These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Body Lice Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)  

MedlinePLUS

... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

2

Head Lice: Treatment Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)  

MedlinePLUS

... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

3

Head Lice: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)  

MedlinePLUS

... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

4

FAQ IRB questions (includes SPE  

Cancer.gov

The most recent Investigator’s Brochure (IB) will provide a good estimate of known adverse event inci-dence (see the FAQ on how to receive an IB), and some CAEPRs (included in the protocol docu-ment) do, too.

5

Lymphatic Filariasis: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)  

MedlinePLUS

... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Parasites - Lymphatic Filariasis Parasites Home Share Compartir Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) On ... develop clinical symptoms, despite the fact that the parasite damages the lymph system. A small percentage of ...

6

Ground Water and Drinking Water: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, from the Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, presents a list of most frequently asked questions (with answers). Question topics include: drinking water standards, getting information about your tap water and questions about bottled water.

7

The Women's Health Questionnaire (WHQ): Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Women's Health Questionnaire (WHQ) is a measure of mid-aged women's emotional and physical health. Since its publication in 1992 the WHQ has been widely used in multinational clinical trials, in epidemiological studies as well as in the evaluation of non-medical treatments. In particular the WHQ has been included as a quality of life measure in trials of hormonal preparations

Myra S Hunter

2003-01-01

8

Head Lice: Malathion Frequently Asked Questions  

MedlinePLUS

... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

9

The Women's Health Questionnaire (WHQ): Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ).  

PubMed

The Women's Health Questionnaire (WHQ) is a measure of mid-aged women's emotional and physical health. Since its publication in 1992 the WHQ has been widely used in multinational clinical trials, in epidemiological studies as well as in the evaluation of non-medical treatments. In particular the WHQ has been included as a quality of life measure in trials of hormonal preparations for peri and post menopausal women and in studies using a variety of preventative interventions for mid-aged and older women. The questionnaire was developed in English and standardised on a sample of women aged 45-65 years. It is reliable, has good concurrent validity and is sensitive to detecting change, and is available in 27 languages. The range of subscales included in the WHQ enable a detailed assessment of dimensions of emotional and physical health, such as depression, anxiety, sleep problems, somatic symptoms, with optional subscales for menstrual problems and sexual difficulties. The WHQ is the first measure to be included in the MAPI Research Institute's database, the International Health-related Quality of Life Outcomes Database (IQOD). Drawing upon data from international studies this project aims to produce reference values for cross-culturally valid, reliable and responsive quality of life instruments. In addition to this work, a revised shorter version of the WHQ is currently being developed. PMID:14521718

Hunter, Myra S

2003-01-01

10

The Women's Health Questionnaire (WHQ): Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)  

PubMed Central

The Women's Health Questionnaire (WHQ) is a measure of mid-aged women's emotional and physical health. Since its publication in 1992 the WHQ has been widely used in multinational clinical trials, in epidemiological studies as well as in the evaluation of non-medical treatments. In particular the WHQ has been included as a quality of life measure in trials of hormonal preparations for peri and post menopausal women and in studies using a variety of preventative interventions for mid-aged and older women. The questionnaire was developed in English and standardised on a sample of women aged 45–65 years. It is reliable, has good concurrent validity and is sensitive to detecting change, and is available in 27 languages. The range of subscales included in the WHQ enable a detailed assessment of dimensions of emotional and physical health, such as depression, anxiety, sleep problems, somatic symptoms, with optional subscales for menstrual problems and sexual difficulties. The WHQ is the first measure to be included in the MAPI Research Institute's database, the International Health-related Quality of Life Outcomes Database (IQOD). Drawing upon data from international studies this project aims to produce reference values for cross-culturally valid, reliable and responsive quality of life instruments. In addition to this work, a revised shorter version of the WHQ is currently being developed. PMID:14521718

Hunter, Myra S

2003-01-01

11

Cosmetics FAQs  

MedlinePLUS

... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Cosmetics Print this page Share this page E-mail this page Home Cosmetics Resources for You Consumers Cosmetics FAQs Here are questions consumers frequently ask about ...

12

Fish FAQ  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Northeast Fisheries Science Center answers your question regarding all things fish. Hundreds of fish and other marine fauna questions are answered in the FAQ section. Site also links to several external fish FAQs, as well as other internal and external resources, including kids sites, fish images, species synopses, how to age a fish. The site also features a glossary of fish terms and insight into the different ways fish are caught.

13

Financial Aid Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's) for Study Abroad Students Please read and keep for your records  

E-print Network

Financial Aid Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's) for Study Abroad Students Please read and keep for your records How does the Study Abroad Financial Aid Process work? 1. Students doing non-UM sponsored in a Financial Aid Study Abroad Worksheet and a Permission to Study Abroad Form to the financial aid office

Milchberg, Howard

14

Investment FAQ  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Christopher Lott developed the Investment FAQ site to help individual investors obtain "clear and concise information about investments and personal finance." The site consists of a collection of Frequently Asked Questions and answers about investments and personal finance. Collection categories include advice, analysis, bonds, derivatives, exchanges, financial planning, information sources, insurance, mutual funds, real estate, regulation, retirement plans, software, stocks, strategies, tax code, technical analysis and trading. There are tours designed for the beginner, intermediate users, and experts.

15

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)  

Cancer.gov

Costs to consider when planning a study that uses ASA24 include system and labor costs associated with uploading study details, including respondent usernames and recall dates. Costs also are associated with contacting and monitoring respondents, assessing data quality, and analyzing data. The labor and resources needed by researchers and associated costs to configure and manage studies using ASA24 are within the purview and the responsibility of users.

16

Economic FAQs About the Internet  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a set of Frequently Asked Questions (and answers) about the economic, institutional, and technological structure of the Internet. We describe the history and current state of the Internet, discuss some of the pressing economic and regulatory problems, and speculate about future developments. What is a FAQ? FAQ stands for Frequently Asked Questions. There are dozens of FAQ documents

Jeffrey K. MacKie-Mason; Hal R. Varian

1995-01-01

17

Breastfeeding FAQs: Solids and Supplementing  

MedlinePLUS

Breastfeeding FAQs: Solids and Supplementing KidsHealth > Parents > Growth & Development > Feeding & Eating > Breastfeeding FAQs: Solids and Supplementing Print A A A ... a new mom or a seasoned parenting pro, breastfeeding often comes with its fair share of questions. ...

18

Bad Coriolis FAQ  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This set of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) is written in response to questions from readers of the Bad Meteorology pages. Although the questions presented here are often ones asked by a specific person, each is chosen to characterize a group of similar questions which have been asked about the topic. The questions and answers printed here all center around the topic of the Coriolis effect.

Alistair Fraser

19

Agricultural biotechnology FAQs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource from the U.S. Department of Agriculture list a number of frequently asked questions regarding biotechnology. The FAQs addresses questions related to defining biotechnology, biotechnology helping farmers and consumers, public dialogue and exchange of information on biotechnology, federal agencies that regulate biotechnology, testing a biotechnology derived plant, commercial production of a biotechnology derived plant, exposure of biotech crops, the role of the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency), and trade issues with biotechnology. Copyright 2005 International Technology Education Association

US Department of Agriculture (USDA)

2003-01-01

20

his document presents the highlights of the Frequently Asked Questions about Ocean Acidification (2010, 2012; www.whoi.edu/OCB-OA/FAQs), a detailed summary of the state of  

E-print Network

T his document presents the highlights of the Frequently Asked Questions about Ocean Acidification (2010, 2012; www.whoi.edu/OCB-OA/FAQs), a detailed summary of the state of ocean acidification research policy advisors asked to comment on details about ocean acidification. In all, 63 scientists from 47

21

Scabies: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)  

MedlinePLUS

... scabicide may be necessary. If I come in contact with a person who has scabies, should I ... page Get email updates Listen to audio/Podcast Contact Us: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1600 ...

22

Giardiasis Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)  

MedlinePLUS

... water where Giardia may live, especially in lakes, rivers, springs, ponds, and streams Eating uncooked food that ... water where Giardia may live, especially in lakes, rivers, springs, ponds, and streams International travelers People exposed ...

23

Falls: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)  

MedlinePLUS

... objects such as furniture, cords and rugs Poor lighting, particularly areas with dark/light variability Poorly fitting ... a fall, such as loose carpets or poor lighting Treat any cardiovascular disorders, such as heart-rhythm ...

24

Fish FAQ  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Northeast Fisheries Science Center of the National Marine Fisheries Service provides this wonderful site offering a myriad of answers to frequently asked fish questions. If your questions include "Do fish sleep?" or "How does a scallop move?" or "What is 'tomalley'?", you are sure to find the answers here--as well as many other fascinating fish facts. Answers are thorough, and many are accompanied by color graphics, tables, and photographs to illustrate principles and provide examples.

1999-01-01

25

Bad Rain FAQ  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Frequently asked questions (FAQ) is written in response to questions posed over the years by readers of the Bad Meteorology pages. Although the questions presented here are often ones asked by a specific person, each is chosen to characterize a group of similar questions which have been asked about the topic. The author cites four types of evidence: photography, theory, rainbows, and radar and proceeds to explain how each offers evidence of the true shape of raindrops. In his replies to the other two issues the author points out that rain does not fall through a vacuum and that some of the paintings of Picasso would not be helpful in the teaching of anatomy.

Alistair Fraser

26

FAQs - caHUB.Cancer.Gov  

Cancer.gov

This page is designed to answer some of the common questions about NCI's Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB) initiative. We will update these Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) as new information becomes available or new questions are submitted to us. If you don't find an answer to your question on this page, please send us an e-mail.

27

NCI DEA - FAQs & Glossary  

Cancer.gov

National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Division of Extramural Activities - Home Page Skip to Main Content Home Funding Advisory Consumer Guides FAQs & Glossary Awarded Research Division of Extramural Activities FAQs & Glossary Site

28

Acanthamoeba Keratitis FAQs  

MedlinePLUS

... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Parasites - Acanthamoeba - Granulomatous Amebic Encephalitis (GAE); Keratitis Parasites Home Share Compartir Acanthamoeba Keratitis FAQs On this ...

29

Bed Bugs FAQs  

MedlinePLUS

... gov . Parasites - Bed Bugs Parasites Home Share Compartir Bed Bugs FAQs On this Page What are bed bugs? ... are bed bugs treated and prevented? What are bed bugs? Bed bugs ( Cimex lectularius ) are small, flat, parasitic ...

30

FAQ: Pregnancy and Breastfeeding  

MedlinePLUS

... gov . West Nile Virus Share Compartir FAQ: Pregnancy & Breastfeeding I am pregnant. Am I at higher risk ... Top of Page If I am pregnant or breastfeeding, should I use insect repellents? Yes. Protecting yourself ...

31

Onchocerciasis (River Blindness) FAQs  

MedlinePLUS

... About CDC.gov . Parasites - Onchocerciasis (also known as River Blindness) Parasites Home Share Compartir Onchocerciasis FAQs On ... an infected Simulium blackfly. It is also called River Blindness because the fly that transmits infection breeds ...

32

FAQ DARF discrepancies  

Cancer.gov

September 7, 2008 Prepared and distributed by the Pharmaceutical Management Branch, CTEP, NCI. Please do not re-distribute or post without permission. Information in this FAQ is subject to change without notice; check periodically for updates.

33

FAQ Nurse practitions physician  

Cancer.gov

September 7, 2008 Prepared and distributed by the Pharmaceutical Management Branch, CTEP, NCI. Please do not re-distribute or post without permission. Information in this FAQ is subject to change without notice; check periodically for updates.

34

Culinary herbFAQ  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Readers interested in herbs and the culinary arts can explore Culinary herbFAQ, a site maintained by Henriette Kress that provides information on a wide array of herbs for eating, drinking, gifts (potpourri, bath salts, etc.), ground cover, and shade. Composed of long and short contributions from listserv members, herbFAQ offers useful advice on herb-related topics that spans from seeding to transplanting to harvesting and documents discussions on a variety of herb problems. Readers may need to look a bit for a particular herb as items are randomly arranged within the seven sections of this FAQ. Links to Medicinal herbFAQ can also be found at this site.

35

Isaac Asimov FAQ  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A WWW FAQ on Isaac Asimov is now available covering Dr. Asimov's personal life and the books he wrote. It includes pointers to bibliographies of his books and stories and other miscellaneous items on Dr. Asimov available on the Internet.

36

FAQ: Child Sexual Exploitation  

MedlinePLUS

... Law Enforcement Training Victim & Family Support FAQ: Child Sexual Exploitation What is child pornography? Federal law (18 ... in graphic bestiality, sadistic or masochistic abuse or sexual intercourse, including genital-genital, oral-genital, anal-genital ...

37

FAQ: General Questions about West Nile Virus  

MedlinePLUS

... Mosquitoes become infected when they feed on infected birds. Infected mosquitoes can then spread the virus to ... from year to year. The weather, numbers of birds that maintain the virus, numbers of mosquitoes that ...

38

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Malaria  

MedlinePLUS

... Where Malaria Occurs Eradication The Disease What is malaria? Malaria is a serious and sometimes fatal disease ... and poverty. Back To Top How People Get Malaria (Transmission) How is malaria transmitted? Usually, people get ...

39

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about Plague  

MedlinePLUS

... Evaluation Lab Testing Infection Control Surveillance & Investigation Preparation & Planning Response Vaccination Images Medical Management Training & Education References Tularemia Diagnosis & Evaluation Treatment & PEP ...

40

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about Extreme Heat  

MedlinePLUS

... the environment. How much should I drink during hot weather? During hot weather you will need to ... more fluid. Should I take salt tablets during hot weather? Do not take salt tablets unless directed ...

41

Scabies: Workplace Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)  

MedlinePLUS

... scabies and my job requires skin-to-skin contact with patients? Scabies usually is spread by prolonged ... page Get email updates Listen to audio/Podcast Contact Us: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1600 ...

42

Lyme Disease Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)  

MedlinePLUS

... prone to false positive results. Peer-reviewed and published studies of semen have involved collecting semen from ... come from the methods. Finalized estimates will be published when these studies are complete. How are cases ...

43

CAM Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's) - Health Information  

Cancer.gov

It is important that CAM therapies receive the same scientific evaluation that is used to assess standard healthcare approaches. As CAM therapies are proven safe and effective, they may become part of standard health care.

44

Epidemiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Contact dermatitis and contact allergy are common medical conditions. But how common are they? Are they more common in certain\\u000a populations? Are reactions to specific contact allergens more prevalent than to other allergens? This chapter presents some\\u000a basic epidemiologic principles which are important in population-based or clinic-based studies on contact dermatitis. Examples\\u000a of studies on contact allergy as well as

Pieter-Jan Coenraads; Wolfgang Uter; Thomas Diepgen

45

FAQs About Ocean Acidification  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website provides a FAQ in a concise, readable summary of the current state of ocean acidification knowledge to support the scientific research community and educators. It is maintained by the OCB Project Office, with oversight from the Ocean Acidification Subcommittee of the Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry (OCB) program. Featured items include a primer to offer the foundational basics of ocean acidification and its impact on humans, Earth systems and marine life.

2012-09-24

46

Breastfeeding FAQs: Pain and Discomfort  

MedlinePLUS

Breastfeeding FAQs: Pain and Discomfort KidsHealth > Parents > Pregnancy & Newborn Center > Newborn Care > Breastfeeding FAQs: Pain and Discomfort ... have. Is it normal to have cramps while nursing? Yes. During the first few days to weeks ...

47

Bad Greenhouse FAQ  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These answers were written in response to questions from readers of the Bad Meteorology pages. Although the questions presented here are often ones asked by a specific person, each is chosen to characterize a group of similar questions which have been asked about the topic. They involve temperature conversion and energy emission.

Alistair Fraser

48

Frequently Asked Questions - Research Bases  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) Updated Frequently Asked Questions on Research Bases Request for Application (RFA) Select a category by clicking on its title below. How to search the content of the FAQs: Click on the FAQ Category you

49

Bad Clouds FAQ  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The answers on this page were written in response to questions from readers of the Bad Meteorology pages. Although the questions presented here are often ones asked by a specific person, each is chosen to characterize a group of similar questions which have been asked about the topic. Topics include: the vapor-holding capacity of air, reasoning and prediction, relative humidity, and boiling point.

Alistair Fraser

50

The Online Tornado FAQ  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides answers to frequently asked questions about tornadoes. The questions are grouped into the following categories: the basics about tornadoes, tornado forecasting, tornado damage, tornado safety, historical tornadoes, tornado climatology, spotting and chasing, tornado research, and scientific references. Information on related concepts is linked within each section and can also be accessed via a clickable index of terms.

Roger Edwards

51

The Online Tornado FAQ  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides answers to frequently asked questions about tornadoes. The questions are grouped into the following categories: the basics about tornadoes, tornado forecasting, tornado damage, tornado safety, historical tornadoes, tornado climatology, spotting and chasing, tornado research, and scientific references. Information on related concepts is linked within each section and can also be accessed via a clickable index of terms.

Roger Edwards

2009-12-31

52

Online Darwin FAQs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource provides links to organizations that offer information for a general audience about teaching evolution, suggestions for responding to questions from students and your community, and strategies for addressing the public controversy about evolution and science education.

53

Black Holes FAQ  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains a list of Frequently Asked Questions about Black Holes. The goal is to answer the common, and not so common, doubts about Black Holes, such as their origin, properties, and fate. It also deals with gravitational effects of Black Holes, and the concepts of White Holes and Wormholes. It provides rationale for existence of Black Holes despite lack of direct observation.

Bunn, Ted

54

About ALS: FAQ  

MedlinePLUS

... disease deterioration in these mice. Clinical trials are of the utmost importance to investigate if the effects seen in the mouse model are seen in humans with ALS. Another question is whether this exciting result found in a model of familial ALS is applicable to sporadic ALS that ...

55

The Cockroach FAQ.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

More than 75 frequently asked questions about cockroaches are here answered expertly by University of Massachusetts Amherst biologist Joseph Kunkel. Everything from how to determine the gender of roaches to why they sometimes die on their backs is authoritatively answered. From this page, one also can link to the cockroach home page, which includes much additional information about cockroaches.

0000-00-00

56

Global Warming FAQs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research is dedicated to understanding the atmosphereâ??the air around usâ??and the interconnected processes that make up the Earth system, from the ocean floor to the Sun's core. The National Center for Atmospheric Research and the UCAR Office of Programs provide research, observing and computing facilities, and a variety of services for the atmospheric and Earth sciences community. Here, they have helpfully provided a series of frequently asked questions about Climate Change. Each question provides a clear and concise answer and provides links to further information. In addition, the site includes a special inset on Global Warming, a "Ask a Scientist" section, and links at the bottom of the page to learn more.

57

Fragile X Syndrome: Other FAQs  

MedlinePLUS

... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications En Espańol Fragile X Syndrome: Other FAQs Skip sharing on social media ... Are there specific disorders or conditions associated with Fragile X syndrome? Among the other conditions associated with Fragile ...

58

FAQ Shipping+storage temperatur  

Cancer.gov

September 11, 2008 Prepared and distributed by the Pharmaceutical Management Branch, CTEP, NCI. Please do not re-distribute or post without permission. Information in this FAQ is subject to change without notice; check periodically for updates.

59

FAQ Accounting for Oral Agents  

Cancer.gov

September 11, 2008 Prepared and distributed by the Pharmaceutical Management Branch, CTEP, NCI. Please do not re-distribute or post without permission. Information in this FAQ is subject to change without notice; check periodically for updates.

60

The Moon FAQ  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As you look in the sky over the course of a month, you should notice a change in the appearance of the moon. The different shapes the moon makes are known as the moon\\'s phases. The moon is an extremely hot & cold place, and it is very, very far away. Huh? Read on... 1. For billions of years the moon has orbited the Earth. Read about The Origin of the Moon and then answer these two questions: A. How old is the moon? B. Where did it come from? 2. The moon is far away. So far, in fact, you\\'re going to need ...

2007-09-26

61

The Canadian Nuclear FAQ  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This highly pro-nuclear website offers information not only about nuclear energy in Canada, but about this controversial energy resource more generally. Start with the Introduction and Disclaimer, where Dr. Jeremy Whitlock, the author of the site and a reactor physicist at an Ottawa Valley nuclear power plant, explains the purpose and limitations of the site. Then have a look at the dozens of questions Dr. Whitlock answers with erudite â?? and opinionated â?? precision, covering such broad topics as Cost and Benefits, Safety and Liability, Waste Management, and Security and Non-Proliferation. Also, take a look at the excellent Links and Further Information pages, as well as the Editorials page, which features dozens of pro-nuclear missives. In all, interested readers will find this page well argued and informative.

Whitlock, Jeremy

1996-04-24

62

Just the FAQs: An Alternative to Teaching the Research Paper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Changing the form of the traditional research paper often results in a greater emphasis on inquiry or FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions). An alternative form of presentation that capitalizes on available technology and requires students to develop their thinking, reading, writing and presentation skills is presented.

Strickland, James

2004-01-01

63

FAQs  

Cancer.gov

The DCIDE program is intended to supply or enable missing steps to those who lack development capacity or resources so that promising discoveries may eventually be translated to the clinical research environment. The DCIDE program will focus on promising diagnostic agents that are not otherwise likely to undergo adequate pre-clinical testing to warrant an IND application.

64

Breastfeeding FAQs: Your Eating and Drinking Habits  

MedlinePLUS

... the Flu Pregnancy Precautions Checkups: What to Expect Breastfeeding FAQs: Your Eating and Drinking Habits KidsHealth > Parents > Growth & Development > Feeding & Eating > Breastfeeding FAQs: Your Eating and Drinking Habits Print A ...

65

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) - caHUB.Cancer.Gov  

Cancer.gov

Letting researchers study your samples may help find new and better treatments for cancer and other diseases. Researchers use samples to look for ways to prevent, find, or treat health problems-as in Example 1 below.

66

Web Search Engines FAQS: Questions, Answers, and Issues  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The October issue of Searcher magazine offers this article by Gary Price, Web searcher extraordinaire (see the October 3, 1997 Scout Report). The article, which "reviews the latest goings on in the search world and tries to provide some suggestions and tools to make you more knowledgeable and save you some time," is, as one might expect from Price, clear and detailed in its review of the latest in search engines and the like. Running down the side of the page are "Price's Priceless Tips," including Ten Things to Know about Google (AllTheWeb, Altavista, etc.) and information on new search tools. There is a wealth of useful information here.

Price, Gary.

67

DICK'S HOUSE Questions and answers to frequently  

E-print Network

DICK'S HOUSE FAQ Questions and answers to frequently asked questions at the Geisel School of Medicine Always identify yourself as a Geisel student when you contact Dick's House!! Updated: December 2013 #12;Dick's House FAQ Contents How do I find what I need quickly in this document? 2 Mental Health

Myers, Lawrence C.

68

Frequently Asked Questions about Bunion Surgery  

MedlinePLUS

... Size Print Bookmark Frequently Asked Questions About Bunion Surgery Here are some frequently asked questions (FAQs) and ... best for you. 5. How can I avoid surgery? Sometimes observation of the bunion is all that's ...

69

[Field epidemiology and social epidemiology].  

PubMed

Comparing field epidemiology and social epidemiology, we pretend to think about the no explicit images and meanings operating in both necessary convergent fields, about the obstacles present in epidemiological practice to fulfil its social function and about the necessity of changing epistemological, methodological and practice grounds, beginning with field epidemiologists teaching programmes. Field epidemiology would tend to act in an absent theoretical frame. On the other hand, social epidemiology would tend to prioritize theoretical developments (thinking and research about social determinants) without correspondent action, because of the limits to change public policies. Other differences are found at intervention level (micro-macrospace), its aim (outbreak control vs. inequalities control) and the way to communicate with society. They are similar in the methodological concern, the predominance of orientation based on positivism and framed through statistic methods, but in process of epistemological opening, the stress experienced between the alternative relationship to a virtual world of data bases or to the real society, their peripherical situation in relation of the political, social, institutional and professional system and the tendency to professional frustration. Finally, we ask ten questions to the field epidemiologists related with their present practice, in order to consider if they are developing social epidemiology, and propose some changes in epidemiologist teaching and practice. PMID:16753093

Segura del Pozo, Javier

2006-01-01

70

FAQ: West Nile Virus and Dead Birds  

MedlinePLUS

... Virus Share Compartir FAQ: West Nile Virus & Dead Birds How do birds get infected with West Nile ... dead bird sightings to local authorities. How do birds get infected with West Nile virus? West Nile ...

71

Toxocariasis (also known as Roundworm Infection) FAQs  

MedlinePLUS

... page: About CDC.gov . Parasites - Toxocariasis (also known as Roundworm Infection) Parasites Home Share Compartir Toxocariasis FAQs ... Toxocara larvae migrate to various body organs, such as the liver or central nervous system. Symptoms of ...

72

FAQ Lost shipment or missing dr  

Cancer.gov

September 11, 2008 Prepared and distributed by the Pharmaceutical Management Branch, CTEP, NCI. Please do not re-distribute or post without permission. Information in this FAQ is subject to change without notice; check periodically for updates.

73

FAQ Used commercial drug or vic  

Cancer.gov

September 7, 2008 Prepared and distributed by the Pharmaceutical Management Branch, CTEP, NCI. Please do not re-distribute or post without permission. Information in this FAQ is subject to change without notice; check periodically for updates.

74

FAQs of Pregnancy Loss and Miscarriage  

MedlinePLUS

... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Pregnancy Loss: Other FAQs Skip sharing on social media ... anything a woman can do to prevent a pregnancy loss? Most of the time, a woman cannot ...

75

FAQ: Blood Donation and Organ Transplant  

MedlinePLUS

... CDC.gov . West Nile Virus Share Compartir FAQ: Blood Donation & Organ Transplant Can I get infected with ... get infected with West Nile virus by donating blood? No. You cannot get West Nile virus by ...

76

Contraception and Birth Control: Other FAQs  

MedlinePLUS

... Trials Resources and Publications En Espańol Contraception and Birth Control: Other FAQs Skip sharing on social media ... choose a method of contraception? The choice of birth control depends on many factors. Before deciding on ...

77

Treatment of Anthrax Disease Frequently Asked Questions  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a summary of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on the treatment of anthrax disease caused by a wide-area release of Bacillus anthracis spores as an act bioterrorism. These FAQs are intended to provide the public health and medical community, as well as others, with guidance and communications to support the response and long-term recovery from an anthrax event.

Judd, Kathleen S.; Young, Joan E.; Lesperance, Ann M.; Malone, John D.

2010-05-14

78

Epidemiology in Knowledge Integration  

Cancer.gov

Session 5 Panel Discussion Question: How can epidemiology help integrate knowledge from basic, clinical and population sciences to accelerate translation from research to practice? Moderator: Muin J. Khoury, M.D., Ph.D., EGRP, DCCPS, NCI Panelists:

79

Layoff FAQs for Employees Updated January 2014  

E-print Network

Layoff FAQs for Employees Updated January 2014 GENERAL General Resources for Employees: UCF Human Resources HR Employee Relations Section Faculty Affairs 407-823-2771 407-823-2771 407-823-5420 askhr@ucf.edu 1. What is a layoff? A layoff is the involuntary termination of an employee due to the elimination

Wu, Shin-Tson

80

CAMP FAQ's What is Hi-GEAR?  

E-print Network

CAMP FAQ's What is Hi-GEAR? High School Girls' Engineering to offer our Annual Hi - GEAR Program, a special week-long event for female high school students. Hi-GEAR will be held June 16­20, 2014 from 9:00 am until 4

Provancher, William

81

Pennsylvania School Certification FAQs For Working SLPs  

E-print Network

Pennsylvania School Certification FAQs For Working SLPs This is a Summary of Information from the Pennsylvania Department of Education Website www.pde.state.pa.us How do I become School-Certified in PA Paperwork: The application packet you submit must include: . GENERAL APPLICATION FOR PENNSYLVANIA 338G

Guiltinan, Mark

82

Questioning the Questions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Historical accounts of questioning used in the education process trace back to Socrates. One of the best examples of his use of questioning is found in Plato's "The Republic." Socrates used a series of strategic questions to help his student Glaucon come to understand the concept of justice. Socrates purposefully posed a series of questions to…

Tienken, Christopher H.; Goldberg, Stephanie; DiRocco, Dominic

2010-01-01

83

Questioning the Questions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Well-known historical accounts of questioning used in the education process trace back to Socrates. One of the best examples of his use of questioning is found in Plato's classic work "The Republic" (2003). Today, teachers still use questions as one way to help students develop productive thinking skills and to understand concepts and topics.…

Tienken, Christopher H.; Goldberg, Stephanie; DiRocco, Dominic

2009-01-01

84

question_1408193863 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Epidemiological and experimental evidence has shown the usefulness of fasting or dietary interventions as potential cancer preventive and therapeutic approach. Fasting itself is known to suppress many cancer cells growth and increases chemo-sensitivity. Likewise, ketogenic diets are also known to suppress cancer cells growth. The potential of such kind of approaches has motivated many clinicians and researchers to carry out experimental and clinical studies at different parts of the world.

85

question_1296837100 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

While the causal mechanisms that link excess body weight to increased risk for certain cancers are largely unknown (as noted in other questions), we pose an associated question -- what are the causal mechanisms that link excess body weight to decreased risk of certain other cancers?

86

4-Year Cohort Graduation Rate: FAQ  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper offers a list of questions and corresponding answers about the 4-year cohort graduation rate. Answers to the following questions are presented: (1) Why don't GED (General Educational Development) students count as graduates?; (2) How does a district code students who have moved out of state? How should a district code a student who…

Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2010

2010-01-01

87

question_1312912193 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

88

question_1409921534 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

89

question_1297533065 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

90

question_1296071530 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

91

question_1410545293 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

92

question_1328803566 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

93

question_1309292190 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

94

question_1296157694 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

95

question_1298857225 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

96

question_1297435384 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

97

question_1296786566 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

98

question_1314022426 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

99

question_1410236285 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

100

question_1310150051 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

101

question_1302545047 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

102

question_1410878914 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

103

question_1297107652 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

104

question_1411972022 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

105

question_1411972090 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

106

question_1413444261 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

107

question_1309214151 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

108

question_1299510834 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

109

question_1295643225 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

110

question_1309209288 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

111

question_1296508079 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

112

question_1299508744 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

113

question_1409064725 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

114

question_1409064112 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

115

question_1312382828 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

116

question_1411014068 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

117

question_1411474796 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

118

question_1410251969 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

119

question_1410563953 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

120

question_1296669988 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

121

question_1296850328 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

122

question_1302126805 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

123

question_1310868762 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

124

question_1410865099 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

125

question_1411052189 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

126

question_1412100531 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

127

question_1301530459 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

128

question_1410246408 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

129

question_1410245819 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

130

question_1414049861 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

131

question_1298409202 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

132

question_1412830344 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

133

question_1408110976 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

134

question_1297499720 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

135

question_1411460063 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

136

question_1337049045 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

137

question_1295444776 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

138

question_1298674892 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

139

question_1412833175 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

140

question_1309532294 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

141

question_1309291793 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

142

question_1309291860 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

143

question_1296657942 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

144

question_1296786622 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

145

question_1414062103 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

146

question_1297424940 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

147

question_1297460130 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

148

question_1309209336 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

149

question_1297125849 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

150

question_1328804555 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

151

question_1296513894 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

152

question_1298614465 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

153

question_1333398119 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

154

question_1296786512 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

An exciting development in this area that would be encouraged by attempting to answer this important question, is the connection between the observations of cancer risk modulation by epidemiologists and immune mechanisms that appear to be involved, described by immunologists.

155

question_1296759663 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

156

question_1296830406 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

157

question_1302559585 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

158

question_1296401928 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

159

question_1302203772 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

160

question_1413469312 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

161

question_1297190968 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

162

question_1410546275 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

163

question_1409976519 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

164

question_1302099820 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

165

question_1298942394 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

166

question_1296826063 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

167

question_1309291494 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

168

question_1302560270 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

169

question_1410844360 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

170

question_1329194782 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

171

question_1299173164 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

172

question_1296849841 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

173

question_1314052528 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

174

question_1410954604 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

175

question_1410954609 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

176

question_1412835958 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

177

question_1299539367 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

178

question_1296057192 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

179

question_1412859595 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

180

question_1409740665 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

181

question_1309292133 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

182

question_1411079495 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

183

question_1309360864 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

184

question_1414730345 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

185

question_1313450002 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

186

question_1409209586 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

187

FAQ: Earthquakes, Faults, Plate Tectonics, Earth Structure  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This frequently-asked-questions feature provides answers about earthquakes, faults, plate tectonics, and earth structure. Maps and diagrams are provided with some answers, and links to additional information and to related topics are included.

188

MedlinePlus FAQ: Search Cloud  

MedlinePLUS

... Cool Tools ESPAŃOL Question: How does the search cloud work? To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Answer: The search cloud displays the top 100 search terms typed into ...

189

Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium Working Groups  

Cancer.gov

Childhood Brain Tumor Working Group - This Working Group focuses on epidemiologic studies of childhood brain tumors. We will focus on establishing research questions of interest in order to plan appropriate studies to address these questions.

190

FAQ: Hurricanes, Typhoons, and Tropical Cyclones  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains the answers to over 50 questions relating the characteristics of typhoons, tropical cyclones, and hurricanes. It covers a wide variety of topics, from basic definitions to myths, names, winds, forecasting, and historical information. The answers to the questions contain charts, graphs, text, and illustrations for a thorough explanation. When appropriate, links are given for more details. This site is also available in Spanish and French.

Christopher Landsea

191

Frequently asked questions about the Inventory of Learning Styles (ILS)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website presents frequently asked questions (FAQ's) about the Inventory of Learning Styles, a tool designed to identify students' preferred methods of learning and to help to improve their learning skills.

Richard Felder

192

Accessing the Internet by E-mail FAQ  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Gerald Boyd has spent much time learning the internal syntax of web search engines. He has made the fruits of his labor available at an ftp site. Interested Internauts can download FAQs on how to query fifteen generic and eight specialty search engines by email. Included are Alta Vista, Excite, Inktomi, Yahoo, Infoseek, OKRA, Open Text, SwitchBoard, TheList, and others. Also included is a FAQ on how to use an Agora Server to use the web by email. See the Scout Report for March 8, 1996 for more on Agora. The FAQs are of greatest use to those without a web connection, but are also interesting to anyone who is intrigued by the intricacies of search engines. Users should download wsintro.faq (table of contents of FAQs), wscrack.faq (basic strategy for figuring out how to query search indexes via email) and wshelp.faq (Agora help file) before any others. For those who would like to download everything at once, wssearch.zip contains all of the files. Note that while these files are fairly technical, they are very useful for those who need such Internet access.

Boyd, Gerald E.

193

question_1410159378 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Looking at cell to cell differences within a tumor bed, contributed by either DNA mutations, epigenetic or post-translational modifications (PTM) or miRNA mediated control switches or even a combination of all these, the question rise how to best design a personalized drug trial?

194

question_1296796037 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

If this important question is answered we would be able to develop a highly tailored therapeutic approach for cancers. Actually, inflammatory type of the anti-tumor immune response such as IFN-g can also induce initial tumor inhibition but eventual tumor escape and progression.

195

question_1411473029 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Gemcitabine is a widely used drug for pancreatic cancer therapy, but due to poor prognosis this drug is now in question. Cells resistance to gemcitabine activates EMT in the background, but the drug itself is a potential replication blocker and activates apoptosis, then why gemcitabine induced apoptosis activates a kind of fleeting mechanism (EMT) to get protection from apoptotic threat?

196

Some FAQs about Usage-Based Pricing  

Microsoft Academic Search

. This is a list of Frequently Asked Questions about usage-based pricing of the Internet.We argue that usage-based pricing is likely to come sooner or later and that some serious thoughtshould be devoted to devising a sensible system of usage-based pricing. This document is availableon-line at

197

Some FAQs about Usage-Based Pricing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a list of Frequently Asked Questions about usage-based pricing of the Internet. We argue that usage-based pricing is likely to come sooner or later and that some serious thought should be devoted to devising a sensible system of usage-based pricing.

Jeffrey K. Mackie-mason; Hal R. Varian

1995-01-01

198

Astronomy Cafe: FAQ's About the Planet Mars  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an archive of questions and answers about Mars. It is divided into Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced categories and covers such topics as the possibility of life on Mars, Martian atmosphere and geography, and Mars colonization. There are also links to other Mars-related sites.

Sten Odenwald

199

question_1410236555 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

This is a great question. Gene-based targeting has contributed significantly to decrease mortality. Despite the unexplored black box of molecular mechanisms, these drugs were highly effective as first line of therapy. However over time, a percentage of patients were either non-responders or developed resistance. Our deep knowledge of molecular mechanisms has helped redesign some of the drugs, or established diagnostic tests to stratify patients that would benefit from such drugs.

200

question_1332002134 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Sequencing of natural human tumors is teaching us invaluable lessons. It is becoming clear that the new dogmas created in the post genome era are being questioned. The previously suspected genetic heterogeneity of tumors is now proven on the sequence level. The extreme genetic heterogeneity of individual tumors and the existence of multiple tumors (not metastases) pose fundamental doubt on the prevailing dogma of targeted drug(s) and personalized treatments.

201

FAQs about Hepatitis B Vaccine (Hep B) and Multiple Sclerosis  

MedlinePLUS

... not associated with autism CDC Statement: 2004 Pediatrics Paper CDC Statement on Pandemrix Fainting (Syncope) FAQs about ... confirmed diagnosis of MS. The findings in this paper cannot be taken as confirmation that the vaccine ...

202

Dibromochloropropane: epidemiological findings and current questions.  

PubMed

Dibromochloropropane, DBCP, has had a seminal role in our current understanding of how to prevent chemical risks to health. Early toxicological studies showed its special impact on the testes, and detection of its mutagenic potency was soon followed by demonstration of its carcinogenicity to animals. Its commercial use as a useful nematocide ignored, at first, these warnings from the laboratory. When production workers, first in California and then in Israel, found they were sterile as a result of their exposure, this was convincing evidence that prevention had failed. The evidence, azospermia, oligospermia, and gonadotrophin response to testicular damage, were found first in production workers. In agricultural applicators in California who used the material, decreased sperm count and increased gonadotrophin levels were found. While production in California, Texas, and Israel was halted, studies continued and so, it seems, did use. Our first Israeli study was of workers on banana crops, and we found convincing evidence of increased spontaneous abortion in their family histories. Follow-up studies among production workers in Israel showed that some recovered testicular function, but among their offspring, otherwise in good health, there was a predominance of females. Those who did not recover from azospermia were those with high levels of follicle stimulating hormone. However data for production workers did not show increased spontaneous abortion. Nor have any studies so far shown increased birth defects or increased infant mortality. Unfavorable reproductive outcomes can be due to other agents, as shown by sprayers in Dutch orchards having hypofecundity (increased interpregnancy period) and sex ratio changes; but the agents responsible have not yet been identified. These experiences have lead to the general acceptance of some implications: (1) Paternal exposures can lead to a variety of unfavorable effects on reproductive outcome, including infertility, spontaneous abortion, and altered sex ratio. (2) Patterns of effects of potent agents in production workers and in applicators or users of chemicals may differ. (3) Although human carcinogenesis has not yet been confirmed, unfavorable reproductive outcomes are a reasonable early indicator of such risk. (4) Shifts in sex ratios of populations may be a subtle sign of more serious risks. (5) Continued use of an agent such as this under circumstances in which these UROs cannot be prevented is unconscionable. PMID:9472348

Goldsmith, J R

1997-12-26

203

Pubic "Crab" Lice Diagnosis  

MedlinePLUS

... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

204

Head Lice: Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

205

Head Lice: Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

206

Body Lice Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

207

Head Lice: Diagnosis  

MedlinePLUS

... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

208

Head Lice: Information for Parents  

MedlinePLUS

... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

209

Pubic "Crab" Lice Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

210

Pubic "Crab" Lice Prevention and Control  

MedlinePLUS

... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

211

Body Lice Diagnosis  

MedlinePLUS

... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

212

Body Lice Prevention and Control  

MedlinePLUS

... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

213

Parasites - Lice  

MedlinePLUS

... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

214

question_1303305591 — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

This is an outstanding and intellectually-stimulating question which introduces a new way to translate more effectively metastasis research to the clinic. It is certainly worth exploring and badly needed. because, if positive, drugs could be immediately useful to help defined populations of patients. Per points, we agree that these are limited metastasis groups; however, results could at minimum justify moving forward to full adjuvant trials. Worthy cause given the "bottleneck" we experience nowadays since drugs are mostly not tested in metastasis prevention.

215

Black Holes: From Here to Infinity FAQ  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Black Holes: From Here to Infinity is a 6-page illustrated brochure that answers the eight most frequently asked questions about black holes. It was developed by the Education and Public Outreach group at Sonoma State University, with funding from the EXIST mission concept study and the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission. It is available in both English and Spanish and is part of the “Black Holes” suite of materials that accompany the PBS NOVA show “Monster of the Milky Way” and the planetarium show “Black Holes: the Other Side of Infinity.”

2009-01-01

216

Demand Response For Power System Reliability: FAQ  

SciTech Connect

Demand response is the most underutilized power system reliability resource in North America. Technological advances now make it possible to tap this resource to both reduce costs and improve. Misconceptions concerning response capabilities tend to force loads to provide responses that they are less able to provide and often prohibit them from providing the most valuable reliability services. Fortunately this is beginning to change with some ISOs making more extensive use of load response. This report is structured as a series of short questions and answers that address load response capabilities and power system reliability needs. Its objective is to further the use of responsive load as a bulk power system reliability resource in providing the fastest and most valuable ancillary services.

Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2006-12-01

217

Environmental Epidemiology  

Cancer.gov

Environmental epidemiology seeks to understand how physical, chemical, biologic, as well as, social and economic factors affect human health. Social factors, that is where one lives, works, socializes or buys food, often influence exposure to environmental factors.

218

Descriptive Epidemiology  

Cancer.gov

Descriptive epidemiology studies characterize cancer incidence and mortality temporal trends, age-specific rates, geographic distribution of cancer, race and ethnic differences in cancer rates, and birth cohort effects.

219

Epidemiological Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter discusses the principles of study design and related methodological issues in the epidemiology of congenital\\u000a anomalies, with specific regard to environmental factors. We present the major types of experimental and observational designs\\u000a used in environmental epidemiology, namely the basic designs involving the individual as the unit of analysis and the ecological\\u000a designs, which involve groups or geographical areas

A. Rosano; E. Robert-Gnansia

220

Fermi Questions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Fermi questions emphasize estimation, numerical reasoning, communicating in mathematics, and questioning skills. Students often believe that word problems have one exact answer and that the answer is derived in a unique manner. Fermi questions encourage multiple approaches, emphasize process rather than the answer, and promote non-traditional problem solving strategies. The a href= /workshops/sum96/interdisc/sheila3.html Fermi Questions Library/a features classic Fermi questions with annotated solutions, a list of Fermi questions for use with students, Fermi questions with a Louisiana twist, and Fermi activities for the K-12 classroom. A Louisiana Lessons Web Activity.

Math Forum

2001-01-01

221

Environmental epidemiology  

SciTech Connect

This volume is a compendium of peer-reviewed papers presented at the Symposium on Exposure Measurement and Evaluation Methods for Epidemiology, cosponsored in 1985 by the Health Effects Research Laboratory, USEPA, and the Division of Environmental Chemistry of the American Chemical Society. The book is divided into four sections: Use of Biological Monitoring to Assess Exposure, Epidemiologic Considerations for Assessing Exposure, Health and Exposure Data Bases, and Assessment of Exposure to Environmental Contaminants for Epidemiologic Studies. Both background papers and detailed reports of human studies are presented. The Biological Monitoring section contains reports of efforts to quantify adducts in blood and urine samples. In the section on Epidemiologic Considerations the feasibility of conducting epidemiologic studies of persons residing near hazardous waste sites and those exposed to arsenic in drinking water is described. The review of Data Bases includes government and industry water quality monitoring systems, the FDA Market Basket Study, major EPA air monitoring data, the National Database on Body Burden of Toxic chemicals, and the National Human Adipose Tissue Survey. Methods of assessing current exposure and estimating past exposure are detailed in the final section. Exposure to trichloroethylene in shower water, the relationship between water quality and cardiovascular disease, the contribution of environmental lead exposures to pediatric blood lead levels, and data from the TEAM study in which researchers compare indoor, outdoor, and breath analysis of air pollutant exposures are also discussed.

Kopfler, F.C.; Craun, G.F. (eds.)

1986-01-01

222

The Identity Study for Alzheimers Patient FAQ Brochure  

E-print Network

The Identity Study for Alzheimers Patient FAQ Brochure W H O C A N I C O N T A C T A B O U T P A R in the Identity Study for Alzheimer's disease. When thinking about joining any clinical study, it is important aspects of the study, why we are doing this research, and what will happen should you decide

Chisholm, Rex L.

223

Epidemiology 766 Discussion Guide: Readings 1  

E-print Network

Epidemiology 766 Discussion Guide: Readings 1 HIV and CD4 counts: Describing Patterns Over Time by the investigators? Be as precise as possible. Why is this question of clinical interest? Of epidemiologic interest methods are used to describe patterns over time? Do the authors use all of the available data? Can you

Zhang, Daowen

224

Epidemiology 766 Discussion Guide: Readings 1  

E-print Network

Epidemiology 766 Discussion Guide: Readings 1 HIV and CD4 counts: Describing Patterns Over Time as possible. Why is this question of clinical interest? Of epidemiologic interest? What would be the ideal the outcome of interest vary over time?,... The independent variable? What methods are used to describe

Zhang, Daowen

225

[Occupational epidemiology].  

PubMed

The aim of occupational epidemiology is to describe workplace-related diseases and to identify their underlying causes. Its primary goal is to protect workers from hazardous effects of the working process by applying work-related primary and secondary prevention measures. To assess health risks different study designs and a wide array of complex study instruments and methods are frequently employed that cannot be replaced by toxicological investigations. This paper primarily addresses health risks by agent exposures. In this context a central task of occupational epidemiology is careful assessment of exposure. Different data sources, such as work site measurements, register data, archive material, experts' opinion, and the workers' personal estimates of exposure may be used during this process. In addition, biological markers can complement exposure assessment. Since thorough occupational epidemiologic studies allow assessment of disease risks under realistic exposure conditions, their results should be more frequently used to derive workplace-related threshold limit values. PMID:18311483

Ahrens, W; Behrens, T; Mester, B; Schmeisser, N

2008-03-01

226

Cognitive epidemiology  

PubMed Central

This glossary provides a guide to some concepts, findings and issues of discussion in the new field of research in which intelligence test scores are associated with mortality and morbidity. Intelligence tests are devised and studied by differential psychologists. Some of the major concepts in differential psychology are explained, especially those regarding cognitive ability testing. Some aspects of IQ (intelligence) tests are described and some of the major tests are outlined. A short guide is given to the main statistical techniques used by differential psychologists in the study of human mental abilities. There is a discussion of common epidemiological concepts in the context of cognitive epidemiology. PMID:17435201

Deary, Ian J; Batty, G David

2007-01-01

227

Questioning Strategies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this brief article from the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin the best practices of questioning strategies are explained. The author illustrates the difference between an open and a closed question and provides examples of the five categories of questions that teachers should be asking. A bibliography of additional resources is included for further study.

2012-01-01

228

Four Questions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author is pleased to introduce a new section in "TAJ," Four Questions. The structure is simple: four questions are asked to teaching artists working in various media and locations. The questions are always the same, but because each teaching artist's approach is unique, their answers will provide an insight into particular methodologies that…

Hark-Weber, Amara G., Ed.

2013-01-01

229

Sample Cancer Epidemiology Grant Applications  

Cancer.gov

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) frequently receives questions from investigators for examples of successfully funded grant applications. Several investigators and their organizations agreed to let the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP) post excerpts of their grant applications online. The applications in the table below are excellent examples of grantsmanship.

230

Nutritional Epidemiology  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Although observations on relationships between diet and health have always been recognized—the systematic science of nutritional epidemiology in populations is relatively recent. Important observations propelling the field of nutrition forward were numerous in the 18th and 19th centuries, as it was...

231

About Provocative Questions — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

The provocative questions initiative has assembled a list of 24 important questions from the research community to stimulate the NCI’s research communities to use laboratory, clinical and populations sciences in especially effective and imaginative ways to answer the questions. The questions are not simple restatements of long-term goals of the National Cancer Program, which are to improve the prevention, detection, diagnosis, and treatment of all forms of cancer.

232

Proposed Provocative Questions — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

View all of the questions that have been submitted and see how they have been evaluated by peers. Submit your own evaluation of a submitted question, or leave a comment about a question (commenting requires log in or creation of your own PQ account).

233

Post-genome respiratory epidemiology: a multidisciplinary challenge F. Kauffmann and the Post Genome Respiratory Epidemiology group  

Microsoft Academic Search

Post-genome respiratory epidemiology: a multidisciplinary challenge. F. Kauffmann and the Post Genome Respiratory Epidemiology group. #ERS Journals Ltd 2004. ABSTRACT: The introduction of genetic approaches in respiratory epidemiology is novel for most epidemiologists, and the post-genome phase poses new challenges. After describing specific questions pertinent to the field of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, two main methodological aspects regarding

J. Anto; M. P. Baur; H. Bickeboller; D. Clayton; W. O. C. Cookson; F. Demenais; P. J. Helms; I. Humphery-Smith; S. Imbeaud; F. Kauffmann; B. M. Knoppers; M. Lathrop; N. Pearce; D. Schaid; E. Silverman; S. Weiss; M. Wjst

234

Digital Epidemiology  

PubMed Central

Mobile, social, real-time: the ongoing revolution in the way people communicate has given rise to a new kind of epidemiology. Digital data sources, when harnessed appropriately, can provide local and timely information about disease and health dynamics in populations around the world. The rapid, unprecedented increase in the availability of relevant data from various digital sources creates considerable technical and computational challenges. PMID:22844241

Salathé, Marcel; Bengtsson, Linus; Bodnar, Todd J.; Brewer, Devon D.; Brownstein, John S.; Buckee, Caroline; Campbell, Ellsworth M.; Cattuto, Ciro; Khandelwal, Shashank; Mabry, Patricia L.; Vespignani, Alessandro

2012-01-01

235

Essential Questions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The secret to teaching may be as simple as asking students good questions--and then giving them the opportunity to find the answers. The author shares how he uses essential questions that set the class off on an inquiry. Rather than consuming information that he distributes and then repeating it on a test, students carry out their own…

Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

2012-01-01

236

Curiosity Questions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Have you ever found yourself lecturing a child, with the best of intentions, in an attempt to help him or her learn a lesson or process a situation in a manner that you feel will be productive? Curiosity questions, which the authors also call What and How questions, help children process an experience, event, or natural consequence so that they…

Nelsen, Jane; DeLorenzo, Chip

2010-01-01

237

Question Mars  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lesson about generating hypotheses and testable questions. Learners will use critical thinking and a collaborative approach to pose questions related to the study of Mars and evaluate the quality of their questions. They will explore remote-sensing data collected by a camera orbiting Mars - the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) and develop a team science question. Students will practice critical thinking skills, use a collaborative approach to this first critical step of the scientific process. Exploring the images of the surface of Mars in Visible (VIS) images, students will come up with a topic of study, their team science question and hypotheses. The lesson models scientific inquiry using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes and vocabulary.

238

Epidemiology Exemption Exam  

E-print Network

. Epidemiology and epidemiologic methods are central to public health, being used to describe and explain, among other uses. While epidemiology and epidemiologists rely on biostatistical theory and methods for meeting this requirement: PH 250A (Epidemiologic Methods I), PH 250B (Epidemiologic Methods II

Doudna, Jennifer A.

239

Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

240

Composing questions  

E-print Network

This dissertation motivates a new syntax and semantics for simplex and multiple wh-questions, concentrating on English and German data. The proposed theory combines Cable's (2007; 2010) Q-based syntax for wh-movement and ...

Kotek, Hadas

2014-01-01

241

Provocative Questions feedback — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

242

Epidemiologic methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

When performing empirical research in public health and medicine, the investigator is typically faced with a variety of methodologic issues to resolve at the design and analysis stages of the research. The investigator must specify the research question, conceptualize and operationalize the variables to be measured, consider several research designs to choose from, determine appropriate measures of disease frequency and

David G. Kleinbaum

2002-01-01

243

Questionable Exercises.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication presents general guidelines for exercise prescription that have an anatomical basis but also consider the exerciser's ability to do the exercise correctly. It reviews various common questionable exercises, explaining how some exercises, especially those designed for flexibility and muscle fitness, can cause harm. Safer…

Liemohn, Wendell; Haydu, Traci; Phillips, Dawn

1999-01-01

244

Questor's Question  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Questor is a curious little bird whose four broad questions are helpful to anyone interested in making art or understanding the art of others. He was designed as a character in an online video for children, "Building on a River: Questor's Tale." The video is narrated by Questor, who relates the 2000 year history of architecture along the Salt…

Erickson, Mary; Dock, Michelle Nichols; Eldridge, Laurie

2009-01-01

245

Four Questions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching artists often find themselves working in schools and communities that are new to them, whether these are situations close to home or farther afield. This issue of Four Questions highlights teaching artists who travel extensively as part of their teaching and artistic practices and bring their expertise, energy, and creativity to…

Hark-Weber, Amara G., Ed.

2013-01-01

246

Mathematical modeling and the epidemiological research process  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors of this paper advocate for the expanded use of mathematical models in epidemiology and provide an overview of\\u000a the principles of mathematical modeling. Mathematical models can be used throughout the epidemiological research process.\\u000a Initially they may help to refine study questions by visually expressing complex systems, directing literature searches, and\\u000a identifying sensitive variables. In the study design phase,

Mikayla C. Chubb; Kathryn H. Jacobsen

2010-01-01

247

Questions Submitted Online — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Sequencing of natural human tumors is teaching us invaluable lessons. It is becoming clear that the new dogmas created in the post genome era are being questioned. The previously suspected genetic heterogeneity of tumors is now proven on the sequence level. The extreme genetic heterogeneity of individual tumors and the existence of multiple tumors (not metastases) pose fundamental doubt on the prevailing dogma of targeted drug(s) and personalized treatments.

248

Regression Discontinuity Designs in Epidemiology  

PubMed Central

When patients receive an intervention based on whether they score below or above some threshold value on a continuously measured random variable, the intervention will be randomly assigned for patients close to the threshold. The regression discontinuity design exploits this fact to estimate causal treatment effects. In spite of its recent proliferation in economics, the regression discontinuity design has not been widely adopted in epidemiology. We describe regression discontinuity, its implementation, and the assumptions required for causal inference. We show that regression discontinuity is generalizable to the survival and nonlinear models that are mainstays of epidemiologic analysis. We then present an application of regression discontinuity to the much-debated epidemiologic question of when to start HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy. Using data from a large South African cohort (2007–2011), we estimate the causal effect of early versus deferred treatment eligibility on mortality. Patients whose first CD4 count was just below the 200 cells/?L CD4 count threshold had a 35% lower hazard of death (hazard ratio = 0.65 [95% confidence interval = 0.45–0.94]) than patients presenting with CD4 counts just above the threshold. We close by discussing the strengths and limitations of regression discontinuity designs for epidemiology. PMID:25061922

Moscoe, Ellen; Mutevedzi, Portia; Newell, Marie-Louise; Bärnighausen, Till

2014-01-01

249

MedlinePlus FAQ: Listing Your Web Site  

MedlinePLUS

... Supplements Videos & Cool Tools ESPAŃOL Question: How do Web sites get listed in MedlinePlus? To use the ... authoritative resources. MedlinePlus uses quality guidelines to evaluate Web sites. We try to ensure that the information ...

250

MedlinePlus FAQ: Easy-to-Read Documents  

MedlinePLUS

... Cool Tools ESPAŃOL Question: How can I locate materials on MedlinePlus that are easy to read and ... public, not for health professionals. But, not all materials on MedlinePlus are at the same reading level. ...

251

MedlinePlus FAQ: Copyrighted and Non-Copyrighted Material  

MedlinePLUS

... Supplements Videos & Cool Tools ESPAŃOL Question: Is the material on MedlinePlus copyrighted? To use the sharing features ... Answer: MedlinePlus contains both copyrighted and non-copyrighted material. Please see our copyright information page . Restrictions may ...

252

Epidemiologic Methods Manuscript 1005  

E-print Network

Epidemiologic Methods Manuscript 1005 Use of Individual-level Covariates to Improve Latent Class and Development, and Epidemiology Graduate Program, University of Arizona Ricardo Castillo Neyra, Universidad and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine ©2011 Berkeley Electronic Press. All

Small, Dylan

253

Cascades Volcano Observatory - Learn About Volcanoes: Frequently Asked Volcano Questions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page provides the answers to frequently asked questions about volcanoes. It is created by the United States Geological Survey. Topics addressed include: What Is A Volcano? Why Do Volcanoes Occur? How Do Volcanoes Erupt? Where Do Volcanoes Occur? When Will A Volcano Erupt? How Hot Is A Volcano? Can Lava Be Diverted? Do Volcanoes Affect Weather? What Types of Volcanoes are There? Which Eruptions Were The Deadliest? 20th Century Volcanic Eruptions and Their Impact. About 60 additional questions with answers are available under MORE FAQ's -Volcano Questions and Answers, and includes some sections on volcanoes of the western United States. Other links to volcano information are also available.

254

John Snow: Pioneer of Epidemiology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video segment adapted from Rx for Survival, actors portray how John Snow, a London physician, traced a major outbreak of cholera in the 1850s to its source. Using logic, statistics, and mapping, Snow rejected the idea that cholera was carried in a cloud of bad air. Instead, he believed contaminated water was responsible for spreading the disease among the local population. Snow’s surveillance and response tactics would become a foundation of modern epidemiology—the science of public health that is built on a working knowledge of probability, statistics, and sound research methods. A background essay, discussion questions, and standards correlations are also provided.

2010-08-31

255

Urbana-Champaign Chicago Springfield FAQ ID # 117  

E-print Network

/05/04 Rating : Not Rated Question / Issue I've been using a USB key to run my ESRI software offline. I would now like to switch to using the MAC address of my computer but my comp on the USB key. How do I fix

Illinois at Chicago, University of

256

FAQs-6: Evaluating Teaching and Converting the Masses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A short article that responds to two frequently asked questions: "Is there a meaningful way to evaluate teaching?". And "How can staunchly traditional professors be persuaded to use proven but non-traditional teaching methods?" Target Audience: 2-4 year College Faculty/Administrators

Brent, Rebecca, 1956-

257

* || Sign In as Member || FAQ Similar articles found in  

E-print Network

of these questions are shedding light on ancient associations between plants and their animal predators. One approach of phylogenetic trees [HN9] allows inferences about whether a particular ancestral herbivore was generalized plant-herbivore associations are very ancient, whereas others are labile; that innovations in plant

Wilf, Peter

258

Biological markers in epidemiologic research  

SciTech Connect

This paper identifies some of the issues relevant to the use of biological markers in epidemiologic research. Foremost among these are clarity of definitions and marker classification. Illustrations of markers in the categories of internal dose, biological effective dose, biological response, disease, and susceptibility are presented with a theoretical model for the interrelationship among these. Issues faced by epidemiologists in selecting markers for specific studies concern exposure complexity, marker specificity, marker persistence, time to appearance, and the use of target vs. surrogate biological media. Feasibility issues concern sample collection, transport, storage, and characteristics of the laboratory assay. The rationale for biological markers in epidemiologic research is strong in that markers have the potential for (1.) improving the accuracy of our exposure variables, (2.) permitting the identification of preclinical disease and providing opportunities for prevention, (3.) allowing for more homogeneous and etiologically relevant classifications of disease, and (4.) enhancing our understanding of the biological processes leading to disease occurrence, thereby strengthening the interpretation of epidemiologic data and the theoretical framework from which we formulate research questions.

Hulka, B.S.; Wilcosky, T.

1988-03-01

259

Careers in Bioengineering FAQ This has been prepared for those undergraduates and postgraduates in the  

E-print Network

Careers in Bioengineering FAQ This has been prepared for those undergraduates and postgraduates in the Department of Bioengineering wanting more information in jobs and careers in Bioengineering. In this document to become a bioengineer. What are my options? ..........................................................1

260

Abiogenesis FAQs: Articles on the Origin of Life  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page contains links to articles that address common questions about the origins of life and refute many creationist assertions. The articles cover the probability of abiogenesis, current models of the origin of life, and a historical review of the theory of spontaneous generation. There is also an index of creationist claims with specific rebuttals. This would be a good source of background information for high school or undergraduate teachers.

The TalkOrigins Archive

261

NLM extramural program: frequently asked questions.  

PubMed Central

New and aspiring investigators often ask the same questions of experts as proposals are formulated, written, and submitted to the National Library of Medicine (NLM) for peer review. The NLM's Division of Extramural Programs (EP) provides support to medical libraries, academic medical centers, individuals, and industry through numerous types of grants and contracts. A complex set of processes and procedures is in place and is familiar to established and funded researchers, but to few others. A collection of frequently asked questions (FAQ) and their answers on these issues has been prepared by the Biomedical Library Review Committee (BLRC), a standing advisory group to the NLM that meets three times a year to review and score proposals. The BLRC and two experts on National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants and contracts compiled their advice in an electronic FAQ that has been edited and abridged as an introduction to NLM EP for investigators from medical library science, informatics, and biotechnology. The BLRC expects that if new investigators are able to avoid common mistakes and misconceptions, their proposals will improve in quality and they will be able to spend their time more effectively in proposal preparation. Images PMID:8826620

Zink, S; Illes, J; Vannier, M W

1996-01-01

262

Question, Problem, Purpose  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Questions and question-formulating strategies are central to science. In many ways the formulation of a question forms the basis for high-quality instruction in science. Effective questioning has a strong connection to cognitive theory. The sentence start

Michael P. Klentschy

2008-04-01

263

The Department of Epidemiology and  

E-print Network

) EPI 808 Biostatistics I 3 EPI 809 Biostatistics II 3 EPI 826 Research Methods in Epidemiology 3 Epidemiology EPI 920 Advanced Methods in Epidemiology and Applied Statistics EPI 945 Molecular Epidemiology EPIThe Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics GRADUATE HANDBOOK #12;Fall 2013 (Aug. 14) Page1 I

264

Automated question answering for clinical comparison questions   

E-print Network

This thesis describes the development and evaluation of new automated Question Answering (QA) methods tailored to clinical comparison questions that give clinicians a rank-ordered list of MEDLINE® abstracts targeted to ...

Leonhard, Annette Christa

2012-06-25

265

Epidemiology in the Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This high school classroom exercise from the Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion gives an introduction to epidemiology. Visitors will find background materials (including an introduction to epidemiology and how to investigate and outbreak) and suggestions for classroom use.

266

[Epidemiology of schizophrenic disorders].  

PubMed

Epidemiological research has demonstrated that schizophrenic disorders disorders occur in all countries and in all cultures with a relatively comparable frequency and with the same symptomatics. Furthermore, it was also demonstrated that the incidence of this disorder has not increased in the past 180 years. The clinical epidemiological findings have activated various research approaches: The protective effect of estrogen appears to explain the later occurrence of schizophrenic disorders and their more favourable course in women. Other areas of applied epidemiology (comorbidity research, ecological and social epidemiology) and their effects on suicide prevention are also discussed. Thanks to improved knowledge of prevalence and incidence, of distribution and the various social and ecological factors in schizophrenic disorders epidemiological research has been able to demonstrate that it has acquired increasing significance for basic research. PMID:9746967

Hinterhuber, H; Liensberger, D

1998-01-01

267

The future of epidemiology.  

PubMed

In this article, the authors discuss current challenges and opportunities in epidemiology that will affect the field's future. Epidemiology is commonly considered the methodologic backbone for the fields of public health and outcomes research because its practitioners describe patterns of disease occurrence, identify risk factors and etiologic determinants, and demonstrate the usefulness of interventions. Like most aspects of science, epidemiology is in rapid flux. Several factors that are influencing and will continue to influence epidemiology and the health of the public include factors fundamental to framing the discipline of epidemiology (i.e., its means of communication, its methodologies, its access to data, its values, its population perspective), factors relating to scientific advances (e.g., genomics, comparative effectiveness in therapeutics), and factors shaping human health (e.g., increasing globalism, the environment, disease and lifestyle, demographics, infectious disease). PMID:19858828

Ness, Roberta B; Andrews, Elizabeth B; Gaudino, James A; Newman, Anne B; Soskolne, Colin L; Stürmer, Til; Wartenberg, Daniel E; Weiss, Stanley H

2009-11-01

268

2-4-2011 PQ Summary — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Twenty-six cancer researchers assembled at the Stone House on the NIH campus on February 4, 2011 for the NCI Behavioral, Population, Epidemiology, and Prevention Provocative Questions workshop. The participants were invited by the project's organizers to craft a list of interesting questions that might highlight potential new research directions among NCI-supported investigators or reinvigorate research in important areas that have been neglected, and to discuss and evaluate some of the questions submitted by the participants prior to the workshop.

269

Evolution of environmental epidemiologic risk assessment.  

PubMed Central

Epidemiology has historically played an important role in the recognition of causes for diseases affecting the health of the public. Initially, epidemiology was concerned with infectious diseases. Later it became involved in metabolic and dietary deficiency diseases. Most recently, epidemiology has addressed the question of the public health effects of chemicals from production facilities, accidental spills, and chemical waste disposal sites. Concurrent improvements in the sensitivity of chemical analyses have enabled the identification of chemicals arising from waste disposal sites in the soil, air, drinking water, and food supplies of neighboring residential areas, albeit usually at very low concentrations. This knowledge has created great concerns among the affected populations and their public health agencies. The responsibility for interpreting the potential severity of the health effects of these environmental contaminants has fallen to those scientists experienced in epidemiology. This has led to a subdiscipline, reactive epidemiology, which describes investigations focused on specific events, usually under emotion-laden circumstances, rather than scientific merit. The reactive epidemiologist is rigidly constrained as to the size, timing, and location of the study. There is a strong requirement for public communication skills. New data bases are needed including "sentinel" diseases that are linked to exposure to chemicals, records of land use, and residency data for the population at risk. PMID:4085441

Anderson, H A

1985-01-01

270

Evolution of environmental epidemiologic risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

Epidemiology has historically played an important role in the recognition of causes for diseases affecting the health of the public. Initially, epidemiology was concerned with infectious diseases. Later it became involved in metabolic and dietary deficiency diseases. Most recently, epidemiology has addressed the question of the public health effects of chemicals from production facilities, accidental spills, and chemical waste disposal sites. Concurrent improvements in the sensitivity of chemical analyses have enabled the identification of chemicals arising from waste disposal sites in the soil, air, drinking water, and food supplies of neighboring residential areas, albeit usually at very low concentrations. This knowledge has created great concerns among the affected populations and their public health agencies. The responsibility for interpreting the potential severity of the health effects of these environmental contaminants has fallen to those scientists experienced in epidemiology. This has led to a subdiscipline, reactive epidemiology, which describes investigations focused on specific events, usually under emotion-laden circumstances, rather than scientific merit. The reactive epidemiologist is rigidly constrained as to the size, timing, and location of the study. There is a strong requirement for public communication skills. New data bases are needed including ''sentinel'' diseases that are linked to exposure to chemicals, records of land use, and residency data for the population at risk.

Anderson, H.A.

1985-10-01

271

Epidemiology and causation: a realist view.  

PubMed Central

In this paper the controversy over how to decide whether associations between factors and diseases are causal is placed within a description of the public health and scientific relevance of epidemiology. It is argued that the rise in popularity of the Popperian view of science, together with a perception of the aims of epidemiology as being to identify appropriate public health interventions, have focussed this debate on unresolved questions of inferential logic, leaving largely unanalysed the notions of causation and of disease at the ontological level. A realist ontology of causation of disease and pathogenesis is constructed within the framework of "scientific materialism", and is shown to provide a coherent basis from which to decide causes and to deal with problems of confounding and interaction in epidemiological research. It is argued that a realist analysis identifies a richer role for epidemiology as an integral part of an ontologically unified medical science. It is this unified medical science as a whole rather than epidemiological observation or experiment which decides causes and, in turn, provides a key element to the foundations of rational public health decision making. PMID:8138775

Renton, A

1994-01-01

272

What matters most: quantifying an epidemiology of consequence.  

PubMed

Risk factor epidemiology has contributed to substantial public health success. In this essay, we argue, however, that the focus on risk factor epidemiology has led epidemiology to ever increasing focus on the estimation of precise causal effects of exposures on an outcome at the expense of engagement with the broader causal architecture that produces population health. To conduct an epidemiology of consequence, a systematic effort is needed to engage our science in a critical reflection both about how well and under what conditions or assumptions we can assess causal effects and also on what will truly matter most for changing population health. Such an approach changes the priorities and values of the discipline and requires reorientation of how we structure the questions we ask and the methods we use, as well as how we teach epidemiology to our emerging scholars. PMID:25749559

Keyes, Katherine; Galea, Sandro

2015-05-01

273

Epidemiology: Understanding Disease Spread  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Factors that influence disease spread throughout populations can be explored with the program Epidemiology. Both population and disease characteristics can be modeled over different time periods. The Susceptible- Infected- Recovered (SIR) model enables us to make predictions based on significant variables such as the flow of new susceptibles in to the population, transmission rates, disease deaths, and the duration of the disease. Ebola is used as a model organism and epidemiology is presented from both a microbiological and social perspective. * build epidemiological models of different diseases, design strategies for disease control, and test the effectiveness of these strategies on virtual populations

Marion Fass (Beloit College; Biology)

2006-05-20

274

Spatiotemporal Reasoning about Epidemiological Data  

E-print Network

information systems. Methodology. We describe the general methods of how to (1) store epidemiolog- ical data in geographic information systems. We propose new methods to visualize and reason about epidemiological dataSpatiotemporal Reasoning about Epidemiological Data Peter Revesz , Shasha Wu Keywords Epidemiology

Revesz, Peter

275

EPIDEMIOLOGY AND EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

Research collaborations between the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL) and the National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) centered on the development and application of exposure analysis tools in environmental epidemiology include the El Paso...

276

Weekly Epidemiological Record  

MedlinePLUS

... ??????? Espańol RSS Feed Youtube Twitter Facebook Google + iTunes Play Store Weekly Epidemiological Record (WER) Menu WER ... Twitter WHO Facebook page WHO Google+ page WHO iTunes WHO Play Store © WHO 2015 Back to top ...

277

Epidemiology of Toxoplasmosis  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Infection with Toxoplasma gondii is highly prevalent throughout the world. This chapter discusses modes of transmission, the epidemiology of T. gondii infection worldwide and in Brazil, and methods of prevention and control....

278

International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium  

Cancer.gov

The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Formed in 2001, the Consortium is a group of international investigators who have completed or have ongoing case-control studies and who discuss and undertake research projects that pool data across studies or otherwise undertake collaborative research.

279

Epidemiology of Stone Disease  

PubMed Central

Epidemiology has improved our understanding and management of stone. These types of studies have quantified changes in patterns and burden of disease, while identification of risk factors has changed clinical practice and provided insight into pathophysiologic processes related to stone formation. Because nephrolithiasis is a complex disease, an understanding of the epidemiology, particularly the interactions among different factors, may help lead to approaches that reduce the risk of stone formation. PMID:17678980

Curhan, Gary C.

2009-01-01

280

Epidemiology of Anaphylaxis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of health-related states or events in specified populations,\\u000a and the application of this study to the control of health problems [1]. Epidemiological measures of interest for anaphylaxis\\u000a include the incidence, incidence rate, lifetime prevalence of its occurrence and case fatality rate (Box 1). Other aspects\\u000a of interest concern features of persons

David J. Chinn; Aziz Sheikh

281

Question the Author  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page describes the comprehension strategy of Question the Author (QtA), a strategy in which students pose questions while reading nonfiction text. Students pose questions about the author's purpose in including certain phrases or forms of information while reading. Sample questions are provided in a three-step instructional sequence. References are included.

2012-05-16

282

Posing Einstein's Question: Questioning Einstein's Pose.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the events surrounding a famous picture of Albert Einstein in which he poses near a blackboard containing a tensor form of his 10 field equations for pure gravity with a question mark after it. Speculates as to the content of Einstein's lecture and the questions he might have had about the equation. (Contains over 30 references.) (WRM)

Topper, David; Vincent, Dwight E.

2000-01-01

283

Frequently Asked Questions: Questions About Paleontology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site asks and answers questions about paleontology, fossils and dinosaurs. Paleontology questions are: What is paleontology? How does paleontology differ from anthropology and archaeology? What are the practical uses of paleontology? How do paleontologists know how old their fossils are? What training is necessary to become a paleontologist? What organizations exist for paleontologists?

2007-01-01

284

Special Expanded Computer Science MS Program FAQ for Admitted Viterbi Students  

E-print Network

Special Expanded Computer Science MS Program FAQ for Admitted Viterbi Students Can I transfer Computer Science MS Program guaranteed? No. Admitted students must submit their intent to join the Special for Admission to the Special Expanded Computer Science M.S. Program? The deadline to submit your request

Rohs, Remo

285

Home About Us FAQ Back Issues Email Us Choosing a high-speed logic analyzer probe  

E-print Network

Home About Us FAQ Back Issues Email Us Choosing a high-speed logic analyzer probe The test engineer rates have forced designers to consider signal integrity in all parts of their systems, including inductive and the impedance will increase. Resonance The capacitive and inductive nature of the probe load

LaMeres, Brock J.

286

Questions in reference interviews  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article characterises the questioning behaviour in reference interviews preceding delegated online searches of bibliographic databases and relates it to questioning behaviour in other types of interviews\\/settings. With one exception, the unit of analysis is the question (N=610), not the interview. The author uses A.C. Graesser‘s typology of questions to analyse type of question and M.D. White’s typology of information

Marilyn Domas White

1998-01-01

287

Epidemiology 1: What's My Hypothesis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson is part of a 34-lesson curriculum called Detectives in the Classroom, a project of the College of Education and Human Services at Montclair State University. The project is supported by Science Education Partnership Awards from the National Center for Research Resources, National Institutes of Health. The entire curriculum, which can be viewed at the Detectives in the Classroom site, consists of five instructional modules that explore specific health-related issues relevant to middle-school students through the science of epidemiology.This lesson is the third of six lessons in Module 1 that all deal with the Essential Question: Why do some people get sick while others remain healthy? In learning to answer this question, students will come to appreciate the Enduring Understanding that Clues for formulating hypotheses can be found by describing the way a disease is distributed in a population of people in terms of person, place, and time. The lessons which precede and follow this lesson help develop this Essential Understanding but are not prerequisites.

American Association for the Advancement of Science (; )

2005-06-09

288

Reproducible epidemiologic research.  

PubMed

The replication of important findings by multiple independent investigators is fundamental to the accumulation of scientific evidence. Researchers in the biologic and physical sciences expect results to be replicated by independent data, analytical methods, laboratories, and instruments. Epidemiologic studies are commonly used to quantify small health effects of important, but subtle, risk factors, and replication is of critical importance where results can inform substantial policy decisions. However, because of the time, expense, and opportunism of many current epidemiologic studies, it is often impossible to fully replicate their findings. An attainable minimum standard is "reproducibility," which calls for data sets and software to be made available for verifying published findings and conducting alternative analyses. The authors outline a standard for reproducibility and evaluate the reproducibility of current epidemiologic research. They also propose methods for reproducible research and implement them by use of a case study in air pollution and health. PMID:16510544

Peng, Roger D; Dominici, Francesca; Zeger, Scott L

2006-05-01

289

Formulating a Research Question  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This tutorial discusses the conceptual development of a research goal, beginning with the formation of a research question. It also explains the links between a research question, specific aims, hypotheses, and long-term research goals.

The Research Assistant (Danya International, Inc.)

2003-08-12

290

Workshops & Outcomes — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

The participants of the first Provocative Questions meeting supported the idea that the format of small workshops are a useful means to engage in conversations about questions that might stimulate innovative research on various aspects of cancer.

291

Using Socratic Questioning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Can it be, Ischomachus, that asking questions is teaching? I am just beginning to see what is behind all your questions. You lead me on by means of things I know, point to things that resemble them, and persuade ...

Dorothy Merritts

292

Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Division of Cancer Epidemiology Greenebaum Cancer Center Population Research Program Genetic Epidemiology of Cancer  

E-print Network

Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Division of Cancer Epidemiology Greenebaum Cancer Center Population Research Program ­ Genetic Epidemiology of Cancer Associate Professor Tenuretrack Health is expanding research in Cancer Genetic Epidemiology to enrich an already robust campuswide

Weber, David J.

293

Questions for Surveys  

PubMed Central

We begin with a look back at the field to identify themes of recent research that we expect to continue to occupy researchers in the future. As part of this overview, we characterize the themes and topics examined in research about measurement and survey questions published in Public Opinion Quarterly in the past decade. We then characterize the field more broadly by highlighting topics that we expect to continue or to grow in importance, including the relationship between survey questions and the total survey error perspective, cognitive versus interactional approaches, interviewing practices, mode and technology, visual aspects of question design, and culture. Considering avenues for future research, we advocate for a decision-oriented framework for thinking about survey questions and their characteristics. The approach we propose distinguishes among various aspects of question characteristics, including question topic, question type and response dimension, conceptualization and operationalization of the target object, question structure, question form, response categories, question implementation, and question wording. Thinking about question characteristics more systematically would allow study designs to take into account relationships among these characteristics and identify gaps in current knowledge. PMID:24970951

Schaeffer, Nora Cate; Dykema, Jennifer

2011-01-01

294

Improve Your Verbal Questioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most teachers are well aware that verbal questioning can aid student learning. Asking questions can stimulate students to think about the content being studied; connect it to prior knowledge consider its meanings and implications; and explore its applications. A common problem with many teachers' use of verbal questioning is a lack of knowledge…

Vogler, Kenneth E.

2005-01-01

295

Exam Question Exchange.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Acceptable answers are provided for two chemistry questions. The first question is related to the prediction of the appearance of non-first-order proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. The second question is related to extraterrestrial kinetic theory of gases. (JN)

Alexander, John J., Ed.

1983-01-01

296

Community Dialog — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

View all of the questions that have been submitted and see how they have been evaluated by peers. Submit your own evaluation of a submitted question, or leave a comment about a question (commenting requires log in or creation of your own PQ account).

297

Teachers' Classroom Questions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a large body of literature on the types of questions asked by teachers. Questions are a way that teachers use to bring students around to the correct mathematical concepts and procedures through "the negotiation of meaning for necessary condition of learning" (Voigt, 1992, p. 43). Teachers ask many questions, but we are not sure what…

Sahin, Alpaslan

2007-01-01

298

Listening and Questioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the article that follows, I take up a debate that has arisen over the past three years concerning the following issue: Does every act of listening involve the listener in questioning? I argue that the answer to the questions is yes. I give background on the question and then consider one instance of listening that may suggest no role for…

Haroutunian-Gordon, Sophie

2007-01-01

299

Commentary: epidemiology in the era of big data.  

PubMed

Big Data has increasingly been promoted as a revolutionary development in the future of science, including epidemiology. However, the definition and implications of Big Data for epidemiology remain unclear. We here provide a working definition of Big Data predicated on the so-called "three V's": variety, volume, and velocity. From this definition, we argue that Big Data has evolutionary and revolutionary implications for identifying and intervening on the determinants of population health. We suggest that as more sources of diverse data become publicly available, the ability to combine and refine these data to yield valid answers to epidemiologic questions will be invaluable. We conclude that while epidemiology as practiced today will continue to be practiced in the Big Data future, a component of our field's future value lies in integrating subject matter knowledge with increased technical savvy. Our training programs and our visions for future public health interventions should reflect this future. PMID:25756221

Mooney, Stephen J; Westreich, Daniel J; El-Sayed, Abdulrahman M

2015-05-01

300

Leishmaniasis FAQs  

MedlinePLUS

... count (thrombocytopenia). How common is leishmaniasis in the world? The number of new cases per year is ... million (400,000). In what parts of the world is leishmaniasis found? In the Old World (the ...

301

Catastrophism FAQs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is devoted to refuting the pseudo-scientific theory of catastrophism, which claims that only catastrophic events are responsible for changing the Earth's surface. Scientific evidence is used to counter evidence that the young-Earth theory (catastrophism) is plausible.

Talk.Origins Archive

302

Sunscreens FAQs  

MedlinePLUS

... contacts Public service advertisements Stats and facts Gold Triangle Awards Stories and news News releases Press kits ... Vitamin D and UV exposure Cosmetic treatments Gold Triangle Awards Media contacts Public service advertisements View PSAs ...

303

BIQSFP FAQs  

Cancer.gov

Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) provides useful information to help health care payers manage the use of costly medical technologies in order to maximize the health of their patient populations when facing constrained budgets, and to clinicians and patients to help guide treatment decisions based on CEA’s unique endpoints, perspectives (e.g., societal, clinical, or third-party), and time horizon (e.g., within trial or long-term survivorship).

304

Registration - FAQs  

Cancer.gov

Yes, NCI is willing to work with sites on their registration process. No "link" is required. System developers and vendors can configure their applications to use NCI Enterprise Services. CTRP is working with various vendors and institutions to facilitate registration via Clinical Data Management Systems (CDMS).

305

Stillbirth FAQ  

MedlinePLUS

... a second opinion. Please refer to your First Candle Kicks Count! Guide or visit www.firstcandle.org/ ... to top Where can families find support? First Candle provides a 24 hour a day, seven days ...

306

Infertility FAQ's  

MedlinePLUS

... chemotherapy or radiation. Unhealthy habits such as heavy alcohol use, testosterone supplementation, smoking, anabolic steroid use, and ... more likely to have a miscarriage. Smoking. Excessive alcohol use. Extreme weight gain or loss. Excessive physical ...

307

TES FAQ  

Atmospheric Science Data Center

... file contains data from a single TES orbit for one focal plane. Note that a TES orbit starts at the South Pole Apex. A Level 1B ... fp represents the two-character focal plane identifier: 1A, 1B, 2A or 2B run id represents the ten-digit ...

2013-03-14

308

Caregiver FAQ  

MedlinePLUS

... more information on how to contribute to LBD research, visit LBDA's website . When my loved one passes away, should I consider allowing an autopsy to aid in research to LBD? A brain autopsy is the only ...

309

CTRP FAQs  

Cancer.gov

In January 2004, the Director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) established the Clinical Trials Working Group (CTWG) to advise the National Cancer Advisory Board (NCAB) on whether and in what ways the NCI-supported national clinical trials enterprise should be restructured to realize the promise of molecular medicine for advancing oncologic clinical practice in the 21st century.

310

Proposed Provocative Questions for the Indian PQ Workshops — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

To stimulate wider participation in the Provocative Questions Initiative, scientists may pose their own Provocative Questions (Indian "Pose a Question" link) on this website or comment on questions submitted online (Indian "Questions Submitted Online" link) from the research community.

311

First NCI Epidemiology Leadership Workshop: Tobacco, Diet, and Genes  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Croyle, DCCPS Director, said that this workshop is one in a series of activities to be undertaken as part of a review of the EGRP, as has occurred in other parts of DCCPS. It is an important opportunity to identify the epidemiologic questions in tobacco, diet, and genetic research that need support and facilitation and what is needed to overcome barriers.

312

Epidemiology Affinity Group Summary of Meetings. April 18th Elena Andresen (note-taker and moderator; errors are the responsibility of Elena and no others)  

E-print Network

and local health problems.) 2. Apply analytic methods and interpret results commonly used in epidemiologic research 3. Formulate and test a researchable question using epidemiologic methods and theories informed with interdisciplinary teams in diverse setting while integrating epidemiologic perspective and methods 7. Communicate

Chapman, Michael S.

313

Epidemiology of Down Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Down syndrome (DS) is the most commonly identified genetic form of mental retardation and the leading cause of specific birth defects and medical conditions. Traditional epidemiological studies to determine the prevalence, cause, and clinical significance of the syndrome have been conducted over the last 100 years. DS has been estimated to occur…

Sherman, Stephanie L.; Allen, Emily G.; Bean, Lora H.; Freeman, Sallie B.

2007-01-01

314

Prospects for Epigenetic Epidemiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epigenetic modification can mediate environmental influences on gene expression and can modulate the dis- ease risk associated with genetic variation. Epigenetic analysis therefore holds substantial promise for identifying mechanisms through which genetic and environmental factors jointly contribute to disease risk. The spatial and temporal variance in epigenetic profile is of particular relevance for developmental epidemiology and the study of aging,

Debra L. Foley; Jeffrey M. Craig; Ruth Morley; Craig J. Olsson; Terence Dwyer; Katherine Smith; Richard Saffery

315

MATHEMATICAL MODELS IN EPIDEMIOLOGY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This paper provides an overview of the use of mathematical models to explain the epidemiology of infectious diseases, and to assess the potential benefits of proposed control strategies. The development is broadly historical: beginning with the concept of mass action and compartmental models; proceeding through models for vector-born infections with special reference to malaria; touching on ideas arising in

M. G. Roberts

316

Drug abuse epidemiology: an overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

The field of drug abuse epidemiology is a relatively new one and recognition of drug abuse as a phenomenon amenable to study within the field of epidemiology is still forthcoming. Reviews of programmes for meetings of epidemiologic research societies rarely highlight drug abuse, even in association with the transmission of, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) or hepatitis

Z. SLOBODA

317

Epi Bio 401 INTERMEDIATE EPIDEMIOLOGY  

E-print Network

an epidemiologic methods topic first covered in Epi Bio 301, and a 30 minute guided discussion of a paper from and critically interpret literature using epidemiologic methods. · Describe the pathophysiology and basicEpi Bio 401 INTERMEDIATE EPIDEMIOLOGY 1.0 Credit Fall Quarter 2013 (September 25 ­ December 11

Contractor, Anis

318

Modeling of Functional Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ) as continuous bounded data from the ADNI database.  

PubMed

An assessment of abilities to function independently in daily life is an important clinical endpoint for all Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and caregivers. A mathematical model was developed to describe the natural history of change of the Functional Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ) from data obtained in normal elderly, mild cognitive impairment, and mild AD in the AD neuroimaging initiative (ADNI) study. FAQ is a bounded outcome (ranging from 0 to 30), with 0 scored as "no impairment" and 30 as "severely impaired". Since many normal elderly patients had 0 scores and some AD patients had scores of 30 in the ADNI database, a censored approach for handling the boundary data was compared with a standard approach, which ignores the bounded nature of the data. Baseline severity, ApoE4 genotype, age, sex, and imaging biomarkers were tested as covariates. The censored approach greatly improved the predictability of the disease progression in FAQ scores. The basic method for handling boundary data used in this analysis is also applicable to handle boundary observations for numerous other endpoints. PMID:22990808

Ito, K; Hutmacher, M M; Corrigan, B W

2012-12-01

319

The "Trickster" and the Questionability of Questions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tricksters represent creativity and ingenuity in ways that are also integral to arts education. Like the tricksters, strong arts programs teach that a question can have many answers and there are multiple ways to interpret what is seen (Eisner, 2002). In this article, the author discusses how she applies lessons learned from the Trickster stories…

Stewart, Connie

2009-01-01

320

Measuring Victimization inside Prisons: Questioning the Questions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Violence and victimization inside the prison setting are accepted as facts, although the facts about their prevalence remain uncertain. Variation in the methods used to estimate rates of sexual and physical victimization contribute to the wide range in estimates appearing in the prison literature. This article focuses on the questions used in the…

Wolff, Nancy; Shi, Jing; Bachman, Ronet

2008-01-01

321

Molecular Epidemiology of Foodborne Pathogens  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this chapter is to describe the basic principles and advancements in the molecular epidemiology of foodborne pathogens. Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of infectious diseases and/or the dynamics of disease transmission. The goals of epidemiology include the identification of physical sources, routes of transmission of infectious agents, and distribution and relationships of different subgroups. Molecular epidemiology is the study of epidemiology at the molecular level. It has been defined as "a science that focuses on the contribution of potential genetic and environmental risk factors, identified at the molecular level, to the etiology, distribution and prevention of diseases within families and across populations".

Chen, Yi; Brown, Eric; Knabel, Stephen J.

322

Unpark Those Questions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Whenever Mr. Henderson's 3rd grade students had a question that he couldn't immediately answer or that seemed off-topic, he asked them to write the question on a sticky note and place it on a poster dubbed the "Parking Lot." His intention was to find time later to answer those questions, but too often, he said, the parking lot…

Ness, Molly

2013-01-01

323

When lawyers question children  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed the impact of some complex question forms frequently used by attorneys who examine and cross-examine witnesses in the courtroom. Fifteen males and 15 females from each of four student populations (kindergarten, fourth grade, ninth grade, and college) viewed a videotaped incident and then responded to questions about the incident. Half the questions were asked in “law-yerese” (i.e.,

Nancy W. Perry; Bradley D. McAuliff; Paulette Tam; Linda Claycomb; Colleen Dostal; Cameron Flanagant

1995-01-01

324

Department of Epidemiology Master of Science in Epidemiology Curriculum (36 credits minimum)  

E-print Network

Epidemiologic Methods (All 3 courses required for 9 Credits) Credit PHC 6001 Principles of Epidemiology 3 PHC 6000 Epidemiology Research Methods I 3 PHC 6011 Epidemiology Research Methods II 3 Course Epidemiology Regression Methods 3 PHC 7065 Critical Skills in Epidemiology Data Management 2 Course Epidemiology Electives

Kane, Andrew S.

325

Dengue: update on epidemiology.  

PubMed

The epidemiology of dengue fever has undergone major shifts in recent decades. The global distribution has expanded to include more geographic areas. The intensity of transmission and the severity of infections have increased in areas where infection was already endemic. Multiple studies provide a clearer picture of the epidemiology and allow mapping of its distribution and change over time. Despite major efforts to control transmission, competent vectors now infest most tropical and subtropical regions; Aedes albopictus, also a competent vector, is able to survive in temperate areas, placing parts of Europe and North America at risk for local transmission. Many research teams in dengue-endemic areas are working to identify key local weather, vector, and other variables that would allow prediction of a likely epidemic early enough to permit interventions to avert it or blunt its impact. PMID:25475383

Wilson, Mary Elizabeth; Chen, Lin H

2015-01-01

326

International Genetic Epidemiology Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The International Genetic Epidemiology Society (IGES) is composed of "geneticists, epidemiologists, statisticians, mathematicians, biologists, related biomedical researchers and students interested in the research of the genetic basis of the diseases, complex traits and their risk factors." Hosted by the Division of Biostatistics at Washington University School of Medicine, the IGES website provides information about annual scientific meetings; organizational information such as bylaws; the official IGES journal, _Genetic Epidemiology_; books of interest; relevant courses and training programs, and meetings for related organizations. Notably, the site posts an extensive list of available positions (at institutions in a number of countries) such as post-docs, research fellows, faculty positions, research associate positions, and more. The website links to an IGES membership directory as well.

327

Epidemiology of Anxiety Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter presents an overview of the descriptive epidemiology of anxiety disorders based on recently completed surveys\\u000a of the general population. The overall prevalence of anxiety disorders is shown to be quite high, but with considerable variation\\u000a from the most prevalent (specific phobias) to the least prevalent (agoraphobia without a history of panic disorder) disorders.\\u000a Age-of-onset (AOO) of anxiety disorders

Ronald C. Kessler; Ayelet Meron Ruscio; Katherine Shear; Hans-Ulrich Wittchen

328

Cancer epidemiology of woodworking  

Microsoft Academic Search

The literature published between 1965 and 1989 on the cancer epidemiology of woodworking in furniture industries and carpentry shops in 17 countries ist reviewed. Included are some unpublished data obtained through personal communication with epidemiologists or collected from doctoral dissertations. Of 5,785 cases with sino-nasal cancers, about 23% were found to be woodworkers. Dusty jobs, expecially wood processing using high-speed

E. Mohtashamipur; K. Norpoth; F. Liihmann

1989-01-01

329

The leukemias: Epidemiologic aspects  

SciTech Connect

Particularly geared to physicians and cancer researchers, this study of the epidemiology and etiology of leukemia analyzes the four major leukemia subtypes in terms of genetic and familial determinant factors and examines the incidence, distribution and frequency of reported leukemia clusters. Linet discusses the connection between other types of malignancies, their treatments, and the subsequent development of leukemia and evaluates the impact on leukemia onset of such environmental factors as radiation therapy, drugs, and occupational hazards.

Linet, M.S.

1984-01-01

330

Epidemiology of Childhood Asthma  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Over recent years, wheezing illness in children of the Western world has become synonymous with asthma, but as in adults there\\u000a remains no universally accepted epidemiological definition of the condition. Existing definitions of asthma in adults are\\u000a more descriptive than definitive, focussing on the clinical characteristics of reversible airways obstruction, chronic airway\\u000a inflammation, and increased bronchial responsiveness to a variety

John R. Britton; Sarah A. Lewis

331

Ten questions about systems biology  

PubMed Central

In this paper we raise ‘ten questions’ broadly related to ‘omics’, the term systems biology, and why the new biology has failed to deliver major therapeutic advances for many common diseases, especially diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We argue that a fundamentally narrow and reductionist perspective about the contribution of genes and genetic variants to disease is a key reason ‘omics’ has failed to deliver the anticipated breakthroughs. We then point out the critical utility of key concepts from physiology like homeostasis, regulated systems and redundancy as major intellectual tools to understand how whole animals adapt to the real world. We argue that a lack of fluency in these concepts is a major stumbling block for what has been narrowly defined as ‘systems biology’ by some of its leading advocates. We also point out that it is a failure of regulation at multiple levels that causes many common diseases. Finally, we attempt to integrate our critique of reductionism into a broader social framework about so-called translational research in specific and the root causes of common diseases in general. Throughout we offer ideas and suggestions that might be incorporated into the current biomedical environment to advance the understanding of disease through the perspective of physiology in conjunction with epidemiology as opposed to bottom-up reductionism alone. PMID:21224238

Joyner, Michael J; Pedersen, Bente K

2011-01-01

332

Senapati, Shantibhusan — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Epidemiological and experimental evidence has shown the usefulness of fasting or dietary interventions as potential cancer preventive and therapeutic approach. Fasting itself is known to suppress many cancer cells growth and increases chemo-sensitivity. Likewise, ketogenic diets are also known to suppress cancer cells growth. The potential of such kind of approaches has motivated many clinicians and researchers to carry out experimental and clinical studies at different parts of the world.

333

Epigenetic epidemiology of cancer.  

PubMed

Epigenetic epidemiology includes the study of variation in epigenetic traits and the risk of disease in populations. Its application to the field of cancer has provided insight into how lifestyle and environmental factors influence the epigenome and how epigenetic events may be involved in carcinogenesis. Furthermore, it has the potential to bring benefit to patients through the identification of diagnostic markers that enable the early detection of disease and prognostic markers that can inform upon appropriate treatment strategies. However, there are a number of challenges associated with the conduct of such studies, and with the identification of biomarkers that can be applied to the clinical setting. In this review, we delineate the challenges faced in the design of epigenetic epidemiology studies in cancer, including the suitability of blood as a surrogate tissue and the capture of genome-wide DNA methylation. We describe how epigenetic epidemiology has brought insight into risk factors associated with lung, breast, colorectal and bladder cancer and review relevant research. We discuss recent findings on the identification of epigenetic diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for these cancers. PMID:25124661

Barrow, Timothy M; Michels, Karin B

2014-12-01

334

Floating point o questions  

E-print Network

Floating point o questions o co-processor o SPARC instructions o example o double-floats o quad-floats o Intel floating point 1 #12; Floating Point Questions o why use sign/magnitude instead of 2's complement

Biagioni, Edoardo S.

335

Seven Questions of Networking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What do leaders mean when they talk about networks and whether leadership networks have the power to transform the profession? When it comes to educational leadership networks, there certainly are more than seven important questions. This article focuses on seven key questions about networking in the superintendent ranks by the coordinator of one…

Livingston, David

2007-01-01

336

It's about the Questions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The best coaching partnerships are built on conversation and listening, and they are not built on a coach giving answers to a mentee. Ronald Bearward explains how coaches can use questions to help mentees find answers for themselves. Effective questions lead to greater reflection and solutions that teachers can use now and in the future.

Bearwald, Ronald R.

2011-01-01

337

Problem of Questioning  

ScienceCinema

Le Prof.Leprince-Ringuet, chercheur sur le plan scientifique, artistique et humain, parle de la remise en question des hommes et la remise en question scientifique fondamentale ou exemplaire- plusieurs personnes prennent la parole p.ex Jeanmairet, Adam, Gregory. Le Prof.Gregory clot la soirée en remerciant le Prof.Leprince-Ringuet

None

2011-04-25

338

1 Great Question  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author presents an ideal question that can take an art teacher and his or her students through all the levels of thought in Bloom's taxonomy--perfect for modeling the think-aloud process: "How many people is the artist inviting into this picture?" This great question always helps the students look beyond the obvious and dig…

Nethery, Carrie

2011-01-01

339

Math Questions Worth Asking  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article by Wendy Petti contains an updated version of Bloom's Taxonomy and sample questions that encourage dialogue with students. The article also includes suggestions for teachers about how to create questions that stimulate higher order thinking. Although there are advertisements on this webpage, the content of the freely available article is a valuable resource for teachers.

Wendy Petti

2010-05-18

340

Henipaviruses-unanswered questions of lethal zoonoses.  

PubMed

The highly lethal Hendra and Nipah viruses have been described for little more than a decade, yet within that time have been aetiologically associated with major livestock and human health impacts, albeit on a limited scale. Do these emerging pathogens pose a broader threat, or are they inconsequential 'viral chatter'. Given their lethality, and the evident multi-generational human-to-human transmission associated with Nipah virus in Bangladesh, it seems prudent to apply the precautionary principle. While much is known of their clinical, pathogenic and epidemiologic features in livestock species and humans, a number of fundamental questions regarding the relationship between the viruses, their natural fruit-bat host and the environment remain unanswered. In this paper, we pose and probe these questions in context, and offer perspectives based primarily on our experience with Hendra virus in Australia, augmented with Nipah virus parallels. PMID:22440924

Field, Hume; Kung, Nina

2011-12-01

341

Question Answering Using Question Classification and Document Tagging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Question answering (QA) is a relatively new area of research. We took the approach of designing a question answering system that is based on question classification and document tagging. Question classification extracts useful information from the question about how to answer the question. Document tagging extracts useful information from the documents, which are used to find the answer to the

Yllias Chali

2009-01-01

342

Scientific Computing FAQ: S.C., Numerical Analysis, and Associated Fields Resource Guide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Numerical Analysis (NA) is the union of theoretical and computational investigation into the computer solution of mathematical problems, including linear algebra, statistics, and operations research. The Scientific Computing FAQ metasite lists and links to resources such as electronic texts and software catalogs for NA and related fields in scientific computing. Examples of topics covered include Dense Linear Algebra Systems, Stochastic Differential Equations, and Random Numer Generators (RNG's), among others. The site is provided by Mathcom Solutions, Inc., a consulting business for the fields of finance, engineering, and operations.

343

What is a Question?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A given question can be defined in terms of the set of statements or assertions that answer it. Application of the logic of inference to this set of assertions allows one to derive the logic of inquiry among questions. There are interesting symmetries between the logics of inference and inquiry; where probability describes the degree to which a premise implies an assertion, there exists an analogous quantity that describes the bearing or relevance that a question has on an outstanding issue. These have been extended to suggest that the logic of inquiry results in functional relationships analogous to, although more general than, those found in information theory. Employing lattice theory, I examine in greater detail the structure of the space of assertions and questions demonstrating that the symmetries between the logical relations in each of the spaces derive directly from the lattice structure. Furthermore, I show that while symmetries between the spaces exist, the two lattices are not isomorphic. The lattice of assertions is described by a Boolean lattice 2(sup N) whereas the lattice of real questions is shown to be a sublattice of the free distributive lattice FD(N) = 2(sup 2(sup N)). Thus there does not exist a one-to-one mapping of assertions to questions, there is no reflection symmetry between the two spaces, and questions in general do not possess unique complements. Last, with these lattice structures in mind, I discuss the relationship between probability, relevance and entropy.

Knuth, Kevin H.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

344

The Challenge Question  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students are introduced to the "Walk the Line" challenge question. They write journal responses to the question and brainstorm what information they need to answer the question. Ideas are shared with the class (or in pairs and then to the class, if class size is large). Then students read an interview with an engineer to gain a professional perspective on linear data sets and best-fit lines. Students brainstorm for additional ideas and add them to the list. With the teacher's guidance, students organize the ideas into logical categories of needed knowledge.

VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering,

345

Molecular Epidemiology of Foodborne Pathogens  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The purpose of this chapter is to describe the basic principles and advancements in the molecular epidemiology of foodborne\\u000a pathogens. Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of infectious diseases and\\/or the dynamics of disease\\u000a transmission. The goals of epidemiology include the identification of physical sources, routes of transmission of infectious\\u000a agents, and distribution and relationships of different

Yi Chen; Eric Brown; Stephen J. Knabel

2011-01-01

346

Is there epidemiology in Russia?  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—To examine the current state of epidemiology in Russia.?DESIGN—The structure of clinical research and statistical methods was used to shed light on the epidemiology in Russia. The frequencies of specific study designs were evaluated using Medline data for 1970-1997. To determine the proportion of advanced design clinical studies the frequency of cohort, prospective, follow up, or longitudinal studies, and controlled trials was evaluated. All diagnosis related studies were found to determine the usage of advanced statistical technique (ROC analysis). The adequacy of Medline information was checked by hand search of journals. All dissertations in epidemiology defended in Russia in 1995 and 1996 were evaluated for their methodology. The curriculum recommended by Ministry of Health to Medical Universities was evaluated. Available literature and library indexing of epidemiological terms examined.?MAIN RESULTS—Russian medical research uses less frequently advanced study designs and methods of data analysis. Medical students are taught epidemiology as a science of spread of infectious diseases. There is no department of epidemiology in Russian universities where epidemiology is taught in the modern sense and no epidemiological and biostatistical periodicals available in Russia.?CONCLUSION—Epidemiology in Russia remains in an archaic state of science of the spread of infectious diseases and it is detrimental to methodology of medical research in Russia.???Keywords: Soviet Union; Russia; study design; comparative studies PMID:10990475

Vlassov, V.

2000-01-01

347

Asking Higher Level Questions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A learning hierarchy for teaching inservice and preservice teachers to ask questions which require complex thought (instead of memory) is presented. Some assessment of effectiveness has been carried out on an informal basis. (Author)

O'Neill, Leo; Raths, James

1970-01-01

348

Schneider, Thomas — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

349

Questions about Biological Parents  

MedlinePLUS

... About Biological Parents Family Life Listen Questions About Biological Parents Article Body As you raise your adopted ... to her life—the fact that she has biological parents elsewhere—that may make it necessary for ...

350

Qian, Yong — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

351

Student Questioning Educational Outreach  

E-print Network

a greater understanding of what is going on in class Meta cognition- evaluating ones own learning prompts four times and evaluated their questions on a scale of 0-3(Minimal to High) using a rubric we had

Petta, Jason

352

Chia, David — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

353

Pagel, Mark — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

354

Lerman, Michael — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

355

Endocrine System Clicker Questions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a set of clicker questions designed for first year nursing students in an Anatomy and Physiology course, used during the endocrine system. It can also be used for an undergraduate Physiology course.

DDS/DO Elizabeth J Kavran (Ursuline College Biology)

2009-05-01

356

CAT questions and answers  

SciTech Connect

This document, prepared in February 1993, addresses the most common questions asked by APS Collaborative Access Teams (CATs). The answers represent the best judgment on the part of the APS at this time. In some cases, details are provided in separate documents to be supplied by the APS. Some of the answers are brief because details are not yet available. The questions are separated into five categories representing different aspects of CAT interactions with the APS: (1) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), (2) CAT Beamline Review and Construction, (3) CAT Beamline Safety, (4) CAT Beamline Operations, and (5) Miscellaneous. The APS plans to generate similar documents as needed to both address new questions and clarify answers to present questions.

Not Available

1993-02-01

357

Prehn, Richmond — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

358

Finn, Olivera — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

359

Finn, Olivera — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

An exciting development in this area that would be encouraged by attempting to answer this important question, is the connection between the observations of cancer risk modulation by epidemiologists and immune mechanisms that appear to be involved, described by immunologists.

360

Scardino, Peter — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Excellent question, made more provocative when we realize that the seminal vesicles and Cowper’s gland in the male, tissues adjacent to the prostate and under the same hormonal influences as the prostate, rarely if even harbor malignant tumors.

361

Griguer, Corinne — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

362

Paternostro, Giovanni — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

This question addresses a very important problem but could be slightly modified to be more provocative. For example, can we design combinatorial cancer therapies that use the same strategies as biological combinatorial control?

363

Asking gender questions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Jonathan Pritchard, Karen Masters, James Allen, Filippo Contenta, Leo Huckvale, Stephen Wilkins and Alice Zocchi report on a survey of the gender of astronomers attending and asking questions at this year's UK National Astronomy Meeting.

Pritchard, Jonathan; Masters, Karen; Allen, James; Contenta, Filippo; Huckvale, Leo; Wilkins, Stephen; Zocchi, Alice

2014-12-01

364

Shridhar, Krithiga — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Provocative Questions Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Sign Up Log in Sections Home Home Current RFAs and PQs Cancer Prevention and Risk Mechanisms of Tumor Development or Recurrence Tumor Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis Cancer

365

GoodQuestions Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

GoodQuestions is a pedagogical strategy designed to improve calculus instruction for higher-level students by adapting two methods developed in physics instruction: ConcepTests (conceptual multiple-choice questions) and Just-in-Time Teaching (a pedagogical strategy that blends web technology with active learning in classroom situations). The project web site includes class materials, links to math classes where the strategy is being employed, news articles, and information on the project team.

2004-04-03

366

Evaluating Interactive Question Answering  

Microsoft Academic Search

This volume is filled with a variety of innovative approaches to helping users answer questions. In much of the research,\\u000a however, one part of the solution is missing, namely the user. This chapter describes evaluation of interactive question answering\\u000a with a focus on two initiatives: the Text REtrieval Conference (TREC) Interactive Track and studies in the medical domain.\\u000a As is

William Hersh

367

Epidemiologic research in Antarctica  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study of epidemiology of respiratory viruses that was begun in the early 1960's is described. Locations selected for the study included a Wisconsin University housing village, a second grade school population, individual volunteers who associated socially, married couples, and the winter-over population at McMurdo Bay and at Scott Base in the Antarctic. It was concluded that most rhinovirus transmission is through aerosolized particles. Air filtration and careful nasal sanitation with virucidal tissues are determined to be effective in blocking rhinovirus transmission and should be useful in both isolated space colonies and in ordinary earth-bound populations.

1990-01-01

368

Animal influenza epidemiology  

PubMed Central

Influenza A viruses exist within their natural host, aquatic birds, in a number of antigenic subtypes. Only a few of these subtypes have successfully crossed into other avian and mammalian hosts. This brief review will focus on just three examples of viruses that have successfully passed between species; avian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses and H3N2 viruses which have transmitted from aquatic birds to humans and then to swine. Although there are a number of other subtypes that have also transmitted successfully between species, these three selected examples have spread and evolved in different ways, exemplifying the complexity of influenza A virus epidemiology. PMID:19230163

Ducatez, M.F.; Webster, R.G.; Webby, R.J.

2009-01-01

369

[Epidemiology of allergic diseases].  

PubMed

The article gives a critical review of the main epidemiological features of allergic diseases, their frequency, distribution and etiologic background as well as the possibilities of prevention and control, based on current literature. Statistical data for Croatia, collected by the Croatian National Institute of Public Health, are used to present actual epidemiological situation in Croatia. Basic descriptive epidemiological methods were used to express age and sex distribution, etc. In comments and review of preventive measures, our own epidemiological experiences and experience acquired on creating the national programs of health measures were used. The genesis of allergies usually implies the influence of various potent environmental allergens such as proteins or smaller molecules attached to proteins (haptens) through repeat or continuous exposure by contact, alimentary or respiratory route, and parenteral route as most efficient (mucous membrane exposure is similar to parenteral exposure). In addition, almost all substances from our environment may, under certain circumstances, become allergens and produce allergic reaction. Individual constitution that is inherited also plays a role. Allergic diseases are present all over the world, however, with variable frequency. Response to an allergen is generally the same, causing distinct allergic diseases like urticaria, anaphylactic shock, asthma, etc., while the main allergens can be different. It is estimated that 30%-40% of all people have some type or manifestation of allergy. According to our Institute data, in Croatia hospitalization was mostly required for allergic urticaria and allergic asthma, followed by Quincke's edema. Optimal treatment and appropriate healthcare structure are essential for efficient control and prevention of allergic diseases. The main direct elements are as follows: well organized emergency service for anaphylactic and other severe conditions; health education expected from all levels of healthcare system; allergology outpatient services available; and sufficient hospital capacities. An indirect yet important element is optimal drug prescribing and usage practice. Other specific public health measures include: pollen air concentration monitoring by public health institutes; information on particular allergen presence and intensity via public media; and control of potential allergen emission into the environment, especially air. People will, as always, find ways to adapt themselves and cope with allergies, with medical profession helping them by identifying the reasons causing allergic diseases and developing successful measures of treatment, prevention and control. PMID:22359881

Aleraj, Borislav; Tomi?, Branimir

2011-01-01

370

To Question or Not to Question: That Seems to Be the Question.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on the effects of questioning in the classroom has explored the placement, timing, type, and social impact of questions. Principles of good questioning include the following: (1) well-stated questions should be concise, clear, and complete; (2) questions should be topical in nature, requiring a complex answer; (3) yes or no questions

Bradtmueller, Weldon G.; Egan, James B.

371

Epidemiology of ARDS.  

PubMed

For decades the incidence of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been unclear. A first effort to tackle the problem was undertaken by the National Heart and Lung Task Force who, in 1972, provided the scientific community with an arguable estimate of 75 cases per 100,000 inhabitants/year for the USA. Nearly 20 years later, the first population based studies yielded figures of 1.5-4.5 cases per 100 000 inhabitants/year in Europe. Epidemiologic research became much more focused when in 1992 the new ARDS and acute lung injury (ALI) definitions of the American-European Consensus Conference became available. In subsequent studies in which these refined definitions were used, incidence figures ranging from 13-23 cases per 100,000 inhabitants/year for ARDS and 18 cases per 100,000 inhabitants/year for ALI were reported. Latest results from a high-class epidemiological study conducted in Seattle, suggested ARDS/ALI incidence figures of 59 and 79 cases per 100,000 inhabitants/year, respectively. These new figures, similar to the one proposed in 1972, led to a paradigm shift: ARDS and ALI are no longer viewed as rare syndromes but as widespread diseases with a massive socio-economic impact that is comparable with the burden from breast cancer, AIDS, asthma or myocardial infarction. PMID:16682918

Lewandowski, K; Lewandowski, M

2006-06-01

372

Epidemiology of esophageal cancer  

PubMed Central

Esophageal cancer (EsC) is one of the least studied and deadliest cancers worldwide because of its extremely aggressive nature and poor survival rate. It ranks sixth among all cancers in mortality. In retrospective studies of EsC, smoking, hot tea drinking, red meat consumption, poor oral health, low intake of fresh fruit and vegetables, and low socioeconomic status have been associated with a higher risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Barrett’s esophagus is clearly recognized as a risk factor for EsC, and dysplasia remains the only factor useful for identifying patients at increased risk, for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma in clinical practice. Here, we investigated the epidemiologic patterns and causes of EsC. Using population based cancer data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program of the United States; we generated the most up-to-date stage distribution and 5-year relative survival by stage at diagnosis for 1998-2009. Special note should be given to the fact that esophageal cancer, mainly adenocarcinoma, is one of the very few cancers that is contributing to increasing death rates (20%) among males in the United States. To further explore the mechanism of development of EsC will hopefully decrease the incidence of EsC and improve outcomes. PMID:24039351

Zhang, Yuwei

2013-01-01

373

Accident and disaster epidemiology.  

PubMed

Natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, and cyclones are responsible each year for a large number of deaths and injuries. Over recent years, the emphasis in disaster management has shifted from post-disaster improvisation to pre-disaster planning. There is a strong feeling that one should be able to prevent or mitigate the human consequences through improved preparedness. The decade 1990-99 has been proclaimed by the United Nations the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction (IDNDR). Epidemiology is proving an essential tool to study the health effects of disasters and to suggest appropriate control measures at each of the phases of the disaster process, from prevention to long-term rehabilitation. Case-studies have shown that rescue by the disaster-struck community is the most effective way to reduce the death toll due to earthquakes. Disaster preparedness should be part and parcel of primary health care in disaster-prone areas. Appropriate information to evaluate needs should be preferred to precipitate relief. Epidemiological surveillance should replace indiscriminate vaccination. In the long term, disaster preparedness can provide a stimulus for setting up more efficient health services. PMID:8047651

Lechat, M F

374

Ecogeographic Genetic Epidemiology  

PubMed Central

Complex diseases such as cancer and heart disease result from interactions between an individual's genetics and environment, i.e. their human ecology. Rates of complex diseases have consistently demonstrated geographic patterns of incidence, or spatial “clusters” of increased incidence relative to the general population. Likewise, genetic subpopulations and environmental influences are not evenly distributed across space. Merging appropriate methods from genetic epidemiology, ecology and geography will provide a more complete understanding of the spatial interactions between genetics and environment that result in spatial patterning of disease rates. Geographic Information Systems (GIS), which are tools designed specifically for dealing with geographic data and performing spatial analyses to determine their relationship, are key to this kind of data integration. Here the authors introduce a new interdisciplinary paradigm, ecogeographic genetic epidemiology, which uses GIS and spatial statistical analyses to layer genetic subpopulation and environmental data with disease rates and thereby discern the complex gene-environment interactions which result in spatial patterns of incidence. PMID:19025788

Sloan, Chantel D.; Duell, Eric J.; Shi, Xun; Irwin, Rebecca; Andrew, Angeline S.; Williams, Scott M.; Moore, Jason H.

2009-01-01

375

2014 American College of Epidemiology Annual Meeting  

Cancer.gov

The theme of the 2014 American College of Epidemiology (ACE) annual meeting is "Making Epidemiology More Consequential." Participants will focus on how epidemiology is used to directly impact the public health of communities and societies, both locally and globally.

376

ASKING AND ANSWERING QUESTIONS Guidelines for Asking Good Questions  

E-print Network

involves critical thinking, and focuses on the substance or content of what a person has said. A question question because it involves no critical thinking on the questioner's part (however, these questions could) The critical thinking required in asking a good, substantive question involves making a careful analysis

Wagner, Diane

377

Finding similar questions in large question and answer archives  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has recently been a significant increase in the number of community-based question and answer services on the Web where people answer other peoples' questions. These services rapidly build up large archives of questions and answers, and these archives are a valuable linguistic resource. One of the major tasks in a question and answer service is to find questions in

Jiwoon Jeon; Joon Ho Lee

2005-01-01

378

CEDR: Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies have a long history of epidemiologic research programs. The main focus of these programs has been the Health and Mortality Study of the DOE work force. This epidemiologic study began in 1964 with a feasibility study of workers at the Hanford facility. Studies of other populations exposed to radiation have also been supported, including the classic epidemiologic study of radium dial painters and studies of atomic bomb survivors. From a scientific perspective, these epidemiologic research program have been productive, highly credible, and formed the bases for many radiological protection standards. Recently, there has been concern that, although research results were available, the data on which these results were based were not easily obtained by interested investigators outside DOE. Therefore, as part of an effort to integrate and broaden access to its epidemiologic information, the DOE has developed the Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) Program. Included in this effort is the development of a computer information system for accessing the collection of CEDR data and its related descriptive information. The epidemiologic data currently available through the CEDAR Program consist of analytic data sets, working data sets, and their associated documentation files. In general, data sets are the result of epidemiologic studies that have been conducted on various groups of workers at different DOE facilities during the past 30 years.

Not Available

1993-08-01

379

The evolutionary epidemiology of vaccination  

E-print Network

The evolutionary epidemiology of vaccination Sylvain Gandon1,* and Troy Day2 1 Ge´ne´tique et 3N6, Canada Vaccination leads to dramatic perturbations of the environment of parasite populations for modelling the short- and long-term epidemiological and evolutionary consequences of vaccination

380

Spatial Statistics for Environmental Epidemiology  

E-print Network

of methods and techniques of spatial data analysis used in environmental epidemiology. Speci c topics includeSpatial Statistics for Environmental Epidemiology Peter Diggle (Medical Statistics Unit, Lancaster intensities 2.2 Poisson processes 2.3 Cox processes/cluster processes 3. Case-control methods 3.1 Spatial

Diggle, Peter J.

381

Shadow enhancers: Frequently asked questions about distributed cis-regulatory information and enhancer redundancy  

PubMed Central

This review, in the form of a FAQ, addresses outstanding questions about “shadow enhancers”, quasi-redundant cis-regulatory elements, and their proposed roles in transcriptional control. Questions include: What exactly are shadow enhancers? How many genes have shadow/redundant/distributed enhancers? How redundant are these elements? What is the function of distributed enhancers? How modular are enhancers? Is it useful to study a single enhancer in isolation? In addition, a revised definition of “shadow enhancers” is proposed, and possible mechanisms of shadow enhancer function and evolution are discussed. PMID:22083793

Barolo, Scott

2012-01-01

382

The Epidemiology of Sarcoma  

PubMed Central

Sarcomas account for over 20% of all pediatric solid malignant cancers and less than 1% of all adult solid malignant cancers. The vast majority of diagnosed sarcomas will be soft tissue sarcomas, while malignant bone tumors make up just over 10% of sarcomas. The risks for sarcoma are not well-understood. We evaluated the existing literature on the epidemiology and etiology of sarcoma. Risks for sarcoma development can be divided into environmental exposures, genetic susceptibility, and an interaction between the two. HIV-positive individuals are at an increased risk for Kaposi’s sarcoma, even though HHV8 is the causative virus. Radiation exposure from radiotherapy has been strongly associated with secondary sarcoma development in certain cancer patients. In fact, the risk of malignant bone tumors increases as the cumulative dose of radiation to the bone increases (p for trend <0.001). A recent meta-analysis reported that children with a history of hernias have a greater risk of developing Ewing’s sarcoma (adjusted OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.9, 5.7). Bone development during pubertal growth spurts has been associated with osteosarcoma development. Occupational factors such as job type, industry, and exposures to chemicals such as herbicides and chlorophenols have been suggested as risk factors for sarcomas. A case-control study found a significant increase in soft tissue sarcoma risk among gardeners (adjusted OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.00, 14.00), but not among those strictly involved in farming. A European-based study reported an increased risk in bone tumors among blacksmiths, toolmakers, or machine-tool operators (adjusted OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.08, 4.26). Maternal and paternal characteristics such as occupation, age, smoking status, and health conditions experienced during pregnancy also have been suggested as sarcoma risk factors and would be important to assess in future studies. The limited studies we identified demonstrate significant relationships with sarcoma risk, but many of these results now require further validation on larger populations. Furthermore, little is known about the biologic mechanisms behind each epidemiologic association assessed in the literature. Future molecular epidemiology studies may increase our understanding of the genetic versus environmental contributions to tumorigenesis in this often deadly cancer in children and adults. PMID:23036164

2012-01-01

383

The epidemiology of sarcoma.  

PubMed

Sarcomas account for over 20% of all pediatric solid malignant cancers and less than 1% of all adult solid malignant cancers. The vast majority of diagnosed sarcomas will be soft tissue sarcomas, while malignant bone tumors make up just over 10% of sarcomas. The risks for sarcoma are not well-understood. We evaluated the existing literature on the epidemiology and etiology of sarcoma. Risks for sarcoma development can be divided into environmental exposures, genetic susceptibility, and an interaction between the two. HIV-positive individuals are at an increased risk for Kaposi's sarcoma, even though HHV8 is the causative virus. Radiation exposure from radiotherapy has been strongly associated with secondary sarcoma development in certain cancer patients. In fact, the risk of malignant bone tumors increases as the cumulative dose of radiation to the bone increases (p for trend <0.001). A recent meta-analysis reported that children with a history of hernias have a greater risk of developing Ewing's sarcoma (adjusted OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.9, 5.7). Bone development during pubertal growth spurts has been associated with osteosarcoma development. Occupational factors such as job type, industry, and exposures to chemicals such as herbicides and chlorophenols have been suggested as risk factors for sarcomas. A case-control study found a significant increase in soft tissue sarcoma risk among gardeners (adjusted OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.00, 14.00), but not among those strictly involved in farming. A European-based study reported an increased risk in bone tumors among blacksmiths, toolmakers, or machine-tool operators (adjusted OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.08, 4.26). Maternal and paternal characteristics such as occupation, age, smoking status, and health conditions experienced during pregnancy also have been suggested as sarcoma risk factors and would be important to assess in future studies. The limited studies we identified demonstrate significant relationships with sarcoma risk, but many of these results now require further validation on larger populations. Furthermore, little is known about the biologic mechanisms behind each epidemiologic association assessed in the literature. Future molecular epidemiology studies may increase our understanding of the genetic versus environmental contributions to tumorigenesis in this often deadly cancer in children and adults. PMID:23036164

Burningham, Zachary; Hashibe, Mia; Spector, Logan; Schiffman, Joshua D

2012-01-01

384

Research Questions and Hypotheses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This first section guides students to ask testable questions, and formulate hypotheses and null hypotheses. Students also become familiar with the parts of a science research report. This structure reinforces the concepts of quantitative observations and comparative research. It also sets the stage for doing statistical testing. At the end of the first section, students are ready to ask a research question and formulate hypotheses for their Long-Term Research Projects (LTRP). Students finish the section by drafting the introduction paragraphs for their LTRP poster presentations. In this free section you will find Lesson 1--Ooze Observations, an Introduction and the Table of Contents.

Ashley Steel

2001-01-01

385

Genetic Epidemiology of Psoriasis  

PubMed Central

Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, immune-mediated skin condition with a prevalence of 0-11.8% across the world. It is associated with a number of cardiovascular, metabolic, and autoimmune disease co-morbidities. Psoriasis is a multifactorial disorder, influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Its genetic basis has long been established through twin studies and familial clustering. The association of psoriasis with the HLA-Cw6 allele has been shown in many studies. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified a large number of other genes associated with psoriasis. Many of these genes regulate the innate and adaptive immune system. These findings indicate that a dysregulated immune system may play a major role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. In this article, we review the clinical and genetic epidemiology of psoriasis with a brief description of the pathogenesis of disease. PMID:25580373

Gupta, Rashmi; Debbaneh, Maya G.; Liao, Wilson

2014-01-01

386

Epidemiology of Behçet disease.  

PubMed

Behçet disease (BD) is a multisystem inflammatory disorder that is an important cause of morbidity worldwide. BD is most common along the ancient "Silk Road" route in the Far East and Mediterranean basin. The eye is the most commonly involved organ in BD patients.The prototypical form of involvement is a relapsing remitting panuveitis and retinal vasculitis. Less commonly, BD may present in the form of conjunctivitis, conjunctival ulcers, keratitis, episcleritis, scleritis, and extraocular muscle paralysis. Uveitis in BD carries significant implications for the patient, because it is a chronic recurrent disease characterized by explosive attacks of severe inflammation that may cause significant, cumulative damage to the intraocular structures. This review summarizes the epidemiology of systemic and ocular clinical features of BD with particular focus on risk factors, clinical characteristics, complications, and prognosis of BD-associated uveitis. PMID:23030353

Khairallah, Moncef; Accorinti, Massimo; Muccioli, Cristina; Kahloun, Rim; Kempen, John H

2012-10-01

387

[Epidemiology of lung tumors].  

PubMed

Approximately one out of 500 chest radiographs shows the incidental finding of a solitary pulmonary nodule and almost one half of these pulmonary lesions are caused by a tumor. Unfortunately, only 2% to 5% of all lung tumors are of benign origin, e. g. lipoma, fibroma, hamartoma, and chondroma, and the majority are malignant neoplasms, most commonly primary lung cancer followed by metastases of extrapulmonary primary carcinomas. Thus, a careful diagnostic work up of solitary pulmonary nodules, including histological diagnosis, is mandatory for an adequate management and treatment of patients with pulmonary lesions. Despite all recent improvements of treatment modalities, lung cancer continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality among malignant diseases worldwide. The prognosis of affected patients is still very poor and a 5-years survival rate of only 14% makes lung cancer the number one cause of death due to cancer in Switzerland. Active and passive tobacco smoking are by far the best known risk factor for the development of lung cancer, but there are severe other probably less known factors that may increase the individual risk for malignant neoplasms of the lung. These risk factors include e. g. exposure to natural ionic radiation, consisting of terrestrial radiation and indoor radiation caused by radon gas, exposure to respirable dust and Diesel engine emissions, asbestos, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In the majority of cases, the latency between exposure and development of cancer is years to decades and the person concerned was occupationally exposed. Therefore, a detailed evaluation of a patient's medical and occupational history is needed. Due to its poor prognosis, prevention and early diagnosis of lung cancer is crucial to improve our patients' outcome. Good knowledge of epidemiology and aetiology of pulmonary tumors is the key to preventive measures and identification of individuals at increased risk for lung cancer. An overview will be provided on the epidemiology of lung tumors and predominantly preventable risk factors for lung cancer. PMID:22753285

Ott, S; Geiser, T

2012-07-01

388

That Is the Question.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the author's evolution from a teacher set in his ways to one who adapted to students' voices. Contends that classrooms need to be environments where students are able to ask their own questions. Explains that key elements of such an environment include the following: interviews; mini-lessons; multi-genre projects; literature circles;…

Korsunsky, Syd

2002-01-01

389

A Question of Choice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Women's reproductive rights, reproductive health, and constitutional privacy rights in the United States are addressed in\\u000a light of the contemporary onslaught of the Christian Right. The misuse of State power by fundamentalist social forces in America\\u000a is critiqued. The article also briefly reviews the question of State control over women's bodies.

Gene Grabiner

2011-01-01

390

Finding the Right Questions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Does the world really need another computing magazine? Surely, that's a legitimate question. By any measure, we already have an overwhelming number of publications to choose from. But how many do you actually read? And of those, how many do you feel really contribute to your knowledge and understanding of emerging software technologies and capabilities?

Steve Bourne

2003-01-01

391

De, Abhijit — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

Looking at cell to cell differences within a tumor bed, contributed by either DNA mutations, epigenetic or post-translational modifications (PTM) or miRNA mediated control switches or even a combination of all these, the question rise how to best design a personalized drug trial?

392

Question: Who Can Vote?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This year's rollercoaster primary elections and the pending national election, with an anticipated record voter turnout, provide the perfect backdrop for an examination of the questions: (1) Who can vote?; and (2) Who will vote? Historically, the American government refused voting rights to various groups based on race, gender, age, and even…

Rodeheaver, Misty D.; Haas, Mary E.

2008-01-01

393

Questioning and Experimentation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper is a philosophical analysis of experimentation. The philosophical framework of the analysis is the interrogative model of inquiry developed by Hintikka. The basis of the model is explicit and well-formed logic of questions and answers. The framework allows us to formulate a flexible logic of experimentation. In particular, the formulated…

Mutanen, Arto

2014-01-01

394

Exam Question Exchange.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two exam questions are presented. One suitable for advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate courses in organic chemistry, is on equivalent expressions for the description of several pericyclic reactions. The second, for general chemistry students, asks for an estimation of the rate of decay of a million-year-old Uranium-238 sample. (BB)

Alexander, John J., Ed.

1978-01-01

395

Manjili, Masoud — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

If this important question is answered we would be able to develop a highly tailored therapeutic approach for cancers. Actually, inflammatory type of the anti-tumor immune response such as IFN-g can also induce initial tumor inhibition but eventual tumor escape and progression.

396

Some Questions About Neurocognitive  

E-print Network

Some Questions About Neurocognitive Networks Steven Bressler Center for Complex Systems & Brain is a Brain Network? · A brain network is a large-scale system in the brain consisting of distributed neuronal ­ Dynamic Interdependency #12;Does The Brain Need Networks? · Serial processing, as found in the PNS, is too

Bressler, Steven L.

397

A Question of Choice  

PubMed Central

Women's reproductive rights, reproductive health, and constitutional privacy rights in the United States are addressed in light of the contemporary onslaught of the Christian Right. The misuse of State power by fundamentalist social forces in America is critiqued. The article also briefly reviews the question of State control over women's bodies. PMID:21696627

2011-01-01

398

Researching Classroom Questioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The complexities of the modern society and interconnected world in which we live requires students who are able to problem solve and think critically. The research on which this article is based aims to explore how classroom questioning can help students guide their learning and model the spirit of inquiry to become lifelong learners. The research…

Lores Gonzalez, Adriana

2010-01-01

399

Asking the Right Question  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When it comes to teaching, learning, technology, and students, it is very easy to ask the wrong question. Because students in the current generation seem to be technologically savvy, we often want to know how they use technology. So as part of the NLII?s focus on the next generation of learners -- the Net Generation --NLII started talking to…

Oblinger, Diana G.

2005-01-01

400

QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING  

E-print Network

QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING ÂĄIS IT REAL? ÂĄIS IT IMPORTANT? ÂĄWHAT IS IT DUE TO? ÂĄHOW MUCH MORE in the atmosphere, giving Earth its temperate climate. Global Atmosphere, Global Warming GLOBAL TEMPERATURE TRENDĂ?t a cure for global warming! Aerosols only last a short while in the atmosphere, they would have

401

A question of impact  

Microsoft Academic Search

When they reviewed the studies concerning the connections among property values, perception, and power lines, two researchers noticed gaps in knowledge, gaps one can fill by asking the right questions. Sixty and seventy years ago, small farm families greeted the siting of electric power facilities with delight, as men with mules dragged poles into place and strung lines by hand

2009-01-01

402

A Question of Character  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When intern placement veteran Jacqueline Perkins begins counseling students at Florida A&M University (FAMU) about their prospects for getting well-paying, security-related jobs with the federal government, she confronts the 800-pound gorilla in the room--the question of whether a student has been convicted of or pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor.…

Stuart, Reginald

2010-01-01

403

Asking the Right Questions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a student teacher at Nottingham Trent University, the author explored the issues surrounding children asking investigable questions in science and the repertoire of strategies that could be employed by teachers in the classroom to support this process. His project was carried out in an inner-city primary school in Nottingham. The four focus…

Lord, Rob

2011-01-01

404

EFFECTIVELY ADDRESSING CONSUMER QUESTIONS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Answering consumer questions can be one of the toughest aspects of working in the egg industry. Consumers enjoy being informed about the products they purchase. The increased use of the internet by consumers can prove problematic due to the wealth of inaccurate information available on the interne...

405

Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers  

MedlinePLUS

... Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Share Compartir Antibiotic Resistance Questions & Answers On this Page Questions about Bacteria, ... of antibiotic resistance. Top of Page Questions about Antibiotic Resistance Q: What is antibiotic resistance? A: Antibiotic resistance ...

406

An Ethics Primer: Ethical Questions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource is a PDF that provides a short introduction to ethical questions and strategies having to do with Ethics instruction. The PDF describes an overview of ethical questions and develops student understanding of ethical questions through three different worksheets.

2008-01-01

407

OpenEpi - Epidemiologic Calculators  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, created by Andrew G. Dean, Roger A. Mir and Kevin Sullivan of Open Epidemiology.com, contains calculators for use in epidemiological calculations. There are modules that can be used online and open source modules that can be downloaded and altered. Some modules include 2x2 tables, an R by C table, proportions, dose-response and trend calculator, sample size, and generation of random numbers. This is a great resource for those interested in general statistics, social statistics, public health, or more specifically, epidemiology.

Dean, Andrew G.

408

Attending, questioning, and quality.  

PubMed

Health care is just now feeling the effects of many years of neglect of serious attention to quality outcomes. We have many tools available now to change our thinking and to provide techniques to attain excellence in quality, such as Six Sigma and principals from Toyota. However, these techniques will only get us to a minimal level of quality. We need to change our questions, think the impossible, and break out of our old modes of thinking about quality. Zero defects are possible. We only have to take that quantum leap and think in new ways. We are posed on the edge of a quantum leap into new ways of thinking about quality. We will hear much more about nurse-sensitive indicators in the near future. Nurse leaders should change their questions now to attend to new models that will get us closer to the ultimate "impossible thinking" goal of zero defects in nurse-sensitive indicators of quality. PMID:15586486

Kerfoot, Karlene

2004-01-01

409

Living in the question.  

PubMed

We live in a fast moving-world. Business has accelerated to breathtaking speeds in the 1990s--and in the last few years the afterburner has really kicked in. The speed of change is overwhelming. Especially in health care, who has time to "live in the question?" We need to decide things quickly, get the decision out of the way, and move on, right? Maybe. Biology shows us that you can't plan ahead very far. New things come along that you don't even have a category for, and therefore you don't even see them. Things are going to happen that you literally have no notion are even possible. The key to succeeding in this environment? Don't plan ahead. Stay curious. Make small bets. Build organizational hothouses. Feed the seedlings that grow. The challenge is to remain curious, to live in the question, both personally and organizationally. PMID:10557490

Flower, J

1999-01-01

410

Knowledge based question answering  

SciTech Connect

The natural language database query system incorporated in the Knobs Interactive Planning System comprises a dictionary driven parser, APE-II, and script interpreter whch yield a conceptual dependency as a representation of the meaning of user input. A conceptualisation pattern matching production system then determines and executes a procedure for extracting the desired information from the database. In contrast to syntax driven q-a systems, e.g. those based on atn parsers, APE-II is driven bottom-up by expectations associated with word meanings. The goals of this approach include utilising similar representations for questions with similar meanings but widely varying surface structures, developing a powerful mechanism for the disambiguation of words with multiple meanings and the determination of pronoun referents, answering questions which require inferences to be understood, and interpreting ellipses and ungrammatical statements. The Knobs demonstration system is an experimental, expert system for air force mission planning applications. 16 refs.

Pazzani, M.J.; Engelman, C.

1983-01-01

411

Welcome to Provocative Questions: The Unanswered Questions in Cancer Research — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

The provocative questions initiative has assembled a list of 20 important questions from the research community to stimulate the NCI's research communities to use laboratory, clinical and population sciences in especially effective and imaginative ways to answer the questions.

412

The "Looting Question" Bibliography  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provocatively subtitled "Web and Literary Resources on the Archaeological Politics of Private Collecting, Commercial Treasure Hunting, Looting, and 'Professional' Archaeology," this comprehensive online bibliography provides scholars and practitioners with resources related to the "looting question." The bibliography is organized by format type and focuses on North American materials. Hugh Jarvis, a doctoral candidate in Anthropology as well as a graduate student in Information and Library Studies at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo, has compiled this unique, frequently updated resource.

413

Desai, Kartiki — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

This is a great question. Gene-based targeting has contributed significantly to decrease mortality. Despite the unexplored black box of molecular mechanisms, these drugs were highly effective as first line of therapy. However over time, a percentage of patients were either non-responders or developed resistance. Our deep knowledge of molecular mechanisms has helped redesign some of the drugs, or established diagnostic tests to stratify patients that would benefit from such drugs.

414

Finn, Olivera — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

The importance of this question depends on what sort of research will be considered important to fund. If we prioritize research on the tumor cell and forget about the host response, we might miss the answer. This has in part been happening in many studies over many years that attempted to find the most effective chemotherapy by testing its effects on the growth of a xenograft in an immunocompromized mouse.

415

Questions of wisdom.  

PubMed

In this column questions concerning wisdom are addressed, such as, what is wisdom? Can wisdom be taught in the academy? Several perspectives on wisdom from philosophy, education, business, and psychology are presented. Wisdom with creativity-creativity with wisdom is then explored through discussion of Parse's humanbecoming teaching-learning model and Laird Hamilton's life lessons learned from surfing, which he termed wisdom of the wave. The column concludes with consideration of the wise person. PMID:19342709

Schmidt Bunkers, Sandra

2009-04-01

416

Neutrino Oscillations:. Hierarchy Question  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The only experimentally observed phenomenon that lies outside the standard model of the electroweak interaction is neutrino oscillations. A way to try to unify the extensive neutrino oscillation data is to add a phenomenological mass term to the Lagrangian that is not diagonal in the flavor basis. The goal is then to understand the world's data in terms of the parameters of the mixing matrix and the differences between the squares of the masses of the neutrinos. An outstanding question is what is the correct ordering of the masses, the hierarchy question. We point out a broken symmetry relevant to this question, the symmetry of the simultaneous interchange of hierarchy and the sign of ?13. We first present the results of an analysis of data that well determine the phenomenological parameters but are not sensitive to the hierarchy. We find ?13 = 0.152±0.014, ? 23 = 0.25{ - 0.05}{ + 0.03} ? and ?32 = 2.45±0.14×10-3 eV2, results consistent with others. We then include data that are sensitive to the hierarchy and the sign of ?13. We find, unlike others, four isolated minimum in the ?2-space as predicted by the symmetry. Now that Daya Bay and RENO have determined ?13 to be surprisingly large, the Super-K atmospheric data produce meaningful symmetry breaking such that the inverse hierarchy is preferred at the 97.2 % level.

Ernst, D. J.; Cogswell, B. K.; Burroughs, H. R.; Escamilla-Roa, J.; Latimer, D. L.

2014-09-01

417

Questioning Many Mysteries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The first section of this memoir queries my formative years. Indirectly I address the question, did my childhood and early years make a difference in my choice of career? Why and how did I begin my journey to becoming a scientist? Did I choose the field of solar astronomy or did circumstances dictate it for me? In the second section, I travel through my work environments and experiences, talking about interactions and aspects of being a scientist that do not appear in our research papers. What parts of my research were happenstances and what parts did I plan? What does it feel like to be on scientific quests? Using examples in my journey, I also turn to questions that have intrigued me throughout my sojourn as a solar astronomer. How do scientific discoveries come about? What factors lead to little discoveries? And what factors lead to major exciting discoveries? Are there timely questions we do not think to ask? How can small, seemingly scattered pieces of knowledge suddenly coalesce into a deeper understanding - what is called the "Aha!" experience - the times when our mental light switches on, and with child-like wonder we behold a "big picture"?

Martin, Sara F.

2015-04-01

418

Epi Bio 301 Syllabus: Introduction to Epidemiology  

E-print Network

of Introduction to Epidemiology is to introduce you to epidemiologic methods so that you can understand. Optional Koepsell TD and Weiss NS. Epidemiologic Methods: Studying the Occurrence of Illness. New York1 Epi Bio 301 Syllabus: Introduction to Epidemiology 1.0 Credit Summer 2013 (June 24 ­ August 23

Contractor, Anis

419

EPIDEMIOLOGY AND DISEASES SURVEILLANCE (DEDS)  

EPA Science Inventory

To establish and operate a central epidemiologic resource for the Army; analyze, interpret, and disseminate information regarding the status, trends, and determinants of the health and fitness of America's Army; and identify and evaluate obstacles to medical readiness. The Direct...

420

EGRP-Supported Epidemiology Consortia  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Epidemiology and Genomics Research In NCI's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences Menu Search EGRP Site: EGRP Home About the Program Mission & Vision Organizational

421

Epidemiology: Cornerstone for Health Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Epidemiology has been used historically to reduce the incidence of communicable diseases and is used presently to study chronic conditions, environmental conditions, and social conditions. Its analytical method is necessary for health educators to evaluate tactics and recommend programs. (MT)

Markellis, Victoria C.

1986-01-01

422

Q Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology  

MedlinePLUS

... Reading Statistics and Epidemiology Annual Cases of Q Fever in the United States Q fever was first ... Q fever. Figure 1 - Number of U.S. Q Fever cases* reported to CDC, 1998 – 2010. *Numbers presented ...

423

The competency question.  

PubMed

JCAHO mandates "processes that are designed to ensure that the competency of all staff members is assessed, maintained, demonstrated, and improved on an ongoing basis." However, it is difficult to collect aggregate data regarding staff competency patterns and trends. How many facilities have the time or energy to collect aggregate data, let alone statistically analyze it for patterns and trends? Not many in today's environment. I saw the need to create a test to evaluate staff competency at my facility, but soon realized I would have no way of knowing if the results were good or bad. The only way to judge the results would be to have a standardized test that was used by multiple facilities. As president of the Houston X-ray Quality Society, I brought the topic up at a meeting in 1995, and a committee was set up to work on the test. The result is two competency tests--one for staff radiographers and one for mammographers--which are currently used by 35 to 40 facilities, with approximately 1,000 technologists taking the test each year. The tests include practical questions that reflect the knowledge required to perform daily exams. Each test has five sections that assess different areas of competency. The scoring system allows technologists to fail one or more individual sections but still pass the test overall. Twenty to 30 percent of the questions are new each year. That gives us the ability to look for improvement on previous year's questions, and at the same time, avoid producing a static and ineffective test. There are 60 questions on the staff radiographer test and 65 questions on the mammographer test, which also includes clinical images. Facilities must sign an agreement that states that they cannot use the test as a disciplinary tool in the employee's evaluation, or in any other way against the technologist. As a profession, radiology administration not only has regulatory requirements to evaluate competency, but also a moral duty to insure that patients receive the best possible care. We should not cover up or ignore the blemishes that we all know exist. Instead, we should take them on, as professional and personal challenges to improve the competency of our staff. PMID:11151318

Ruthemeyer, M

2000-01-01

424

Summer School in Cesme (Turkey) Epidemiologic Methods May/June 2011 Epidemiologic Methods  

E-print Network

Summer School in Cesme (Turkey) ­ Epidemiologic Methods ­ May/June 2011 1 Epidemiologic) ­ Epidemiologic Methods ­ May/June 2011 2 15.4516.15 Break 16.1517.00 L6: Measures of effect School in Cesme (Turkey) ­ Epidemiologic Methods ­ May/June 2011 3 Epidemiologic Methods Principal

Boehning, Dankmar

425

SCHOLARSHIP FAQ'S How do I apply for scholarships if I'm an incoming freshman or transfer student?  

E-print Network

SCHOLARSHIP FAQ'S How do I apply for scholarships if I'm an incoming freshman or transfer student of the scholarship application. Please click on "apply for scholarships". · Complete the scholarship pages and then move to the essay section to complete your application. · Be sure to check the scholarship section

Gelfond, Michael

426

Epidemiology of childhood atopic dermatitis.  

PubMed

Atopic dermatitis (AD) or eczema is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder with significant morbidity and quality of life impairment. Elucidating the epidemiology of AD is important for understanding disease risk factors and facilitates development of interventions for disease prevention. This contribution aims to summarize recent developments in the epidemiology of AD, including the US prevalence, regional differences, and secular trends of disease prevalence, genetic and environmental determinants, distribution, and determinants of disease severity and health care use for AD. PMID:25889128

Garg, Nitin; Silverberg, Jonathan I

2015-01-01

427

Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)  

Cancer.gov

The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC) is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors. During the process of attaining this mission, BTEC plans to mentor junior investigators or investigators who are new to brain tumor epidemiologic research.

428

The epidemiology of mood disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review provides an overview of the epidemiology, risk factors, and genetic epidemiology of mood disorders in adults and\\u000a children. The magnitude and impact of mood disorders in the community outweighs that of most other chronic diseases. Although\\u000a there is substantial knowledge regarding the sociodemographic risk factors for mood disorders, our understanding of the pathogenesis\\u000a and classification still is evolving.

Kathleen Ries Merikangas; Nancy C. P. Low

2004-01-01

429

Epidemiology of binge eating disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: Objective: First described over 50 years ago, binge eating disorder (BED) only recently has become,the focus of epidemiologic,studies. This article provides a comprehen- sive review,of these studies. Method: Relevant studies were examined,and summarized,in the form of a narrative review. Results: Similar to the early studies of bulimia nervosa (BN), the first generation of epidemiologic,studies of BED is limited in

Ruth H. Striegel-Moore; Debra L. Franko

2003-01-01

430

Epidemiology of actinic keratoses.  

PubMed

The epidemiology of actinic keratoses (AKs) reflects their causation by cumulative sun exposure, with the highest prevalence seen in pale-skinned people living at low latitudes and on the most sun-exposed body sites, namely the hands, forearms and face. AKs are markers of increased risk of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma, especially when they are numerous and have coalesced into an area of 'field cancerisation'. The major risk factors are male sex, advanced age, sun-sensitive complexion, high lifetime sun exposure and prolonged immunosuppression. Clinical counts of AKs enable the assessment and monitoring of AK burden, but accurate counting is notoriously difficult, especially when skin is severely sun damaged. AK counting has been repeatedly shown to be unreliable, even among expert dermatologists. Notwithstanding these challenges, qualitative assessment of the natural history of AKs shows a high turnover, with new lesions developing and with other lesions regressing. A very small proportion of AKs undergo malignant transformation, but the precise rate of transformation is unknown due to the inaccuracies in monitoring AK lesions over time. Primary prevention of AKs is achieved by limiting intense sun exposure through sun-protective behaviour, including seeking deep shade, wearing sun-protective clothing and applying sunscreen regularly to exposed skin, from an early age. PMID:25561199

Green, Adčle C

2015-01-01

431

[Epidemiology of brain metastases].  

PubMed

The most frequent intracranial brain tumours are brain metastases. All types of cancer can develop brain metastases but two thirds of brain metastases occurring in adult patients are secondary to one of these three cancers: lung cancer, breast cancer and melanoma. In accordance with these data, this review is focusing on the epidemiology of these three types of cancer. We report here the incidence, risk factors, median time of brain metastases occurrence after diagnosis of the primary cancer, prognosis and median survival for these three types of cancer. We also discuss the clinical implications of these data. The second part of this review is focusing on the Graded Prognostic Assessment scores in all types of primary cancer with brain metastases, how they can be applied in clinical research for a better stratification of patients, and to some extent in clinical practice to guide decisions for personalized treatments. These scores provide a better understanding of the different profiles of clinical evolution that can be observed amongst patients suffering from brain metastases according to the type of primary cancer. We highlighted the most remarkable and useful clinical implications of these data. PMID:25636729

Taillibert, S; Le Rhun, É

2015-02-01

432

[Epidemiology of Behçet's disease].  

PubMed

With more than 30 published prevalence estimates for Behçet's disease (BD), covering many different regions worldwide, the prevalence of BD is quite well described. Even though the interpretation of these data is complicated by between-study differences in methodology, which may substantially influence the results, these data suggest large geographic variations in frequency of BD, with prevalence rates of 20-420/100,000 inhabitants for Turkey, 2.1-19.5 for other Asian countries, 1.5-15.9 for southern Europe and 0.3-4.9 for northern Europe. Additional epidemiological studies or case series from North and South America, the Caribbean Islands, and individuals of sub-Saharan ancestry further suggest that the geographic distribution of BD is much wider than the boundaries of the ancient Silk Road. The few available incidence rates prevent from making strong inferences as to whether the frequency of BD has changed over time. Recent population-based studies of immigrants or migrant populations consistently indicate that migrants from areas of high BD prevalence remain at high risk for BD, which may even be close to the prevalence observed in their countries of origin. Genetic factors, which are not detailed in this review, seem to play a preponderant role in BD development, although they cannot explain the wide between-country disparities in BD prevalence. However, environmental risk factors, including infectious and non-infectious causes, remain poorly investigated and have not yet produced solid hints. PMID:24398415

Mahr, A; Maldini, C

2014-02-01

433

Microtia: Epidemiology & Genetics  

PubMed Central

Microtia is a congenital anomaly of the ear that ranges in severity from mild structural abnormalities to complete absence of the ear, and can occur as an isolated birth defect or as part of a spectrum of anomalies or a syndrome. Microtia is often associated with hearing loss and patients typically require treatment for hearing impairment and surgical ear reconstruction. The reported prevalence varies among regions, from 0.83 to 17.4 per 10,000 births and the prevalence is considered to be higher in Hispanics, Asians, Native Americans, and Andeans. The etiology of microtia and the cause of this wide variability in prevalence are poorly understood. Strong evidence supports the role of environmental and genetic causes for microtia. Although some studies have identified candidate genetic variants for microtia, no causal genetic mutation has been confirmed. The application of novel strategies in developmental biology and genetics has facilitated elucidation of mechanisms controlling craniofacial development. In this paper we review current knowledge of the epidemiology and genetics of microtia, including potential candidate genes supported by evidence from human syndromes and animal models. We also discuss the possible etiopathogenesis in light of the hypotheses formulated to date: neural crest cells disturbance, vascular disruption and altitude. PMID:22106030

Luquetti, Daniela V.; Heike, Carrie L.; Hing, Anne V.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Cox, Timothy C.

2012-01-01

434

Tuberculosis: Epidemiology and Control  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health concern worldwide: despite a regular, although slow, decline in incidence over the last decade, as many as 8.6 million new cases and 1.3 million deaths were estimated to have occurred in 2012. TB is by all means a poverty-related disease, mainly affecting the most vulnerable populations in the poorest countries. The presence of multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis in most countries, with somewhere prevalence is high, is among the major challenges for TB control, which may hinder recent achievements especially in some settings. Early TB case detection especially in resource-constrained settings and in marginalized groups remains a challenge, and about 3 million people are estimated to remain undiagnosed or not notified and untreated. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recently launched a new global TB strategy for the “post-2015 era” aimed at “ending the global TB epidemic” by 2035. This strategy is based on the three pillars that emphasize patient-centred TB care and prevention, bold policies and supportive systems, and intensified research and innovation. This paper aims to provide an overview of the global TB epidemiology as well as of the main challenges that must be faced to eliminate the disease as a public health problem everywhere. PMID:25408856

Sulis, Giorgia; Roggi, Alberto; Matteelli, Alberto; Raviglione, Mario C.

2014-01-01

435

Unanswered questions from CTX  

SciTech Connect

The big question being addressed on CTX during the past year has been: Why was energy confinement not improved by increasing the mesh flux conserver radius from 40 cm to 67 cm. A comparison of decaying spheromaks with the same values of j and n in the two cases shows tau/sub B/2 improving roughly as R/sup 2/ but little change in T/sub e/. As a result, <..beta..>/sub vol/ has gone from approx. 7.0% to approx. 2.0% and the inferred energy confinement time has remained unchanged at approx. 23 ..mu..s. An energy balance analysis of the 40 cm case showed that the observed rapid particle loss could account for most of the energy loss while providing a mechanism for the removal of impurities. At 67 cm, tau/sub p/ has also improved by about a factor of 2, particle loss therefore contributes substantially less to energy balance and the achievement in CTX of j/n/sub e/ as high as 3 x 10/sup -14/ A.m (I/sub tor/ up to 1 MA), low-Z impurities should not be a problem. A question then arises: Is CTX faced with a new strong energy loss mechanism that is characteristic of spheromaks in general. This question is not simply answered because it may involve processes of thermal conduction or convection that cannot be directly measured. In the following paragraphs we discuss many of the topics that have been considered in this search.

Wright, B.L.; Barnes, C.W.; Fernandez, J.C.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; Knox, S.O.; Marklin, G.J.; Platts, D.A.

1986-01-01

436

Lerman, Michael — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

This question is highly important. Indeed, high-dose cisplatin-based chemotherapy represents a curative option for patients with testicular germ cell tumors including seminoma and nonseminomas, namely embryonal carcinoma, yolk-sac tumor, teratoma, and choriocarcinoma. The curative effect is most likely due to large growth fractions in these solid and hematological tumors and probably high expression of protein target(s) of cisplatin. At least one such protein target of cisplatin was identified in species ranging from yeast to humans. These predictions could be easily verified.

437

Marchetti, Dario — Provocative Questions  

Cancer.gov

This is an outstanding and intellectually-stimulating question which introduces a new way to translate more effectively metastasis research to the clinic. It is certainly worth exploring and badly needed. because, if positive, drugs could be immediately useful to help defined populations of patients. Per points, we agree that these are limited metastasis groups; however, results could at minimum justify moving forward to full adjuvant trials. Worthy cause given the "bottleneck" we experience nowadays since drugs are mostly not tested in metastasis prevention.

438

Women Veterans Health Care: Frequently Asked Questions  

MedlinePLUS

... Program Overview » Outreach Materials » FAQs Women Veterans Health Care Womens Health Women Veterans Health Care Home Program ... can I call for more help? What health care services are available to women Veterans? A full ...

439

Epidemiology of eosinophilic esophagitis.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergy-associated disease defined clinically by esophagus-related symptoms in combination with a dense esophageal eosinophilia, both of which are unresponsive to prolonged acid suppression with proton pump inhibitors. Over the last two decades EoE has increasingly been recognized in various geographical areas (mostly industrialized countries) with high socioeconomic development. The prevalence rate is increasing and reaches up to 50 patients per 100,000 inhabitants in some indicator regions. Whether this increased prevalence is due to a real increase in incidence, a result of increased awareness by health care providers or because of the nonfatal nature of EoE adding more and more cases to the patient pool is still a matter of controversy. Several studies have consistently demonstrated a male predominance in EoE, with a male-to-female risk ratio of 3:1. The average age at diagnosis ranges between 30 and 50 years and suggests that EoE is a disease of the middle-aged man. It can affect patients of every race, but the disease is more common among Caucasians. In both children and adults, EoE has been clearly associated with allergies to food and aeroallergens, and most EoE patients present with a personal allergic background (e.g. asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis or oral allergy syndrome). In conclusion, knowledge of epidemiologic parameters of EoE is crucial for identifying risk factors as well as pathogenic mechanisms, planning preventive measures and determining optimal treatment strategies. PMID:24603379

Hruz, Petr

2014-01-01

440

MedlinePlus FAQ: Can I play videos on my mobile device?  

MedlinePLUS

... Videos & Cool Tools ESPAŃOL Question: Can I play videos on my mobile device? To use the sharing ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Answer: MedlinePlus has video content in different formats. MedlinePlus also links to ...

441

MedlinePlus FAQ: What's New on Medline Plus Page and Email Updates  

MedlinePLUS

... Cool Tools ESPAŃOL Question: How is the What's New on MedlinePlus page and RSS feed different from ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Answer: The What's New on MedlinePlus page and RSS feed include alerts ...

442

Recurrent brief depression: clinical and epidemiological issues.  

PubMed

Initially based on empirical observations, the concept of RBD has led to operational diagnostic criteria allowing further studies in various and large populations. In line with the hypothesis of a continuum from normal sad mood to major depression, the spectrum of affective disorders is thus probably more in agreement with everyday clinical practice. Moreover, recurrent and so-called subthreshold conditions have been concurrently investigated in other fields of psychopathology. Nevertheless, many methodological problems and clinical implications of RBD still require further research. The question of a precise definition of the disorder, even if a consensus seems to be obtained about some key points, remains partially to be addressed, for example, concerning the problem of the reliability of assessment. The possibility of a seasonality of the episodes needs further investigations, as do the relationships between RBD and personality disorders such as borderline personality disorder. Finally, the important question of prophylactic treatment of RBD remains unsolved, as antidepressants have failed to demonstrate any efficacy and some neuroleptics have been proposed in particular conditions. Angst's prediction that clinical relevance, impairment, distress and public health impact of affective disorders could be related not only to the duration of an episode but also to the recurrence of episodes, possibly referring to a kindling model, has therefore been confirmed. His major contribution has been to underline, in various forms of affective disorders, the importance of conducting longitudinal clinical as well as epidemiologic studies to refine our psychopathological knowledge. PMID:8903895

Lepine, J P; Pelissolo, A; Weiller, E; Boyer, P; Lecrubier, Y

1995-01-01

443

Operational definitions of asthma in recent epidemiological studies are inconsistent  

PubMed Central

Objective The best combination of questions to define asthma in epidemiological asthma studies is not known. We summarized the operational definitions of asthma used in prevalence studies and empirically assess how asthma prevalence estimates vary depending on the definition used. Methods We searched the Thomson Reuters ISI Web of knowledge and included (1) cross-sectional studies (2) on asthma prevalence (3) conducted in the general population and (4) containing an explicit definition of asthma. The search was limited to the 100 most-cited papers or published since January 2010. For each paper, we recorded the asthma definition used and other variables. Then we applied the definitions to the data of the Portuguese National Asthma survey (INAsma) and of the 2005–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) computing asthma prevalence estimates for the different definitions. Results Of 1738 papers retrieved, 117 were included for analysis. Lifetime asthma, diagnosed asthma and current asthma were defined in 8, 12 and 29 different ways, respectively. By applying definitions of current asthma on INAsma and NHANES data, the prevalence ranged between 5.3%-24.4% and 1.1%-17.2%, respectively. Conclusions There is considerable heterogeneity in the definitions of asthma used in epidemiological studies leading to highly variable estimates of asthma prevalence. Studies to inform a standardized operational definition are needed. Meanwhile, we propose a set of questions to be reported when defining asthma in epidemiological studies. PMID:25136441

2014-01-01

444

Environmental epidemiology: challenges and opportunities.  

PubMed Central

Epidemiology is struggling increasingly with problems with correlated exposures and small relative risks. As a consequence, some scholars have strongly emphasized molecular epidemiology, whereas others have argued for the importance of the population context and the reintegration of epidemiology into public health. Environmental epidemiology has several unique features that make these debates especially pertinent to it. The very large number of environmental exposures require prioritization, and the relative risks are usually very low. Furthermore, many environmental exposures can be addressed only by comparing populations rather than individuals, and the disruption of both local and global ecosystems requires us to develop new methods of study design. The population context is also very important to consider in risk management decisions because of the involuntary nature of most environmental exposures and the diversity of possible outcomes, both health- and nonhealth-related. Studies at the individual or molecular level tend to focus the research hypotheses and subsequent interventions at that level, even when research and interventions at other levels may be more appropriate. Thus, only by starting from the population and ecosystem levels can we ensure that these are given appropriate consideration. Although better research is needed at all levels, it is crucially important to choose the most appropriate level, or levels, of research for a particular problem. Only by conducting research at all these levels and by developing further methods to combine evidence from these different levels can we hope to address the challenges facing environmental epidemiology today. PMID:11171517

Pekkanen, J; Pearce, N

2001-01-01

445

Unproven (questionable) cancer therapies.  

PubMed Central

More than half of all cancer patients use some form of alternative treatment during the course of their illness. Alternative therapies are often started early in patients' illness, and their use is frequently not acknowledged to health care professionals. Some alternative therapies are harmful, and their promoters may be fraudulent. Persons who try alternative cancer therapies may not be poorly educated but may ultimately abandon conventional treatment. Recent attention has focused on aspects of questionable therapies that make these treatments attractive to patients and that may be perceived as being deficient in the practice of conventional health care professionals. Physicians with patients with cancer should always make sure that unproven therapies are discussed early in the therapeutic relationship. They should also attempt to be aware of alternative therapies that are in vogue in their particular geographic area. PMID:8533410

Brigden, M L

1995-01-01

446

Question popularity analysis and prediction in community question answering services.  

PubMed

With the blooming of online social media applications, Community Question Answering (CQA) services have become one of the most important online resources for information and knowledge seekers. A large number of high quality question and answer pairs have been accumulated, which allow users to not only share their knowledge with others, but also interact with each other. Accordingly, volumes of efforts have been taken to explore the questions and answers retrieval in CQA services so as to help users to finding the similar questions or the right answers. However, to our knowledge, less attention has been paid so far to question popularity in CQA. Question popularity can reflect the attention and interest of users. Hence, predicting question popularity can better capture the users' interest so as to improve the users' experience. Meanwhile, it can also promote the development of the community. In this paper, we investigate the problem of predicting question popularity in CQA. We first explore the factors that have impact on question popularity by employing statistical analysis. We then propose a supervised machine learning approach to model these factors for question popularity prediction. The experimental results show that our proposed approach can effectively distinguish the popular questions from unpopular ones in the Yahoo! Answers question and answer repository. PMID:24837851

Liu, Ting; Zhang, Wei-Nan; Cao, Liujuan; Zhang, Yu

2014-01-01

447

Question Popularity Analysis and Prediction in Community Question Answering Services  

PubMed Central

With the blooming of online social media applications, Community Question Answering (CQA) services have become one of the most important online resources for information and knowledge seekers. A large number of high quality question and answer pairs have been accumulated, which allow users to not only share their knowledge with others, but also interact with each other. Accordingly, volumes of efforts have been taken to explore the questions and answers retrieval in CQA services so as to help users to finding the similar questions or the right answers. However, to our knowledge, less attention has been paid so far to question popularity in CQA. Question popularity can reflect the attention and interest of users. Hence, predicting question popularity can better capture the users’ interest so as to improve the users’ experience. Meanwhile, it can also promote the development of the community. In this paper, we investigate the problem of predicting question popularity in CQA. We first explore the factors that have impact on question popularity by employing statistical analysis. We then propose a supervised machine learning approach to model these factors for question popularity prediction. The experimental results show that our proposed approach can effectively distinguish the popular questions from unpopular ones in the Yahoo! Answers question and answer repository. PMID:24837851

Liu, Ting; Zhang, Wei-Nan; Cao, Liujuan; Zhang, Yu

2014-01-01

448

Global epidemiology of Trichomonas vaginalis.  

PubMed

Despite having the highest prevalence of any sexually transmitted infection (STI) globally, there is a dearth of data describing Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) incidence and prevalence in the general population. The lack of basic epidemiological data is an obstacle to addressing the epidemic. Once considered a nuisance infection, the morbidities associated with TV have been increasingly recognised over the past decade, highlighting the importance of this pathogen as a public health problem. Recent developments in TV diagnostics and molecular biology have improved our understanding of TV epidemiology. Improved characterisation of the natural history of TV infection has allowed us to hypothesise possible explanations for observed variations in TV prevalence with age. Direct and indirect hormonal effects on the female genital tract provide a likely explanation for the greater burden of persistent TV infection among women compared with men. Further characterisation of the global epidemiology of TV could enhance our ability to respond to the TV epidemic. PMID:23744960

Poole, Danielle N; McClelland, R Scott

2013-09-01

449

Question of the Day: Weather  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To answer the questions, refer to the map below and the wind belt map. The question refers to an imaginary continent named "Xeyna," which is populated by a fierce band of female warriors, which is ...

450

Question of the Day Examples  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Refine the Results Biosphere 2 matches Climate 2 matches Earth surface 1 match Ocean 4 matches Solid Earth 2 matches Results 1 - 10 of 11 matches Question of the Day: Efficiency of Food Production part of Question ...

451

Gallery Walk Questions on Rivers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

created by Mark Francek, Central Michigan University The following are potential questions that could be used in a gallery walk activity about rivers. The questions are organized according to the cognitive level ...

452

Gallery Walk Questions about Volcanism  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

created by Mark Francek, Central Michigan University The following are potential questions that could be used in a gallery walk activity about volcanism. The questions are organized according to the cognitive ...

453

Gallery Walk Questions about Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

created by Mark Francek, Central Michigan University The following are potential questions that could be used in a gallery walk activity about glaciers. The questions are organized according to the cognitive level ...

454

Gallery Walk Questions on Karst  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

created by Mark Francek, Central Michigan University The following are potential questions that could be used in a gallery walk activity about karst. The questions are organized according to the cognitive level at ...

455

Gallery Walk Questions about Climate  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

created by Mark Francek, Central Michigan University The following are potential questions that could be used in a gallery walk activity about climate. The questions are organized according to the cognitive level ...

456

Gallery Walk Questions about Coastlines  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

created by Mark Francek, Central Michigan University The following are potential questions that could be used in a gallery walk activity about coastlines. The questions are organized according to the cognitive ...

457

Question answering using constraint satisfaction  

E-print Network

QA-by-Dossier-with-Constraints is a new approach to Question Answering whereby candidate answers ’ confidences are adjusted by asking auxiliary questions whose answers constrain the original answers. These constraints emerge naturally from the domain of interest, and enable application of real-world knowledge to QA. We show that our approach significantly improves system performance (75 % relative improvement in F-measure on select question types) and can create a “dossier ” of information about the subject matter in the original question.

John Prager

2004-01-01

458

EpiBasket: how e-commerce tools can improve epidemiological preparedness  

PubMed Central

Background Should an emerging infectious disease outbreak or an environmental disaster occur, the collection of epidemiological data must start as soon as possible after the event's onset. Questionnaires are usually built de novo for each event, resulting in substantially delayed epidemiological responses that are detrimental to the understanding and control of the event considered. Moreover, the public health and/or academic institution databases constructed with responses to different questionnaires are usually difficult to merge, impairing necessary collaborations. We aimed to show that e-commerce concepts and software tools can be readily adapted to enable rapid collection of data after an infectious disease outbreak or environmental disaster. Here, the ‘customers’ are the epidemiologists, who fill their shopping ‘baskets’ with standardised questions. Methods For each epidemiological field, a catalogue of questions is constituted by identifying the relevant variables based on a review of the published literature on similar circumstances. Each question is tagged with information on its source papers. Epidemiologists can then tailor their own questionnaires by choosing appropriate questions from this catalogue. The software immediately provides them with ready-to-use forms and online questionnaires. All databases constituted by the different EpiBasket users are interoperable, because the corresponding questionnaires are derived from the same corpus of questions. Results A proof-of-concept prototype was developed for Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice (KAP) surveys, which is one of the fields of the epidemiological investigation frequently explored during, or after, an outbreak or environmental disaster. The catalogue of questions was initiated from a review of the KAP studies conducted during or after the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic. Conclusion Rapid collection of standardised data after an outbreak or environmental disaster can be facilitated by transposing the e-commerce paradigm to epidemiology, taking advantage of the powerful software tools already available. PMID:24183326

Xing, Weijia; Hejblum, Gilles; Valleron, Alain-Jacques

2013-01-01

459

Understanding Literature: Questions to Consider.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the questions included in literature anthologies play a key role in the high school English class questioning process, a study examined the questions in four eleventh-grade American literature anthologies. The anthologies met the following criteria: textbooks (1) contained selections organized chronologically, (2) were major compilations in…

Seminoff, Nancy Wiseman; Elliott, Brownlee

460

The Questions of Liberal Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a certain kind of liberal educator who bases his or her practice on a particular attitude toward the "Big Questions." The questions of fundamental literacy in K-12 education, or of expertise in vocational and professional education, may be just as important, but they are seen as quite different in kind. Indeed, the questions of liberal…

Arcilla, Rene V.

2007-01-01

461

Questions for music education research  

Microsoft Academic Search

In addressing the question-set ‘What questions do music education researchers need to address?’, an illustrative list of juxtaposed descriptive and normative questions is sketched as follows: What are and should be the dimensions of music education? What are and should be the institutional agencies of music education? What are and should be the specifically educational dimensions of music education? What

Estelle R. Jorgensen

2008-01-01

462

Cosmic questions: an introduction.  

PubMed

This introductory talk at the Cosmic Questions conference sponsored by the AAAS summarizes some earlier pictures of the universe and some pictures based on modern physics and cosmology. The uroboros (snake swallowing its tail) is an example of a traditional picture. The Biblical flat-earth picture was very different from the Greek spherical earth-centered picture, which was the standard view until the end of the Middle Ages. Many people incorrectly assume that the Newtonian picture of stars scattered through otherwise empty space is still the prevailing view. Seeing Earth from space shows the power of a new picture. The Hubble Space Telescope can see all the bright galaxies, all the way to the cosmic Dark Ages. We are at the center of cosmic spheres of time: looking outward is looking backward in time. All the matter and energy in the universe can be represented as a cosmic density pyramid. The laws of physics only allow the material objects in the universe to occupy a wedge-shaped region on a diagram of mass versus size. All sizes--from the smallest size scale, the Planck scale, to the entire visible universe--can be represented on the Cosmic Uroboros. There are interesting connections across this diagram, and the human scale lies in the middle. PMID:11797741

Primack, J R; Abrams, N E

2001-12-01

463

[Questions about pharmaceutical expertise].  

PubMed

Over the last thirty years, many areas of expertise have developed in the pharmaceutical industry, from research and production to delivery to the patient. Strict European regulations and international best practice guidelines have shaped the expertise of pharmaceutical firms. Governments have set up health agencies to strengthen the supervision of private operators by recruiting in-house scientific experts and expert committees. The private and public sectors compete to recruit the best experts, and conflicts of interest must be addressed. The recent 'Mediator' (Benfluorex) case in France raises many questions about the potential failures of the health security system. Beyond the primary responsibility of the company, the main concern is off-label use. An effort to strengthen the legal framework and the tools used to collect, analyze and publicize pharmacovigilance data is currently underway at a national and European level. The competent authorities must restore public confidence through a more diligent and transparent handling of sensitive issues related to high-risk medicine. In a country where drug consumption is particularly high, doctors and pharmaceutical experts have been accused of becoming accustomed to risk and of loosing sight of the benefit to the patient. Health professionals in the private and public sectors must regain the appropriate health security reflexes to promote a more rational use of drugs. PMID:22730611

Sauer, Fernand

2012-01-01

464

Frontline: The Torture Question  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Experts and pundits continue to debate the myriad of strategies deployed by the United States in the effort to combat terrorism around the world and internally. The Frontline program on PBS has created this website to complement a special edition of their show. This show focused on the question of whether torture is a viable way to obtain effective results in combating terrorism. Visitors can dive right in by watching the program in its entirety, or they may also wish to visit one of the sections providing supplementary information. One particularly compelling area is the section that provides information on how the current administration of President George W. Bush has created a protocol for conducting such investigations. Another very useful section is titled â??Behind the Wireâ?ť and offers visitors an inside look into the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba. Perhaps the most moving and intense portion of the site is the discussion section, where visitors can leave feedback and read the impassioned opinions of others who have seen the program.

2005-01-01

465

Geographic boundary analysis in spatial and spatio-temporal epidemiology: Perspective and prospects  

PubMed Central

Geographic boundary analysis is a relatively new approach that is just beginning to be applied in spatial and spatio-temporal epidemiology to quantify spatial variation in health outcomes, predictors and correlates; generate and test epidemiologic hypotheses; to evaluate health-environment relationships; and to guide sampling design. Geographic boundaries are zones of rapid change in the value of a spatially distributed variable, and mathematically may be defined as those locations with a large second derivative of the spatial response surface. Here we introduce a pattern analysis framework based on Value, Change and Association questions, and boundary analysis is shown to fit logically into Change and Association paradigms. This article addresses fundamental questions regarding what boundary analysis can tell us in public health and epidemiology. It explains why boundaries are of interest, illustrates analysis approaches and limitations, and concludes with prospects and future research directions. PMID:21218153

Jacquez, Geoffrey M.

2010-01-01

466

Cancer Epidemiology: From Pedigrees to Populations  

Cancer.gov

In May 2014, NCI’s Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) hosted Cancer Epidemiology: From Pedigrees to Populations, a scientific symposium honoring 50 years of visionary leadership by Dr. Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr., the founding Director of

467

NCI Workshop on Broadening Epidemiologic Data Sharing  

Cancer.gov

The NCI Workshop on Broadening Epidemiologic Data Sharing, sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP), was held on October 8, 2014, at the NCI Shady Grove Campus in Rockville, Maryland.

468

THE COMPREHENSIVE EPIDEMIOLOGIC DATA RESOURCE (CEDR)  

EPA Science Inventory

The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) is a Department of Energy (DOE) public-use repository of data collected for DOE-sponsored epidemiologic, environmental, and related health studies....

469

Official Master's of Public Health Epidemiology Program of Study Form  

E-print Network

7133 EPIDEMIOLOGY RESEARCH METHODS I 3 EPID 7134 EPIDEMIOLOGY RESEARCH METHODS II 3 EPIDOfficial Master's of Public Health ­ Epidemiology Program of Study Form Student Name PUBH 6541 BIOSTATISTICS 4 PUBH 6532 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 3 PUBH 6533 EPIDEMIOLOGY 3

Hutcheon, James M.

470

Technology Cell phones and brain tumors: a review including the long-term epidemiologic data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The debate regarding the health effects of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation from sources such as power lines, base stations, and cell phones has recently been reignited. In the present review, the authors attempt to address the following question: is there epidemiologic evidence for an association between long-term cell phone usage and the risk of developing a brain tumor? Included with

Vini G. Khurana; Charles Teo; Michael Kundi; Lennart Hardell; Michael Carlberg

2009-01-01

471

Information Technology Usage for Epidemiological Functions in U.S. State Public Health Departments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information technology (IT) use for epidemiological purposes in state public health departments has been documented only for a limited number of specific applications, leaving questions about its actual utilization and hindering IT's potential for information sharing. Communications, stages of change, and systems theories all influence the…

Stokes, Linda C.

2012-01-01

472

Phoning while driving I: a review of epidemiological, psychological, behavioural and physiological studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impact of cell (mobile) phone use on driving performance has been widely questioned for 20 years. This paper reviews the literature to evaluate the extent to which phoning may impact behaviour with a risk to affect safety. After analysing epidemiological studies that give an overview of cell phone use, this paper examines the experimental results and focuses on variables

C. Collet; A. Guillot; C. Petit

2010-01-01

473

Healthy imaginations: A social history of the epidemiology of aboriginal and Torres strait islander health  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is difficult to imagine Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health without the powerful descriptors of epidemiology. The statistical imagery of numerical tables, pie charts, and bar graphs have become a key element in the public presentation of Indigenous public health issues. Such quantitative measurements of health draw on the authority of neutral, objective science and are thus rarely questioned

Mark Brough

2001-01-01

474

The epidemiology of rape and sexual coercion in South Africa: an overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

During 1999 the issue of rape in South Africa was debated at the highest levels. The epidemiology of rape has become an issue of considerable political importance and sensitivity, with President Mbeki demanding an answer to the question: how much rape is there in South Africa? The purpose of this paper is both to summarise and synthesise the findings of

Rachel Jewkes; Naeema Abrahams

2002-01-01

475

Epidemiology and Natural History of Nephrolithiasis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The epidemiology and natural history of nephrolithiasis comprise its incidence and prevalence; role of age, gender, and race;\\u000a risk factors, comorbidities, and course. As such, epidemiology verges into clinical features, pathogenesis, treatment, and\\u000a prognosis. Although it is well known that associations derived from epidemiological studies do not prove causal relationships,\\u000a lessons from epidemiology and natural history have been readily applied

Alan G. Wasserstein

476

FAQs. II.(a) Active Learning vs. Covering The Syllabus; (b) Dealing with Large Classes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An article, written by Richard M. Felder and Rebecca Brent, which addresses the questions "Can I use active learning exercises in my classes and still cover the syllabus?" and "Do active learning methods work in large classes?" Target Audience: 2-4 Year College Faculty/Administrators

Brent, Rebecca, 1956-

477

Questioning Our Questions: Assessing Question Asking Practices to Evaluate a yPAR Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this research was to examine question asking practices in a youth participatory action research (yPAR) after school program housed at an elementary school. The research question was: In which ways did the adult question asking practices in a yPAR setting challenge and/or reproduce conventional models of power in educational…

Grace, Sarah; Langhout, Regina Day

2014-01-01

478

Respiratory symptoms questionnaire for asthma epidemiology: validity and reproducibility.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: There is a need for a new respiratory symptoms questionnaire for use in epidemiological research in asthma. METHOD: A questionnaire was designed following a pilot study in 78 subjects. It contains nine questions on symptoms such as wheeze and difficulty with breathing in defined circumstances such as exercise and sleep. It was completed by 211 adults and validated by comparison with a self reported history of asthma and with bronchial hyperresponsiveness to histamine. Its short term reproducibility was measured by three repeat administrations over two weeks. RESULTS: Subjects with asthma (n = 33), particularly those having had an asthma attack in the last year (n = 23), were more likely to report any symptom and to report a greater number of symptoms than those without asthma. The same relationship was found for bronchial hyperresponsiveness and symptoms. Either two or more, or three or more, symptoms appeared to be good indices of self reported asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness, or both, with a high sensitivity (65-91%) and specificity (85-96%). Reproducibility was good, with few subjects changing the number of symptoms reported by more than one symptom and none by more than four symptoms. The results compared favourably with those from questions on phlegm production from the MRC questionnaire and were better than those reported for the MRC wheeze questions. CONCLUSIONS: The questionnaire will be useful for epidemiological research on asthma and could form part of a new standardised questionnaire with wide applications. PMID:8497818

Venables, K M; Farrer, N; Sharp, L; Graneek, B J; Newman Taylor, A J

1993-01-01

479

A question of authority  

SciTech Connect

A Question of Authority. This article deals with a certain scenario and several reviewers are to give their opinion. This one is in regards to - Suspending an IACUC approved animal use activity is about the last thing a research institution wants to do. Consider the predicament that the Great Eastern University IACUC faced when Dr. Janet Jenkins, the Attending Veterinarian, suspended all animal use activity on an approved protocol of Dr. Roy Maslo. Jenkins had the IACUCs authority to temporarily suspend a protocol, subject to review by a quorum of the full committee. She alleged that Maslo used mice from his breeding colony, not purchased rats, to begin a new study. Jenkins saw Maslos technicians bringing mouse cages to a procedure room and setting up for a minor survival surgery. She asked them to wait until she clarified things as she felt confident that the protocol called for rats. She called Maslo and asked him if the study had been approved for mice, to which he responded affirmatively. Still not feeling quite assured, she went to her office, reviewed the protocol, and found only rat studies described. She also called the IACUC office to see if there were any approved amendments which she may not have received, and was told that there were none. By the time she returned, one procedure was completed. Understandably upset, she informed the technicians and Maslo that any further activity on the protocol was suspended until the issue was resolved. Jenkins informed the IACUC chairman who in turned called an emergency meeting of the committee.

Morgan, Earl W.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)) [BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)

2003-10-15

480

Bovine spongiform encephalopathy: epidemiological studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study, initiated in June 1987, describes the epidemiology of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a recently described novel neurological disease of domestic cattle first identified in Great Britain in November 1986. Records suggested that the earliest suspected cases occurred in April 1985. There was variability in the presenting signs and the disease course, but the majority of cases developed behavioural

JW Wilesmith; GA Wells; MP Cranwell; JB Ryan

1988-01-01

481

Epidemiology of Binge Eating Disorder  

E-print Network

Abstract: Objective: First described over 50 years ago, binge eating disorder (BED) only recently has become the focus of epidemiologic studies. This article provides a comprehensive review of these studies. Method: Relevant studies were examined and summarized in the form of a narrative review

Ruth H. Striegel-moore; Debra L. Franko

2003-01-01

482

Veterinary epidemiology in Latin America  

Microsoft Academic Search

Veterinary epidemiology began in different Latin American countries during the 1960s and the 1970s in different universities and state-run institutes of animal health. The discipline evolved as a continuation of the activities veterinarians carried out in the areas of public health, infectious diseases, biostatistics, and the planning and administration of animal health programs. From the outset, the concepts were oriented

Santiago P. Urcelay

2009-01-01

483

Huanglongbing Epidemiology: An international perspective  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Prior to the discovery of Huanglongbing (HLB) in Brazil and Florida in 2004 and 2005 respectively, very few quantitative epidemiological studies had been conducted, and thus the increase and spread of the disease remains incompletely characterized. The main issue is the perennial nature of the dise...

484

Metabolomics and Epidemiology Working Group  

Cancer.gov

The Metabolomics and Epidemiology (MetEpi) Working Group was established in 2012 to promote strategies to develop capacity to support metabolomics analyses in population-based studies, as well as to advance the field of metabolomics for broader biomedical and public health research.

485

Unsolved Problems in Genetic Epidemiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic epidemiology faces six critical issues: its scope, genetic mapping, complex inheritance, population structure, nonmendelian genetics, and the internationalization of genetics. To solve these problems the scope must be broadened to include normal variation, although much of descriptive genetics will be lost to related sciences. Genetic mapping continues to play an essential role for positional cloning and chromosome architecture, which

Newton E. Morton

2000-01-01

486

[Mathematical models and epidemiological analysis].  

PubMed

The limited use of mathematical simulation in epidemiology is due not only to the difficulty of monitoring the epidemic process and identifying its parameters but also to the application of oversimplified models. It is shown that realistic reproduction of actual morbidity dynamics requires taking into account heterogeneity and finiteness of the population and seasonal character of pathogen transmission mechanism. PMID:21395059

Gerasimov, A N

2010-01-01

487

Epidemiological aspects in food safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rapid growth of international trade in food products has resulted in increased hazards from transboundary foodborne infections and intoxication. Therefore, the development of multinational surveillance and registration of foodborne diseases or food contamination, of both biological and chemical origin, is of utmost importance for their prevention and control. Recognizing the importance of accurate and adequate epidemiological data for decision

Dinko Kello

1990-01-01

488

About the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program  

Cancer.gov

Epidemiology is the scientific study of the causes and distribution of disease in populations. NCI-funded epidemiology research is conducted through research at institutions in the United States and internationally with funding through the extramural Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP) and other Programs in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (DCCPS).

489

Discrete Methods in Epidemiology James Abello  

E-print Network

Discrete Methods in Epidemiology James Abello Graham Cormode DIMACS and Ask.com Research E@dimacs.rutgers.edu #12;2000 Mathematics Subject Classification. Primary 92D30 Epidemiology, Secondary 68R01 Discrete, and Ilya Muchnik 1 Descriptive Epidemiology: A Brief Introduction Dona Schneider 41 Biostatistical

Cormode, Graham

490

EPI Epidemiology College of Public Health  

E-print Network

,retrospectivecohort,nestedcasecontrol,case-cohortandcase-crossoverdesigns.Thecoursewillfocusconsiderableattention on measurement methods and measurement error, borrowing examples from the subfields of epidemiology including occupational, cardiovascular, and social epidemiology. Given current interest on multilevel methods of analysis. Prereq: CPH 605 or consent of instructor. EPI 715 RESEARCH METHODS IN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND BIOSTATISTICS. (3

MacAdam, Keith

491

Updated October 1, 2013 INTERMEDIATE EPIDEMIOLOGY  

E-print Network

epidemiologic theory and methods. Specifically, this course provides students with the following: (1) advanced understanding of epidemiologic and clinical study designs; (2) knowledge of classical methods of statistical epidemiologic studies (i.e., confounding). In addition, the course will address the use of statistical methods

Contractor, Anis

492

2015 Radiation Epidemiology and Dosimetry Course  

Cancer.gov

Mark your calendars for the 2015 Radiation Epidemiology and Dosimetry Course, offered by the Radiation Epidemiology Branch, part of NCI's Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG). World renowned radiation experts will discuss basic principles and the most up-to-date thinking about the health effects of radiation exposure.

493

Predicting Best Answerers for New Questions in Community Question Answering  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Community question answering (CQA) has become a very popular web service to provide a platform for people to share knowledge.\\u000a In current CQA services, askers post their questions to the system and wait for answerers to answer them passively. This procedure\\u000a leads to several drawbacks. Since new questions are presented to all users in the system, the askers can not

Mingrong Liu; Yicen Liu; Qing Yang

2010-01-01

494

08/2011 108/2011 1 PhD Minor in Epidemiology PhD Minor in Epidemiology  

E-print Network

of Epidemiology ( EPID 573B Epidemiologic Methods (3) A B EPID 573B Epidemiologic Methods (3) A B EPID08/2011 108/2011 1 PhD Minor in Epidemiology PhD Minor in Epidemiology The PhD minor in Epidemiology is designed for individuals from other University of Arizona doctoral degree programs who wish

Arizona, University of

495

Enter Search Term Enter Drill Deeper or ED Online ID Home Subscribe Back Issues Design FAQs Ideas for Design Power Analog  

E-print Network

Enter Search Term Enter Drill Deeper or ED Online ID Home Subscribe Back Issues Design FAQs Ideas Subscribe to Electronic Design UPDATE (Archive) Email: Enter Email Click to view this week's welcome screen

Rogers, John A.

496

The value of asking questions  

PubMed Central

Science begins by asking questions and then seeking answers. Young children understand this intuitively as they explore and try to make sense of their surroundings. However, science education focuses upon the end game of “facts” rather than the exploratory root of the scientific process. Encouraging questioning helps to bring the true spirit of science into our educational system, and the art of asking good questions constitutes an important skill to foster for practicing scientists. PMID:23486404

Vale, Ronald D.

2013-01-01

497

Geomagnetic Field Frequently Asked Questions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

At this site the question and answer format is used to provide information about the Earth's magnetic field. Frequently asked questions are linked to detailed answers. Along with standard questions about the magnetic poles and how a compass works, there are sections about geomagnetic models, Space Weather Scales and magnetic field reversals. Links lead to a site to download the latest model as well as sites for more detailed information.

498

Frequently Asked Questions Frequently Asked Question 1.3  

E-print Network

Frequently Asked Questions Frequently Asked Question 1.3 What is the Greenhouse Effect? The Sun by the atmosphere, including clouds, and reradiated back to Earth. This is called the greenhouse effect. The glass, but through a different physical process, the Earth's greenhouse effect warms the surface of the planet

499

Epidemiology as discourse: the politics of development institutions in the Epidemiological Profile of El Salvador  

PubMed Central

STUDY OBJECTIVE—To determine the ways in which institutions devoted to international development influence epidemiological studies.?DESIGN—This article takes a descriptive epidemiological study of El Salvador, Epidemiological Profile, conducted in 1994 by the US Agency for International Development, as a case study. The methods include discourse analysis in order to uncover the ideological basis of the report and its characteristics as a discourse of development.?SETTING—El Salvador.?RESULTS—The Epidemiological Profile theoretical basis, the epidemiological transition theory, embodies the ethnocentrism of a "colonizer's model of the world." This report follows the logic of a discourse of development by depoliticising development, creating abnormalities, and relying on the development consulting industry. The epidemiological transition theory serves as an ideology that legitimises and dissimulates the international order.?CONCLUSIONS—Even descriptive epidemiological assessments or epidemiological profiles are imbued with theoretical assumptions shaped by the institutional setting under which epidemiological investigations are conducted.???Keywords: El Salvador; politics PMID:11160170

Aviles, L

2001-01-01

500

Epidemiology of traumatic brain injury.  

PubMed

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death, and in a recent analysis it was found that nearly one-third of all injury-related deaths in the US have at least one diagnosis of TBI (CDC-Quickstats, 2010). This chapter presents the burden of TBI as regards age group, gender, costs, race, emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, and deaths. Injury trends over a 15 year period are examined. Rehabilitation estimates and disability estimates are also available. Through good epidemiology we can better understand the causes of TBI and design more effective intervention programs to reduce injury. Important sources of evidence for this chapter include mostly studies from the US because of their leading work in the epidemiology of this important injury. PMID:25702206

Faul, Mark; Coronado, Victor

2015-01-01