Sample records for questionnaire hospital anxiety

  1. Prevalence of anxiety and depression in cancer patients seen at the Norwegian Radium Hospital

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Aass; S. D. Fosså; A. A. Dahl; T. J. Aloe

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of anxiety and depression in cancer patients seen at the Norwegian Radium Hospital, using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the EORTC QLQ-C33 and an ad hoc designed questionnaire. In addition, information about the patients' malignant disease and treatment was obtained. The prevalence of anxiety and depression among 716

  2. Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Anxiety Control Questionnaire among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerolimatos, Lindsay A.; Gould, Christine E.; Edelstein, Barry A.

    2012-01-01

    Among young adults and clinical populations, perceived inability to control internal and external events is associated with anxiety. At present, it is unclear what role perceived anxiety control plays in anxiety among older adults. The Anxiety Control Questionnaire (ACQ) was developed to assess one's perceived ability to cope with anxiety-related…

  3. Predictors of preoperative anxiety among surgical patients in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital, South Western Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospitalization and surgery are critical negative life events that lead to the experience of considerable anxiety in patients. Patients may perceive the day of surgery as the biggest and the most threatening day in their lives. There is paucity of information on predictors of anxiety in the current study area. The main objective of this study is to assess predictors of preoperative anxiety among patients scheduled for surgery in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital. Methods A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted using quantitative data collection technique in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital from February 13 to April 13, 2012 on 239 patients scheduled for surgery. The data were collected by five trained diploma nurses using structured interviewer administered questionnaires that were prepared based on state trait anxiety inventory measurement scale. The quantitative data were entered into SPSS for windows version 16. 0 and descriptive, simple and multiple linear regression analyses were performed. Results A total of 239 patients were enrolled in the study with a response rate of 93.0%. Their mean age was 42.7?±?1.8 years (range 16 to 85 years). Nearly over half 53.6% were females, while 48.1% illiterate, 72.4% Oromo and 56.5% were Muslim followers. Significant preoperative anxiety was seen in 70.3% patients. The most common factors that lead to anxiety were fear of death 38.1% and fear of unknown origin 24.3% and the most common strategy mentioned by patient in reducing anxiety were talking to other patient 79.8% and religious belief. Conclusions In the present study, two third 70.3% of preoperative patients had anxiety. Factors which were positively correlated with anxiety were trait anxiety, single and divorced, time of operation and income. Factors which were shown to reduce anxiety were preoperative anxiety related information provision and afternoon operation. Health professionals working in the hospital should provide anxiety related information for patients. PMID:25189274

  4. Internet administration of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in a sample of tinnitus patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerhard Andersson; Viktor Kaldo-Sandström; Lars Ström; Tryggve Strömgren

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To administer and validate the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) via the Internet to a sample of persons with tinnitus. Method: The HADS was converted into a Web page and administered via the Internet to a sample of 157 persons with tinnitus who were recruited for participation in a treatment trial. Also included were the Tinnitus Reaction Questionnaire

  5. Beyond test anxiety: Development and validation of the test emotions questionnaire (TEQ)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reinhard Pekrun; Thomas Goetz; Raymond P. Perry; Klaudia Kramer; Michaela Hochstadt; Stefan Molfenter

    2004-01-01

    Measures of test emotions other than test anxiety are lacking. In a series of six studies, we developed a multi-scale questionnaire assessing test-related joy, hope, pride, relief, anger, anxiety, shame, and hopelessness (Test Emotions Questionnaire, TEQ). Consisting of subscales measuring affective, cognitive, physiological, and motivational emotion components, the scales can be used to identify both trait and state test emotions,

  6. Validity and Clinical Utility of the Fear Questionnaire for Anxiety-Disorder Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tian P. S. Oei; Ann Moylan; Larry Evans

    1991-01-01

    Although the Fear Questionnaire (FQ) has been widely used, its psychometric properties for anxiety disorder patients are still unclear. This study reports the psychometric properties of the FQ with a sample of 251 (178 female and 73 male) anxiety disorder patients. Factor analysis showed a clear 3-factor solution that accounted for 42% of the variance. The 3 factors corresponded to

  7. Depression and Anxiety Disorders among Hospitalized Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Akinyemiju, Tomi F.; Galea, Sandro; Bovbjerg, Dana H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To document the prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders, and their associations with mortality among hospitalized breast cancer patients. Methods We examined the associations between breast cancer diagnosis and the diagnoses of anxiety or depression among 4,164 hospitalized breast cancer cases matched with 4,164 non-breast cancer controls using 2006-2009 inpatient data obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Conditional logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations between breast cancer diagnosis and diagnoses of anxiety or depression. We also used binary logistic regression models to examine the association between diagnoses of depression or anxiety, and in-hospital mortality among breast cancer patients. Results We observed that breast cancer cases were less likely to have a diagnosis of depression (OR=0.63, 95% CI: 0.52-0.77), and less likely to have a diagnosis of anxiety (OR=0.68, 95% CI: 0.52-0.90) compared with controls. This association remained after controlling for race/ethnicity, residential income, insurance and residential region. Breast cancer patients with a depression diagnosis also had lower mortality (OR=0.69, 95% CI: 0.52-0.89) compared with those without a depression diagnosis, but there was no significant difference in mortality among those with and without anxiety diagnoses. Conclusion Diagnoses of depression and anxiety in breast cancer patients were less prevalent than expected based on our analysis of hospitalized breast cancer patients and matched non-breast cancer controls identified in the NIS dataset using ICD-9 diagnostic codes. Results suggest that under-diagnosis of mental health problems may be common among hospitalized women with a primary diagnosis of breast cancer. Future work may fruitfully explore reasons for, and consequences of, inappropriate identification of the mental health needs of breast cancer patients. PMID:26035180

  8. Evaluation of the hospital anxiety and depression scale in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Marinus, Johan; Leentjens, Albert F G; Visser, Martine; Stiggelbout, Anne M; van Hilten, Jacobus J

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and to assess the prevalence of symptoms of anxiety and depression in this population. The HADS was sent to 205 patients with PD, together with three quality-of-life (QoL) instruments, i.e. the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39), the EQ-5D, and a visual analogue scale (VAS). Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores were also compared with Hoehn-Yahr (H&Y) scores. Eighty-six percent of the patients returned the questionnaires. The quality of the data was good. Cronbach alpha for the HADS was 0.88. Test-retest reliability over 2 weeks was 0.84 for the sum score of the HADS (intraclass correlation coefficient) and ranged from 0.42-0.76 for individual items (weighted kappa). Factor analysis revealed two factors, accounting for 51.9% of the variance. One factor represented anxiety, the other depression. Correlations with PDQ-39, EQ-5D, VAS, and H&Y were 0.72, -0.59, -0.59, and 0.32, respectively (p values < 0.001). Depression scores accounted for 52% of the variance in QoL, whereas disease severity explained 24%. Using the cut-off values proposed by the developers indicated that possible and probable anxiety were present in 29.4% and 19.8% of the patients, respectively. Percentages for possible and probable depression were 21.5 and 16.9. The psychometric performance of the HADS in patients with PD is satisfactory. In addition, almost 50% of the patients displayed symptoms of anxiety, whereas nearly 40% showed signs of depression. PMID:12469006

  9. Screening for generalized anxiety disorder using the Penn State Worry Questionnaire: a receiver operating characteristic analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evelyn Behar; Oscar Alcaine; Andrea R. Zuellig; T. D. Borkovec

    2003-01-01

    The present study examined the usefulness of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) as a means of screening for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Using receiver operating characteristic analyses, the accuracy of the PSWQ in screening for GAD was examined in both clinical and analogue diagnosed GAD samples. Given high comorbidity between GAD and other emotional disorders, we also investigated the

  10. The Factor Structure and Dimensional Scoring of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire for "DSM-IV"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Holaway, Robert M.; Heimberg, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    Despite favorable psychometric properties, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire for the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.) (GAD-Q-IV) does not have a known factor structure, which calls into question use of its original weighted scoring system (usually referred to as the dimensional score). Analyses…

  11. To what extent does the anxiety scale of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) detect specific types of anxiety disorder in primary care? A psychometric study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety scales may help primary care physicians to detect specific anxiety disorders among the many emotionally distressed patients presenting in primary care. The anxiety scale of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) consists of an admixture of symptoms of specific anxiety disorders. The research questions were: (1) Is the anxiety scale unidimensional or multidimensional? (2) To what extent does the anxiety scale detect specific DSM-IV anxiety disorders? (3) Which cut-off points are suitable to rule out or to rule in (which) anxiety disorders? Methods We analyzed 5 primary care datasets with standardized psychiatric diagnoses and 4DSQ scores. Unidimensionality was assessed through confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). We examined mean scores and anxiety score distributions per disorder. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to determine optimal cut-off points. Results Total n was 969. CFA supported unidimensionality. The anxiety scale performed slightly better in detecting patients with panic disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and specific phobia. ROC-analysis suggested that ?4 was the optimal cut-off point to rule out and ?10 the cut-off point to rule in anxiety disorders. Conclusions The 4DSQ anxiety scale measures a common trait of pathological anxiety that is characteristic of anxiety disorders, in particular panic disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, OCD and PTSD. The anxiety score detects the latter anxiety disorders to a slightly greater extent than GAD and specific phobia, without being able to distinguish between the different anxiety disorder types. The cut-off points ?4 and ?10 can be used to separate distressed patients in three groups with a relatively low, moderate and high probability of having one or more anxiety disorders. PMID:24761829

  12. Correlations among two self-report questionnaires for measuring DSM-defined anxiety disorder symptoms in children: the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders and the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Muris; Henk Schmidt; Harald Merckelbach

    2000-01-01

    The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) and the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale (SCAS) are recently developed self-report questionnaires for measuring DSM-IV defined anxiety disorder symptoms in children. The present study examined correlations among these measures in a large sample of Dutch school children (N=1011). Results showed that there was a strong correlation between the total anxiety scores

  13. Limitations of the Patient Health Questionnaire in Identifying Anxiety and Depression in Community Mental Health: Many Cases Are Undetected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Greeno, Catherine G.; Lee, Bong-Jae

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the concordance between the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in diagnosing anxiety and depressive disorders. Method: Fifty women seeking psychiatric services for their children at two mental health centers in western Pennsylvania were assessed for anxiety and…

  14. Using the Penn State Worry Questionnaire to identify individuals with generalized anxiety disorder: a receiver operating characteristic analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David M. Fresco; Douglas S. Mennin; Richard G. Heimberg; Cynthia L. Turk

    2003-01-01

    We report on the use of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) to identify individuals with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Fifty individuals with primary or secondary GAD and 114 individuals with social anxiety disorder (without GAD) completed the PSWQ. In receiver operating characteristic analyses, a score of 65 simultaneously optimized sensitivity and specificity in discriminating individuals with GAD from individuals

  15. Validation study of a Portuguese version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale.

    PubMed

    Pais-Ribeiro, J; Silva, I; Ferreira, T; Martins, A; Meneses, R; Baltar, M

    2007-03-01

    The study aims to develop and assess metric proprieties of the Portuguese version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. A sequential sample includes 1322 participants diagnosed with cancer, stroke, epilepsy, coronary heart disease, diabetes, myotonic dystrophy, obstructive sleep apnoea, depression and a non-disease group, which completed the HADS. The first step includes translation, retroversion, inspection for lexical equivalence and content validity, and cognitive debriefing. Then we reproduce oblique exploratory factor analysis and use confirmatory factor analysis. We explore the sensibility of the questionnaire. The validation process of the Portuguese HADS version shows metric properties similar to those in international studies, suggesting that it measures the same constructs, in the same way, as the original HADS form. PMID:17365902

  16. The role of depression and anxiety symptoms in hospital readmissions after cardiac surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Phillip J. Tully; Robert A. Baker; Deborah Turnbull; Helen Winefield

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the association between depression, anxiety and general stress symptoms with\\u000a hospital readmissions after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Two hundred and twenty six coronary artery bypass graft\\u000a patients completed baseline self-report measures of depression, anxiety and stress and 222 patients completed these measures\\u000a after surgery on the hospital ward. The hospital readmission

  17. Construction of a questionnaire measuring outpatients' opinion of quality of hospital consultation departments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isabelle Gasquet; Sylvie Villeminot; Carla Estaquio; Pierre Durieux; Philippe Ravaud; Bruno Falissard

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few questionnaires on outpatients' satisfaction with hospital exist. All have been constructed without giving enough room for the patient's point of view in the validation procedure. The main objective was to develop, according to psychometric standards, a self-administered generic outpatient questionnaire exploring opinion on quality of hospital care. METHOD: First, a qualitative phase was conducted to generate items and

  18. Screening high-risk patients and assisting in diagnosing anxiety in primary care: the Patient Health Questionnaire evaluated

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Questionnaires may help in detecting and diagnosing anxiety disorders in primary care. However, since utility of these questionnaires in target populations is rarely studied, the Patient Health Questionnaire anxiety modules (PHQ) were evaluated for use as: a) a screener in high-risk patients, and/or b) a case finder for general practitioners (GPs) to assist in diagnosing anxiety disorders. Methods A cross-sectional analysis was performed in 43 primary care practices in the Netherlands. The added value of the PHQ was assessed in two samples: 1) 170 patients at risk of anxiety disorders (or developing them) according to their electronic medical records (high-risk sample); 2) 141 patients identified as a possible ‘anxiety case’ by a GP (GP-identified sample). All patients completed the PHQ and were interviewed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric interview to classify DSM-IV anxiety disorders. Psychometric properties were calculated, and a logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic value of the PHQ. Results Using only the screening questions of the PHQ, the area under the curve was 83% in the high-risk sample. In GP-identified patients the official algorithm showed the best characteristics with an area under the curve of 77%. Positive screening questions significantly increased the odds of an anxiety disorder diagnosis in high-risk patients (odds ratio?=?23.4; 95% confidence interval 6.9 to 78.8) as did a positive algorithm in GP-identified patients (odds ratio?=?13.9; 95% confidence interval 3.8 to 50.6). Conclusions The PHQ screening questions can be used to screen for anxiety disorders in high-risk primary care patients. In GP-identified patients, the benefit of the PHQ is less evident. PMID:23865984

  19. Student and Instructor Beliefs and Attitudes about Target Language Use, First Language Use, and Anxiety: Report of a Questionnaire Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Glenn S.

    2003-01-01

    Presents the results of an anonymous, Internet-based questionnaire study on target language and first language use in university-level foreign language classes. Goals were to develop preliminary components of a descriptive model of target language and first language use and explore the relationships between target language and student anxiety

  20. Self-Reported Acceptance of Social Anxiety Symptoms: Development and Validation of the Social Anxiety-Acceptance and Action Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Meagan B.; Kocovski, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions have been used in social anxiety treatments with initial success. Further research requires the psychometrically sound measurement of mechanisms of change associated with these treatments. This research was conducted to develop and evaluate such a measure, the Social Anxiety-Acceptance and Action…

  1. [Accuracy and diagnostic utility of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) in a sample of obese Mexican patients].

    PubMed

    López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Vázquez-Velázquez, Verónica; Arcila-Martínez, Denise; Sierra-Ovando, Angel Ernesto; González-Barranco, Jorge; Salín-Pascual, Rafael J

    2002-01-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) have been used in Mexico in drug abusers, burned patients, older people, with renal insufficiency and high-risk pregnant women. The aim of this study was to determine reproducibility and accuracy of the questionnaire in a sample of obese subjects. A group of 75 obese patients (BMI > 27) without diabetes mellitus were invited to participated in the study. Diagnosis of anxiety or depression was made by an structured interview based on the DSM-IV criteria, and they were requested to complete the HAD. All subjects were randomized for the manoeuvre sequence. Sensibility specificity, positive predictive value and negative value, and unweighted kappa coefficient (for concordance) were calculated for the two procedures. The questionnaire reproducibility was assessed buy test-retest with other 25 independent subjects. Internal validity was estimated by alpha Cronbach, Guttman and intraclass correlation coefficients. Mean age was 39.7 +/- 11.5 years and BMI 39.1 +/- 9.6. The best cut off point for anxiety was 8 points (Kappa 0.68) and for depression 7 points (Kappa 0.73). Mean age for test-retest was 39.2 +/- 14.5 years and BMI 45.3 +/- 14.6. The alpha-Cronbach was 0.84 for the first tes. and 0.86 for the second. Intraclass coefficient correlation was 0.946. The HAD is applicable for obese subjects, it is reproducible and concordant with a structured interview. PMID:12587414

  2. A confirmatory bifactor analysis of the hospital anxiety and depression scale in an Italian community sample

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is a widely used self-report measure to assess emotional distress in clinical populations. As highlighted in recent review studies, the latent structure of the HADS is still an issue. The aim of this study was to analyze the factorial structure of the HADS in a large community sample in Italy, and to test the invariance of the best fitting model across age and gender groups. Methods Data analyses were carried out on a sample of 1.599 participants proportionally stratified according to the Italian census population pyramid. Participants aged 18 to 85 years (females?=?51.8%), living in eight different regions of Italy, voluntarily participated in the study. The survey questionnaire contained the HADS, Health Status questions, and sociodemographic variables. Results Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that a bifactor model, with a general psychological distress factor and two orthogonal group factors with anxiety and depression, was the best fitting one compared to six alternative factor structures reported in the literature, with overall good fit indices [Non-normed Fit Index (NNFI)?=?.97; Comparative Fit Index (CFI)?=?.98; Root Mean-Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA)?=?.04]. Multi-group analyses supported total invariance of the HADS measurement model for males and females, and for younger (i.e., 18–44 years old) and older (i.e., 45–85 years old) participants. Our descriptive analyses showed that females reported significant higher anxiety and general distress mean scores than males. Moreover, older participants reported significant higher HADS, anxiety and depression scores than younger participants. Conclusions The results of the present study confirmed that the HADS has good psychometric properties in an Italian community sample, and that the HADS scores, especially the general psychological distress one, can be reliably used for assessing age and gender differences. In keeping with the most recent factorial studies, our analysis supported the superior fit of a bifactor model. However, the high factor loadings on the general factor also recommend caution in the use of the two subscales as independent measures. PMID:24902622

  3. Measurement of depression and anxiety for hospitalized depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Fischer, E H; Goethe, J W

    1997-05-01

    Standard scales for measuring anxiety and depression did not distinguish between these two psychological constructs in a sample of 295 inpatients with major depressive disorder. Items from these scales were used to form new measures, based on the results of a factor analysis. The new depression and anxiety subscales were internally consistent and only moderately correlated with one another, compared with the standard measures, which were highly correlated. When the factorial procedure was repeated with a subsample of patients with only mild to moderate symptoms, there was no discrimination between depression and anxiety. This finding suggests that when measured in a sample with a restricted range of symptom severity, anxiety and depression have poor discriminant validity. PMID:9144828

  4. Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire Factors in Major Depressive Disorder: Relationship to Anxiety Disorder Comorbidity and Age of Onset

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dost Öngür; Amy Farabaugh; Dan V. Iosifescu; Roy Perlis; Maurizio Fava

    2005-01-01

    Objective: We used the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ) to study the relationship between temperamental traits and comorbid anxiety disorders as well as age of onset of major depressive disorder (MDD) in 263 patients with MDD. Methods: Patients recruited for a large clinical study on MDD underwent a Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R assessment and were administered the self-rated TPQ [mean

  5. Underestimation of self-reported occupational exposure by questionnaire in hospital workers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Donnay; M-A Denis; R Magis; J Fevotte; N Massin; O Dumas; I Pin; D Choudat; F Kauffmann; N Le Moual

    2011-01-01

    ObjectivesThe aim of the study was to determine whether self-reported occupational exposure to cleaning\\/disinfecting agents in hospital workers is accurate, in comparison to expert assessment, taken to be the gold standard.MethodsIn the Epidemiological Study of the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA), participants were interviewed on occupation with a specific questionnaire for hospital workers regarding tasks and cleaning\\/disinfecting agents. Two

  6. Validation study of a Portuguese version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Pais-Ribeiro; I. Silva; T. Ferreira; A. Martins; R. Meneses; M. Baltar

    2007-01-01

    The study aims to develop and assess metric proprieties of the Portuguese version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. A sequential sample includes 1322 participants diagnosed with cancer, stroke, epilepsy, coronary heart disease, diabetes, myotonic dystrophy, obstructive sleep apnoea, depression and a non-disease group, which completed the HADS. The first step includes translation, retroversion, inspection for lexical equivalence and

  7. The Anxieties of Male and Female Medical Students on Commencing Clinical Studies: The Role of Gender

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sheila Greenfield; Jim Parle; Roger Holder

    2001-01-01

    Context: Many medical students experience considerable anxiety when starting hospital experiences. Objectives: To investigate the role of gender in this transitional experience. Method: A questionnaire study was conducted in 1992 and 1995 to compare female and male anxieties about clinical situations they anticipated encountering. The 31-item questionnaire listed potential anxiety-provoking situations and requested the respondents' ratings of their reactions (from

  8. Depression and Anxiety Disorders among Patients with Psoriasis: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Golpour, Masoud; Hosseini, Seyed Hamzeh; Khademloo, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Maryam; Ebadi, Aghdas; Koohkan, Fatemeh; Shahmohammadi, Soheila

    2012-01-01

    Background. Psoriasis is a common, genetically determined inflammatory and proliferative disease of the skin. Psychological stress can exacerbate the disease. This study sought to investigate the depression and anxiety disorders among patients with psoriasis and control group. Method. In this hospital-based case-control study, One hundred patients with psoriasis (case) referred to the dermatology department and 100 patients with otolaryngology problems and dermatological healthy volunteers (control) who referred to the Otolaryngology Department of Bouali Sina Hospital in Sari, Iran, in 2007 were studied. Demographic characteristics were recorded. Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Scale I-II were administered to the patients in both groups. Data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software and descriptive statistical tests. Results. From One-hundred patients in each group, 44 (45%) were men. Depression score was 67% and 12% in psoriatic patients and control, respectively. The Beck depression scores of patients with psoriasis were significantly higher than scores of the control group (P < 0.05). Based on Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Scale, anxiety was found in 45% of patients in case group and 18% of controls. Conclusion. The results revealed that psoriatic patients reported significantly higher degrees of depression and anxiety than controls. In addition, psoriatic women were more depressed than psoriatic men. PMID:22844272

  9. Hospital Safety Culture in Taiwan: A Nationwide Survey Using Chinese Version Safety Attitude Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Safety activities have been initiated at many hospitals in Taiwan, but little is known about the safety culture at these hospitals. The aims of this study were to verify a safety culture survey instrument in Chinese and to assess hospital safety culture in Taiwan. Methods The Taiwan Patient Safety Culture Survey was conducted in 2008, using the adapted Safety Attitude Questionnaire in Chinese (SAQ-C). Hospitals and their healthcare workers participated in the survey on a voluntary basis. The psychometric properties of the five SAQ-C dimensions were examined, including teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, perception of management, and working conditions. Additional safety measures were asked to assess healthcare workers' attitudes toward their collaboration with nurses, physicians, and pharmacists, respectively, and perceptions of hospitals' encouragement of safety reporting, safety training, and delivery delays due to communication breakdowns in clinical areas. The associations between the respondents' attitudes to each SAQ-C dimension and safety measures were analyzed by generalized estimating equations, adjusting for the clustering effects at hospital levels. Results A total of 45,242 valid questionnaires were returned from 200 hospitals with a mean response rate of 69.4%. The Cronbach's alpha was 0.792 for teamwork climate, 0.816 for safety climate, 0.912 for job satisfaction, 0.874 for perception of management, and 0.785 for working conditions. Confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated a good model fit for each dimension and the entire construct. The percentage of hospital healthcare workers holding positive attitude was 48.9% for teamwork climate, 45.2% for perception of management, 42.1% for job satisfaction, 37.2% for safety climate, and 31.8% for working conditions. There were wide variations in the range of SAQ-C scores in each dimension among hospitals. Compared to those without positive attitudes, healthcare workers with positive attitudes to each SAQ dimension were more likely to perceive good collaboration with coworkers, and their hospitals were more likely to encourage safety reporting and to prioritize safety training programs (Wald chi-square test, p < 0.001 for all). Conclusions Analytical results verified the psychometric properties of the SAQ-C at Taiwanese hospitals. The safety culture at most hospitals has not fully developed and there is considerable room for improvement. PMID:20698965

  10. Dimensionality of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in Cardiac Patients: Comparison of Mokken Scale Analysis and Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emons, Wilco H. M.; Sijtsma, Klaas; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2012-01-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) measures anxiety and depressive symptoms and is widely used in clinical and nonclinical populations. However, there is some debate about the number of dimensions represented by the HADS. In a sample of 534 Dutch cardiac patients, this study examined (a) the dimensionality of the HADS using Mokken…

  11. Questionnaire survey of working relationships between nurses and doctors in University Teaching Hospitals in Southern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogbimi, Roseline I; Adebamowo, Clement A

    2006-01-01

    Background Smooth working relationships between nurses and doctors are necessary for efficient health care delivery. However, previous studies have shown that this is often absent with negative impact on the quality of health care delivery. In 2002, we studied factors that affect nurse-doctor working relationships in University Teaching Hospitals (UTH) in Southern Nigeria in order to characterize it and identify managerial and training needs that might be used to improve it. Method Questionnaire survey of doctors and nurses working in four UTH in Southern Nigeria was done in 2002. The setting and subjects were selected by random sampling procedures. Information on factors in domains of work, union activities, personnel and hospital management were studied using closed and open-ended questionnaires. Results Nurse-doctor working relationships were statistically significantly affected by poor after-work social interaction, staff shortages, activist unionism, disregard for one's profession, and hospital management and government policies. In general, nurses had better opinion of doctors' work than doctors had about nurses' work. Conclusion Working relationships between doctors and nurses need to be improved through improved training and better working conditions, creation of better working environment, use of alternative methods of conflict resolution and balanced hospital management and government policies. This will improve the retention of staff, job satisfaction and efficiency of health care delivery in Nigeria. PMID:16504039

  12. Dimensions and reliability of a hospital safety climate questionnaire in Chinese health-care practice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek R; Zhao, Isabella; Wang, Lina; Ho, Alan

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the dimensions and reliability of a hospital safety climate questionnaire in Chinese health-care practice. To achieve this, a cross-sectional survey of health-care professionals was undertaken at a university teaching hospital in Shandong province, China. Our survey instrument demonstrated very high internal consistency, comparing well with previous research in this field conducted in other countries. Factor analysis highlighted four key dimensions of safety climate, which centred on employee personal protection, employee interactions, safety-related housekeeping and time pressures. Overall, this study suggests that hospital safety climate represents an important aspect of health-care practice in contemporary China. PMID:23577973

  13. Improving hospital doctors' working lives: online questionnaire survey of all grades

    PubMed Central

    Dornhorst, A; Cripps, J; Goodyear, H; Marshall, J; Waters, E; Boddy, S; on, b

    2005-01-01

    Background: In 2001, the Department of Health produced the Improving Working Lives (IWL) for Doctors document. This is the first national survey which asks hospital doctors what changes are needed to improve their working lives. Methods: An online questionnaire was run over a period of six weeks and was open to all doctors of all grades. Doctors were asked to choose their top five factors from a list of 35 diverse choices or to provide alternatives in free text. Demographic data were also collected. Results: 1603 hospital doctors working in the UK completed the online questionnaire. Improved secretarial or managerial support was the first IWL choice for consultants, with different aspects of clinical and non-clinical support representing their top four choices. Junior hospital doctors and staff and associate specialist grades (staff grades, associate specialists, and clinical assistants) identified improved support for education and training as their first choice, while among the female specialist registrars, it was improved support for childcare. Greater opportunities to develop new skills was an important issue for doctors in the surgical specialties and improved access to mentoring was important for all junior doctors, staff and associate specialist grades, and doctors from black and ethnic minority groups. Conclusions: Hospital doctors in the UK need more support to improve their working lives. The principle needs are better secretarial and managerial support for consultants; education, training, and mentoring for junior doctors and staff and associate specialist grades; and improved opportunities to develop new skills for those in surgical specialties. Support with childcare is an important issue for female specialist registrars. The Department of Health, NHS trusts, deaneries, and Royal Colleges need to endorse policies that promote a training and working environment that will improve working lives for all hospital doctors, ensuring that appropriate and continuing support is available from the time doctors enter the new foundation programmes and proposed run-through grades, to their time spent as consultants in today's NHS. PMID:15640429

  14. Anxiety

    MedlinePLUS

    Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Anxiety Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information ... Abuse High Blood Pressure Join our ... finish for work or are having a large get-together at your home, feeling a bit worried about getting everything done ...

  15. The prevalence and correlates of the positive Androgen Deficiency in the Aging Male (ADAM) questionnaire among psychiatric outpatients: a cross-sectional survey of 176 men in a general hospital in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chin-Pang; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Kun-Hao; Chu, Chun-Lin; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Jiun-Liang; Chen, Ching-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Androgen Deficiency in the Aging Male (ADAM) questionnaire is widely used to screen for late-onset hypogonadism. The positive response to the ADAM questionnaire (positive ADAM) has been associated with depression and poorer quality of life in a number of studies. It is unclear whether there is any value of the ADAM questionnaire in psychiatric populations. In this study, we aimed to determine the utility of the ADAM questionnaire in a convenient sample of male psychiatric outpatients. Methods One hundred and seventy-six men (mean age: 54.3 years; standard deviation: 10.7 years; range: 40–80 years) completed the ADAM questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and the Aging Males’ Symptoms (AMS) scale. Anxiety was defined as a HADS anxiety subscore ?8; depression as a HADS depression subscore ?8; and moderate/severe impairment of health-related quality of life (HQoL) as AMS ?37. ADAM, anxiety, and depression was used to model the moderate/severe impairment of HQoL. Results One hundred and sixty-four (93%) men had positive ADAM. Positive ADAM was associated with a lower body mass index (P<0.05) and moderate/severe impairment of HQoL (P<0.001), but was not associated with anxiety or depression (P>0.05). Positive ADAM was associated with five symptoms of the AMS scale: “decline of one’s feeling of general well-being”, “depressive mood”, and three sexual symptoms. In regression analysis, positive ADAM was associated with increased risk of moderate/severe impairment of HQoL (unadjusted odds ratio 20.1, 95% confidence interval 3.77–372, P<0.01), which remained significant with covariates of anxiety and depression (adjusted odds ratio 15.6, 95% confidence interval 2.52–309, P<0.05). Conclusion The ADAM questionnaire can be used to screen the sexual symptoms but not depression/anxiety in male psychiatric outpatients. Positive ADAM may indicate moderate/severe impairment of HQoL. PMID:25653527

  16. The Factor Structure of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in Orthopedic Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Man; Bounsanga, Jerry; Tang, Philip; Chen, Wei; Cheng, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background Many instruments exist to assess mental disorders and anxiety, such as the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). Nothing has been evaluated on the HADS factor structure for use with orthopedic trauma patients. The aim of this study was to validate the underlying structure of the HADS. Specifically, we sought to understand which of the factor structures found in the literature is appropriate for the orthopedic trauma patient population. Methods This study included 348 patients with an average age of 49.8 years (SD: 18.4; range: 18 - 95). Confirmatory data analysis was performed to analyze the latent structure of the HADS. Akaike information criterion (AIC) was used to compare all the models, with the lowest AIC being the best fitting model. Results We found that both the anxiety and the depression factors were highly correlated (with Pearson correlations greater than 0.700). After removing one item from each subscale, we found that a two-factor model was the best fitting one (AIC: 8,298.901); all other models had an AIC over 10,000. Conclusion Our results support a satisfactory two-factor structure for the HADS in the orthopedic trauma patients. Further studies are needed to test for higher factor structures in larger samples and in a different population. PMID:25883709

  17. Adaption and validation of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire for the Danish hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Solvejg; Sabroe, Svend; Bartels, Paul; Mainz, Jan; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Measuring and developing a safe culture in health care is a focus point in creating highly reliable organizations being successful in avoiding patient safety incidents where these could normally be expected. Questionnaires can be used to capture a snapshot of an employee’s perceptions of patient safety culture. A commonly used instrument to measure safety climate is the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). The purpose of this study was to adapt the SAQ for use in Danish hospitals, assess its construct validity and reliability, and present benchmark data. Materials and methods The SAQ was translated and adapted for the Danish setting (SAQ-DK). The SAQ-DK was distributed to 1,263 staff members from 31 in- and outpatient units (clinical areas) across five somatic and one psychiatric hospitals through meeting administration, hand delivery, and mailing. Construct validity and reliability were tested in a cross-sectional study. Goodness-of-fit indices from confirmatory factor analysis were reported along with inter-item correlations, Cronbach’s alpha (?), and item and subscale scores. Results Participation was 73.2% (N=925) of invited health care workers. Goodness-of-fit indices from the confirmatory factor analysis showed: c2=1496.76, P<0.001, CFI 0.901, RMSEA (90% CI) 0.053 (0.050–0056), Probability RMSEA (p close)=0.057. Inter-scale correlations between the factors showed moderate-to-high correlations. The scale stress recognition had significant negative correlations with each of the other scales. Questionnaire reliability was high, (?=0.89), and scale reliability ranged from ?=0.70 to ?=0.86 for the six scales. Proportions of participants with a positive attitude to each of the six SAQ scales did not differ between the somatic and psychiatric health care staff. Substantial variability at the unit level in all six scale mean scores was found within the somatic and the psychiatric samples. Conclusion SAQ-DK showed good construct validity and internal consistency reliability. SAQ-DK is potentially a useful tool for evaluating perceptions of patient safety culture in Danish hospitals. PMID:25674015

  18. Psychometric evaluation of the dating anxiety survey: A self-report questionnaire for the assessment of dating anxiety in males and females

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James D. Calvert; DeWayne Moore; Bernard J. Jensen

    1987-01-01

    The Dating Anxiety Survey (DAS) was constructed to assess dating anxiety in males and females. Factor analysis of the survey revealed three factors: passive contact, active intentions for dating, and dating interactions. The reliabilities of the three subscales, as determined by coefficient alpha, were .87, .91, and .93 for males and .90, .90, and .92 for females, respectively. Correlations with

  19. The Psychometric Properties of the Hospital Anxiety and Depressions Scale Adapted for Use with People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagnan, D.; Jahoda, A.; McDowell, K.; Masson, J.; Banks, P.; Hare, D.

    2008-01-01

    Background: There is increasing recognition of depression in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). There is a need to develop well-standardised self-report measures for both clinical and research purposes. This paper presents some psychometric properties of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) adapted for use with people with ID.…

  20. International experiences with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-A review of validation data and clinical results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christoph Herrmann

    1997-01-01

    More than 200 published studies from most medical settings worldwide have reported experiences with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) which was specifically developed by Zigmond and Snaith for use with physically ill patients. Although introduced in 1983, there is still no comprehensive documentation of its psychometric properties. The present review summarizes available data on reliability and validity and

  1. Hospital workers -EGEA 25/02/2011 1 Under-estimation of self-reported occupational exposure by questionnaire in hospital workers

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the study was to determine whether self-reported occupational exposure to cleaning/disinfecting agents figure - 28 references 4 keywords : Healthcare worker, epidemiology, exposure assessment, disinfectant with a specific questionnaire for hospital workers regarding tasks and cleaning/disinfecting agents. Two estimates

  2. Factors influencing health-related quality of life of Asians with anxiety disorders in Singapore

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nan Luo; Calvin Soon-Leng Fones; Julian Thumboo; Shu-Chuen Li

    2004-01-01

    As little is known about health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in Asians with anxiety disorders, we assessed HRQoL in Singaporeans with anxiety disorders and identified factors influencing their HRQoL. Outpatients with anxiety disorders (n = 119) attending a hospital psychiatric clinic completed the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). SF-36 score

  3. An integrative review of literature examining psychometric properties of instruments measuring anxiety or fear in hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Foster, Roxie L; Park, Jeong-hwan

    2012-06-01

    Anxiety and fear are among the most frequently reported emotional responses to hospitalization and are known to be contributing factors to pain and other negative patient outcomes. The first step in confronting unnecessary anxiety and fear is to identify valid and clinically feasible assessment instruments. The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate instruments that measure children's fear or anxiety associated with hospitalization or painful procedures. A search was conducted of published English-language literature from 1980 through 2010 with the use of Ovid Health and Psychosocial Instruments, Medline, Nursing/Academic Edition, Cinahl, and Google Scholar. Inclusion criteria specified that the self-report instrument: 1) was developed in English; 2) was developed for and/or widely used with hospitalized children or children undergoing medical procedures or treatment; and 3) had research evidence of psychometric properties from at least five different studies. A comprehensive review of the literature revealed only five fear or anxiety instruments with adequate testing for evaluation of reliability and validity. Although all instruments have beginning psychometric adequacy, no one tool stands out as superior to the others. Therefore, we recommend that researchers and clinicians exercise caution in choosing assessment instruments, balancing potential strengths with reported limitations. Using more than one tool (triangulating) may be one way to achieve more credible results. Knowledge of credible existing instruments alerts us to what is possible today and to the imperative for research that will improve communication with children tomorrow. PMID:22652282

  4. Usage of documented pre-hospital observations in secondary care: a questionnaire study and retrospective comparison of records

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The patient handover is important for the safe transition from the pre-hospital setting to secondary care. The loss of critical information about the pre-hospital phase may impact upon the clinical course of the patient. Methods University Hospital Emergency Care registrars answered a questionnaire about how they perceive clinical documentation from the ambulance services. We also reviewed patient records retrospectively, to investigate to what extent eight selected parameters were transferred correctly to hospital records by clinicians. Only parameters outside the normal range were selected. Results The registrars preferred a verbal handover with hand-written pre-hospital reports as the combined source of clinical information. Scanned report forms were infrequently used. Information from other doctors was perceived as more important than the information from ambulance crews. Less than half of the selected parameters in pre-hospital notes were transferred to hospital records, even for parameters regarded as important by the registrars. Abnormal vital signs were not transferred as often as mechanism of injury, medication administered and immobilisation of trauma patients. Conclusions Data on pre-hospital abnormal vital signs are frequently not transferred to the hospital admission notes. This information loss may lead to suboptimal care. PMID:23453123

  5. A comparative study of anxiety and depression in patients with bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and tuberculosis in a general hospital of chest diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moussas, Georgios; Tselebis, Athanasios; Karkanias, Athanasios; Stamouli, Dimitra; Ilias, Ioannis; Bratis, Dionisios; Vassila-Demi, Kalliopi

    2008-01-01

    Background Depression necessitating assistance from health professionals has a lifetime prevalence of 10%. Chronic disease increases comorbidity with mood and/or anxiety disorders. Patients with chronic pulmonary disease present with severely impaired functionality, chronic somatic and psychogenic pain, require frequent hospitalizations and have a dependency upon medical and nursing personnel. In the present study we assessed anxiety and depression in patients hospitalized for pulmonary disease in a pulmonary disease hospital. Methods We assessed anxiety, using the Spielberger state-trait anxiety scale, and depression, using the Beck Depression Inventory, in 132 patients with pulmonary disease. Results A total of 49.2% of the sample had moderate or severe depression and 26.5% had anxiety. Women had higher depression and anxiety scores than men (t test, p < 0.05). Depression was positively correlated with anxiety, age and time from diagnosis. Anxiety was positively correlated with depression and time from diagnosis (Pearson r = 0.62 and 0.29, p < 0.01). Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchial asthma had higher depression scores than patients with tuberculosis (t test, p < 0.01). Conclusion Depression and anxiety are very prevalent in patients with pulmonary disease, especially chronic disease. This may be a very important negative factor in patients' adaptation to the chronic course of their disease. PMID:18495038

  6. Childhood Peer Status and Adult Susceptibility to Anxiety and Depression. A 30Year Hospital Follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bitte Modin; Viveca Östberg; Ylva Almquist

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which sixth grade peer status could predict anxiety and\\/or depression in 5,242 women and\\u000a 5,004 men who were born in 1953 and whose hospital records were followed up from 1973–2003. The data used was the Stockholm\\u000a Birth Cohort Study. While no association could be established for men, results indicated that women who held low

  7. Childhood Peer Status and Adult Susceptibility to Anxiety and Depression. A 30-Year Hospital Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modin, Bitte; Ostberg, Viveca; Almquist, Ylva

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which sixth grade peer status could predict anxiety and/or depression in 5,242 women and 5,004 men who were born in 1953 and whose hospital records were followed up from 1973-2003. The data used was the Stockholm Birth Cohort Study. While no association could be established for men, results indicated that women…

  8. Hospital Safety Culture in Taiwan: A Nationwide Survey Using Chinese Version Safety Attitude Questionnaire

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wui-Chiang Lee; Hwei-Ying Wung; Hsun-Hsiang Liao; Chien-Ming Lo; Fei-Ling Chang; Pa-Chun Wang; Angela Fan; Hsin-Hsin Chen; Han-Chuan Yang; Sheng-Mou Hou

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Safety activities have been initiated at many hospitals in Taiwan, but little is known about the safety culture at these hospitals. The aims of this study were to verify a safety culture survey instrument in Chinese and to assess hospital safety culture in Taiwan. METHODS: The Taiwan Patient Safety Culture Survey was conducted in 2008, using the adapted Safety

  9. Depression, death anxiety, and hope among female caregivers of children with HIV\\/AIDS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Enrique Gular

    1995-01-01

    This study examined depression, death anxiety and hope among pediatric HIV caregivers. One hundred and seven female caregivers of children with HIV\\/AIDS were interviewed in a pediatric clinic at a large metropolitan hospital.^ Caregivers were given the Beck Depression Inventory, Templer's Death Anxiety Scale, Herth Hope Index, and a demographic questionnaire. Anonymous HIV testing was offered, and HIV status was

  10. Validity of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12) in detecting depressive and anxiety disorders among high school students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gennady Nickolaevich Baksheev; Jo Robinson; Elizabeth Mary Cosgrave; Kathryn Baker; Alison Ruth Yung

    2011-01-01

    Despite the common use of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) with adolescents, there is limited data supporting its validity with this population. The aims of the study were to investigate the psychometric properties of the GHQ-12 among high school students, to validate the GHQ-12 against the gold standard of a diagnostic interview, and to suggest a threshold score for

  11. Questionnaire survey of working relationships between nurses and doctors in University Teaching Hospitals in Southern Nigeria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roseline I Ogbimi; Clement A Adebamowo

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Smooth working relationships between nurses and doctors are necessary for efficient health care delivery. However, previous studies have shown that this is often absent with negative impact on the quality of health care delivery. In 2002, we studied factors that affect nurse-doctor working relationships in University Teaching Hospitals (UTH) in Southern Nigeria in order to characterize it and identify

  12. Anxiety Status and its Relationship with General Health Related Quality of Life among Prostate Cancer Patients in Two University Hospitals in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    ISA, Mohamad Rodi; MOY, Foong Ming; ABDUL RAZACK, Azad Hassan; MD ZAINUDDIN, Zulkifli; ZAINAL, Nur Zuraida

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the prevalence of anxiety among prostate cancer patients, and to ascertain the association between stress status, socio-demographic, medical and surgical illness, current urinary problem and cancer status with general health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among these patients. Methods: A hospital based, cross sectional study was conducted at Surgical Clinic, University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) and Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) using universal sampling. Result: A total of 193 patients were recruited. The prevalence of anxiety was 25.4% (95%CI: 19.2 – 31.6). The anxiety ratings were mild anxiety (10.4%), moderate anxiety (13.6%) and severe anxiety (1.6%). The total quality of life among stress group was 59.2 ± 14.7 and among non-stress group was 73.9 ± 12.7. There was a significant negative weak correlation between anxiety score and total quality of life (rs=?0.534, P<0.001). In multivariable analysis, there was a significant difference in the total quality of life (QOL) among anxiety status [adj. mean diff. = ?9.1 (95%CI: ?15.2, ?4.7)]. The adjusted mean difference was associated by age category of the patients (P<0.001); living partner (P<0.001); intermittency (P=0.035) and problem of hematuria during micturition (P=0.005). Conclusion: The prevalence of anxiety among prostate cancer was moderately high. Treating the urination problem as well as encouraging living with spouse/family may improve the quality of life among anxiety condition of these patients. PMID:23641401

  13. Parental anxiety and stress during children’s hospitalisation: The StayClose study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jo Wray; Kirsty Lee; Nettie Dearmun; Linda Franck

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this pilot study were to assess anxiety and stress in parents of children admitted to hospital and identify influencing factors, and assess the feasibility and acceptability of the methodology to parents and hospital staff. Parents of 28 children hospitalised for at least 3 days completed questionnaires assessing psychological functioning after admission, 16 and 13 of whom completed

  14. Problems in Cross-Cultural Use of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: “No Butterflies in the Desert”

    PubMed Central

    Maters, Gemma A.; Sanderman, Robbert; Kim, Aimee Y.; Coyne, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is widely used to screen for anxiety and depression. A large literature is citable in support of its validity, but difficulties are increasingly being identified, such as inexplicably discrepant optimal cutpoints and inconsistent factor-structures. This article examines whether these problems could be due to the construction of the HADS that poses difficulties for translation and cross-cultural use. Methods Authors’ awareness of difficulties translating the HADS were identified by examining 20% of studies using the HADS, obtained by a systematic literature search in Pubmed and PsycINFO in May 2012. Reports of use of translations and validation studies were recorded for papers from non-English speaking countries. Narrative and systematic reviews were examined for how authors dealt with different translations. Results Of 417 papers from non-English speaking countries, only 45% indicated whether a translation was used. Studies validating translations were cited in 54%. Seventeen reviews, incorporating data from diverse translated versions, were examined. Only seven mentioned issues of language and culture, and none indicated insurmountable problems in integrating results from different translations. Conclusion Initial decisions concerning item content and response options likely leave the HADS difficult to translate, but we failed to find an acknowledgment of problems in articles involving its translation and cross-cultural use. Investigators’ lack of awareness of these issues can lead to anomalous results and difficulties in interpretation and integration of these results. Reviews tend to overlook these issues and most reviews indiscriminately integrate results from studies performed in different countries. Cross-culturally valid, but literally translated versions of the HADS may not be attainable, and specific cutpoints may not be valid across cultures and language. Claims about rates of anxiety and depression based on integrating cross-cultural data or using the same cutpoint across languages and culture should be subject to critical scrutiny. PMID:23976969

  15. Statistics Anxiety, Trait Anxiety, Learning Behavior, and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macher, Daniel; Paechter, Manuela; Papousek, Ilona; Ruggeri, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between statistics anxiety, individual characteristics (e.g., trait anxiety and learning strategies), and academic performance. Students enrolled in a statistics course in psychology (N = 147) filled in a questionnaire on statistics anxiety, trait anxiety, interest in statistics, mathematical…

  16. Death anxiety in hospitalized end-of-life patients as captured from a structured electronic health record: differences by patient and nurse characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lodhi, Muhammad Kamran; Cheema, Umer Iftikhar; Stifter, Janet; Wilkie, Diana J; Keenan, Gail M; Yao, Yingwei; Ansari, Rashid; Khokhar, Ashfaq A

    2014-01-01

    The nursing outcomes of hospitalized patients whose plans of care include death anxiety, which is a diagnosis among patients at the end-of-life, are obscure. The authors of the current article applied data mining techniques to nursing plan-of-care data for patients diagnosed with death anxiety, as defined by North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International, from four different hospitals to examine nursing care outcomes and associated factors. Results indicate that <50% of patients met the expected outcome of comfortable death. Gerontology unit patients were more likely to meet the expected outcome than patients from other unit types, although results were not statistically significant. Younger patients (i.e., age <65) had a lower chance of meeting the outcome compared with older patients (i.e., age ?65) (?(2)(1) = 9.266, p < 0.004). Longer stays improved the chances of meeting the outcome (?(2)(2) = 6.47, p < 0.04). Results indicate that death anxiety outcomes are suboptimal and suggest the need to better educate clinicians about diagnosing and treating death anxiety among patients who face the end-of-life transition. PMID:25157534

  17. HOW DO NHS GENERAL HOSPITALS IN ENGLAND DEAL WITH PATIENTS WITH ALCOHOL-RELATED PROBLEMS? A QUESTIONNAIRE SURVEY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LYNN OWENS; IAN T. GILMORE; MUNIR PIRMOHAMED

    Aims: Alcohol-related disease represents a major burden on hospitals. However, it is unclear whether hospitals have developed the necessary expertise and guidelines to deal with this burden. The aim of this survey was to determine what measures general hospital NHS Trusts in England had in place to deal with alcohol-related problems, including the employment of dedicated alcohol specialist nurses. Methods:

  18. Anxiety disorders and physical comorbidity: increased prevalence but reduced relevance of specific risk factors for hospital-based mortality during a 12.5-year observation period in general hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Schoepf, Dieter; Heun, Reinhard

    2015-08-01

    Anxiety disorders (AD) are associated with an increase in physical comorbidities, but the effects of these diseases on hospital-based mortality are unclear. Consequently, we investigated whether the burden of physical comorbidity and its relevance on hospital-based mortality differed between individuals with and without AD during a 12.5-year observation period in general hospital admissions. During 1 January 2000 and 30 June 2012, 11,481 AD individuals were admitted to seven General Manchester Hospitals. All comorbidities with a prevalence ?1 % were compared with those of 114,810 randomly selected and group-matched hospital controls of the same age and gender, regardless of priority of diagnoses or specialized treatments. Comorbidities that increased the risk of hospital-based mortality (but not mortality outside of the hospital) were identified using multivariate logistic regression analyses. AD individuals compared to controls had a substantial excess comorbidity, but a reduced hospital-based mortality rate. Twenty-two physical comorbidities were increased in AD individuals compared with controls, which included cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors. The most frequent physical comorbidities in AD individuals were hypertension, asthma, cataract, and ischaemic heart disease. Risk factors for hospital-based mortality in AD individuals were lung cancer, alcoholic liver disease, respiratory failure, heart failure, pneumonia, bronchitis, non-specific dementia, breast cancer, COPD, gallbladder calculus, atrial fibrillation, and angina. The impact of atrial fibrillation, angina, and gallbladder calculus on hospital-based mortality was higher in AD individuals than in controls. In contrast, other mortality risk factors had an equal or lower impact on hospital-based mortality in sample comparisons. Therefore AD individuals have a higher burden of physical comorbidity that is associated with a reduced risk of general hospital-based mortality. Atrial fibrillation, angina, and gallbladder calculus are major risk factors for general hospital-based mortality in AD individuals. PMID:25472881

  19. Accuracy of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for Identifying Depression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Christoph; Sievi, Noriane A.; Clarenbach, Christian F.; Schwarz, Esther Irene; Schlatzer, Christian; Brack, Thomas; Brutsche, Martin; Frey, Martin; Irani, Sarosh; Leuppi, Jörg D.; Rüdiger, Jochen; Thurnheer, Robert; Kohler, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Psychological morbidity is common in chronic respiratory diseases. The diagnostic accuracy of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and risk factors for comorbid depression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are addressed. Consecutive COPD patients (GOLD stage I–IV, 40–75 years old) were enrolled in a multicentre, cross-sectional cohort study. Diagnosis of depression was ascertained through clinical records. Lung function, HADS score, 6-minute walking test (6-MWT), MRC dyspnoea score, and COPD Assessment Test (CAT) were evaluated. Two hundred fifty-nine COPD patients (mean age 62.5 years; 32% female; mean FEV1 48% predicted) were included. Patients diagnosed with depression (29/259; 11.2%) had significantly higher HADS-D and HADS-Total scores than nondepressed patients (median (quartiles) HADS-D 6 [4; 9] versus 4 [2; 7], median HADS-Total 14 [10; 20] versus 8 [5; 14]). Receiver-operating characteristic plots showed moderate accuracy for HADS-D, AUC 0.662 (95%CI 0.601–0.719), and HADS-Total, AUC 0.681 (95%CI 0.620–0.737), with optimal cut-off scores of >5 and >9, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity were 62.1% and 62.6% for HADS-D compared to 75.9% and 55.2% for HADS-Total. Age, comorbidities, sex, and lower airflow limitation predicted depression. The HADS exhibits low diagnostic accuracy for depression in COPD patients. Younger men with comorbidities are at increased risk for depression. PMID:25548667

  20. Genetic analyses benefit from using less heterogeneous phenotypes: an illustration with the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS).

    PubMed

    Laurin, Charles A; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I; Lubke, Gitta H

    2015-05-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of depression has been cited as one of the causes of the limited success to detect genetic variants in genome-wide studies. The 7-item Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D) was developed to detect depression in individuals with physical health problems. An initial psychometric analysis showed that a short version ("HADS-4") is less heterogeneous and hence more reliable than the full scale, and correlates equally strong with a DSM-oriented depression scale. We compared the HADS-D and the HADS-4 to assess the benefits of using less heterogeneous phenotype measures in genetic analyses. We compared HADS-D and HADS-4 in three separate analyses: (1) twin- and family-based heritability estimation, (2) SNP-based heritability estimation using the software GCTA, and (3) a genome-wide association study (GWAS). The twin study resulted in heritability estimates between 18% and 25%, with additive genetic variance being the largest component. There was also evidence for assortative mating and a dominance component of genetic variance, with HADS-4 having slightly lower estimates of assortment. Importantly, when estimating heritability from SNPs, the HADS-D did not show a significant genetic variance component, while for the HADS-4, a statistically significant amount of heritability was estimated. Moreover, the HADS-4 had substantially more SNPs with small P-values in the GWAS analysis than did the HADS-D. Our results underline the benefits of using more homogeneous phenotypes in psychiatric genetic analyses. Homogeneity can be increased by focusing on core symptoms of disorders, thus reducing the noise in aggregate phenotypes caused by substantially different symptom profiles. PMID:25832296

  1. Social anxiety spectrum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liliana Dell’Osso; Paola Rucci; Francesca Ducci; Antonio Ciapparelli; Laura Vivarelli; Marina Carlini; Carla Ramacciotti; Giovanni B. Cassano

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide the prevalence rates of mild, moderate and severe symptoms of social anxiety in a sample of high school students and to analyze gender differences and associated impairment levels within these three levels of severity. Five hundred and twenty students were assessed with the Social Anxiety Spectrum Self-Report (SHY-SR), a questionnaire that explores

  2. Death Anxiety as a Function of Aging Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Jeremy P.; Christopher, Andrew N.; Walter, Mark I.

    2007-01-01

    To assess how different facets of aging anxiety contributed to the prediction of tangible and existential death anxiety, 167 Americans of various Christian denominations completed a battery of questionnaires. Multiple regression analyses, controlling for demographic variables and previously demonstrated predictors of death anxiety, revealed that…

  3. Anxiety Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Anxiety Disorders About Anxiety Disorders Anxiety Disorders in Older Adults If you have an anxiety disorder, worry or ... of better as time goes on. Doctors and older adults tend to view anxiety and fear as normal ...

  4. Relation of Depression, Anxiety, and Quality of Life with Outcome after Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Suprakash; Srivastava, Kalpana

    2013-01-01

    Background. Despite, increasing number of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) being performed, there is a paucity of Indian studies on the psychological effects of PTCA. Aim. To study the relation of anxiety, depression, and health related quality of life with outcome after PTCA. Methods. A total of 35 patients undergoing PTCA were included in the present project with their informed consent. All patients filled a specially designed proforma, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Coronary Scale, Seattle Angina Questionnaire, and a health related quality of life measure (EQ 5D) one day before undergoing PTCA. Three days after PTCA patients were reassessed with the Hospital anxiety & depression scale, Seattle angina questionnaire and the EQ 5D. Results. Analysis showed that 46% had significant anxiety and 32.1% had significant depression before PTCA. Following successful PTCA, none of the patients had significant anxiety, and only 2 (3.6%) had significant depression. On the Seattle Angina Questionnaire, physical limitation reduced from 67.9 to 48. Disease perception improved from 21.2 to 37.1. On the EQ5D, the health status improved from 42.7 before PTCA to 78.7 after PTCA. Conclusion. Successful PTCA resulted in significant reduction in anxiety, depression, and physical limitation and improvement in disease perception and health status. PMID:24319368

  5. Therapists' anxiety and attitudes toward computerized documentation in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, K; Brodnik, M; Sachs, L; Schiller, M R

    1997-01-01

    Many hospitals are converting to electronic records and allied health professionals are required to modify their traditional documentation practices to accommodate this new technology. This paper discusses a study conducted to determine the computer anxiety and attitudes of physical, occupational, and speech therapists in a large urban teaching hospital before and after the implementation of a computerized documentation system. Fifty-three therapists surveyed with a preinstallation questionnaire reported mild computer anxiety and generally good attitudes about the planned computer system. A greater amount of previous computer use and better self-related computer skills were consistent with less computer anxiety. Seven of the original sample became the first to use the computer system. After their six month trial period, surveys revealed a reduction in computer anxieties. Manual time logs completed before and after the system implementation revealed a significant decrease in total documentation time when using computers. PMID:9451584

  6. Dry eye disease and depression-anxiety-stress: A hospital-based case control study in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ugur; Gokler, Mehmet Enes; Unsal, Alaettin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between dry eye disease (DED) and psychosomatic conditions, such as depression, stress, and anxiety, and the distribution of associated risk factors. Methods: In this case control study, the sample consisted of 121 DED subjects and 242 control subjects. Each subjects was diagnosed as having DED or not by an ophthalmologist. Ocular Surface Disease Index and Depression Anxiety Stress Scales were administered to all subjects. Data were analysed using chi-square and Mann Whitney U tests as a univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression as a multivariate analysis. Results: Of 1,458 consecutive outpatients, clinically diagnosed DED was present in 121 individuals (8.3%). There was a significant relationship of family history of DED (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 0.84-2.41), chronic disease history (OR, 2.84; 95% CI, 1.66-4.87), OSDI score (OR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.97–4.06), depression (OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.30-3.27), anxiety (OR, 2.66; 95% CI, 1.67-4.23), and stress (OR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.48-3.67) with DED. Conclusion: Individuals with depression, anxiety and stress are more likely to experience DED. In addition to confirming some well-known risk factors, this study has found new associations between DED and a family history of DED and the presence of stress.

  7. Chronic fatigue in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors and associations with anxiety, depression and comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Daniëls, L A; Oerlemans, S; Krol, A D G; Creutzberg, C L; van de Poll-Franse, L V

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fatigue is a frequent and persistent problem among Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. We investigated the prevalence of clinically relevant fatigue in HL survivors and the relation between fatigue and anxiety and depression. Methods: Fatigue was measured through the generic European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and Fatigue Assessment Scale (FAS). Anxiety and depression were measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Questionnaires were mailed to 267 HL survivors. Results were compared with a Dutch age-matched normative population. Results: Response rate was 68% (median age 46 years, mean time since diagnosis 4.6 years). Prevalence of fatigue was significantly higher among HL survivors than in the norm population (FAS 41% vs 23%, QLQ-C30 43% vs 28%), as were fatigue levels. There was a significant association between fatigue, anxiety and depression. Of the HL survivors with high symptom levels of depression, 97% also reported fatigue. In multivariate analysis, depression was strongly associated with high levels of fatigue and, to a lesser extent, anxiety and comorbidity. Conclusions: Prevalence rates of fatigue are significantly higher in HL survivors than in the general population and differences are clinically relevant. Depression and anxiety were strongly associated with high levels of fatigue. Reducing fatigue levels by treatment of depression and anxiety should be further explored. PMID:24434433

  8. Association of Help-seeking Behavior with Depression and Anxiety Disorders among Gastroenterological Patients in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alosaimi, Fahad D.; Al-sultan, Omar; Alghamdi, Qusay; Almohaimeed, Ibrahim; Alqannas, Sulaiman

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims: There is a high prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders among gastroenterological outpatients. Relatively few studies have been done on the help-seeking behavior among those who suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms with or without psychiatric disorders. We aimed to characterize the help-seeking behavior of gastroenterological outpatients and to evaluate if this behavior is linked to the presence of depression and anxiety. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in gastroenterology clinics in four hospitals in Riyadh between February and September 2013. A self-administrated questionnaire was developed and administered to patients. Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) questionnaires were used to diagnose depression and anxiety, respectively. Results: A total of 440 patients completed the study questionnaire. The average age was 36.0 ± 12.8 years and 69% of the patients were males. Complaints included abdominal pain (58%), heartburn (29%), diarrhea or constipation (25%), appetite or weight changes (22%), and nausea or vomiting (16%). Depression was diagnosed in 36%, while anxiety was diagnosed in 28% of the patients. The first intervention was use of medications (68%) and undergoing endoscopy (16%), while few patients initially used herbs or Islamic incantation (7.5%). This first intervention was done primarily (59%) in private sector hospitals rather than government sector hospitals (36%). The rates of depression and anxiety in our patients were higher among those who suffered from multiple complaints for longer durations and with less satisfaction with the offered services. Conclusion: Depression and anxiety are common comorbidities in gastroenterological outpatient population, especially those who have a chronic course of multiple gastrointestinal complaints. PMID:25038209

  9. The Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) - the first trial of a German version

    PubMed Central

    Berth, Hendrik; Petrowski, Katja; Balck, Friedrich

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Preoperative anxiety influences the result of the treatment in patients. To assess preoperative anxiety the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) [1] was developed. The APAIS measures anxiety and the need-for-information with 6 items, with good reliability and validity. This article presents the first test of the German version of this screening instrument. Methods: The German version of the APAIS was tested on 68 patients questioned before surgery on the lower extremities in the Orthopaedic Department of a University Hospital. From 68 patients, 47 (69%) were female and the average age was 55 years. Besides the APAIS, several additional questionnaires with similar or divergent content were administered for testing the convergent and discriminant validity of the APAIS (HADS, SCL-9-K, KASA, COSS, STOA). Results: The two scales anxiety and need-for-information could be replicated by a factor analysis and had high reliability (anxiety: Cronbachs Alpha = 0.92; need-for-information: Cronbachs Alpha = 0.86). As expected the scales of the APAIS correlated highly with different standard questionnaires which measure anxiety (KASA, STOA) and low with questionnaires of divergent contents (HADS depression, COSS). The APAIS-scales are independent of sex, age or previous surgeries. Patients with a higher need-for-information show higher anxiety (r=0.59) prior to surgery. Conclusions: During its first trial the German version of the APAIS proved to be a reliable and valid instrument. Furthermore, it is a good screening instrument to assess preoperative anxiety and need-for-information in clinical practice, especially due to its brevity. In further studies the predictive validity has to be examined in large heterogeneous samples. PMID:19742298

  10. Prevalence and Associated Positive Psychological Variables of Depression and Anxiety among Chinese Cervical Cancer Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-Long; Liu, Li; Wang, Xiao-Xi; Wang, Yang; Wang, Lie

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of depression and anxiety and its associated factors in cervical cancer are not well evaluated in China. Meanwhile, with increasing attention given to positive psychological variables in oncology field, there is a need to conduct a study to explore the integrative effects of positive psychological variables on depression/anxiety so as to provide patients a more holistic cancer care. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of depression/anxiety as well as the integrative effects of hope, optimism and general self-efficacy on depression/anxiety among Chinese cervical cancer patients. Methods A multi-centre, cross-sectional study was conducted of consecutive inpatients at the Liaoning Cancer Hospital & Institute and the Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University in Liaoning Province, northeast China. A total of 224 cervical cancer patients eligible for this study completed questionnaires on demographic and clinic variables, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Herth Hope Index, Life Orientation Scale-Revised, and General Self-Efficacy Scale during February and August 2013. Results The prevalence of depression and anxiety was 52.2% and 65.6% in cervical cancer patients. The anxiety score was significantly higher in patients at the period of 4–6 months after diagnose and at cancer stage II. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that hope, optimism and general self-efficacy as a whole accounted for 31.3% variance of depression and 35.6% variance of anxiety. Under standardized estimate (?) sequence, hope, optimism and general self-efficacy significantly associated with depression, respectively; hope and optimism were also significant individual predictors of anxiety. Conclusions The high prevalence of depression and anxiety among cervical cancer patients should receive more attention in Chinese medical settings. More importantly, efforts to develop the integrated psychosocial interventions are effective and necessary to alleviate depression/anxiety in cervical cancer patients by synthesizing and integrating the individual protective effects of hope, optimism and general self-efficacy. PMID:24722558

  11. Repetitive negative thinking predicts depression and anxiety symptom improvement during brief cognitive behavioral therapy.

    PubMed

    Kertz, Sarah J; Koran, Jennifer; Stevens, Kimberly T; Björgvinsson, Thröstur

    2015-05-01

    Repetitive negative thinking (RNT) is a common symptom across depression and anxiety disorders and preliminary evidence suggests that decreases in rumination and worry are related to improvement in depression and anxiety symptoms. However, despite its prevalence, relatively little is known about transdiagnostic RNT and its temporal associations with symptom improvement during treatment. The current study was designed to examine the influence of RNT on subsequent depression and anxiety symptoms during treatment. Participants (n = 131; 52% female; 93% White; M = 34.76 years) were patients presenting for treatment in a brief, cognitive behavior therapy based, partial hospitalization program. Participants completed multiple assessments of depression (Center for the Epidemiological Studies of Depression-10 scale), anxiety (the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale), and repetitive negative thinking (Perseverative Thinking Questionnaire) over the course of treatment. Results indicated statistically significant between and within person effects of RNT on depression and anxiety, even after controlling for the effect of time, previous symptom levels, referral source, and treatment length. RNT explained 22% of the unexplained variability in depression scores and 15% of the unexplained variability in anxiety scores beyond that explained by the control variables. RNT may be an important transdiagnostic treatment target for anxiety and depression. PMID:25812825

  12. Questionnaire-based survey on structural quality of hospitals and nursing homes for the elderly, their staffing with infection control personal, and implementation of infection control measures in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kramer, A; Assadian, O; Helfrich, J; Krüger, C; Pfenning, I; Ryll, S; Perner, A; Loczenski, B

    2013-01-01

    From January to May 2012, 1,860 hospitals throughout Germany received a questionnaire encompassing 77 items. Additionally, 300 outpatient care services and 310 nursing homes for elderly in Berlin also received a 10-item questionnaire asking on their implemented infection control practices. All questionnaires were anonymous. A total of 229 completed questionnaires from hospitals, 14 questionnaires from outpatient care services, and 16 questionnaires from nursing homes were eligible for further analysis. The lack of Infection Control physicians was identified as the largest issue. In hospitals sized 400-999 beds a gap of 71%, and in hospitals sized ?1,000 beds a gap of 17% was reported. Depending on the number of hospital beds, 13-29% of hospitals sized ?100 beds reported not havening one infection control nurse. Since based on the number of beds in larger institutions or in facilities caring for high-risk patients several infection control nurses may be required, the deficiency in infection control nurses may even be higher, particularly in secondary and tertiary care facilities. Furthermore, the analysis revealed that the legal requirements for surveillance and reporting of notifiable infectious diseases have not yet been implemented in 11% of the facilities. The implementation of antibiotic strategies did show significant gaps. However, deficiencies in the implemented measures for the prevention of surgical site infections were less frequent. Yet 12% of the participants did not have a dedicated infection control concept for their surgical services. Eight percent of hospitals were not prepared for an outbreak management and 10% did not have established regulations for wearing surgical scrubs. Deficiencies in waste disposal and the control of air-conditioning systems were also noted. Based on the results of this survey, conclusions on the optimal resource allocation for further improvement of patient safety may be drawn. While all participating nursing homes had some sort of infection control consultation, this only applied to 12 out of 16 outpatient nursing services. However, all 16 nursing services worked on the basis of an implemented infection control plan. Though legally binding hygiene recommendations have not yet been implemented for nursing homes, the necessity of infection control to assure patient safety has obviously been recognised throughout these services. PMID:23967397

  13. The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED): Relationship with anxiety and depression in normal children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Muris; Harald Merckelbach; Anneke van Brakel; Birgit Mayer; Lieke van Dongen

    1998-01-01

    The current article presents two studies that investigated the concurrent validity of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED), a self-report questionnaire that measures symptoms of DSM-IV linked anxiety disorders in children. Study 1 (N = 68) addressed the connection between the SCARED, on the one hand, and state anxiety and trait anxiety as indexed by the Spielberger

  14. The effect of need-based spiritual/religious intervention on spiritual well-being and anxiety of elderly people.

    PubMed

    Elham, Hedayati; Hazrati, Maryam; Momennasab, Marzieh; Sareh, Keshavarzi

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety and spiritual distress are the most common problems among the patients admitted in intensive care units. The elderly are more vulnerable to this problem due to impairment of their adaptation mechanisms. Hence, helping to reduce anxiety is one of the most effective nursing interventions. Therefore, this study aimed at investigating the effect of need-based spiritual/religious interventions on spiritual well-being (SWB) and anxiety of the elderly admitted to coronary care unit (CCU). This quasi-experimental study with pre- and posttest control group design was conducted on 66 patients admitted to CCU of Imam Reza hospital in Lar, southern Iran, in 2014. After obtaining informed consents, the data were collected using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the SWB Scale, and a demographic questionnaire. The questionnaires were completed through interviewing the patients before and after the intervention. The participants of the intervention group underwent 60- to 90-minute sessions of spiritual and religious need-based interventions for 3 consecutive days. The results showed a significant increase in the mean scores of SWB in the intervention group after the intervention (P = .001). Also, a significant decrease was found in mean scores of trait and state anxiety in the intervention group in comparing to control group (P < .001). Moreover, a significant correlation was observed between the mean scores of SWB and state and trait anxiety. Spiritual/religious interventions could enhance SWB and reduce anxiety in the elderly admitted to CCU. PMID:25882263

  15. Association of temporomandibular disorder symptoms with anxiety and depression in Portuguese college students.

    PubMed

    Minghelli, Beatriz; Morgado, Marcos; Caro, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its association with anxiety and depression among 1,493 Portuguese college students (age 17-69 years) at Piaget Institute. The assessment instruments were the Fonseca Anamnestic Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. TMD was present in 633 (42.4%) students, and anxiety or depression was present in 456 (30.5%) students. Regarding the association of TMD with anxiety and depression, 280 of the 633 students (61.4%) with TMD symptoms also had signs of anxiety or depression (P < 0.001). As compared with men, women had an odds ratio of 1.9 (95% confidence interval: 1.53-2.46; P < 0.001) for TMD. As compared with students without signs of anxiety or depression, students with such signs had an odds ratio of 3.1 (95% confidence interval: 2.42-3.84; P < 0.001) for TMD. College students from various fields of study and regions of Portugal had a high prevalence of TMD, which was significantly associated with anxiety and depression. PMID:24930749

  16. Measuring Metacognition in Cancer: Validation of the Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 (MCQ-30)

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Sharon A.; Salmon, Peter; Dunn, Graham; Fisher, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 assesses metacognitive beliefs and processes which are central to the metacognitive model of emotional disorder. As recent studies have begun to explore the utility of this model for understanding emotional distress after cancer diagnosis, it is important also to assess the validity of the Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 for use in cancer populations. Methods 229 patients with primary breast or prostate cancer completed the Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale pre-treatment and again 12 months later. The structure and validity of the Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 were assessed using factor analyses and structural equation modelling. Results Confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses provided evidence supporting the validity of the previously published 5-factor structure of the Metacognitions Questionnaire 30. Specifically, both pre-treatment and 12 months later, this solution provided the best fit to the data and all items loaded on their expected factors. Structural equation modelling indicated that two dimensions of metacognition (positive and negative beliefs about worry) were significantly associated with anxiety and depression as predicted, providing further evidence of validity. Conclusions These findings provide initial evidence that the Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 is a valid measure for use in cancer populations. PMID:25215527

  17. Anxiety and depression in association with morbid obesity: changes with improved physical health after duodenal switch

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with morbid obesity have an increased risk for anxiety and depression. The "duodenal switch" is perhaps the most effective obesity surgery procedure for inducing weight loss. However, to our knowledge, data on symptoms of anxiety and depression after the duodenal switch are lacking. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that self-reported physical health is the major predictor of symptoms of depression in patients with morbid obesity. We therefore investigated the symptoms of anxiety and depression before and after the duodenal switch procedure and whether post-operative changes in self-reported physical health were predictive of changes in these symptoms. Methods Data were assessed before surgery (n = 50), and one (n = 47) and two (n = 44) years afterwards. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were assessed by the "Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale", and self-reported physical health was assessed by the "Short-Form 36" questionnaire. Linear mixed effect models were used to investigate changes in the symptoms of anxiety and depression. Correlation and linear multiple regression analyses were used to study whether changes in self-reported physical health were predictive of post-operative changes in the symptoms of anxiety and depression. Results The symptom burden of anxiety and depression were high before surgery but were normalized one and two years afterwards (P < 0.001). The degree of improvement in self-reported physical health was associated with statistically significant reductions in the symptoms of anxiety (P = 0.003) and depression (P = 0.004). Conclusions The novelty of this study is the large and sustained reductions in the symptoms of anxiety and depression after the duodenal switch procedure, and that these changes were closely associated with improvements in self-reported physical health. PMID:20492663

  18. 'Why I feel bad': Refinement on the effects of prostate cancer upon lifestyle questionnaire and an initial exploration of its links with anxiety and depression among prostate cancer patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher F. Sharpley; Vicki Bitsika; David R. H. Christie

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To psychometrically refine a standardized scale for identifying those lifestyle changes that were most likely to contribute to anxiety and depression among prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Methods: Three hundred and eighty-one PCa patients who had received their initial diagnosis between one and 96 months completed a survey of background variables, anxiety and depression inventories and the 36-item Effects of

  19. The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) and traditional childhood anxiety measures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Muris; Harald Merckelbach; Birgit Mayer; Anneke van Brakel; Sandra Thissen; Véronique Moulaert; Björn Gadet

    1998-01-01

    The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) is a self-report questionnaire that measures symptoms of DSM-IV linked anxiety disorders in children. This article presents two studies that investigated the relationship between the SCARED, on the one hand, and two other widely used anxiety measures for children, namely the Revised Children’s Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS) and the Fear Survey

  20. Aromatherapy With Citrus Aurantium Oil and Anxiety During the First Stage of Labor

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Masoumeh; Amir Ali Akbari, Seddigheh; Mojab, Faraz; Talebi, Atefe; Alavi Majd, Hamid; Jannesari, Sharareh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is the most common psychological response of women to labor. Aromatherapy, i.e. the use of fragrant essential oils to stimulate the olfactory system, can create a state of calmness and help to alleviate anxiety. Objectives: The present study tried to determine the efficacy of aromatherapy with Citrus aurantium oil in reducing anxiety during the first stage of labor. Patients and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was conducted on two groups of pregnant women, referred to Vali-Asr Hospital (Tuyserkan, Iran) between June and September 2013. The sample size was comprised of 63 subjects in each group. Gauzes impregnated with 4 mL of C. aurantium distillate and normal saline were attached to the collar of subjects in the aromatherapy and control groups, respectively. The gauzes were changed every 30 minutes. The levels of anxiety in both groups were measured at baseline and after the intervention at dilations of 3-4 and 6-8 cm. The participants were followed up until delivery and the first- and fifth-minute Apgar scores were recorded. Data were collected using a demographic and obstetric characteristics questionnaire, an examination and observation checklist, and Spielberger state-trait anxiety questionnaire. Data analysis was performed with independent-t, Mann-Whitney, and chi-square tests in SPSS-22. P values less than 0.05 were considered significant. Results: Before the intervention, both groups had same levels of anxiety. However, the levels of anxiety at dilations of 3-4 and 6-8 cm were significantly lower in the aromatherapy group compared with the control group. Conclusions: The results of this study confirmed aromatherapy with C. aurantium blossom oil as a simple, inexpensive, noninvasive, and effective intervention to reduce anxiety during labor. PMID:25068058

  1. Evaluation of The Effects of Psychotherapy on Anxiety Among Mothers of Children With Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    NAZARI, Shiva; MORADI, Nahid; SADEGHI KOUPAEI, Mohammad Taghi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Children with leukemia and their families face a long period of medical treatment and uncertainty about the future. These families may suffer from short- and long-term emotional problems. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of supportive psychotherapy on the anxiety of mothers whose children suffer from leukemia. Materials & Methods The current research were performed on mothers who had a child with leukemia hospitalized in Mofid Children’s Hospital, Tehran, Iran. They were randomly selected. The research method was a quasi-experimental study with pretest/posttest design. The pretest Kettles’ anxiety questionnaire was given to all the mothers and after seven sessions of supportive psychotherapy, the posttest was performed and the grades were compared. Results Ten mothers finished all seven therapeutic sessions. There was a statistically significant difference between the pretest and posttest mean scores, confirming the mothers’ reduced anxiety level. Conclusion Finding effective and newer approaches to improve the well-being of parents with a sick child is an important challenge of today’s medical researches. Based on our findings, it is possible to reduce the anxiety in mothers of children with leukemia through supportive psychiatric therapies. Keywords: Leukemia; Mothers; Anxiety; Psychology; Child PMID:24665328

  2. Evaluating anxiety and depression in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Savard, J; Laberge, B; Gauthier, J G; Ivers, H; Bergeron, M G

    1998-12-01

    Because there is a large overlap between HIV manifestations and somatic symptoms of anxiety and depression, it is crucial to use measures that do not contain somatic items to validly and reliably assess these psychological states in HIV-infected patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), a questionnaire that does not include any somatic items, in HIV-seropositive individuals. Because the study was conducted among French Canadian individuals, the quality of the translation was 1st subjectively and empirically assessed. Then, the psychometric properties of the HADS were evaluated in 162 HIV-seropositive patients, who, in addition to the HADS, also completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The French Canadian version used was found to be subjectively and empirically equivalent to the original English version. Moreover, results of this study demonstrated a bifactorial structure with factors corresponding to the HADS subscales, an excellent internal consistency and test-retest reliability, a very good convergent validity, and an acceptable discriminant validity. Strikingly, in contrast to the BDI, HADS scores were found to be unconfounded by the presence of HIV symptomatology. The HADS appears to represent the best currently available self-report scale to reliably and validly assess anxiety and depression in HIV-infected patients. The HADS is simple and brief to administer (14 items) and may therefore be easily implemented in routine HIV care. PMID:9933941

  3. Logo therapy effect on anxiety and depression in mothers of children with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Delavari, H; Nasirian, M; Baezegar bafrooei, K

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer diagnosis among children can cause high stress and anxiety in parents, and they may lose their life expectancy. The present study investigated the effectiveness of Logo therapy on anxiety and depression among mothers of children with cancer. Materials and Methods This study was conducted by a semi-pilot method using pre-test and post-test with a control experimental group. Therapy sessions were held during 9 sessions of Logo therapy training for 90 minutes. The participants of this study were selected among 30 mothers of children with cancer and using sampling method in Yazd hospitals. The participants divided randomly into two groups: experimental and control. Participants in both experimental and control group completed questionnaires on Beck Anxiety Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory before and after training. Results The results showed that the index of depression and anxiety in control and experimental groups are 32.3, 6.63, 7.4 and 6.75, respectively. So, the level among the experimental group has been decreased after intervention of Logotherapy training and a significant difference occurred in the pre-post test stages. The results showed that Logo Therapy has a significant effect in reducing anxiety and depression among mothers of children with cancer (p<0.05). Conclusion Regarding the efficiency of this approach to reduce anxiety and depression among mothers, this treatment is recommended to be practiced beside other cancer therapies, so they can practice the treatment process with a better mood and mentality. PMID:25002923

  4. Psychopharmacologic treatment for pediatric anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Peters, Todd E; Connolly, Sucheta

    2012-10-01

    Anxiety is an innate emotion that all humans experience, especially during early childhood in periods of significant growth and development. Treatment strategies exist for anxiety disorders that cause significant dysfunction and impairment in youth. This article provides a current overview of the literature on psychopharmacologic management of pediatric anxiety disorders. Potential side effects and complications of psychotropic medications are reviewed. The treatment of anxiety disorders in patients with comorbid conditions is explored, addressing the impact on treatment course and pharmacologic recommendations. A clinical vignette describing a 10-year-old boy with increasing anxiety is presented describing in-hospital and outpatient treatment and therapies. PMID:23040902

  5. Anxiety Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rose C. Smith; Lisa S. Elwood; Matthew T. Feldner; Bunmi O. Olatunji

    \\u000a Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychological disorders, with a lifetime prevalence of 31.2% and a 12-month prevalence\\u000a of 19.1% in the United States (Kessler et al., 2005; Kessler, Chiu, Demler, Merikangas, & Walters, 2005). Individuals with\\u000a an anxiety disorder present with a variety of physical and psychological symptoms. Particularly unique to anxiety are the\\u000a symptoms of physical tension

  6. Internet Anxiety among Foreign Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Selami

    2011-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the demotivating potential of new technologies in foreign language research. Thus, this study aims to investigate Internet anxiety among foreign language learners and to determine the relationships between Internet anxiety and certain variables. A background questionnaire, an Internet information test, and an…

  7. College students' social anxiety associated with stress and mental health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shi Kan; Jiang Nan; Chen Xuefeng; Wang Zhen; Gao Jing; Hu Weipeng

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the mediator effects of social anxiety on college students' life stress and mental health. METHODS: 1430 college students were tested by revised Adolescent Self-Rating Life Events Check List (ASLEO), General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12) and social anxiety scale chose from Self Consciousness Scale. RESUTL AND ANALYSIS: The college students' stressors were related to social anxiety and mental health.

  8. Correlation of Anxiety and Motivation in English Language Learning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zheng Bin; Ji Lixia

    2009-01-01

    Correlation of anxiety and motivation was studied by means of questionnaire. The results show that inner interest motivation and effort intensity are significantly and negatively correlated with anxiety while achievement motivation. Learning context motivation is significantly and positively correlated with anxiety. Pedagogic implications are given according to the findings of study, like developing students' interest in English language and its

  9. Prevalence and Predictors of Anxiety and Depression among Female Medical Students in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    IBRAHIM, Nahla; AL-KHARBOUSH, Dania; EL-KHATIB, Lamis; AL-HABIB, Ahd; ASALI, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medical education & medical profession are among the most challenging and most stressful ones. Anxiety and depression represents an escalating public health problem among medical students. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence & predictors of anxiety and depression among female medical students in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out during 2010–2011. A stratified random sample method was used to select 450 medical students. A confidential, anonymous & self administered questionnaire included Standardized Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale was used. Results: The mean scores for anxiety and depression were 9.32 ± 3.77 & 6.59 ± 3.62, respectively. There is a positive correlation between anxiety & depression scores (r= 0.52, P< 0.001). Prevalence of morbid anxiety and depression were 34.9% and 14.7%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the first predictor of morbid anxiety was depression (adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR) = 3.28; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.85–5.82, P < 0.001). Students complained from condensed academic course, had academic and emotional failures during the 6 months preceded the study were about 2 times more prone to anxiety. Predictors of depression were having anxiety, nationality (being non-Saudi) & having emotional failure. Conclusion: Medical students encountered high rates of anxiety & depression compared to others. Academic problems and major life events were the main predictors. Enhancing faculty preventive & curative mental health services is recommended. Initiation of stress management courses & enhancing academic advising services are required since the start of medical education. PMID:24427751

  10. Type D personality parents of children with leukemia tend to experience anxiety: the mediating effects of social support and coping style.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Liu, Yang; Cai, Qing-Qing; Liu, Yi-Min; Wang, Tong; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Jing-Feng; Chen, Wei-qing; Huang, Hui

    2015-03-01

    The aims were to access anxiety and type D personality (TDP) in parents of children with leukemia, and to determine the mediating effect of social support and coping style on the relationship between TDP and anxiety. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 231 parents of children with leukemia and 261 parents of children with acute diseases in hospitals. Parents completed questionnaires on anxiety, TDP, social support, coping styles, children's clinical characteristics, and demographic characteristics. Parents of children with leukemia showed higher prevalence of anxiety (64.5% vs 40.2%, P?anxiety. Parents with TDP showed lower social support and less positive coping, but more negative coping compared with those without. Moreover, multiple mediation analyses revealed that the significant effect of TDP on anxiety was partially mediated by social support and positive coping. In conclusion, anxiety and TDP were highly prevalent in parents of children with leukemia. The predictive factors could be used to identify those parents who are at high risk of anxiety and may also be targets for prevention and intervention. PMID:25761192

  11. Effect of Inhalation of Aroma of Geranium Essence on Anxiety and Physiological Parameters during First Stage of Labor in Nulliparous Women: a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi Fakari, Fahimeh; Tabatabaeichehr, Mahbubeh; Kamali, Hossian; Rashidi Fakari, Farzaneh; Naseri, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Anxiety increases significantly during labor, especially among nulliparous women. Such anxiety may affect the progress of labor and physiological parameters. The use of essential oils of aromatic plants, or aromatherapy, is a non-invasive procedure that can decrease childbirth anxiety. This study examined the effect of inhalation of the aroma of geranium essential oil on the level of anxiety and physiological parameters of nulliparous women in the first stage of labor. Methods: In study, was carried out on 100 nulliparous women admitted to Bent al-Hoda Hospital in the city of Bojnord in North Khorasan province of Iran during 2012-2013. The women were randomly assigned to two groups of equal size, one experimental group (geranium essential oil) and one control (placebo) group. Anxiety levels were measured using Spielberger' questionnaire before and after intervention. Physiological parameters (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respiratory rate, pulse rate) were also measured before and after intervention in both groups. Data analysis was conducted using the x2 test, paired t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Wilcox on test on SPSS 11.5. Results: The mean anxiety score decreased significantly after inhalation of the aroma of geranium essential oil. There was also a significant decrease in diastolic blood pressure. Conclusion: Aroma of essential oil of geraniums can effectively reduce anxiety during labor and can be recommended as a non-invasive anti-anxiety aid during childbirth. PMID:26161367

  12. Parents' Cognitions and Expectations about Their Pre-School Children: The Contribution of Parental Anxiety and Child Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheatcroft, Rebecca; Creswell, Cathy

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the relative associations between parent and child anxiety and parents' cognitions about their children. One hundred and four parents of children aged 3-5 years completed questionnaires regarding their own anxiety level, their child's anxiety level and their cognitions about the child, specifically parents' expectations…

  13. Parents' cognitions and expectations about their pre-school children: The contribution of parental anxiety and child anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca Wheatcroft; Cathy Creswell

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the relative associations between parent and child anxiety and parents' cognitions about their children. One hundred and four parents of children aged 3-5 years completed questionnaires regarding their own anxiety level, their child's anxiety level and their cognitions about the child, specifically parents' expectations about child distress and avoidance, and parents' perceived control over child mood and

  14. [Anxiety disorder].

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Maiko; Horiguchi, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Anxiety disorder (AD) often is under diagnosed and under treated in older adults, especially when the clinical presentation of anxiety. Symptoms often overlap with medical conditions. Of all the anxiety disorders in later life, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is one of the most frequently diagnosed. AD is often comorbid with depression. AD is associated with excess disability. Anxiety in older adults has traditionally been treated pharmacology, often with benzodiazepine. However, the clinical recommendations for pharmacologic treatment actually have been much broader, including suggestions to consider serotonergic antidepressants. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin nor epinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) generally are safe and procedure fewer side effects compared with tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), in older patients. Effective treatment includes pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy, and complementary and alternative therapies. Late life AD is associated with substantial impairments in quality of life. Effective treatment for AD may be one of the most predictors of improvement of QOL. PMID:24261208

  15. College English Writing Affect: Self-Efficacy and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodrow, Lindy

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a research project into the self-efficacy and anxiety of college English students at four universities in China. A total of 738 participants completed a questionnaire measuring self-efficacy and anxiety in writing in English. This was immediately followed by a writing task. The questionnaire used a seven point Likert type…

  16. College English writing affect: Self-efficacy and anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lindy Woodrow

    This article describes a research project into the self-efficacy and anxiety of college English students at four universities in China. A total of 738 participants completed a questionnaire measuring self-efficacy and anxiety in writing in English. This was immediately followed by a writing task. The questionnaire used a seven point Likert type scale to measure self-efficacy and anxiety in writing.

  17. Increased Anxiety and Depression in Danish Cardiac Patients with a Type D personality: Cross-Validation of the Type D Scale (DS14)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helle Spindler; Charlotte Kruse; Ann-Dorthe Zwisler; Susanne S. Pedersen

    2009-01-01

    Background  Type D personality is an emerging risk factor in cardiovascular disease. We examined the psychometric properties of the Danish\\u000a version of the Type D Scale (DS14) and the impact of Type D on anxiety and depression in cardiac patients.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  Cardiac patients (n?=?707) completed the DS14, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. A subgroup\\u000a (n?=?318) also

  18. General Hospital Psychiatry 29 (2007) 285-293 Title: Use of the PRIME-MD Patient Health Questionnaire for estimating the

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2007-01-01

    1 General Hospital Psychiatry 29 (2007) 285-293 Title: Use of the PRIME-MD Patient Health 5, France 2 Service Universitaire de Psychiatrie Adulte, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 39 av, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College, London SE5 8AF, UK

  19. Structure of Anxiety Symptoms Among Children: A Confirmatory Factor-Analytic Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan H. Spence

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which anxiety symptoms among children cluster into subtypes of anxiety problems consistent with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition) classification of anxiety disorders. Two community samples of 698 children 8–12 years of age completed a questionnaire regarding the frequency with which they experienced a wide range of anxiety symptoms. Confirmatory factor

  20. Structure of anxiety symptoms among children: A confirmatory factor-analytic study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan H. Spence

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which anxiety symptoms among children cluster into subtypes of anxiety problems consistent with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition) classification of anxiety disorders. Two community samples of 698 children 8-12 years of age completed a questionnaire regarding the frequency with which they experienced a wide range of anxiety symptoms. Confirmatory factor

  1. Cognitive Errors in Youth with Anxiety Disorders: The Linkages Between Negative Cognitive Errors and Anxious Symptoms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carl F. Weems; Steven L. Berman; Wendy K. Silverman; Lissette M. Saavedra

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the linkages between negative cognitive errors and anxiety in a sample of children and adolescents referred for anxiety problems (N = 251). The Children's Negative Cognitive Error Questionnaire was used to assess cognitive errors and several self-report measures of anxiety were used to examine the specific linkages between cognitive errors and different aspects of children's anxiety phenomenology.

  2. Trait anxiety and children's state anxiety, cognitive behaviors, and performance under stress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Kent Houston; Judith E. Fox; Lynette Forbes

    1984-01-01

    Sixty-seven fourth-grade children anticipated and then performed a mathematics task in either a high or a low stress condition. While the children anticipated performing the task, measures of seven cognitive behaviors were obtained by means of both a Think Aloud procedure and a questionnaire. Measures of trait and state anxiety and task performance were also obtained. Trait anxiety was found

  3. Stress in Residency Training as Perceived by Resident Doctors in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. A. Issa; A. D. Yussuf; G. T. Olanrewaju; A. O. Oyewole

    Summary Medical education is a stressful endeavor and has been reported to be a cause of burnout, anxiety, depression and other psycho-social problems among resident doctors. This descriptive cross-sectional study described the stress of residency training as perceived by resident doctors at a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital using a structured questionnaire. Seventy-three of the 98 residents who met the inclusion

  4. Anxiety Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be related to genes that can affect brain chemistry and the regulation of chemicals called neurotransmitters. But ... should: Tell a parent or other adult about physical sensations, worries, or fears. Because anxiety disorders don' ...

  5. Anxiety/depression and orofacial myofacial disorders as factors associated with TMD in children.

    PubMed

    Pizolato, Raquel Aparecida; Freitas-Fernandes, Frederico Silva de; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors associated with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in children. TMD clinical signs were evaluated using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD; axis I), and subjective symptoms were evaluated using a structured questionnaire. Eighty-two children were selected, 40 with TMD (19 boys and 21 girls, mean age 9.84 ± 1.53 and 9.71 ± 1.30 years, respectively) and 42 without TMD (21 boys and 21 girls, mean age 10.27 ± 1.63 and 9.9 ± 1.37 years, respectively). Intra- and extra-oral examinations were carried out to determine the myofunctional characteristics of the masticatory system. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used to assess anxiety and depression. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and bivariate analysis followed by multiple logistic regression (? = 0.05). In bivariate analysis, the variables of open lips, anxiety, and depression had a p value < 0.15 and were entered into the multivariate logistic regression model. The most significant predictor factors were the presence of open lips (odds ratio = 5.42, p = 0.034) and anxiety (odds ratio = 18.59, p < 0.001). Thus, anxiety levels and open lips were associated with TMD in children. Owing to the cross-sectional design of the present study, the associations observed may have a bidirectional relationship. PMID:23538427

  6. Maternal phobic anxiety and child anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gail A. Bernstein; Ann E. Layne; Elizabeth A. Egan; Lara P. Nelson

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the relation between maternal anxiety symptoms and child anxiety symptoms and evaluated whether a reporting bias is associated with maternal anxiety. Fifty-seven mother–child pairs participated. All children had features or diagnoses of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), generalized anxiety disorder, and\\/or social phobia. Measures of maternal symptomatology and child anxiety were administered. Higher levels of maternal phobic

  7. Eating disorder symptoms among female anxiety disorder patients in clinical practice: the importance of anxiety comorbidity assessment.

    PubMed

    Becker, Carolyn Black; DeViva, Jason C; Zayfert, Claudia

    2004-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated the relationship between anxiety disorders, anxiety comorbidity, and eating disorder (ED) symptoms in clinical practice, and examined the naturalistic detection of ED when diagnoses were based on the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule (ADIS). Two hundred and fifty-seven female patients completed an ED questionnaire and were assessed with the ADIS. Although ED frequency did not differ among anxiety disorder diagnoses, regression analyses revealed that social phobia (SP) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) accounted for unique variance in eating pathology. Questionnaire results indicated that almost 12% of patients met criteria for a possible ED. Clinicians using the ADIS evidenced good specificity but were not sensitive to detecting ED, missing 80% of possible cases. Results support possible links between ED, social phobia and PTSD and highlight the importance of assessing anxiety comorbidity when examining the relationship between ED and anxiety disorders. Results also suggest that formal screening for ED among female anxiety patients may be warranted. PMID:15125976

  8. The relationship between anxiety, depression and illness perception in tberculosis patients in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective As the rates of TB world over have increased during the past 10 years, there has been a growing awareness of depression and its role in the outcome of chronic disorders. Though depression is common in patients with TB no study as yet has examined the prevalence of depression in this group in Pakistan. We aimed to determine the presence of depression, anxiety and illness perceptions in patients suffering from Tuberculosis (TB) in Pakistan. Methods 108 consecutive outpatients with tuberculosis completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS) and the Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ). Results Out of 108 patients, 50 (46.3%) were depressed and 51 (47.2%) had anxiety. Raised depression and anxiety scores were associated with an increase in the number of symptoms reported (HADS Depression: r = 0.346, p = < 0.001), more serious perceived consequences (HADS Depression: r = 0.279, p = 0.004, HADS Anxiety: r = 0.234, p = 0.017) and less control over their illness (HADS Depression: r = 0.239, p = 0.014, HADS Anxiety: r = 0.271, p = 0.005). Conclusion We found that about a half of patients in our sample met the criteria for probable depression and anxiety based on HADS score. Negative illness perceptions were clearly related to reports of mood symptoms. As depression and lack of perceived control over illness in those suffering from tuberculosis are reported to be independent predictors of poor adherence further studies to investigate their relationship with medication adherence are required. PMID:18302758

  9. The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) and traditional childhood anxiety measures.

    PubMed

    Muris, P; Merckelbach, H; Mayer, B; van Brakel, A; Thissen, S; Moulaert, V; Gadet, B

    1998-12-01

    The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) is a self-report questionnaire that measures symptoms of DSM-IV linked anxiety disorders in children. This article presents two studies that investigated the relationship between the SCARED, on the one hand, and two other widely used anxiety measures for children, namely the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS) and the Fear Survey Schedule for Children-Revised (FSSC-R), on the other hand. Results indicate that SCARED scores are positively and in a theoretically meaningful way related to RCMAS and FSSC-R scores, and thus provide evidence for the concurrent validity of the SCARED. PMID:10037229

  10. Correlation between depression, anxiety, and polymorphonuclear cells’ resilience in ulcerative colitis: the mediating role of heat shock protein 70

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To investigate whether anxiety and depression levels are associated with Heat Shock Protein 70 (HSP70) induction in the colon of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods The design was cross-sectional. Clinical activity was assessed by the Rachmilewitz Index (CAI). Three psychometric questionnaires were used: Zung Depression Rating Scale (ZDRS), Spielberg State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Colon biopsies were obtained from each affected anatomical site. Severity of inflammation was assessed by eosin/hematoxylin. Constitutive (HSP70c) and inducible (HSP70i) HSP70 expression were immunohistochemically studied. Results 29 UC patients were enrolled (69% men). Mean age was 46.5 years (SD: 19.5). Inflammation severity was moderate in 17 patients, severe in 6, and mild in 6. The mean number of years since diagnosis was 7.9 (SD: 6.5). The mean CAI was 6.4 (SD: 3.1). In active UC, there was downregulation of HSP70c in inflamed epithelium, without significant HSP70 induction. In 22/29 cases of active cryptitis, polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) clearly expressed HSP70i, with weak, focal positivity in the other 7 cases. Except for the hospital anxiety scale, scores in all psychometric tools were higher in patients with strong HSP70i immunoreactivity in the PMN. Logistic regression showed a strong positive relationship between HSP70i immunoreactivity in the PMN cells and scores in the trait anxiety, ZDRS, and hospital depression scales, (Odds ratios 1.3, 1.3, and 1.5; P?=?0.018, 0.023, and 0.038; Wald test, 5.6, 5.2, and 4.3 respectively) and a weaker but significant positive correlation with the CAI (Odds ratio 1.654; P?=?0.049; Wald test 3.858). Conclusion HSP70 is induced in PMN cells of UC patients and its induction correlates with depression and anxiety levels. PMID:24742079

  11. Test Anxiety Questionnaire Think you might have test anxiety? Take this test anxiety questionnaire to see if you do!

    E-print Network

    Westfall, Peter H.

    on things like intelligence tests and finals. T F 7. If I were to take an intelligence test, I would worry forget facts that I really know. T F 10. If I knew I was going to take an intelligence test, I would feel an uneasy, upset feeling before taking a final/test. T F 13. When taking a test, I find my emotional

  12. Direct and indirect predictors of social anxiety: The role of anxiety sensitivity, behavioral inhibition, experiential avoidance and self-consciousness.

    PubMed

    Panayiotou, Georgia; Karekla, Maria; Panayiotou, Margarita

    2014-11-01

    Using mediated and moderated regression, this study examined the hypothesis that anxiety sensitivity, the tendency to be concerned about anxiety symptoms, and behavioral inhibition, the tendency to withdraw from novel and potentially dangerous stimuli, predict social anxiety indirectly through experiential avoidance as measured by the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II and self-consciousness, as measured by the Self-Consciousness Scale. Behavioral inhibition and anxiety sensitivity are operationalized as temperamental traits, while experiential avoidance and self-consciousness are seen as learned emotion regulation strategies. Study 1 included college student groups from Cyprus scoring high and low on social anxiety (N=64 and N=63) as measured by the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory. Study 2 examined a random community sample aged 18-65 (N=324) treating variables as continuous and using the Psychiatric Disorders Screening Questionnaire to screen for social anxiety. Results suggest that experiential avoidance, but not self-consciousness mediates the effects of anxiety sensitivity on predicting social anxiety status, but that behavioral inhibition predicts social anxiety directly and not through the proposed mediators. Moderation effects were not supported. Overall, the study finds that social anxiety symptomatology is predicted not only by behavioral inhibition, but also anxiety sensitivity, when individuals take actions to avoid anxious experiences. Modifying such avoidant coping approaches may be more beneficial for psychological treatments than attempts to change long-standing, temperamental personality traits. PMID:25214373

  13. Comparison of the effects of doula supportive care and acupressure at the BL32 point on the mother's anxiety level and delivery outcome

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Marzieh; Masoudi, Zahra; Zare, Najaf; Vaziri, Farideh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Natural delivery is distressing and the mother's severe pain and anxiety in this condition can have negative impacts on the fetus, mother, and the delivery process. Yet, pain and anxiety can be reduced by supporting the mother by a doula. Thus, the present study aims to compare the effects of doula supportive care and acupressure at the BL32 point on the mother's anxiety level and delivery outcome. Materials and Methods: The present clinical trial was conducted on 150 pregnant women who had referred to the Shoushtari Hospital, Shiraz, Iran for delivery in 2012. The subjects were randomly divided into two intervention groups (supportive care and acupressure) and a control group (hospital routine care). The mothers’ anxiety score was assessed before and after the intervention, using the Spielberger questionnaire. The delivery outcomes were evaluated, as well. Subsequently, the data were entered into the SPSS statistical software (Ver. 16) and analyzed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA), Chi-square test, correlation coefficient, and logistic regression analysis. Results: After the intervention, the highest and lowest mean scores of the state and trait anxieties were compared with the control and the supportive care groups, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). A significant relationship was found between the labor length and mother's anxiety score after the intervention in the supportive care (P < 0.001) and the control group (P = 0.006). However, this relationship was not significant in the acupressure group (P = 0.425). Also, a significant difference was observed among the three groups regarding the mothers’ anxiety level (P = 0.009). Conclusions: The study results showed that doula supportive care and acupressure at the BL32 point reduced the mother's anxiety as well as the labor length. Therefore, non-pharmacological methods are recommended to be used during labor for improving birth outcomes and creating a positive birth experience. PMID:25878703

  14. Anxiety and pain in surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angel Martinez-Urrutia

    1975-01-01

    Investigated the effects of surgery on state anxiety (A-state) and perceived pain in 59 white male surgical patients. The Melzack-Torgerson Pain Questionnaire, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and the Fear of Surgery Scale (FSS) were given the day before the operation and again 10 days after surgery. Results indicate that surgery as a physical threat has an effect on A-state

  15. The effects of state anxiety and thermal comfort on sleep quality and eye fatigue in shift work nurses

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Habibollah; Azmoon, Hiva; Souri, Shiva; Akbari, Jafar

    2014-01-01

    Psychological problems as state anxiety (SA) in the work environment has negative effect on the employees life especially shift work nurses, i.e. negative effect on mental and physical health (sleep quality, eye fatigue and comfort thermal). The purpose of this study was determination of effects of state anxiety and thermal comfort on sleep quality and eye fatigue in shift work nurses. Methods: This cross-sectional research conducted on 82 shift-work personnel of 18 nursing workstations of Isfahan hospitals in 2012. To measure the SA, sleep quality, visual fatigue and thermal comfort, Spielberger state-trait anxiety inventory, Pittsburg sleep quality index, eye fatigue questionnaire and thermal comfort questionnaire were used respectively. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, student test and correlation analysis. Results: Correlation between SA and sleep quality was ?0.664(P < 0001), Pearson correlation between SA and thermal comfort was ?0.276(P = 0.016) and between SA and eye fatigue was 0.57 (P < 0001). Conclusion: Based on these results, it can be concluded that improvement of thermal conditions and reduce state anxiety level can be reduce eye fatigue and increase the sleep quality in shift work nurses. PMID:25077165

  16. A Psychometric Analysis of the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scales--Parent Version in a School Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebesutani, Chad; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K.; Nakamura, Brad J.; Regan, Jennifer; Lynch, Roxanna E.

    2011-01-01

    The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale--Parent Version (RCADS-P) is a parent-report questionnaire of youth anxiety and depression with scales corresponding to the "DSM" diagnoses of separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and major depressive disorder. The…

  17. A Psychometric Analysis of the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale-Parent Version in a Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebesutani, Chad; Bernstein, Adam; Nakamura, Brad J.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Weisz, John R.

    2010-01-01

    The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale-Parent Version (RCADS-P) is a 47-item parent-report questionnaire of youth anxiety and depression, with scales corresponding to the DSM-IV categories of Separation Anxiety Disorder, Social Phobia, Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Panic Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Major Depressive…

  18. The Perinatal Anxiety Screening Scale: development and preliminary validation.

    PubMed

    Somerville, Susanne; Dedman, Kellie; Hagan, Rosemary; Oxnam, Elizabeth; Wettinger, Michelle; Byrne, Shannon; Coo, Soledad; Doherty, Dorota; Page, Andrew C

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a scale (Perinatal Anxiety Screening Scale, PASS) to screen for a broad range of problematic anxiety symptoms which is sensitive to how anxiety presents in perinatal women and is suitable to use in a variety of settings including antenatal clinics, inpatient and outpatient hospital and mental health treatment settings. Women who attended a tertiary obstetric hospital in the state of Western Australia antenatally or postpartum (n = 437) completed the PASS and other commonly used measures of depression and anxiety. Factor analysis was used to examine factor structure, and ROC analysis was used to evaluate performance as a screening tool. The PASS was significantly correlated with other measures of depression and anxiety. Principal component analyses (PCA) suggested a four-factor structure addressing symptoms of (1) acute anxiety and adjustment, (2) general worry and specific fears, (3) perfectionism, control and trauma and (4) social anxiety. The four subscales and total scale demonstrated high to excellent reliabilities. At the optimal cutoff score for detecting anxiety as determined by ROC analyses, the PASS identified 68 % of women with a diagnosed anxiety disorder. This was compared to the EPDS anxiety subscale which detected 36 % of anxiety disorders. The PASS is an acceptable, valid and useful screening tool for the identification of risk of significant anxiety in women in the perinatal period. PMID:24699796

  19. Prevalence of dental anxiety and its relation to age and gender in coastal Andhra (Visakhapatnam) population, India

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Rezwana Begum; Lalithamma, Thota; Varma, Dandu Maruti; Sudhakar, Korukonda Naga Venkata; Srinivas, Baratam; Krishnamraju, Penumetsa Venkata; Shaik, Ahammad Basha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental fear, anxiety and phobia have consistently been reported as widespread problems that persist despite the technological advances that have made dentistry less painful and less uncomfortable. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental anxiety (DA) and its relation to age and sex among Coastal Andhra (Visakhapatnam) population. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled study was designed among 340 individuals at GITAM Dental College and Hospital, Visakhapatnam. The sample for the study consisted of 180 female and 160 male subjects between 15 and 65 years of age; all were supplied with two questionnaires (Corah DA scale [CDAS] and Clarke and Rustvold dental concerns assessment scale describing anxiety provoking stimuli. The Mann-Whitney U-test and the Kruskal-Wallis test were applied (significance level P < 0.05). The correlations between the two questionnaires were calculated using the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Results: Two questionnaires were collected from all 340 individuals and the Indian translation of both instruments was found to be internally reliable with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.093. Overall prevalence of DA was high (77.4%) but severe (22.6%) anxiety (phobia) was low. Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant relation between age and DA. The mean CDAS scores were high in 25-35 (11.08) and low in 55-65 (9.45) year age groups. Mann-Whitney U test showed significant relation between sex and DA. Mean CDAS score levels were significantly higher in females (10.88) than in males (9.96) (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Patients anxious about dental procedures are often more difficult to treat. If Dentists become aware about the level of DA among their patients, they can anticipate patient's behavior and can be prepared to take behavioral/pharmacological measures to reduce anxiety levels. PMID:25097425

  20. Effects of reflexotherapy on acute postoperative pain and anxiety among patients with digestive cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsay, Shiow-Luan; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Chen, Su-Chiu; Lin, Hung-Ru; Lin, Kuan-Chia

    2008-01-01

    Even after receiving analgesia, patients with gastric and liver cancer still report moderate levels of postoperative pain. The purpose of the study was to investigate the efficacy of foot reflexotherapy as adjuvant therapy in relieving pain and anxiety in postoperative patients with gastric cancer and hepatocellular cancer. The study design was a randomized controlled trial. Data were collected from 4 surgical wards of a medical center in 2005 in Taipei, Taiwan. Sixty-one patients who had received surgery for gastric cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma were randomly allocated to an intervention (n = 30) or control (n = 31) group. Patients in the intervention group received the usual pain management plus 20 minutes of foot reflexotherapy during postoperative days 2, 3, and 4. Patients in the control group received usual pain management. Outcome measures included the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, visual analog scale for pain, summary of the pain medications consumed, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results demonstrated that studied patients reported moderately high levels of pain and anxiety postoperatively while patients were managed with patient-controlled analgesia. Using generalized estimation equations and controlling for confounding variables, less pain (P < .05) and anxiety (P < .05) over time were reported by the intervention group compared with the control group. In addition, patients in the intervention group received significantly less opioid analgesics than the control group (P < .05). Findings from this study provide nurses with an additional treatment to offer postoperative digestive cancer patients. PMID:18490886

  1. Acupressure and Anxiety in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beikmoradi, Ali; Najafi, Fatemeh; Roshanaei, Ghodratallah; Pour Esmaeil, Zahra; Khatibian, Mahnaz; Ahmadi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anxiety has negative effects on mental and physical performance, quality of life, duration of hospitalization, and even on the treatment of patients with cancer. Objectives: Today acupressure is widely used to treat anxiety. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of acupressure on anxiety in patients with cancer. Patients and Methods: A double-blind randomized clinical trial was conducted on 85 patients hospitalized with 3 groups including acupressure group (n = 27), sham group (n = 28), and control group (n = 30) in the hematologic ward of Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Hamadan, Iran, in 2013. The sampling permuted-block randomization with triple block was used. The anxiety of the patients in the experimental, sham, and control groups were measured with Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Then, real acupressure was performed in the experimental group and fake acupressure in the sham group, and only routine care was provided for the control group. Anxiety of the patients was also assessed at 5 and 10 days after the intervention. Statistical analysis of the data was performed by SPSS software using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc least significant difference (LSD) test. Results: According to the findings, the mean level of anxiety before the intervention between groups were matched (P > 0.05). Acupressure had a significant influence on the anxiety in the experimental group at 5 (45.30 ± 7.14) and 10 days (43.48 ± 6.82) after the intervention (P < 0.05). However, it did not have a significant impact on their covert anxiety (45.48 ± 7.92 at 5th day vs 45.63 ± 8.08 at 10th day, P > 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the fake points regarding overt and covert anxiety of patients in the sham group (overt anxiety; 47.57 ± 7.85 at 5th day vs. 46.71 ± 7.32 at 10th day, P > 0.05) (covert anxiety; 47.96 ± 6.33 at 5th day vs. 46.89 ± 6.94 at 10th day, P > 0.05). Moreover, the routine care provided for the control group did not have any effect on the overt and covert anxiety of the patients (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Acupressure is recommended as a complementary therapy to reduce anxiety in patients with cancer because of its low cost, safety, and simplicity. PMID:26019908

  2. Psychosocial Factors of Antenatal Anxiety and Depression in Pakistan: Is Social Support a Mediator?

    PubMed Central

    Waqas, Ahmed; Raza, Nahal; Lodhi, Haneen Wajid; Muhammad, Zerwah; Jamal, Mehak; Rehman, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pregnancy is generally viewed as a time of fulfillment and joy; however, for many women it can be a stressful event. In South Asia it is associated with cultural stigmas revolving around gender discrimination, abnormal births and genetic abnormalities. Methodology This cross-sectional study was done at four teaching hospitals in Lahore from February, 2014 to June, 2014. A total of 500 pregnant women seen at hospital obstetrics and gynecology departments were interviewed with a questionnaire consisting of three sections: demographics, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Social Provisions Scale (SPS). Pearson’s chi-squared test, bivariate correlations and multiple linear regression were used to analyze associations between the independent variables and scores on the HADS and SPS. Results Mean age among the 500 respondents was 27.41 years (5.65). Anxiety levels in participants were categorized as normal (145 women, 29%), borderline (110, 22%) or anxious (245, 49%). Depression levels were categorized as normal (218 women, 43.6%), borderline (123, 24.6%) or depressed (159, 31.8%). Inferential analysis revealed that higher HADS scores were significantly associated with lower scores on the SPS, rural background, history of harassment, abortion, cesarean delivery and unplanned pregnancies (P < .05). Social support (SPS score) mediated the relationship between the total number of children, gender of previous children and HADS score. Women with more daughters were significantly more likely to score higher on the HADS and lower on the SPS, whereas higher numbers of sons were associated with the opposite trends in the scores (P < .05). Conclusion Because of the predominantly patriarchal sociocultural context in Pakistan, the predictors of antenatal anxiety and depression may differ from those in developed countries. We therefore suggest that interventions designed and implemented to reduce antenatal anxiety and depression should take into account these unique factors. PMID:25629925

  3. Science Anxiety, Science Attitudes, and Constructivism: A Binational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Fred B.; Kastrup, Helge; Udo, Maria; Hislop, Nelda; Shefner, Rachel; Mallow, Jeffry

    2013-01-01

    Students' attitudes and anxieties about science were measured by responses to two self-report questionnaires. The cohorts were Danish and American students at the upper secondary- and university-levels. Relationships between and among science attitudes, science anxiety, gender, and nationality were examined. Particular attention was paid to…

  4. Personality dimensions in panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vladan Starcevic; E. H. Uhlenhuth; Stephanie Fallon; Dorothy Pathak

    1996-01-01

    To make a dimensional assessment of personality in individuals with pathological anxiety, the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ) was administered to 32 patients with panic disorder (PD) and 49 patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The most striking findings were a substantially increased score on the harm avoidance dimension in both groups of patients, and a lack of significant differences between

  5. Recognition of Depressive and Anxiety Disorders in Dermatological Outpatients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angelo Picardi; Paolo Amerio; Giannandrea Baliva; Claudio Barbieri; Patrizia Teofoli; Simone Bolli; Valentina Salvatori; Eva Mazzotti; Paolo Pasquini; Damiano Abeni

    2004-01-01

    Although mental disorders are frequent among dermato- logical patients, little is known about their recognition by dermatologists. This study aimed to assess dermato- logists' ability to recognize depressive and anxiety disorders. All adult outpatients who visited four dermatologists on predetermined days (n~317) com- pleted the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ- 12) and the section on depressive and anxiety disorders of

  6. Death and Dying Anxiety among Elderly Arab Muslims in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azaiza, Faisal; Ron, Pnina; Shoham, Meyrav; Gigini, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Death and dying anxiety were examined among elderly Arab Muslims in Israel. A total of 145 people aged 60 and over were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. Nursing home residents reported higher death anxiety than others; women and uneducated participants reported greater levels of fear of death and dying than others. There were no…

  7. Social Cognition and Social Anxiety among Icelandic Schoolchildren

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannesdottir, Dagmar Kr.; Ollendick, Thomas H.

    2007-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to examine relationships among social cognition, social anxiety, and social skills with friends and strangers in children. Ninety-two children (age 10-14 years) in Iceland completed questionnaires on social anxiety, social skills, assertiveness, self-efficacy, and outcome expectancy in social situations with…

  8. Gender, Anxiety, and Depressive Symptoms: A Longitudinal Study of Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Tara M.; Gillham, Jane E.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2009-01-01

    Does anxiety lead to depression more for girls than for boys? This study prospectively examines gender differences in the relationship between anxiety and depressive symptoms in early adolescence. One hundred thirteen 11- to 14-year-old middle school students complete questionnaires assessing depressive symptoms and three dimensions of anxiety

  9. Eating disorder symptoms among female anxiety disorder patients in clinical practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carolyn Black Becker; Jason C DeViva; Claudia Zayfert

    2004-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated the relationship between anxiety disorders, anxiety comorbidity, and eating disorder (ED) symptoms in clinical practice, and examined the naturalistic detection of ED when diagnoses were based on the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule (ADIS). Two hundred and fifty-seven female patients completed an ED questionnaire and were assessed with the ADIS. Although ED frequency did not differ among

  10. Rating scales for anxiety\\/anxiety disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Balon; UPC Jefferson

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews new developments in rating scales for anxiety\\/anxiety disorders. Several new rating instruments have\\u000a been developed. These instruments could be useful in various areas, such as research of anxiety disorders or in assessment\\u000a of anxiety in patients with various somatic diseases (dyspnea, pain, chronic illnesses such as diabetes or cancer). Some of\\u000a the existing instruments have been modified,

  11. Social Physique Anxiety, Obligation to Exercise, and Exercise Choices among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Hui-Wen; Bushman, Barbara A.; Woodard, Rebecca J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined relationships among social physique anxiety, obligation to exercise, and exercise choices. Participants and Methods: College students (N = 337; 200 women, 137 men) volunteered to complete 3 questionnaires: the Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS), Obligatory Exercise Questionnaire (OEQ), and Physical Activity…

  12. Singificant relationship between perinatal geomagnetic field activity and anxiety levels in females

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K.-P. Ossenkopp; J. N. Nobrega

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between geomagnetic activity around the time of birth to subsequent responding on an anxiety test was examined in 13–16 year old high school students. The students were given a questionnaire designed to measure “state” and “trait” anxiety, and the scores on this questionnaire were correlated with daily geomagnetic activity measures (Ap index) for an 11 day period centered

  13. The patient health questionnaire for adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey G Johnson; Emily S Harris; Robert L Spitzer; Janet B. W Williams

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the validity of the Patient Health Questionnaire for Adolescents (PHQ-A), a self-administered instrument that assesses anxiety, eating, mood, and substance use disorders among adolescent primary care patients.Methods: A total of 403 adolescents from California, New Jersey, New York, and Ohio completed the PHQ-A and the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form General Health Survey (SF-20) during or shortly after

  14. Sleep bruxism and anxiety level in children.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcelo Tomás de; Bittencourt, Sandra Teixeira; Marcon, Karina; Destro, Samia; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the association of level of anxiety in children with and without sleep bruxism (SB). The study was performed with 84 six- to eigth-years-old children, divided into two groups: with bruxism (BG) and without bruxism (CG). Following the criteria purposed by American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) to determine SB, the presence of tooth wear has been verified through clinical examinations, and the parents have answered a questionnaire about their children's behavior and habits. Additionally, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC) was applied to parents of the selected patients. Data analysis revealed a statistical significant difference between the groups (Student's t-test, p = 0.0136). Based on the results, anxiety assessment revealed that children with bruxism have reached higher levels in the STAIC scale than the non-bruxism group. Therefore, it indicates a direct relationship between the presence of anxiety disorder and the onset of bruxism in children. PMID:25627888

  15. Anxiety, Arousability and Neuroticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Zahhar, Nabil; Hocevar, Dennis

    With the availability of so many definitions of and assessment devices for anxiety, researchers have stressed that the dimensionality of anxiety needs further investigation. To examine the dimensionality of three components of anxiety (trait anxiety, arousability, and neuroticism) two studies were conducted. In the first study, 123 high school…

  16. Deconstructing Statistics Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earley, Mark A.; Mertler, Craig A.

    A number of scales have been developed to measure the construct of statistics anxiety, the anxiety students feel when they take a statistics course, but few researchers have examined whether this anxiety is due solely to being enrolled in a statistics course or if there is some component that is simply a function of being a student (anxiety in any…

  17. Separation Anxiety Disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas Dick-Niederhauser; Wendy K. Silverman

    ?Separation anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common psychiatric disorder of childhood and early adolescence and is characterized by an unrealistic and excessive fear of separation from an attachment figure, usually the mother. Separation anxiety can be a characteristic of normal development or a symptom of an anxiety disorder. Anxieties about separation are regarded as clinically significant if they are excessive,

  18. Epidemiology of anxiety disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jürgen Margraf; U ZETSCHE

    2007-01-01

    This contribution provides an overview of the most important recent epidemiological studies examining anxiety disorders in the general population. Results demonstrate that anxiety disorders are widespread, with lifetime prevalence rates ranging between 13.6% and 28.8% in Western countries. Comorbidity among individuals with an anxiety disorder is high: three out of four people with a lifetime anxiety disorder experience at least

  19. An assessment of treating depression and anxiety with aromatherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katie Lemon

    2004-01-01

    This investigation studied the effects of aromatherapy in alleviating depression and anxiety. It was an evaluation of the aromatherapy service offered as part of the Surrey Oaklands NHS Trust's Day Hospital treatment plan. The research was designed to identify if there was a significant difference in perceived levels of anxiety and depression between a control group receiving massage with carrier

  20. Mapping Mindfulness Facets onto Dimensions of Anxiety and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, Alethea; Klemanski, David H.; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Background Mindfulness has been associated with anxiety and depression, but the ways in which specific facets of mindfulness relate to symptoms of anxiety and depression remains unclear. The purpose of the current study was to investigate associations between specific facets of mindfulness (e.g., observing, describing, nonjudging, acting with awareness, and nonreactivity) and dimensions of anxiety and depression symptoms (e.g., anxious arousal, general distress-anxiety, general distress-depression, and anhedonic depression) while controlling for shared variance among variables. Methods Participants were 187 treatment-seeking adults. Mindfulness was measured using the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire and symptoms of depression and anxiety were measured using the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire. Results Bivariate correlations showed that all facets of mindfulness were significantly related to all dimensions of anxiety and depression with two exceptions: describing was unrelated to general distress -anxiety, and observing was unrelated to all symptom clusters. Path analysis was used to simultaneously examine associations between mindfulness facets and depression and anxiety symptoms. Significant and marginally significant pathways were retained to construct a more parsimonious model and model fit indices were examined. The parsimonious model indicated that nonreactivity was significantly inversely associated with general distress anxiety symptoms. Describing was significantly inversely associated with anxious arousal, while observing was significantly positively associated with it. Nonjudging and nonreactivity were significantly inversely related to general distress-depression and anhedonic depression symptomatology. Acting with awareness was not significantly associated with any dimensions of anxiety or depression. Conclusions Findings support associations between specific facets of mindfulness and dimensions of anxiety and depression and highlight the potential utility of targeting these specific aspects of mindfulness in interventions for anxiety and mood disorders. PMID:23768665

  1. Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gail A. Bernstein; Andrea M. Victor

    Anxiety disorders is one of the most prevalent diagnostic categories identified in children and adolescents. This chapter\\u000a provides an overview of the epidemiology of childhood anxiety disorders. Several pathways of etiology are presented, specifically\\u000a genetics, parent–child attachment, parental anxiety and parenting style, and life experiences. Six of the common childhood\\u000a anxiety disorders, separation anxiety disorder, specific phobia, social phobia, generalized

  2. Anxiety sensitivity and aspects of alexithymia are independently and uniquely associated with posttraumatic distress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Zahradnik; Sherry H. Stewart; Grant N. Marshall; Terry L. Schell; Lisa H. Jaycox

    2009-01-01

    Using a sample of adult survivors of physical trauma requiring hospitalization (N = 677), we examined the relationship of aspects of alexithymia and anxiety sensitivity to symptoms of posttraumatic distress (PTD). At the bivariate level, both aspects of alexithymia and anxiety sensitivity were positively associated with acute PTD symptomatology, but anxiety sensitivity was more strongly related to PTD symptoms. At

  3. Interoception in anxiety and depression

    E-print Network

    Paulus, Martin P.; Stein, Murray B.

    2010-01-01

    the amygdala and anterior cingulate in generalized anxietyAnxiety-prone relative to comparison subjects show greater bilateral amygdalaamygdala and insula activation during emotion processing in anxiety-

  4. Treating late-life generalized anxiety disorder in primary care: an effectiveness pilot study.

    PubMed

    Calleo, Jessica S; Bush, Amber L; Cully, Jeffrey A; Wilson, Nancy L; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia; Rhoades, Howard M; Novy, Diane M; Masozera, Nicholas; Williams, Susan; Horsfield, Matthew; Kunik, Mark E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2013-05-01

    To increase the sustainability of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) in primary care for late-life anxiety, we incorporated nonexpert counselors, options for telephone meetings, and integration with primary care clinicians. This open trial examines the feasibility, satisfaction, and clinical outcomes of CBT delivered by experienced and nonexperienced counselors for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Clinical outcomes assessed worry (Penn State Worry Questionnaire), GAD (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale), and anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory and Structured Interview Guide for Hamilton Anxiety Scale). After 3 months of treatment, Cohen's d effect sizes for worry and anxiety ranged from 0.48 to 0.78. Patients treated by experienced and nonexperienced counselors had similar reductions in worry and anxiety, although treatment outcomes were more improved on the Beck Anxiety Inventory for experienced therapists. Preliminary results suggest that adapted CBT can effectively reduce worry. The piloted modifications can provide acceptable and feasible evidence-based care. PMID:23588228

  5. Marketing: The Applicant Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddleston, Thomas, Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The construction of a market research questionnaire is recommended as one way a college can identify its applicant pool market. Included are an outline of information the applicant pool questionnaire might seek and basic criteria of question writing. (JT)

  6. Sense of coherence contributes to physical and mental health in general hospital patients in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentian; Leonhart, Rainer; Schaefert, Rainer; Zhao, Xudong; Zhang, Lan; Wei, Jing; Yang, Jianzhong; Wirsching, Michael; Larisch, Astrid; Fritzsche, Kurt

    2015-07-01

    The sense of coherence (SOC) may explain why some people become ill under stress whereas others remain healthy. SOC is strongly related to perceived health, particularly mental health. Little is known about the physical and mental health statuses associated with SOC among general hospital outpatients in China. This multicentre cross-sectional study analysed 491 outpatients from four large Chinese general hospitals located in Beijing, Shanghai, Chengdu and Kunming. Patients completed questionnaires examining their SOC (SOC-9), somatic symptom severity (PHQ-15), depression (PHQ-9), generalised anxiety disorder (GAD), health anxiety (WI-7), quality of life (QoL; SF-12) and socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. SOC was negatively correlated with daily-life impairment, symptom duration, somatic symptom severity, depression, GAD and health anxiety, but was positively correlated with age as well as physical and mental QoL. Using a multiple linear regression model, the three strongest correlates of SOC were mental QoL, depression and age. These three variables explained 52% of the variance. SOC may be an important contributor to both mental and physical health in Chinese general hospital outpatients, which is consistent with the results obtained for primary care patients in Western countries. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate how SOC predicts physical and mental health statuses over time and how these statuses respond to treatment for low SOC. PMID:25200137

  7. Anxious Solitude and Clinical Disorder in Middle Childhood: Bridging Developmental and Clinical Approaches to Childhood Social Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazelle, Heidi; Workman, Jamie Olson; Allan, Wesley

    2010-01-01

    It was hypothesized that children identified by their peers at school as anxious solitary would report more symptoms of social anxiety disorder on a self report questionnaire and, on the basis of child and parent clinical interviews, receive more diagnoses of social anxiety disorder and additional anxiety and mood disorders. Participants were 192…

  8. Children At-Risk for Anxiety: Their Self-Esteem, Somatic Symptoms, and Perceptions of Parental Support

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria G Fraire

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined children at risk for anxiety, analyzing their symptoms, self-esteem, and their perception of parental behavior. Data were collected as part of a large anxiety prevention study conducted at the University of Rhode Island. Elementary and middle school children who were identified as at risk for anxiety through an initial assessment were administered a battery of questionnaires,

  9. Screening for anxiety disorders in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are prevalent and associated with poor prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, studies examining screening of anxiety disorders in CAD patients are lacking. In the present study we evaluated the prevalence of anxiety disorders in patients with CAD and diagnostic utility of self-rating scales for screening of anxiety disorders. Methods Five-hundred and twenty-three CAD patients not receiving psychotropic treatments at initiation of rehabilitation program completed self-rating scales (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale or HADS; Spielberger State-Anxiety Inventory or SSAI; and Spielberger Trait-Anxiety Inventory or STAI) and were interviewed for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social phobia, panic disorder and agoraphobia (Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview or MINI). Results Thirty-eight (7%) patients were diagnosed with anxiety disorder(s), including GAD (5%), social phobia (2%), agoraphobia (1%) and panic disorder (1%). Areas under the ROC curve of the HADS Anxiety subscale (HADS-A), STAI and SSAI for screening of any anxiety disorder were .81, .80 and .72, respectively. Optimal cut-off values for screening of any anxiety disorders were ?8 for the HADS-A (sensitivity?=?82%; specificity?=?76%; and positive predictive value (PPV)?=?21%); ?45 for the STAI (sensitivity?=?89%; specificity?=?56%; and PPV?=?14%); and ?40 for the SSAI (sensitivity?=?84%; specificity?=?55%; PPV?=?13%). In a subgroup of patients (n?=?340) scoring below the optimal major depressive disorder screening cut-off value of HADS-Depression subscale (score <5), the HADS-A, STAI and SSAI had moderate-high sensitivity (range from 69% to 89%) and low PPVs (?22%) for GAD and any anxiety disorders. Conclusions Anxiety disorders are prevalent in CAD patients but can be reliably identified using self-rating scales. Anxiety self-rating scales had comparable sensitivities but the HADS-A had greater specificity and PPV when compared to the STAI and SSAI for screening of anxiety disorders. However, false positive rates were high, suggesting that patients with positive screening results should undergo psychiatric interview prior to initiating treatment for anxiety disorders and that routine use of anxiety self-rating scales for screening purposes can increase healthcare costs. Anxiety screening has incremental value to depression screening for identifying anxiety disorders. PMID:23497087

  10. The Interrelatedness of Affective Factors in EFL Learning: An Examination of Motivational Patterns in Relation to Anxiety in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming Wei

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the motivational pattern in relation to the anxiety of Chinese learners of English. Based on a survey consisting of an anxiety questionnaire and a motivation questionnaire, the findings revealed an unbalanced pattern of two types of motivation clusters that resembled the integrative-instrumental duality, with the level of instrumental motivation significantly higher than that of integrative motivation. Although

  11. Competitive Anxiety in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Rainer; And Others

    This book is a comprehensive review of competitive anxiety research that has used the Sport Competition Anxiety Test, or SCAT (a trait scale), and the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2). The book describes the theoretical basis and development procedures for both scales, including detailed information on reliability and validity. In…

  12. Cognitive functioning and anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael W. Eysenck; Colin MacLeod; Andrew Mathews

    1987-01-01

    Various possible differences in cognitive functioning between those high and low in trait anxiety are considered. Particular emphasis is paid to the hypothesis that individuals high in trait anxiety tend to approach threatening stimuli, whereas those low in trait anxiety tend to avoid such stimuli. The evidence indicates that there are such differences in the processing of threatening stimuli as

  13. An investigation of the Schwartz Cognitive-Somatic Anxiety Questionnaire 

    E-print Network

    Goldston, James Donald

    1985-01-01

    -related behaviors or disorders may thus encompass one or more physiological systems. These behaviors are related to cognitive varibles which mediate between stressors in the environment (or with the person himself) and the person's idiosyncratic responding... subjects scoring low on the cognitive subscale. Results of analysis of variance did not indicate a relationship between the somatic subscale to either physiological or cognitive variables. Implications for the results are discussed. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I...

  14. An investigation of the Schwartz Cognitive-Somatic Anxiety Questionnaire

    E-print Network

    Goldston, James Donald

    1985-01-01

    -related behaviors. The term stress is applied by a variety of people, professional and non-professional, to explain a great number of behaviors in situations ranging from classrooms and businesses to battlefields and prisons. Hans Selye first introduced.... However, an apparent overlap of items and a high intercorrelation (0. 81) between scales was present as well as an apparent lack of face validity. Each of' the Schalling et al . ( 1975) subscales was compared with the Eysenck Personality Inventory...

  15. Social communication deficits: Specific associations with Social Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Halls, Georgia; Cooper, Peter J.; Creswell, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Background Social communication deficits are prevalent amongst children with anxiety disorders; however whether they are over-represented specifically among children with Social Anxiety Disorder has not been examined. This study set out to examine social communication deficits among children with Social Anxiety Disorder in comparison to children with other forms of anxiety disorder. Methods Parents of 404 children with a diagnosed anxiety disorder completed the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ; Rutter, M., Bailey, A., Lord, C., 2003. The Social Communication Questionnaire – Manual. Western Psychological Services, Los Angeles, CA). Children with a diagnosis of Social Anxiety Disorder (n=262) and anxious children without Social Anxiety Disorder (n=142) were compared on SCQ total and subscale scores and the frequency of participants scoring above clinical cut-offs. Results Children with Social Anxiety Disorder scored significantly higher than anxious children without Social Anxiety Disorder on the SCQ total (t(352)=4.85, p<.001, d=.55, r=.27), Reciprocal Social Interaction (t(351)=4.73, p<.001, d=.55, r=.27), communication (t(344)=3.62, p<.001, d=.43, r=.21) and repetitive, restrictive and stereotyped behaviors subscales (t(353)=3.15, p=.002, d=.37, r=.18). Furthermore, children with Social Anxiety Disorder were three times more likely to score above clinical cut-offs. Limitations The participants were a relatively affluent group of predominantly non-minority status. The social communication difficulties measure relied on parental report which could be influenced by extraneous factors. Conclusions Treatments for Social Anxiety Disorder may benefit from a specific focus on developing social communication skills. Future research using objective assessments of underlying social communication skills is required. PMID:25451393

  16. The Effects of Relaxation Training with Cognitive or Nondirective Therapy and the Role of Relaxation-Induced Anxiety in the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borkovec, T. D.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Provided 30 volunteers with generalized anxiety disorder with training in progressive muscle relaxation. Clients were also given cognitive or nondirective therapy. All showed substantial reductions in anxiety measured by psychiatric assessor ratings, questionnaires, and daily self-monitoring. Relaxation plus cognitive therapy produced…

  17. Temperament, Family Environment and Anxiety in Preschool Children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer L. Hudson; Helen F. Dodd; Nataly Bovopoulos

    This research examines the relationship between behavioural inhibition (BI), family environment (overinvolved and negative\\u000a parenting, parental anxiety and parent-child attachment) and anxiety in a sample of 202 preschool children. Participants were\\u000a aged between 3 years 2 months and 4 years 5 months, 101 were male. A thorough methodology was used that incorporated data\\u000a from multiple observations of behaviour, diagnostic interviews and questionnaire measures. The

  18. Friendship quality predicts treatment outcome in children with anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Baker, J R; Hudson, J L

    2013-01-01

    It was examined whether friendship quality (FQ) and friends' anxiety predicted treatment outcome in 116 children with anxiety disorders (72.3% Australian) receiving cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Target children and an identified close friend aged between 7 and 13 years (50% female) completed the Friendship Quality Questionnaire (Parker & Asher, 1993) before treatment, and child diagnoses were based on the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV-Child/Parent Version (Silverman & Albano, 1996). Children who reported higher FQ were significantly more likely to be free of their initial primary anxiety disorder and of any anxiety disorder at posttreatment and 6-month follow-up; friend report of FQ and friend's anxiety as measured by the Spence Child Anxiety Scale (Spence, 1998) did not predict treatment outcome. Children with anxiety disorders reporting higher FQ responded better to CBT than children with anxiety disorders reporting lower FQ. FQ measures could help identify anxious children at heightened risk of poor treatment response. Further, good quality friendships may be an important aid in anxious children's treatment response. PMID:23178676

  19. Differences in university students' attitudes and anxiety about statistics.

    PubMed

    Mji, Andile

    2009-06-01

    The Statistics Anxiety Rating Scale and the Attitudes Toward Statistics questionnaire were administered to 226 university of technology students. The former scale measures anxiety about learning statistics in terms of Worth of Statistics, Interpretation Anxiety, Test and Class Anxiety, Computational Self-concept, Fear of Asking for Help, and Fear of Statistics Teachers. The latter measures attitudes toward use of statistics and statistics course for which a student was registered. These African students were enrolled in Taxation, Marketing, or Accounting. Participants took a required course in statistics intended to improve statistical skills. There were 150 women and 57 men, chosen because they had no previous mathematics learning. Students' ages ranged between 16 and 26 years (M = 20.1, SD = 2.0). There were no statistically significant sex differences on attitudes and anxiety toward statistics, but there were significant differences among areas of study programs. PMID:19708400

  20. Patterns of anxiety and personality disorder comorbidity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew E. Skodol; John M. Oldham; Steven E. Hyler; Dan J. Stein; Eric Hollander; Peggy E. Gallaher; Anne E. Lopez

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine patterns of comorbidity of DSM-III-R anxiety disorders and personality disorders (PD). Two-hundred subjects were independently interviewed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R (SCID) and the Personality Disorder Examination (PDE) face-to-face by two experienced clinicians. One-hundred and forty-six also completed the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire—Revised (PDQ-R). Rates of personality disorder among patients with

  1. Predictors of change following cognitive-behavioral treatment of children with anxiety problems: a preliminary investigation on negative automatic thoughts and anxiety control.

    PubMed

    Muris, Peter; Mayer, Birgit; den Adel, Madelon; Roos, Tamara; van Wamelen, Julie

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate negative automatic thoughts and anxiety control as predictors of change produced by cognitive-behavioral treatment of youths with anxiety disorders. Forty-five high-anxious children aged between 9 and 12 years who were selected from the primary school population, received a standardized CBT intervention that was provided in a group format. Before and after the intervention, children completed scales of negative automatic thoughts and perceived control over anxiety-related events as well as a questionnaire for measuring DSM-defined anxiety disorders symptoms, which was the outcome measure. Results indicated that CBT was effective in reducing children's anxiety symptoms. Most importantly, the reduction of anxiety disorders symptoms was significantly associated with a decrease in negative automatic thoughts and an increase of anxiety control, which provides support for the notion that these variables are candidate mediators of CBT in anxious youths. PMID:18661229

  2. Test Anxiety Tips to Ease Your Test Anxiety

    E-print Network

    Kasman, Alex

    Test Anxiety Tips to Ease Your Test Anxiety Adapted from: Study Guides and Strategies website, Overcoming test anxiety Test taking can be overwhelming and can cause a lot of anxiety. Try these tips to ease your anxiety through the testing process! Before Approach the exam with confidence Be prepared

  3. A pilot study addressing the effect of aromatherapy massage on mood, anxiety and relaxation in adult mental health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer Edge

    2003-01-01

    This study was carried out with eight subjects specifically referred for aromatherapy; each received a standardised aromatherapy massage weekly for 6 weeks. The subjects’ levels of anxiety and depression were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale prior to the first massage and after the final massage. The subjects’ levels of mood, anxiety and relaxation were recorded using

  4. Report on maternal anxiety 16 months after the great East Japan earthquake disaster: anxiety over radioactivity.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Hatsumi; Saito, Hidemitsu; Kikuchi, Saya; Ueno, Takashi; Sato, Kineko

    2014-11-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011. The tsunami caused extensive damage to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, resulting in a level 7 nuclear accident. Among those affected by this combined disaster were many pregnant and parturient women. Sixteen months after the earthquake, we conducted a questionnaire survey on anxiety among 259 women who gave birth around the time of the earthquake in Miyagi Prefecture, one of the affected areas. Participants reported 12 categories of anxiety, including anxiety over radioactivity. This study aimed to determine anxiety over radioactivity among this specific population and to record measures for future study. Anxiety over radiation was classified into seven subcategories: food safety, outdoor safety, effects on the fetuses of pregnant women, effects on children, radiation exposure, economic problems, and distrust of information disclosed. This study confirmed that concrete types of anxiety over radiation were keenly felt by mothers who had experienced the disaster who were currently raising children. The findings suggest the need to provide accurate information to these mothers, who are otherwise inundated with miscellaneous confusing information. PMID:25363115

  5. Need for closure and anxiety in delusions: A longitudinal investigation in early psychosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susannah M. Colbert; Emmanuelle R. Peters; Philippa A. Garety

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the role of need for closure (NFC) and anxiety in delusions. The Need For Closure Scale (NFCS) and measures of trait and state anxiety were administered to an early psychosis group with current delusions, a clinical (generalised anxiety disorder—GAD) control group and a non-clinical control group. The battery of questionnaires was repeated at follow-up one year later.

  6. Sensitivity for Treatment Effects of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Muris; Harald Merckelbach; Björn Gadet; Véronique Moulaert; Sandy Tierney

    1999-01-01

    The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) is a relatively new self-report questionnaire that measures DSM-defined anxiety disorders symptoms in children. The present study examined the treatment sensitivity of the SCARED. Eleven anxiety-disordered children aged 10 to 13 years received cognitive-behavioral treatment, an intervention that is generally known to be effective. Children completed the SCARED on three occasions:

  7. Cancer pain and anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul D. Thielking

    2003-01-01

    Anxiety and pain can be understood with a multidimensional framework that accounts for somatic, emotional, cognitive, and\\u000a behavioral aspects of these conditions. Patients who have cancer or treatment-related pain are more likely to be anxious than\\u000a cancer patients without pain. Patients with cancer pain and anxiety cause difficult diagnostic dilemmas because some degree\\u000a of anxiety is a normal response to

  8. Separation Anxiety Disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew R. Eisen; Joshua M. Sussman; Talya Schmidt; Luke Mason; Lee Ann Hausler; Rebecca Hashim

    \\u000a According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, text revision (DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2000), the central feature of separation\\u000a anxiety disorder (SAD) is unrealistic and excessive anxiety upon separation or anticipation of separation from major attachment\\u000a figures. SAD is the only anxiety disorder based on specific child criteria as well as having a childhood

  9. Reaction time in adolescence, cumulative allostatic load and symptoms of anxiety and depression in adulthood: The West of Scotland Twenty-07 Study

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Catharine R; Batty, G David; Cooper, Sally-Ann; Deary, Ian J; Der, Geoff; McEwen, Bruce S; Cavanagh, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation between reaction time in adolescence and subsequent symptoms of anxiety and depression and investigate the mediating role of sociodemographic measures, health behaviors, and allostatic load. Methods Participants were 705 members of the West of Scotland Twenty-07 Study (54% female). Choice reaction time was measured at age 16 years. At age 36 years, anxiety and depression were assessed with the 12-item General Health Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and measurements were made of blood pressure, pulse rate, waist-to-hip ratio, total and HDL cholesterol, C-reactive protein, albumin and HbA1c from which allostatic load was calculated. Results In unadjusted models, longer choice reaction time at age 16 was positively associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression at age 36: for a SD increment in choice reaction time, regression coefficients (95% confidence intervals) for logged GHQ score, and square-root transformed HADS anxiety and depression scores were 0.048 (0.016, 0.080), 0.064 (0.009, 0.118) and 0.097 (0.032, 0.163) respectively. Adjustment for sex, parental social class, GHQ score at age 16, health behaviors at age 36 and allostatic loach had little attenuating effect on the association between reaction time and GHQ score, but weakened those between reaction time and the HADS subscales. Part of the effect of reaction time on depression was mediated through allostatic load; this mediating role was of borderline significance after adjustment. Conclusion Adolescents with slower processing speed may be at increased later risk of anxiety and depression. Cumulative allostatic load may partially mediate the relation between processing speed and depression. PMID:25984823

  10. Anxiety and alcohol abuse in patients in treatment for depression.

    PubMed

    Fischer, E H; Goethe, J W

    1998-08-01

    Anxiety may be an important factor in explaining the prevalence of alcohol abuse among depressive patients. However, it is unclear whether anxiety has effects that are independent of other core symptoms in depression, and whether it is linked to alcoholic problems in both sexes. The present study of hospitalized depressive patients found a strong association between anxiety and alcohol abuse for women, and a weaker association for men. These effects were independent of severity of depression and global pathology. Whereas the correlation appeared to be linear for men, with each higher level of anxiety being associated with more alcohol problems, for women depressives those in a moderate-anxiety subgroup had the most difficulty with alcohol. PMID:9741946

  11. A longitudinal look at the relation between depression and anxiety in children and adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Cole; Lachlan G. Peeke; Joan M. Martin; Ruth Truglio; A. D. Seroczynski

    1998-01-01

    Elementary school students (n = 330) and their parents (n = 228) participated in a.3-year longitudinal study of the temporal relation between anxiety and depressive symptoms in children. Every 6 months, children and parents completed depression and anxiety questionnaires for a total of 6 waves. Structural equation modeling revealed that individual differences on all measures were remarkably stable over time.

  12. The Relation between Gender Role Orientation and Fear and Anxiety in Nonclinic-Referred Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muris, Peter; Meesters, Cor; Knoops, Miranda

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the relation between gender role orientation and fear and anxiety in a sample of nonclinic-referred children (N = 209) ages 10 to 13 years. Children and their parents completed questionnaires assessing children's gender role orientation, toy and activity preferences, and fear and anxiety. Results generally indicated that…

  13. Multiplicative Measurements of a Trait Anxiety Scale as Predictors of Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cremades, J. Gualberto; Wated, Guillermo; Wiggins, Matthew S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether combining the two dimensions of anxiety (i.e., intensity and direction) by using a multiplicative model would strengthen the prediction of burnout. Collegiate athletes (N = 157) completed the Athlete Burnout Questionnaire as well as a trait version of the Competitive State Anxiety

  14. Mathematics Anxiety as a Function of Multidimensional Self-Regulation and Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Sachin; Dowson, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the veracity of a model of Mathematics Anxiety as the end-point of related self-regulatory and self-efficacy processes. Data were collected in India from 232, eighth grade students on the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire and the Mathematics Anxiety Scale. Demographic information such as student' gender, age, marks…

  15. Daily and Nightly Anxiety Among Patients Affected by Night Eating Syndrome and Binge Eating Disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandra Sassaroli; Giovanni Maria Ruggiero; Piergiuseppe Vinai; Silvia Cardetti; Gabriella Carpegna; Noemi Ferrato; Paola Vallauri; Donatella Masante; Silvio Scarone; Sara Bertelli; Roberta Bidone; Luca Busetto; Simona Sampietro

    2009-01-01

    We tested if there were any differences about nocturnal and diurnal anxiety between patients either affected by Binge Eating Disorder (BED) or Night eating Syndrome (NES). Fifty four patients affected by BED, 13 by NES and 16 by both BED and NES were tested using the Self Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) and the Sleep Disturbance Questionnaire (SDQ). Their nocturnal eating

  16. Trait Anxiety among Japanese Massage Practitioners with Visual Impairment: What Is Required in Japanese Rehabilitation Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoyama, Nozomi; Munakata, Tsunetsugu

    2009-01-01

    This questionnaire-based study of Japanese massage practitioners with visual impairment (n = 155, 126 males, 29 females, mean age = 41 years) found that measures of self-repression, helplessness and "daily hassles" were positively correlated to measures of trait anxiety. Also, trait anxiety was negatively associated with measures of self-esteem…

  17. Defense Styles and Personality Dimensions of Research Subjects with Anxiety and Depressive Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara L. Kennedy; John J. Schwab; James A. Hyde

    2001-01-01

    We used the Bond Defense Style and Cloninger Tridimensional Personality questionnaires to assess defense styles and personality dimensions in subjects with anxiety and depressive disorders. When measured against a comparison group, maladaptive defense style scores were significantly higher in those with major depression, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and social phobia, and higher at a trend level in the subjects

  18. Self-reported driving behaviors as a function of trait anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amit Shahar

    2009-01-01

    This study examined self-reported driving behaviors in 120 (Israeli) male drivers as a function of trait anxiety (TA). TA was assessed through the TA scale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. For the analysis of driving behaviors, the present study used the Driver Behavior Questionnaire (DBQ) and adopted previous distinctions between four classes of behaviors within the DBQ: errors, lapses, ordinary

  19. The relationship between memories for childhood teasing and anxiety and depression in adulthood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deborah A. Roth; Meredith E. Coles; Richard G. Heimberg

    2002-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between memories for childhood teasing and anxiety and depression in adulthood. A Teasing Questionnaire (TQ) was developed that measured the degree to which people recall having been teased about 20 different topics during childhood. The TQ was completed by a sample of 514 undergraduates who also completed established measures of anxiety and depression. A one-factor

  20. Success in learning English as a foreign language as a predictor of computer anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mehrak Rahimi; Samaneh Yadollahi

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between success in English as a foreign language and the degree of computer anxiety, frequency of computer use, and computer ownership among Iranian high-school students. Eight hundred and nineteen highschool students were selected from eight cities across the country. They completed Computer Anxiety Rating Scale and a personal information questionnaire. School achievement in English was

  1. Comorbidity of generalized social anxiety disorder and depression in a pediatric primary care sample

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denise A Chavira; Murray B Stein; Kelly Bailey; Martin T Stein

    2004-01-01

    Background: Comorbidity between adult social anxiety disorder and major depression is extensive. Considerably less information about this relationship is available among youth. Methods: A randomly selected (from enrollees in a pediatric primary care clinic) sample of 190 families with children between the ages of 8 and 17 responded by mail to questionnaires assessing social anxiety, depression, and social functioning. Parents

  2. Effects of Language Anxiety on Three Proficiency-Level Courses of Spanish as a Foreign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcos-Llinas, Monica; Garau, Maria Juan

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of language anxiety on course achievement in three foreign language proficiency levels of Spanish, namely, beginner, intermediate, and advanced. Participants completed the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (Horwitz, Horwitz, & Cope, 1986) and a background questionnaire. Results showed that language…

  3. The Relationship between "Theory of Mind" and Attachment-Related Anxiety and Avoidance in Italian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunefeldt, Thomas; Laghi, Fiorenzo; Ortu, Francesca; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between "theory of mind" and attachment-related anxiety and avoidance in adolescence. The "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" test and the "Experiences in Close Relationships--Relationship Structures" questionnaires were administered to 402 14-19 year-old adolescents. Contrary to expectations, anxiety but not…

  4. Students' Anxiety towards the Learning of Chemistry in Some Nigerian Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jegede, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    The study was designed to find out students' anxiety towards the learning of chemistry, identify the factors that cause the anxiety, examine the disposition of sex towards the learning of chemistry and suggest ways to increase their taste towards the learning of the subject. Data for the study was obtained by administering a questionnaire to 300…

  5. Teachers' Recognition and Referral of Anxiety Disorders in Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headley, Clea J.; Campbell, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of primary school teachers to recognise and refer children with anxiety symptoms. Two hundred and ninety-nine primary school teachers completed a questionnaire exploring their recognition and referral responses to five hypothetical vignettes that described boys and girls with varying severity of anxiety

  6. An Investigation into the Choral Singer's Experience of Music Performance Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Charlene; Andrews, Nicholle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the performance experiences of choral singers with respect to music performance anxiety. Members of seven semiprofessional choirs (N = 201) completed questionnaires pertaining to their experience of performance anxiety in the context of their performance history, their experience with conductors, and their…

  7. Electrocardiographic anxiety profiles improve speech anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kim, Pyoung Won; Kim, Seung Ae; Jung, Keun-Hwa

    2012-12-01

    The present study was to set out in efforts to determine the effect of electrocardiographic (ECG) feedback on the performance in speech anxiety. Forty-six high school students participated in a speech performance educational program. They were randomly divided into two groups, an experimental group with ECG feedback (N = 21) and a control group (N = 25). Feedback was given with video recording in the control, whereas in the experimental group, an additional ECG feedback was provided. Speech performance was evaluated by the Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) speech ability test, which determines the 10 different speaking categories. ECG was recorded during rest and speech, together with a video recording of the speech performance. Changes in R-R intervals were used to reflect anxiety profiles. Three trials were performed for 3-week program. Results showed that the subjects with ECG feedback revealed a significant improvement in speech performance and anxiety states, which compared to those in the control group. These findings suggest that visualization of the anxiety profile feedback with ECG can be a better cognitive therapeutic strategy in speech anxiety. PMID:22714138

  8. A self-report diagnostic measure of generalized anxiety disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lizabeth Roemer; Mary Borkovec; Sharon Posa; T. D. Borkovec

    1995-01-01

    The present study tested the reliability of a self-report diagnostic measure of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) based on DSM criteria. Among two samples of undergraduate students, 47–80% of the GAD diagnoses by questionnaire were confirmed by diagnostic interview, with the higher rate being associated with DSM-IV criteria. Categorization of a participant as Non-GAD by questionnaire was found to be 100%

  9. A Meta-Analysis of the Cross-Cultural Psychometric Properties of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, William W.; Crocetti, Elisabetta; Raaijmakers, Quinten A. W.; Meeus, Wim H. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Accumulating studies have demonstrated that the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED), a modern youth anxiety questionnaire with scales explicitly designed to map onto specific DSM-IV-TR anxiety disorders, has good psychometric properties for children and adolescents from various countries. However, no study has…

  10. Anxiety in Student Clinicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleight, Christine C.; And Others

    The Sleight Clinician Anxiety Test (SCAT) was developed to rate the anxiety of speech language pathology students during their practicum. Items were selected based on writings in speech language pathology, education and psychology and four areas previously identified as of concern to new practitioners: (1) living up to supervisory standards, (2)…

  11. A Psychometric Analysis of the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale—Parent Version in a Clinical Sample

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chad Ebesutani; Adam Bernstein; Brad J. Nakamura; Bruce F. Chorpita; John R. Weisz

    2010-01-01

    The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale—Parent Version (RCADS-P) is a 47-item parent-report questionnaire of youth\\u000a anxiety and depression, with scales corresponding to the DSM-IV categories of Separation Anxiety Disorder, Social Phobia,\\u000a Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Panic Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The\\u000a RCADS-P is currently the only parent-report questionnaire that concurrently assesses youth symptomatology of individual

  12. Utility of brief questionnaires of health-related quality of life (Airways Questionnaire 20 and Clinical COPD Questionnaire) to predict exacerbations in patients with asthma and COPD

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is some evidence that quality of life measured by long disease-specific questionnaires may predict exacerbations in asthma and COPD, however brief quality of life tools, such as the Airways Questionnaire 20 (AQ20) or the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ), have not yet been evaluated as predictors of hospital exacerbations. Objectives To determine the ability of brief specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaires (AQ20 and CCQ) to predict emergency department visits (ED) and hospitalizations in patients with asthma and COPD, and to compare them to longer disease-specific questionnaires, such as the St George´s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRQ) and the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ). Methods We conducted a two-year prospective cohort study of 208 adult patients (108 asthma, 100 COPD). Baseline sociodemographic, clinical, functional and psychological variables were assessed. All patients completed the AQ20 and the SGRQ. COPD patients also completed the CCQ and the CRQ, while asthmatic patients completed the AQLQ. We registered all exacerbations that required ED or hospitalizations in the follow-up period. Differences between groups (zero ED visits or hospitalizations versus???1 ED visits or hospitalizations) were tested with Pearson´s X2 or Fisher´s exact test for categorical variables, ANOVA for normally distributed continuous variables, and Mann–Whitney U test for non-normally distributed variables. Logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the predictive ability of each HRQoL questionnaire. Results In the first year of follow-up, the AQ20 scores predicted both ED visits (OR: 1.19; p?=?.004; AUC 0.723) and hospitalizations (OR: 1.21; p?=?.04; AUC 0.759) for asthma patients, and the CCQ emerged as independent predictor of ED visits in COPD patients (OR: 1.06; p?=?.036; AUC 0.651), after adjusting for sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological variables. Among the longer disease-specific questionnaires, only the AQLQ emerged as predictor of ED visits in asthma patients (OR: 0.9; p?=?.002; AUC 0.727). In the second year of follow-up, none of HRQoL questionnaires predicted exacerbations. Conclusions AQ20 predicts exacerbations in asthma and CCQ predicts ED visits in COPD in the first year of follow-up. Their predictive ability is similar to or even higher than that of longer disease-specific questionnaires. PMID:23706146

  13. Corporal Punishment And Its Association With Anxiety In Youth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Allison Brown Marks

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between parental use of corporal punishment and anxiety in youth. Parental warmth, child's age, and child's ethnicity were examined in order to explore their effects on the association. Parents and their children (ages 6 – 17; N=153) completed the parent and child versions of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire [APQ-P (parent)

  14. The effects of music intervention on anxiety in the patient waiting for cardiac catheterization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wallace J. Hamel

    2001-01-01

    Background: Hospitalization causes anxiety for many patients. It increases when patients anticipate their turn for cardiac catheterization. Music therapy reduces the psychophysiologic effects of anxiety and stress through the relaxation response.Aim: To determine the effects of music therapy an anxiety, heart rate and arterial blood pressure in patients waiting for their scheduled cardiac catheterization.Methods: In a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design, 101

  15. Hospital Waste Management in Nonteaching Hospitals of Lucknow City, India

    PubMed Central

    Manar, Manish Kumar; Sahu, Krishna Kumar; Singh, Shivendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess hospital waste management in nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted on the staffs of nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow from September 2012 to March 2013. A total of eight hospitals were chosen as the study sample size. Simple random sampling technique was used for the selection of the nonteaching hospitals. A pre-structured and pre-tested interview questionnaire was used to collect necessary information regarding the hospitals and biomedical waste (BMW) management of the hospitals. The general information about the selected hospitals/employees of the hospitals was collected. Results: Mean hospital waste generated in the eight nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow was 0.56 kg/bed/day. About 50.5% of the hospitals did not have BMW department and colored dustbins. In 37.5% of the hospitals, there were no BMW records and segregation at source. Incinerator was used only by hospital A for treatment of BMW. Hospital G and hospital H had no facilities for BMW treatment. Conclusion: There is a need for appropriate training of staffs, strict implementation of rules, and continuous surveillance of the hospitals of Lucknow to improve the BMW management and handling practices. PMID:25657950

  16. Perseverative thinking in depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Sorg, Sonja; Vögele, Claus; Furka, Nadine; Meyer, Andrea Hans

    2012-01-01

    The current study investigated the impact of worry and brooding as moderators of the tripartite model of depression and anxiety (TMDA). We hypothesized that both types of perseverative thinking would moderate the association between negative affectivity (NA) and both anxiety and depression. Complete data sets for this questionnaire survey were obtained from 537 students. Participants' ages ranged from 16 to 49?years with a mean age of 21.1?years (SD?=?3.6). Overall, results from path analyses supported the assumptions of the TMDA, in that NA was a non-specific predictor for both depression and anxiety whilst lack of positive affectivity (PA) was related to depression only. Unexpectedly, perseverative thinking had an effect on the dependency of negative and positive affectivity. Worry was a significant moderator for the path NA-anxiety. All other hypothesized associations were only marginally significant. Alternative pathways as well as methodological implications regarding similarities and differences of the two types of perseverative thinking are discussed. PMID:22347869

  17. Perseverative Thinking in Depression and Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Sonja; Vögele, Claus; Furka, Nadine; Meyer, Andrea Hans

    2012-01-01

    The current study investigated the impact of worry and brooding as moderators of the tripartite model of depression and anxiety (TMDA). We hypothesized that both types of perseverative thinking would moderate the association between negative affectivity (NA) and both anxiety and depression. Complete data sets for this questionnaire survey were obtained from 537 students. Participants’ ages ranged from 16 to 49?years with a mean age of 21.1?years (SD?=?3.6). Overall, results from path analyses supported the assumptions of the TMDA, in that NA was a non-specific predictor for both depression and anxiety whilst lack of positive affectivity (PA) was related to depression only. Unexpectedly, perseverative thinking had an effect on the dependency of negative and positive affectivity. Worry was a significant moderator for the path NA–anxiety. All other hypothesized associations were only marginally significant. Alternative pathways as well as methodological implications regarding similarities and differences of the two types of perseverative thinking are discussed. PMID:22347869

  18. A community-based epidemiological study of health anxiety and generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sing; Lam, Ivy M H; Kwok, Kathleen P S; Leung, Candi M C

    2014-03-01

    This community-based study examined the frequency of worry about personal health in respondents with and without generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and the impact of health anxiety on the disorder. A random community-based telephone survey of 5118 Chinese respondents aged 18-64 was conducted. A fully structured questionnaire covered the DSM-IV-TR criteria of GAD, major depressive episode (MDE), eight domains of worry, the seven-item Whiteley Index (WI-7), health service use, and socio-demographic information. Worry about personal health ranked fifth (75.6%) among eight domains of worries examined. GAD respondents with high level of health anxiety were significantly older, less educated, and had lower family income. High health anxiety significantly increased the occurrence of one-year MDE, previous persistent worry, previous persistent low mood, number of domains of worries, number of non-core DSM-IV-TR GAD symptoms, health service use, and mistrust of doctors. Health anxiety is common in GAD and may signify greater severity of the disorder. PMID:24295847

  19. Hospitality in hospitals?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denver Severt; Taryn Aiello; Shannon Elswick; Cheryl Cyr

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore an organization-wide philosophy of hospitality in a hospital setting. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – An exploratory case study method approach matched the research purpose. First, a hospitality centric philosophy (HCP) was defined from the literature review. Next, a triangulation of unstructured visits, structured visits and key informant interviews is used to further explore

  20. Depression and anxiety among high-risk obstetric inpatients?

    PubMed Central

    Byatt, Nancy; Hicks-Courant, Katherine; Davidson, Autumn; Levesque, Ruth; Mick, Eric; Allison, Jeroan; Moore Simas, Tiffany A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the following among women hospitalized antenatally due to high-risk pregnancies: (1) rates of depression symptoms and anxiety symptoms, (2) changes in depression symptoms and anxiety symptoms and, (3) rates of mental health treatment. Methods Sixty-two participants hospitalized for high-risk obstetrical complications completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item scale (GAD-7) and Short-Form 12 weekly until delivery or discharge, and once postpartum. Results Average length of total hospital stay was 8.3±7.6days for women who completed an initial admission survey (n=62) and 16.3±8.9 (n=34), 25.4±10.2 (n=17) and 35±10.9 days (n=9) for those who completed 2, 3 and 4 surveys, respectively. EPDS was ?10 in 27% (n=17) and GAD-7 was ?10 in 13% (n=8) of participants at initial survey. Mean anxiety (4.2±6.5 vs. 5.2±5.1, p=.011) and depression (4.4±5.6 vs. 6.9±4.8, p=.011) scores were lower postpartum compared to initial survey. Past mental health diagnosis predicted depression symptoms [odds ratio (OR)=4.54; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.91–7.17] and anxiety symptoms (OR=5.95; 95% CI 3.04–8.86) atinitial survey; however, 21% (n=10) with no diagnostic history had EPDS ?10. Five percent (n=3) received mental health treatment during pregnancy. Conclusion Hospitalized high-risk obstetrical patients may commonly experience depression symptoms and/or anxiety symptoms and not receive treatment. A history of mental health treatment or diagnosis was associated with depression symptoms or anxiety symptoms in pregnancy. Of women with an EPDS ?10, >50% did not report a past mental health diagnosis. PMID:25149040

  1. Depression, anxiety, and relevant cognitions in persons with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Elizabeth; Bihm, Elson M; Lammers, William J

    2003-02-01

    We assessed depression, anxiety, and relevant cognitions in persons with mental retardation by administering modified versions of the Reynolds Child Depression Scale, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire, and the Cognitions Checklist to 46 persons with borderline to moderate mental retardation. Consistent with research with other groups, self-reports of depression and anxiety were highly correlated (r = .74) in these individuals, and cognitions were strong predictors of negative affect. Subscales measuring cognitions related to depression and anxiety were also highly related, limiting the "cognitive-specificity" hypothesis. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses offered mixed support for cognitive-specificity. We discuss the implications of these findings for the cognitive and affective assessment of persons with intellectual limitations. PMID:12708581

  2. Is prospective memory related to depression and anxiety? A hierarchical MPT modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Nina R; Bayen, Ute J; Böhm, Mateja F

    2014-10-22

    Prospective memory (PM) refers to remembering to perform an action in the future. One hundred and twenty-nine students completed a laboratory event-based PM task as well as depression and anxiety questionnaires. The data were analysed with the beta-MPT version of the multinomial processing tree model of event-based PM. Thereby, the prospective and retrospective components of PM were estimated for each participant and were then correlated with depression and anxiety. State anxiety was negatively correlated with the prospective component of PM. Neither depression nor trait anxiety were related to either component of PM. PMID:25337864

  3. Clinical use of virtual reality distraction system to reduce anxiety and pain in dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Mark D; Gao, Kenneth; Wiederhold, Brenda K

    2014-06-01

    Virtual reality (VR) has been used by clinicians to manage pain in clinical populations. This study examines the use of VR as a form of distraction for dental patients using both subjective and objective measures to determine how a VR system affects patients' reported anxiety level, pain level, and physiological factors. As predicted, results of self-evaluation questionnaires showed that patients experienced less anxiety and pain after undergoing VR treatment. Physiological data reported similar trends in decreased anxiety. Overall, the favorable subjective and objective responses suggest that VR distraction systems can reduce discomfort and pain for patients with mild to moderate fear and anxiety. PMID:24892198

  4. Clinical Use of Virtual Reality Distraction System to Reduce Anxiety and Pain in Dental Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kenneth; Wiederhold, Brenda K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Virtual reality (VR) has been used by clinicians to manage pain in clinical populations. This study examines the use of VR as a form of distraction for dental patients using both subjective and objective measures to determine how a VR system affects patients' reported anxiety level, pain level, and physiological factors. As predicted, results of self-evaluation questionnaires showed that patients experienced less anxiety and pain after undergoing VR treatment. Physiological data reported similar trends in decreased anxiety. Overall, the favorable subjective and objective responses suggest that VR distraction systems can reduce discomfort and pain for patients with mild to moderate fear and anxiety. PMID:24892198

  5. Following up patients with depression after hospital discharge: a mixed methods approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A medication information intervention was delivered to patients with a major depressive episode prior to psychiatric hospital discharge. Methods The objective of this study was to explore how patients evolved after hospital discharge and to identify factors influencing this evolution. Using a quasi-experimental longitudinal design, the quantitative analysis measured clinical (using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the somatic dimension of the Symptom Checklist 90 and recording the number of readmissions) and humanistic (using the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire) outcomes of patients via telephone contacts up to one year following discharge. The qualitative analysis was based on the researcher diary, consisting of reports on the telephone outcome assessment of patients with major depression (n = 99). All reports were analyzed using the thematic framework approach. Results The change in the participants' health status was as diverse as it was at hospital discharge. Participants reported on remissions; changes in mood; relapses; and re-admissions (one third of patients). Quantitative data on group level showed low anxiety, depression and somatic scores over time. Three groups of contributing factors were identified: process, individual and environmental factors. Process factors included self caring process, medical care after discharge, resumption of work and managing daily life. Individual factors were symptom control, medication and personality. Environmental factors were material and social environment. Each of them could ameliorate, deteriorate or be neutral to the patient's health state. A mix of factors was observed in individual patients. Conclusions After hospital discharge, participants with a major depressive episode evolved in many different ways. Process, individual and environmental factors may influence the participant's health status following hospital discharge. Each of the factors could be positive, neutral or negative for the patient. PMID:22074732

  6. Attachment anxiety is related to Epstein-Barr virus latency.

    PubMed

    Fagundes, Christopher P; Jaremka, Lisa M; Glaser, Ronald; Alfano, Catherine M; Povoski, Stephen P; Lipari, Adele M; Agnese, Doreen M; Yee, Lisa D; Carson, William E; Farrar, William B; Malarkey, William B; Chen, Min; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2014-10-01

    Attachment theory provides a framework for understanding individual differences in chronic interpersonal stress. Attachment anxiety, a type of relationship insecurity characterized by worry about rejection and abandonment, is a chronic interpersonal stressor. Stress impacts cellular immunity, including herpesvirus reactivation. We investigated whether attachment anxiety was related to the expression of a latent herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), when individuals were being tested for breast or colon cancer and approximately 1 year later. Participants (N=183) completed a standard attachment questionnaire and provided blood to assess EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) IgG antibody titers. Individuals with more attachment anxiety had higher EBV VCA IgG antibody titers than those with less attachment anxiety. The strength of the association between attachment anxiety and antibody titers was the same at both assessments. This study is the first to show an association between latent herpesvirus reactivation and attachment anxiety. Because elevated herpesvirus antibody titers reflect poorer cellular immune system control over the latent virus, these data suggest that high attachment anxiety is associated with cellular immune dysregulation. PMID:24945717

  7. The Persian version of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Mesgarian, Fatemeh; Asghari, Ali; Shaeiri, Mohammad Reza; Broumand, Akram

    2013-01-01

    Research on the role of acceptance in adjustment to persisting pain has been facilitated by the development of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ). However, the CPAQ has not yet been validated amongst Iranian patients with chronic pain. To examine the psychometric properties of the Persian version of the CPAQ (P-CPAQ), 245 Persian-speaking chronic pain patients completed a battery of questionnaires, including: the P-CPAQ, a Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, a slightly modified Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire, the Catastrophizing Scale of the Coping Strategies Questionnaire, the Depression and Anxiety Scales of the Depression Anxiety And Stress Scale-21 and the Pain-Related Interference and Pain Intensity Scales of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory. Furthermore, to evaluate the reliability of the P-CPAQ, the measure was completed by 24 chronic pain patients, on two occasions that are 2 weeks apart. The results of the principal component analysis and confirmatory factor analysis yielded a two-factor solution. Furthermore, the reliability and construct validity of the P-CPAQ were confirmed. In general, consistent with studies in other countries, the results of the present study indicate that pain acceptance plays an important role in adjustment to chronic pain regardless of cultural and language differences between countries. PMID:22281840

  8. Computer Anxiety: Definition, Measurement, and Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambre, Marjorie A.; Cook, Desmond L.

    This review examines the definition, measurement, and correlates of computer anxiety as provided in available research. The concept of computer anxiety reflects an anxiety state, rather than an anxiety trait, thus rendering it susceptible to change over time. Computer anxiety is similar in nature to math anxiety and test anxiety. Two approaches to…

  9. The relationship among bullying, victimization, depression, anxiety, and aggression in elementary school children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy M. Craig

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine sex and grade differences among bullies, victims, bully\\/victims, and comparison children on physical, verbal, and indirect aggression and victimization and on depression and anxiety. 546 children (254 boys and 292 girls) in grades five through eight participated in the study. Children completed the Bully\\/Victim Questionnaire (Olweus (1989) Questionnaire for students (Junior and

  10. Anger Feelings and Anger Expression as a Mediator of the Effects of Witnessing Family Violence on Anxiety and Depression in Japanese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitamura, Toshinori; Hasui, Chieko

    2006-01-01

    The effects of anger feelings (rated by the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory) and witnessing family violence on anxiety and depression (rated by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) were examined in 457 junior high school students. Anxiety and depression scores were correlated with frequencies of witnessing family violence. In a…

  11. The Preschool Behavior Questionnaire

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lenore B. Behar

    1977-01-01

    In summary, the Preschool Behavior Questionnaire was developed as a screening instrument for use by preschool teachers, providing norms for children, ages 3–6. During the 34-month period since its publication in late 1974, the scale has been used to a considerable extent in the screening of young children. Those who have used the scale evaluate it highly. However, the variations

  12. Identification Number:.... Questionnaire Four

    E-print Network

    Boschetti, Fabio

    the complete complex system?'' This is the last questionnaire for the experiment. It asks about your general thoughts and your learning from this experiment. Could you give some information that could explain how you particularly easy? If so what were they and why? Were there any specific aspects that were particularly

  13. Questionnaire typography and production.

    PubMed

    Gray, M

    1975-06-01

    This article describes the typographic principles and practice which provide the basis of good design and print, the relevant printing processes which can be used, and the graphic designer's function in questionnaire production. As they impose constraints on design decisions to be discussed later in the text, the various methods of printing and production are discussed first. PMID:15677172

  14. Diet History Questionnaire

    Cancer.gov

    NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH Diet History Questionnaire Today's date: MONTH DAY YEAR |___|___| 0 0 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 5 6 7 8 01 Jan 02 Feb 03 Mar 04 Apr 05 May 06 Jun 07 Jul 08 Aug 09 Sep 10 Oct 11 Nov 12

  15. Philosophy of Glasser Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, James R.; Laverty, Grace E.

    As part of the instrumentation to assess the effectiveness of the Schools Without Failure (SWF) program in 10 elementary schools in the New Castle, Pa. School District, the Philosophy of Glasser Questionnaire was developed. This 15-item scale measuring attitudes toward the philosophy of William Glasser had a coefficient alpha reliability of .77…

  16. Subjective health complaints in older adolescents are related to perceived stress, anxiety and gender – a cross-sectional school study in Northern Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Negative trends in adolescent mental and subjective health are a challenge to public health work in Sweden and worldwide. Self-reported mental and subjective health complaints such as pain, sleeping problems, anxiety, and various stress-related problems seem to have increased over time among older adolescents, especially girls. The aim of this study has therefore been to investigate perceived stress, mental and subjective health complaints among older adolescents in Northern Sweden. Methods Data were derived from a cross-sectional school-based survey with a sample consisting of 16–18?year olds (n?=?1027), boys and girls, in the first two years of upper secondary school, from different vocational and academic programmes in three public upper secondary schools in a university town in northern Sweden. Prevalence of perceived stress, subjective health complaints, general self-rated health, anxiety, and depression were measured using a questionnaire, including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Results A large proportion of both girls and boys reported health complaints and perceived stress. There was a clear gender difference: two to three times as many girls as boys reported subjective health complaints, such as headache, tiredness and sleeping difficulties and musculoskeletal pain, as well as sadness and anxiety. High pressure and demands from school were experienced by 63.6% of girls and 38.5% of boys. Perceived stress in the form of pressure and demands correlated strongly with reported health complaints (r?=?0.71) and anxiety (r?=?0.71). Conclusions The results indicate that mental and subjective health complaints are prevalent during adolescence, especially in girls, and furthermore, that perceived stress and demands may be important explanatory factors. Future studies should pay attention to the balance between gender-related demands, perceived control and social support, particularly in the school environment, in order to prevent negative strain and stress-related ill-health. The gender gap in subjective adolescent health needs to be further explored. PMID:23158724

  17. The comparison of severity and prevalence of major depressive disorder, general anxiety disorder and eating disorders before and after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Matini, Diana; Ghanbari Jolfaei, Atefeh; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Pishgahroudsari, Mohadeseh; Ehtesham, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Severe obesity is highly co-morbid with psychiatric disorders and may have effect on the quality of life. This study aimed to compare severity and prevalence rate of depression, anxiety and eating disorders and quality of life in severe obese patients before and 6 months after the gastric bypass surgery. Methods: This was a prospective observational study which conducted at Hazarat Rasool-Akram Hospital in Tehran, 2012. Questionnaires included demographic questions, eating disorder Inventory (EDI), The Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) for quality of life, Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) and anxiety (HRSA). Participants were interviewed two times, before surgery and six months after, to determine changes of the disorders. Patients with the history of bariatric surgery, individuals younger than 18 year old and those who disagreed to join the study were excluded. Results: In assessing the eating disorder inventory-3rd version (EDI-3), Significant reduction in drive for thinness (DT) (p= 0.010), bulimia (B) (p< 0.0001) and body dissatisfaction mean (BD) (0.038) was observed at the 6-month follow-up. At this period, the mean for physical component summary of SF36, significantly decreased (p< 0.0001), however mental component summary did not significantly differ (p= 0.368); Also differences in severity of anxiety (p= 0.852), and depression in HRSD (p= 0.311), prevalence of depression (p= 0.189) and prevalence of general anxiety disorder according to SCID (p=0.167) did not differ significantly, at this period. Conclusion: Although weight loss after bariatric surgery improved the physical component of quality of life, this improvement did not affect the mental aspect of life, depression and anxiety and it seems that these psychopathologies need attention and treatment in addition to weight loss treatments in patients with obesity. PMID:25664310

  18. The positive automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ-P) and the automatic thoughts questionnaire—Revised (ATQ-RP): Equivalent measures of positive thinking?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ellen Burgess; David A. F. Haaga

    1994-01-01

    We examined two recently developed measures of positive automatic thought, the Positive Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ-P)\\u000a and the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire—Revised (ATQ-RP). Internal consistency, concurrent validity, and convergent and discriminant\\u000a validity were addressed. Two hundred one undergraduates completed self-report measures of positive automatic thoughts, negative\\u000a automatic thoughts, depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and positive affectivity. The ATQ-P and ATQ-RP both showed

  19. Depression, Anxiety, Stress and Demographic Determinants of Hypertension Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mushtaq, Mamoona; Najam, Najma

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective : Research evidence supports the relationship of psychological and demographic factors with hypertension and these variables are strongest predictors of hypertension which are scarcely studied in Pakistan. The present study was carried out to explore the correlation of depression, anxiety, stress and demographic factors with hypertension. Method: We used correlation research design and a sample of (N = 237), hypertensive patients (N = 137) and their age matched healthy controls (N = 100) was taken from hospitals. Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) (Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995) was used to assess depression, anxiety and stress. Results: Results indicated significant positive correlation between depression (?2MH = 104.18, p < .001), anxiety (?2MH = 78.48, p < .001), stress (?2MH = 110.95, p < .001) and overall negative states (?2MH = 97.43, p < .001) with hypertension. Depression (OR = 1.44, p < .01), anxiety (OR = 1. 76, p < .01) stress (OR = 1.37, p < .01), job and dependents, working hours and weight turned out as predictors of hypertension. Conclusion: Hypertension has significant positive relationship with depression, anxiety, stress and with demographic variables. The findings of the present study will contribute in the existing knowledge of health professionals to enhance public awareness regarding the harmful outcomes of depression, anxiety and stress upon human health. PMID:25674126

  20. Pain and Anxiety versus Sense of Family Support in Lung Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Lekka, Dimitra; Pachi, Argiro; Tselebis, Athanasios; Zafeiropoulos, Georgios; Bratis, Dionisios; Evmolpidi, Argiri; Ilias, Ioannis; Karkanias, Athanasios; Moussas, Georgios; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Syrigos, Konstantinos N

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is a stressful condition for both patient and family. The anxiety and pain accompanying cancer and its treatment have a significant negative influence on the patient's quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between anxiety, pain, and perceived family support in a sample of lung cancer patients. The sample consisted of a total of 101 lung cancer outpatients receiving treatment at the oncology department of a general hospital. Anxiety, pain (severity and impact on everyday life), and perceived family support were assessed using Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Brief Pain Inventory, and the Family Support Scale, respectively. Statistical analyses revealed correlations between anxiety, pain, and family support as perceived by the patients. The intensity of pain had a positive correlation with both state and trait anxiety and a negative correlation with family support. Anxiety (state and trait) had a significant negative correlation with family support. In conclusion, high prevalence rates of anxiety disorders were observed in lung cancer patients. Females appeared more susceptible to anxiety symptoms with a less sense of family support. A negative correlation was evidenced between family support and anxiety and a positive one between anxiety and pain. PMID:25126424

  1. Pain and Anxiety versus Sense of Family Support in Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lekka, Dimitra; Pachi, Argiro; Zafeiropoulos, Georgios; Evmolpidi, Argiri; Ilias, Ioannis; Karkanias, Athanasios; Moussas, Georgios; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is a stressful condition for both patient and family. The anxiety and pain accompanying cancer and its treatment have a significant negative influence on the patient's quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between anxiety, pain, and perceived family support in a sample of lung cancer patients. The sample consisted of a total of 101 lung cancer outpatients receiving treatment at the oncology department of a general hospital. Anxiety, pain (severity and impact on everyday life), and perceived family support were assessed using Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Brief Pain Inventory, and the Family Support Scale, respectively. Statistical analyses revealed correlations between anxiety, pain, and family support as perceived by the patients. The intensity of pain had a positive correlation with both state and trait anxiety and a negative correlation with family support. Anxiety (state and trait) had a significant negative correlation with family support. In conclusion, high prevalence rates of anxiety disorders were observed in lung cancer patients. Females appeared more susceptible to anxiety symptoms with a less sense of family support. A negative correlation was evidenced between family support and anxiety and a positive one between anxiety and pain. PMID:25126424

  2. Anxious Solitude and Clinical Disorder in Middle Childhood: Bridging Developmental and Clinical Approaches to Childhood Social Anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heidi Gazelle; Jamie Olson Workman; Wesley Allan

    2010-01-01

    It was hypothesized that children identified by their peers at school as anxious solitary would report more symptoms of social\\u000a anxiety disorder on a self report questionnaire and, on the basis of child and parent clinical interviews, receive more diagnoses\\u000a of social anxiety disorder and additional anxiety and mood disorders. Participants were 192 children drawn from a community\\u000a sample of

  3. The predicting model of math anxiety: The role of classroom goal structure, self-regulation and math self-efficacy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masoud Gholamali Lavasani; Elahe Hejazi; Javad Yazdani Varzaneh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine a predicting model of high school students’ math anxiety based on classroom goal structure, self-regulation and math self-efficacy. For this reason 436 first grade male high school students were selected through multiple cluster sampling. They completed a questionnaire consisting of perceived classroom goal structure (Midgley et al. 2000), Math anxiety (Bai

  4. A Rating Scale Model for a Scale of Test Anxiety in Italy. Working Paper N. 11/2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliandri, Donatella; Cardone, Michele; Muzzioli, Paola; Romiti, Sara

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate a test anxiety scale for Italian students. The scale is part of a questionnaire administered after the students' annual competence test by the National Institute for the Educational Evaluation of Instruction and Training (INVALSI). The aim of the scale is to explore the anxiety levels of Italian students…

  5. Cannabis Use and Anxiety: Is Stress the Missing Piece of the Puzzle?

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Elizabeth C.; Driver, Matthew; Brown, Rhonda F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Comorbidity between anxiety and cannabis use is common yet the nature of the association between these conditions is not clear. Four theories were assessed, and a fifth hypothesis tested to determine if the misattribution of stress symptomology plays a role in the association between state-anxiety and cannabis. Methods: Three-hundred-sixteen participants ranging in age from 18 to 71?years completed a short online questionnaire asking about their history of cannabis use and symptoms of stress and anxiety. Results: Past and current cannabis users reported higher incidence of lifetime anxiety than participants who had never used cannabis; however, these groups did not differ in state-anxiety, stress, or age of onset of anxiety. State-anxiety and stress were not associated with frequency of cannabis use, but reported use to self-medicate for anxiety was positively associated with all three. Path analyses indicated two different associations between anxiety and cannabis use, pre-existing and high state-anxiety was associated with (i) higher average levels of intoxication and, in turn, acute anxiety responses to cannabis use; (ii) frequency of cannabis use via the mediating effects of stress and self-medication. Conclusion: None of the theories was fully supported by the findings. However, as cannabis users reporting self-medication for anxiety were found to be self-medicating stress symptomology, there was some support for the stress-misattribution hypothesis. With reported self-medication for anxiety being the strongest predictor of frequency of use, it is suggested that researchers, clinicians, and cannabis users pay greater attention to the overlap between stress and anxiety symptomology and the possible misinterpretation of these related but distinct conditions. PMID:25505428

  6. Assessing maternal anxiety in pregnancy with the State?Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI): issues of validity, location and participation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D. Gunning; F. C. Denison; C. J. Stockley; S. P. Ho; H. K. Sandhu; R. M. Reynolds

    2010-01-01

    The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) has been widely used in research with pregnant women. However, few studies have examined its validity for this group. In this paper the content validity of the STAI, the impact of location and consequences for further participation of higher STAI scores are investigated for 215 pregnant women who completed the STAI at hospital or

  7. Multi-Dimensional Health Assessment Questionnaire in China: Reliability, Validity and Clinical Value in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Zhu, Li-an; Wang, Su-li; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Lu, Liang-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the psychometric properties and clinical utility of Chinese Multidimensional Health Assessment Questionnaire (MDHAQ-C) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in China. Methods 162 RA patients were recruited in the evaluation process. The reliability of the questionnaire was tested by internal consistency and item analysis. Convergent validity was assessed by correlations of MDHAQ-C with Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Hospital anxiety and depression scales (HAD). Discriminant validity was tested in groups of patients with varied disease activities and functional classes. To evaluate the clinical values, correlations were calculated between MDHAQ-C and indices of clinical relevance and disease activity. Agreement with the Disease Activity Score (DAS28) and Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) was estimated. Results The Cronbach's alpha was 0.944 in the Function scale (FN) and 0.768 in the scale of psychological status (PS). The item analysis indicated all the items of FN and PS are correlated at an acceptable level. MDHAQ-C correlated with the questionnaires significantly in most scales and scores of scales differed significantly in groups of different disease activity and functional status. MDHAQ-C has moderate to high correlation with most clinical indices and high correlation with a spearman coefficient of 0.701 for DAS 28 and 0.843 for CDAI. The overall agreement of categories was satisfying. Conclusion MDHAQ-C is a reliable, valid instrument for functional measurement and a feasible, informative quantitative index for busy clinical settings in Chinese RA patients. PMID:24848431

  8. The Effects of Inhalation Aromatherapy on Anxiety in Patients With Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Zahra; Taghadosi, Mohsen; Sharifi, Khadijeh; Farrokhian, Alireza; Tagharrobi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is an important mental health problem in patients with cardiac disease. Anxiety reduces patients’ quality of life and increases the risk of different cardiac complications. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of inhalation aromatherapy on anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction. Patients and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial conduced on 68 patients with myocardial infarction hospitalized in coronary care units of a large-scale teaching hospital affiliated to Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran in 2013. By using the block randomization technique, patients were randomly assigned to experimental (33 patients receiving inhalation aromatherapy with lavender aroma twice a day for two subsequent days) and control (35 patients receiving routine care of study setting including no aromatherapy) groups. At the beginning of study and twenty minutes after each aromatherapy session, anxiety state of patients was assessed using the Spielberger’s State Anxiety Inventory. Data was analyzed using SPSS v. 16.0. We used Chi-square, Fisher’s exact, independent-samples T-test and repeated measures analysis of variance to analyze the study data. Results: The study groups did not differ significantly regarding baseline anxiety mean and demographic characteristics. However, after the administration of aromatherapy, anxiety mean in the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group. Conclusions: Inhalation aromatherapy with lavender aroma can reduce anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction. Consequently, healthcare providers, particularly nurses, can use this strategy to improve postmyocardial infarction anxiety management. PMID:25389481

  9. Childhood anxiety disorders and developmental issues in anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Arnold; S. Preeya Banerjee; Rashmi Bhandari; Jennifer Ivey; Michelle Rose; David R. Rosenberg

    2003-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common disorders in childhood, and developmental differences must be considered when diagnosing and\\u000a treating patients in this age group. Recent research has illuminated the course of childhood anxiety disorders, including\\u000a how they can be precursors to continued anxiety and mood problems in adulthood. Recent studies of cognitive-behavioral therapy,\\u000a the first-line psychosocial treatment for childhood anxiety, have focused

  10. [Levels of state-trait anxiety between mothers and fathers who have children in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Carrasco, Karmina Elena

    2013-01-01

    Background: when there is a child patient in the family, it is frequent that parents get upset. Anxiety in the mother and father could be different depending on the way each one lives the critical situation of the child patient. The purpose was to measure levels of anxiety in fathers and mothers who had a hospitalized child in an intensive care unit. Methods: the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was applied to a group of 50 pairs of parents who had a hospitalized child in the intensive care unit in a pediatric hospital. A no probabilistic intentional sample was used. Differences between groups were analyzed by Student's t test. Results: no significant differences were obtained between mothers and fathers for both state-anxiety and trait-anxiety. Significant differences were obtained intra-groups between both kinds of anxiety. Conclusions: having a child who is chronically sick or hospitalized for intensive therapy causes similar levels of anxiety in both parents. Anxiety is significantly increased in both parents when their child is hospitalized in an intensive therapy unit. PMID:24290008

  11. Anxiety, Sedation, and Simulated Driving in Binge Drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Aston, Elizabeth R.; Shannon, Erin E.; Liguori, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluated the relationships among trait anxiety, subjective response to alcohol, and simulated driving following a simulated alcohol binge. Sixty drinkers with a binge history completed the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Alcohol Use Questionnaire, and subsequently completed a driving simulation. Participants were then administered 0.2 g/kg ethanol at 30 minute intervals (cumulative dose 0.8 g/kg). Following alcohol consumption, the Biphasic Alcohol Effects Scale (BAES) and visual analog scales of subjective impairment and driving confidence were administered, after which simulated driving was re-assessed. Due to the emphasis on simulated driving after drinking in the current study, subjective response to alcohol (i.e., self-reported sedation, stimulation, impairment, and confidence in driving ability) was assessed once following alcohol consumption, as this is the time when drinkers tend to make decisions regarding legal driving ability. Alcohol increased driving speed, speeding tickets, and collisions. Sedation following alcohol predicted increased subjective impairment and decreased driving confidence. Subjective impairment was not predicted by sensitivity to stimulation or trait anxiety. High trait anxiety predicted low driving confidence after drinking and this relationship was mediated by sedation. Increased speed after alcohol was predicted by sedation, but not by trait anxiety or stimulation. Anxiety, combined with the sedating effects of alcohol, may indicate when consumption should cease. However, once driving is initiated, sensitivity to sedation following alcohol consumption is positively related to simulated driving speed. PMID:24955664

  12. Anxiety-Expectation Mediation Model of Library Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Qun G.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    This study presents a test of the Anxiety-Expectation Mediation (AEM) model of library anxiety. The AEM model contains variables that are directly or indirectly related to information search performance, as measured by students' scores on their research proposals. This model posits that library anxiety and self-perception serve as factors that…

  13. Memory and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Mcnally, R J

    1997-01-01

    Experimental psychopathologists have identified varying patterns in memory bias in people with depressive and anxiety disorders. Individuals suffering from depression tend to exhibit explicit memory deficits for positively-valanced material, and sometimes exhibit biases for retrieving negative self-relevant information as well. Most studies, however, provide scant evidence for implicit memory biases in depression. In contrast to depression, anxiety disorders are rarely associated with enhanced explicit memory for threat-related information (with the exception of panic disorder). Evidence for implicit memory biases for threat in these syndromes is mixed. After providing an overview of findings on memory abnormalities in depressive and anxiety disorders, data from several new studies bearing on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in Vietnam combat veterans and in women with histories of childhood sexual abuse are presented. Involving directed forgetting, implicit memory and autobiographical cueing paradigms, these experiments point to a pattern of abnormalities linked to PTSD rather than to trauma per se. PMID:9415928

  14. Medication dependence and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    von Moltke, Lisa L.; Greenblatt, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common and costly psychiatric illnesses. Pharmacological treatment was enhanced with the introduction of benzodiazepines, which proved safer and more effective than older drugs. The risk of dependence, however, has made clinicians reluctant to use these medications. In fact, few patients appear to develop significant difficulties with these drugs, given how widely they are used. Careful planning for discontinuation of therapy is important. In addition, for some individuals, there appears to be a complex and as yet unelucidaied relationship between dependence on drugs or alcohol and anxiety. The newer antidepressants offer efficacy without abuse or dependence liability, but are expensive and have side effects that are intolerable for some patients. Pharmacological therapy for anxiety should be prescribed and managed so as to minimize any existing risk, while aiming to restore the patient to wellness in terms of symptoms and function. PMID:22033703

  15. [Test anxiety: various aspects].

    PubMed

    Farnè, M; Sebellico, A

    1989-06-01

    "Academic achievement anxiety" (or "test anxiety") is a situation-specific anxiety. In this research, 53 medical student were subjected to the McNair et al. POMS (an inventory assessing six identifiable mood or affective states) during their psychology examination; 31 of them had been tested with the POMS also 50-70 days before the examination and the other 22 repeated the test 50-70 days after it. All the emotional states increased significantly during the examination, except the Anger-Hostility factor; the significance of the "period effect" for the Confusion-Bewilderment factor shows there is a state of confusion due to the novelty of the test. PMID:2611019

  16. Investigation of health anxiety and its related factors in nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuqun; Zhao, Yueqiu; Mao, Shengqin; Li, Guohong; Yuan, Yonggui

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore health anxiety in a sample of nursing students to determine the relationships between health anxiety and life satisfaction, personality, and alexithymia. Methods Two thousand and eighty-six nursing students in junior college, which were divided into five groups, were evaluated by questionnaires, including the Life Satisfaction Scales Applicable to College Students, the Chinese version of the Short Health Anxiety Inventory, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Results The mean age, whether the individual was an only child, residence (urban or rural), and were significantly different between the groups. The self-assessment scores were also significantly different between the groups. The Short Health Anxiety Inventory total score and the factor of fearing the likelihood of becoming ill were significantly negatively correlated with the Life Satisfaction Scales Applicable to College Students total score and its two factors, but were significantly positively correlated with psychoticism, neuroticism, and TAS-20 total scores and its scores of the three TAS-20 factors. The negative consequence scale of Short Health Anxiety Inventory was not significantly correlated with externally oriented thinking, but was significantly negatively correlated with extraversion. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicted that objective satisfaction, subjective satisfaction, neuroticism, and the three factors of TAS-20 were predictors of health anxiety. Conclusion Health anxiety was correlated with life satisfaction, personality, and alexithymia in junior college nursing students. Subjective and objective satisfaction, neuroticism, and the identification and expression of emotions may be predictors of health anxiety in nursing students. PMID:25045266

  17. The Effects of Anxiety on Balance Parameters in Young Female University Students

    PubMed Central

    Abadi, Zahra Ebrahim

    2012-01-01

    Objective In human beings, the balance control is a result of an integration of physical and psychological factors and people show different reactions when feel anxious or face stability threatened conditions such as standing on an unstable surface. University students, particularly the female ones, are a group of the society who are prone to face anxieties. The current study focused on the effects of anxiety on balance index in young female university students. Methods A group of 15 female students with a high anxiety score (higher than 42 in Shpielberger Questionnaire) and a group of 15 female students with a low anxiety score (lower than 42 in Shpielberger Questionnaire) were recruited for this study. Using a Biodex stabilometer (Biodex System, USA), the antero-posterior (AP), medio-latral (ML) and the overall dynamic stability index (SI) of the subjects were recorded and compared. Results The results revealed a significant difference between the two groups. Subjects with a high anxiety score showed a stability index higher than those in the low anxiety group (p<0.005), which simply indicate significantly less stability in this group. Conclusion This study showed that subjects with higher anxiety scores were less stable compared to those subjects with lower anxiety scores. PMID:23408745

  18. Anxiety levels among Turkish public transportation drivers: a relation to restless legs syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Ozder, Aclan; Eker, Hasan Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of individuals who are at high risk for state and trait anxiety as well as to investigate the relationship of anxiety levels of urban transportation drivers from Istanbul, Turkey with restless legs syndrome (RLS). The data was gathered between April 2013 and June 2013 by the use of a questionnaire prepared for the purpose of this study, completed anonymously. Restless leg syndrome and anxiety level were evaluated in the group; data obtained was analyzed using the SPSS version 16. Chi-square, correlation and student-t tests were used. Restless leg syndrome symptoms were determined by a self-assessment questionnaire, including the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) diagnostic criteria, to determine RLS symptoms and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) to determine anxiety levels of the participants. In the present study, the four RLS criteria were reported in 31.2%. STAI-state and STAI-trait scores were 40.82 ± 9.55 and 42.99 ± 8.54 respectively. The state and trait anxiety mean scores were different among participants with RLS in this study (p < 0.05). It was found a significant difference between tobacco usage and state anxiety (p < 0.05). There were a significant difference between RLS and age, number of cigarettes daily consumed and employment time (p < 0.05). The state and trait anxiety scores were found high among bus drivers with RLS in this study. PMID:25035782

  19. Using Presence Questionnaires in Reality Using Presence Questionnaires in Reality

    E-print Network

    Slater, Mel

    compared to immersive virtual. #12;Using Presence Questionnaires in Reality 2 1. Introduction The concept1 Using Presence Questionnaires in Reality Using Presence Questionnaires in Reality Martin Usoh different presence question- naires can distinguish between real and virtual experiences. One group of 10

  20. Mathematics Anxiety and Working Memory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derek R. Hopko; Mark H. Ashcraft; James Gute; Kenneth J. Ruggiero; Colleen Lewis

    1998-01-01

    A current theory of anxiety effects in cognition claims that anxiety disrupts normal processing within the working memory system. We examined this theory in the context of a reading task, for participants who were high or low in assessed mathematics anxiety. The task was designed to measure the ability to inhibit attention to distracting information and the effects of this

  1. Anticipatory anxiety and risk perception

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gillian Butler; Andrew Mathews

    1987-01-01

    This study tested the prediction that anxiety, arising from anticipation of a stressful examination (state anxiety), would be associated with an inflation of subjective risk in judgments of negative events related to oneself. The subjective probability of pleasant and unpleasant events was rated on two occasions, 1 month and 1 day before the examination date. Increases in anticipatory anxiety as

  2. Test Anxiety: Age Appropriate Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, David B.; Driscoll, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The presentation covers information on test anxiety reduction strategies from over thirty years of experience with clients of a variety of ages. Dr. Ross is from the College of Lake County. Dr. Driscoll is a private practitioner and Director of the American Test Anxieties Association. The purpose is to address age appropriate test anxiety

  3. Statistics Anxiety and Instructor Immediacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Amanda S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between instructor immediacy and statistics anxiety. It was predicted that students receiving immediacy would report lower levels of statistics anxiety. Using a pretest-posttest-control group design, immediacy was measured using the Instructor Immediacy scale. Statistics anxiety was…

  4. Guides & Reports for Questionnaire Design

    Cancer.gov

    Applied Research Program (ARP) staff use a variety of methods to develop and test questionnaires, including established Questionnaire Design Principles, empirical methods such as Cognitive Testing and psychometric methods such as Item Response Theory Modeling.

  5. Diet History Questionnaire: International Applications

    Cancer.gov

    ARP staff adapted the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) for use by Canadian populations in collaboration with the Alberta Cancer Board. This questionnaire takes into account the different food fortification polices of the US and Canada.

  6. Threat perception abnormalities in children: the role of anxiety disorders symptoms, chronic anxiety, and state anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Muris; Ron Rapee; Cor Meesters; Erik Schouten; Marijn Geers

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the relative contribution of general (trait) anxiety and state anxiety to threat perception abnormalities in nonreferred children aged 8–13 years (N=299). Children were first asked to complete self-report measures of anxiety disorders symptoms and chronic anxiety. Next, they were individually interviewed using an ambiguous story paradigm from which a number of threat perception indexes were derived. Just

  7. Diamond Anxiety Bull 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    learning. It is not known whether inducing anxiety at other behavioral time points will also influence the relative use of multiple memory systems. In experiment 1, male Long-Evans rats were trained to swim from the same start point to an escape platform...

  8. Computer Anxiety and Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgarte, Roger

    While the computer is commonly viewed as a tool for simplifying and enriching lives, many individuals react to this technology with feelings of anxiety, paranoia, and alienation. These reactions may have potentially serious career and educational consequences. Fear of computers reflects a generalized fear of current technology and is most…

  9. Mobile Computer Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Patricia Brisotti

    2012-01-01

    As the basis of a society undergoes a fundamental change, such as progression from the industrial age to the knowledge/information age, the massive change affects every aspect of life. Change causes stress in individuals that often manifest itself as anxiety. Using an economic model of the endogenous growth, which includes technology as input,…

  10. Implicit associations and social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Westberg, Peter; Lundh, Lars-Gunnar; Jönsson, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether an Implicit Association Test (IAT) with self- and social anxiety-words is sensitive to differences in trait social anxiety, and to an experimental induction of social anxiety. This was performed in the context of a partial replication of a previous study, in which Mauss et al. (2004) compared high and low trait socially anxious individuals before and after a social anxiety induction (an impromptu speech). Mauss et al.'s findings were replicated; that is, (i) the social anxiety induction produced increases in self-rated anxiety, self-rated physiological responses, and actual physiological arousal; and (ii) higher trait social anxiety was associated with stronger self-rated anxiety and stronger self-rated physiological responses, but not with stronger actual physiological responses. In addition, the results showed higher IAT social anxiety scores, both (i) as a result of the social anxiety induction, and (ii) as a function of self-reported trait social anxiety. It is suggested that the IAT may be a useful method for the experimental study of automatic evaluational thought patterns. PMID:17364651

  11. Anxiety disorders in late life.

    PubMed Central

    Flint, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and treatment of anxiety disorders in late life. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Epidemiologic and comorbidity data are derived from well designed random-sample community surveys. There are virtually no controlled data specific to treatment of anxiety in the elderly. Guidelines for treating anxiety disorders in late life, therefore, must be extrapolated from results of randomized controlled trials conducted in younger patients. MAIN MESSAGE: Generalized anxiety disorder and agoraphobia account for most cases of anxiety disorder in late life. Late-onset generalized anxiety is usually associated with depressive illness and, in this situation, the primary pharmacologic treatment is antidepressant medication. Most elderly people with agoraphobia do not give a history of panic attacks; exposure therapy is the preferred treatment for agoraphobia without panic. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians need to make more use of antidepressant medication and behavioural therapy and less use of benzodiazepines in treating anxiety disorders in late life. PMID:10587775

  12. Self-Objectification and Exercise Behaviors: The Mediating Role of Social Physique Anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lise Melbye

    2005-01-01

    Self-objectification and social physique anxiety (SPA) were investigated in relation to exercise behaviors. A theoretical model was developed that viewed SPA as a mediating variable between self-objectification and protective\\/ permissive exercise behaviors. Two hundred and ninety nine women within the age range of 18-74 participated in this study. They completed the Self-Objectification Questionnaire (SOQ), the Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS),

  13. Foreign Language Learning Anxiety in Japanese EFL University Classes: Physical, Emotional, Expressive, and Verbal Reactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melvin Andrade; Kenneth Williams

    This study presents an overview of research devoted to foreign language learning anxiety and then examines in detail the reactions reported by Japanese university students to an anxiety-provoking situations in English-as-a-foreign language (EFL) classes. Questionnaire data was obtained from 243 Japanese learners in conversational English classes at 31 four-year universities in Japan. The following research questions are addressed: (1) What

  14. Effect of negative air ions on computer operation, anxiety and salivary chromogranin Alike immunoreactivity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hideo Nakane; Osamu Asami; Yukio Yamada; Hideki Ohira

    2002-01-01

    The effects of negative air ions on computer operation were examined using a biochemical index of the activity of the sympathetic\\/adrenomedullary system (i.e. salivary chromogranin A-like immunoreactivity (CgA-like IR)) and a self-report questionnaire (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Anxiety State—STAI-S). Twelve female students carried out a word processing task for 40 min. The salivary CgA-like IR increased more than three times on

  15. Shorter communication Thought-action fusion and anxiety disorders symptoms in normal adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Muris; Cor Meesters; Eric Rassin; Harald Merckelbach; Jerehm Campbell

    The present study examined thought-action fusion (TAF) in a large sample of normal adolescents (n=427). Participants completed the Thought-Action Fusion Questionnaire for Adolescents (TAFQ-A) and scales measuring trait anxiety, symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder, other anxiety disorders, and depression. Results showed that the TAFQ-A is a reliable instrument assessing two dimensions of TAF, viz. Morality (i.e., the belief that unacceptable thoughts

  16. Thought–action fusion and anxiety disorders symptoms in normal adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Muris; Cor Meesters; Eric Rassin; Harald Merckelbach; Jerehm Campbell

    2001-01-01

    The present study examined thought–action fusion (TAF) in a large sample of normal adolescents (n=427). Participants completed the Thought–Action Fusion Questionnaire for Adolescents (TAFQ–A) and scales measuring trait anxiety, symptoms of obsessive–compulsive disorder, other anxiety disorders, and depression. Results showed that the TAFQ–A is a reliable instrument assessing two dimensions of TAF, viz. Morality (i.e., the belief that unacceptable thoughts

  17. A Multitrait-Multimethod Analysis of the Construct Validity of Child Anxiety Disorders in a Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langer, David A.; Wood, Jeffrey J.; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Piacentini, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines the construct validity of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SoP), panic disorder (PD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in a clinical sample of children. Participants were 174 children, 6 to 17 years old (94 boys) who had undergone a diagnostic evaluation at a university hospital based clinic.…

  18. A multidisciplinary program of preparation for childbirth and motherhood: maternal anxiety and perinatal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To study maternal anxiety and perinatal outcomes in pregnant women submitted to a Multidisciplinary Program for Childbirth and Motherhood Preparation (MPCM). Methods This is a not randomized controlled trial on 67 nulliparous pregnant women divided into two groups according to participation (MPCM Group; n = 38) or not (Control Group; n = 29) in MPCM. The program consisted of 10 meetings (between the 18th and the 38th gestational week) during which educational, physiotherapeutic and interaction activities were developed. Anxiety was quantified at the beginning and at the end of the gestational period by the Trace-State Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Results Initial maternal anxiety was equivalent between the groups. At the end of the gestational period, it was observed that anxiety levels increased in the Control Group and were maintained in the MPCM Group. A higher occurrence of vaginal deliveries (83.8%) and hospital discharge of three-day-older newborns (81.6%) as a result of MPCM was also significant. Levels of state-anxiety at the end of pregnancy showed a negative correlation with vaginal delivery, gestational age, birth weight and Apgar index at the first minute and positive correlation with the hospital period remaining of the newborns. Conclusion In the study conditions, MPCM was associated with lower levels of maternal anxiety, a larger number of vaginal deliveries and shorter hospitalization time of newborns. It was not related to adverse perinatal outcomes. PMID:21034460

  19. Impact of a mindfulness stress management program on stress, anxiety, depression and quality of life in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Stefanaki, Charikleia; Bacopoulou, Flora; Livadas, Sarantis; Kandaraki, Anna; Karachalios, Athanasios; Chrousos, George P; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder with a significant psychological burden throughout the life course of affected women. Thus, use of mindful awareness may be beneficial as an adjunct to conventional medical management of women with PCOS. A randomized, controlled trial was conducted at the Evgenideion Hospital of the Athens University Medical School to explore the impact of an 8-week mindfulness stress management program on measures of depression, anxiety and stress as well as on the quality of life in reproductive age women with PCOS. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee. Twenty-three and 15 women with PCOS were randomly allocated to the intervention or control group, respectively. All participants were administered DASS21, PSS-14, PCOSQ, Daily Life and General Life Satisfaction Questionnaires and provided three-timed daily samples of salivary cortisol, before and after the intervention. Intervention group participants were provided with the Credibility/Expectancy Questionnaire at the day of enrolment, to check for possible placebo effect on the outcome. Post-intervention, between-group results revealed statistically significant reductions in stress, depressive and anxiety symptoms, as well as in salivary cortisol concentrations, along with an increase in Life Satisfaction and Quality of Life scores in the intervention group only. There was no significant "placebo" effect on the outcome measures. Mindfulness techniques seem promising in ameliorating stress, anxiety, depression and the quality of life in women with PCOS and could be used as an adjunct method to the conventional management of these women. PMID:25287137

  20. Factorial Invariance of the Questionnaire about Interpersonal Difficulties for Adolescents across Spanish and Chinese Adolescent Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingles, Candido J.; Marzo, Juan C.; Hidalgo, Maria D.; Zhou, Xinyue; Garcia-Fernandez, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    The Questionnaire about Interpersonal Difficulties for Adolescents (QIDA) is a self-report instrument designed to measure adolescents' perceived interpersonal anxiety levels in a wide range of relationships with people of different ages, genders, levels of authority, and levels of intimacy and in several contexts: family, school, friends, opposite…

  1. Using a Speech Apprehension Questionnaire as a Tool to Reduce Students' Fear of Public Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ablamowicz, Halina

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an activity that makes use of a questionnaire similar to a Personal Report of Communication Apprehension (PRCA) which elicit students' responses about their previous speaking experiences, their own definitions of anxiety and its causes, and their plans for future careers. This activity is aimed at helping students overcome…

  2. How Hospitals Choose a Quality Management System: Relevant Criteria in Large Spanish Hospitals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marta Sangüesa; Ricardo Mateo; Laura Ilzarbe

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the selection criteria used by hospital managers when choosing a quality management system (QMS): ISO 9001, Joint Commission (JC), EFQM, or a combination of them. Furthermore, this study provides a view of how extensive is the use of QMS in the main Spanish hospitals. Between December 2004 and March 2005, a questionnaire was sent to Spanish hospitals

  3. Predicting precompetitive state anxiety: using the 2 x 2 achievement goal framework.

    PubMed

    Li, Chiung-Huang

    2013-10-01

    The goal was to examine the predictiveness of achievement goals for self-confidence, cognitive anxiety, and somatic anxiety using a prospective design. 160 high school athletes completed the 2 x 2 Achievement Goals Questionnaire for Sport after daily practice and the Revised Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 before an official competition. Using hierarchical regression analyses, mastery-approach goals were found as positive predictors of self-confidence and negative predictors of cognitive and somatic anxiety. In contrast, performance- and mastery-avoidance goals positively predicted cognitive and somatic anxiety. Also, performance-avoidance goals negatively predicted self-confidence. Generally, athletes who pursued task mastery and improvement of competence were less physically and cognitively anxious and more self-confident. However, athletes felt tense, worried, and had lower confidence when they endorsed avoidance forms of achievement goals. PMID:24611239

  4. Internal consistency of the Sport Competition Anxiety Test.

    PubMed

    Brand, H J; Hanekom, J D; Scheepers, D

    1988-10-01

    The Sport Competition Anxiety Test was administered to 77 university athletes, 55 men and 22 women whose ages ranged from 18 to 27 yr., to ascertain internal consistency of responses to the questionnaire. Both methods used (Guttman and Kuder-Richardson) indicated that the test satisfied the basic requirements with regard to interitem consistency normally imposed for self-report inventories: .85 and .82, respectively. PMID:3217190

  5. CALM Pregnancy: results of a pilot study of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for perinatal anxiety.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Janice H; Guarino, Anthony; Chenausky, Kerry; Klein, Lauri; Prager, Joanna; Petersen, Rebecca; Forget, Avery; Freeman, Marlene

    2014-10-01

    Many women experience anxiety during pregnancy with potential negative effects on maternal, birth, and child outcomes. Because of potential risks of fetal exposure to psychotropic medications, efficacious non-pharmacologic approaches are urgently needed. However, no published studies of psychotherapeutic treatments for anxiety in pregnancy exist. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) may substantially reduce anxiety and co-morbid symptoms in people with anxiety disorders. Coping with Anxiety through Living Mindfully (CALM) Pregnancy is an adaptation of MBCT designed to address anxiety in pregnant women. This study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and clinical outcomes of the CALM Pregnancy intervention in pregnant women anxiety. Twenty-four pregnant women with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) or prominent symptoms of generalized anxiety participated in an open treatment trial of the CALM Pregnancy group intervention. Psychiatric diagnoses were determined by structured clinical interview, and self-report measures of anxiety, worry, depression, self-compassion, and mindfulness were completed at baseline and post-intervention. Qualitative feedback was elicited via questionnaire. Twenty-three participants completed the intervention with high attendance and good compliance with home practice. Completers showed statistically and clinically significant improvements in anxiety, worry, and depression, and significant increases in self-compassion and mindfulness. Of the 17 participants who met GAD criteria at baseline, only one continued to meet criteria post-intervention. Participants regarded their experience in the intervention to be overwhelmingly positive. MBCT in the form of the CALM Pregnancy intervention holds potential to provide effective, non-pharmacological treatment for pregnant women with anxiety. These promising findings warrant further testing of the intervention with a randomized controlled trial. PMID:24449191

  6. Quality of life, depression, and anxiety among hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Gülseren; Gümüs, Aysun Babacan; Orgun, Fatma

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive cross-sectional study was designed to determine the depression and anxiety levels, and their effects, on quality of life of patients with chronic Hepatitis B. Chronic infection with Hepatitis B virus has a profound effect on health-related quality of life. Medications, including interferon, that are commonly used to treat chronic viral Hepatitis B may cause depression as an adverse effect. However, little is known about the impact of depression and anxiety on quality of life in patients with Hepatitis B. A total of 96 patients aged between 15 and 61 years were included in the study. Slightly more than half of them (52%) were female. Three scales-the Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Scale, and Short Form of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF)-were used in the study. The scores obtained from the BDS in 91.7% of the patients were above the cutoff value of 17. Moreover, 80 patients received interferon. There was a negative correlation between the physical, environmental, and cultural areas on the Beck Anxiety Scale and WHOQOL-BREF (Turkish) (p< .05). A high level of depressive symptoms was established in this study, and the physical, environmental, and cultural aspects of quality of life were determined to increase as the anxiety level increased. PMID:24084133

  7. Glutamate and anxiety disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan M. Amiel; Sanjay J. Mathew

    2007-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent psychiatric disorders, but they represent a particular challenge for treatment.\\u000a The standard first-line treatments, including antidepressants, benzodiazepines, and buspirone, result in significant response\\u000a rates for a majority of patients; however, unfavorable side effect profiles or risk for dependency for particular agents might\\u000a limit their use by anxious patients, who often have low thresholds

  8. The Italian MacNew heart disease health-related quality of life questionnaire: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Fattirolli, Francesco; Marchionni, Niccolò; Höfer, Stefan; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Angelino, Elisabetta; Fioretti, Paolo; Miani, Daniela; Oldridge, Neil

    2015-04-01

    Patient-centered treatment outcomes such as health-related quality of life are recommended in clinical care and research studies. Health-related quality of life questionnaires need to be validated in the language of the target population. The reliability and validity of the Italian version of the MacNew Questionnaire was determined in patients with angina, myocardial infarction, or ischemic heart failure. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected on 298 patients [angina, n = 88; MI, n = 106; heart failure, n = 104; mean age, 64.8 (±10.6) years] at three centers in Italy. MacNew mean scores were higher (p < 0.001) in patients with myocardial infarction than in patients with either angina or heart failure with no floor and minimal ceiling effects. The three-factor structure of the original MacNew form was largely confirmed explaining 54.6% of the total variance. The Italian MacNew version demonstrates high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's ? ? 0.86), confirms the convergent validity hypotheses with strong correlations on six of eight comparisons (r ? 0.86), partially confirms discriminative validity with the SF-36 health transition item, and fully confirms discriminative validity with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The Italian version of the MacNew Questionnaire demonstrates satisfactory psychometric properties, and is reliable and valid in Italian-speaking patients with angina, MI, or heart failure. Responsiveness could not be tested due to the cross-sectional design of the parent study, and needs to be investigated in an intervention study. PMID:25666514

  9. Anxiety and EFL: does multilingualism matter?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amy S. Thompson; Junkyu Lee

    2012-01-01

    The current study is motivated by the gap in the current literature about foreign language classroom anxiety, namely the underlying construct of FL anxiety with regard to the understudied relationship between anxiety, proficiency, and multilingualism. The evidence for the effect of language anxiety on achievement is well-documented. More recently, there has been evidence that anxiety is inversely proportional to the

  10. When social anxiety co-occurs with substance use: does an impulsive social anxiety subtype explain this unexpected relationship?

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Julia; Staiger, Petra Karin; Williams, James Stephen; Richardson, Ben; Kambouropoulos, Nicolas

    2014-12-30

    Although most conceptualizations of social anxiety emphasise that socially anxious individuals are overtly shy, and utilise avoidant behavioural strategies (e.g., risk-aversion, passivity, and submissiveness), there is tentative support for the existence of an approach-motivated subtype, characterised by risk taking and a greater propensity for substance misuse. It is likely that this subtype may help explain the reported co-occurrence of substance misuse and social anxiety. The current study sought to test via latent class analysis whether an approach-motivated social anxiety subtype could be identified within a community sample. A self-report questionnaire was completed by 351 participants (age: 18-74 years). Two distinct social anxiety subgroups were identified: one characterised by prototypical SAD symptomatology (i.e., behavioural inhibition and risk-avoidance), the second by elevated levels of rash impulsiveness, reward sensitivity, risk-taking and co-occurring substance use problems. The current findings provides support for the existence of a distinct approach-motivated social anxiety subtype and indicates that impulsivity may be critical to understanding the comorbid substance use symptomatology of these individuals. PMID:25261335

  11. Symptoms of depression and anxiety before and after myocardial infarction: The HUNT 2 and HUNT 3 study.

    PubMed

    Langvik, Eva; Hjemdal, Odin

    2015-07-01

    The long-term effect of having a myocardial infarction (MI) and to what extent post-MI anxiety and depression can be attributed to pre-MI anxiety and depression are not known. Anxiety as an independent risk factor for the onset of MI is not clear and studies treating anxiety and depression as continuous variables are lacking. Baseline data in this prospective study were obtained from the Health Study of Nord-Trøndelag County (HUNT 2). Anxiety and depression were measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) at HUNT 2. Age, gender, waist circumference, hypertension, total cholesterol, diabetes, and years of daily smoking were included as control variables. In the sample of 28,859 participants, 770 MI were reported in the follow-up study 5-8 years later (HUNT 3). The level of depressive symptoms at HUNT 2 was a significant and independent predictor of MI at HUNT 3, while symptoms of anxiety were not. Level of anxiety and depression at HUNT 3 was best predicted by baseline anxiety and depression. Having an MI had only a marginal effect on the levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms at HUNT 3. In the MI group, time since MI was not a significant predictor of anxiety and depression. PMID:25495669

  12. Anxiety and Memory Test Performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Murry G. Mutchnick; J. Michael Williams

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship of extra-test anxiety to memory test performance among patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (N = 47) and back surgery (N = 24). These patients were chosen because they are often anxious before surgery and thus serve as a model of extra-test anxiety. This examination is important in neuropsychology because anxiety may serve as an extraneous factor compromising the validity

  13. Parent Training for Childhood Anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam B. Lewin

    \\u000a Few clinicians would suggest that the parent’s role during the treatment of their child’s anxiety should be limited to keeping\\u000a a chair warm in the therapist’s waiting room. In fact, etiological models suggest that parenting behaviors impact child anxiety\\u000a (Hudson & Rapee, 2001). However, the optimal role of parents in the treatment of children with anxiety disorders is unclear.\\u000a What

  14. Anxiety disorders in neurologic illness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert D. Davies; Sherri L. Gabbert; Paula D. Riggs

    2001-01-01

    Opinion statement  \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a Anxiety disorders frequently occur in individuals with neurologic illness. Anxiety may be a symptom of or a reaction to the\\u000a neurologic disorder, a medication side effect, or a comorbid condition. The most common anxiety disorders seen in neurologic\\u000a patients are panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Very often,\\u000a these conditions go unrecognized

  15. Child Anxiety Sensitivity and Family Environment as Mediators of the Relationship between Parent Psychopathology, Parent Anxiety Sensitivity, and Child Anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kelly L. Drake; Christopher A. Kearney

    2008-01-01

    This study examined child anxiety sensitivity and family environment as mediators of the relationship between (1) parent psychopathology\\u000a and anxiety sensitivity and (2) child anxiety in a community sample of 157 youths aged 7–18 years. Parents completed measures\\u000a of anxiety sensitivity, psychopathology, and family environment. Youths completed measures of anxiety sensitivity and anxiety.\\u000a One structural equation model was tested with child

  16. Social Anxiety with Peers in 9- to 14-year-olds. Developmental Process and Relations with Self-Consciousness and Perceived Peer Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallet, Pascal; Rodriguez-Tome, Gladis

    1999-01-01

    Hypothesizes that self-consciousness and perceived peer acceptance correlates with social anxiety. Focuses on 508 French fourth- to ninth-grade students who completed questionnaires that assessed their perceptions of social anxiety with peers, self-consciousness, and perceived peer acceptance. Discusses the results. (CMK)

  17. Effect of Sleep Deprivation on Anxiety and Perceived Fatigue During a One-Man Atlantic Ocean Crossing on a Sport Catamaran

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alain Groslambert; Robin B. Candau; Gregoire P. Millet

    2008-01-01

    This study is designed to identify the effects of sleep deprivation on state anxiety and perceived fatigue during a one-man Atlantic crossing on a sport catamaran. State anxiety and perceived fatigue were self-reported by the sailor on a daily basis by using a specific questionnaire and were linked by mathematical transfer functions to the sleep deprivation. The results show that

  18. Penetration of Medication Safety Technology in Community Hospitals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Glen T. Schumock; Vinit P. Nair; Jamie M. Finley; Richard K. Lewis

    2003-01-01

    Results of a survey of medication safety technology in community hospitals are presented. A written questionnaire was mailed to pharmacy directors at 88 hospitals located in 21 states. Items in the questionnaire addressed current and planned use of technology intended to improve medication safety. Fifty-six usable responses were received for a response rate of 63.6%. Medication safety was considered one

  19. JOB EVALUATION QUESTIONNAIRE ANSWER SHEET

    E-print Network

    Amin, S. Massoud

    JOB EVALUATION QUESTIONNAIRE ANSWER SHEET DO NOT WRITE IN THIS SPACE N.C. Date Received Reclass New Starting Date in Class Yes No NA (NA if Temporary Job) Notice # Effective Date If Reclassified IS TO BE USED WITH THE JOB EVALUATION QUESTIONNAIRE (BA 802) ONLY FOR POSITIONS COVERED BY CIVIL SERVICE

  20. The Relationship between Coaches’ and Athletes’ Competitive Anxiety,and their Performance

    PubMed Central

    Mottaghi, Mahmoodreza; Atarodi, Alireza; Rohani, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to survey the relationship between coaches’ and athletes’ competitive anxiety, and their performance. Methods: This is a descriptive correlational study performed using a demographic questionnaire, an athletic performance checklist, and sport competition anxiety test designed by Martens consisting of 15 questions. The study population consisted of 540 players and 60 coaches from 60 futsal teams (5 main players, 4 reserves, and 1 coach for each team). All of the players and the coaches were surveyed in a census method and no sampling was done. The data were analyzed by SPSS software, using chi-square, and Pearson correlation coefficient test. Results: The results showed a positive significant relationship between the coaches’ anxiety level and sport competition anxiety level in the athletes (p = 0.019, r = 0.56). It also showed that there was a negative significant relationship between the coaches’ anxiety level and performance level of the athletes (p = 0.012, r = -0.80). A negative significant relationship was also demonstrated between the athletes’ competitive anxiety level, and their athletic experiences (p < 0.001, r = -0.45) and age (p = 0.001, r = -0.37). Conclusions: Coaches and officials should consider sport competition anxiety among athletes before and during competitions. Formal and planned competitions, training sessions, and preparation practices can be a major factor assisting to decrease athletes' anxiety. Declaration of interest: None. PMID:24644512

  1. Health-related internet habits and health anxiety in university students.

    PubMed

    Singh, Karmpaul; Brown, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Health-related Internet use has grown rapidly, yet little research has considered how health anxious individuals use the Internet for this purpose. Our aim was to examine the relationships between health anxiety and the extent of, reasons for, and consequences of health-related Internet usage in university students (n = 255). Responses on a purpose-made Internet use questionnaire were correlated with health anxiety scores; multiple regression analyses controlling for depression and anxiety were also conducted. Health anxiety positively correlated with (all ps < .01): frequency of health-related searching (r(s) = .163), proportion of health-related information sought (r(s) = .200), time spent online for health purposes (r(s) = .166), and number of searches for both illness (r(s) = .453) and wellness (r(s) = .208) information. Health anxiety further positively correlated with advantages perceived in health-related Internet use (r(s) = .183), heightened tension (r(s) = .364) and relief (r(s) = .174) post-search, and perceived doctor disadvantages (r(s) = .306), yet a greater likelihood to visit a doctor post-search (r(s) = .217). Health anxiety also correlated with six measures of possible addiction to using the Internet for health purposes (r(s) range = .171 to .366, all ps < .01). Some (including several potentially dysfunctional) aspects of health-related Internet use correlate with health anxiety. Research evaluating the possible role of Internet use in the development and maintenance of health anxiety is warranted. PMID:24467278

  2. Different measures of impulsivity in patients with anxiety disorders: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Del Carlo, Alessandra; Benvenuti, Marzia; Fornaro, Michele; Toni, Cristina; Rizzato, Salvatore; Swann, Alan C; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Perugi, Giulio

    2012-05-30

    The relationship between anxiety and impulsivity is controversial and not well explored. The present investigation aims to compare impulsivity, measured by different rating tools, in patients with anxiety disorders vs. healthy controls. Forty-seven subjects with different anxiety disorders and 45 matched controls underwent diagnostic and symptomatological evaluations by the Mini Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I) Plus 5.0, Bech-Raphaelsen Depression and Mania Scale (BRDMS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Hypomania Check List (HCL-32) and the Clinical Global Impression (CGI); temperamental evaluations by the Questionnaire for the Affective and Anxious Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego-Modified (TEMPS-M), the Separation Anxiety Sensitivity Index (SASI), the Interpersonal Sensitivity Symptoms Inventory (ISSI); and psychometric and a neurocognitive evaluations of impulsivity using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and the Immediate and Delayed Memory Task (IMT-DMT). Subjects with anxiety disorders were more impulsive than the controls in all the explored measures, with higher scores in symptomatological and, temperamental scales. Patients with anxiety disorders but without a lifetime history of comorbid major mood episodes had greater trait and state impulsivity than controls. Further investigations are needed to assess the extent to which impulsivity might or might not be directly related to the anxiety disorder. PMID:22357357

  3. Threat perception bias and anxiety among Chinese school children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weili; Daleiden, Eric; Lu, Shou-En

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between threat perception bias and anxiety among children and adolescents in China. A sample of 1,004 elementary, middle and high school students aged 9 to 19 years listened to stories containing themes of generalized anxiety, social anxiety and separation anxiety in either an ambiguous or non-ambiguous context. The story content included topics such as upset stomach, teacher-student interaction, and parents who are late to return home. Multiple threat perception indices were derived from children's responses. Children's level of anxiety was assessed by means of self-report questionnaires and parental reports. Higher levels of anxiety were related to higher frequencies of threat perception and interpretation, lower thresholds to detect threat and more negative feelings and cognitions. Age and gender were also related to some indices of threat perception bias. Threat perception bias was related to anxious symptomatology in general and was not content specific to particular anxiety disorders. The findings were consistent with studies conducted in Western culture and suggest that cognitive processing theories of childhood anxiety may generalize beyond Western society. PMID:18088215

  4. Cultural Aspects in Social Anxiety and Social Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Stefan G.; Asnaani, Anu; Hinton, Devon E.

    2010-01-01

    To examine cultural aspects in social anxiety and social anxiety disorder (SAD), we reviewed the literature on the prevalence rates, expressions, and treatments of social anxiety/SAD as they relate to culture, race, and ethnicity. We further reviewed factors that contribute to the differences in social anxiety/SAD between different cultures, including individualism/collectivism, perception of social norms, self-construal, gender roles, and gender role identification. Our review suggests that the prevalence and expression of social anxiety/SAD depends on the particular culture. Asian cultures typically show the lowest rates, whereas Russian and US samples show the highest rates, of SAD. Taijin kyofusho is discussed as a possible culture-specific expression of social anxiety, although the empirical evidence concerning the validity of this syndrome has been mixed. It is concluded that the individual's social concerns need to be examined in the context of the person's cultural, racial, and ethnic background in order to adequately assess the degree and expression of social anxiety and social anxiety disorder. This has direct relevance for the upcoming DSM-V. PMID:21132847

  5. Anxiety and depression affects life and sleep quality in adults with beta-thalassemia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bashir Hajibeigi; Azita Azarkeyvan; Seyed Moayed Alavian; Maryam Moghani Lankarani; Shervin Assari

    2009-01-01

    Purpose  The aim of this study was to investigate the association of anxiety and depression symptoms with health related quality of\\u000a life (HRQoL) and sleep quality in patients with beta-thalassemia.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  In a cross-sectional study between 2006 and 2007, 292 thalassemic patients were assessed for symptoms of anxiety and depression\\u000a (Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale; HADS), HRQoL (Short Form-36, SF-36) and quality of

  6. [Anxiety in patients undergoing fast-track knee arthroplasty in the light of recent literature].

    PubMed

    Zi?tek, Pawe?; Zi?tek, Joanna; Szczypiór, Karina

    2014-01-01

    The rapid progress in knee implants technology and operational techniques go together with more and more modem medical programs, designed to optimize the patients' care and shorten their stay in hospital. However, this does not guarantee any elimination ofperioperative stress in patients. Anxiety is a negative emotional state arising from stressful circumstances accompanied by activation of the autonomous nervous system. Anxiety causes negative physiological changes, including wound healing, resistance to anesthetic induction, it is associated with an increased perioperative pain and prolong recovery period. The purpose of this work is to present the current state of knowledge on the preoperative anxiety and discuss its impact on pain and other parameters in patients undergoing fast-track arthroplasty of big joints. The work also shows selected issues of anxiety pathomechanism, and actual methods reducing preoperative anxiety in hospitalized patients. The common prevalence of anxiety in patients undergoing surgery induces the attempt to routinely identify patients with higher anxiety, which may be a predictive factor of worse results after TKA. Undertaking widely understood psychological support in these patients before and after the operation could be a favorable element, which would influence thefinal result of the treatment of patients after big joints arthroplasties. PMID:25639020

  7. Predictors of anxiety and depression in Egyptian thalassemic patients: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Yahia, Sohier; El-Hadidy, Mohamed Adel; El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; Anwar, Rokiah; Darwish, Ahmad; Mansour, A K

    2013-05-01

    Thalassemic patients are vulnerable to emotional and behavioral problems. Each patient age group exhibits problems unique to that stage of development, and although up to 80 % of thalassemic patients are likely to have psychological disorders, e.g., anxiety and depression, predictors of these disorders remain poorly understood. The present study was designed to assess the prevalence of anxiety and depression in a sample of Egyptian thalassemic patients and to identify predictors of these psychiatric disorders. A case-control study was conducted in 218 thalassemic patients, with 244 healthy subjects as a control. All patients and control subjects were subjected to thorough evaluation of medical history and clinical examination, and examined by a psychiatrist using the clinician version of the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV (SCID-CV), hospital anxiety and depression scale and Coopersmith self-esteem inventory. Abnormal and borderline anxieties were reported by 36.7 and 20.6 % of thalassemic patients, respectively, while abnormal and borderline depressions were reported by 32.1 and 16.1 % of patients, respectively. Hospitalization, low self-esteem, diabetes mellitus and heart failure were independent predictors of anxiety. The independent predictors of depression were heart failure, hospitalization, diabetes mellitus, short stature and delayed puberty. Thalassemic patients were more vulnerable to anxiety and depression, indicating that screening and management for such psychiatric disorders should be considered in treating all such patients. PMID:23595950

  8. Measuring Financial Anxiety

    E-print Network

    Burchell, Brendan J.; Shapiro, Gilla K.

    2012-01-01

    of the emotional Stroop effect by increased anxiety in patients with social phobia. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 34, 945–948. Baker, P. M., & Hagedorn, R. B. (2008). Attitudes to money in a random sample of adults: Factor anal- ysis of the MAS and MBBS scales... ). Attentional bias to incentive stimuli in frequent ketamine users. Psychological Medicine, 38, 1331–1340. National Council on Economic Education (NCEE). 2005. What American teens and adults know about economics. Retrieved from http://207.124.141.218/ What...

  9. Attachment insecurities and women's sexual function and satisfaction: the mediating roles of sexual self-esteem, sexual anxiety, and sexual assertiveness.

    PubMed

    Brassard, Audrey; Dupuy, Emmanuelle; Bergeron, Sophie; Shaver, Phillip R

    2015-01-01

    We examined the potential role of three mediators--sexual self-esteem, sexual anxiety, and sexual assertiveness--of the association between romantic attachment insecurities (anxiety and avoidance) and two aspects of women's sexual functioning: sexual function and sexual satisfaction. A sample of 556 women aged 18 to 30 agreed to complete an online series of validated questionnaires assessing attachment insecurities and several aspects of sexual functioning. Lower sexual self-esteem and higher sexual anxiety mediated the associations between attachment anxiety and lower sexual function and satisfaction. Lower sexual self-esteem and higher sexual anxiety also partially mediated the links between attachment-related avoidance and the two sexual functioning variables. Sexual assertiveness, however, did not mediate these associations. A significant interaction between attachment anxiety and avoidance was also found to predict sexual satisfaction, with women high in avoidance and low in anxiety being the least satisfied. Results are discussed in terms of theoretical and clinical implications. PMID:24350570

  10. Pain-related anxiety and anxiety sensitivity across anxiety and depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Carleton, R Nicholas; Abrams, Murray P; Asmundson, Gordon J G; Antony, Martin M; McCabe, Randi E

    2009-08-01

    Fear-anxiety-avoidance models posit pain-related anxiety and anxiety sensitivity as important contributing variables in the development and maintenance of chronic musculoskeletal pain [Asmundson, G. J. G, Vlaeyen, J. W. S., & Crombez, G. (Eds.). (2004). Understanding and treating fear of pain. New York: Oxford University Press]. Emerging evidence also suggests that pain-related anxiety may be a diathesis for many other emotional disorders [Asmundson, G. J. G., & Carleton, R. N. (2005). Fear of pain is elevated in adults with co-occurring trauma-related stress and social anxiety symptoms. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 34, 248-255; Asmundson, G. J. G., & Carleton, R. N. (2008). Fear of pain. In: M. M. Antony & M. B. Stein (Eds.), Handbook of anxiety and the anxiety disorders (pp. 551-561). New York: Oxford University Press] and appears to share several elements in common with other fears (e.g., anxiety sensitivity, illness/injury sensitivity, fear of negative evaluation) as described by Reiss [Reiss, S. (1991). Expectancy model of fear, anxiety, and panic. Clinical Psychology Review, 11, 141-153] and Taylor [Taylor, S. (1993). The structure of fundamental fears. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 24, 289-299]. The purpose of the present investigation was to assess self-reported levels of pain-related anxiety [Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-Short Form; PASS-20; McCracken, L. M., & Dhingra, L. (2002). A short version of the Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale (PASS-20): preliminary development and validity. Pain Research and Management, 7, 45-50] across several anxiety and depressive disorders and to compare those levels to non-clinical and chronic pain samples. Participants consisted of a clinical sample (n=418; 63% women) with principal diagnoses of a depressive disorder (DD; n=22), panic disorder (PD; n=114), social anxiety disorder (SAD; n=136), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; n=86), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n=46), or specific phobia (n=14). Secondary group comparisons were made with a community sample as well as with published data from a treatment-seeking chronic pain sample [McCracken, L. M., & Dhingra, L. (2002). A short version of the Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale (PASS-20): preliminary development and validity. Pain Research and Management, 7, 45-50]. Results suggest that pain-related anxiety is generally comparable across anxiety and depressive disorders; however, pain-related anxiety was typically higher (p<.01) in individuals with anxiety and depressive disorders relative to a community sample, but comparable to or lower than a chronic pain sample. Results imply that pain-related anxiety may indeed be a construct independent of other fundamental fears, warranting subsequent hierarchical investigations and consideration for inclusion in treatments of anxiety disorders. Additional implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:19362446

  11. Teacher Anxiety and Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbo, Joseph J.

    1983-01-01

    This review focuses on the influence of teacher anxiety on student achievement and suggests directions for further inquiry. Research has determined no mutually acceptable definition of teacher anxiety, therefore a variety of its aspects are examined, including teacher effectiveness and influence upon classroom climate.

  12. Academic Success Centre Presentation Anxiety

    E-print Network

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    : New to public speaking--for someone who is new to public speaking, presenting in front of an audience--this type of anxiety is not directly connected with public speaking. In this case stress from other parts a person sometimes feels anxiety related to public speaking but not in every instance. A stress management

  13. Spiritual issues in anxiety states.

    PubMed

    Rosen, I M

    1993-03-01

    This overview points to large areas of human concern that cannot be bounded by the biomedical, behavioral, and narrowly cognitive approaches that characterize current understanding and treatment of anxiety disorders. I look at some aspects of existential, wholistic, and transpersonal psychology that I have found especially useful in enhancing therapy of the anxiety spectrum. PMID:24271217

  14. Social Phobia (SocialAnxiety

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    anxiety disorder. national institute of mental Health U.S. Department of HealtH anD HUman ServiceS national institutes of Health #12;Social Phobia (SocialAnxiety Disorder) What is social phobia? Social. People with social phobia are afraid of doing common things in front of other people. For example

  15. Interpersonal Consequences of Social Anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erin A. Heerey; Ann M. Kring

    2007-01-01

    The behavioral manifestations of social anxiety may have implications for social outcomes. Unfortunately, little is known about how anxiety shapes social interaction. The present study examined social interactions in dyads consisting of either 2 nonsocially anxious (NSA) individuals or 1 socially anxious (SA) and 1 NSA individual. Behavior, self-reported affect, and perceptions were examined. In comparison with the interactions of

  16. Irrational beliefs, anger, and anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Weare A. Zwemer; Jerry L. Deffenbacher

    1984-01-01

    Administered to 382 undergraduates measures of irrational beliefs, general anxiety, and general anger to investigate their relationship. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and 2 self-report measures of irrational beliefs and anger were used. Analyses showed that personal perfection, anxious overconcern, blame proneness, and catastrophizing were predictors of general anger. Anxious overconcern, problem avoidance, catastrophizing, and personal perfection were significant regression factors

  17. Separation anxiety, attachment and agoraphobia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pat Sable

    1994-01-01

    Within a framework of attachment, developed by John Bowlby, the anxiety disorder of agoraphobia (fear of leaving familiar surroundings, especially when alone) is conceived as a condition of anxious attachment, related to fear of separation from those with whom one has formed affectional bonds. Bowlby attributes this anxiety to earlier separation or loss experiences or threat of separation. Uncertain about

  18. The Parental Overprotection Scale: Associations with child and parental anxiety?

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Kiri; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Background Parental overprotection has commonly been implicated in the development and maintenance of childhood anxiety disorders. Overprotection has been assessed using questionnaire and observational methods interchangeably; however, the extent to which these methods access the same construct has received little attention. Edwards et al. (2008, 2010) developed a promising parent-report measure of overprotection (OP) and reported that, with parents of pre-school children, the measure correlated with observational assessments and predicted changes in child anxiety symptoms. We aimed to validate the use of the OP measure with mothers of children in middle childhood, and examine its association with child and parental anxiety. Methods Mothers of 90 children (60 clinically anxious, 30 non-anxious) aged 7–12 years completed the measure and engaged in a series of mildly stressful tasks with their child. Results The internal reliability of the measure was good and scores correlated significantly with observations of maternal overprotection in a challenging puzzle task. Contrary to expectations, OP was not significantly associated with child anxiety status or symptoms, but was significantly associated with maternal anxiety symptoms. Limitations Participants were predominantly from affluent social groups and of non-minority status. Overprotection is a broad construct, the use of specific sub-dimensions of behavioural constructs may be preferable. Conclusions The findings support the use of the OP measure to assess parental overprotection among 7–12 year-old children; however, they suggest that parental responses may be more closely related to the degree of parental rather than child anxiety. PMID:23916305

  19. Depression, Anxiety and Somatization in Women with War Missing Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Barakovi?, Devla; Avdibegovi?, Esmina; Sinanovi?, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: During the war circumstances, women and children are exposed to multiple traumatic experiences, one of which is an violent disappearance of a family member. Goal: The aim of this research was to establish the presence of symptoms of depression, anxiety and somatization in women in Bosnia and Herzegovina who have sought their war missing family members for 15 to 18 years. Subjects and Methods: The research was based on a sample of 120 women with war missing family member and 40 women without a war missing family member as a control group. For assessment of depression, anxiety and symptoms of somatization the self-rating Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), Somatic Symptoms Index (SSI) questionnaire and a general questionnaire on the sociodemographic data and data on war missing family members were used. Results: A significantly higher intensity of symptoms of depression (p<0.001), anxiety (p<0.001) and somatization (p = 0.013) was present in women with, in comparison to women without a missing family member. In comparison of the kinship with the missing family members, statistically significantly higher intensity of symptoms of depression, anxiety and somatization was in women with a missing child (p<0.001) in comparison to other missing family members. Conclusion: A prolonged period of seeking, waiting and uncertainty of what happened in the war with the missing family member presents for those women a prolonged suffering manifested through depression, anxiety and symptoms of somatization. PMID:24167436

  20. No Moderating Effect of 5-HTTLPR on Associations Between Antenatal Anxiety and Infant Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Braithwaite, Elizabeth C.; Ramchandani, Paul G.; O'Connor, Thomas G.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Glover, Vivette; Netsi, Elena; Evans, Jonathan; Meaney, Michael J.; Murphy, Susannah E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Maternal antenatal anxiety is associated with an increased risk of behavioral disturbances in offspring. Recent work has suggested that the effect of maternal antenatal anxiety on infant temperament at 6 months is moderated by the serotonin transporter polymorphism 5-HTTLPR, with carriers of the short allele more susceptible to the adverse behavioral outcomes of maternal antenatal anxiety. These findings, however, are yet to be replicated and extended beyond infancy. The aim of the current study was to assess this same potential moderator (5-HTTLPR) in a large population-based cohort study, and to determine whether or not the effects persist into childhood and early adolescence. Method Data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Children and Parents (ALSPAC) cohort (N = 3,946) were used to assess whether the 5-HTTLPR genotype moderated the association between self-reported maternal antenatal anxiety (Crown Crisp Index) in pregnancy, and child temperament at 6 months (Infant Temperament Questionnaire), and also later behavioral and emotional problems on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire from age 4 to 13 years. Results We found no evidence to suggest that the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism moderated the effects of maternal antenatal anxiety on infant temperament at 6 months or infant behavioral and emotional problems from childhood through to adolescence. Conclusion Our results, based on a large prospective community sample that assessed children from infancy to early adolescence, provide a thorough test of, but no evidence for, a genetic moderation of the effects of maternal antenatal anxiety by 5-HTTLPR. PMID:23622853

  1. A new condition-specific health-related quality of life questionnaire for the assessment of women with anal incontinence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. J. Bugg; E. S. Kiff; G. Hosker

    2001-01-01

    Objective To design and validate a condition-specific health-related quality of life questionnaire for the assessment of women with anal incontinence.Design A psychometric study by postal survey.Setting South Manchester University Hospital, UK.Sample Two hundred and twenty women with known anal incontinence.Method The questionnaire was adapted from the King's Health Questionnaire, a condition-specific health-related quality of life questionnaire for the assessment of

  2. Rural hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Andrea; Slifkin, Rebecca; Schur, Claudia; Cheung, Karen; Baernholdt, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    The 340B Drug Pricing Program has the potential to reduce outpatient pharmaceutical costs for qualifying hospitals—hut many rural hospital administrators are unaware of their organization’s eligibility. PMID:18637547

  3. A Multitrait–Multimethod Analysis of the Construct Validity of Child Anxiety Disorders in a Clinical Sample

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jeffrey J.; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Piacentini, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines the construct validity of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SoP), panic disorder (PD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in a clinical sample of children. Participants were 174 children, 6 to 17 years old (94 boys) who had undergone a diagnostic evaluation at a university hospital based clinic. Parent and child ratings of symptom severity were assessed using the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC). Diagnostician ratings were obtained from the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children and Parents (ADIS: C/P). Discriminant and convergent validity were assessed using confirmatory factor analytic techniques to test a multitrait–multimethod model. Confirmatory factor analyses supported the current classification of these child anxiety disorders. The disorders demonstrated statistical independence from each other (discriminant validity of traits), the model fit better when the anxiety syndromes were specified than when no specific syndromes were specified (convergent validity), and the methods of assessment yielded distinguishable, unique types of information about child anxiety (discriminant validity of methods). Using a multi-informant approach, these findings support the distinctions between childhood anxiety disorders as delineated in the current classification system, suggesting that disagreement between informants in psychometric studies of child anxiety measures is not due to poor construct validity of these anxiety syndromes. PMID:20443053

  4. A Comparison of Mathematics Anxiety and Statistics Anxiety in Relation to General Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baloglu, Mustafa

    Over the years, researchers in the field of psychology have been interested in the factors associated with anxiety. As a result of this interest, several theories have attempted to explain the construct and interventions developed to treat it. Even though there is no agreement on the nature of anxiety, there is a wide agreement that general…

  5. [Anxiety, anxiety disorders and sexuality. The complex relation between anxiety and sexual performance].

    PubMed

    Flichman, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety and sexuality are in if same as inexhaustible as controversial universes. The relationship between them, a pair even more difficult to cover. This paper aims to describe the complex relationships existing between the different types of anxiety and its impact on sexuality. PMID:24260754

  6. Physical Activity Questionnaire Search Results

    Cancer.gov

    The Brunel Lifestyle Physical Activity Questionnaire a4 If you add together each session of pre-planned physical activity that you engage in during a normal week, how much time would you estimate that you spend in total?

  7. Anxiety, attitude and information use behaviour of school teachers in central schools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suresh Jange; Suresh Surpur

    The research paper presents the findings of a study that explores the use of school libraries and attitude, anxiety and level of satisfaction of teachers towards using information sources and services, level of collaboration between librarians \\/ library staff and teaching activities, searching methods, difficulties faced and level of association between personal characteristics and use of library resources. A questionnaire

  8. Do Anxiety and Distress Increase During Active Surveillance for Low Risk Prostate Cancer?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roderick C. N. van den Bergh; Marie-Louise Essink-Bot; Monique J. Roobol; Fritz H. Schröder; Chris H. Bangma; Ewout W. Steyerberg

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Anxiety and distress may be present in patients with low risk prostate cancer who are on active surveillance. This may be a reason to discontinue active surveillance. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 Dutch patients with prostate cancer on active surveillance in a prospective active surveillance study received questionnaires at study inclusion and 9 months after diagnosis. We

  9. Subclinical checking compulsions are related to impaired prospective memory independently of depression, anxiety and distractibility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carrie Cuttler; Peter Graf

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we explored whether relationships between checking compulsions and prospective memory are a result of the increased levels of distractibility, depression, state and trait anxiety associated with checking compulsions. Students (N=126) completed a prospective memory task and questionnaires which assess the frequency of experiencing prospective memory failures. Checking compulsions were associated with failing the prospective memory task and

  10. Effect of Differentiated Curriculum and Instruction on Taiwanese EFL Students' Motivation, Anxiety and Interest

    Microsoft Academic Search

    An-Chih Cheng

    This study examined the effects of differentiated curriculum and instruction on the teaching of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) to university freshmen in their English reading classes in Taiwan. This quasi-experimental study investigated whether using differentiated curriculum and instruction impacted motivation, anxiety, and interest toward learning English. A pre- and post- questionnaire comparison group design was used to determine

  11. Explained and Unexplained Medical Symptoms in Generalized Anxiety and Panic Disorder: Relationship to the Somatoform Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James G. Barbee; Alexandre A. Todorov; Andrzej R. Kuczmierczyk; Donna M. Mancuso; John J. Schwab; Richard J. Maddock; Rudolf Hoehn-Saric; Lee Ann Kelley; Jonathan R. T. Davidson

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the numbers and types of symptoms in a sample of 90 patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and 77 patients with panic disorder (PD) collected from six different sites during the conduct of a multicenter clinical trial. This information was obtained utilizing the Health Questionnaire, a 47-item self-report list of medical symptoms, patterned after the Somatization Disorder

  12. Evaluation and characterization of generalized anxiety and depression in patients with primary brain tumors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Staci D. Arnold; Leslie M. Forman; Bart D. Brigidi; Karen E. Carter; Holly A. Schweitzer; Heather E. Quinn; A. Bebe Guill; James E. Herndon II; Renee H. Raynor

    To determine clinical and sociodemographic factors that are associated with major neuropsychiatric illnesses among brain tumor patients, we administered a modified version of the Brief Patient Health Questionnaire and a demographic data form to 363 adult neuro-oncology patients. Responses were analyzed to assess for associa- tions between demographic variables, clinical variables, and symptoms consistent with diagnoses of generalized anxiety disorder

  13. Temperament Variation in Sensitivity to Parenting: Predicting Changes in Depression and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiff, Cara J.; Lengua, Liliana J.; Bush, Nicole R.

    2011-01-01

    Temperament was examined as a moderator of maternal parenting behaviors, including warmth, negativity, autonomy granting, and guidance. Observations of parenting and questionnaire measures of temperament and adjustment were obtained from a community sample (N = 214; ages 8-12). Trajectories of depression and anxiety were assessed across 3 years.…

  14. The course of anxiety and depression in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Duits; H. J. Duivenvoorden; S. Boeke; M. A. Taams; B. Mochtar; X. H. Krauss; J. Passchier; R. A. M. Erdman

    1998-01-01

    A semilongitudinal study was designed to follow-up the course of anxiety and depression in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. The focus was on possible effects of gender and age on variations in both mean level and interindividual differences over time. At two timepoints before and two after surgery, 217 patients completed self-report questionnaires. Multivariate testing revealed an

  15. Reduction of children's symptomatology through reduction of parental, child-focused anxiety: An exploratory study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elise E. Lessing; Robert L. Phillips

    1971-01-01

    Investigated the hypothesized relationship between symptomatology and decreases in parental anxiety, and direction of causality. 62 parents of 5-16 yr. old children displaying behavioral problems completed, at intervals, the 163-item Louisville Behavior Checklist described by L. C. Miller on children's symptom status and a 15-item questionnaire on parental attitudes. Results of statistical analysis demonstrate the predicted correlation, but failed to

  16. Parental Reinforcement of Recurrent Pain: The Moderating Impact of Child Depression and Anxiety on Functional Disability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. C. Peterson

    2004-01-01

    Objective To examine whether children's distress moderates the relationship between parental responses to children's pain behaviors and functional disability. Methods Participants were 215 children (ages 8 to 16 years) diagnosed with either headaches, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or sickle cell disease. Children and parents completed questionnaires assessing sociodemographics, pain, depression, anxiety, parental solicitous responses to pain behaviors, and functional disability. Results

  17. Influence of Parenting Factors on Childhood Social Anxiety: Direct Observation of Parental Warmth and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rork, Kristine E.; Morris, Tracy L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the association of parenting behaviors and social anxiety in children. Three parental factors--including parental socialization, control, and warmth--were investigated in a sample of 31 two-parent families. Rather than solely relying upon retrospective questionnaires, this study incorporated direct…

  18. Depression and anxiety: Associations with biological and perceived stress reactivity to a psychological stress protocol in a middle-aged population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susanne R. de Rooij; Aart H. Schene; David I. Phillips; Tessa J. Roseboom

    2010-01-01

    Background: Depression and anxiety have been linked to higher as well as lower reactivity to stressful circumstances. Large, population-based studies investigating the association between depression and anxiety, perceived and physiological stress responses are lacking. Methods: We studied 725 men and women, aged 55-60 years, from a population-based cohort, who filled out the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). We performed

  19. Michigan Questionnaire Documentation System (MQDS)

    E-print Network

    Cheung, Gina-Qian

    2013-04-03

    Michigan Questionnaire Documentation System (MQDS) Gina Cheung University of Michigan, Survey Research Center North American DDI Conference April 2-3, 2013 Agenda MQDS Background MQDS current design Demo Survey Lifecycle http... questionnaire roster structure Blaise alien router (external program) Paradata Not a tool for Survey life circle documentation yet…. Where we are going… and DDI for… Mixed Mode Project Management CATI CAPI WEB MAIL Decentralized CATI Mixed Mode Survey...

  20. Preparation of Young Healthy Children for Possible Hospitalization: The Issues. Monograph No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azarnoff, Pat, Ed.

    Ten authors' viewpoints about preparing healthy children for possible hospitalization are presented. Selected topics include (1) the fallacy of "preparing" young healthy children for possible hospitalization, (2) parents as the best preparers of young children, (3) preparing young children for unplanned hospital admissions, (4) anxiety created…

  1. Autonomic perception and responses in anxiety-inducing situations.

    PubMed

    Klicpera, C; Strian, F

    1978-05-01

    The anxiolytic and sedative properties of a thienodiazepine (clotiazepam) were investigated in 40 healthy subjects with varying degrees of arousal and with the aid of specific anxiety-inducing conditions. A cross-over design with a double blind technique was used. EEG, heart and respiratory rate, peripheral pulse volume and skin resistance were measured during the anxiety-inducing conditions with the visualization of neutral and fearful situations as well as with the threat of shock. The mood, physical sensations and behaviour tendencies of the test subjects were determined by self-rating questionnaires. The anxiolytic and sedative effects of the thienodiazepine under study were able to be differentiated as far as subjective perception and autonomic responses were concerned. The development of sedative and anxiolytic effects is dependent on the subject's state of arousal. Situations involving the anticipation of anxiety are sufficient as proof of pharmacogenic anxiolysis. The tranquilizer reduces anxiety and physical tension, but does not influence the timing of autonomic readiness responses, and thus does not affect the coping strategies. PMID:27828

  2. Assessing Anxiety in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Kristine; Pierre, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety can be broadly described as a psychological state in which normally innocuous environmental stimuli trigger negative emotional expectations. Human anxiety disorders are multidimensional and may be organic or acquired, situational or pervasive. The broad ranging nature of the anxiety phenotype speaks to the need for models that identify its various components and root causes to develop effective clinical treatments. The cross-species comparative approach to modeling anxiety disorders in animals aims to understand mechanisms that both contribute to and modulate anxiety. Nonhuman primate models provide an important bridge from nonprimate model systems because of the complexity of nonhuman primates’ biobehavioral capacities and their commonalities with human emotion. The broad goal of this review is to provide an overview of various procedures available to study anxiety in the nonhuman primate, with a focus on the behavioral aspects of anxiety. Commonly used methods covered in this review include assessing animals in their home environment or in response to an ethologically relevant threat, associative conditioning and startle response tests, and cognitive bias tests. We also discuss how these procedures can help veterinarians and researchers care for captive nonhuman primates. PMID:25225310

  3. Dimensional assessment of anxiety disorders in parents and children for DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Möller, Eline L; Majdandži?, Mirjana; Craske, Michelle G; Bögels, Susan M

    2014-09-01

    The current shift in the DSM towards the inclusion of a dimensional component allows clinicians and researchers to demonstrate not only the presence or absence of psychopathology in an individual, but also the degree to which the disorder and its symptoms are manifested. This study evaluated the psychometric properties and utility of a set of brief dimensional scales that assess DSM-based core features of anxiety disorders, for children and their parents. The dimensional scales and the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED-71), a questionnaire to assess symptoms of all anxiety disorders, were administered to a community sample of children (n?=?382), aged 8-13 years, and their mothers (n?=?285) and fathers (n?=?255). The dimensional scales assess six anxiety disorders: specific phobia, agoraphobia, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and separation anxiety disorder. Children rated their own anxiety and parents their child's anxiety. The dimensional scales demonstrated high internal consistency (??>?0.78, except for father reported child panic disorder, for reason of lack of variation), and moderate to high levels of convergent validity (rs ?=?0.29-0.73). Children who exceeded the SCARED cutoffs scored higher on the dimensional scales than those who did not, providing preliminary support for the clinical sensitivity of the scales. Given their strong psychometric properties and utility for both child and parent report, addition of the dimensional scales to the DSM-5 might be an effective way to incorporate dimensional measurement into the categorical DSM-5 assessment of anxiety disorders in children. PMID:24943058

  4. Information Processing Bias and Pharmacotherapy Outcome in Older Adults with Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Amanda R. W.; Petkus, Andrew J.; Nguyen, Hoang; Loebach Wetherell, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Information processing bias was evaluated in a sample of 25 older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) over the course of 12 weeks of escitalopram pharmacotherapy. Using the CANTAB Affective Go/No Go test, treatment response (as measured by the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Penn State Worry Questionnaire, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale) was predicted from a bias score (i.e., difference score between response latencies for negative and positive words) using mixed-models regression. A more positive bias score across time predicted better response to treatment. Faster responses to positive words relative to negative words were associated with greater symptomatic improvement over time as reflected by scores on the GADSS. There was a trend towards significance for PSWQ scores and no significant effects related to HAMA outcomes. These preliminary findings offer further insights into the role of biased cognitive processing of emotional material in the manifestation of late-life anxiety symptoms. PMID:23245629

  5. Relationship between Temperament, Depression, Anxiety, and Hopelessness in Adolescents: A Structural Equation Model

    PubMed Central

    Iliceto, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio; Lester, David; Gonda, Xenia; Niolu, Cinzia; Girardi, Nicoletta; Rihmer, Zoltán; Candilera, Gabriella; Girardi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the validity of affective temperaments for predicting psychiatric morbidity and suicide risk, using a two-factor model to explain the relationships between temperament, anxiety, depression, and hopelessness. We investigated 210 high school students, 103 males and 107 females, 18-19 years old, who were administered self-report questionnaires to assess temperament (TEMPS-A), depression (BDI-II), anxiety (STAI) and hopelessness (BHS). The final structural model had a good fit with the data, with two factors significantly correlated, the first labeled unstable cyclothymic temperament including Dysthymic/Cyclothymic/Anxious temperament, Irritable temperament and Depression, and the second labeled Demoralization including Anxiety (State/Trait) and Hopelessness. Depression, anxiety and hopelessness are in a complex relationship partly mediated by temperament. PMID:21789278

  6. Relationship between Temperament, Depression, Anxiety, and Hopelessness in Adolescents: A Structural Equation Model.

    PubMed

    Iliceto, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio; Lester, David; Gonda, Xenia; Niolu, Cinzia; Girardi, Nicoletta; Rihmer, Zoltán; Candilera, Gabriella; Girardi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the validity of affective temperaments for predicting psychiatric morbidity and suicide risk, using a two-factor model to explain the relationships between temperament, anxiety, depression, and hopelessness. We investigated 210 high school students, 103 males and 107 females, 18-19 years old, who were administered self-report questionnaires to assess temperament (TEMPS-A), depression (BDI-II), anxiety (STAI) and hopelessness (BHS). The final structural model had a good fit with the data, with two factors significantly correlated, the first labeled unstable cyclothymic temperament including Dysthymic/Cyclothymic/Anxious temperament, Irritable temperament and Depression, and the second labeled Demoralization including Anxiety (State/Trait) and Hopelessness. Depression, anxiety and hopelessness are in a complex relationship partly mediated by temperament. PMID:21789278

  7. Tailored support for type 2 diabetes patients with an acute coronary event after discharge from hospital – design and development of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with an acute coronary event (ACE) experience decreased quality of life and increased distress. According to the American Diabetes Association, discharge from the hospital is a time of increased distress for all patients. Tailored support specific to diabetes is scarce in that period. We developed an intervention based on Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory, Leventhal’s Common Sense Model, and results of focus groups. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention to reduce distress in type 2 diabetes patients who experienced a first ACE. Methods Randomised controlled trial. Two hundred patients are recruited in thirteen hospitals. A diabetes nurse visits the patients in the intervention group (n?=?100) at home within three weeks after discharge from hospital, and again after two weeks and two months. The control group (n?=?100) receives a consultation by telephone. The primary outcome is diabetes-related distress, measured with the Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are well-being, health status, anxiety, depression, HbA1c, blood pressure and lipids. Mediating variables are self-management, self-efficacy and illness representations. Outcomes are measured with questionnaires directly after discharge from hospital and five months later. Biomedical variables are obtained from the records from the primary care physician and the hospital. Differences between groups in change over time are analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. The Holm-Bonferroni correction is used to adjust for multiplicity. Discussion Type 2 diabetes patients who experience a first ACE need tailored support after discharge from the hospital. This trial will provide evidence on the effectiveness of a supportive intervention in reducing distress in these patients. Trial registration NCT01801631 PMID:24438342

  8. Add neurons, subtract anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Kheirbek, Mazen A.; Hen, René

    2014-01-01

    IN BRIEF To keep memories from becoming jumbled, the brain must encode the distinct features of events and situations in a way that allows them to be distinguished from one another—a process called pattern separation. Pattern separation enables us to distinguish dangerous situations from similar ones that pose no risk. People with defects in this ability may be prone to anxiety disorders. The process occurs in one of the two regions of the brain that generate neurons throughout life. These fledgling cells seem to be critical to pattern separation. Interventions that specifically boost the ranks of rookie neurons could provide new ways to regulate mood and possibly treat conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:24974712

  9. Diet-regulated anxiety.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michelle; Mercer, Julian G

    2013-01-01

    A substantial proportion of noncommunicable disease originates in habitual overconsumption of calories, which can lead to weight gain and obesity and attendant comorbidities. At the other end of the spectrum, the consequences of undernutrition in early life and at different stages of adult life can also have major impact on wellbeing and quality of life. To help address some of these issues, greater understanding is required of interactions with food and contemporary diets throughout the life course and at a number of different levels: physiological, metabolic, psychological, and emotional. Here we review the current literature on the effects of dietary manipulation on anxiety-like behaviour. This evidence, assembled from study of preclinical models of diet challenge from gestation to adult life, supports a role for diet in the important connections between psychology, physiology, and behaviour. Analogous processes in the human population in our current obesogenic environment are likely to contribute to individual and societal challenges in this area. PMID:24027581

  10. Writing Anxiety--Barrier to Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aikman, Carol C.

    Research into writing anxiety is an off-shoot of research into oral communication anxiety. At first, researchers thought that people with high oral communication anxiety tended to compensate by writing. However, when the Daly-Miller Writing Apprehension Test was used, it was found that the link between oral and written anxiety did not exist. The…

  11. Computer Anxiety: Definition, Measurement, and Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambre, Marjorie A.; Cook, Desmond L.

    1985-01-01

    Review of general anxiety and its measurement provides a framework for considering computer anxiety. Test and math anxiety are discussed as specific anxieties with potential similarities. Five studies are identified and discussed for their contributions to an understanding of the definition, measurement practices, and correlates of computer…

  12. The communication of public speaking anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralph R. Behnke; Chris R. Sawyer; Paul E. King

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between beginning speakers’ self?reported speech state anxiety and audience perceptions of that anxiety, during public speaking performances are investigated in this study. The results indicate that untrained audiences are not proficient at detecting the self?perceived state anxiety of beginning speakers. Moreover, audiences perceive speaker anxiety levels to be lower, during performance, than the speakers themselves report. Implications of

  13. Worry, Intolerance of Uncertainty, and Statistics Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Amanda S.

    2013-01-01

    Statistics anxiety is a problem for most graduate students. This study investigates the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty, worry, and statistics anxiety. Intolerance of uncertainty was significantly related to worry, and worry was significantly related to three types of statistics anxiety. Six types of statistics anxiety were…

  14. Compatibility of Self-Actualization and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodez, Orin; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Examined the relationship between anxiety and self-actualization in a sample of college students. Items (N=33) from the Personal Orientation Inventory were found to measure anxiety and scored negatively for self-actualization. Removal of anxiety items and rescoring yielded self-actualization measures related postively to anxiety test scores.…

  15. Addressing Math Anxiety in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlayson, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    In today's educational systems, students of all levels of education experience math anxiety. Furthermore, math anxiety is frequently linked to poor achievement in mathematics. The purpose of this study is to examine the causes of math anxiety and to explore strategies which pre-service teachers have identified to overcome math anxiety. The…

  16. Elementary Pre-Service Teachers' Mathematics Anxiety and Mathematics Teaching Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haciomeroglu, Guney

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the structure of elementary pre-service teachers' mathematics anxiety and mathematics teaching anxiety by asking whether the two systems of anxiety are related. The Turkish Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale Short Version and the Mathematics Teaching Anxiety Scale were administered to 260 elementary pre-service…

  17. Anxiety, Anxiety Disorders, Tobacco Use, and Nicotine: A Critical Review of Interrelationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morissette, Sandra Baker; Tull, Matthew T.; Gulliver, Suzy Bird; Kamholz, Barbara Wolfsdorf; Zimering, Rose T.

    2007-01-01

    Smoking is highly prevalent across most anxiety disorders. Tobacco use increases risk for the later development of certain anxiety disorders, and smokers with anxiety disorders have more severe withdrawal symptoms during smoking cessation than smokers without anxiety disorders. The authors critically examined the relationships among anxiety,…

  18. The revised version of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED-R): Factor structure in normal children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Muris; Harald Merckelbach; Henk Schmidt; Birgit Mayer

    1998-01-01

    The revised version of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED-R) is a self-report questionnaire that measures symptoms of DSM-IV linked anxiety disorders in children. The present study examined the factor structure of the SCARED-R in a sample of 674 normal Dutch school children aged 8 to 13years. Exploratory factor analysis (principal components with oblimin rotation) clearly pointed

  19. Association of Stigma, Self-Esteem, and Symptoms with Concurrent and Prospective Assessment of Social Anxiety in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lysaker, Paul H.; Yanos, Philip T.; Outcalt, Jared; Roe, David

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Often overlooked clinically, social anxiety is common in schizophrenia and may represent a barrier to quality of life and social function. Little is known, however, about the possible roots of social anxiety in schizophrenia or their relationship to social anxiety over time. Methods To explore this issue, we examined the relationship between self-esteem, self-stigma, positive and negative symptoms, emotional discomfort and affect recognition with concurrent and prospective assessments of social anxiety using the Multidimensional Anxiety Questionnaire in a sample of seventy-eight persons meeting criteria for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Results Univariate correlations revealed that self-esteem, self-stigma, negative symptoms and emotional discomfort were significantly related to social anxiety assessed concurrently and five months later. Multiple regressions revealed negative symptoms and discrimination experiences in particular were found to predict social anxiety prospectively even when initial levels of social anxiety were controlled for statistically. Conclusions Negative symptoms and self-stigma may be consistently related to social anxiety across time. PMID:20643628

  20. Anxiety mediates the association between cannabis use and attenuated positive psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Lauren E; Anglin, Deidre M; Heimberg, Richard G; Gibson, Lauren E; Fineberg, Anna M; Maxwell, Seth D; Kerns, Connor M; Ellman, Lauren M

    2014-08-15

    Cannabis use has been associated with a continuum of psychotic experiences. However, it is unclear whether mood and anxiety symptoms account for increases in attenuated positive psychotic symptoms (APPS) among cannabis users. We predicted that depression and anxiety symptoms would mediate the relation between cannabis use and APPS, and between cannabis use and endorsement of eight or more distressing APPS (D-APPS), a potentially more clinically meaningful group. Young adults (n=674) completed the Prodromal Questionnaire (PQ); Drug Use Frequency measure; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Trait Form, Anxiety Subscale; and Social Phobia Scale. Results indicated that symptoms of trait anxiety, but not symptoms of depression or social anxiety, mediated the relationship between cannabis use and APPS, as well as the relationship between cannabis use and D-APPS. Results indicate that symptoms of trait anxiety may play a role in the relation between cannabis use and APPS. Findings underscore the importance of considering clinical characteristics co-occurring with psychotic symptoms, such as affective symptoms, when examining the association between cannabis use and psychotic symptoms. PMID:24745470

  1. Social anxiety disorder in the Chinese military: prevalence, comorbidities, impairment, and treatment-seeking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaning; Zhang, Ruiguo; Chen, Yunchun; Wang, Huaihai; Zhang, Yahong; Gan, Jingli; Zhang, Liyi; Tan, Qingrong

    2014-12-30

    The objective of this work is To investigate the prevalence, comorbidities, impairment, and treatment-seeking of social anxiety disorder in the Chinese military personnel. Military personnel (n=11,527) were surveyed from May to August 2007 using a multistage whole cohort probability sampling method. A Chinese version of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was used for assessment, and a military-related socio-demographic questionnaire was used to describe the prevalence distribution. A unified survey was performed to investigate 11 different social situations. The short-form health survey was used to assess role impairment. The 12-month and lifetime prevalence rates of social anxiety disorder were 3.34% (95% CI: 3.25-3.42%) and 6.22% (95% CI: 6.11-6.32%), respectively. Social anxiety disorder was associated with increased odds of depression, substance abuse, panic attacks/disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. Childhood foster, female, stressful life events, younger age, and being divorced/widowed increase the incidence of social anxiety disorder. Treatment-seeking was relatively rare. Social anxiety disorder is a common disorder in military personnel in China, and it is a risk factor for subsequent depressive illness, substance abuse and other mental disorder. Early detection and treatment of social anxiety disorder are important because of the low rate of treatment-seeking. PMID:25262639

  2. Increased tobacco and alcohol use among women with joint hypermobility: a way to cope with anxiety?

    PubMed

    Baeza-Velasco, C; Stoebner-Delbarre, A; Cousson-Gélie, F; Pailhez, G; Bulbena, A; Baguet, F; Gély-Nargeot, M C

    2015-01-01

    Joint hypermobility (JH) is a common trait of heritable disorders of the connective tissue which has been identified as a risk factor for anxiety states. Anxiety and other negative emotions lead some people to use tobacco and alcohol as a coping strategy. The purpose of this study was to examine JH in relation to the consumption of these psychoactive substances and the associated anxiety and coping strategies. A cross-sectional sample of 305 female college students completed self-administered questionnaires on JH, tobacco and alcohol use, state and trait anxiety, and coping strategies. The prevalence of JH in the final sample (N = 301) was 51.8 %. The percentage of smokers, smokers using tobacco to calm anxiety, at-risk drinkers, tobacco and alcohol users, and the number of standard drinks consumed per week were significantly higher among females with JH than among those without it. The percentage of participants with severe state anxiety was significantly higher in the JH group, as were the emotion-focused coping score. The results of the logistic regression analysis showed that the odds of being assessed with JH were greater in those who consume tobacco and alcohol. This study provides evidence that women with JH report higher levels of state anxiety than non-JH women and use emotion-focused coping (i.e., efforts to regulate affect) more than any other coping strategies to deal with stress. These factors may help explain the increase in tobacco and alcohol use observed in this population. PMID:24874121

  3. Comorbidity of PTSD in anxiety and depressive disorders: prevalence and shared risk factors.

    PubMed

    Spinhoven, Philip; Penninx, Brenda W; van Hemert, Albert M; de Rooij, Mark; Elzinga, Bernet M

    2014-08-01

    The present study aims to assess comorbidity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in anxiety and depressive disorders and to determine whether childhood trauma types and other putative independent risk factors for comorbid PTSD are unique to PTSD or shared with anxiety and depressive disorders. The sample of 2402 adults aged 18-65 included healthy controls, persons with a prior history of affective disorders, and persons with a current affective disorder. These individuals were assessed at baseline (T0) and 2 (T2) and 4 years (T4) later. At each wave, DSM-IV-TR based anxiety and depressive disorder, neuroticism, extraversion, and symptom severity were assessed. Childhood trauma was measured at T0 with an interview and at T4 with a questionnaire, and PTSD was measured with a standardized interview at T4. Prevalence of 5-year recency PTSD among anxiety and depressive disorders was 9.2%, and comorbidity, in particular with major depression, was high (84.4%). Comorbidity was associated with female gender, all types of childhood trauma, neuroticism, (low) extraversion, and symptom severity. Multivariable significant risk factors (i.e., female gender and child sexual and physical abuse) were shared among anxiety and depressive disorders. Our results support a shared vulnerability model for comorbidity of anxiety and depressive disorders with PTSD. Routine assessment of PTSD in patients with anxiety and depressive disorders seems warranted. PMID:24629482

  4. The effect of video-based education on patient anxiety in men undergoing transrectal prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Tarhan, Huseyin; Cakmak, Ozgur; Unal, Elif; Akarken, Ilker; Un, Sitki; Ekin, Rahmi Gokhan; Konyalioglu, Ersin; Isoglu, Cemal Selcuk; Zorlu, Ferruh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We assess the effect of video-based education on patient anxiety during transrectal prostate biopsy. Methods: A total of 246 patients who underwent transrectal prostate biopsy were prospectively enrolled in the study. Group 1 included 123 patients who received both written and video-based education, while Group 2 included 123 patients who received only written instructions regarding prostate biopsies. State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was used to assess state and trait anxiety (STAI-S/T) After completing the STAI-S and STAI-T questionnaires, all patients in Group 1 received written information and video-based education and they again completed STAI-S before the biopsy. On the contrary, after completing the STAI-S and STAI-T questionnaires, the patients in Group 2 received only written information and then they completed the STAI-S before the biopsy. Moreover, a visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess pain scores during digital rectal examination, probe insertion, periprostatic local anesthesic infiltration, and biopsy. Results: No difference was noted between 2 groups regarding VAS scores. Comparing the 2 groups on baseline anxiety, we found that trait anxiety scores (STAI-T) were similar (p = 0.238). Pre-information STAI-S scores were similar in both groups (p = 0.889) and they both indicated high anxiety levels (score ?42). While post-information STAI-S scores remained high in Group 2, post-information STAI-S scores significantly decreased in Group 1 (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Undergoing a prostate biopsy is stressful and may cause anxiety for patients. Video-based education about the procedure can diminish patient anxiety. PMID:25553162

  5. Psychometric and biohormonal indices of dental anxiety in children. A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Yfanti, Konstantina; Kitraki, Efthymia; Emmanouil, Dimitris; Pandis, Nikolaos; Papagiannoulis, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    The stress of dental treatment often elicits negative emotions in children, expressed as dental fear or anxiety. Highly anxious children obstruct treatment and avoid therapy, further amplifying oral health problems. The aim of this study was to examine the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous system responses to dental treatment and their possible interactions and associations with psychometric indices of anxiety, caries, previous dental experience, anesthesia, age and gender in school children. Upon informed consent, saliva was obtained from 97 children (59% males, mean age?±??SD: 89.73?±?15 months) in the Clinic of pediatric dentistry before treatment, immediately post-treatment and at the recall visit to determine cortisol and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) levels. Dental and general anxiety was assessed through specific questionnaires completed by the children. Compared to pre-treatment, cortisol levels were increased following treatment, while sAA levels were higher at the recall. Pre- and post-treatment cortisol and sAA responses were positively correlated. Dental and general anxiety questionnaire scores were also significantly correlated with each other. The integrated autonomic and neuroendocrine responses prior to treatment were correlated with state anxiety and those following treatment with dental anxiety. However, univariable and multivariable linear regression analysis associated post-treatment cortisol, but not sAA, levels with dental anxiety. No associations of cortisol or sAA responses with caries, age, gender, previous dental experience or anesthesia were detected. These data provide some evidence that both sAA and cortisol levels are altered in children in anticipation or during dental treatment, but only cortisol levels are associated to dental anxiety. PMID:24766350

  6. Hospital waste management in El-Beheira Governorate, Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Magda Magdy Abd El-Salam

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the hospital waste management practices used by eight randomly selected hospitals located in Damanhour City of El-Beheira Governorate and determined the total daily generation rate of their wastes. Physico-chemical characteristics of hospital wastes were determined according to standard methods. A survey was conducted using a questionnaire to collect information about the practices related to waste segregation, collection

  7. Anxiety and extreme response styles

    E-print Network

    Rhone, Teresa Ann

    1971-01-01

    , when placed ' n s' tuations embodying ec" ivalent. amounts of anxiety, would resoond in a similar manner. The Ss were administered the Perceptu" I Reaction Test and data, consisting of the number of responses in each category alcng a four...

  8. Afraid to be there? Evaluating the relation between presence, self-reported anxiety, and heart rate in a virtual public speaking task.

    PubMed

    Felnhofer, Anna; Kothgassner, Oswald D; Hetterle, Thomas; Beutl, Leon; Hlavacs, Helmut; Kryspin-Exner, Ilse

    2014-05-01

    The link between anxiety and presence in a virtual environment (VE) is still a subject of an unresolved debate, with little empirical research to support theoretical claims. Thus, the current study analyzed presence, self-reported anxiety, and a physiological parameter (heart rate [HR]) in a sample of 30 high anxious and 35 low anxious participants. Both groups delivered a 5 minute speech in a virtual lecture hall. Results indicate no mediating influences of presence on group differences in self-reported state anxiety during the speech, but point toward negative correlations between state anxiety and the iGroup Presence Questionnaire (IPQ) scales "sense of being there" and "realism." Furthermore, HR was found to be unrelated to self-reported presence. Only the IPQ scale "spatial presence" showed a marginally significant influence on group differences in state anxiety. The present results support the assumption that presence and anxiety are logically distinct, meaning that presence does not directly influence the intensity of an emotion felt in a VE. Rather, it constitutes a precondition for an emotion to be at all elicited by a VE. Also, HR has proven to be no adequate substitute measure for presence, since it only assesses anxiety not presence. It may, however, mediate the interplay between trait anxiety and state anxiety. Possible implications of the current findings are discussed alongside the problem of using presence questionnaires that seem to be prone to subjective bias (i.e., participants confusing presence and emotion). PMID:24605993

  9. Measuring Students' Emotions in the Early Years: The Achievement Emotions Questionnaire-Elementary School (AEQ-ES)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenfeld, Stephanie; Pekrun, Reinhard; Stupnisky, Robert H.; Reiss, Kristina; Murayama, Kou

    2012-01-01

    This article reports about the development and validation of a measurement instrument assessing elementary school students' achievement emotions (Achievement Emotions Questionnaire-Elementary School, AEQ-ES). Specifically, the instrument assesses students' enjoyment, anxiety, and boredom pertaining to three types of academic settings (i.e.,…

  10. Development and validation of a rapid, generic measure of disease control from the patient's perspective: the IBD-Control questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Bodger, Keith; Ormerod, Clare; Shackcloth, Daniela; Harrison, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The use of patient reported outcome measures to support routine inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) care is not widespread and suggests that existing questionnaires lack relevance to day-to-day decisions or are too cumbersome to administer. We developed a simple, generic tool for capturing disease control from the patient's perspective to address these barriers. Methods Development based on literature review, patient focus groups/interviews and a steering group, defining a limited set of generic questions. The ‘IBD-Control’ questionnaire comprises 13 items plus a visual analogue scale (VAS) (0–100). Prospective validation involved baseline completion of IBD-Control, quality of life (QoL) questionnaire (UK-IBD-Q), EuroQol (EQ-5D), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score; and clinician assessment (blinded to questionnaire; recording Harvey-Bradshaw Index or Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index; Global Clinician Rating; treatment outcome). Results 299 patients returned baseline surveys (Crohn's disease, n=160; ulcerative colitis, n=139) and 138 attended for repeat visits. Completion time (mean; SD): 1?min 15?s; 25?s; Internal consistency: Cronbach's ? for all 13 items (0.85); for subgroup of eight questions (‘IBD-Control-8’; 0.86). Strong correlation between IBD-Control-8 and IBD-Control-VAS (r=0.81). Test-retest reliability (2?week repeat): intra-class correlation=0.97 for IBD-Control-8 and 0.96 for IBD-Control-VAS. Construct validity: Moderate-to-strong correlations between IBD-Control-8 and IBD-Control-VAS versus activity indices, UK-IBD-Q and EQ-5D (utility) with r values 0.52–0.86. Discriminant validity (mean instrument scores for remission, mild, moderate or severe): p<0.001 (analysis of variance (ANOVA)). Sensitivity to change: Effect sizes: 0.76–1.44. Conclusions The IBD-Control is a rapid, reliable, valid and sensitive instrument for measuring overall disease control from the patient's perspective. Unlike existing patient reported outcome measures, its simplicity, ease-of-use and generic applicability make it a candidate for supporting routine care. PMID:24107590

  11. Cognitive failure, teacher’s rejection and interpersonal relationship anxiety in children with dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Aneeza; Naz, Fauzia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Present research aimed to explore relationship between cognitive failure, teacher’s rejection (TR), interpersonal relationship anxiety (IRA) and Signs of Dyslexia (SD) in children with dyslexia. Another aim was to explore TR, SD and IRA as predictors of cognitive failure and final aim was to see TR, SD and cognitive failure as predictors of IRA. Method: Sample included140 students (70 girls & 70 boys) with dyslexia. Their age was ranged between 7-14 years (mean age: M=10.50, SD= 1.89). Cognitive Failure Questionnaire, Teacher’s Acceptance-Rejection Questionnaire and Interpersonal Relationship Anxiety Questionnaire were used for assessment. Results: Results revealed significant positive relationship between cognitive failure, TR, SD and IRA. TR, SD, IRA emerged as significant predictors of cognitive failure while TR, SD and cognitive failure emerged as significant predictors of IRA. Conclusion: Findings from the present research have practical implications for parents, teachers, trainers and health physicians while dealing children with dyslexia.

  12. Frequency of depression and anxiety before and after insertion of a continuous flow left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Reynard, Alison K; Butler, Robert S; McKee, Michael G; Starling, Randall C; Gorodeski, Eiran Z

    2014-08-01

    Our objective was to investigate the course of depression and anxiety symptoms in patients treated with continuous flow (CF) left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). Depression and anxiety are associated with poor outcomes in patients with heart failure, yet few studies have examined such symptoms in patients with CF-LVADs. Depression and anxiety were measured as part of routine clinical care in patients who received a CF-LVAD at our institution from October 2009 to April 2012. Sixty-six patients completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and 48 of 66 patients also completed the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire-7. Nineteen of 66 patients completed measures before implantation. Patients who completed measures before and after implantation demonstrated significant improvements in depression and anxiety scores. All patients showed significant improvements in depression and anxiety scores from implantation to the first time point after implantation. Pairwise mean comparisons between time intervals after implantation were not significant. In conclusion, depression and anxiety scores improve after CF-LVAD implantation and remain stable up to 1 year. The improvement does not depend on baseline psychotropic medication use and may be related to improved physical health. PMID:24931289

  13. Alcohol Use and Anxiety Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brigitte C. Sabourin; Sherry H. Stewart

    The relationship between anxiety and alcohol use is a topic of great theoretical and practical interest for both scientists interested in the nature and causes of psychopathology and practitioners working with anxious and\\/or alcohol abusing clients. Although it has been clearly established that anxiety disorders and alcohol use disorders are highly ‘‘comorbid’’ or co-occurring conditions (e.g., see Kushner, Abrams &

  14. Possible determinants, correlates and consequences of high levels of anxiety in primiparous mothers.

    PubMed

    Barnett, B; Parker, G

    1986-02-01

    Groups of highly anxious, moderately anxious and minimally anxious primiparous mothers (N = 147) were obtained on the basis of Spielberger trait anxiety scores in the postpartum period, and subjects were compared. Allocation to those groups appeared to be more likely to reflect constitutional levels of anxiety, rather than recent or current social stressors. Highly anxious mothers were distinguished on a number of presumed correlates of anxiety measured by clinical questions (e.g. terminating of anxious situations), hospital notes (e.g. mood problems noted by nursing staff) and blind rater assessments (e.g. unassertiveness). While highly anxious mothers were more likely to report more recent life events, less social support, and negative interpretations of the pregnancy, the hospital experience and the hospital staff, such variables were less discriminating when neuroticism levels were effectively controlled. This suggests an intrinsic perceptual bias, rather than that the factors were determinants. Highly anxious mothers had more delivery complications, while their babies were more likely to be dysmature and slow to suckle, features we interpret as consequences of the anxiety levels. In the postpartum period these mothers were more depressed, had more concerns about their baby, themselves and their marriage, and were less confident about coping and their parenting capacities. Such variables may be correlates or consequences of anxiety. PMID:3961043

  15. Depression and AnxietyDepression and Anxiety Rochester Recreation Club for the DeafRochester Recreation Club for the Deaf

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    relationship with mother and baby #12;What is Anxiety?What is Anxiety? ·· Generalized anxietyGeneralizedDepression and AnxietyDepression and Anxiety Rochester Recreation Club for the Deaf (""REAPREAP"")) #12;OverviewOverview ·· What is depression and anxiety?What is depression and anxiety? ·· How

  16. COMPLICATED GRIEF SYMPTOMS IN ANXIETY DISORDERS: PREVALENCE AND ASSOCIATED IMPAIRMENT

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Luana; Bui, Eric; LeBlanc, Nicole; Porter, Eliora; Robinaugh, Donald; Dryman, Taylor; Nadal-Vicens, Mireya; Worthington, John; Simon, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous research has identified high rates of comorbid anxiety disorders among individuals presenting with primary CG. In the present study, we examined the prevalence of comorbid CG in bereaved primary anxiety disorder (AD) patients compared to bereaved healthy controls. We also examined the impairment associated with comorbid CG in AD. Methods Participants were 242 bereaved adults (mean (SD) age = 41.5 (13.1), 44.2% women) with a primary AD diagnosis, including generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n = 57), panic disorder (PD; n = 49), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; n = 29), and generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD; n = 107), as well as 155 bereaved healthy controls with no current DSM-IV Axis I diagnosis (mean (SD) age = 43.0 (13.6), 51.0% women). CG symptoms were measured using the 19-item inventory of complicated grief (ICG), with threshold CG defined as an ICG score of ?30. Quality of life and functional impairment were assessed with the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q) and the Range of Impaired Functioning Tool (LIFE-RIFT), respectively. Results Participants with primary ADs had significantly higher rates of threshold CG symptoms than bereaved controls (12.0% vs. 0.65%; Fisher’s Exact P < 0.001). Rates of threshold CG were significantly elevated for each AD when compared to bereaved controls. After adjustment for age, sex, education, and comorbid major depressive disorder, threshold CG was associated with lower quality of life (? = ?0.140, P = 0.023) and greater impairment (? = 0.141, P = 0.035) among individuals with AD. Conclusions Our findings suggest that threshold CG is of clinical relevance in bereaved individuals with a primary anxiety disorder. Screening for CG in patients with ADs may be warranted. PMID:23495105

  17. Stability of questionnaire items in sport and exercise psychology: Bootstrap limits of agreement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KAREN WILSON; ALAN BATTERHAM

    1999-01-01

    We describe an alternative method for assessing the stability of individual questionnaire items in sport and exercise psychology. To date, the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient has been widely used in psychometrics. We propose an alternative non-parametric method based on proportion of agreement. Ninety-two male university students completed the revised 9-item Social Physique Anxiety Scale on two occasions, separated by a

  18. Diffusivity of the uncinate fasciculus in heroin users relates to their levels of anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Wong, N M L; Cheung, S-H; Chan, C C H; Zeng, H; Liu, Y-P; So, K-F; Lee, T M C

    2015-01-01

    Heroin use is closely associated with emotional dysregulation, which may explain its high comorbidity with disorders such as anxiety and depression. However, the understanding of the neurobiological etiology of the association between heroin use and emotional dysregulation is limited. Previous studies have suggested an impact of heroin on diffusivity in white matter involving the emotional regulatory system, but the specificity of this finding remains to be determined. Therefore, this study investigated the association between heroin use and diffusivity of white matter tracts in heroin users and examined whether the tracts were associated with their elevated anxiety and depression levels. A sample of 26 right-handed male abstinent heroin users (25 to 42 years of age) and 32 matched healthy controls (19 to 55 years of age) was recruited for this study. Diffusion tensor imaging data were collected, and their levels of anxiety and depression were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Our findings indicated that heroin users exhibited higher levels of anxiety and depression, but the heroin use-associated left uncinate fasciculus was only related to their anxiety level, suggesting that association between heroin and anxiety has an incremental organic basis but that for depression could be a threshold issue. This finding improves our understanding of heroin addiction and its comorbid affective disorder and facilitates future therapeutic development. PMID:25918991

  19. Serbian version of the Women's Health Questionnaire: psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Dotlic, J; Gazibara, T; Radovanovic, S; Rancic, B; Milosevic, B; Nurkovic, S; Kurtagic, I; Kovacevic, N

    2015-08-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to translate the Women's Health Questionnaire (WHQ) into the Serbian language and assess its validity and reliability in a population of Serbian menopausal women. Methods The study included peri- and postmenopausal women from two Community Health Centers in Belgrade. Women filled out the WHQ, the Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36) and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). The WHQ was translated according to recommended methodology for cultural adaptation of questionnaires and its psychometric characteristics (internal consistency, inter-rater reliability, factor analysis, sensitivity, discriminant, construct and criterion validity) were tested. Results In the Serbian population, the mean values of the WHQ domains were mostly comparable with reference Mediterranean countries. Whole-scale Cronbach's ? was 0.838. Moreover, five WHQ domains had a value of Cronbach's ? above the acceptable limit. There were no significant differences in WHQ scores between our two investigators. On exploratory factor analysis, we obtained ten factors (two items formed a new factor - 'Menstrual pathology'). Almost all SF-36 domains were significantly associated with WHQ domains, while the BDI was associated with domains: depressive mood, anxiety and sleep problems. Based on ROC analysis, WHQ is slightly more reliable for perimenopausal than postmenopausal Serbian women. Conclusion The Serbian version of the WHQ showed very good reliability and validity in assessment of quality of life among menopausal women. The WHQ is applicable for both peri- and postmenopausal women. PMID:25373408

  20. Pregnancy Anxiety and Prenatal Cortisol Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Heidi S.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; Glynn, Laura M.; Hobel, Calvin J.; Sandman, Curt A.

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy anxiety is a potent predictor of adverse birth and infant outcomes. The goal of the current study was to examine one potential mechanism whereby these effects may occur by testing associations between pregnancy anxiety and maternal salivary cortisol on 4 occasions during pregnancy in a sample of 448 women. Higher mean levels of pregnancy anxiety over the course of pregnancy predicted steeper increases in cortisol trajectories compared to lower pregnancy anxiety. Significant differences between cortisol trajectories emerged between 30 to 31 weeks of gestation. Results remained significant when adjusted for state anxiety and perceived stress. Neither changes in pregnancy anxiety over gestation, nor pregnancy anxiety specific to only a particular time in pregnancy predicted cortisol. These findings provide support for one way in which pregnancy anxiety may influence maternal physiology and contribute to a growing literature on the complex biological pathways linking pregnancy anxiety to birth and infant outcomes. PMID:24769094

  1. Pregnancy anxiety and prenatal cortisol trajectories.

    PubMed

    Kane, Heidi S; Dunkel Schetter, Christine; Glynn, Laura M; Hobel, Calvin J; Sandman, Curt A

    2014-07-01

    Pregnancy anxiety is a potent predictor of adverse birth and infant outcomes. The goal of the current study was to examine one potential mechanism whereby these effects may occur by testing associations between pregnancy anxiety and maternal salivary cortisol on 4 occasions during pregnancy in a sample of 448 women. Higher mean levels of pregnancy anxiety over the course of pregnancy predicted steeper increases in cortisol trajectories compared to lower pregnancy anxiety. Significant differences between cortisol trajectories emerged between 30 and 31 weeks of gestation. Results remained significant when adjusted for state anxiety and perceived stress. Neither changes in pregnancy anxiety over gestation, nor pregnancy anxiety specific to only a particular time in pregnancy predicted cortisol. These findings provide support for one way in which pregnancy anxiety may influence maternal physiology and contribute to a growing literature on the complex biological pathways linking pregnancy anxiety to birth and infant outcomes. PMID:24769094

  2. TIME MANAGEMENT Time Management Questionnaire

    E-print Network

    TIME MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP #12;2 Time Management Questionnaire Self Assessment: Answer "Yes" or "No you tend to complete your assignments on time? 3. ____ Have you estimated how long it takes to read schedule time to study for exams? 8. ____ Do you have a job that requires more than 20 hours a week? 9

  3. Instructional Television Questionnaire -- Teacher Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, David A.; And Others

    The instructional television questionnaire for teachers consists primarily of statements to be answered with a rating scale. The first seventeen statements ask for evaluative judgments about various aspects of instructional television. The remainder of the statements require judgments of frequency. Questions to ascertain personal data and use of…

  4. Physical Activity Questionnaire Search Results

    Cancer.gov

    The Physical Activity Questionnaire for Elderly Japanese (PAQ-EJ) 1 Over 7 typical days, how often did you take a walk or ride a bicycle on errands such as going to or from a store or taking children to school?

  5. A Split Questionnaire Survey Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Trivellore E. Raghunathan; James E. Grizzle

    1995-01-01

    This article develops a survey design where the questionnaire is split into components and individuals are administered the varying subsets of the components. A multiple imputation method for analyzing data from this design is developed, in which the imputations are created by random draws from the posterior predictive distribution of the missing parts, given the observed parts by using Gibbs

  6. Exit Interview Questionnaire Employee's Name

    E-print Network

    Oyet, Alwell

    Exit Interview Questionnaire Employee's Name: Department/Unit: Position Title: Date Hired Good Poor Very Poor Comments: #12;Job satisfaction Very High High Average Low Very Low Comments: Overall satisfaction with Memorial as an employer Very High High Average Low Very Low Comments: Overall

  7. Physical Activity Questionnaire Search Results

    Cancer.gov

    Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ) 13 Do you do any moderate-intensity sports, fitness or recreational (leisure) activities that causes a small increase in breathing or heart rate such as brisk walking, cycling, swimming, volleyball) for at least 10 minutes continuously?

  8. College Student Services Accreditation Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1979-01-01

    This questionnaire is intended for use as one aspect in accrediting the "Student Personnel Services" which an institution of higher learning provides for students. Areas in question include personal development, health fostering, vocational preparation, effective personalized learning, economic viability, transpersonal offerings, and satisfactory…

  9. Effects of Temperament and Character Profiles on State and Trait Depression and Anxiety: A Prospective Study of a Japanese Youth Population

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xi; Chen, Zi; Cui, Xiaoyi; Uji, Masayo; Miyazaki, Wataru; Oda, Masako; Nagata, Toshiaki; Kitamura, Toshinori; Katoh, Takahiko

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To examine the effects of temperament and character profiles on state and trait depression and anxiety in a Japanese youth population. Method. Japanese university students were solicited for participation in a two-wave study, with assessments performed at Time 1 (T1) and Time 2 (T2), separated by a five-month interval. A total of 184 students completed the Japanese version of the temperament and character inventory (TCI) at T1 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) at T1 and T2. We posited two latent variables, trait depression and anxiety, composed of the T1 and T2 HADS depression and anxiety scores, respectively. We also posited that temperament domain traits would predict character domain traits, and that all the personality traits would be linked to trait depression and anxiety and also predict T2 depression and anxiety. Results. Structural regression modeling showed that (1) only high Novelty Seeking predicted T2 Anxiety score, (2) trait depression and anxiety were linked to high harm avoidance and low self-directedness, and (3) trait depression was linked to high self-transcendence whereas trait anxiety was linked to low reward dependence, persistence, and cooperativeness. Conclusion. The characteristic associations between TCI subscales and depression and anxiety were limited to the trait rather than state aspects of depression and anxiety. PMID:22957225

  10. The effect of progressive muscle relaxation method on test anxiety in nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Zargarzadeh, Maryam; Shirazi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Concerning the prevalence of test anxiety among nursing students and presence of stress in nursing education years, this study was conducted to determine the effect of progressive muscle relaxation method on test anxiety among nursing students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Materials and Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study conducted in three stages on 49 male and female nursing students divided into two groups (study and control). In the pre-test stage, demographic data and Sarason anxiety questionnaires were filled by 94 students (of terms 3 and 4). Then, in the intervention stage, the students having test anxiety were assigned to two groups (study and control), and the progressive muscle relaxation method was performed in the experiment group in four sessions. Then, the students did this method two times a day until final exams, immediately following which they filled the self-reported checklists. On the first day of the final exams, test anxiety questionnaire was filled by the two groups again. The collected data were analyzed by the statistical tests, i.e. ?2, paired t-test, independent sample t-test, Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon tests, using SPSS 18. Results: Independent t-test showed a significant difference in the mean scores of test anxiety after intervention between the two groups of study and control (P = 0.00), but this difference was not significant before intervention (P = 0.76). Also, in the study group, there was a significant difference in the mean scores of test anxiety before and after intervention (P = 0.00), but this difference was not significant in the control group (P = 0.09). Mann–Whitney test showed no significant difference in categorization of test anxiety scores before intervention in the study and control groups (P = 0.60), but the difference was significant after intervention (P = 0.00). Wilcoxon test showed a significant difference in categorization of test anxiety scores in the study group before and after intervention (P = 0.00), but the difference was not significant in the control group (P = 0.083). Conclusions: Generally, the results showed that performing progressive muscle relaxation method was effective in reducing test anxiety among nursing students. It is suggested to conduct educational programs concerning this method in the faculties of nursing to decrease the test anxiety of nursing students. PMID:25558258

  11. Expectations of Care, Perceived Safety, and Anxiety following Acute Behavioural Disturbance in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Magdalen; Weiland, Tracey; Gerdtz, Marie; Dent, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Objective. We explored perspectives of emergency department users (patients and visitors) regarding the management of acute behavioural disturbances in the emergency department and whether these disturbances influenced their levels of anxiety. Methods. Emergency department patients and visitors were surveyed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and a purpose-designed questionnaire and semistructured interview. The main outcome measures were themes that emerged from the questionnaires, the interviews, and scores from the state component of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Results. 70 participants were recruited. Users of the emergency department preferred behaviourally disturbed people be managed in a separate area from the general emergency department population so that the disturbance was inaudible (n = 32) and out of view (n = 40). The state anxiety levels of those that witnessed an acute behavioural disturbance were within the normal range and did not differ to that of ED patients that were not present during such a disturbance (median, control = 37, Code Grey = 33). Conclusions. Behavioural disturbances in the emergency department do not provoke anxiety in other users. However, there is a preference that such disturbances be managed out of visual and audible range. Innovative design features may be required to achieve this. PMID:22046537

  12. [The German short version of the interpersonal guilt questionnaire--Validation in a population-based sample and clinical application].

    PubMed

    Albani, Cornelia; Blaser, Gerd; Körner, Anett; Geyer, Michael; Volkart, Reto; O'Connor, Lynn; Berry, Jack; Brähler, Elmar

    2002-01-01

    The present study describes the development of the German short version "Fragebogen zu interpersonellen Schuldgefühlen" (FIS) of the "Interpersonal Guilt Questionnaire" (IGQ) developed by O'Connor et al. The questionnaire was used in a representative sample of 652 eastern and 1283 western Germans. Woman show higher scores on the subscales "Seperation Guilt" and "Omnipotent Responsibility Guilt" than man. Eastern Germans mark higher scores on the subscale "Omnipotent Responsibility Guilt" than western Germans. Correlations between interpersonal guilt and social anxiety and differences between a non-clinical and a clinical sample show that maladaptive aspects of guilt feelings can be assessed by the "Interpersonal Guilt Questionnaire". PMID:11941527

  13. Hospital network performance: a survey of hospital stakeholders' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bravi, F; Gibertoni, D; Marcon, A; Sicotte, C; Minvielle, E; Rucci, P; Angelastro, A; Carradori, T; Fantini, M P

    2013-02-01

    Hospital networks are an emerging organizational form designed to face the new challenges of public health systems. Although the benefits introduced by network models in terms of rationalization of resources are known, evidence about stakeholders' perspectives on hospital network performance from the literature is scanty. Using the Competing Values Framework of organizational effectiveness and its subsequent adaptation by Minvielle et al., we conducted in 2009 a survey in five hospitals of an Italian network for oncological care to examine and compare the views on hospital network performance of internal stakeholders (physicians, nurses and the administrative staff). 329 questionnaires exploring stakeholders' perspectives were completed, with a response rate of 65.8%. Using exploratory factor analysis of the 66 items of the questionnaire, we identified 4 factors, i.e. Centrality of relationships, Quality of care, Attractiveness/Reputation and Staff empowerment and Protection of workers' rights. 42 items were retained in the analysis. Factor scores proved to be high (mean score>8 on a 10-item scale), except for Attractiveness/Reputation (mean score 6.79), indicating that stakeholders attach a higher importance to relational and health care aspects. Comparison of factor scores among stakeholders did not reveal significant differences, suggesting a broadly shared view on hospital network performance. PMID:23201189

  14. Effects of music therapy on anxiety in ventilator-dependent patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. L. C. Wong; Violeta Lopez-Nahas; A. Molassiotis

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of music therapy in decreasing anxiety in ventilator-dependent patients. Design: A crossover repeated measures design with random assignment was used. Setting: The intensive care unit of a university hospital in Hong Kong was used as the setting for this study. Patients: Twenty patients who were ventilator-dependent were recruited for

  15. Spiritual values and death anxiety: Implications for counseling with terminal cancer patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harriett W. Gibbs; Jeanne Achterberg-Lawlis

    1978-01-01

    Investigated death fear as a function of discomfort level, previous experience with death, and religiosity among indigent cancer patients in a county general hospital. The patients were those participants in a cancer rehabilitation program who were judged closest to death. The Allport Religious Orientation Scale, Discomfort Indices, and the Death Anxiety Scale (DAS) were administered to each patient. Patients also

  16. Symptoms of anxiety and depression in adolescent students; a perspective from Sri Lanka

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chaturaka Rodrigo; Srina Welgama; Jayantha Gurusinghe; Thilina Wijeratne; Gamini Jayananda; Senaka Rajapakse

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sri Lanka recorded an extraordinary high suicide rate for adolescents aged 15 - 19 in the early 1990s (46.5\\/100,000). With this in perspective, the Ministry of Health in Sri Lanka recommends school programmes for adolescents by mental health units of local hospitals. METHODS: We conducted cross sectional surveys to screen for symptoms of anxiety and depression among students aged

  17. Amygdala Subregions Tied to SSRI and Placebo Response in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    E-print Network

    Amygdala Subregions Tied to SSRI and Placebo Response in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder Hospital and Quintiles AB Phase I Services, Uppsala, Sweden The amygdala is a key structure reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and placebo seem to induce anxiolytic effects by attenuating amygdala

  18. The interaction of early life experiences with COMT val158met affects anxiety sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Baumann, C; Klauke, B; Weber, H; Domschke, K; Zwanzger, P; Pauli, P; Deckert, J; Reif, A

    2013-11-01

    The pathogenesis of anxiety disorders is considered to be multifactorial with a complex interaction of genetic factors and individual environmental factors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine gene-by-environment interactions of the genes coding for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) with life events on measures related to anxiety. A sample of healthy subjects (N = 782; thereof 531 women; mean age M = 24.79, SD = 6.02) was genotyped for COMT rs4680 and MAOA-uVNTR (upstream variable number of tandem repeats), and was assessed for childhood adversities [Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ)], anxiety sensitivity [Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI)] and anxious apprehension [Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ)]. Main and interaction effects of genotype, environment and gender on measures related to anxiety were assessed by means of regression analyses. Association analysis showed no main gene effect on either questionnaire score. A significant interactive effect of childhood adversities and COMT genotype was observed: Homozygosity for the low-active met allele and high CTQ scores was associated with a significant increment of explained ASI variance [R(2) = 0.040, false discovery rate (FDR) corrected P = 0.04]. A borderline interactive effect with respect to MAOA-uVNTR was restricted to the male subgroup. Carriers of the low-active MAOA allele who reported more aversive experiences in childhood exhibited a trend for enhanced anxious apprehension (R(2) = 0.077, FDR corrected P = 0.10). Early aversive life experiences therefore might increase the vulnerability to anxiety disorders in the presence of homozygosity for the COMT 158met allele or low-active MAOA-uVNTR alleles. PMID:24118915

  19. A Multitrait–Multimethod Analysis of the Construct Validity of Child Anxiety Disorders in a Clinical Sample

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. LangerJeffrey; Jeffrey J. Wood; R. Lindsey Bergman; John C. Piacentini

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines the construct validity of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SoP), panic disorder\\u000a (PD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in a clinical sample of children. Participants were 174 children, 6 to 17 years\\u000a old (94 boys) who had undergone a diagnostic evaluation at a university hospital based clinic. Parent and child ratings of\\u000a symptom severity were assessed

  20. Maternal bonding in mothers with postpartum anxiety disorder: the crucial role of subclinical depressive symptoms and maternal avoidance behaviour.

    PubMed

    Tietz, A; Zietlow, A-L; Reck, C

    2014-10-01

    Hardly any research has examined the link between postpartum anxiety disorder and maternal bonding. This study examined if postpartum anxiety disorder and maternal bonding are related in the postpartum period. Thereby, subclinical depressive symptoms and specific aspects of an anxious symptomatology were also taken into consideration. The German sample of N = 78 mother-infant dyads is composed of n = 30 mothers with postpartum anxiety disorders but without major or minor depression according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-IV) and n = 48 healthy mothers. Subjects were interviewed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders at an average infant age of M = 4.1 months. Moreover, mothers filled out the Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire-16. The Anxiety Cognitions Questionnaire, the Body Sensations Questionnaire and the Mobility Inventory were chosen to assess different aspects of anxious symptomatology. To control for concurrent subclinical depressive symptoms, we used the German Edinburgh-Postnatal-Depression Scale. Mothers with postpartum anxiety disorder reported significantly lower bonding than healthy mothers. However, in a linear regression analysis, concurrent subclinical depressive symptoms and avoidance of anxiety-related situations in company explained 27 % of the overall variance in maternal bonding. The perceived lower bonding of mothers with anxiety disorder could be due to aspects of a concurrent subclinical depressive symptomatology. This notion emphasizes the need to target even mild depressive symptoms in the treatment of postpartum anxiety disorders. The outcomes also underline that the severity of anxious symptomatology, reflected by avoidance behaviour in company, puts the mother-infant bond at risk. PMID:24687168

  1. A study on epidemiological profile of anxiety disorders among people living with HIV/AIDS in a sub-Saharan Africa HIV clinic.

    PubMed

    Olagunju, Andrew T; Adeyemi, Joseph D; Ogbolu, Raphael E; Campbell, Elizabeth A

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the prevalence, types and correlates of anxiety disorders among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) attending a sub-Saharan Africa HIV clinic. Three hundred HIV positive adults were subjected to semi-structured clinical interview using the Schedule for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry to diagnose anxiety disorders in them. Additionally, a socio-demographic/clinical profile questionnaire designed for the study was administered to the study participants. The prevalence of anxiety disorders among PLWHA in this study was 21.7 %, and anxiety disorder unspecified (6.2 %), mixed anxiety-depressive disorder (5.3 %) and social phobia (4 %) among others were the subtypes of anxiety disorders elicited among the participants. Lack of family support [correlation coefficient (r) = 0.212, P < 0.001], unemployment (r = 0.168, P = 0.004) and being unmarried (r = 0.182, P = 0.002) were much more likely to be found among participants with anxiety disorders; while younger age group (r = -0.126, P = 0.039) and negative previous mental illness (r = -0.894, P = 0.021) seem protective against anxiety disorders in this study. Our findings suggest a high burden of anxiety disorders among PLWHA and up to five-folds when compared to the general population. Thus, integration of proactive mental health screening as well as treatment services with inclusion of targeted intervention for anxiety disorders among PLWHA is recommended. PMID:22772942

  2. Intolerance of uncertainty and adult separation anxiety.

    PubMed

    Boelen, Paul A; Reijntjes, Albert; Carleton, R Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU)-the tendency to react negatively to situations that are uncertain-is involved in different anxiety disorders and depression. No studies have yet examined the association between IU and symptoms of adult separation anxiety disorder. However, it is possible that greater difficulties tolerating uncertainties that can occur in relationships with attachment figures inflate fears and worries about the consequences of being separated from these attachment figures. The current study examined the possible role of IU in symptoms of adult separation anxiety disorder, relative to its role in symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), social anxiety, and depression, using self-reported data from 215 undergraduates (92% women) with elevated separation anxiety. Findings showed that IU was significantly associated with symptom levels of separation anxiety disorder, GAD, OCD, social anxiety, and depression (rs > .30). IU continued to explain variance in OCD, social anxiety, and depression (but not GAD and separation anxiety) when controlling for the association of neuroticism, attachment anxiety, and attachment avoidance with these symptoms. Additional findings indicated that IU is more strongly associated with symptoms of GAD, OCD, and social anxiety than symptoms of adult separation anxiety disorder and depression. PMID:24601766

  3. Doctors' use of electronic medical records systems in hospitals: cross sectional survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Larum; G. Ellingsen; A. Faxvaag

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To compare the use of three electronic medical records systems by doctors in Norwegian hospitals for general clinical tasks. Design Cross sectional questionnaire survey. Semistructured telephone interviews with key staff in information technology in each hospital for details of local implementation of the systems. Setting 32 hospital units in 19 Norwegian hospitals with electronic medical records systems. Participants 227

  4. Peer Perceptions and Liking of Children with Anxiety Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy L. Verduin; Philip C. Kendall

    2008-01-01

    Examined three aspects of childhood anxiety and peer liking: (1) whether or not children can detect anxiety in age-mates,\\u000a (2) the degree to which peer-reported anxiety, self-reported anxiety, and presence of anxiety disorders are associated with\\u000a peer liking, and (3) whether or not self-reported anxiety and presence of anxiety disorders are associated with peer liking\\u000a after controlling for peer-reported anxiety.

  5. Prevalence and determinants of anxiety and depression symptoms in patients with type 2 diabetes in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    Mikali?kštien?, Aldona; Žagminas, K?stutis; Juozulynas, Algirdas; Narkauskait?, Laura; S?lyga, Jonas; Jankauskien?, Konstancija; Stukas, Rimantas; Šurkien?, Gen?

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression is associated with a variety of diabetes complications, including diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and macrovascular complications. The prevalence of the symptoms of anxiety (32%) and depression (22.4%) in patients with diabetes is considerably higher than in general population samples (10%). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and determinants of anxiety and depression symptoms in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Material/Methods This survey was conducted during 2007–2010. In total, 1500 patients were invited to participate in the study. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used to measure depression and anxiety for the evaluation of the depressive state and anxiety. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS 17.0. Results More than 70% of all respondents who participated in the study had diabetes mellitus complications (72.2%). The prevalence of mild to severe depression score was 28.5% (95% CI 25.7–31.4). The prevalence of anxiety was 42.4% (95% CI 39.3–45.5). Anxiety was more frequent among females (46.8%) than among males (34.7%) (p<0.001). A significant negative trend was observed between prevalence of anxiety and depression, and age and education (p for trend <0.001). Conclusions A significant association between depression and diabetic complications was identified (p<0.05). Duration of diabetes was a risk factor significantly associated with higher scores of anxiety among the patients with T2DM. PMID:24492643

  6. Coping strategies as psychological risk factor for antenatal anxiety, worries, and depression among Greek women.

    PubMed

    Gourounti, Kleanthi; Anagnostopoulos, Fotios; Lykeridou, Katerina

    2013-10-01

    A range of psychosocial, medical, and demographic variables may influence pregnant women's psychological status. However the association between coping strategies, anxiety, worries, and depression during pregnancy is a relatively neglected area of research. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between coping strategies, antenatal anxiety, pregnancy worries, and depressive symptomatology after controlling for the effects of background variables. The study sample consisted of 163 pregnant women, with gestational age ranging from 11 to 26 weeks, attending antenatal screening at a Greek public hospital. Coping strategies were measured with Brief COPE, pregnancy worries were measured with Cambridge Worry Scale (CWS), anxiety was assessed using State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-X version), and depression was measured with Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale (CES-D). Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated among all study variables, followed by hierarchical multiple linear regression. In the univariate analysis, low annual income, unemployment, conception after an IVF treatment, and a previous history of miscarriage were associated with anxiety, depression, and worries. Additionally, almost all coping strategies (denial, behavioral disengagement, self-blame, self-distraction, substance use, acceptance, positive reframing, active coping, and seeking emotional support) were significantly associated with antenatal anxiety, worries, and depression. Linear regression analysis showed that only previous history of miscarriage, conception after IVF, as well as denial, behavioral disengagement and acceptance coping strategies were significantly related to anxiety, worries and depressive symptomatology. The risk factors found in this study could help clinicians target anxiety and depression screening to high-risk populations of pregnant women. Provision of adequate training for obstetricians and midwives in the detection and management of anxiety and depression among pregnant women should help to decrease the psychological burden during pregnancy. PMID:23558945

  7. Cognitive trait anxiety, situational stress, and mental effort predict shifting efficiency: Implications for attentional control theory.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Elizabeth J; Edwards, Mark S; Lyvers, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Attentional control theory (ACT) predicts that trait anxiety and situational stress interact to impair performance on tasks that involve attentional shifting. The theory suggests that anxious individuals recruit additional effort to prevent shortfalls in performance effectiveness (accuracy), with deficits becoming evident in processing efficiency (the relationship between accuracy and time taken to perform the task). These assumptions, however, have not been systematically tested. The relationship between cognitive trait anxiety, situational stress, and mental effort in a shifting task (Wisconsin Card Sorting Task) was investigated in 90 participants. Cognitive trait anxiety was operationalized using questionnaire scores, situational stress was manipulated through ego threat instructions, and mental effort was measured using a visual analogue scale. Dependent variables were performance effectiveness (an inverse proportion of perseverative errors) and processing efficiency (an inverse proportion of perseverative errors divided by response time on perseverative error trials). The predictors were not associated with performance effectiveness; however, we observed a significant 3-way interaction on processing efficiency. At higher mental effort (+1 SD), higher cognitive trait anxiety was associated with poorer efficiency independently of situational stress, whereas at lower effort (-1 SD), this relationship was highly significant and most pronounced for those in the high-stress condition. These results are important because they provide the first systematic test of the relationship between trait anxiety, situational stress, and mental effort on shifting performance. The data are also consistent with the notion that effort moderates the relationship between anxiety and shifting efficiency, but not effectiveness. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25642722

  8. Dental Students’ Perception and Anxiety Levels during their First Local Anesthetic Injection

    PubMed Central

    CHANDRASEKARAN, Balamanikandasrinivasan; CUGATI, Navaneetha; KUMARESAN, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Student-to-student administration of local anesthesia (LA) has been widely used as the teaching modality to train preclinical dental students. However, studies assessing students’ outlook towards their first injection were limited. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate students’ perception and anxiety levels towards their first LA injection. Methods: Sixty three pre-clinical dental students swapped their roles as both operator and respondents in relation to their first supraperiosteal injection. After being injected, the students conferred their opinion and experiences to the questionnaire based on the five point Likert’s scale and indicated their anxiety levels based on the Interval Scale of Anxiety response (ISAR). Their perception was described using frequencies and percentages and anxiety levels were statistically analysed using one way analysis variance and paired t test. Results: Students learning LA techniques directly on human subjects depicted not only greater confidence in them but also increased anxiety levels. The anxiety levels were found to be high before and during injection in both operator and respondent. Conclusion: The students’ preferred the use of preclinical models rather than student to student administration for their first LA injection exercise. Based on the results obtained, we recommend the need of preclinical simulation model in LA training program. PMID:25897282

  9. Cannabis use and schizotypy: the role of social anxiety and other negative affective states.

    PubMed

    Najolia, Gina M; Buckner, Julia D; Cohen, Alex S

    2012-12-30

    Emerging research suggests that cannabis use might be related to psychosis onset in people vulnerable to developing schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. Furthermore, individuals with high-positive and disorganized schizotypy traits report more cannabis use and cannabis-related problems than controls. Social anxiety, a frequently co-occurring schizotypal feature, is related to increased cannabis-related problems in the general population. Building on this research, we explored the impact of social anxiety, measured by the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS), and depression and trait anxiety reported on the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), on the relationship of schizotypy, measured by the Schizotypy Personality Questionnaire-Brief Revised (SPQ-BR), to cannabis use (n=220 schizotypy, 436 controls) and frequent use and cannabis-related problems among users (n=88 schizotypy, 83 controls) in college undergraduates. Among cannabis users, social anxiety moderated the relationships of schizotypy to frequent cannabis use and more cannabis-related problems in the total schizotypy group, and across high-positive, negative, and disorganized schizotypy subgroups. Depression and trait anxiety also moderated the relationship of schizotypy to frequent cannabis use and more cannabis-related problems, but results varied across high-positive, negative, and disorganized schizotypy subgroups. Results suggest therapeutically targeting negative affective states may be useful in psychosocial intervention for cannabis-related problems in schizotypy. PMID:22920791

  10. Experiences of Dental Care and Dental Anxiety in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dahllöf, Göran; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Dental anxiety is associated with previous distressing dental experiences, such as lack of understanding of the dentist intentions, perceptions of uncontrollability and experiences of pain during dental treatment. People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are impaired in building flexible predictions and expectations, which is very much needed during a dental visit. The aims of the study were to investigate if people with ASD have more negative dental experiences and a higher level of dental anxiety compared to a matched control group. Forty-seven adults with ASD and of normal intellectual performance, and 69 age- and sex-matched typically developing controls completed questionnaires on previous dental experiences and dental anxiety, the Dental Anxiety Scale, and the Dental Beliefs Survey. The ASD group experienced pain during dental treatments more often than the controls and 22% had repeatedly experienced being forced to dental treatment they were not prepared for, compared to 3% of the controls. A higher level of dental anxiety was reported by the ASD group. Dental treatment and methods for supporting the communication with patients with ASD need to be developed, in order to reduce the negative dental experiences and dental anxiety in people with ASD. PMID:25530879

  11. Are there specific metacognitive processes associated with anxiety disorders in youth?

    PubMed Central

    Bacow, Terri Landon; May, Jill Ehrenreich; Brody, Leslie R; Pincus, Donna B

    2010-01-01

    While Wells’ metacognitive model of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) posits that certain metacognitive processes, such as negative meta-worry (negative beliefs about worry), are more strongly associated with symptoms of GAD than other anxiety disorders in adults, research has yet to determine whether the same pattern is true for younger individuals. We examined the relationship between several metacognitive processes and anxiety disorder diagnostic status in a sample of 98 youth aged 7–17 years. Twenty youth with GAD were compared with similarly sized groups of youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, n = 18), social phobia (SOC, n = 20), separation anxiety disorder (SAD, n = 20), and healthy controls who were not patients (NONP, n = 20) using a self-report measure of metacognition adapted for use with young people in this age range (Metacognitions Questionnaire for Children). Contrary to expectations, only one specific metacognitive process was significantly associated with an anxiety disorder diagnosis, in that the controls endorsed a greater degree of cognitive monitoring (self-reported awareness of one’s thoughts) than those with SAD. In addition, there was a trend indicating that nonpatients scored higher than youth with GAD on this scale. These surprising results suggest potentially differing patterns in the relationships between symptoms and metacognitive awareness in anxious youth, depending on the type of anxiety disorder presentation. PMID:22110332

  12. Diaper dermatitis-frequency and contributory factors in hospital attending children.

    PubMed

    Adalat, Shazia; Wall, David; Goodyear, Helen

    2007-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of diaper dermatitis varies widely between published studies. It is a condition which causes considerable parental anxiety. To better understand the frequency of diaper dermatitis, treatment practices, and the current importance of previously identified etiologic factors, a questionnaire survey of parents who had children wearing diapers (n = 532) attending a large United Kingdom district general hospital was undertaken. At the time of survey, only 16% of the study population had diaper dermatitis. Forty-eight percent of the study population had never had an episode of diaper dermatitis. In a multivariate analysis, current diaper dermatitis was independently associated with four factors: presence of oral thrush, number of previous episodes, frequency of diaper changes, and diarrhea. Recurrent episodes of diaper dermatitis were associated with increasing age, lack of barrier cream use, current diaper rash, and frequency of diaper changes. In the majority of children with diaper dermatitis at the time of survey, treatment had been instituted in the community. Diaper dermatitis usually presents and is treated successfully outside the hospital setting and is not a common clinical problem in secondary care. PMID:17958792

  13. The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Spilsbury, James C.; Drotar, Dennis; Rosen, Carol L.; Redline, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: Developed the Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire (CASQ), a brief, self-completed instrument to measure excessive daytime sleepiness in adolescents. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Participants: A subsample of 411 adolescents 11–17 years of age recruited from area schools, churches, and “control” participants in a sleep disordered breathing cohort study; a second subsample of 62 adolescents with diagnosed sleep disordered breathing also participating in the sleep disordered breathing study. Measurements: Participants completed the CASQ along with two other available measures of daytime sleepiness and other sleep parameters (sleep duration on school nights, sleep duration on non-school nights, and sleep debt, defined as non-school night sleep duration minus school-night sleep duration). Demographic information was obtained from a caregiver-completed questionnaire. The CASQ was developed using exploratory factor analysis, followed by confirmatory factor analysis using structural equation modeling techniques. Results: Goodness-of-fit measures for the final 16-item scale structure ranged from good to excellent. The CASQ's internal consistency was good (? = 0.89). Correlations between the CASQ, two other measures of daytime sleepiness, and sleep parameters gave preliminary evidence of the CASQ's construct validity. Conclusion: The CASQ shows promise as a valid measure of daytime sleepiness in adolescents. Citation: Spilsbury JC; Drotar D; Rosen CL et al. The cleveland adolescent sleepiness questionnaire: a new measure to assess excessive daytime sleepiness in adolescents. PMID:17993042

  14. Developing and Validation of Identifying People in Risk of Addiction Questionnaire (I.P.R.A)

    PubMed Central

    Anisi, Jafar; Bahadori, Mohammad Hossein; Jahanbakhsh, Marziyeh

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug addiction is considered as a problem of the new century which has destructive consequences for both family and society. This ominous phenomenon resulted from many factors. Present research aimed at recognition of inter-personal factors related to addiction and were conducted through a questionnaire to identify the youths at risk of addiction. Objectives Present research aimed at recognition of inter-personal factors related to addiction and were conducted through a questionnaire to identify the youths at risk of addiction. Materials and Methods The design of the present research is correlational analytic. The population consists of all young addicted or non-addicted people between the ages 18 to 35 and the sample consists of 82 addicted and 223 non-addicted young people in Tehran who were selected randomly and simply. The initial form included 120 questions which were administered on the sample in three stages. The data was analyzed through descriptive statistic and factor analysis. Results In this questionnaire four factors of depression and miserableness, having a positive attitude to drug, stress and anxiety and finally seeking high levels of excitement were respectively the strongest factors in predicting the risk of drug-abuse and addiction. The validity of the questionnaire which consists of 75 questions in the final form was calculated through internal consistency. Cronbach alpha of the whole questionnaire was 0.97, which that of the factor of depression and miserableness was 0.96, the factor of a positive attitude to drug was 0.93, the factor of stress and anxiety was 0.90 and the factor of high excitement-seeking was 0.80. Conclusions The evaluation of the questionnaire for identifying the individuals in the risk of addiction showed that the questionnaire benefits from appropriate validity and reliability. Therefore, it can be used in preventive fields and research. Moreover, by illuminating interpersonal factors that are effective in drug abuse, proper strategies can be used to prevent drug addiction. PMID:24971260

  15. Evolutionary aspects of anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Price, John S.

    2003-01-01

    Danger and harm are avoided by strategic decisions made at all three levels of the triune forebrain: rational (neomammalian), emotional (paleomammalian), and instinctive (reptilian). This applies also to potential harm from conspecifics, which leads to a choice between escalating and de-escalating strategies. Anxiety is a component of de-escalating strategies mediated by the paleomammalian and reptilian forebrains. When the neomammalian (rational) brain fails to deal with the threat of conspecific danger, these more primitive de-escalating strategies may be activated and may present as anxiety disorders. The capacity for concealment of anxiety and other forms of negative affect has also evolved, and excessive concealment may lead to psychopaihology by breaking the negative feedback loop of excessive motivation, leading to impaired performance, leading to signals of distress, and leading to reduced exhortation to succeed on the part of parents and teachers; this situation is illustrated by a model based on the Yerkes-Dodson law. PMID:22033473

  16. Properties of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist25 (HSCL-25) and the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) as screening instruments used in primary care in Afghanistan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Ventevogel; Gieljan De Vries; Willem F. Scholte; Nasratullah Rasa Shinwari; Hafizullah Faiz; Ruhullah Nassery; Wim van den Brink; Miranda Olff

    2007-01-01

    Background  Recent epidemiological studies in Afghanistan using mental health questionnaires yielded high prevalence rates for anxiety\\u000a and depression.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objectives  To explore the validity in the Afghan cultural context of two mental health questionnaires, the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25\\u000a (HSCL-25) and the Self-Reporting Questionnaire-20 (SRQ-20).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The two mental health questionnaires were compared against a ‘gold standard’ semi-structured psychiatric interview, the Psychiatric\\u000a Assessment Schedule (PAS).

  17. Validation of the French version of the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale (APAIS)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most patients are anxious before surgery. The level of preoperative anxiety depends on several factors and merits an objective evaluation. The Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) is a self-report questionnaire comprising six questions that have been developed and validated to evaluate the preoperative anxiety of patients. This global index assesses three separate areas: anxiety about anaesthesia, anxiety about surgery, and the desire for information. The purpose of this study was to translate the APAIS into French and to evaluate the psychometric properties of the French version of the APAIS. Methods The process consisted of two steps. The first step involved the production of a French version of the APAIS that was semantically equivalent to the original version. In the second step, we evaluated the psychometric properties of the French version, including the internal consistency and reliability, the differential item functioning, and the external validity. Participants older than 18, undergoing elective surgery (except obstetric), able to understand and read French, and able to complete a self-report questionnaire were eligible for inclusion in the study. A forward-backward translation was performed. The psychometric evaluation covered three domains: internal validity, external validity, and acceptability. Within 4–48 h after surgery, the patients were asked to complete the “Evaluation du Vécu de l’ANesthésie” questionnaire” (EVAN) questionnaire, which is a validated, multi-dimensional questionnaire that assesses the patient’s experiences in the perioperative period. Results A database with 175 patients was created. The principal component factor analysis revealed the same three-dimensional structure as the original scale. The confirmatory factor analysis showed a strong fit with a root mean square error of approximation of 0.069 and a comparative fit index of 1.00. The amount of differential item functioning (DIF) between the subgroups of patients (i.e., based on age, gender, type of anaesthesia or surgery, premedication, ASA physical status, and ambulatory course) was low. The APAIS was strongly correlated with the dimensions of the EVAN. Each dimension had a low proportion of missing values (ranging from 0.6 to 2.9%), which indicates good acceptability of the questionnaire. Conclusions The French version of the APAIS is valid and reliable. The availability of this tool enables the evaluation of anxiety in French patients undergoing anaesthesia. PMID:24099176

  18. The Adjective Generation Technique (AGT) and the Trait-Anxiety, State-Anxiety Distinction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Bem P.

    Research involving Potkay and Allen's Adjective Generation Technique (AGT) is reviewed concerning the measurement of anxiety. In this paper, no distinction is made between state anxiety and trait anxiety. It is suggested that state and trait anxiety may be considered apart from behavioral consistency. The issue of dramaturgical quality is…

  19. Developing a Writing Anxiety Scale and Examining Writing Anxiety Based on Various Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakaya, Ismail; Ulper, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    There are two main aims of this research. The primary aim is to develop a reliable and valid anxiety scale to determine writing anxiety levels of prospective teachers. The secondary aim is to determine what variables explain anxiety levels of students to what extent, by determining whether writing anxiety levels of prospective teachers…

  20. The prevalence and correlates of adult separation anxiety disorder in an anxiety clinic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derrick M Silove; Claire L Marnane; Renate Wagner; Vijaya L Manicavasagar; Susan Rees

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adult separation anxiety disorder (ASAD) has been identified recently, but there is a paucity of data about its prevalence and associated characteristics amongst anxiety patients. This study assessed the prevalence and risk factor profile associated with ASAD in an anxiety clinic. METHODS: Clinical psychologists assigned 520 consecutive patients to DSM-IV adult anxiety subcategories using the SCID. We also measured

  1. Anxiety Sensitivity and the Anxiety Disorders: A Meta-Analytic Review and Synthesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bunmi O. Olatunji; Kate B. Wolitzky-Taylor

    2009-01-01

    There has been significant interest in the role of anxiety sensitivity (AS) in the anxiety disorders. In this meta-analysis, we empirically evaluate differences in AS between anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and nonclinical controls. A total of 38 published studies (N = 20,146) were included in the analysis. The results yielded a large effect size indicating greater AS among anxiety disorder

  2. Library Anxiety of Law Students: A Study Utilizing the Multidimensional Library Anxiety Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Stacey L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether law students experienced library anxiety and, if so, which components contributed to that anxiety. The Multidimensional Library Anxiety Scale (MLAS) developed by Dr. Doris Van Kampen was used to assess library anxiety levels of law students. The MLAS is a 53 question Likert scale instrument that…

  3. Comorbid anxiety and mood disorders among persons with social anxiety disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brigette A Erwin; Richard G Heimberg; Harlan Juster; Melissa Mindlin

    2002-01-01

    Axis I comorbidity is associated with greater severity of social anxiety disorder. However, the differential effects of comorbid mood and anxiety disorders on symptom severity or treatment outcome have not been investigated. We evaluated 69 persons with uncomplicated social anxiety disorder, 39 persons with an additional anxiety disorder, and 33 persons with an additional mood disorder (with or without additional

  4. Mental health service use among Canadian older adults with anxiety disorders and clinically significant anxiety symptoms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tiffany Scott; Corey S. Mackenzie; Judith G. Chipperfield; Jitender Sareen

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Despite evidence of disproportionate underutilization of mental health services by older adults and by individuals with anxiety disorders, little is known specifically about service use by older adults with anxiety. This study examines the prevalence of mental health service use among older adults with anxiety disorders and clinically significant anxiety symptoms, as well as factors associated with service use.Method:

  5. The Utility of Clinicians Ratings of Anxiety Using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsburg, Golda S.; Keeton, Courtney P.; Drazdowski, Tess K.; Riddle, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinician ratings of anxiety hold the promise of clarifying discrepancies often found between child and parent reports of anxiety. The Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS) is a clinician-administered instrument that assesses the frequency, severity, and impairment of common pediatric anxiety disorders and has been used as a primary outcome…

  6. Anxiety, Mood, and Substance Use Disorders in Parents of Children with Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Alicia A.; Furr, Jami M.; Sood, Erica D.; Barmish, Andrea J.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    Examined the prevalence of anxiety, mood, and substance use disorders in the parents of anxiety disordered (AD) children relative to children with no psychological disorder (NPD). The specificity of relationships between child and parent anxiety disorders was also investigated. Results revealed higher prevalence rates of anxiety disorders in…

  7. Exploring the association between cognitive functioning and anxiety in children with autism spectrum disorders: the role of social understanding and aggression.

    PubMed

    Niditch, Laura A; Varela, R Enrique; Kamps, Jodi L; Hill, Trenesha

    2012-01-01

    This study examined relations between anxiety, aggression, social understanding, IQ, and diagnosis in a sample of 231 children (ages 2-9) diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs; Autistic Disorder, Asperger's Disorder, Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified) in a hospital setting. Children were administered tests of IQ, and parents completed measures of remaining variables. ASD diagnosis was associated with level of anxiety, and level of IQ explained this relation. IQ was significantly and positively associated with anxiety. Tests of a developmental model to explain the relation between IQ and anxiety showed that social understanding and aggression mediated the relation for toddlers. For preschool- and early elementary school-aged children, respectively, three-way interactions between IQ, social understanding, and aggression predicted anxiety, and graphs of the interactions suggest that the association between IQ and anxiety is increasingly driven by either aggression or social understanding over the course of childhood. PMID:22417187

  8. Anxiety and female sexual functioning: An empirical study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Davide Dèttore; Martina Pucciarelli; Emiliano Santarnecchi

    2012-01-01

    Previous research regarding anxiety and female sexual functioning has yielded conflicting conclusions. This study examined the impact of state\\/trait anxiety and anxiety sensitivity on sexual responding and the propensity towards sexual inhibition\\/excitation in women without an anxiety disorder (n = 100, M age = 28.8) compared to women with an anxiety disorder (panic disorder or generalized anxiety disorder, n =

  9. Motivations, Death Anxiety, and Empathy in Hospice Volunteers in France.

    PubMed

    Garbay, Meriem; Gay, Marie-Claire; Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the motivations for volunteering of hospice volunteers in France. In addition, their levels of death anxiety and empathy were measured and compared with those of French non-hospice volunteers and non-volunteers. Three questionnaires-the Inventory of Motivations for Hospice Palliative Care Volunteerism (IMHPCV),(1) the Templer/McMordie Death Anxiety Scale(2), and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index(3)-were sent via an Internet link to 2 hospice volunteer associations and to non-hospice volunteers and non-volunteers (only the hospice volunteers received the IMHPCV). Altruistic motives had the most influence on the respondents' decision to become a hospice volunteer. French hospice volunteers scored significantly lower on 3 categories of motives on the IMHPCV compared to a sample of Canadian hospice palliative care volunteers (study 2),(1) suggesting that cultural differences may be involved. No significant differences were found in levels of death anxiety or empathy between the 3 groups of respondents of the study. PMID:24879884

  10. Anxiety, depression and behavioral problems among adolescents with recurrent headache: the Young-HUNT study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well documented that both anxiety and depression are associated with headache, but there is limited knowledge regarding the relation between recurrent primary headaches and symptoms of anxiety and depression as well as behavioral problems among adolescents. Assessment of co-morbid disorders is important in order to improve the management of adolescents with recurrent headaches. Thus the main purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship of recurrent headache with anxiety and depressive symptoms and behavioral problems in a large population based cross-sectional survey among adolescents in Norway. Methods A cross-sectional, population-based study was conducted in Norway from 1995 to 1997 (Young-HUNT1). In Young-HUNT1, 4872 adolescents aged 12 to 17 years were interviewed about their headache complaints and completed a comprehensive questionnaire that included assessment of symptoms of anxiety and depression and behavioral problems, i.e. conduct and attention difficulties. Results In adjusted multivariate analyses among adolescents aged 12–14 years, recurrent headache was associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression (OR: 2.05, 95% CI: 1.61-2.61, p?anxiety and depressive symptoms was evident for all headache categories; i.e. migraine, tension-type headache and non-classifiable headache. Among adolescents aged 15–17 years there was a significant association between recurrent headache and symptoms of anxiety and depression (OR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.39-1.93, p?anxiety and depressive symptoms and attention difficulties, while tension-type headache was significantly associated only with symptoms of anxiety and depression. Non-classifiable headache was associated with attention difficulties and conduct difficulties, but not with anxiety and depressive symptoms. Headache frequency was significantly associated with increasing symptoms scores for anxiety and depressive symptoms as well as attention difficulties, evident for both age groups. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that both anxiety and depressive symptoms and behavioral problems are associated with recurrent headache, and should accordingly be considered a part of the clinical assessment of children and adolescents with headache. Identification of these associated factors and addressing them in interventions may improve headache management. PMID:24925252

  11. Self-Appraisal of Illness Questionnaire (SAIQ): relationship to researcher-rated insight and neuropsychological function in schizophrenia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kriscinda A. Marks; Philip S. Fastenau; Paul H. Lysaker; Gary R. Bond

    2000-01-01

    The Self-Appraisal of Illness Questionnaire (SAIQ) is a self-report instrument designed to assess attitudes toward mental illness among persons receiving psychiatric treatment. This instrument was developed for use in community settings, adapted closely from the Patient's Experience of Hospitalization questionnaire. In order to examine the validity of the SAIQ, a factor analysis was first conducted on the items of this

  12. Anxiety after stroke: time for an intervention.

    PubMed

    Chun, Ho-Yan Yvonne; Whiteley, William N; Carson, Alan; Dennis, Martin; Mead, Gillian E

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety is common and persistent after stroke, and is associated with a poorer quality of life. Guidelines from numerous countries, including the United Kingdom, recommend screening for poststroke emotional problems. Anxiety is a priority for the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, stroke charities, and stroke survivors in the United Kingdom. Yet there is little evidence to guide the management of anxiety after stroke. New evidence-based interventions are needed to improve the care of poststroke anxiety. PMID:26094669

  13. Genetic Approaches to Modeling Anxiety in Animals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura H. Jacobson; John F. Cryan

    \\u000a Anxiety disorders are a growing health problem world-wide. However, the causative factors, etiology, and underlying mechanisms\\u000a of anxiety disorders, as for most psychiatric disorders, remain relatively poorly understood. The current status of clinical\\u000a research indicates that anxiety traits and anxiety disorder in man have a genetic component, and therefore genetic modeling\\u000a in animals is a logical approach to gain a

  14. Pharmacological Treatment for Phobias and Anxiety Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael H. Bloch; Joseph F. McGuire

    \\u000a Anxiety disorders in childhood are quite ­common, affecting between 6 and 20% of all children (Costello, Mustillo, Erkanli,\\u000a Keeler, & Angold, 2003). Anxiety disorders can adversely impact social and academic functioning as well as self-esteem (Mendlowicz\\u000a & Stein, 2000). Children with anxiety disorders grow up to having greater rates of depression, new anxiety disorders, substance\\u000a abuse, educational underachievement, and suicide

  15. Development of the Italian version of the Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire in patients with chronic low back pain: cross-cultural adaptation, confirmatory factor analysis, reliability and validity.

    PubMed

    Monticone, Marco; Ferrante, Simona; Ferrari, Silvano; Mugnai, Raffaele; Pillastrini, Paolo; Rocca, Barbara; Vanti, Carla; Foti, Calogero

    2014-09-01

    Translating, culturally adapting and validating the Italian version of the Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire (PSOCQ-I) to allow its use with Italian-speaking patients with low back pain. The PSOCQ-I was developed by forward-backward translation, a final review by an expert committee and a test of the prefinal version to establish its correspondence with the original English version. Psychometric testing included confirmatory factor analysis, reliability by internal consistency (Cronbach's ?) and test-retest reliability (intraclass coefficient correlation), and construct validity by comparing PSOCQ-I with the Pain Catastrophising Scale (PCS), the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK), the Roland Morris Disability Scale (RMDQ), a pain Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Pearson's correlation). The questionnaire was administered to 308 patients with chronic low back pain. Factor analysis confirmed a four-factor solution (namely, Precontemplation, Contemplation, Action, and Maintenance), achieving an acceptable data-model fit. Internal consistency (?=0.91-93) and test-retest reliability (intraclass coefficient correlation=0.74-0.81) were satisfactory. Construct validity showed moderate correlations between Precontemplation and PCS (r=0.318), TSK (r=0.385), RMDQ (r=0.320) and NRS (r=0.335); low correlations were found between the other PSOCQ subscales and PCS (r=-0.062; 0.039), TSK (r=-0.164; 0.024), RMDQ (r=-0.073; 0.004) and NRS (r=-0.170; 0.020). Low correlations were found between the PSOCQ-I subscales and anxiety (r=-0.132; 0.150) and depression (r=-0.113; 0.186). The PSOCQ was translated successfully into Italian, and proved to have a good factorial structure and psychometric properties that replicated the results of other versions. Its use is recommended for research purposes. PMID:24557491

  16. Elevated Social Anxiety among Early Maturing Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenthal, Heidemarie; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W.; Babson, Kimberly A.; Gahr, Jessica L.; Trainor, Casey D.; Frala, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescence is a key period in terms of the development of anxiety psychopathology. An emerging literature suggests that early pubertal maturation is associated with enhanced vulnerability for anxiety symptomatology, although few studies have examined this association with regard to social anxiety. Accordingly, the current study was designed to…

  17. Mathematics Anxiety in Secondary Students in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Whatever the changes that are made to the mathematics curriculum in England, there will always remain a problem with mathematics anxiety. Maths anxiety is rarely facilitative. This study examined aspects of mathematics in secondary schools and how students rated them as sources of anxiety. Over 2000 students in independent and mainstream schools…

  18. Research Report Social Anxiety and Anger

    E-print Network

    Gosselin, Frédéric

    suggest that the amygdala is hyperresponsive in anxiety (Phan, Fitzgerald, Nathan, & Tancer, 2006; SteinResearch Report Social Anxiety and Anger Identification Bubbles Reveal Differential Use of Facial frequencies). Cognitive theories suggest that social phobia and social anxiety are marked by altered

  19. Examining relationships between anxiety and dangerous driving

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris S. Dula; Cristi L. Adams; Michael T. Miesner; Robin L. Leonard

    2010-01-01

    Driving anxiety that has developed following crashes has been studied relatively frequently, but anxiety per se and its effects on driving has not as yet garnered much attention in the literature. The current study included 1121 participants and found higher levels of general anxiety were related to a wide variety of dangerous driving behaviors. While there were clear and expected

  20. Anxiety Sensitivity and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calamari, John E.; Rector, Neil A.; Woodard, John L.; Cohen, Robyn J.; Chik, Heather M.

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity (AS), a cognitive risk factor for anxiety disorders, was evaluated in a homogeneous obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) sample. A total of 280 individuals with OCD completed measures. Evaluation of the Anxiety Sensitivity Index revealed a latent structure that was congruent with previous studies showing a single higher order…

  1. What Do Childhood Anxiety Disorders Predict?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bittner, Antje; Egger, Helen L.; Erkanli, Alaattin; Costello, E. Jane; Foley, Debra L.; Angold, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    Background: Few longitudinal studies of child and adolescent psychopathology have examined the links between specific childhood anxiety disorders and adolescent psychiatric disorder. In this paper we test the predictive specificity of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), overanxious disorder (OAD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and social…

  2. Social support, occupational stress and anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Terry A. Beehr; Joseph E. McGrath

    1992-01-01

    When occupational stressors, that is stress-producing environmental circumstances (SPECs) in the workplace, lead to anxiety, this anxiety is considered work-related strain. Social support is frequently recommended as a treatment of such strain, because it is expected to help in one of three ways: by directly reducing the anxiety, by interacting with SPECs to reduce the strength of their effects on

  3. Anxiety and Identity in the Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroud, Christopher; Wee, Lionel

    2006-01-01

    While ELT has long recognized the need to address student anxiety in language learning situations, it has all too often assumed that such anxiety is primarily competence-based. Consequently, there has been insufficient recognition of the fact that identity-based anxiety, too, can have significant effects on language learning in the classroom. In…

  4. Generalized anxiety disorder: neurobiological and pharmacotherapeutic perspectives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathryn M Connor; Jonathan R. T Davidson

    1998-01-01

    The concept of generalized anxiety has evolved over many years, from initial descriptions of “anxiety neurosis” to recognition of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) as a clinical entity included in the 3rd edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III) in 1980. Since 1980, the definition of GAD has undergone further change, with modifications in the salience of

  5. Comorbid Anxiety Disorders in Depressed Elderly Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric J. Lenze; Benoit H. Mulsant; Herbert C. Schulberg; D. Mary Amanda Dew; Amy E. Begley; Bruce G. Pollock; Charles F. Reynolds III

    2000-01-01

    Method: History of anxiety disorders was assessed by using a structured diag- nostic instrument in 182 depressed sub- jects aged 60 and older seen in primary care and psychiatric settings. Associa- tions between comorbid anxiety disor- ders and baseline characteristics were measured. The modified structured in- strument allowed detection of symp- toms that met inclusion criteria for gen- eralized anxiety

  6. Stereotype Threat, Test Anxiety, and Mathematics Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tempel, Tobias; Neumann, Roland

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the combined effects of stereotype threat and trait test anxiety on mathematics test performance. Stereotype threat and test anxiety interacted with each other in affecting performance. Trait test anxiety predicted performance only in a diagnostic condition that prevented stereotype threat by stereotype denial. A state measure of…

  7. Test Anxiety in Written and Oral Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparfeldt, Jorn R.; Rost, Detlef H.; Baumeister, Ulrike M.; Christ, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The distinction of different test anxiety reactions (e.g., worry, emotionality) is well established. Recently, additional relevance has been given to school-subject-specific test anxiety factors. The present study explored a further aspect concerning the structure of test anxiety experiences, specifically oral versus written examination modes. A…

  8. Depersonalization disorder and anxiety: a special relationship?

    PubMed

    Sierra, Mauricio; Medford, Nick; Wyatt, Geddes; David, Anthony S

    2012-05-15

    A significant association between anxiety and depersonalization has been found in healthy controls and psychiatric patients irrespective of underlying conditions. Although patients with depersonalization disorder (DPD) often have a history of severe anxiety symptoms, clinical observations suggest that the relation between anxiety and depersonalization is complex and poorly understood. Using relevant rating scales, levels of anxiety and depersonalization were assessed in 291 consecutive DPD cases. 'High' and 'low' depersonalization groups, were compared according to anxiety severity. Correlation and multivariate regression analyses were also used to assessed the contribution of anxiety to the phenomenology and natural course of depersonalization. A low but significant association between depersonalization and anxiety (as measured by Beck's Anxiety Inventory) was only apparent in those patients with low intensity depersonalization, but not in those with severe depersonalization. Levels of anxiety did not seem to make specific contributions to the clinical features of depersonalization itself, although DPD patients with high anxiety seem characterised by additional non-specific perceptual symptoms. The presence of a 'statistical dissociation' between depersonalization and anxiety adds further evidence in favour of depersonalization disorder being an independent condition and suggests that its association with anxiety has been overemphasized. PMID:22414660

  9. Mathematics Anxiety and the Underprepared Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godbey, Cathy

    This article discusses the symptoms and causes of math anxiety, and preventative measures that teachers can use to alleviate the stress some students experience in mathematics problem solving. Mathematics anxiety is defined as "feelings of tension and anxiety that interfere with the manipulation of numbers and the solving of mathematical problems…

  10. A Foucaultian Approach to Academic Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Gavrielle

    2008-01-01

    Academic anxiety interferes with achievement and performance, as well as social and psychological development among children and adults. Although the writings of Michel Foucault do not address anxiety directly, his themes of knowledge and power have been applied to education and describe relationships that are likely to create anxiety among some…

  11. The structure of anxiety symptoms among preschoolers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan H. Spence; Ronald Rapee; Casey McDonald; Michelle Ingram

    2001-01-01

    This study examined whether anxiety symptoms in preschoolers reflect subtypes of anxiety consistent with current diagnostic classification systems, or should be better regarded as representing a single dimension. Parents of a large community sample of preschoolers aged 2.5 to 6.5 years rated the frequency with which their children experienced a wide range of anxiety problems. Exploratory factor analysis indicated four

  12. Management of anxiety after acute myocardial infarction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan K. Frazier; Debra K. Moser; Jennifer L. O'Brien; Bonnie J. Garvin; Kyungeh An; Marlene Macko

    2002-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is common after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and may induce complications and poorer outcome because of activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis. Little is known about critical care nurses' management of anxiety in the initial days after AMI. Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe pharmacological and nonpharmacological anxiety management

  13. Reducing nursing students' anxiety level and increasing retention of materials.

    PubMed

    Phillips, A P

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study is to examine the effects active learning, collaboration and modified group testing have on reducing students' anxiety and increasing learning and retention of material. Subjects consist of 34 associate degree nursing students enrolled in the Advanced Adult Health nursing class at North Georgia College. Most of the students are married, have children and work part time. A self-reporting questionnaire suggests a reduction of the students' anxiety during the quarter. The attitudinal questionnaire reveals an atmosphere of collaboration among peers. Data evaluating learning and retention of material were analyzed using the parametric (T-test) and nonparametric (Wiley Rank Sum test) methods. Examination of the Null Hypotheses I and II suggests there were increased learning and retention of material as evidenced by higher grades on the comprehensive final examination than on the quizzes given after presentation of content. Principles of andragogy as defined by Knowles (1980) and cooperation with peers as described by Johnson, Johnson, Holabec, and Roy (1984), Johnson, Johnson, and Maruyama (1983), and Johnson and Johnson (1975) form the theoretical foundation. PMID:2828575

  14. Temperament factor structure in fragile X syndrome: the children's behavior questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jane E; Tonnsen, Bridgette L; Robinson, Marissa; McQuillin, Samuel D; Hatton, Deborah D

    2014-02-01

    Early patterns of temperament lay the foundation for a variety of developmental constructs such as self-regulation, psychopathology, and resilience. Children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) display unique patterns of temperament compared to age-matched clinical and non-clinical samples, and early patterns of temperament have been associated with later anxiety in this population. Despite these unique patterns in FXS and recent reports of atypical factor structure of temperament questionnaires in Williams Syndrome (Leyfer, John, Woodruff-Borden, & Mervis, 2012), no studies have examined the latent factor structure of temperament scales in FXS to ensure measurement validity in this sample. The present study used confirmatory factor analysis to examine the factor structure of a well-validated parent-reported temperament questionnaire, the Children's Behavior Questionnaire (Rothbart, Ahadi, Hershey, & Fisher, 2001), in a sample of 90 males with FXS ages 3-9 years. Our data produced a similar, but not identical, three-factor model that retained the original CBQ factors of negative affectivity, effortful control, and extraversion/surgency. In particular, our FXS sample demonstrated stronger factor loadings for fear and shyness than previously reported loadings in non-clinical samples, consistent with reports of poor social approach and elevated anxiety in this population. Although the original factor structure of the Children's Behavior Questionnaire is largely retained in children with FXS, differences in factor loading magnitudes may reflect phenotypic characteristics of the syndrome. These findings may inform future developmental and translational research efforts. PMID:24380785

  15. General Factor of Personality Questionnaire (GFPQ): only one factor to understand personality?

    PubMed

    Amigó, Salvador; Caselles, Antonio; Micó, Joan C

    2010-05-01

    This study proposes a psychometric approach to assess the General Factor of Personality (GFP) to explain the whole personality. This approach defends the existence of one basic factor that represents the overall personality. The General Factor of Personality Questionnaire (GFPQ) is presented to measure the basic, combined trait of the complete personality. The questionnaire includes 20 items and is constituted by two scales with 10 items each one: the Extraversion Scale (ES) and the Introversion Scale (IS). The GFPQ shows adequate internal consistency and construct validity, while the relationships with the personality factors of other models and with psychopathology are as expected. It correlates positively and significantly with Extraversion (E) and Psychoticism (P), and negatively with Neuroticism (N) of Eysenck's EPQ (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire); it correlates positively and significantly with the Sensation Seeking Scaled (SSS) of Zuckerman, and is inside the expected direction with Sensitivity to Reward (SR) and Sensitivity to Punishment (SP) of the Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ), which represent the approach and avoidance trends of behavior, respectively. It not only relates negatively with the personality disorders of the anxiety spectrum, but also with the emotional disorders in relation to anxiety and depression, and it relates positively with the antisocial personality disorder. PMID:20480675

  16. Targeted Behavioral Therapy for childhood generalized anxiety disorder: a time-series analysis of changes in anxiety and sleep.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Michelle A; Alfano, Candice A

    2014-03-01

    This study examined the efficacy of Targeted Behavioral Therapy (TBT), a newly developed intervention targeting features of childhood generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Using a time-series design, 4 children (7-12 years) with primary GAD were treated with TBT, which includes sleep improvement strategies, systematic desensitization for reducing intolerance of uncertainty, and in vivo exposures for anxiety. Diagnostic interviews and questionnaires were administered at baseline, post-treatment and 3 months follow-up. Anxiety symptoms and sleep characteristics/problems were rated weekly during a 4-week baseline and 14-weeks of treatment. Two children remitted at post-treatment and no child had a GAD diagnosis at follow-up. Child but not parent report revealed improvements in both worry and sleep. Despite improvements from pre- to post-assessment, considerable symptom fluctuation observed during the baseline period preclude conclusion that symptom changes are specifically attributable to the course of treatment. Overall, preliminary support is provided for the efficacy of TBT for childhood GAD. PMID:24289931

  17. Depression and general anxiety in the prisoner of war's children: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed Hossein; Razavi-Ratki, Seid Kazem; Nojomi, Marzieh Molavi

    2012-01-01

    Background The main aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of depression and general anxiety of the prisoners of war (POW) children. The study was also designed to compare the prevalence of depression and general anxiety amongst the POW's children and normal adults, 20 years after the Iraq-Iran war. Method An analytic cross-sectional study carried out in June 2009 in Yazd (the centre of Yazd province in Iran). The target and sampled population were the children of the Iranian POW who lived in Yazd. One hundred and twenty six POW's children, who were born before 1990 (date of father's freedom) were assessed. The duration of father's captivation was between 29-119 months. Ninety-five subjects accepted to participate. General anxiety and major depression were assessed by Persian version of Hamilton Scale for anxiety and Beck depression Inventory. This study was a combination of the psychological interview and questionnaire. Ninety five of normal adult group were also paired matched and assessed. Result Among 126 POW's children who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, the responsive rate was 75.3% (95 participants). The mean age of participants was 28.3 (SD: 5.34).The father's captivation duration were 29-119 months (mean: 79.2, SD: 21.6). The prevalence of depression and general anxiety amongst the POW's children were 48.4% and 79%. The prevalence of depression and general anxiety among the paired group were 21.1% and 63.2%.The differences between two groups were significant (p =0.000). Conclusion In this study we have demonstrated the prevalence of major depression and general anxiety in POW's children and a normal adult sample. The differences of major depression and general anxiety among the two groups were significant. PMID:23482674

  18. A Randomized-Controlled Trial Examining the Effects of Reflexology on Anxiety of Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Molavi Vardanjani, Mehdi; Masoudi Alavi, Negin; Razavi, Narges Sadat; Aghajani, Mohammad; Azizi-Fini, Esmail; Vaghefi, Seied Morteza

    2013-01-01

    Background: The anxiety reduction before coronary angiography has clinical advantages and is one of the objectives of nursing. Reflexology is a non-invasive method that has been used in several clinical situations. Applying reflexology might have effect on the reduction of anxiety before coronary angiography. Objectives: The aim of this randomized clinical trial was to investigate the effect of reflexology on anxiety among patients undergoing coronary angiography. Patients and Methods: This trial was conducted in Shahid Beheshti Hospital, in Kashan, Iran. One hundred male patients who were undergoing coronary angiography were randomly enrolled into intervention and placebo groups. The intervention protocol was included 30 minutes of general foot massage and the stimulation of three reflex points including solar plexus, pituitary gland, and heart. The placebo group only received the general foot massage. Spielbergers state trait anxiety inventory was used to assess the anxiety experienced by patients. Data was analyzed using Man-Witney, Wilcoxon and Chi-square tests. The stepwise multiple regressions used to analyze the variables that are involved in anxiety reduction. Results: The mean range of anxiety decreased from 53.24 to 45.24 in reflexology group which represented 8 score reduction (P = 0.0001). The reduction in anxiety was 5.9 score in placebo group which was also significant (P = 0.0001). The anxiety reduction was significantly higher in reflexology group (P = 0.014). The stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that doing reflexology can explain the 7.5% of anxiety reduction which made a significant model. Conclusions: Reflexology can decrease the anxiety level before coronary angiography. Therefore, reflexology before coronary angiography is recommended. PMID:25414869

  19. Anxiety and Depression Are More Prevalent in Patients with Graves' Disease than in Patients with Nodular Goitre

    PubMed Central

    Bové, Kira Bang; Watt, Torquil; Vogel, Asmus; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Bjoerner, Jakob Bue; Groenvold, Mogens; Bonnema, Steen Joop; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective Graves' disease has been associated with an increased psychiatric morbidity. It is unclarified whether this relates to Graves' disease or chronic disease per se. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms in patients with Graves' disease compared to patients with another chronic thyroid disease, nodular goitre, and to investigate determinants of anxiety and depression in Graves' disease. Methods 157 cross-sectionally sampled patients with Graves' disease, 17 newly diagnosed, 140 treated, and 251 controls with nodular goitre completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The differences in the mean HADS scores between the groups were analysed using multiple linear regression, controlling for socio-demographic variables. HADS scores were also analysed dichotomized: a score >10 indicating probable ‘anxiety’/probable ‘depression’. Determinants of anxiety and depression symptoms in Graves' disease were examined using multiple linear regression. Results In Graves' disease levels of anxiety (p = 0.008) and depression (p = 0.014) were significantly higher than in controls. The prevalence of depression was 10% in Graves' disease versus 4% in nodular goitre (p = 0.038), anxiety was 18 versus 13% (p = 0.131). Symptoms of anxiety (p = 0.04) and depression (p = 0.01) increased with comorbidity. Anxiety symptoms increased with duration of Graves' disease (p = 0.04). Neither thyroid function nor autoantibody levels were associated with anxiety and depression symptoms. Conclusions Anxiety and depression symptoms were more severe in Graves' disease than in nodular goitre. Symptoms were positively correlated to comorbidity and duration of Graves' disease but neither to thyroid function nor thyroid autoimmunity. PMID:25538899

  20. Measuring Anxiety in Visually-Impaired People: A Comparison between the Linear and the Nonlinear IRT Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Pallero, Rafael; Anguiano-Carrasco, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The present study has two main interests. First, some pending issues about the psychometric properties of the CTAC (an anxiety questionnaire for blind and visually-impaired people) are assessed using item response theory (IRT). Second, the linear model is compared to the graded response model (GRM) in terms of measurement precision, sensitivity…

  1. Therapeutic Factors and Members' Perception of Co-Leaders' Attitudes in a Psychoeducational Group for Greek Children with Social Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouzos, Andreas; Vassilopoulos, Stephanos P.; Baourda, Vasiliki C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate therapeutic factors and perception of co-leaders' attitudes in elementary children. The Critical Incident Questionnaire was collected from participants during 8 sessions of 3 psychoeducational groups for social anxiety, whereas the Barrett-Lennard Relationship Inventory was administered twice. It was…

  2. Comparison of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy and Psychodynamic Therapy in the Treatment of Anxiety among University Students: An Effectiveness Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monti, Fiorella; Tonetti, Lorenzo; Ricci Bitti, Pio Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural (CBT) and psychodynamic (PDT) therapies in the treatment of anxiety among university students. To this aim, the Symptom Questionnaire (SQ) was completed by 30 students assigned to CBT and by 24 students assigned to PDT, both at the beginning and at the end of…

  3. An Antidote for Science Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisel, Raymond W.

    1991-01-01

    Recounts an anecdote about a teacher's science anxiety resulting from the mysterious results of a plant growth experiment. Students found that bean plants grew taller in a dark closet because of etiolation. Points out that teachers need to deal with experimental results objectively and resist looking for "right" answers. (MDH)

  4. Cloacal Anxiety in Female Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Gilmore

    1998-01-01

    Contemporary psychoanalytic theory about feminine genital anxieties has shifted our focus away from some essential developmental realities of the little girl prior to the oedipal phase. Anal phase experience has recently been reemphasized as contributing significantly to the girl's developing body image, her mastery modes, and her psychological experience of gender. This paper proposes that associated with this phase is

  5. Mental imagery in anxiety disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emily A. Holmes

    2007-01-01

    Distressing mental images are common in anxiety disorders and have recently been found to have an important role in the maintenance of anxious problems. For example, in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) the hallmark feature is the presence of recurrent sensory images of a past trauma, known as ‘flashbacks’. These flashbacks comprise the key information that needs to be addressed in

  6. Treating anxiety in early life.

    PubMed

    Cartwright-Hatton, Sam

    2013-12-01

    Anxiety disorders in pre-adolescence are probably the most common serious disorder of childhood, affecting around 1 in 30 British children. These conditions are chronic, distressing and impairing, and are treatable, but we are currently doing a poor job of serving these children. PMID:24297785

  7. Implementing Benson's Relaxation Training in Hemodialysis Patients: Changes in Perceived Stress, Anxiety, and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Ali; Gorji, Mohammad Ali Heidari; Gorji, Ali Morad Heidari; Yazdani, Jamshid; Ardebil, Maryam Didehdar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hemodialysis patients usually experience high levels of psychological stress, anxiety, and depression. Reducing these matters in patients provides more psychological resources to cope with their physical situation. Aim: The present study aimed to explore the efficacy of Benson's relaxation technique for stress, anxiety, and depression of patients with hemodialysis. Materials and Methods: Eighty hemodialysis patients were selected from two hospitals as an intervention and control groups. Then Benson relaxation training was implemented in the intervention group for 15 min twice a day during 4 weeks. The patients were assessed by depression, anxiety, and stress scale; which was completed before and after the intervention. Results: There were significant differences between stress and anxiety levels in case group before and after intervention (P > 0.001) and there is no meaningful difference between the mean of depression value in case group before and after intervention (P > 0.22). Conclusion: Instructing Benson's relaxation technique is accompanied by reducing stress and anxiety level of hemodialysis patients. Reducing stress and anxiety levels can provide more calmness for the patients so that pursuing medical therapy would be accompanied with more tranquility. Authors have suggested to improve and prevent the patients’ psychological problems as well as other chronic disorders by applying this practice. PMID:24251271

  8. Defense style changes with the addition of psychodynamic group therapy to clonazepam in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Knijnik, Daniela Z; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Blanco, Carlos; Moraes, Carolina; Hauck, Simone; Mombach, Clarissa K; Strapasson, Atahualpa C P; Manfro, Gisele G; Eizirik, Cláudio L

    2009-07-01

    Psychodynamic Group Therapy (PGT) and clonazepam are strategies to reduce symptoms of generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD). The addition of PGT might lead to changes in defense styles. The objective of this study is to examine changes in defense styles when comparing clonazepam to psychodynamic group therapy plus clonazepam in GSAD during 12 weeks. Fifty-seven patients that met DSM-IV criteria for GSAD participated. social anxiety disorder symptoms were evaluated with the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, and defense styles with the Defense Style Questionnaire. All defense styles changed overtime for both groups, especially mature defense style, which increased independently of the treatment allocation group. Regression analyses found that overtime there was a reduction in neurotic defenses in the combined group, whereas there was an increase in the clonazepam group. Neurotic defense style can change toward greater adaptiveness with the addition of PGT to clonazepam in GSAD, even in 12 weeks. PMID:19597364

  9. [Preliminary validation of the French translation of anxiety sensibility index-revised (ASI-R)].

    PubMed

    Bouvard, M; Ayxères-Vighetto, A; Dupont, H; Aupetit, J; Portalier, S; Arrindell, W

    2003-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity represents a stimulus-outcome expectancy that reflects individual differences in the propensity to experience fear in response to one's arousal-related bodily sensations. It refers to the fear of anxiety-related symptoms that are based on beliefs that such sensations have negative somatic, social or psychological consequences. Anxiety sensitivity occupies an important place in theory and research on panic and related interoceptive fear disorders. Findings from this body of research indicate that this construct may act as a specific vulnerability variable in the development of panic attacks and anxiety symptoms. However, anxiety sensitivity theory also has been applied to understanding mood disorders and chronic pain disorders. Thus, as a psychological construct, anxiety sensitivity holds specific relevance to understanding panic disorders and general relevance for expanding knowledge about negative emotional functioning in other pathologies. All the research on anxiety sensitivity has been completed with the 16-item Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI). The review of the literature using this instrument suggested that anxiety sensitivity has three lower-order factors that all load on a single higher-order factor. The lower-order factors represent Physical-Concerns, Mental Incapacitation Concerns, and Social Concerns, and the higher-order factor represents the global anxiety sensitivity construct (21). Taylor and Cox (22) suggested that this questionnaire was not designed on an a priori basis to measure the identified lower-order factors. The low number of items for the Social and Mental Incapacitation dimensions of the 16-item ASI often leads to relatively lower levels of reliability compared to the third dimension. To address this issue, Taylor and Cox (22) developed an expanded measure of the anxiety sensitivity construct. The 36-item Revised Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI-R) maintains the same format as the 16-item ASI, but expands the number of content domains assessed. The ASI-R was designed to assess 6 lower-order domains identified in previous factor analytic research using the 16-item ASI (21), including fear of cardiovascular symptoms, fear of respiratory symptoms, fear of gastrointestinal symptoms, fear of publicity observable reactions, fear of dissociative and neurological symptoms, and fear of cognitive dyscontrol. The principal components factor analysis using the ASI-R among psychiatric outpatients indicated that there were 4 lower-order factors tapping the constructs of (1) fear of respiratory symptoms, (2) fear of publicly observable anxiety reactions, (3) fear of cardiovascular symptoms, and (4) fear of cognitive dyscontrol (22). A recent study (27) provided an initial psychometric evaluation of the ASI-R in a large, diverse sample of people (n = 2,786) from 6 different countries: Canada, United States, Mexico, Spain, The Netherlands and France. The data suggested that the two-factor solution is most replicable than other solutions (2 to 6 factors). The underlying structure of the anxiety sensitivity construct was generally similar across countries, tapping fear about the negative consequences of anxiety-related physical and social-cognitive sensations. Lower-order factors were moderately to strongly correlated with one another and showed good internal consistency. This manuscript presents the French translation of the ASI-R and a preliminary validation study. This research was realized conjointly with the transcultural study previously mentioned (27). Seven hundred and one French university students (non-clinical participants) completed the questionnaire at the beginning of a class. Subjects were undergraduate students from 2 universities (psychology and classics). Table I provides age, sex and marital status. There were no differences between the two groups on sex. The two groups were not comparable on age and marital status. The psychology group was older than the other was. The psychology students were also more married. The total group (n = 701) comprises 79 men and 622 women, with a

  10. Antidepressant adherence after psychiatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, Kara; Ganoczy, Dara; Pfeiffer, Paul N.; Miller, Erin M.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Objective Depressed patients discharged from psychiatric hospitalizations face increased risks for adverse outcomes including suicide, yet antidepressant adherence rates during this high-risk period are unknown. Using Veterans Affairs (VA) data, we assessed antidepressant adherence and predictors of poor adherence among depressed veterans following psychiatric hospitalization. Method We identified VA patients nationwide with depressive disorders who had a psychiatric hospitalization between April 1, 1999 and September 30, 2003, received antidepressant medication, and had an outpatient appointment following discharge. We calculated medication possession ratios (MPRs), a measure of medication adherence, within three and six months following discharge. We assessed patient factors associated with having lower levels of adherence (MPRs <0.8) after discharge. Results 20,931 and 23,182 patients met criteria for three and six month MPRs. The mean three month MPR was 0.79 (s.d.=0.37). The mean six month MPR was 0.66 (s.d.=0.40). Patients with poorer adherence were male, younger, non-white, and had a substance abuse disorder, but were less likely to have PTSD or other anxiety disorders. Conclusion Poor antidepressant adherence is common among depressed patients after psychiatric hospitalization. Efforts to improve adherence at this time may be critical in improving the outcomes of these high-risk patients. PMID:19609666

  11. Resilience, self-efficacy, coping styles and depressive and anxiety symptoms in those newly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tan-Kristanto, Stef; Kiropoulos, Litza A

    2015-09-01

    High levels of depressive and anxiety symptoms have been reported by individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). This study examined the associations between resilience, self-efficacy and coping and depressive and anxiety symptoms and whether resilience, self-efficacy and coping were predictors of depressive and anxiety symptoms in patients newly diagnosed with MS. A sample of 129 individuals newly diagnosed with MS participated in this cross-sectional study and completed an online questionnaire assessing resilience, self-efficacy, coping and depressive and anxiety symptoms. Results revealed that depressive and anxiety symptoms were significantly associated with problem-focused, emotion-focused and avoidance coping strategies, resilience and self-efficacy. Anxiety symptoms were also significantly associated with employment status and level of disability. Results from hierarchical multiple regression revealed that the resilience subscale of personal competence, the avoidance coping style of substance use and emotion-focused coping styles of venting predicted depressive symptoms and uniquely accounted for 63.8% of the variance in the depression score, F (18, 124)?=?10.36, p = .000. Level of disability and employment status accounted for 13.2% of the anxiety score and avoidance coping style of denial and emotion-focused coping style of humour accounted for 36.4% of the variance in the anxiety symptom score, F (15, 112)?=?6.37, p = .000. Our findings suggest that resilience and avoidance and emotion-focused coping strategies are predictive of depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms in those newly diagnosed with MS. Resilience and coping styles may be another target for interventions aimed at managing depressive and anxiety symptoms in those newly diagnosed with MS. PMID:25588098

  12. Predicting the Onset of Anxiety Syndromes at 12 Months in Primary Care Attendees. The PredictA-Spain Study

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Peral, Patricia; Luna, Juan de Dios; Marston, Louise; King, Michael; Nazareth, Irwin; Motrico, Emma; GildeGómez-Barragán, María Josefa; Torres-González, Francisco; Montón-Franco, Carmen; Sánchez-Celaya, Marta; Díaz-Barreiros, Miguel Ángel; Vicens, Catalina; Muñoz-Bravo, Carlos; Bellón, Juan Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Background There are no risk algorithms for the onset of anxiety syndromes at 12 months in primary care. We aimed to develop and validate internally a risk algorithm to predict the onset of anxiety syndromes at 12 months. Methods A prospective cohort study with evaluations at baseline, 6 and 12 months. We measured 39 known risk factors and used multilevel logistic regression and inverse probability weighting to build the risk algorithm. Our main outcome was generalized anxiety, panic and other non-specific anxiety syndromes as measured by the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders, Patient Health Questionnaire (PRIME-MD-PHQ). We recruited 3,564 adult primary care attendees without anxiety syndromes from 174 family physicians and 32 health centers in 6 Spanish provinces. Results The cumulative 12-month incidence of anxiety syndromes was 12.2%. The predictA-Spain risk algorithm included the following predictors of anxiety syndromes: province; sex (female); younger age; taking medicines for anxiety, depression or stress; worse physical and mental quality of life (SF-12); dissatisfaction with paid and unpaid work; perception of financial strain; and the interactions sex*age, sex*perception of financial strain, and age*dissatisfaction with paid work. The C-index was 0.80 (95% confidence interval?=?0.78–0.83) and the Hedges' g?=?1.17 (95% confidence interval?=?1.04–1.29). The Copas shrinkage factor was 0.98 and calibration plots showed an accurate goodness of fit. Conclusions The predictA-Spain risk algorithm is valid to predict anxiety syndromes at 12 months. Although external validation is required, the predictA-Spain is available for use as a predictive tool in the prevention of anxiety syndromes in primary care. PMID:25184313

  13. Comparison of depression, anxiety, stress, and related factors among women and men with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Mina; Behboodi, Zahra M.; Saadat, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To compare depression, anxiety, stress, and related factors among women and men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: In this cross-sectional survey conducted between November and September 2013, 200 participants with HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) attending Consultation Centers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Participants with HIV/AIDS were interviewed using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales questionnaire (DASS21 ). RESULTS: There were significant associations between marital status of women and the level of depression (P < 0.05). However, the mean depression and anxiety in women are greater than men (P < 0.05), and the mean stress in men is greater than women (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: HIV infection is related with psychiatric disorders. According to the results, women are more vulnerable to depression and anxiety and they need more care. Management of these psychiatric disorders is very important and requires innovative comprehensive approaches. PMID:25838749

  14. Modelling Anxiety in Humans for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Siepmann, Martin; Joraschky, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Animal behavioural profiles are commonly employed to investigate new therapeutic agents to treat anxiety disorders as well as to investigate the mechanism of action of anxiolytic drugs. However, many clinically important symptoms of anxiety can not be modelled directly in animals. Human models of anxiety should bridge between animal models and anxiety disorders. Experimental anxiety states in humans can be induced by either pharmacological means such as CO2 inhalation or psychological means such as aversive conditioning of skin conductance responses to tones. Investigation of these models may contribute to a better understanding of anxiety disorders, both from a biological and behavioural point of view. In a comprehensive review existing models of human experimental anxiety states are summarized and validity is discussed. PMID:18615150

  15. Health anxiety disorders: a cognitive construal.

    PubMed

    Rachman, S

    2012-08-01

    The features of severe health anxiety, intense and persistent anxiety about one's present and future health, are described. In common with other anxiety disorders such as GAD, PTSD and OCD, the core of HAD is distressing, uncontrollable anxiety, and is classifiable as an Anxiety Disorder, Health Anxiety Disorder (HAD). The cognitive construal of HAD proposes that health anxiety is caused by catastrophic misinterpretations of the significance of sensations and/or changes in bodily functions and appearance (such as swellings, pain, loss of energy, dizzy spells). The nature, causes, triggers, persistence, assessment and treatment of HAD are reviewed, and the present status of the cognitive model is appraised. Suggestions are made for future research and clinical applications, and the need for incisive evaluations of the main premises of the model is emphasized. PMID:22659160

  16. The revised version of the screen for child anxiety related emotional disorders (scared-r): Further evidence for its reliability and validity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Muris; Harald Merckelbach; Anneke Van Brakel; Birgit Mayer

    1999-01-01

    The revised version of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED-R) is a self-report questionnaire that intends to measure symptoms of childhood anxiety disorders as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM; American Psychiatric Association, 1994). The current article presents three studies which examined in more detail the reliability and validity of the SCARED-R.

  17. Surveys and questionnaires in nursing research.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Fiona

    2015-06-17

    Surveys and questionnaires are often used in nursing research to elicit the views of large groups of people to develop the nursing knowledge base. This article provides an overview of survey and questionnaire use in nursing research, clarifies the place of the questionnaire as a data collection tool in quantitative research design and provides information and advice about best practice in the development of quantitative surveys and questionnaires. PMID:26080989

  18. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: sense of coherence and family support versus anxiety and depression].

    PubMed

    Tselebis, A; Bratis, D; Pachi, A; Moussas, G; Karkanias, A; Harikiopoulou, M; Theodorakopoulou, E; Kosmas, E; Ilias, I; Siafakas, N; Vgontzas, A; Tzanakis, N

    2013-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is mainly related to smoking habit and is characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. The airflow limitation is usually both progressive and associated with an abnormal inflammatory response of the lungs to noxious particles or gases. Worldwide and in Greece, COPD constitutes a major epidemiological issue. Incidence of depression and anxiety is high in the COPD population. Most studies on depression and anxiety in COPD deal with factors that are positively correlated with both of these comorbidities. The aim of our study was to assess whether two variables, sense of coherence (SOC) and perception of family support (FS), are negatively correlated with depressive and anxiety symptoms in outpatients with COPD. According to Aaron Antonovsky, sense of coherence refers to the ability of individuals to make sense of and manage events. Studies in other diseases suggest that sense of family support has a significant impact on the course and outcome of the disease, yet a limited number of reports across literature addresses the role of family support in COPD patients. In our present study one hundred twenty two (98 men and 24 women) outpatients with pure COPD were included. Age and years of education were recorded. Severity of COPD was assessed with spirometry before and after bronchodilation. All patients replied to self- administered questionnaires on depression (Beck Depression Inventory, BDI), anxiety (Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Scale, STAI), family support (Family Support Scale, FSS-13) and sense of coherence (Sense of Coherence Scale, SOC). According to our results the mean BDI depression score was 11.65 (SD 7.35), mean trait anxiety score was 40.69 (SD 11.19), mean SOC score was 54.62 (SD 7.40) and mean FS score was 64.58 (SD 11.63). Women patients had higher anxiety scores and lower sense of family support compared to men. Significant negative correlations were evidenced between depression and sense of coherence as well as between anxiety and family support. Step-wise multiple linear regression analysis verified the results and quantified the aforementioned correlations. Notably, raising scores in sense of family support by one point reduces anxiety scores by 0.14 points, and increasing sense of coherence scores by one point reduces depression scores by 0.21 points. In sum, our study confirms the presence of high levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms in COPD patients, with females being in a more disadvantaged position as they tend to have higher levels of both. Sense of coherence and family support are both protective psychological factors against the risk of developing anxiety and depressive symptoms in these patients. PMID:24200541

  19. Anxiety and Somatic Complaints in Children with Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Madeleine J.; Compas, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective?To compare anxiety symptoms and disorders in children and adolescents with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), anxiety disorders, and healthy control children.?Methods?Twenty-one children with RAP (nine males, mean age = 11.05) were compared to 21 children with anxiety disorders (11 males, mean age = 12.29), and 21 children without pain or anxiety (nine males, mean age = 11.57) using diagnostic interviews and continuous measures of anxiety and other internalizing symptoms.?Results?Sixty-seven percent of children with RAP met criteria for an anxiety disorder. Children with RAP were higher than well children but not significantly different from children with anxiety on total internalizing and anxiety symptoms.?Conclusions?RAP and anxiety are closely related. Further understanding between these disorders is essential to understanding the development and progression of RAP, and to inform the prevention and treatment of the disorder. PMID:18577541

  20. Psychometric evaluation of a visual analog scale for the assessment of anxiety

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fast-acting medications for the management of anxiety are important to patients and society. Measuring early onset, however, requires a sensitive and clinically responsive tool. This study evaluates the psychometric properties of a patient-reported Global Anxiety - Visual Analog Scale (GA-VAS). Methods Data from a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study of lorazepam and paroxetine in patients with Generalized Anxiety Disorder were analyzed to assess the reliability, validity, responsiveness, and utility of the GA-VAS. The GA-VAS was completed at clinic visits and at home during the first week of treatment. Targeted psychometric analyses—test-retest reliabilities, validity correlations, responsiveness statistics, and minimum important differences—were conducted. Results The GA-VAS correlates well with other anxiety measures, at Week 4, r = 0.60 (p < 0.0001) with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety and r = 0.74 (p < 0.0001) with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale - Anxiety subscale. In terms of convergent and divergent validity, the GA-VAS correlated -0.54 (p < 0.0001), -0.48 (p < 0.0001), and -0.68 (p < 0.0001) with the SF-36 Emotional Role, Social Function, and Mental Health subscales, respectively, but correlated much lower with the SF-36 physical functioning subscales. Preliminary minimum important difference estimates cluster between 10 and 15 mm. Conclusions The GA-VAS is capable of validly and effectively capturing a reduction in anxiety as quickly as 24 hours post-dose. PMID:20529361

  1. State anxiety and depression as factors modulating and influencing postoperative pain in dental implant surgery. A prospective clinical survey

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio; Montero-Martín, Javier; Prados-Frutos, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Objetives: To determine whether preoperative state anxiety and depression modulate or influence objective and subjective postoperative pain following dental implant insertion. Study Design: Prospective, clinical study with 7-day follow-up of a sample of 105 subjects who preoperatively completed the state anxiety questionnaire (STAI-E) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and postoperatively, at 2 and 7 days, recorded objective pain with the Semmes-Weinstein mechanical esthesiometer (SW test) and subjective pain with the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Results: 85.6% and 81.5% of patients, respectively, recorded no signs of state anxiety or depression. The correlation between anxiety and depression for both maxillary bones was the lower (P=0.02). The correlation between subjective and objective pain at 2 and 7 days, and the anatomic regions intervened, was statistically significant in the mandible at day 7 (P<0.01), and highly significant (P<0.001) for the other variables. The correlation between state anxiety and objective pain at day 7 was nearly statistically significant (P=0.07). Conclusions: The correlation between state anxiety and depression, and objective and subjective pain at day 7 was not statistically significant. A strong correlation was found between objective and subjective pain in the immediate postoperative period. Key words:Anxiety, depression, postoperative pain, dental implants. PMID:24880447

  2. Anxiety and psychological stress before prenatal screening in first-time mothers who conceived through IVF/ICSI or spontaneously.

    PubMed

    Darwiche, Joëlle; Lawrence, Cindy; Vial, Yvan; Wunder, Dorothea; Stiefel, Friedrich; Germond, Marc; Despland, Jean-Nicolas; de Roten, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Mothers' general anxiety, anxiety about the well-being of the child and psychological stress before prenatal testing was studied by comparing women who conceived through in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) with women who conceived naturally. Before the first trimester screening test for Down's syndrome, a group of 51 women who conceived through IVF/ICSI and a group of 54 women who conceived spontaneously completed the State Scale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (S-Anxiety; Spielberger, 1983), the Fear of Bearing a Physically or Mentally Handicapped Child Subscale of the Pregnancy-related Anxiety Questionnaire (PRAQ-R; Huizink et al., 2004), the Psychological Stress Measure (PSM; Lemyre & Tessier, 1988), and the Prenatal Psychosocial Profile (PPP; Curry, Campbell, & Christian, 1994). Women who conceived through IVF/ICSI had more elevated levels of general anxiety and psychological stress than the women who conceived naturally; however, no difference was observed between the two groups for anxiety specifically related to the health of the child. These results underline the need to monitor women's emotional state after conception via IVF/ICSI-when counseling usually ends-and around the time of the first trimester screening. Counseling might thus be extended. PMID:24794917

  3. Positive and negative expressions of shyness in toddlers: are they related to anxiety in the same way?

    PubMed

    Colonnesi, Cristina; Napoleone, Elisa; Bögels, Susan M

    2014-04-01

    Shyness has generally been investigated as a negative and unpleasant emotional state, strongly related to social anxiety and loneliness. However, recent evidence has suggested that shyness may have a positive and socially adaptive form. We examined whether the positive expression of shyness differs from the negative expression of shyness during toddlerhood, and whether a negative relation to anxiety exists. Participants were 30-month-old children (N=102; 56 girls) who were asked to mimic animal sounds with a novel person (performance) and then to watch their performance (self-watching). Their expression of pleasure (positive reactions) and distress (negative reactions), as well as their positive and negative expressions of shyness, were coded. Children's temperamental level of shyness, sociability, and anxiety were measured with parent-reported questionnaires. Toddlers produced more positive and negative displays of shyness in the performance task than in the self-watching task. Children's positive expression of shyness was associated with lower parent-reported anxiety and higher sociability. Negative reactions, but not negative shyness, were related to children's higher anxiety levels and lower sociability. Multiple linear regression analyses confirmed a negative predictive role of the positive expression of shyness on anxiety. These results suggest that the positive expression of shyness can regulate early anxiety symptoms and already serves a social function in interpersonal interactions in early childhood. PMID:24564372

  4. Self-perceived depression, anxiety, stress and their relationships with psychosocial job factors in male automotive assembly workers.

    PubMed

    Edimansyah, Bin Abdin; Rusli, Bin Nordin; Naing, Lin; Mohamed Rusli, Bin Abdullah; Winn, Than; Tengku Mohamed Ariff, Bin Raja Hussin

    2008-01-01

    Depression, anxiety and stress have been recognized as important mental outcome measures in stressful working settings. The present study explores the prevalence of self-perceived depression, anxiety and stress; and their relationships with psychosocial job factors. A cross-sectional study involving 728 male automotive assembly workers was conducted in two major automotive assembly plants in Malaysia using the validated Malay versions of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) and Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). Based on the DASS cut-off of > or =78 percentile scores, the prevalence of self-perceived depression, anxiety and stress was 35.4%, 47.2% and 31.1%, respectively. Four (0.5%), 29 (4.0%) and 2 (0.3%) workers, respectively, reported extremely severe self-perceived depression, anxiety and stress. Multiple linear regression analyses, controlling for age, education, salary, duration of work and marital status, revealed that psychological job demand, job insecurity and hazardous condition were positively associated with DASS-Depression, DASS-Anxiety and DASS-Stress; supervisor support was inversely associated with DASS-Depression and DASS-Stress. We suggest that reducing psychological job demand, job insecurity and hazardous condition factors may improve the self-perceived depression, anxiety and stress in male automotive assembly workers. Supervisor support is protective for self-perceived depression and stress. PMID:18270454

  5. Comparison of anxiety prevalence among based and offshore National Iranian Drilling Company staff's children in Ahvaz, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali; Shahba, Zohre; Abedi, Heidarali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is one of the most common psychological issues among all age groups including children. The main role of parents has been known to support their children. Being far away from a source of support has been shown to be a potential trigger for childhood anxiety. Periodical jobs, including offshore work, are among the main reasons for absence of one of the parents. Therefore, this study aims to assess anxiety in children of National Iranian Drilling Company offshore staff. Materials and Methods: In this historical cohort study, 160 students including 80 boys and 80 girls were selected through convenient random sampling from the schools of National Iranian Drilling Company. Data were collected using Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Inventory (by Reynolds and Richmond), consisting 37 items and a demographic questionnaire. The collected data were statistically analyzed by t-test and logistic regression tests through SPSS software. Results: The mean anxiety score was 12.80 among offshore staff's children and 11.67 among the children of the based staff. The ratio of manifest anxiety among the offshore workers’ children was significantly more than the based ones’. Conclusions: Based on the findings, offshore fathers’ job affects the anxiety of the children. PMID:26097851

  6. Organizational safety climate differently affects on patient safety behavior of nurses according to the hospital scale in Japanese private hospitals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takayasu Inoue; Risuke Karima

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to elucidate how patient safety behavior of nurses is associated with organizational safety climate and nurse's individual factors by covariance structure analysis of the results of the questionnaires, such as professional awareness and job- satisfaction, in 10 Japanese private hospitals. Methodology: In this study, the questionnaire was developed including organizational factors (organizational safety

  7. Medical Students’ Death Anxiety: Severity and Association with Psychological Health and Attitudes Toward Palliative Care

    E-print Network

    Thiemann, Pia; Quince, Thelma; Benson, John; Wood, Diana; Barclay, Stephen

    2015-05-12

    for patients approaching the end of life. There was an inverse (AU: IS INVERSE CORRECT?) relationship between DA and medical students’ psychological health: those with high DA had significantly greater self-rated measures of anxiety and depression... responded to the questionnaire, especially those who responded over several years. The authors thank James Brimicombe for managing the database and to Gary Abel for statistical advice. References 1. Field D, Howells K. Dealing with dying patients...

  8. Temperament Variation in Sensitivity to Parenting: Predicting Changes in Depression and Anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cara J. Kiff; Liliana J. Lengua; Nicole R. Bush

    Temperament was examined as a moderator of maternal parenting behaviors, including warmth, negativity, autonomy granting,\\u000a and guidance. Observations of parenting and questionnaire measures of temperament and adjustment were obtained from a community\\u000a sample (N?=?214; ages 8–12). Trajectories of depression and anxiety were assessed across 3 years. The pattern of parenting as a predictor\\u000a of internalizing symptoms depended on temperament. Maternal negativity

  9. Adolescent's perceptions of parenting behaviours and its relationship to adolescent Generalized Anxiety Disorder symptoms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William W. Hale; Rutger Engels; W. H. J. Meeus

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between how adolescents perceived parenting behaviours and adolescent Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) symptom scores. The 1106 junior high and high school students (12–19 years old; 49.6% males and 50.4% females) completed questionnaires regarding their perception of parenting behaviours and self-rated symptoms of GAD. The findings of this study demonstrate that adolescent perceptions of parental alienation

  10. A Space Odyssey: Experimental Manipulation of Threat Perception and Anxiety-Related Interpretation Bias in Children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Muris; Jorg Huijding; Birgit Mayer; Marjolein Hameetman

    2008-01-01

    This study provides a first test of an experimental method, the “space odyssey” paradigm, that was designed to manipulate\\u000a interpretation bias in children. Seventy non-clinical children aged 8–12 years first completed a standardized anxiety questionnaire.\\u000a Following this, they completed the space odyssey paradigm to induce either a negative or a positive interpretation bias. After\\u000a this stage of interpretation training, children

  11. Decreasing Neuroscience Anxiety in an Introductory Neuroscience Course: An Analysis Using Data from a Modified Science Anxiety Scale

    PubMed Central

    Birkett, Melissa; Shelton, Kerisa

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether participation in a neuroscience course reduced neuroscience anxiety, a modified version of the Science Anxiety Scale was administered to students at the beginning and end of an introductory course. Neuroscience anxiety scores were significantly reduced at the end of the course and correlated with higher final grades. Reduced neuroscience anxiety did not correlate with reduced science anxiety, suggesting that neuroscience anxiety is a distinct subtype of anxiety. PMID:23626491

  12. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  13. Oxytocin's role in anxiety: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Kai; Feifel, David

    2014-09-11

    A growing literature suggests that the oxytocin (OT) system may play a role in human anxiety states, anxiety-related traits, and moreover, that this system may be a target for the development of novel anxiolytic treatments. However, studies of OT's acute and chronic effects on various aspects of anxiety have produced mixed results. In this forward-looking review, we discuss the myriad phenomena to which the term "anxiety" is applied in the OT literature and the problem this presents developing a coherent picture of OT's role in anxiety. We then survey several different fields of research that support the role of the OT system in human anxiety, including evolutionary perspectives, translational and neuroimaging research, genetic studies, and clinical trials of intranasal OT. As an outgrowth of this data, we propose a "bowtie" model of OT's role at the interface of social attachment and anxiety. We next direct attention to understudied brain regions and neural circuits which may be important to study in OT experiments in humans anxiety disorders. Finally, we conclude by proposing questions and priorities for studying both the clinical potential of OT in anxiety, as well as mechanisms that may underlie this potential. Crucially, these priorities include targeted proof-of-concept clinical trials of IN OT in certain anxiety disorders, including investigations of individual moderators of OT's anxiolytic effects (i.e. sex, genetic factors, and early experience). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin and Social Behav. PMID:24468203

  14. Assessing Alcohol Dependence in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Doering-Silveira, Juliana; Fidalgo, Thiago Marques; Nascimento, Carolina Lins E. Silva; Alves, Juliana Bernardo; Seito, Caroline Lumy; Saita, Maria Claudia; Belluzzi, Lorenza Oliveira; Silva, Laila Carolina; Silveira, Dartiu; Rosa-Oliveira, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol misuse is generally not detected in hospital settings. The goal of this study was to estimate the prevalence of alcohol abuse and dependence in hospitalized patients in a university hospital in Sao Paulo (Brazil). Patients were randomly selected from all hospital admissions. The final sample consisted of 169 adult inpatients. Two screening tools were used: the Short Alcohol Dependence Data (SADD) and the CAGE questionnaires. In this sample, 25.4% of patients could be considered alcohol dependent according to the CAGE questionnaire, whereas 32.9% of patients fulfilled the criteria according to the SADD. The only predictor of alcohol dependence was gender; male inpatients were 3.2 times more prone to alcohol dependence with female inpatients. All inpatients should be systematically screened for alcohol use disorders. The choice of the screening tool will depend on whether the goal is to identify inpatients with hazardous drinking behaviors or with established alcohol-related problems. To maximize proper case identification, the CAGE questionnaire should be used as a first-step screening tool, and patients who screen positive on this scale should be subsequently administered the SADD questionnaire to assess the severity of the condition. PMID:24879488

  15. Emotion Regulation and Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Amstadter, Ananda B.

    2009-01-01

    Recent attention has been given to the role of emotion regulation in the development and maintenance of psychopathology. Gross (1998) provided a framework from which to understand emotion regulation processes, and it is within this framework that the literature on emotion regulation/dysregulation in the anxiety disorder population is reviewed, with a focus on possible deficiencies that lead to or maintain the disorders. The present paper aims to (1) briefly introduce emotion regulation strategies of suppression and reappraisal; (2) summarize the empirical studies of emotion regulation within anxiety disorders; (3) discuss the neurobiological markers of emotion regulation within these disorders; (4) provide future directions for research; and (5) summarize possible treatment implications resulting from this important area of research. PMID:17349775

  16. A short questionnaire for the assessment of quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: psychometric properties of VQ11

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a need for a validated short instrument that can be used in routine practice to quantify potential short-term change in Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our aim is to determine the validity and reliability of the VQ11 questionnaire dedicated to the routine assessment of HRQoL. Methods 181 COPD patients (40–85 yrs, I to IV GOLD stages) completed the VQ11, and several tests. One week later, 49 of these patients completed the VQ11 again. Results Confirmatory factor analysis supported the two-level hierarchical structure of the VQ11 with 11 items covering three components and HRQoL at a higher level. The VQ11 showed good internal consistency and good reproducibility (r?=?0.88). Concurrent validity showed significant correlations between VQ11 total scores and St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire-C (r?=?0.70), Short Form-36 (r?=?-0.66 for the physical component and -0.63 for the mental component). We obtained significant correlations with MRC Dyspnea Grades (r?=?0.59), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale total score (r?=?0.62), and the BODE index (r?=?0.53). Conclusion The VQ11 has good measurement properties and provides a valid and reliable measure of COPD-specific HRQoL. It is ready for use in routine practice. Clinical registration The study was approved by the University of Montpellier 1 Ethics Committee and the Regional Ethics Committee (authorization number: A00332-53). PMID:24160852

  17. Influence of physical activity on depression and anxiety of former elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Bäckmand, H; Kaprio, J; Kujala, U; Sarna, S

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of physical activity and other factors on the mood of former elite male athletes and controls of middle and old age. The subjects were 664 former athletes and 500 controls who answered questionnaires in 1985 and 1995. The dependent variables depressive and anxiety symptoms were assessed by the shortened anxiety and depression scales of the BSI-53. Logistic regression was used for longitudinal as well as cross-sectional analyses to estimate odds ratios for symptoms of depression and anxiety in relation to leisure physical activity adjusted for age in 1995, sports group, personality characteristics, alcohol use, smoking, marital status, life events and socio-economic status. In the longitudinal analysis, low levels of physical activity as well as neuroticism, dissatisfaction, marital status, life events and social class in 1985 increased the risk of depression in 1995. Also physical activity has a protective effect against depressiveness; an increase of one MET-unit (hour/day) statistically significantly decreased the risk of depressiveness by 8 %. In the longitudinal analysis, physical activity had no significant association with anxiety. Cross-sectional analysis for depressive symptoms in 1995, but not for anxiety found associations with sports group and physical activity as well as alcohol use and marital status. Very high physical activity has a significant protective effect against depression. PMID:14598199

  18. Changes in physicians' computer anxiety and attitudes related to clinical information system use.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S H; Coney, R D

    1994-01-01

    STUDY OVERVIEW: Interns' anxiety about computer use ("computer anxiety") and their attitudes toward medical computer applications were determined by a standardized questionnaire. Participants were surveyed before and after three months of differential exposure to three clinical information systems (CISs), including one with provider-entered encounters. POPULATION: Fifty-one interns completed both surveys. Their average age was 27 years. Thirty-three percent were female, 7% were African American, and 8% were foreign graduates. RESULTS: The most common previous exposures to computers were for literature searching and retrieval of patient information (both 92%). Factors that commonly emerged as predictive of anxiety about computer use included self-rated skills, typing ability, and computer attitudes. Factors predictive of attitudes toward computers included self-rated skills, typing ability, maximal frequency of prior computer use, computer ownership, and computer anxiety. Factors that were not predictive of computer anxiety or attitudes toward computers included age, gender, and physician input of data. CONCLUSION: Identification of markers for negative psychological reactions to computer use may allow development of interventions to improve acceptance of computer base patient records (CBPRs). PMID:7850562

  19. Antidepressant medication augmented with cognitive-behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety disorder in older adults.

    PubMed

    Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Petkus, Andrew J; White, Kamila S; Nguyen, Hoang; Kornblith, Sander; Andreescu, Carmen; Zisook, Sidney; Lenze, Eric J

    2013-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Generalized anxiety disorder is common among older adults and leads to diminished health and cognitive functioning. Although antidepressant medications are efficacious, many elderly individuals require augmentation treatment. Furthermore, little is known about maintenance strategies for older people. The authors examined whether sequenced treatment combining pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) boosts response and prevents relapse in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder. METHOD Participants were individuals at least 60 years of age with generalized anxiety disorder (N=73) who were recruited from outpatient clinics at three sites. Participants received 12 weeks of open-label escitalopram and were then randomly assigned to one of four conditions: 16 weeks of escitalopram (10-20 mg/day) plus modular CBT, followed by 28 weeks of maintenance escitalopram; escitalopram alone, followed by maintenance escitalopram; escitalopram plus CBT, followed by pill placebo; and escitalopram alone, followed by placebo. RESULTS Escitalopram augmented with CBT increased response rates on the Penn State Worry Questionnaire but not on the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale compared with escitalopram alone. Both escitalopram and CBT prevented relapse compared with placebo. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates effective strategies for treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in older adults. The sequence of antidepressant medication augmented with CBT leads to worry reduction in the short-term. Continued medication prevents relapse, but for many individuals, CBT would allow sustained remission without requiring long-term pharmacotherapy. PMID:23680817

  20. Antidepressant Treatment in Anxiety Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anton Y. Bespalov; Marcel M. van Gaalen; Gerhard Gross

    \\u000a Antidepressant drug treatment is the clinical standard of care for all types of anxiety disorders. Broad efficacy of selective\\u000a serotonin reuptake inhibitors suggests the importance of enhanced serotonergic function of the anxiolytic properties of current\\u000a antidepressants. However, analysis of the preclinical evidence indicates that most conventional “anxiolytic” drug tests are\\u000a not sensitive to antidepressants. Such dissociation is not surprising because

  1. Taijin Kyofusho and Social Anxiety and Their Clinical Relevance in Indonesia and Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Vriends, N.; Pfaltz, M. C.; Novianti, P.; Hadiyono, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Taijin Kyofusho Scale (TKS) is an interpersonal fear to offend others and is defined by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) as a culturally bound syndrome that occurs in Japan and Korea. Recently, cases with TKS have also been recognized in other cultures. The present questionnaire study investigated self-report TKS symptoms and social anxiety symptoms, and their clinical relevance in an Indonesian and Swiss sample. It also investigated whether self-construal is associated with TKS and social anxiety, and if self-construal is a mediator of the expected association between cultural background and social anxiety and TKS symptoms. Method: 311 Indonesian and 349 Swiss university students filled out the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, the Taijin Kyofusho Scale, the Self-Construal Scale, self-report social phobia DSM-IV criteria, and rated their wish for professional help to deal with social fears. Results: TKS and social anxiety symptoms were higher in the Indonesian than the Swiss sample. TKS symptoms were associated with clinical relevance in Indonesia, whereas in Switzerland only social anxiety symptoms were associated with clinical relevance. Independent self-construal was negatively associated and interdependent self-construal was positively associated with TKS and social anxiety symptoms. Interdependent self-construal mediated the association between cultural background and these symptoms. Discussion: TKS might be a clinically relevant syndrome in all individuals or cultures with an interdependent self-construal or less independent self-construal. The proposal to include the fear of offending others in the DSM-V criteria of social phobia is supported by the present findings. PMID:23382720

  2. An Investigation of Students' Perspectives on Foreign Language Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Worde, Renee

    This research identified factors that may increase anxiety in a foreign language classroom and factors that may assist in reducing anxiety, described student manifestations of anxiety, and correlated final grade with anxiety level. The research was accomplished by means of in-depth phenomenological interviews, a foreign language anxiety

  3. Anticipatory Anxiety in Women Receiving Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul B. Jacobsen; Dana H. Bovbjerg; William H. Redd

    1993-01-01

    This study examined (a) the prevalence and course of anxiety before the 1st 6 infusions of cancer chemotherapy and (b) the contribution of trait anxiety, side effect expectations, and prior occurrence of posttreatment side effects to anxiety before infusions. Fifty-three women receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer participated. Anxiety was most prevalent and intense before the 1st infusion. Trait anxiety

  4. Cognitions in Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Panic Disorder Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elisabeth Breitholtz; Bengt E. Westling

    1998-01-01

    Forty-three patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and 44 patients with panic disorder (PD) were given a standardized interview about thoughts and images during times of anxiety. The two groups differed significantly regarding the ideational content of anxiety. GAD patients experienced more thoughts focusing on themes of mental catastrophes and other catastrophes when suffering from anxiety or anxiety attacks, while

  5. Assessing the usefulness of a safety climate questionnaire in UK healthcare

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Hutchinson; J. E. Dean; K. L. Cooper; M. Patterson; A. McIntosh; C. B. Stride; C. M. Smith; B. E. Laurence

    This paper presents the results of an assessment of a safety climate questionnaire in UK primary and secondary healthcare settings. Surveys were sent to four Acute Trusts and nine Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) and responses were received from 722 hospital and 585 primary care staff. Factor analysis and reliability analyses were undertaken, with the result that 2 Teamwork factors were

  6. Prevalence and Impact of Anxiety and Depression on Type 2 Diabetes in Tunisian Patients over Sixty Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Masmoudi, Jawaher; Damak, Rahma; Zouari, Hela; Ouali, Uta; Mechri, Anouar; Zouari, Nouri; Jaoua, Abdelaziz

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To estimate the prevalence of anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in a population aged over sixty years with type 2 diabetes and to study the impact of anxiety and depression on glycemic balance and disease outcome. Results. The prevalence of anxiety and depression in the 62 subjects included in the study was, respectively, 40.3% and 22.6%. We found a relationship between these disorders and complicated diabetes. The subjects having an imperfectly balanced diabetes had a higher average anxiety score than those having a good glycemic control (9.1 ± 4.2 versus 6.5 ± 3.1; P = 0.017). No relationship was found between diabetes balance and depression. Conclusion. Association between anxiety and depressive disorders and diabetes is frequent and worsens patients' outcome, in terms of diabetes imbalance as well as in terms of diabetic complications. Our study shows that there is need for physicians to detect, confirm, and treat anxiety and depressive disorders in elderly diabetic patients. PMID:23853718

  7. Audience Size and Trait Anxiety Effects Upon State Anxiety and Motor Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankel, Leonard M.

    1977-01-01

    Results of this study indicate that trait anxiety (personal disposition) significantly affects both state anxiety and motor performance, but no audience main effects or interaction effects were statistically significant. (JD)

  8. The impact of critical total quality management practices on hospital performance in the ministry of health hospitals in saudi arabia.

    PubMed

    Alaraki, Mohammad Shamsuddin

    2014-01-01

    Total Quality Management (TQM) offers a method for solving quality and patient safety problems and bringing significant improvement to hospital performance. However, only few studies have been conducted in this area in developing countries, particularly in Saudi Arabia. This research is carried out in an attempt to address this gap, exploring the impact of applying TQM practices on hospital performance in the Saudi Ministry of Health hospitals. The study has included 4 hospitals in Tabuk Region, namely, King Khaled Hospital, King Fahad Hospital, Maternity and Children Hospital, and Hagel General Hospital. The data collection was done by the researcher when 400 questionnaires were distributed using a convenient sampling technique to access the required data. The response rate was 67.25% of the total questionnaires distributed. The TQM practices used in the study were as follows: leadership, employee management, information analysis, training, customer focus, continuous improvement, process management, and supplier management. The findings of the research show a significant positive correlation between the 8 practices of TQM and hospital performance with a correlation coefficient r value of 0.9 (P = .0001). The study also reveals that Saudi hospitals are facing difficulties in engaging the clinical staff in their quality initiative. Moreover, our findings show that accredited hospitals have significantly applied TQM practices more than unaccredited hospitals. PMID:24368721

  9. Reducing Noise Pollution in the Hospital Setting by Establishing a Department of Sound: A Survey of Recent Research on the Effects of Noise and Music in Health Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Izumi Nomura Cabrera; Mathew H. M. Lee

    2000-01-01

    A proposal for a solution to reduce stress and anxiety in the hospital setting by combining the problems of excess noise in a hospital setting with the efficacy of music therapy is supported through an analysis of research in the field of noise, hospital noise pollution, and music medicine. Included in this overview are articles describing the effects of noise

  10. [A Recreation Room for adolescents who are hospitalized at a tertiary-care Center: Care Program for Hospitalized Adolescents].

    PubMed

    Mato, Roberto; Rodríguez, M Susana

    2015-06-01

    Hospital admission is a high-impact event in children. Adolescence is a critical and complex period of human development that may be adversely affected by hospitalization. At the Garrahan Hospital, where adolescents account for more than 30% of inpatients, a program for comprehensive care of adolescents was set up in 2008 with a special focus on their specific needs. As a part of this program, the aim of the Recreation Room for Hospitalized Adolescents is to provide a friendly environment to reduce stress and anxiety and to facilitate the learning of healthy behaviors, under the permanent care of nurses and medical doctors. Interventions in health, leisure time, education, and emotional care are effective in diminishing the negative impact of hospitalization and prevent risk behaviors. Our objective was to report our experience in the Recreation Room for Hospitalized Adolescents. PMID:25996325

  11. Assessing Eating Disorder Risk: The Pivotal Role of Achievement Anxiety, Depression and Female Gender in Non-Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Fragkos, Konstantinos C.; Frangos, Christos C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess factors predicting eating disorder risk in a sample of undergraduate students. A structured questionnaire was employed on a random sample (n = 1865) consisting of the following sections: demographics, SCOFF (Sick, Control, One stone, Fat, Food) questionnaire for screening eating disorders and the Achievement Anxiety Test and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale. The students at risk for eating disorders (SCOFF score ?2) were 39.7%. Eating disorder risk was more frequent in females, students with divorced parents, students who lived alone, students who were seeking a romantic relationship or were married, students who were at a post-secondary vocational institute/college (private-public) educational level and who were more likely to have marks under merit level. Also, the mean scores for the psychological factors of depression, stress and anxiety were higher in students with eating disorder risk. A logistic regression model was produced depicting that depression, stress, female gender, being married and searching for a romantic relationship were risk factors of having an eating disorder risk. The suggested psychological model examined with structural equation modelling signified the role of academic anxiety as an immediate precursor of general anxiety. Hence, college populations in Greece need organized infrastructures of nutrition health services and campaigns to assist in reducing the risk of eating disorders. PMID:23482057

  12. Assessing eating disorder risk: the pivotal role of achievement anxiety, depression and female gender in non-clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Fragkos, Konstantinos C; Frangos, Christos C

    2013-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess factors predicting eating disorder risk in a sample of undergraduate students. A structured questionnaire was employed on a random sample (n = 1865) consisting of the following sections: demographics, SCOFF (Sick, Control, One stone, Fat, Food) questionnaire for screening eating disorders and the Achievement Anxiety Test and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale. The students at risk for eating disorders (SCOFF score ?2) were 39.7%. Eating disorder risk was more frequent in females, students with divorced parents, students who lived alone, students who were seeking a romantic relationship or were married, students who were at a post-secondary vocational institute/college (private-public) educational level and who were more likely to have marks under merit level. Also, the mean scores for the psychological factors of depression, stress and anxiety were higher in students with eating disorder risk. A logistic regression model was produced depicting that depression, stress, female gender, being married and searching for a romantic relationship were risk factors of having an eating disorder risk. The suggested psychological model examined with structural equation modelling signified the role of academic anxiety as an immediate precursor of general anxiety. Hence, college populations in Greece need organized infrastructures of nutrition health services and campaigns to assist in reducing the risk of eating disorders. PMID:23482057

  13. Anxiety Management Training for pattern A behavior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard M. Suinn; Larry J. Bloom

    1978-01-01

    During a 3-week period, seven subjects were treated with Anxiety Management Training (AMT) while seven subjects served as a wait-list control. Pattern A behaviors, measured by the Jenkins Activity Survey (JAS), self-report of anxiety, as measured by the Spielberger state (STAI-S) and trait (STAI-T) anxiety inventories, and indices of blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglycerides were obtained before and after treatment.

  14. Virtual Hospital

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Provided and maintained by the University of Iowa Health Care, the Virtual Hospital is designed as a "medical reference and health promotion tool for health care providers and patients." To that end, the site offers current and authoritative medical information for patients and professional and pedagogical information for health care providers. The former includes patient educational briefs browseable by organ system or by a topical list, a collection of peer-reviewed and annotated Web resources, an internal search engine, and archives of a column offering medical advice to middle-aged users. Resources in the health care provider section include several digital libraries aimed at certain specialties (Pediatrics, Pediatric Radiology, Family Medicine, and Medical Student); multimedia textbooks and teaching files grouped by organ system; lectures and publications; and clinical practice guidelines. Additional resources at the site include links to the Virtual Children's and Virtual Naval Hospitals, an internal search engine, and online continuing education courses.

  15. Self Audit QuestionnaireSelf Audit QuestionnaireSelf Audit QuestionnaireSelf Audit Questionnaire A Self-Audit of your unit is included in the Internal Audit Plan for the current year. A Self-Audit Questionnaire is a

    E-print Network

    Cinabro, David

    of questions designed to identify areas of audit risk, the presence of internal controls to mitigateSelf Audit QuestionnaireSelf Audit QuestionnaireSelf Audit QuestionnaireSelf Audit Questionnaire A Self-Audit of your unit is included in the Internal Audit Plan for the current year. A Self-Audit

  16. Anxiety Symptoms in African American Children: Relations with Ethnic Pride, Anxiety Sensitivity, and Parenting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Calonie M. K. Gray; Rona Carter; Wendy K. Silverman

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined the relations among children’s ethnic pride, perceived parenting behavior (i.e., parental\\u000a control, parental acceptance), anxiety sensitivity, and child anxiety symptoms (i.e., physical symptoms, social anxiety symptoms,\\u000a separation anxiety symptoms, and harm avoidance symptoms) in 266 African American school children (M = 9.98 years old; 55% girls). Structural equation modeling results indicated that high ethnic pride was associated with high

  17. The Impact of Peplau's Therapeutic Communication Model on Anxiety and Depression in Patients Candidate for Coronary Artery Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Zarea, Kourosh; Maghsoudi, Solmaz; Dashtebozorgi, Bahman; Hghighizadeh, Mohammad Hossin; Javadi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Anxiety and depression are among the psychological disorders in heart surgeries. Establishing a simple communication is essential to reduce anxiety and depression. Hence, the objective of the present studywas to examine the impact of Peplau therapeutic communication model on anxiety and depression in patients, who were candidate for coronary artery bypass in Al-Zahra Heart Hospital, Shiraz during 2012-2013. Methods: This is a clinical trial in which 74 patients were randomly divided into intervention and control groups, each consisted of 37 patients. Anxiety and depression levels were assessed before, and two and four months after intervention using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Seven therapeutic communication sessions were held in four stages. Data were analyzed with the SPSS (version 16) using analysis of covariance. Results: The mean anxiety and depression levels decreased in the intervention group after the therapeutic communication (p<0.01). Anxiety scores in the intervention group before and after intervention were 10.23 and 9.38, respectively. While the corresponding scores in the control group were 10.26 and 11.62, respectively. Depression scores in the intervention group before and after intervention were 11 and 9.13, respectively. The corresponding scores in the control group were 11.30 and 12.08, respectively. Conclusion: The results demonstrated the positive role of therapeutic communication in reducing anxiety and depression of the patients. Therefore, the therapeutic communication is recommended as a simple, cost effective and efficient method in this area. PMID:25505931

  18. The prevalence of anxiety and depression in palliative care patients with cancer in Western Australia and New South Wales

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Moira O'Connor; Kate White; Linda J Kristjanson; Kerry Cousins; Lesley Wilkes

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the prevalence and predictors of depression and anxiety in palliative care patients with cancer in Western Australia and New South Wales. Design, setting and participants: A descriptive study of 266 consecutive patients at a range of inpatient and outpatient settings including home care, hospices, and private and tertiary care hospitals in WA and NSW from 1 March

  19. Death anxiety among emergency care workers.

    PubMed

    Brady, Mike

    2015-07-10

    Death anxiety, or 'thanatophobia', is a state in which people experience negative emotional reactions in recognition of their own mortality. Emergency and unscheduled healthcare workers, such as emergency nurses and paramedics, are constantly reminded of death and therefore of their own mortality, and this makes them susceptible to death anxiety. This article introduces the concept of death anxiety, and highlights the need for staff, employers and universities to recognise its signs and symptoms. It also suggests some interventions that could prevent the debilitating effects of death anxiety, to improve staff's mental health and the care they provide to patients. PMID:26159347

  20. Self-Efficacy, Gender and Trait Anxiety as Moderators of Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyeizugbo, Euckay U.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Test anxiety inhibits students from performing according to their full potential in academic setting. Objectives: This study investigated self-efficacy, gender and trait anxiety as moderators of test anxiety. Method: Two hundred and forty nine (249) psychology majors drawn from a university in Eastern Nigeria participated in the…