe, Veit; Becher, Paul G.; Carlsson, Mikael A.; Nässel, Dick R.; Hansson, Bill S.; Sachse, Silke; Witzgall, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, gender-specific behavioural responses to the male-produced sex pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA) rely on sexually dimorphic, third-order neural circuits. We show that nutritional state in female flies modulates cVA perception in first-order olfactory neurons. Starvation increases, and feeding reduces attraction to food odour, in both sexes. Adding cVA to food odour, however, maintains attraction in fed females, while it has no effect in males. Upregulation of sensitivity and behavioural responsiveness to cVA in fed females is paralleled by a strong increase in receptivity to male courtship. Functional imaging of the antennal lobe (AL), the olfactory centre in the insect brain, shows that olfactory input to DA1 and VM2 glomeruli is also modulated by starvation. Knocking down insulin receptors in neurons converging onto the DA1 glomerulus suggests that insulin-signalling partly controls pheromone perception in the AL, and adjusts cVA attraction according to nutritional state and sexual receptivity in Drosophila females. PMID:26255707

  16. MAP kinase dynamics in response to pheromones in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    van Drogen, F; Stucke, V M; Jorritsma, G; Peter, M

    2001-12-01

    Although scaffolding is a major regulator of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, scaffolding proteins are poorly understood. During yeast mating, MAPK Fus3p is phosphorylated by MAPKK Ste7p, which is activated by MAPKKK Ste11p. This MAPK module interacts with the scaffold molecule Ste5p. Here we show that Ste11p and Ste7p were predominantly cytoplasmic proteins, while Ste5p and Fus3p were found in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Ste5p, Ste7p and Fus3p also localized to tips of mating projections in pheromone-treated cells. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we demonstrate that Fus3p rapidly shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm independently of pheromones, Fus3p phosphorylation and Ste5p. Membrane-bound Ste5p can specifically recruit Fus3p and Ste7p to the cell cortex. Ste5p remains stably bound at the plasma membrane, unlike activated Fus3p, which dissociates from Ste5p and translocates to the nucleus. PMID:11781566

  17. Ready for a fight? The physiological effects of detecting an opponent's pheromone cues prior to a contest.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mark J; Williams, John; Sinderman, Benjamin; Earley, Ryan L

    2015-10-01

    Reception of pheromone cues can elicit significant physiological (e.g. steroid hormone levels) changes in the recipient. These pheromone-induced physiological changes have been well documented for male-female interactions, but scarcely in same-sex interactions (male-male and female-female). We sought to address this dearth in the current literature and examine whether mangrove rivulus fish (Kryptolebias marmoratus) could detect and, ultimately, mount a physiological response to the pheromone signature of a potential, same-sex competitor. We examined steroid hormone levels in mangrove rivulus exposed to one of three treatments: 1) isolation, 2) exposure to pheromones of a size-matched partner, and 3) pheromone exposure to a size-matched opponent followed by a physical encounter with the opponent. We found that exposure to a competitor's pheromone cues elicited a significant increase in testosterone levels. Increases in testosterone were similar across genetically distinct lineages derived from geographically distinct populations. Further, testosterone levels were similar between individuals only exposed to pheromone cues and individuals exposed to both pheromone cues and a subsequent physical encounter. Our findings led us to generate a number of testable predictions regarding how mangrove rivulus utilize pheromone signals in social interactions, the molecular mechanisms linking social stimuli and hormonal responses, and the possible adaptive benefits of hormonal responsiveness to receiving a potential competitor's pheromone cues. PMID:26002821

  18. Treating dental crowding with mandibular incisor extraction in an Angle Class I patient

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Gislana Braga

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular dental crowding often encourages patients to seek orthodontic treatment. The orthodontist should decide between protrusion of incisors or decrease in dental volume so as to achieve proper alignment and leveling. The present study reports the treatment of an Angle Class I malocclusion adolescent female brachyfacial patient with severe mandibular dental crowding, increased curve of Spee and deep overbite. The patient was treated with extraction of a mandibular incisor. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO) as a requirement for the title of certified by the BBO. PMID:26154463

  19. [A study of mandibular movement velocity and acceleration in young adults with normal people].

    PubMed

    Lu, P J

    1993-09-01

    The velocity and acceleration of mandibular movements including the border movement, habitual movement and functional movement were studied in 25 young adults by using D-SGG measuring instrument. The results showed that the conception of functional velocity and the maximum velocity of mandibular movement were developed. The physiological and clinical significance of the value of mandibular movement acceleration can be explained by Newton's Second law, F = ma. The author pointed out that in order to keep the necessary masticatory efficiency, the masticatory velocity enjoy the priority in matching with the masticatory force in mastication. PMID:8194415

  20. 76 FR 3596 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Queen Conch Fishery of Puerto...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ...would implement measures to address overfishing of Caribbean queen conch in the U...continues to be overfished and is undergoing overfishing. Additional management measures are...implemented several measures to address overfishing of queen conch, including setting...

  1. Pheromone discrimination by a pH-tuned polymorphism of the Bombyx mori pheromone-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Damberger, Fred F.; Michel, Erich; Ishida, Yuko; Leal, Walter S.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The Bombyx mori pheromone-binding protein (BmorPBP) is known to adopt two different conformations. These are BmorPBPA, where a regular helix formed by the C-terminal dodecapeptide segment, ?7, occupies the ligand-binding cavity, and BmorPBPB, where the binding site is free to accept ligands. NMR spectra of delipidated BmorPBP solutions at the physiological pH of the bulk sensillum lymph near pH 6.5 show only BmorPBPA, and in mixtures, the two species are in slow exchange on the chemical shift frequency scale. This equilibrium has been monitored at variable pH and ligand concentrations, demonstrating that it is an intrinsic property of BmorPBP that is strongly affected by pH variation and ligand binding. This polymorphism tunes BmorPBP for optimal selective pheromone transport: Competition between ?7 and lipophilic ligands for its binding cavity enables selective uptake of bombykol at the pore endings in the sensillum wall, whereas compounds with lower binding affinity can only be bound in the bulk sensillum lymph. After transport across the bulk sensillum lymph into the lower pH area near the dendritic membrane surface, bombykol is ejected near the receptor, whereas compounds with lower binding affinity are ejected before reaching the olfactory receptor, rendering them susceptible to degradation by enzymes present in the sensillum lymph. PMID:24158483

  2. Removal of an extensive mandibular odontoma using an intraoral approach.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Hadas; Lustmann, Joshua; Regev, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Odontomas, the most common odontogenic tumors, occur more frequently in the maxilla and are rarely larger than a tooth. They are usually found incidentally on routine dental radiographs during the second decade of life. The treatment of choice is surgical removal, and large tumors are challenging as damage may occur to surrounding anatomic structures. In this article we describe a "giant" compound odontoma occupying the entire body of the mandible and ramus in a 7-year-old girl. A conservative intraoral enucleation was used to avoid facial scarring and preserve mandibular continuity and function. The huge bony defect healed completely without a bone graft or further intervention. This case report emphasizes the importance of the early diagnosis of these lesions and a conservative surgical approach as well as the extraordinary healing potential of young patients. PMID:23479585

  3. MANDIBULAR ASYMMETRY CHARACTERIZATION USING GENERALIZED TENSOR-BASED MORPHOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Beatriz; Alhadidi, Abeer; Cevidanes, Lucia; Styner, Martin; Oguz, Ipek

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of facial asymmetry is crucial for successful planning of corrective surgery. We propose a tensor-based morphometry (TBM) framework to locate and quantify asymmetry using 3D CBCT images. To this end, we compute a rigid transformation between the mandible segmentation and its mirror image, which yields global rotation and translation with respect to the cranial base to guide the surgery’s first stage. Next, we nonrigidly register the rigidly aligned images and use TBM methods to locally analyze the deformation field. This yields data on the location, amount and direction of “growth” (or “shrinkage”) between the left and right sides. We visualize this data in a volumetric manner and via scalar and vector maps on the mandibular surface to provide the surgeon with optimal understanding of the patient’s anatomy. We illustrate the feasibility and strength of our technique on 3 representative patients with a wide range of facial asymmetries. PMID:24443671

  4. Mandibular bone response to plasma-sprayed coatings of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Denissen, H W; Kalk, W; de Nieuport, H M; Maltha, J C; van de Hooff, A

    1990-01-01

    Sintered hydroxyapatite ceramic particles can be applied as a coating on a titanium substrate using a plasma-spraying technique. The biological and mechanical properties of implants with such a coating were studied in the mandible of a dog. The results indicated that a very strong and direct bonding between the hydroxyapatite coating and the mandibular bone developed. The shear strength of the bone/ceramic interface was higher than the interfacial strength between ceramic and titanium substrate. From the radiologic, macroscopic, and microscopic observations it was concluded that the biological properties of plasma-sprayed coatings of hydroxyapatite are the same as those of sintered hydroxyapatite ceramic. As a result of mechanical failure of the coherence of the hydroxyapatite particles at the outer layer of the coating, free particles of hydroxyapatite were observed in the surrounding bone tissue. PMID:2372367

  5. MultiModality Surgical and Hyperbaric Management of Mandibular Osteoradionecrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Freiberger, John J.; Yoo, David S.; Lisle Dear, Guy de; McGraw, Thomas A.; Blakey, George H.; Padilla Burgos, Rebecca; Kraft, Kevin; Nelson, John W.; Moon, Richard E.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To elucidate long-term outcomes in 65 consecutive patients meeting a uniform definition of mandibular osteoradionecrosis (ORN) treated with multimodality therapy including hyperbaric oxygen (HBO). Methods and Materials: Pretreatment, post-treatment and long-term follow-up of mandibular lesions with exposed bone were ranked by a systematic review of medical records and patient telephone calls. The ranking system was based on lesion diameter and number plus disease progression. Changes from pretreatment to post-treatment and follow-up were analyzed by Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Improved wound survival, measured by time to relapse, defined as any less favorable rank after HBO treatment, was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: In all, 57 cases (88%) resolved or improved by lesion grade or progression and evolution criteria after HBO (p < 0.001). Four patients healed before surgery after HBO alone. Of 57 patients who experienced improvement, 41 had failed previous nonmultimodality therapy for 3 months and 26 for 6 months or more. A total of 43 patients were eligible for time-to-relapse survival analysis. Healing or improvement lasted a mean duration of 86.1 months (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 64.0-108.2) in nonsmokers (n = 20) vs. 15.8 months (95% CI, 8.4-23.2) in smokers (n = 14) versus 24.2 months (95% CI, 15.2-33.2) in patients with recurrent cancer (n = 9) (p = 0.002 by the log-rank method). Conclusions: Multimodality therapy using HBO is effective for ORN when less intensive therapies have failed. Although the healing rate in similarly affected patients not treated with HBO is unknown, the improvements seen with peri-operative HBO were durable provided that the patients remained cancer free and abstained from smoking.

  6. Similarities in pheromonal communication of flea beetles Phyllotreta cruciferae Goeze and Ph. vittula Redtenbacher (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remarkable similarities have been found in the pheromonal communication of Phyllotreta vittula Redtenbacher and of Ph. cruciferae Goeze (European population) (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae). In previous European field tests with Ph. cruciferae, only the major male-produced sesquiterpene identified from ...

  7. Early-Summer Pheromone Biology of Galerucella calmariensis and Relationship to Dispersal and Colonization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Galerucella calmariensis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) has become an effective biological control agent for purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria). A male-produced aggregation pheromone was recently identified in this mostly univoltine beetle, and attractiveness to both sexes was demonstrated in the ...

  8. Molecular and Pheromone Studies of Pecan Nut Casebearer, Acrobasis nuxvorella Neunzig (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) 

    E-print Network

    Hartfield, Emilie Anne

    2011-02-22

    The pecan nut casebearer, Acrobasis nuxvorella Neunzig (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) is the most damaging insect pest of pecan, Carya illinoinensis (Wang) K. Koch (Fagales: Juglandaceae). Two sex pheromones have been identified ...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1124 - Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1124 Arthropod pheromones...of this chapter, when used in retrievably sized polymeric matrix dispensers are exempt from the requirement of a...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1124 - Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1124 Arthropod pheromones...of this chapter, when used in retrievably sized polymeric matrix dispensers are exempt from the requirement of a...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1124 - Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1124 Arthropod pheromones...of this chapter, when used in retrievably sized polymeric matrix dispensers are exempt from the requirement of a...

  12. 40 CFR 180.1124 - Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1124 Arthropod pheromones...of this chapter, when used in retrievably sized polymeric matrix dispensers are exempt from the requirement of a...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1124 - Arthropod pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1124 Arthropod pheromones...of this chapter, when used in retrievably sized polymeric matrix dispensers are exempt from the requirement of a...

  14. A new vertebrate courtship pheromone, PMF, affects female receptivity in a terrestrial salamander

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Stevan J.

    & Reagan 1990; Rollmann et al. 1999, 2003). These chem- ical signals differ from sex attractants for these salamander courtship pheromones is to increase female receptivity (cf. Houck & Reagan 1990; Houck et al. 1998

  15. Key biosynthetic gene subfamily recruited for pheromone production prior to the extensive radiation of Lepidoptera

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Moths have evolved highly successful mating systems, relying on species-specific mixtures of sex pheromone components for long-distance mate communication. Acyl-CoA desaturases are key enzymes in the biosynthesis of these compounds and to a large extent they account for the great diversity of pheromone structures in Lepidoptera. A novel desaturase gene subfamily that displays ?11 catalytic activities has been highlighted to account for most of the unique pheromone signatures of the taxonomically advanced ditrysian species. To assess the mechanisms driving pheromone evolution, information is needed about the signalling machinery of primitive moths. The currant shoot borer, Lampronia capitella, is the sole reported primitive non-ditrysian moth known to use unsaturated fatty-acid derivatives as sex-pheromone. By combining biochemical and molecular approaches we elucidated the biosynthesis paths of its main pheromone component, the (Z,Z)-9,11-tetradecadien-1-ol and bring new insights into the time point of the recruitment of the key ?11-desaturase gene subfamily in moth pheromone biosynthesis. Results The reconstructed evolutionary tree of desaturases evidenced two ditrysian-specific lineages (the ?11 and ?9 (18C>16C)) to have orthologs in the primitive moth L. capitella despite being absent in Diptera and other insect genomes. Four acyl-CoA desaturase cDNAs were isolated from the pheromone gland, three of which are related to ?9-desaturases whereas the fourth cDNA clusters with ?11-desaturases. We demonstrated that this transcript (Lca-KPVQ) exclusively accounts for both steps of desaturation involved in pheromone biosynthesis. This enzyme possesses a Z11-desaturase activity that allows transforming the palmitate precursor (C16:0) into (Z)-11-hexadecenoic acid and the (Z)-9-tetradecenoic acid into the conjugated intermediate (Z,Z)-9,11-tetradecadienoic acid. Conclusion The involvement of a single Z11-desaturase in pheromone biosynthesis of a non-ditrysian moth species, supports that the duplication event leading to the origin of the Lepidoptera-specific ?11-desaturase gene subfamily took place before radiation of ditrysian moths and their divergence from other heteroneuran lineages. Our findings uncover that this novel class of enzymes affords complex combinations of unique unsaturated fatty acyl-moieties of variable chain-lengths, regio- and stereo-specificities since early in moth history and contributes a notable innovation in the early evolution of moth-pheromones. PMID:18831750

  16. Analysis and design of an adjustable bone plate for mandibular fracture fixation

    E-print Network

    Cervantes, Thomas Michael

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents the design, analysis and testing of a bone plate for mandibular fracture fixation. Conventional bone plates are commonly used to set fractures of the mandible in a surgical setting. If proper alignment ...

  17. Root Canal Morphology of Human Mandibular First Permanent Molars in an Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Shahriar; Yavari, Hamid Reza; Rahimi, Saeed; Torkamani, Reza

    2008-01-01

    Background and aims The knowledge of variations in root canal morphology is critical for a successful endodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate variations in the root canal system of human mandibular first permanent molars in an Iranian population. Materials and methods In this study, 209 mandibular first molar teeth were decalcified, dye-injected, and cleared in order to determine the number and configuration of the root canals. Results The results demonstrated that 65.56% of the mandibular first molars under study had three, 31.57% had four and 2.87% had two canals. Conclusion According to the results of this study and considering variations in the root canal systems of the mandibular first molars, it seems that great care should be taken in the root canal treatment of these teeth. PMID:23285325

  18. COLONY INSULARITY THROUGH QUEEN CONTROL ON WORKER SOCIAL MOTIVATION IN ANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the relative contribution of the queen and workers to colony nestmate recognition cues and on colony territoriality in the ant Camponotus fellah. Workers were either individually isolated, preventing contact with both queen and workers (Colony Deprived, CD), kept in queenless groups,...

  19. Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Information Technology ~ Training & Technology Solutions

    E-print Network

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Information Technology ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 Student Center 1. Logging the period between for first and last name. #12;Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office

  20. Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions

    E-print Network

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 2 may receive #12;Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies