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Sample records for questionnaire secondary outcomes

  1. Asymmetry questionnaire outcomes correlate with several hemisphericity measures.

    PubMed

    Morton, Bruce E

    2003-04-01

    The asymmetry questionnaire segregated subjects (n=143) into two groups. These were significantly correlated with similar groups separated, not only by three new biophysical hemisphericity protocols (Dichotic Deafness Test, Phased Mirror Tracing, Best Hand Test), but also by two preference-type measures (polarity questionnaire, preference questionnaire). Each of the 15 asymmetry questionnaire statements was significantly correlated with the outcomes of these five laterality measures. This is the third questionnaire whose outcomes correlate with those of the new biophysical measures of hemisphericity. PMID:12727192

  2. Further Evaluation of the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Suh, Hanna; Ege, Engin

    2014-01-01

    Data from clinical and nonclinical samples ("Ns" = 2,096, 618) were used to evaluate and replicate the measurement structure of the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2. Different measurement models and invariance tests were evaluated and the best psychometric support was found for a shortened measure of two factors: overall maladjustment and…

  3. The Conceptions about Teamwork Questionnaire: Design, Reliability and Validity with Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Fernandez, J. Reinaldo; Corcelles, Mariona; Cerrato-Lara, Maria

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we present the conceptions about teamwork questionnaire designed to evaluate the conceptions that secondary students have about teamwork. Participants were 309 students aged 15-16 from eight secondary schools, seven from Barcelona and one from Girona (Spain). The original 27-item questionnaire was reduced according to expert…

  4. Clinicians' Attitudes Towards Outcome and Process Monitoring: A Validation of the Outcome Measurement Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Smits, Dave F; Claes, Laurence; Stinckens, Nele; Smits, Dirk J M

    2015-09-01

    Valid and reliable instruments to measure monitoring attitudes of clinicians are scarce. The influence of sociodemographics and professional characteristics on monitoring attitudes is largely unknown. First, we investigated the factor structure and reliability of the Outcome Measurement Questionnaire among a sample of Flemish mental health professionals (n = 170). Next, we examined the relationship between clinicians' sociodemographic and professional characteristics and monitoring attitudes. Construct validity was determined using a confirmatory factor analysis. Internal consistency was ascertained using Cronbach's alpha. Mean level differences in monitoring attitudes related to clinicians' gender, work setting, level of education and psychotherapeutic training, were investigated using ANOVAs. The relationships between clinicians' age, clinical experience and attitudes were calculated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. A model with one general factor and a method factor referring to reverse-worded items best fitted our data. Internal consistency was good. Clinicians with psychotherapeutic training reported more favorable monitoring attitudes than those without such training. Compared to clinicians working in subsidized outpatient services, private practitioners and clinicians from inpatient mental health clinics had more positive attitudes. Results highlight the need for sustained and targeted training, with particular focus on transforming measurement data into meaningful clinical support tools. PMID:25315180

  5. Development of Questionnaire on Emotional Labor among Primary and Secondary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yanling; Zhang, Dajun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, based on the analysis of existing definitions of emotional labor, operational definition of teachers' emotional labor is given and questionnaire on emotional labor among primary and secondary school teachers is developed. Research results: exploratory factor analysis shows that teacher's emotional labor involves three dimensions…

  6. Psychometric Properties of the Aggression Questionnaire in Dutch Violent Forensic Psychiatric Patients and Secondary Vocational Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornsveld, Ruud H. J.; Muris, Peter; Kraaimaat, Floris W.; Meesters, Cor

    2009-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a Dutch version of Buss and Perry's Aggression Questionnaire (AQ) were examined in a sample of violent forensic psychiatric inpatients and outpatients and a sample of secondary vocational students. The internal consistency, interitem correlations, and item--scale correlations of the subscales Physical Aggression,…

  7. The Cognitive Bias Questionnaire: An Outcome Measure in the Treatment of Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez, Yolanda; And Others

    The Cognitive Bias Questionnaire (CBQ) was assessed as an outcome measure in the treatment of depression in a study involving 20 depressed and 20 non-depressed female subjects. The role of depressive distortion in the maintenance or stabilization of depression was also examined. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of four groups:…

  8. Outcome Questionnaire: Is It Sensitive to Changes in Counseling Center Clients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeersch, David A.; Whipple, Jason L.; Lambert, Michael J.; Hawkins, Eric J.; Burchfield, Colin M.; Okiishi, John C.

    2004-01-01

    Sensitivity to change of the Outcome Questionnaire (OQ; M. J. Lambert et al., 1996) items, subscales, and total score was evaluated for clients receiving personal counseling in university counseling center settings. OQ data collected for 248 university students who did not receive treatment and 5,553 students who received treatment from 527…

  9. HEALTH OUTCOMES OF OBESITY AMONG OLDER PERSONS REVEALED BY COMMUNITY-BASED SCREENING QUESTIONNAIRE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to pilot test a Nutrition Health Outcomes Questionnaire (NHOQ) designed to identify overweight/obese persons at risk for funcitonal decline and increased healthcare use. The NHOQ is a 14-item self-administered survey that queries body weight/weight change, dietary pr...

  10. Use of the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 with a University Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Joseph E.; Clack, R. James

    2006-01-01

    The Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 (OQ) was administered to a college student counseling and psychological services center sample of 435 students both before and after brief psychotherapeutic counseling. Initial ambivalence of the staff about the use of the instrument is described. Issues of implementation are discussed, and results reported including…

  11. A Comparison of DASH, PEM and Levine questionnaires in outcome measurement of carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Zyluk, A; Piotuch, B

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the 3 commonly used questionnaires DASH, PEM and Levine to assess which is the best as an outcome measure after carpal tunnel release. 50 patients (43 women and 7 men) with an average age of 56 years underwent minimally invasive carpal tunnel release. Patients were examined before the operation, and at 1 and 6 months after, according to the same protocol. They completed the DASH, PEM and Levine questionnaires and undertook total grip, key-pinch strengths, and sensation by filament tests. The results showed higher responsiveness to change in the Levine and the PEM, compared to the DASH at the 1- and 6-month-assessments. The Levine showed the highest validity as it correlated strongly with all functional measures, although all 3 questionnaires, including Levine, showed a discordance with total grip and key-pinch strength at the 1-month assessment. The instruments were characterized by various (excellent and poor) concurrent validity in the assumed periods of observation and all 3 showed high internal consistency. PMID:21607899

  12. Outcome Measurement for COPD: Reliability and Validity of the Dyspnea Management Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Norweg, Anna; Jette, Alan M.; Ni, Pengsheng; Whiteson, Jonathan; Kim, Minjin

    2010-01-01

    Background The Dyspnea Management Questionnaire (DMQ) is a measure of the psychosocial and behavioral responses to dyspnea for adults with COPD. The research objectives were to evaluate the reliability and validity of an expanded DMQ item pool, as a preliminary step for developing a computer adaptive test. Methods The original 66 items of the DMQ were used for the analyses. The sample included 63 women and 44 men with COPD (n = 107) recruited from two urban medical centers. We used confirmatory factor analysis to test the factor structure of the DMQ and its underlying cognitive-behavioral theoretical base. The internal consistency and test-retest reliability, and breadth of coverage of the expanded DMQ item bank were also evaluated. Results Five distinct dyspnea domains were confirmed using 56 original items of the DMQ: dyspnea intensity, dyspnea anxiety, activity avoidance, activity self-efficacy, and strategy satisfaction. Overall, the breadth of items was excellent with a good match between sample scores and item difficulty. The DMQ-56 showed good internal consistency reliability (? = .85 to .96) and good preliminary test-retest reliability over a 3-week interval (ICC = .69 to .92). Conclusions The DMQ demonstrated acceptable levels of reliability and validity for measuring multidimensional dyspnea outcomes after medical, psychological, and behavioral interventions for adults with COPD. PMID:20884194

  13. Development of a Short Questionnaire to Measure an Extended Set of Job Demands, Job Resources, and Positive Health Outcomes: The New Brief Job Stress Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, Akiomi; KAWAKAMI, Norito; SHIMOMITSU, Teruichi; TSUTSUMI, Akizumi; HARATANI, Takashi; YOSHIKAWA, Toru; SHIMAZU, Akihito; ODAGIRI, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the reliability and construct validity of a new version of the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (New BJSQ), which measures an extended set of psychosocial factors at work by adding new scales/items to the current version of the BJSQ. Additional scales/items were extensively collected from theoretical job stress models and similar questionnaires in several countries. Scales/items were field-tested and refined through a pilot internet survey. Finally, an 84-item questionnaire (141 items in total when combined with the current BJSQ) was developed. A nationally representative survey was administered to employees in Japan (n=1,633) to examine the reliability and construct validity. Most scales showed acceptable levels of internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Principal component analyses showed that the first factor explained 50% or greater proportion of the variance in most scales. A scale factor analysis and a correlation analysis showed that these scales fit the theoretical expectations. These findings provided a piece of evidence that the New BJSQ scales are reliable and valid. Although more detailed content and construct validity should be examined in future study, the New BJSQ is a useful instrument to evaluate psychosocial work environment and positive mental health outcomes in the current workplace. PMID:24492763

  14. Korean Secondary Students' Perception of Scientific Literacy as Global Citizens: Using Global Scientific Literacy Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mun, Kongju; Shin, Namsoo; Lee, Hyunju; Kim, Sung-Won; Choi, Kyunghee; Choi, Sung-Youn; Krajcik, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    We re-conceptualized the meaning of scientific literacy and developed an instrument, which we call the Global Scientific Literacy Questionnaire (GSLQ) based on a new conceptual framework for scientific literacy in the twenty-first century. We identified five dimensions, each with key elements. The five dimensions are (1) content knowledge (core…

  15. Teachers' Teaching Experience and Students' Learning Outcomes in Secondary Schools in Ondo State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeyemi, T. O.

    2008-01-01

    This article examined teachers' teaching experience and students' learning outcomes in the secondary schools in Ondo State Nigeria. As a correlational survey, the study population comprised all the 257 secondary schools in the State. This population was made up of 147 rural schools and 110 urban schools. It was also made up of 12 single sex…

  16. The Impact of Open Textbooks on Secondary Science Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, T. Jared; Fischer, Lane; Wiley, David; Hilton, John, III

    2014-01-01

    Given the increasing costs associated with commercial textbooks and decreasing financial support of public schools, it is important to better understand the impacts of open educational resources on student outcomes. The purpose of this quantitative study is to analyze whether the adoption of open science textbooks significantly affects science…

  17. Teacher Interpersonal Behaviour and Secondary Students' Cognitive, Affective and Moral Outcomes in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivan, Atara; Chan, Dennis W. K.

    2013-01-01

    This study validated the Chinese version of the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) in the Hong Kong context as well as examined the relationship between students' perceptions of interpersonal teacher behaviour and their cognitive, affective and moral learning outcomes. Data were collected with the QTI and four other measures of student…

  18. Outcomes Research Branch | Questionnaire Designed to Assess Multidisciplinary Cancer Treatment Planning

    Cancer.gov

    The multidisciplinary cancer care delivery paradigm is being widely implemented to assure quality care, and involves utilizing the collaborative expertise of clinicians from various disciplines to enable complex treatment decision-making and appropriate and timely care. As the first step in facilitating multidisciplinary cancer care research, the NCI developed the Multidisciplinary Treatment Planning (MTP) questionnaire. The instrument facilitates data collection for examining various MTP structures and processes being implemented in cancer care organizations.

  19. AACVPR consensus statement. Outcomes evaluation in cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention programs: improving patient care and program effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Bonnie K; Southard, Douglas; Oldridge, Neil

    2004-01-01

    The reported outcomes statement is an update to the previous recommendations for outcomes evaluation in cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention programs. The purposes of outcomes evaluation are reviewed, and practical information with examples is provided to help programs implement an outcomes-directed approach within routine patient care and program management functions. PMID:15052108

  20. PBL-GIS in Secondary Geography Education: Does It Result in Higher-Order Learning Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yan; Bui, Elisabeth N.; Chang, Chew-Hung; Lossman, Hans G.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents research on evaluating problem-based learning using GIS technology in a Singapore secondary school. A quasi-experimental research design was carried to test the PBL pedagogy (PBL-GIS) with an experimental group of students and compare their learning outcomes with a control group who were exposed to PBL but not GIS. The…

  1. Effect of Mastery Learning on Senior Secondary School Students' Cognitive Learning Outcome in Quantitative Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitee, Telimoye Leesi; Obaitan, Georgina N.

    2015-01-01

    The cognitive learning outcome of Senior Secondary School chemistry students has been poor over the years in Nigeria. Poor mathematical skills and inefficient teaching methods have been identified as some of the major reasons for this. Bloom's theory of school learning and philosophy of mastery learning assert that virtually all students are…

  2. Educational Outcomes, Policy Reform and Cultural Capital in Italian Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polesel, John

    2010-01-01

    Italy's poor performance in various indicators of educational achievement, such as the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), has featured strongly in analyses of Italian education policy, and its progress towards the Lisbon objectives has been slow. With weak outcomes often linked to a highly stratified system of upper secondary

  3. Primary- and secondary-control strategies in later life: predicting hospital outcomes in men and women.

    PubMed

    Chipperfield, Judith G; Perry, Raymond P

    2006-03-01

    Community-dwelling individuals (n = 143, 73-98 years old) were assessed to consider if their use of task-specific control strategies predicted hospital outcomes in the subsequent 2 years. The authors were interested in whether men and women facing health-induced task restrictions benefited equally from the use of primary- and secondary-control strategies. Gender interacted with primary-control strategies; men's more frequent use of these proactive strategies generally related to fewer hospital admissions. Gender also interacted with secondary-control strategies; women's more frequent use of compensatory (self-protective) strategies corresponded to fewer hospital admissions and shorter hospital stay durations. Taken together, our findings suggest that men benefit by adopting certain primary-control strategies and women benefit by adopting certain compensatory secondary-control strategies. PMID:16569115

  4. Long-Term Visual Outcomes of Secondary Intraocular Lens Implantation in Children with Congenital Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yongxiang; Lu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term visual outcomes and factors affecting visual results in children undergoing secondary intraocular lens (IOL) implantation following primary congenital cataract extraction. Methods Children with congenital cataracts who underwent secondary IOL implantation for aphakia at the Eye and ENT Hospital of Fudan University between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2007, were retrospectively reviewed. One eye was randomly selected in children with bilateral cataracts. Laterality, type of cataract (total or partial opacity), sex, age at primary and secondary surgeries, visual axis opacity (VAO), compliance with amblyopia therapy, postoperative ocular complications, refractive error, ocular alignment, and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at last follow-up were recorded; potential factors that might have affected the visual results were evaluated. Results Seventy-six bilateral and 34 unilateral congenital cataract cases were analyzed; the mean ages of the children were 12.70±5.06 and 12.50±2.71 years at final follow-up, the mean follow-up periods from IOL implantation were 94.93±24.22 and 109.09±18.89 months, and the mean BCVA (Log MAR) values were 0.51±0.37 and 1.05±0.46, respectively. Final BCVA after secondary IOL implantation was significantly associated with laterality, type of cataract, age at primary cataract extraction, compliance with amblyopia therapy, and refractive correction after surgery. No significant associations were found between BCVA and sex, age at secondary IOL implantation, VAO, or other ocular complications. The most common ocular complications were VAO and elevated intraocular pressure after surgery. There were no other complications, with the exception of one eye with IOL dislocation. Conclusions The results indicate that the important determinants of long-term visual outcomes in children with congenital cataracts undergoing secondary IOL implantation are laterality, cataract type, age at initial cataract extraction, compliance with amblyopia therapy, and refractive error. PMID:26230501

  5. Development and Validation of the "iCAN!"--A Self-Administered Questionnaire Measuring Outcomes/Competences and Professionalism of Medical Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimoliatis, Ioannis D. K.; Lyrakos, Georgios N.; Tseretopoulou, Xanthippi; Tzamalis, Theodoros; Bazoukis, George; Benos, Alexis; Gogos, Charalambos; Malizos, Konstantinos; Pneumatikos, Ioannis; Thermos, Kyriaki; Kaldoudi, Eleni; Tzaphlidou, Margaret; Papadopoulos, Iordanis N.; Jelastopulu, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    The Tuning-Medicine Project produced a set of "level one" and "level two" learning outcomes/competences to be met by European medical graduates. In the learner-centered era self-assessment becomes more and more important. Our aim was to develop a self-completion questionnaire ("iCAN!") evaluating graduates' learning…

  6. Secondary science classroom dissections: Informing policy by evaluating cognitive outcomes and exploring affective outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allspaw, Kathleen M.

    Animal protection organizations claim that dissection is pedagogically unsound and that it will cause students to lose respect for non-human animals. Science teacher organizations support curricula that teach respect for animal life and include dissection. Prior research compared dissection to dissection alternatives. Four of the six studies revealed no difference between groups on tests of cognitive outcomes. One study revealed that dissection was superior, and one revealed that the alternative was superior. No differences in attitudes toward science, dissection or school were found. Attitudes toward non-human animals were not measured. This study focused on the dissections of earthworms and frogs in middle and high school classrooms. Pre and post-tests of conceptual understanding revealed failing scores and no significant pre/post differences. Because these tests required critical thinking skills, and the dissection activities did not, it is difficult to determine if the poor performance on these tests indicates the inability of the students to think critically, and/or if it indicates the ineffectiveness of dissection. Further studies of dissections that focus on critical thinking would be necessary to make this distinction. Classroom observations, student written narratives, and student and adult interviews revealed mixed attitudes toward non-human animals. Student behaviors during dissection were similar to those behaviors exhibited during non-dissection activities. Most students and adults readily supported worm dissections while they expressed some trepidation about frog dissections. Students and adults universally expressed affection for their pets and opposed the use of their own pets for dissection/research. There was slight support for the use of dogs and cats for dissection/research, but only those students who expressed hate for cats said that they could dissect cats. None of the students or adults expressed a willingness to dissect dogs. Some students abandoned plans for life science careers because they did not want to do further dissections. Students and adults often expressed confliction about the use of animals for food and/or research. Students and adults employed psychological mechanisms including dissociation, conflict reduction and viewing animals as an "outgroup" to rationalize their support for the use of animals for food, dissection and research.

  7. A Comparison of the Gatehouse Bullying Scale and the Peer Relations Questionnaire for Students in Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Lyndal; Wolfe, Sarah; Tollit, Michelle; Butler, Helen; Patton, George

    2007-01-01

    Background: Bullying occurs in all schools. Measuring bullying in schools is complicated because both definitions of bullying and methods for measuring bullying vary. This study compared a brief 12-item Gatehouse Bullying Scale (GBS) with items drawn from the Peer Relations Questionnaire (PRQ), a well-established bullying questionnaire to measure…

  8. Early augmented language intervention for children with developmental delays: potential secondary motor outcomes.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Ani S; Romski, Mary Ann; Sevcik, Rose A

    2014-09-01

    This exploratory study examined the potential secondary outcome of an early augmented language intervention that incorporates speech-generating devices (SGD) on motor skill use for children with developmental delays. The data presented are from a longitudinal study by Romski and colleagues. Toddlers in the augmented language interventions were either required (Augmented Communication-Output; AC-O) or not required (Augmented Communication-Input; AC-I) to use the SGD to produce an augmented word. Three standardized assessments and five event-based coding schemes measured the participants' language abilities and motor skills. Toddlers in the AC-O intervention used more developmentally appropriate motor movements and became more accurate when using the SGD to communicate than toddlers in the AC-I intervention. AAC strategies, interventionist/parent support, motor learning opportunities, and physical feedback may all contribute to this secondary benefit of AAC interventions that use devices. PMID:25109299

  9. The RAISE Connection Program for Early Psychosis: Secondary Outcomes and Mediators and Moderators of Improvement.

    PubMed

    Marino, Leslie; Nossel, Ilana; Choi, Jean C; Nuechterlein, Keith; Wang, Yuanjia; Essock, Susan; Bennett, Melanie; McNamara, Karen; Mendon, Sapna; Dixon, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    The aims of this study were to explore secondary outcomes of a coordinated specialty care program for persons with early psychosis, including quality of life and recovery, as well as to explore mediators and moderators of improvement in occupational and social functioning and symptoms. Sixty-five individuals across two sites were enrolled and received services for up to 2 years. Trajectories for individuals' outcomes over time were examined using linear and quadratic mixed-effects models with repeated measures. In addition, baseline prognostic factors of participant improvement in social and occupational functioning were explored based on previous literature and expert opinion of the analytic team. Results demonstrate that the program was effective in improving quality of life and recovery over time. Furthermore, processing speed was identified as a significant moderator of improvement in occupational Global Assessment of Function, and treatment fidelity, engagement, and family involvement were identified as mediators of improvement in social and occupational functioning. PMID:25900546

  10. The Effects of Career Calling and Perceived Overqualification on Work Outcomes for Primary and Secondary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobene, Eleni V.; Meade, Adam W.

    2013-01-01

    While perceived overqualification (POQ) has received increased research attention in recent years, the identification of variables that moderate POQ-outcome relationships is critical to our understanding of how the construct affects career outcomes. This study, involving 170 full-time primary and secondary school educators in a suburban…

  11. The Munich Shoulder Questionnaire (MSQ): development and validation of an effective patient-reported tool for outcome measurement and patient safety in shoulder surgery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Outcome measurement in shoulder surgery is essential to evaluate the patient safety and treatment efficiency. Currently this is jeopardized by the fact that most patient-reported self-assessment instruments are not comparable. Hence, the aim was to develop a reliable self-assessment questionnaire which allows an easy follow-up of patients. The questionnaire also allows the calculation of 3 well established scoring systems, i.e. the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), the Constant-Murley Score (CMS), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) Score. The subjective and objective items of these three systems were condensed into a single 30-questions form and validated against the original questionnaires. Methods A representative collective of patients of our shoulder clinic was asked to fill in the newly designed self-assessment Munich Shoulder Questionnaire (MSQ). At the same time, the established questionnaires for self-assessment of CONSTANT, SPADI and DASH scores were handed out. The obtained results were compared by linear regression analysis. Results Fifty one patients completed all questionnaires. The correlation coefficients of the results were r?=?0.91 for the SPADI, r?=?-0.93 for the DASH and r?=?0.94 for the CMS scoring system, respectively. Conclusions We developed an instrument which allows a quantitative self-assessment of shoulder function. It provides compatible data sets for the three most popular shoulder function scoring systems by one single, short 30-item. This instrument can be used by shoulder surgeons to effectively monitor the outcome, safety and quality of their treatment and also compare the results to published data in the literature. PMID:22607967

  12. Multidisciplinary Approach for Improved Outcomes in Secondary Cranial Reconstruction: Introducing the Pericranial-Onlay Cranioplasty Technique

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Chad R.; Fisher, Mark; Liauw, Jason; Lina, Ioan; Puvanesarajah, Varun; Susarla, Srinivas; Coon, Alexander; Lim, Michael; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Weingart, Jon; Colby, Geoffrey; Olivi, Alessandro; Huang, Judy

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although materials for secondary cranial reconstruction have evolved with time, the overall approach in terms of bone flap/implant reconstruction after necessary delay has remained constant. OBJECTIVE To present our cases series of 50 consecutive secondary cranial reconstruction patients and to describe a multidisciplinary cranioplasty approach developed to reduce morbidity, to minimize infection, and to improve aesthetic appearance. METHODS Standard technique teaches us to place the bone flap and/or alloplastic implant directly over the dura or dural protectant after scalp flap re-elevation. However, this procedure is fraught with high complication rates, including infection. While raising the previously incised scalp flap overlying the full-thickness calvarial defect, the dissection is performed within the loose areolar tissue plane beneath the galea aponeurosis, thus leaving vascularized pericranium intact over the dura. RESULTS A total of 50 consecutive patients were treated by the senior author encompassing 46 cranioplasties using the pericranial-onlay approach, along with 4 isolated temporal soft tissue reconstructions with liquid poly-methyl-methacrylate. Of the 46 cranioplasties (> 5 cm2), only 1 autologous bone flap developed deep infection necessitating bone flap removal (1 of 46, 2.17%; 95% confidence interval, 0.003–11.3). None of the alloplastic custom implants placed have developed any infection requiring removal. CONCLUSION This multidisciplinary approach illustrated in our case series, including our “pericranial-onlay” technique described here for the first time, has the potential to improve patient outcomes, to decrease perioperative morbidity, and to minimize costs associated with postoperative infections after secondary cranial reconstruction. PMID:24448187

  13. Impact of Interactive Engagement on Reducing the Gender Gap in Quantum Physics Learning Outcomes among Senior Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adegoke, Benson Adesina

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the author examines the extent to which an interactive engagement approach can reduce the gender gap in senior secondary school (SSS) (age 16-18 years) students' learning outcomes in quantum physics. One hundred and twenty one (male = 65; female = 56) SSS 3 students participated in this study. They were randomly selected from two…

  14. Clinical Outcomes of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy in Patients With Secondary Lymphedema: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hasuk

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in patients with secondary lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. Methods In a prospective clinical trial, ESWT was performed consecutively 4 times over two weeks in 7 patients who were diagnosed with stage 3 secondary lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. Each patient was treated with four sessions of ESWT (0.056-0.068 mJ/mm2, 2,000 impulses). The parameters were the circumference of the arm, thickness of the skin and volume of the arm. We measured these parameters with baseline values before ESWT and repeated the evaluation after each ESWT treatment. Subjective data on skin thickness, edema and sensory impairment were obtained using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Results The mean volume of the affected arm after four consecutive ESWT was significantly reduced from 2,332 to 2,144 mL (p<0.05). The circumference and thickness of the skin fold of the affected arm were significantly decreased after the fourth ESWT (p<0.05). The three VAS scores were significantly improved after the fourth ESWT. Almost all patients were satisfied with this treatment and felt softer texture in their affected arm after treatment. Conclusion ESWT is an effective modality in the treatment of stage 3 lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. ESWT reduced the circumference and the thickness of arms with lymphedema and satisfied almost all patients with lymphedema. Therefore, this treatment provides clinically favorable outcome to patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema. PMID:23705118

  15. Change Trajectories for the Youth Outcome Questionnaire Self-Report: Identifying Youth at Risk for Treatment Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Jennifer A. N.; Warren, Jared S.; Nelson, Philip L.; Burlingame, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    This study used longitudinal youth outcome data in routine mental health services to test a system for identifying cases at risk for treatment failure. Participants were 2,715 youth (M age = 14) served in outpatient managed care and community mental health settings. Change trajectories were developed using multilevel modeling of archival data.…

  16. Long-Term Outcomes and Complications of Trabeculectomy for Secondary Glaucoma in Patients with Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kawaji, Takahiro; Inoue, Toshihiro; Hara, Ryuhei; Eiki, Daisuke; Ando, Yukio; Tanihara, Hidenobu

    2014-01-01

    Objective Secondary glaucoma is a serious complication in patients with transthyretin (TTR)-related familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP). We assessed the long-term outcomes and complications of trabeculectomy with mitomycin C (MMC) for secondary glaucoma associated with FAP. Methods Medical case records of Kumamoto University Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-one eyes of 13 patients (10 with FAP ATTR Val30Met; 3 with FAP ATTR Tyr114Cys) underwent trabeculectomy with MMC and follow-up of at least 2 years. The primary outcome measure was Kaplan-Meier survival, with failure of this treatment being defined as an intraocular pressure (IOP) of ?5 mm Hg or ?22 mm Hg on two consecutive visits or as additional operations needed to reduce IOP. Secondary outcome measures included complications, bleb characteristics, and additional postoperative interventions required. Results The mean postoperative follow-up period was 5.7 years (range, 2.2–12.7 years). Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated probabilities of success of 0.76, 0.67, and 0.53 at 1, 2, and 3 years after operation, respectively. Significant complications included ocular decompression retinopathy in 7 eyes (33%) and bleb encapsulation in 10 eyes (48%). Twelve eyes (57%) needed additional surgery, such as bleb revision or trabeculectomy with MMC, to reduce IOP. Conclusions Trabeculectomy with MMC may not be optimal for patients with FAP-related glaucoma and may have several significant complications. PMID:24802803

  17. Cross-Cultural Validity, Reliability, and Psychometric Properties of the Persian Version of the Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's Disease-Psychosocial Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Farzaneh; Hadizadeh, Hasti; Delbari, Ahmad; Lökk, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Considering the influence of different motor and nonmotor features of Parkinson's disease (PD), it is important to evaluate the psychosocial functioning of the patients. For this purpose, the scales for outcomes in Parkinson's disease-psychosocial questionnaire (SCOPA-PS) has been previously designed. The aim of our study was to assess the cross-cultural validation and psychometric properties of the Persian version of the SCOPA-PS. Methods. One hundred and ten nondemented idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) patients were consecutively recruited from an outpatient referral movement disorder clinic. Eligible patients filled up a number of questionnaires including the Persian version of SCOPA-PS during the face-to-face interview session and clinical examination to measure disease severity, nonmotor psychiatric symptoms, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Results. The highest and lowest correlation coefficients of internal consistency were reported for item 7 on “asking for help” (r = 0.765) and item 5 on “sexual problems” (r = 0.553). Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient of the entire scale was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.83–0.90). The Hoehn and Yahr stage (r = 0.34, P < 0.001), Schwab and England ADL scale (r = ?0.55, P < 0.001), anxiety (r = 0.64, P < 0.001), depression (r = 0.71, P < 0.001), and fatigue (r = 0.35, P < 0.001) were significantly correlated with the total score of the SCOPA-PS questionnaire. Conclusions. The Persian version of SCOPA-PS is a highly reliable and valid scale to measure psychosocial functioning in IPD patients with different sex, age-group, and educational level, which could be applied in future researches. Disease severity scales, depression, anxiety, fatigue, and different domains of HRQoL were all associated with psychosocial functioning in PD patients. PMID:24804096

  18. A double blind randomised trial of IIb or not IIb neck dissections on electromyography, clinical examination, and questionnaire-based outcomes: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Parikh, S; Tedman, B M; Scott, B; Lowe, D; Rogers, S N

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this double-blind randomised controlled trial was to evaluate the feasibility of a study to compare differences using electromyographic (EMG) or nerve conduction studies (NCS), questionnaires completed by patients, and range of movement, after selective supraomohyoid neck dissection in patients with and without level IIb for node-negative oral cancer. Between January 2006 and July 2008 we recruited 57 previously untreated consecutive patients with node-negative T1 or T2 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and floor of the mouth. Thirty-eight patients were randomised (32 unilateral and 6 bilateral dissections) into two groups. Preoperatively and at 6 weeks postoperatively we collected EMG or NCS data on trapezius muscle activity (primary outcome), the University of Washington quality of life scale (UWQoLv4), the neck dissection impairment index (NDII), and range of movement. At 6 months data on range of movement and data from the questionnaires were obtained. There was a greater mean fall in trapezius M-response amplitude for those who had IIb dissected, which suggested that inclusion of this level caused additional morbidity. However, it was not significant for patients who had unilateral dissections or for all necks combined. Changes in M-amplitude from baseline to 6 weeks, and from baseline to 6 months were strongly associated with changes in the shoulder domain of the UWQoL and the NDII, but were less strong for change in range of movement. This feasibility study has shown that a randomised controlled trial (RCT) is achievable. The combination of EMG or NCS with questionnaire data preoperatively and to 6 weeks would suffice and would simplify a new study design. PMID:21996573

  19. Comparable outcomes post allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant for patients with de novo or secondary acute myeloid leukemia in first remission.

    PubMed

    Michelis, F V; Atenafu, E G; Gupta, V; Kim, D D; Kuruvilla, J; Lipton, J H; Loach, D; Seftel, M D; Uhm, J; Alam, N; Lambie, A; McGillis, L; Messner, H A

    2015-07-01

    Secondary AML (sAML) has a poor prognosis with conventional chemotherapy alone. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is beneficial for high-risk AML. Data comparing outcomes of transplants for patients with de novo and sAML are limited. We compared outcomes of patients transplanted for de novo and sAML in first complete remission and investigated the effect of age, HCT comorbidity index (HCT-CI) and karyotype in both groups. A total of 264 patients with de novo (n=180) and sAML (n=84) underwent allogeneic HCT between 1999 and 2013. Median age at transplant was 51 years (range 18-71), median follow-up of survivors was 77 months. Evaluation of all patients demonstrated no significant difference between de novo and sAML for overall survival (P=0.18), leukemia-free survival (P=0.17), cumulative incidence of relapse (P=0.51) and non-relapse mortality (P=0.42). Multivariable and propensity score analyses confirmed the comparable outcomes between de novo and sAML post transplant. Although sAML demonstrates outcomes inferior to de novo AML treated with chemotherapy alone, outcomes following allogeneic HCT are comparable between the two groups. PMID:25822226

  20. The Gutenberg Health Study: measuring psychosocial factors at work and predicting health and work-related outcomes with the ERI and the COPSOQ questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several instruments have been developed to assess psychosocial workload. We compared two of these instruments, the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) model and the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) with regard to congruent validity and internal validity. Methods This analysis is based on a population-based sample of the baseline examination of 2,783 employees from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS). About half of the participants completed the ERI questionnaire (n?=?1,342), the other half completed the COPSOQ (n?=?1,441). First, the two samples were compared and descriptive analyses were carried out calculating mean values for both instruments in general, then separately for age, gender and main occupational groups. Second, we analyzed the relationship between ERI and COPSOQ scales on the workplace situation and on the workplace outcomes: job satisfaction, general health, burnout, satisfaction with life, by applying stepwise logistic regression analysis. Results and discussion For the majority of occupations, high effort as reflected by the ERI corresponded with high demands as reflected by the COPSOQ. Comparably, high reward (according to ERI) yielded a good agreement with high “influence and development” (according to COPSOQ). However, we could also find differences between ERI and COPSOQ concerning the intensity of psychosocial workload in some occupations (e.g., physicians/pharmacists or warehouse managers/warehousemen/transport workers). These differences point to differing theoretical concepts of ERI and COPSOQ. When the ability of ERI and COPSOQ was examined to determine the associations with health and work outcomes, burnout could be better predicted by the COPSOQ; this might be due to the fact that COPSOQ comprises the constructs “work-privacy conflict” and “emotional demand”, which are closely related to burnout. However, methodological differences between these instruments limit their direct comparability. Conclusions The ERI and COPSOQ instrument yielded similar results for most occupational groups. The slightly stronger association between psychosocial workload as assessed by COPSOQ and burnout might be explained by its broader approach. The ability of the ERI and COPSOQ instrument to reflect relevant risk factors for clinically manifest disorders (e.g., coronary heart disease) will be derived from subsequent prospective analyses of the GHS with the follow-up data. PMID:23734632

  1. Preanesthesia Questionnaire

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ask Brochures and Resources Videos AANA / Patients Pre-Anesthesia Questionnaire Page Content The information you supply below ... supplements; complementary or alternative medicines)______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ Prior ... Pre-Anesthesia Questionnaire Please answer the following questions. These responses ...

  2. The development and application of a questionnaire designed to measure pre-existing, process, and outcome variables in the productivity measurement and enhancement 

    E-print Network

    Decuir, Arlette Desha

    1997-01-01

    The ProMES questionnaire was developed to assess individuals' experiences as they relate to the implementation of the Productivity Measurement and Enhancement System. The questionnaire, which resulted in a total of 30 subscales that assess...

  3. A Theoretically Grounded Exploration of the Social and Emotional Outcomes of Transition to Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Stacey K.; Lester, Leanne; Wenden, Elizabeth; Cross, Donna

    2012-01-01

    Adolescent development involves a complex interplay between genetics, biology, and social and emotional relationships within multiple contexts of home, school and the broader community. The transition from primary to secondary school, coupled with the onset of puberty, can therefore be a difficult period for young people to negotiate at a critical…

  4. Impact of interactive engagement on reducing the gender gap in quantum physics learning outcomes among senior secondary school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adesina Adegoke, Benson

    2012-07-01

    In this study, the author examines the extent to which an interactive engagement approach can reduce the gender gap in senior secondary school (SSS) (age 16-18 years) students' learning outcomes in quantum physics. One hundred and twenty one (male = 65; female = 56) SSS 3 students participated in this study. They were randomly selected from two senior secondary schools from the Ibadan North Local Government Area, Oyo State, Nigeria. There were two groups: the experimental group (interactive engagement) and the control group (traditional lecture method). Prior to the commencement of the experiment, students' scores in a previous examination conducted by their schools were collected and analysed. This was to determine the extent to which gender disparity had been narrowed after the experiment. Three hypotheses were tested. The data collected were analysed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). The results show that, generally, the students in the interactive engagement group had higher mean scores in the quantum physics achievement test than their colleagues in the control group. Among the participants in the interactive engagement group, female students had a slightly higher mean score than their male counterparts. These results show that with interactive engagement, gender disparity in quantum physics learning outcomes among students can be narrowed. The author recommends that physics teachers should adopt an interactive engagement approach in physics classes.

  5. Secondary Evaluations of MTA 36-Month Outcomes: Propensity Score and Growth Mixture Model Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, James M.; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Gibbons, Robert D.; Marcus, Sue; Hur, Kwan; Jensen, Peter S.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Abikoff, Howard B.: Greenhill, Laurence L.; Hechtman, Lily; Pelham, William E.; Wells, Karen C.; Conners, C. Keith; March, John S.; Elliott, Glen R.; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Hoza, Betsy; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Severe, Joanne B.; Wigal, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate two hypotheses: that self-selection bias contributed to lack of medication advantage at the 36-month assessment of the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children With ADHD (MTA) and that overall improvement over time obscured treatment effects in subgroups with different outcome trajectories. Method: Propensity score analyses,…

  6. Physical Disabilities and Post-Secondary Educational Outcomes. Working Paper No. 609.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakotko, Robert A.; Grossman, Michael

    The effects of poor early life cycle health on the postsecondary educational choices and outcomes of 10,430 physically disabled persons who were high school seniors in 1972 were examined. Ss were resurveyed in October of each year through 1976. Health information, including self report and official school report of disability was collected at the…

  7. Is Real-Time Feedback of Burn-Specific Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Clinical Settings Practical and Useful? A Pilot Study Implementing the Young Adult Burn Outcome Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Colleen M; Lee, Austin F; Kazis, Lewis E; Shapiro, Gabriel D; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Goverman, Jeremy; Fagan, Shawn P; Wang, Chao; Kim, Julia; Sheridan, Robert L; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2016-01-01

    Long-term follow-up care of survivors after burn injuries can potentially be improved by the application of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). PROMs can inform clinical decision-making and foster communication between the patient and provider. There are no previous reports using real-time, burn-specific PROMs in clinical practice to track and benchmark burn recovery over time. This study examines the feasibility of a computerized, burn-specific PROM, the Young Adult Burn Outcome Questionnaire (YABOQ), with real-time benchmarking feedback in a burn outpatient practice. The YABOQ was redesigned for formatting and presentation purposes using images and transcribed to a computerized format. The redesigned questionnaire was administered to young adult burn survivors (ages 19-30 years, 1-24 months from injury) via an ipad platform in the office before outpatient visits. A report including recovery curves benchmarked to a nonburned relatively healthy age-matched population and to patients with similar injuries was produced for the domains of physical function and social function limited by appearance. A copy of the domain reports as well as a complete copy of the patient's responses to all domain questions was provided for use during the clinical visit. Patients and clinicians completed satisfaction surveys at the conclusion of the visit. Free-text responses, included in the satisfaction surveys, were treated as qualitative data adding contextual information about the assessment of feasibility. Eleven patients and their providers completed the study for 12 clinical visits. All patients found the ipad survey and report "easy" or "very easy" to use. In nine instances, patients "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that it helped them communicate their situation to their doctor/nurse practitioner. Patients "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that the report helped them understand their course of recovery in 10 visits. In 11 visits, the patients "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that they would recommend this feedback to others. Qualitative comments included: "it helped organize my thoughts of recovery," "it opened lines of communication with the doctor," "it showed me how far I have come, and how far I need to go," and "it raised questions I would not have thought of." Only four of 12 provider surveys agreed that it helped them understand a patient's condition; however, in two visits, the providers stated that it helped identify a pertinent clinical issue. During two visits, providers stated that a treatment plan was discussed or recommended based on the survey results. Separately, qualitative comments from the providers included "survey was not sensitive enough to identify that this patient needed surgery for their scars." This is the first report describing clinical use of a burn-specific patient reported outcome measure. Real-time feedback using the ipad YABOQ was well received for the most part by the clinicians and burn survivors in the outpatient clinic setting. The information provided by the reports can be tested in a future randomized controlled clinical study evaluating impacts on physician decisions. PMID:26284638

  8. Progesterone Reduces Secondary Damage, Preserves White Matter, and Improves Locomotor Outcome after Spinal Cord Contusion

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; González, Susana; Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Lima, Analía; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; De Nicola, Alejandro F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Progesterone is an anti-inflammatory and promyelinating agent after spinal cord injury, but its effectiveness on functional recovery is still controversial. In the current study, we tested the effects of chronic progesterone administration on tissue preservation and functional recovery in a clinically relevant model of spinal cord lesion (thoracic contusion). Using magnetic resonance imaging, we observed that progesterone reduced both volume and rostrocaudal extension of the lesion at 60 days post-injury. In addition, progesterone increased the number of total mature oligodendrocytes, myelin basic protein immunoreactivity, and the number of axonal profiles at the epicenter of the lesion. Further, progesterone treatment significantly improved motor outcome as assessed using the Basso-Bresnahan-Beattie scale for locomotion and CatWalk gait analysis. These data suggest that progesterone could be considered a promising therapeutical candidate for spinal cord injury. PMID:24460450

  9. Reliability and Validity Evidence of Scores on the Achievement Goal Tendencies Questionnaire in a Sample of Spanish Students of Compulsory Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingles, Candido J.; Garcia-Fernandez, Jose M.; Castejon, Juan L.; Valle, Antonio; Delgado, Beatriz; Marzo, Juan C.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity evidence drawn from the scores of the Spanish version of the Achievement Goal Tendencies Questionnaire (AGTQ) using a sample of 2,022 (51.1% boys) Spanish students from grades 7 to 10. Confirmatory factor analysis replicated the correlated three-factor structure of the AGTQ in this sample: Learning…

  10. A Validation of the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction in Italian Secondary School Students: The Effect of Positive Relations on Motivation and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passini, Stefano; Molinari, Luisa; Speltini, Giuseppina

    2015-01-01

    The model for interpersonal teacher behavior, mapping the various teachers' interpersonal behaviors, has been applied for research in many countries. In order to measure the students' perceptions regarding the interaction with their teachers, the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) has been developed. The QTI has been shown to be a valid…

  11. Impact of parathyroidectomy on cardiovascular outcomes and survival in chronic hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. A retrospective study of 50 cases prior to the calcimimetics era

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In chronic hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism, pathological modifications of bone and mineral metabolism increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Parathyroidectomy, reducing the incidence of cardiovascular events, may improve outcomes; however, its effects on long-term survival are still subject of active research. We compared, in hemodialysis patients, the results of parathyroidectomy, in terms of cardiovascular outcomes and mortality, with those present in patients following medical treatment only, prior to the diffusion of calcimimetics. Methods From January 2004 to December 2006, 30 hemodialysis patients, affected by severe and unresponsive secondary hyperparathyroidism, underwent parathyroidectomy - 15 total parathyroidectomy and 15 total parathyroidectomy + subcutaneous autoimplantation. During a 5-year follow-up, patients did not receive a renal transplantation and were evaluated for biochemical modifications and major cardiovascular events - death, cardiovascular accidents, myocardial infarction and peripheral vascular disease. Results were compared with those obtained in a control group of 20 hemodialysis patients, affected by secondary hyperparathyroidism, and refusing surgical treatment, and following medical treatment only. Results The groups were comparable in terms of age, gender, dialysis vintage, and comorbidities. Postoperative cardiovascular events were observed in 18/30 - 54% - surgical patients and in 4/20 - 20%- medical patients, with a mortality rate respectively of 23.3% in the surgical group vs. 15% in the control group. Parathyroidectomy was not associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular morbidity and survival rate was unaffected by surgical treatment. Conclusions In secondary hyperparathyroidism hemodialysis patients affected by severe cardiovascular disease, surgery did not modify cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates. Therefore, in secondary hyperparathyroidism hemodialysis patients, resistant to medical treatment, only an early indication to calcimimetics, or surgery, in the initial stage of chronic kidney disease - mineral bone disorders, may offer a higher long-term survival. Further studies will be useful to clarify the role of secondary hyperparathyroidism in determining unfavorable cardiovascular outcomes and mortality in hemodialysis population. PMID:24268127

  12. Secondary Sclerosing Cholangitis in Critically Ill Patients: Clinical Presentation, Cholangiographic Features, Natural History, and Outcome: A Series of 16 Cases.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Silke; Veltzke-Schlieker, Wilfried; Adler, Andreas; Schott, Eckart; Eurich, Dennis; Faber, Wladimir; Neuhaus, Peter; Seehofer, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Secondary sclerosing cholangitis in critically ill patients (SSC-CIP) is an important differential diagnosis in patients presenting with cholestasis and PSC-like cholangiographic changes in endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). As a relatively newly described entity, SSC-CIP is still underdiagnosed, and the diagnosis is often delayed. The present study aims to improve the early detection of SSC-CIP and the identification of its complications.A total of 2633 records of patients who underwent or were listed for orthotopic liver transplantation at the University Hospital Charité, Berlin, were analyzed retrospectively. The clinical presentation and outcome (mean follow-up 62.7 months) of the 16 identified SSC-CIP cases were reviewed.Cholestasis was the first sign of SSC-CIP. GGT was the predominant enzyme of cholestasis. Hypercholesterolemia occurred in at least 75% of the patients. SSC-CIP provoked a profound weight loss (mean 18?kg) in 94% of our patients. SSC-CIP was diagnosed by ERC in all patients. The 3 different cholangiographic features detected correspond roughly to the following stages: (I) evidence of biliary casts, (II) progressive destruction of intrahepatic bile ducts, and (III) picture of pruned tree. Biliary cast formation is a hallmark of SSC-CIP and was seen in 87% of our cases. In 75% of the patients, the clinical course was complicated by cholangiosepsis, cholangitic liver abscesses, acalculous cholecystitis, or gallbladder perforation. SSC-CIP was associated with worse prognosis; transplant-free survival was ?40 months (mean).Because of its high rate of serious complications and unfavorable prognosis, it is imperative to diagnose SSC-CIP early and to differentiate SSC-CIP from other types of sclerosing cholangitis. Specific characteristics enable identification of SSC-CIP. Early cooperation with a transplant center and special attention to biliary complications are required after diagnosis of SSC-CIP. PMID:26656347

  13. CLASSIFICATION OF IRANIAN NURSES ACCORDING TO THEIR MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES USING GHQ-12 QUESTIONNAIRE: A COMPARISON BETWEEN LATENT CLASS ANALYSIS AND K-MEANS CLUSTERING WITH TRADITIONAL SCORING METHOD

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Jamshid; Ayatollahi, Seyyed Mohammad Taghi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nurses constitute the most providers of health care systems. Their mental health can affect the quality of services and patients’ satisfaction. General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) is a general screening tool used to detect mental disorders. Scoring method and determining thresholds for this questionnaire are debatable and the cut-off points can vary from sample to sample. This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of mental disorders among Iranian nurses using GHQ-12 and also compare Latent Class Analysis (LCA) and K-means clustering with traditional scoring method. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was carried out in Fars and Bushehr provinces of southern Iran in 2014. Participants were 771 Iranian nurses, who filled out the GHQ-12 questionnaire. Traditional scoring method, LCA and K-means were used to estimate the prevalence of mental disorder among Iranian nurses. Cohen’s kappa statistic was applied to assess the agreement between the LCA and K-means with traditional scoring method of GHQ-12. Results: The nurses with mental disorder by scoring method, LCA and K-mean were 36.3% (n=280), 32.2% (n=248), and 26.5% (n=204), respectively. LCA and logistic regression revealed that the prevalence of mental disorder in females was significantly higher than males. Conclusion: Mental disorder in nurses was in a medium level compared to other people living in Iran. There was a little difference between prevalence of mental disorder estimated by scoring method, K-means and LCA. According to the advantages of LCA than K-means and different results in scoring method, we suggest LCA for classification of Iranian nurses according to their mental health outcomes using GHQ-12 questionnaire PMID:26622202

  14. Usability of a barcode scanning system as a means of data entry on a PDA for self-report health outcome questionnaires: a pilot study in individuals over 60 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Boissy, Patrick; Jacobs, Karen; Roy, Serge H

    2006-01-01

    Background Throughout the medical and paramedical professions, self-report health status questionnaires are used to gather patient-reported outcome measures. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate in individuals over 60 years of age the usability of a PDA-based barcode scanning system with a text-to-speech synthesizer to collect data electronically from self-report health outcome questionnaires. Methods Usability of the system was tested on a sample of 24 community-living older adults (7 men, 17 women) ranging in age from 63 to 93 years. After receiving a brief demonstration on the use of the barcode scanner, participants were randomly assigned to complete two sets of 16 questions using the bar code wand scanner for one set and a pen for the other. Usability was assessed using directed interviews with a usability questionnaire and performance-based metrics (task times, errors, sources of errors). Results Overall, participants found barcode scanning easy to learn, easy to use, and pleasant. Participants were marginally faster in completing the 16 survey questions when using pen entry (20/24 participants). The mean response time with the barcode scanner was 31 seconds longer than traditional pen entry for a subset of 16 questions (p = 0.001). The responsiveness of the scanning system, expressed as first scan success rate, was less than perfect, with approximately one-third of first scans requiring a rescan to successfully capture the data entry. The responsiveness of the system can be explained by a combination of factors such as the location of the scanning errors, the type of barcode used as an answer field in the paper version, and the optical characteristics of the barcode scanner. Conclusion The results presented in this study offer insights regarding the feasibility, usability and effectiveness of using a barcode scanner with older adults as an electronic data entry method on a PDA. While participants in this study found their experience with the barcode scanning system enjoyable and learned to become proficient in its use, the responsiveness of the system constitutes a barrier to wide-scale use of such a system. Optimizing the graphical presentation of the information on paper should significantly increase the system's responsiveness. PMID:17184533

  15. Imputation by the mean score should be avoided when validating a Patient Reported Outcomes questionnaire by a Rasch model in presence of informative missing data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nowadays, more and more clinical scales consisting in responses given by the patients to some items (Patient Reported Outcomes - PRO), are validated with models based on Item Response Theory, and more specifically, with a Rasch model. In the validation sample, presence of missing data is frequent. The aim of this paper is to compare sixteen methods for handling the missing data (mainly based on simple imputation) in the context of psychometric validation of PRO by a Rasch model. The main indexes used for validation by a Rasch model are compared. Methods A simulation study was performed allowing to consider several cases, notably the possibility for the missing values to be informative or not and the rate of missing data. Results Several imputations methods produce bias on psychometrical indexes (generally, the imputation methods artificially improve the psychometric qualities of the scale). In particular, this is the case with the method based on the Personal Mean Score (PMS) which is the most commonly used imputation method in practice. Conclusions Several imputation methods should be avoided, in particular PMS imputation. From a general point of view, it is important to use an imputation method that considers both the ability of the patient (measured for example by his/her score), and the difficulty of the item (measured for example by its rate of favourable responses). Another recommendation is to always consider the addition of a random process in the imputation method, because such a process allows reducing the bias. Last, the analysis realized without imputation of the missing data (available case analyses) is an interesting alternative to the simple imputation in this context. PMID:21756330

  16. Xenon improves neurological outcome and reduces secondary injury following trauma in an in vivo model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Luh, Clara; Gruss, Marco; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Hirnet, Tobias; Werner, Christian; Engelhard, Kristin; Franks, Nicholas P; Thal, Serge C; Dickinson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the neuroprotective efficacy of the inert gas xenon following traumatic brain injury, and to determine whether application of xenon has a clinically relevant therapeutic time window. Design Controlled animal study. Setting University research laboratory. Subjects Male C57BL/6N mice (n=196) Interventions 75% xenon, 50% xenon or 30% xenon, with 25% oxygen (balance nitrogen) treatment following mechanical brain lesion by controlled cortical impact. Measurements & Main Results Outcome following trauma was measured using: 1) functional neurological outcome score, 2) histological measurement of contusion volume, 3) analysis of locomotor function and gait. Our study shows that xenon-treatment improves outcome following traumatic brain injury. Neurological outcome scores were significantly (p<0.05) better in xenon-treated groups in the early phase (24 hours) and up to 4 days after injury. Contusion volume was significantly (p<0.05) reduced in the xenon-treated groups. Xenon treatment significantly (p<0.05) reduced contusion volume when xenon was given 15 minutes after injury or when treatment was delayed 1 hour or 3 hours after injury. Neurological outcome was significantly (p<0.05) improved when xenon treatment was given 15 minutes or 1 hour after injury. Improvements in locomotor function (p<0.05) were observed in the xenon-treated group, 1 month after trauma. Conclusions These results show for the first time that xenon improves neurological outcome and reduces contusion volume following traumatic brain injury in mice. In this model, xenon application has a therapeutic time window of up to at least 3 hours. These findings support the idea that xenon may be of benefit as a neuroprotective treatment in brain trauma patients. PMID:25188549

  17. Helping Alliance, Retention, and Treatment Outcomes: A Secondary Analysis From the NIDA Clinical Trials Network Women and Trauma Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruglass, Lesia M.; Miele, Gloria M.; Hien, Denise A.; Campbell, Aimee N. C.; Hu, Mei-Chen; Caldeira, Nathilee; Jiang, Huiping; Litt, Lisa; Killeen, Therese; Hatch-Maillette, Mary; Najavits, Lisa; Brown, Chanda; Robinson, James A.; Brigham, Gregory S.; Nunes, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the association between the therapeutic alliance and treatment outcomes among 223 women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders who participated in a multisite clinical trial of group treatments for trauma and addictions in the United States throughout 2004 and 2005. General linear models indicated that women who received Seeking Safety, a cognitive-behavioral treatment, had significantly higher alliance ratings than those in Women's Health Education, a control group. Alliance was related to significant decreases in PTSD symptoms and higher attendance in both interventions. Alliance was not related to substance use outcomes. Implications and limitations of the findings are discussed. PMID:22475068

  18. Using the Assessment Model for Developing Learning Managements in Enrichment Science Classrooms of Upper Secondary Educational Students' Outcomes in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athan, Athit; Srisa-ard, Boonchom; Suikraduang, Arun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop and investigate the model for assessing learning management on the enrichment science classrooms in the upper secondary education of the Development and Promotion of Science and Technology Talents Project in Thailand. Using the research methodologies with the four phases: to investigate the background of the…

  19. Impacts of an Inquiry Teaching Method on Earth Science Students' Learning Outcomes and Attitudes at the Secondary School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mao, Song-Ling; Chang, Chun-Yen

    This paper summarizes two companion studies that were designed to investigate the impacts of an inquiry teaching method on Earth science students' achievement and attitudes towards Earth science in secondary schools. Subjects were 557 students (9th grade) enrolled in 14 Earth science classes. Two Earth science units, including topics of astronomy…

  20. Outcomes of Total Parathyroidectomy with Autotransplantation versus Subtotal Parathyroidectomy with Routine Addition of Thymectomy to both Groups: Single Center Experience of Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Sakman, Gürhan; Parsak, Cem Kaan; Balal, Mustafa; Seydaoglu, Gül?ah; Eray, ?smail Cem; Sar?ta?, Gökhan; Demircan, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Secondary hyperparathyroidism is a common acquired disorder seen in chronic renal failure. It may result in potentially serious complications including metabolic bone diseases, severe atherosclerosis and undesirable cardiovascular events. Parathyroidectomy is required in about 20% of patients after 3–10 years of dialysis and in up to 40% after 20 years. Aims: The aim of the current study was to evaluate the short-term and long-term outcomes of patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism who had undergone total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation and thymectomy or subtotal parathyroidectomy with thymectomy by the same surgical team during the study period. Study Design: Retrospective comparative study. Methods: Clinical data of 50 patients who underwent parathyroid surgery for secondary hyperparathyroidism between 2003 and 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were divided into two subgroups of total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation or subtotal parathyroidectomy. Thymectomy was routinely performed for both groups. Short term outcome parameters included intact parathyroid hormone, ionized calcium and alkaline phosphatase levels. Bone pain, bone fractures, persistent or recurrent disease were included in long term outcome parameters. Results: The mean duration of dialysis was eight years. The mean ionized calcium levels dropped significantly in the total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation group (p=0.016). No serious postoperative complications were observed. Postoperative intravenous calcium supplementation was required in four patients in the total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation group (total PTX+AT) and in three patients in the subtotal parathyroidectomy group (subtotal PTX). Postoperatively, all patients received oral calcium carbonate and calcitriol. The length of average hospital stay was 5 (3–10) days. Including nine patients who underwent successful renal transplantation pre-operative bone symptoms, hypercalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and an increased alkaline phosphatase levels were improved or resolved in all patients. After a mean follow-up of 65 months, three patients (6%) had persistent and one (2%) had recurrent disease. Conclusion: Total parathroidectomy with autotransplantation is a beneficial and safe surgical procedure for patients on chronic dialysis with otherwise uncontrollable secondary hyperparathroidism and even in patients who have undergone renal transplantation after parathyroidectomy. Careful cervical exploration and routine thymectomy should be considered as a routine part of the surgical approach regardless of the preferred technique. PMID:25207173

  1. The CTE/Academic Balance and Three Secondary Outcomes. In Brief: Fast Facts for Policy and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wonacott, Michael E.

    A study examined the outcomes of taking different balances of career and technical education (CTE) and academic courses. The study sample consisted of members of the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88) who were eighth-graders in 1988. The study sample members were divided into four groups as follows: (1) academic concentrators…

  2. Responsiveness of the individual work performance questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Individual work performance is an important outcome measure in studies in the workplace. Nevertheless, its conceptualization and measurement has proven challenging. To overcome limitations of existing scales, the Individual Work Performance Questionnaire (IWPQ) was recently developed. The aim of the current study was to gain insight into the responsiveness of the IWPQ. Methods Data were used from the Be Active & Relax randomized controlled trial. The aim of the trial was to investigate the effectiveness of an intervention to stimulate physical activity and relaxation of office workers, on need for recovery. Individual work performance was a secondary outcome measure of the trial. In total, 39 hypotheses were formulated concerning correlations between changes on the IWPQ scales and changes on similar constructs (e.g., presenteeism) and distinct constructs (e.g., need for recovery) used in the trial. Results 260 Participants completed the IWPQ at both baseline and 12 months of follow-up. For the IWPQ scales, 23%, 15%, and 38%, respectively, of the hypotheses could be confirmed. In general, the correlations between change scores were weaker than expected. Nevertheless, at least 85% of the correlations were in the expected direction. Conclusions Based on results of the current study, no firm conclusions can be drawn about the responsiveness of the IWPQ. Several reasons may account for the weaker than expected correlations. Future research on the IWPQ’s responsiveness should be conducted, preferably in other populations and intervention studies, where greater changes over time can be expected. PMID:24885593

  3. Evaluation of Liver Biomarkers as Prognostic Factors for Outcomes to Yttrium-90 Radioembolization of Primary and Secondary Liver Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Henrie, Adam M; Wittstrom, Kristina; Delu, Adam; Deming, Paulina

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine indicators of liver function and inflammation for prognostic value in predicting outcomes to yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE). In a retrospective analysis, markers of liver function and inflammation, biomarkers required to stage liver function and inflammation, and data regarding survival, tumor response, and progression after RE were recorded. Univariate regression models were used to investigate the prognostic value of liver biomarkers in predicting outcome to RE as measured by survival, tumor progression, and radiographic and biochemical tumor response. Markers from all malignancy types were analyzed together. A subgroup analysis was performed on markers from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. A total of 31 patients received RE from 2004 to 2014. Median survival after RE for all malignancies combined was 13.6 months (95% CI: 6.7-17.6 months). Results from an exploratory analysis of patient data suggest that liver biomarkers, including albumin concentrations, international normalized ratio, bilirubin concentrations, and the model for end-stage liver disease score, possess prognostic value in predicting outcomes to RE. PMID:26352926

  4. Questionnaire Development Resources

    Cancer.gov

    Downloadable resources made available by DCEG for use in developing study questionnaires. Includes questionnaires reviewed and approved by DCEG’s Technical Evaluation Committee, as well as non-reviewed questionnaire modules to be used as starting points for development.

  5. Intimate Partner Violence Outcomes in Women with PTSD and Substance Use: A Secondary Analysis of NIDA Clinical Trials Network “Women and Trauma” Multi-Site Study

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lisa R.; Field, Craig; Campbell, Aimee N. C.; Hien, Denise A.

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown strong associations between intimate partner violence (IPV) and both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders (SUD). Despite these linkages, research on the dual diagnosis of PTSD-SUD and its relationship to IPV is in an early stage, and little is known about how PTSD-SUD treatment might influence IPV outcomes. The current study is a secondary analysis of a larger NIDA Clinical Trials Network study exploring the effectiveness of two behavioral interventions for women with comorbid PTSD-SUD. Participants (n =288) were randomly assigned to Seeking Safety (SS), a cognitive-behavioral treatment that focuses on trauma and substance abuse symptoms, or to Women’s Health Education, a psychoeducational group. Logistic regressions were used to examine how treatment condition, identified risk factors and their interactions were related to IPV. Results showed that participants who were abstinent at baseline were significantly less likely to experience IPV over the 12-month follow-up period, whereas participants living with someone with an alcohol problem were significantly more likely to experience IPV over follow-up. Findings also showed that at a trend level participants with recent interpersonal trauma at baseline and higher total of lifetime trauma exposures were more likely to report IPV during follow-up. Although there was no main effect for treatment condition, a significant interaction between treatment condition and baseline abstinence was found. Participants who were abstinent at baseline and in the SS condition were significantly less likely to report IPV over follow-up. These findings indicate that an integrated treatment for PTSD and SUD was associated with significantly better IPV outcomes for a subset of individuals. The possibility that women with PTSD-SUD may differentially benefit from SS has important clinical implications. Further research examining the intersection of PTSD, SUD and IPV, and the impact of treatment on a range of outcomes is needed. PMID:23584194

  6. The Survey Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A. Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Internet-based surveys are still relatively new, and researchers are just beginning to articulate best practices for questionnaire design. Online questionnaire design has generally been guided by the principles applying to other self-administered instruments, such as paper-based questionnaires. Web-based questionnaires, however, have the potential…

  7. Appendix B: Questionnaire B1: Questionnaire

    E-print Network

    . Where was the study child born? City ST ___ ___ Country 6. What is the child's sex? Male Female 7. HowAppendix B: Questionnaire B1: Questionnaire #12;Do not write in this space To protect your child/her as the "study child". This page, which includes his/her personal information, will be separated from the rest

  8. Characteristics and outcome of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms: Report from the Italian network on secondary leukemias.

    PubMed

    Fianchi, Luana; Pagano, Livio; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Candoni, Anna; Gaidano, Gianluca; Breccia, Massimo; Criscuolo, Marianna; Specchia, Giorgina; Maria Pogliani, Enrico; Maurillo, Luca; Aloe-Spiriti, Maria Antonietta; Mecucci, Cristina; Niscola, Pasquale; Rossetti, Elena; Mansueto, Giovanna; Rondoni, Michela; Fozza, Claudio; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Spadea, Antonio; Fenu, Susanna; Buda, Gabriele; Gobbi, Marco; Fabiani, Emiliano; Sica, Simona; Hohaus, Stefan; Leone, Giuseppe; Voso, Maria Teresa

    2015-05-01

    Therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MN) are a complication of cytotoxic treatment for primary tumors and autoimmune diseases. We report data on 277 t-MN patients, recruited between 1999 and 2013 by the Italian Network on Secondary Leukemias (104 retrospectively and 173 prospectively registered). Median age at t-MN diagnosis was 64 years (range, 21-87). Most frequent primary malignancies (PMs) were lymphoproliferative diseases and breast cancer. One hundred and thirty-three patients had received chemotherapy (CHT), 43 patients radiotherapy (RT), and 101 patients combined CHT/RT for PM. Median time between cytotoxic treatment and t-MN was 5.7 years, with t-MN following RT alone associated with significantly longer latency, compared to CHT or combined CHT/RT (mean, 11.2 vs. 7.1 years, P = 0.0005). The addition of topoisomerase-II inhibitors to alkylating agents was associated with shorter latency compared to alkylating agents alone (median, 6 vs. 8.4 years, P = 0.02). Median survival was 14.6 months from t-MN diagnosis, and was significantly longer in patients treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Significant factors for survival at the multivariable analysis included age, adverse karyotype, and degree of anemia. Our data underline the prognostic importance of karyotype and age in t-MN, similar to de novo acute myeloid leukemia. Treatment approaches should not preclude the use of conventional treatments for younger t-MN patients, including allogeneic stem cell transplantation as potentially curative approach. PMID:25653205

  9. Evolution of cyclizing 5-aminolevulinate synthases in the biosynthesis of actinomycete secondary metabolites: outcomes for genetic screening techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pet?í?ková, Kate?ina; Chro?áková, Alica; Zelenka, Tomáš; Chrudimský, Tomáš; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Pet?í?ek, Miroslav; Krišt?fek, Václav

    2015-01-01

    A combined approach, comprising PCR screening and genome mining, was used to unravel the diversity and phylogeny of genes encoding 5-aminolevulinic acid synthases (ALASs, hemA gene products) in streptomycetes-related strains. In actinomycetes, these genes were believed to be directly connected with the production of secondary metabolites carrying the C5N unit, 2-amino-3-hydroxycyclopent-2-enone, with biological activities making them attractive for future use in medicine and agriculture. Unlike “classical” primary metabolism ALAS, the C5N unit-forming cyclizing ALAS (cALAS) catalyses intramolecular cyclization of nascent 5-aminolevulinate. Specific amino acid sequence changes can be traced by comparison of “classical” ALASs against cALASs. PCR screening revealed 226 hemA gene-carrying strains from 1,500 tested, with 87% putatively encoding cALAS. Phylogenetic analysis of the hemA homologs revealed strain clustering according to putative type of metabolic product, which could be used to select producers of specific C5N compound classes. Supporting information was acquired through analysis of actinomycete genomic sequence data available in GenBank and further genetic or metabolic characterization of selected strains. Comparison of 16S rRNA taxonomic identification and BOX-PCR profiles provided evidence for numerous horizontal gene transfers of biosynthetic genes or gene clusters within actinomycete populations and even from non-actinomycete organisms. Our results underline the importance of environmental and evolutionary data in the design of efficient techniques for identification of novel producers. PMID:26300877

  10. Evolution of cyclizing 5-aminolevulinate synthases in the biosynthesis of actinomycete secondary metabolites: outcomes for genetic screening techniques.

    PubMed

    Pet?í?ková, Kate?ina; Chro?áková, Alica; Zelenka, Tomáš; Chrudimský, Tomáš; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Pet?í?ek, Miroslav; Krišt?fek, Václav

    2015-01-01

    A combined approach, comprising PCR screening and genome mining, was used to unravel the diversity and phylogeny of genes encoding 5-aminolevulinic acid synthases (ALASs, hemA gene products) in streptomycetes-related strains. In actinomycetes, these genes were believed to be directly connected with the production of secondary metabolites carrying the C5N unit, 2-amino-3-hydroxycyclopent-2-enone, with biological activities making them attractive for future use in medicine and agriculture. Unlike "classical" primary metabolism ALAS, the C5N unit-forming cyclizing ALAS (cALAS) catalyses intramolecular cyclization of nascent 5-aminolevulinate. Specific amino acid sequence changes can be traced by comparison of "classical" ALASs against cALASs. PCR screening revealed 226 hemA gene-carrying strains from 1,500 tested, with 87% putatively encoding cALAS. Phylogenetic analysis of the hemA homologs revealed strain clustering according to putative type of metabolic product, which could be used to select producers of specific C5N compound classes. Supporting information was acquired through analysis of actinomycete genomic sequence data available in GenBank and further genetic or metabolic characterization of selected strains. Comparison of 16S rRNA taxonomic identification and BOX-PCR profiles provided evidence for numerous horizontal gene transfers of biosynthetic genes or gene clusters within actinomycete populations and even from non-actinomycete organisms. Our results underline the importance of environmental and evolutionary data in the design of efficient techniques for identification of novel producers. PMID:26300877

  11. Factor Analysis of the Modified Sexual Adjustment Questionnaire-Male

    PubMed Central

    Wilmoth, Margaret C.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Ng, Lit Soo; Bruner, Debra W.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The Sexual Adjustment Questionnaire (SAQ) is used in National Cancer Institute–sponsored clinical trials as an outcome measure for sexual functioning. The tool was revised to meet the needs for a clinically useful, theory-based outcome measure for use in both research and clinical settings. This report describes the modifications and validity testing of the modified Sexual Adjustment Questionnaire-Male (mSAQ-Male). Methods This secondary analysis of data from a large Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial employed principal axis factor analytic techniques in estimating validity of the revised tool. The sample size was 686; most subjects were White, older than the age 60 years, and with a high school education and a Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score of greater than 90. Results A 16-item, 3-factor solution resulted from the factor analysis. The mSAQ-Male was also found to be sensitive to changes in physical sexual functioning as measured by the KPS. Conclusion The mSAQ-Male is a valid self-report measure of sexuality that can be used clinically to detect changes in male sexual functioning. PMID:25255676

  12. [Day-clinic and Inpatient Psychotherapy of Depression (DIP-D)--Secondary Outcomes and Follow-up Results of a Randomized-Controlled Pilot Trial].

    PubMed

    Dinger, Ulrike; Köhling, Johanna; Klipsch, Ottilia; Ehrenthal, Johannes C; Nikendei, Christoph; Herzog, Wolfgang; Schauenburg, Henning

    2015-07-01

    Depressions are frequent disorders in psychosomatic medicine and psychotherapy. However, there are only few controlled studies comparing different levels of care for depressed patients. Especially the efficacy of day-clinic psychotherapy for depression remains understudied. The pilot study aims to close this gap by examining the feasibility of a randomized-controlled trial comparing day-clinic and inpatient psychotherapy for depression in a routine hospital setting. The current paper adds the secondary outcome measures on patient self-reported symptoms and interpersonal problems. In addition, findings of a 6-month follow-up are analyzed. Overall, 44 patients were recruited and randomly allocated to either day clinic or inpatient psychotherapy for 8 weeks. Depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems decreased during treatment, and follow-up scores stayed below intake scores. There were no differences between the treatment groups in this pilot study. For the future, it is desirable to compare randomized patients with those patients who received their preferred treatment option. Although the findings need to be replicated in larger samples, they appear promising for day-clinic psychotherapy. The better understanding of differential effectiveness of different levels of care of patient subgroups remains an important goal. PMID:25927239

  13. Classroom, Home and Peer Environment Influences on Student Outcomes in Science and Mathematics: An Analysis of Systemic Reform Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Barry J.; Kahle, Jane Butler

    2007-01-01

    Using secondary analysis of a large database from a Statewide Systemic Initiative, we examined the effects of several types of environments on student outcomes. Over 3 years, nearly 7,000 students in 392 classes in 200 different schools responded to a questionnaire that assesses class, home, and peer environments as well as student attitudes.…

  14. Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Lambert, Mireille; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the reliability and validity of the newly developed Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire (PESQ) by assessing its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity with patient-centred care, and predictive validity with patient activation and patient enablement. Design Validation study. Setting Saguenay, Que. Participants One hundred patients with at least 1 chronic disease who presented in a waiting room of a regional health centre family medicine unit. Main outcome measures Family physicians’ enabling skills, measured with the PESQ at 2 points in time (ie, while in the waiting room at the family medicine unit and 2 weeks later through a mail survey); patient-centred care, assessed with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument; patient activation, assessed with the Patient Activation Measure; and patient enablement, assessed with the Patient Enablement Instrument. Results The internal consistency of the 6 subscales of the PESQ was adequate (Cronbach ? = .69 to .92). The test-retest reliability was very good (r = 0.90; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.93). Concurrent validity with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument was good (r = ?0.67; 95% CI ?0.78 to ?0.53; P < .001). The PESQ accounts for 11% of the total variance with the Patient Activation Measure (r2 = 0.11; P = .002) and 19% of the variance with the Patient Enablement Instrument (r2 = 0.19; P < .001). Conclusion The newly developed PESQ presents good psychometric properties, allowing for its use in practice and research.

  15. [The outcomes of program based on complex decongestive physiotherapy for a patient with secondary lymphedema caused by infection on the leg].

    PubMed

    Nakao, Fujiko; Furutani, Akira; Yoshimura, Koichi; Hamano, Kimikazu; Kinoshita, Yumiko; Kawamoto, Rieko; Nakao, Hisako; Suzuki, Shizue

    2009-06-01

    Lymphedema is a chronic problem causing distress and loss of functions throughout the lifespan. Complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP) is in common use in developed countries but has only recently been used in Japan for people in outpatient settings. CDP is a representative conservative treatment for lymphedema, conducted by combining four kinds of physical therapies: skin care, manual lymph drainage (MLD), bandage and exercise. This research project lead by a nurse is underway using CDP in an outpatient department. We report a case of secondary lymphedema caused by infection successfully treated by CDP. A 22-year-old man suffered from cellulitis of unknown origin when he was a high school student. After this event, he had been repeatedly admitted to hospital with infections as a result of the lymphedema. He underwent MLD once or twice monthly and received health education for skin care, self-massage and exercise, and was advised to wear compression stockings. Within 7 months the leg swelling had significantly reduced and his feelings of malaise and pain disappeared. Fourteen months later the circumferences of his knee and ankle had kept the sizes, and he has not re-entered hospital for infections. For this man, CDP had a positive outcome, as it has for many others around the world. Our experience has found it very important to establish adequate support systems for such people in outpatient and community settings. However, more research and knowledge sharing are required to understand the usefulness and effectiveness about this program as a primary treatment combined with health education in community settings in Japan. PMID:19670806

  16. Clinical Outcomes of Eyes with Submacular Hemorrhage Secondary to Age-related Macular Degeneration Treated with Anti-vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Hae; Chang, Young Suk; Lee, Tae Gon; Kim, Jong Woo; Lew, Young Ju

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the long-term outcomes of intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monotherapy for patients diagnosed with submacular hemorrhage secondary to exudative age-related macular degeneration. Methods This retrospective, observational study included 49 patients (49 eyes) who initially presented with submacular hemorrhage associated with exudative age-related macular degeneration and who were followed-up for at least 24 months. Only eyes that were treated with intravitreal anti-VEGF monotherapy were included in the study. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) measurements obtained at diagnosis, six months, and the final visit were compared. The associations of BCVA at the final visit with baseline BCVA, BCVA at six months, symptom duration, hemorrhage extent, and central foveal thickness were also analyzed. Results Over the course of follow-up (mean, 32.1 ± 8.5 months), an average of 5.1 ± 2.2 anti-VEGF injections were administered. Recurrent hemorrhage was noted in 13 eyes (26.5%). The mean logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution BCVA at diagnosis, six months, and the final visit were 1.40 ± 0.52, 0.87 ± 0.64, and 1.03 ± 0.83, respectively. Both baseline BCVA (p = 0.012) and BCVA at six months (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with BCVA at the final visit. Conclusions Improved visual acuity was maintained for more than two years with intravitreal anti-VEGF monotherapy. BCVA at six months is a useful clinical index to predict long-term visual prognosis. PMID:26457037

  17. The role of alcohol misuse on PTSD outcomes for women in community treatment: A secondary analysis of NIDA’s Women and Trauma study

    PubMed Central

    Hien, Denise A.; Campbell, Aimee N. C.; Ruglass, Lesia M.; Hu, Mei-Chen; Killeen, Therese

    2010-01-01

    Background Individuals with comorbid substance use and posttraumatic stress disorder may differentially benefit from integrated trauma-focused interventions based on specific presenting characteristics such as substance use type and PTSD severity. The current study is a secondary analysis of a NIDA Clinical Trials Network study exploring the effectiveness of two interventions for women with comorbid PTSD and substance use disorders. Method Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the effect of baseline alcohol misuse on PTSD outcome measures over time for all randomized participants. Results Women entering treatment with baseline alcohol misuse had higher Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Scale (PSS-SR) total scores (t = 2.43, p < .05), cluster C (avoidance/numbing) scores (t = 2.63, p < .01), and cluster D (hyper-arousal) scores (t = 2.31, p < .05). For women with alcohol misuse, after treatment week one, PSS-SR scores were significantly lower in the Seeking Safety intervention during treatment (?2(1) = 4.00, p < .05) and follow-up (?2(1) = 4.87, p < .05) compared to those in the health education intervention. Alcohol misusers in the Seeking Safety group who had higher baseline hyper-arousal severity improved more quickly than those with lower baseline hyper-arousal severity during treatment (?2(1) = 4.06, p < .05). Conclusions These findings suggest that the type of substance abuse at treatment entry may inform treatment selection, predict treatment response among those with co-occurring PTSD and substance use disorders, and indicate a more severe clinical picture. PMID:20537811

  18. Language Usage Questionnaire, Ethiopian Schoolchildren. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Charles A.; And Others

    The questionnaire presented here was designed to be administered to a representative sample of Ethiopian children enrolled in primary and secondary schools. Responses to be elicited pertain to --(1) personal use of language in several domains of speech behavior, (2) use of language by others in situations which the respondent has had an…

  19. Brief Report: Accuracy of a 16-Item Questionnaire Based on the HEADSS Approach (QBH-16) in the Screening of Mental Disorders in Adolescents with Behavioral Problems in Secondary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagel, Lilian Day; Mainieri, Alberto Scolfano; Zeni, Cristian Patrick; Wagner, Mario Bernardes

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Compare a questionnaire based on the HEADSS approach (QBH-16) and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) in the screening of mental disorder in adolescents with behavioral problems. Methods: Adolescents from both genders 12-17 years-old presenting behavioral problems without a previous diagnosis of mental disorder were referred from…

  20. Leadership Talent Identification and Development: Perceptions of Heads, Middle Leaders and Classroom Teachers in 70 Contextually Different Primary and Secondary Schools in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Christopher; Brundrett, Mark; Nevill, Alan

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on outcomes from a study funded by the National College for School Leadership (NCSL) designed to explore leadership talent identification, development, succession and retention in contextually different primary and secondary schools in England. Focus groups and a questionnaire were used to secure perceptions of heads, middle…

  1. Utah Drug Use Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in junior and senior high school students. The 21 multiple choice items pertain to drug use practices, use history, available of drugs, main reason for drug use, and demographic data. The questionnaire is untimed, group administered, and may be given by the classroom teacher in about 10 minutes. Item…

  2. Write Your Own Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, David I.

    1975-01-01

    Contends that student evaluative questionnaires should be designed by instructors themselves to help improve their classroom performance and therefore should contain only questions that students are capable of answering objectively and not, for instance, questions about the relevancy of the course. Contains a sample questionnaire. (GH)

  3. Predictors of outcome after 6 and 12 months following anthroposophic therapy for adult outpatients with chronic disease: a secondary analysis from a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Anthroposophic medicine is a physician-provided complementary therapy system involving counselling, artistic and physical therapies, and special medications. The purpose of this analysis was to identify predictors of symptom improvement in patients receiving anthroposophic treatment for chronic diseases. Methods 913 adult outpatients from Germany participated in a prospective cohort study. Patients were starting anthroposophic treatment for mental (30.4% of patients, n = 278/913), musculoskeletal (20.2%), neurological (7.6%), genitourinary (7.4%) or respiratory disorders (7.2%) or other chronic indications. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was performed with the improvement of Symptom Score (patients' assessment, 0: not present, 10: worst possible) after 6 and 12 months as dependent variables. 61 independent variables pertaining to socio-demographics, life style, disease status, co-morbidity, health status (SF-36), depression, and therapy factors were analysed. Results Compared to baseline, Symptom Score improved by average 2.53 points (95% confidence interval 2.39-2.68, p < 0.001) after six months and by 2.49 points (2.32-2.65, p < 0.001) after 12 months. The strongest predictor for improvement after six months was baseline Symptom Score, which alone accounted for 25% of the variance (total model 32%). Improvement after six months was also positively predicted by better physical function, better general health, shorter disease duration, higher education level, a diagnosis of respiratory disorders, and by a higher therapy goal documented by the physician at baseline; and negatively predicted by the number of physiotherapy sessions in the pre-study year and by a diagnosis of genitourinary disorders. Seven of these nine variables (not the two diagnoses) also predicted improvement after 12 months. When repeating the 0-6 month analysis on two random subsamples of the original sample, three variables (baseline Symptom Score, physical function, general health) remained significant predictors in both analyses, and three further variables (education level, respiratory disorders, therapy goal) were significant in one analysis. Conclusion In adult outpatients receiving anthroposophic treatment for chronic diseases, symptom improvement after 6 and 12 months was predicted by baseline symptoms, health status, disease duration, education, and therapy goal. Other variables were not associated with the outcome. This secondary predictor analysis of data from a pre-post study does not allow for causal conclusions; the results are hypothesis generating and need verification in subsequent studies. PMID:20682028

  4. Design a questionnaire.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, D H

    1993-01-01

    The design of questionnaires is a craft which has been badly neglected by the medical profession. A questionnaire should be appropriate, intelligible, unambiguous, unbiased, capable of coping with all possible responses, satisfactorily coded, piloted, and ethical. The key steps in designing a questionnaire are to: decide what data you need, select items for inclusion, design the individual questions, compose the wording, design the layout and presentation, think about coding, prepare the first draft and pretest, pilot, and evaluate the form, and perform the survey. Despite the apparently complicated nature of the task, theoretical knowledge is no substitute for practical experience. PMID:8281062

  5. The Environmental Satisfaction Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corazzini, John G.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The Environmental Satisfaction Questionnaire (ESQ) is an instrument that has been developed to provide assessment information which can be used for redesign purposes. The article includes an explanation of the technology of the ESQ and several examples. (Author)

  6. Self-Rated Competences Questionnaires from a Design Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Edith; Woodley, Alan; Richardson, John T. E.; Leidner, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a theoretical review of self-rated competences questionnaires. This topic is influenced by the ongoing world-wide reform of higher education, which has led to a focus on the learner outcomes of higher education. Consequently, questionnaires on self-rated competences have increasingly been employed. However, self-ratings are…

  7. Secondary School Advisors as Mentors and Secondary Attachment Figures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ryzin, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The teacher-student relationship is vital to student outcomes in secondary school. Unfortunately, the transition from elementary to secondary school is associated with a decrease in the quality or supportiveness of this relationship. In response, some secondary schools implement advisory programs, in which a teacher/advisor meets periodically with…

  8. Perinatal and maternal outcomes in planned home and obstetric unit births in women at ‘higher risk’ of complications: secondary analysis of the Birthplace national prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y; Townend, J; Rowe, R; Brocklehurst, P; Knight, M; Linsell, L; Macfarlane, A; McCourt, C; Newburn, M; Marlow, N; Pasupathy, D; Redshaw, M; Sandall, J; Silverton, L; Hollowell, J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore and compare perinatal and maternal outcomes in women at ‘higher risk’ of complications planning home versus obstetric unit (OU) birth. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting OUs and planned home births in England. Population 8180 ‘higher risk’ women in the Birthplace cohort. Methods We used Poisson regression to calculate relative risks adjusted for maternal characteristics. Sensitivity analyses explored possible effects of differences in risk between groups and alternative outcome measures. Main outcome measures Composite perinatal outcome measure encompassing ‘intrapartum related mortality and morbidity’ (intrapartum stillbirth, early neonatal death, neonatal encephalopathy, meconium aspiration syndrome, brachial plexus injury, fractured humerus or clavicle) and neonatal admission within 48 hours for more than 48 hours. Two composite maternal outcome measures capturing intrapartum interventions/adverse maternal outcomes and straightforward birth. Results The risk of ‘intrapartum related mortality and morbidity’ or neonatal admission for more than 48 hours was lower in planned home births than planned OU births [adjusted relative risks (RR) 0.50, 95% CI 0.31–0.81]. Adjustment for clinical risk factors did not materially affect this finding. The direction of effect was reversed for the more restricted outcome measure ‘intrapartum related mortality and morbidity’ (RR adjusted for parity 1.92, 95% CI 0.97–3.80). Maternal interventions were lower in planned home births. Conclusions The babies of ‘higher risk’ women who plan birth in an OU appear more likely to be admitted to neonatal care than those whose mothers plan birth at home, but it is unclear if this reflects a real difference in morbidity. Rates of intrapartum related morbidity and mortality did not differ statistically significantly between settings at the 5% level but a larger study would be required to rule out a clinically important difference between the groups. PMID:25603762

  9. Diet History Questionnaire

    Cancer.gov

    NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH Diet History Questionnaire Today's date: MONTH DAY YEAR |___|___| 0 0 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 5 6 7 8 01 Jan 02 Feb 03 Mar 04 Apr 05 May 06 Jun 07 Jul 08 Aug 09 Sep 10 Oct 11 Nov 12

  10. Narcotics Center Questionnaire, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, John B.; And Others

    This questionnaire assesses drug knowledge, drug use practices, and attitudes toward drugs in junior high school, senior high school, and college students. The 105 items (multiple choice, yes/no, or completion) are concerned with personal and demographic data, "book" knowledge of drugs, "street" knowledge of drugs (drug argot and the like),…

  11. Questionnaire typography and production.

    PubMed

    Gray, M

    1975-06-01

    This article describes the typographic principles and practice which provide the basis of good design and print, the relevant printing processes which can be used, and the graphic designer's function in questionnaire production. As they impose constraints on design decisions to be discussed later in the text, the various methods of printing and production are discussed first. PMID:15677172

  12. Effects of Two Modes of Student Teams-Achievement Division Strategies on Senior Secondary School Students' Learning Outcomes in Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibraheem, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    Research results have shown that cooperative learning methods enhanced understanding of many difficult concepts. Different kinds of cooperative methods and their efficacy have been researched into but the results of such studies have been inconclusive. Chief examiners reports of external chemistry examinations in Nigeria secondary Schools had…

  13. Using Presence Questionnaires in Reality Using Presence Questionnaires in Reality

    E-print Network

    Slater, Mel

    compared to immersive virtual. #12;Using Presence Questionnaires in Reality 2 1. Introduction The concept1 Using Presence Questionnaires in Reality Using Presence Questionnaires in Reality Martin Usoh different presence question- naires can distinguish between real and virtual experiences. One group of 10

  14. Patterns and Outcomes of Induction of Labour in Africa and Asia: A Secondary Analysis of the WHO Global Survey on Maternal and Neonatal Health

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Joshua P.; Souza, João Paulo; Gülmezoglu, A. Metin

    2013-01-01

    Background Labour induction should be performed where benefit outweighs potential harm, however epidemiology of induction in lower-income countries is not well described. We used the WHO Global Survey dataset to describe the epidemiology and outcomes of labour induction in 192,538 deliveries in 253 facilities across 16 countries in Africa and Asia. Methods Data was analyzed separately for Africa and Asia. Prevalence of indications, methods, success and characteristics associated with labour induction were determined. Multilevel logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between induction (with medical indication and elective) and maternal/perinatal outcomes. Results Induction accounted for 4.4% (Africa) and 12.1% (Asia) of deliveries. Oxytocin alone was the most common method (45.9% and 37.5%) and success rates were generally over 80%. Medically indicated inductions were associated with increased adjusted odds of Apgar <7 at 5 minutes, low birthweight, NICU admission and fresh stillbirth in both regions. The odds of caesarean section in Africa were reduced (Adj OR 0.61, 95%CI 0.42–0.88). Elective induction was associated with increased adjusted odds of NICU (Africa) and ICU (Asia) admissions. Discussion Induction was generally less common than in higher-income countries. Prostaglandin use was uncommon despite evidence supporting use. Induction for medical indications may be associated with poorer outcomes due to maternal baseline risks. Despite one-third of elective inductions occurring at <39 weeks, the risk of maternal, fetal and neonatal mortality was not elevated following elective inductions. PMID:23755259

  15. ATBC Study - Questionnaires and Forms

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Home Contact Us Links Study Details Questionnaires & Forms Current Projects ATBC Study Bibliography Study Investigators & Collaborators Proposal Review & Collaboration Research Consortium Projects Questionnaires & Forms Baseline

  16. Guides & Reports for Questionnaire Design

    Cancer.gov

    Applied Research Program (ARP) staff use a variety of methods to develop and test questionnaires, including established Questionnaire Design Principles, empirical methods such as Cognitive Testing and psychometric methods such as Item Response Theory Modeling.

  17. Diet History Questionnaire: International Applications

    Cancer.gov

    ARP staff adapted the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) for use by Canadian populations in collaboration with the Alberta Cancer Board. This questionnaire takes into account the different food fortification polices of the U.S. and Canada.

  18. Diet History Questionnaire: Suggested Citations

    Cancer.gov

    Use of the Diet History Questionnaire and Diet*Calc Analysis Software for publication purposes should contain a citation which includes version information for the software, questionnaire, and nutrient database.

  19. Acceptability of Home-Assessment Post Medical Abortion and Medical Abortion in a Low-Resource Setting in Rajasthan, India. Secondary Outcome Analysis of a Non-Inferiority Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Mandira; Iyengar, Kirti; Essén, Birgitta; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Iyengar, Sharad D.; Bring, Johan; Soni, Sunita; Klingberg-Allvin, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies evaluating acceptability of simplified follow-up after medical abortion have focused on high-resource or urban settings where telephones, road connections, and modes of transport are available and where women have formal education. Objective To investigate women’s acceptability of home-assessment of abortion and whether acceptability of medical abortion differs by in-clinic or home-assessment of abortion outcome in a low-resource setting in India. Design Secondary outcome of a randomised, controlled, non-inferiority trial. Setting Outpatient primary health care clinics in rural and urban Rajasthan, India. Population Women were eligible if they sought abortion with a gestation up to 9 weeks, lived within defined study area and agreed to follow-up. Women were ineligible if they had known contraindications to medical abortion, haemoglobin < 85mg/l and were below 18 years. Methods Abortion outcome assessment through routine clinic follow-up by a doctor was compared with home-assessment using a low-sensitivity pregnancy test and a pictorial instruction sheet. A computerized random number generator generated the randomisation sequence (1:1) in blocks of six. Research assistants randomly allocated eligible women who opted for medical abortion (mifepristone and misoprostol), using opaque sealed envelopes. Blinding during outcome assessment was not possible. Main Outcome Measures Women’s acceptability of home-assessment was measured as future preference of follow-up. Overall satisfaction, expectations, and comparison with previous abortion experiences were compared between study groups. Results 731 women were randomized to the clinic follow-up group (n = 353) or home-assessment group (n = 378). 623 (85%) women were successfully followed up, of those 597 (96%) were satisfied and 592 (95%) found the abortion better or as expected, with no difference between study groups. The majority, 355 (57%) women, preferred home-assessment in the event of a future abortion. Significantly more women, 284 (82%), in the home-assessment group preferred home-assessment in the future, as compared with 188 (70%) of women in the clinic follow-up group, who preferred clinic follow-up in the future (p < 0.001). Conclusion Home-assessment is highly acceptable among women in low-resource, and rural, settings. The choice to follow-up an early medical abortion according to women’s preference should be offered to foster women’s reproductive autonomy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01827995 PMID:26327217

  20. Do treatment improvements in PTSD severity affect substance use outcomes? A secondary analysis from a randomized clinical trial in NIDA’s Clinical Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Hien, Denise A.; Jiang, Huiping; Campbell, Aimee N. C.; Hu, Mei-Chen; Miele, Gloria M.; Cohen, Lisa R.; Brigham, Gregory S.; Capstick, Carrie; Kulaga, Agatha; Robinson, James; Suarez-Morales, Lourdes; Nunes, Edward V.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the analysis was to examine the temporal course of improvement in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorder symptoms among women in outpatient substance abuse treatment. Method Participants were 353 women randomized to 12 sessions of trauma-focused or health education group treatment. PTSD and substance use assessments were conducted during treatment and at 1-week, 3-, 6-, and 12-months post treatment. A continuous Markov model was fit on participants’ four defined responder categories (non-responder, substance use responder, PTSD responder or global responder [improvement in both PTSD and substance use]) to investigate the temporal association between improvement in PTSD and substance use symptom severity during the study’s treatment phase. A generalized linear model was applied to test this relationship over follow-up. Results Non-responders, substance use responders and global responders tended to maintain original classification; PTSD responders were significantly more likely to transition to global responders over time, indicating maintained PTSD improvement was associated with subsequent substance use improvement. Trauma-focused treatment was significantly more effective in achieving substance use improvement compared to the health education group, but only among those who were heavy substance users at baseline and had achieved significant PTSD reductions. Conclusions PTSD severity reductions were more likely to be associated with substance use improvement, with minimal evidence of substance use symptom reduction improving PTSD symptoms. Results support the self-medication model of coping with PTSD symptoms and an empirical basis for integrated interventions for improved substance use outcomes in patients with severe symptomatology. PMID:19917596

  1. Paper to Electronic Questionnaires: Effects on Structured Questionnaire Forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.

    2009-01-01

    With the use of computers, paper questionnaires are being replaced by electronic questionnaires. The formats of traditional paper questionnaires have been found to effect a subject's rating. Consequently, the transition from paper to electronic format can subtly change results. The research presented begins to determine how electronic questionnaire formats change subjective ratings. For formats where subjects used a flow chart to arrive at their rating, starting at the worst and middle ratings of the flow charts were the most accurate but subjects took slightly more time to arrive at their answers. Except for the electronic paper format, starting at the worst rating was the most preferred. The paper and electronic paper versions had the worst accuracy. Therefore, for flowchart type of questionnaires, flowcharts should start at the worst rating and work their way up to better ratings.

  2. Secondary Procedures in Replantation

    PubMed Central

    Sabapathy, S. Raja; Bhardwaj, Praveen

    2013-01-01

    The success of replantation surgery is not judged by survival of the replanted part, but by the functional outcome attained. Hence, primary repair of all injured structures is the preferred aim. At times, constraints induced by the ischemia time and nature of injury preclude primary repair. In such situations, secondary procedures are inevitable. Secondary procedures are also frequently required to improve the function and appearance of the replanted extremity. The incidence of secondary procedures will vary with the level of replantation and the type of patient population. Secondary procedures are difficult because they carry risk of injury to the vital neurovascular structures that now lay at nonanatomical locations. Nevertheless, when indicated and performed with caution they could significantly raise the functional status of the individuals. PMID:24872769

  3. Measurement Services Association Questionnaire Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lewis J.; Gillis, Rod

    This paper presents the results of a questionnaire sent to 211 Measurement Services Association members. Sixty-four centers responded. The main purpose of the questionnaire was to find out what hardware and software are used by testing centers throughout the country. Results indicate that 52 institutions use mainframe computers, 50 use…

  4. Knowledge of ICT of Secondary School Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valavicius, Eugenijus; Babravicius, Kestutis

    2012-01-01

    The paper analyses the results of the computer literacy survey conducted among the 11th and 12th form students in gymnasiums and secondary schools in Lithuania. The basis for the questionnaire was taken from previous surveys carried out in Vilnius Pedagogical University. The questionnaire is divided into five topics, such as computer hardware and…

  5. Patient-Reported Outcome Questionnaire for Systemic Mastocytosis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Aggressive Systemic Mastocytosis (ASM); Systemic Mastocytosis With Associated Clonal Hematological Non-mast Cell Lineage Disease (SM-AHNMD); Mast Cell Leukemia (MCL); Smoldering Systemic Mastocytosis (SSM); Indolent Systemic Mastocytosis (ISM) [ISM Subgroup Fully Recruited

  6. Students' Experience of Working with Socioscientific Issues - a Quantitative Study in Secondary School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottander, Christina; Ekborg, Margareta

    2012-12-01

    This research project aims to investigate how students in lower secondary school experience work with socioscientific issues (SSI). The six socioscientific cases developed and used in this project are relevant according to characteristics of SSI and to the national curriculum. Approximately 1,500 students in Sweden have worked with one SSI case chosen by the teachers. A questionnaire-based instrument was used to measure the affective domain of students' attitudes towards and interest in science before starting to work with the case and a second questionnaire after finishing a case. The second student questionnaire, measured the situational characteristics of the SSI work and perceived cognitive and affective outcomes. According to the students' self-reported experience, all cases were interesting and related to a current issue. Most cases were equally interesting to boys and girls, the only exception was You are what you eat, which girls found more interesting than boys did. Almost all students claim that they learnt new facts, learnt to argue for their standpoint and to search and evaluate information during the work with the cases. The girls' average scores were higher on several aspects of learning outcomes. Furthermore the students, especially the girls, perceived that the outcome of working with SSI had relevance for their future, with some cases more relevant than others. The more interesting the student found the case, the more they claimed they learnt. The students do not, however, claim that they learnt more science than during ordinary lessons.

  7. Evaluation of the Nasal Surgical Questionnaire for Monitoring Results of Septoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Haye, Rolf; Tarangen, Magnus; Shiryaeva, Olga; Døsen, Liv Kari

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the results of surgery is important. The otorhinolaryngology department of our hospital currently uses preoperative and postoperative versions of the Nasal Surgical Questionnaire (NSQ) for continuous evaluation of nasal septoplasty. In this study, 55 patients undergoing septoplasty answered the preoperative version twice to assess the NSQ's test-retest precision, and 75 patients answered the preoperative questionnaire before and the postoperative one 6 months after surgery to evaluate the NSQ's ability to detect change in symptoms following surgery. Both the pre- and postoperative versions of the NSQ use separate visual analogue scales (VAS) to assess nasal obstruction during the day, at night, and during exercise. Other nasal symptoms are graded as secondary outcomes using 4-point Likert scales. The mean VAS scores for the two preoperative obstruction ratings were not significantly different. The scores were significantly higher than in a normal population. There were also significant differences between preoperative and postoperative ratings. The mean pre- and postoperative scores at night for those who reported complete improvement were 66.1 and 8.4, substantial improvement 74.5 and 24.2, and no improvement 83.3 and 76.4. The NSQ reliably assesses nasal symptoms in patients and may be useful for both short and long term prospective studies of septoplasty. PMID:26612987

  8. ICCS 2009 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 2: National Adaptations of International Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brese, Falk; Jung, Michael; Mirazchiyski, Plamen; Schulz, Wolfram; Zuehlke, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    This supplement describes national adaptations made to the international version of the International Civic and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS) 2009 questionnaires. This information provides users with a guide to evaluate the availability of internationally comparable data for use in secondary analyses involving the ICCS 2009 questionnaire

  9. TIMSS 2011 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 2: National Adaptations of International Background Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Pierre, Ed.; Arora, Alka, Ed.; Stanco, Gabrielle M., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    This supplement describes national adaptations made to the international version of the TIMSS 2011 background questionnaires. This information provides users with a guide to evaluate the availability of internationally comparable data for use in secondary analyses involving the TIMSS 2011 background variables. Background questionnaire adaptations…

  10. DIVING QUESTIONNAIRE University of Florida

    E-print Network

    Slatton, Clint

    . Number of months since last active diving period: ______ months Bottom time using SCUBA: ______ hours Number of dives using SCUBA: ______ Average depth: ______ feet. Maximum depth: ______ feet RecreationalDIVING QUESTIONNAIRE University of Florida Division of Environmental Health and Safety Diving

  11. A General Questionnaire Analysis Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Lewis R.

    1978-01-01

    A general FORTRAN computer program for analyzing categorical or frequency data obtained from questionnaires is described. A variety of descriptive statistics, chi square, Kendall's tau and Cramer's statistic are provided. (Author/JKS)

  12. Physical Activity Questionnaire Search Results

    Cancer.gov

    The Brunel Lifestyle Physical Activity Questionnaire a4 If you add together each session of pre-planned physical activity that you engage in during a normal week, how much time would you estimate that you spend in total?

  13. The Michigan data needs questionnaire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill-Rowley, R.

    1981-01-01

    The data needs questionnaire is an element in the project design study for the Michigan Resource Inventory Act and is aimed at gathering information on what inventory information is required by land use planners throughout the state. Analysis of questionnaire responses is discussed. Some information on current use categories was tabulated. The respondents selected a broad range of categories at all levels of detail. Those most frequently indicated were urban categories.

  14. Reliability of a telephone questionnaire measuring diet and activity level in cats 

    E-print Network

    Harbison, Jacque L

    2001-01-01

    A telephone questionnaire was developed to collect information on diet and activity level as part of a study examining long-term outcome of early age versus traditional age gonadectomy in cats. The objectives of this study were to measure...

  15. Association between brain imaging signs, early and late outcomes, and response to intravenous alteplase after acute ischaemic stroke in the third International Stroke Trial (IST-3): secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Brain scans are essential to exclude haemorrhage in patients with suspected acute ischaemic stroke before treatment with alteplase. However, patients with early ischaemic signs could be at increased risk of haemorrhage after alteplase treatment, and little information is available about whether pre-existing structural signs, which are common in older patients, affect response to alteplase. We aimed to investigate the association between imaging signs on brain CT and outcomes after alteplase. Methods IST-3 was a multicentre, randomised controlled trial of intravenous alteplase (0·9 mg/kg) versus control within 6 h of acute ischaemic stroke. The primary outcome was independence at 6 months (defined as an Oxford Handicap Scale [OHS] score of 0–2). 3035 patients were enrolled to IST-3 and underwent prerandomisation brain CT. Experts who were unaware of the random allocation assessed scans for early signs of ischaemia (tissue hypoattenuation, infarct extent, swelling, and hyperattenuated artery) and pre-existing signs (old infarct, leukoaraiosis, and atrophy). In this prespecified analysis, we assessed interactions between these imaging signs, symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (a secondary outcome in IST-3) and independence at 6 months, and alteplase, adjusting for age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, and time to randomisation. This trial is registered at ISRCTN.com, number ISRCTN25765518. Findings 3017 patients were assessed in this analysis, of whom 1507 were allocated alteplase and 1510 were assigned control. A reduction in independence was predicted by tissue hypoattenuation (odds ratio 0·66, 95% CI 0·55–0·81), large lesion (0·51, 0·38–0·68), swelling (0·59, 0·46–0·75), hyperattenuated artery (0·59, 0·47–0·75), atrophy (0·74, 0·59–0·94), and leukoaraiosis (0·72, 0·59–0·87). Symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage was predicted by old infarct (odds ratio 1·72, 95% CI 1·18–2·51), tissue hypoattenuation (1·54, 1·04–2·27), and hyperattenuated artery (1·54, 1·03–2·29). Some combinations of signs increased the absolute risk of symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (eg, both old infarct and hyperattenuated artery, excess with alteplase 13·8%, 95% CI 6·9–20·7; both signs absent, excess 3·2%, 1·4–5·1). However, no imaging findings—individually or combined—modified the effect of alteplase on independence or symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage. Interpretation Some early ischaemic and pre-existing signs were associated with reduced independence at 6 months and increased symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage. Although no interaction was noted between brain imaging signs and effects of alteplase on these outcomes, some combinations of signs increased some absolute risks. Pre-existing signs should be considered, in addition to early ischaemic signs, during the assessment of patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Funding UK Medical Research Council, Health Foundation UK, Stroke Association UK, Chest Heart Stroke Scotland, Scottish Funding Council SINAPSE Collaboration, and multiple governmental and philanthropic national funders. PMID:25819484

  16. Outcome Measurement of Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Lien, Chi-Shun; Chieh-Lung Chou, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common disease. The diagnosis of OAB is based on its symptoms without physiological markers of disease activity. Frequently used assessment methods for OAB include frequency volume chart; urodynamic studies; patient-reported outcomes questionnaires, such as the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire, King's Health Questionnaire, patient perception of bladder conditions; and OAB symptom score. The severity of OAB and degree of improvement after treatment can be obtained by comprehensive evaluation. However, a consensus of which evaluations should be used to define the severity of OAB is still lacking. We expect a proper OAB assessment with universal acceptance in the future. PMID:26676702

  17. Close to recommended caloric and protein intake by enteral nutrition is associated with better clinical outcome of critically ill septic patients: secondary analysis of a large international nutrition database

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Current international sepsis guidelines recommend low-dose enteral nutrition (EN) for the first week. This contradicts other nutrition guidelines for heterogenous groups of ICU patients. Data on the optimal dose of EN in septic patients are lacking. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of energy and protein amount given by EN on clinical outcomes in a large cohort of critically ill septic patients. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of pooled data collected prospectively from international nutrition studies. Eligible patients had a diagnosis of sepsis and/or pneumonia and were admitted to the ICU for ?3 days, mechanically ventilated within 48 hours of ICU admission and only receiving EN. Patients receiving parenteral nutrition were excluded. Data were collected from ICU admission up to a maximum of 12 days. Regression models were used to examine the impact of calorie and protein intake on 60-day mortality and ventilator-free days. Results Of the 13,630 patients included in the dataset, 2,270 met the study inclusion criteria. Patients received a mean amount of 1,057 kcal/d (14.5 kcal/kg/day) and 49 g protein/day (0.7 g/kg/d) by EN alone. Patients were mechanically ventilated for a median of 8.4 days and 60-day mortality was 30.5%. An increase of 1,000 kcal was associated with reduced 60-day mortality (odds ratio (OR) 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48 to 0.77, P <0.001) and more ventilator-free days (2.81 days, 95% CI 0.53 to 5.08, P?=?0.02) as was an increase of 30 g protein per day (OR 0.76; 95% CI 0.65 to 0.87, P <0.001 and 1.92 days, 95% CI 0.58 to 3.27, P?=?0.005, respectively). Conclusions In critically ill septic patients, a calorie and protein delivery closer to recommended amounts by EN in the early phase of ICU stay was associated with a more favorable outcome. PMID:24506888

  18. Increasing response rates to postal questionnaires: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Phil; Roberts, Ian; Clarke, Mike; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn; Pratap, Sarah; Wentz, Reinhard; Kwan, Irene

    2002-01-01

    Objective To identify methods to increase response to postal questionnaires. Design Systematic review of randomised controlled trials of any method to influence response to postal questionnaires. Studies reviewed 292 randomised controlled trials including 258?315 participants Intervention reviewed 75 strategies for influencing response to postal questionnaires. Main outcome measure The proportion of completed or partially completed questionnaires returned. Results The odds of response were more than doubled when a monetary incentive was used (odds ratio 2.02; 95% confidence interval 1.79 to 2.27) and almost doubled when incentives were not conditional on response (1.71; 1.29 to 2.26). Response was more likely when short questionnaires were used (1.86; 1.55 to 2.24). Personalised questionnaires and letters increased response (1.16; 1.06 to 1.28), as did the use of coloured ink (1.39; 1.16 to 1.67). The odds of response were more than doubled when the questionnaires were sent by recorded delivery (2.21; 1.51 to 3.25) and increased when stamped return envelopes were used (1.26; 1.13 to 1.41) and questionnaires were sent by first class post (1.12; 1.02 to 1.23). Contacting participants before sending questionnaires increased response (1.54; 1.24 to 1.92), as did follow up contact (1.44; 1.22 to 1.70) and providing non-respondents with a second copy of the questionnaire (1.41; 1.02 to 1.94). Questionnaires designed to be of more interest to participants were more likely to be returned (2.44; 1.99 to 3.01), but questionnaires containing questions of a sensitive nature were less likely to be returned (0.92; 0.87 to 0.98). Questionnaires originating from universities were more likely to be returned than were questionnaires from other sources, such as commercial organisations (1.31; 1.11 to 1.54). Conclusions Health researchers using postal questionnaires can improve the quality of their research by using the strategies shown to be effective in this systematic review. What is already known on this topicPostal questionnaires are widely used in the collection of data in epidemiological studies and health researchNon-response to postal questionnaires reduces the effective sample size and can introduce biasWhat this study addsThis systematic review includes more randomised controlled trials than any previously published review or meta-analysis no questionnaire responseThe review has identified effective ways to increase response to postal questionnairesThe review will be updated regularly in the Cochrane Library PMID:12016181

  19. Smoking Intensity among Nigerian Secondary Schools Adolescent Smokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imhonde, Henry O.; Aluede, Oyaziwo

    2007-01-01

    This study examined smoking intensity among secondary school adolescent smokers. A total of 800 students, made up of 685 males and 115 females who have at least tasted a cigarette once, from twenty secondary schools (5 private and 15 public secondary schools) in Benin City, Nigeria participated in the study. A questionnaire was used in collecting…

  20. Narcotics Center Questionnaire (Spring 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, John B.; And Others

    This questionnaire assesses drug knowledge, drug use practices, and attitudes in junior high school, senior high school, and college students. The 115 items (multiple choice, yes/no, agree/disagree, or completion) deal with personal and demographic data, general attitudes, attitudes toward institutions (police, American business, Army, etc.),…

  1. Physical Activity Questionnaire Search Results

    Cancer.gov

    Neighborhood Physical Activity Questionnaire (NPAQ) A1 In a USUAL WEEK, do you cycle in or around your new neighbourhood or new local area to get to or from somewhere (such as cycling to a shop or to public transport) or for recreation, health or fitness (including cycling with your dog)?

  2. College Student Services Accreditation Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1979-01-01

    This questionnaire is intended for use as one aspect in accrediting the "Student Personnel Services" which an institution of higher learning provides for students. Areas in question include personal development, health fostering, vocational preparation, effective personalized learning, economic viability, transpersonal offerings, and satisfactory…

  3. HEALTH AND HAZARD ASSESSMENT QUESTIONNAIRE

    E-print Network

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    Questionnaire, the Director, University Health Services will assess the applicant's capability to perform that it is used to determine whether the prospective employee has the physical, and other capabilities, to perform accommodation is required to enable an employee to carry out the inherent requirements of the job. For more

  4. Physical Activity Questionnaire Search Results

    Cancer.gov

    The Physical Activity Questionnaire for Elderly Japanese (PAQ-EJ) 1 Over 7 typical days, how often did you take a walk or ride a bicycle on errands such as going to or from a store or taking children to school?

  5. Diet History Questionnaire: Canadian Version

    Cancer.gov

    The Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) and the DHQ nutrient database were modified for use in Canada through the collaborative efforts of Dr. Amy Subar and staff at the Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch, and Dr. Ilona Csizmadi and colleagues in the Division of Population Health and Information at the Alberta Cancer Board in Canada.

  6. HEALTH AND HAZARD ASSESSMENT QUESTIONNAIRE

    E-print Network

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    1 HEALTH AND HAZARD ASSESSMENT QUESTIONNAIRE The information on this form will be kept strictly the property of the University Health Service of the University of Newcastle. The University of Newcastle is committed to achieving a safe and healthy workplace for its staff. Based on the completed Health and Hazard

  7. Physical Activity Questionnaire Search Results

    Cancer.gov

    Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ) 13 Do you do any moderate-intensity sports, fitness or recreational (leisure) activities that causes a small increase in breathing or heart rate such as brisk walking, cycling, swimming, volleyball) for at least 10 minutes continuously?

  8. Effects of school meals with weekly fish servings on vitamin D status in Danish children: secondary outcomes from the OPUS (Optimal well-being, development and health for Danish children through a healthy New Nordic Diet) School Meal Study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Rikke A; Damsgaard, Camilla T; Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; Sørensen, Louise B; Hjorth, Mads Fiil; Andersen, Rikke; Tetens, Inge; Krarup, Henrik; Ritz, Christian; Astrup, Arne; Michaelsen, Kim F; Mølgaard, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Children's vitamin D intake and status can be optimised to meet recommendations. We investigated if nutritionally balanced school meals with weekly fish servings affected serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and markers related to bone in 8- to 11-year-old Danish children. We conducted an explorative secondary outcome analysis on data from 784 children from the OPUS School Meal Study, a cluster-randomised cross-over trial where children received school meals for 3 months and habitual lunch for 3 months. At baseline, and at the end of each dietary period, 25(OH)D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), osteocalcin (OC), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), bone mineral content (BMC), bone area (BA), bone mineral density (BMD), dietary intake and physical activity were assessed. School meals increased vitamin D intake by 0·9 (95 % CI 0·7, 1·1) ?g/d. No consistent effects were found on 25(OH)D, BMC, BA, BMD, IGF-1 or OC. However, season-modified effects were observed with 25(OH)D, i.e. children completing the school meal period in January/February had higher 25(OH)D status (5·5 (95 % CI 1·8, 9·2) nmol/l; P = 0·004) than children completing the control period in these months. A similar tendency was indicated in November/December (4·1 (95 % CI -0·12, 8·3) nmol/l; P = 0·057). However, the effect was opposite in March/April (-4·0 (95 % CI -7·0, -0·9) nmol/l; P = 0·010), and no difference was found in May/June (P = 0·214). Unexpectedly, the school meals slightly increased PTH (0·18 (95 % CI 0·07, 0·29) pmol/l) compared with habitual lunch. Small increases in dietary vitamin D might hold potential to mitigate the winter nadir in Danish children's 25(OH)D status while higher increases appear necessary to affect status throughout the year. More trials on effects of vitamin D intake from natural foods are needed. PMID:26495118

  9. Secondary Headaches

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Migraine and Other Headaches Headache Journal - Public Site Art Gallery Art Gallery Support the AMF American Migraine Foundation The ... but there are usually clues in the medical history or examination to suggest secondary headache. Headache can ...

  10. Leadership styles in secondary school science teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Michael A.

    A comparison of United States secondary school science teachers who mentor high quality student research and teachers who do not mentor research was conducted using a demographic survey and the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire-Form 5X. The major demographic difference between the two groups was a significantly greater number of years of teaching experience in the research group, a factor that correlated significantly with Extra Effort in students. Research group teachers self-reported higher mean scores than non-research group teachers on the five transformational leadership scales plus the transactional scale of Contingent Reward; however, a Multivariate Analysis of Variance found no significant difference between the groups. Independent t-tests found no significant difference between the groups based upon the remaining transactional scales. The research group was found to be significantly higher on the outcome variable of Extra Effort generated by students while the non-research group rated themselves significantly higher on Satisfaction of students. Transformational leadership in teachers should be addressed by future studies as a possible method of identifying motivational teachers.

  11. [Secondary dyslipidemias].

    PubMed

    Vargová, V; Pytliak, M; Mechírová, V

    2012-03-01

    Dyslipidemias rank among the most important preventabile factors of atherogenesis and its progression. This topic is increasingly being discussed as e.g. more than 50% of Slovak population die on atherosclerotic complications. According to etiology we distinguish primary dyslipidemias with strictly genetic background and secondary ones with origin in other disease or pathological state. Secondary dyslipidemias accompany various diseases, from common (endocrinopathies, renal diseases etc) to rare ones (thesaurismosis etc.) and represents one of symptoms of these diseases. Apart from particular clinical follow up of diagnosed dysipidemias, basic screening and secondary causes as well as treatment due to updated guidelines is recuired. In this review we present the most frequent dyslipidemias of clinical practice. PMID:22486289

  12. Development of a questionnaire to assess medical competencies: Reliability and validity of the Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Giesler, Marianne; Forster, Johannes; Biller, Silke; Fabry, Götz

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: While preparing a graduate survey for medical education in 2008 we realized that no instrument existed that would be suitable to evaluate whether the learning outcomes outlined in the Medical Licensure Act (ÄAppO) would be met. Therefore we developed the Freiburg Questionnaire to Assess Competencies in Medicine (Freiburger Fragebogen zur Erfassung von Kompetenzen in der Medizin, FKM)1 which has been revised and extended several times since then. Currently the FKM includes 45 items which are assigned to nine domains that correspond to the CanMEDS roles: medical expertise, communication, team-work, health and prevention, management, professionalism, learning, scholarship, and personal competencies. Methods: In order to test the reliability and validity of the questionnaire we have repeatedly surveyed medical students and residents since May 2008. In this article we report on the results of a cross-sectional study with 698 medical students from the preclinical and clinical years. In addition, we report the results of a survey of 514 residents who were up to two years into their residency. Results and conclusions: In summary, results show that the scales of the FKM are reliable (Cronbach’s ? between .68 and .97). Significant differences in means between selected groups of students support the measure’s construct validity. Furthermore, there is evidence that the FKM might be used as a screening tool e.g. in graduate surveys to identify weaknesses in the medical education curriculum. PMID:21818241

  13. Snoring, Trouble Breathing, Un-Refreshed (STBUR) Screening Questionnaire to Reduce Perioperative Respiratory Adverse Events in Pediatric Surgical Patients: A Quality Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Terry, Karrey L; Disabato, Jennifer; Krajicek, Marilyn

    2015-08-01

    Children who present for surgery with undiagnosed sleep-disordered breathing are particularly vulnerable to perioperative respiratory adverse events (PRA Es). Preoperative screening can identify children at increased risk who would benefit from evidence-based perioperative management, reducing serious preventable harm or death. The purpose of this quality improvement study was 2-fold: (1) increase identification of pediatric surgical patients who may be at increased risk of PRAE through the introduction of a validated pediatric screening questionnaire (Snoring, Trouble Breathing, Un-Refreshed [STBUR]), and (2) reduce preventable harm by introducing evidence-based perioperative management guidelines. A pre-post intervention design was conducted in 6,216 patients aged 1 to 18 years. The STBUR questionnaire embedded in the electronic medical record was the primary intervention. Data for the primary outcome measure and 3 secondary process measures were analyzed using Yates?2 and Fisher exact test to compare proportional change. After STBUR implementation, PRAE risk identification increased from 10.5% to 15% (?2 (1, N = 12,975) = 57.19, z = -7.59, P < .001, odds ratio =1.49). Results of the secondary process measures were mixed. The STBUR screening questions embedded in the medical record significantly improved identification of patients at risk, allowing modification of perioperative management toward safer practices. PMID:26390743

  14. Secondary Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of their name, "secondary" products are essential for plant survival. They are required for basic cell functions as well as communicating the plant's presence to the surrounding environment and defense against pests as defined in the broad sense (i.e., diseases, nematodes, insects and plan...

  15. 19 CFR 357.105 - Questionnaires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SHORT SUPPLY PROCEDURES § 357.105 Questionnaires...product to determine whether it is in short supply. Questionnaires shall be completed...not received within this period will be deemed favorable to the...

  16. Validation of a questionnaire measuring the regulation of autonomic function

    PubMed Central

    Kröz, M; Feder, G; von Laue, HB; Zerm, R; Reif, M; Girke, M; Matthes, H; Gutenbrunner, C; Heckmann, C

    2008-01-01

    Background To broaden the range of outcomes that we can measure for patients undergoing treatment for oncological and other chronic conditions, we aimed to validate a questionnaire measuring self-reported autonomic regulation (aR), i.e. to characterise a subject's autonomic functioning by questions on sleeping and waking, vertigo, morningness-eveningness, thermoregulation, perspiration, bowel movements and digestion. Methods We administered the questionnaire to 440 participants (?: N = 316, ?: N = 124): 95 patients with breast cancer, 49 with colorectal cancer, 60 with diabetes mellitus, 39 with coronary heart disease, 28 with rheumatological conditions, 32 with Hashimoto's disease, 22 with multiple morbidities and 115 healthy people. We administered the questionnaire a second time to 50.2% of the participants. External convergence criteria included the German version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D), a short questionnaire on morningness-eveningness, the Herdecke Quality of Life Questionnaire (HLQ) and a short version questionnaire on self-regulation. Results A principal component analysis yielded a three dimensional 18-item inventory of aR. The subscales orthostatic-circulatory, rest/activity and digestive regulation had internal consistency (Cronbach-?: r? = 0.65 – 0.75) and test-retest reliability (rrt = 0.70 – 85). AR was negatively associated with anxiety, depression, and dysmenorrhoea but positively correlated to HLQ, self-regulation and in part to morningness (except digestive aR) (0.49 – 0.13, all p < 0.05). Conclusion An internal validation of the long-version scale of aR yielded consistent relationships with health versus illness, quality of life and personality. Further studies are required to clarify the issues of external validity, clinical and physiological relevance. PMID:18533043

  17. 19 CFR 357.105 - Questionnaires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Questionnaires. 357.105 Section 357.105 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SHORT SUPPLY PROCEDURES § 357.105 Questionnaires. For reviews conducted under section 106(b)(2), the Secretary normally will send questionnaires...

  18. 19 CFR 357.105 - Questionnaires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Questionnaires. 357.105 Section 357.105 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SHORT SUPPLY PROCEDURES § 357.105 Questionnaires. For reviews conducted under section 106(b)(2), the Secretary normally will send questionnaires...

  19. 19 CFR 357.105 - Questionnaires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Questionnaires. 357.105 Section 357.105 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SHORT SUPPLY PROCEDURES § 357.105 Questionnaires. For reviews conducted under section 106(b)(2), the Secretary normally will send questionnaires...

  20. Senior High School Questionnaire. Appendix C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Wayne W.; And Others

    This was developed in collaboration with the White Bear Lake Senior High School Evaluation Committee to evaluate the school's flexible module scheduling program. It includes a questionnaire about the school and its program and a questionnaire form for interviews in the community. Part I of the high school questionnaire has 25 questions about the…

  1. Patient-Reported Outcome Coordinator Did Not Improve Quality of Life Assessment Response Rates: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Donna; Gerbing, Robert; Alonzo, Todd; Aplenc, Richard; Nagarajan, Rajaram; Schulte, Fiona; Cullen, Patricia; Sung, Lillian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Health related quality of life (HRQL) assessments during therapy for pediatric cancer provide valuable information to better understand the patient experience. Our objective was to determine the impact of a patient-reported outcome (PRO) coordinator on HRQL questionnaire completion rates during a pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) trial. Methods AAML1031 is a multicenter Children’s Oncology Group therapeutic trial for de novo AML with a secondary aim to assess HRQL of children and adolescents treated with chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Parents/guardians are the primary respondents and four questionnaires are administered at eight time points. The questionnaires are the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales, PedsQL 3.0 Acute Cancer Module, PedsQL Multidimensional Fatigue Scale, and the Pediatric Inventory for Parents. To improve response rates, a central PRO coordinator was instituted and reminded sites about upcoming and delinquent questionnaires. The proportion of HRQL questionnaires completed were compared prior to, and following institution of the PRO coordinator. This analysis evaluated the first five assessment time points. Results There were231 families who consented to participate in the HRQL aim. Overall response rates for all questionnaires were 73–83%. At time point 1, within 14 days of chemotherapy initiation, post-PRO coordinator completion rates were significantly higher for three of four questionnaires. However, the effect was not sustained and at time point 4, one month following last chemotherapy or HSCT, completion rates were significantly lower post-PRO coordinator for all four questionnaires. Conclusion Addition of a central PRO coordinator did not result in sustained improvement in HRQL questionnaire completion rates. Efforts to improve response rates must consider other strategies. PMID:25915772

  2. Stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia: outcomes and complications.

    PubMed

    Loescher, Alison R; Radatz, Matthias; Kemeny, Andras; Rowe, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is one of a number of recognised treatments for the management of trigeminal neuralgia refractory to drug therapy. The reported success of stereotactic radiosurgery in managing patients with trigeminal neuralgia varies in different units from 22 to 75%. This paper reports the outcomes of patients with trigeminal neuralgia who were treated at the National Centre for Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Sheffield, UK. The study reports the outcome of 72 patients treated consecutively between October 2004 and May 2008. Data were collected prospectively by a postal questionnaire sent to patients at 6, 12 and 24 months after treatment. The median age was 65.6 years (39 males: 33 females). Fourteen patients had secondary trigeminal neuralgia (eight multiple sclerosis). Fifteen of the patients included in the study were receiving a second treatment (an initial treatment having improved their pain significantly for at least 6 months). All radiosurgical procedures were performed using a single 4 mm collimator isocenter covering the region of the dorsal root entry zone with a maximal radiation dose of 80 Gy. The percentage of patients defined as having an excellent outcome (pain free without medication) was 39% after 6 months, 36% after 12 months and 64% after 24 months. The percentage of patients who reported being very satisfied with treatment was 71% after 6 months, 57% after 12 months and 53% after 24 months. Half the patients with secondary trigeminal neuralgia were pain free without medication after treatment, and 60% of patients who underwent a second treatment were pain free. A new trigeminal sensory deficit was reported by 31% of patients after radiosurgical treatment. PMID:21815736

  3. Comprehensive Patient Questionnaires in Predicting Complications in Older Patients With Gynecologic Cancer Undergoing Surgery | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This research trial studies comprehensive patient questionnaires in predicting complications in older patients with gynecologic cancer undergoing surgery. Comprehensive patient questionnaires completed before surgery may help identify complications, such as the need for assistance in taking medications, decreased mobility, decreased social activity, and falls, and may improve outcomes for older patients with gynecologic cancer.

  4. Teacher's Professional Use of Information and Communication Technology in Secondary Schools in Tamil Nadu, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagamani, Deepa; Muthuswamy, Prema

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate secondary school teachers' abilities to use Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in schools in Tamil Nadu, India. Questionnaires method was used for data collection. Around 200 questionnaires were distributed to secondary school teachers and headmasters, in which 157 were completed and returned.…

  5. Secondary Conditions in People with Developmental Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koritsas, Stella; Iacono, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated secondary conditions in people with developmental disabilities in terms of (a) the average number of conditions experienced and overall health and independence, (b) their degree and nature, and (c) gender differences. Information was obtained by a questionnaire completed by the caregivers for 659 people with developmental…

  6. Stress Producing Conditions in the Secondary Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruner, Anna L.; And Others

    Secondary school teachers in the Houston Independent School District were asked for their perceptions of variables that contributed to difficulty of teaching. A 60-item questionnaire included variables from school environment categories: student characteristics, managerial efficiency, instructional program, material resources, teacher personal…

  7. Canadian Content Survey: Secondary Panel. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Philippe

    Survey results summarize secondary-school use of Canadian and non-Canadian oriented materials, resources, and activities in the borough of North York, Ontario. A questionnaire completed by 188 teachers inquired about use of textbooks and unpublished material, resource people, and field trips. Focus on Canadian culture was identified whenever it…

  8. Can Social Support Protect Bullied Adolescents from Adverse Outcomes? A Prospective Study on the Effects of Bullying on the Educational Achievement and Mental Health of Adolescents at Secondary Schools in East London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothon, Catherine; Head, Jenny; Klineberg, Emily; Stansfeld, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the extent to which social support can have a buffering effect against the potentially adverse consequences of bullying on school achievement and mental health. It uses a representative multiethnic sample of adolescents attending East London secondary schools in three boroughs. Bullied adolescents were less likely to…

  9. Life after High School: Which Postschool Outcomes Matter for Students with and without Disabilities in Restructured High Schools? Research Institute on Secondary Education Reform (RISER) for Youth with Disabilities Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Marianne; Phelps, L. Allen

    The Research Institute on Secondary Education Reform for Youth with Disabilities (RISER) has been studying three significantly restructured high schools that have included students with disabilities and their parents in the design and/or implementation of school reform efforts. Each of these schools has operated for 3-12 years with its new,…

  10. Outcomes Measurement

    Cancer.gov

    Evaluating and improving methods for measuring cancer outcomes is critically important for NCI's initiatives to enhance the quality of cancer care, reduce cancer-related health disparities, and better understand the individual and population burden of disease. The Applied Research Program's initiatives in this area include developing resources for researchers to learn about psychometric and other tools that aid in assessing and developing outcomes measures.

  11. Impact of the revised International Prognostic Scoring System, cytogenetics and monosomal karyotype on outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for myelodysplastic syndromes and secondary acute myeloid leukemia evolving from myelodysplastic syndromes: a retrospective multicenter study of the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Koenecke, Christian; Göhring, Gudrun; de Wreede, Liesbeth C.; van Biezen, Anja; Scheid, Christof; Volin, Liisa; Maertens, Johan; Finke, Jürgen; Schaap, Nicolaas; Robin, Marie; Passweg, Jakob; Cornelissen, Jan; Beelen, Dietrich; Heuser, Michael; de Witte, Theo; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of the revised 5-group International Prognostic Scoring System cytogenetic classification on outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes or secondary acute myeloid leukemia who were reported to the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation database. A total of 903 patients had sufficient cytogenetic information available at stem cell transplantation to be classified according to the 5-group classification. Poor and very poor risk according to this classification was an independent predictor of shorter relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 1.40 and 2.14), overall survival (hazard ratio 1.38 and 2.14), and significantly higher cumulative incidence of relapse (hazard ratio 1.64 and 2.76), compared to patients with very good, good or intermediate risk. When comparing the predictive performance of a series of Cox models both for relapse-free survival and for overall survival, a model with simplified 5-group cytogenetics (merging very good, good and intermediate cytogenetics) performed best. Furthermore, monosomal karyotype is an additional negative predictor for outcome within patients of the poor, but not the very poor risk group of the 5-group classification. The revised International Prognostic Scoring System cytogenetic classification allows patients with myelodysplastic syndromes to be separated into three groups with clearly different outcomes after stem cell transplantation. Poor and very poor risk cytogenetics were strong predictors of poor patient outcome. The new cytogenetic classification added value to prediction of patient outcome compared to prediction models using only traditional risk factors or the 3-group International Prognostic Scoring System cytogenetic classification. PMID:25552702

  12. Patterns of Drug Abuse in Public Secondary Schools in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndetei, David M.; Khasakhala, Lincoln I.; Mutiso, Victoria; Ongecha-Owuor, Francisca A.; Kokonya, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the association between substance abuse and the sociodemographic characteristics of secondary school students. All the students of 17 randomly stratified public secondary schools in Nairobi were required to complete self-administered sociodemographic and the School Toolkit questionnaires in a…

  13. The Performance of Portuguese Secondary Schools: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarrico, Claudia S.; Rosa, Maria J.; Coelho, Ines P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to measure and compare the performance of Portuguese secondary schools. Design/methodology/approach: Some data on the schools were collected via an electronic questionnaire sent to 103 secondary schools of the centre region of Portugal; other needed data were available through the Centre Regional Education…

  14. Knowledge of Secondary School Pupils regarding Sexual Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westwood, Jo; Mullan, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the sexual health knowledge of secondary school pupils in order to ascertain whether the current government public health and education policies are having any impact on pupils' sexual health. Design: Results obtained from a questionnaire as part of a two-phase intervention study. Setting: Nineteen mixed-sex, state secondary

  15. Predictors of Anxiety and Depression in Taiwanese Secondary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Zuway-R; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; Lawrenz, Frances

    This study investigated significant predictors of anxiety and depression in Taiwanese secondary students and the different functions of these predictors. Surveys were completed by 1,672 senior high school students in Taiwan. As part of a larger study, these students completed the Secondary Student Questionnaire (SSQ), an instrument developed by…

  16. National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire: usefulness in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Nariman; Mehravaran, Shiva; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kouros; Coleman, Anne L

    2013-08-01

    The National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire 25 (NEI-VFQ-25) is the most commonly used patient-reported outcome measure to assess vision-related quality of life in patients with glaucoma. Glaucoma negatively affects the composite and several NEI-VFQ subscale scores; this effect is correlated with the severity of glaucomatous visual field loss. Contrast sensitivity, glare, and dark adaptation are potential items that could be added to the NEI-VFQ to make it more responsive to changes in vision-related quality of life in patients with glaucoma. PMID:23851305

  17. Dysautonomia in Narcolepsy: Evidence by Questionnaire Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Gilles; Vaillant, Michel; Pieri, Vannina; Fink, Gereon R.; Diederich, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Excessive daytime sleepiness and sudden sleep attacks are the main features of narcolepsy, but rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD), hyposmia, and depression can also occur. The latter symptoms are nonmotor features in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). In the present study, IPD-proven diagnostic tools were tested to determine whether they are also applicable in the assessment of narcolepsy. Methods This was a case-control study comparing 15 patients with narcolepsy (PN) and 15 control subjects (CS) using the Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's Autonomic Test (SCOPA-AUT), Parkinson's Disease Nonmotor Symptoms (PDNMS), University of Pennsylvania Smell Test, Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue test, Beck Depression Inventory, and the RBD screening questionnaire. Results Both the PN and CS exhibited mild hyposmia and no deficits in visual tests. Frequent dysautonomia in all domains except sexuality was found for the PN. The total SCOPA-AUT score was higher for the PN (18.47±10.08, mean±SD) than for the CS (4.40±3.09), as was the PDNMS score (10.53±4.78 and 1.80±2.31, respectively). RBD was present in 87% of the PN and 0% of the CS. The PN were more depressed than the CS. The differences between the PN and CS for all of these variables were statistically significant (all p<0.05). Conclusions The results of this study provide evidence for the presence of dysautonomia and confirm the comorbidities of depression and RBD in narcolepsy patients. The spectrum, which is comparable to the nonmotor complex in IPD, suggests wide-ranging, clinically detectable dysfunction beyond the narcoleptic core syndrome. PMID:25324880

  18. Compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress in UK therapists who work with adult trauma clients

    PubMed Central

    Sodeke-Gregson, Ekundayo A.; Holttum, Sue; Billings, Jo

    2013-01-01

    Background Therapists who work with trauma clients are impacted both positively and negatively. However, most studies have tended to focus on the negative impact of the work, the quantitative evidence has been inconsistent, and the research has primarily been conducted outside the United Kingdom. Objectives This study aimed to assess the prevalence of, and identify predictor variables for, compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress in a group of UK therapists (N=253) working with adult trauma clients. Method An online questionnaire was developed which used The Professional Quality of Life Scale (Version 5) to assess compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress and collect demographics and other pertinent information. Results Whilst the majority of therapists scored within the average range for compassion satisfaction and burnout, 70% of scores indicated that therapists were at high risk of secondary traumatic stress. Maturity, time spent engaging in research and development activities, a higher perceived supportiveness of management, and supervision predicted higher potential for compassion satisfaction. Youth and a lower perceived supportiveness of management predicted higher risk of burnout. A higher risk of secondary traumatic stress was predicted in therapists engaging in more individual supervision and self-care activities, as well as those who had a personal trauma history. Conclusions UK therapists working with trauma clients are at high risk of being negatively impacted by their work, obtaining scores which suggest a risk of developing secondary traumatic stress. Of particular note was that exposure to trauma stories did not significantly predict secondary traumatic stress scores as suggested by theory. However, the negative impact of working with trauma clients was balanced by the potential for a positive outcome from trauma work as a majority indicated an average potential for compassion satisfaction. PMID:24386550

  19. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) 2009 Cohort: Wave 2 (2010)-- Questionnaire. Technical Report 71A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) program studies the progress of several groups of young Australians as they move from school into post-secondary education and work. This technical paper contains the questionnaire for the LSAY 2009 cohort Wave 2 (2010) data set.

  20. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) 2009 Cohort: Wave 3 (2011)--Questionnaire. Technical Report 72A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) program studies the progress of several groups of young Australians as they move from school into post-secondary education and work. This technical paper contains the questionnaire for the LSAY 2009 cohort Wave 3 (2011) data set.

  1. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY): 2006 Cohort Wave 4 (2009)--Questionnaire. Technical Report 56A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) program studies the progress of several groups of young Australians as they move from school into post-secondary education and work. This technical paper contains the questionnaire for the LSAY 2006 cohort Wave 4 (2009) data set. [For the "Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY): 2006…

  2. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) 1998 Cohort: Wave 12 (2009)--Questionnaire. Technical Report 58A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) program studies the progress of several groups of young Australians as they move from school into post-secondary education and work. This technical paper contains the questionnaire for the LSAY 1998 cohort Wave 12 (2009) data set. [For the accompanying frequency tables, "Longitudinal Surveys of…

  3. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) 2006 Cohort: Wave 6 (2011)--Questionnaire. Technical Report 75A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) program studies the progress of several groups of young Australians as they move from school into post-secondary education and work. This series of documents provides supporting information for the LSAY data set of the 2006 cohort at wave 6 (2011). The document presents the questionnaire for LSAY…

  4. PIRLS 2011 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 2: National Adaptations of International Background Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Pierre, Ed.; Drucker, Kathleen T., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    This supplement describes national adaptations made to the international version of the PIRLS/prePIRLS 2011 background questionnaires. This information provides users with a guide to evaluate the availability of internationally comparable data for use in secondary analyses involving the PIRLS/prePIRLS 2011 background variables. Background…

  5. The use of research questionnaires with hearing impaired adults: online vs. paper-and-pencil administration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background When evaluating hearing rehabilitation, it is reasonable to use self-report questionnaires as outcome measure. Questionnaires used in audiological research are developed and validated for the paper-and-pencil format. As computer and Internet use is increasing, standardized questionnaires used in the audiological context should be evaluated to determine the viability of the online administration format. The aim of this study was to compare administration of questionnaires online versus paper- and pencil of four standardised questionnaires used in hearing research and clinic. We included the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE), the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA), Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Methods A cross-over design was used by randomly letting the participants complete the questionnaires either online or on paper. After 3 weeks the participants filled out the same questionnaires again but in the other format. A total of 65 hearing-aid users were recruited from a hearing clinic to participate on a voluntary basis and of these 53 completed both versions of the questionnaires. Results A significant main effect of format was found on the HHIE (p < 0.001), with participants reporting higher scores on the online format than in the paper format. There was no interaction effect. For the other questionnaires were no significant main or interaction effects of format. Significant correlations between the two ways of presenting the measures was found for all questionnaires (p<0.05). The results from reliability tests showed Cronbachs ?’s above .70 for all four questionnaires and differences in Cronbachs ? between administration formats were negligible. Conclusions For three of the four included questionnaires the participants’ scores remained consistent across administrations and formats. For the fourth included questionnaire (HHIE) a significant difference of format with a small effect size was found. The relevance of the difference in scores between the formats depends on which context the questionnaire is used in. On balance, it is recommended that the administration format remain stable across assessment points. PMID:23107440

  6. Hanford Site Secondary Waste Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, Joseph H.

    2009-01-29

    Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is making plans to dispose of 54 million gallons of radioactive tank wastes at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The high-level wastes and low-activity wastes will be vitrified and placed in permanent disposal sites. Processing of the tank wastes will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents, and these need to be processed and disposed of also. The Department of Energy Office of Waste Processing sponsored a meeting to develop a roadmap to outline the steps necessary to design the secondary waste forms. Representatives from DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Washington State Department of Ecology, the Oregon Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, technical experts from the DOE national laboratories, academia, and private consultants convened in Richland, Washington, during the week of July 21-23, 2008, to participate in a workshop to identify the risks and uncertainties associated with the treatment and disposal of the secondary wastes and to develop a roadmap for addressing those risks and uncertainties. This report describes the results of the roadmap meeting in Richland. Processing of the tank wastes will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents. The secondary waste roadmap workshop focused on the waste streams that contained the largest fractions of the 129I and 99Tc that the Integrated Disposal Facility risk assessment analyses were showing to have the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater. Thus, the roadmapping effort was to focus on the scrubber/off-gas treatment liquids with 99Tc to be sent to the Effluent Treatment Facility for treatment and solidification and the silver mordenite and carbon beds with the captured 129I to be packaged and sent to the IDF. At the highest level, the secondary waste roadmap includes elements addressing regulatory and performance requirements, waste composition, preliminary waste form screening, waste form development, process design and support, and validation. The regulatory and performance requirements activity will provide the secondary waste-form performance requirements. The waste-composition activity will provide workable ranges of secondary waste compositions and formulations for simulants and surrogates. Preliminary waste form screening will identify candidate waste forms for immobilizing the secondary wastes. The waste form development activity will mature the waste forms, leading to a selected waste form(s) with a defensible understanding of the long-term release rate and input into the critical decision process for a secondary waste treatment process/facility. The process and design support activity will provide a reliable process flowsheet and input to support a robust facility design. The validation effort will confirm that the selected waste form meets regulatory requirements. The final outcome of the implementation of the secondary waste roadmap is the compliant, effective, timely, and cost-effective disposal of the secondary wastes. The work necessary to address the programmatic, regulatory, and technical risks and uncertainties identified through the Secondary Waste Roadmap Workshop are assembled into several program needs elements. Programmatic/Regulatory needs include: • Select and deploy Hanford tank waste supplemental treatment technology • Provide treatment capability for secondary waste streams from tank waste treatment • Develop consensus on secondary waste form acceptance. Technology needs include: • Define secondary waste composition ranges and uncertainties • Identify and develop waste forms for secondary waste immobilization and disposal • Develop test methods to characterize secondary waste form performance. Details for each of these program elements are provided.

  7. New York Community Environment Study Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Daniel; Snow, Mary

    This questionnaire assesses neighborhood drug problem concern, drug use practices, knowledge of drugs and agencies dealing with drugs, and views on drug education in persons aged 13 or older. The questionnaire has 31 items (multiple-choice or free response), most with several parts. The items deal with demographic and personal data, problems in…

  8. Applying Learning Strategy Questionnaires: Problems and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellings, Gonny

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses measuring learning strategies by means of questionnaires. In "multi-method" research, in which think-aloud measures are compared with questionnaires, low or moderate correlations are found. A conclusion often drawn is that learners are not able to verbally report on their learning activities. Alternative explanations concern…

  9. Assessing Epistemological Beliefs: Schommer's Questionnaire Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarebout, Geraldine; Elen, Jan; Luyten, Lieve; Bamps, Hadewych

    2001-01-01

    Reviewed the literature on the questionnaire developed by M. Schommer to assess epistemological beliefs and studied the factor structure of the questionnaire in 2 studies involving 117 junior college students and 148 university students. In neither study could Schommer's factor structure be retrieved. Results reveal counter-indications to the use…

  10. Name of Audit Self-Assessment Questionnaire

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    Name of Audit Self-Assessment Questionnaire Audit Number Self-Assessment Questionnaire BD-2 1 of 8 from you so that Internal Audit can effectively determine the correct level and areas of focus of their activity in the upcoming audit of your area. Your input is important and appreciated. Please return

  11. Assessing and Improving the Quality of Undergraduate Teaching in China: The Course Experience Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Hongbiao; Wang, Wenlan

    2015-01-01

    Assessing and improving the quality of undergraduate teaching is an important issue in China. Using the Course Experience Questionnaire, this study examined the quality of undergraduate teaching by investigating the relationships between students' course experience, the learning outcomes demonstrated by the students and the learning environment.…

  12. Readiness and Expectations Questionnaire: A Cross-Cultural Measurement Instrument for First-Year University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Ellen; Andre, Stefanie; Suhre, Cor

    2013-01-01

    The readiness and expectations questionnaire (REQ) assesses first-year students' expectations and preparedness for their first year in university. This measurement instrument is useful for educational policy and curriculum development; it can also be used to predict the outcomes of the first year of college. This instrument was initially developed…

  13. The Psychometric Properties of the Perceived Motivational Climate in Exercise Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Theresa C.; Fry, Mary D.; Little, Todd D.

    2013-01-01

    Given the potential benefits of understanding how climate may influence individuals' motivational outcomes, there exists a need for instrumentation measuring exercise setting climates. The purpose of this study was to validate further the psychometric properties of the Perceived Motivational Climate in Exercise Questionnaire (Huddleston, Fry &…

  14. Transformational Leadership and the Leadership Performance of Oregon Secondary School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breaker, Jason Lee

    2009-01-01

    A study of 118 secondary school principals in Oregon was conducted to examine the relationship of transformational leadership to secondary school principals' leadership performance. This study measured the transformational leadership of secondary school principals in Oregon using the "Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (5X-Short)" (Avolio &…

  15. Learning about Learning Outcomes: The Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Sara; Dobbins, Kerry; Scott, Jon J. A.; Rawlinson, Mark; Norman, Robert I.

    2014-01-01

    Despite an extensive literature on how to frame learning outcomes, to date, limited attention has been given to understanding whether and how students actually use them. This study employed a questionnaire survey and focus groups with students in three disciplines at the University of Leicester to explore students' perceptions and use of…

  16. Diet History Questionnaire II and Canadian Diet History Questionnaire II: Coding Guidelines

    Cancer.gov

    A questionnaire data file is an ASCII text file containing data from completed Diet History Questionnaires. If using paper forms, this file can be created by a scanner or a data entry system. If using DHQ*Web, the questionnaire data file is created automatically.

  17. Can social support protect bullied adolescents from adverse outcomes? A prospective study on the effects of bullying on the educational achievement and mental health of adolescents at secondary schools in East London.

    PubMed

    Rothon, Catherine; Head, Jenny; Klineberg, Emily; Stansfeld, Stephen

    2011-06-01

    This paper investigates the extent to which social support can have a buffering effect against the potentially adverse consequences of bullying on school achievement and mental health. It uses a representative multiethnic sample of adolescents attending East London secondary schools in three boroughs. Bullied adolescents were less likely to achieve the appropriate academic achievement benchmark for their age group and bullied boys (but not girls) were more likely to exhibit depressive symptoms compared to those not bullied. High levels of social support from family were important in promoting good mental health. There was evidence that high levels of support from friends and moderate (but not high) family support was able to protect bullied adolescents from poor academic achievement. Support from friends and family was not sufficient to protect adolescents against mental health difficulties that they might face as a result of being bullied. More active intervention from schools is recommended. PMID:20637501

  18. Alcohol-Outcome Expectancies: Predicting Interest in Violence and Erotica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, William H.; Marlatt, G. Alan

    Although research has examined the content of alcohol-outcome expectancies and also the role of alcohol use in aggressive and sexual behaviors, few studies have linked the two lines of inquiry. To examine the efficacy of outcome expectancies for predicting actual behavior, 64 male social drinkers, aged 21 to 25 years, completed questionnaires and,…

  19. Development of the Sport Orientation Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Diane L.; Deeter, Thomas E.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of the Sport Orientation Questionnaire, a multidimensional, sport-specific measure of individual differences in achievement orientation, indicates that it is a valid and reliable measure of individual sport achievement orientation. (JD)

  20. Physical Activity Questionnaires (PAQ) Validation Studies - References

    Cancer.gov

    Wareham NJ, Jakes RW, Rennie KL et al. Validity and repeatability of a simple index derived from the short physical activity questionnaire used in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.

  1. Development of the Eating Habits Questionnaire 

    E-print Network

    Graham, Erin Collins

    2005-02-17

    The purpose of the studies presented was to develop and examine the psychometric properties of the Eating Habits Questionnaire (EHQ). The author designed the 21-item self-report inventory to assess cognitions, behaviors, and feelings related...

  2. Data Request Questionnaire: Name of Requestor: _________________________________

    E-print Network

    Miami, University of

    Data Request Questionnaire: Name of Requestor: _________________________________ Circle One:_________________________ Telephone: __________________________ Email: _____________________________ What data variables and level?___________________________________________________________________ Describe how will you use the data? By signing this document, you agree to follow the Data Policy outlined

  3. Marijuana Use & Educational Outcomes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topics » Trends & Statistics » Infographics » Marijuana Use & Educational Outcomes Marijuana Use & Educational Outcomes Email Facebook Twitter Marijuana Use & Educational Outcomes Top Figure: Studies show that ...

  4. The relevance of unrelated costs internal and external to the healthcare sector to the outcome of a cost-comparison analysis of secondary prevention: the case of general colorectal cancer screening in the German population.

    PubMed

    Tscheulin, Dieter K; Drevs, Florian

    2010-04-01

    The potential of secondary prevention measures, such as cancer screening, to produce cost savings in the healthcare sector is a controversial issue in healthcare economics. Potential savings are calculated by comparing treatment costs with the cost of a prevention program. When survivors' subsequent unrelated health care costs are included in the calculation, however, the overall cost of disease prevention rises. What have not been studied to date are the secondary effects of fatal disease prevention measures on social security systems. From the perspective of a policy maker responsible for a social security system budget, it is not only future healthcare costs that are relevant for budgeting, but also changes in the contributions to, and expenditures from, statutory pension insurance and health insurance systems. An examination of the effect of longer life expectancies on these insurance systems can be justified by the fact that European social security systems are regulated by the state, and there is no clear separation between the financing of individual insurance systems due to cross-subsidisation. This paper looks at how the results of cost-comparison analyses vary depending on the inclusion or exclusion of future healthcare and non-healthcare costs, using the example of colorectal cancer screening in the German general population. In contrast to previous studies, not only are future unrelated medical costs considered, but also the effects on the social security system. If a German colorectal cancer screening program were implemented, and unrelated future medical care were excluded from the cost-benefit analysis, savings of up to 548 million euros per year would be expected. The screening program would, at the same time, generate costs in the healthcare sector as well as in the social security system of 2,037 million euros per year. Because the amount of future contributions and expenditures in the social security system depends on the age and gender of the recipients of the screening program (i.e. survivors of a typically fatal condition), the impact of age and gender on the results of a cost-comparison analysis of colorectal cancer screening are presented and discussed. Our study shows that colorectal cancer screening generates individual cost savings in the social security system up to a life expectancy of 60 years. Beyond that age, the balance between a recipient's social security contributions and insurance system expenditure is negative. The paper clarifies the relevance of healthcare costs not related to the prevented disease to the economic evaluation of prevention programs, particularly in the case of fatal diseases such as colorectal cancer. The results of the study imply that, from an economic perspective, the participation of at-risk individuals in disease prevention programs should be promoted. PMID:19449159

  5. Standardized Questionnaires of Walking & Bicycling Database

    Cancer.gov

    This database contains questionnaire items and a list of validation studies for standardized items concerning walking and biking from multiple national and international physical activity questionnaires (PAQs). The purpose of this database is to provide easy access to a large number of items assessing duration and frequency of walking and bicycling in the non-disabled adult population. We also briefly review the results of validation studies identified for some of the PAQs.

  6. Blood circulating microparticle species in relapsing–remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. A case–control, cross sectional study with conventional MRI and advanced iron content imaging outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J.S.; Chervenak, R.; Weinstock-Guttman, B.; Tsunoda, I.; Ramanathan, M.; Martinez, N.E.; Omura, S.; Sato, F.; Chaitanya, G.V.; Minagar, A.; McGee, J.; Jennings, M.H.; Monceaux, C.; Becker, F.; Cvek, U.; Trutschl, M.; Zivadinov, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although multiple sclerosis (MS) is thought to represent an excessive and inappropriate immune response to several central nervous system (CNS) autoantigens, increasing evidence also suggests that MS may also be a neurovascular inflammatory disease, characterized by endothelial activation and shedding of cell membrane microdomains known as ‘microparticles’ into the circulation. Objective To investigate the relationships between these endothelial biomarkers and MS. Methods We examined the relative abundance of CD31+/PECAM-1, CD51+CD61+ (?V–?3) and CD54+ (ICAM-1) bearing microparticles in sera of healthy individuals, patients with relapsing–remitting MS, and secondary-progressive MS. We also investigated the correlation among circulating levels of different microparticle species in MS with conventional MRI (T2- and T1-lesion volumes and brain atrophy), as well as novel MR modalities [assessment of iron content on susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI)-filtered phase]. Results Differences in circulating microparticle levels were found among MS groups, and several microparticle species (CD31+/CD51+/CD61+/CD54+) were found to correlate with conventional MRI and SWI features of MS. Conclusion These results indicate that circulating microparticles’ profiles in MS may support mechanistic roles for microvascular stress and injury which is an underlying contributor not only to MS initiation and progression, but also to pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:26073484

  7. Sexual outcome of patients undergoing thulium laser enucleation of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Carmignani, Luca; Bozzini, Giorgio; Macchi, Alberto; Maruccia, Serena; Picozzi, Stefano; Casellato, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) may affect the quality of sexual function and ejaculation. The effect of new surgical procedures, which are currently available to treat BPH, on erection and ejaculation, has been poorly studied. This study aimed to assess the effect of thulium laser enucleation of the prostate (ThuLEP) on sexual function and retrograde ejaculation in patients with LUTS secondary to BPH. We performed a prospective study in 110 consecutive patients who had undergone ThuLEP to analyze changes in sexual function and urinary symptoms. To evaluate changes in erection and ejaculation, and the effect of urinary symptoms on the quality of life (QoL), five validated questionnaires were used: the ICIQ-MLUTSsex, MSHQ-EjD, International Index of Erectile Function 5, International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) questionnaire, and QoL index of the intraclass correlation coefficients. Patients also underwent IPSS and flowmetry to assess the outcome of flow. Patients were evaluated before surgery and 3–6 months after ThuLEP, whereas those with previous abdominal surgery were excluded. The patients’ mean age was 67.83 years. Postoperative urinary symptoms improved after surgery. No significant differences in erectile function before and after surgery were observed. As compared with other techniques described in the literature, the percentage of patients with conserved ejaculation increased by 52.7% after ThuLEP. ThuLEP positively affects urinary symptoms and their effect on the QoL of patients as assessed by questionnaire scores. While endoscopic management of BPH (e.g. transurethral resection of the prostate) causes retrograde ejaculation in most patients, those who undergo ThuLEP have conserved ejaculation and erectile function. PMID:25652616

  8. Sexual outcome of patients undergoing thulium laser enucleation of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Carmignani, Luca; Bozzini, Giorgio; Macchi, Alberto; Maruccia, Serena; Picozzi, Stefano; Casellato, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) may affect the quality of sexual function and ejaculation. The effect of new surgical procedures, which are currently available to treat BPH, on erection and ejaculation, has been poorly studied. This study aimed to assess the effect of thulium laser enucleation of the prostate (ThuLEP) on sexual function and retrograde ejaculation in patients with LUTS secondary to BPH. We performed a prospective study in 110 consecutive patients who had undergone ThuLEP to analyze changes in sexual function and urinary symptoms. To evaluate changes in erection and ejaculation, and the effect of urinary symptoms on the quality of life (QoL), five validated questionnaires were used: the ICIQ-MLUTSsex, MSHQ-EjD, International Index of Erectile Function 5, International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) questionnaire, and QoL index of the intraclass correlation coefficients. Patients also underwent IPSS and flowmetry to assess the outcome of flow. Patients were evaluated before surgery and 3-6 months after ThuLEP, whereas those with previous abdominal surgery were excluded. The patients' mean age was 67.83 years. Postoperative urinary symptoms improved after surgery. No significant differences in erectile function before and after surgery were observed. As compared with other techniques described in the literature, the percentage of patients with conserved ejaculation increased by 52.7% after ThuLEP. ThuLEP positively affects urinary symptoms and their effect on the QoL of patients as assessed by questionnaire scores. While endoscopic management of BPH (e.g. transurethral resection of the prostate) causes retrograde ejaculation in most patients, those who undergo ThuLEP have conserved ejaculation and erectile function. PMID:25652616

  9. How an online questionnaire can explore leadership teaching in an undergraduate curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Sian; Verma, Anju; Booton, Paul; Bicknell, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To design a tool to explore current leadership teaching in an undergraduate curriculum, using the medical leadership competency framework (MLCF) Design An online questionnaire was designed based on the MLCF competences and sent to all course leads at Imperial College, London in Autumn 2011 Setting Imperial College, London Participants Sixty-nine course leads were invited to participate in the questionnaire study Main outcome measures Course leads were asked whether they teach each MLCF competence, which teaching methods they use, and how long they spend teaching each competency Results Overall there was a 78% questionnaire response rate (54/69). From the questionnaires received it was possible to extrapolate results across the remaining courses to achieve a 100% response rate. We were then able to produce a map of current leadership teaching showing that all MLCF competences are taught to varying degrees across the curriculum. The tool does not however provide information on the quality of teaching provided, or what students learn Conclusions There is a strong emphasis on the development of teaching leadership skills to undergraduates in Tomorrow's Doctors 2009 (TD09). It is difficult to know what teaching occurs across the curriculum of a large medical school. The design of a simple, electronic questionnaire will enable medical schools to map their current leadership teaching to the TD09 outcomes. This will help to inform further curriculum development and integration as well as signposting of learning opportunities PMID:23323202

  10. Measuring Orthodontic Treatment Satisfaction: Questionnaire Development and Preliminary Validation

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M. Elizabeth; Vig, Katherine W. L.; Phillips, Ceib L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to develop a reliable self-report measure of consumer satisfaction with orthodontic treatment, and to preliminarily assess its validity. Method Transcripts of qualitative interviews with patients, their parents, and practicing orthodontists together with items from existing dental satisfaction questionnaires were used to develop a pool of 41 items assessing satisfaction with various aspects of orthodontic care. These items were paired with five-point Likert scales (1=strongly disagree, 5=strongly agree) and were administered to 299 parents of children who had completed orthodontic treatment at two university-based clinics. Results Factor analyses and reliability analyses identified three main subscales with high reliabilities: 13 items assessing satisfaction with treatment process (Cronbach’s alpha=.92), seven items assessing satisfaction with psychosocial effects of treatment (Cronbach’s alpha=.87), and five items assessing satisfaction with overall treatment outcome (Cronbach’s alpha=. 79). Relationships among these three subscales and pre- and posttreatment variables were examined in a subset of 86 parent/patients. Forward stepwise regression with backward overlook revealed no significant relationships between any satisfaction subscale and demographic variables. Posttreatment overjet was inversely related to parental satisfaction with orthodontic treatment process (R2=.13; P<.001), and parent satisfaction with treatment outcome (R2=.28; P<.0001). Improvement in esthetics as measured by improvement in IOTN Aesthetic Component scores was positively related to satisfaction with psychosocial outcomes (R2=.28; P<.0001). Conclusions The present instrument is reliable and can be used to assess three dimensions of parental satisfaction with their child‘s orthodontic treatment. Relationships between visible orthodontic outcome variables and parent satisfaction provide preliminary validity support for the instrument. PMID:11603319

  11. Convergent Validity of the Arab Teens Lifestyle Study (ATLS) Physical Activity Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M.; Al-Sobayel, Hana I.; Musaiger, Abdulrahman O.

    2011-01-01

    The Arab Teens Lifestyle Study (ATLS) is a multicenter project for assessing the lifestyle habits of Arab adolescents. This study reports on the convergent validity of the physical activity questionnaire used in ATLS against an electronic pedometer. Participants were 39 males and 36 females randomly selected from secondary schools, with a mean age of 16.1 ± 1.1 years. ATLS self-reported questionnaire was validated against the electronic pedometer for three consecutive weekdays. Mean steps counts were 6,866 ± 3,854 steps/day with no significant gender difference observed. Questionnaire results showed no significant gender differences in time spent on total or moderate-intensity activities. However, males spent significantly more time than females on vigorous-intensity activity. The correlation of steps counts with total time spent on all activities by the questionnaire was 0.369. Relationship of steps counts was higher with vigorous-intensity (r = 0.338) than with moderate-intensity activity (r = 0.265). Pedometer steps counts showed higher correlations with time spent on walking (r = 0.350) and jogging (r = 0.383) than with the time spent on other activities. Active participants, based on pedometer assessment, were also most active by the questionnaire. It appears that ATLS questionnaire is a valid instrument for assessing habitual physical activity among Arab adolescents. PMID:22016718

  12. The power of outcomes: FOTO Industrial Outcomes Tool -- Initial assessment.

    PubMed

    Hart, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate how outcomes assessment can assist in describing clients receiving rehabilitation in occupational health rehabilitation clinics and to describe the preliminary assessment of internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the FOTO Industrial Outcomes Tool. METHODS: 266 adults referred for acute work rehabilitation (AWR), work conditioning/hardening (WC/WH) or a Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE) comprised the data set. Clients were treated between July 1998 and January 1999 in 15 clinics from 6 states by 46 clinicians participating in the Focus on Therapeutic Outcomes (FOTO) national rehabilitation database beta test. For AWR and WC/WH, clients completed a health status questionnaire on intake and discharge, and health status was assessed prior to the FCE. Comprehensive demographic data were collected describing the clinics, clinicians, clients and work status collected 2 weeks following discharge. RESULTS: Internal consistency reliability coefficients for the health status scores ranged from 0.57 to 0.89. Construct validity was supported. CONCLUSION: Results demonstrate the power of collecting outcomes from a variety of constructs for clients receiving industrial rehabilitation services. Initial reliability and construct validity findings were adequate and support continuing data analyses. PMID:12441480

  13. What contributes to good patient outcomes in the home treatment of the severely mentally ill: study protocol of a multi-centre analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While evidence is available that home treatment could be effective for treating severe mental illness, there is a lack of evidence on what exactly makes home treatment effective. The study presented here aims to develop recommendations for structures and processes in home treatment that are necessary for its effectiveness. Methods/Design 14 provider networks of home treatment for severe mental illness will be analyzed and compared according to their structures, processes and patient-related outcomes. Data will be drawn from health care claims data, routine assessments of psychosocial functioning, and from questionnaires on structures and processes. The primary outcome will be psychosocial functioning; secondary outcomes, quality of life and days spent in hospital. The relation between structures and processes on one hand side and outcomes on the other side will be identified by multilevel analysis. In addition, focus groups with patients, relatives and network staff will be held to add further insight into relevant processes. All networks will receive individual quality reports, providing them with feedback on the results of this research and benchmarking them against the average. Based on this research, recommendations for processes and structures of home treatment will be developed. Discussion The research will use longitudinal data on outcomes routinely assessed since 2009 and claims data. Routine data is also used for the assessment of structures and processes. By way of additional questionnaires developed in discussion with providers, further relevant factors can be included. The approach of this study becomes more comprehensive by conducting focus groups with patients, relatives and providers and by having the chance to evaluate the results with the networks by providing feedback of results. Several factors such as outcomes related to regional availability of hospital beds or size of networks might limit this study. PMID:24192048

  14. Rasch analysis of three versions of the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Megan

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the construct validity of three versions of the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire for low back pain using Rasch analysis. The three versions of the ODQ share 9 items and differ on one other. About 100 patients with non-specific low back pain seeking physiotherapy treatment at hospital outpatient departments and physiotherapy private practices completed the 12 Oswestry items as part of a battery of questionnaires. Rasch analysis revealed that four items (Personal Care, Standing, Sex Life and Social Life) had disordered response thresholds and one item (Walking) showed differential item functioning by age. The 10 standard Oswestry items and a modified version in which Sex Life is replaced by Work/Housework showed adequate overall fit to the Rasch model (chi(2)P>.01). The third version, in which Sex Life is replaced by Changing Degree of Pain, did not fit the model (chi(2)P=.006) and the Changing Degree of Pain item was misfitting (residual 2.34, P=.007). These findings suggest that either of the first two of the three versions of this widely used low back pain outcome measure should be selected over the third. Users should also be aware that for some items the rating scale steps do not perform as intended. PMID:17363319

  15. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--TECHNICIAN WALKTHROUGH QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Technician Walkthrough questionnaire data set contains information about each household as determined during a walkthrough by trained technicians. The information is from 403 technician walkthrough questionnaires for 80 households across 6 cycles. The questionnaire includes...

  16. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--BASELINE QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Baseline Questionnaire data set provides information about the household using the primary resident (IRN 01) and other residents who chose to participate. The information is from 1106 Baseline Questionnaires for 534 households. The Baseline Questionnaire was administered to...

  17. 77 FR 39986 - Information Collection; Health Screening Questionnaire

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Forest Service Information Collection; Health Screening Questionnaire AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... a currently approved information collection, Health Screening Questionnaire. DATES: Comments must be...: Title: Health Screening Questionnaire. OMB Number: 0596-0164. Expiration Date of Approval: January...

  18. Trainees versus Staff: Exploring Counseling Outcomes in a College Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilagan, Guy; Vinson, Mike; Sharp, Julia L.; Havice, Pamela; Ilagan, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Investigators compared counseling outcomes among nonpaid graduate-level trainees and professional staff at a college counseling center. Counseling outcomes for 331 college student participants were measured using the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 (OQ45.2), employing a pretest--posttest design. The two groups of service providers did not differ…

  19. A Philosophical, Qualitative, and Quantitative Examination of Transformational Leadership in Secondary Agricultural Education 

    E-print Network

    Hall, Johnathan Lewis

    2011-08-08

    style of a random sample of agricultural educators across the nation who taught secondary agriculture during the 2008-2009 school year. Data were collected online using the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ). Descriptive statistics were used...

  20. Maternal occupation and pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Savitz, D A; Olshan, A F; Gallagher, K

    1996-05-01

    Few studies have addressed the effect of maternal employment on late pregnancy outcomes. The National Maternal and Infant Health Survey, a probability sample of U.S. livebirths, stillbirths, and infant deaths in 1988, provided an opportunity to evaluate mothers' jobs in relation to preterm delivery, very low birthweight ( < 1,500 gm), moderately low birthweight (1,500-2,499 gm), small-for-gestational-age (SGA) birth, stillbirth, and infant death. We aggregated mothers' jobs, which were ascertained by mailed questionnaire or telephone interview, into categories for analysis. We considered jobs held at any time during pregnancy and jobs held during the fifth month of pregnancy. Relative to the referent group of clerks, textile workers had adjusted odds ratios of 1.5 or greater for all outcomes, with elevated risks also found sporadically for food service workers (preterm delivery, SGA birth, stillbirth) and electrical equipment operators (all outcomes except for still-birth and infant death). Janitors had elevated adjusted odds ratios of 2.0 or greater for preterm delivery and stillbirth. Relative to clerks, teachers and librarians tended to have reduced risks for adverse outcomes. PMID:8728440

  1. Presenting Feedback on the Minnesota Importance Questionnaire and the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Janny M.; Blain, Michelle D.

    1992-01-01

    Describes visual method for condensing and presenting feedback to career counseling clients on their vocational needs and satisfaction as assessed by Minnesota Importance Questionnaire paired form and long-form Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. Describes instruments and their place in career counseling and illustrates use of satisfaction x…

  2. Avoiding unfavourable outcomes in liposuction

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Atul; Filobbos, George

    2013-01-01

    The origin of liposuction can be traced to an adverse event by Dujarrier in 1921 when he used a uterine curette to remove fat from the knees of a ballerina ending in an amputation secondary to damage of the femoral artery. The history of liposuction since then has been one of avoiding complications and optimising outcome. After this adverse event, liposuction was abandoned until the 1960's when Schrudde revived the practice using small stab incisions and sharp curettage with the secondary suction to aspirate the freed tissue. This technique was associated with a high incidence of complications especially seroma and skin necrosis. Illouz then replaced the curette with a blunt cannula connected to vacuum pump thus avoiding the complications of a sharp curette. Despite the presence of various techniques for liposuction, suction assisted liposuction (SAL) is still the standard technique of liposuction. This article aims to discuss literature regarding the various aspects of liposuction (SAL) and to highlight the salient points in the literature and in the senior author's experience in order to avoid unfavourable outcomes in liposuction. A literature review on avoiding complication is in liposuction including some of the seminal papers on liposuction. Liposuction is generally a safe procedure with reproducible outcome. Just like any surgical procedure it should be treated with the utmost care. Illouz published 10 commandments for liposuction in 1989 and we review these commandments to demonstrate how liposuction has evolved. PMID:24501475

  3. Testing the Validity and Reliability of the Shame Questionnaire among Sexually Abused Girls in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Michalopoulos, Lynn T. M.; Murray, Laura K.; Kane, Jeremy C.; Skavenski van Wyk, Stephanie; Chomba, Elwyn; Cohen, Judith; Imasiku, Mwiya; Semrau, Katherine; Unick, Jay; Bolton, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the current study is to test the validity and reliability of the Shame Questionnaire among traumatized girls in Lusaka, Zambia. Methods The Shame Questionnaire was validated through both classical test and item response theory methods. Internal reliability, criterion validity and construct validity were examined among a sample of 325 female children living in Zambia. Sub-analyses were conducted to examine differences in construct validity among girls who reported sexual abuse and girls who did not. Results All girls in the sample were sexually abused, but only 61.5% endorsed or reported that sexual abuse had occurred. Internal consistency was very good among the sample with alpha = .87. Criterion validity was demonstrated through a significant difference of mean Shame Questionnaire scores between girls who experienced 0–1 trauma events and more than one traumatic event, with higher mean Shame Questionnaire scores among girls who had more than one traumatic event (p = .004 for 0–1 compared to 2 and 3 events and p = .016 for 0–1 compared to 4+ events). Girls who reported a history of witnessing or experiencing physical abuse had a significantly higher mean Shame Questionnaire score than girls who did not report a history of witnessing or experiencing physical abuse (p<.0001). There was no significant difference in mean Shame Questionnaire score between girls who reported a sexual abuse history and girls who did not. Exploratory factor analysis indicated a two-factor model of the Shame Questionnaire, with an experience of shame dimension and an active outcomes of shame dimension. Item response theory analysis indicated adequate overall item fit. Results also indicate potential differences in construct validity between girls who did and did not endorse sexual abuse. Conclusions This study suggests the general utility of the Shame Questionnaire among Zambian girls and demonstrates the need for more psychometric studies in low and middle income countries. PMID:25879658

  4. Jordanian Vocational, Secondary Education Teachers and Acquisition of the National Professional Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Dajeh, Hesham I.

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to estimate the level of acquisition of the Jordanian national professional standards by vocational, secondary education teachers. Two hundred teachers participated in the study. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 15.0. Questionnaire validity was assessed by content validity,…

  5. Exposure to Bullying, Reactions and Psychological Adjustment of Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabuzoka, Dabie; Ronning, John Andreas; Handegard, Bjorn Helge

    2009-01-01

    A sample of 575 secondary school students aged 11-15 years was administered a checklist on experiences of bullying, then divided into groups of victims, witnesses and not exposed, and by gender. Participants completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire on psychosocial adjustment. Victims and witnesses completed another questionnaire on…

  6. University of Michigan Drug Education Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, John Bruce; Patch, David J.

    This questionnaire assesses attitudes toward potential drug education programs and drug use practices in college students. The 87 items (multiple choice or free response) pertain to the history and extent of usage of 27 different drugs, including two non-existent drugs which may be utilized as a validity check; attitude toward the content, format,…

  7. Caregivers feeding styles questionnaire. Establishing cutoff points

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers use the Caregiver's Feeding Styles Questionnaire (CFSQ) to categorize parent feeding into authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent, and uninvolved styles. The CFSQ assesses self-reported feeding and classifies parents using median splits which are used in a substantial body of parenting l...

  8. Psychometric Evaluation of the Chinese Virtues Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duan, Wenjie; Ho, Samuel M. Y.; Bai, Yu; Tang, Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Chinese Virtues Questionnaire (CVQ). The reliability, factor structure, construct validity, and temporal stability of the inventory were examined. Method: A university student sample ("n" = 878) and a working adult sample ("n" = 153) were recruited.…

  9. IRON AND STEEL EFFLUENT GUIDELINES ECONOMIC QUESTIONNAIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:This information acquired via the questionnaire is used to support development of the effluent guidelines for the Iron and Steel Point Source Category (40CFR Part 420). One of the statutory decision criteria for the adoption of a best available treatment t...

  10. The Personal Attributes Questionnaire: A Conceptual Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozer, Daniel

    The rich complexity of the concepts of masculinity and femininity has been reflected in personality measures in at least two different ways: by employing a variety of subscales with comparatively homogeneous items or by using a single scale with comparatively heterogeneous items. The Personal Attributes Questionnaire (PAQ) was the subject of an…

  11. Utah Drop-Out Drug Use Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in high school drop-outs. The 79 items (multiple choice or apply/not apply) are concerned with demographic data and use, use history, reasons for use/nonuse, attitudes toward drugs, availability of drugs, and drug information with respect to narcotics, amphetamines, LSD, Marijuana, and barbiturates.…

  12. INSURANCE & CLAIMS MANAGEMENT SPECIAL EVENTS QUESTIONNAIRE

    E-print Network

    Li, Mo

    INSURANCE & CLAIMS MANAGEMENT SPECIAL EVENTS QUESTIONNAIRE TODAY'S DATE: / / 1. TITLE OF EVENT: 2. EVENT DATE (S): HOURS: 3. DESCRIBE EVENT: 4. SPONSORING ORGANIZATION: 5. ADDRESS: 6. CONTACT PERSON. OF PARTICIPANTS: NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS UNDER 18: APPROXIMATE NO. OF EVENT ATTENDEES: 9. ANY VEHICLES INVOLVED

  13. Structural Validity of the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tepper, Bennett J.; Percy, Paul M.

    1994-01-01

    Two studies with 290 college students and 95 business managers investigated the latent structure of items from the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ). Results support models in which transformational and transactional leadership items load on separate factors and suggest that charismatic and inspirational leadership scales converge for…

  14. Canadian Version of the Diet History Questionnaire

    Cancer.gov

    The Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) and the DHQ nutrient database were modified for use in Canada through the collaborative efforts of Dr. Amy Subar and staff at the Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch, and Dr. Ilona Csizmadi and colleagues in the Division of Population Health and Information at the Alberta Cancer Board in Canada.

  15. Validation of the Child Sport Cohesion Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Luc J.; Carron, Albert V.; Eys, Mark A.; Loughead, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the validity evidence of the Child Sport Cohesion Questionnaire (CSCQ). To accomplish this task, convergent, discriminant, and known-group difference validity were examined, along with factorial validity via confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Child athletes (N = 290, M[subscript age] = 10.73 plus or…

  16. Diet History Questionnaire Paper-based Forms

    Cancer.gov

    DHQ-1 is the standard version of the NCI's Diet History Questionnaire. It was originally printed in 1998, reprinted in 2002 with minor changes to the front page and the development of a Spanish translation, and reprinted again in 2007 with changes to the Today's Date field to include the years 2007-2011.

  17. Applicant Questionnaire for admission to the

    E-print Network

    British Columbia, University of

    ) 1. Have you taken university-level courses in the following subjects? Biology Chemistry Physics taxonomic keys to classify soils? Measured tree dimensions? Advised a client or employer on a business for overcoming these gaps? NOTE: this questionnaire is only part of the supporting documentation required

  18. ANNUAL MEDICAL HISTORY QUESTIONNAIRE FOR RESPIRATOR USE

    E-print Network

    Slatton, Clint

    ANNUAL MEDICAL HISTORY QUESTIONNAIRE FOR RESPIRATOR USE Occupational Medicine Program Name: UFID Telephone Number: Describe any apparent difficulties noted with respirator use, if any: Have you had or do that might interferewith respirator use or result in limited work ability 18. Are you taking any medications

  19. Cardiff's TELEform: Scanning the Diet History Questionnaire

    Cancer.gov

    Software, such as Cardiff's TELEform Information Capture System, is available to create and print a scannable version of the Diet History Questionnaire form. To create booklets, you may still need to hire a professional printer. Using TELEform, you will be able to scan the instrument with an imaging scanner (contact Cardiff for specifications).

  20. The Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Katie E.; West, Robin L.; Reese, Celinda M.; Santa Maria, Michael P.; Yassuda, Monica

    2000-01-01

    The Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire was tested in a group of studies with several populations: 33 mental health professionals; 85 older adults; and 110, 32, and 46 undergraduates. Older adults and professionals knew more about pathological than normal memory aging. Instruction improved undergraduates' pathological knowledge. Instrument…

  1. Workplace bullying in NHS community trust: staff questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Quine, Lyn

    1999-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of workplace bullying in an NHS community trust; to examine the association between bullying and occupational health outcomes; and to investigate the relation between support at work and bullying. Design Questionnaire survey. Setting NHS community trust in the south east of England. Subjects Trust employees. Main outcome measures Measures included a 20 item inventory of bullying behaviours designed for the study, the job induced stress scale, the hospital anxiety and depression scale, the overall job satisfaction scale, the support at work scale, and the propensity to leave scale. Results 1100 employees returned questionnaires—a response rate of 70%. 421 (38%) employees reported experiencing one or more types of bullying in the previous year. 460 (42%) had witnessed the bullying of others. When bullying occurred it was most likely to be by a manager. Two thirds of the victims of bullying had tried to take action when the bullying occurred, but most were dissatisfied with the outcome. Staff who had been bullied had significantly lower levels of job satisfaction (mean 10.5 (SD 2.7) v 12.2 (2.3), P<0.001) and higher levels of job induced stress (mean 22.5 (SD 6.1) v 16.9 (5.8), P<0.001), depression (8% (33) v 1% (7), P<0.001), anxiety (30% (125) v 9% (60), P<0.001), and intention to leave the job (8.5 (2.9) v 7.0 (2.7), P<0.001). Support at work seemed to protect people from some of the damaging effects of bullying. Conclusions Bullying is a serious problem. Setting up systems for supporting staff and for dealing with interpersonal conflict may have benefits for both employers and staff. Key messages38% of staff in a community NHS trust reported being subjected to bullying behaviours in the workplace in the previous year and 42% had witnessed the bullying of othersStaff who had been bullied had lower levels of job satisfaction and higher levels of job induced stress, depression, anxiety, and intention to leaveSupport at work may be able to protect people from some of the damaging effects of bullyingEmployers should have policies and procedures that comprehensively address the issue of workplace bullying PMID:9915730

  2. Simple assessment of outcome after acute brain injury using the Glasgow Outcome Scale.

    PubMed

    Hellawell, D J; Signorini, D F; Pentland, B

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate alternative methods of determining Glasgow Outcome Scale scores, a postal survey was made of 288 general practitioners and 128 relatives of patients who had sustained acute brain injuries 5-7 years previously. The Glasgow Outcome Scale score from the general practitioner and relative were compared with that calculated from questionnaire information by an experienced rater. There was poor agreement between general practitioner and rater (K = 0.17) and relative and rater (K = 0.35) scores. Both general practitioners and relatives indicated more favourable outcomes than the rater, with a higher level of agreement (K = 0.61) between them. When Glasgow Outcome Scale scores are used, the methods employed should be valid and reliable; failure to ensure this may be responsible for a considerable proportion of variability in reported studies of brain injury outcome. PMID:10782938

  3. Minority Status, Consumer Outcomes, and Service Inputs in Four States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stancliffe, Roger J.; Lakin, K. Charlie

    2006-01-01

    Data from the Center for Outcome Analysis were subjected to independent secondary analysis involving comparisons by ethnic group of eight indicators of service quality for users of adult developmental disability services in four states. Ethnic group membership had very limited or no association with the consumer outcomes and service inputs…

  4. Influences of Mastery Goal and Perceived Competence on Educational Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Craven, Rhonda G.; Kaur, Gurvinder

    2014-01-01

    Motivation research has shown significant relations of students' mastery goal orientation and perceived competence to educational outcomes, but has not simultaneously scrutinized their relative influences on various educational outcomes. In the present investigation, a sample of Australian students from 6 secondary schools in Western Sydney…

  5. Standardized Outcome Measurement for Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: Consensus From the International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM)

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Robert L; Spatz, Erica S; Kelley, Thomas A; Stowell, Caleb J; Beltrame, John; Heidenreich, Paul; Tresserras, Ricard; Jernberg, Tomas; Chua, Terrance; Morgan, Louise; Panigrahi, Bishnu; Rosas Ruiz, Alba; Rumsfeld, John S; Sadwin, Lawrence; Schoeberl, Mark; Shahian, David; Weston, Clive; Yeh, Robert; Lewin, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) outcomes consistently improve when they are routinely measured and provided back to physicians and hospitals. However, few centers around the world systematically track outcomes, and no global standards exist. Furthermore, patient-centered outcomes and longitudinal outcomes are under-represented in current assessments. Methods and Results The nonprofit International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) convened an international Working Group to define a consensus standard set of outcome measures and risk factors for tracking, comparing, and improving the outcomes of CAD care. Members were drawn from 4 continents and 6 countries. Using a modified Delphi method, the ICHOM Working Group defined who should be tracked, what should be measured, and when such measurements should be performed. The ICHOM CAD consensus measures were designed to be relevant for all patients diagnosed with CAD, including those with acute myocardial infarction, angina, and asymptomatic CAD. Thirteen specific outcomes were chosen, including acute complications occurring within 30 days of acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting surgery, or percutaneous coronary intervention; and longitudinal outcomes for up to 5 years for patient-reported health status (Seattle Angina Questionnaire [SAQ-7], elements of Rose Dyspnea Score, and Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ-2]), cardiovascular hospital admissions, cardiovascular procedures, renal failure, and mortality. Baseline demographic, cardiovascular disease, and comorbidity information is included to improve the interpretability of comparisons. Conclusions ICHOM recommends that this set of outcomes and other patient information be measured for all patients with CAD. PMID:25991011

  6. A Physical Activity Questionnaire: Reproducibility and Validity

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Nicolas; Sanchez, Carlos E.; Vera, Jose A.; Perez, Wilson; Thalabard, Jean-Christophe; Rieu, Michel

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluates the Quantification de L’Activite Physique en Altitude chez les Enfants (QAPACE) supervised self-administered questionnaire reproducibility and validity on the estimation of the mean daily energy expenditure (DEE) on Bogotá’s schoolchildren. The comprehension was assessed on 324 students, whereas the reproducibility was studied on a different random sample of 162 who were exposed twice to it. Reproducibility was assessed using both the Bland-Altman plot and the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). The validity was studied in a sample of 18 girls and 18 boys randomly selected, which completed the test - re-test study. The DEE derived from the questionnaire was compared with the laboratory measurement results of the peak oxygen uptake (Peak VO2) from ergo-spirometry and Leger Test. The reproducibility ICC was 0.96 (95% C.I. 0.95-0.97); by age categories 8-10, 0.94 (0.89-0. 97); 11-13, 0.98 (0.96- 0.99); 14-16, 0.95 (0.91-0.98). The ICC between mean TEE as estimated by the questionnaire and the direct and indirect Peak VO2 was 0.76 (0.66) (p<0.01); by age categories, 8-10, 11-13, and 14-16 were 0.89 (0.87), 0.76 (0.78) and 0.88 (0.80) respectively. The QAPACE questionnaire is reproducible and valid for estimating PA and showed a high correlation with the Peak VO2 uptake. Key pointsThe presence of a supervisor, the limited size of the group with the possibility of answering to their questions could explain the high reproducibility for this questionnaire.No study in the literature had directly addressed the issue of estimating a yearly average PA including school and vacation period.A two step procedure, in the population of schoolchildren of Bogotá, gives confidence in the use of the QAPACE questionnaire in a large epidemiological survey in related populations. PMID:24149485

  7. Traumatic brain injury: guidance in a forensic context from outcome, dose-response, and response bias research.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Jerry J; Goldman, Daniel J; Guidotti Breting, Leslie M

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs at a high incidence, involving millions of individuals in the U.S. alone. Related to this, there are large numbers of litigants and claimants who are referred annually for forensic evaluation. In formulating opinions regarding claimed injuries, the present review advises experts to rely on two sets of information: TBI outcome and neuropsychological dose-response studies of non-litigants and non-claimants, and response bias literature that has demonstrated the relatively high risk of invalid responding among examinees referred within a secondary gain context, which in turn has resulted in the development of specific assessment methods. Regarding prospective methods for detecting possible response bias, both symptom validity tests, for measuring over-reporting of symptoms on inventories and questionnaires, and performance validity tests, for measuring insufficient effort on ability tests, are considered essential. PMID:24019125

  8. Political Activism and Civic Education among Australian Secondary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saha, Lawrence J.

    2000-01-01

    Studied the impact of school variables on student political knowledge and political activity using questionnaire responses from 1,311 secondary school students in South Australia and the Australian Capital Territory. Findings show that many students have had experience with normative forms of political activity, but fewer have engaged in…

  9. Interior Design Standards in the Secondary FCS Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Shana H.; Smith, Bettye P.

    2006-01-01

    This article deals with a study on interior design standards in the secondary FCS curriculum. This study assessed the importance FCS teachers placed on content standards in the interior design curriculum to help determine the amount of time and emphasis to place on the units within the courses. A cover letter and questionnaire were sent…

  10. Managing Information and Communication Technology in Sudanese Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Abdelrahman

    2015-01-01

    This research article is based on a larger study whose purpose was to investigate the current status and implementation of ICT in Khartoum State secondary schools. The study, adopted a descriptive survey design. Two instruments questionnaires and a structured interview schedule were used to collect data. The target population comprised of 320…

  11. What Greek Secondary School Students Believe about Climate Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liarakou, Georgia; Athanasiadis, Ilias; Gavrilakis, Costas

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate what Greek secondary school students (grades 8 and 11) believe about the greenhouse effect and climate change. A total of 626 students completed a closed-form questionnaire consisting of statements regarding the causes, impacts and solutions for this global environmental issue. The possible influence of…

  12. The Geographic Information System (GIS) in Secondary Education in Serbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komlenovic, Djurdjica; Manic, Emilija; Malinic, Dusica

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the application of new educational technologies in geography classes. The research involved 126 students from vocational secondary schools in Serbia taking geography as a compulsory subject. We developed and applied a questionnaire for this research. The results indicate that out of several ICTs available, the majority of…

  13. Teachers' Perceptions of the Coaching Role in Secondary Vocational Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketelaar, Evelien; den Brok, Perry; Beijaard, Douwe; Boshuizen, Henny P. A.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a study on teachers' perceptions of the coaching role in innovative secondary vocational education (SVE) in the Netherlands. Data from 109 teachers were collected by means of an online questionnaire, asking for their associations with the coaching role, goals concerning the coaching role, and typical coaching activities.…

  14. Psychosocial Predictors of Taiwanese Secondary Students' Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Zuway-R; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; Lawrenz, Frances

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between psychosocial factors and self-esteem for 1,672 Taiwanese senior high school students (779 boys, 893 girls). Students from Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, completed a Chinese version of the Secondary Student Questionnaire (SSQ), which measures self-esteem, depression, anxiety, stereotyped thinking,…

  15. Some Student Teachers' Conceptions of Creativity in Secondary School English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Beth

    2008-01-01

    This article explores a group of trainee teachers' conceptions of Creativity in Secondary School English. Data was collected by means of questionnaires and interviews. Whilst there are many promising notions of creativity, the results also reveal some evidence of narrow conceptions, inconsistent thinking and some misconceptions. This suggests that…

  16. User questionnaire to evaluate the radiological workspace.

    PubMed

    van Ooijen, Peter M A; Koesoema, Allya P; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    Over the past few years, an increase in digitalization of radiology departments can be seen, which has a large impact on the work of the radiologists. This impact is not only demonstrated by the increased use of digital images but also by changing demands on the whole reading environment. In this study, we evaluated the satisfaction of our radiologists with our digital Picture Archival and Communication System environment and their workspace. This evaluation was performed by distribution of a questionnaire consisting of a score sheet and some open questions to all radiologists and residents. Out of 25 questionnaires, 12 were adequately answered and returned. Results clearly showed that most problems were present in the area of reading room design and layout and comfort and ergonomics. Based on the results from this study, adaptations were made and the results were also used in the planning of the redesign of the entire department of radiology. PMID:16767350

  17. Teaching Cell Division to Secondary School Students: An Investigation of Difficulties Experienced by Turkish Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oztap, Haydar; Ozay, Esra; Oztap, Fulya

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the difficulties biology teachers face when teaching cell division in the secondary schools of the central part of the Erzurum province in Turkey. During this research, a questionnaire was distributed to a total of 36 secondary school biology teachers. Findings of the study indicate biology teachers perceive cell division as…

  18. The Use of Research and Theory in English Language Teaching in Botswana Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooko, Theophilus

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the usage of research and theory in the teaching of English language in secondary schools in Botswana. Altogether 100 questionnaires were administered in 19 secondary schools. The results of this study indicate that teachers rarely ever refer to language research in their teaching. Less value was also…

  19. Effectiveness of Communication on Students Discipline in Secondary Schools in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindiki, Jonah Nyaga

    2009-01-01

    The influence of communication on student discipline in secondary schools is an issue of continued debate in Kenya. This study was necessitated by the growing concern by education stakeholders in Kenya over the rising reports of student indiscipline in secondary schools. The study utilized qualitative approach with questionnaires, interviews and…

  20. Substance Use Disorders in a Sample of Iranian Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Alishahi, Mohammadjavad; Alavi, Maryam

    2004-01-01

    Aims: The current research assessed the rate of substance use among Iranian secondary school students. Participants: 470 boy secondary school students selected randomly and were assessed. Measurements: A confidential questionnaire based on DSM-IV and a prior study was distributed, completed by the students and collected in the same sessions in…

  1. Survey of Occupational Stress of Secondary and Elementary School Teachers and the Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pei, Wang; Guoli, Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Based on the measuring instruments used by scholars in China and abroad, we devised a questionnaire to study occupational stress of 500 secondary and elementary school teachers in Tacheng municipality in Xinjiang and examined its negative effects on teachers. They found that the occupational stress of secondary and elementary school teachers are…

  2. Romanian, Spanish and US Secondary Science Teacher Perceptions of Threats to the Biosphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Michael; Naumescu, Adrienne Kozan; Ives, Bob

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the data from a current study involving 41 Romanian secondary science teachers and a previously published study that compared 89 Spanish and 42 US secondary science teachers. All three groups were convenience samples who answered a two part questionnaire that was given in English, Spanish or Romanian, depending on the sample.…

  3. The Short- and Long-Term Effects of Secondary Schools upon Students' Academic Success and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoniou, Panayiotis

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study investigating the short- and long-term effects of secondary schools upon student academic success and development. A questionnaire was administered to a randomly selected sample of 15% of Cypriot students who graduated in June 2004 and June 2005 from secondary schools. A good response rate (i.e., 66%) was…

  4. Investigation of Junior Secondary Students' Perceptions of Mathematics Classroom Learning Environments in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Xinrong

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study investigating junior secondary school students' perceptions of mathematics classroom learning environments in China. An adapted 'What Is Happening In this Classroom?' questionnaire was administered to a sample of 2324 junior secondary school students from 72 classrooms in six provinces.…

  5. The primary outcome measure and its importance in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-10-01

    The primary outcome measure is the outcome that an investigator considers to be the most important among the many outcomes that are to be examined in the study. The primary outcome needs to be defined at the time the study is designed. There are 2 reasons for this: it reduces the risk of false-positive errors resulting from the statistical testing of many outcomes, and it reduces the risk of a false-negative error by providing the basis for the estimation of the sample size necessary for an adequately powered study. This article discusses the setting of the primary outcome measure, the need for it, the increased risk of false-positive and false-negative errors in secondary outcome results, how to regard articles that do not state the primary outcome, how to interpret results when secondary outcomes are statistically significant but not the primary outcome, and limitations of the concept of a primary outcome measure in clinical trial research. PMID:26528658

  6. Predicting Psychotherapy Client Dropout from In-Treatment Client-Reported Outcome 

    E-print Network

    Yu, Jason Juijen

    2012-02-14

    -focused research explore the effects of treatment response as a process factor on aspects of psychotherapy. As an added benefit, real-time treatment response measures, such as the Outcome Questionnaire, offer the possibility of timely adjustment in clinical...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix to Subpart G of... - Applicant Questionnaire for Modification of Secondary Treatment Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., construction, start-up and full operation, with your application. This requirement must be met by the effective... discharge meets the criteria of section 301(h) and EPA regulations (40 CFR part 125, subpart G). 2. Most... discharge, or altered discharge, as defined in 40 CFR 125.58? 2. (L,S) Description of the...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix to Subpart G of... - Applicant Questionnaire for Modification of Secondary Treatment Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., construction, start-up and full operation, with your application. This requirement must be met by the effective... discharge meets the criteria of section 301(h) and EPA regulations (40 CFR part 125, subpart G). 2. Most... discharge, or altered discharge, as defined in 40 CFR 125.58? 2. (L,S) Description of the...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix to Subpart G of... - Applicant Questionnaire for Modification of Secondary Treatment Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR 125.66(b). (* to the extent practicable) 2. (S)a. Are there any known or suspected water quality... discharge meets the criteria of section 301(h) and EPA regulations (40 CFR part 125, subpart G). 2. Most... discharge, or altered discharge, as defined in 40 CFR 125.58? 2. (L,S) Description of the...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix to Subpart G of... - Applicant Questionnaire for Modification of Secondary Treatment Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 125.66(b). (* to the extent practicable) 2. (S)a. Are there any known or suspected water quality... discharge meets the criteria of section 301(h) and EPA regulations (40 CFR part 125, subpart G). 2. Most... discharge, or altered discharge, as defined in 40 CFR 125.58? 2. (L,S) Description of the...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix to Subpart G of... - Applicant Questionnaire for Modification of Secondary Treatment Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... programs to meet the requirements of 40 CFR 126.66(d)(3). (L)d. Provide a schedule for development and... discharge meets the criteria of section 301(h) and EPA regulations (40 CFR part 125, subpart G). 2. Most... discharge, or altered discharge, as defined in 40 CFR 125.58? 2. (L,S) Description of the...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix to Subpart G of... - Applicant Questionnaire for Modification of Secondary Treatment Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...occurrence of mass mortalities. 2. (L,S)a. Are distinctive habitats of limited distribution (such as kelp beds or coral reefs) located in areas potentially affected by the modified discharge? [40 CFR 125.62(c)] b. If yes,...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix to Subpart G of... - Applicant Questionnaire for Modification of Secondary Treatment Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...occurrence of mass mortalities. 2. (L,S)a. Are distinctive habitats of limited distribution (such as kelp beds or coral reefs) located in areas potentially affected by the modified discharge? [40 CFR 125.62(c)] b. If yes,...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix to Subpart G of... - Applicant Questionnaire for Modification of Secondary Treatment Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...occurrence of mass mortalities. 2. (L,S)a. Are distinctive habitats of limited distribution (such as kelp beds or coral reefs) located in areas potentially affected by the modified discharge? [40 CFR 125.62(c)] b. If yes,...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix to Subpart G of... - Applicant Questionnaire for Modification of Secondary Treatment Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...of toxic pollutants or pesticides at levels which exert...Describe the sampling techniques, schedules, and locations, analytical techniques, quality control and...of toxic pollutants or pesticides? b. (L,S)...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix to Subpart G of... - Applicant Questionnaire for Modification of Secondary Treatment Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...of toxic pollutants or pesticides at levels which exert...Describe the sampling techniques, schedules, and locations, analytical techniques, quality control and...of toxic pollutants or pesticides? b. (L,S)...

  17. Relationship Between Intervention Dose and Outcomes in Living Well With Diabetes-A Randomized Trial of a Telephone-Delivered Lifestyle-Based Weight Loss Intervention.

    PubMed

    Goode, Ana D; Winkler, Elisabeth A H; Reeves, Marina M; Eakin, Elizabeth G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose . To examine associations of intervention dose with weight, physical activity, glycemic control, and diet outcomes in a randomized trial of a telephone counseling intervention. Design . Study design was a secondary analysis of intervention group. Setting . Study setting was primary care practices in a disadvantaged community in Australia. Subjects . Participants were adult patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 151). Intervention . Up to 27 telephone counseling calls were made during 18 months. Measures . Intervention dose was assessed as the number of calls completed (in tertile categories). Primary outcomes were weight and HbA1c, and moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity via accelerometer. Secondary outcomes were dietary energy intake and diet quality via a validated questionnaire. Analysis . Analyses employed were bivariate associations of call completion with sociodemographics, and confounder-adjusted linear mixed models for associations of call completion with outcomes (multiple imputation of missing data). Results . Only previous diagnosis of depression/anxiety had a statistically significant (p = .008) association with call completion. Call completion was significantly associated with weight loss (p < .001) but not the other outcomes (p > .05). Relative to low call completion, mean weight loss (as a percentage of baseline weight) was greater in the high-call completion group by -3.3% (95% confidence interval, -5.0% to -1.5%). Conclusion . Increased dose of intervention was associated with greater weight loss. More needs to be done to retain patients for the duration of weight loss and behavior change interventions, particularly those with diabetes and comorbid depression, who were the most difficult to engage. PMID:25372235

  18. The impact of transmural multiprofessional simulation-based obstetric team training on perinatal outcome and quality of care in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Perinatal mortality and morbidity in the Netherlands is relatively high compared to other European countries. Our country has a unique system with an independent primary care providing care to low-risk pregnancies and a secondary/tertiary care responsible for high-risk pregnancies. About 65% of pregnant women in the Netherlands will be referred from primary to secondary care implicating multiple medical handovers. Dutch audits concluded that in the entire obstetric collaborative network process parameters could be improved. Studies have shown that obstetric team training improves perinatal outcome and that simulation-based obstetric team training implementing crew resource management (CRM) improves team performance. In addition, deliberate practice (DP) improves medical skills. The aim of this study is to analyse whether transmural multiprofessional simulation-based obstetric team training improves perinatal outcome. Methods/Design The study will be implemented in the south-eastern part of the Netherlands with an annual delivery rate of over 9,000. In this area secondary care is provided by four hospitals. Each hospital with referring primary care practices will form a cluster (study group). Within each cluster, teams will be formed of different care providers representing the obstetric collaborative network. CRM and elements of DP will be implemented in the training. To analyse the quality of care as perceived by patients, the Pregnancy and Childbirth Questionnaire (PCQ) will be used. Furthermore, self-reported collaboration between care providers will be assessed. Team performance will be measured by the Clinical Teamwork Scale (CTS). We employ a stepped-wedge trial design with a sequential roll-out of the trainings for the different study groups. Primary outcome will be perinatal mortality and/or admission to a NICU. Secondary outcome will be team performance, quality of care as perceived by patients, and collaboration among care providers. Conclusion The effect of transmural multiprofessional simulation-based obstetric team training on perinatal outcome has never been studied. We hypothesise that this training will improve perinatal outcome, team performance, and quality of care as perceived by patients and care providers. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register, http://www.trialregister.nl/NTR4576, registered June 1, 2014 PMID:25145317

  19. Current Research Continuing Education Questionnaire, page 2087

    E-print Network

    Ané, Cécile

    variations in childhood obesity rates. Studies conducted by the US Department of Agriculture and based, may help explain why the highest rates of obesity continue to be observed among groups of limited are associated with lower risk of obesity and with more favorable health outcomes. Such low-energy-den- sity

  20. The Swindon Foot and Ankle Questionnaire: Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words?

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Rosemary; Manuel, Peter; Williamson, Lyn

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Despite increased awareness of the high prevalence and significance of foot and ankle problems in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), feet remain neglected. Reasons may include the perception that feet are difficult to assess, they are not included in the DAS28, and lack of freely available foot screening tools specific for RA. Methods. The Swindon Foot and Ankle Questionnaire (SFAQ) is a simply worded 10-point foot and ankle screening questionnaire with diagrams of feet and ankles for use in general rheumatology outpatients. All RA patients on our electronic database were invited to complete the questionnaire and attend clinic for assessment. Patients assessed clinically were scored out of 10 using the parameters from the questionnaire. The SFAQ was compared to the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index (MFPDI), DAS28, HAQ, HAD, and OSRA scores. Results. 597 questionnaires were sent, 301 (50%) returned, and 137 seen in clinic. There was good correlation between the postal SFAQ score, clinic score (r = 0.63), and the MFPDI (r = 0.65). Neither of the foot scores correlated with other RA disease outcome measures. 75% patients completed the picture. 73% corresponded to clinical findings. 45% of patients required an intervention following clinical review and trended towards higher scores. Conclusions. The SFAQ was quick to complete and correlated with the MFPDI. Lack of association with standard RA outcome measures suggests that relying on these scores alone may miss foot pathology. The diagrams were a useful complement. This simple screening tool could aid identification of RA foot and ankle problems. PMID:23056959

  1. Operationalising the capability approach as an outcome measure in public health: The development of the OCAP-18.

    PubMed

    Lorgelly, Paula K; Lorimer, Karen; Fenwick, Elisabeth A L; Briggs, Andrew H; Anand, Paul

    2015-10-01

    There is growing interest in operationalising the capability approach to measure quality of life. This paper reports the results of a research project undertaken in 2007 that sought to reduce and refine a longer survey in order to provide a summary measure of wellbeing and capability in the realm of public health. The reduction and refinement of the questionnaire took place across a number of stages, using both qualitative (five focus group discussions and 17 in-depth interviews) and quantitative (secondary data analysis, N = 1048 and primary data collection using postal surveys and interviews, N = 45) approaches. The questionnaire was reduced from its original 60+ questions to 24 questions (including demographic questions). Each of Nussbaum's ten Central Human Capabilities are measured using one (or more) of the 18 specific capability items which are included in the questionnaire (referred to as the OCAP-18). Analysis of the questionnaire responses (N = 198) found that respondents differed with respect to the levels of capabilities they reported, and that these capabilities appear to be sensitive to one's gender, age, income and deprivation decile. An index of capability, estimated by assuming equal weight for each capability question, found that the average level of capability amongst respondents was 12.44 (range 3-17.75). This index was found to be highly correlated with a measure of health (EQ-5D) and wellbeing (global QoL), although some differences were apparent. This project operationalised the capability approach to produce an instrument to measure the effectiveness (and cost effectiveness) of public health interventions; the resulting OCAP-18 appears to be responsive and measure something supplementary to health and wellbeing, thus offers a promising addition to the current suite of outcome measures that are available. PMID:26291444

  2. The presence of an HLA-identical sibling donor has no impact on outcome of patients with high-risk MDS or secondary AML (sAML) treated with intensive chemotherapy followed by transplantation: results of a prospective study of the EORTC, EBMT, SAKK and GIMEMA Leukemia Groups (EORTC study 06921).

    PubMed

    Oosterveld, M; Suciu, S; Verhoef, G; Labar, B; Belhabri, A; Aul, C; Selleslag, D; Ferrant, A; Wijermans, P; Mandelli, F; Amadori, S; Jehn, U; Muus, P; Zittoun, R; Hess, U; Anak, O; Beeldens, F; Willemze, R; de Witte, T

    2003-05-01

    This report used the framework of a large European study to investigate the outcome of patients with and without an HLA-identical sibling donor on an intention-to-treat basis. After a common remission-induction and consolidation course, patients with an HLA-identical sibling donor were scheduled for allogeneic transplantation and patients lacking a donor for autologous transplantation. In all, 159 patients alive at 8 weeks from the start of treatment were included in the present analysis. In total, 52 patients had a donor, 65 patients did not have a donor and in 42 patients the availability of a donor was not assessed. Out of 52 patients, 36 (69%) with a donor underwent allogeneic transplantation (28 in CR1). Out of 65 patients, 33 (49%) received an autograft (27 in CR1). The actuarial survival rates at 4 years were 33.3% (s.e. = 6.7%) for patients with a donor and 39.0% (s.e. = 6.5%) for patients without a donor (P = 0.18). Event-free survival rates were 23.1% (s.e. = 6.2%) and 21.5% (s.e. = 5.3%), respectively (P = 0.66). Correction for alternative donor transplants did not substantially alter the survival of the group without a donor. Also, the survival in the various cytogenetic risk groups was not significantly different when comparing the donor vs the no-donor group. This analysis shows that patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome and secondary acute myeloid leukemia may benefit from both allogeneic and autologous transplantation. We were unable to demonstrate a survival advantage for patients with a donor compared to patients without a donor. PMID:12750698

  3. [Workplace health promotion program quality evaluation questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Korzeniowska, Elzbieta; Puchalski, Krzysztof

    2002-01-01

    There are substantial reasons for undertaking the evaluation of workplace health promotion (WHP) programs. The most important ones are: (a) the need to guarantee a competent organization of programs; (b) the feasibility to evaluate WHP programs, which take the form of medical services offered to employers on the health service market; (c) the need to disseminate the idea and support the workplace health promotion lobby; and (d) the use of evaluation as a tool for analyzing WHP promulgation process. The implementation of the scientifically-based evaluation of health promotion programs carried out in regularly functioning enterprises is very limited, hence the increasing interest in procedures of quality assessment already known and accepted by enterprises. This approach is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). In the European Union countries, a questionnaire on the workplace health promotion program evaluation is promulgated within the European Network for Workplace Health Promotion. The National Center for Workplace Health Promotion that coordinates the activities of the National Network for Workplace Health Promotion Centers in Poland has developed a Polish version of the questionnaire adopted to local conditions. The author presents the criteria and the most essential solutions that provided the ground for designing the questionnaire to be used by the organizers of WHP programs in enterprises for self-assessment of their own activities. It reflects the views on the strategy of the WHP evaluation presented by the National Center, and contains a simplified procedure that does not involve control groups so difficult to gather under the concept of "health promoting enterprise". The idea of control groups is usually misunderstood and disapproved by the management of enterprises involved in the implementation of WHP programs. PMID:12577802

  4. Employability and Employment Outcomes of No-Fee Preservice Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Yule; Li, Ling; Ding, Shujing; Li, Zhichao

    2013-01-01

    This study used interviews and questionnaires to survey 770 no-fee preservice students. Its findings were as follows: (1) Their employability encompasses five dimensions: teaching skills, ability to learn specialized knowledge, ability to grasp elementary and secondary teaching materials and methods, communication skills, and ability to apply for…

  5. Sexual behavioral abstine HIV/AIDS questionnaire: Validation study of an Iranian questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Najarkolaei, Fatemeh Rahmati; Niknami, Shamsaddin; Shokravi, Farkhondeh Amin; Tavafian, Sedigheh Sadat; Fesharaki, Mohammad Gholami; Jafari, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to assess the validity and reliability of the designed sexual, behavioral abstinence, and avoidance of high-risk situation questionnaire (SBAHAQ), with an aim to construct an appropriate development tool in the Iranian population. Materials and Methods: A descriptive–analytic study was conducted among female undergraduate students of Tehran University, who were selected through cluster random sampling. After reviewing the questionnaires and investigating face and content validity, internal consistency of the questionnaire was assessed by Cronbach's alpha. Explanatory and confirmatory factor analysis was conducted using SPSS and AMOS 16 Software, respectively. Results: The sample consisted of 348 female university students with a mean age of 20.69 ± 1.63 years. The content validity ratio (CVR) coefficient was 0.85 and the reliability of each section of the questionnaire was as follows: Perceived benefit (PB; 0.87), behavioral intention (BI; 0.77), and self-efficacy (SE; 0.85) (Cronbach's alpha totally was 0.83). Explanatory factor analysis showed three factors, including SE, PB, and BI, with the total variance of 61% and Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin (KMO) index of 88%. These factors were also confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis [adjusted goodness of fitness index (AGFI) = 0.939, root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.039]. Conclusion: This study showed the designed questionnaire provided adequate construct validity and reliability, and could be adequately used to measure sexual abstinence and avoidance of high-risk situations among female students. PMID:24741650

  6. DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-10-09

    We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

  7. Digging Deeper: Enriching Transition to Adult Life Outcome Research through Life-Histories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Post-secondary outcomes for students with and without disabilities have been documented in transition research for over three decades. However, despite efforts to improve outcomes by the field of transition, former students with disabilities outcomes have remain lower than their non-disabled peers. Historically, the data, which has been collected…

  8. The Relationship between Parent Expectations and Postschool Outcomes of Adolescents with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doren, Bonnie; Gau, Jeff M.; Lindstrom, Lauren E.

    2012-01-01

    A secondary analysis was conducted of the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 to examine (a) main effects of parents' school and postschool outcome expectations on the actual outcomes achieved, (b) demographic moderators, and (c) adolescent autonomy as a mediator of parent expectations and outcomes. Parent expectations were found to…

  9. Systematic review: questionnaires for assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bolier, E A; Kessing, B F; Smout, A J; Bredenoord, A J

    2015-01-01

    Numerous questionnaires with a wide variety of characteristics have been developed for the assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Four well-defined dimensions are noticeable in these GERD questionnaires, which are symptoms, response to treatment, diagnosis, and burden on the quality of life of GERD patients. The aim of this review is to develop a complete overview of all available questionnaires, categorized per dimension of the assessment of GERD. A systematic search of the literature up to January 2013 using the Pubmed database and the Embase database, and search of references and conference abstract books were conducted. A total number of 65 questionnaires were extracted and evaluated. Thirty-nine questionnaires were found applicable for the assessment of GERD symptoms, three of which are generic gastrointestinal questionnaires. For the assessment of response to treatment, 14 questionnaires were considered applicable. Seven questionnaires with diagnostic purposes were found. In the assessment of quality of life in GERD patients, 18 questionnaires were found and evaluated. Twenty questionnaires were found to be used for more than one assessment dimension, and eight questionnaires were found for GERD assessment in infants and/or children. A wide variety of GERD questionnaires is available, of which the majority is used for assessment of GERD symptoms. Questionnaires differ in aspects such as design, validation and translations. Also, numerous multidimensional questionnaires are available, of which the Reflux Disease Questionnaire is widely applicable. We provided an overview of GERD questionnaires to aid investigators and clinicians in their search for the most appropriate questionnaire for their specific purposes. PMID:24344627

  10. Development of the Device-Oriented Subjective Outcome (DOSO) Scale

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Robyn M.; Alexander, Genevieve C.; Xu, Jingjing

    2015-01-01

    Background The empirical basis for this work is derived from previous research completed in our laboratory and published in 2005 and 2007. The previous work suggested that self-report hearing aid outcomes can be viewed as device-oriented or wearer-oriented. Further, compared to wearer-oriented outcomes, device-oriented outcomes were more independent of personality variables. Purpose To develop a device-oriented questionnaire to measure self-report hearing aid outcomes. Research Design A descriptive study in which 140 potential questionnaire items were evaluated and a questionnaire was devised. Study Sample A total of 306 adult hearing aid wearers participated. One hundred and eighty-nine were clinical patients and 117 were subjects in hearing aid field trials. Data Collection and Analysis Some items and some subjects were removed due to insufficient responses. The final data set included 295 subjects and 66 items. Response data were subjected to exploratory principal component analysis with orthogonal rotation. Six components, explaining 64% of the variance, were retained. Item statistics were examined. Results Six subscales were identified. Long and short forms of the questionnaire were developed. There are two equivalent versions of the short form. Conclusions The DOSO questionnaire is suitable for quantifying subjective hearing aid outcomes in both research and clinical settings. The DOSO is especially suited for comparing outcomes with different hearing aids. Future research is needed to cross-validate the results, determine retest consistency, and to explore the extent to which data from the DOSO is independent of personality. PMID:25380119

  11. Psychometric validation of the Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX).

    PubMed

    Shaw, Simone; Oei, Tian P S; Sawang, Sukanlaya

    2015-03-01

    This study reported on the validation of the psychometric properties, the factorability, validity, and sensitivity of the Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX) in 3 clinical and nonclinical samples. A mixed sample of 997 participants--community (n = 663), psychiatric (depressed [n = 92] and anxious [n = 122]), and neurologically impaired (n = 120)--completed self-report questionnaires assessing executive dysfunction, depression, anxiety, stress, general self-efficacy, and satisfaction with life. Before analyses the data were randomly split into 2 subsets (A and B). Exploratory factor analysis performed on Subset A produced a 3-factor model (Factor 1: Inhibition, Factor 2: Volition, and Factor 3: Social Regulation) in which 15 of the original 20 items provided a revised factor structure that was superior to all other structures. A series of confirmatory factor analyses performed on Subset B confirmed that this revised factor structure was valid and reliable. The revised structure, labeled the DEX-R, was found to be a reliable and valid tool for assessing behavioral symptoms of dysexecutive functioning in mixed community, psychiatric, and neurological samples. PMID:25602692

  12. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--DESCRIPTIVE QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Descriptive Questionnaire data set contains demographic information about each of the households and indicates the primary respondent within each residence. The information is from 380 descriptive questionnaires for 80 households across 6 cycles. The data set contains only ...

  13. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--DESCRIPTIVE QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Descriptive Questionnaire data set provides demographic information about each of the households and indicates the primary respondent within each residence. The information is from 1225 Descriptive Questionnaires for 1225 households. The database contains only a portion of ...

  14. Usual Dietary Intakes: NHANES Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ)

    Cancer.gov

    NCI developed a new instrument called the NHANES Food Frequency Questionnaire (formerly called Food Propensity Questionnaire) and supported its application in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

  15. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--DESCRIPTIVE QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes responses for 459 descriptive questionnaires. The Descriptive Questionnaire was used to enumerate individuals within a household for sampling purposes (basis for selection of sample individual), to identify general characteristics of the living quarters and...

  16. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--TECHNICIAN WALKTHROUGH QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Technician Walk-through Questionnaire data set updates information about each household from the Descriptive Questionnaire and includes relevant information regarding dwelling arrangements, as well as interior and exterior residential characteristics. The information is from...

  17. Development of a Preference-Based Index from the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-25

    PubMed Central

    Rentz, Anne M.; Kowalski, Jonathan W.; Walt, John G.; Hays, Ron D.; Brazier, John E.; Yu, Ren; Lee, Paul; Bressler, Neil; Revicki, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Understanding how individuals value health states is central to patient-centered care and to health policy decision making. Generic preference-based measures of health may not effectively capture the impact of ocular diseases. Recently, 6 items from the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-25 were used to develop the Visual Function Questionnaire-Utility Index health state classification, which defines visual function health states. Objective To describe elicitation of preferences for health states generated from the Visual Function Questionnaire-Utility Index health state classification and development of an algorithm to estimate health preference scores for any health state. Design Non-intervention, cross-sectional study. Setting General community in four countries (Australia, Canada, United Kingdom, and United States) Participants 607 adult participants recruited from local newspaper advertisements. In the United Kingdom, an existing database of participants from previous studies was used for recruitment. Interventions Eight out of 15,625 possible health states from the Visual Function Questionnaire-Utility Index were valued using time trade-off technique. Main Outcome Measures A theta severity score was calculated for Visual Function Questionnaire-Utility Index–defined health states using item response theory analysis. Regression models were then used to develop an algorithm to assign health state preference values for all potential health states defined by the Visual Function Questionnaire-Utility Index. Results Health state preference values for the 8 states ranged from 0.343 (standard deviation, 0.395) to 0.956 (0.124). As expected, preference values declined with worsening visual function. Results indicate that the Visual Function Questionnaire-Utility Index describes states that participants view as spanning most of continuum from full health to dead. Conclusions and Relevance Visual Function Questionnaire-Utility Index health state classification produces health preference scores that can be estimated in vision-related studies that include National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-25. These preference scores may be of value for estimating utilities in economic and health policy analyses. PMID:24435696

  18. Assessment of dietary fish consumption in pregnancy: comparing 1, 4, and 36 item questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Oken, Emily; Guthrie, Lauren B.; Bloomingdale, Arienne; Gillman, Matthew W.; Olsen, Sjurdur F.; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra J.; Platek, Deborah N.; Bellinger, David C.; Wright, Robert O.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fish consumption influences a number of health outcomes. Few studies have directly compared dietary assessment methods to determine the best approach to estimating intake of fish and its component nutrients, including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and toxicants, including methylmercury. Our objective was to compare 3 methods of assessing fish intake. Design We assessed 30-day fish intake using 3 approaches: a single question on total fish consumption, a brief comprehensive food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) that included 4 questions about fish, and a focused FFQ with 36 questions about different finfish and shellfish. Setting Obstetrics practices in Boston, MA Subjects 59 pregnant women who consumed <=2 monthly fish servings. Results Estimated intakes of fish, DHA, and mercury were lowest with the 1-question screener, and highest with the 36-item fish questionnaire. Estimated intake of DHA with the 36-item questionnaire was 4.4 fold higher (97 vs. 22 mg/day), and intake of mercury was 3.8-fold higher (1.6 vs. 0.42 mcg/day), compared with the 1-question screener. Plasma DHA concentration was correlated with fish intake assessed with the 1-question screener (Spearman r=0.27, p=0.04), but not with the 4-item FFQ (r=0.08, p=0.54) or 36-item fish questionnaire (r=0.01, p=0.93). In contrast, blood and hair mercury concentrations were similarly correlated with fish and mercury intake regardless of the assessment method (r= 0.35 to 0.52). Conclusions A longer questionnaire provides no advantage over shorter questionnaires in ranking intake of fish, DHA, and mercury compared with biomarkers, but estimates of absolute intakes can vary by as much as 4-fold across methods. PMID:23883550

  19. Construction and updating of a public events questionnaire for repeated measures longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Noone, Martha; Semkovska, Maria; Carton, Mary; Dunne, Ross; Horgan, John-Paul; O'Kane, Breige; McLoughlin, Declan M

    2014-01-01

    Impairments of retrospective memory and cases of retrograde amnesia are often seen in clinical settings. A measure of the proportion of memories retained over a specified time can be useful in clinical situations and public events questionnaires may be valuable in this respect. However, consistency of retention of public events memory has rarely been studied in the same participants. In addition, when used in a research context, public events questionnaires require updating to ensure questions are of equivalent age with respect to when the test is taken. This paper describes an approach to constructing and updating a Public Events Questionnaire (PEQ) for use with a sample that is recruited and followed-up over a long time-period. Internal consistency, parallel-form reliability, test-retest reliability, and secondary validity analyses were examined for three versions of the PEQ that were updated every 6 months. Versions 2 and 3 of the questionnaire were reliable across and within versions and for recall and recognition. Change over time was comparable across each version of the PEQ. These results show that PEQs can be regularly updated in a standardized fashion to allow use throughout studies with long recruitment periods. PMID:24678306

  20. Looking for Students' Personal Characteristics Predicting Study Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Bragt, Cyrille A. C.; Bakx, Anouke W. E. A.; Bergen, Theo C. M.; Croon, Marcel A.

    2011-01-01

    The central goal of this study is to clarify to what degree former education and students' personal characteristics (the "Big Five personality characteristics", personal orientations on learning and students' study approach) may predict study outcome (required credits and study continuance). Analysis of the data gathered through questionnaires of…

  1. Parental Involvement in Schooling, Classroom Environment and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamski, Aurora; Fraser, Barry J.; Peiro, Maria M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated relationships between students' perceptions of parental involvement in schooling, their Spanish classroom environment and student outcomes (attitudes and achievement). Modified Spanish versions of the What Is Happening In this Class?, Test of Spanish-Related Attitudes-L[subscript 1], a parental involvement questionnaire and a…

  2. Educational Outcomes: Their Impact on Graduate Pediatric Dentistry Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adair, Steven M.

    1990-01-01

    Six outcomes of professional competence that can be applied to postdoctoral pediatric dentistry training are: conceptual, contextual, technical, interpersonal communications, integrative, and adaptive competence. Questionnaire-type surveys are probably the best means of assessing the contextual, interpersonal, and adaptive competencies of…

  3. Stress Carry-Over and College Student Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Daphne E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Using a stress carry-over perspective, this study examines the relationship between stress stemming from school and family domains and physical and mental health outcomes. Methods: The study sample included 268 undergraduate men and women from a Midwestern university. Participants completed an anonymous online questionnaire. OLS…

  4. Establishing the Validity and Reliability of Course Evaluation Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kember, David; Leung, Doris Y. P.

    2008-01-01

    This article uses the case of designing a new course questionnaire to discuss the issues of validity, reliability and diagnostic power in good questionnaire design. Validity is often not well addressed in course questionnaire design as there are no straightforward tests that can be applied to an individual instrument. The authors propose the…

  5. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Follow-up questionnaire data set contains information concerning the activities within the household during the sampling week. The information is from 402 follow-up questionnaires for 80 households across 6 cycles. The Follow-up Questionnaire specifically addressed the time ...

  6. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--BASELINE QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Baseline Questionnaire data set provides information about each household and its primary respondent. The information is from 380 baseline questionnaires for 80 households across 6 cycles. The Baseline Questionnaire was administered to the primary respondent during a face-t...

  7. Education Secondary the stars ...

    E-print Network

    Little, Tony

    knowledge and developed experience of these processes to maximise the quality of education experienced of Stirling is rated number one in Scotland for Education by a number of University Guides and for the qualityBA(Hons) Education Secondary Reach for the stars ... #12;Why study Secondary Education

  8. Facial Attractiveness Assessment using Illustrated Questionnairers

    PubMed Central

    MESAROS, ANCA; CORNEA, DANIELA; CIOARA, LIVIU; DUDEA, DIANA; MESAROS, MICHAELA; BADEA, MINDRA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. An attractive facial appearance is considered nowadays to be a decisive factor in establishing successful interactions between humans. In relation to this topic, scientific literature states that some of the facial features have more impact then others, and important authors revealed that certain proportions between different anthropometrical landmarks are mandatory for an attractive facial appearance. Aim. Our study aims to assess if certain facial features count differently in people’s opinion while assessing facial attractiveness in correlation with factors such as age, gender, specific training and culture. Material and methods. A 5-item multiple choice illustrated questionnaire was presented to 236 dental students. The Photoshop CS3 software was used in order to obtain the sets of images for the illustrated questions. The original image was handpicked from the internet by a panel of young dentists from a series of 15 pictures of people considered to have attractive faces. For each of the questions, the images presented were simulating deviations from the ideally symmetric and proportionate face. The sets of images consisted in multiple variations of deviations mixed with the original photo. Junior and sophomore year students from our dental medical school, having different nationalities were required to participate in our questionnaire. Simple descriptive statistics were used to interpret the data. Results. Assessing the results obtained from the questionnaire it was observed that a majority of students considered as unattractive the overdevelopment of the lower third, while the initial image with perfect symmetry and proportion was considered as the most attractive by only 38.9% of the subjects. Likewise, regarding the symmetry 36.86% considered unattractive the canting of the inter-commissural line. The interviewed subjects considered that for a face to be attractive it needs to have harmonious proportions between the different facial elements. Conclusions. Considering an evaluation of facial attractiveness it is important to keep in mind that such assessment is subjective and influenced by multiple factors, among which the most important are cultural background and specific training. PMID:26528052

  9. Secondary fuel delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Parker, David M. (Oviedo, FL); Cai, Weidong (Oviedo, FL); Garan, Daniel W. (Orlando, FL); Harris, Arthur J. (Orlando, FL)

    2010-02-23

    A secondary fuel delivery system for delivering a secondary stream of fuel and/or diluent to a secondary combustion zone located in the transition piece of a combustion engine, downstream of the engine primary combustion region is disclosed. The system includes a manifold formed integral to, and surrounding a portion of, the transition piece, a manifold inlet port, and a collection of injection nozzles. A flowsleeve augments fuel/diluent flow velocity and improves the system cooling effectiveness. Passive cooling elements, including effusion cooling holes located within the transition boundary and thermal-stress-dissipating gaps that resist thermal stress accumulation, provide supplemental heat dissipation in key areas. The system delivers a secondary fuel/diluent mixture to a secondary combustion zone located along the length of the transition piece, while reducing the impact of elevated vibration levels found within the transition piece and avoiding the heat dissipation difficulties often associated with traditional vibration reduction methods.

  10. The Relationship between Transformational Leadership and Job Satisfaction: The Case of Government Secondary School Teachers in Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesfaw, Tadele Akalu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between transformational leadership of government secondary school principals and teachers' job satisfaction. A random sample of 320 teachers responded to a three-part instrument (the transformational leadership questionnaire, the teachers' job satisfaction questionnaire and a…

  11. The Use of Social Networking among Senior Secondary School Students in Abuja Municipal Area of Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, F. A. Farah; Aliyu, Umar Yanda

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the use of social networking among senior secondary school students in Abuja Municipal Area Council of FCT. The study employed quantitative method for data collection involving questionnaire administration. Fifteen questions with Likert model and ten yes/no responses in a questionnaire were personally administered to 400…

  12. Diet History Questionnaire II & Canadian Diet History Questionnaire II: Web-based DHQ

    Cancer.gov

    The Web-based versions of DHQ II and C-DHQ II are identical in content to the paper forms. By automating the DHQ II and providing versions on the Web for public use, researchers have another tool to collect and analyze food frequency questionnaire data.

  13. Validation of a Parent Report Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Trabulsi, Jillian; Yao, Manjiang; Bevans, Katherine B.; DeRusso, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the reliability and validity of the Infant Gastrointestinal Symptom Questionnaire (IGSQ), a tool to assess feeding tolerance in infants. Methods. Qualitative methods were used to develop IGSQ content across 5 symptom clusters, yielding a 13-item index of parent-reported infant digestion and elimination behaviors over the prior 7 days. Classical psychometric methods evaluated factor structure, interrater and retest reliability, and validity in 4 prospective studies of 836 infants. Results. Interrater and retest reliability were acceptable to good. IGSQ Index score was highly correlated (r = 0.89) with daily parent reports. IGSQ scores were significantly different between infants whose parents planned to switch formulas because of perceived feeding problems and those without parental concerns. Conclusions. The IGSQ is a practical, reliable, and valid method for assessment of infant gastrointestinal-related behaviors. Its use in clinical studies can provide empirical evidence to advance parent education regarding both normal and clinically meaningful feeding-related behaviors. PMID:25758425

  14. A questionnaire to assess social stigma.

    PubMed

    Tavormina, Maurilio Giuseppe Maria; Tavormina, Romina; Nemoianni, Eugenio; Tavormina, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Psychiatric patients often suffer for two reasons: due to the illness and due to the social stigma of mental illness, that increases the uneasiness and psychic pain of the person suffering from serious psychiatric disorder. This unwell person is often the object of stigma because he is "different" from others, and he also can be margenalised by society. In this study we intend to assess whether these margenalising attitudes might be also present among mental health professionals who have presented psychic problems in a previous period of their life, against sick persons suffering of the same illness even if he is a mental health professional. Two questionnaires have been developed, one for professionals and another for the patients, with the aim of identifying these marginalising attitudes. We intend that this study shall be a multicenter, observational and international study, promoted by the Mental Health Dept. of Naples (ASL Naples 3 South, Italy). PMID:26417789

  15. Assessing the Psychological Changes of Gifted Students Attending a Residential High School with an Outcome Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Marlon R.; Cross, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the psychological changes that 272 students experienced while attending a residential school for gifted adolescents in the Midwest. This article shares the quantitative portion of a mixed-methods study. Outcome measurement data from the Youth Outcome Questionnaire Self-Report 2.0 (YOQ-SR) tracked students' level of…

  16. Assessing Academic Outcomes at the United States Coast Guard Academy: The Role of Student Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezendes, George J.; Gable, Robert K.

    This paper discusses the efforts of the Department of Mathematics at the United States Coast Guard Academy (USCGA) to determine the degree to which their courses support the published academic outcomes of the institution, and presents the results of a survey of student attitudes toward the academic outcomes. A survey questionnaire was developed…

  17. [Validation of the French version of "Self Appraisal of Illness Questionnaire"].

    PubMed

    Hunt, Elena; Vachon, Geneviève; Côté, Gilles

    2009-06-01

    Poor insight into mental illness is associated with treatment non-compliance, relapse and re-hospitalization. Measuring insight becomes therefore important in assessing risk of non-compliance. A few reliable insight instruments are available in English. Self Appraisal of Illness Questionnaire (SAIQ) (Marks & al., 2000) was translated in French and validation analysis was performed. The 17 items French version is called Questionnaire d'autoévaluation de l'introspection (QAI). Cronbach's alpha showed 0.78 for internal consistency (N = 124). Factor analysis generated three factors explaining 49.8 % of the variance. They were: Need for treatment (Awareness of), Worry and Presence/Outcome of mental disorder. Concurrent validity analysis of QAI and Insight Scale (IS) (Markova & al., 2003) resulted in a coefficient of 0.37. QAI demonstrated solid psychometric properties and should be further reassessed in research and clinical practice. It is well adapted for use in hospital and clinical setti PMID:19642479

  18. The Impact of Diabetes on the Outcomes of Surgical and Nonsurgical Treatment of Patients in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Mitchell K.; Hilibrand, Alan S.; Blood, Emily A.; Zhao, Wenyan; Albert, Todd J.; Vacarro, Alexander; Oleson, Christina V.; Morgan, Tamara S.; Weinstein, James N.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A secondary analysis comparing diabetic patients with nondiabetic patients enrolled in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT). Objective To compare surgical outcomes and complications between diabetic and nondiabetic spine patients. Summary of Background Data Patients with diabetes are predisposed to comorbidities that may confound the diagnosis and treatment of patients with spinal disorders. Methods Baseline characteristics and outcomes of 199 patients with diabetes were compared with those of the nondiabetic population in a total of 2405 patients enrolled in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial for the diagnoses of intervertebral disc herniation (IDH), spinal stenosis (SpS), and degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). Primary outcome measures include the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) Health Status questionnaire and the Oswestry Disability Index. Results Patients with diabetes were significantly older and had a higher body mass index than nondiabetic patients. Comorbidities, including hypertension, stroke, cardiovascular disease, and joint disease, were significantly more frequent in diabetic patients than in nondiabetic patients. Patients with diabetes and IDH did not make significant gains in pain and function with surgical intervention relative to diabetic patients who underwent nonoperative treatment. Diabetic patients with SpS and DS experienced significantly greater improvements in pain and function with surgical intervention when compared with nonoperative treatment. Among those who had surgery, nondiabetic patients with SpS achieved marginally significantly greater gains in function than their diabetic counterparts (SF-36 physical function, P = 0.062). Among patients who had surgery for DS, diabetic patients did not have as much improvement in pain or function as did the nondiabetic population (SF-36 bodily pain, P = 0.003; physical function, P = 0.002). Postoperative complications were more prevalent in patients with diabetes than in nondiabetic patients with SpS (P = 0.002). There was an increase in postoperative (P = 0.028) and intraoperative (P = 0.029) blood replacement in DS patients with diabetes. Conclusion Diabetic patients with SpS and DS benefited from surgery, though older SpS patients with diabetes have more postoperative complications. IDH patients with diabetes did not benefit from surgical intervention. PMID:21270715

  19. [Patient-reported outcomes: definition and measurement].

    PubMed

    Botturi, Davide; Rodella, Stefania

    2014-06-01

    The concept of "patient-reported outcomes" have been proposed by the Food and Drug Administration in the year 2000, in order to describe one of the different and potential sources of information on the drug's safety and effectiveness. It represents an "umbrella" term, which covers a multiplicity of meanings and primarily identifies a conceptual approach and a methodology specifically oriented to the patients' point of view on outcomes, instead of the traditional clinical and professional perspective. The patient-reported outcomes measures are frequently self-completed questionnaires. The measures can be classified in general and specific. The first one, general, relates to the assessment of the quality of life or the health status, in the general population or in subgroups with particular health problems (eg. SF-36 Health Survey, EQ-5D). The second one, specific, mainly relates to the assessment of particular types of symptoms (eg. pain, anxiety, fear, depression) and functions (eg. daily living activities), in population's subgroups with definite health problems, undergoing or not to a healthcare procedure (eg. Adult Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, Kidney Disease Quality of Life Instrument, Oxford Hip Score, Oxford Knee Score). For the selection of an instrument a series of criteria needs to be taken into account, among which the psychometric properties, the expert judgement, the interpretability, the acceptability, and the feasibility of the entire process. PMID:25002284

  20. Adult Outcomes, Reported Self-Aptitude, and Perceived Training: A Follow-Up Study of Individuals with Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Holly Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors that relate to successful adult outcomes for 28 individuals with visual impairment ages 23-30. The primary dependent variable was current employment. Independent living and completion of postsecondary educational program were secondary, related outcome measures. A secondary goal of this research was…

  1. Canine Secondary Glaucomas.

    PubMed

    Pumphrey, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    Secondary glaucomas are common in dogs, and occur due to obstruction of aqueous humor flow at the pupil, iridocorneal angle, or trabecular meshwork by numerous mechanisms. Secondary glaucoma is suspected based on examination findings, or presence of elevated IOP in an animal with a signalment inconsistent with primary glaucoma. Animals with secondary glaucoma require more diagnostic testing than animals with primary glaucoma. Management is challenging, and treatments used for primary glaucoma may be ineffective or even detrimental. Prognosis for vision and/or globe retention may be better than for primary glaucoma, particularly if underlying causes can be found and addressed promptly. PMID:26319444

  2. Association between Physical Pain and Alcohol Treatment Outcomes: The Mediating Role of Negative Affect

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewitz, Katie; McCallion, Elizabeth; Vowles, Kevin E.; Kirouac, Megan; Frohe, Tessa; Maisto, Stephen A.; Hodgson, Ray; Heather, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Objective Physical pain and negative affect have been described as risk factors for alcohol use following alcohol treatment. The current study was a secondary analysis of two clinical trials for alcohol use disorder (AUD) to examine the associations between pain, negative affect and AUD treatment outcomes. Method Participants included 1383 individuals from the COMBINE Study (COMBINE Study Group, 2003; 31% female, 23% ethnic minorities, average age=44.4 (SD=10.2)), a multisite combination pharmacotherapy and behavioral intervention study for AUD in the United States, and 742 individuals from the United Kingdom Alcohol Treatment Trial (UKATT Research Team, 2001; 25.9% female, 4.4% ethnic minorities, average age=41.6 (SD=10.1)) a multisite behavioral intervention study for AUD in the United Kingdom. The Form-90 was used to collect alcohol use data, the Short Form Health Survey and Quality of Life measures were used to assess pain, and negative affect was assessed using the Brief Symptom Inventory (COMBINE) and the General Health Questionnaire (UKATT). Results Pain scores were significantly associated with drinking outcomes in both datasets. Greater pain scores were associated with greater negative affect and increases in pain were associated with increases in negative affect. Negative affect significantly mediated the association between pain and drinking outcomes and this effect was moderated by social behavior network therapy (SBNT) in the UKATT study, with SBNT attenuating the association between pain and drinking. Conclusion Findings suggest pain and negative affect are associated among individuals in AUD treatment and that negative affect mediated pain may be a risk factor for alcohol relapse. PMID:26098375

  3. Functional outcome after centralization for radius dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Charles A; Klepps, Steven J; Dailey, Loray A; Manske, Paul R

    2002-01-01

    Centralization for radius dysplasia purportedly offers a more normal appearance, provides length to a shortened forearm, and improves upper-extremity function. Limited objective outcome data, however, exist to substantiate its use. To better define functional status after centralization, the Jebsen-Taylor hand test and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire (DASH) were administered to 21 patients (25 wrists) at an average of 20 years after surgery. Jebsen-Taylor scores, a measure of hand function, were significantly altered with an average total score of 48 seconds compared with an average normal score of 30 seconds (62% increase). The DASH questionnaire, a measure of upper-extremity function, showed only a mild disability of 18%. These long-term follow-up data show that hand function remains markedly abnormal while upper-extremity disability is mild. Improved wrist alignment and increased ulna length did not correlate with improved upper-extremity function. PMID:11810625

  4. The Headache Under-Response to Treatment (HURT) Questionnaire: assessment of utility in headache specialist care.

    PubMed

    Westergaard, Maria L S; Steiner, Timothy J; MacGregor, E Anne; Antonaci, Fabio; Tassorelli, Cristina; Buse, Dawn C; Lipton, Richard B; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2013-03-01

    The HURT Questionnaire consists of eight questions which the patient answers as a measure of effectiveness of intervention against headache. This first assessment of clinical utility was conducted in headache specialist centres in three countries in order to demonstrate that HURT was responsive to change induced by effective management. We administered HURT on three occasions to 159 consecutive patients seeking non-urgent care from centres in Denmark and the United Kingdom: the first before the initial visit to the centres; the second at the initial visit; and the third when the specialist judged that the best possible outcome had been achieved in each patient. Questionnaires were also answered by 42 patients at initial and final visits to a centre in Italy. Internal consistency reliability was very good (? = 0.85) while test-retest reliability was fair to low (? = 0.38-0.62 and r (s)?= 0.49-0.76), possibly because headache was unstable prior to start of management. There were significant changes in responses post-intervention compared with baseline (p < 0.01), indicating a favourable outcome overall in up to 77% of patients, and responsiveness to change, but there was no improvement in patients' concerns about side effects of medication (p = 0.18). We conclude that the questionnaire has utility across headache disorders. It can help patients describe headache frequency and headache-attributed disability, medication use/efficacy/tolerability, self-efficacy and knowledge about headache. It may guide physicians in assessment of disability of individual patients, how to proceed with management towards the best possible outcome, and in evaluating the quality of management. PMID:23236098

  5. The process of reconciliation: evaluation of guidelines for translating quality-of-life questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Koller, Michael; Kantzer, Valeska; Mear, Isabelle; Zarzar, Katie; Martin, Mona; Greimel, Eva; Bottomley, Andrew; Arnott, Maria; Kuli?, Dagmara

    2012-04-01

    Reconciliation refers to the process through which two or more independent forward translations are merged into one single translation. This critical step in the translation process is difficult to formalize. The purpose of this review is to analyze how reconciliation is specified in leading guidelines for the translation of quality-of-life questionnaires and other patient-reported outcome forms with regard to the number and qualifications of individuals involved, the processes followed, as well as the criteria applied. In general, relatively little attention has been paid to characterizing the process in detail. Based on these findings, we specify criteria to be followed. PMID:22458620

  6. Interviewer versus self-administered health-related quality of life questionnaires - Does it matter?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patient-reported outcomes are measured in many epidemiologic studies using self- or interviewer-administered questionnaires. While in some studies differences between these administration formats were observed, other studies did not show statistically significant differences important to patients. Since the evidence about the effect of administration format is inconsistent and mainly available from cross-sectional studies our aim was to assess the effects of different administration formats on repeated measurements of patient-reported outcomes in participants with AIDS enrolled in the Longitudinal Study of Ocular Complications of AIDS. Methods We included participants enrolled in the Longitudinal Study of Ocular Complications in AIDS (LSOCA) who completed the Medical Outcome Study [MOS] -HIV questionnaire, the EuroQol, the Feeling Thermometer and the Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ) 25 every six months thereafter using self- or interviewer-administration. A large print questionnaire was available for participants with visual impairment. Considering all measurements over time and adjusting for patient and study site characteristics we used linear models to compare HRQL scores (all scores from 0-100) between administration formats. We defined adjusted differences of ?0.2 standard deviations [SD]) to be quantitatively meaningful. Results We included 2,261 participants (80.6% males) with a median of 43.1 years of age at enrolment who provided data on 23,420 study visits. The self-administered MOS-HIV, Feeling Thermometer and EuroQol were used in 70% of all visits and the VFQ-25 in 80%. For eight domains of the MOS-HIV differences between the interviewer- and self- administered format were < 0.1 SD. Differences in scores were highest for the social and role function domains but the adjusted differences were still < 0.2 SD. There was no quantitatively meaningful difference between administration formats for EuroQol, Feeling Thermometer and VFQ-25 domain scores. For ocular pain (VFQ-25), we found a statistically significant difference of 3.5 (95% CI 0.2, 6.8), which did, however, not exceed 0.2 SD. For all instruments scores were similar for the large and standard print formats with all adjusted differences < 0.2 SD. Conclusions Our large study provides evidence that administration formats do not have a meaningful effect on repeated measurements of patient-reported outcomes. As a consequence, longitudinal studies may not need to consider the effect of different administration formats in their analyses. PMID:21554737

  7. Neuropathy secondary to drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    Neuropathy secondary to drugs is a loss of sensation or movement in a part of the body ... weakness. Many medicines may affect the development of neuropathy, including: Heart or blood pressure drugs: Amiodarone Hydralazine ...

  8. Secondary hyperkalaemic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Evers, S.; Engelien, A.; Karsch, V.; Hund, M.

    1998-01-01

    Besides the hereditary hyperkalaemic paralysis, a secondary form exists which often mimicks Guillain-Barre syndrome. A 62year old patient is reported on who developed severe hyperkalaemic paralysis on the basis of mild renal failure and additive spironolactone intake. Neurophysiological examinations disclosed normal muscle fibre activity but delayed nerve conduction velocities indicating that the mechanism underlying secondary hyperkalaemic paralysis is different from channelopathies. Haemodialysis led to complete recovery. Review of the medical literature showed that spironolactone intake is the most common cause of secondary hyperkalaemic paralysis. Typical symptoms are flaccid tetraplegia sparing the cranial nerves with only mild or lacking sensory impairment. Symptoms promptly resolve after haemodialysis or after glucose and insulin infusion. Only three out of 18 patients reviewed died, because of cardiopulmonary complications. Thus the prognosis of secondary hyperkalaemic paralysis is good.?? PMID:9489541

  9. Hyperaldosteronism - primary and secondary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... caused by a noncancerous (benign) tumor of the adrenal gland. The condition is most common in people 30 to 50 years old. ... Primary and secondary hyperaldosteronism have common symptoms, ... Headache Muscle weakness Numbness Paralysis that comes and goes

  10. Are colors Secondary Qualities?

    E-print Network

    Byrne, Alex

    Introduction: Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century discussions of the senses are often thought to contain a profound truth: some perceptible properties are secondary qualities, dispositions to produce certain sorts of ...

  11. Paralysis: Secondary Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Secondary Conditions Autonomic Dysreflexia Bladder Management Bowel Management Deep Vein Thrombosis Depression Fitness and Exercise Nutirition Pain ... pain related to spinal cord injury or disease. Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) People with spinal cord injury ( ...

  12. Effective components of feedback from Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM) in youth mental health care: study protocol of a three-arm parallel-group randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Routine Outcome Monitoring refers to regular measurements of clients’ progress in clinical practice, aiming to evaluate and, if necessary, adapt treatment. Clients fill out questionnaires and clinicians receive feedback about the results. Studies concerning feedback in youth mental health care are rare. The effects of feedback, the importance of specific aspects of feedback, and the mechanisms underlying the effects of feedback are unknown. In the present study, several potentially effective components of feedback from Routine Outcome Monitoring in youth mental health care in the Netherlands are investigated. Methods/Design We will examine three different forms of feedback through a three-arm parallel-group randomized controlled trial. 432 children and adolescents (aged 4 to 17 years) and their parents, who have been referred to mental health care institution Pro Persona, will be randomly assigned to one of three feedback conditions (144 participants per condition). Randomization will be stratified by age of the child or adolescent and by department. All participants fill out questionnaires at the start of treatment, one and a half months after the start of treatment, every three months during treatment, and at the end of treatment. Participants in the second and third feedback conditions fill out an additional questionnaire. In condition 1, clinicians receive basic feedback regarding clients’ symptoms and quality of life. In condition 2, the feedback of condition 1 is extended with feedback regarding possible obstacles to a good outcome and with practical suggestions. In condition 3, the feedback of condition 2 is discussed with a colleague while following a standardized format for case consultation. The primary outcome measure is symptom severity and secondary outcome measures are quality of life, satisfaction with treatment, number of sessions, length of treatment, and rates of dropout. We will also examine the role of being not on track (not responding to treatment). Discussion This study contributes to the identification of effective components of feedback and a better understanding of how feedback functions in real-world clinical practice. If the different feedback components prove to be effective, this can help to support and improve the care for youth. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register NTR4234 PMID:24393491

  13. Digitised audio questionnaire for assessment of informed consent comprehension in a low-literacy African research population: development and psychometric evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Afolabi, Muhammed O; Bojang, Kalifa; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Ota, Martin O C; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B; Ravinetto, Raffaella; Larson, Heidi J; McGrath, Nuala; Chandramohan, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop and psychometrically evaluate an audio digitised tool for assessment of comprehension of informed consent among low-literacy Gambian research participants. Setting We conducted this study in the Gambia where a high illiteracy rate and absence of standardised writing formats of local languages pose major challenges for research participants to comprehend consent information. We developed a 34-item questionnaire to assess participants’ comprehension of key elements of informed consent. The questionnaire was face validated and content validated by experienced researchers. To bypass the challenge of a lack of standardised writing formats, we audiorecorded the questionnaire in three major Gambian languages: Mandinka, Wolof and Fula. The questionnaire was further developed into an audio computer-assisted interview format. Participants The digitised questionnaire was administered to 250 participants enrolled in two clinical trials in the urban and rural areas of the Gambia. One week after first administration, the questionnaire was readministered to half of the participants who were randomly selected. Participants were eligible if enrolled in the parent trials and could speak any of the three major Gambian languages. Outcome measure The primary outcome measure was reliability and validity of the questionnaire. Results Item reduction by factor analysis showed that 21 of the question items have strong factor loadings. These were retained along with five other items which were fundamental components of informed consent. The 26-item questionnaire has high internal consistency with a Cronbach's ? of 0.73–0.79 and an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.94 (95% CI 0.923 to 0.954). Hypotheses testing also showed that the questionnaire has a positive correlation with a similar questionnaire and discriminates between participants with and without education. Conclusions We have developed a reliable and valid measure of comprehension of informed consent information for the Gambian context, which might be easily adapted to similar settings. This is a major step towards engendering comprehension of informed consent information among low-literacy participants. PMID:24961716

  14. Predictors of CBT Outcome in Older Adults with GAD

    PubMed Central

    Hundt, Natalie E.; Amspoker, Amber B.; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia; Cully, Jeffrey A.; Rhoades, Howard; Kunik, Mark E.; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2014-01-01

    The current study is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial of CBT for late-life GAD (Stanley et al., 2014) which provided an opportunity to examine predictors of outcome among those who received CBT. Participants were 150 older adults who were randomized to receive 10 sessions of CBT. Completer analyses found that homework completion, number of sessions attended, lower worry severity, lower depression severity, and recruitment site predicted 6-month worry outcome on the PSWQ-A, whereas homework completion, credibility of the therapy, lower anxiety severity, and site predicted better 6-month anxiety outcome on the STAI-T. In intent-to-treat multivariate analyses, however, only initial worry and anxiety severity, site, and number of sessions completed predicted treatment outcome. These results are largely consistent with predictors of outcome in younger adults and suggest that lower initial symptom severity and variables consistent with greater engagement in treatment predict outcome. PMID:25445074

  15. Impact of Patient Sex on Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Teitsma, Xavier M.; van der Hoeven, Henk; Tamminga, Rob; de Bie, Rob A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Combined Quality Care Anterior Cruciate Ligament registry provides data for clinical research regarding primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery. Purpose: To explore the data with regard to the clinical outcomes between sexes after ACL reconstruction in a Dutch population. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data involving patients diagnosed with an ACL tear and eligible for surgery were recorded. Isokinetic muscle strength, functional muscle performance, and anterior-posterior translation of the knee joint were documented preoperatively and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postoperatively. Patients completed the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Lysholm, and Tegner rating scales during each examination using a web-based questionnaire. Results: Approximately 90% of ACL injuries occurred during sport activities. The mean (SD) age at surgery was 28 (11) years for both men and women, and the majority of patients were treated with hamstring tendon autografts (94%). Four percent received bone–patellar tendon–bone autografts, and 2% of the patients received other grafts. Preoperatively, the KOOS, Lysholm, and Tegner scores were significantly higher in males. Twelve months postoperatively, both sexes showed comparable isokinetic strength (P = .336), knee laxity (P = .680), and hop test for distance (P = .122) when comparing the injured with the uninjured side. Self-reported knee function was comparable between sexes as assessed by the KOOS (P = .202), Lysholm (P = .872), and Tegner (P = .767) questionnaires during the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: One year after ACL surgery, all patients had improved greatly, showing only minor differences between sexes. The male group showed slightly better results when evaluating self-reported knee questionnaires. Comparable outcomes and knee function between sexes can therefore be presumed with patients who are treated with hamstring tendon autografts in a Dutch population. Clinical Relevance: These results can be used during the clinical evaluation of patients who are eligible for ACL reconstruction. PMID:26535365

  16. Pregnancy in Multiple Sclerosis: A Questionnaire Study

    PubMed Central

    Borisow, Nadja; Paul, Friedemann; Ohlraun, Stephanie; Pach, Daniel; Fischer, Felix; Dörr, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) preferentially affects females at childbearing age. For this reason patients and treating physicians were frequently confronted with questions concerning family planning, pregnancy and birth. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the expertise about pregnancy related topics in multiple sclerosis of neurologists in private practice. Methods We developed a survey with 16 multiple choice questions about pregnancy related topics and sent it to neurologists in private practice in Berlin, Germany. Results 56 completed questionnaires were sent back. 54% of all questions were answered correctly, 21% of the questions were answered with “I don’t know”. Correct answers were more often given by physicians who treat more than 400 MS patients per year (p?=?0.001). Further positive associations were found for assumed relevance of the topic (p?=?0.002) and the degree of counseling (p<0.001). Conclusion To provide a comprehensive counseling, MS patients with desire for children should be counseled by physicians with a lot of experience in MS treatment. PMID:24901447

  17. Secondary psychoses: an update

    PubMed Central

    Keshavan, Matcheri S; Kaneko, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Psychotic disorders due to a known medical illness or substance use are collectively termed secondary psychoses. In this paper, we first review the historic evolution of the concept of secondary versus primary psychosis and how this distinction supplanted the earlier misleading classification of psychoses into organic and functional. We then outline the clinical features and approach to the diagnosis of secondary psychotic disorders. Features such as atypical presentation, temporal relation to detectable medical cause, evidence of direct physiological causal relationship to the etiological agent, and the absence of evidence of a primary psychotic illness that may better explain the presentation suggest consideration of a secondary psychosis. Finally, we discuss how careful studies of secondary psychotic disorders can help elucidate the pathophysiology of primary, or idiopathic, psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia. We illustrate this issue through a discussion of three secondary psychotic disorders — psychoses associated with temporal lobe epilepsy, velocardiofacial syndrome, and N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis — that can, respectively, provide neuroanatomical, genetic, and neurochemical models of schizophrenia pathogenesis. PMID:23471787

  18. The Availability and Utilization of School Library Resources in Some Selected Secondary Schools (High School) in Rivers State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owate, C. N.; Iroha, Okpa

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the availability and utilization of school library resources by Secondary School (High School) Students. Eight Selected Secondary Schools in Rivers State, Nigeria were chosen based on their performance in external examinations and geographic locations. In carrying out the research, questionnaires were administered to both…

  19. The Role of Counselling and Parental Encouragement on Re-Entry of Adolescents into Secondary Schools in Abia State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alika, Henrietta Ijeoma; Ohanaka, Blessing Ijeoma

    2013-01-01

    This paper examined the role of counselling, and parental encouragement on re-entry of adolescents into secondary school in Abia State, Nigeria. A total of 353 adolescents who re-entered school were selected from six secondary schools in the State through a simple random sampling technique. A validated questionnaire was used for data analysis.…

  20. The Relevance of Multi Media Skills in Teaching and Learning of Scientific Concepts in Secondary Schools in Lagos State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okedeyi, Abiodun S.; Oginni, Aderonke M.; Adegorite, Solomon O.; Saibu, Sakibu O.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relevance of multi media skills in teaching and learning of scientific concepts in secondary schools. Self constructed questionnaire was administered to 120 students randomly selected in four secondary schools in Ojo Local Government Area of Lagos state. Data generated were analyzed using chi-square statistical…

  1. How Secondary History Teachers Use and Think about Museums: Current Practices and Untapped Promise for Promoting Historical Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Alan S.; Levine, Thomas H.; Grenier, Robin S.

    2012-01-01

    Museums have great potential to help secondary students develop a deep understanding of the past; however, we know little about what history teachers actually do or want to accomplish when they utilize museums. In this study, the authors draw on questionnaire and interview data from 94 secondary history teachers in Connecticut in an effort to…

  2. Manual Wheelchair Skills: Objective Testing versus Subjective Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, Paula W; Kirby, R Lee; Miller, William C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that the total scores of the Wheelchair Skills Test (WST) version 4.1, an observer rated scale of wheelchair performance, and the Wheelchair Skills Test Questionnaire (WST-Q) version 4.1, a self-report of wheelchair skills, are highly correlated. We also anticipate the WST-Q will be slightly higher indicating an overestimation of capacity to perform wheelchair skills, as compared to actual capacity. Design A cross-sectional, within-subjects comparison design. Participants Convenience sample of 89 community-dwelling, experienced manual wheelchair users ranging in age from 21–94 years. Setting Three Canadian cities. Intervention Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Participants completed the subjective WST-Q version 4.1, followed by the objective WST version 4.1 in one testing session. Results The mean ± SD total percentage scores for WST and WST-Q were 79.5% ±14.4 and 83.0% ±12.1 for capacity and 99.4% ±1.5 and 98.9% ±2.5 for safety. The correlations between the WST and WST-Q scores were ?=0.89 (p=0.000) for capacity and ?=0.12 (p=0.251) for safety. WST-Q total score mean differences were an average of 3.5%±6.5 higher than WST scores for capacity (p = 0.000) and 0.52%±2.8 lower for safety (p = 0.343). For the 32 individual skills, the percentage agreement between the WST and WST-Q scores ranged from 82–100% for capacity and 90–100% for safety. Conclusion WST and WST-Q version 4.1 capacity scores are highly correlated although the WST-Q scores are slightly higher. Decisions on which of these assessments to use can safely be based on the circumstances and objectives of the evaluation. PMID:22728701

  3. Specific trauma subtypes improve the predictive validity of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire in Iraqi refugees.

    PubMed

    Arnetz, Bengt B; Broadbridge, Carissa L; Jamil, Hikmet; Lumley, Mark A; Pole, Nnamdi; Barkho, Evone; Fakhouri, Monty; Talia, Yousif Rofa; Arnetz, Judith E

    2014-12-01

    Trauma exposure contributes to poor mental health among refugees, and exposure often is measured using a cumulative index of items from the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Few studies, however, have asked whether trauma subtypes derived from the HTQ could be superior to this cumulative index in predicting mental health outcomes. A community sample of recently arrived Iraqi refugees (N = 298) completed the HTQ and measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms. Principal components analysis of HTQ items revealed a 5-component subtype model of trauma that accounted for more item variance than a 1-component solution. These trauma subtypes also accounted for more variance in PTSD and depression symptoms (12 and 10%, respectively) than did the cumulative trauma index (7 and 3%, respectively). Trauma subtypes provided more information than cumulative trauma in the prediction of negative mental health outcomes. Therefore, use of these subtypes may enhance the utility of the HTQ when assessing at-risk populations. PMID:24549491

  4. The Generic Short Patient Experiences Questionnaire (GS-PEQ): identification of core items from a survey in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Questionnaires are commonly used to collect patient, or user, experiences with health care encounters; however, their adaption to specific target groups limits comparison between groups. We present the construction of a generic questionnaire (maximum of ten questions) for user evaluation across a range of health care services. Methods Based on previous testing of six group-specific questionnaires, we first constructed a generic questionnaire with 23 items related to user experiences. All questions included a "not applicable" response option, as well as a follow-up question about the item's importance. Nine user groups from one health trust were surveyed. Seven groups received questionnaires by mail and two by personal distribution. Selection of core questions was based on three criteria: applicability (proportion "not applicable"), importance (mean scores on follow-up questions), and comprehensiveness (content coverage, maximum two items per dimension). Results 1324 questionnaires were returned providing subsample sizes ranging from 52 to 323. Ten questions were excluded because the proportion of "not applicable" responses exceeded 20% in at least one user group. The number of remaining items was reduced to ten by applying the two other criteria. The final short questionnaire included items on outcome (2), clinician services (2), user involvement (2), incorrect treatment (1), information (1), organisation (1), and accessibility (1). Conclusion The Generic Short Patient Experiences Questionnaire (GS-PEQ) is a short, generic set of questions on user experiences with specialist health care that covers important topics for a range of groups. It can be used alone or with other instruments in quality assessment or in research. The psychometric properties and the relevance of the GS-PEQ in other health care settings and countries need further evaluation. PMID:21510871

  5. All above Average: Secondary School Improvement as an Impossible Endeavour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Phil

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that secondary school improvement in England, when viewed as a system, has become an impossible endeavour. This arises from the conflation of improvement with effectiveness, judged by a narrow range of outcome measures and driven by demands that all schools should somehow be above average. The expectation of comparable…

  6. Life Management of Post-Secondary Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilgosh, Lorraine; Sobsey, Dick; Cey, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The paper constitutes an examination of life management of post-secondary students with disabilities. Eight individuals, all in attendance at a Western-Canadian university, were interviewed. The purpose was to explore life management issues and transformational outcomes of living with a disability as reported by individuals with disabilities; and…

  7. Burnout and Secondary Traumatic Stress: Impact on Ethical Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everall, Robin D.; Paulson, Barbara L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the issue of counsellor burnout and secondary traumatic stress (STS) and its potential impact on ethical behaviour. Burnout and STS are common outcomes of providing counselling and psychotherapy and may lead to counsellor impairment. A diminished ability to function professionally may constitute a serious violation of the…

  8. Assessment of Noise and Associated Health Impacts at Selected Secondary Schools in Ibadan, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ana, Godson R. E. E.; Shendell, Derek G.; Brown, G. E.; Sridhar, M. K. C.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Most schools in Ibadan, Nigeria, are located near major roads (mobile line sources). We conducted an initial assessment of noise levels and adverse noise-related health and learning effects. Methods. For this descriptive, cross-sectional study, four schools were selected randomly from eight participating in overall project. We administered 200 questionnaires, 50 per school, assessing health and learning-related outcomes. Noise levels (A-weighted decibels, dBA) were measured with calibrated sound level meters. Traffic density was assessed for school with the highest measured dBA. Observational checklists assessed noise control parameters and building physical attributes. Results. Short-term, cross-sectional school-day noise levels ranged 68.3–84.7 dBA. Over 60% of respondents reported that vehicular traffic was major source of noise, and over 70% complained being disturbed by noise. Three schools reported tiredness, and one school lack of concentration, as the most prevalent noise-related health problems. Conclusion. Secondary school occupants in Ibadan, Nigeria were potentially affected by exposure to noise from mobile line sources. PMID:20041025

  9. The relationship between interviewer-respondent race match and reporting of energy intake using food frequency questionnaires in the rural South United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of the observational study was to determine whether interviewer race influences food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) reporting accuracy in a Deep South, largely African American cohort. A secondary analysis was conducted to investigate the influence of interviewer race on energy reporting ...

  10. Young People and Illegal Drugs, 1989-1995: Facts and Predictions. A Report Based on Data Collected between 1989 and 1994, Using the Health Related Behaviour Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balding, John

    The Schools Health Education Unit supports and promotes effective health education in primary and secondary schools. The services it provides promote cooperation between teachers, parents, children, governors, and health-care professionals. A school deciding to use the Health Related Behaviour Questionnaire, developed by the Schools Health…

  11. Impact of modifiable lifestyle factors on outcomes after breast cancer diagnosis: the Setouchi Breast Cancer Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Taira, Naruto; Akiyama, Ichiro; Ishihara, Setsuko; Ishibe, Youichi; Kawasaki, Kensuke; Saito, Makoto; Shien, Tadahiko; Nomura, Tsunehisa; Hara, Fumikata; Mizoo, Taeko; Mizota, Yuri; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Ohsumi, Shozo; Doihara, Hiroyoshi

    2015-06-01

    The primary purpose of this large cohort study is to investigate the effects on breast cancer outcomes of modifiable lifestyle factors after breast cancer diagnosis. These factors include physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity and weight gain after diagnosis, alternative medicine and dietary factors. Women diagnosed with Stage 0 to III breast cancer are eligible for participation to this study. Lifestyle, use of alternative medicine, psychosocial factors, reproductive factors and health-related quality of life will be assessed using a questionnaire at the time of breast cancer diagnosis (baseline), and 1, 2, 3 and 5 years after diagnosis. Clinical information and breast cancer outcomes will be obtained from a breast cancer database. The primary endpoint will be disease-free survival. Secondary endpoints are overall survival, health-related quality of life, breast cancer-related symptoms and adverse events. Patient recruitment commenced in February 2013. Enrollment of 2000 breast cancer patients is planned during the 5-year recruitment period. The concept of the study is described in this article. PMID:25770837

  12. Education Against Tobacco (EAT): a quasi-experimental prospective evaluation of a multinational medical-student-delivered smoking prevention programme for secondary schools in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Brinker, Titus J; Stamm-Balderjahn, Sabine; Seeger, Werner; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Groneberg, David A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the multinational medical-student-delivered tobacco prevention programme for secondary schools for its effectiveness to reduce the smoking prevalence among adolescents aged 11–15?years in Germany at half year follow-up. Setting We used a prospective quasi-experimental study design with measurements at baseline (t1) and 6?months postintervention (t2) to investigate an intervention in 8 German secondary schools. The participants were split into intervention and control classes in the same schools and grades. Participants A total of 1474 eligible participants of both genders at the age of 11–15?years were involved within the survey for baseline assessment of which 1200 completed the questionnaire at 6-month follow-up (=longitudinal sample). The schools participated voluntarily. The inclusion criteria were age (10–15?years), grade (6–8) and school type (regular secondary schools). Intervention Two 60?min school-based modules delivered by medical students. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary end point was the difference from t1 to t2 of the smoking prevalence in the control group versus the difference from t1 to t2 in the intervention group (difference of differences approach). The percentage of former smokers and new smokers in the two groups were studied as secondary outcome measures. Results In the control group, the percentage of students who claimed to be smokers doubled from 4.2% (t1) to 8.1% (t2), whereas it remained almost the same in the intervention group (7.1% (t1) to 7.4% (t2); p=0.01). The likelihood of quitting smoking was almost six times higher in the intervention group (total of 67 smokers at t1; 27 (4.6%) and 7 (1.1%) in the control group; OR 5.63; 95% CI 2.01 to 15.79; p<0.01). However, no primary preventive effect was found. Conclusions We report a significant secondary preventive (smoking cessation) effect at 6-month follow-up. Long-term evaluation is planned. PMID:26384722

  13. Paricalcitol for secondary hyperparathyroidism in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Trillini, Matias; Cortinovis, Monica; Ruggenenti, Piero; Reyes Loaeza, Jorge; Courville, Karen; Ferrer-Siles, Claudia; Prandini, Silvia; Gaspari, Flavio; Cannata, Antonio; Villa, Alessandro; Perna, Annalisa; Gotti, Eliana; Caruso, Maria Rosa; Martinetti, Davide; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Perico, Norberto

    2015-05-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism contributes to post-transplant CKD mineral and bone disorder. Paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor activator, decreased serum parathyroid hormone levels and proteinuria in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. This single-center, prospective, randomized, crossover, open-label study compared the effect of 6-month treatment with paricalcitol (1 ?g/d for 3 months and then uptitrated to 2 µg/d if tolerated) or nonparicalcitol therapy on serum parathyroid hormone levels (primary outcome), mineral metabolism, and proteinuria in 43 consenting recipients of renal transplants with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Participants were randomized 1:1 according to a computer-generated sequence. Compared with baseline, median (interquartile range) serum parathyroid hormone levels significantly declined on paricalcitol from 115.6 (94.8-152.0) to 63.3 (52.0-79.7) pg/ml (P<0.001) but not on nonparicalcitol therapy. At 6 months, levels significantly differed between treatments (P<0.001 by analysis of covariance). Serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin decreased on paricalcitol therapy only and significantly differed between treatments at 6 months (P<0.001 for all comparisons). At 6 months, urinary deoxypyridinoline-to-creatinine ratio and 24-hour proteinuria level decreased only on paricalcitol (P<0.05). L3 and L4 vertebral mineral bone density, assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorption, significantly improved with paricalcitol at 6 months (P<0.05 for both densities). Paricalcitol was well tolerated. Overall, 6-month paricalcitol supplementation reduced parathyroid hormone levels and proteinuria, attenuated bone remodeling and mineral loss, and reduced eGFR in renal transplant recipients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Long-term studies are needed to monitor directly measured GFR, ensure that the bone remodeling and mineral effects are sustained, and determine if the reduction in proteinuria improves renal and cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:25194004

  14. Effect of Feedback and Remediation on Students' Achievement in Junior Secondary School Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Ajogbeje Oke; Folorunso, Alonge Micheal

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of feedback and remediation as instructional strategies on junior secondary school students' achievement in mathematics. The effects of gender and socio economic status on these learning outcomes were also examined. The sample for the study consisted of 240 junior secondary two (JSS II) students in intact classes…

  15. The long-term outcome of four-corner fusion.

    PubMed

    Trail, Ian A; Murali, Raj; Stanley, John Knowles; Hayton, Michael John; Talwalkar, Sumedh; Sreekumar, Ramankutty; Birch, Ann

    2015-05-01

    Introduction?Four-corner arthrodesis with excision of the scaphoid is an accepted salvage procedure for scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) and has been performed in our unit for over 20 years. We have undertaken a retrospective review of 116 of these procedures performed in 110 patients between 1992 and 2009. Fifty-eight patients attended for a clinical evaluation, and 29 responded by postal questionnaire. Methods?The surgical technique undertaken was standard. That is, through a dorsal approach the scaphoid and tip of the radial styloid were excised. The capitate, lunate, triquetrum, and hamate articular surfaces were then prepared down to bleeding bone. Bone grafts from the scaphoid and radial styloid were then inserted and fixation undertaken. For the latter, various methods were used, including Kirschner (K-)wires, staples, bone screws, but predominantly the Spider plate (Integra Life Sciences, USA). Thereafter the wrist was immobilized for a minimum period of 2 weeks prior to rehabilitation. Results?Follow-up was done at a mean of 9 years and 4 months (range 3-19 years). All patients reported a significant improvement in pain relief and ?50% of flexion extension, although only 40% of radioulnar deviation. Grip strength was again ?50% of the contralateral side. Most patients reported a significant improvement in function with 87% returning to work. In addition, radiologic evaluation identified 28 patients (31%) who demonstrated ongoing signs of nonunion, particularly around the triquetrum. Fourteen of these (15%) underwent a further procedure, generally with success. Finally, none of the patients demonstrated any arthritic changes in the lunate fossa on follow-up X-ray, and all secondary procedures were undertaken within 2 years of the primary. Discussion?This research has demonstrated that four-corner fusion fixed with a circular plate can result in a satisfactory outcome with a reduction in pain, a functional range of motion, and a satisfactory functional outcome. The bulk of the complications appear to occur in the first 2 years after surgery. Thereafter, analysis shows long-term satisfaction with little deterioration. Nonunion, particularly around the triquetrum, continues to be a problem, but it may be that this bone should be excised along with the scaphoid, resulting in a three-part fusion only. Alternatively, a simple capitolunate fusion may be satisfactory. PMID:25945298

  16. Secondary differential operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusyatnikova, V. N.; Vinogradov, A. M.; Umaguzhin, V. A.

    Let ? be an arbitrary sustem of partial (non-linear differential equations. Higher infinitesimal sysmmetries of ? may be interpreted as vector fields on the «manifoldå Sol ? of all local solution of this system. The paper deals with construction of differential operators of arbitrary orders on Sol ?. These approaches to construction of the theory of these operators, geometric and functional are presented, and their equivalence is proved when ? is the trivial equation. Coincidence of «extrinsicå and «intrinsicå geometric secondary operator is proved for an arbitrary system ?. It is shown that each geometric secondary operator may be approximated by a sum of compositions of evolution differentiations with any possible accuracy, a description of geometric secondary operators in local coordinates is algo given. These results are obtained by studying the geometry of finite jets and infinitely prolonged equations.

  17. A pilot validation of a modified Illness Perceptions Questionnaire designed to predict response to cognitive therapy for psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Elena; Garety, Philippa; Weinman, John; Emsley, Richard; Dunn, Graham; Bebbington, Paul; Freeman, Daniel; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Fowler, David; Hardy, Amy; Waller, Helen; Jolley, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Clinical responsiveness to cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis (CBTp) varies. Recent research has demonstrated that illness perceptions predict active engagement in therapy, and, thereby, better outcomes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the psychometric properties of a modification of the Illness Perceptions Questionnaire (M-IPQ) designed to predict response following CBTp. Methods Fifty-six participants with persistent, distressing delusions completed the M-IPQ; forty before a brief CBT intervention targeting persecutory ideation and sixteen before and after a control condition. Additional predictors of outcome (delusional conviction, symptom severity and belief inflexibility) were assessed at baseline. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and at follow-up four to eight weeks later. Results The M-IPQ comprised two factors measuring problem duration and therapy-specific perceptions of Cure/Control. Associated subscales, formed by summing the relevant items for each factor, were reliable in their structure. The Cure/Control subscale was also reliable over time; showed convergent validity with other predictors of outcome; predicted therapy outcomes; and differentially predicted treatment effects. Limitations We measured outcome without an associated measure of engagement, in a small sample. Findings are consistent with hypothesis and existing research, but require replication in a larger, purposively recruited sample. Conclusions The Cure/Control subscale of the M-IPQ shows promise as a predictor of response to therapy. Specifically targeting these illness perceptions in the early stages of cognitive behavioural therapy may improve engagement and, consequently, outcomes. PMID:25011076

  18. SIZE FACTORS AND NON-DOLLAR COSTS OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS, PHASE 1. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WAKEFIELD, HOWARD E.; AND OTHERS

    ELEMENTS OF EDUCATIONAL PRODUCTIVITY ARE IDENTIFIED WHICH ARE INFLUENCED BY SIZE OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS. PRODUCTIVITY INCLUDES OUTCOMES SUCH AS ACADEMIC PROGRESS AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOR AND EXCLUDES ECONOMIC OUTCOMES SUCH AS GAINS IN INCOME. RESEARCH IN THIS FIRST PHASE WAS DONE WITH THE HIGH SCHOOLS OF IOWA. DATA STORED WITH THE IOWA EDUCATIONAL…

  19. Development of a Short Version of the New Brief Job Stress Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, Akiomi; KAWAKAMI, Norito; SHIMOMITSU, Teruichi; TSUTSUMI, Akizumi; HARATANI, Takashi; YOSHIKAWA, Toru; SHIMAZU, Akihito; ODAGIRI, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the test-retest reliability and validity of a short version of the New Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (New BJSQ) whose scales have one item selected from a standard version. Based on the results from an anonymous web-based questionnaire of occupational health staffs and personnel/labor staffs, we selected higher-priority scales from the standard version. After selecting one item with highest item-total correlation coefficient from each scale, a 23-item questionnaire was developed. A nationally representative survey was administered to Japanese employees (n=1,633) to examine test-retest reliability and validity. Most scales (or items) showed modest but adequate levels of test-retest reliability (r>0.50). Furthermore, job demands and job resources scales (or items) were associated with mental and physical stress reactions while job resources scales (or items) were also associated with positive outcomes. These findings provided a piece of evidence that the short version of the New BJSQ is reliable and valid. PMID:24975108

  20. Low Back Pain Functional Disability in Athletes; Conceptualization and Initial Development of a Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Elham; Kordi, Ramin; Nourian, Ruhollah; Noorian, Negin; Memari, Amir Hossein; Shariati, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Low Back Pain (LBP) is one of the most prevalent causes of disability not only in the general population but also in athletes. Despite a large number of self-reported back specific disability questionnaires, there is no specific, well documented, outcome measure for athletes suffering from back pain. Objectives: This study aimed to identify the main descriptive themes representing functional disability in athletes due to LBP. Patients and Methods: We conducted a qualitative study using in-depth interviews to characterize the experiences of athletes with LBP. Twenty athletes with LBP were recruited and the main descriptive elements of their LBP related disability were extracted. Then a preliminary questionnaire using these themes was proposed. Results: The main disability indicators were pain intensity; stretching exercises, strengthening exercises, sport specific skills, back range of motion (ROM), sitting, walking, sleep patterns, self-care, and recreational activities, fear of pain and avoidance behavior, and changes in sexual activity. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that apart from non-sports items, some sport related items should be included in the assessment of LBP disability levels in athletes. Our results have also been organized as a preliminary LBP disability questionnaire for athletes. PMID:25741417

  1. 7 CFR 550.31 - Questionnaires and survey plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 and 5 CFR part 1320. ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Questionnaires and survey plans. 550.31 Section 550.31... Agreements Program Management § 550.31 Questionnaires and survey plans. The Cooperator is required to...

  2. 7 CFR 550.31 - Questionnaires and survey plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 and 5 CFR part 1320. ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Questionnaires and survey plans. 550.31 Section 550.31... Agreements Program Management § 550.31 Questionnaires and survey plans. The Cooperator is required to...

  3. 7 CFR 550.31 - Questionnaires and survey plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 and 5 CFR part 1320. ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Questionnaires and survey plans. 550.31 Section 550.31... Agreements Program Management § 550.31 Questionnaires and survey plans. The Cooperator is required to...

  4. 7 CFR 550.31 - Questionnaires and survey plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 and 5 CFR part 1320. ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Questionnaires and survey plans. 550.31 Section 550.31... Agreements Program Management § 550.31 Questionnaires and survey plans. The Cooperator is required to...

  5. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--BASELINE QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes responses for 326 baseline questionnaires. The Baseline Questionnaire was used to provide more detailed information on the characteristics of the sample individual and housing, and on the usual frequency of activities over a longer time frame (i.e., last mo...

  6. The Situational Outlook Questionnaire: assessing the context for change.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Scott G

    2007-04-01

    The Situational Outlook Questionnaire has been in use for many years as an assessment of the climate that supports change, innovation, and creativity. This study reports the descriptive statistics, internal consistency, factor structure, and other psychometric results from a sample of 4,730 respondents. Further areas for improvement of the questionnaire and assessment approach are identified. PMID:17564220

  7. May 2015 Page 1 Job Description Questionnaire (JDQ)

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    May 2015 Page 1 Job Description Questionnaire (JDQ) Professional Staff Instructions What is the JDQ? The Job Description Questionnaire (JDQ) is a critical document that identifies and describes the major procedures, the hiring or discharge of employees, employee compensation, advancement, job training, and other

  8. Investigation of Multiple Imputation in Low-Quality Questionnaire Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ginkel, Joost R.

    2010-01-01

    The performance of multiple imputation in questionnaire data has been studied in various simulation studies. However, in practice, questionnaire data are usually more complex than simulated data. For example, items may be counterindicative or may have unacceptably low factor loadings on every subscale, or completely missing subscales may…

  9. Learning Probe: Benchmarking for Excellence. Questionnaire. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Jane; Yarrow, David; Appleby, Alex

    This document is a questionnaire designed for work-based learning providers. It is a diagnostic benchmarking tool developed to give organizations a snapshot of their current state. Following a brief introduction, there are instructions for filling in the questionnaire, which includes both open-ended response and scoring according to a…

  10. MEDICAL HISTORY QUESTIONNAIRE FOR N-95 FILTERING FACE PIECE RESPIRATORS

    E-print Network

    Slatton, Clint

    MEDICAL HISTORY QUESTIONNAIRE FOR N-95 FILTERING FACE PIECE RESPIRATORS Occupational Medicine Program Complete this one-time questionnaire form if you wear N-95 filtering face piece respirators. Heart Trouble 4. Shortness of Breath 5. History of Fainting / Seizures 6. High Blood Pressure 7

  11. Development and Initial Validation of the Environmental Restriction Questionnaire (ERQ)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Limor; Ratzon, Nava Z.; Jarus, Tal; Bart, Orit

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the Environmental Restriction Questionnaire (ERQ) a parent-reported questionnaire for measuring perceived environmental restrictions for young children participation. Reliability and homogeneity were tested by Cronbach's alpha and inter-item correlations.…

  12. MImm student questionnaire p. 1/2 Marine Immersion

    E-print Network

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    MImm student questionnaire ­ p. 1/2 Marine Immersion Student questionnaire Please return to Jessica you want to learn ­ during Marine Immersion, and more generally? What is your greatest concern about this class? What would you like to be able to say about Marine Immersion at the end of the course? What

  13. Dietary Screener Questionnaire in the NHANES 2009-10

    Cancer.gov

    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) assesses the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the U.S. It collects detailed information about food, nutrient, and supplement intake and other dietary behaviors. Before the 2009-10 administration, the NHANES collected this information exclusively through 24-hour recalls, food frequency questionnaires, and survey questionnaires.

  14. Microsoft Word - Fishbein-Ajzen-Hanson_Questionnaire.doc

    Cancer.gov

    FISHBEIN/AJZEN-HANSON QUESTIONNAIRE In this questionnaire, we ask questions that make use of rating scales with seven places. You are to make a mark (X) in the space that best describes your activity or your opinion. FOR EXAMPLE: If you were asked

  15. Assessing the Efficacy of a Student Expectations Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, Jon

    2012-01-01

    This article uses Rasch analysis to explore the efficacy of a questionnaire designed to assist university teaching staff in identifying those Level 4 students most in need of mathematics support. The students were all taking a mathematics module as part of their first year Computing curriculum, and the questionnaire explores the students' previous…

  16. Measuring Experiential Avoidance in Adults: The Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmalz, Jonathan E.; Murrell, Amy R.

    2010-01-01

    To date, general levels of experiential avoidance are primarily measured by the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II), but it includes items of questionable comprehensibility. The Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y), previously validated as a measure of experiential avoidance with children and adolescents, was…

  17. Measuring Course Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keshavarz, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    Accreditation criteria of programs require effective learning outcomes, assessment with documented procedures, tools, results, and actions to close the assessment loop with broad faculty involvement. This article describes a methodology for providing quantitative measurement of a course's learning outcomes. The methodology uses a linkage matrix…

  18. Toward Standard Usability Questionnaires for Handheld Augmented Reality.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marc Ericson C; Polvi, Jarkko; Taketomi, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Goshiro; Sandor, Christian; Kato, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    Usability evaluations are important to improving handheld augmented reality (HAR) systems. However, no standard questionnaire considers perceptual and ergonomic issues found in HAR. The authors performed a systematic literature review to enumerate these issues. Based on these issues, they created a HAR usability scale that consists of comprehensibility and manipulability scales. These scales measure general system usability, ease of understanding the information presented, and ease of handling the device. The questionnaires' validity and reliability were evaluated in four experiments, and the results show that the questionnaires consistently correlate with other subjective and objective measures of usability. The questionnaires also have good reliability based on the Cronbach's alpha. Researchers and professionals can directly use these questionnaires to evaluate their own HAR applications or modify them with the insights presented in this article. PMID:26416363

  19. Development and Application of a Genetic Algorithm for Variable Optimization and Predictive Modeling of Five-Year Mortality Using Questionnaire Data

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Lucas J.; Bello, Ghalib; Dumancas, Gerard G.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of selecting important variables for predictive modeling of a specific outcome of interest using questionnaire data has rarely been addressed in clinical settings. In this study, we implemented a genetic algorithm (GA) technique to select optimal variables from questionnaire data for predicting a five-year mortality. We examined 123 questions (variables) answered by 5,444 individuals in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The GA iterations selected the top 24 variables, including questions related to stroke, emphysema, and general health problems requiring the use of special equipment, for use in predictive modeling by various parametric and nonparametric machine learning techniques. Using these top 24 variables, gradient boosting yielded the nominally highest performance (area under curve [AUC] = 0.7654), although there were other techniques with lower but not significantly different AUC. This study shows how GA in conjunction with various machine learning techniques could be used to examine questionnaire data to predict a binary outcome. PMID:26604716

  20. Vitamin D and Clinical Outcomes in Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Coral; Gutgarts, Victoria; Eisenberg, Elliot; Melamed, Michal L

    2015-11-01

    Most dialysis patients are vitamin D deficient, including deficiencies in both activated vitamin D (1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D) and the less active 25-hydroxyvitamin D. These and other abnormalities associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), if they remain untreated, lead to secondary hyperparathyroidism and bone changes, such as osteitis fibrosa cystica. Activated vitamin D has been proven to decrease parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels in dialysis patients and is currently used for this indication. There are multiple other potential "pleotrophic" effects associated with vitamin D therapy. These include associations with lower all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, lower rates of infections and improved glycemic indexes. Meta-analyses of multiple observational studies have shown activated vitamin D therapy to be associated with improved survival. Observational data also suggest fewer infections and better glucose control. There have been no randomized clinical trials powered to evaluate mortality or other clinical outcomes. Small trials of nutritional vitamin D (ergocalciferol and cholecalciferol) showed increases in 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels without hypercalcemia or hyperphosphatemia, even when given in addition to activated vitamin D therapy. While activated vitamin D therapy is associated with improved outcomes, it also leads to higher fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) levels, which may be detrimental in dialysis patients. Further research is needed to evaluate whether activated or nutritional vitamin D therapy are beneficial in dialysis patients for outcomes other than secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:26424141

  1. Modernising Portugal's Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitor, Teresa V.

    2008-01-01

    Portugal has a total of 477 public secondary schools. Some date from the end of the 19th century but the majority were built after 1970, reflecting the period of expansion in the school network and the extension of compulsory schooling. The schools are heterogeneous in terms of building types, architectural features and quality. An assessment of…

  2. Secondary alkaline batteries

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.

    1984-03-01

    This report on secondary alkaline batteries covers the overall reactions (charge/discharge characteristics), electrode structures and materials, and cell construction. The following batteries are studied, nickel oxide-cadmium, nickel oxide-iron, nickel oxide-hydrogen, nickel oxide-zinc, silver oxide-zinc, and silver oxide-cadmium, silver oxide-iron, and manganese dioxide-zinc batteries.

  3. Secondary Services in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Marianne; Terry, Edward

    The basic characteristics of sixty-nine secondary services in physics were analyzed in terms of sponsorship and distribution by: (1) country of origin, (2) language, (3) age, (4) frequency of publication, (5) subject and geographical coverage and (6) size. The eight major services, in terms of size, are identified. The use of the services by the…

  4. Secondary Syphilitic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Baughn, Robert E.; Musher, Daniel M.

    2005-01-01

    An important theme that emerges from all early historical accounts is that in addition to the decreased virulence of Treponema pallidum, the incidence of secondary syphilis has decreased drastically over the past three centuries. Even in the early 20th century, most syphilologists were of the opinion that the disease had undergone changes in its manifestations and that they were dealing with an attenuated form of the spirochete. Such opinions were based primarily on the observations that violent cutaneous reactions and fatalities associated with the secondary stage had become extremely rare. The rate of primary and secondary syphilis in the United States increased in 2002 for the second consecutive year. After a decade-long decline that led to an all-time low in 2000, the recent trend is attributable, to a large extent, by a increase in reported syphilis cases among men, particularly homosexual and bisexual men having sex with men. The present review addresses the clinical and diagnostic criteria for the recognition of secondary syphilis, the clinical course and manifestations of the disease if allowed to proceed past the primary stage of disease in untreated individuals, and the treatment for this stage of the disease. PMID:15653827

  5. Aircraft Electric Secondary Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Technologies resulted to aircraft power systems and aircraft in which all secondary power is supplied electrically are discussed. A high-voltage dc power generating system for fighter aircraft, permanent magnet motors and generators for aircraft, lightweight transformers, and the installation of electric generators on turbine engines are among the topics discussed.

  6. Describing variation in the delivery of secondary fracture prevention after hip fracture: an overview of 11 hospitals within one regional area in England

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Sarah; Sheard, Sally; Chana, Jasroop; Cooper, Cyrus; Javaid, M Kassim; Judge, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Hip fractures are usually the result of low impact falls and underlying osteoporosis. Since the risk of further fractures in osteoporotic patients can be reduced by between 20 - 70% with bone protection therapy, the NHS is under an obligation to provide effective fracture prevention services for hip fracture patients to reduce risk of further fractures. Evidence suggests there is variation in service organisation. The objective of the study was to explore this variation in more detail by looking at the services provided in one region in England. Methods A questionnaire was designed which included questions around staffing, models of care and how the four components of fracture prevention (case finding, osteoporosis assessment, treatment initiation and adherence (monitoring) were undertaken. We also examined falls prevention services. Clinicians involved in the delivery of osteoporosis services at 11 hospitals in one region in England completed the questionnaire. Results The service overview showed significant variation in service organisation across all aspects of care examined. All sites provided some form of case finding and assessment. However, interesting differences arose when we examined how these components were structured. Eight sites generally initiated treatment in an inpatient setting, two in outpatients and one in primary care. Monitoring was undertaken by secondary care at seven sites and the remainder conducted by GPs. Conclusions The variability in service provision was not explained by local variations in care need. Further work is now needed to establish how the variability in service provision affects key patient, clinical and health economic outcomes. PMID:24964893

  7. Wage, Work Environment, and Staffing: Effects on Nurse Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Ma, Chenjuan

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that hospitals with better nurse staffing and work environments have better nurse outcomes—less burnout, job dissatisfaction, and intention to leave the job. Many studies, however, have not accounted for wage effects, which may confound findings. By using a secondary analysis with cross-sectional administrative data and a four-state survey of nurses, we investigated how wage, work environment, and staffing were associated with nurse outcomes. Logistic regression models, with and without wage, were used to estimate the effects of work environment and staffing on burnout, job dissatisfaction, and intent to leave. We discovered that wage was associated with job dissatisfaction and intent to leave but had little influence on burnout, while work environment and average patient-to-nurse ratio still have considerable effects on nurse outcomes. Wage is important for good nurse outcomes, but it does not diminish the significant influence of work environment and staffing on nurse outcomes. PMID:25121923

  8. Secondary impact hazard assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A series of light gas gun shots (4 to 7 km/sec) were performed with 5 mg nylon and aluminum projectiles to determine the size, mass, velocity, and spatial distribution of spall and ejecta from a number of graphite/epoxy targets. Similar determinations were also performed on a few aluminum targets. Target thickness and material were chosen to be representative of proposed Space Station structure. The data from these shots and other information were used to predict the hazard to Space Station elements from secondary particles resulting from impacts of micrometeoroids and orbital debris on the Space Station. This hazard was quantified as an additional flux over and above the primary micrometeoroid and orbital debris flux that must be considered in the design process. In order to simplify the calculations, eject and spall mass were assumed to scale directly with the energy of the projectile. Other scaling systems may be closer to reality. The secondary particles considered are only those particles that may impact other structure immediately after the primary impact. The addition to the orbital debris problem from these primary impacts was not addressed. Data from this study should be fed into the orbital debris model to see if Space Station secondaries make a significant contribution to orbital debris. The hazard to a Space Station element from secondary particles above and beyond the micrometeoroid and orbital debris hazard is categorized in terms of two factors: (1) the 'view factor' of the element to other Space Station structure or the geometry of placement of the element, and (2) the sensitivity to damage, stated in terms of energy. Several example cases were chosen, the Space Station module windows, windows of a Shuttle docked to the Space Station, the habitat module walls, and the photovoltaic solar cell arrays. For the examples chosen the secondary flux contributed no more than 10 percent to the total flux (primary and secondary) above a given calculated critical energy. A key assumption in these calculations is that above a certain critical energy, significant damage will be done. This is not true for all structures. Double-walled, bumpered structures are an example for which damage may be reduced as energy goes up. The critical energy assumption is probably conservative, however, in terms of secondary damage. To understand why the secondary impacts seem to, in general, contribute less than 10 percent of the flux above a given critical energy, consider the case of a meteoroid impact of a given energy on a fixed, large surface. This impact results in a variety of secondary particles, all of which have much less energy than the original impact. Conservation of energy prohibits any other situation. Thus if damage is linked to a critical energy of a particle, the primary flux will always deliver particles of much greater energy. Even if all the secondary particles impacted other Space Station structures, none would have a kinetic energy more than a fraction of the primary impact energy.

  9. Science. Suggested Learner Outcomes, Grades 9-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    Developed for the purpose of providing teachers and administrators with objectives upon which a curriculum could be formed, this guide identifies standardized learner outcomes for secondary level science students. A philosophy of science education for Oklahoma schools is presented and student goals are specified. Objectives and descriptive…

  10. Individual Factors Predicting Mental Health Court Diversion Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhaaff, Ashley; Scott, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study examined which individual factors predict mental health court diversion outcome among a sample of persons with mental illness participating in a postcharge diversion program. Method: The study employed secondary analysis of existing program records for 419 persons with mental illness in a court diversion program. Results:…

  11. Single-Sex Schooling and Labour Market Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Alice; Joshi, Heather; Leonard, Diana

    2011-01-01

    One quarter of the 1958 British Birth cohort attended single-sex secondary schools. This paper asks whether sex-segregated schooling had any impact on the experience of gender differences in the labour market in mid-life. We examine outcomes at age 42, allowing for socio-economic origins and abilities measured in childhood. We find no net impact…

  12. Systematic review: conservative treatments for secondary lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several conservative (i.e., nonpharmacologic, nonsurgical) treatments exist for secondary lymphedema. The optimal treatment is unknown. We examined the effectiveness of conservative treatments for secondary lymphedema, as well as harms related to these treatments. Methods We searched MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials®, AMED, and CINAHL from 1990 to January 19, 2010. We obtained English- and non-English-language randomized controlled trials or observational studies (with comparison groups) that reported primary effectiveness data on conservative treatments for secondary lymphedema. For English-language studies, we extracted data in tabular form and summarized the tables descriptively. For non-English-language studies, we summarized the results descriptively and discussed similarities with the English-language studies. Results Thirty-six English-language and eight non-English-language studies were included in the review. Most of these studies involved upper-limb lymphedema secondary to breast cancer. Despite lymphedema's chronicity, lengths of follow-up in most studies were under 6 months. Many trial reports contained inadequate descriptions of randomization, blinding, and methods to assess harms. Most observational studies did not control for confounding. Many studies showed that active treatments reduced the size of lymphatic limbs, although extensive between-study heterogeneity in areas such as treatment comparisons and protocols, and outcome measures, prevented us from assessing whether any one treatment was superior. This heterogeneity also precluded us from statistically pooling results. Harms were rare (< 1% incidence) and mostly minor (e.g., headache, arm pain). Conclusions The literature contains no evidence to suggest the most effective treatment for secondary lymphedema. Harms are few and unlikely to cause major clinical problems. PMID:22216837

  13. Patient-reported outcomes in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Gregor; Hopwood, Christopher J; Jacob, Gitta A; Brändle, Laura S; Schulte-Vels, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) refers to measures that emphasize the subjective view of patients about their health-related conditions and behaviors. Typically, PROs include self-report questionnaires and clinical interviews. Defining PROs for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is particularly challenging given the disorder's high symptomatic heterogeneity, high comorbidity with other psychiatric conditions, highly fluctuating symptoms, weak correlations between symptoms and functional outcomes, and lack of valid and reliable experimental measures to complement self-report data. Here, we provide an overview of currently used BPD outcome measures and discuss them from clinical, psychometric, experimental, and patient perspectives. In addition, we review the most promising leads to improve BPD PROs, including the DSM-5 Section III, the Recovery Approach, Ecological Momentary Assessments, and novel experimental measures of social functioning that are associated with functional and social outcomes. PMID:25152662

  14. Patient-reported outcomes in borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hasler, Gregor; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Jacob, Gitta A.; Brändle, Laura S.; Schulte-Vels, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) refers to measures that emphasize the subjective view of patients about their health-related conditions and behaviors. Typically, PROs include self-report questionnaires and clinical interviews. Defining PROs for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is particularly challenging given the disorder's high symptomatic heterogeneity, high comorbidity with other psychiatric conditions, highly fluctuating symptoms, weak correlations between symptoms and functional outcomes, and lack of valid and reliable experimental measures to complement self-report data. Here, we provide an overview of currently used BPD outcome measures and discuss them from clinical, psychometric, experimental, and patient perspectives. In addition, we review the most promising leads to improve BPD PROs, including the DSM-5 Section III, the Recovery Approach, Ecological Momentary Assessments, and novel experimental measures of social functioning that are associated with functional and social outcomes. PMID:25152662

  15. Academic Outcome, Anxiety and Attitudes in Early and Late Immersion in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muircheartaigh, Jonathan O.; Hickey, Tina

    2008-01-01

    Differences between early and late Irish-immersion secondary school students are examined, not only in terms of academic outcome and target language ability, but also in terms of attitudes to learning the target language. Participants included a gender-balanced group of 97 students in Irish-immersion in fourth year of secondary school (mean age…

  16. How to Investigate the Goal Orientations of Students in Competence-Based Pre-Vocational Secondary Education: Choosing the Right Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koopman, Maaike; Teune, Peter; Beijaard, Douwe

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the psychometric properties of three instruments: a semi-structured interview, a questionnaire and a sorting task. The central question is which instrument is most suitable to investigate the goal orientations of students in competence-based pre-vocational secondary education. The questionnaire proved most accurate. The…

  17. Web-based questionnaires: the future in epidemiology?

    PubMed

    van Gelder, Marleen M H J; Bretveld, Reini W; Roeleveld, Nel

    2010-12-01

    The traditional epidemiologic modes of data collection, including paper-and-pencil questionnaires and interviews, have several limitations, such as decreasing response rates over the last decades and high costs in large study populations. The use of Web-based questionnaires may be an attractive alternative but is still scarce in epidemiologic research because of major concerns about selective nonresponse and reliability of the data obtained. The authors discuss advantages and disadvantages of Web-based questionnaires and current developments in this area. In addition, they focus on some practical issues and safety concerns involved in the application of Web-based questionnaires in epidemiologic research. They conclude that many problems related to the use of Web-based questionnaires have been solved or will most likely be solved in the near future and that this mode of data collection offers serious benefits. However, questionnaire design issues may have a major impact on response and completion rates and on reliability of the data. Theoretically, Web-based questionnaires could be considered an alternative or complementary mode in the range of epidemiologic methods of data collection. Practice and comparisons with the traditional survey techniques should reveal whether they can fulfill their expectations. PMID:20880962

  18. Development and validity of the Outdoor Falls Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Chippendale, Tracy

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and examine the content and face validity of the Outdoor Falls Questionnaire. The initial questionnaire was developed by the primary investigator on the basis of the existing literature on outdoor falls. A rating scale was used to obtain feedback from content experts to ascertain the validity of each question and the questionnaire as a whole. Cognitive interviewing of community-dwelling seniors was performed to ensure accurate interpretation of each question. An expert in questionnaire design reviewed the questions for language and structure. Content experts rated the questionnaire as a whole as 'quite relevant' or 'very relevant' to outdoor falls. The majority of individual questions (22 of 32) were rated by experts as either quite relevant or very relevant. Feedback from reviewers and older adults on specific questions were incorporated into the revised questionnaire. Preliminary testing demonstrates that the Outdoor Falls Questionnaire has good content and face validity. Further testing is needed to examine factor structure, to establish reliability, internal consistency, and interclass correlations. PMID:25851838

  19. Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale in Psychological Practice: Clinical Utility of Ultra-Brief Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Alistair; Hemsley, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    The validity and reliability of the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and the Session Rating Scale (SRS) were evaluated against existing longer measures, including the Outcome Questionnaire-45, Working Alliance Inventory, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21, Quality of Life Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and General Self-efficacy Scale. The measures…

  20. Inclusion or Exclusion?--A Study of Hong Kong Students' Affective and Social Outcomes in a Mainstream Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bick-Har, Lam; See-Wai, Yeung Alison

    2005-01-01

    152 elementary students age ranged from 8 to 11 were studied on their affective and social domains in a school with an inclusive policy in Hong Kong. Five questionnaires from the Assessment Program for Affective and Social Outcomes (APASO) [EMB (2001) Manual for Assessment Program for Affective and Social Outcomes. "Quality Assurance Inspection…

  1. Youth Risk Factors and Educational Outcomes of Mentored and Non-Mentored Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos-Brown, Karen

    2010-01-01

    As mentoring is receiving increasing attention as a method to improve youth educational outcomes, it is important to continue to examine the effects of mentoring on these youth outcomes. This study uses secondary data from Waves I and III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) and transcript data from the Adolescent…

  2. Sources of Bias in Outcome Assessment in Randomised Controlled Trials: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, Hannah; Hewitt, Catherine E.; Higgins, Steve; Wiggins, Andy; Torgerson, David J.; Torgerson, Carole J.

    2015-01-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) can be at risk of bias. Using data from a RCT, we considered the impact of post-randomisation bias. We compared the trial primary outcome, which was administered blindly, with the secondary outcome, which was not administered blindly. From 44 schools, 522 children were randomised to receive a one-to-one maths…

  3. Improving Education Outcomes in the Slovak Republic. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 578

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, David

    2007-01-01

    Improving education outcomes is vital for achieving convergence with GDP per capita levels in Western European countries and for reducing income inequality. While some education outcomes are favourable, such as the low secondary-school drop-out rate, others have room for improvement: education achievement is below the OECD average and strongly…

  4. Comprehensive School Counseling in Rhode Island: Access to Services and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimmitt, Carey; Wilkerson, Belinda

    2012-01-01

    This study explored relationships among school counseling practices, secondary school demographics, and student outcomes in the state of Rhode Island during a 2-year period. The results showed strong and consistent correlations between increased amounts of school counseling services and positive student outcomes. Schools with higher percentages of…

  5. Vocational Rehabilitation Service Patterns and Employment Outcomes for Hispanics with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos; Cardoso, Elizabeth da Silva; Wilson, Lisa M.; Romero, Maria G.; Chan, Fong; Sung, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined demographic and rehabilitation service variables affecting employment outcomes of people with spinal cord injury (SCI) receiving services from state vocational rehabilitation agencies. A secondary purpose was to determine whether there are disparities in services and outcomes between European American and Hispanic…

  6. Outcome analysis of individualized vestibular rehabilitation protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Angel, C. R.; Pesznecker, S. C.; Gianna, C.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the outcome of vestibular rehabilitation protocols in subjects with peripheral vestibular disorders compared with normal and abnormal control subjects. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study using repeated measure, matched control design. Subjects were solicited consecutively according to these criteria: vestibular disorder subjects who had abnormal results of computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) sensory organization tests (SOTs) 5 and 6 and underwent rehabilitation; vestibular disorder subjects who had abnormal results of SOTs 5 and 6 and did not undergo rehabilitation; and normal subjects (normal SOTs). SETTING: Tertiary neurotology clinic. SUBJECTS: Men and women over age 18 with chronic vestibular disorders and chief complaints of unsteadiness, imbalance, and/or motion intolerance, and normal subjects. INTERVENTIONS: Pre- and post-rehabilitation assessment included CDP, vestibular disability, and activities of daily living questionnaires. Individualized rehabilitation plans were designed and implemented to address the subject's specific complaints and functional deficits. Supervised sessions were held at weekly intervals, and self-administered programs were devised for daily home use. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: CDP composite and SOT scores, number of falls on CDP, and self-assessment questionnaire results. RESULTS: Subjects who underwent rehabilitation (Group A) showed statistically significant improvements in SOTs, overall composite score, and reduction in falls compared with abnormal (Group B) control groups. Group A's performances after rehabilitation were not significantly different from those of normal subjects (Group C) in SOTs 3 through 6, and close to normal on SOTs 1 and 2. Subjects in Group A also reported statistically significant symptomatic improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Outcome measures of vestibular protocol physical therapy confirmed objective and subjective improvement in subjects with chronic peripheral vestibular disorders. These findings support results reported by other investigators.

  7. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors sh...

  8. Research to Encourage Exercise for Fibromyalgia (REEF): Use of Motivational Interviewing, Outcomes from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Dennis C.; Kaleth, Anthony S.; Bigatti, Silvia; Mazzuca, Steven A.; Jensen, Mark P.; Hilligoss, Janna; Slaven, James; Saha, Chandan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Regular exercise is associated with important benefits in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Unfortunately, long-term maintenance of exercise after a structured program is rare. The present study tested the efficacy of Motivational Interviewing (MI) to promote exercise and improve symptoms in patients with FM. Methods 216 patients with FM were randomized to 6 MI sessions (n=107) or an equal number of FM self-management lessons (education control/EC, n=109). Co-primary endpoints were an increase of 30 minutes in moderate-vigorous physical activity and improvement in the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Physical Impairment (FIQ-PI) score, assessed at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 3- and 6-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes included clinically meaningful improvements in FIQ score, pain severity ratings, and a 6-minute walk test. Results There were no significant treatment group differences in either co-primary endpoint at 6-month follow-up. However, more MI participants than controls exhibited meaningful improvements in FIQ score at 6-month follow-up (62.9% vs. 49.5%, p=0.06). Compared to EC subjects, MI subjects also displayed a larger increment in their 6-minute walk test (43.9 vs. 24.8 meters, p=0.03). Additionally, MI was superior to EC in increasing the number of hours of physical activity immediately post-intervention and in reducing pain severity both immediately after the intervention and at 3-month follow-up. Conclusions Despite a lack of benefits on long term outcome, MI appears to have short-term benefits with respect to self-report physical activity and clinical outcomes. This is the first study in FM that explicitly addresses exercise maintenance as a primary aim. PMID:23042474

  9. Physical violence against pregnant women by an intimate partner, and adverse pregnancy outcomes in Mazandaran Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi, Fatemeh; Abhari, Farrideh R.; Delavar, Mouloud A.; Charati, Jamshid Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: Violence against women during pregnancy is linked to poor outcome of pregnancy, which is reported to have widespread in Iran. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of physical violence against women by an intimate partner during pregnancy, and to assess the impact of this physical violence on pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted on the characteristics of pregnant women in urban areas and related violence. The modified standard World Health Organization Domestic Violence Questionnaire was used to classify pregnant women and domestic violence. A total of 1461 pregnant women were selected using cluster sampling. The association between sociodemographic with intimate partner violence (IPV) and IPV with pregnancy outcomes was determined using logistic regression. Results: Of these, 206 (14.1%) (confidence interval = 12.3-15.9) reported physical IPV during pregnancy. The adjusted odds ratio for IPV in illiterate women or those with primary level of education (0.001), secondary level education (0.003), and in low income households (0.0001) were significantly higher than in those women with university level education and in higher income households. After adjusting for suspected confounding factors, the women with a history of violence by partners had 1.9 fold risk of premature rupture of membranes, and a 2.9 fold risk of low birth weight compared to women who did not experience any violence from their partners. Conclusion: The results of this research indicated that the prevalence of IPV was high among pregnant women. Therefore, it is necessary to emphasize the screening of pregnant women at Primary Health Centers to prevent physical abuse. PMID:25657606

  10. Outcomes Research Branch

    Cancer.gov

    Outcomes Research Branch A circular graphic depicts a conceptual model of ORB's mission, vision, and research areas. The mission portion of the graphic echoes and expands upon the text description that precedes the graphic; that is, ORB leads, coordinates,

  11. Design of psychosocial factors questionnaires: a systematic measurement approach

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Angélica; Felknor, Sarah A

    2012-01-01

    Background Evaluation of psychosocial factors requires instruments that measure dynamic complexities. This study explains the design of a set of questionnaires to evaluate work and non-work psychosocial risk factors for stress-related illnesses. Methods The measurement model was based on a review of literature. Content validity was performed by experts and cognitive interviews. Pilot testing was carried out with a convenience sample of 132 workers. Cronbach’s alpha evaluated internal consistency and concurrent validity was estimated by Spearman correlation coefficients. Results Three questionnaires were constructed to evaluate exposure to work and non-work risk factors. Content validity improved the questionnaires coherence with the measurement model. Internal consistency was adequate (?=0.85–0.95). Concurrent validity resulted in moderate correlations of psychosocial factors with stress symptoms. Conclusions Questionnaires´ content reflected a wide spectrum of psychosocial factors sources. Cognitive interviews improved understanding of questions and dimensions. The structure of the measurement model was confirmed. PMID:22628068

  12. PART I: JOB DESCRIPTION Weighted Job Questionnaire (WJQ) Custom

    E-print Network

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    PART I: JOB DESCRIPTION Weighted Job Questionnaire (WJQ) Custom Department Name: Harbour Centre.U.P.E., Local 3338 JOB DESCRIPTION 1. POSITION IDENTIFICATION Department Position Title: Accounting and Budget

  13. Faculty Application Questionnaire Date: _______________ Name: ____________________ Job Opening ID #/Title: _______________

    E-print Network

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Faculty Application Questionnaire Date: _______________ Name: ____________________ Job Opening ID #/Title: _______________ 1. In compliance with the Immigration Reform and Control Act, employees must or be supervised by a relative, either directly or indirectly? No Yes 4. Can you perform the essential functions

  14. A novel, illustrated questionnaire to distinguish projector and associator synaesthetes.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Richard; Ludwig, Casimir; Mohr, Christine

    2009-06-01

    Individual differences in synaesthesic experiences have recently received much interest, with synaesthetes typically being classified as either projectors (seeing colours projected externally in space) or associators (experiencing colours in their "minds eye"). However, the current standard method of ascertaining these differences through self-reported ratings of statements has been found to be unreliable. Here, we report a test-retest comparison of two sequentially presented questionnaires, asking participants to rate how well the depictions reflect their own experiences. The first questionnaire used standard rating statements, while the second presented the synaesthetic experience in a visual, illustrated format. Results from 12 female synaesthetes highlighted the test-retest consistency with the illustrated questionnaire to be significantly higher than statements alone, suggesting that the visual presentation more approximates and reflects the synaesthetic experience. Through doing so, the illustrated questionnaire is considered to enable an accurate and reliable partition of synaesthetes into projectors and associators. PMID:18644590

  15. Citizenship and Personal, Social and Health Education in Catholic Secondary Schools: Stakeholders' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincham, David

    2007-01-01

    During 1999-2000, the writer carried out a survey of six randomly selected Catholic secondary schools in England to examine the attitudes of stakeholder groups towards Citizenship and Personal, Social and Health Education. Questionnaires were completed by six governors, 12 parents, 139 pupils, 12 teachers and six school leaders, providing insight…

  16. Secondary Teachers' Concerns in Adopting Learning Management Systems: A U.S. Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochner, Bianca; Conrad, Rita-Marie; Graham, Edward

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the concerns of U.S. secondary teachers regarding the adoption of learning management systems (LMSs) utilizing the concerns-based adoption model (CBAM). The stages of concern questionnaire used enabled the strength of teacher concerns to be measured for seven distinct stages of concerns: awareness, informational, personal,…

  17. First-Year Secondary School Mathematics Students' Conceptions of Mathematical Proofs and Proving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basturk, Savas

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate students' conceptions about proof in mathematics and mathematics teaching. A five-point Likert-type questionnaire was administered in order to gather data. The sample of the study included 33 first-year secondary school mathematics students (at the same time student teachers). The data collected were…

  18. Teachers' Perceptions of the Teaching of Acids and Bases in Swedish Upper Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drechsler, Michal; Van Driel, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We report in this paper on a study of chemistry teachers' perceptions of their teaching in upper secondary schools in Sweden, regarding models of acids and bases, especially the Bronsted and the Arrhenius model. A questionnaire consisting of a Likert-type scale was developed, which focused on teachers' knowledge of different models, knowledge of…

  19. Secondary Pupils' Perceptions and Experiences towards Studying in an Inclusive Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Kwan Lan Vicky

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this research study was to investigate and compare the attitudes and perceptions of secondary pupils, with and without Special Education Needs, towards studying together on the same campus. Both qualitative and quantitative data were gathered from the use of the "On the Same Campus" questionnaire by surveying 216…

  20. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in Biology Teaching in Slovenian Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorgo, Andrej; Verckovnik, Tatjana; Kocijancic, Slavko

    2010-01-01

    About two-thirds of Slovene secondary schools received computers equipped with data-loggers and sensors to be used in teaching Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Later it was recognized that only a couple of Biology teachers were using the donated equipment in their classrooms or laboratories. The questionnaire, intended to investigate the situation,…

  1. Primary and Secondary Teachers' Conceptions about Heritage and Heritage Education: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gimenez, Jesus Estepa; Ruiz, Rosa Maria Avila; Listan, Mario Ferreras

    2008-01-01

    This study describes and analyses the conceptions of primary teachers and secondary teachers of Physics-Chemistry, Biology-Geology and Geography-History with respect to the concept of heritage and its teaching and learning, taking the model of teacher-researcher as the theoretical referent. The data collection instrument used was a questionnaire,…

  2. Australian Secondary Students' Views about Global Warming: Beliefs about Actions, and Willingness to Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyes, Edward; Skamp, Keith; Stanisstreet, Martin

    2009-01-01

    A 44-item questionnaire was constructed to determine secondary students' views about how useful various specific actions might be at reducing global warming, their willingness to undertake the various actions, and the extent to which these two might be linked. Responses (n = 500) were obtained from students in years 7 to 10 in three schools in…

  3. Spanish Secondary-School Science Teachers' Beliefs about Science-Technology-Society (STS) Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vazquez-Alonso, Angel; Garcia-Carmona, Antonio; Manassero-Mas, Maria Antonia; Bennassar-Roig, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the beliefs about science-technology-society, and other Nature of Science (NOS) themes, of a large sample (613) of Spanish pre- and in-service secondary education teachers through their responses to 30 items of the Questionnaire of Opinions on Science, Technology and Society. The data were processed by means of a multiple…

  4. Making the Decision to Provide Enhanced Podcasts to Post-Secondary Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook, Jane; Dupont, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Providing students with supplementary course materials such as audio podcasts, enhanced podcasts, video podcasts and other forms of lecture-capture video files after a lecture is now a common occurrence in many post-secondary courses. We used an online questionnaire to ask students how helpful enhanced podcasts were for a variety of course…

  5. Development of Student Knowledge in Competence-Based Pre-Vocational Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koopman, Maaike; Teune, Peter; Beijaard, Douwe

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the development of student knowledge in pre-vocational secondary education schools which differ in the manner and extent to which they have implemented characteristics of competence-based education. The implementation of these characteristics was examined using a teacher questionnaire and the…

  6. Job Satisfaction among Secondary School Teachers: The Role of Gender and Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Maria Eliophotou; Athanasoula-Reppa, Anastasia

    2011-01-01

    The paper investigates the association between individual characteristics and teacher job satisfaction in secondary education in Cyprus. It focuses on two individual characteristics commonly linked to job satisfaction in the literature, namely, gender and years of experience. A short version of a questionnaire previously employed by Dinham and…

  7. Understanding Militant Teacher Union Members' Activities in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahlangu, Vimbi P.

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the activities of teacher unions in some Gauteng secondary schools in South Africa. The methods used in collecting data were questionnaires, interviews and a literature study of appropriate educational and labour law journals, books and newspapers. An interpretive paradigm was used in analysing the data. In this article,…

  8. Challenges Facing Women Academic Leadership in Secondary Schools of Irbid Educational Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Jaradat, Mahmoud Khaled Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the challenges facing women academic leadership in secondary schools of Irbid Educational Area. A random sample of 187 female leaders were chosen. They responded to a 49-item questionnaire prepared by the researcher. The items were distributed into four domains: organizational, personal, social and physical…

  9. One Secondary School's Subject-Area Teachers' Perspectives on Co-Teaching Students with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legutko, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    This study is an action research study conducted at one rural northeastern Pennsylvania junior/senior high school to gain secondary education subject-area teacher's perspectives on educating students with special needs in a co-teaching environment. A written open-ended questionnaire was issued to relevant faculty members which determined that…

  10. Knowledge and Attitudes of Secondary School Teachers regarding Sexual Health Education in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westwood, Jo; Mullan, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the sexual health knowledge of teachers who contribute to secondary school sexual health education in order to determine whether teachers are adequately prepared to implement present government education and public health policies. Design: Results were obtained from a questionnaire as part of a two-phase intervention study.…

  11. A Study of Secondary School Principals' Leadership Styles and School Dropout Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baggerly-Hinojosa, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the leadership styles of secondary school principals, measured by the self-report "Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire 5X short" (Bass & Avolio, 2000) and the school's dropout rates, as reported by the Texas Education Agency in the Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS) report…

  12. Policy Scripts and Students' Realities Regarding Sexuality Education in Secondary Schools in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obare, Francis; Birungi, Harriet

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the sexual and reproductive health (SRH) policy context and the realities facing in-school young people in Kenya. It is based on a review of the health and education sector policy documents as well as data from self-administered questionnaires with 3624 male and female students from eight secondary schools in Nairobi. Findings…

  13. Dread and Passion: Primary and Secondary Teachers' Views on Teaching the Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Graeme B.; MacDonald, Raymond A. R.; Byrne, Charles; Ewing, Sandra; Sheridan, Marion

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a study of the views of Scottish teachers concerning the delivery of arts subjects within the 5-14 curriculum. Data were gathered through focus group interviews with primary, secondary and primary head teachers, and a questionnaire survey of 232 teachers in 10 Scottish LEAs. Research issues included the balance of the…

  14. The Initial Conceptions for Earthquakes Phenomenon for Moroccan Students of the First Year Secondary College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddif, Aâtika; Touir, Rachid; Majdoubi, Hassan; Larhzil, Hayat; Mousaoui, Brahim; Ahmamou, Mhamed

    2015-01-01

    This work proposes initially to identify the initial conceptions of Moroccan students in the first year of secondary college about the notion of earthquakes. The used methodology is based on a questionnaire addressed to students of life science and Earth in Meknes city, before any official teaching about the said phenomenon. The obtained results…

  15. Practices and Attitudes of Secondary Industrial Education Teachers toward Students with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojewski, Jay W.; And Others

    A self-administered questionnaire about practices and attitudes toward vocational special needs (VSN) students was distributed to a sample of 245 secondary industrial education (IE) teachers in seven central states (Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming). Analysis of 135 returns (55 percent) found moderately…

  16. A Multivariate Analysis of Perceptions Held by Secondary Academic Teachers toward Students with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Pollard, Richard R.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of questionnaire responses of 473 secondary academic teachers indicated that most felt successful in teaching students with special needs. However, over one-third had received no preparation in this area. Perceptions were affected by education; participation in undergraduate, graduate, and inservice training on special needs students; and…

  17. Secondary School Teacher's Perceptions of the Role of Social Studies in Fostering Citizenship Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boikhutso, Keene; Dinama, Baamphatlha; Kgotlaetsile, Moffat Fanah

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions of the role of Botswana's social studies teachers at secondary school level in fostering citizenship competencies and skills. Survey questionnaires were used to collect data comprising close and open-ended questions. The total population comprised forty-one respondents purposively sampled from nine junior…

  18. Teacher-Student Interpersonal Relationships in Indonesian Lower Secondary Education: Teacher and Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maulana, R.; Opdenakker, M. C. J. L.; den Brok, P.; Bosker, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated firstly the reliability and validity of an Indonesian version of the "Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction" (QTI). Second, perceptions of Indonesian secondary school teachers' interpersonal behaviour as perceived by students and teachers were studied with the QTI. Third, differences between students' and teachers'…

  19. Exploring Secondary School Students' Understanding and Practices of Waste Management in Ogun State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ifegbesan, Ayodeji

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the level of awareness, knowledge and practices of secondary schools students with regard to waste management. Few studies have captured waste management problems in Nigerian educational institutions, particularly the views of students. Using a structured, self-administered questionnaire, 650 students were surveyed from six…

  20. The Attitudes and Practices of Japanese Teachers of English in Secondary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taira, Tatsuo

    A study was conducted to analyze the attitudes and English teaching methods of some Japanese teachers of English in secondary schools in Japan. Questionnaires were sent to 50 junior high teachers and 50 high school teachers of English as a second language (ESL). The data analysis is based on responses from 20 junior high teachers and 32 high…

  1. Factors Affecting Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Availability in Competitive Venues of US Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry-McElrath, Yvonne M.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Johnston, Lloyd D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study explores sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) availability in US secondary school competitive venues during the first 3 years following the school wellness policy requirement (2007-2009). Furthermore, analyses examine associations with school policy and SSB availability. Methods: Analyses use questionnaire data from 757 middle and…

  2. Personality and Religion among Secondary School Pupils in the Czech Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Leslie J.; Quesnell, Michael; Lewis, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    The short-form Revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire was completed by 1,780 boys and 1,634 girls attending secondary schools in the Czech Republic, together with the Francis Scale of Attitude towards Christianity. On the one hand, two of the findings are consistent with those from a series of studies employing the same measure of religiosity…

  3. Secondary Education Students' Preferences Regarding Their Participation in Group Work: The Case of Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koutrouba, Konstantina; Kariotaki, Maria; Christopoulos, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    The present questionnaire-based study examines the views of 428 Greek students (aged 13-18 years) from 30 secondary education schools in Athens, who have experienced cooperative learning in group work--an instructional learning strategy not often implemented in Greek schools. The research focuses on students' preferences as regards the composition…

  4. Exploring Secondary Students' Understanding of Chemical Kinetics through Inquiry-Based Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chairam, Sanoe; Klahan, Nutsuda; Coll, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    This research is trying to evaluate the feedback of Thai secondary school students to inquiry-based teaching and learning methods, exemplified by the study of chemical kinetics. This work used the multiple-choice questions, scientifically practical diagram and questionnaire to assess students' understanding of chemical kinetics. The findings…

  5. Attitudes of Secondary School Teachers towards Inclusive Education in New Delhi, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatnagar, Nisha; Das, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the attitudes of secondary regular schoolteachers towards the inclusion of students with disabilities in New Delhi. A total of 470 teachers, working in schools managed by a private organisation in Delhi, returned the completed survey. A two-part questionnaire was used in this study. Part one gathered…

  6. Strategies for School Environmental Management in Nigerian Secondary Schools: A Case of Calabar, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obong, Linus Beba; Okey, Stella-Maris; Aniah, E. J.; Okaba, Lydia A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper on strategies for school environmental management in Nigerian secondary schools was carried out in Calabar, Nigeria. To guide the study three research questions were formulated. This was achieved through administration of structured questionnaires in three randomly sampled schools. Findings show regular grass clearing, sweeping of the…

  7. Finnish Pre-Service Teachers' and Upper Secondary Students' Understanding of Division and Reasoning Strategies Used

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaasila, Raimo; Pehkonen, Erkki; Hellinen, Anu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on Finnish pre-service elementary teachers' (N = 269) and upper secondary students' (N = 1,434) understanding of division. In the questionnaire, we used the following non-standard division problem: "We know that 498:6 = 83. How could you conclude from this relationship (without using long-division algorithm) what 491:6 = ?…

  8. A Survey of the Foreign Language Background and Attitudes of Principals in Washington State Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Nancy

    This survey, conducted in 1966 by the Washington Foreign Language Program, analyzes the possible effect of the secondary school principal on language programs directly or indirectly attributable to his foreign language background and attitudes. Some 369 questionnaires returned by the principals provided information concerning biographical data,…

  9. Memory and Cognitive Strategies of High Ability Students in a Rural Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Fuziana; Yunus, Melor Md

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine language learning strategies employed by the high ability students in a rural secondary school. Memory and cognitive strategies employed by the high ability students were the main focus in this study. A survey design was used and data was collected using Oxford's questionnaires. Findings reveal that the high…

  10. Impact of E-Learning and Digitalization in Primary and Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunmibi, Sunday; Aregbesola, Ayooluwa; Adejobi, Pascal; Ibrahim, Olaniyi

    2015-01-01

    This study examines into the impact of e-learning and digitalization in primary and secondary schools, using Greensprings School in Lagos State, Nigeria as a case study. Questionnaire was used as a data collection instrument, and descriptive statistical method was adopted for analysis. Responses from students and teachers reveal that application…

  11. Investigating the Factors Influencing Teachers' Use of ICT in Teaching in Bruneian Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salleh, Sallimah M.; Laxman, Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The primary focus of the research study described in this paper was to assess the status quo of teachers' use of Information and Communication Technology in teaching in terms of the factors that influence their use. Using a survey questionnaire, data was collected from a total of 1,891 secondary school teachers in all government schools in…

  12. The Relationships between Paranormal Belief, Creationism, Intelligent Design and Evolution at Secondary Schools in Vienna (Austria)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eder, Erich; Turic, Katharina; Milasowszky, Norbert; Van Adzin, Katherine; Hergovich, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The present study is the first to investigate the relationships between a multiple set of paranormal beliefs and the acceptance of evolution, creationism, and intelligent design, respectively, in Europe. Using a questionnaire, 2,129 students at secondary schools in Vienna (Austria) answered the 26 statements of the Revised Paranormal Belief Scale…

  13. An Exploration of Attitudes towards Modern Biotechnology: A Study among Dutch Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klop, Tanja; Severiens, Sabine

    2007-01-01

    Modern biotechnology will have a large impact on society and requires informed decision-making and critical attitudes toward biotechnology among the public. This study aims to explore these attitudes in secondary education. For this purpose, a questionnaire was constructed according to the general tripartite theory of attitudes. A total of 574…

  14. Food Hygiene Education in UK Secondary Schools: A Nationwide Survey of Teachers' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, M. B.; Bielby, G.; Eves, A.; Lumbers, M. L.; Raats, M. M.; Adams, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A nationwide survey of teachers investigated the teaching of food hygiene in UK secondary schools. Previous studies have focused on effective strategies in consumer food hygiene training but there is little research focusing on school-based education. Design: The questionnaire was developed based on the results of in-depth interviews…

  15. Impact of Teachers' Motivational Indices on Science Students' Academic Performance in Nigerian Senior Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oredein, Afolakemi; Awodun, Adebisi

    2013-01-01

    The impact of science teachers' motivation on science students' academic performance in Senior Secondary Schools in Ondo and Ekiti States of Nigeria was investigated in this study. This was a descriptive survey research which was questionnaire based and past WAEC O/L ((May/June 2008 and 2009) student results on the science subjects. The population…

  16. The effect of multiple micronutrient supplementation on quality of life in patients with symptomatic heart failure secondary to ischemic heart disease: a prospective case series clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ang-Peng; Mohamed, Abdul-Latiff; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is a progressive cardiovascular disorder and, in most cases, begins with atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease. The prognosis of patients with heart failure is poor, even with improvement on the management of all forms of ischemic heart disease. There have been studies on heart failure using a single nutrient or a combination of multiple nutrients. Results are mixed. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of multiple micronutrient supplementation using the quality of life measure on patients with heart failure secondary to ischemic heart disease. This prospective case series followed 12 patients for a period between 3 to 8 months, using the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) as the sole outcome measure. The primary outcome was a score change over time between the start and endpoint of treatment. Change in MLHFQ mean total score was 27.08 ± 20.43 and mean symptoms score was 4.67 ± 3.34. Paired t-test showed a difference between baseline and endpoint of treatment (P < 0.001), which was statistically significant. A high dose of multiple micronutrients may have beneficial effects on cardiac function in patients with symptomatic heart failure. This study indicates the need for long-term controlled studies to test the efficacy and safety of this economic approach in managing heart failure. PMID:26417534

  17. Forecasting COPD hospitalization in the clinic: optimizing the chronic respiratory questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Abascal-Bolado, Beatriz; Novotny, Paul J; Sloan, Jeff A; Karpman, Craig; Dulohery, Megan M; Benzo, Roberto P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Forecasting hospitalization in patients with COPD has gained significant interest in the field of COPD care. There is a need to find simple tools that can help clinicians to stratify the risk of hospitalization in these patients at the time of care. The perception of quality of life has been reported to be independently associated with hospitalizations, but questionnaires are impractical for daily clinical use. Individual questions from valid questionnaires can have robust predictive abilities, as has been suggested in previous reports, as a way to use patient-reported outcomes to forecast important events like hospitalizations in COPD. Our primary aim was to assess the predictive value of individual questions from the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire Self-Assessment Survey (CRQ-SAS) on the risk of hospitalization and to develop a clinically relevant and simple algorithm that clinicians can use in routine practice to identify patients with an increased risk of hospitalization. Patients and methods A total of 493 patients with COPD prospectively recruited from an outpatient pulmonary clinic completed the CRQ-SAS, demographic information, pulmonary function testing, and clinical outcomes. The cohort had a mean age of 70 years, was 54% male, with forced expiratory volume in 1 second percentage predicted 42.8±16.7, and modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale score of 2±1.13. Results Our analysis validated the original CRQ-SAS domains. Importantly, recursive partitioning analysis identified three CRQ-SAS items regarding fear or panic of breathlessness, dyspnea with basic activities of daily living, and depressive symptoms that were highly predictive of hospitalization. We propose a robust (area under the curve =0.70) but short and easy algorithm for daily clinical care to forecast hospitalizations in patients with COPD. Conclusion We identified three themes – fear of breathlessness, dyspnea with basic activities of daily living, and depressive symptoms – as important patient-reported outcomes to predict hospitalizations, and propose a short and easy algorithm to forecast hospitalizations in patients with COPD. PMID:26543362

  18. The UCSD Shortness of Breath Questionnaire has Longitudinal Construct Validity in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Swigris, Jeffrey J.; Han, Meilan; Vij, Rekha; Noth, Imre; Eisenstein, Eric L.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Brown, Kevin K.; Fairclough, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Background Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive interstitial lung disease that often causes disabling dyspnea. In IPF and other lung diseases, patient-reported outcomes (PROs)—questionnaires designed to gather information from the patient's perspective—can determine whether therapies affect dyspnea or other outcomes meaningful to patients. Before a PRO can be used confidently as an outcome measure in a longitudinal trial, studies must demonstrate the PRO's ability to capture change over time in the target population. Our goal in this study was to examine whether the UCSD Shortness of Breath Questionnaire does so in patients with IPF. Methods We used data from the Sildenafil Trial of Exercise Performance in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (STEP-IPF) to perform analyses that examined associations between UCSD scores and five external measures (anchors) at baseline and over time. Anchors included the Activity domain from St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ-A), the Physical Functioning domain from the SF-36 (SF36-PF), forced vital capacity (FVC), diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO), and distance walked during a timed walk test (6MWD). Linear regression models were used to examine relationships between UCSD scores and anchors over time. Results At baseline, UCSD scores were weakly correlated with percent predicted FVC (?0.21, p=0.005) and percent predicted DLCO (?0.20, p=0.008), moderately correlated with 6MWD (?0.39, p<0.0001) and strongly correlated with SGRQ-A (0.79, p<0.0001) and SF36-PF (?0.72, p<0.0001). Change over time in UCSD scores was associated with change in FVC (estimate=2.54, standard error [SE]=1.23, p=0.04), SGRQ-A (estimate=7.94, SE=1.11, p<0.0001), SF36-PF (estimate=6.00, SE=1.13, p<0.0001), and 6MWD (estimate=4.23, SE=1.18, p=0.0004) but not DLCO (estimate=0.33, SE=1.33, p=0.80). Conclusions These results support the validity of the UCSD to assess change in dyspnea over time in patients with IPF. PMID:22801586

  19. Inequality in Workplace Conditions and Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    ISHIDA, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between the inequality in workplace conditions and health-related outcomes in Japan. It analyzes the effect of changes in the work conditions and work arrangements on the subjective health, activity restriction, and depression symptoms, using the Japanese Life Course Panel Survey (JLPS). The 2007 JLPS consists of nationally representative sample of the youth (20 to 34?yr old) and the middle-aged (35 to 40?yr old). The original respondents were followed up in 2008, and 2,719 respondents for the youth panel and 1,246 for the middle-aged panel returned the questionnaires. The first major conclusion is that there are substantial changes in health conditions between the two waves even though the distributions of health-related outcomes are very similar at two time points. The second major conclusion is that the effects of work conditions depend on different health-related outcomes. Self-reported health and depression symptoms are affected by a variety of job-related factors. The atmosphere of helping each other and the control over the pace of work are two important factors which affect both depression and self-reported health. All these findings suggest that the workplace conditions and job characteristics have profound influence on the workers’ health. PMID:23955651

  20. Development of Screening Questionnaire for Detection of Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Ashish; Giri, Om Prakash; Sarkar, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Alcohol dependence (AD) is a major reason for morbidity and visits to emergency medical settings. However, the detection of AD is often difficult or overlooked. This study aimed to develop a brief screening questionnaire in Hindi language for detection of AD in an emergency medical setting. Materials and Methods The authors in consultation devised a set of questions related to AD in the Hindi language requiring binary yes/no type of response. These questions were guided by clinical experience, nosological criteria and previously published screening questionnaires. After initial piloting, these questions were administered by the treating doctors to 100 consenting adult patients presenting with possible AD in the emergency medical services of a tertiary care hospital in North India. A diagnosis of AD was arrived at by administering Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview separately. Identification of the most discriminant combinations of items for the detection of AD were based on the chi-square test and binary logistic regression analyses. The final version of the questionnaire was then externally validated on another cohort of patients. Results Based on the analyses, we retained 5 items in the final version of the questionnaire. Sensitivity and specificity values for cut-off scores were calculated. Subsequent external validation revealed satisfactory psychometric properties of the questionnaire. Conclusion The questionnaire represents a simple and brief clinician-administered instrument for screening of AD in an emergency medical setting. PMID:26500989

  1. Malawian secondary students' beliefs about intelligence.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brett D; Rakes, Lee; Landon, Krista

    2013-01-01

    Students who view intelligence as malleable tend to be more academically motivated and perform at higher levels than students who view it as a fixed trait. We examined the beliefs of students from Malawi because the culture and schooling process in this country is very different from some other areas of the world in which students' views of intelligence have already been studied. Our research questions were: (1) How do Malawian students define intelligence? (2) To what extent do Malawian students view intelligence as malleable? (3) Are Malawian students' definitions of intelligence and beliefs about the malleability of intelligence similar to those of students in more developed countries? We conducted a mixed methods study and surveyed 136 students attending a secondary school in Malawi using a 39-item questionnaire. Students responded to questions about their intelligence beliefs on open- and closed-ended items. Our results showed that Malawian students believe that an intelligent student exhibits a variety of behaviors, including studying, working hard, reading, performing well on exams and in class, answering and asking questions, paying attention, and demonstrating good behavior. Most students believe that intelligence is malleable and provided responses that indicated that students can become more intelligent through effort. When compared to the findings of other studies, the present results suggest that the Malawian students who remain in secondary school have definitions of intelligence and beliefs about the malleability of intelligence that are similar to those of students in more developed countries, such as the US and Germany. In fact, it appears that Malawian secondary students have even higher malleable beliefs than American and German students. Finally, some of the measures that have been found to produce scores that are reliable and valid in other populations do not produce scores that are as reliable when used with Malawian students. PMID:22946644

  2. The outcome and cost-effectiveness of nurse-led care in the community for people with rheumatoid arthritis: a non-randomised pragmatic study

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Richard A; Mooney, Janice; Barton, Garry; MacGregor, Alex J; Shepstone, Lee; Irvine, Lisa; Scott, David G I

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the outcome and cost-effectiveness of nurse-led care in the community for people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Design Non-randomised pragmatic study. Setting Primary (7 primary care practices) and secondary care (single centre) in the UK. Methods In a single area, pragmatic non-randomised study, we assessed the outcome, cost-effectiveness of community-based nurse-led care (NLC) compared with rheumatologist-led outpatient care (RLC). Participants were 349 adults (70% female) with stable RA assessed at baseline, 6 and 12?months. In the community NLC arm there were 192 participants. Outcome was assessed using Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ). The economic evaluation (healthcare perspective) estimated cost relative to change in HAQ and quality-adjusted life years (QALY) derived from EQ-5D-3L. We report complete case and multiple imputation results from regression analyses. Results The demographics and baseline characteristics of patients in the community group were comparable to those under hospital care apart from use of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDS), which were adjusted for in the analysis. The mean incremental cost was estimated to be £224 less for RLC compared to the community NLC, with wide CIs (CI –£213 to £701, p=0.296). Levels of functional disability were not clinically significantly higher in the community NLC group: HAQ 0.096 (95% CI ?0.026 to 0.206; p=0.169) and QALY 0.023 (95% CI ?0.059 to 0.012; p=0.194). Conclusions The results suggest that community care may be associated with non-significant higher costs with no significant differences in clinical outcomes, and this suggests a low probability that it is cost-effective. PMID:26307614

  3. Maternal outcomes of cesarean sections

    PubMed Central

    Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Newbery, Sarah; Kelly, Len; Weaver, Bruce; Wilson, Scott

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare maternal outcomes of cesarean sections performed by GPs with the outcomes of those performed by specialists. DESIGN Retrospective, comorbidity-adjusted study. SETTING Mostly small isolated rural hospitals in Ontario, British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan compared with all levels of specialist obstetric programs offered in Canada. PARTICIPANTS Fifteen GPs with less than 1 year of surgical training who performed cesarean sections. METHOD Using data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information’s Discharge Abstracts Database for the years 1990 to 2001, we matched each of 1448 cesarean section cases managed by these GPs to 3 cases managed by specialists and looked for comorbidity. In total, we analyzed the outcomes of 5792 cesarean sections. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Composites of major morbidity possibly attributable to surgery:death, sepsis, cardiac arrest, shock, hypotension, ileus or bowel obstruction,major puerperal infection, septic or fat embolism, postpartum hemorrhage requiring hysterectomy, need for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or another operation; and all major morbidity: major surgical morbidity, acute coronary syndrome, endocarditis, pulmonary edema, cerebrovascular disorder, pneumothorax, respiratory failure, amniotic fluid embolism, complications of anesthesia, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, acute renal failure, and need for mechanical ventilation. RESULTS The rate of all major morbidity was higher among GPs’ patients than among specialists’ patients (3.1% vs 1.9%, odds ratio [OR] 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1 to2.3, P = .009) as was the rate of major surgical morbidity (2.5% vs 1.6%, OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.4, P = .024). Differences in major morbidity variables were not significant if major postpartum infection was excluded (all major morbidity 1.5% vs 1.1%, major surgical morbidity 1.0% vs 0.8%). Secondary outcomes included rate of transfer to acute care institutions (6.0% vs 1.5%, OR 4.6, 95% CI 3.6 to 6.5, P < .001), mean length of hospital stay (5.2 vs 4.9 days, P= .006), need for blood transfusion (5.9% vs 7.0%, OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.5 to 1.1, P = .11) and frequency of surgical error (0.8% vs 0.7%, OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.6 to 2.3, P = .72). CONCLUSION Although major morbidity was higher among GPs’ patients, differences were entirely attributable to the rate of postpartum infection. Infection rates in both groups were far below expected rates. The observation that blood transfusion and surgical error rates were similar suggests that surgical technique was not the cause of differences between groups. We conclude that these GPs with a mean of 4 months’ training subsequently performed cesarean sections with an acceptable degree of safety compared with specialists. PMID:18077752

  4. Cheating Tendency in Examinations among Secondary School Students in Nigeria: A Case Study of Schools in the Odukpani Local Government Area, Cross River State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisong, Nonso Ngozika; Akpama, Felicia; Edet, Pauline B.

    2009-01-01

    This study is designed to examine cheating tendency among secondary school students in Nigeria, with evidence from schools in the Odukpani Local Government Area of Cross River State. A total of 331 respondents in Senior Secondary 3 classes were randomly selected from 10 post-primary schools in the area. A survey questionnaire was used to elicit…

  5. A Second National Survey of Health-Related Quality of Life Questionnaires in Head and Neck Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Kanatas, Anastasios N; Mehanna, Hisham M; Lowe, Derek; Rogers, Simon N

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION With an increasing number of publications on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) following head and neck cancer, the recognition of a number of well-validated questionnaires and a growing awareness of the potential role of HRQOL in practice, it was our aim to repeat the survey of 2002 reported in the Annals to see how practice changed. MATERIALS AND METHODS A postal survey of members of the British Association of Head and Neck Oncologists was undertaken in January 2006 with reminders sent in February, March and April. RESULTS The response was 50% (106 of 210) of which 53% were using or had used HRQOL questionnaires. The main reasons for not using HRQOL questionnaires were that they were too time-consuming or intrusive in a clinic setting and that there was a lack of resources. CONCLUSIONS Clinicians still see the use of questionnaires as a research-tool only, rather than an adjunct to giving patient information, promoting choice, and identifying patients with problems. The burden on HRQOL evaluation in routine clinical practice remains a substantial barrier. Advances with IT support in clinic should make it easier to collect and use these data in the future. As surgeons, we still need to be persuaded of the benefits of HRQOL outcomes in our practice. PMID:19409153

  6. Development and validity of the Emotion and Motivation Self-regulation Questionnaire (EMSR-Q).

    PubMed

    Alonso-Tapia, Jesús; Panadero Calderón, Ernesto; Díaz Ruiz, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    This study has two objectives, first, to develop and validate the "Emotion and Motivation Self-regulation Questionnaire" (EMSR-Q), and second, to analyze (in the context of the questionnaire validation process) the relationships between self-regulation styles (SRS) rooted in goal orientations, and classroom motivational climate (CMC). A total of 664 Secondary Education students from Madrid (Spain) formed the sample of the study. It was divided randomly in two groups to perform confirmatory factor analysis and to cross-validate the results. Both analyses supported a five first-order factor structure, organized around two second-order factors, "Learning self-regulation style" (LSR) and "Avoidance self-regulation style" (ASR): (? 2 /df = 2.71; GFI = .89; IFI = .84; CFI = .84; RMSEA = .07). Hypotheses concerning the relationships between SRS, goal orientations and expectancies are supported by additional correlation and factor analyses. Moreover, several regression analyses supported for the most part of the remaining hypotheses concerning the role of self-regulation styles as predictors of classroom motivational climate (CMC) perception, of change in self-regulation attributed to teacher work, and of students' satisfaction with this same work. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:26055445

  7. A Study to Inform the Design of a National Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trial to Evaluate If Reducing Serum Phosphate to Normal Levels Improves Clinical Outcomes including Mortality, Cardiovascular Events, Bone Pain, or Fracture in Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Ramya; Kalra, Philip A.; Brenchley, Paul; Hurst, Helen; Hutchison, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    Background. Retrospective, observational studies link high phosphate with mortality in dialysis patients. This generates research hypotheses but does not establish “cause-and-effect.” A large randomised controlled trial (RCT) of about 3000 patients randomised 50?:?50 to lower or higher phosphate ranges is required to answer the key question: does reducing phosphate levels improve clinical outcomes? Whether such a trial is technically possible is unknown; therefore, a study is necessary to inform the design and conduct of a future, definitive trial. Methodology. Dual centre prospective parallel group study: 100 dialysis patients randomized to lower (phosphate target 0.8 to 1.4?mmol/L) or higher range group (1.8 to 2.4?mmol/L). Non-calcium-containing phosphate binders and questionnaires will be used to achieve target phosphate. Primary endpoint: percentage successfully titrated to required range and percentage maintained in these groups over the maintenance period. Secondary endpoints: consent rate, drop-out rates, and cardiovascular events. Discussion. This study will inform design of a large definitive trial of the effect of phosphate on mortality and cardiovascular events in dialysis patients. If phosphate lowering improves outcomes, we would be reassured of the validity of this clinical practice. If, on the other hand, there is no improvement, a reassessment of resource allocation to therapies proven to improve outcomes will result. Trial Registration Number. This trial is registered with ISRCTN registration number ISRCTN24741445. PMID:26366297

  8. Development and Preliminary Validation of Chinese Preschoolers’ Eating Behavior Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhai; Wang, Baoxi; Sun, Lijun; Shang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to develop a questionnaire for caregivers to assess the eating behavior of Chinese preschoolers. Methods To assess children’s eating behaviors, 152 items were derived from a broad review of the literature related to epidemiology surveys and the assessment of children’s eating behaviors. All of these items were reviewed by 50 caregivers of preschoolers and 10 experienced pediatricians. Seventy-seven items were selected for use in a primary questionnaire. After conducting an exploratory factor analysis and a variability analysis on the data from 313 preschoolers used to evaluate this primary questionnaire, we deleted 39 of these 77 items. A Chinese Preschoolers’ Eating Behavior Questionnaire (CPEBQ) was finally established from the remaining 38 items. The structure of this questionnaire was explored by factor analysis, and its reliability, validity and discriminative ability were evaluated with data collected from caregivers of 603 preschoolers. Results The CPEBQ consisted of 7 dimensions and 38 items. The 7 dimensions were food fussiness, food responsiveness, eating habit, satiety responsiveness, exogenous eating, emotional eating and initiative eating. The Cronbach’s ? coefficient for the questionnaire was 0.92, and the test-retest reliability was 0.72. There were significant differences between the scores of normal-weight, overweight and obese preschoolers when it was referred to food fussiness, food responsiveness, eating habits, satiety responsiveness and emotional eating (p<0.05). Differences in caregiver’s education levels also had significant effects on scores for food fussiness, eating habits and exogenous eating (p<0.05). Conclusions The CPEBQ satisfies the conditions of reliability and validity, in accordance with psychometric demands. The questionnaire can be employed to evaluate the characteristics of Chinese preschoolers’ eating behaviors; therefore, it can be used in child health care practice and research. PMID:24520359

  9. Translation of the Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire to an Indian language: A description of the process.

    PubMed

    Meera, Shoba Sreenath; Girimaji, Satish Chandra; Seshadri, Shekar P; Philip, Mariamma; Shivashankar, N; Morgan, Parlier; Piven, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    The Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire (BAPQ) which is a reliable, efficient and easy to administer instrument is used to assess the Broad Autism Phenotype (BAP). In order to understand cross cultural perspectives using this instrument, a key process is translation of the instrument. The process of translation is often overlooked and hence the quality of the translated instrument may suffer. This paper highlights the robust process adopted for translating the BAPQ into one of the Indian languages - Kannada, using the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) and World Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines. The translated instrument was tested on a pilot sample of parents of 10 children with ASD and parents of 11 typically developing children. The results are in congruence with the published literature. PMID:26003779

  10. Health Status and Self-care Outcomes Following an Education-Support Intervention for People with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Angela P.; McDougall, Graham; Riegel, Barbara; Joiner-Rogers, Glenda; Innerarity, Sheri; Meraviglia, Martha; Delville, Carol; Davila, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Background The rising cost of hospitalizations for heart failure (HF) care mandates intervention models to address education for self-care success. The effectiveness of memory enhancement strategies to improve self-care and learning needs further examination. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the effects of an education-support intervention delivered in the home setting, using strategies to improve health status and self-care in adults/older adults with class I-III HF. Our secondary purpose was to explore participants’ subjective perceptions of the intervention. Methods This study used a randomized, 2 group design. Fifty people were enrolled for 9 months and tested at 4 time points—baseline; following a 3-month education-support intervention; at 6 months, following 3-months of telephone/email support; and 9 months, following a 3-month period of no contact. Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) delivered the intervention. Memory enhancement methods were built into the teaching materials and delivery of the intervention. We measured the intervention’s effectiveness on health status outcomes (functional status, self-efficacy, quality of life, emotional state/depressive symptoms, and metamemory) and self-care outcomes (knowledge/knowledge retention, self-care ability). Subjects evaluated the usefulness of the intervention at the end of the study. Results The mean age of the sample was 62.4 years, with a slight majority of female participants. Participants were well educated and had other concomitant diseases, including diabetes (48%), and an unexpected degree of obesity. The intervention group showed significant improvements in functional status, self-efficacy and quality of life (Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire-KCCQ); metamemory Change and Capacity subscales (Metamemory in Adulthood Questionnaire-MIA); self-care knowledge (HF Knowledge Test-HFKT); and self-care (Self-Care in Heart Failure Index—SCHFI). Participants in both groups improved in depressive scores (Geriatric Depression Scale-GDS). Conclusions An in-home intervention delivered by APRNs was successful in several health status and self-care outcomes, including self-efficacy, quality of life, metamemory, self-care status, and HF knowledge. PMID:24978157

  11. Secondary aortoduodenal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Geraci, Girolamo; Pisello, Franco; Volsi, Francesco Li; Facella, Tiziana; Platia, Lina; Modica, Giuseppe; Sciumè, Carmelo

    2008-01-01

    Aorto-duodenal fistulae (ADF) are the most frequent aorto-enteric fistulae (80%), presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We report the first case of a man with a secondary aorto-duodenal fistula presenting with a history of persistent occlusive syndrome. A 59-year old man who underwent an aortic-bi-femoral bypass 5 years ago, presented with dyspepsia and biliary vomiting. Computed tomography scan showed in the third duodenal segment the presence of inflammatory tissue with air bubbles between the duodenum and prosthesis, adherent to the duodenum. The patient was submitted to surgery, during which the prosthesis was detached from the duodenum, the intestine failed to close and a gastrojejunal anastomosis was performed. The post-operative course was simple, secondary ADF was a complication (0.3%-2%) of aortic surgery. Mechanical erosion of the prosthetic material into the bowel was due to the lack of interposed retroperitoneal tissue or the excessive pulsation of redundantly placed grafts or septic procedures. The third or fourth duodenal segment was most frequently involved. Diagnosis of ADF was difficult. Surgical treatment is always recommended by explorative laparotomy. ADF must be suspected whenever a patient with aortic prosthesis has digestive bleeding or unexplained obstructive syndrome. Rarely the clinical picture of ADF is subtle presenting as an obstructive syndrome and in these cases the principal goal is to effectively relieve the mechanical bowel obstruction. PMID:18200675

  12. Small Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Interstitial Hernia: Laparoscopic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Gallesio, J. M.; Schlottmann, F.; Sadava, E. E.

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial hernias are a rare entity. Most of them are detected incidentally on imaging studies. We present a case of abdominal bowel obstruction secondary to interstitial hernia on the fifth postoperative day of an open incisional hernia repair. Laparoscopy confirmed the diagnosis and led to an accurate treatment avoiding a new laparotomy. In this case, prompt surgical decision based on clinical and CT scan findings allowed a mini-invasive approach with satisfactory outcome. PMID:26576315

  13. Overweight and Obesity in Pediatric Secondary Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Paley, Grace l.; Sheldon, Claire A.; Burrows, Evanette K.; Chilutti, Marianne R.; Liu, Grant T.; Mccormack, Shana E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the clinical, demographic, and anthropometric patient characteristics of secondary pseudotumor cerebri syndrome in children and adolescents based on the recently revised diagnostic criteria. Design Retrospective observational case series. Methods Patients seen at a tertiary children's hospital for pseudotumor cerebri syndrome were classified as having either primary idiopathic (n = 59) or secondary pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (n = 16), as rigorously defined by recently revised diagnostic criteria. Outcomes included body mass index Z-scores (BMI-Z), height and weight Z-scores, demographics, and clinical features at presentation, such as headache, sixth nerve palsy, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressure. Results In this cohort, the associated conditions and exposures seen in definite secondary pseudotumor cerebri syndrome included tetracycline-class antibiotics (n = 11), chronic kidney disease (n = 3), withdrawal from chronic glucocorticoids (n = 1), and lithium (n = 1). Other associations observed in the possible secondary pseudotumor cerebri syndrome group included Down syndrome, vitamin A derivatives, and growth hormone. In comparison with primary pseudotumor cerebri syndrome, definite secondary pseudotumor cerebri syndrome patients were on average older (15.0 vs 11.6 years; P = .003, Mann-Whitney test). According to US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) classifications, 79% of children with secondary pseudotumor cerebri syndrome were either overweight or obese (36% overweight [n = 5] and 43% obese [n = 6]), as compared to 32% nationally. Conclusions Even when a potential inciting exposure is identified for pediatric pseudotumor cerebri syndrome, the possible contribution of overweight and obesity should be considered. PMID:25447107

  14. Design, development and validation of the RedBrick Health Assessment: a questionnaire-based study

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Peter R; Masloski, Wendy S; Bashaw, Carole M; Butler, Jolene RW; Hillstrom, Molly E; Zimmerman, Eric M

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Health risk assessment (HRA) questionnaires have become a popular tool to help quantify health issues within populations. Over the last decade HRAs have increasingly been delivered in the online environment. The objective of this study was to create and validate an HRA that is optimized for delivery via the Internet. Design After an iterative process of user testing and interface design the RedBrick Health Assessment (RBHA) was validated against known domain specific questionnaires with 464 working Americans, and with medical claims data from over 25,000 employees. Setting All consumer testing, data capture and analysis occurred at the offices of RedBrick Health Corporation, Minneapolis, USA and via a secure online portal. Participants Individuals in full-time employment in the USA, who were between 18 and 65 years of age at the time inquiry. Main outcome measures Correlation of the included RBHA domains with the output from known gold standard health question sets for each assessed health domain. Results The iterative development process employed in creating the RBHA produced a tool that had a high degree of user acceptability. The domains demonstrated good correlations with relevant gold standard questionnaire measures, good internal consistency, and acceptable sensitivity and specificity when compared to gold standard risk stratification and high-risk classification (specificity of domains ranged from 76–94%). A test–retest correlation co-efficient of 0.7, or greater, was achieved 8 weeks after initial completion. Conclusions The RBHA is a new breed of HRA that has been specifically developed for capturing health status information in an online environment. At its heart is user centricity and this focus has enabled the creation of a tool that is not only highly engaging but also captures accurate and robust health status information. PMID:21969882

  15. Self-Reported Knee Symptoms Assessed by KOOS Questionnaire in Downhill Runners (Skyrunners)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The knee is the weight-bearing joint most commonly associated with sports injuries, and therefore is most at risk of developing degenerative changes, including osteoarthritis. Skyrunners can be considered to be at risk of developing symptoms of post-traumatic osteoarthritis due to downhill running. Aim The aim of this study was to analyze the health of the knee joints of a large group of these athletes via a specific self-report questionnaire. Methods This study was carried out by asking the participants of seven official Skyraces (22.4±3.1 km length; 1596±393 m elevation) to fill out a questionnaire. Information regarding age, sex, downhill elevation (m) during training and competitions over the last month, and history of previous knee injury was also collected before the participants filled out the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), which is a reliable and validated instrument designed to assess patients’ opinions about their knees and associated problems that can result in post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Athletes were divided into six age groups (from 17 to 70 years) and 12 groups based on the downhill gradient they had covered over the last month (from 1,000 to 40,000 m). Results Six hundred twenty-one questionnaires were collected from 45% of the participants in the seven races. Multivariate analysis revealed that self-reported KOOS scores were unrelated to age, sex and monthly downhill gradient. Only 74 (12%) of the participants reported previous knee injuries. Significant differences in the five subscales of the KOOS were found between skyrunners with and without previous knee injuries (P<0.01). Conclusions In the studied population, regular training for downhill running and participation in Skyraces could not be considered risk factors for subjective knee symptoms. Skyrunners with self-reported histories of knee injuries scored worse on all five subscales of the KOOS. PMID:25902316

  16. The Panel Management Questionnaire: A Tool to Measure Panel Management Capability

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Elizabeth Ann; Hessler, Danielle; Dube, Kate; Willard-Grace, Rachel; Gupta, Reena; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Grumbach, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Context: To meet demands for evidence-based chronic and preventive services and to improve performance, primary care practices are turning toward team-based strategies such as panel management, in which nonclinicians address routine preventive and chronic disease care tasks for a group of patients. No known validated instruments have been published for measuring panel management implementation. Objective: To describe development and evaluation of the Panel Management Questionnaire (PMQ), a self-report tool measuring panel management capability in primary care. Design: Cross-sectional study for questionnaire validation. Main Outcome Measures: We developed the 12-item PMQ from a conceptual framework to measure 4 domains of panel management and tested the questionnaire for internal and external validity. Data were assembled from self-administered cross-sectional surveys that included the PMQ instrument sent from February 2012 through May 2012. We surveyed 136 staff and 204 clinicians in 9 county and 5 university adult primary care clinics. Additional data came from clinic quality measures routinely collected the quarter before the survey. Results: The PMQ scale demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach ? = 0.92 and 0.84 for staff and clinicians, respectively). Staff and clinician PMQ scores in each clinic were correlated (Kendall ? = 0.45, p < 0.05). The clinic-level median PMQ score was positively associated with a composite clinic quality measure (Kendall ? = 0.42 for staff, 0.28 for clinicians). Conclusions: The PMQ measures self-reported panel management capability and may be a useful assessment and research tool for panel management implementation in primary care practice. PMID:25785637

  17. Development of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: constructing an item pool

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Laura; Jenkinson, Crispin; Dummett, Sarah; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Morley, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire is a patient-reported outcome measure in development that is grounded on the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The study reported here aimed to inform and generate an item pool for the new measure, which is specifically designed for the assessment of participation and activity in patients experiencing a range of health conditions. Methods Items were informed through in-depth interviews conducted with 37 participants spanning a range of conditions. Interviews aimed to identify how their condition impacted their ability to participate in meaningful activities. Conditions included arthritis, cancer, chronic back pain, diabetes, motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and spinal cord injury. Transcripts were analyzed using the framework method. Statements relating to ICF themes were recast as questionnaire items and shown for review to an expert panel. Cognitive debrief interviews (n=13) were used to assess items for face and content validity. Results ICF themes relevant to activities and participation in everyday life were explored, and a total of 222 items formed the initial item pool. This item pool was refined by the research team and 28 generic items were mapped onto all nine chapters of the ICF construct, detailing activity and participation. Cognitive interviewing confirmed the questionnaire instructions, items, and response options were acceptable to participants. Conclusion Using a clear conceptual basis to inform item generation, 28 items have been identified as suitable to undergo further psychometric testing. A large-scale postal survey will follow in order to refine the instrument further and to assess its psychometric properties. The final instrument is intended for use in clinical trials and interventions targeted at maintaining or improving activity and participation. PMID:26056503

  18. Development and validation of a questionnaire to identify severe maternal morbidity in epidemiological surveys

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective to develop and validate a questionnaire on severe maternal morbidity and to evaluate the maternal recall of complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. Design: validity of a questionnaire as diagnostic instrument. Setting: a third level referral maternity in Campinas, Brazil. Population: 386 survivors of severe maternal complications and 123 women that delivered without major complications between 2002 and 2007. Methods eligible women were traced and interviewed by telephone on the occurrence of obstetric complications and events related to their treatment. Their answers were compared with their medical records as gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios plus their correspondent 95% confidence intervals were used as main estimators of accuracy. Main outcomes: diagnosis of severe maternal morbidity associated with past pregnancies, including hemorrhage, eclampsia, infections, jaundice and related procedures (hysterectomy, admission to ICU, blood transfusion, laparotomy, inter-hospital transfer, mechanical ventilation and post partum stay above seven days). Results Women did not recall accurately the occurrence of obstetric complications, especially hemorrhage and infection. The likelihood ratios were < 5 for hemorrhage and infection, while for eclampsia it almost reached 10. The information recalled by women regarding hysterectomy, intensive care unit admission and blood transfusion were found to be highly correlated with finding evidence of the event in the medical records (likelihood ratios ranging from 12.7-240). The higher length of time between delivery and interview was associated with poor recall. Conclusion Process indicators are better recalled by women than obstetric complication and should be considered when applying a questionnaire on severe maternal morbidity. PMID:20663159

  19. Factor structure of the Singapore English version of the KINDL® children quality of life questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Hwee-Lin; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike; Erhart, Michael; Li, Shu-Chuen

    2007-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QoL) outcomes are useful in the assessment of physical, mental and social well-being and for informed healthcare decision making. However, few studies have evaluated QoL issues among Asian children due largely to the lack of culturally valid and reliable QoL questionnaires. Hence, we aimed to report the psychometric properties, in particular factor structure, of KINDL (Singapore) questionnaires among school-going children. Methods Students aged 8–16 years from participating schools were selected by convenience sampling. Subjects self-completed KINDL-Kid (Singapore) and KINDL-Kiddo (Singapore) questionnaires, which were cross-culturally adapted from KINDL (Germany English) for use in Singapore. We evaluated floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency and performed factor analysis. Results A total of 328 respondents (mean (SD) age: 9.6 (1.31) years; 67% female; 75% Chinese, 16% Malays, 9% Indians and others) completed KINDL-Kid while 1,026 respondents (mean (SD) age: 14.0 (1.00) years; 82% female; 82% Chinese, 12% Malays; 6% Indians and others) completed KINDL-Kiddo. Mean (SD) TOTAL QoL score was 65.5 (12.76) and 56.6 (11.92) for KINDL-Kid and KINDL-Kiddo, respectively. Floor and ceiling effects were important in five of six KINDL-Kid and two of six KINDL-Kiddo subscales. Reliability coefficients ranged from 0.40 to 0.71 (KINDL-Kid) and 0.44 to 0.84 (KINDL-Kiddo). Factor analysis generated eight and seven factors in KINDL-Kid and KINDL-Kiddo, respectively. Conclusion KINDL-Kiddo exhibited good psychometric properties and may be used to assess QoL in this multi-ethnic English-speaking Asian population. However, psychometric properties of KINDL-Kid may need to be improved either by developing new items or modifying existing items. PMID:17239229

  20. Measuring the stigma of psychiatry and psychiatrists: development of a questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Gaebel, Wolfgang; Zäske, Harald; Cleveland, Helen-Rose; Zielasek, Jürgen; Stuart, Heather; Arboleda-Florez, Julio; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Gureje, Oye; Jorge, Miguel R; Kastrup, Marianne; Suzuki, Yuriko; Tasman, Allan; Sartorius, Norman

    2011-11-01

    The stigma of mental illness is a severe burden for people suffering from mental illness both in private and public life, also affecting their relatives, their close social network, and the mental health care system in terms of disciplines, providers, and institutions. Interventions against the stigma of mental illness employ complementary strategies (e.g., protest, education, and contact) and address different target groups (e.g., school children and teachers, journalists, stakeholders). Within this framework, the World Psychiatric Association has adopted an Action Plan with the goal to improve the image of psychiatry and to reduce potential stigmatizing attitudes toward psychiatry and psychiatrists. To evaluate such interventions, a questionnaire has been developed that assesses opinions and attitudes toward psychiatrists and psychiatry in different samples of medical specialists (psychiatrists and general practitioners). The questionnaire comprises scales about perceived stigma in terms of the perception of societal stereotypes, self-stigma in terms of stereotype agreement, perceived stigma in terms of structural discriminations, discrimination experiences, stigma outcomes, and attitudes toward a second medical discipline. It is available in several languages (Arab, English, German, Japanese, Polish, and Spanish) and can easily be adapted for utilization in other medical specialties. PMID:21947511

  1. Views of senior UK doctors about working in medicine: questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Trevor W; Goldacre, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives We surveyed the UK medical qualifiers of 1993. We asked closed questions about their careers; and invited them to give us comments, if they wished, about any aspect of their work. Our aim in this paper is to report on the topics that this senior cohort of UK-trained doctors who work in UK medicine raised with us. Design Questionnaire survey Participants 3479 contactable UK-trained medical graduates of 1993. Setting UK. Main outcome measures Comments made by doctors about their work, and their views about medical careers and training in the UK. Method Postal and email questionnaires. Results Response rate was 72% (2507); 2252 were working in UK medicine, 816 (36%) of whom provided comments. Positive comments outweighed negative in the areas of their own job satisfaction and satisfaction with their training. However, 23% of doctors who commented expressed dissatisfaction with aspects of junior doctors’ training, the impact of working time regulations, and with the requirement for doctors to make earlier career decisions than in the past about their choice of specialty. Some doctors were concerned about government health service policy; others were dissatisfied with the availability of family-friendly/part-time work, and we are concerned about attitudes to gender and work-life balance. Conclusions Though satisfied with their own training and their current position, many senior doctors felt that changes to working hours and postgraduate training had reduced the level of experience gained by newer graduates. They were also concerned about government policy interventions. PMID:25408920

  2. The Toddler Language and Motor Questionnaire: A mother-report measure of language and motor development.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, Einar

    2015-01-01

    This study empirically evaluates the psychometric properties of a new mother-answered developmental instrument for toddlers, the Toddler Language and Motor Questionnaire (TLMQ). Mothers of 1132 15- to 38-month-old children filled out a 144-item instrument, tapping the toddlers' competences in five language and motor subtests. Concurrent validity was investigated in an independent sample by administering the McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities (MSCA) individually to 47 children and the TLMQ to their mothers. A two-factor solution emerged in principal axis factor analyses with a promax rotation, with motor subtests loading high on one of the factors and the language subtests on the other. Toddlers' genders significantly affected outcome on all of the five subtests. Divergent and convergent correlations emerged between the TLMQ's motor composite and scales of the MSCA. Partially convergent and divergent correlations emerged between the TLMQ's language composite and scales of the MSCA. The findings show that young children's motor and language development can be reliably and validly assessed by using a psychometrically constructed questionnaire completed by mothers. PMID:26209772

  3. The Weight-Related Abuse Questionnaire (WRAQ): Reliability, validity, and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Salwen, Jessica K; Hymowitz, Genna F

    2015-12-01

    Weight-related teasing (WRT)/stigmatization may be distinct from teasing and general abuse and may differentially impact adult outcomes. As WRT increases in severity so do depression and disordered eating. Currently, there are no validated measures designed to assess abuse specific to weight. Thus, we developed the Weight-Related Abuse Questionnaire (WRAQ) and validated it in young adult and clinically obese populations. The WRAQ was administered to 3 samples of participants: 292 undergraduate students, 382 undergraduate students, and 59 individuals seeking bariatric surgery. Concurrent validity was assessed via measures of WRT and general childhood abuse. Convergent validity was assessed with measures of depression and disordered eating. Study 1 data were used to further develop the structure of the WRAQ. Study 2 indicated that the WRAQ had excellent psychometric properties (based on factor analyses and reliability/scale consistency analysis) and strong concurrent and convergent validity, supporting the validity of the questionnaire. 6-month test-retest reliability was also good. In Study 3 responses on the WRAQ converged well with interview responses, showed good psychometric properties, and showed moderate correlations with measures of childhood abuse and psychopathology. The WRAQ has strong psychometric properties and is strongly associated with measures of current psychopathology. Additionally, it fills a gap in the assessment literature and may be a beneficial tool for determining which individuals are at increased risk for psychopathology. PMID:26402044

  4. The minimal important difference for the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire in patients with severe COPD.

    PubMed

    Welling, Jorrit B A; Hartman, Jorine E; Ten Hacken, Nick H T; Klooster, Karin; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2015-12-01

    The St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) is a validated, commonly used questionnaire for measuring quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The current established minimal important difference (MID) for SGRQ scores in an average COPD population is -4 units. However, for patients with severe COPD, the MID has not been thoroughly validated. We re-determined the SGRQ MID for this patient group.115 severe COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1?s (FEV1) 26±9% of predicted, SGRQ score 62±11 units; mean±sd,) who participated in seven different bronchoscopic lung volume reduction clinical trials were included in the analysis. Anchor- and distribution-based methods were used to define the MID for SGRQ scores. FEV1, 6-min walk distance and residual volume were used as anchors.Combining both anchor- and distribution-based methods, we identified a SGRQ MID of -8.3 units at 1?month and -7.1 units at 6?months.This study proposes an alternative SGRQ MID for patients with severe COPD of -8.3 units at 1?month and -7.1 units at 6?months follow-up after intervention. Our new MID estimates could be applied for both interpreting SGRQ outcomes as well as sample size determination in future clinical trials investigating interventions in severe COPD patients. PMID:26493797

  5. Development and validation of cardiac patient competence questionnaire, Iranian version

    PubMed Central

    Roohafza, Hamidreza; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Khani, Azam; Afshar, Hamid; Amirpour, Afshin; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Scheidt, Carl Eduard

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim was to translate and develop a patient competence (PC) questionnaire in the context of cardiology and test its validity and reliability. METHODS In total, 148 cardiac patients who have inclusion criteria of the study were completed cardiac PC (CPC) questionnaire. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and self-administered instrument European quality of life 5-dimensions were used to further validate the CPC questionnaire. The CPC was translated according to the recommended methodology for translating questionnaires, and psychometric properties including internal consistency, factor analysis, discriminant validity, construct validity, and concurrent criterion validity were tested. RESULTS Five domains in problem-focused task including search for information, self-regulation, being assertive, independent decision-making, and looking for social services, and three domains in emotion-focused task including stress management, confronting the threat, and avoidance were obtained by factor analysis. The standardized Cronbach’s ? of all domains were statistically significant (P < 0.001) and internal consistency for all domains was acceptable. Significant intercorrelations of CPC domains also indicated good criterion validity. As there were no cross-loadings, the domains have demonstrated good construct validity and discriminant validity. CONCLUSION The results of this study show that the Persian version of the CPC is a reliable and valid questionnaire. Although further improvement of this measure is clearly required, it suggests being a potential basis for investigating the determinants and health effects of CPC. PMID:26478729

  6. Development of A Questionnaire to Measure Attitude toward Oocyte Donation

    PubMed Central

    Omani Samani, Reza; Mounesan, Leila; Ezabadi, Zahra; Vesali, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Background To our knowledge, there is no valid and comprehensive questionnaire that considers attitude toward oocyte donation (OD). Therefore this study has aimed to design and develop a tool entitled attitude toward donation-oocyte (ATOD-O) to measure attitude toward OD. Materials and Methods This methodological, qualitative research was undertaken on 15 infertile cases. In addition, we performed a literature review and search of various databases. Validity of this questionnaire was conducted by knowledgeable experts who determined indices such as relevancy, clarity, and comprehensiveness. Reliability of the questionnaire was assessed based on the opinions of experts and infertile couples referred to Royan Institute. Results ATOD-O was designed in 52 statements that covered various issues such as the OD process, donor and recipient characteristics, as well as family, emotional, psychological, legal, religious, and socio-economic dimensions. Results were scored as five points: 1 (strongly disagree), 2 (disagree), 3 (somewhat), 4 (agree), and 5 (strongly agree). The overall relevancy of the questionnaire was 97% and clarity was 96%. Overall comprehensiveness was 100%. Conclusion The findings from this preliminary validation study have indicated that ATOD-O is a valid measure for measuring and assessing attitude toward donated oocytes. This questionnaire can be used in studies regarding different groups of a society. PMID:26644863

  7. Hardware Location and Clinical Outcome in Ulna Shortening Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Hellmich, Susanne; Germann, Günter; Sauerbier, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of plate location during ulna shortening osteotomy on the incidence of hardware irritation and clinical outcome. Methods: Forty patients (17 women, 23 men; mean age, 47 years) who underwent a shortening osteotomy of the ulna due to idiopathic ulna impaction syndrome were examined after a mean of 36 months. All complications and secondary procedures were extracted from the patients’ records. Results: The rate of hardware removal was higher in patients who had a dorsal placement of the plate in comparison with ulnar or palmar placements, although this difference was not statistically significant. Apart from hardware irritation, there were 4 nonunions, 1 secondary osteoarthritis of the distal radioulnar joint, and 1 case of chronic irritation of the dorsal branch of the ulnar nerve, which required secondary surgery. The incidence of secondary surgery other than hardware removal was not significantly related to the original location of the plate. Conclusions: Secondary surgery after ulnar shortening osteotomy is common. However, we found no difference in clinical outcomes based on plate location. PMID:26579355

  8. Teaching Earth Sciences: Should We Implement Teacher-Directed or Student-Controlled CAI in the Secondary Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chun-Yen

    2003-01-01

    Explores how various teaching formats of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) influence student science learning outcomes in the secondary classroom. Compares teacher-directed CAI (TDCAI) and student-controlled CAI (SCCAI) in a compulsory earth science course in a secondary school in Taiwan. Indicates that TDCAI students had significantly higher…

  9. The Advantages of Single-Sex Catholic Secondary Schooling: Selection Effects, School Effects, or "Much Ado About Nothing?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LePore, Paul C.; Warren, John Robert

    Data from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88) were used to investigate whether there are differences between single-sex and coeducational Catholic secondary school students in academic and social psychological outcomes, whether any differences especially favor young women in single-sex Catholic secondary schools, and…

  10. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--BASELINE QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Baseline Questionnaire data set provides information about the household using the primary resident (IRN 01) and other residents who chose to participate. The information is from 362 Baseline Questionnaires for 201 households. The Baseline Questionnaire was administered to ...

  11. 75 FR 8985 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Employee Questionnaire and Complaint...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Employee Questionnaire and.... This Notice also lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Employee Questionnaire and... these collections: an employee questionnaire (in English, Spanish, and electronic versions) and...

  12. 76 FR 36582 - Submission for Review: Disabled Dependent Questionnaire, RI 30-10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ...PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Disabled Dependent Questionnaire, RI 30-10...collection request (ICR) 3206-0179, Disabled Dependent Questionnaire. As required...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: RI 30-10, Disabled Dependent Questionnaire, is used...

  13. 76 FR 18812 - Submission for Review: RI 30-10, Disabled Dependent Questionnaire

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ...Submission for Review: RI 30-10, Disabled Dependent Questionnaire AGENCY: U...collection request (ICR) 3206-0179, Disabled Dependent Questionnaire. As required...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The RI 30-10, Disabled Dependent Questionnaire, is used...

  14. 76 FR 33417 - Agency Information Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires-Group 2) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ...Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21- 0960F-2. h. Amputations Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M- 1. i. Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21- 0960M-2. j. Elbow and Forearm Conditions Disability...

  15. 76 FR 16478 - Proposed Information Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires-Group 2) Activity: Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ...Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21- 0960F-2. h. Amputations Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M- 1. i. Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21- 0960M-2. j. Elbow and Forearm Conditions Disability...

  16. Choroidal Neovascularization Secondary to Myopia, Infection and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marissa L; Heier, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is a significant cause of vision loss in all age groups. The most common cause of CNV is age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, CNV can also occur as a secondary manifestation of various inherited and acquired conditions, including pathologic myopia, presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome, angioid streaks, and various hereditary, traumatic or inflammatory disorders. Fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography are useful tools in the diagnosis and evaluation of CNV. Treatment options are similar to those for CNV secondary to AMD, specifically anti-angiogenic therapy, but including laser photocoagulation, photodynamic therapy and surgery. Anti-angiogenic therapy has been associated with better visual outcomes than other treatment modalities and is now advocated as the first-line therapy for CNV secondary to myopia, infection and inflammation. PMID:26501802

  17. Advances in Patient-Reported Outcomes: The NIH PROMIS® Measures

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Joan E.; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Rothrock, Nan; Crane, Paul K.; Forrest, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are questionnaire measures of patients’ symptoms, functioning, and health-related quality of life. They are designed to provide important clinical information that generally cannot be captured with objective medical testing. In 2004, the National Institutes of Health launched a research initiative to improve the clinical research enterprise by developing state-of-the-art PROs. The NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement System (PROMIS) and Assessment Center are the products of that initiative. Adult, pediatric, and parent-proxy item banks have been developed by using contemporary psychometric methods, yielding rapid, accurate measurements. PROMIS currently provides tools for assessing physical, mental, and social health using short-form and computer-adaptive testing methods. The PROMIS tools are being adopted for use in clinical trials and translational research. They are also being introduced in clinical medicine to assess a broad range of disease outcomes. Recent legislative developments in the United States support greater efforts to include patients’ reports of health experience in order to evaluate treatment outcomes, engage in shared decision-making, and prioritize the focus of treatment. PROs have garnered increased attention by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for evaluating drugs and medical devices. Recent calls for comparative effectiveness research favor inclusion of PROs. PROs could also potentially improve quality of care and disease outcomes, provide patient-centered assessment for comparative effectiveness research, and enable a common metric for tracking outcomes across providers and medical systems. PMID:25848562

  18. Didacticism and Educational Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnes, Geraint

    2006-01-01

    This note provides an analysis of the determinants of educational outcomes at age 16, and of subsequent pathways as school pupils transit toward the labour market. There is some evidence that examination results tend to be better where nondidactic teaching methods are used, but there is little evidence to suggest that teaching method has an…

  19. HRD and Performance Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on human resource development (HRD) and performance outcomes. "Going to the Next Level of Growth: Employing Systems Thinking to Make Effective Interventions" (Carol Ann Zulauf, Joseph A. Ilacqua) shows how a systems view enables organizations to find the most effective point for interventions…

  20. Student Outcomes Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clagett, Craig A.

    Prince George's Community College (PGCC) created a Student Outcomes Report in December 1996 that measures course completion, retention, student achievement, program completion, transfer, and certification. Findings indicated that though the course pass rate was 75%, individual course completion ranged from 44% to 100%. Divisional pass rates ranged…

  1. Religious Education Outcomes Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elford, George

    1977-01-01

    The Religious Education Outcomes Inventory includes two components: 1) the religious knowledge level reporting both individual and class profiles, and 2) the confidential attitude measure which links religious knowledge with attitudes and practices. The program's main use is to help local staffs monitor the effectiveness of their religious…

  2. Outcomes Accreditation Motivates Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petros, Linda L.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a three-year Outcomes Accreditation process whereby Mount Clemens High School in Michigan underwent a renewal of school and staff. Highlights school surveys, the findings of the North Central Association visiting team, committee structures and achievements, and the development of a master plan. (DMM)

  3. Cocaine Treatment and Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunes-Dinis, Maria; Barth, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Describes dimensions of current cocaine problem in United States, drug treatment models, and cocaine treatment effectiveness and outcome. Analyzes research on effectiveness of specific drug treatments, including women-sensitive services. Notes that recommended treatment approaches incorporate variety of rehabilitative services and call for social…

  4. Grading secondary vocational education students with disabilities: a national perspective.

    PubMed

    Rojewski, J W; Pollard, R R; Meers, G D

    1992-09-01

    A nationwide purposive sample of secondary vocational educators completed a questionnaire that examined practices and perceptions toward grading students with disabilities. A variety of grading methods was reportedly used, but over two-thirds of respondents included a competency-based grading component. An overwhelming majority believed that student effort should be used to determine grades. Two-thirds of vocational educators had never been involved in their students' IEP development. The most common changes teachers have made over time in their grading practices included becoming more flexible and individualized in grading. Overall, teachers displayed moderately positive attitudes toward grading students with disabilities. PMID:1396952

  5. Management of secondary peritonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, D H; Schein, M; Condon, R E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The authors review current definition, classification, scoring, microbiology, inflammatory response, and goals of management of secondary peritonitis. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA. Despite improved diagnostic modalities, potent antibiotics, modern intensive care, and aggressive surgical treatment, up to one third of patients still die of severe secondary peritonitis. Against the background of current understanding of the local and systemic inflammatory response associated with peritonitis, there is growing controversy concerning the optimal antibiotic and operative therapy, intensified by lack of properly conducted randomized studies. In this overview the authors attempt to outline controversies, suggest a practical clinical approach, and highlight issues necessitating further research. METHODS. The authors review the literature and report their experience. RESULTS. The emerging concepts concerning antibiotic treatment suggest that less-in terms of the number of drugs and the duration of treatment-is better. The classical single operation for peritonitis, which obliterates the source of infection and purges the peritoneal cavity, may be inadequate for severe forms of peritonitis; for the latter, more aggressive surgical techniques are necessary to decompress increased intra-abdominal pressure and prevent or treat persistent and recurrent infection. The widespread acceptance of the more aggressive and demanding surgical methods has been hampered by the lack of randomized trials and reportedly high associated morbidity rates. CONCLUSIONS. Sepsis represents the host's systemic inflammatory response to bacterial peritonitis. To improve results, both the initiator and the biologic consequences of the peritoneal infective-inflammatory process should be addressed. The initiator may be better controlled in severe forms of peritonitis by aggressive surgical methods, whereas the search for methods to abort its systemic consequences is continuing. PMID:8678610

  6. Students of Action? A Comparative Investigation of Secondary Science and Social Studies Students' Action Repertoires in a Land Use Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumler, Lori M.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental education (EE) and social studies education share an interest in behavioral outcomes. This study compares behavioral outcomes--including both self-reported knowledge of actions and reported actions taken--in the context of a land use curriculum enacted in secondary science versus social studies classes with 500 students and nine…

  7. Development and validation of the Newcastle laryngeal hypersensitivity questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Laryngeal hypersensitivity may be an important component of the common disorders of laryngeal motor dysfunction including chronic refractory cough, pdoxical vocal fold movement (vocal cord dysfunction), muscle tension dysphonia, and globus pharyngeus. Patients with these conditions frequently report sensory disturbances, and an emerging concept of the ‘irritable larynx’ suggests common features of a sensory neuropathic dysfunction as a part of these disorders. The aim of this study was to develop a Laryngeal Hypersensitivity Questionnaire for patients with laryngeal dysfunction syndromes in order to measure the laryngeal sensory disturbance occurring in these conditions. Methods The 97 participants included 82 patients referred to speech pathology for behavioural management of laryngeal dysfunction and 15 healthy controls. The participants completed a 21 item self administered questionnaire regarding symptoms of abnormal laryngeal sensation. Factor analysis was conducted to examine correlations between items. Discriminant analysis and responsiveness to change were evaluated. Results The final questionnaire comprised 14 items across three domains: obstruction, pain/thermal, and irritation. The questionnaire demonstrated significant discriminant validity with a mean difference between the patients with laryngeal disorders and healthy controls of 5.5. The clinical groups with laryngeal hypersensitivity had similar abnormal scores. Furthermore the Newcastle Laryngeal Hypersensitivity Questionnaire (LHQ) showed improvement following behavioural speech pathology intervention with a mean reduction in LHQ score of 2.3. Conclusion The Newcastle Laryngeal Hypersensitivity Questionnaire is a simple, non-invasive tool to measure laryngeal pesthesia in patients with laryngeal conditions such as chronic cough, pdoxical vocal fold movement (vocal cord dysfunction), muscle tension dysphonia, and globus pharyngeus. It can successfully differentiate patients from healthy controls and measure change following intervention. It is a promising tool for use in clinical research and practice. PMID:24552215

  8. Effectiveness of a questionnaire based intervention programme on the prevalence of arm, shoulder and neck symptoms, risk factors and sick leave in computer workers: A cluster randomised controlled trial in an occupational setting

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Arm, shoulder and neck symptoms are very prevalent among computer workers. In an attempt to reduce these symptoms, a large occupational health service in the Netherlands developed a preventive programme on exposure to risk factors, prevalence of arm, shoulder and neck symptoms, and sick leave in computer workers. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of this intervention programme. Methods The study was a randomised controlled trial. The participants were assigned to either the intervention group or the usual care group by means of cluster randomisation. At baseline and after 12 months of follow-up, the participants completed the RSI QuickScan questionnaire on exposure to the risk factors and on the prevalence of arm, shoulder and neck symptoms. A tailor-made intervention programme was proposed to participants with a high risk profile at baseline. Examples of implemented interventions are an individual workstation check, a visit to the occupational health physician and an education programme on the prevention of arm, shoulder and neck symptoms. The primary outcome measure was the prevalence of arm, shoulder and neck symptoms. Secondary outcome measures were the scores on risk factors for arm, shoulder and neck symptoms and the number of days of sick leave. Sick leave data was obtained from the companies. Multilevel analyses were used to test the effectiveness. Results Of the 1,673 persons invited to participate in the study, 1,183 persons (71%) completed the baseline questionnaire and 741 persons participated at baseline as well as at 12-month follow-up. At 12-month follow-up, the intervention group showed a significant positive change (OR = 0.48) in receiving information on healthy computer use, as well as a significant positive change regarding risk indicators for work posture and movement, compared to the usual care group. There were no significant differences in changes in the prevalence of arm, shoulder and neck symptoms or sick leave between the intervention and usual care group. Conclusions The effects of the RSI QuickScan intervention programme were small, possibly as a result of difficulties with the implementation process of the proposed interventions. However, some significant positive effects were found as to an increase in receiving education and a decrease in exposure to adverse postures and movements. With regard to symptoms and sick leave, only small and non-significant effects were found. Trial registration Netherlands National Trial Register NTR1117 PMID:20507548

  9. Routine mental health outcome measurement in the UK.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Alastair J D; Fugard, Andrew J B

    2015-08-01

    This paper offers a short history of routine clinical outcomes measurement (RCOM) in UK mental health services. RCOM developments in primary and secondary care are described, with reference to measures currently in widespread use or likely to be implemented. Assessment procedure and completion rates are discussed. Some of the forces operating in this field are enumerated. Comparison is made with UK attempts at routine outcomes measurement in public education. This field is thus reviewed for lessons for RCOM, and opportunities and challenges considered. PMID:25832566

  10. Women, poverty and adverse maternal outcomes in Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The link between poverty and adverse maternal outcomes has been studied largely by means of quantitative data. We explore poor urban Kenyan women's views and lived experiences of the relationship between economic disadvantage and unpleasant maternal outcomes. Method Secondary analysis of focus group discussions and in-depth individual interviews data with women in two slums in Nairobi, Kenya. Results Urban poor women in Nairobi associate poverty with adverse maternal outcomes. However, their accounts and lived experiences of the impact of poverty on maternal outcomes underscore dynamics other than those typically stressed in the extant literature. To them, poverty primarily generates adverse maternal outcomes by exposing women to exceedingly hard and heavy workloads during pregnancy and the period surrounding it; to intimate partner violence; as well as to inhospitable and unpleasant treatment by service providers. Conclusions Poverty has wider and more intricate implications for maternal outcomes than are acknowledged in extant research. To deliver their expected impact, current efforts to promote better maternal outcomes must be guided by a more thorough perspective of the link between women's livelihoods and their health and wellbeing. PMID:21122118

  11. A Web-Based Program Improves Physical Activity Outcomes in a Primary Care Angina Population: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Powell, John; Singh, Sally

    2014-01-01

    Background Angina affects more than 50 million people worldwide. Secondary prevention interventions such as cardiac rehabilitation are not widely available for this population. An Internet-based version could offer a feasible alternative. Objective Our aim was to examine the effectiveness of a Web-based cardiac rehabilitation program for those with angina. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial, recruiting those diagnosed with angina from general practitioners (GPs) in primary care to an intervention or control group. Intervention group participants were offered a 6-week Web-based rehabilitation program (“ActivateYourHeart”). The program was introduced during a face-to-face appointment and then delivered via the Internet (no further face-to-face contact). The program contained information about the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) and set each user goals around physical activity, diet, managing emotions, and smoking. Performance against goals was reviewed throughout the program and goals were then reset/modified. Participants completed an online exercise diary and communicated with rehabilitation specialists through an email link/synchronized chat room. Participants in the control group continued with GP treatment as usual, which consisted of being placed on a CHD register and attending an annual review. Outcomes were measured at 6-week and 6-month follow-ups during face-to-face assessments. The primary outcome measure was change in daily steps at 6 weeks, measured using an accelerometer. Secondary outcome measures were energy expenditure (EE), duration of sedentary activity (DSA), duration of moderate activity (DMA), weight, diastolic/systolic blood pressure, and body fat percentage. Self-assessed questionnaire outcomes included fat/fiber intake, anxiety/depression, self-efficacy, and quality of life (QOL). Results A total of 94 participants were recruited and randomized to the intervention (n=48) or the usual care (n=46) group; 84 and 73 participants completed the 6-week and 6-month follow-ups, respectively. The mean number of log-ins to the program was 18.68 (SD 13.13, range 1-51), an average of 3 log-ins per week per participant. Change in daily steps walked at the 6-week follow-up was +497 (SD 2171) in the intervention group and –861 (SD 2534) in the control group (95% CI 263-2451, P=.02). Significant intervention effects were observed at the 6-week follow-up in EE (+43.94 kcal, 95% CI 43.93-309.98, P=.01), DSA (–7.79 minutes, 95% CI –55.01 to –7.01, P=.01), DMA (+6.31 minutes, 95% CI 6.01-51.20, P=.01), weight (–0.56 kg, 95% CI –1.78 to –0.15, P=.02), self-efficacy (95% CI 0.30-4.79, P=.03), emotional QOL score (95% CI 0.01-0.54, P=.04), and angina frequency (95% CI 8.57-35.05, P=.002). Significant benefits in angina frequency (95% CI 1.89-29.41, P=.02) and social QOL score (95% CI 0.05-0.54, P=.02) were also observed at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusions An Internet-based secondary prevention intervention could be offered to those with angina. A larger pragmatic trial is required to provide definitive evidence of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Trial Registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 90110503; http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN90110503/ISRCTN90110503 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6RYVOQFKM). PMID:25217464

  12. German translation, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the whiplash disability questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Australian Whiplash Disability Questionnaire (WDQ) was cross-culturally translated, adapted, and tested for validity to be used in German-speaking patients. The self-administered questionnaire evaluates actual pain intensity, problems in personal care, role performance, sleep disturbances, tiredness, social and leisure activities, emotional and concentration impairments with 13 questions rated on an 11-point rating scale from zero to ten. Methods In a first part, the Australian-based WDQ was forward and backward translated. In a consensus conference with all translators and health care professionals, who were experts in the treatment of patients with a whiplash associated disorder (WAD), formulations were refined. Original authors were contacted for clarification and approval of the forward-backward translated version. The German version (WDQ-G) was evaluated for comprehensiveness and clarity in a pre-study patient survey by a random sample of German-speaking patients after WAD and four healthy twelve to thirteen year old teenagers. In a second part, the WDQ-G was evaluated in a patient validation study including patients affected by a WAD. Inpatients had to complete the WDQ-G, the North American Spine Society questionnaire (NASS cervical pain), and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) at entry in the rehabilitation centre. Results In the pre-study patient survey (response rate 31%) patients rated clarity for title 9.6 ± 0.9, instruction 9.3 ± 1.4 and questions 9.6 ± 0.7, and comprehensiveness for title 9.6 ± 0.7, instruction 9.3 ± 1.4 and questions 9.8 ± 0.4. Time needed to fill in was 13.7 ± 9.0 minutes. In total, 70 patients (47 females, age?=?43.4?±?12.5 years, time since injury: 1.5 ± 2.6 years) were included in the validation study. WDQ-G total score was 74.0 ± 21.3 points (range between 15 and 117 points). Time needed to fill in was 6.7 ± 3.4 minutes with data from 22 patients. Internal consistency was confirmed with Cronbachs’s ??=?0.89. Concurrent validity showed a highly significant correlation with subscale pain and disability (NASS) at r?=?0.74 and subscale pain (SF-36) at r?=?0.71. Conclusions The officially translated and adapted WDQ-G can be used in German-speaking patients affected by a WAD to evaluate patients’ impairments in different domains. The WDQ-G is a self-administered outcome measure showing a high internal consistency and good concurrent validity. PMID:23497358

  13. Secondary glaucoma after paediatric cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, B N; Billson, F; Martin, F; Donaldson, C; Hing, S; Smith, J E H; Jamieson, R; Grigg, J

    2007-01-01

    Aim To determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with secondary glaucoma postcongenital cataract surgery. Methods All children diagnosed as having congenital cataracts in a major children's hospital between 1985 and 2005 were included in a retrospective case series. Medical records of 423 eyes among 283 patients who underwent cataract surgery with or without intraocular lens implantation at age ?16 for congenital cataract were reviewed. The main outcome measure was presence or absence of secondary glaucoma and time to glaucoma postsurgery. The following risk factors were evaluated: age at cataract surgery, presence of systemic anomalies, microcornea, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), primary capsulotomy/anterior vitrectomy, primary intraocular lens implantation, secondary membrane surgery and duration of postoperative observation. Results The statistical methods were the use of Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and Multivariate Cox hazards regression analysis. The mean follow?up was 6.3 (SD 5.0)?years (median 4.6?years; range 0.5 to 20.3?years). Glaucoma developed in 36 of 234 patients (15.4%). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis identified age less than 9?months at time of surgery (RR 2.9, 95% CI 1.3 to 7.7; p?=?0.03), microcornea (RR 3.7, 95% CI 2.0 to 7.0; p<0.001), and follow?up time as important predictors of glaucoma. PHPV (RR 1.4, 95% CI 0.7 to 2.7; p?=?0.41) and primary posterior capsulotomy/anterior vitrectomy (RR 2.2, 95% CI 0.9 to 5.5; p?=?0.17) were not significantly associated with secondary glaucoma in the multivariate model. The mean time to glaucoma after congenital cataract surgery was 4.9?years (range 2?weeks to 16.8?years). Conclusion Secondary glaucoma is an important sequela in patients who undergo surgery for congenital cataracts. It is imperative that these patients get lifelong surveillance, as glaucoma can occur years after the initial operation. PMID:17475699

  14. Specific Trauma Subtypes Improve the Predictive Validity of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire in Iraqi Refugees

    PubMed Central

    Arnetz, Bengt B.; Broadbridge, Carissa L.; Jamil, Hikmet; Lumley, Mark A.; Pole, Nnamdi; Barkho, Evone; Fakhouri, Monty; Talia, Yousif Rofa; Arnetz, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trauma exposure contributes to poor mental health among refugees, and exposure often is measured using a cumulative index of items from the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Few studies, however, have asked whether trauma subtypes derived from the HTQ could be superior to this cumulative index in predicting mental health outcomes. Methods A community sample of recently arrived Iraqi refugees (N = 298) completed the HTQ and measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms. Results Principal components analysis of HTQ items revealed a 5-component subtype model of trauma that accounted for more item variance than a 1-component solution. These trauma subtypes also accounted for more variance in PTSD and depression symptoms (12% and 10%, respectively) than did the cumulative trauma index (7% and 3%, respectively). Discussion Trauma subtypes provided more information than cumulative trauma in the prediction of negative mental health outcomes. Therefore, use of these subtypes may enhance the utility of the HTQ when assessing at-risk populations. PMID:24549491

  15. Attitudes towards mental illness of nursing students in a Baccalaureate programme in Jamaica: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J; Stennett, R

    2015-10-01

    There is longstanding evidence of nurses demonstrating negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Student nurses' fear or discomfort with mentally ill patients results in poorer outcomes for patients and students' dissatisfaction with their experience of mental health nursing. There is evidence of negative attitudes towards mental illness in the Jamaican society; however, no studies have explored whether these attitudes are held by nursing students. The aim of the study was to examine the attitudes of nursing students towards mental illness. A questionnaire survey was conducted with a convenience sample of 143 third-year nursing students who were enrolled in a baccalaureate programme. Data were collected using the Attitudes Towards Acute Mental Health Scale (ATAMHS). A response rate of 71% was achieved for the survey. The findings indicated that the student nurses held an overall negative attitude towards mental illness, with a general perception that mentally ill people are dangerous. The student nurses were divided in their opinions in a number of areas, suggesting a possible conflict of opinions. Negative attitudes towards mental illness impact client outcomes and the career choices made by nurses. This study provides baseline data within the Jamaican context that adds to the evidence on nursing students' attitude to mental illness. Further research is needed to explore whether nursing education and clinical experience enables student nurses in Jamaica to develop a more positive attitude towards mental illness and mental health nursing and whether cultural factors contribute to negative attitudes. PMID:26036468

  16. In Search of the Elusive Magic Bullet: Parent Involvement and Student Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yap, Kim O.; Enoki, Donald Y.

    A study examined the relationships between parent involvement practices and student outcomes in 10 Chapter 1 project schools in the Honolulu school district. The research on parent involvement was reviewed extensively to identify research questions and develop various instruments. Questionnaire surveys and interviews were conducted with parents,…

  17. Using Strengthsfinder to Identify Relationships between Marketing Graduate Strengths and Career Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkovick, Chuck; Swanson, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The present study seeks to better understand how marketing graduates' strengths, and utilization of those strengths in the workplace, may be associated with a variety of academic and career outcomes. Respondents completed two different questionnaires. Findings suggest that marketing graduates whose strengths are not being utilized with their…

  18. Father Locus of Control and Child Emotional and Behavioral Outcomes: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tone, Erin B.; Goodfellow, Stephanie; Nowicki, Stephen, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In a prospective longitudinal study the authors examined the associations between parent locus of control of reinforcement (LOCR), measured before the birth of a child, and behavioral-emotional outcomes in that child at age 7 years. A total of 307 couples completed questionnaires regarding their emotional status and LOCR at their first prenatal…

  19. Development of Prototype Outcomes-Based Training Modules for Aesthetic Dentistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andres, Maricar Joy T.; Borabo, Milagros L.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to know the essential components of Aesthetic Dentistry that will be a basis for prototype Outcomes-based training modules. Using a 5-point Likert scale, the researcher-made questionnaire assessed the different elements of Aesthetic Dentistry which are needed in the designing of the training module, the manner of…

  20. A Longitudinal Study of Student Outcomes at a State University. AIR Forum 1980 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endo, Jean J.; Harpel, Richard L.

    The impact of liberal arts and professional programs on student outcomes variables was studied. Data were gathered from the 1975 entering freshman cohort at the University of Colorado at Boulder through a 1975 Freshman Questionnaire and a 1979 Graduating Students Survey. Program impact was measured using a model developed by Astin. Type of program…