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Sample records for quiet solar intranetwork

  1. Does the Variation of Solar Intra-network Horizontal Field Follow Sunspot Cycle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, C. L.; Wang, J. X.

    2015-07-01

    The ubiquitousness of the solar inter-network horizontal magnetic field has been revealed by space-borne observations with high spatial resolution and polarization sensitivity. However, no consensus has been achieved on the origin of the horizontal field among solar physicists. For a better understanding, in this study, we analyze the cyclic variation of the inter-network horizontal field by using the spectro-polarimeter observations provided by the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode, covering the interval from 2008 April to 2015 February. The method of wavelength integration is adopted to achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio. It is found that from 2008 to 2015 the inter-network horizontal field does not vary when solar activity increases, and the average flux density of the inter-network horizontal field is 87 ± 1 G, In addition, the imbalance between horizontal and vertical fields also keeps invariant within the scope of deviation, i.e., 8.7 ± 0.5, from the solar minimum to maximum of solar cycle 24. This result confirms that the inter-network horizontal field is independent of the sunspot cycle. The revelation favors the idea that a local dynamo is creating and maintaining the solar inter-network horizontal field.

  2. The identification and interaction of network, intranetwork, and ephemeral-region magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Sara F.

    1988-01-01

    Network magnetic fields are described as the dynamic product of the merging and cancelling of intranetwork fields, ephemeral regions, and the remnants of active regions. The similarities of these phenomena with solar magnetic features are pointed out. The intranetwork magnetic fields are characterized by the flow of successive fragments in approximately radial patterns away from their apparent source sites.

  3. Reconnection brightenings in the quiet solar photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouppe van der Voort, Luc H. M.; Rutten, Robert J.; Vissers, Gregal J. M.

    2016-08-01

    We describe a new quiet-Sun phenomenon which we call quiet-Sun Ellerman-like brightenings (QSEB). QSEBs are similar to Ellerman bombs (EB) in some respects but differ significantly in others. EBs are transient brightenings of the wings of the Balmer Hα line that mark strong-field photospheric reconnection in complex active regions. QSEBs are similar but smaller and less intense Balmer-wing brightenings that occur in quiet areas away from active regions. In the Hα wing, we measure typical lengths of less than 0.5 arcsec, widths of 0.23 arcsec, and lifetimes of less than a minute. We discovered them using high-quality Hα imaging spectrometry from the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) and show that, in lesser-quality data, they cannot be distinguished from more ubiquitous facular brightenings, nor in the UV diagnostics currently available from space platforms. We add evidence from concurrent SST spectropolarimetry that QSEBs also mark photospheric reconnection events, but in quiet regions on the solar surface. The movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. The aluminum I autoionization doublet in the quiet solar spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heasley, J. N.; Roussel-Dupre, D.; Mcallister, H. C.; Beerman, C.

    1981-01-01

    Observations are presented of the Al I autoionization doublet 1932 A and 1936 A in the quiet solar spectrum, obtained from the NRL slit spectrograph aboard Skylab and from the University of Hawaii Echelle Rocket Spectrograph. The observed profiles are compared with theoretical spectra computed for the Harvard Smithsonian Reference Atmosphere and the Vernazza, Avrett and Loeser (1976) solar models. It is found that nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium effects are important in the line-formation problem and the synthetic spectra are in good agreeement with the data.

  5. A theory of heating of quiet solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C. S.; Yoon, P. H.; Wang, C. B.

    2015-03-15

    A theory is proposed to discuss the creation of hot solar corona. We pay special attention to the transition region and the low corona, and consider that the sun is quiet. The proposed scenario suggests that the protons are heated by intrinsic Alfvénic turbulence, while the ambient electrons are heated by the hot protons via collisions. The theory contains two prime components: the generation of the Alfvénic fluctuations by the heavy minor ions in the transition region and second, the explanation of the temperature profile in the low solar atmosphere. The proposed heating process operates continuously in time and globally in space.

  6. A theory of heating of quiet solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. S.; Yoon, P. H.; Wang, C. B.

    2015-03-01

    A theory is proposed to discuss the creation of hot solar corona. We pay special attention to the transition region and the low corona, and consider that the sun is quiet. The proposed scenario suggests that the protons are heated by intrinsic Alfvénic turbulence, while the ambient electrons are heated by the hot protons via collisions. The theory contains two prime components: the generation of the Alfvénic fluctuations by the heavy minor ions in the transition region and second, the explanation of the temperature profile in the low solar atmosphere. The proposed heating process operates continuously in time and globally in space.

  7. Energy distribution of nanoflares in the quiet solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulyanov, Artyom

    2012-07-01

    We present a detailed statistical analysis of flare-like events in low layer of solar corona detected with TESIS instrument onboard CORONAS-PHOTON satellite in 171 {Å} during high-cadence (5 sec) time-series. The estimated thermal energies of these small events amount to 10^{23} - 10^{26} erg. According to modern classification flare-like events with such energies are usually referred to as nanoflares. The big number of registered events (above 2000) allowed us to obtain precise distributions of geometric and physical parameters of nanoflares, the most intriguing being energy distribution. Following Aschwanden et al. (2000) and other authors we approximated the calculated energy distribution with a single power law slope: N(E)dE ˜ N^{-α}dE. The power law index was derived to be α = 2.4 ± 0.2, which is very close to the value reported by Krucker & Benz (1998): α ≈ 2.3 - 2.4. The total energy input from registered events constitute about 10^4 erg \\cdot cm^{-2} \\cdot s^{-1}, which is well beyond net losses in quiet corona (3 \\cdot 10^5 erg \\cdot cm^{-2} \\cdot s^{-1}). However, the value of α > 2 indicates that nanoflares with lower energies dominate over nanoflares with bigger energies and could contribute considerably to quiet corona heating.

  8. EUV brightness variations in the quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brković, A.; Rüedi, I.; Solanki, S. K.; Fludra, A.; Harrison, R. A.; Huber, M. C. E.; Stenflo, J. O.; Stucki, K.

    2000-01-01

    The Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) onboard the SOHO satellite has been used to obtain movies of quiet Sun regions at disc centre. These movies were used to study brightness variations of solar features at three different temperatures sampled simultaneously in the chromospheric He I 584.3 Ä (2 * 104 K), the transition region O V 629.7 Ä (2.5 * 105 K) and coronal Mg IX 368.1 Ä (106 K) lines. In all parts of the quiet Sun, from darkest intranetwork to brightest network, we find significant variability in the He I and O V line, while the variability in the Mg IX line is more marginal. The relative variability, defined by rms of intensity normalised to the local intensity, is independent of brightness and strongest in the transition region line. Thus the relative variability is the same in the network and the intranetwork. More than half of the points on the solar surface show a relative variability, determined over a period of 4 hours, greater than 15.5% for the O V line, but only 5% of the points exhibit a variability above 25%. Most of the variability appears to take place on time-scales between 5 and 80 minutes for the He I and O V lines. Clear signs of ``high variability'' events are found. For these events the variability as a function of time seen in the different lines shows a good correlation. The correlation is higher for more variable events. These events coincide with the (time averaged) brightest points on the solar surface, i.e. they occur in the network. The spatial positions of the most variable points are identical in all the lines.

  9. Spatiotemporal Organization of Energy Release Events in the Quiet Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, we show that temporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona is close to random, in contrast to the clustered behavior of flaring times in solar active regions. The locations of the quiet-Sun events follow the meso- and supergranulation pattern of the underling photosphere. Together with earlier reports of the scale-free event size statistics, our findings suggest that quiet solar regions responsible for bulk coronal heating operate in a driven self-organized critical state, possibly involving long-range Alfvenic interactions.

  10. Spatiotemporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2014-11-01

    Using data from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, we show that temporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona is close to random, in contrast to the clustered behavior of flaring times in solar active regions. The locations of the quiet-Sun events follow the meso- and supergranulation pattern of the underling photosphere. Together with earlier reports of the scale-free event size statistics, our findings suggest that quiet solar regions responsible for bulk coronal heating operate in a driven self-organized critical state, possibly involving long-range Alfvénic interactions.

  11. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    2002-04-01

    The grant supported research on the structure of the quiet, nonmagnetic chromosphere and on wave excitation and propagation in both the nonmagnetic chromosphere and the magnetic network. The work on the structure of the chromosphere culminated in the recognition that between two competing views of the solar chromosphere, older models by Avrett and collaborators (referred to as VAL) and the newer, dynamical model by Carlsson & Stein (referred to as CS), the clear decision is in favor of the older models, and this in spite of the evident lack of physics, which does not include wave motion and oscillations. The contrast between the static VAL models and the dynamical CS model can be stated most succinctly by comparing the temperature variation implied by the VAL models and the temperature fluctuations of the CS model, which are, respectively, of the order of 10% for the VAL model (at heights where hydrogen is 50% ionized) and a factor of 10 (at the upper boundary of their chromospheric model). The huge fluctuations of the CS model have never been observed, whereas the smaller temperature variations of the VAL models are consistent with ground-based and space-based observations. While it should be obvious which model describes the Sun and which one fails, the case is far from settled in the minds of solar physicists. Thus, much educational work remains to be done and, of course, more research to develop arguments that make the case more convincing. The research on waves and oscillations has been based on a unified theory of excitation of acoustic waves in the field-free atmosphere and of transverse and longitudinal waves in magnetic flux tubes located in the magnetic network by noting, first, that impulsive excitation of all these waves in gravitationally stratified media leads to oscillations at the respective cutoff frequencies and, second, that the observed oscillation frequencies in the nonmagnetic and magnetic parts of the chromosphere match corresponding cutoff

  12. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang; Wagner, William J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The grant supported research on the structure of the quiet, nonmagnetic chromosphere and on wave excitation and propagation in both the nonmagnetic chromosphere and the magnetic network. The work on the structure of the chromosphere culminated in the recognition that between two competing views of the solar chromosphere, older models by Avrett and collaborators (referred to as VAL) and the newer, dynamical model by Carlsson & Stein (referred to as CS), the clear decision is in favor of the older models, and this in spite of the evident lack of physics, which does not include wave motion and oscillations. The contrast between the static VAL models and the dynamical CS model can be stated most succinctly by comparing the temperature variation implied by the VAL models and the temperature fluctuations of the CS model, which are, respectively, of the order of 10% for the VAL model (at heights where hydrogen is 50% ionized) and a factor of 10 (at the upper boundary of their chromospheric model). The huge fluctuations of the CS model have never been observed, whereas the smaller temperature variations of the VAL models are consistent with ground-based and space-based observations. While it should be obvious which model describes the Sun and which one fails, the case is far from settled in the minds of solar physicists. Thus, much educational work remains to be done and, of course, more research to develop arguments that make the case more convincing. The research on waves and oscillations has been based on a unified theory of excitation of acoustic waves in the field-free atmosphere and of transverse and longitudinal waves in magnetic flux tubes located in the magnetic network by noting, first, that impulsive excitation of all these waves in gravitationally stratified media leads to oscillations at the respective cutoff frequencies and, second, that the observed oscillation frequencies in the nonmagnetic and magnetic parts of the chromosphere match corresponding cutoff

  13. Quiet-time electron increases, a measure of conditions in the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, L. A.; Vanhollebeke, M.

    1972-01-01

    One possible explanation for quiet-time electron increases, increases in the intensity of 3-12 MeV interplanetary electrons that have been reported by McDonald, Cline and Simnett, is discussed. It is argued that the electrons in quiet-time increases are galactic in origin, but that the observed increases are not the result of any variation in the modulation of these particles in the inner solar system. It is suggested instead that quiet-time increases may occur when more electrons than normal penetrate a modulating region that lies far beyond the orbit of earth. The number of electrons penetrating this region may increase when field lines that have experienced an unusually large random walk in the photosphere are carried by the solar wind out to the region. As evidence for this increased random walk, it is shown that five solar rotations before most of the quiet-time increases there is an extended period when the amplitude of the diurnal anisotropy, as is measured by the Deep River neutron monitor, is relatively low. Five rotations delay time implies that the proposed modulating region lies at approximately 30 AU from the Sun, assuming that the average solar wind speed is constant over this distance at approximately 400 km/sec.

  14. High-Resolution Microwave Observations of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Dulk, G. A.; Leblanc, Y.

    1996-12-01

    The VLA was used to observe a quiet region of the Sun on 1992 September 23 at 1.3 and 2 cm. Unlike previous interferometric microwave observations of the quiet Sun, we have used the total power data to calibrate the brightness temperature distribution in an absolute sense. We find a good correlation between the time-averaged 1.3 and 2 cm brightness distributions, and, in agreement with past studies at 3.6 and 6 cm, we find that both the 1.3 and 2 cm brightness distributions are closely correlated with the network magnetic field. The mean brightness at 1.3 and 2 cm was 10,400±1230 K and 12890±1415 K, respectively. The width of the σ1.3 cm brightness distribution function is σ1.3 = 270 K, while that at 2 cm is σ2 = 460 K. We have examined the time variability of the 1.3 and 2 cm emission on a timescale of 2 hr. The correlation between the 1.3 and 2 cm brightness distributions is maintained, as is the correlation with the underlying magnetic field. However, considerable variability in the details of the brightness distribution is evident during the course of the day. We compare our mean brightness measurements with those of Zirin, Baumert, & Hurford and compare the ensemble of observations with semi-empirical models of the chromosphere and transition region. The MCO model proposed by Avrett, which is in agreement with carbon monoxide observations, yields a microwave brightness temperature spectrum that is in excellent agreement with the microwave observations of Zirin et al. and those reported in this paper. The need for a model that reconciles all chromospheric observations optical, UV, infrared, and radio remains however. Inhomogeneous and/or dynamic chromospheric models are likely required.

  15. Penetration boundary of solar cosmic rays into the earth's magnetosphere during magnetically quiet times

    SciTech Connect

    Biryukov, A.S.; Ivanova, T.A.; Kovrygina, L.M.; Kudels, K.; Kuznetsov, S.N.; Sosnovets, E.N.; Tuerskaya, L.V.

    1984-05-01

    Data is used from the satellites Interkosmos-17 and Kosmos-900 to determine penetration boundaries at high latitudes in the earth's magnetosphere. Considered are the results of observations of the penetration boundary of solar cosmic ray (SCR) protons and electrons during an SCR increase on November 22-25, 1977. The position of the SCR penetration boundary during a single increase at practically all values of MLT in quiet conditions is examined. Magnetospheric structure is determined in the region of closed drift shells where the magnetic field is asymmetric. The authors can estimate how the solar wind pressure affects the magnetosphere by using data on the penetration boundaries of solar protons obtained during quiet geomagnetic conditions.

  16. QUIET-TIME INTERPLANETARY {approx}2-20 keV SUPERHALO ELECTRONS AT SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Linghua; Lin, Robert P.; Salem, Chadi; Pulupa, Marc; Larson, Davin E.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Yoon, Peter H.

    2012-07-01

    We present a statistical survey of {approx}2-20 keV superhalo electrons in the solar wind measured by the SupraThermal Electron instrument on board the two STEREO spacecraft during quiet-time periods from 2007 March through 2009 March at solar minimum. The observed superhalo electrons have a nearly isotropic angular distribution and a power-law spectrum, f{proportional_to}v{sup -{gamma}}, with {gamma} ranging from 5 to 8.7, with nearly half between 6.5 and 7.5, and an average index of 6.69 {+-} 0.90. The observed power-law spectrum varies significantly on a spatial scale of {approx}>0.1 AU and a temporal scale of {approx}>several days. The integrated density of quiet-time superhalo electrons at 2-20 keV ranges from {approx}10{sup -8} cm{sup -3} to 10{sup -6} cm{sup -3}, about 10{sup -9}-10{sup -6} of the solar wind density, and, as well as the power-law spectrum, shows no correlation with solar wind proton density, velocity, or temperature. The density of superhalo electrons appears to show a solar-cycle variation at solar minimum, while the power-law spectral index {gamma} has no solar-cycle variation. These quiet-time superhalo electrons are present even in the absence of any solar activity-e.g., active regions, flares or microflares, type III radio bursts, etc.-suggesting that they may be accelerated by processes such as resonant wave-particle interactions in the interplanetary medium, or possibly by nonthermal processes related to the acceleration of the solar wind such as nanoflares, or by acceleration at the CIR forward shocks.

  17. Dependence of Quiet Time Geomagnetic Activity Seasonal Variation on the Solar Magnetic Polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Suyeon

    2013-03-01

    The geomagnetic activity shows the semiannual variation stronger in vernal and autumnal equinoxes than in summer and winter solstices. The semiannual variation has been explained by three main hypotheses such as Axial hypothesis, Equinoctial hypothesis, and Russell-McPherron Effect. Many studies using the various geomagnetic indices have done to support three main hypotheses. In recent, Oh & Yi (2011) examined the solar magnetic polarity dependency of the geomagnetic storm occurrence defined by Dst index. They reported that there is no dependency of the semiannual variation on the sign of the solar polar fields. This study examines the solar magnetic polarity dependency of quiet time geomagnetic activity. Using Dxt index (Karinen & Mursula 2005) and Dcx index (Mursula & Karinen 2005) which are recently suggested, in addition to Dst index, we analyze the data of three-year at each solar minimum for eight solar cycles since 1932. As a result, the geomagnetic activity is stronger in the period that the solar magnetic polarity is anti-parallel with the Earth's magnetic polarity. There exists the difference between vernal and autumnal equinoxes regarding the solar magnetic polarity dependency. However, the difference is not statistically significant. Thus, we conclude that there is no solar magnetic polarity dependency of the semiannual variation for quiet time geomagnetic activity.

  18. Simulation of Quiet-Sun Hard X-Rays Related to Solar Wind Superhalo Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen; Wang, Linghua; Krucker, Säm; Hannah, Iain

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose that the accelerated electrons in the quiet Sun could collide with the solar atmosphere to emit Hard X-rays (HXRs) via non-thermal bremsstrahlung, while some of these electrons would move upwards and escape into the interplanetary medium, to form a superhalo electron population measured in the solar wind. After considering the electron energy loss due to Coulomb collisions and the ambipolar electrostatic potential, we find that the sources of the superhalo could only occur high in the corona (at a heliocentric altitude {≳} 1.9 R_{⊙} (the mean radius of the Sun)), to remain a power-law shape of electron spectrum as observed by Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) at 1 AU near solar minimum (Wang et al. in Astrophys. J. Lett. 753, L23, 2012). The modeled quiet-Sun HXRs related to the superhalo electrons fit well to a power-law spectrum, f ˜ ɛ^{-γ} in the photon energy ɛ, with an index γ≈2.0 - 2.3 (3.3 - 3.7) at 10 - 100 keV, for the warm/cold-thick-target (thin-target) emissions produced by the downward-traveling (upward-traveling) accelerated electrons. These simulated quiet-Sun spectra are significantly harder than the observed spectra of most solar HXR flares. Assuming that the quiet-Sun sources cover 5 % of the solar surface, the modeled thin-target HXRs are more than six orders of magnitude weaker than the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) upper limit for quiet-Sun HXRs (Hannah et al. in Astrophys. J. 724, 487, 2010). Using the thick-target model for the downward-traveling electrons, the RHESSI upper limit restricts the number of downward-traveling electrons to at most {≈} 3 times the number of escaping electrons. This ratio is fundamentally different from what is observed during solar flares associated with escaping electrons where the fraction of downward-traveling electrons dominates by a factor of 100 to 1000 over the escaping population.

  19. Simulation of Quiet-Sun Hard X-Rays Related to Solar Wind Superhalo Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen; Wang, Linghua; Krucker, Säm; Hannah, Iain

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose that the accelerated electrons in the quiet Sun could collide with the solar atmosphere to emit Hard X-rays (HXRs) via non-thermal bremsstrahlung, while some of these electrons would move upwards and escape into the interplanetary medium, to form a superhalo electron population measured in the solar wind. After considering the electron energy loss due to Coulomb collisions and the ambipolar electrostatic potential, we find that the sources of the superhalo could only occur high in the corona (at a heliocentric altitude ≳ 1.9 R_{⊙} (the mean radius of the Sun)), to remain a power-law shape of electron spectrum as observed by Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) at 1 AU near solar minimum (Wang et al. in Astrophys. J. Lett. 753, L23, 2012). The modeled quiet-Sun HXRs related to the superhalo electrons fit well to a power-law spectrum, f ˜ ɛ^{-γ} in the photon energy ɛ, with an index γ≈2.0 - 2.3 (3.3 - 3.7) at 10 - 100 keV, for the warm/cold-thick-target (thin-target) emissions produced by the downward-traveling (upward-traveling) accelerated electrons. These simulated quiet-Sun spectra are significantly harder than the observed spectra of most solar HXR flares. Assuming that the quiet-Sun sources cover 5 % of the solar surface, the modeled thin-target HXRs are more than six orders of magnitude weaker than the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) upper limit for quiet-Sun HXRs (Hannah et al. in Astrophys. J. 724, 487, 2010). Using the thick-target model for the downward-traveling electrons, the RHESSI upper limit restricts the number of downward-traveling electrons to at most {≈} 3 times the number of escaping electrons. This ratio is fundamentally different from what is observed during solar flares associated with escaping electrons where the fraction of downward-traveling electrons dominates by a factor of 100 to 1000 over the escaping population.

  20. Cloud modeling of a quiet solar region in Halpha .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostanci, Z. F.; Al Erdoğan, N.

    We present chromospheric cloud modeling on the basis of Halpha profile-sampling images taken with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). We choose the required reference background profile by using theoretical NLTE profile synthesis. The resulting cloud parameters are converted into estimates of physical parameters (temperature and various densities). Their mean values compare well with the VAL-C model.

  1. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang; Wagner, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    For the meeting of the AAS/SPD in Albuquerque, NM, I organized a Topical Session of the AAS on Structure and Dynamics of Chromospheres. The grant support was used to bring to the US two of the speakers from abroad. I had invited them for presentations at the Session: Dr. Klaus Wilhelm, the former PI of the SUMER instrument on SOHO, from the Max-Planck Institut in Lindau, Germany, and Dr. Sirajul Hasan, from the Indian Institute of Astrophysics in Bangalore, India. Both speakers preceded their trip to the AAS meeting with a stay at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, where they interacted with members of the Solar and Stellar Physics division. The highlights of the visits were the talks at the AAS/SPD meeting, in which six invited speakers told the audience of astronomers about current problems in solar physics and their relation to stellar problems. An important result of the visits is a paper by Dr. Wilhelm and me on 'Observations of the upper solar chromosphere with SUMER on SOHO', which has been submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics for publication.

  2. Relation between Intensity Contrast and Magnetic Field for Active and Quiet Regions Observed on the Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Taylor; Criscuoli, Serena; Norton, Aimee Ann

    2016-05-01

    Current solar modeling techniques assume that active and quiet regions can be considered in the same manner. However, recent results from numerical simulations and high-spatial resolution observations indicate that radiative properties of small magnetic elements depend on whether they are located in plages, network, or quiet areas. These studies have been carried out typically at, or close to, disk center. In this study, data from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) are used to investigate the differences between magnetic elements located in Network/Quiet and Active Regions (AR) observed at different positions over the solar disk.

  3. Contributions of Active Regions, Sunspots, Quiet Sun to the Solar UV Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, J. S.; McMullin, D. R.; Cookson, A.; Chapman, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    During the declining phase of the most recent solar cycle, the full disk solar UV spectrum was measured by several space-based instruments, including the SOLSTICE and SIM instruments on the SORCE satellite and the SUSIM instrument on the UARS satellite. These results show distinctively different behavior and have implications for our understanding of the contributions played by various surface features in producing the disk integrated UV spectrum as well as the impact of solar UV emissions on climate. The primary goal of this study is to determine the impact of regions of increased activity (e.g. plage and sunspots) during the recent solar cycle and how this relates to variability of the solar spectrum. Two important results from this study will be the plage and sunspot UV contrast compared to the quiet as well as the center to limb variability of plage, sunspots, and the quiet sun at UV wavelengths. This study will estimate the solar spectrum by utilizing the recently digitized UV spectral radiance observations of plage, sunspots, the quiet sun made by the S082B spectrograph on Skylab, Ca II K images collected at San Fernando Observatory during the recent solar cycle, and a solar spectral model developed under a previous NASA grant. Once generated, these spectra will be compared to the UV observations produced by the above instruments. An important step in the estimation process involves the calibration of the Skylab data for a valid comparison between model and observed spectra. This will require separate calibration curves for SUSIM and SORCE observations. These will be generated from days of no or minimal activity. The determination of separate calibrations will allow any subtle contributions due to variations in instrument performance to be accounted for in the comparison of model and observed spectra. Also, changes in instrumental behavior over time will be separable from real changes in the solar spectrum which are due to contributions of active solar

  4. Contributions of Active Regions, Sunspots, Quiet Sun to the Solar UV Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, J. S.; McMullin, D. R.; Cookson, A.; Chapman, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    During the declining phase of the most recent solar cycle, the full disk solar UV spectrum was measured by several space-based instruments, including the SOLSTICE and SIM instruments on the SORCE satellite and the SUSIM instrument on the UARS satellite. These results show distinctively different behavior and have implications for our understanding of the contributions played by various surface features in producing the disk integrated UV spectrum as well as the impact of solar UV emissions on climate. The primary goal of this study is to determine the impact of regions of increased activity (e.g. plage and sunspots) during the recent solar cycle and how this relates to variability of the solar spectrum. Two important results from this study will be the plage and sunspot UV contrast compared to the quiet as well as the center to limb variability of plage, sunspots, and the quiet sun at UV wavelengths. This study will estimate the solar spectrum by utilizing the recently digitized UV spectral radiance observations of plage, sunspots, the quiet sun made by the S082B spectrograph on Skylab, Ca II K images collected at San Fernando Observatory during the recent solar cycle, and a solar spectral model developed under a previous NASA grant. Once generated, these spectra will be compared to the UV observations produced by the above instruments. An important step in the estimation process involves the calibration of the Skylab data for a valid comparison between model and observed spectra. This will require separate calibration curves for SUSIM and SORCE observations. These will be generated from days of no or minimal activity. The determination of separate calibrations will allow any subtle contributions due to variations in instrument performance to be accounted for in the comparison of model and observed spectra. Also, changes in instrumental behavior over time will be separable from real changes in the solar spectrum which are due to contributions of active solar

  5. Solar wind entry into the high-latitude terrestrial magnetosphere during geomagnetically quiet times.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q Q; Zong, Q-G; Fu, S Y; Dunlop, M W; Pu, Z Y; Parks, G K; Wei, Y; Li, W H; Zhang, H; Nowada, M; Wang, Y B; Sun, W J; Xiao, T; Reme, H; Carr, C; Fazakerley, A N; Lucek, E

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the transport of solar wind plasma into and throughout the terrestrial magnetosphere is crucial to space science and space weather. For non-active periods, there is little agreement on where and how plasma entry into the magnetosphere might occur. Moreover, behaviour in the high-latitude region behind the magnetospheric cusps, for example, the lobes, is poorly understood, partly because of lack of coverage by previous space missions. Here, using Cluster multi-spacecraft data, we report an unexpected discovery of regions of solar wind entry into the Earth's high-latitude magnetosphere tailward of the cusps. From statistical observational facts and simulation analysis we suggest that these regions are most likely produced by magnetic reconnection at the high-latitude magnetopause, although other processes, such as impulsive penetration, may not be ruled out entirely. We find that the degree of entry can be significant for solar wind transport into the magnetosphere during such quiet times. PMID:23403567

  6. Solar quiet day ionospheric source current in the West African region

    PubMed Central

    Obiekezie, Theresa N.; Okeke, Francisca N.

    2012-01-01

    The Solar Quiet (Sq) day source current were calculated using the magnetic data obtained from a chain of 10 magnetotelluric stations installed in the African sector during the French participation in the International Equatorial Electrojet Year (IEEY) experiment in Africa. The components of geomagnetic field recorded at the stations from January–December in 1993 during the experiment were separated into the source and (induced) components of Sq using Spherical Harmonics Analysis (SHA) method. The range of the source current was calculated and this enabled the viewing of a full year’s change in the source current system of Sq. PMID:25685434

  7. Observations of the brightness temperature distribution of the quiet solar corona at decametric wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, Ch. V.

    1987-01-01

    The brightness temperature distribution of the quiet solar corona at a wavelength of 8.9 meters is measured by two types of radio telescope: (1) a 'T' type array with a resolution of 26'X38', and (2) a fan beam interferometer with an E-W resolution of 3'. It is found that the persistent bright regions do not have any angular structure on scales of 6' or less. The daily variations of the brightness temperature of different regions are studied and the possible interpretation discussed.

  8. Solar quiet day ionospheric source current in the West African region.

    PubMed

    Obiekezie, Theresa N; Okeke, Francisca N

    2013-05-01

    The Solar Quiet (Sq) day source current were calculated using the magnetic data obtained from a chain of 10 magnetotelluric stations installed in the African sector during the French participation in the International Equatorial Electrojet Year (IEEY) experiment in Africa. The components of geomagnetic field recorded at the stations from January-December in 1993 during the experiment were separated into the source and (induced) components of Sq using Spherical Harmonics Analysis (SHA) method. The range of the source current was calculated and this enabled the viewing of a full year's change in the source current system of Sq. PMID:25685434

  9. Alfvénic waves with sufficient energy to power the quiet solar corona and fast solar wind.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott W; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Hansteen, Viggo; Boerner, Paul; Goossens, Marcel

    2011-07-28

    Energy is required to heat the outer solar atmosphere to millions of degrees (refs 1, 2) and to accelerate the solar wind to hundreds of kilometres per second (refs 2-6). Alfvén waves (travelling oscillations of ions and magnetic field) have been invoked as a possible mechanism to transport magneto-convective energy upwards along the Sun's magnetic field lines into the corona. Previous observations of Alfvénic waves in the corona revealed amplitudes far too small (0.5 km s(-1)) to supply the energy flux (100-200 W m(-2)) required to drive the fast solar wind or balance the radiative losses of the quiet corona. Here we report observations of the transition region (between the chromosphere and the corona) and of the corona that reveal how Alfvénic motions permeate the dynamic and finely structured outer solar atmosphere. The ubiquitous outward-propagating Alfvénic motions observed have amplitudes of the order of 20 km s(-1) and periods of the order of 100-500 s throughout the quiescent atmosphere (compatible with recent investigations), and are energetic enough to accelerate the fast solar wind and heat the quiet corona. PMID:21796206

  10. NEW SOLAR TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION OCCURRING IN THE CHROMOSPHERE OF THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Jongchul; Ahn, K.; Goode, P. R.; Yurchysyn, V.; Abramenko, V.; Andic, A.; Cao, W.; Park, Y. D.

    2010-04-10

    Magnetic reconnection is a process in which field-line connectivity changes in a magnetized plasma. On the solar surface, it often occurs with the cancellation of two magnetic fragments of opposite polarity. Using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, we observed the morphology and dynamics of plasma visible in the H{alpha} line, which is associated with a canceling magnetic feature (CMF) in the quiet Sun. The region can be divided into four magnetic domains: two pre-reconnection and two post-reconnection. In one post-reconnection domain, a small cloud erupted, with a plane-of-sky speed of 10 km s{sup -1}, while in the other one, brightening began at points and then tiny bright loops appeared and subsequently shrank. These features support the notion that magnetic reconnection taking place in the chromosphere is responsible for CMFs.

  11. A measurement of the quiet network contribution to solar irradiance variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foukal, Peter; Milano, Leo

    A large increase in quiet network area since the 17th century Maunder Minimum has been suggested as a mechanism for increasing solar irradiance sufficiently to drive global warming. We show that this mechanism requires essentially complete disappearance of network proceeding back in time to the beginning of the 20th century. This disappearance is ruled out by the many Ca K spectroheliograms taken since the discovery of the network in the early 1890's. Furthermore, network area measurements we have carried out on Ca K spectroheliograms digitized from the Mt. Wilson and NSO/Sacramento Peak archives, for the nine solar activity minima between 1914 and 1996, show no evidence of network area variations large enough to produce a significant long-term component of total irradiance variation. A network brightness variation of sufficient magnitude is also unlikely, given the linear dependence of solar microwave flux on area of bright structures.More generally, recent analyses of cycle 21,22 pyrheliometry, and of broadband stellar photometry, provide little support for any long-term irradiance component These results do not rule out a secular irradiance increase. But they suggest that high climate sensitivity to the relatively small changes in solar total and UV irradiance that have been observed, provides a more likely explanation of the global temperature-solar activity correlation.

  12. SCATTERING POLARIZATION OF THE Ca II IR TRIPLET FOR PROBING THE QUIET SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Manso Sainz, R.; Trujillo Bueno, J. E-mail: jtb@iac.e

    2010-10-20

    The chromosphere of the quiet Sun is a very important stellar atmospheric region whose thermal and magnetic structure we need to decipher in order to unlock new discoveries in solar and stellar physics. To this end, we need to identify and exploit observables sensitive to weak magnetic fields (B {approx}< 100 G) and to the presence of cool and hot gas in the bulk of the solar chromosphere. Here, we report on an investigation of the Hanle effect in two semi-empirical models of the quiet solar atmosphere with different chromospheric thermal structures. Our study reveals that the linear polarization profiles produced by scattering in the Ca II IR triplet have thermal and magnetic sensitivities potentially of great diagnostic value. The linear polarization in the 8498 A line shows a strong sensitivity to inclined magnetic fields with strengths between 0.001 and 10 G, while the emergent linear polarization in the 8542 A and 8662 A lines is mainly sensitive to magnetic fields with strengths between 0.001 and 0.1 G. The reason for this is that the scattering polarization of the 8542 A and 8662 A lines, unlike the 8498 A line, is controlled mainly by the Hanle effect in their (metastable) lower levels. Therefore, in regions with magnetic strengths noticeably larger than 1 G, their Stokes Q and U profiles are sensitive only to the orientation of the magnetic field vector. We also find that for given magnetic field configurations the sign of the Q/I and U/I profiles of the 8542 A and 8662 A lines is the same in both atmospheric models, while the sign of the linear polarization profile of the 8498 A line turns out to be very sensitive to the thermal structure of the lower chromosphere. We suggest that spectropolarimetric observations providing information on the relative scattering polarization amplitudes of the Ca II IR triplet will be very useful to improve our empirical understanding of the thermal and magnetic structure of the quiet chromosphere.

  13. Quiet-Time Spectra and Abundances of Energetic Particles During the 1996 Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1999-01-01

    We report the energy spectra and abundances of ions with atomic number, Z, in the interval Z is greater than or equal to 2 and Z is less than or equal to 36 and energies approximately 3-20 MeV/amu for solar and interplanetary quiet periods between 1994 November and 1998 April as measured by the large-geometry Low Energy Matrix Telescope (LEMT) telescope on the Wind spacecraft near Earth. The energy spectra show the presence of galactic (GCR) and "anomalous" cosmic ray (ACR) components, depending on the element. ACR components are reported for Mg and Si for the first time at 1 AU and the previous observation of S and Ar is confirmed. However, only GCR components are clearly apparent for the elements Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, as well as for C. New limits are placed on a possible ACR contribution for other elements, including Kr.

  14. Quiet-Time Spectra and Abundances of Energetic Particles During the 1996 Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1998-01-01

    This report concerns the energy spectra and abundances of ions with atomic number, Z, in the interval 2 greater than or equal to Z and Z less than or equal to 36 and energies approximately 3-20 MeV/amu for solar and interplanetary quiet periods between November 1994 and April 1998 as measured by the large-geometry LEMT telescope on the Wind spacecraft near Earth. The energy spectra show the presence of galactic (GCR) and 'anomalous' cosmic ray (ACR) components, depending on the element. ACR components are reported for Mg and Si for the first time at 1 AU and the previous observation of S and Ar is confirmed. However, only GCR components are clearly apparent for the elements Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, as well as for C. New limits are placed on a possible ACR contribution for other elements, including Kr.

  15. Markov Properties of the Magnetic Field in the Quiet Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorobets, A. Y.; Borrero, J. M.; Berdyugina, S.

    2016-07-01

    The observed magnetic field on the solar surface is characterized by a very complex spatial and temporal behavior. Although feature-tracking algorithms have allowed us to deepen our understanding of this behavior, subjectivity plays an important role in the identification and tracking of such features. In this paper, we study the temporal stochasticity of the magnetic field on the solar surface without relying on either the concept of magnetic feature or on the subjective assumptions about their identification and interaction. The analysis is applied to observations of the magnetic field of the quiet solar photosphere carried out with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment (IMaX) instrument on board the stratospheric balloon, Sunrise. We show that the joint probability distribution functions of the longitudinal ({B}\\parallel ) and transverse ({B}\\perp ) components of the magnetic field, as well as of the magnetic pressure ({B}2={B}\\perp 2+{B}\\parallel 2), verify the necessary and sufficient condition for the Markov chains. Therefore, we establish that the magnetic field as seen by IMaX with a resolution of 0.″15–0.″18 and 33 s cadence, which can be considered as a memoryless temporal fluctuating quantity.

  16. Aircraft Crew Radiation Exposure in Aviation Altitudes During Quiet and Solar Storm Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Peter

    The European Commission Directorate General Transport and Energy published in 2004 a summary report of research on aircrew dosimetry carried out by the EURADOS working group WG5 (European Radiation Dosimetry Group, http://www.eurados.org/). The aim of the EURADOS working group WG5 was to bring together, in particular from European research groups, the available, preferably published, experimental data and results of calculations, together with detailed descriptions of the methods of measurement and calculation. The purpose is to provide a dataset for all European Union Member States for the assessment of individual doses and/or to assess the validity of different approaches, and to provide an input to technical recommendations by the experts and the European Commission. Furthermore EURADOS (European Radiation Dosimetry Group, http://www.eurados.org/) started to coordinate research activities in model improvements for dose assessment of solar particle events. Preliminary results related to the European research project CONRAD (Coordinated Network for Radiation Dosimetry) on complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces are presented. The major aim of this work is the validation of models for dose assessment of solar particle events, using data from neutron ground level monitors, in-flight measurement results obtained during a solar particle event and proton satellite data. The radiation protection quantity of interest is effective dose, E (ISO), but the comparison of measurement results obtained by different methods or groups, and comparison of measurement results and the results of calculations, is done in terms of the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent, H* (10). This paper gives an overview of aircrew radiation exposure measurements during quiet and solar storm conditions and focuses on dose results using the EURADOS In-Flight Radiation Data Base and published data on solar particle events

  17. DETECTION OF SMALL-SCALE GRANULAR STRUCTURES IN THE QUIET SUN WITH THE NEW SOLAR TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Abramenko, V. I.; Yurchyshyn, V. B.; Goode, P. R.; Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2012-09-10

    Results of a statistical analysis of solar granulation are presented. A data set of 36 images of a quiet-Sun area on the solar disk center was used. The data were obtained with the 1.6 m clear aperture New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory and with a broadband filter centered at the TiO (705.7 nm) spectral line. The very high spatial resolution of the data (diffraction limit of 77 km and pixel scale of 0.''0375) augmented by the very high image contrast (15.5% {+-} 0.6%) allowed us to detect for the first time a distinct subpopulation of mini-granular structures. These structures are dominant on spatial scales below 600 km. Their size is distributed as a power law with an index of -1.8 (which is close to the Kolmogorov's -5/3 law) and no predominant scale. The regular granules display a Gaussian (normal) size distribution with a mean diameter of 1050 km. Mini-granular structures contribute significantly to the total granular area. They are predominantly confined to the wide dark lanes between regular granules and often form chains and clusters, but different from magnetic bright points. A multi-fractality test reveals that the structures smaller than 600 km represent a multi-fractal, whereas on larger scales the granulation pattern shows no multi-fractality and can be considered as a Gaussian random field. The origin, properties, and role of the population of mini-granular structures in the solar magnetoconvection are yet to be explored.

  18. The angular distribution of solar wind ˜20-200 keV superhalo electrons at quiet times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; Wang, Linghua; Li, Gang; He, Jiansen; Salem, Chadi S.; Tu, Chuanyi; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Bale, Stuart D.

    2016-03-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the angular distribution of ˜20-200 keV superhalo electrons measured at 1 AU by the WIND 3DP instrument during quiet times from 1995 January through 2005 December. According to the interplanetary magnetic field, we re-bin the observed electron pitch angle distributions to obtain the differential flux, Jout (Jin), of electrons traveling outward from (inward toward) the Sun, and define the anisotropy of superhalo electrons as A =2/(Jo u t-Ji n) Jo u t+Ji n at a given energy. We found that for out in ˜96% of the selected quiet-time samples, superhalo electrons have isotropic angular distributions, while for ˜3% (˜1%) of quiet-time samples, superhalo electrons are outward-anisotropic (inward-anisotropic). All three groups of angular distributions show no correlation with the local solar wind plasma, interplanetary magnetic field and turbulence. Furthermore, the superhalo electron spectral index shows no correlation with the spectral index of local solar wind turbulence. These quiet-time superhalo electrons may be accelerated by nonthermal processes related to the solar wind source and strongly scattered/ reflected in the interplanetary medium, or could be formed due to the electron acceleration through the interplanetary medium.

  19. The energy spectrum of 0.16 to 2 MeV electrons during solar quiet times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurford, G. J.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    New observations of the quiet-time energy spectrum of 0.16 to 2 MeV electrons were made with the Caltech Electron/Isotope Spectrometer which was launched on IMP-7 in September 1972. Earlier measurements of quiet-time electrons in this energy range by other groups have resulted in spectra differing by more than an order of magnitude in intensity. A minimum quiet-time flux somewhat lower than the lowest previously reported spectra and consistent with an extrapolation of the spectrum measured at higher energies was found. A galactic secondary source of knock-on electrons is consistent with the results and with independent studies of the interstellar spectra of cosmic ray nuclei provided that solar modulation does not suppress the 0.162 MeV electron flux by more than a factor of approximately 3. Although not required, other recently suggested sources may also contribute to the observed fluxes.

  20. Spatial variability of solar quiet fields along 96° magnetic meridian in Africa: Results from MAGDAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolaji, O. S.; Rabiu, A. B.; Bello, O. R.; Yoshikawa, A.; Yumoto, K.; Odeyemi, O. O.; Ogunmodimu, O.

    2015-05-01

    We have used chains of Magnetic Data Acquisition System (MAGDAS) magnetometer records of the horizontal (H) and vertical (Z) magnetic field intensities during September 2008 to August 2009 (year of deep minimum) across Africa to study their variability during the quietest international days, which coincidently associated with the sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event in January 2009. This selection of the most international quiet days is indicative of 80% that are strongly associated with days when unusually strong and prolonged sudden SSW event occurs in January 2009. Interestingly, in January, a significant magnitude depletion of solar quiet (Sq) equivalent current was observed near noon hours around the magnetic equator (Addis Ababa, ABB) compared to any other months along with a consistent significantly reduced value across the Northern Hemisphere and moderate decrease at the Southern Hemisphere. Also, we found that Nairobi and Dar es Salaam at the Southern Hemisphere, which are close to ABB (dip equator), are strongly prone to westward electric field compared to the magnetic equator and Khartoum at the Northern Hemisphere. Significant negative values of MSq(Z) magnitudes observed near noon hours at Hermanus indicate the presence of induced currents that suggest ocean effects along with reversal to significant positive values in the afternoon, which subsided before 1800 LT in almost all the months, indicate stronger influence of ionospheric currents. On seasonal variability of Sq(H), a slight depression at ABB during September equinox is one of the evidences of seasonal Sq focus shift. Latitudinal variability of Sq near-noon hours was also investigated.

  1. On the Solar Quiet Variation Measured in Latin America by the Embrace Magnetometer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Moro, Juliano; Araujo Resende, Laysa Cristina; Chen, Sony Su

    2016-07-01

    The present work show the first results of the study about the seasonal variation of the Solar quiet (Sq) Earth's magnetic field based on magnetic measurements from the Embrace Magnetic Network (MagNet) at several latitudes in South America, covering the equatorial and low latitudinal region. For this study, we used data covering the period from September 2010 to December 2015, during the ascending phase of the solar cycle 24. Before analyzing the magnetic data collected from the Embrace Magnet, we compared the magnetic data collected by the Embrace variometer installed at Vassouras-RJ, in Brazil, with the same data collected by the absolute magnetometer installed by the Intermagnet at the same observatory. We show that our data is in pretty good agreement to the absolute values. With respect to the seasonal variation, we show clear seasonal modulation in all components, irrespective the latitude. The H component analysis revealed to have a seasonal dependence in both aspects: the duration of positive excursion along the day and the maximum amplitude. And the other components have also shown remarkable regional characteristic of the variation of the Sq. Finally, we take these results as the first steps towards developing a Sq model to be superimposed to International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model as a useful tool for space weather forecast.

  2. Solar wind ˜0.1-1.5 keV electrons at quiet times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiawei; Wang, Linghua; Zong, Qiugang; Li, Gang; Salem, Chadi S.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Bale, Stuart D.

    2016-03-01

    We present a statistical survey of the energy spectrum of solar wind suprathermal (˜0.1-1.5 keV) electrons measured by the WIND 3-D Plasma & Energetic Particle (3DP) instrument at 1 AU during quiet times at the minimum and maximum of solar cycles 23 and 24. Firstly, we separate strahl (beaming) electrons and halo (isotropic) electrons based on their features in pitch angle distributions. Secondly, we fit the observed energy spectrum of both the strahl and halo electrons at ˜0.1-1.5 keV to a Kappa distribution function with an index κ, effective temperature Teff and density n0. We also integrate the the measurements over ˜0.1-1.5 keV to obtain the average electron energy Eavg of the strahl and halo. We find a strong positive correlation between κ and Teff for both the strahl and halo, possibly reflecting the nature of the generation of these suprathermal electrons. Among the 245 selected samples, ˜68% have the halo κ smaller than the strahl κ, while ˜50% have the halo Eh larger than the strahl Es.

  3. Explaining Inverted Temperature Loops in the Quiet Solar Corona with Magnetohydrodynamic Wave Mode Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Avery; Cranmer, Steven R.

    2016-05-01

    We simulate the temperature profiles along coronal loops measured with AIA DEM tomography and field-line extrapolation by Nuevo et al (2013). By varying the strength and nature of the heating mechanism, we modeled steady-state, gravitationally stable loops that have temperature profiles with local maxima below the loop apex. Because these loops have negative vertical temperature gradients over much of their length, they have been called "down loops" and were seen to exist primarily in equatorial quiet regions near solar minimum. In our models, the amount of heat deposited in the loop is attributed to two sources: (1) the dissipation of Alfven waves in a turbulent cascade, and (2) the dissipation of compressive waves over a variable length. The compressive waves are generated in a nonlinear process by which some fraction of the Alfven waves undergo mode conversion instead of contributing directly to the heating process. We found that when a large percentage (> 99%) of the Alfven waves underwent this conversion, the heating was greatly concentrated at the base of the loop and stable "down loops" were created. In some cases, we found loops with three extrema that are gravitationally stable. We map the full parameter space to explore which conditions lead to which loop types, and we demonstrate that the simulated characteristics of the loops -- including magnetic field strength, pressure, and temperature -- are consistent with values measured by Nuevo et al. (2013).

  4. ON QUIET-TIME SOLAR WIND ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS IN DYNAMICAL EQUILIBRIUM WITH LANGMUIR TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Zaheer, S.; Yoon, P. H.

    2013-10-01

    A recent series of papers put forth a self-consistent theory of an asymptotically steady-state electron distribution function and Langmuir turbulence intensity. The theory was developed in terms of the κ distribution which features Maxwellian low-energy electrons and a non-Maxwellian energetic power-law tail component. The present paper discusses a generalized κ distribution that features a Davydov-Druyvesteyn type of core component and an energetic power-law tail component. The physical motivation for such a generalization is so that the model may reflect the influence of low-energy electrons interacting with low-frequency kinetic Alfvénic turbulence as well as with high-frequency Langmuir turbulence. It is shown that such a solution and the accompanying Langmuir wave spectrum rigorously satisfy the balance requirement between the spontaneous and induced emission processes in both the particle and wave kinetic equations, and approximately satisfy the similar balance requirement between the spontaneous and induced scattering processes, which are nonlinear. In spite of the low velocity modification of the electron distribution function, it is shown that the resulting asymptotic velocity power-law index α, where f{sub e} ∼ v {sup –α} is close to the average index observed during the quiet-time solar wind condition, i.e., α ∼ O(6.5) whereas α{sub average} ∼ 6.69, according to observation.

  5. Small Scale Dynamo Magnetism And the Heating of the Quiet Sun Solar Atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, T.

    2015-12-01

    The longstanding problem of the solar atmosphere heating has been addressed by many theoretical studies. Two specific mechanisms have been shown to play a key role in those : magnetic reconnection and waves. On the other hand the necessity of treating together chromosphere and corona has also been been stressed, with debates going on about the possibility of heating coronal plasma by energetic phenomena observed in the chromosphere,based on many key observations such as spicules, tornadoes…. We present some recent results about the modeling of quiet Sun heating in which magnetic fields are generated by a subphotospheric fluid dynamo which is connected to granulation. The model shows a topologically complex magnetic field of 160 G on the Sun's surface, agreeing with inferences obtained from spectropolarimetric observations.Those generated magnetic fields emerge into the chromosphere, providing the required energy flux and then small-scale eruptions releasing magnetic energy and driving sonic motions. Some of the more energetic eruptions can affect the very low corona only.It is also found that taking into account a vertical weak network magnetic field then allows to provide energy higher in the corona, while leaving unchanged the physics of chromospheric eruptions. The coronal heating mechanism rests on the eventual dissipation of Alfven waves generated inside the chromosphere and carrying upwards an adequate energy flux, while more energetic phenomena contribute only weakly to the heating of the corona.

  6. NEWLY DISCOVERED GLOBAL TEMPERATURE STRUCTURES IN THE QUIET SUN AT SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Zhenguang; Frazin, Richard A.; Landi, Enrico; Manchester, Ward B.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Vasquez, Alberto M.

    2012-08-20

    Magnetic loops are building blocks of the closed-field corona. While active region loops are readily seen in images taken at EUV and X-ray wavelengths, quiet-Sun (QS) loops are seldom identifiable and are therefore difficult to study on an individual basis. The first analysis of solar minimum (Carrington Rotation 2077) QS coronal loops utilizing a novel technique called the Michigan Loop Diagnostic Technique (MLDT) is presented. This technique combines Differential Emission Measure Tomography and a potential field source surface (PFSS) model, and consists of tracing PFSS field lines through the tomographic grid on which the local differential emission measure is determined. As a result, the electron temperature T{sub e} and density N{sub e} at each point along each individual field line can be obtained. Using data from STEREO/EUVI and SOHO/MDI, the MLDT identifies two types of QS loops in the corona: so-called up loops in which the temperature increases with height and so-called down loops in which the temperature decreases with height. Up loops are expected, however, down loops are a surprise, and furthermore, they are ubiquitous in the low-latitude corona. Up loops dominate the QS at higher latitudes. The MLDT allows independent determination of the empirical pressure and density scale heights, and the differences between the two remain to be explained. The down loops appear to be a newly discovered property of the solar minimum corona that may shed light on the physics of coronal heating. The results are shown to be robust to the calibration uncertainties of the EUVI instrument.

  7. Quiet-time properties of low-energy (less than 10 MeV per nucleon) interplanetary ions during solar maximum and solar minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Reames, D. V.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Rodriguez-Pacheco, J.

    1990-01-01

    The abundances and spectra of 1-10 MeV per nucleon protons, He-3, He-4, C, O, and Fe have been exmained during solar quiet periods from 1978 to 1987 in an effort to investigate the recent suggestion by Wenzel et al. (1990) that the ions may be of solar origin. It is found that the intensities of the ions, other than O, fall by an order of magnitude between solar maximum and solar minimum, and that the greater than 1 MeV per nucleon ions exhibit weak streaming away from the sun. More significantly, the quiet-time ions during solar maximum have He-3-rich and Fe-rich abundances which are established characteristics of small impulsive solar flares. Thus, it is suggested that small unresolved impulsive flares make a substantial contribution to the 'quiet-time' fluxes. He-4 from these flares may also contribute strongly to the ion spectra that were reported for the 35-1600 keV energy range by Wenzel et al.

  8. Heliospheric and geomagnetic modulation of galactic cosmic rays under quiet and disturbed interplanetary conditions during solar cycles 20-23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukwudi Okpala, Kingsley

    2015-08-01

    The modulation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) within the heliosphere leads to a reduction in the GCR count rates during period of high solar activity and conversely. Data from three geomagnetic observatories and three Neutron monitors (in close proximity to the geomagnetic stations) have been studied. The monthly residuals of the geomagnetic field components with respect to quiet time conditions from these three stations have been computed and compared with the cosmic ray count rates. The modulations of the GCR during quiet and disturbed interplanetary conditions have been investigated with a view to better understand the role of the global merged interaction regions and intense magnetic fields to the GCR modulation. From first-order partial correlation, we found that removing the influence of the total IMF-B, (especially during quiet conditions) and the influence of SW dynamic pressure (during disturbed conditions) generally enhances the correlation of the residual geomagnetic field with the GCR significantly. The influence of the more subtle parameters like speed, Bz component and proton density were masked by these dominant parameters. Results from this work are important for the modeling of long term GCR variability.

  9. Pole-equator difference and the variability of the brightness of the chromospheric CaII-K-network elements in quiet regions over the solar cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kariyappa, R.

    1995-01-01

    The dependence of the brightness of chromospheric network elements on latitude was investigated for quiet solar regions. Calibrated photographic CaII K-spectroheliograms were used to compare the variation in brightness at the center of the disk with higher latitude of chromospheric network elements in a quiet region as a function of solar activity. It was found that there was no significant difference in brightness between the center of the solar disk and higher latitude. It is concluded that the brightness of the chromospheric network elements in a quiet region does not depend on the latitude, but that the variation in the intensity enhancement is related to the level of solar activity.

  10. Upper limits to the quiet-time solar neutron flux from 10 to 100 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, S.; Simnett, G. M.; White, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    The UCR large area solid-angle double scatter neutron telescope was flown to search for solar neutrons on 3 balloon flights on September 26, 1971, May 14, 1972 and September 19, 1972. The first two flights were launched from Palestine, Texas and the third from Cape Girardeau, Missouri. The float altitude on each flight was at about 5 g/sq cm residual atmosphere. Neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV were measured. No solar flares occurred during the flights. Upper limits to the quiet time solar neutron fluxes at the 95% confidence level are .00028, .00046, .00096 and .00090 neutrons/sq cm-sec in the energy intervals of 10-30, 30-50, 50-100 and 10-100 MeV, respectively.

  11. Correlation lifetimes of quiet and magnetic granulation from the SOUP instrument on Spacelab 2. [Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A.; Tarbell, T.; Topka, K.; Acton, L.; Duncan, D.

    1988-01-01

    The time sequences of diffraction limited granulation images obtained by the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter on Spacelab 2 are presented. The uncorrection autocorrelation limetime in magnetic regions is dominated by the 5-min oscillation. The removal of this oscillation causes the autocorrelation lifetime to increase by more than a factor of 2. The results suggest that a significant fraction of granule lifetimes are terminated by nearby explosions. Horizontal displacements and transverse velocities in the intensity field are measured. Lower limits to the lifetime in the quiet and magnetic sun are set at 440 s and 950 s, respectively.

  12. Quiet-time Suprathermal (~0.1-1.5 keV) Electrons in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiawei; Wang, Linghua; Zong, Qiugang; Li, Gang; Salem, Chadi S.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Bale, Stuart D.

    2016-03-01

    We present a statistical survey of the energy spectrum of solar wind suprathermal (˜0.1-1.5 keV) electrons measured by the WIND 3DP instrument at 1 AU during quiet times at the minimum and maximum of solar cycles 23 and 24. After separating (beaming) strahl electrons from (isotropic) halo electrons according to their different behaviors in the angular distribution, we fit the observed energy spectrum of both strahl and halo electrons at ˜0.1-1.5 keV to a Kappa distribution function with an index κ and effective temperature Teff. We also calculate the number density n and average energy Eavg of strahl and halo electrons by integrating the electron measurements between ˜0.1 and 1.5 keV. We find a strong positive correlation between κ and Teff for both strahl and halo electrons, and a strong positive correlation between the strahl n and halo n, likely reflecting the nature of the generation of these suprathermal electrons. In both solar cycles, κ is larger at solar minimum than at solar maximum for both strahl and halo electrons. The halo κ is generally smaller than the strahl κ (except during the solar minimum of cycle 23). The strahl n is larger at solar maximum, but the halo n shows no difference between solar minimum and maximum. Both the strahl n and halo n have no clear association with the solar wind core population, but the density ratio between the strahl and halo roughly anti-correlates (correlates) with the solar wind density (velocity).

  13. Long-term variation in the ionosphere and lower thermosphere as seen in the geomagnetic solar quiet daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Hori, T.; Nose, M.; Otsuka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In order to investigate characteristics of the long-term variation in the ionosphere and lower thermosphere, we analyzed the amplitude of geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) field daily variation using 1-h geomagnetic field data obtained from 69 geomagnetic stations within the period of 1947-2013. In the present data analysis, we took advantage of the Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork (IUGONET) products (metadata database and analysis software) for finding and handling the long-term observation data obtained at many observatories. The Sq amplitude observed at these geomagnetic stations showed a clear solar activity dependence and tended to be enhanced during each solar maximum phase. The Sq amplitude was the smallest around the minimum of solar cycle 23/24 in 2008-2009. This significant depression implies that the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation responsible for ionization of the upper atmosphere decreased during this solar cycle minimum. In order to examine a global distribution of the long-term trend in the Sq amplitude, we derived the residual Sq amplitude from the deviation from the fitting curve between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude. As a result, a majority of the trends in the residual Sq amplitude showed negative values over a wide region. This tendency was relatively strong in Europe, India, the eastern part of Canada, and New Zealand. Moreover, we estimate the neutral wind in the lower thermosphere from the Sq amplitude and height-integrated ionospheric conductivity in order to know the physical mechanism of the long-term trend in the residual Sq amplitude. As a result, the estimated thermospheric zonal and meridional winds showed a seasonal variation with a period of one year or less, but the solar activity dependence was unclear. This result suggests that the solar cycle dependence of the Sq amplitude may be mainly attributed to the variation of the ionospheric conductivity.

  14. The dynamic quiet solar corona: 4 days of joint observing with MDI and EIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrijver, C. J.; Shine, R. A.; Hurlburt, N. E.; Tarbell, T. D.; Lemen, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of a sequence of joint extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope (EIT) Fe XII and Michelson Doppler imager (MDI) magnetogram observations of the quiet sun near disk center is presented. It was found that: all the emerging flux above the threshold of approximately 10(sup 17) Mx is associated with enhanced coronal emissions; loop systems between the polarities in ephemeral regions remain visible up to separations of 10000 up to 30000 km; brightenings between approaching opposite polarity network concentrations form when the concentrations are between 5000 and 25000 km apart, and that faint connections up to 40000 km in length form as sets of concentrations of the same polarity coagulate. The coronal emission over patches of the quiet sun depends on the total flux in connected concentrations, on their distance and on the positions and strengths of neighboring concentrations.

  15. Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the geomagnetic solar quiet daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, Atsuki; Koyama, Yukinobu; Nose, Masahito; Hori, Tomoaki; Otsuka, Yuichi; Yatagai, Akiyo

    2014-12-01

    Characteristics of long-term variation in the amplitude of solar quiet (Sq) geomagnetic field daily variation have been investigated using 1-h geomagnetic field data obtained from 69 geomagnetic observation stations within the period of 1947 to 2013. The Sq amplitude observed at these geomagnetic stations showed a clear dependence on the 10- to 12-year solar activity cycle and tended to be enhanced during each solar maximum phase. The Sq amplitude was the smallest around the minimum of solar cycle 23/24 in 2008 to 2009. The relationship between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude was approximately linear but about 53% of geomagnetic stations showed a weak nonlinear relation to the solar F10.7 index. In order to remove the effect of solar activity seen in the long-term variation of the Sq amplitude, we calculated a linear or second-order fitting curve between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude during 1947 to 2013 and examined the residual Sq amplitude, which is defined as the deviation from the fitting curve. As a result, the majority of trends in the residual Sq amplitude that passed through a trend test showed negative values over a wide region. This tendency was relatively strong in Europe, India, the eastern part of Canada, and New Zealand. The relationship between the magnetic field intensity at 100-km altitude and residual Sq amplitude showed an anti-correlation for about 71% of the geomagnetic stations. Furthermore, the residual Sq amplitude at the equatorial station (Addis Ababa) was anti-correlated with the absolute value of the magnetic field inclination. This implies movement of the equatorial electrojet due to the secular variation of the ambient magnetic field.

  16. Changes of intranetwork and internetwork functional connectivity in Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Haoze; Zhou, Peng; Alcauter, Sarael; Chen, Yuanyuan; Cao, Hongbao; Tian, Miao; Ming, Dong; Qi, Hongzhi; Wang, Xuemin; Zhao, Xin; He, Feng; Ni, Hongyan; Gao, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a serious neurodegenerative disorder characterized by deficits of working memory, attention, language and many other cognitive functions. Although different stages of the disease are relatively well characterized by clinical criteria, stage-specific pathological changes in the brain remain relatively poorly understood, especially at the level of large-scale functional networks. In this study, we aimed to characterize the potential disruptions of large-scale functional brain networks based on a sample including amnestic mild cognition impairment (aMCI) and AD patients to help delineate the underlying stage-dependent AD pathology. Approach. We sought to identify the neural connectivity mechanisms of aMCI and AD through examination of both intranetwork and internetwork interactions among four of the brain’s key networks, namely dorsal attention network (DAN), default mode network (DMN), executive control network (ECN) and salience network (SAL). We analyzed functional connectivity based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data from 25 Alzheimer’s disease patients, 20 aMCI patients and 35 elderly normal controls (NC). Main results. Intranetwork functional disruptions within the DAN and ECN were detected in both aMCI and AD patients. Disrupted intranetwork connectivity of DMN and anti-correlation between DAN and DMN were observed in AD patients. Moreover, aMCI-specific alterations in the internetwork functional connectivity of SAL were observed. Significance. Our results confirmed previous findings that AD pathology was related to dysconnectivity both within and between resting-state networks but revealed more spatial details. Moreover, the SAL network, reportedly flexibly coupling either with the DAN or DMN networks during different brain states, demonstrated interesting alterations specifically in the early stage of the disease.

  17. Observations of low energy hydrogen and helium isotopes during solar quiet times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurford, G. J.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Results of a new quiet-time measurement of the relative abundance of cosmic-ray H-2 and He-4. The observations were made in selected time intervals between September 1972 and February 1973 with the Caltech Electron/Isotope Spectrometer on IMP-7. In the energy interval from 13 to 29 MeV/nucleon, an upper limit to the H-2 to He-4 ratio of less than 0.06 is found. This new upper limit is significantly lower than finite H-2/He-4 ratios measured in earlier years by other workers. Possible implications of this new result are discussed.

  18. Comparison of physical properties of quiet and active regions through the analysis of magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar photosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Criscuoli, S.

    2013-11-20

    Recent observations have shown that the photometric and dynamic properties of granulation and small-scale magnetic features depend on the amount of magnetic flux of the region they are embedded in. We analyze results from numerical hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations characterized by different amounts of average magnetic flux and find qualitatively the same differences as those reported from observations. We show that these different physical properties result from the inhibition of convection induced by the presence of the magnetic field, which changes the temperature stratification of both quiet and magnetic regions. Our results are relevant for solar irradiance variations studies, as such differences are still not properly taken into account in irradiance reconstruction models.

  19. Observations of high-energy jets in the corona above the quiet sun, the heating of the corona, and the acceleration of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Bartoe, J.-D. F.

    1983-01-01

    High spatial resolution observations of the ultraviolet solar spectrum which reveal high-energy events in the quiet sun are presented. The tandem Wadsworth spectrograph used to make the observations is described along with the observing techniques, and a brief description of the characteristics of high-resolution transition zone spectra is given. The sizes, velocities, line profiles, time behavior, temperature range, differential emission measures, densities, masses, energies, and birthrates of turbulent events and jets in the quiet sun are derived from the observations and discussed. Possible accelerating mechanisms for these events are discussed, and the consequences of these events for the heating of the solar corona are discussed. A cloud model of the solar wind is proposed and possible correlations between the high-energy events and other solar fine-structure features are discussed.

  20. CORONAL HEATING BY THE INTERACTION BETWEEN EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS AND THE QUIET SUN OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Bin; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Yuzong; Li, Leping; Chen, Feng; Peter, Hardi E-mail: liting@nao.cas.cn E-mail: yuzong@nao.cas.cn E-mail: chen@mps.mpg.de

    2015-02-01

    The question of what heats the solar corona remains one of the most important puzzles in solar physics and astrophysics. Here we report Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of coronal heating by the interaction between emerging active regions (EARs) and the surrounding quiet Sun (QS). The EARs continuously interact with the surrounding QS, resulting in dark ribbons which appear at the boundary of the EARs and the QS. The dark ribbons visible in extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths propagate away from the EARs with speeds of a few km s{sup −1}. The regions swept by the dark ribbons are brightening afterward, with the mean temperature increasing by one quarter. The observational findings demonstrate that uninterrupted magnetic reconnection between EARs and the QS occurs. When the EARs develop, the reconnection continues. The dark ribbons may be the track of the interface between the reconnected magnetic fields and the undisturbed QS’s fields. The propagating speed of the dark ribbons reflects the reconnection rate and is consistent with our numerical simulation. A long-term coronal heating which occurs in turn from nearby the EARs to far away from the EARs is proposed.

  1. Altered Intranetwork and Internetwork Functional Connectivity in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With and Without Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Qi; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Xiong, Ying; Zhan, Ya-Feng; Guo, Lin-Ying; Zhang, Shun; Jiang, Ri-Feng; Yao, Yi-Hao; Qin, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Yong; Zhu, Wen-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with cognitive impairment. We investigated whether alterations of intranetwork and internetwork functional connectivity with T2DM progression exist, by using resting-state functional MRI. MRI data were analysed from 19 T2DM patients with normal cognition (DMCN) and 19 T2DM patients with cognitive impairment (DMCI), 19 healthy controls (HC). Functional connectivity among 36 previously well-defined brain regions which consisted of 5 resting-state network (RSN) systems [default mode network (DMN), dorsal attention network (DAN), control network (CON), salience network (SAL) and sensorimotor network (SMN)] was investigated at 3 levels (integrity, network and connectivity). Impaired intranetwork and internetwork connectivity were found in T2DM, especially in DMCI, on the basis of the three levels of analysis. The bilateral posterior cerebellum, the right insula, the DMN and the CON were mainly involved in these changes. The functional connectivity strength of specific brain architectures in T2DM was found to be associated with haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), cognitive score and illness duration. These network alterations in intergroup differences, which were associated with brain functional impairment due to T2DM, indicate that network organizations might be potential biomarkers for predicting the clinical progression, evaluating the cognitive impairment, and further understanding the pathophysiology of T2DM. PMID:27622870

  2. The quiet time spectra of low energy hydrogen and helium nuclei. [suggesting protons and alphas of solar origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements of the 1972-1973 quiet time hydrogen and helium spectra from 1.3-40 MeV/nuc are discussed. For both spectra the relative-intensity minimum occurs at lower energies than those reported for earlier years. There is no evidence of a low energy turnup in the He spectrum down to 2.4 MeV/nuc. The spectra indicate that the galactic component dominates down to about 10 MeV; a stable, non-solar He-4 component extends from higher energies down to about 2.4 MeV/nuc. At lower energies the periods of minimum H and He intensity do not coincide, and the relative abundance of H and He at 1.3-2.3 MeV/nuc is variable, with H/He ratios ranging from about 3 to about 10. The observations suggest that the 1.3-2.3 MeV/nuc protons and alphas are of solar origin.

  3. Wave propagation in a solar quiet region and the influence of the magnetic canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontogiannis, I.; Tsiropoula, G.; Tziotziou, K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We seek indications or evidence of transmission/conversion of magnetoacoustic waves at the magnetic canopy, as a result of its impact on the properties of the wave field of the photosphere and chromosphere. Methods: We use cross-wavelet analysis to measure phase differences between intensity and Doppler signal oscillations in the Hα, Ca ii h, and G-band. We use the height of the magnetic canopy to create appropriate masks to separate internetwork (IN) and magnetic canopy regions. We study wave propagation and differences between these two regions. Results: The magnetic canopy affects wave propagation by lowering the phase differences of progressive waves and allowing the propagation of waves with frequencies lower than the acoustic cut-off. We also find indications in the Doppler signals of Hα of a response to the acoustic waves at the IN, observed in the Ca ii h line. This response is affected by the presence of the magnetic canopy. Conclusions: Phase difference analysis indicates the existence of a complicated wave field in the quiet Sun, which is composed of a mixture of progressive and standing waves. There are clear imprints of mode conversion and transmission due to the interaction between the p-modes and small-scale magnetic fields of the network and internetwork.

  4. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF LARGE AND SMALL GRANULES IN SOLAR QUIET REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Daren; Xie Zongxia; Hu Qinghua; Yang Shuhong; Zhang Jun; Wang Jingxiu E-mail: zjun@ourstar.bao.ac.cn

    2011-12-10

    The normal mode observations of seven quiet regions obtained by the Hinode spacecraft are analyzed to study the physical properties of granules. An artificial intelligence technique is introduced to automatically find the spatial distribution of granules in feature spaces. In this work, we investigate the dependence of granular continuum intensity, mean Doppler velocity, and magnetic fields on granular diameter. We recognized 71,538 granules by an automatic segmentation technique and then extracted five properties: diameter, continuum intensity, Doppler velocity, and longitudinal and transverse magnetic flux density to describe the granules. To automatically explore the intrinsic structures of the granules in the five-dimensional parameter space, the X-means clustering algorithm and one-rule classifier are introduced to define the rules for classifying the granules. It is found that diameter is a dominating parameter in classifying the granules and two families of granules are derived: small granules with diameters smaller than 1.''44, and large granules with diameters larger than 1.''44. Based on statistical analysis of the detected granules, the following results are derived: (1) the averages of diameter, continuum intensity, and Doppler velocity in the upward direction of large granules are larger than those of small granules; (2) the averages of absolute longitudinal, transverse, and unsigned flux density of large granules are smaller than those of small granules; (3) for small granules, the average of continuum intensity increases with their diameters, while the averages of Doppler velocity, transverse, absolute longitudinal, and unsigned magnetic flux density decrease with their diameters. However, the mean properties of large granules are stable; (4) the intensity distributions of all granules and small granules do not satisfy Gaussian distribution, while that of large granules almost agrees with normal distribution with a peak at 1.04 I{sub 0}.

  5. Solar magnetic field studies using the 12 micron emission lines. I - Quiet sun time series and sunspot slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deming, Drake; Boyle, Robert J.; Jennings, Donald E.; Wiedemann, Gunter

    1988-01-01

    The use of the extremely Zeeman-sensitive IR emission line Mg I, at 12.32 microns, to study solar magnetic fields. Time series observations of the line in the quiet sun were obtained in order to determine the response time of the line to the five-minute oscillations. Based upon the velocity amplitude and average period measured in the line, it is concluded that it is formed in the temperature minimum region. The magnetic structure of sunspots is investigated by stepping a small field of view in linear 'slices' through the spots. The region of penumbral line formation does not show the Evershed outflow common in photospheric lines. The line intensity is a factor of two greater in sunspot penumbrae than in the photosphere, and at the limb the penumbral emission begins to depart from optical thinness, the line source function increasing with height. For a spot near disk center, the radial decrease in absolute magnetic field strength is steeper than the generally accepted dependence.

  6. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Solar Quiet Daily Sq Variation and Equatorial Electrojet Over Africa: Results From International Heliophysical Year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabiu, A.; Yumoto, K.; Bello, O.

    2010-12-01

    Space Environment Research Centre of Kyushu University, Japan, installed 13 units of Magnetic Data Acquisition Systems MAGDAS over Africa during the International Heliophysical Year IHY. Magnetic records from 10 stations along the African 96o Magnetic Meridian (Geographical 30o - 40o East) were examined for Solar quiet daily Sq variation in the three geomagnetic field components H, D and Z. Spatial variations of Sq in the geomagnetic components were examined. Signatures of equatorial electrojet and worldwide Sq were identified and studied in detail. H field experienced more variation within the equatorial electrojet zone. Diurnal and seasonal variations of the geomagnetic variations in the three components were discussed. Levels of inter-relationships between the Sq and its variability in the three components were statistically derived and interpreted in line with the mechanisms responsible for the variations of the geomagnetic field. Data from 2 magnetic observatories within equatorial electrojet EEJ strip and 2 stations outside the EEJ strip were employed to evaluate and study the signatures of the Equatorial electrojet over the African sector. The transient variations of the EEJ at two almost parallel axes using Lagos-Ilorin and Nairobi-Addis pairs were examined. The EEJ appear stronger in East than West Africa. The magnitudes and patterns of variation of EEJ strength along the two axes were examined for any simultaneity or otherwise of responses to ionospheric processes. The flow gradient of EEJ along the African sector was estimated and its diurnal variation studied.

  7. MESSENGER soft X-ray observations of the quiet solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Richard A.; Hudson, Hugh S.; Tolbert, Anne K; Dennis, Brian R.

    2014-06-01

    In a remarkable result from their "SphinX" experiment, Sylwester et al. (2012) found a non-varying base level of soft X-ray emission at the quietest times in 2009. We describe comparable data from the soft X-ray monitor on board MESSENGER (en route to Mercury) which had excellent coverage both in 2009 and during the true solar minimum of 2008. These observations overlap SphinX's and also are often exactly at Sun-MESSENGER-Earth conjunctions. During solar minimum the Sun-MESSENGER distance varied substantially, allowing us to use the inverse-square law to help distinguish the aperture flux (ie, solar X-rays) from that due to sources of background in the 2-5 keV range. The MESSENGER data show a non-varying background level for many months in 2008 when no active regions were present. We compare these data in detail with those from SphinX. Both sets of data reveal a different behavior when magnetic active regions are present on the Sun, and when they are not.Reference: Sylwester et al., ApJ 751, 111 (2012)

  8. Quiet Ride

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2006-01-01

    Several companies are marketing maintenance equipment to education institutions on a "quiet platform," citing benefits such as a safer, more pleasant indoor environment and unobtrusive operations during day cleaning or operating hours. This is basically "sound advice" (no one likes noisy equipment), but some of the messages can be confusing and…

  9. Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the amplitude of the geomagnetic solar quiet daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Nose, M.; Hori, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Tsuda, T.

    2011-12-01

    It has been well-known that geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation is produced by global ionospheric currents flowing in the E-region from middle latitudes to the magnetic equator. These currents are generated by a dynamo process via interaction between the neutral wind and ionospheric plasma in a region of the thermosphere and ionosphere. From the Ohm's equation, the ionospheric currents strongly depend on the ionospheric conductivity, polarization electric field and neutral wind. Then, to investigate the Sq amplitude is essential for understanding the long-term variations in the ionospheric conductivity and neutral wind of the thermosphere and ionosphere. Elias et al. [2010] found that the Sq amplitude tends to increase by 5.4-9.9 % in the middle latitudes from 1961 to 2001. They mentioned that the long-term variation of ionospheric conductivity associated with geomagnetic secular variation mainly determines the Sq trend, but that the rest component is ionospheric conductivity enhancement associated with cooling effects in the thermosphere due to increasing the greenhouse gases. In this talk, we clarify the characteristics of the long-term variation in the Sq amplitude using the long-term observation data of geomagnetic field and neutral wind. These observation data have been provided by the IUGONET (Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork) project. In the present analysis, we used the F10.7 flux as an indicator of the variation in the solar irradiance in the EUV and UV range, geomagnetic field data with time resolution of 1 hour. The definition of the Sq amplitude is the difference of the H-component between the maximum and minimum per day when the Kp index is less than 4. As a result, the Sq amplitude at all the stations strongly depends on 11-year solar activity, and tends to enhance more during the high activities (19- and 22- solar cycles) than during the low activity (20-solar cycle). The Fourier spectra of the F10.7 flux and Sq

  10. The Temperature and Density Structure of the Solar Corona. I. Observations of the Quiet Sun with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.; Brooks, David H.

    2009-07-01

    Measurements of the temperature and density structure of the solar corona provide critical constraints on theories of coronal heating. Unfortunately, the complexity of the solar atmosphere, observational uncertainties, and the limitations of current atomic calculations, particularly those for Fe, all conspire to make this task very difficult. A critical assessment of plasma diagnostics in the corona is essential to making progress on the coronal heating problem. In this paper, we present an analysis of temperature and density measurements above the limb in the quiet corona using new observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. By comparing the Si and Fe emission observed with EIS we are able to identify emission lines that yield consistent emission measure distributions. With these data we find that the distribution of temperatures in the quiet corona above the limb is strongly peaked near 1 MK, consistent with previous studies. We also find, however, that there is a tail in the emission measure distribution that extends to higher temperatures. EIS density measurements from several density sensitive line ratios are found to be generally consistent with each other and with previous measurements in the quiet corona. Our analysis, however, also indicates that a significant fraction of the weaker emission lines observed in the EIS wavelength ranges cannot be understood with current atomic data.

  11. Determination of Geomagnetically Quiet Time Disturbances of the Ionosphere over Uganda during the Beginning of Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habyarimana, Valence

    2016-07-01

    The ionosphere is prone to significant disturbances during geomagnetically active and quiet conditions. This study focused on the occurrence of ionospheric disturbances during geomagnetically quiet conditions. Ionospheric data comprised of Global Positioning System (GPS)-derived Total Electron Content (TEC), obtained over Mt. Baker, Entebbe, and Mbarara International Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Service (IGS) stations. The Disturbance storm time (Dst) index was obtained from Kyoto University website. The number of geomagnetically quiet days in the period under study were first identified. Their monthly percentages were compared for the two years. The monthly percentage of geomagnetically quiet days for all the months in 2009 numerically exceeded those in 2008. December had the highest percentage of geomagnetically quiet days for both years (94 % in 2008 and 100 % in 2009). Geomagnetically quiet days did not show seasonal dependence. The variation in percentage of geomagnetically quiet days during solstice months (May, June, July, November, December, and January) and equinoctial months (February, March, April, August, September, and October) was not uniform. Geomagnetically quiet time disturbances were found to be more significant from 09:00 UT to 13:00 UT. However, there were some other disturbances of small scale amplitude that occurred between 14:00 UT and 22:00 UT. Further analysis was done to identify the satellites that observed the irregularities that were responsible for TEC perturbations. Satellites are identified by Pseudo Random Numbers (PRNs). The ray path between individual PRNs and the corresponding receivers were analysed. Satellites with PRNs: 3, 7, 8, 19 and 21 registered most of the perturbations. It was found that Q disturbances led to fluctuations in density gradients. Significant TEC perturbations were observed on satellite with PRN 21 with receivers at Entebbe and Mbarara on June 28, 2009 between 18:00 UT and 21:00 UT.

  12. Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Yatagai, A. I.; Nose, M.; Hori, T.; Otsuka, Y.

    2012-12-01

    It has been well-known that geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation is produced by the global ionospheric currents flowing in the E-region, which are generated by dynamo process via interaction between the neutral wind and ionospheric plasma in a region of the lower thermosphere and ionosphere. Then, to investigate the Sq amplitude is essential for understanding the long-term variations in the ionospheric conductivity and neutral wind of the lower thermosphere and ionosphere. Recently, Elias et al. [2010] reported that the Sq amplitude tends to increase by 5.4-9.9 % in the middle latitudes in a period of 1961-2001. They mentioned that the long-term variation of ionospheric conductivity associated with geomagnetic secular variation mainly determines the Sq trend, but that the rest component is due to ionospheric conductivity enhancement associated with cooling effect in the thermosphere due to increasing greenhouse gas. In the present study, we clarify the characteristics of the long-term variation in the Sq amplitude using the long-term observation data of geomagnetic field and neutral wind. In the present analysis, we used the F10.7 solar flux as a good indicator of the variation in the solar irradiance in the EUV and UV range as well as geomagnetic field data with time resolution of 1 hour observed at 184 geomagnetic stations. The definition of the Sq amplitude is the difference of the H-component between the maximum and minimum every day when the Kp index is less than 4. As a result, the long-term variation in the Sq amplitude at all the geomagnetic stations shows a strong correlation with the solar F10.7 flux which depends on 11-year solar activity. The relationship between the Sq amplitude and F10.7 flux was not linear but nonlinear. This nonlinearity could be interpreted as the decrease of production rate of electrons and ions in the ionosphere for the strong EUV and UV fluxes as already reported by Balan et al. [1993]. In order to minimize the solar

  13. NEW Fe IX LINE IDENTIFICATIONS USING SOLAR AND HELIOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY/SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET MEASUREMENT OF EMITTED RADIATION AND HINODE/EIS JOINT OBSERVATIONS OF THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Young, P. R.

    2009-12-20

    In this work, we study joint observations of Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation of Fe IX lines emitted by the same level of the high energy configuration 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 5}4p. The intensity ratios of these lines are dependent on atomic physics parameters only and not on the physical parameters of the emitting plasma, so that they are excellent tools to verify the relative intensity calibration of high-resolution spectrometers that work in the 170-200 A and 700-850 A wavelength ranges. We carry out extensive atomic physics calculations to improve the accuracy of the predicted intensity ratio, and compare the results with simultaneous EIS-SUMER observations of an off-disk quiet Sun region. We were able to identify two ultraviolet lines in the SUMER spectrum that are emitted by the same level that emits one bright line in the EIS wavelength range. Comparison between predicted and measured intensity ratios, wavelengths and energy separation of Fe IX levels confirms the identifications we make. Blending and calibration uncertainties are discussed. The results of this work are important for cross-calibrating EIS and SUMER, as well as future instrumentation.

  14. Mapping the earth conductivity-depth structure of African geomagnetic equatorial anomaly regions using solar quiet current variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugbor, D. O.; Okeke, F. N.; Yumoto, K.

    2016-04-01

    The solar quiet day ionospheric (Sq) current variations observed in Abuja, Bangui and Addis Ababa were used to delineate the mantle conductivity-depth structure along the equatorial African regions. Spherical harmonic analysis (SHA) was employed in separating the internal and external field contributions to the Sq variations. For each of the paired external and internal coefficients of the SHA, we used transfer function to compute the conductivity-depth profile for the region. Strikingly, we observed increased electrical conductivity values in the Earth layers and deep depth penetration. The calculated average electrical conductivity values in Addis Ababa and Abuja are 0.087 Sm-1 and 0.104 Sm-1 at depths of 93 km and 121 km respectively. These values suddenly rose to 0.235 Sm-1 and 0.222 Sm-1 at depths of 440 km and 427 km respectively. In Bangui, the calculated average values are 0.092 Sm-1, 0.144 Sm-1, 0.312 Sm-1 and 0.466 Sm-1 at 96 km, 300 km, 834 km and 1228 km depths respectively. At the greatest depths of penetration of 1412 km, 1385 km and 1278 km in Addis Ababa, Abuja and Bangui, the electrical conductivity attained the highest values of 0.415 Sm-1, 0.467 Sm-1 and 0.515 Sm-1 respectively. Two most Earth conductive layers were discovered in the magnetic equatorial zone. These layers lie between the depth of about 100 and 400 km within the upper mantle and beyond 1200 km in the lower mantle. It can be inferred that the closer one goes towards the Earth magnetic equator; the deeper the Sq current can penetrate the Earth's interior.

  15. Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandra Swamy, A. C.

    EXTENDED ABSTRACT Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles A.C.Balachandra swmay & Late C.S.G.K. Setty Absorption of radio waves in the ionosphere is of great practical importance for radio communication and navigation systems. The first attempt to measure the absolute magnitude of the radiowave absorption were made by appletion and Ratcliffe (1930) using the frequency change method for medium frequency waves reflected from the E-region. They concluded from their experiment that the main part of the attenuation occurred below the reflection level and named the absorption region, D-region of the ionosphere. One of the basic properties of the ionosphere is the absorption of high Frequency Radiowaves. HF radiowave absorption results mainly from collisions between electrons (which are set into forced oscillations by the electric field of the wave) and neutral air particles, the RF energy abstracted from the wave being converted into thermal energy. The radiowave absorption in the ionosphere depends on electron density and collision frequency. The most important absorbing regions are the D-region and the lower E-region (50-100 Km.) The regular diurnal variation of the electron density in this height range is caused mainly by the changes in the depth of penetration of solar XUV radiations with solar zenith angle under quiet solar conditions. In 1937 Dellinger J.H.identified fade outs in high frequency radio circuits as due to abnormal ionospheric absorption associated with solar flares. The onset of the fade out was usually rapid and the duration was typically tens of minutes like that of the visible flare, because of the sudden onset, the immediate effects of solar flares are known collectively as sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (STD). The phenomenon discovered by Dellinger is usually called a short Wave Fadeout(SWF). Since the SWF is due to abnormal absorption

  16. The seasonal and solar cycle variations of electron density gradient scale length, vertical drift and layer height during magnetically quiet days: Implications for Spread F over Trivandrum, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manju, G.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, S.

    2009-12-01

    A study has been carried out on the behaviour of electron density gradient scale length, L, vertical drift and layer height, around post sunset hours, during the magnetically quiet days of summer, winter and equinox seasons of solar maximum (2002) and minimum years (1995), using ionosonde data of Trivandrum (8.5°N, 76.5°E, dip = 0.5°N) in the Indian longitude sector. The results indicate a clear seasonal and solar cycle variation in all the three parameters. Further, the seasonal variation of equatorial Spread F (ESF) during the above period is examined in terms of the relative roles of L, the vertical drift and layer height (of the F layer) in the triggering of the collisional Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The results, show for the first time, that L also plays an important role, in controlling the quiet time seasonal and solar cycle variability of ESF; whereas in earlier studies this parameter had been taken to be constant. The detailed results are presented and discussed.

  17. OBSERVATION OF HIGH-SPEED OUTFLOW ON PLUME-LIKE STRUCTURES OF THE QUIET SUN AND CORONAL HOLES WITH SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Hui; McIntosh, Scott W.; Habbal, Shadia Rifal; He Jiansen E-mail: mscott@ucar.edu E-mail: jshept@gmail.com

    2011-08-01

    Observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory reveal ubiquitous episodic outflows (jets) with an average speed around 120 km s{sup -1} at temperatures often exceeding a million degree in plume-like structures, rooted in magnetized regions of the quiet solar atmosphere. These outflows are not restricted to the well-known plumes visible in polar coronal holes, but are also present in plume-like structures originating from equatorial coronal holes and quiet-Sun (QS) regions. Outflows are also visible in the 'inter-plume' regions throughout the atmosphere. Furthermore, the structures traced out by these flows in both plume and inter-plume regions continually exhibit transverse (Alfvenic) motion. Our finding suggests that high-speed outflows originate mainly from the magnetic network of the QS and coronal holes (CHs), and that the plume flows observed are highlighted by the denser plasma contained therein. These outflows might be an efficient means to provide heated mass into the corona and serve as an important source of mass supply to the solar wind. We demonstrate that the QS plume flows can sometimes significantly contaminate the spectroscopic observations of the adjacent CHs-greatly affecting the Doppler shifts observed, thus potentially impacting significant investigations of such regions.

  18. Differential energy spectra of low energy (less than 8.5 MeV per nucleon) heavy cosmic rays during solar quiet times. [from Explorer 47 satellite observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovestadt, D.; Vollmer, O.; Gloeckler, G.; Fan, C. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Explorer 47 satellite observations of carbon, oxygen, and heavier nuclei differential energy spectra below 8.5 MeV/nucleon are presented for solar quiet time periods. A dE/dx vs E method for particle identification and energy determination was used. The instrumentation telescope included an isobutane proportional counter, a surface barrier Si detector, and a cylindrical plastic scintillator anticoincidence shield. The observations were performed outside the bow-shock and in the ecliptic plane. Results show an anisotropy of about 25% at 22 degrees west of the sun with a C/O ratio of 0.5 supporting a solar origin. The low energy portions of the C and O spectra have steep negative slopes, and the corresponding power law is given. Peculiarities in the O spectrum are discussed.

  19. Dependences of statistical characteristics of NmE on the month of the year at middle and low latitudes under daytime geomagnetically quiet conditions at low solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.; Pavlova, N. M.

    2016-07-01

    Month-to-month changes in the statistical characteristics of the ionospheric E layer peak electron density NmE at medium and low geomagnetic latitudes under daytime geomagnetically quiet conditions are investigated. Critical frequencies of the ionospheric E layer measured by the middle latitude ionosonde Boulder and low latitude ionosondes Huancayo and Jicamarca at low solar activity from 1957 to 2015 have been used in the conducted statistical analysis. The mathematical expectation of NmE, standard deviation of NmE from the expectation of NmE, and NmE variation coefficient have been calculated for each month of the year. The months of the formation of extrema of these statistical parameters of NmE were found.

  20. Long-term monthly statistics of mid-latitudinal NmF2 in the northern geographic hemisphere during geomagnetically quiet and steadily low solar activity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.; Pavlova, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    Long-term mid-latitude hourly values of NmF2 measured in 1957-2015 by 10 ionosondes in the Northern geographic hemisphere were processed to select periods of geomagnetically quiet and low solar activity conditions to calculate several descriptive statistics of the noon NmF2 for each month, including the mathematical expectation, most probable value, arithmetic average, and arithmetic average median. The month-to-month variability of these descriptors allowed us to identify months of a year when they reach their extremes (maxima, minima). The calculated month-to-month variations of the NmF2 statistical parameters made it possible to study the winter anomaly and spring-autumn asymmetry in these statistical parameters.

  1. Heating of the quiet solar corona from measurements of the FET/TESIS instrument on-board the KORONAS-FOTON satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybák, J.; Gömöry, P.; Benz, A.; Bogachev, P.; Brajša, R.

    2010-12-01

    The paper presents the first results of the observations of time evolution of the quiet solar corona brightenings obtained due to very rapid photography of the corona with full-disk EUV telescopes of the FET/TESIS instrument onboard the KORONA FOTON satellite. The measurements were performed simultaneously in the emission of the Fe IX / X 17.1 and Fe VIII 13.1 spectral lines with 10 second temporal cadence and spatial scale of 1.7 arc seconds within one hour. This test observation, carried out on 15 July 2009, was analyzed in order to determine whether this type of observation can be used to identify individual microevents in the solar corona heating that are above the tresholds of spatial and temporal resolutions of the observations of non-active regions in the solar atmosphere. For this purpose, a simple method was used involving cross-correlation of the plasma emission time evolution at different temperatures, each time from observations of identical elements. The results obtained are confronted with the expected observable manifestations of the corona heating via nanoflares. TESIS is a set of instruments for the Sun photography developed in the Lebedev Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences that was launched into orbit in January 2009.

  2. Fourier transform spectrometer observations of solar carbon monoxide. II - Simultaneous cospatial measurements of the fundamental and first-overtone bands, and Ca II K, in quiet and active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, T. R.; Testerman, L.; Brault, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Fourier transform spectrometry has yielded simultaneous cospatial measurements of important diagnostics of thermal structure in the high solar photosphere and low chromosphere. It is noted that the anomalous behavior of the fundamental bands of CO in quiet areas near the limb is accentuated in an active region plage observed close to the limb. The difference between the core temperatures of the CO fundamental bands in a plage and a nearby quiet region at the limb is larger than the corresponding brightness temperature differences in the inner wings of the Ca II line measured in a quiet region and several plages closer to the disk center. Numerical simulations indicate that the disparate behavior of the CO bands with respect to Ca II K cannot be reconciled with existing single component thermal structure models; a two-component atmosphere is required.

  3. OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING OF THE EMERGING EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET LOOPS IN THE QUIET SUN AS SEEN WITH THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Chitta, L. P.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; DeLuca, E. E.; Kariyappa, R.; Hasan, S. S.; Hanslmeier, A.

    2013-05-01

    We used data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to study coronal loops at small scales, emerging in the quiet Sun. With HMI line-of-sight magnetograms, we derive the integrated and unsigned photospheric magnetic flux at the loop footpoints in the photosphere. These loops are bright in the EUV channels of AIA. Using the six AIA EUV filters, we construct the differential emission measure (DEM) in the temperature range 5.7-6.5 in log T (K) for several hours of observations. The observed DEMs have a peak distribution around log T Almost-Equal-To 6.3, falling rapidly at higher temperatures. For log T < 6.3, DEMs are comparable to their peak values within an order of magnitude. The emission-weighted temperature is calculated, and its time variations are compared with those of magnetic flux. We present two possibilities for explaining the observed DEMs and temperatures variations. (1) Assuming that the observed loops are composed of a hundred thin strands with certain radius and length, we tested three time-dependent heating models and compared the resulting DEMs and temperatures with the observed quantities. This modeling used enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops (EBTEL), a zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic code. The comparisons suggest that a medium-frequency heating model with a population of different heating amplitudes can roughly reproduce the observations. (2) We also consider a loop model with steady heating and non-uniform cross-section of the loop along its length, and find that this model can also reproduce the observed DEMs, provided the loop expansion factor {gamma} {approx} 5-10. More observational constraints are required to better understand the nature of coronal heating in the short emerging loops on the quiet Sun.

  4. On the statistical characteristics of radio-loud and radio-quiet halo coronal mass ejections and their associated flares during solar cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Nishant; Sharma, Joginder; Verma, Virendar Kumar; Garg, Vijay

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the characteristics of radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) front side halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) (angular width 360°) observed between the time period years 1996-2014. RL-HCMEs are associated with type II radio bursts, while RQ-HCMEs are not associated with type II radio bursts. CMEs near the Sun in the interplanetary medium associated with radio bursts also affect the magnetosphere. The type II radio burst data was observed by WIND/WAVES instrument and HCMEs were observed by LASCO/ SOHO instruments. In our study, we have examined the properties of RL-HCMEs and RQ-HCMEs and found that RL-HCMEs follow the solar cycle variation. Our study also shows that the 26% of slow speed HCMEs and 82% of fast speed HCMEs are RL. The average speed of RL-HCMEs and RQ-HCMEs are 1370 km/s and 727 km/s, respectively. Most of the RQ-HCMEs occur around the solar disc center while most of RL-HCMEs are uniformly distributed across the solar disc. The mean value of acceleration of RL-HCMEs is more than twice that of RQ-HCMEs and mean value of deceleration of RL- HCMEs is very small compare to RQ-HCMEs events. It is also found that RQ-HCMEs events are associated with C- and M-class of SXR flares, while RL-HCMEs events are associated with M and X-class of SXR flares, which indicates that the RQ-HCMEs are less energetic than the RL-HCMEs. We have also discussed the various results obtained in present investigation in view of recent scenario of solar physics.

  5. Climatologies of nighttime upper thermospheric winds measured by ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometers during geomagnetically quiet conditions: 1. Local time, latitudinal, seasonal, and solar cycle dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert, J. T.; Faivre, M. L.; Hernandez, G.; Jarvis, M. J.; Meriwether, J. W.; Niciejewski, R. J.; Sipler, D. P.; Tepley, C. A.

    2006-12-01

    We analyze ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometer observations of upper thermospheric (˜250 km) horizontal neutral winds derived from Doppler shifts in the 630.0 nm (red line) nightglow. The winds were measured over the following locations: South Pole (90°S), Halley (76°S, 27°W), Arequipa (17°S, 72°W), Arecibo (18°N, 67°W), Millstone Hill (43°N, 72°W), Søndre Strømfjord (67°N, 51°W), and Thule (77°N, 68°W). We derive climatological quiet time (Kp < 3) wind patterns as a function of local time, solar cycle, day of year, and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and provide parameterized representations of these patterns. At the high-latitude stations, and at Arequipa near the geomagnetic equator, wind speeds tend to increase with increasing solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance. Over Millstone Hill and Arecibo, solar EUV has a negative effect on wind magnitudes. As represented by the 10.7 cm radio flux proxy, the solar EUV dependence of the winds at all latitudes is characterized by a saturation or weakening of the effect above moderate values (F10.7 > 150). The seasonal dependence of the winds is generally annual, but there are isolated cases in which a semiannual variation is observed. Within the austral winter, winds measured from the South Pole show a substantial intraseasonal variation only along longitudes directed toward the magnetic pole. IMF effects are described in a companion paper.

  6. Detection of interplanetary electrons from 18 keV to 1.8 MeV during solar quiet times, 1. On the origin of 200 KeV interplanetary electrons, 2.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Cline, T. L.; Ramaty, R.; Fisk, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    A quiet time component of interplanetary electrons having energies above solar wind energies and below those characterized as cosmic radiation was observed. Its energy spectrum falls with energy from 18 keV to 1.8 MeV, but it shows a feature in the 100 to 300 keV range. The observed temporal variations of the intensity suggest that the 18 to 100 keV portion is solar and the 0.3 to 1.8 MeV portion is galactic in origin. Solar and terrestrial neutron decay electrons appear inadequate to explain the 100 to 300 keV feature.

  7. Results from the Big Bear Solar Observatory's New Digital Vector Magnetograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirock, T. J.; Denker, C.; Varsik, J.; Shumko, S.; Qiu, J.; Gallagher, P.; Chae, J.; Goode, P.; Wang, H.

    2001-05-01

    During the past several years the Big Bear Solar Observatory has been involved in an aggressive program to modernize the observatory's instrumentation. At the forefront of this effort has been the upgrade of the observatory's digital vector magnetograph (DVMG), which has been recently integrated into the observatory's daily observing program. The DVMG, which is mounted on the observatory's 25 cm vacuum refractor, is a highly sensitive, high cadence magnetograph which studies the FeI line at 630.1 nm. An easy to use GUI observing tool has been written to aid instrument development and data acquisition. This tool automatically calibrates the data and generates near real-time vector magnetograms which will aid space weather forecasting and the support of space weather missions. Also, our plan is to integrate the DVMG data into the HESSI Synoptic Archive. The very sensitive quiet Sun magnetograms, produced by the DVMG, will aid the study of small scale magnetic reconnection at the intranetwork level and its possible contribution to the coronal heating problem. Quiet sun longitudinal and active region vector magnetograms will be presented. Image quality, such as bias, cross-talk, noise levels and sensitivity, will be discussed in addition to the improvements gained in post processing such as image selection and image alignment.

  8. Fourier Transform Spectrometer observations of solar carbon monoxide. I - The fundamental and first overtone bands in the quiet sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, T. R.; Testerman, L.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the 2200/cm fundamental and 4300/cm first overtone vibration-rotation band systems of solar carbon monoxide, were obtained with the Fourier Transform Spectrometer of the McMath telescope at Kitt Peak. The overtone measurements were taken at the east, north, and west heliocentric limbs, and at disk center. Observations of the strong fundamental bands were obtained at disk center and near the north limb. The low core brightness temperatures of the strongest fundamental carbon monoxide lines near the limb, reported previously by Noyes (1972) and Hall (1974), are confirmed. The possibility that thermal inhomogeneities might be responsible for the unusual behavior of the fundamental carbon dioxide lines have been examined. The somewhat discordant behavior of the fundamental lines at disk center compared with the north limb seems to favor a limb shadowing effect. The first overtone limb equivalent widths and the best-fit thermal and microvelocity models indicate a solar carbon abundance of 0.004 (on the scale with A sub H = 1) for an oxygen-to-carbon abundance ratio of 2.

  9. On the inability of magnetically constricted transition regions to account for the 10 to the 5th to 10 to the 6th K plasma in the quiet solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, James F., Jr.; Moore, Ronald L.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    1987-01-01

    Static models of the plasma in the quiet solar atmosphere incorporating not only conduction and radiation but also the effects of large magnetic constrictions are examined. It is found that the bulk of the solar plasma at temperatures below 7 x 10 to the 5th K cannot be produced by a conductive transition region when it is modeled by flux tubes with constriction compatible with observations. The present findings suggest that the major portion of the UEV plasma may be maintained in an ensemble of small, individual magnetic loops located within the supergranular network and having peak temperatures ranging from chromospheric to coronal values.

  10. An introduction to quiet daily geomagnetic fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    On days that are quiet with respect to solar-terrestrial activity phenomena, the geomagnetic field has variations, tens of gamma in size, with major spectral components at about 24, 12, 8, and 6 hr in period. These quiet daily field variations are primarily due to the dynamo currents flowing in the E region of the earth's ionosphere, are driven by the global thermotidal wind systems, and are dependent upon the local tensor conductivity and main geomagnetic field vector. The highlights of the behavior and interpretation of these quiet field changes, from their discovery in 1634 until the present, are discussed as an introduction to the special journal issue on Quiet Daily Geomagnetic Fields. ?? 1989 Birkha??user Verlag.

  11. Statistical Study of Network Jets Observed in the Solar Transition Region: a Comparison Between Coronal Holes and Quiet-Sun Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Nancy; Arbacher, Rebecca T.; Tian, Hui; Banerjee, Dipankar; Cranmer, Steven R.; DeLuca, Ed E.; McKillop, Sean

    2016-04-01

    Recent IRIS observations have revealed a prevalence of intermittent small-scale jets with apparent speeds of 80 - 250 km s^{-1}, emanating from small-scale bright regions inside network boundaries of coronal holes. We find that these network jets appear not only in coronal holes but also in quiet-sun regions. Using IRIS 1330 Å (C II) slit-jaw images, we extracted several parameters of these network jets, e.g. apparent speed, length, lifetime, and increase in foot-point brightness. Using several observations, we find that some properties of the jets are very similar, but others are obviously different between the quiet Sun and coronal holes. For example, our study shows that the coronal-hole jets appear to be faster and longer than those in the quiet Sun. This can be directly attributed to a difference in the magnetic configuration of the two regions, with open magnetic field lines rooted in coronal holes and magnetic loops often present in the quiet Sun. We also detected compact bright loops that are most likely transition region loops and are mostly located in quiet-Sun regions. These small loop-like regions are generally devoid of network jets. In spite of different magnetic structures in the coronal hole and quiet Sun in the transition region, there appears to be no substantial difference for the increase in footpoint brightness of the jets, which suggests that the generation mechanism of these network jets is very likely the same in both regions.

  12. Recent Advances in the Exploration of the Small-Scale Structure of the Quiet Solar Atmosphere: Vortex Flows, the Horizontal Magnetic Field, and the Stokes- V Line-Ratio Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, O.; Rezaei, R.

    2012-05-01

    We review (i) observations and numerical simulations of vortical flows in the solar atmosphere and (ii) measurements of the horizontal magnetic field in quiet Sun regions. First, we discuss various manifestations of vortical flows and emphasize the role of magnetic fields in mediating swirling motion created near the solar surface to the higher layers of the photosphere and to the chromosphere. We reexamine existing simulation runs of solar surface magnetoconvection with regard to vortical flows and compare to previously obtained results. Second, we reviews contradictory results and problems associated with measuring the angular distribution of the magnetic field in quiet Sun regions. Furthermore, we review the Stokes-V-amplitude ratio method for the lines Fe i λλ 630.15 and 630.25 nm. We come to the conclusion that the recently discovered two distinct populations in scatter plots of this ratio must not bee interpreted in terms of “uncollapsed'' and “collapsed'' fields but stem from weak granular magnetic fields and weak canopy fields located at the boundaries between granules and the intergranular space. Based on new simulation runs, we reaffirm earlier findings of a predominance of the horizontal field components over the vertical one, particularly in the upper photosphere and at the base of the chromosphere.

  13. The quiet and disturbed time performance of the IRI 2012 within 90°-130°E longitude sector during solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, Pradip; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Supnithi, Pornchai; Kalita, Bitap Raj; Wang, Kehe; Komolmis, Tharadol; Yatini, Clara

    2016-07-01

    The performance of the IRI 2012 model is examined for the double peaked solar cycle 24 in the low latitude region of 90-130oE longitude in the context of the global longitudinal wave number four structure (WN4). The monthly mean values of the foF2 and the hmF2(if available) measurements at low and low mid-latitude stations Dibrugarh (27.5°N, 95°E), Hainan (19.2°N,109.7°E),Okinawa (26.5°N,128°E) and Cocos Island (12.2°S,96.8°E) during quiet times and Dibrugarh (27.5°N, 95°E), Chiang Mai (18.76°N,98.93°E), Chumphon (10.72°N,99.37°E), Kototabang (0.2°S,100.32°E) and Cocos Island (12.2°S,96.8°E ) during the disturbed days of a severe geomagnetic storm are investigated. These stations are located under the strongest peak of the longitudinal WN4 structure in NmF2 along 90-130°E longitudes. The IRI is quite successful in predicting the seasonal averages of NmF2 over this region except in the equinox afternoon period where IRI underestimates the NmF2 in low latitudes. When the monthly mean measured data is compared with IRI, the difference between the IRI model predictions and the measurements are found to follow a systematic pattern. The IRI-2012 with CCIR options slightly underestimates foF2 over Dibrugarh in day time and overestimates in the night time. The amount of underestimation varies from month to month and also depends on the solar activity levels. The IRI also underestimated the day time hmF2 and overestimated the night time hmF2 over Dibrugarh. In case of Hainan, the IRI overestimates the NmF2 in the equinox months and generally in the afternoon to post sunset period. The model values are closer in the solstice than in the equinox. In Okinawa, the trend reverses and the IRI overestimates the NmF2 in the day time and underestimates in the night time. The IRI overestimated the day time hmF2 and underestimated the night time hmF2 over Okinawa. In case of Cocos Island which lies almost on the EIA anomaly region of the southern hemisphere, IRI

  14. Quiet areas and the need for quietness in Amsterdam.

    PubMed

    Booi, Hester; van den Berg, Frits

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the Quiet Places Project in Amsterdam. The purpose of the study was to find out: (1) which public quiet places there are according to Amsterdam residents; (2) what characterizes a quiet place; (3) to what extent do residents want peace and quiet; (4) how do residents realize these needs. The factors determining the need for quietness are presented in a model showing the influence of demographic and socio-economic issues, health status, sensitiveness to noise, daily activities and the noisiness in and around home. Most important of these factors is sensitivity to noise. Elderly and less healthy people are more often sensitive to noise. People who are annoyed by sound from traffic, airplanes and the like show a higher need for quietness. People with a lively household or neighbourhood report lower needs for quietness. Visiting a quiet place and going outside to walk or bike can have a compensating effect on the need for quietness. This suggests that creating quiet places and enhancing possibilities for quiet recreation in urban environments can have a positive effect on the quality of life in the city. Objective noise levels at the quiet places were taken from environmental noise maps. This shows that there may be a preference for low transportation noise levels, but levels up to 60 dB L(day) are acceptable. Apparently this depends on a relative quietness or on non-acoustic characteristics of an area: the presence of vegetation and other pleasant stimuli. PMID:22690181

  15. Quiet Areas and the Need for Quietness in Amsterdam

    PubMed Central

    Booi, Hester; van den Berg, Frits

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the Quiet Places Project in Amsterdam. The purpose of the study was to find out: (1) which public quiet places there are according to Amsterdam residents; (2) what characterizes a quiet place; (3) to what extent do residents want peace and quiet; (4) how do residents realize these needs. The factors determining the need for quietness are presented in a model showing the influence of demographic and socio-economic issues, health status, sensitiveness to noise, daily activities and the noisiness in and around home. Most important of these factors is sensitivity to noise. Elderly and less healthy people are more often sensitive to noise. People who are annoyed by sound from traffic, airplanes and the like show a higher need for quietness. People with a lively household or neighbourhood report lower needs for quietness. Visiting a quiet place and going outside to walk or bike can have a compensating effect on the need for quietness. This suggests that creating quiet places and enhancing possibilities for quiet recreation in urban environments can have a positive effect on the quality of life in the city. Objective noise levels at the quiet places were taken from environmental noise maps. This shows that there may be a preference for low transportation noise levels, but levels up to 60 dB Lday are acceptable. Apparently this depends on a relative quietness or on non-acoustic characteristics of an area: the presence of vegetation and other pleasant stimuli. PMID:22690181

  16. Rapid and Quiet Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2007-01-01

    This describes aspects of the rapid and quiet drill (RAQD), which is a prototype apparatus for drilling concrete or bricks. The design and basic principle of operation of the RAQD overlap, in several respects, with those of ultrasonic/ sonic drilling and coring apparatuses described in a number of previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The main difference is that whereas the actuation scheme of the prior apparatuses is partly ultrasonic and partly sonic, the actuation scheme of the RAQD is purely ultrasonic. Hence, even though the RAQD generates considerable sound, it is characterized as quiet because most or all of the sound is above the frequency range of human hearing.

  17. An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamazaki, Y.; Yumoto, K.; Cardinal, M.G.; Fraser, B.J.; Hattori, P.; Kakinami, Y.; Liu, J.Y.; Lynn, K.J.W.; Marshall, R.; McNamara, D.; Nagatsuma, T.; Nikiforov, V.M.; Otadoy, R.E.; Ruhimat, M.; Shevtsov, B.M.; Shiokawa, K.; Abe, S.; Uozumi, T.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2011-01-01

    An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation has been constructed based on geomagnetic data obtained from 21 stations along the 210 Magnetic Meridian of the Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (CPMN) from 1996 to 2007. Using the least squares fitting method for geomagnetically quiet days (Kp ??? 2+), the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation at each station was described as a function of solar activity SA, day of year DOY, lunar age LA, and local time LT. After interpolation in latitude, the model can describe solar-activity dependence and seasonal dependence of solar quiet daily variations (S) and lunar quiet daily variations (L). We performed a spherical harmonic analysis (SHA) on these S and L variations to examine average characteristics of the equivalent external current systems. We found three particularly noteworthy results. First, the total current intensity of the S current system is largely controlled by solar activity while its focus position is not significantly affected by solar activity. Second, we found that seasonal variations of the S current intensity exhibit north-south asymmetry; the current intensity of the northern vortex shows a prominent annual variation while the southern vortex shows a clear semi-annual variation as well as annual variation. Thirdly, we found that the total intensity of the L current system changes depending on solar activity and season; seasonal variations of the L current intensity show an enhancement during the December solstice, independent of the level of solar activity. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Y.; Yumoto, K.; Cardinal, M. G.; Fraser, B. J.; Hattori, P.; Kakinami, Y.; Liu, J. Y.; Lynn, K. J. W.; Marshall, R.; McNamara, D.; Nagatsuma, T.; Nikiforov, V. M.; Otadoy, R. E.; Ruhimat, M.; Shevtsov, B. M.; Shiokawa, K.; Abe, S.; Uozumi, T.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2011-10-01

    An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation has been constructed based on geomagnetic data obtained from 21 stations along the 210 Magnetic Meridian of the Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (CPMN) from 1996 to 2007. Using the least squares fitting method for geomagnetically quiet days (Kp ≤ 2+), the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation at each station was described as a function of solar activity SA, day of year DOY, lunar age LA, and local time LT. After interpolation in latitude, the model can describe solar-activity dependence and seasonal dependence of solar quiet daily variations (S) and lunar quiet daily variations (L). We performed a spherical harmonic analysis (SHA) on these S and L variations to examine average characteristics of the equivalent external current systems. We found three particularly noteworthy results. First, the total current intensity of the S current system is largely controlled by solar activity while its focus position is not significantly affected by solar activity. Second, we found that seasonal variations of the S current intensity exhibit north-south asymmetry; the current intensity of the northern vortex shows a prominent annual variation while the southern vortex shows a clear semi-annual variation as well as annual variation. Thirdly, we found that the total intensity of the L current system changes depending on solar activity and season; seasonal variations of the L current intensity show an enhancement during the December solstice, independent of the level of solar activity.

  19. Nanoflare Heating of the Quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viall, N. M.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    How the solar corona is heated to temperatures of over 1 MK, while the photosphere below is only ~ 6000 K remains one of the outstanding problems in all of space science. Solving this problem is crucial for understanding Sun-Earth connections, and will provide new insight into universal processes such as magnetic reconnection and wave-particle interactions. We use a systematic technique to analyze the properties of coronal heating throughout the solar corona using data taken with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Our technique computes cooling times of the coronal plasma on a pixel-by-pixel basis and has the advantage that it analyzes all of the coronal emission, including the diffuse emission surrounding distinguishable coronal features. We have already applied this technique to 15 different active regions, and find clear evidence for dynamic heating and cooling cycles that are consistent with the 'impulsive nanoflare' scenario. What about the rest of the Solar corona? Whether the quiet Sun is heated in a similar or distinct manner from active regions is a matter of great debate. Here we apply our coronal heating analysis technique to quiet Sun locations. We find areas of quiet Sun locations that also undergo dynamic heating and cooling cycles, consistent with impulsive nanoflares. However, there are important characteristics that are distinct from those of active regions.

  20. Characteristics of long-term variation in the amlitude of the geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation using the Inter-university Upper atmosphere Gobal Observation NETwork (IUGONET) data analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Nose, M.; Hori, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Yatagai, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    Characteristics of long-term variation in the amplitude of solar quiet geomagnetic field daily variation (Sq) have been investigated using 1-hour geomagnetic field data obtained from 69 geomagnetic stations in a period of 1947-2013. In the present data analysis, we took advantage of the IUGONET data analysis system. The Sq amplitude clearly showed a 10-12 year solar activity dependence and it tended to enhance during each solar maximum. During the minimum of solar cycle 23/24 in 2008-2009, the Sq amplitude became the smallest in the investigated period. The relationship between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude is approximately linear but 64 percent of geomagnetic stations show a weak nonlinear dependence on the solar F10.7 index. In order to remove the effect of solar activity seen in the long-term variation of the Sq amplitude, we calculated a linear or second order fitting curve between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude during 1947-2013, and examined the residual Sq amplitude, which is defined as the deviation from the fitting curve. As a result, a majority of the trends in the residual Sq amplitude that passed through a trend test showed a negative value in a wide region. This tendency was relatively strong in Europe, India, the eastern part of Canada, and New Zealand. The relationship between the magnetic field intensity and residual Sq amplitude showed an anti-correlation for about 71 percent of geomagnetic stations. On the other hand, the residual Sq amplitude in the equatorial station (Addis Ababa) was anti-correlated with the absolute value of the magnetic field inclination. This implies the movement of the equatorial electrojet due to the secular variation of the ambient magnetic field.

  1. The Quiet Skies Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Steve

    2008-01-01

    To help promote student awareness of the connection between radio astronomy and radio frequency interference (RFI), an inquiry-based science curriculum was developed to allow high school students to determine RFI levels in their communities. The Quiet Skies Project--the result of a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space…

  2. Magnetic Bright Points in the Quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Bonet, J. A.; Viticchié, B.; Del Moro, D.

    2010-05-01

    We present a visual determination of the number of bright points (BPs) existing in the quiet Sun, which are structures though to trace intense kG magnetic concentrations. The measurement is based on a 0farcs1 angular resolution G-band movie obtained with the Swedish Solar Telescope at the solar disk center. We find 0.97 BPs Mm-2, which is a factor 3 larger than any previous estimate. It corresponds to 1.2 BPs per solar granule. Depending on the details of the segmentation, the BPs cover between 0.9% and 2.2% of the solar surface. Assuming their field strength to be 1.5 kG, the detected BPs contribute to the solar magnetic flux with an unsigned flux density between 13 G and 33 G. If network and inter-network regions are counted separately, they contain 2.2 BPs Mm-2 and 0.85 BPs Mm-2, respectively.

  3. The vertical propagation of waves in the solar atmosphere. II Phase delays in the quiet chromosphere and cell-network distinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lites, B. W.; Chipman, E. G.; White, O. R.

    1982-01-01

    The differences in the phase of the velocity oscillations between a pair of chromospheric Ca II lines was measured using the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Sacramento Peak Observatory. The observed phase differences indicate that the acoustic modes are trapped or envanescent, rather than propagating, in the chromosphere. Systematic distinctions are found in the phase delays between quiet network and cell interior regions for both intensity and velocity oscillations in photospheric and chromospheric lines. The theory of linear perturbations in an isothermal atmosphere is invoked to interpret these differences. From this analysis it is found that one or more of the following explanations is possible: (1) the radiative damping is more effective in the network than in the cell interior; (2) the network features exclude oscillations of large horizontal wavenumber; or (3) the scale height of the chromosphere is larger in the network than in the cell interior.

  4. The Cretaceous Quiet Zone: How Quiet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Y.; Dyment, J.; Kitazawa, M.; Bouligand, C.; Hoise, E.; Kim, M.; Savary, J.; Royer, J.; Choi-Dyment, Y.; Gotab, B.

    2005-12-01

    Geomagnetic field intensity variations deduced from magnetostratigraphic data are mainly restricted to the past few million years. As a consequence, many important questions, such as the long-term evolution of the geomagnetic field intensity and the temporal distribution of excursions, remain unsolved yet. The possibility to recover these fluctuations over a long time interval from marine magnetic anomalies is therefore of particular interest. Within the period documented by these anomalies, the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (CNS) presents a major interest in geomagnetism as little is known on the characteristics of the geomagnetic field during this event, except that it apparently did not reverse for about 35 Myr. Cruise Magofond 3 of R/V Suroit (July-August 2005) was dedicated to the CNS, with a target area on the Cretaceous Quiet Zone off Western Africa, on the eastern flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Both sea-surface and deep tow magnetic anomaly profiles have been collected. Magnetic observatory data from M'Bour (Senegal) and Guimar (Canary Islands) have been regularly transmitted to the ship in order to check for any external magnetic field disturbance which may have affected the data. In addition, seismic reflection data were acquired to insure that the observed anomalies are not caused by the basement topography and, eventually, to estimate and correct such an effect. Altogether, these data brings new constraints on the variability of the geomagnetic field during the superchron. As a preliminary result, they show the occurrence of several consistent short-wavelength magnetic anomalies which may be linked either to short reversed polarity intervals or to excursions. In particular, the ISEA reversed polarity subchron at the beginning of the CNS seems to be present in most profiles. Other observed anomalies may also depict subchrons and would therefore challenge the concept of a non-reversing geodynamo during the exceptionally long CNS.

  5. Investigation on Radio-Quiet and Radio-Loud Fast CMEs and Their Associated Flares During Solar Cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, K.; Shanmugaraju, A.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of a detailed analysis on the differences between radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ( V≥900 km s-1) observed during the period 1996 - 2012. The analysis consists of three different steps in which we examined the properties of (i) RL and RQ CMEs, (ii) accelerating (class-A) and decelerating (class-D) CMEs among RL and RQ CMEs, and (iii) associated flares. The last two steps and events from a longer period are the extensions of the earlier work on RL and RQ CMEs that mainly aimed to determine the reason for the radio-quietness of some fast CMEs. During this period, we found that 38 % of fast CMEs are RL and 62 % of fast CMEs are RQ. Moreover, fewer RQ CMEs occur around the disc centre. The average speeds of RL and RQ CMEs are 1358 km s-1 and 1092 km s-1. Around 10 % of the RQ events are halo CMEs, but ≈ 66 % of RL events are halo CMEs. The mean acceleration or deceleration value of RL-CMEs is slightly greater than that of RQ-CMEs. When we divide these events based on their acceleration behaviour into class A and class D, there are no considerable differences between classes A and D of RL-CMEs or between classes A and D of RQ CMEs, except for their initial acceleration values. But there are significant differences among their associated flare properties. According to our study here, the RQ CMEs are less energetic than RL CMEs, and they are not associated with flares as strong as those associated with RL CMEs. This confirms the previous results that RQ CMEs do not often exceed the critical Alfvén speed of 1000 km s-1 in the outer corona that is needed to produce type II radio bursts.

  6. Quiet time enhancements over African latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orford, Nicola; Katamzi, Zama; Buresova, Dalia

    2016-07-01

    F2 layer disturbances not related to geomagnetic activity are known as quiet time enhancements (QTEs). The phenomenon of QTEs has not yet been studied over African latitudes. We therefore explore the occurrence of QTEs over Africa in order to expand our knowledge on the behaviour of the ionosphere over this region. Several GPS stations in the middle to equatorial latitudes, during the solar minimum (2009) and near solar maximum (2013), are used. This data was examined for possible trends in variation with solar cycle, season and latitude as well as time of commencement of enhancements. Over the southern mid-latitude region of Africa we have observed that the QTEs are more likely to commence during the night in both solar minimum and maximum, however a slightly larger portion of daytime commencements during solar minimum than during solar maximum were observed. The total number of enhancements for the solar minimum period appears greater than during solar maximum. A seasonal trend is seen with the maximum number of enhancements occurring in summer during solar minimum and in winter during solar maximum. We explore further whether these trends are mirrored or different at low latitude/equatorial African regions.

  7. Quiet time particle fluxes and active phenomena on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishkov, Vitaly; Zeldovich, Mariya; Logachev, Yurii; Kecskemety, Karoly

    Using ACE, SOHO and STEREO data the connection of quiet time particle fluxes with active processes on the Sun is examined in the 23rd SC. Investigation of the intervals selected in the conditions of low solar activity supports our assumption that the active structures on the Sun arising during minimum solar activity are mostly responsible for background particle fluxes. Sources on the Sun of charged particles with energies 0.3-8 MeV/nucleon have been determined during quiet time periods over all solar cycle by comparison with solar wind fluxes. It is shown that at the solar maximum a part of background fluxes with abundances of C and Fe corresponding to mean values in solar corona resulted from equatorial coronal holes. Bipolar structures arising in the hole area (bright X-ray points) were accompanied in most cases by the ejection of solar plasma according to HINOTORI satellite. The speed of a part of such emissions and open magnetic field lines above coronal holes can allow energetic particles to escape into the interplanetary space. During solar minimum abundances of C and Fe in majority of quiet time fluxes corresponded to solar wind values possibly indicating the common origin of energetic particle and solar wind fluxes.

  8. The QUIET Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, T.; Kangaslahti, P.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leitch, E. M.; Wollack, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is designed to measure polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background, targeting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves at large angular scales ( approx 1 deg.) . Between 2008 October and 2010 December, two independent receiver arrays were deployed sequentially on a 1.4 m side-fed Dragonian telescope. The polarimeters which form the focal planes use a highly compact design based on High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) that provides simultaneous measurements of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and I in a single module. The 17-element Q-band polarimeter array, with a central frequency of 43.1 GHz, has the best sensitivity (69 micro Ks(exp 1/2)) and the lowest instrumental systematic errors ever achieved in this band, contributing to the tensor-to-scalar ratio at r < 0.1. The 84-element W-band polarimeter array has a sensitivity of 87 micro Ks(exp 1/2) at a central frequency of 94.5 GHz. It has the lowest systematic errors to date, contributing at r < 0.01 (QUIET Collaboration 2012) The two arrays together cover multipoles in the range l approximately equals 25-975 . These are the largest HEMT-ba.sed arrays deployed to date. This article describes the design, calibration, performance of, and sources of systematic error for the instrument,

  9. Achieving a quiet rooftop installation

    SciTech Connect

    Harold, R.G.

    1993-12-01

    This article examines the design considerations for quiet roof top installations of air conditioning systems. The topics of the article include the elements of a quiet installation, acoustic design requirements for minimizing noise problems, incorporating system requirements into the overall design of the building, and survival of the system design through bid review and installation.

  10. Diurnal variation of galactic cosmic ray intensity on quiet days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, S.; Datt, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed study of the diurnal variation on long term basis was performed on geomagnetically quiet days using the experimental data of the cosmic ray intensity from the worldwide neutron monitoring stations. During the period when the polarity of the solar magnetic field in the Northern Hemisphere of the sun is negative the phase and amplitude of the diurnal anisotropy on quiet days was observed to remain almost constant. When the polarity of solar magnetic field in the Northern Hemisphere changes from negative to positive, a shift in the phase of the diurnal anisotropy on quiet days towards earlier hours is observed and the shift is found to be maximum during minimum solar activity periods 1953-54 and 1975-76. When the polarity of solar magnetic field changes from positive to negative in the Northern Hemisphere of the Sun the phase of the diurnal anisotropy on quiet days recovers to its usual direction of corotational anisotropy and is observed to remain almost constant till the polarity of the solar magnetic field does not change.

  11. Closing the pseudogap quietly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, J. G.

    2015-09-01

    The physical properties of hole-doped cuprate high-temperature superconductors are heavily influenced by an energy gap known as the pseudogap whose origin remains a mystery second only to that of superconductivity itself. A key question is whether the pseudogap closes at a temperature T* . The absence of a specific heat anomaly, together with persistent entropy losses up to 300 K, have long suggested that the pseudogap does not vanish at T* . However, amid a growing body of evidence from other techniques pointing to the contrary we revisit this question. Here we investigate if, by adding a temperature dependence to the pseudogap energy and quasiparticle lifetime in the resonating-valence-bond spin-liquid model of Yang, Rice and Zhang, we can close the pseudogap quietly in the specific heat.

  12. UV intensity distributions of the quiet Sun observed with Sunrise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirzberger, Johann; Feller, A.; Riethmueller, T.; Borrero, J. M.; Schüssler, M.; Barthol, P.; Berkefeld, T.; Gandorfer, A.; Knoelker, M.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Schmidt, W.; Solanki, S.; Title, A.

    High resolution solar images in the near UV have been obtained with the Solar UV Filtergraph (SUFI) onboard the Sunrise balloon borne observatory, amongst others in wavelength regions not accessible from the ground. We present intensity distributions of the quiet Sun at different heliocentric angles, from disk center to the solar limb. These results, obtained in spectral windows at 214 nm, 313 nm (OH band), 388 nm (CN band) and 396.7 nm (CaIIH), represent an important validation of numerical models of the solar photosphere and are, thus, fundamental ingredients for our understanding of the thermal processes in the solar surface region.

  13. The quiet sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. G.

    1973-01-01

    An up-to-date textbook of solar physics is presented. The solar structure and processes, and the interior are described along with the photosphere, the chromosphere, and the corona. The strongest Fraunhofer lines, visible coronal lines, and coronal UV, XUV, and X-ray lines are listed.

  14. Long-term monthly statistics of the mid-latitude ionospheric E-layer peak electron density in the Northern geographic hemisphere during geomagnetically quiet and steadily low solar activity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Anatoli; Pavlova, Nadezhda

    2016-07-01

    Long-term hourly values of the ionospheric E-layer peak electron density, NmE, measured during the time period of 1957-2014 by 4 mid-latitude ionosondes (Wallops Island, Boulder, de l'Ebre, and Rome) in the Northern geographic hemisphere were processed to select periods of geomagnetically quiet and low solar activity conditions to calculate several descriptive statistics of NmE close to noon for each month in a year, including the mathematical expectation of NmE, the standard deviations of NmE from the mathematically expected NmE, and the NmE variation coefficient. The month-to-month variability of these descriptors allowed us to identify months of a year when they reach their extremes (maxima, minima). We found that the most probable NmE cannot be considered as the best statistical parameter among the most probable NmE and the mathematically expected NmE in statistical studies of month-to-month variations of NmE. Depending on a choice of an ionosonde and a month, the calculated NmE variation coefficient changes from 5 to 12 %.

  15. The QUIET Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, C.; et al.

    2012-07-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is designed to measure polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background, targeting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves at large angular scales ({approx}1{sup o}). Between 2008 October and 2010 December, two independent receiver arrays were deployed sequentially on a 1.4m side-fed Dragonian telescope. The polarimeters which form the focal planes use a highly compact design based on High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) that provides simultaneous measurements of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and I in a single module. The 17-element Q-band polarimeter array, with a central frequency of 43.1 GHz, has the best sensitivity (69 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2}) and the lowest instrumental systematic errors ever achieved in this band, contributing to the tensor-to-scalar ratio at r < 0:1. The 84-element W-band polarimeter array has a sensitivity of 87 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2} at a central frequency of 94.5 GHz. It has the lowest systematic errors to date, contributing at r < 0:01. The two arrays together cover multipoles in the range {ell} {approx} 25 -- 975. These are the largest HEMT-based arrays deployed to date. This article describes the design, calibration, performance of, and sources of systematic error for the instrument.

  16. Quiet powered-lift propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Latest results of programs exploring new propulsion technology for powered-lift aircraft systems are presented. Topics discussed include results from the 'quiet clean short-haul experimental engine' program and progress reports on the 'quiet short-haul research aircraft' and 'tilt-rotor research aircraft' programs. In addition to these NASA programs, the Air Force AMST YC 14 and YC 15 programs were reviewed.

  17. The dynamic magnetic quiet Sun: physical mechanisms and UV signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.

    2009-04-01

    The changes in the Sun occurring at human time-scales can be pinned down to the presence of magnetic fields. These fields determine the structure of the outer solar atmosphere and, therefore, they are responsible for all the energetic part of the solar spectrum, including the UV. Our understanding of the magnetic fields existing at the base of the atmosphere has changed during the last years. The new spectro-polarimeters reveal an ubiquitous magnetic field, present even in the quiet regions. They are widespread and of complex topology, containing far more (unsigned) magnetic flux and magnetic energy that all traditional manifestations of solar activity. These so-called quiet Sun magnetic fields are the subject of the contribution. I summarize their main observational properties, as well as the models put forward to explain them. According to the common wisdom, they may be generated by a turbulent dynamo driven by convective motions. Their true physical role is not understood yet, but it may be consequential both for the Sun (e.g., in determining the structure of the quiet corona), and for other astronomical objects (e.g., if a turbulent dynamo operates in the Sun, the same mechanism provides a very efficient mean of creating surface magnetic fields in all stars with convective envelopes). I discuss the impact of the quiet Sun fields on the transition region and corona, trying to point out the UV signatures of those fields.

  18. MAGNETIC BRIGHT POINTS IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Bonet, J. A.; Viticchie, B.

    2010-05-20

    We present a visual determination of the number of bright points (BPs) existing in the quiet Sun, which are structures though to trace intense kG magnetic concentrations. The measurement is based on a 0.''1 angular resolution G-band movie obtained with the Swedish Solar Telescope at the solar disk center. We find 0.97 BPs Mm{sup -2}, which is a factor 3 larger than any previous estimate. It corresponds to 1.2 BPs per solar granule. Depending on the details of the segmentation, the BPs cover between 0.9% and 2.2% of the solar surface. Assuming their field strength to be 1.5 kG, the detected BPs contribute to the solar magnetic flux with an unsigned flux density between 13 G and 33 G. If network and inter-network regions are counted separately, they contain 2.2 BPs Mm{sup -2} and 0.85 BPs Mm{sup -2}, respectively.

  19. NASA Connect: 'Quieting The Skies'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From NASA Connect: 'Quieting The Skies' In this animation we see how the ear converts pressure waves into something the brain can perceive as 'sound' NASA engineers and scientists are trying to design airplanes to run as quietly as cars. In this program, students will learn the basics: what sound is, what makes sound, how sound affects us and the environment, and how we measure sound. They will also learn some of the techniques being used by NASA to reduce aircraft noise. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the creation, visualization, and measurement of sound.

  20. NASA Connect: 'Quieting The Skies'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From NASA Connect: 'Quieting The Skies' Brenda Sullivan, a psychoacoustician, explains how she researces peoples responses to noise with the help of binaural recordings made inside aircraft. NASA engineers and scientists are trying to design airplanes to run as quietly as cars. In this program, students will learn the basics: what sound is, what makes sound, how sound affects us and the environment, and how we measure sound. They will also learn some of the techniques being used by NASA to reduce aircraft noise. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the creation, visualization, and measurement of sound.

  1. 76 FR 64353 - Buy Quiet Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... controls on machinery and equipment and to motivate the development and implementation of Buy Quiet... machinery and equipment who believe ``Buy Quiet'' programs can be effectively and efficiently woven...

  2. Looking for Peace and Quiet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palin, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Ray Palin, librarian at Sunapee Middle High School in Sunapee, New Hampshire describes what it takes to make the school library a space for those looking for "peace and quiet." Palin begins this article by noting that much has been written about the advantages associated with the learning commons model of library design, however less has…

  3. A triumph of quiet diplomacy

    SciTech Connect

    Keeny, S.M. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    The new US agreement with North Korea is a breakthrough in the international effort to eliminate the most serious threat to the non-proliferation regime. Despite mutual mistrust, the two sides have, by quiet diplomacy, crafted an ingenious agreement that terminates Pyongyang`s current and future nuclear weapons program in return for economic benefits and an opportunity to join the international community.

  4. Quiet Sun and its Dynamics as Viewed from the Ground and from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, K.

    2016-04-01

    Over the last years, state-of-the-art ground-based and/or space-based observations using imaging, spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric instruments, at a wide range of wavelengths, reveal that the quiet Sun, just like active regions, is a highly inhomogeneous and dynamic environment that plays an important role in the dynamics of the entire solar atmosphere. This dynamic quiet Sun is manifested through a number of different types of features and phenomena that occur in a large range of spatial and temporal scales and are nowadays believed to be mostly driven by the local magnetic field and its dynamics. Ground-based observations processed with state-of-the-art, post-processing reconstruction techniques, often combined with simultaneous space-based observations from a variety of instruments on different spacecraft, offer a unique opportunity to investigate and understand the physical conditions of the local plasma, the nature, formation mechanisms and evolution of quiet Sun phenomena and possible interrelationships between quiet Sun phenomena occurring at different heights of the quiet Sun solar atmosphere, from the photosphere and chromosphere to the transition region and low corona. We provide a comprehensive review of our latest understanding of quiet Sun and its dynamics as viewed from the ground and from space and discuss the advantages/disadvantages of ground- and space-based observations and future advents in solar observations with new solar instruments.

  5. A nanoflare model of quiet Sun EUV emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauluhn, A.; Solanki, S. K.

    2007-01-01

    Nanoflares have been proposed as the main source of heating of the solar corona. However, detecting them directly has so far proved elusive, and extrapolating to them from the properties of larger brightenings gives unreliable estimates of the power-law exponent α characterising their distribution. Here we take the approach of statistically modelling light curves representative of the quiet Sun as seen in EUV radiation. The basic assumption is that all quiet-Sun EUV emission is due to micro- and nanoflares, whose radiative energies display a power-law distribution. Radiance values in the quiet Sun follow a lognormal distribution. This is irrespective of whether the distribution is made over a spatial scan or over a time series. We show that these distributions can be reproduced by our simple model. By simultaneously fitting the radiance distribution function and the power spectrum obtained from the light curves emitted by transition region and coronal lines the power-law distribution of micro- and nanoflare brightenings is constrained. A good statistical match to the measurements is obtained for a steep power-law distribution of nanoflare energies, with power-law exponent α> 2. This is consistent with the dominant heat input to the corona being provided by nanoflares, i.e., by events with energies around 1023 erg. In order to reproduce the observed SUMER time series approximately 103 to 104 nanoflares are needed per second throughout the atmosphere of the quiet Sun (assuming the nanoflares to cover an average area of 1013 m2).

  6. Modeling the Quiet Time Outflow Solution in the Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, Alex

    2011-01-01

    We use the Polar Wind Outflow Model (PWOM) to study the geomagnetically quiet conditions in the polar cap during solar maximum, The PWOM solves the gyrotropic transport equations for O(+), H(+), and He(+) along several magnetic field lines in the polar region in order to reconstruct the full 3D solution. We directly compare our simulation results to the data based empirical model of Kitamura et al. [2011] of electron density, which is based on 63 months of Akebono satellite observations. The modeled ion and electron temperatures are also compared with a statistical compilation of quiet time data obtained by the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR) and Intercosmos Satellites (Kitamura et al. [2011]). The data and model agree reasonably well. This study shows that photoelectrons play an important role in explaining the differences between sunlit and dark results, ion composition, as well as ion and electron temperatures of the quiet time polar wind solution. Moreover, these results provide validation of the PWOM's ability to model the quiet time ((background" solution.

  7. The Quiet Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-07-01

    weak and 'soft' [1], very different from a gamma-ray burst and more in line with what is expected from a normal supernova." So, after the supernova was discovered, the team rapidly observed it from the Asiago Observatory in Northern Italy and established that it was a Type Ic supernova. "These are supernovae produced by stars that have lost their hydrogen and helium-rich outermost layers before exploding, and are the only type of supernovae which are associated with (long) gamma-ray bursts," explains Mazzali. "The object thus became even more interesting!" Earlier this year, an independent team of astronomers reported in the journal Nature that SN 2008D is a rather normal supernova. The fact that X-rays were detected was, they said, because for the first time, astronomers were lucky enough to catch the star in the act of exploding. Mazzali and his team think otherwise. "Our observations and modeling show this to be a rather unusual event, to be better understood in terms of an object lying at the boundary between normal supernovae and gamma-ray bursts." The team set up an observational campaign to monitor the evolution of the supernova using both ESO and national telescopes, collecting a large quantity of data. The early behaviour of the supernova indicated that it was a highly energetic event, although not quite as powerful as a gamma-ray burst. After a few days, however, the spectra of the supernova began to change. In particular Helium lines appeared, showing that the progenitor star was not stripped as deeply as supernovae associated with gamma-ray bursts. Over the years, Mazzali and his group have developed theoretical models to analyse the properties of supernovae. When applied to SN2008D, their models indicated that the progenitor star was at birth as massive as 30 times the Sun, but had lost so much mass that at the time of the explosion the star had a mass of only 8-10 solar masses. The likely result of the collapse of such a massive star is a black hole

  8. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF THE VERY QUIET SUN MAGNETISM

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez Gonzalez, M. J.; Manso Sainz, R.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2010-03-10

    The behavior of the observed polarization amplitudes with spatial resolution is a strong constraint on the nature and organization of solar magnetic fields below the resolution limit. We study the polarization of the very quiet Sun at different spatial resolutions using ground- and space-based observations. It is shown that 80% of the observed polarization signals do not change with spatial resolution, suggesting that, observationally, the very quiet Sun magnetism remains the same despite the high spatial resolution of space-based observations. Our analysis also reveals a cascade of spatial scales for the magnetic field within the resolution element. It is manifest that the Zeeman effect is sensitive to the microturbulent field usually associated with Hanle diagnostics. This demonstrates that Zeeman and Hanle studies show complementary perspectives of the same magnetism.

  9. Microbial proteomics: the quiet revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Seraphin, Bertrand; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2012-01-01

    Technological developments in DNA sequencing and their application to study thousands of microbial genomes or even microbial ecosystems still today often make the headlines of general newspapers and scientific journals. These revolutionary changes are hiding another revolution that is unfolding more quietly in the background: the development of microbial proteomics to study genome expression products. It is important to recognize that while DNA sequencing reveals extensive details about the genomic potential of an organism or community, proteomic measurements reveal the functional gene products that are present and operational under specific environmental conditions, and thus perhaps better characterize the critical biomolecules that execute the life processes (enzymes, signaling, structural factors, etc.).

  10. Smart materials for turbomachinery quieting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonson, Michael L.; Lysak, Peter D.; Willits, Steven M.

    2000-06-01

    As part of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) SAMPSON program, a team has been developing and testing the use of smart materials for quieting turbomachinery. The team is composed of representatives form Pennsylvania State University, General Dynamics Electric Boat, GTE BBN Technologies, and the Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division. Four concepts for quieting were proposed and wind tunnel testing, water tunnel testing, as well as computational fluid dynamic analysis were performed to down select two of the concepts for further consideration: protuberance and gap control. The wind tunnel testing was performed to determine the optimum shape of the protuberance. Water tunnel testing was performed at Penn State University/Applied Research Laboratory to establish the performance of the protuberance and gap control elements. Piezoelectric inchworm actuators, developed by PSU/Center for Acoustics and Vibration, were utilized for the evaluation of the two concepts. GTE BBN Technologies developed the control system simulation for the ultimate concept, the General Dynamics Electric Boat was responsible for hydrodynamic and hydroacoustic analysis. Naval Surface Warfare Center/Carderock Division performed hydrodynamic analysis and developed the rotary component design for the water tunnel test fixture. Successful testing in the twelve- inch diameter water tunnel at PSU/ARL demonstrated superior performance with the gap control concept over the protuberance control concept, and efforts are on-going to develop the final large scale demonstration. This paper summarizes the result of these activities.

  11. Abundances and charge states in quiet-time low-energy ion fluxes at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecskemety, Karoly; Zeldovich, Mariya; Klecker, Berndt; Logachev, Yurii

    Abundances of C and Fe ions with energies 0.04-1.28 MeV/nuc in the 23rd solar activity cycle are examined in the quiet-time fluxes using ACE, SOHO and STEREO data. They are com-bined with charge state measurement data from SEPICA (ACE, 0.18-0.43 MeV/nuc). Quiet periods of solar activity were selected using the criteria a) Jp < 2x10-4 protons/(cm2 s sr MeV) for 4-8 MeV protons (from EPHIN/SOHO) and b) the ratio H/He < 10 at these energies. The values of C/O and Fe/O were determined over the solar cycle and the following was found. In about 50% of the time intervals during high activity they both were near the average values observed in the solar corona, whereas at solar minimum in more than 90% of the periods the ratios were around the solar wind values. Most of the quiet time periods around maximum, which have sufficient statistics show high average Fe charge states (>15), consistent with im-pulsive solar event origin. During the SC minima the abundances in almost all cases correspond to solar wind values. The results obtained suggest that the active structures on the Sun arising at low solar activity are mostly responsible for background particle fluxes at these energies. There may be microflares, disappearing of ribbons, soft X-ray bright points etc.

  12. Reflections on Wilson's "The Quiet Evolution."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, W. Dwaine

    1999-01-01

    Explores Brent Wilson's report "The Quiet Evolution: Changing the Face of Arts Education," focusing on Wilson's reformulation of discipline-based art education and the methodology of the evaluation. Examines the findings and refers to "The Quiet Evolution Executive Summary." (CMK)

  13. A Quiet Place for Student Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    As electronic gadgets predominate a student's life, there comes a need for silence. A quiet place free of electromagnetic spectrum waves, dirty and stray electricity, and the endless chirps, whistles, beeps, and customized signaling. A quiet place can offer solitude for meditation, inspiration, and spiritual awareness. Student involvement in the…

  14. Studies Highlight Classroom Plight of Quiet Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    Educators often look for ways to bring quiet children out of their shells, but emerging research suggests schools can improve academic outcomes for introverted students by reducing the pressure to be outgoing and giving all students a little more time to reflect. A 2011 study found teachers from across K-12 rated hypothetical quiet children as…

  15. Magnetic Loops in the Quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegelmann, T.; Solanki, S. K.; Borrero, J. M.; Martínez Pillet, V.; del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Domingo, V.; Bonet, J. A.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Knölker, M.; Schmidt, W.; Title, A. M.

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the fine structure of magnetic fields in the atmosphere of the quiet Sun. We use photospheric magnetic field measurements from SUNRISE/IMaX with unprecedented spatial resolution to extrapolate the photospheric magnetic field into higher layers of the solar atmosphere with the help of potential and force-free extrapolation techniques. We find that most magnetic loops that reach into the chromosphere or higher have one footpoint in relatively strong magnetic field regions in the photosphere. Ninety-one percent of the magnetic energy in the mid-chromosphere (at a height of 1 Mm) is in field lines, whose stronger footpoint has a strength of more than 300 G, i.e., above the equipartition field strength with convection. The loops reaching into the chromosphere and corona are also found to be asymmetric in the sense that the weaker footpoint has a strength B < 300 G and is located in the internetwork (IN). Such loops are expected to be strongly dynamic and have short lifetimes, as dictated by the properties of the IN fields.

  16. MAGNETIC LOOPS IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegelmann, T.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Borrero, J. M.; Schmidt, W.; Pillet, V. MartInez; Bonet, J. A.; Domingo, V.; Knoelker, M.; Title, A. M.

    2010-11-10

    We investigate the fine structure of magnetic fields in the atmosphere of the quiet Sun. We use photospheric magnetic field measurements from SUNRISE/IMaX with unprecedented spatial resolution to extrapolate the photospheric magnetic field into higher layers of the solar atmosphere with the help of potential and force-free extrapolation techniques. We find that most magnetic loops that reach into the chromosphere or higher have one footpoint in relatively strong magnetic field regions in the photosphere. Ninety-one percent of the magnetic energy in the mid-chromosphere (at a height of 1 Mm) is in field lines, whose stronger footpoint has a strength of more than 300 G, i.e., above the equipartition field strength with convection. The loops reaching into the chromosphere and corona are also found to be asymmetric in the sense that the weaker footpoint has a strength B < 300 G and is located in the internetwork (IN). Such loops are expected to be strongly dynamic and have short lifetimes, as dictated by the properties of the IN fields.

  17. First results on quiet and magnetic granulation from SOUP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Tarbell, T. D.; Acton, L.; Duncan, D.; Ferguson, S. H.; Finch, M.; Frank, Z.; Kelly, G.; Lindgren, R.; Morrill, M.

    1987-01-01

    The flight of Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 allowed the collection of time sequences of diffraction limited (0.5 arc sec) granulation images with excellent pointing (0.003 arc sec) and completely free of the distortion that plagues groundbased images. The p-mode oscillations are clearly seen in the data. Using Fourier transforms in the temporal and spatial domain, it was shown that the p-modes dominate the autocorrelation lifetime in magnetic regions. When these oscillations are removed the autocorrelation lifetime is found to be 500 sec in quiet and 950 sec in magnetic regions. In quiet areas exploding granules are seen to be common. It is speculated that a significant fraction of granule lifetimes are terminated by nearby explosions. Using local correlation tracking techniques it was able to measure horizontal displacements, and thus transverse velocities, in the magnetic field. In quiet sun it is possible to detect both super and mesogranulation. Horizontal velocities are as great as 1000 m/s and the average velocity is 400 m/s. In magnetic regions horizontal velocities are much less, about 100 m/s.

  18. Small-scale eruptive filaments on the quiet sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermans, Linda M.; Martin, Sara F.

    1986-01-01

    A study of a little known class of eruptive events on the quiet sun was conducted. All of 61 small-scale eruptive filamentary structures were identified in a systematic survey of 32 days of H alpha time-lapse films of the quiet sun acquired at Big Bear Solar Observatory. When fully developed, these structures have an average length of 15 arc seconds before eruption. They appear to be the small-scale analog of large-scale eruptive filaments observed against the disk. At the observed rate of 1.9 small-scale eruptive features per field of view per average 7.0 hour day, the rate of occurence of these events on the sun were estimated to be greater than 600 per 24 hour day.. The average duration of the eruptive phase was 26 minutes while the average lifetime from formation through eruption was 70 minutes. A majority of the small-scale filamentary sturctures were spatially related to cancelling magnetic features in line-of-sight photospheric magnetograms. Similar to large-scale filaments, the small-scale filamentary structures sometimes divided opposite polarity cancelling fragments but often had one or both ends terminating at a cancellation site. Their high numbers appear to reflect the much greater flux on the quiet sun. From their characteristics, evolution, and relationship to photospheric magnetic flux, it was concluded that the structures described are small-scale eruptive filaments and are a subset of all filaments.

  19. PERVASIVE LINEAR POLARIZATION SIGNALS IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Bellot Rubio, L. R.; Orozco Suarez, D.

    2012-09-20

    This paper investigates the distribution of linear polarization signals in the quiet-Sun internetwork using ultra-deep spectropolarimetric data. We reduce the noise of the observations as much as is feasible by adding single-slit measurements of the Zeeman-sensitive Fe I 630 nm lines taken by the Hinode spectropolarimeter. The integrated Stokes spectra are employed to determine the fraction of the field of view covered by linear polarization signals. We find that up to 69% of the quiet solar surface at disk center shows Stokes Q or U profiles with amplitudes larger than 0.032% (4.5 times the noise level of 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} reached by the longer integrations). The mere presence of linear polarization in most of the quiet Sun implies that the weak internetwork fields must be highly inclined, but we quantify this by inverting those pixels with Stokes Q or U signals well above the noise. This allows for a precise determination of the field inclination, field strength, and field azimuth because the information carried by all four Stokes spectra is used simultaneously. The inversion is performed for 53% of the observed field of view at a noise level of 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} I{sub c}. The derived magnetic distributions are thus representative of more than half of the quiet-Sun internetwork. Our results confirm the conclusions drawn from previous analyses using mainly Stokes I and V: internetwork fields are very inclined, but except in azimuth they do not seem to be isotropically distributed.

  20. Magnetospheric convection during quiet or moderately disturbed times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caudal, G.; Blanc, M.

    1988-01-01

    The processes which contribute to the large-scale plasma circulation in the earth's environment during quiet times, or during reasonable stable magnetic conditions are reviewed. The various sources of field-aligned current generation in the solar wind and the magnetosphere are presented. The generation of field-aligned currents on open field lines connected to either polar cap and the generation of closed field lines of the inner magnetosphere are examined. Consideration is given to the hypothesis of Caudal (1987) that loss processes of trapped particles are competing with adiabatic motions in the generation of field-aligned currents in the inner magnetosphere.

  1. Charged Particles in Earth's Magnetosphere during Storm and Quiet time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, D. R.; Grande, M.; Perry, C. H.; Davies, J. A.

    2009-04-01

    Ionic number density, taken by the Magnetospheric Ion Composition Spectrometer (MICS) instrument on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES), are used to investigate the behaviour of singly charged Oxygen and Helium ions, and also Alpha Particles, while under both quiet and storm-time conditions during a Solar Maximum Period. Number density data are plotted against Invariant Latitude and Local time. The results of this investigation show clearly an enhancement of all species during periods of highly negative DST, and are in agreement with previous work (Grande et al, 1996, 2004).

  2. Aeroassist flight experiment guidance Quiet Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striepe, Scott A.; Suit, William T.

    1988-01-01

    The science experiments for the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) will be greatly enhanced by taking measurements with no Reaction Control System (RCS) contamination just before perigee. Methods of modifying the AFE guidance to accomplish this are discussed. Several methods that could give up to 30 seconds of quiet time were investigated and the results of these guidance modifications shown. A 20 second quiet time is definitely possible and a 30 second quiet time may be possible if the guidance can be inactive past perigee. Some of the most significant being the criterion for determining if the mission is threatened. A limited follow-on test program is outlined.

  3. Small-scale swirl events in the quiet Sun chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemeyer-Böhm, S.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Recent progress in instrumentation enables solar observations with high resolution simultaneously in the spatial, temporal, and spectral domains. Aims: We use such high-resolution observations to study small-scale structures and dynamics in the chromosphere of the quiet Sun. Methods: We analyse time series of spectral scans through the Ca ii 854.2 nm spectral line obtained with the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. The targets are quiet Sun regions inside coronal holes close to disc-centre. Results: The line core maps exhibit relatively few fibrils compared to what is normally observed in quiet Sun regions outside coronal holes. The time series show a chaotic and dynamic scene that includes spatially confined “swirl” events. These events feature dark and bright rotating patches, which can consist of arcs, spiral arms, rings or ring fragments. The width of the fragments typically appears to be of the order of only 0.2 arcsec, which is close to the effective spatial resolution. They exhibit Doppler shifts of -2 to -4 km s-1 but sometimes up to -7 km s-1, indicating fast upflows. The diameter of a swirl is usually of the order of 2´´. At the location of these swirls, the line wing and wide-band maps show close groups of photospheric bright points that move with respect to each other. Conclusions: A likely explanation is that the relative motion of the bright points twists the associated magnetic field in the chromosphere above. Plasma or propagating waves may then spiral upwards guided by the magnetic flux structure, thereby producing the observed intensity signature of Doppler-shifted ring fragments. The movie is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org Marie Curie Intra-European Fellow of the European Commission.

  4. Near field zones of quiet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, P.; Elliott, S. J.; Nelson, P. A.

    1994-05-01

    This paper examines the consequences of driving a single secondary loudspeaker to cancel the pressure due to some primary source at a point in its near field. This simple technique has been applied to the sound field in a highly reverberant room to produce zones of quiet in the vicinity of the loudspeaker, which have diameters that are typically equal to one-tenth of the acoustic wavelength, within which the sound pressure level is attenuated by at least 10 dB. The principal advantage gained with this strategy over other active techniques for controlling the sound field in rooms is that the sound pressure level well away from the control point is largely unaffected, an increase of only a small fraction of one dB being typical. Such a loudspeaker-microphone configuration could be located, for example, in the head rests of cars or aeroplanes, or indeed anywhere where the listener is seated for significant lengths of time and subjected to high ambient noise levels such that auditory comfort may be disturbed.

  5. Quiet Supersonic Wind Tunnel Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Lyndell S.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The ability to control the extent of laminar flow on swept wings at supersonic speeds may be a critical element in developing the enabling technology for a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Laminar boundary layers are less resistive to forward flight than their turbulent counterparts, thus the farther downstream that transition from laminar to turbulent flow in the wing boundary layer is extended can be of significant economic impact. Due to the complex processes involved experimental studies of boundary layer stability and transition are needed, and these are performed in "quiet" wind tunnels capable of simulating the low-disturbance environment of free flight. At Ames, a wind tunnel has been built to operate at flow conditions which match those of the HSCT laminar flow flight demonstration 'aircraft, the F-16XL, i.e. at a Mach number of 1.6 and a Reynolds number range of 1 to 3 million per foot. This will allow detailed studies of the attachment line and crossflow on the leading edge area of the highly swept wing. Also, use of suction as a means of control of transition due to crossflow and attachment line instabilities can be studied. Topics covered include: test operating conditions required; design requirements to efficiently make use of the existing infrastructure; development of an injector drive system using a small pilot facility; plenum chamber design; use of computational tools for tunnel and model design; and early operational results.

  6. NASA's Quiet Aircraft Technology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitfield, Charlotte E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Quiet Aircraft Technology Project is developing physics-based understanding, models and concepts to discover and realize technology that will, when implemented, achieve the goals of a reduction of one-half in perceived community noise (relative to 1997) by 2007 and a further one-half in the far term. Noise sources generated by both the engine and the airframe are considered, and the effects of engine/airframe integration are accounted for through the propulsion airframe aeroacoustics element. Assessments of the contribution of individual source noise reductions to the reduction in community noise are developed to guide the work and the development of new tools for evaluation of unconventional aircraft is underway. Life in the real world is taken into account with the development of more accurate airport noise models and flight guidance methodology, and in addition, technology is being developed that will further reduce interior noise at current weight levels or enable the use of lighter-weight structures at current noise levels.

  7. Quiet High-Speed Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieber, Lysbeth; Repp, Russ; Weir, Donald S.

    1996-01-01

    A calibration of the acoustic and aerodynamic prediction methods was performed and a baseline fan definition was established and evaluated to support the quiet high speed fan program. A computational fluid dynamic analysis of the NASA QF-12 Fan rotor, using the DAWES flow simulation program was performed to demonstrate and verify the causes of the relatively poor aerodynamic performance observed during the fan test. In addition, the rotor flowfield characteristics were qualitatively compared to the acoustic measurements to identify the key acoustic characteristics of the flow. The V072 turbofan source noise prediction code was used to generate noise predictions for the TFE731-60 fan at three operating conditions and compared to experimental data. V072 results were also used in the Acoustic Radiation Code to generate far field noise for the TFE731-60 nacelle at three speed points for the blade passage tone. A full 3-D viscous flow simulation of the current production TFE731-60 fan rotor was performed with the DAWES flow analysis program. The DAWES analysis was used to estimate the onset of multiple pure tone noise, based on predictions of inlet shock position as a function of the rotor tip speed. Finally, the TFE731-60 fan rotor wake structure predicted by the DAWES program was used to define a redesigned stator with the leading edge configured to minimize the acoustic effects of rotor wake / stator interaction, without appreciably degrading performance.

  8. The Solar Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattaneo, F.

    2000-05-01

    Magnetic activity on the Sun presents us with an interesting dichotomy. On large spatial and temporal scales the solar magnetic field displays a remarkable degree of organization. The 11 years cadence of the solar cycle, Hales' polarity law, and the systematic drift of the regions of emergence of active regions towards the equator throughout the solar cycle are all indicative of a powerful organizing process. On small spatial and temporal scales, the Solar magnetic field appears random and chaotic. It is interesting that recent advances in dynamo theory provide us with a unified approach to solar magnetic activity whereby both large and small scales emerge naturally as dynamo processes associated with rotationally constrained and unconstrained scales of motions in the convection zone (or directly below it). According to this view all coherent scales of motions produce magnetic structures of comparable coherence length. Those that are further endowed with lack of reflectional symmetry by virtue of being rotationally constrained are further associated with inverse cascades that can generate magnetic structures on larger scales still. The picture that emerges is one in which dynamo action proceeds on different time scales all over the convection zone. But only in very special regions, like for instance the solar tachocline, is the magnetic field organized on large scales. This idea provides a natural explanation for the origin of active regions, ephemeral regions, and intra--network fields.

  9. Time evolution of a single, quiet-Sun magnetic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requerey, Iker S.; Bonet, José Antonio; Solanki, Sami K.; Bellot Rubio, L. R.; Del Toro Iniesta, Jose Carlos

    Isolated flux tubes are considered to be fundamental magnetic building blocks of the solar photosphere. Their formation is usually attributed to the concentration of magnetic field to kG strengths by the convective instability mechanism. However, the small size of the magnetic elements in quiet-Sun areas has prevented this scenario from being studied in fully resolved structures. Here we report on the formation and subsequent evolution of a photospheric magnetic flux tube, observed in the quiet Sun with unprecedented spatial resolution (0. ('') 15 - 0. ('') 18) and high temporal cadence (33 s). The observations were acquired by the Imaging Magnetograph Experiment (IMaX) aboard the textsc{Sunrise} balloon-borne solar observatory. The equipartition field strength magnetic element is reached from the merging of several magnetic flux patches in a mesogranule-sized sink. The magnetic structure is then further intensified to kG field strengths by convective collapse and granular compression. The fine structure found within the flux concentration reveal that the scenario is more complex than a canonical flux tube model. After a subsequent weakening process, the field is further intensified to kG strengths. Seen as a whole, the evolution of the magnetic structure is compatible with oscillations in all basic physical quantities. A discussion on whether this evolution fits to the current theoretical descriptions is also presented.

  10. ON THE PROBABLE EXISTENCE OF AN ABRUPT MAGNETIZATION IN THE UPPER CHROMOSPHERE OF THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Stepan, JirI; Trujillo Bueno, Javier E-mail: jtb@iac.es

    2010-03-10

    We report on a detailed radiative transfer modeling of the observed scattering polarization in the H{alpha} line, which allows us to infer quantitative information on the magnetization of the quiet solar chromosphere. Our analysis suggests the presence of a magnetic complexity zone with a mean field strength (B) > 30 G lying just below the sudden transition region to the coronal temperatures. The chromospheric plasma directly underneath is very weakly magnetized, with (B) {approx} 1 G. The possible existence of this abrupt change in the degree of magnetization of the upper chromosphere of the quiet Sun might have large significance for our understanding of chromospheric (and, therefore, coronal) heating.

  11. SMALL MAGNETIC LOOPS CONNECTING THE QUIET SURFACE AND THE HOT OUTER ATMOSPHERE OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez Gonzalez, M. J.; Manso Sainz, R.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2010-05-01

    Sunspots are the most spectacular manifestation of solar magnetism, yet 99% of the solar surface remains 'quiet' at any time of the solar cycle. The quiet sun is not void of magnetic fields, though; they are organized at smaller spatial scales and evolve relatively fast, which makes them difficult to detect. Thus, although extensive quiet Sun magnetism would be a natural driver to a uniform, steady heating of the outer solar atmosphere, it is not clear what the physical processes involved would be, due to lack of observational evidence. We report on the topology and dynamics of the magnetic field in very quiet regions of the Sun from spectropolarimetric observations of the Hinode satellite, showing a continuous injection of magnetic flux with a well-organized topology of {omega}-loop from below the solar surface into the upper layers. At first stages, when the loop travels across the photosphere, it has a flattened (staple-like) geometry and a mean velocity ascent of {approx}3 km s{sup -1}. When the loop crosses the minimum temperature region, the magnetic fields at the footpoints become almost vertical and the loop topology resembles a potential field. The mean ascent velocity at chromospheric height is {approx}12 km s{sup -1}. The energy input rate of these small-scale loops in the lower boundary of the chromosphere is (at least) of 1.4 x 10{sup 6}-2.2 x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Our findings provide empirical evidence for solar magnetism as a multi-scale system, in which small-scale low-flux magnetism plays a crucial role, at least as important as active regions, coupling different layers of the solar atmosphere and being an important ingredient for chromospheric and coronal heating models.

  12. Analysis of blinkers and EUV brightenings in the quiet Sun observed with CDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brković, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Rüedi, I.

    2001-07-01

    Movies of quiet Sun regions at disc centre obtained with the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) onboard the SOHO spacecraft are used to study the properties of transient brightenings seen in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV), so-called blinkers, at three different temperatures sampled simultaneously in the chromospheric He I 584.3 Å (2 x 104 K), the transition region O V 629.7 Å (2.5 x 105 K) and coronal Mg IX 368.1 Å (106 K) lines. Blinkers, here defined somewhat differently than in previous studies, were clearly detected in the O V and He I lines. Brightenings of the Mg IX line were also seen. A thorough analysis of blinker properties is carried out and their detailed properties are determined. Blinkers are found to be present in both bright (network) and dark (intranetwork) regions, but their number density is larger in the brighter areas (in O V) although the rest of their properties appear to be unaffected. The average sizes of brightenings range from 2.8 Mm2 in Mg IX, 12.4 Mm2 in He I to 23.5 Mm2 in O V. The durations of blinkers are in the range 3-110 min, with the average durations being 23 min in He I, about 16 min in O V and 12 min in Mg IX. The frequency distributions of ratio of peak to background intensity, excess energy and size follow power laws with exponents <-5 for the intensity ratio, and between -1 and -3 for the other two parameters. The correlation coefficients between pairs of ratio, energy and size are at least 0.5, while other pairs of parameters describing the blinkers appear to be uncorrelated. The best correlation is between size and energy. The blinker durations exhibit a distribution whose form is compatible with a log-normal function. Finally, blinkers in the 3 lines (i.e. 3 temperature regimes) are poorly correlated; with the correlation coefficient being always less than 0.4. This suggests that to a large extent the transition region reacts independently of the corona and chromosphere to energy deposition, so that these parts of

  13. A substantial amount of hidden magnetic energy in the quiet Sun.

    PubMed

    Bueno, J Trujillo; Shchukina, N; Ramos, A Asensio

    2004-07-15

    Deciphering and understanding the small-scale magnetic activity of the quiet solar photosphere should help to solve many of the key problems of solar and stellar physics, such as the magnetic coupling to the outer atmosphere and the coronal heating. At present, we can see only approximately 1 per cent of the complex magnetism of the quiet Sun, which highlights the need to develop a reliable way to investigate the remaining 99 per cent. Here we report three-dimensional radiative transfer modelling of scattering polarization in atomic and molecular lines that indicates the presence of hidden, mixed-polarity fields on subresolution scales. Combining this modelling with recent observational data, we find a ubiquitous tangled magnetic field with an average strength of approximately 130 G, which is much stronger in the intergranular regions of solar surface convection than in the granular regions. So the average magnetic energy density in the quiet solar photosphere is at least two orders of magnitude greater than that derived from simplistic one-dimensional investigations, and sufficient to balance radiative energy losses from the solar chromosphere. PMID:15254531

  14. EMIC waves observed at geosynchronous orbit under quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp ≤ 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.-S.; Kim, K.-H.; Shiokawa, K.; Lee, D.-H.; Lee, E.; Kwon, H.-J.; Jin, H.; Jee, G.

    2016-02-01

    We statistically study the local time distribution of the helium band electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves observed at geosynchronous orbit when geomagnetic activity was low (Kp ≤ 1). In order to identify the geosynchronous EMIC waves, we use high time resolution magnetic field data acquired from GOES 10, 11, and 12 over a 2 year period from 2007 and 2008 and examine the local time distribution of EMIC wave events. Unlike previous studies, which reported high EMIC wave occurrence in the postnoon sector with a peak around 1500-1600 magnetic local time (MLT) during magnetically disturbed times (i.e., storm and/or substorm), we observed that quiet time EMIC waves mostly occur in a region from morning (˜0600 MLT) to afternoon (˜1600 MLT) with a peak around 1100-1200 MLT. To investigate whether the quiet time EMIC wave occurrence has a causal relationship with magnetospheric convection enhancement or solar wind dynamic pressure variations, we performed a superposed epoch analysis of solar wind parameters (solar wind speed, density, dynamic pressure, and interplanetary magnetic field Bz) and geomagnetic indices (AE and SYM-H). From the superposed epoch analysis we found that solar wind dynamic pressure variation is a more important parameter than AE and SYM-H for quiet time EMIC wave occurrence.

  15. Determination of the radial gradient in the region 0.81-1.0 AU using both high- and low-energy /more than 10-GeV and more than 52-MeV/ detectors for the 1-AU monitor. [solar quiet measurements of alpha particles and protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, W. R.; Bukata, R. P.; Rao, U. R.

    1974-01-01

    A determination of the radial gradient for alpha particles (31-46 MeV/nuc) and protons with energies above 7.5 MeV and 44-77 MeV in the region 1.0-0.81 AU is presented for the solar-quiet year 1966. The determinations are based on data from the Pioneer 6 space probe. Two different detectors are used: the Deep River neutron monitor and measurements of low energy protons made on the IMP-C satellite. The average energy response of the Deep River monitor is 16 GeV, whereas the IMP-C data is for protons with energies above 50 MeV. The resulting radial gradient is found to be nearly zero for the alpha particles and slightly negative for the protons. The same qualitative results were found using the IMP-C data and the Deep River neutron monitor to measure the temporal variation in the cosmic ray intensity. The present analysis indicates that detectors over a wide range of energies are suitable for measuring the radial gradient, providing sufficient statistical precision is obtained to evaluate short-term modulation and the azimuthal separation of the detectors is not great.

  16. 47 CFR 1.924 - Quiet zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... impact on the operations of radio astronomy or other facilities that are highly sensitive to interference. Consent throughout this paragraph means written consent from the quiet zone, radio astronomy, research... Radio Astronomy Observatory site located at Green Bank, Pocahontas County, West Virginia, and at...

  17. 47 CFR 1.924 - Quiet zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... impact on the operations of radio astronomy or other facilities that are highly sensitive to interference. Consent throughout this paragraph means written consent from the quiet zone, radio astronomy, research... Radio Astronomy Observatory site located at Green Bank, Pocahontas County, West Virginia, and at...

  18. MASS COMPOSITION IN PRE-ERUPTION QUIET SUN FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kilper, Gary; Gilbert, Holly; Alexander, David

    2009-10-10

    Filament eruptions are extremely important phenomena due to their association with coronal mass ejections and their effects on space weather. Little is known about the filament mass and composition in the eruption process, since most of the related research has concentrated on the evolution and disruption of the magnetic field. Following up on our previous work, we present here an analysis of nineteen quiet Sun filament eruptions observed by Mauna Loa Solar Observatory in Halpha and He I 10830 A that has identified a compositional precursor common to all of these eruptions. There is a combined trend of an apparent increase in the homogenization of the filament mass composition, with concurrent increases in absorption in Halpha and He I and in the level of activity, all starting at least one day prior to eruption. This finding suggests that a prolonged period of mass motions, compositional mixing, and possibly even extensive mass loading is occurring during the build up of these eruptions.

  19. Quiet-sun Intensity Contrasts in the Near-ultraviolet as Measured from SUNRISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Schüssler, M.; Borrero, J. M.; Afram, N.; Unruh, Y. C.; Berdyugina, S. V.; Gandorfer, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Bonet, J. A.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Berkefeld, T.; Knölker, M.; Schmidt, W.; Title, A. M.

    2010-11-01

    We present high-resolution images of the Sun in the near-ultraviolet spectral range between 214 nm and 397 nm as obtained from the first science flight of the 1 m SUNRISE balloon-borne solar telescope. The quiet-Sun rms intensity contrasts found in this wavelength range are among the highest values ever obtained for quiet-Sun solar surface structures—up to 32.8% at a wavelength of 214 nm. We compare the rms contrasts obtained from the observational data with theoretical intensity contrasts obtained from numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations. For 388 nm and 312 nm the observations agree well with the numerical simulations whereas at shorter wavelengths discrepancies between observed and simulated contrasts remain.

  20. The elemental and isotopic composition of quiet time low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B.; Mcdonald, F. B.

    1983-01-01

    Isotopic abundances during several periods of solar quiet times are derived from multidimensional analysis of double dE/dX modes made with two 150 micron dE detectors and a 3000 micron stopping E detector. The spectra of the low-energy cosmic rays suggest that all the primary species of elements exhibit flux enhancements. The flux increases of 5-12 MeV/N for C, Mg, Si, and Fe are different from the anomalous components and may result from solar contamination of the quiet time data or from interplanetary acceleration processes. They may be anomalous components (ACR), although to a lesser extent than He, N, O, and Ne. The isotopic data indicate that the ACR component is predominantly N-14, O-16, and Ne-20. The isotopic compositions require that the ACRs have traversed a very limited amount of material, suggesting a local origin for them.

  1. QUIET-SUN INTENSITY CONTRASTS IN THE NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET AS MEASURED FROM SUNRISE

    SciTech Connect

    Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Riethmueller, T. L.; Schuessler, M.; Borrero, J. M.; Gandorfer, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Afram, N.; Unruh, Y. C.; Berdyugina, S. V.; Berkefeld, T.; Schmidt, W.; Bonet, J. A.; MartInez Pillet, V.; Knoelker, M.; Title, A. M.

    2010-11-10

    We present high-resolution images of the Sun in the near-ultraviolet spectral range between 214 nm and 397 nm as obtained from the first science flight of the 1 m SUNRISE balloon-borne solar telescope. The quiet-Sun rms intensity contrasts found in this wavelength range are among the highest values ever obtained for quiet-Sun solar surface structures-up to 32.8% at a wavelength of 214 nm. We compare the rms contrasts obtained from the observational data with theoretical intensity contrasts obtained from numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations. For 388 nm and 312 nm the observations agree well with the numerical simulations whereas at shorter wavelengths discrepancies between observed and simulated contrasts remain.

  2. Densities in the quiet sun and coronal holes using EUV emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    1989-03-01

    The density dependence of solar EUV line intensity ratios from Mg VIII, Si VII, S IX and Si IX ions have been used to determine electron densities in the quiet sun and coronal holes. The line intensity values have been computed using a model atmosphere of Kopp and Orrall (1976) in order to emphasize the utility of the lines studied which could be compared with observational data that future missions might provide.

  3. Determining Orientation in Radio-Quiet Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotherton, Michael S.; Singh, Vikram; Runnoe, Jessie C.

    2016-01-01

    We present further steps developing an orientation indicator based on optical parameters that can be used for radio-quiet quasars. We recently demonstrated that the ratio of orientation-biased black hole mass calculated using the velocity width of Hbeta to the orientation-unbiased black hole mass calculated using the stellar velocity dispersion correlates with radio-loud orientation indicators, albeit with significant scatter. Our new work eliminates or reduces some sources of scatter to improve the significance of the correlation and to produce a better predictive prescription. Beyond biasing some mass measurements, orientation also affects luminosity determinations, and in turn estimates of the Eddington fraction, as well as luminosity functions, and other quasar properties. A practical radio-quiet orientation indicator for quasars is overdue.

  4. 3D Radiative MHD Modeling of Quiet-Sun Magnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitiashvili, Irina

    2016-05-01

    Quiet-Sun regions that cover most of the solar surface represent a background state that plays an extremely important role in the dynamics and energetics of the solar atmosphere. A clear understanding of these regions is required for accurate interpretation of solar activity events such as emergence of magnetic flux, sunspot formation, and eruptive dynamics. Modern high-resolution observations from ground and space telescopes have revealed a complicated dynamics of turbulent magnetoconvection and its effects in the solar atmosphere and corona, showing intense interactions across different temporal and spatial scales. Interpretation of the observed complex phenomena and understanding of their origins is impossible without advanced numerical models. I will present new results of realistic-type 3D radiative MHD simulations of the upper turbulent convective layer and atmosphere of the Sun. The results reveal the mechanism of formation and properties of the Sun’s “magnetic carpet” controlled by subsurface small-scale dynamo processes, and demonstrate interaction between the subsurface layers and the atmosphere via spontaneous small-scale eruptions and wave phenomena. To link the simulations to solar data the spectro-polarimetric radiative transfer code SPINOR is used to convert the simulated data into the Stokes profiles of various spectral lines, including the SDO and Hinode observables. The results provide a detailed physical understanding of the quiet-Sun dynamics, and show potential for future observations with the DKIST and other large solar telescopes.

  5. Mideast stays quiet but has vigor

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    New drilling activity in the Middle East comes in the Egyptian Red Sea and at both Yemen and Qatar. The last in the scene of the giant North Dome gas development. Otherwise the Mideast sector is quiet with hard production ceilings demanded by OPEC and a war on the east coast of the gulf causing more confusion. A review of the current activity is presented.

  6. BUY QUIET INITIATIVE IN THE USA

    PubMed Central

    Beamer, Bryan; McCleery, Trudi; Hayden, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is still considered one of the most common work-related illnesses in the United States of America. The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health launched a national Buy Quiet campaign to raise awareness of the importance of purchasing quieter equipment. Buy Quiet encourages companies to seek out and demand quieter equipment thus driving the market to design and create quieter products. In the long run, investment in noise controls should be more prevalent as the market demands quieter products. This paradigm occurs as the market for quieter products expands both from the supply side (manufacturers) and the demand side (tool and equipment purchasers). The key to experiencing the reduced costs and increased benefits of Buy Quiet will be to develop partnerships between manufacturers and consumers. To this end, the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health continues to work with partners to educate stakeholders about the risks and true costs of noise-induced hearing loss, as well as the economic benefits of buying quieter equipment. PMID:27274613

  7. EXCITATION OF ACOUSTIC WAVES BY VORTICES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.

    2011-02-01

    The five-minute oscillations are one of the basic properties of solar convection. Observations show a mixture of a large number of acoustic wave fronts propagating from their sources. We investigate the process of acoustic waves excitation from the point of view of individual events, by using a realistic three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamic simulation of the quiet Sun. The results show that the excitation events are related to the dynamics of vortex tubes (or swirls) in intergranular lanes of solar convection. These whirlpool-like flows are characterized by very strong horizontal velocities (7-11 km s{sup -1}) and downflows ({approx}7 km s{sup -1}), and are accompanied by strong decreases of temperature, density, and pressure at the surface and 0.5-1 Mm below the surface. High-speed whirlpool flows can attract and capture other vortices. According to our simulation results the processes of vortex interaction, such as vortex annihilation, can cause excitation of acoustic waves on the Sun.

  8. Low-latitude Pi2 pulsations during intervals of quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp≤1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H.-J.; Kim, K.-H.; Jun, C.-W.; Takahashi, K.; Lee, D.-H.; Lee, E.; Jin, H.; Seon, J.; Park, Y.-D.; Hwang, J.

    2013-10-01

    It has been reported that Pi2 pulsations can be excited under extremely quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp=0). However, there have been few comprehensive reports of Pi2 pulsations in such a near ground state magnetosphere. To understand the characteristics of quiet-time Pi2 pulsations, we statistically examined Pi2 events observed on the nightside between 1800 and 0600 local time at the low-latitude Bohyun (BOH, L = 1.35) station in South Korea. We chose year 2008 for analysis because geomagnetic activity was unusually low in that year. A total of 982 Pi2 events were identified when Kp≤1. About 80% of the Pi2 pulsations had a period between 110 and 300 s, which significantly differs from the conventional Pi2 period from 40 to 150 s. Comparing Pi2 periods and solar wind conditions, we found that Pi2 periods decrease with increasing solar wind speed, consistent with the result of Troitskaya (1967). The observed wave properties are discussed in terms of plasmaspheric resonance, which has been proposed for Pi2 pulsations in the inner magnetosphere. We also found that Pi2 pulsations occur quasi-periodically with a repetition period of ˜23-38 min. We will discuss what determines such a recurrence time of Pi2 pulsations under quiet geomagnetic conditions.

  9. Combining quiet- and disturbance-hmF2 models to provide a forecasting tool for hmF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdaleno, Sergio; Blanch, Estefanía.; Herraiz, Miguel; Altadill, David; de La Morena, Benito

    2010-05-01

    The quiet behavior of the ionospheric electron density peak height of the F2 region, hmF2, at mid latitude has been evaluated from average electron density profiles providing more reliable hmF2 measurement than converting hmF2 from M(3000)F2. A model temporal extent has been obtained by considering the daily and seasonal variations and the solar activity influence on them. The quiet-hmF2 model provides better performance than current IRI does. A disturbance-hmF2 model has been added to the quiet-hmF2 providing a forecasting tool for hmF2 in response to the configuration and variation of the interplanetary magnetic field. The performance of this tool under particular events will be presented.

  10. Design of Quiet Rotorcraft Approach Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Burley, Casey L.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    A optimization procedure for identifying quiet rotorcraft approach trajectories is proposed and demonstrated. The procedure employs a multi-objective genetic algorithm in order to reduce noise and create approach paths that will be acceptable to pilots and passengers. The concept is demonstrated by application to two different helicopters. The optimized paths are compared with one another and to a standard 6-deg approach path. The two demonstration cases validate the optimization procedure but highlight the need for improved noise prediction techniques and for additional rotorcraft acoustic data sets.

  11. The quiet revolution of numerical weather prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Peter; Thorpe, Alan; Brunet, Gilbert

    2015-09-01

    Advances in numerical weather prediction represent a quiet revolution because they have resulted from a steady accumulation of scientific knowledge and technological advances over many years that, with only a few exceptions, have not been associated with the aura of fundamental physics breakthroughs. Nonetheless, the impact of numerical weather prediction is among the greatest of any area of physical science. As a computational problem, global weather prediction is comparable to the simulation of the human brain and of the evolution of the early Universe, and it is performed every day at major operational centres across the world.

  12. 49 CFR 222.38 - Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region... § 222.38 Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region? Public authorities that are eligible to establish quiet zones under this part may create New Quiet Zones or New Partial Quiet Zones in the...

  13. 49 CFR 222.38 - Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region... § 222.38 Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region? Public authorities that are eligible to establish quiet zones under this part may create New Quiet Zones or New Partial Quiet Zones in the...

  14. 49 CFR 222.38 - Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region... § 222.38 Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region? Public authorities that are eligible to establish quiet zones under this part may create New Quiet Zones or New Partial Quiet Zones in the...

  15. 49 CFR 222.38 - Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region... § 222.38 Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region? Public authorities that are eligible to establish quiet zones under this part may create New Quiet Zones or New Partial Quiet Zones in the...

  16. 49 CFR 222.38 - Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region... § 222.38 Can a quiet zone be created in the Chicago Region? Public authorities that are eligible to establish quiet zones under this part may create New Quiet Zones or New Partial Quiet Zones in the...

  17. Quiet Sun Explosive Events: Jets, Splashes, and Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innes, D. E.; Teriaca, L.

    2013-02-01

    Explosive events appear as broad non-Gaussian wings in the line profiles of small transition-region phenomena. Images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) give a first view of the plasma dynamics at the sites of explosive events seen simultaneously in O vi spectra of a region of quiet Sun, taken with the ultraviolet spectrometer Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Distinct event bursts were seen either at the junction of supergranular network cells or near emerging flux. Three are described in the context of their surrounding transition region (304 Å) and coronal (171 Å) activity. One showed plasma ejections from an isolated pair of sites, with a time lag of 50 seconds between events. At the site where the later explosive event was seen, the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images show a hot core surrounded by a small, expanding ring of chromospheric emission, which we interpret as a "splash." The second explosive-event burst was related to flux cancellation, inferred from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) magnetograms, and a coronal dimming surrounded by a ring of bright EUV emission with explosive events at positions where the spectrometer slit crossed the bright ring. The third series of events occurred at the base of a slow, small coronal mass ejection (mini-CME). All events studied here imply jet-like flows probably triggered by magnetic reconnection at supergranular junctions. Events come from sites close to the footpoints of jets seen in Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) images, and possibly from the landing site of high-velocity flows. They are not caused by rapid rotation in spicules.

  18. Microwave properties of a quiet sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J.

    1985-01-01

    The microwave flux responses of a quiet sea are observed at five microwave frequencies and with both horizontal and vertical polarizations at each frequency--a simultaneous 10 channel receiving system. The measurements are taken from Earth orbit with an articulating antenna. The 10 channel responses are taken simultaneously since they share a common articulating collector with a multifrequency feed. The plotted flux responses show: (1) the effects of the relative, on-axis-gain of the collecting aperture for each frequency; (2) the effects of polarization rotation in the output responses of the receive when the collecting aperture mechanically rotates about a feed that is fixed; (3) the difference between the flux magnitudes for the horizontal and vertical channels, at each of the five frequencies, and for each pointing position, over a 44 degree scan angle; and (4) the RMS value of the clutter--as reckoned over the interval of a full swath for each of the 10 channels. The clutter is derived from the standard error of estimate of the plotted swath response for each channel. The expected value of the background temperature is computed for each of the three quiet seas. The background temperature includes contributions from the cosmic background, the downwelling path, the sea surface, and the upwelling path.

  19. Electron density profiles in the quiet lower ionosphere based on the results of modeling and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, V.; Osepian, A.; Dalin, P.; Kirkwood, S.

    2012-09-01

    The theoretical PGI (Polar Geophysical Institute) model for the quiet lower ionosphere has been applied for computing the ionization rate and electron density profiles in the summer and winter D-region at solar zenith angles less than 80° and larger than 99° under steady state conditions. In order to minimize possible errors in estimation of ionization rates provided by solar electromagnetic radiation and to obtain the most exact values of electron density, each wavelength range of the solar spectrum has been divided into several intervals and the relations between the solar radiation intensity at these wavelengths and the solar activity index F10.7 have been incorporated into the model. Influence of minor neutral species (NO, H2O, O, O3) concentrations on the electron number density at different altitudes of the sunlit quiet D-region has been examined. The results demonstrate that at altitudes above 70 km, the modeled electron density is most sensitive to variations of nitric oxide concentration. Changes of water vapor concentration in the whole altitude range of the mesosphere influence the electron density only in the narrow height interval 73-85 km. The effect of the change of atomic oxygen and ozone concentration is the least significant and takes place only below 70 km. Model responses to changes of the solar zenith angle, solar activity (low-high) and season (summer-winter) have been considered. Modeled electron density profiles have been evaluated by comparison with experimental profiles available from the rocket measurements for the same conditions. It is demonstrated that the theoretical model for the quiet lower ionosphere is quite effective in describing variations in ionization rate, electron number density and effective recombination coefficient as functions of solar zenith angle, solar activity and season. The model may be used for solving inverse tasks, in particular, for estimations of nitric oxide concentration in the mesosphere.

  20. The "Quiet" Troubles of Low-Income Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissbourd, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Most of the troubles poor at-risk children have are not "loud" problems like disruptive behavior or gang involvement. They are "quiet." The range of these problems is vast. Hunger, dehydration, asthma, obesity, and hearing problems can all insidiously trip children up in school. Some quiet problems are psychological--depression, anxiety, the fear…

  1. Mired in the Shadows: Quiet Students in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Greg; Bell, James

    2011-01-01

    Quiet students are a feature of the organisation of secondary schools. Using qualitative methods and Deleuzean conceptualisations of modern subjectivity, this paper explores the ways that quiet students negotiate the terrain of their school. These negotiations often seem to produce a self that is trapped rather than a subject who seizes…

  2. Quiet swimming at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Anders; Wadhwa, Navish; Kiorboe, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Planktonic organisms that inhabit the water masses of the oceans are faced with a dilemma: They need to swim to find food and mates, but by swimming they inevitably create flow disturbances that attract predators. We discuss that planktonic swimmers can reduce the flow disturbances due to their swimming, simply by appropriately arranging their propulsion apparatus. Motivated by recent experiments, we demonstrate that a three-Stokeslet model of a breast stroke swimmer is an example of a quiet swimmer. We show that the flow disturbances around the organism in both the near field and the far field are small in comparison with simple pullers and pushers, and we find that the far field power laws are valid surprisingly close to the organism. Breast stroke swimming may thus be advantageous, and this might explain why it is very common in the world of the plankton.

  3. Some effects of quiet geomagnetic field changes upon values used for main field modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of three methods of data selection upon the assumed main field levels for geomagnetic observatory records used in main field modeling were investigated for a year of very low solar-terrestrial activity. The first method concerned the differences between the year's average of quiet day field values and the average of all values during the year. For H these differences were 2-3 gammas, for D they were -0.04 to -0.12???, for Z the differences were negligible. The second method of selection concerned the effects of the daytime internal Sq variations upon the daily mean values of field. The midnight field levels when the Sq currents were a minimum deviated from the daily mean levels by as much as 4-7 gammas in H and Z but were negligible for D. The third method of selection was designed to avoid the annual and semi-annual quiet level changes of field caused by the seasonal changes in the magnetosphere. Contributions from these changes were found to be as much as 4-7 gammas in quiet years and expected to be greater than 10 gammas in active years. Suggestions for improved methods of improved data selection in main field modeling are given. ?? 1987.

  4. An alternative way to identify local geomagnetically quiet days: a case study using wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klausner, Virginia; Reinaldo Rodriguez Papa, Andrés; Cândido, Cláudia Maria Nicole; Oliveira Domingues, Margarete; Mendes, Odim

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a new method to evaluate geomagnetic activity based on wavelet analysis during the solar minimum activity (2007). In order to accomplish this task, a newly developed algorithm called effectiveness wavelet coefficient (EWC) was applied. Furthermore, a comparison between the 5 geomagnetically quiet days determined by the Kp-based method and by wavelet-based method was performed. This paper provides a new insight since the geomagnetic activity indexes are mostly designed to quantify the extent of disturbance rather than the quietness. The results suggest that the EWC can be used as an alternative tool to accurately detect quiet days, and consequently, it can also be used as an alternative to determine the Sq baseline to the current Kp-based 5 quietest days method. Another important aspect of this paper is that most of the quietest local wavelet candidate days occurred in an interval 2 days prior to the high-speed-stream-driven storm events. In other words, the EWC algorithm may potentially be used to detect the quietest magnetic activity that tends to occur just before the arrival of high-speed-stream-driven storms.

  5. CORONAL SEISMOLOGY USING EIT WAVES: ESTIMATION OF THE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    West, M. J.; Zhukov, A. N.; Dolla, L.; Rodriguez, L.

    2011-04-01

    Coronal EIT waves have been observed for many years. The nature of EIT waves is still contentious, however, there is strong evidence that some of them might be fast magnetosonic waves, or at least have a fast magnetosonic wave component. The fast magnetosonic wave speed is formed from two components; the Alfven speed (magnetic) and the sound speed (thermal). By making measurements of the wave speed, coronal density and temperature it is possible to calculate the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field strength through coronal seismology. In this paper, we investigate an EIT wave observed on 2009 February 13 by the SECCHI/EUVI instruments on board the STEREO satellites. The wave epicenter was observed at disk center in the STEREO B (Behind) satellite. At this time, the STEREO satellites were separated by approximately 90 deg., and as a consequence the STEREO A (Ahead) satellite observed the wave on the solar limb. These observations allowed us to make accurate speed measurements of the wave. The background coronal density was derived through Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations of the quiet Sun and the temperature was estimated through the narrow temperature response in the EUVI bandpasses. The density, temperature, and speed measurements allowed us to estimate the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field strength to be approximately 0.7 {+-} 0.7 G.

  6. Quiet Sun coronal heating: A statistical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnoselskikh, V.; Podladchikova, O.; Lefebvre, B.; Vilmer, N.

    2002-02-01

    Recent observations of Krucker & Benz (\\cite{Krucker98}) give strong support to Parker's hypothesis (\\cite∥) that small-scale dissipative events make up the main contribution to quiet Sun coronal heating. They also showed that these small-scale events are associated not only with the magnetic network, but also with the cell interiors (Benz & Krucker \\cite{Benz98}). Taking into account in addition the results of the analysis performed by Priest with co-authors (\\cite{pr1}) who demonstrated that the heating is quasi-homogeneous along the arcs, we come to the conclusion that the sources driving these dissipative events are also small-scale sources. Typically they are of the order of or smaller than the linear scale of the events observed, that is <2000 km. To describe statistical properties of quiet Sun corona heating by microflares, nanoflares, and even smaller events, we consider a cellular automata model subject to uniform small-scale driving and dissipation. The model consists of two elements, the magnetic field source supposed to be associated with the small scale hydrodynamic turbulence convected from the photosphere and local dissipation of small scale currents. The dissipation is assumed to be provided by either anomalous resistivity, when the current density exceeds a certain threshold value, or by the magnetic reconnection. The main problem considered is how the statistical characteristics of dissipated energy flow depend upon characteristics of the magnetic field source and on physical mechanism responsible for the magnetic field dissipation. As the threshold value of current is increased, we observe the transition from Gaussian statistics to power-law type. In addition, we find that the dissipation provided by reconnection results in stronger deviations from Gaussian distribution.

  7. HF radar observations of ionospheric backscatter during geomagnetically quiet periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, T. A.; Makarevich, R. A.; Devlin, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    The quiet-time coherent backscatter from the F-region observed by the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER) Bruny Island HF radar is analysed statistically in order to determine typical trends and controlling factors in the ionospheric echo occurrence. A comparison of the F-region peak density values from the IRI-2007 model and ionosonde measurements in the vicinity of the radar's footprint shows a very good agreement, particularly at subauroral and auroral latitudes, and model densities within the radar's footprint are used in the following analyses. The occurrence of F-region backscatter is shown to exhibit distinct diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle variations and these are compared with model trends in the F-region peak electron density and Pedersen conductance of the underlying ionosphere. The solar cycle effects in occurrence are demonstrated to be strong and more complex than a simple proportionality on a year-to-year basis. The diurnal and seasonal effects are strongly coupled to each other, with diurnal trends exhibiting a systematic gradual variation from month to month that can be explained when both electron density and conductance trends are considered. During the night, the echo occurrence is suggested to be controlled directly by the density conditions, with a direct proportionality observed between the occurrence and peak electron density. During the day, the echo occurrence appears to be controlled by both conductance and propagation conditions. It is shown that the range of echo occurrence values is smaller for larger conductances and that the electron density determines what value the echo occurrence takes in that range. These results suggest that the irregularity production rates are significantly reduced by the highly conducting E layer during the day while F-region density effects dominate during the night.

  8. Response of Granulation to Small-scale Bright Features in the Quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anđić, A.; Chae, J.; Goode, P. R.; Cao, W.; Ahn, K.; Yurchyshyn, V.; Abramenko, V.

    2011-04-01

    We detected 2.8 bright points (BPs) per Mm2 in the quiet Sun with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, using the TiO 705.68 nm spectral line at an angular resolution ~0farcs1 to obtain a 30 minute data sequence. Some BPs formed knots that were stable in time and influenced the properties of the granulation pattern around them. The observed granulation pattern within ~3'' of knots presents smaller granules than those observed in a normal granulation pattern, i.e., around the knots a suppressed convection is detected. Observed BPs covered ~5% of the solar surface and were not homogeneously distributed. BPs had an average size of 0farcs22, they were detectable for 4.28 minutes on average, and had an averaged contrast of 0.1% in the deep red TiO spectral line.

  9. RESPONSE OF GRANULATION TO SMALL-SCALE BRIGHT FEATURES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Andic, A.; Chae, J.; Goode, P. R.; Cao, W.; Ahn, K.; Yurchyshyn, V.; Abramenko, V.

    2011-04-10

    We detected 2.8 bright points (BPs) per Mm{sup 2} in the quiet Sun with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, using the TiO 705.68 nm spectral line at an angular resolution {approx}0.''1 to obtain a 30 minute data sequence. Some BPs formed knots that were stable in time and influenced the properties of the granulation pattern around them. The observed granulation pattern within {approx}3'' of knots presents smaller granules than those observed in a normal granulation pattern, i.e., around the knots a suppressed convection is detected. Observed BPs covered {approx}5% of the solar surface and were not homogeneously distributed. BPs had an average size of 0.''22, they were detectable for 4.28 minutes on average, and had an averaged contrast of 0.1% in the deep red TiO spectral line.

  10. SOHO reveals violent action on the quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-05-01

    SOHO's scientists are impressed by the vigorous action that they see going on every day, because the Sun is in the very quietest phase of its eleven-year cycle of activity. To ground-based observatories it appears extremely calm just now. The early indications of SOHO's performance amply justify the creation of a sungazing spacecraft capable of observing ultraviolet emissions that are blotted out by the Earth's atmosphere. Apart from the imager, two ultraviolet spectrometers and an ultraviolet coronagraph (an imager for the outer atmosphere) are busy analysing the violent processes at a wide range of wavelengths. Between them, these instruments should cure long-lasting ignorance concerning the Sun, especially about why the atmosphere is so hot and what drives the solar wind that blows non-stop into the Solar System. Scientists from other experimental teams use SOHO to explore the Sun from its deep interior to the far reaches of the solar wind. They have watched the supposedly quiet Sun belching huge masses of gas into space. They have mapped a hole burnt by the solar wind in a breeze of gas coming from the stars. And they have detected currents of gas flowing just below the visible surface. SOHO is a project of international cooperation between the European Space Agency and NASA. The spacecraft was built in Europe and instrumented by scientists on both sides of the Atlantic. NASA launched SOHO on 2 December 1995, and also provides the ground stations and an operations centre near Washington. The first results are the more remarkable because SOHO arrived at its vantage point 1,500,000 kilometres out in space only in February, and formally completed its commissioning on 16 April. It has a long life ahead of it. All scientific instruments are working well. The luminosity oscillation imager belonging to the VIRGO experiment had trouble with its lens cover. When opened, the cover rebounded on its hinges and closed again. Commands were devised that gave a shorter impulse

  11. Day-To Variability of the Quiet-Time Equatorial Electrojet and Post-Sunset Occurrence of Equatorial Ionospheric Scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Archana; Okpala, Kingsley

    Strength of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) derived from measurements of the horizontal component H of the geomagnetic field at an equatorial station, Tirunelveli, and a low-latitude station Alibag, outside the influence of the EEJ, on International quiet (IQ) days of the years 2001-2005, have been subjected to Principal Component Analysis to determine the principal components (PCs) that describe the variability of the quiet-time EEJ. It is found that the first three PCs together account for 94% of the variability of the EEJ observed during the IQ days of this period. PC1 itself represents about 64% of the EEJ variations, while PC2 and PC3 respectively account for 23% and 7% of the quiet-time variability of the EEJ during these years when the daily adjusted 10.7 cm solar flux, Sa, decreased from values exceeding 200 to around 100. The temporal structure of PC1 is such that it contributes only to the variability of the normal electrojet and cannot explain events such as the counter-electrojet (CEJ). A model is constructed for quiet-day PC1 scores as a function of day number and solar activity to describe a major part of the variability of the normal quiet-time EEJ. However, the CEJ and other 'abnormal' variations such as an afternoon enhancement of the EEJ, are only associated with PC2 and PC3. The quiet-day PC2 and PC3 scores obtained in this study, therefore, indicate the influence of forcing of the equatorial ionosphere from below. The day-to-day variability of the quiet-time pre-reversal enhancement of the post-sunset equatorial F region zonal electric field, which plays a crucial role in the occurrence of scintillation-producing equatorial ionospheric irregularities, is also influenced by forcing from below. In this context, occurrence of scintillations on a 251 MHz signal, transmitted from a geostationary satellite, and recorded at Tirunelveli, is studied in relation to the PC scores, which describe the variability of the EEJ, in order to identify a possible

  12. Overview of the Arizona Quiet Pavement Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donavan, Paul; Scofield, Larry

    2005-09-01

    The Arizona Quiet Pavement Pilot Program (QP3) was initially implemented to reduce highway related traffic noise by overlaying most of the Phoenix metropolitan area Portland cement concrete pavement with a one inch thick asphalt rubber friction coarse. With FHWA support, this program represents the first time that pavement surface type has been allowed as a noise mitigation strategy on federally funded projects. As a condition of using pavement type as a noise mitigation strategy, ADOT developed a ten-year, $3.8 million research program to evaluate the noise reduction performance over time. Historically, pavement surface type was not considered a permanent solution. As a result, the research program was designed to specifically address this issue. Noise performance is being evaluated through three means: (1) conventional roadside testing within the roadway corridor (e.g., far field measurements within the right-of-way) (2) the use of near field measurements, both close proximity (CPX) and sound intensity (SI); and (3) far field measurements obtained beyond the noise barriers within the surrounding neighborhoods. This paper provides an overview of the program development, presents the research conducted to support the decision to overlay the urban freeway, and the status of current research.

  13. Prognostic Analysis of the Tactical Quiet Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, Lee M

    2008-09-01

    The U.S. Army needs prognostic analysis of mission-critical equipment to enable condition-based maintenance before failure. ORNL has developed and patented prognostic technology that quantifies condition change from noisy, multi-channel, time-serial data. This report describes an initial application of ORNL's prognostic technology to the Army's Tactical Quiet Generator (TQG), which is designed to operate continuously at 10 kW. Less-than-full power operation causes unburned fuel to accumulate on internal components, thereby degrading operation and eventually leading to failure. The first objective of this work was identification of easily-acquired, process-indicative data. Two types of appropriate data were identified, namely output-electrical current and voltage, plus tri-axial acceleration (vibration). The second objective of this work was data quality analysis to avoid the garbage-in-garbage-out syndrome. Quality analysis identified more than 10% of the current data as having consecutive values that are constant, or that saturate at an extreme value. Consequently, the electrical data were not analyzed further. The third objective was condition-change analysis to indicate operational stress under non-ideal operation and machine degradation in proportion to the operational stress. Application of ORNL's novel phase-space dissimilarity measures to the vibration power quantified the rising operational stress in direct proportion to the less-than-full-load power. We conclude that ORNL's technology is an excellent candidate to meet the U.S. Army's need for equipment prognostication.

  14. Quiet swimming at low Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Anders; Wadhwa, Navish; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The stresslet provides a simple model of the flow created by a small, freely swimming and neutrally buoyant aquatic organism and shows that the far field fluid disturbance created by such an organism in general decays as one over distance squared. Here we discuss a quieter swimming mode that eliminates the stresslet component of the flow and leads to a faster spatial decay of the fluid disturbance described by a force quadrupole that decays as one over distance cubed. Motivated by recent experimental results on fluid disturbances due to small aquatic organisms, we demonstrate that a three-Stokeslet model of a swimming organism which uses breast stroke type kinematics is an example of such a quiet swimmer. We show that the fluid disturbance in both the near field and the far field is significantly reduced by appropriately arranging the propulsion apparatus, and we find that the far field power laws are valid surprisingly close to the organism. Finally, we discuss point force models as a general framework for hypothesis generation and experimental exploration of fluid mediated predator-prey interactions in the planktonic world. PMID:25974532

  15. 49 CFR 222.51 - Under what conditions will quiet zone status be terminated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Quiet Zones § 222.51 Under what conditions will quiet zone status be terminated? (a) New Quiet Zones... under 49 U.S.C. 20104 and 49 CFR part 211. (d) Termination by the public authority. (1) Any public... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Under what conditions will quiet zone status...

  16. 49 CFR 222.51 - Under what conditions will quiet zone status be terminated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Quiet Zones § 222.51 Under what conditions will quiet zone status be terminated? (a) New Quiet Zones... under 49 U.S.C. 20104 and 49 CFR part 211. (d) Termination by the public authority. (1) Any public... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Under what conditions will quiet zone status...

  17. 49 CFR 222.51 - Under what conditions will quiet zone status be terminated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Quiet Zones § 222.51 Under what conditions will quiet zone status be terminated? (a) New Quiet Zones... under 49 U.S.C. 20104 and 49 CFR part 211. (d) Termination by the public authority. (1) Any public... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Under what conditions will quiet zone status...

  18. 49 CFR 222.51 - Under what conditions will quiet zone status be terminated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-Quiet Zones § 222.51 Under what conditions will quiet zone status be terminated? (a) New Quiet Zones... under 49 U.S.C. 20104 and 49 CFR part 211. (d) Termination by the public authority. (1) Any public... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Under what conditions will quiet zone status...

  19. 49 CFR 222.51 - Under what conditions will quiet zone status be terminated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Quiet Zones § 222.51 Under what conditions will quiet zone status be terminated? (a) New Quiet Zones... under 49 U.S.C. 20104 and 49 CFR part 211. (d) Termination by the public authority. (1) Any public... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Under what conditions will quiet zone status...

  20. Study of quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short haul transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, T. P.; Stout, E. G.; Sweet, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    A study of quiet turbofan short takeoff aircraft for short haul air transportation was conducted. The objectives of the study were to: (1) define representative aircraft configurations, characteristics, and costs associated with their development, (2) identify critical technology and technology related problems to be resolved in successful introduction of representative short haul aircraft, (3) determine relationships between quiet short takeoff aircraft and the economic and social viability of short haul, and (4) identify high payoff technology areas.

  1. Quiet Spike (TM) Build-Up Ground Vibration Testing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Natalie D.; Herrera, Claudia; Truax, Roger; Pak, Chan-gi; Freund, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Flight tests of Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation s Quiet Spike(TM) hardware were recently completed on the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center F-15B airplane. NASA Dryden uses a modified F-15B airplane as a testbed aircraft to cost-effectively fly flight research experiments that are typically mounted underneath the F-15B airplane, along the fuselage centerline. For the Quiet Spike(TM) experiment, however, instead of a centerline mounting, a relatively long forward-pointing boom was attached to the radar bulkhead of the F-15B airplane. The Quiet Spike(TM) experiment is a stepping-stone to airframe structural morphing technologies designed to mitigate the sonic-boom strength of business jets over land. The Quiet Spike(TM) boom is a concept in which an aircraft's noseboom would be extended prior to supersonic acceleration. This morphing effectively lengthens the aircraft, thus reducing the peak sonic-boom amplitude, but is also expected to partition the otherwise strong bow shock into a series of reduced-strength, noncoalescing shocklets. Prior to flying the Quiet Spike(TM) experiment on the F-15B airplane several ground vibration tests were required to understand the Quiet Spike(TM) modal characteristics and coupling effects with the F-15B airplane. However, due to the flight hardware availability and compressed schedule requirements, a "traditional" ground vibration test of the mated F-15B Quiet Spike(TM) ready-for-flight configuration did not leave sufficient time available for the finite element model update and flutter analyses before flight testing. Therefore, a "nontraditional" ground vibration testing approach was taken. This paper provides an overview of each phase of the "nontraditional" ground vibration testing completed for the Quiet Spike(TM) project which includes the test setup details, instrumentation layout, and modal results obtained in support of the structural dynamic modeling and flutter analyses.

  2. Aurora at quiet magnetospheric conditions: Repeatability and dipole tilt angle dependence. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Oznovich, I.; Eastes, R.W.; Huffman, R.E.; Tur, M.; Glaser, I.

    1993-03-01

    Is there a magnetospheric ground state? Do the position and size of the auroral oval depend on the magnetic dipole tilt angle at quiet magnetospheric conditions? In order to address these questions, northern hemisphere images of the aurora at 1356 A, obtained by Polar BEAR at solar minimum (beginning of 1987), were related to high temporal resolution IMP 8 measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field, to solar wind velocity, and to the ground-based activity index Kp. The first problem was addressed by a two-dimensional correlation study of the repeatability of auroral emissions in corrected geomagnetic space at conditions of minimum energy transfer from the magnetosphere. The correlation measure of auroral images was 0.6--0.85. Error simulations indicate that given the uncertainties in pixel position and intensity, the maximum expected value of the correlation measure is 0.65-0.9. The notion of a ground state magnetosphere is therefore supported by this data. Repeatability was found at the same level regardless of time or reconfigurations of the magnetosphere between images and independent of magnetic time sector. The second problem was addressed by relating latitudinal shifts of the aurora with dipole tilt angle without resorting to auroral boundary specification. The authors data indicate that the latitude of the continuous aurora is related to the dipole tilt angle at quiet magnetospheric conditions. In the winter hemisphere a 10 deg increase in the dipole tilt angle causes a 1 deg decrease (increase) in the latitude of auroral emissions at noon (midnight).

  3. Stiffness control of balance in quiet standing.

    PubMed

    Winter, D A; Patla, A E; Prince, F; Ishac, M; Gielo-Perczak, K

    1998-09-01

    Our goal was to provide some insights into how the CNS controls and maintains an upright standing posture, which is an integral part of activities of daily living. Although researchers have used simple performance measures of maintenance of this posture quite effectively in clinical decision making, the mechanisms and control principles involved have not been clear. We propose a relatively simple control scheme for regulation of upright posture that provides almost instantaneous corrective response and reduces the operating demands on the CNS. The analytic model is derived and experimentally validated. A stiffness model was developed for quiet standing. The model assumes that muscles act as springs to cause the center-of-pressure (COP) to move in phase with the center-of-mass (COM) as the body sways about some desired position. In the sagittal plane this stiffness control exists at the ankle plantarflexors, in the frontal plane by the hip abductors/adductors. On the basis of observations that the COP-COM error signal continuously oscillates, it is evident that the inverted pendulum model is severely underdamped, approaching the undamped condition. The spectrum of this error signal is seen to match that of a tuned mass, spring, damper system, and a curve fit of this "tuned circuit" yields omega n the undamped natural frequency of the system. The effective stiffness of the system, Ke, is then estimated from Ke = I omega n2, and the damping B is estimated from B = BW X I, where BW is the bandwidth of the tuned response (in rad/s), and I is the moment of inertia of the body about the ankle joint. Ten adult subjects were assessed while standing quietly at three stance widths: 50% hip-to-hip distance, 100 and 150%. Subjects stood for 2 min in each position with eyes open; the 100% stance width was repeated with eyes closed. In all trials and in both planes, the COP oscillated virtually in phase (within 6 ms) with COM, which was predicted by a simple 0th order spring

  4. Two-Component Fitting of Coronal-Hole and Quiet-Sun He I 1083 Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harrison P.; Malanushenko, Elena V.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present reduction techniques and first results for detailed fitting of solar spectra obtained with the NASA/National Solar Observatory Spectromagnetograph (NASA/NSO SPM over a 2 nm bandpass centered on the He 1 1083 nm line. The observation for this analysis was a spectra-spectroheliogram obtained at the NSO/Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope (KPVT) on 00 Apr 17 at 21:46 UT spanning an area of 512 x 900 arc-seconds; the field of view included a coronal hole near disk center as well as surrounding quiet sun. Since the He I line is very weak and blended with nearby solar and telluric lines, accurate determination of the continuum intensity as a function of wavelength is crucial. We have modified the technique of Malanushenko {\\it et al.) (1992; {\\it AA) (\\bf 259), 567) to tie regions of continuua and the wings of spectral lines which show little variation over the image to standard reference spectra such as the NSO Fourier Transform Spectrometer atlas (Wallace {\\it et al). 1993; NSO Tech Report \\#93-001). We performed detailed least-squares fits of spectra from selected areas, accounting for all the known telluric and solar absorbers in the spectral bandpass. The best physically consistent fits to the Helium lines were obtained with Gaussian profiles from two components (one ''cool'', characteristic of the upper chromosphere; one ''hot'', representing the cool transition region at 2-3 x 10$^{4)$ K). In the coronal hole, the transition-region component, shifted by 6-7 km/s to the blue, is mildly dominant, consistent with mass outflow as suggested by Dupree {\\it et all. (1996; {\\it Ap. J.}-{\\bf 467), 121). In quiet-sun spectra there is less evidence of outward flow, and the chromospheric component is more important. All our fitted spectra show a very weak unidentified absorption feature at 1082.880 nm in the red wing of the nearby Si I line.

  5. Dynamic signatures of quiet sun magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, S. F.

    1983-01-01

    The collision and disappearance of opposite polarity fields is observed most frequently at the borders of network cells. Due to observational limitations, the frequency, magnitude, and spatial distribution of magnetic flux loss have not yet been quantitatively determined at the borders or within the interiors of the cells. However, in agreement with published hypotheses of other authors, the disapperance of magnetic flux is speculated to be a consequence of either gradual or rapid magnetic reconnection which could be the means of converting magnetic energy into the kinetic, thermal, and nonthermal sources of energy for microflares, spicules, the solar wind, and the heating of the solar corona.

  6. First simultaneous SST/CRISP and IRIS observations of a small-scale quiet Sun vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.-H.; Tsiropoula, G.; Kontogiannis, I.; Tziotziou, K.; Scullion, E.; Doyle, J. G.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Ubiquitous small-scale vortices have recently been found in the lower atmosphere of the quiet Sun in state-of-the-art solar observations and in numerical simulations. Aims: We investigate the characteristics and temporal evolution of a granular-scale vortex and its associated upflows through the photosphere and chromosphere of a quiet Sun internetwork region. Methods: We analyzed high spatial and temporal resolution ground- and spaced-based observations of a quiet Sun region. The observations consist of high-cadence time series of wideband and narrowband images of both Hα 6563 Å and Ca II 8542 Å lines obtained with the CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter (CRISP) instrument at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST), as well as ultraviolet imaging and spectral data simultaneously obtained by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Results: A small-scale vortex is observed for the first time simultaneously in Hα, Ca II 8542 Å, and Mg II k lines. During the evolution of the vortex, Hα narrowband images at -0.77 Å and Ca II 8542 Å narrowband images at -0.5 Å, and their corresponding Doppler signal maps, clearly show consecutive high-speed upflow events in the vortex region. These high-speed upflows with a size of 0.5-1 Mm appear in the shape of spiral arms and exhibit two distinctive apparent motions in the plane of sky for a few minutes: (1) a swirling motion with an average speed of 13 km s-1 and (2) an expanding motion at a rate of 4-6 km s-1. Furthermore, the spectral analysis of Mg II k and Mg II subordinate lines in the vortex region indicates an upward velocity of up to ~8 km s-1 along with a higher temperature compared to the nearby quiet Sun chromosphere. Conclusions: The consecutive small-scale vortex events can heat the upper chromosphere by driving continuous high-speed upflows through the lower atmosphere. Movies associated to Figs. 2 and 3 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  7. OBSERVATIONS OF THE INTERACTION OF ACOUSTIC WAVES AND SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN A QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Chitta, Lakshmi Pradeep; Kariyappa, R.; Jain, Rekha; Jefferies, Stuart M. E-mail: rkari@iiap.res.in E-mail: stuartj@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2012-01-10

    The effect of the magnetic field on photospheric intensity and velocity oscillations at the sites of small-scale magnetic fields (SMFs) in a quiet Sun near the solar disk center is studied. We use observations made by the G-band filter in the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode for intensity oscillations; Doppler velocity, magnetic field, and continuum intensity are derived from an Ni I photospheric absorption line at 6767.8 A using the Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Our analysis shows that both the high-resolution intensity observed in the G band and velocity oscillations are influenced by the presence of a magnetic field. While intensity oscillations are suppressed at all frequencies in strong magnetic field regions compared to weak magnetic field regions, velocity oscillations show an enhancement of power in the frequency band 5.5-7 mHz. We find that there is a drop of 20%-30% in the p-mode power of velocity oscillations within the SMFs when compared to the regions surrounding them. Our findings indicate that the nature of the interaction of acoustic waves with the quiet Sun SMFs is similar to that of large-scale magnetic fields in active regions. We also report the first results of the center-to-limb variation of such effects using the observations of the quiet Sun from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The independent verification of these interactions using SDO/HMI suggests that the velocity power drop of 20%-30% in p-modes is fairly constant across the solar disk.

  8. 49 CFR 222.41 - How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Rule Quiet Zone may be established by automatic approval and remain in effect, subject to § 222.51, if the Pre-Rule Quiet Zone is in compliance with §§ 222.35 (minimum requirements for quiet zones) and 222... Zone may be established by automatic approval and remain in effect, subject to § 222.51, if the...

  9. 49 CFR 222.41 - How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Rule Quiet Zone may be established by automatic approval and remain in effect, subject to § 222.51, if the Pre-Rule Quiet Zone is in compliance with §§ 222.35 (minimum requirements for quiet zones) and 222... Zone may be established by automatic approval and remain in effect, subject to § 222.51, if the...

  10. 49 CFR 222.41 - How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-Rule Quiet Zone may be established by automatic approval and remain in effect, subject to § 222.51, if the Pre-Rule Quiet Zone is in compliance with §§ 222.35 (minimum requirements for quiet zones) and 222... Zone may be established by automatic approval and remain in effect, subject to § 222.51, if the...

  11. 49 CFR 222.41 - How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Rule Quiet Zone may be established by automatic approval and remain in effect, subject to § 222.51, if the Pre-Rule Quiet Zone is in compliance with §§ 222.35 (minimum requirements for quiet zones) and 222... Zone may be established by automatic approval and remain in effect, subject to § 222.51, if the...

  12. 49 CFR 222.41 - How does this rule affect Pre-Rule Quiet Zones and Pre-Rule Partial Quiet Zones?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Rule Quiet Zone may be established by automatic approval and remain in effect, subject to § 222.51, if the Pre-Rule Quiet Zone is in compliance with §§ 222.35 (minimum requirements for quiet zones) and 222... Zone may be established by automatic approval and remain in effect, subject to § 222.51, if the...

  13. A novel acoustically quiet coil for neonatal MRI system

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, Christopher M.; Giaquinto, Randy O.; Loew, Wolfgang; Tkach, Jean A.; Pratt, Ronald G.; Kline-Fath, Beth M.; Merhar, Stephanie L.; Dumoulin, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    MRI acoustic exposure has the potential to elicit physiological distress and impact development in preterm and term infants. To mitigate this risk, a novel acoustically quiet coil was developed to reduce the sound pressure level experienced by neonates during MR procedures. The new coil has a conventional high-pass birdcage RF design, but is built on a framework of sound abating material. We evaluated the acoustic and MR imaging performance of the quiet coil and a conventional body coil on two small footprint NICU MRI systems. Sound pressure level and frequency response measurements were made for six standard clinical MR imaging protocols. The average sound pressure level, reported for all six imaging pulse sequences, was 82.2 dBA for the acoustically quiet coil, and 91.1 dBA for the conventional body coil. The sound pressure level values measured for the acoustically quiet coil were consistently lower, 9 dBA (range 6-10 dBA) quieter on average. The acoustic frequency response of the two coils showed a similar harmonic profile for all imaging sequences. However, the amplitude was lower for the quiet coil, by as much as 20 dBA. PMID:26457072

  14. Field Line Resonances in Quiet and Disturbed Time Three-dimensional Magnetospheres

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z. Cheng; S. Zaharia

    2002-05-30

    Numerical solutions for field line resonances (FLR) in the magnetosphere are presented for three-dimensional equilibrium magnetic fields represented by two Euler potentials as B = -j Y -a, where j is the poloidal flux and a is a toroidal angle-like variable. The linearized ideal-MHD equations for FLR harmonics of shear Alfvin waves and slow magnetosonic modes are solved for plasmas with the pressure assumed to be isotropic and constant along a field line. The coupling between the shear Alfvin waves and the slow magnetosonic waves is via the combined effects of geodesic magnetic field curvature and plasma pressure. Numerical solutions of the FLR equations are obtained for a quiet time magnetosphere as well as a disturbed time magnetosphere with a thin current sheet in the near-Earth region. The FLR frequency spectra in the equatorial plane as well as in the auroral latitude are presented. The field line length, magnetic field intensity, plasma beta, geodesic curvature and pressure gradient in the poloidal flux surface are important in determining the FLR frequencies. In general, the computed shear Alfvin FLR frequency based on the full MHD model is larger than that based on the commonly adopted cold plasma model in the beq > 1 region. For the quiet time magnetosphere, the shear Alfvin resonance frequency decreases monotonically with the equatorial field line distance, which reasonably explains the harmonically structured continuous spectrum of the azimuthal magnetic field oscillations as a function of L shell in the L is less than or equal to 9RE region. However, the FLR frequency spectrum for the disturbed time magnetosphere with a near-Earth thin current sheet is substantially different from that for the quiet time magnetosphere for R > 6RE, mainly due to shorter field line length due to magnetic field compression by solar wind, reduced magnetic field intensity in the high-beta current sheet region, azimuthal pressure gradient, and geodesic magnetic field

  15. HOMOLOGOUS CYCLONES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xinting; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Zhang, Yuzong; Yang, Shuhong E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn E-mail: yuzong@nao.cas.cn

    2014-02-20

    Through observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, we tracked one rotating network magnetic field (RNF) near the solar equator. It lasted for more than 100 hr, from 2013 February 23 to 28. During its evolution, three cyclones were found to be rooted in this structure. Each cyclone event lasted for about 8 to 10 hr. While near the polar region, another RNF was investigated. It lasted for a shorter time (∼70 hr), from 2013 July 7 to 9. There were two cyclones rooted in the RNF and each lasted for 8 and 11 hr, respectively. For the two given examples, the cyclones have a similar dynamic evolution, and thus we put forward a new term: homologous cyclones. The detected brightening in AIA 171 Å maps indicates the release of energy, which is potentially available to heat the corona.

  16. The quiet-Sun photosphere and chromosphere.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Robert J

    2012-07-13

    The overall structure and the fine structure of the solar photosphere outside active regions are largely understood, except possibly the important roles of a turbulent near-surface dynamo at its bottom, internal gravity waves at its top and small-scale vorticity. Classical one-dimensional static radiation-escape modelling has been replaced by three-dimensional time-dependent magento-hydrodynamic simulations that come closer to reality. The solar chromosphere, in contrast, remains little understood, although its pivotal role in coronal mass and energy loading makes it a principal research area. Its fine structure defines its overall structure, so that hard-to-observe and hard-to-model small-scale dynamical processes are key to understanding. However, both chromospheric observation and chromospheric simulation presently mature towards the required sophistication. Open-field features seem of greater interest than easier-to-see closed-field features. PMID:22665896

  17. A New Observation of the Quiet Sun Soft X-ray (0.5-5 keV) Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Stone, J.

    2012-12-01

    The solar corona is the brightest source of X-rays in the solar system, and the X-ray emission is highly variable with solar activity. While this is particularly true during solar flares, when emission can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude up to gamma-ray energies, even the so-called "quiet Sun" is bright in soft X-rays (SXRs), as the ~1-2 MK ambient plasma of the corona emits significant thermal bremsstrahlung up to ~5 keV. However, the actual solar SXR (0.5-5 keV) spectrum is not well known, particularly during quiet periods, as, with few exceptions, this energy range has not been systematically studied in many years. Previous observations include ultra-high-resolution but very narrow-band spectra from crystral spectrometers (e.g. Yohkoh/BCS), or integrated broadband irradiances from photometers (e.g. GOES/XRS, TIMED/XPS, etc.) that lack detailed spectral information. In recent years, broadband measurements with fair energy resolution (~0.5-0.7 keV FWHM) were made by SphinX on CORONAS-Photon and XRS on MESSENGER, although they did not extend below ~1 keV. We present observations of the quiet Sun SXR emission obtained using a new SXR spectrometer flown on the third SDO/EVE underflight calibration rocket (NASA 36.286). The commercial off-the-shelf Amptek X123 silicon drift detector, with an 8-micron Be window and custom aperture, measured the solar SXR emission from ~0.5 to >10 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution (though, due to hardware limitations, with only ~0.12 keV binning) and 2-sec cadence over ~5 minutes on 23 June 2012. Despite the rising solar cycle, activity on 23 June 2012 was abnormally low, with no visible active regions and GOES XRS emission near 2010 levels; we measured no solar counts above ~4 keV during the observation period. We compare our X123 measurements with spectra and broadband irradiances from other instruments, including the SphinX observations during the deep solar minimum of 2009, and with upper limits of >3 keV quiet Sun emission

  18. Principal components of quiet time temporal variability of equatorial and low-latitude geomagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Archana; Okpala, Kingsley C.

    2015-10-01

    Diurnal variations of the horizontal component of the geomagnetic field ΔH on International Quiet days of 1999-2012, measured hourly at two stations in the same longitude zone in the Northern Hemisphere, near and away from the dip equator, have been subjected to principal component analysis. This technique is also applied to the difference ΔHEEJ of ΔH at these two stations, which is attributed to the equatorial electrojet (EEJ). The first three principal components, PC1-PC3, account for 91-96% of the variances in the data. Maximum contribution to the quiet day variations in ΔH around its peak in the morning hours at both the stations, and in the EEJ, comes from the day-to-day variation of the amplitude of PC1. Patterns of day-to-day variations of PC1 amplitudes for the equatorial station and the EEJ are essentially semiannual modulated by solar EUV flux, superimposed on a longer timescale solar EUV flux-dependent trend. Contributions from PC2 and to a lesser extent from PC3 are seen to be responsible for the absence of semiannual variations in ΔH in the afternoon hours at the equatorial station. Distribution of amplitudes of PC2 and PC3 for ΔHEEJ for weak electrojet days shows seasonal features in accordance with greater occurrence of afternoon (morning) counter electrojet during June (December) solstice. During the extended solar minimum, PC3 amplitudes for ΔH at the equatorial station and for the EEJ display annual variation. Possible sources for these seasonal features in the variations of equatorial ΔH are discussed.

  19. STUDY OF SINGLE-LOBED CIRCULAR POLARIZATION PROFILES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Sainz Dalda, A.; Martinez-Sykora, J.; Title, A.; Bellot Rubio, L. E-mail: asainz@lmsal.com

    2012-03-20

    The existence of asymmetries in the circular polarization (Stokes V) profiles emerging from the solar photosphere has been known since the 1970s. These profiles require the presence of a velocity gradient along the line of sight (LOS), possibly associated with gradients of magnetic field strength, inclination, and/or azimuth. We have focused our study on the Stokes V profiles showing extreme asymmetry in the form of only one lobe. Using Hinode spectropolarimetric measurements, we have performed a statistical study of the properties of these profiles in the quiet Sun. We show their spatial distribution, their main physical properties, how they are related with several physical observables, and their behavior with respect to their position on the solar disk. The single-lobed Stokes V profiles occupy roughly 2% of the solar surface. For the first time, we have observed their temporal evolution and have retrieved the physical conditions of the atmospheres from which they emerged using an inversion code implementing discontinuities of the atmospheric parameters along the LOS. In addition, we use synthetic Stokes profiles from three-dimensional magnetoconvection simulations to complement the results of the inversion. The main features of the synthetic single-lobed profiles are in general agreement with the observed ones, lending support to the magnetic and dynamic topologies inferred from the inversion. The combination of all these different analyses suggests that most of the single-lobed Stokes V profiles are signals coming from the magnetic flux emergence and/or submergence processes taking place in small patches in the photosphere of the quiet Sun.

  20. Quiet Sonic Booms: A NASA and Industry Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, David Nils; Martin, Roy; Haering, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this Oral Presentation is to present a progress report on NASA and Industry efforts related to Quiet Sonic Boom Program activities. This presentation will review changes in aircraft shaping to produce quiet supersonic booms and associated supersonic flight test methods and results. In addition, new flight test profiles have been recently developed that have allowed for the generation of sonic booms of varying intensity. These new flight test profiles have allowed for ground testing of the response of various building structures to sonic booms and the associated public acceptability to various sonic boom intensities. The new flight test profiles and associated ground measurement test methods will be reviewed. Finally, this Oral Presentation will review the International Regulatory requirements that would be involved to change aviation regulation and allow for overland quiet supersonic flight.

  1. High latitude equivalent current systems during extremely quiet times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostoker, G.; Chen, A. J.; Yasuhara, F.; Akasofu, S.-I.; Kawasaki, K.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic perturbation patterns in the polar cap and auroral zone regions are obtained for extremely quiet days using two different techniques. It is shown that the form of the equivalent current flow pattern is extremely sensitive to the level of quietness, and that even so-called quiet days are at times disturbed by substorm activity. Certain characteristic equivalent flow not typically observed during substorms is noted in the polar cap, and this flow appears to be associated with effects of polar cap perturbations discussed by Svalgaard (1973). A region of equatorward flow at high latitudes near the dawn meridian, appears to be Hall current driven by an eastward electric field. The dayside sub-auroral zone is dominated by the Sq-current system, while the nightside shows no significant current flow in the absence of substorm activity.

  2. Impacts of Extended Periods of Low Solar Activity on Climate (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denig, W. F.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) There has been great interest in determining the length and amplitude of Solar Cycle 24 in recent years, in part due to increasing speculation that the current solar minimum is anomalously quiet and perhaps signaling the beginning of a decreased period of solar activity in the coming decades. We aim to examine the current solar minimum and compare it to previous solar minima in order to: determine if the current minimum shares characteristics with other historically quiet solar minima (sometimes referred to as grand minima); outline the potential consequences of a grand minimum with respect to climate; and predict the future of Solar Cycle 24.

  3. NASA Quiet, Clean General Aviation Turbofan /QCGAT/ program status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresnahan, D. L.; Sievers, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Emissions pollution studies, noise studies, and engine performance studies and their place in QCGAT developmental program status are reported. The Lycoming TFE 731 turbofan engine, the GE T700-GE-700 high bypass ratio turbofan, and the AVCO-Lycoming LTS 101 turboshaft engine are prominent candidates in the tests for urban quiet turbofan service. Two phases in the program are characterized. Engine quieting, polluting emissions abatement, and fuel economies are particularly important for the anticipated rise in number of jet propulsion craft using smaller airports adjacent to communities accustomed to low noise/pollution backgrounds.

  4. Quiet geomagnetic field representation for all days and latitudes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.; Schiffmacher, E.R.; Arora, B.R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a technique for obtaining the quiet-time geomagnetic field variation expected for all days of the year and distribution of latitudes from a limited set of selected quiet days within a year at a discrete set of locations. A data set of observatories near 75??E longitude was used as illustration. The method relies upon spatial smoothing of the decomposed spectral components. An evaluation of the fidelity of the resulting model shows correlation coefficients usually above 0.9 at the lower latitudes and near 0.7 at the higher latitudes with variations identified as dependent upon season and field element. -from Authors

  5. 3D Simulations of the Quiet Sun Radio Emission at Millimeter and Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Luz, V.; Lara, A.; Mendoza, E.; Shimojo, M.

    2008-07-01

    We present 2D projections of 3D simulations of the quiet-sun radio-emission, at different frequencies on the centimeter- submillimeter wavelength range (specifically at 1.4, 3.9, 17, 34, 43, 110, 212 and 250 GHz). We have built a 3D, spherically symmetric, solar model and solved the classical equation of radiative transfer using quiet-sun temperature and electronic density models. We compare our results with Nobeyama Radio Heliograph observations at 17 GHz. The 3.9 and 43 GHz images will be useful to calibrate the observations of the new 5 meter millimeter telescope (RT5) which is going to be installed at "Sierra Negra" Volcano, in the state of Puebla, México, at an altitude of 4,600 m. over the sea level. This project is a collaboration between Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE) and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM).

  6. Milne-Eddington inversion for unresolved magnetic structures in the quiet Sun photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, Véronique

    2016-06-01

    This paper is first devoted to present our method for modeling unresolved magnetic structures in the Milne-Eddington inversion of spectropolarimetric data. The related definitions and other approaches and different used inversion algorithms are recalled for comparison. In a second part, we apply our method to quiet Sun data outside active regions. We obtain the quiet Sun photospheric magnetic field as composed of unresolved opening and connected magnetic flux tubes, which form a loop carpet of field lines. We then analyze the spatial correlation, which we also observed for the magnetic field vector, in terms of flux tube diameter, distance, and field strength. We find that different observations with the Zurich imaging polarimeter and THEMIS polarimeter mounted on the THEMIS telescope give very close results, and we add results also very close derived from HINODE/Solar Optical Telescope/spectropolarimeter observations analyzed with the same method. We obtain a mean flux tube diameter of 30 km, a mean flux tube distance of 230 km, and a mean flux tube magnetic field of 1.3 kG.

  7. Quiet Sun Magnetic Field Evolution Observed with Hinode SOT and IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, C. E.; Bello González, N.; Rezaei, R.

    2016-04-01

    We study two physical processes that can be commonly observed in the quiet sun and involve temporal evolution of the magnetic field: convective collapse and flux cancellation. The aim is to investigate the response of the chromosphere to the magnetic events in the photosphere below. We have calibrated and aligned a co-spatial and co-temporal 3 hour quiet sun time series observed with the Hinode SOT (Solar Optical Telescope) and the IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph) satellites. Convective collapse events are identified in the photosphere by inverting spectropolarimetric data and searching for magnetic field intensification, preceded by a downflow and accompanied by the development of a bright point in Ca II H images. We find a corresponding downflow in the low chromosphere as deduced from IRIS Mg II k and h spectra and an ensuing oscillatory velocity pattern. We use magnetograms in the high photosphere to study pairs of magnetic elements involved in flux cancellation and find an increase in the entire quasi-continuum of the IRIS Mg II k and h spectrum following the flux cancellation process and indicating a substantial energy deposit into the lower atmosphere.

  8. UBIQUITOUS ROTATING NETWORK MAGNETIC FIELDS AND EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET CYCLONES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jun; Liu Yang E-mail: yliu@sun.stanford.edu

    2011-11-01

    We present Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations of EUV cyclones in the quiet Sun. These cyclones are rooted in the rotating network magnetic fields (RNFs). Such cyclones can last several to more than 10 hr and, at the later phase, they are found to be associated with EUV brightenings (microflares) and even EUV waves. SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) observations show a ubiquitous presence of RNFs. Using HMI line-of-sight magnetograms on 2010 July 8, we find 388 RNFs in an area of 800 x 980 arcsec{sup 2} near the disk center where no active region is present. The sense of rotation shows a weak hemisphere preference. The unsigned magnetic flux of the RNFs is about 4.0 x 10{sup 21} Mx, or 78% of the total network flux. These observational phenomena at small scale reported in this Letter are consistent with those at large scale in active regions. The ubiquitous RNFs and EUV cyclones over the quiet Sun may suggest an effective way to heat the corona.

  9. Commission 12: Solar Radiation and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauzzi, Gianna; Shchukina, Nataliya; Kosovichev, Alexander; Bianda, Michele; Brandenburg, Axel; Chou, Dean-Yi; Dasso, Sergio; Ding, Ming-De; Jefferies, Stuart; Krivova, Natalie; Kuznetsov, Vladimir D.; Moreno-Insertis, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Commission 12 of the International Astronomical Union encompasses investigations of the internal structure and dynamics of the Sun, the quiet solar atmosphere, solar radiation and its variability, and the nature of relatively stable magnetic structures like sunspots, faculae and the magnetic network. The Commission sees participation of over 300 scientists worldwide.

  10. Remote Observations of Ion Temperatures in the Quiet Time Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesee, A. M.; Buzulukova, N.; Goldstein, J.; McComas, D. J.; Scime, E. E.; Spence, H.; Fok, M. C.; Tallaksen, K.

    2011-01-01

    Ion temperature analysis of the first energetic neutral atom images of the quiet -time, extended magnetosphere provides evidence of multiple regions of ion heating. This study confirms the existence of a dawn -dusk asymmetry in ion temperature predicted for quiescent magnetospheric conditions by Spence and Kivelson (1993) and demonstrates that it is an inherent magnetospheric feature.

  11. Contemplative Pedagogy: A Quiet Revolution in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajonc, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    During the last fifteen years a quiet pedagogical revolution has taken place in colleges, universities, and community colleges across the United States and increasingly around the world. Often flying under the name "contemplative pedagogy," it offers to its practitioners a wide range of educational methods that support the development of student…

  12. Design note about a 75 KVA quiet power distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, A.T.

    1984-04-05

    This note describes a 75KVA quiet power distribution system for X 653 in neutrino Lab D. It is fed from the regular AC distribution which exists in the building and it has no standby power. Its purpose is to remove electrical disturbances which are present on the regular AC distribution.

  13. On the hazard of quiet vehicles to pedestrians and drivers.

    PubMed

    Wogalter, Michael S; Lim, Raymond W; Nyeste, Patrick G

    2014-09-01

    The need to produce more efficient and less polluting vehicles has encouraged mass production of alternative energy vehicles, such as hybrid and electric cars. Many of these vehicles are capable of very quiet operation. While reducing noise pollution is desirable, quieter vehicles could negatively affect pedestrian safety because of reduced sound cues compared to louder internal combustion engines. Three studies were performed to investigate people's concern about this issue. In Study 1, a questionnaire completed by 378 people showed substantial positive interest in quiet hybrid and electric cars. However, they also indicated concern about the reduced auditory cues of quiet vehicles. In Study 2, 316 participants rated 14 sounds that could be potentially added to quiet alternative-energy vehicles. The data showed that participants did not want annoying sounds, but preferred adding "engine" and "hum" sounds relative to other types of sounds. In Study 3, 24 persons heard and rated 18 actual sounds within 6 categories that were added to a video of a hybrid vehicle driving by. The sounds most preferred were "engine" followed by "white noise" and "hum". Implications for adding sounds to facilitate pedestrians' detection of moving vehicles and for aiding drivers' awareness of speed are discussed. PMID:24035347

  14. The Reform Movement and the Quiet Crisis in Gifted Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renzulli, Joseph S.; Reis, Sally M.

    1991-01-01

    Gifted education faces a quiet crisis as reform movements focus on cosmetic administrative changes in school organization and management rather than interaction among teachers, students, and the material to be learned. Two goals of American education are presented: providing the best possible education to promising students and improving the…

  15. Ionospheric, protonospheric and total electron content in quiet geomagnetic conditions and during geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosikov, Igor; Klimenko, Maxim; Klimenko, Vladimir

    This report presents the results of studies the ionospheric, plasmaspheric and total electron content during recent minimum of solar activity in quiet geomagnetic condition and for geomagnetic storm on 26 September 2011. A comparison of the calculation results obtained using the GSM TIP model, with observational data of the mid- and high-latitude ionospheric sounding stations, as well as estimation of the plasmaspheric reservoir contribution into the total electron content obtained from GPS TEC measurements, COSMIC radio-occultation experiment and incoherent scatter radars were presented. The particular attention is given to the global distribution of the O+/H+ transition height in order to determine the top and low boundary for ionospheric and protonospheric electron content, respectively. This work was supported by Grant of Russian President №МК-4866.2014.5, №14-05-00578, and Program 22 RAS.

  16. SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES OBSERVED ABOVE A QUIET-SUN REGION IN A DARK CAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jiajia; Zhou Zhenjun; Wang Yuming; Liu Rui; Liao Chijian; Shen Chenglong; Zheng Huinan; Miao Bin; Su Zhenpeng; Wang, S.; Wang Bin E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn

    2012-10-20

    Waves play a crucial role in diagnosing the plasma properties of various structures in the solar corona and coronal heating. Slow magnetoacoustic (MA) waves are one of the important types of magnetohydrodynamic waves. In past decades, numerous slow MA waves were detected above active regions and coronal holes, but were rarely found elsewhere. Here, we investigate a 'tornado'-like structure consisting of quasi-periodic streaks within a dark cavity at about 40-110 Mm above a quiet-Sun region on 2011 September 25. Our analysis reveals that these streaks are actually slow MA wave trains. The properties of these wave trains, including phase speed, compression ratio, and kinetic energy density, are similar to those of the reported slow MA waves, except that the period of these waves is about 50 s, much shorter than the typical reported values (3-5 minutes).

  17. Numerical simulations of quiet sun magnetism: On the contribution from a small-scale dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Rempel, M.

    2014-07-10

    We present a series of radiative MHD simulations addressing the origin and distribution of the mixed polarity magnetic field in the solar photosphere. To this end, we consider numerical simulations that cover the uppermost 2-6 Mm of the solar convection zone and we explore scales ranging from 2 km to 25 Mm. We study how the strength and distribution of the magnetic field in the photosphere and subsurface layers depend on resolution, domain size, and boundary conditions. We find that 50% of the magnetic energy at the τ = 1 level comes from fields with the less than 500 G strength and that 50% of the energy resides on scales smaller than about 100 km. While the probability distribution functions are essentially independent of resolution, properly describing the spectral energy distribution requires grid spacings of 8 km or smaller. The formation of flux concentrations in the photosphere exceeding 1 kG requires a mean vertical field strength greater than 30-40 G at τ = 1. The filling factor of kG flux concentrations increases with overall domain size as the magnetic field becomes organized by larger, longer-lived flow structures. A solution with a mean vertical field strength of around 85 G at τ = 1 requires a subsurface rms field strength increasing with depth at the same rate as the equipartition field strength. We consider this an upper limit for the quiet Sun field strength, which implies that most of the convection zone is magnetized close to the equipartition. We discuss these findings in view of recent high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of quiet Sun magnetism.

  18. On the day-to-day variation of the equatorial electrojet during quiet periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Y.; Richmond, A. D.; Maute, A.; Liu, H.-L.; Pedatella, N.; Sassi, F.

    2014-08-01

    It has been known for a long time that the equatorial electrojet varies from day to day even when solar and geomagnetic activities are very low. The quiet time day-to-day variation is considered to be due to irregular variability of the neutral wind, but little is known about how variable winds drive the electrojet variability. We employ a numerical model introduced by Liu et al. (2013), which takes into account weather changes in the lower atmosphere and thus can reproduce ionospheric variability due to forcing from below. The simulation is run for May and June 2009. Constant solar and magnetospheric energy inputs are used so that day-to-day changes will arise only from lower atmospheric forcing. The simulated electrojet current shows day-to-day variability of ±25%, which produces day-to-day variations in ground level geomagnetic perturbations near the magnetic equator. The current system associated with the day-to-day variation of the equatorial electrojet is traced based on a covariance analysis. The current pattern reveals return flow at both sides of the electrojet, in agreement with those inferred from ground-based magnetometer data in previous studies. The day-to-day variation in the electrojet current is compared with those in the neutral wind at various altitudes, latitudes, and longitudes. It is found that the electrojet variability is dominated by the zonal wind at 100-120 km altitudes near the magnetic equator. These results suggest that the response of the zonal polarization electric field to variable zonal winds is the main source of the day-to-day variation of the equatorial electrojet during quiet periods.

  19. The History of a Quiet-Sun Magnetic Element Revealed by IMaX/SUNRISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requerey, Iker S.; Del Toro Iniesta, Jose Carlos; Bellot Rubio, Luis R.; Bonet, José A.; Martínez Pillet, Valentín; Solanki, Sami K.; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Isolated flux tubes are considered to be fundamental magnetic building blocks of the solar photosphere. Their formation is usually attributed to the concentration of magnetic field to kG strengths by the convective collapse mechanism. However, the small size of the magnetic elements in quiet-Sun areas has prevented this scenario from being studied in fully resolved structures. Here, we report on the formation and subsequent evolution of one such photospheric magnetic flux tube, observed in the quiet Sun with unprecedented spatial resolution (0.''15-0.''18) and high temporal cadence (33 s). The observations were acquired by the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment on board the SUNRISE balloon-borne solar observatory. The equipartition field strength magnetic element is the result of the merging of several same polarity magnetic flux patches, including a footpoint of a previously emerged loop. The magnetic structure is then further intensified to kG field strengths by convective collapse. The fine structure found within the flux concentration reveals that the scenario is more complex than can be described by a thin flux tube model with bright points and downflow plumes being established near the edges of the kG magnetic feature. We also observe a daisy-like alignment of surrounding granules and a long-lived inflow toward the magnetic feature. After a subsequent weakening process, the field is again intensified to kG strengths. The area of the magnetic feature is seen to change in anti-phase with the field strength, while the brightness of the bright points and the speed of the downflows varies in phase. We also find a relation between the brightness of the bright point and the presence of upflows within it.

  20. The history of a quiet-sun magnetic element revealed by IMaX/SUNRISE

    SciTech Connect

    Requerey, Iker S.; Del Toro Iniesta, Jose Carlos; Bellot Rubio, Luis R.; Bonet, José A.; Martínez Pillet, Valentín; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Isolated flux tubes are considered to be fundamental magnetic building blocks of the solar photosphere. Their formation is usually attributed to the concentration of magnetic field to kG strengths by the convective collapse mechanism. However, the small size of the magnetic elements in quiet-Sun areas has prevented this scenario from being studied in fully resolved structures. Here, we report on the formation and subsequent evolution of one such photospheric magnetic flux tube, observed in the quiet Sun with unprecedented spatial resolution (0.''15-0.''18) and high temporal cadence (33 s). The observations were acquired by the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment on board the SUNRISE balloon-borne solar observatory. The equipartition field strength magnetic element is the result of the merging of several same polarity magnetic flux patches, including a footpoint of a previously emerged loop. The magnetic structure is then further intensified to kG field strengths by convective collapse. The fine structure found within the flux concentration reveals that the scenario is more complex than can be described by a thin flux tube model with bright points and downflow plumes being established near the edges of the kG magnetic feature. We also observe a daisy-like alignment of surrounding granules and a long-lived inflow toward the magnetic feature. After a subsequent weakening process, the field is again intensified to kG strengths. The area of the magnetic feature is seen to change in anti-phase with the field strength, while the brightness of the bright points and the speed of the downflows varies in phase. We also find a relation between the brightness of the bright point and the presence of upflows within it.

  1. THE STORAGE AND DISSIPATION OF MAGNETIC ENERGY IN THE QUIET SUN CORONA DETERMINED FROM SDO/HMI MAGNETOGRAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, K. A.; Sabol, J.; Mackay, D. H.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    2013-06-20

    In recent years, higher cadence, higher resolution observations have revealed the quiet-Sun photosphere to be complex and rapidly evolving. Since magnetic fields anchored in the photosphere extend up into the solar corona, it is expected that the small-scale coronal magnetic field exhibits similar complexity. For the first time, the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field is continuously evolved through a series of non-potential, quasi-static equilibria, deduced from magnetograms observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, where the photospheric boundary condition which drives the coronal evolution exactly reproduces the observed magnetograms. The build-up, storage, and dissipation of magnetic energy within the simulations is studied. We find that the free magnetic energy built up and stored within the field is sufficient to explain small-scale, impulsive events such as nanoflares. On comparing with coronal images of the same region, the energy storage and dissipation visually reproduces many of the observed features. The results indicate that the complex small-scale magnetic evolution of a large number of magnetic features is a key element in explaining the nature of the solar corona.

  2. ON THE TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF THE DISK COUNTERPART OF TYPE II SPICULES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Sekse, D. H.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; De Pontieu, B.

    2013-02-20

    The newly established type II spicule has been speculated to provide enough hot plasma to play an important role in the mass loading and heating of the solar corona. With the identification of rapid blueshifted excursions (RBEs) as the on-disk counterpart of type II spicules we have analyzed three different high-quality timeseries with the CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter (CRISP) at the Swedish Solar Telescope on La Palma and subjected to an automated detection routine to detect a large number of RBEs for statistical purposes. Our observations are of a quiet-Sun region at disk center and we find lower Doppler velocities, 15-40 km s{sup -1}, and Doppler widths, 2-15 km s{sup -1}, of RBEs than in earlier coronal hole studies, 30-50 km s{sup -1} and 7-23 km s{sup -1}, respectively. In addition, we examine the spatial dependence of Doppler velocities and widths along the RBE axis and conclude that there is no clear trend to this over the field of view or in individual RBEs in the quiet Sun at disk center. These differences with previous coronal hole studies are attributed to the more varying magnetic field configuration in quiet-Sun conditions. Using an extremely high-cadence data set has allowed us to improve greatly on the determination of lifetimes of RBEs, which we find to range from 5 to 60 s with an average lifetime of 30 s, as well as the transverse motions in RBEs, with transverse velocities up to 55 km s{sup -1} and averaging 12 km s{sup -1}. Furthermore, our measurements of the recurrence rates of RBEs provide important new constraints on coronal heating by spicules. We also see many examples of a sinusoidal wave pattern in the transverse motion of RBEs with periods averaging 54 s and amplitudes from 21.5 to 129 km which agrees well with previous studies of wave motion in spicules at the limb. We interpret the appearance of RBEs over their full length within a few seconds as the result of a combination of three kinds of motions as is earlier reported for

  3. Properties of magnetic elements in the quiet Sun using the marker-controlled watershed method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Z. X.; Yu, D. R.; Zhang, J.; Yang, S. H.; Hu, Q. H.

    2009-10-01

    Context: The quiet Sun is an important part of understanding the global magnetic properties of the Sun. A recently launched observation system, named HINODE, provides a lot of high-resolution images for studying the quiet Sun. Obviously, it is time-consuming to analyze these images by hand. It is desirable to develop a technique for recognizing magnetic elements, thus automatically computing magnetic properties and the relationship between magnetic elements and granulation. Aims: We design an automatic method of recognizing magnetic elements based on the features of HINODE magnetograms and of measuring their properties. Then we study the relationship between magnetic elements and granulation. Methods: We used the magnetogram, continuum image, and Dopplergram on April 16, 2007, which were taken with the Solar Optical Telescope instrument aboard HINODE. The field of view is 147.60 arcsec×162.30 arcsec in a quiet solar region, locating at disk center. We introduced the mark-controlled watershed method to detect magnetic elements automatically, because it is a popular image-segmentation method for dealing with overlapping objects. We took the centers that are the local maximum in all directions as the marks for restraining over-segmentation. We computed the properties of the detected magnetic elements and the relation among magnetic field strength, relative continuum intensity, and Doppler velocity at the same locations of magnetic elements. Results: We obtain the following results: (1) 34% of our observation region are covered by magnetic fields; (2) the magnetic flux distribution of all elements reaches a peak at 1.07× 1016 Mx for the whole region; (3) the relative continuum intensity distribution at the locations of magnetic elements reaches a peak at 0.97, which shows that the majority of magnetic elements located at the areas where the relative continuum intensity is less than its average. The relative continuum intensities in the areas with strong flux density

  4. Center-to-limb variation of the area covered by magnetic bright points in the quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonet, J. A.; Cabello, I.; Sánchez Almeida, J.

    2012-03-01

    Context. The quiet Sun magnetic fields produce ubiquitous bright points (BPs) that cover a significant fraction of the solar surface. Their contribution to the total solar irradiance (TSI) is so-far unknown. Aims: We aim at measuring the center-to-limb variation (CLV) of the fraction of solar surface covered by quiet Sun magnetic bright points. The fraction is referred to as the fraction of covered surface (FCS). Methods: We count the area covered by BPs in G-band images obtained at various heliocentric angles with the 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope on La Palma. We restore the images to bring them close to the diffraction limit of the instrument (~0'.1). Results: The FCS is largest at the disk center (≃1%), and then drops down to become ≃0.2% at μ ≃ 0.3 (where μ is the cosine of the heliocentric angle). The relationship has a large scatter, which we evaluate by comparing different subfields within our FOVs. We develop a toy-model to describe the observed CLV, which considers the BPs as depressions in the mean solar photosphere characterized by a depth, a width, and a spread in the inclinations. Although the model is poorly constrained by observations, it shows the BPs to be shallow structures (depth < width) with a large range of inclinations. We also estimate how different parts of the solar disk may contribute to the TSI variations, finding that 90% is contributed by BPs with μ > 0.5, and half of it is due to BPs with μ > 0.8.

  5. The quiet Sun magnetism: What can we learn from the Hanle effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faurobert, M.

    2012-12-01

    The physics of the outer layers of the Sun is mostly driven by magnetic phenomena. This is the reason why high resolution investigations of the magnetic fields in the hot and dilute outer atmosphere of the Sun, from the photosphere to the chromosphere and corona, are the major objectives of future large solar telescopes, such as the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST), or the European Solar Telescope (EST). The so-called "quiet Sun" is filled in with magnetic fields distributed in strengths and over a wide range of spatial scales. The magnetic energy content of this distribution of fields is a crucial issue, related to the long standing questions of the coronal and chromospheric heatings. Zeeman diagnostics of the magnetic fields depend crucially on the spatial resolution of the observations, whereas diagnostics based on the Hanle effect do provide valuable information on the average field strength even if the magnetic structures are not resolved. However, they rely on the precise radiative transfer modeling of polarized lines formed under non-LTE conditions. The use of the differential Hanle effect on lines with different magnetic sensitivities is a method of choice to obtain model-independent diagnostics. Another promissing way explored nowdays is to make use of the complementary diagnostics provided by both the Zeeman and Hanle effects when they can be observed in the same lines.

  6. The association of chromospheric and coronal phenomena with the evolution of the quiet sun magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Karen L.; Tang, Frances; Gaizauskas, Victor

    1986-01-01

    Using daily full-disk magnetograms and He I 10830 spectroheliograms to study the count and surface distribution of ephemeral regions over the solar cycle, Harvey (1985) concluded that the small dark structures seen in 10830, thought to correspond to X-ray bright points, were more often associated with magnetic bipoles that appeared to result from an encounter of already existing opposite polarity magentic flux than with emerging small magnetic bipoles (ephemeral regions). Such encounters would be more likely to occur in areas of mixed polarity. The fractional area of the sun covered by mixed polarity fields varies anti-correlated with the solar cycle leading to a possible explanation for the 180 degrees out of phase solar cycle variation of X-ray bright points. To establish the validity of this suggestion, a detailed study of time-sequence magnetic field, He I wavelength 10830, Ha, C IV, and Si II observations of selected areas of the quiet sun was initiated about 2 years ago. The preliminary results of this study are reported.

  7. The quiet Sun average Doppler shift of coronal lines up to 2 MK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadashi, N.; Teriaca, L.; Solanki, S. K.

    2011-10-01

    Context. The average Doppler shift shown by spectral lines formed from the chromosphere to the corona reveals important information on the mass and energy balance of the solar atmosphere, providing an important observational constraint to any models of the solar corona. Previous spectroscopic observations of vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) lines have revealed a persistent average wavelength shift of lines formed at temperatures up to 1 MK. At higher temperatures, the behaviour is still essentially unknown. Aims: Here we analyse combined SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation)/SoHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) and EIS (EUV Imaging Spectrometer)/Hinode observations of the quiet Sun around disk centre to determine, for the first time, the average Doppler shift of several spectral lines formed between 1 and 2 MK, where the largest part of the quiet coronal emission is formed. Methods: The measurements are based on a novel technique applied to EIS spectra to measure the difference in Doppler shift between lines formed at different temperatures. Simultaneous wavelength-calibrated SUMER spectra allow establishing the absolute value at the reference temperature of T ≈ 1 MK. Results: The average line shifts at 1 MK < T < 1.8 MK are modestly, but clearly bluer than those observed at 1 MK. By accepting an average blue shift of about (-1.8 ± 0.6) km s-1 at 1 MK (as provided by SUMER measurements), this translates into a maximum Doppler shift of (-4.4 ± 2.2) km s-1 around 1.8 MK. The measured value appears to decrease to about (-1.3 ± 2.6) km s-1 at the Fe xv formation temperature of 2.1 MK. Conclusions: The measured average Doppler shift between 0.01 and 2.1 MK, for which we provide a parametrisation, appears to be qualitatively and roughly quantitatively consistent with what foreseen by 3D coronal models where heating is produced by dissipation of currents induced by photospheric motions and by reconnection with emerging magnetic flux.

  8. Quantitative Global Heat Transfer in a Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John P.; Schneider, Steven P.; Liu, Tianshu; Rubal, Justin; Ward, Chris; Dussling, Joseph; Rice, Cody; Foley, Ryan; Cai, Zeimin; Wang, Bo; Woodiga, Sudesh

    2012-01-01

    This project developed quantitative methods for obtaining heat transfer from temperature sensitive paint (TSP) measurements in the Mach-6 quiet tunnel at Purdue, which is a Ludwieg tube with a downstream valve, moderately-short flow duration and low levels of heat transfer. Previous difficulties with inferring heat transfer from TSP in the Mach-6 quiet tunnel were traced to (1) the large transient heat transfer that occurs during the unusually long tunnel startup and shutdown, (2) the non-uniform thickness of the insulating coating, (3) inconsistencies and imperfections in the painting process and (4) the low levels of heat transfer observed on slender models at typical stagnation temperatures near 430K. Repeated measurements were conducted on 7 degree-half-angle sharp circular cones at zero angle of attack in order to evaluate the techniques, isolate the problems and identify solutions. An attempt at developing a two-color TSP method is also summarized.

  9. Radio Quiet Protection at the Australian Square Kilometre array site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Smith, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    Radio astronomy relies on the detection of very faint signals from the universe. Many radio telescopes are now detrimentally affected by radio frequency interference (RFI), which results from a wide range of active spectrum users such as communications, aviation and satellites. This is why many new radio observatories are being sited at increasingly remote locations.The site for the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders in Australia is the Murchison Radio-Astronomy Observatory (MRO). The MRO is located more than 350km from the nearest population centre and has a large radio-quiet zone that is managed under a range of legislative agreements.In this talk I will describe the radio quiet zone, what protection it gives, how it works and how astronomers interact with the spectrum management authorities.

  10. The influence of "quiet time" for patients in critical care.

    PubMed

    Maidl, Carolyn A; Leske, Jane S; Garcia, Annette E

    2014-10-01

    The primary aim was to examine the influence of "quiet time" in critical care. A dual-unit, nonrandomized, uncontrolled trial of a quiet time (QT) protocol was completed. A sample of adult patients from the Neurosciences Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU) participated. Environmental stressors were reduced and patient rest promoted prior to QT. One hundred twenty-nine patients participated in 205 QTs. A one-way, repeated measure analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was calculated comparing Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire scores, pain and anxiety over three consecutive QTs. No significant statistical effect was found. However, patients rated sleep higher and anxiety levels decreased over consecutive QTs. Ninety-three percent of patients reported QT mattered to them. The combined efforts of nursing, medicine, and ancillary staff are necessary to foster periods of uninterrupted rest, thereby optimizing patient care. Further research is needed to determine if successive QTs positively influence patient outcomes. PMID:23847172