Science.gov

Sample records for quinolone antibacterial drug

  1. Novel antibacterial active quinolone-fluoroquinolone conjugates and 2D-QSAR studies.

    PubMed

    Panda, Siva S; Liaqat, Sumaira; Girgis, Adel S; Samir, Ahmed; Hall, C Dennis; Katritzky, Alan R

    2015-09-15

    Novel, quinolone-fluoroquinolone conjugates 10a-f, 11a-f, 13a-f and 14a-f with amino acid linkers were synthesized in good yields utilizing benzotriazole chemistry. Antibacterial bioassay showed the synthesized bis-conjugates exhibit anti-bacterial properties comparable with the parent drugs. PMID:26253630

  2. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  3. Drug interactions with antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Horn, J R; Hansten, P D

    1995-07-01

    Antibacterial drugs, such as quinolones, macrolides, rifampin, isoniazid, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, can interact with other drugs in a wide variety of clinically significant ways. They are frequently administered with other prescription and nonprescription medications. Antibacterial agents may interact by causing a change in the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics of a second drug. In other cases, the antimicrobial may be affected by the action of another drug. Interactions involving antimicrobials often result from alterations in the absorption of the antimicrobial from the gastrointestinal tract or changes in the hepatic metabolism or renal elimination of the drugs concurrently administered. While certain classes of antibacterial drugs are known to interact with many other drugs, the interaction potential of most classes of antimicrobials is not uniform among members of the class. This diversity in interaction potential provides the clinician with an opportunity to avoid potential interactions by means of appropriate drug selection. An understanding of the common, clinically significant drug interactions involving antibacterial agents will enable the physician to avoid unnecessary adverse drug reactions. PMID:7798069

  4. Design and biological evaluation of novel quinolone-based metronidazole derivatives as potent Cu(2+) mediated DNA-targeting antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Kumar, Kannekanti Vijaya; Geng, Rong-Xia; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2015-09-01

    A series of novel quinolone-based metronidazole derivatives as new type of antimicrobial agents were developed and characterized. Most of them gave good antibacterial activity towards the Gram-positive and negative bacteria. Noticeably, quinolone derivative 3i exhibited low MIC value of 0.25 ?g/mL against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which was even superior to reference drugs Norfloxacin, Ciprofloxacin and Clinafloxacin. The further research revealed that compound 3i could intercalate into P. aeruginosa DNA through copper ion bridge to form a steady 3i-Cu(2+)-DNA ternary complex which might further block DNA replication to exert the powerful bioactivities. PMID:26149183

  5. Biological Activity of Some Magnesium(II) Complexes of Quinolones

    PubMed Central

    Šonc, Andrej; Zupan?i?, Marija; Sep?i?, Kristina; Turk, Tom

    2000-01-01

    A new magnesium complex of quinolone antibacterial agent was prepared. This new complex as well as a previously isolated complex of magnesium with ciprofloxacin were tested against various Gram positive and Gram negative microorganisms. Antimicrobial activities were evaluated using the agar diffusion test. The results have shown that all magnesium complexes are significantly less active than the parent quinolone drugs. It was also found that the activity of quinolones is reduced when the solutions of quinolones are titrated with magnesium ions. PMID:18475931

  6. [Effect of pazufloxacin mesilate, a new quinolone antibacterial agent, for intravenous use on QT interval].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Morita, Yukie; Shiotani, Norio; Mizuo, Midori; Komae, Norihisa

    2004-08-01

    The potential for QT interval prolongation of pazufloxacin mesilate (PZFX mesilate), a new quinolone antibacterial agent for intravenous use, was investigated by in vitro and in vivo electrophysiology studies. Following results were obtained. In vitro electrophysiology study using guinea pig papillary muscles: PZFX mesilate (30-300 microM) had no effects on resting membrane potential (RMP), action potential amplitude (APA) and action potential duration (APD). Reference quinolones, sparfloxacin (3-30 microM) and moxifloxacin (10-100 microM), had no effects on RMP and APA, but significantly prolonged APD at more than 3 and 10 microM, respectively, while ciprofloxacin (10-100 microM) had no effect on each parameter. In vivo electrophysiology study using anesthetized dogs: PZFX mesilate had no effects on electrocardiograph parameter (PR interval, QRS interval, QT interval and QTc) after intravenous administration of 3-30 mg/kg. These results suggest that PZFX mesilate has low potential for QT interval prolongation. PMID:15535041

  7. The measurement of a new antimicrobial quinolone in hair as an index of drug exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, T; Nakano, M; Akiyama, H; Nakashima, M

    1993-01-01

    1. Scalp hair samples were obtained at 1 month intervals up to 5 months from healthy male volunteers participating in a phase I study of a new antimicrobial quinolone, OPC-17116. 2. Hair was sectioned into 1 cm lengths from the scalp end. Corresponding portions from five pieces of hair were dissolved in 1 N NaOH and assayed for OPC-17116 by h.p.l.c. 3. In all subjects taking a single dose (400 mg, n = 5) or repeated doses (400 mg day-1, twice daily, for 6.5 days, n = 6), the drug was detected in the portions of hair corresponding to the administration period, assuming a hair growth rate of 1 cm/month. 4. OPC-17116 (300 mg day-1, three times daily, for 2 days) was given to four healthy male volunteers, from whom hair samples were obtained at 1 month and 3 months. The drug was detected in 1 to 4 consecutive 2.5-mm long portions of a single hair and there was no significant axial diffusion of the agent along the hair shaft with time. 5. These findings indicate the utility of measuring this quinolone derivative in hair as an index of exposure, and as a time-marker for the hair analysis of other drugs. PMID:8382934

  8. Carriage of Class 1 and 2 Integrons in Quinolone, Extended-Spectrum-?-Lactamase-Producing and Multi Drug Resistant E.coli and K.pneumoniae: High Burden of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shams, Froogh; Hasani, Alka; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Nahaie, Mohammad Reza; Hasani, Akbar; Soroush Bar Haghi, Mohammad Hossein; Pormohammad, Ali; Elli Arbatan, Asghar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The study aimed at assessing any association between quinolone resistance, MDR and ESBL production and their relation with the presence of integrons in Esherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Methods: E.coli and K.pneumoniae isolated from various clinical infections were fully identified and analyzed for being quinolone resistant. These isolates were further tested for ESBL production, multi drug resistance and carriage of integrons. Results: In total, 135 isolates were confirmed as quinolone resistant. K.pneumoniae was observed as potent ESBL producer in comparison to E.coli. Ciprofloxacin resistance in both organisms was related significantly with the presence of integron class 1, co-presence of class 1 and 2 as well as to the presence of ESBL production (p< 0.001). However, nalidixic acid resistance was related significantly (p< 0.01) with only integron class 1 and to the presence of ESBL production. Class 1 and 2 integrons were found in 73.5% of MDR isolates with 13.2% of them possessing both intI1 and intI2 genes. Conclusion: Prevalence of quinolone resistance together with ESBL production and MDR in E.coli and K.pneumoniae has contributed to the emergence of antibacterial resistance burden. The higher integron prevalence in our isolates advocates the potentiality of these isolates as a source for dissemination of resistance determinants. PMID:26504755

  9. 75 FR 73109 - Guidance for Industry on Antibacterial Drug Products: Use of Noninferiority Trials to Support...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ...2007D-0367] Guidance for Industry on Antibacterial Drug Products: Use of Noninferiority...guidance for industry entitled ``Antibacterial Drug Products: Use of Noninferiority...clinical trial designs to evaluate antibacterial drug products. The Agency's...

  10. 75 FR 33317 - Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and Drug Development Research for Bacterial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ...Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0001] Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and...scientific and potential research issues in antibacterial drug resistance, rapid diagnostic...development for bacterial diseases, and antibacterial drug development. The workshop...

  11. Genotypic diversity of multidrug-, quinolone- and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Disratthakit, Areeya; Meada, Shinji; Prammananan, Therdsak; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Doi, Norio; Chaiprasert, Angkana

    2015-06-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), which includes multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB), quinolone-resistant (QR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB), is a serious threat to TB control. We aimed to characterize the genotypic diversity of drug-resistant TB clinical isolates collected in Thailand to establish whether the emergence of drug-resistant TB is attributable to transmitted resistance or acquired resistance. We constructed the first molecular phylogeny of MDR-TB (n=95), QR-TB (n=69) and XDR-TB (n=28) in Thailand based on spoligotyping and proposed 24-locus multilocus variable-number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Clustering analysis was performed using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean. Spoligotyping identified the Beijing strain (SIT1) as the most predominant genotype (n=139; 72.4%). The discriminatory power of 0.9235 Hunter-Gaston Discriminatory Index (HGDI) with the 15-locus variable-number tandem repeats of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units typing was improved to a 0.9574 HGDI with proposed 24-locus MLVA, thereby resulting in the subdivision of a large cluster of Beijing strains (SIT1) into 17 subclusters. We identified the spread of drug-resistant TB clones caused by three different MLVA types in the Beijing strain (SIT1) and a specific clone of XDR-TB caused by a rare genotype, the Manu-ancestor strain (SIT523). Overall, 49.5% of all isolates were clustered. These findings suggest that a remarkable transmission of drug-resistant TB occurred in Thailand. The remaining 50% of drug-resistant TB isolates were unique genotypes, which may have arisen from the individual acquisition of drug resistance. Our results suggest that transmitted and acquired resistance have played an equal role in the emergence of drug-resistant TB. Further characterization of whole genome sequences of clonal strains could help to elucidate the mycobacterial genetic factors relevant for drug resistance, transmissibility and virulence. PMID:25847698

  12. Nanofibers based antibacterial drug design, delivery and applications.

    PubMed

    Ulubayram, Kezban; Calamak, Semih; Shahbazi, Reza; Eroglu, Ipek

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by microorganisms like bacteria, fungi, etc. are the main obstacle in healing processes. Conventional antibacterial administration routes can be listed as oral, intravenous/intramuscular, topical and inhalation. These kinds of drug administrations are faced with critical vital issues such as; more rapid delivery of the drug than intended which can result in bacterial resistance, dose related systemic toxicity, tissue irritation and finally delayed healing process that need to be tackled. Recently, studies have been focused on new drug delivery systems, overcoming resistance and toxicological problems and finally localizing the molecules at the site of action in a proper dose. In this regard, many nanotechnological approaches such as nanoparticulate therapeutic systems have been developed to address accompanying problems mentioned above. Among them, drug loaded electrospun nanofibers propose main advantages like controlled drug delivery, high drug loading capacity, high encapsulation efficiency, simultaneous delivery of multiple drugs, ease of production and cost effectiveness for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. Therefore, some particular attention has been devoted to the design of electrospun nanofibers as promising antibacterial drug carrier systems. A variety of antibacterials e.g., biocides, antibiotics, quaternary ammonium salts, triclosan, metallic nanoparticles (silver, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide) and antibacterial polymers (chitosan, polyethyleneimine, etc.) have been impregnated by various techniques into nanofibers that exhibit strong antibacterial activity in standard assays. This review highlights the design and delivery of antibacterial drug loaded nanofibers with particular focus on their function in the fields of drug delivery, wound healing, tissue engineering, cosmetics and other biomedical applications. PMID:25732666

  13. A Method of Determining Patterns of Use of Antibacterial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ruedy, John

    1966-01-01

    A hospital chart review system using standard IBM punch cards was designed to review patterns of use of antibacterial drugs in a large Canadian general hospital. Review of the charts of 4894 patients during an eight-month period showed that this method provided an inexpensive and accurate summary of many of the details of use of antibacterial drugs, including indications accepted for drug use, specific drugs selected, the manner in which the drugs were used and the precautions taken to avoid adverse reactions. This method of review should be valuable in delineating drug misuse and overuse, and hence in the continuing education of the physician. PMID:5928520

  14. Functional Analysis of Pneumococcal Drug Efflux Pumps Associates the MATE DinF Transporter with Quinolone Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Tocci, Nadia; Iannelli, Francesco; Bidossi, Alessandro; Ciusa, Maria Laura; Decorosi, Francesca; Viti, Carlo; Pozzi, Gianni; Ricci, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    The pneumococcal chromosome encodes about 140 transporters, many of which are predicted to be involved in efflux. In order to critically evaluate pneumococcal efflux, a series of transporter mutants were constructed, and their phenotypes were assayed by disk diffusion, microdilution drug susceptibility testing (MIC testing), growth of cultures at sub-MIC concentrations, and phenotype microarray analysis. Mutants with mutations in seven ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, three multiantimicrobial extrusion (MATE) family efflux pumps, and one major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter were obtained in Streptococcus pneumoniae strain DP1004. The susceptibility of these 11 mutants to over 250 different substances was compared to that of the parent strain. Of the tested transporters, only the ABC transporter PatAB (SP2073-5) presented a clear multidrug resistance (MDR) profile, as the mutant showed significantly increased susceptibility to ethidium bromide, acriflavine, and berberine. Among the other transporters analyzed, the mutants devoid of the MATE efflux pump SP2065 exhibited reduced susceptibility to novobiocin, and those with mutations of the MATE family DinF transport system (SP1939) exhibited increased susceptibility to moxifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin. This change in quinolone MIC was found to be independent from the competence-mediated effect of quinolones on the cinA-recA-dinF operon. Furthermore, the dinF mutant, in contrast to the parental strain, allowed selection for quinolone-resistant mutants when exposed to moxifloxacin. These data confirm the clear MDR profile of the PatAB ABC transporter and suggest for the MATE DinF a phenotype associated with quinolone susceptibility, particularly for moxifloxacin. PMID:23114782

  15. Antibacterial drug discovery and structure-based design.

    PubMed

    Barker, John J

    2006-05-01

    Bacterial resistance continues to develop and pose a significant threat, both in hospitals and, more recently, in the community. A focus on other therapeutic areas by the larger pharmaceutical companies has left a shortfall in the pipeline of novel antibacterials. Recently, many new structures have been studied by structure-genomics initiatives, delivering a wealth of targets to consider. Using the tools of structure-based design, antibacterial discovery must exploit these targets to accelerate the process of drug discovery. PMID:16635801

  16. Cost-effectiveness and pricing of antibacterial drugs.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Talitha I; Morris, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Growing resistance to antibacterial agents has increased the need for the development of new drugs to treat bacterial infections. Given increasing pressure on limited health budgets, it is important to study the cost-effectiveness of these drugs, as well as their safety and efficacy, to find out whether or not they provide value for money and should be reimbursed. In this article, we systematically reviewed 38 cost-effectiveness analyses of new antibacterial agents. Most studies showed the new antibacterial drugs were cost-effective compared to older generation drugs. Drug pricing is a complicated process, involving different stakeholders, and has a large influence on cost-effectiveness. Value-based pricing is a method to determine the price of a drug at which it can be cost-effective. It is currently unclear what the influence of value-based pricing will be on the prices of new antibacterial agents, but an important factor will be the definition of 'value', which as well as the impact of the drug on patient health might also include other factors such as wider social impact and the health impact of disease. PMID:25521641

  17. Cost-effectiveness and Pricing of Antibacterial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Verhoef, Talitha I; Morris, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Growing resistance to antibacterial agents has increased the need for the development of new drugs to treat bacterial infections. Given increasing pressure on limited health budgets, it is important to study the cost-effectiveness of these drugs, as well as their safety and efficacy, to find out whether or not they provide value for money and should be reimbursed. In this article, we systematically reviewed 38 cost-effectiveness analyses of new antibacterial agents. Most studies showed the new antibacterial drugs were cost-effective compared to older generation drugs. Drug pricing is a complicated process, involving different stakeholders, and has a large influence on cost-effectiveness. Value-based pricing is a method to determine the price of a drug at which it can be cost-effective. It is currently unclear what the influence of value-based pricing will be on the prices of new antibacterial agents, but an important factor will be the definition of ‘value’, which as well as the impact of the drug on patient health might also include other factors such as wider social impact and the health impact of disease. PMID:25521641

  18. Characterization of Salmonella Typhimurium DNA gyrase as a target of quinolones.

    PubMed

    Kongsoi, Siriporn; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Suprasert, Apinun; Utrarachkij, Fuangfa; Nakajima, Chie; Suthienkul, Orasa; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Quinolones exhibit good antibacterial activity against Salmonella spp. isolates and are often the choice of treatment for life-threatening salmonellosis due to multi-drug resistant strains. To assess the properties of quinolones, we performed an in vitro assay to study the antibacterial activities of quinolones against recombinant DNA gyrase. We expressed the S. Typhimurium DNA gyrase A (GyrA) and B (GyrB) subunits in Escherichia coli. GyrA and GyrB were obtained at high purity (>95%) by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid agarose resin column chromatography as His-tagged 97-kDa and 89-kDa proteins, respectively. Both subunits were shown to reconstitute an ATP-dependent DNA supercoiling activity. Drug concentrations that suppressed DNA supercoiling by 50% (IC50 s) or generated DNA cleavage by 25% (CC25 s) demonstrated that quinolones highly active against S. Typhimurium DNA gyrase share a fluorine atom at C-6. The relationships between the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), IC50 s and CC25 s were assessed by estimating a linear regression between two components. MICs measured against S. Typhimurium NBRC 13245 correlated better with IC50 s (R?=?0.9988) than CC25 s (R?=?0.9685). These findings suggest that the DNA supercoiling inhibition assay may be a useful screening test to identify quinolones with promising activity against S. Typhimurium. The quinolone structure-activity relationship demonstrated here shows that C-8, the C-7 ring, the C-6 fluorine, and N-1 cyclopropyl substituents are desirable structural features in targeting S. Typhimurium gyrase. PMID:25381884

  19. The evolving role of chemical synthesis in antibacterial drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wright, Peter M; Seiple, Ian B; Myers, Andrew G

    2014-08-18

    The discovery and implementation of antibiotics in the early twentieth century transformed human health and wellbeing. Chemical synthesis enabled the development of the first antibacterial substances, organoarsenicals and sulfa drugs, but these were soon outshone by a host of more powerful and vastly more complex antibiotics from nature: penicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, and erythromycin, among others. These primary defences are now significantly less effective as an unavoidable consequence of rapid evolution of resistance within pathogenic bacteria, made worse by widespread misuse of antibiotics. For decades medicinal chemists replenished the arsenal of antibiotics by semisynthetic and to a lesser degree fully synthetic routes, but economic factors have led to a subsidence of this effort, which places society on the precipice of a disaster. We believe that the strategic application of modern chemical synthesis to antibacterial drug discovery must play a critical role if a crisis of global proportions is to be averted. PMID:24990531

  20. The Evolving Role of Chemical Synthesis in Antibacterial Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Peter M.; Seiple, Ian B.; Myers, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery and implementation of antibiotics in the early twentieth century transformed human health and wellbeing. Chemical synthesis enabled the development of the first antibacterial substances, organoarsenicals and sulfa drugs, but these were soon outshone by a host of more powerful and vastly more complex antibiotics from nature: penicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, and erythromycin, among others. These primary defences are now significantly less effective as an unavoidable consequence of rapid evolution of resistance within pathogenic bacteria, made worse by widespread misuse of antibiotics. For decades medicinal chemists replenished the arsenal of antibiotics by semisynthetic and to a lesser degree fully synthetic routes, but economic factors have led to a subsidence of this effort, which places society on the precipice of a disaster. We believe that the strategic application of modern chemical synthesis to antibacterial drug discovery must play a critical role if a crisis of global proportions is to be averted. PMID:24990531

  1. Preparation, structure and microbial evaluation of metal complexes of the second generation quinolone antibacterial drug lomefloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeek, Sadeek A.; El-Shwiniy, Walaa H.

    2010-09-01

    Lomefloxacinate of Y(III), Zr(IV) and U(VI) were isolated as solids with the general formula; [Y(LFX) 2Cl 2]Cl·12H 2O, [ZrO(LFX) 2Cl]Cl·15H 2O and [UO 2(LFX) 3](NO 3) 2·4H 2O. The new synthesized complexes were characterized with physicochemical and diverse spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-Vis. and 1H NMR spectroscopies) as well as thermal analyses. In these complexes lomefloxacin act as bidentate ligand bound to the metal ions through the pyridone oxygen and one carboxylate oxygen. The kinetic parameters of thermogravimetric (TGA) and its differential (DTG), such as entropy of activation, activation energy, enthalpy of activation and Gibbs free energy evaluated by using Coats- Redfern and Horowitz- Metzger equations for free lomefloxacin and three complexes were carried out. The bond stretching force constant and length of the U dbnd O bond for the [UO 2(LFX) 3](NO 3) 2·4H 2O complex were calculated. The antimicrobial activity of lomefloxacin and its metal complexes was tested against different bacterial species, such as Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus), Escherichia coli ( E. coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P. aeruginosa) as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species and also against two species of antifungal, penicillium ( P. rotatum) and trichoderma ( T. sp.). The three complexes are of a good action against three bacterial species but the Y(III) complex exhibit excellent activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P. aeruginosa), when compared to the free lomefloxacin.

  2. Metal complexes of the fourth generation quinolone antimicrobial drug gatifloxacin: Synthesis, structure and biological evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeek, Sadeek A.; El-Shwiniy, Walaa H.

    2010-08-01

    Three metal complexes of the fourth generation quinolone antimicrobial agent gatifloxacin (GFLX) with Y(???), Zr(?V) and U(V?) have been prepared and characterized with physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. In these complexes, gatifloxacin acts as a bidentate deprotonated ligand bound to the metal through the ketone oxygen and a carboxylato oxygen. The complexes are six-coordinated with distorted octahedral geometry. The kinetic parameters for gatifloxacin and the three prepared complexes have been evaluated from TGA curves by using Coats-Redfern (CR) and Horowitz-Metzeger (HM) methods. The calculated bond length and force constant, F(U dbnd O), for the UO 2 bond in uranyl complex are 1.7522 Å and 639.46 N m -1. The antimicrobial activity of the complexes has been tested against microorganisms, three bacterial species, such as Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus), Escherichia coli ( E. coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P. aeruginosa) and two fungi species, penicillium ( P. rotatum) and trichoderma ( T. sp.), showing that they exhibit higher activity than free ligand.

  3. The relationship between target-class and the physicochemical properties of antibacterial drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mugumbate, Grace; Overington, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of novel mechanism of action (MOA) antibacterials has been associated with the concept that antibacterial drugs occupy a differentiated region of physicochemical space compared to human-targeted drugs. With, in broad terms, antibacterials having higher molecular weight, lower log P and higher polar surface area (PSA). By analysing the physicochemical properties of about 1700 approved drugs listed in the ChEMBL database, we show, that antibacterials for whose targets are riboproteins (i.e., composed of a complex of RNA and protein) fall outside the conventional human ‘drug-like’ chemical space; whereas antibacterials that modulate bacterial protein targets, generally comply with the ‘rule-of-five’ guidelines for classical oral human drugs. Our analysis suggests a strong target-class association for antibacterials—either protein-targeted or riboprotein-targeted. There is much discussion in the literature on the failure of screening approaches to deliver novel antibacterial lead series, and linkage of this poor success rate for antibacterials with the chemical space properties of screening collections. Our analysis suggests that consideration of target-class may be an underappreciated factor in antibacterial lead discovery, and that in fact bacterial protein-targets may well have similar binding site characteristics to human protein targets, and questions the assumption that larger, more polar compounds are a key part of successful future antibacterial discovery. PMID:25975639

  4. 75 FR 37818 - Issues in the Design and Conduct of Clinical Trials for Antibacterial Drug Development; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ...Issues in the Design and Conduct of Clinical Trials for Antibacterial Drug Development...scientific issues in the design and conduct of clinical trials for antibacterial drug development...various aspects of design and conduct of clinical trials for antibacterial drugs....

  5. Drug features that contribute to the activity of quinolones against mammalian topoisomerase II and cultured cells: correlation between enhancement of enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage in vitro and cytotoxic potential.

    PubMed Central

    Elsea, S H; McGuirk, P R; Gootz, T D; Moynihan, M; Osheroff, N

    1993-01-01

    CP-115,953 [6,8-difluoro-7-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)-1-cyclopropyl-4- quinolone-3-carboxylic acid] is a novel quinolone that is highly active against topoisomerase II in vitro and in mammalian cells in culture (M. J. Robinson, B. A. Martin, T. D. Gootz, P. R. McGuirk, M. Moynihan, J. A. Sutcliffe, and N. Osheroff, J. Biol. Chem. 266:14585-14592, 1991). However, the features of the drug that contribute to its activity towards mammalian systems have not been characterized. Therefore, CP-115,953 and a series of related quinolones were examined for their activity against calf thymus topoisomerase II and cultured mammalian cells. CP-115,953 stimulated DNA cleavage mediated by the type II enzyme with a potency that was approximately 600-fold greater than that of the antimicrobial quinolone ciprofloxacin and approximately 50-fold greater than that of the antineoplastic drug etoposide. As determined by the ability to enhance enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage, quinolone activity towards calf thymus topoisomerase II was enhanced by the presence of a cyclopropyl group at the N-1 ring position and by the presence of a fluorine at C-8. Furthermore, the 4'-hydroxyphenyl substituent at the C-7 position was critical for the potency of CP-115,953 towards the mammalian type II enzyme. In this regard, the aromatic nature of the C-7 ring as well as the presence and the position of the 4'-hydroxyl group contributed greatly to drug activity. Finally, the cytotoxicity of quinolones in the CP-115,953 series towards mammalian cells paralleled the in vitro stimulation of DNA cleavage by topoisomerase II rather than the inhibition of enzyme-catalyzed DNA relaxation. This correlation strongly suggests that these quinolones promote cell death by converting topoisomerase II to a cellular poison. PMID:8257142

  6. DRUG DISCOVERY AND RESISTANCE Antibacterial activities of dendritic amphiphiles against nontuberculous

    E-print Network

    Falkinham, Joseph

    DRUG DISCOVERY AND RESISTANCE Antibacterial activities of dendritic amphiphiles against November 2011 Accepted 4 December 2011 Keywords: Dendritic amphiphiles Nontuberculous mycobacteria Anti of nine series of dicarboxyl and tricarboxyl dendritic amphiphiles with one alkyl, two alkyl

  7. 21 CFR 201.24 - Labeling for systemic antibacterial drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of (insert name of antibacterial drug... treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria. (b) In the “Indications and Usage” section, the labeling must state: To reduce the development of drug-resistant...

  8. 21 CFR 201.24 - Labeling for systemic antibacterial drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of (insert name of antibacterial drug... treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria. (b) In the “Indications and Usage” section, the labeling must state: To reduce the development of drug-resistant...

  9. 21 CFR 201.24 - Labeling for systemic antibacterial drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of (insert name of antibacterial drug... treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria. (b) In the “Indications and Usage” section, the labeling must state: To reduce the development of drug-resistant...

  10. 21 CFR 201.24 - Labeling for systemic antibacterial drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of (insert name of antibacterial drug... treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria. (b) In the “Indications and Usage” section, the labeling must state: To reduce the development of drug-resistant...

  11. 21 CFR 201.24 - Labeling for systemic antibacterial drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of (insert name of antibacterial drug... treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria. (b) In the “Indications and Usage” section, the labeling must state: To reduce the development of drug-resistant...

  12. 76 FR 39883 - Design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Drugs for the Treatment of Acute Otitis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ...Design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Drugs for the Treatment of Acute Otitis...design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Agents for the Treatment of Acute Otitis...in the design of clinical trials of antibacterial agents for the treatment of acute...

  13. 77 FR 49450 - Issues in the Design of Clinical Trials of Antibacterial Drugs for the Treatment of Non-Cystic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Issues in the Design of Clinical Trials of Antibacterial Drugs for... announcing a public workshop focusing on the design of clinical trials of antibacterial drugs for the..., academia, and industry on various aspects of the design of clinical trials. The input from this...

  14. Electrospinning polyvinylidene fluoride fibrous membranes containing anti-bacterial drugs used as wound dressing.

    PubMed

    He, Ting; Wang, Jingnan; Huang, Peilin; Zeng, Baozhen; Li, Haihong; Cao, Qingyun; Zhang, Shiying; Luo, Zhuo; Deng, David Y B; Zhang, Hongwu; Zhou, Wuyi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesis drug-loaded fibrous membrane scaffolds for potential applications as wound dressing. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) fibrous membranes were loaded with enrofloxacin (Enro) drugs by using an electrospinning process, and their mechanical strength, drug release profile and anti-bacterial properties were evaluated. Enro drug-loaded PVDF membranes exhibited good elasticity, flexibility and excellent mechanical strength. The electrospinning Enro/PVDF membranes showed a burst drug release in the initial 12h, followed by sustained release for the next 3 days, which was an essential property for antibiotic drugs applied for wound healing. The drug-loaded PVDF fibrous membranes displayed excellent anti-bacterial activity toward Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The results suggest that electrospinning PVDF membrane scaffolds loaded with drugs can be used as wound dressing. PMID:25936562

  15. 78 FR 32669 - New Approaches to Antibacterial Drug Development; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... new clinical development paradigms for antibacterial drugs. Areas of ongoing need are numerous and... drug development (e.g., broader use of clinical pharmacology data, new statistical methods, innovative... reasonably likely to predict an effect on IMM or other clinical benefit. To advance the development...

  16. Dysglycemia associated with quinolones.

    PubMed

    El Ghandour, Sarah; Azar, Sami T

    2015-06-01

    Antimicrobial therapy is well known to be associated with fluctuations of blood glucose levels. This review aims at exploring the association between glycemic fluctuations and antibiotics mainly focusing on quinolones. Quinolones are associated with hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Several mechanism are proposed to explain this causality. PMID:25466161

  17. 77 FR 49450 - Issues in the Design of Clinical Trials of Antibacterial Drugs for the Treatment of Non-Cystic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ...FDA-2012-N-0001] Issues in the Design of Clinical Trials of Antibacterial Drugs for the...public workshop focusing on the design of clinical trials of antibacterial drugs for the...industry on various aspects of the design of clinical trials. The input from this public...

  18. 76 FR 39883 - Design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Drugs for the Treatment of Acute Otitis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Drugs for the... regarding the design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Agents for the Treatment of Acute Otitis... design of clinical trials. The input from this public workshop will help in developing topics for...

  19. Molecular details of quinolone–DNA interactions: solution structure of an unusually stable DNA duplex with covalently linked nalidixic acid residues and non-covalent complexes derived from it

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Karsten; Maheshwary, Shruti; Narayanan, Sukunath; Connors, William; Riedrich, Matthias; Printz, Michael; Richert, Clemens

    2005-01-01

    Quinolones are antibacterial drugs that are thought to bind preferentially to disturbed regions of DNA. They do not fall into the classical categories of intercalators, groove binders or electrostatic binders to the backbone. We solved the 3D structure of the DNA duplex (ACGCGU-NA)2, where NA denotes a nalidixic acid residue covalently linked to the 2?-position of 2?-amino-2?-deoxyuridine, by NMR and restrained torsion angle molecular dynamics (MD). In the complex, the quinolones stack on G:C base pairs of the core tetramer and disrupt the terminal A:U base pair. The displaced dA residues can stack on the quinolones, while the uracil rings bind in the minor groove. The duplex-bridging interactions of the drugs and the contacts of the displaced nucleotides explain the high UV-melting temperature for d(ACGCGU-NA)2 of up to 53°C. Further, non-covalently linked complexes between quinolones and DNA of the sequence ACGCGT can be generated via MD using constraints obtained for d(ACGCGU-NA)2. This is demonstrated for unconjugated nalidixic acid and its 6-fluoro derivative. The well-ordered and tightly packed structures thus obtained are compatible with a published model for the quinolone–DNA complex in the active site of gyrases. PMID:16126848

  20. Antimalarial Quinolones: Synthesis, potency, and mechanistic studies

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Rolf W.; Kelly, Jane X.; Smilkstein, Martin J.; Dodean, Rozalia; Hinrichs, David; Riscoe, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    In the present article we examine the antiplasmodial activities of novel quinolone derivatives bearing extended alkyl or alkoxy side chains terminated by a trifluoromethyl group. In the series under investigation, the IC50 values ranged from 1.2 to ? 30 nM against chloroquine-sensitive and multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains. Modest to significant cross-resistance was noted in evaluation of these haloalkyl- and haloalkoxy-quinolones for activity against the atovaquone-resistant clinical isolate Tm90-C2B, indicating that a primary target for some of these compounds is the parasite cytochrome bc1 complex. Additional evidence to support this biochemical mechanism includes the use of oxygen biosensor plate technology to show that the quinolone derivatives block oxygen consumption by parasitized red blood cells in a fashion similar to atovaquone in side-by-side experiments. Atovaquone is extremely potent and is the only drug in clinical use that targets the Plasmodium bc1 complex, but rapid emergence of resistance to it in both mono- and combination therapy is evident and therefore additional drugs are needed to target the cytochrome bc1 complex which are active against atovaquone-resistant parasites. Our study of a number of halogenated alkyl and alkoxy 4(1H)-quinolones highlights the potential for development of “endochin-like quinolones” (ELQ) bearing an extended trifluoroalkyl moiety at the 3-position that exhibit selective antiplasmodial effects in the low nanomolar range and inhibitory activity against chloroquine and atovaquone resistant parasites. Further studies of halogenated alkyl and alkoxy quinolones may lead to the development of safe and effective therapeutics for use in treatment or prevention of malaria and other parasitic diseases. PMID:18082162

  1. Impact of antibacterial drugs on human serum paraoxonase-1 (hPON1) activity: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Söyüt, Hakan; Kaya, Elif Duygu; Beydemir, ?ükrü

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the in vitro effects of the antibacterial drugs, meropenem trihydrate, piperacillin sodium, and cefoperazone sodium, on the activity of human serum paraoxonase (hPON1). Methods hPON1 was purified from human serum using simple chromatographic methods, including DEAE-Sephadex anion exchange and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration chromatography. Results The three antibacterial drugs decreased in vitro hPON1 activity. Inhibition mechanisms meropenem trihydrate was noncompetitive while piperacillin sodium and cefoperazone sodium were competitive. Conclusions Our results showed that antibacterial drugs significantly inhibit hPON1 activity, both in vitro, with rank order meropenem trihydrate piperacillin sodium cefoperazone sodium in vitro. PMID:25183328

  2. DNA replication is the target for the antibacterial effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhou; Wang, Yao; Whittell, Louise R; Jergic, Slobodan; Liu, Michael; Harry, Elizabeth; Dixon, Nicholas E; Kelso, Michael J; Beck, Jennifer L; Oakley, Aaron J

    2014-04-24

    Evidence suggests that some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) possess antibacterial properties with an unknown mechanism. We describe the in vitro antibacterial properties of the NSAIDs carprofen, bromfenac, and vedaprofen, and show that these NSAIDs inhibit the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III ? subunit, an essential interaction hub that acts as a mobile tether on DNA for many essential partner proteins in DNA replication and repair. Crystal structures show that the three NSAIDs bind to the sliding clamp at a common binding site required for partner binding. Inhibition of interaction of the clamp loader and/or the replicative polymerase ? subunit with the sliding clamp is demonstrated using an in vitro DNA replication assay. NSAIDs thus present promising lead scaffolds for novel antibacterial agents targeting the sliding clamp. PMID:24631121

  3. Design of anti-bacterial drug and anti-mycobacterial drug for drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Katsunori

    2002-01-01

    Liposome-encapsulated drugs often exhibit reduced toxicity and have also been shown to enhance retention of drugs in the tissues. Thus, encapsulation of drugs in liposomes has often resulted in an improved overall therapeutic efficacy. The results of efficacy of liposome-encapsulated ciplofloxacin or azithromycin for therapy of intracellular M. avium infection show enhanced cellular delivery of liposome-encapsulated antibiotics and suggest that efficiency of intracellular targeting is sufficient to mediate enhanced antimycobacterial effects. The antitubercular drugs encapsulated in lung specific stealth liposomes have enhanced efficacies against tuberculosis infection in mice. These results from stealth liposome study indicate that antitubercular drugs encapsulated in liposome may provide therapeutic advantages over the existing chemotherapeutic regimen for tuberculosis. Liposomes with encapsulated amikacin are able to protect collagen almost completely from adherence of bacterial cells of all strains examined and prevent from invading of bacteria. PMID:12069384

  4. Antitubercular and antibacterial activity of quinonoid natural products against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Dey, Diganta; Ray, Ratnamala; Hazra, Banasri

    2014-07-01

    Multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacterial pathogens represent a major threat to human health. In view of the critical need to augment the current drug regime, we have investigated therapeutic potential of five quinonoids, viz. emodin, diospyrin, plumbagin, menadione and thymoquinone, derived from natural products. The antimicrobial activity of quinonoids was evaluated against a broad panel of multi-drug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB) strains, rapid growing mycobacteria and other bacterial isolates, some of which were producers of ?-lactamase, Extended-spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL), AmpC ?-lactamase, metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) enzymes, as well as their drug-sensitive ATCC counterparts. All the tested quinones exhibited antimycobacterial and broad spectrum antibacterial activity, particularly against M. tuberculosis (lowest MIC 0.25?µg/mL) and Gram-positive bacteria (lowest MIC <4?µg/mL) of clinical origin. The order of antitubercular activity of the tested quinonoids was plumbagin?>?emodin?~?menadione?~?thymoquinone?>?diospyrin, whereas their antibacterial efficacy was plumbagin?>?menadione?~?thymoquinone?>?diospyrin?>?emodin. Furthermore, this is the first evaluation performed on these quinonoids against a broad panel of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive clinical isolates, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:24318724

  5. Antibacterial drugs as corrosion inhibitors for bronze surfaces in acidic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Ileana; Varvara, Simona; Gaina, Luiza; Muresan, Liana Maria

    2014-12-01

    The present study is aiming to investigate the effect of four antibiotics (amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, doxycycline and streptomycin,) belonging to different classes of antibacterial drugs on bronze corrosion in a solution simulating an acid rain (pH 4). Due to their ability to form protective films on the metal surface, the tested antibiotics act as corrosion inhibitors for bronze. The antibiotics were tested at various concentrations in order to determine the optimal concentration range for the best corrosion inhibiting effect. In evaluating the inhibition efficiency, polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, SEM and XPS measurements were used. Moreover, a correlation between the inhibition efficiency of some antibacterial drugs and certain molecular parameters was determined by quantum chemical computations. Parameters like energies EHOMO and ELUMO and HOMO-LUMO energy gap were used for correlation with the corrosion data.

  6. Nanosilver-based antibacterial drugs and devices: mechanisms, methodological drawbacks, and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Rizzello, Loris; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Despite the current advancement in drug discovery and pharmaceutical biotechnology, infection diseases induced by bacteria continue to be one of the greatest health problems worldwide, afflicting millions of people annually. Almost all microorganisms have, in fact, an intrinsic outstanding ability to flout many therapeutic interventions, thanks to their fast and easy-to-occur evolutionary genetic mechanisms. At the same time, big pharmaceutical companies are losing interest in new antibiotics development, shifting their capital investments in much more profitable research and development fields. New smart solutions are, thus, required to overcome such concerns, and should combine the feasibility of industrial production processes with cheapness and effectiveness. In this framework, nanotechnology-based solutions, and in particular silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), have recently emerged as promising candidates in the market as new antibacterial agents. AgNPs display, in fact, enhanced broad-range antibacterial/antiviral properties, and their synthesis procedures are quite cost effective. However, despite their increasing impact on the market, many relevant issues are still open. These include the molecular mechanisms governing the AgNPs-bacteria interactions, the physico-chemical parameters underlying their toxicity to prokaryotes, the lack of standardized methods and materials, and the uncertainty in the definition of general strategies to develop smart antibacterial drugs and devices based on nanosilver. In this review, we analyze the experimental data on the bactericidal effects of AgNPs, discussing the complex scenario and presenting the potential drawbacks and limitations in the techniques and methods employed. Moreover, after analyzing in depth the main mechanisms involved, we provide some general strategies/procedures to perform antibacterial tests of AgNPs, and propose some general guidelines for the design of antibacterial nanosystems and devices based on silver/nanosilver. PMID:24292075

  7. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent.

    PubMed

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F N; Hamed, Maha I; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Hedrick, Victoria E; Paul, Lake N; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin's ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (?-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections. PMID:26553420

  8. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Hamed, Maha I.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin’s ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (?-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections. PMID:26553420

  9. Structural basis of DNA gyrase inhibition by antibacterial QPT-1, anticancer drug etoposide and moxifloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pan F.; Srikannathasan, Velupillai; Huang, Jianzhong; Cui, Haifeng; Fosberry, Andrew P.; Gu, Minghua; Hann, Michael M.; Hibbs, Martin; Homes, Paul; Ingraham, Karen; Pizzollo, Jason; Shen, Carol; Shillings, Anthony J.; Spitzfaden, Claus E.; Tanner, Robert; Theobald, Andrew J.; Stavenger, Robert A.; Bax, Benjamin D.; Gwynn, Michael N.

    2015-01-01

    New antibacterials are needed to tackle antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Type IIA topoisomerases (topo2As), the targets of fluoroquinolones, regulate DNA topology by creating transient double-strand DNA breaks. Here we report the first co-crystal structures of the antibacterial QPT-1 and the anticancer drug etoposide with Staphylococcus aureus DNA gyrase, showing binding at the same sites in the cleaved DNA as the fluoroquinolone moxifloxacin. Unlike moxifloxacin, QPT-1 and etoposide interact with conserved GyrB TOPRIM residues rationalizing why QPT-1 can overcome fluoroquinolone resistance. Our data show etoposide's antibacterial activity is due to DNA gyrase inhibition and suggests other anticancer agents act similarly. Analysis of multiple DNA gyrase co-crystal structures, including asymmetric cleavage complexes, led to a ‘pair of swing-doors' hypothesis in which the movement of one DNA segment regulates cleavage and religation of the second DNA duplex. This mechanism can explain QPT-1's bacterial specificity. Structure-based strategies for developing topo2A antibacterials are suggested. PMID:26640131

  10. Structural basis of DNA gyrase inhibition by antibacterial QPT-1, anticancer drug etoposide and moxifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pan F; Srikannathasan, Velupillai; Huang, Jianzhong; Cui, Haifeng; Fosberry, Andrew P; Gu, Minghua; Hann, Michael M; Hibbs, Martin; Homes, Paul; Ingraham, Karen; Pizzollo, Jason; Shen, Carol; Shillings, Anthony J; Spitzfaden, Claus E; Tanner, Robert; Theobald, Andrew J; Stavenger, Robert A; Bax, Benjamin D; Gwynn, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    New antibacterials are needed to tackle antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Type IIA topoisomerases (topo2As), the targets of fluoroquinolones, regulate DNA topology by creating transient double-strand DNA breaks. Here we report the first co-crystal structures of the antibacterial QPT-1 and the anticancer drug etoposide with Staphylococcus aureus DNA gyrase, showing binding at the same sites in the cleaved DNA as the fluoroquinolone moxifloxacin. Unlike moxifloxacin, QPT-1 and etoposide interact with conserved GyrB TOPRIM residues rationalizing why QPT-1 can overcome fluoroquinolone resistance. Our data show etoposide's antibacterial activity is due to DNA gyrase inhibition and suggests other anticancer agents act similarly. Analysis of multiple DNA gyrase co-crystal structures, including asymmetric cleavage complexes, led to a 'pair of swing-doors' hypothesis in which the movement of one DNA segment regulates cleavage and religation of the second DNA duplex. This mechanism can explain QPT-1's bacterial specificity. Structure-based strategies for developing topo2A antibacterials are suggested. PMID:26640131

  11. Nanomechanics of Drug-target Interactions and Antibacterial Resistance Detection

    PubMed Central

    Ndieyira, Joseph W.; Watari, Moyu; McKendry, Rachel A.

    2013-01-01

    The cantilever sensor, which acts as a transducer of reactions between model bacterial cell wall matrix immobilized on its surface and antibiotic drugs in solution, has shown considerable potential in biochemical sensing applications with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity1-5. The drug-target interactions generate surface stress, causing the cantilever to bend, and the signal can be analyzed optically when it is illuminated by a laser. The change in surface stress measured with nano-scale precision allows disruptions of the biomechanics of model bacterial cell wall targets to be tracked in real time. Despite offering considerable advantages, multiple cantilever sensor arrays have never been applied in quantifying drug-target binding interactions. Here, we report on the use of silicon multiple cantilever arrays coated with alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers mimicking bacterial cell wall matrix to quantitatively study antibiotic binding interactions. To understand the impact of vancomycin on the mechanics of bacterial cell wall structures1,6,7. We developed a new model1 which proposes that cantilever bending can be described by two independent factors; i) namely a chemical factor, which is given by a classical Langmuir adsorption isotherm, from which we calculate the thermodynamic equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) and ii) a geometrical factor, essentially a measure of how bacterial peptide receptors are distributed on the cantilever surface. The surface distribution of peptide receptors (p) is used to investigate the dependence of geometry and ligand loading. It is shown that a threshold value of p ~10% is critical to sensing applications. Below which there is no detectable bending signal while above this value, the bending signal increases almost linearly, revealing that stress is a product of a local chemical binding factor and a geometrical factor combined by the mechanical connectivity of reacted regions and provides a new paradigm for design of powerful agents to combat superbug infections. PMID:24192763

  12. Peptide deformylase: a new target in antibacterial, antimalarial and anticancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Sangshetti, Jaiprakash N; Khan, Firoz A Kalam; Shinde, Devanand B

    2015-01-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is a class of metalloenzyme responsible for catalyzing the removal of the N-formyl group from N-terminal methionine following translation. PDF inhibitors are moving into new phase of drug development. Initially, PDF was considered as an important target in antibacterial drug discovery; however genome database searches have revealed PDF-like sequences in parasites (P. falciparum) and human, widening the utility of this target in antimalarial and anticancer drug discovery along with antibacterial. Using structural and mechanistic information together with high throughput screening, several types of chemical classes of PDF inhibitors with improved efficacy and specificity have been identified. Various drugs like, GSK-1322322 (Phase II), BB-83698 (Phase I), and LBM-415 (Phase I) have entered into clinical developments. Developments in the field have prompted us to review the current aspects of PDFs, especially their structures, different classes of PDF inhibitors, and molecular modeling studies. In nut shell, this review enlightens PDF as a versatile target along with its inhibitors and future perspectives of different PDF inhibitors. PMID:25174923

  13. Comparative study of four fluorinated quinolones in susceptibility factors on microorganisms 

    E-print Network

    Patel, Ketul R

    2013-02-22

    Widely considered in the medical field as the last of the golden anti-microbial drugs, fluorinated quinolones provide a "last defense" for the attack on bacterial infections. The drugs are useful for treating gram negative and some gram positive...

  14. Pulmonary drug delivery: a review on nanocarriers for antibacterial chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Sastre, M; Pastor, M; Salomon, C J; Esquisabel, A; Pedraz, J L

    2015-11-01

    As the WHO stated, lower respiratory infections are the third leading cause of death. In addition, it is remarkable that antimicrobial resistance represents a huge threat. Thus, new therapeutic weapons are required. Among the possible alternatives, antibiotic encapsulation in nanoparticles has gained much attention in terms of improved tolerability, activity and ability to combat the resistance mechanisms of bacteria. In this regard, this review article focuses on the latest nanocarrier approaches for inhalatory therapy of antibiotics. First, the technology related to lung disposition will be reviewed. Then, nanocarrier systems will be introduced and the challenges required to perform adequate pulmonary deposition analysed. In the following part, drug delivery systems (DDSs) on the market or in clinical trials are described and, finally, new approaches of nanoparticles that have reached pre-clinical stage are enumerated. Altogether, this review aims at gathering together the novel nanosystems for anti-infectious therapy, underlining the potential of DDSs to improve and optimize currently available antibiotic therapies in the context of lung infections. PMID:26203182

  15. Fate and antibacterial potency of anticoccidial drugs and their main abiotic degradation products.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Martin; Krogh, Kristine A; Brandt, Asbjørn; Christensen, Jan H; Halling-Sørensen, Bent

    2009-02-01

    The antibacterial potency of eight anticoccidial drugs was tested in a soil bacteria bioassay (pour plate method), EC(50)-values between 2.4 and 19.6 microM were obtained; however, one compound, nicarbazin exhibited an EC(50)-value above the maximum tested concentration (21 microM, 9.1 mg L(-1)). The potency of mixtures of two of the compounds, narasin and nicarbazin, was synergistic (more than additive) with 10-fold greater antibacterial potency of the mixture than can be explained by their individual EC(50)-values. The influence of pH, temperature, oxygen concentration and light on the transformation of robenidine and salinomycin was investigated. Robenidine was transformed by photolysis (DT(50) of 4.1 days) and was unstable at low pH (DT(50) of approximately 4 days); salinomycin was merely transformed at low pH, the latter into an unknown number of products. The antibacterial potency of the mixtures of transformation products of robenidine after photolysis and at low pH was comparable with that of the parent compound. Finally five photo-transformation products of robenidine were structural elucidated by accurate mass measurements, i-FIT values (isotopic pattern fit) and MS/MS fragmentation patterns. PMID:18976841

  16. Improvement of antibacterial activity of some sulfa drugs through linkage to certain phthalazin-1(2H)-one scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hany S; Eldehna, Wagdy M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Aziz, Marwa M

    2014-10-01

    RAB1 5 is a lead antibacterial agent in which trimethoprim is linked to phthalazine moiety. Similarly, our strategy in this research depends on the interconnection between some sulfa drugs and certain phthalazin-1(2H)-one scaffolds in an attempt to enhance their antibacterial activity. This approach was achieved through the combination of 4-substituted phthalazin-1(2H)-ones 9a, b or 14a, b with sulfanilamide 1a, sulfathiazole 1b or sulfadiazine 1c through amide linkers 6a, b to produce the target compounds 10a-d and 15a-e, respectively. The antibacterial activity of the newly synthesized compounds showed that all tested compounds have antibacterial activity higher than that of their reference sulfa drugs 1a-c. Compound 10c represented the highest antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus with MIC = 0.39 ?mol/mL. Moreover, compound 10d displayed excellent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium with MIC = 0.39 and 0.78 ?mol/mL, respectively. PMID:25113876

  17. Antibacterial effect of Allium sativum cloves and Zingiber officinale rhizomes against multiple-drug resistant clinical pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Karuppiah, Ponmurugan; Rajaram, Shyamkumar

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antibacterial properties of Allium sativum (garlic) cloves and Zingiber officinale (ginger) rhizomes against multi-drug resistant clinical pathogens causing nosocomial infection. Methods The cloves of garlic and rhizomes of ginger were extracted with 95% (v/v) ethanol. The ethanolic extracts were subjected to antibacterial sensitivity test against clinical pathogens. Results Anti-bacterial potentials of the extracts of two crude garlic cloves and ginger rhizomes were tested against five gram negative and two gram positive multi-drug resistant bacteria isolates. All the bacterial isolates were susceptible to crude extracts of both plants extracts. Except Enterobacter sp. and Klebsiella sp., all other isolates were susceptible when subjected to ethanolic extracts of garlic and ginger. The highest inhibition zone was observed with garlic (19.45 mm) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). The minimal inhibitory concentration was as low as 67.00 µg/mL against P. aeruginosa. Conclusions Natural spices of garlic and ginger possess effective anti-bacterial activity against multi-drug clinical pathogens and can be used for prevention of drug resistant microbial diseases and further evaluation is necessary. PMID:23569978

  18. One-pot synthesis of antibacterial chitosan/silver bio-nanocomposite hydrogel beads as drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Yadollahi, Mehdi; Farhoudian, Sana; Namazi, Hassan

    2015-08-01

    Silver nanoparticles were synthesized in situ during the formation of physically crosslinked chitosan hydrogel beads using sodium tripolyphosphate as the crosslinker. The aim of the study was to investigate whether these nanocomposite beads have the potential to be used in drug delivery applications. The formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the hydrogels was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy studies. Furthermore, the antibacterial and swelling properties of the beads were studied. The nanocomposite hydrogels demonstrated good antibacterial effects against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. AgNPs caused an increase in the swelling capacity of the beads. In vitro drug release test was carried out to prove the effectiveness of this novel type of nanocomposite beads as a controlled drug delivery system. Prolonged and more controlled drug releases were observed for AgNPs containing chitosan beads, which increased by the increase in AgNPs content. PMID:25931399

  19. Nanotechnology approaches for antibacterial drug delivery: Preparation and microbiological evaluation of fusogenic liposomes carrying fusidic acid.

    PubMed

    Nicolosi, Daria; Cupri, Sarha; Genovese, Carlo; Tempera, Gianna; Mattina, Roberto; Pignatello, Rosario

    2015-06-01

    Many antibacterial drugs have some difficulty passing through the bacterial cell membrane, especially if they have a high molecular weight or large spatial structure. Consequently, intrinsic resistance is shown by some bacterial strains. Reduced cell membrane permeability is one of the mechanisms of resistance known for fusidic acid (FUS), a bacteriostatic steroidal compound with activity limited to Gram-positive bacteria. Moreover, the lipophilic character of FUS has been shown to cause drug retention inside the bilayers of cell membranes, preventing its diffusion towards target sites inside the cytoplasm. Targeting antimicrobial agents by means of liposomes may be a valid strategy in the treatment of infections refractory to conventional routes of antimicrobial treatment. On this basis, loading of FUS in fusogenic liposomes (FLs) was planned in this study. Fusogenic small unilamellar vesicles loaded with FUS were produced to evaluate their influence on improving the cell penetration and antibacterial activity of the antibiotic. The produced carriers were technologically characterised and were subjected to an in vitro microbiological assay against several strains of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The experimental results showed that encapsulating FUS in a liposomal carrier can improve antimicrobial efficacy and reduce the effective concentration required, probably through putative mechanisms of increased diffusion through the bacterial cell membrane. In fact, whilst free FUS was active only on the tested Gram-positive strains, incubation of FUS-loaded FLs exhibited growth inhibitory activity both against Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. The lowest MICs were obtained against Staphylococcus epidermidis (?0.15 ?g/mL) and Acinetobacter baumannii (37.5 ?g/mL) clinical strains. PMID:25816979

  20. Novel N-2-(Furyl)-2-(chlorobenzyloxyimino) Ethyl Piperazinyl Quinolones: Synthesis, Cytotoxic Evaluation and Structure-Activity Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadhosseini, Negar; Pordeli, Mahboobeh; Safavi, Maliheh; Firoozpour, Loghman; Amin, Fatame; Kabudanian Ardestani, Sussan; Edraki, Najmeh; Shafiee, Abbas; Foroumadi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone antibacterials are one of the most important classes of pharmacological agents known as potent inhibitors of bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV that efficiently inhibit DNA replication and transcription by generating several double-stranded DNA break. Some quinolone derivatives demonstrated inhibitory potential against eukaryote topoismarase II and substantial dose-dependent cytotoxic potential against some cancerous cells. In present study, synthesis and cytotoxic activity evaluation of new series of N-pipearzinyl quinolones containing N-2-(furyl-2 or 3-yl)-2-(chlorobenzyloxyimino) ethyl moiety 7a-i have been studied. Reaction of quinolone, with 2-bromo-1-(furan-2 or 3-yl)ethanone-O-substituted chlorobenzyloxime in DMF in presence of NaHCO3 at room temperature, gave the title compounds N-2-(furan-2 or 3-yl)-2-(chlorobenzyloxyiminoethyl) quinolone 7a-i. Synthesized compounds were further evaluated in-vitro against three human breast tumor cell lines. Preliminary screening indicated that compound 7 g demonstrated significant growth inhibitory potential against all evaluated cell lines. The results of structure-activity relationship study exhibited that quinolone derivatives are superior in cytotoxic potential compared to 1, 8-naphthyridone series. Furthermore, ethyl quinolone derivatives were more potent cytotoxic agents comparing with cyclopropyl quinolones.

  1. The mode of action of anticoccidial quinolones (6-decyloxy-4-hydroxyquinoline-3-carboxylates) in chickens.

    PubMed

    Williams, R B

    1997-01-01

    The anticoccidial mode of action of quinolones (6-decyloxy-4-hydroxyquinoline-3-carboxylates) against Eimeria tenella and E. acervulina in chickens has been investigated, using decoquinate and M&B 15,584 as examples. The well known static effect on sporozoites of relatively high continuous drug concentrations in the food masked other components of the mode of action, newly described here. Lower concentrations of quinolones allowed sporozoites to continue their development. First-stage schizonts were susceptible to a secondary cidal effect, although later schizonts seemed to be rather refractory. Furthermore, the sporulation of oocysts produced by E. tenella that completed its life cycle in the presence of suboptimal concentrations of quinolones was inhibited: this probably reflects a drug effect on gametocytes. Quinolones were absorbed rapidly from the chicken intestine, probably in less than 1 h. Drug withdrawal experiments showed that quinolones persisted in chicken tissues at active concentrations for up to 48 h. Despite their static effect on sporozoites, they may nevertheless be expected to exert a therapeutic effect against drug-sensitive coccidia in interrupted regimes that allow the later cidal effect to come into play. This allows immunity to coccidiosis to develop in the presence of drug. These new results, with the previously available data have been combined in an updated account of the anticoccidial mode of action of quinolones in the chicken. PMID:9076535

  2. Immobilisation of an antibacterial drug to Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaithilingam, Jayasheelan; Kilsby, Samuel; Goodridge, Ruth D.; Christie, Steven D. R.; Edmondson, Steve; Hague, Richard J. M.

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial infections from biomedical implants and surgical devices are a major problem in orthopaedic, dental and vascular surgery. Although the sources of contaminations that lead to bacterial infections are known, it is not possible to control or avoid such infections completely. In this study, an approach to immobilise Ciprofloxacin® (an antibacterial drug) to phosphonic acid based self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) adsorbed on a selectively laser melted (SLM) Ti6Al4V structure, has been presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and static water contact angle measurements confirmed the attachment of SAMs and the drug. Results showed that Ciprofloxacin® is highly stable under the oxidative conditions used in this study. In-vitro stability was estimated by immersing the Ciprofloxacin® immobilised substrates in 10 mM of Tris-HCl buffer (pH-7.4) for 42 days. The Tris-HCl buffer was analysed using UV-vis spectrophotometry at 7, 14, 28 and 42 day time intervals to determine the release of the immobilised drug. The drug was observed to release in a sustained manner. 50% of the drug was released after 4 weeks with approximately 40% of the drug remaining after 6 weeks. Antibacterial susceptibility tests revealed that the immobilised drug was therapeutically active upon its release. This study demonstrates the potential to use self-assembled monolayers to modify SLM fabricated surfaces with therapeutics.

  3. Two approaches to form antibacterial surface: Doping with bactericidal element and drug loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhorukova, I. V.; Sheveyko, A. N.; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, Ph. V.; Anisimova, N. Y.; Gloushankova, N. A.; Zhitnyak, I. Y.; Benesova, J.; Amler, E.; Shtansky, D. V.

    2015-03-01

    Two approaches (surface doping with bactericidal element and loading of antibiotic into specially formed surface microcontainers) to the fabrication of antibacterial yet biocompatible and bioactive surfaces are described. A network structure with square-shaped blind pores of 2.6 ± 0.6 × 10-3 mm3 for drug loading was obtained by selective laser sintering (SLS). The SLS-fabricated samples were loaded with 0.03, 0.3, 2.4, and 4 mg/cm2 of co-amoxiclav (amoxicillin and clavulanic acid). Ag-doped TiCaPCON films with 0.4, 1.2, and 4.0 at.% of Ag were obtained by co-sputtering of composite TiC0.5-Ca3(PO4)2 and metallic Ag targets. The surface structure of SLS-prepared samples and cross-sectional morphology of TiCaPCON-Ag films were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The through-thickness of Ag distribution in the TiCaPCON-Ag films was obtained by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The kinetics of Ag ion release in normal saline solution was studied using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Bacterial activity of the samples was evaluated against S. epidermidis, S. aureus, and K. pneum. ozaenae using the agar diffusion test and photometric method by controlling the variation of optical density of the bacterial suspension over time. Cytocompatibility of the Ag-doped TiCaPCON films was observed in vitro using chondrocytic and MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. The viability and proliferation of chondrocytic cells were determined using the MTS assay and PicoGreen assay tests, respectively. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of the SLS-fabricated samples loaded with co-amoxiclav was also studied. The obtained results showed that the moderate bacteriostatic effect of the Ag-doped TiCaPCON films is mainly manifested in the change of bacterial colony morphology and optical densities of bacteria suspensions. In contrast, the SLS-prepared samples showed a very rapid initial drug release resulting in strong bactericidal effect just from the start of the test and for as long as several days. Cytocompatibility and ALP activity tests demonstrated that it is possible to achieve a pronounced antibacterial effect compatible or even higher than that in the control sample (standard disk loaded with the amoxicillin/clavulanic acid mixture (30 ?g)) without compromising the material biocompatibility and bioactivity.

  4. 1. (a) Why are DNA-targeted drugs largely used as anticancer agents and not as, say, antibacterial or antifungal agents?

    E-print Network

    Gates, Kent. S.

    CHEM 4170 Homework 4 1. (a) Why are DNA-targeted drugs largely used as anticancer agents and not as, say, antibacterial or antifungal agents? (b) Provide an explanation for how anticancer drugs can-damaging drugs mentioned in Question 1). (b) However, some medicinal chemists believe that these compounds

  5. Proteomics Evidence for the Activity of the Putative Antibacterial Plant Alkaloid (-)-Roemerine: Mainstreaming Omics-Guided Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Gokgoz, Nilay Budeyri; Akbulut, Berna Sariyar

    2015-08-01

    Discovery of new antibacterials with novel mechanisms is important to counteract the ingenious resistance mechanisms of bacteria. In this connection, omics-guided drug discovery offers a rigorous method in the quest of new antibacterials. (-)-Roemerine is a plant alkaloid that has been reported to possess putative antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Salmonella typhimurium. The aim of the present study was to characterize the activity of (-)-roemerine in Escherichia coli TB1 using proteomics tools. With (-)-roemerine treatment, we found limited permeability through the outer membrane and repression of transport proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, resulting in poor carbon source availability. The shortfall of intracellular carbon sources in turn led to impaired cell growth. The reduction in the abundance of proteins related to translational machinery, amino acid biosynthesis, and metabolism was accompanied by a nutrient-limited state. The latter finding could suggest a metabolic shutdown in E. coli cells. High osmolarity was clearly not one of the reasons of bacterial death by (-)-roemerine. These observations collectively attest to the promise of plant omics and profiling of putative drug candidates using proteomics tools. Omics-guided drug discovery deserves greater attention in mainstream pharmacology so as to better understand the plants' medicinal potentials. PMID:26230533

  6. Antibacterial activity of herbal extracts against multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli recovered from retail chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Arfat Yousaf; Sheikh, Ali Ahmad; Rabbani, Masood; Aslam, Asim; Bibi, Tasra; Liaqat, Fakhra; Muhammad, Javed; Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima

    2015-07-01

    Increasing incidence rate of multiple drug resistance in Escherichia coli (E. coli) due to extensive uses of antibiotics is a serious challenge to disease treatment. Contaminated retail chicken meat is one of the major sources of spread of multi drug resistant (MDR) E. coli. Current study has been conducted to study the prevalence of MDR E. coli in retail chicken meat samples from Lahore city of Pakistan and it was found that 73.86% of E. coli isolates have MDR pattern. In vitro evaluation of antibacterial activity of crude ethanolic extracts of six herbs against MDR E. coli phenotypes has revealed that clove and cinnamon have maximum zones of inhibition as compared to other herbal extracts. Mint and coriander gave the intermediate results while garlic and kalonji showed the least antibacterial activity against the MDR E. coli phenotypes using the agar well diffusion technique. Average Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) for clove, mint, cinnamon, coriander, kalonji and garlic extracts were 1.15, 1.38, 0.5, 1.99, 2.41, 8.60 mg/mL respectively using the broth micro dilution method. The results obtained in present study were revealed that crude ethanol extracts of selected herbs have had significant antibacterial activity. Hence they can be used as promising alternatives of antimicrobials against MDR E. coli species and can be used for cooked food preservation. PMID:26142503

  7. 75 FR 33317 - Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and Drug Development Research for Bacterial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... diagnosis and treatment of bacterial diseases. The input from this public workshop will help in developing... diagnostics in the diagnosis and management of bacterial infections, and (4) the science of antibacterial...

  8. Antibacterial to antifungal conversion of neamine aminoglycosides through alkyl modification. Strategy for reviving old drugs into agrofungicides.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Wei T; Fosso, Marina; Kawasaki, Yukie; Shrestha, Sanjib; Bensaci, Mekki F; Wang, Jinhua; Evans, Conrad K; Takemoto, Jon Y

    2010-11-01

    Many Actinomycetes aminoglycosides are widely used antibiotics. Although mainly antibacterials, a few known aminoglycosides also inhibit yeasts, protozoans and important crop pathogenic fungal oomycetes. Here we show that attachment of a C8 alkyl chain to ring III of a neamine-based aminoglycoside specifically at the 4?-o position yields a broad-spectrum fungicide (FG08) without the antibacterial properties typical for aminoglycosides. Leaf infection assays and greenhouse studies show that FG08 is capable of suppressing wheat fungal infections by Fusarium graminearum-the causative agent of Fusarium head blight-at concentrations that are minimally phytotoxic. Unlike typical aminoglycoside action of ribosomal protein translation miscoding, FG08's antifungal action involves perturbation of the plasma membrane. This antibacterial to antifungal transformation could pave the way for the development of a new class of aminoglycoside-based fungicides suitable for use in crop disease applications. In addition, this strategy is an example of reviving a clinically obsolete drug by simple chemical modification to yield a new application. PMID:20924381

  9. Clinical Importance and Epidemiology of Quinolone Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eu Suk

    2014-01-01

    The quinolone class of antimicrobial agents is one of most widely used classes of antimicrobial agents in outpatient and inpatient treatment. However, quinolone resistance in gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria has emerged and increased globally. This resistance limits the usefulness of quinolones in clinical practice. The review summarizes mechanisms of quinolone resistance and its epidemiology and implications in the most common clinical settings, urinary tract infections, respiratory tract infections, intraabdominal infections, skin and skin structure infections, and sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:25566402

  10. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George A.; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Hooper, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Three mechanisms for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) have been discovered since 1998. Plasmid genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, and qnrVC code for proteins of the pentapeptide repeat family that protects DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from quinolone inhibition. The qnr genes appear to have been acquired from chromosomal genes in aquatic bacteria, are usually associated with mobilizing or transposable elements on plasmids, and are often incorporated into sul1-type integrons. The second plasmid-mediated mechanism involves acetylation of quinolones with an appropriate amino nitrogen target by a variant of the common aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6?)-Ib. The third mechanism is enhanced efflux produced by plasmid genes for pumps QepAB and OqxAB. PMQR has been found in clinical and environmental isolates around the world and appears to be spreading. The plasmid-mediated mechanisms provide only low-level resistance that by itself does not exceed the clinical breakpoint for susceptibility but nonetheless facilitates selection of higher-level resistance and makes infection by pathogens containing PMQR harder to treat. PMID:25584197

  11. Kinetic assessment of the potassium ferrate(VI) oxidation of antibacterial drug sulfamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virender K; Mishra, Santosh K; Ray, Ajay K

    2006-01-01

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX), a worldwide-applied antibacterial drug, was recently found in surface waters and in secondary wastewater effluents, which may result in ecotoxical effects in the environment. Herein, removal of SMX by environmentally-friendly oxidant, potassium ferrate(VI) (K(2)FeO(4)), is sought by studying the kinetics of the reaction between Fe(VI) and SMX as a function of pH (6.93-9.50) and temperature (15-45 degrees C). The rate law for the oxidation of SMX by Fe(VI) is first-order with respect to each reactant. The observed second-order rate constant decreased non-linearly from 1.33+/-0.08 x 10(3) M(-1)s(-1) to 1.33+/-0.10 x 10(0) M(-1)s(-1) with an increase of pH from 7.00 to 9.50. This is related to protonation of Fe(VI) (HFeO(4)(-) <==> H(+) + FeO(4)(2-); pK(a,HFeO(4)) = 7.23) and sulfamethoxazole (SH <==> H(+) + S(-); pK(a,SH)=5.7). The estimated rate constants were k(11)(HFeO(4)(-) + SH) = 3.0 x 10(4) M(-1)s(-1), k(12)(HFeO(4)(-) + S(-)) = 1.7 x 10(2) M(-1)s(-1), and k(13) (FeO(4)(2-) + SH) = 1.2 x 10(0) M(-1)s(-1). The energy of activation at pH 7.0 was found to be 1.86+/-0.04 kJ mol(-1). If excess potassium ferrate(VI) concentration (10 microM) is used than the SMX in water, the half-life of the reaction using a rate constant obtained in our study would be approximately 2 min at pH 7. The reaction rates are pH dependent; thus, so are the half-lives of the reactions. The results suggest that K(2)FeO(4) has the potential to serve as an oxidative treatment chemical for removing SMX in water. PMID:15950258

  12. Antibacterial activities of Beilschmiedia obscura and six other Cameroonian medicinal plants against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The rapid spread of bacteria expressing multi-drug resistance propels the search for new antibacterial agents. The present study was designed to evaluate the antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts from Beilschmiedia obscura and six other Cameroonian plants against a panel of twenty nine Gram-negative bacteria including Multi-drug resistant (MDR) phenotypes. Methods The phytochemical investigations of the extracts were carried out according to the standard methods and the liquid micro-dilution assay was used for all antibacterial assays. Results Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of alkaloids in all studied extracts. Other chemical classes of secondary metabolites such as anthocyanines, anthraquinones flavonoids, saponins, tannins, sterols and triterpenes were selectively detected in the extracts. The extract from the fruits of Beilschmiedia obscura, Pachypodanthium staudtii leaves and Peperomia fernandopoiana (whole plant) displayed the best spectrum of activity with MIC values ranging from 16 to 1024 ?g/mL against at least 65% and above of the tested bacteria. The extract from Beilschmiedia obscura was the most active with MIC values below 100 ?g/mL against ten of the tested bacteria. This extract also showed MBC values below 1024 ?g/mL against 55.17% of the studied microorganisms. Phenylalanine arginine ?-naphthylamide (PA?N) significantly modulated the activities of extracts from the leaves and fruits of Pachypodanthium staudtii and Beilschmiedia obscura respectively, by increasing their inhibitory activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae KP55 strain at least four fold. Conclusion The overall results of the present investigation provide information for the possible use of the methanol extracts of the studied plant species, especially B. obscura to fight infectious diseases caused by Gram-negative bacteria including MDR phenotypes. PMID:25023038

  13. Anti-Mycobacterium avium activity of quinolones: in vitro activities.

    PubMed Central

    Klopman, G; Wang, S; Jacobs, M R; Bajaksouzian, S; Edmonds, K; Ellner, J J

    1993-01-01

    The MICs of 88 quinolones against 14 selected reference and clinical strains of Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellular complex were determined. Agents tested included ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin (PD 131501), and 86 other experimental quinolones. Test strains were selected to represent various susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin and other drug resistance profiles. MICs were determined by the microdilution method in 7HSF broth, with incubation for 14 days at 35 degrees C. The results showed 25 of the quinolones to be active against the strains, with MICs for 90% of the strains (MIC90s) of 2 to 32 micrograms/ml. Ten of these compounds had activities equivalent to or greater than that of ciprofloxacin. The most active compound was PD 125354, with an MIC50 of 0.5 micrograms/ml and an MIC90 of 2 micrograms/ml; comparable values for ciprofloxacin were 4 and 8 micrograms/ml, respectively. The next most active compounds, with MIC90s of 4 micrograms/ml, were sparfloxacin (PD 131501), PD 123982, PD 135144, and PD 119421. MIC90s of PD 131575, PD 126889, PD 122642, PD 139586, and PD 143289 were 8 micrograms/ml. Further evaluation of the most active agents is warranted, as is assessment of structure-activity relationships of active and inactive agents to elucidate the active portions of the compounds and to lead to the development of compounds with enhanced activity. PMID:8239587

  14. In vitro anti-Mycobacterium avium activities of quinolones: predicted active structures and mechanistic considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Klopman, G; Li, J Y; Wang, S; Pearson, A J; Chang, K; Jacobs, M R; Bajaksouzian, S; Ellner, J J

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between the structures of quinolones and their anti-Mycobacterium avium activities has been previously derived by using the Multiple Computer-Automated Structure Evaluation program. A number of substructural constraints required to overcome the resistance of most of the strains have been identified. Nineteen new quinolones which qualify under these substructural requirements were identified by the program and subsequently tested. The results show that the substructural attributes identified by the program produced a successful a priori prediction of the anti-M. avium activities of the new quinolones. All 19 quinolones were found to be active, and 4 of them are as active or better than ciprofloxacin. With these new quinolones, the updated multiple computer-automated structure evaluation program structure-activity relationship analysis has helped to uncover additional information about the nature of the substituents at the C5 and C7 positions needed for optimal inhibitory activity. A possible explanation of drug resistance based on the observation of suicide inactivation of bacterial cytochrome P-450 by the cyclopropylamine moiety has also been proposed and is discussed in this report. Furthermore, we confirm the view that the amount of the uncharged form present in a neutral pH solution plays a crucial role in the drug's penetration ability. PMID:7986010

  15. MRJP1-containing glycoproteins isolated from honey, a novel antibacterial drug candidate with broad spectrum activity against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin; Lannigan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of extended- spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL) is the underlying cause of growing antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative bacteria to ?-lactam antibiotics. We recently reported the discovery of honey glycoproteins (glps) that exhibited a rapid, concentration-dependent antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli that resembled action of cell wall-active ?-lactam drugs. Glps showed sequence identity with the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 (MRJP1) precursor that harbors three antimicrobial peptides: Jelleins 1, 2, and 4. Here, we used semi-quantitative radial diffusion assay and broth microdilution assay to evaluate susceptibility of a number of multi-drug resistant (MDR) clinical isolates to the MRJP1-contaning honey glycoproteins. The MDR bacterial strains comprised three methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), four Pseudomonas aeruginosa, two Klebsiella pneumoniae, two vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE), and five ESBL identified as one Proteus mirabilis, three E. coli, and one E. coli NDM. Their resistance to different classes of antibiotics was confirmed using automated system Vitek 2. MDR isolates differed in their susceptibility to glps with MIC90 values ranging from 4.8 ?g/ml against B. subtilis to 14.4 ?g/ml against ESBL K. pneumoniae, Klebsiella spp. ESBL and E. coli and up to 33 ?g/ml against highly resistant strains of P. aeruginosa. Glps isolated from different honeys showed a similar ability to overcome bacterial resistance to ?-lactams suggesting that (a) their mode of action is distinct from other classes of ?-lactams and that (b) the common glps structure was the lead structure responsible for the activity. The results of the current study together with our previous evidence of a rapid bactericidal activity of glps demonstrate that glps possess suitable characteristics to be considered a novel antibacterial drug candidate. PMID:26217333

  16. Distribution of Quinolones, Sulfonamides, Tetracyclines in Aquatic Environment and Antibiotic Resistance in Indochina

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Satoru; Hoa, Phan Thi Phuong

    2012-01-01

    Southeast Asia has become the center of rapid industrial development and economic growth. However, this growth has far outpaced investment in public infrastructure, leading to the unregulated release of many pollutants, including wastewater-related contaminants such as antibiotics. Antibiotics are of major concern because they can easily be released into the environment from numerous sources, and can subsequently induce development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Recent studies have shown that for some categories of drugs this source-to-environment antibiotic resistance relationship is more complex. This review summarizes current understanding regarding the presence of quinolones, sulfonamides, and tetracyclines in aquatic environments of Indochina and the prevalence of bacteria resistant to them. Several noteworthy findings are discussed: (1) quinolone contamination and the occurrence of quinolone resistance are not correlated; (2) occurrence of the sul sulfonamide resistance gene varies geographically; and (3) microbial diversity might be related to the rate of oxytetracycline resistance. PMID:22363337

  17. 21 CFR 201.24 - Labeling for systemic antibacterial drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of (insert...or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria. (b) In the “Indications and Usage...reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of...

  18. 21 CFR 201.24 - Labeling for systemic antibacterial drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of (insert...or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria. (b) In the “Indications and Usage...reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of...

  19. 21 CFR 201.24 - Labeling for systemic antibacterial drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of (insert...or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria. (b) In the “Indications and Usage...reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of...

  20. Comparative activity of the topical quinolone OPC-7251 against bacteria associated with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Vogt, K; Hermann, J; Blume, U; Gollnick, H; Hahn, H; Haustein, U F; Orfanos, C E

    1992-10-01

    The antibacterial activity of the topical quinolone OPC-7251 against bacteria commonly found in acne vulgaris was tested in vitro by an agar dilution method. The MIC50 was 0.25 mg/l for Propionibacterium acnes, 0.125 mg/l for Propionibacterium granulosum, 0.03 mg/l for Staphylococcus aureus and 0.06 mg/l for coagulase-negative staphylococci. Compared with seven other antibiotics tested (ciprofloxacin, penicillin, erythromycin, tetracycline, clindamycin, fusidic acid and gentamicin), OPC-7251 had potent activity against both propionibacteria and staphylococci and the lowest incidence of resistant strains. PMID:1486893

  1. Influence of First-Line Antibiotics on the Antibacterial Activities of Acetone Stem Bark Extract of Acacia mearnsii De Wild. against Drug-Resistant Bacterial Isolates.

    PubMed

    Olajuyigbe, Olufunmiso O; Coopoosamy, Roger M

    2014-01-01

    Background. This study was aimed at evaluating the antibacterial activity of the acetone extract of A. mearnsii and its interactions with antibiotics against some resistant bacterial strains. Methods. The antibacterial susceptibility testing was determined by agar diffusion and macrobroth dilution methods while the checkerboard method was used for the determination of synergy between the antibiotics and the extract. Results. The results showed that the susceptibility of the different bacterial isolates was concentration dependent for the extract and the different antibiotics. With the exception of S. marcescens, the inhibition zones of the extract produced by 20?mg/mL ranged between 18 and 32?mm. While metronidazole did not inhibit any of the bacterial isolates, all the antibiotics and their combinations, except for ciprofloxacin and its combination, did not inhibit Enterococcus faecalis. The antibacterial combinations were more of being antagonistic than of being synergistic in the agar diffusion assay. From the macrobroth dilution, the extract and the antibiotics exerted a varied degree of inhibitory effect on the test organisms. The MIC values of the acetone extract which are in mg/mL are lower than those of the different antibiotics which are in ?g/mL. From the checkerboard assay, the antibacterial combinations showed varied degrees of interactions including synergism, additive, indifference, and antagonism interactions. While antagonistic and additive interactions were 14.44%, indifference interaction was 22.22% and synergistic interaction was 37.78% of the antibacterial combinations against the test isolates. While the additivity/indifference interactions indicated no interactions, the antagonistic interaction may be considered as a negative interaction that could result in toxicity and suboptimal bioactivity. Conclusion. The synergistic effects of the herbal-drug combinations may be harnessed for the discovery and development of more rational evidence-based drug combinations with optimized efficiency in the prevention of multidrug resistance and therapy of multifactorial diseases. PMID:25101132

  2. Controlled drug release characteristics and enhanced antibacterial effect of graphene nanosheets containing gentamicin sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Himanshu; Parashar, Vyom; Parashar, Rashmi; Prakash, Rajiv; Ramteke, Promod W.; Pandey, Avinash C.

    2011-10-01

    A novel methanol derived graphene (MDG) and gentamicin sulfate nanohybrid was prepared, and the loading and release behaviour of gentamicin on MDG is investigated. An efficient drug loading of 2.57 mg mg-1 was obtained at pH 7. By applying release kinetic models, the mechanism of release of the drug from the MDG matrix was found to be following the Korsmeyer-Peppas model. However, the diffusional release exponent (n) value lies below 0.5 demonstrating that the mechanism controlling the drug release is the Fickian diffusion.A novel methanol derived graphene (MDG) and gentamicin sulfate nanohybrid was prepared, and the loading and release behaviour of gentamicin on MDG is investigated. An efficient drug loading of 2.57 mg mg-1 was obtained at pH 7. By applying release kinetic models, the mechanism of release of the drug from the MDG matrix was found to be following the Korsmeyer-Peppas model. However, the diffusional release exponent (n) value lies below 0.5 demonstrating that the mechanism controlling the drug release is the Fickian diffusion. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10661a

  3. Resistance pattern of enterobacteriaceae isolates from urinary tract infections to selected quinolones in Yaoundé

    PubMed Central

    Lyonga, Emilia Enjema; Toukam, Michel; Nkenfou, Celine; Gonsu, Hortense Kamga; Assoumou, Marie-Claire Okomo; Mesembe, Martha Tongo; Eyoh, Agnes Bedie; Ikomey, George Mondinde; Ndze, Valantine Ngum; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It is estimated that 150 million urinary tract infections (UTIs) occur yearly worldwide, resulting in more than 6 billion dollar in direct healthcare cost. The etiology of UTIs is predictable, with Escherichia coli, an Enterobacteriaceae being the principal pathogen. Quinolones are usually the drug of choice. In this study, we report the resistance pattern of Enterobacteriaceae isolates from UTIs to quinolones among in-patients and out-patients at the Yaoundé Reference Hospital in Cameroon. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out for a ten-month period. Consecutive clean-catch mid-stream urine samples were collected from 207 in and out-patients. Identification was done using the Api 20E, and susceptibility testing using the Kirby Bauer's disc diffusion method and the MIC was done using the E-test. Results Out of the 207 isolates, 58(28.0%) were found to be resistant to all the quinolones used in the study. The resistances observed by species were in the order: Enterobacter 4(30.8%); Klebsiella 19(29.7%); Escherichia 25 (29.4%); Proteus 2(11.8%); Serratia 4(25.0%). Quinolone resistance for Escherichia was 42.9% for In-Patients (IP) and 16.3% for Out-Patient (OP) (P-value = 0.006); Klebsiella 35.9% for IP and 20% for OP; Proteus 11.1% for IP and 12.5% for OP; Serratia 18.2% for IP and 40% for OP; Enterobacter 22.2 for IP and 50% for OP. Conclusion High resistance rates to quinolones were observed not only for in-patients but also for out-patients with urinary tract enterobacterial infections. These findings demonstrate the importance of antibiotics susceptibility testing in improving quinolones prescription practices in Cameroon. PMID:26327943

  4. Determination of sensitivity of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae to tylosin and selected antibacterial drugs by a microtiter technique.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, B J; Ross, R F

    1975-01-01

    A microtiter technique was used for determination of the sensitivity of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae to antibiotics and other drugs. Use of a biphasic agar-broth medium in microtiter plates allowed direct visualization of growth. Results were more reproducible with this system than when broth alone was used and evaluation based on color change was required. Attempts to adapt the test for use with Mycoplasma hyorhinis were not successful. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of 12 drugs and drug combinations for 12 strains of M. hyosynoviae are presented. Drugs with the lowest minimal inhibitory concentrations were tylosin (0.37 mcg/ml)and lincomycin (0.88 mcg/ml), both of which have been used for treatment and control of M. hyosynoviae arthritis. Comparison of the minimal inhibitory concentrations of tylosin for 43 isolates of M. hyosynoviae obtained in 1959 and 1960 and from 1966 through 1971 indicated the possibilty of decreasing sensitivity to the drug although differences between recent isolates and earlier ones were not statistically significant. PMID:122911

  5. Generation and characterization of quinolone-specific DNA aptamers suitable for water monitoring.

    PubMed

    Reinemann, C; Freiin von Fritsch, U; Rudolph, S; Strehlitz, B

    2016-03-15

    Quinolones are antibiotics that are accredited in human and veterinary medicine but are regularly used in high quantities also in industrial livestock farming. Since these compounds are often only incompletely metabolized, significant amounts contaminate the aquatic environment and negatively impact on a variety of different ecosystems. Although there is increasing awareness of problems caused by pharmaceutical pollution, available methods for the detection and elimination of numerous pharmaceutical residues are currently inefficient or expensive. While this also applies to antibiotics that may lead to multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacteria, aptamer-based technologies potentially offer alternative approaches for sensitive and efficient monitoring of pharmaceutical micropollutants. Using the Capture-SELEX procedure, we here describe the selection of an aptamer pool with enhanced binding qualities for fluoroquinolones, a widely used group of antibiotics in both human and veterinary medicine. The selected aptamers were shown to detect various quinolones with high specificity, while specific binding activities to structurally unrelated drugs were not detectable. The quinolone-specific aptamers bound to ofloxacin, one of the most frequently prescribed fluoroquinolone, with high affinity (KD=0.1-56.9nM). The functionality of quinolone-specific aptamers in real water samples was demonstrated in local tap water and in effluents of sewage plants. Together, our data suggest that these aptamers may be applicable as molecular receptors in biosensors or as catcher molecules in filter systems for improved monitoring and treatment of polluted water. PMID:26547431

  6. Synthesis of novel selenium-containing sulfa drugs and their antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hafez, Sh H

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of 3-[4-(N-substituted sulfamoyl)phenyl]-3,4-dihydro-4-oxo-7,9-dimethylpyrido[3',2':4,5]selenolo[3,2-d]pyrimidines, 7-[4-(N-substituted sulfamoyl)phenyl]-7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-3,4-diphenylpyrimido[4',5':4,5]selenolo [2,3-c]pyridazines and 1-[4-(N-substituted sulfamoyl)phenyl]-1,11-dihydro-11-oxo-4-methylpyrimido[4',5':4,5]selenolo[2,3-b]quinolines is reported. 4-Amino-N-pyrimidine-2-ylbenzene sulfonamide (a), 4-amino-N-(2,6-dimetnylpyrimidin-4-yl)benzene sulfonamide (b), N-[(4-aminophenyl)sulfonyl] acetamide (c) with N-ethoxymethyleneamino of selenolo pyridine, selenolo pyridazine and selenolo quinoline derivatives respectively were obtained starting from 1-amino-N-substituted sulfanilamides. Spectroscopic data (IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and Mass spectral) confirmed the structure of the newly synthesized compounds. Substituted pyrimidines, pyridazines and quinolines were screened for antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Selenolo derivative of N-[(4-aminophenyl)sulfonyl] acetamide (substitutent of sulfacetamide c) showed strong bactericidal effect against all the tested organisms. Selenolo[3,2-d]pyrimidin (substitutent a) showed a good bactericidal effect against Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Compounds Selenolo[2,3-c]pyridazine (substitutent b), Selenolo[2,3-b]quinoline(substitutents c)) exhibited a moderate bactericidal effect against Serratia marcescens. None of the synthesized selenopyridazines has a considerable antimicrobial activity against the tested organisms. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the most active compound - 3-[4-(N-acetyl sulfamoyl)phenyl]-3,4-dihydro-4-oxo-7,9-dimethylpyrido[3',2':4,5]selenolo [3,2-d]pyrimidine was 10 mg mL(-1). PMID:20644596

  7. Conversion of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal and Related Alkylhydroxyquinolines by Rhodococcus sp. Strain BG43

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Niewerth, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial strain, which based on the sequences of its 16S rRNA, gyrB, catA, and qsdA genes, was identified as a Rhodococcus sp. closely related to Rhodococcus erythropolis, was isolated from soil by enrichment on the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone], a quorum sensing signal employed by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The isolate, termed Rhodococcus sp. strain BG43, cometabolically degraded PQS and its biosynthetic precursor 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) to anthranilic acid. HHQ degradation was accompanied by transient formation of PQS, and HHQ hydroxylation by cell extracts required NADH, indicating that strain BG43 has a HHQ monooxygenase isofunctional to the biosynthetic enzyme PqsH of P. aeruginosa. The enzymes catalyzing HHQ hydroxylation and PQS degradation were inducible by PQS, suggesting a specific pathway. Remarkably, Rhodococcus sp. BG43 is also capable of transforming 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide to PQS. It thus converts an antibacterial secondary metabolite of P. aeruginosa to a quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:25239889

  8. Biosurfactins production by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens R3 and their antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant pathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zhe; Rong, Yan-Jun; Li, Yang; Tang, Mei-Juan; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2015-05-01

    In this work, the anti-Escherichia coli activity of the bioactive substances produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens R3 was examined. A new and cheap medium for production of the anti-E. coli substances which contained 20.0 g L(-1) soybean powder, 20.0 g L(-1) wheat flour, pH 6.0 was developed. A crude surfactant concentration of 0.48 mg mL(-1) was obtained after 27 h of 10-L fermentation, and the diameter of the clear zone on the plate seeded with the pathogenic E. coli 2# was 23.3 mm. A preliminary characterization suggested that the anti-E. coli substances produced by B. amyloliquefaciens R3 were the biosurfactins (F1, F2, F3, F4, and F5) with amino acids (GLLVDLL) and hydroxy fatty acids (of 12-15 carbons in length). It was found that all the strains of the pathogenic E. coli showed resistance to several different antibiotics, suggesting that they were the multi-drug resistance and all the strains of the pathogenic E. coli were sensitive to the biosurfactins, indicating that the biosurfactins produced by B. amyloliquefaciens R3 had a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity against the pathogenic E. coli with multi-drug resistant profiles. After the treatment with the purified biosurfactin (F1), the cell membrane of both the whole cells and protoplasts of the E. coli 2# was damaged and the whole cells of the bacterium were broken. PMID:25407729

  9. Phytochemicals increase the antibacterial activity of antibiotics by acting on a drug efflux pump

    PubMed Central

    Ohene-Agyei, Thelma; Mowla, Rumana; Rahman, Taufiq; Venter, Henrietta

    2014-01-01

    Drug efflux pumps confer resistance upon bacteria to a wide range of antibiotics from various classes. The expression of efflux pumps are also implicated in virulence and biofilm formation. Moreover, organisms can only acquire resistance in the presence of active drug efflux pumps. Therefore, efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) are attractive compounds to reverse multidrug resistance and to prevent the development of resistance in clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. We investigated the potential of pure compounds isolated from plants to act as EPIs. In silico screening was used to predict the bioactivity of plant compounds and to compare that with the known EPI, phe-arg-?-naphthylamide (PA?N). Subsequently, promising products have been tested for their ability to inhibit efflux. Plumbagin nordihydroguaretic acid (NDGA) and to a lesser degree shikonin, acted as sensitizers of drug-resistant bacteria to currently used antibiotics and were able to inhibit the efflux pump-mediated removal of substrate from cells. We demonstrated the feasibility of in silico screening to identify compounds that potentiate the action of antibiotics against drug-resistant strains and which might be potentially useful lead compounds for an EPI discovery program. PMID:25224951

  10. Identification of compounds with potential antibacterial activity against Mycobacterium through structure-based drug screening.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, Tomohiro; Koseki, Yuji; Kobayashi, Maiko; Yamada, Atsumi; Morita, Koji; Yamaguchi, Kento; Tsurusawa, Ryoya; Gulten, Gulcin; Komatsu, Hideyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sacchettini, James C; Kitamura, Mitsuru; Aoki, Shunsuke

    2013-05-24

    To identify novel antibiotics against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we performed a hierarchical structure-based drug screening (SBDS) targeting the enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (InhA) with a compound library of 154,118 chemicals. We then evaluated whether the candidate hit compounds exhibited inhibitory effects on the growth of two model mycobacterial strains: Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium vanbaalenii. Two compounds (KE3 and KE4) showed potent inhibitory effects against both model mycobacterial strains. In addition, we rescreened KE4 analogs, which were identified from a compound library of 461,383 chemicals through fingerprint analysis and genetic algorithm-based docking simulations. All of the KE4 analogs (KES1-KES5) exhibited inhibitory effects on the growth of M. smegmatis and/or M. vanbaalenii. Based on the predicted binding modes, we probed the structure-activity relationships of KE4 and its analogs and found a correlative relationship between the IC50 values and the interaction residues/LogP values. The most potent inhibitor, compound KES4, strongly and stably inhibited the long-term growth of the model bacteria and showed higher inhibitory effects (IC50 = 4.8 ?M) than isoniazid (IC50 = 5.4 ?M), which is a first-line drug for tuberculosis therapy. Moreover, compound KES4 did not exhibit any toxic effects that impede cell growth in several mammalian cell lines and enterobacteria. The structural and experimental information of these novel chemical compounds will likely be useful for the development of new anti-TB drugs. Furthermore, the methodology that was used for the identification of the effective chemical compound is also likely to be effective in the SBDS of other candidate medicinal drugs. PMID:23600706

  11. A novel cotton fabric with anti-bacterial and drug delivery properties using SBA-15-NH2/polysiloxane hybrid containing tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Hashemikia, Samaneh; Hemmatinejad, Nahid; Ahmadi, Ebrahim; Montazer, Majid

    2016-02-01

    Here, mesoporous silica particles containing tetracycline were loaded on cotton fabric for possible application on the infected human skin. Amino functionalized mesoporous silica, SBA-15-NH2, was chosen as a safe drug carrier loaded with tetracycline via post impregnation method. Diverse content of the drug loaded silica particles were then attached on the cotton fabric surface using polysiloxane reactive softener as a soft and safe fixing agent. UV-Vis spectroscopy was used to study the drug delivery properties of the mesoporous silica on the treated cotton fabrics. The treated fabric with long drug release properties was selected as the optimized sample. Further analysis was carried out on this sample including anti-bacterial, water contact angle, bending length, mineral content and washing durability. Also, SEM images, EDX patterns, X-Ray spectra and thermal behavior of the optimum sample were studied. The optimized treated sample indicated the gradual release profile of tetracycline in PBS buffer media within 48h along with excellent anti-bacterial efficiency as a good feature for biological application. PMID:26652393

  12. 75 FR 37818 - Issues in the Design and Conduct of Clinical Trials for Antibacterial Drug Development; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ...) clinical ] trials, which are often used in the evaluation of the safety and efficacy of a new antibacterial... . Persons without access to the Internet can call Chris Moser or Lori Benner at 301-796-1300 to...

  13. Antibacterial activities of polyethylene glycol, tween 80 and sodium dodecyl sulphate coated silver nanoparticles in normal and multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Debalina; Samanta, Saheli; Mukherjee, Ananda; Santra, Chitta Ranjan; Ghosh, Amar N; Niyogi, Swapan Kumar; Karmakar, Parimal

    2012-03-01

    Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles coated with different functionalizing agents i.e., polyethylene glycol, tween 80 and sodium dodecyl sulphate were evaluated on both normal and multi-drug resistant strains of bacteria. Under the same reaction conditions, these functionalizing agents were added separately to coat silver nanoparticles. Among these, polyethylene glycol coated nanoparticles were most effective in killing all the bacterial strains which includes Escherichia coli DH5a, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus and multi-drug resistant clinical isolates of Shigella spp. (flexneri, boydii, sohnea) and Vibrio cholerae. The minimum inhibitory concentration of polyethylene glycol coated silver nanoparticles was also less compared to the other two sets of nanoparticles. Consistence with that polyethylene glycol coated nanoparticles produced more intracellular reactive oxygen species in bacteria. Moreover, when human cell lines MCF7 and Chang Liver were incubated in presence of these nanoparticles for 18 h with same concentrations as used for bacteria, no toxicity was observed. But significant increase in cell killing was observed with longer incubation time. Thus our present investigation implicates the potential therapeutic use of silver nanoparticles as antibacterial agent particularly the polyethylene glycol coated one. PMID:22755083

  14. Cytotoxic, antibacterial, DNA interaction and superoxide dismutase like activities of sparfloxacin drug based copper(II) complexes with nitrogen donor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mohan N.; Joshi, Hardik N.; Patel, Chintan R.

    2013-03-01

    The novel neutral mononuclear copper(II) complexes with fluoroquinolone antibacterial drug, sparfloxacin and nitrogen donor heterocyclic ligand have been synthesized and characterized. An antimicrobial efficiency of the complexes has been tested against five different microorganisms and showed diverse biological activity. The interaction of complex with Herring sperm (HS) DNA was investigated using viscosity titration and absorption titration techniques. The results indicate that the complexes bind to DNA by intercalative mode and have rather high DNA-binding constants. DNA cleavage study showed better cleaving ability of the complexes compare to metal salt and standard drug. All the complexes showed good cytotoxic activity with LC50 values ranging from 4.89 to 11.94 ?g mL-1. Complexes also exhibit SOD-like activity with their IC50 values ranging from 0.717 to 1.848 ?M.

  15. Regional variations in quinolone use in France and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Gallini, A; Taboulet, F; Bourrel, R

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate geographic variations in the use of quinolones in France and their associated factors. All reimbursement claims of antimicrobials were collected for 90 % of the French population for the year 2007. Dispensed quantities were then converted into defined daily doses (DDD) and adjusted for the age structure of the national population. Correlations between quinolone use and total antimicrobial use and some morbidity and socio-economic factors were studied using Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. On average, 2.05 DDD of quinolones per 1,000 inhabitants per day (DID) were dispensed in 2007 in France, accounting for 10.2 % of the total antimicrobial consumption in adults. A 40 % variation was observed between the regions with the lowest (1.73 DID) and the highest use (2.44 DID). This variation was more important for anti-pneumococcal quinolones than for quinolones directed against urinary tract infections (coefficients of variation: 26 vs. 6 %). Quinolone use was correlated with some regional socio-economic factors (unemployment, growth domestic product, health expenditures) and physician density, but was independent of the total antimicrobial use. After adjustment for age, large variations in quantitative and qualitative quinolone use were observed across French regions, especially for anti-pneumococcal fluoroquinolones. These results, though not controlled for potential epidemics variations, argue in favour of a possible improvement in quinolone prescribing to be achieved in some regions. PMID:22644054

  16. Temperature-dependent in vitro antimicrobial activity of four 4-quinolones and oxytetracycline against bacteria pathogenic to fish.

    PubMed Central

    Martinsen, B; Oppegaard, H; Wichstrøm, R; Myhr, E

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro antimicrobial activities of oxolinic acid, flumequine, sarafloxacin, enrofloxacin, and oxytetracycline against strains of bacteria pathogenic to fish (Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, atypical A. salmonicida, Vibrio salmonicida, Vibrio anguillarum, and Yersinia ruckeri) were determined at two different incubation temperatures, 4 and 15 degrees C, by a drug microdilution method. The main objective of the study was to examine the effect of incubation temperature on the in vitro activities of 4-quinolones and oxytetracycline against these bacteria. When tested against A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, all of the quinolones examined had MICs two- to threefold higher at 4 degrees C than at 15 degrees C. Similarly, 1.5- to 2-fold higher MICs were recorded for all of the quinolones except sarafloxacin at 4 degrees C than at 15 degrees C when the drugs were tested against V. salmonicida. In contrast to those of the quinolones, the MICs of oxytetracycline were two- to eightfold lower at 4 degrees C than at 15 degrees C against all of the bacterial species tested. Of the antimicrobial agents tested against the bacterial species included in the study, enrofloxacin was the most active and oxytetracycline was the least active. Sarafloxacin was slightly more active than flumequine and oxolinic acid, especially against oxolinic acid-resistant A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida strains. PMID:1416857

  17. Evaluation of a topical herbal drug for its in-vivo immunomodulatory effect on cytokines production and antibacterial activity in bovine subclinical mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Vaibhav D.; Shah, Tejas M.; Nauriyal, Dev S.; Kunjadia, Anju P.; Joshi, Chaitanya G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antibiotics have been in use in the treatment of bovine mastitis since decades; however, their use is associated with cost issues and human health concern. Use of herbal drugs does not generally carry these disadvantages. Many plants/herbs have been evaluated in the treatment of bovine mastitis with additional property of immunomodulation in affected mammary gland. Aim: To evaluate a topical herbal drug in two breeds of cattle for its in-vivo immunomodulatory effect on cytokines production and antibacterial activity in bovine subclinical mastitis. Materials and Methods: The response to treatment was evaluated by enumerating somatic cell count (SCC), determining total bacterial load, and studying the expression of different cytokines (interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8, IL-12, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, interferon (IFN)-? and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-?). Results: The pre- and post-treatment SCC in mastitic quarters statistically did not differ significantly, however, total bacterial load declined significantly from day 0 onwards in both the breeds. Highly significant differences (P < 0.01) were observed in all the cytokines on day 0, 5, and 21 postlast treatment in both the breeds. The expression level of all the cytokines showed a significant increase on day 5, while a decrease was noticed on day 21 in both the breeds of cattle. The comparison of cytokine expression profiles between crossbred and Gir cattle revealed a significant difference in expression of IL-6 and TNF-?. However, other cytokines exhibited a similar pattern of expression in both breeds, which was non-significant. Conclusion: The topical herbal drug exhibited antibacterial and immunomodulatory activities in subclinical mastitis and thus the work supports its use as alternative herbal therapy against subclinical udder infection in bovines. PMID:25558168

  18. Design, Synthesis, Molecular Docking, and Antibacterial Evaluation of Some Novel Flouroquinolone Derivatives as Potent Antibacterial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mehul M.; Patel, Laxman J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Quinolone moiety is an important class of nitrogen containing heterocycles widely used as key building blocks for medicinal agents. It exhibits a wide spectrum of pharmacophores and has bactericidal, antiviral, antimalarial, and anticancer activities. In view of the reported antimicrobial activity of various fluoroquinolones, the importance of the C-7 substituents is that they exhibit potent antimicrobial activities. Our objective was to synthesize newer quinolone analogues with increasing bulk at C-7 position of the main 6-fluoroquinolone scaffold to produce the target compounds which have potent antimicrobial activity. Methods. A novel series of 1-ethyl-6-fluoro-4-oxo-7-{4-[2-(4-substituted phenyl)-2-(substituted)-ethyl]-1-piperazinyl}-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid derivatives were synthesized. To understand the interaction of binding sites with bacterial protein receptor, the docking study was performed using topoisomerase II DNA gyrase enzymes (PDB ID: 2XCT) by Schrodinger's Maestro program. In vitro antibacterial activity of the synthesized compounds was studied and the MIC value was calculated by the broth dilution method. Results. Among all the synthesized compounds, some compounds showed potent antimicrobial activity. The compound 8g exhibited good antibacterial activity. Conclusion. This investigation identified the potent antibacterial agents against certain infections. PMID:25574496

  19. Chemical conjugation of 2-hexadecynoic acid to C5-curcumin enhances its antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Ríos, David J; Rivera-Torres, Yaritza; Rosario, Joshua; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Torres-García, Yeireliz; Montano, Nashbly; Ortíz-Soto, Gabriela; Ríos-Olivares, Eddy; Rodríguez, José W; Carballeira, Néstor M

    2015-11-15

    The first total synthesis of a C5-curcumin-2-hexadecynoic acid (C5-Curc-2-HDA, 6) conjugate was successfully performed. Through a three-step synthetic route, conjugate 6 was obtained in 13% overall yield and tested for antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Our results revealed that 6 was active against eight MRSA strains at MICs that range between 31.3 and 62.5?g/mL. It was found that the presence of 2-hexadecynoic acid (2-HDA, 4) in conjugate 6 increased 4-8-fold its antibacterial activity against MRSA strains supporting our hypothesis that the chemical connection of 4 to C5-curcumin (2) increases the antibacterial activity of 2 against Gram-positive bacteria. Combinational index (CIn) values that range between 1.6 and 2.3 were obtained when eight MRSA strains were treated with an equimolar mixture of 2 and 4. These results demonstrated that an antagonistic effect is taking place. Finally, it was investigated whether conjugate 6 can affect the replication process of S. aureus, since this compound inhibited the supercoiling activity of the S. aureus DNA gyrase at minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 250?g/mL (IC50=100.2±13.9?g/mL). Moreover, it was observed that the presence of 4 in conjugate 6 improves the anti-topoisomerase activity of 2 towards S. aureus DNA gyrase, which is in agreement with results obtained from antibacterial susceptibility tests involving MRSA strains. PMID:26483137

  20. Quinolones Sensitize Gram-Negative Bacteria to Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Miguel A.; Morey, Pau; Bengoechea, José A.

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of infections caused by bacteria resistant to the vast majority of antibiotics is a challenge worldwide. Antimicrobial peptides (APs) make up the front line of defense in those areas exposed to microorganisms, and there is intensive research to explore their use as new antibacterial agents. On the other hand, it is known that subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics affect the expression of numerous bacterial traits. In this work we evaluated whether treatment of bacteria with subinhibitory concentrations of quinolones may alter the sensitivity to APs. A 1-h treatment of Klebsiella pneumoniae with 0.25× the MIC of ciprofloxacin rendered bacteria more sensitive to polymyxins B and E, human neutrophil defensin 1, and ?-defensin 1. Levofloxacin and nalidixic acid at 0.25× the MICs also increased the sensitivity of K. pneumoniae to polymyxin B, whereas gentamicin and ceftazidime at 0.25× the MICs did not have such an effect. Ciprofloxacin also increased the sensitivities of K. pneumoniae ciprofloxacin-resistant strains to polymyxin B. Two other pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Haemophilus influenzae, also became more sensitive to polymyxins B and E after treatment with 0.25× the MIC of ciprofloxacin. Incubation with ciprofloxacin did not alter the expression of the K. pneumoniae loci involved in resistance to APs. A 1-N-phenyl-naphthylamine assay showed that ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin increased the permeabilities of the K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa outer membranes, while divalent cations antagonized this action. Finally, we demonstrated that ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin increased the binding of APs to the outer membrane by using dansylated polymyxin B. PMID:16801413

  1. Antibacterial Activity of Protocatechuic Acid Ethyl Ester on Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Strains Alone and in Combination with Antistaphylococcal Drugs.

    PubMed

    Miklasi?ska, Maria; K?pa, Ma?gorzata; Wojtyczka, Robert D; Idzik, Danuta; Zdebik, Anna; Orlewska, Kamila; W?sik, Tomasz J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the presented study was to examine in vitro the antibacterial activity of protocatechuic acid ethyl ester (ethyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, EDHB) against Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates alone and in the combination with four selected antibiotics. The EDHB antimicrobial activity was tested against twenty S. aureus strains isolated from the clinical samples, and three reference strains. The phenotypes and genotypes of resistance to methicillin for the tested strains were defined as well as the phenotypic resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B (MLSB). EDHB displayed diverse activity against examined S. aureus strains with the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) within the range from 64 to 1024 µg/mL. Addition of ¼ MIC of EDHB into the Mueller-Hinton Agar (MHA) resulted in augmented antibacterial effect in the presence of clindamycin. In the case of cefoxitin no synergistic effect with EDHB was noted. For erythromycin and vancomycin the decrease of mean MICs in the presence of EDHB was observed but did not reach statistical significance. The results of the present study showed that in vitro EDHB possesses antibacterial activity against S. aureus clinical strains and triggers a synergistic antimicrobial effect with clindamycin and to the lesser extent with erythromycin and vancomycin. PMID:26213908

  2. Apigenin as an anti-quinolone-resistance antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yuh; Baba, Tadashi; Sasaki, Takashi; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported the first 'reverse antibiotic' (RA), nybomycin (NYB), which showed a unique antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus strains. NYB specifically suppressed the growth of quinolone-resistant S. aureus strains but was not effective against quinolone-susceptible strains. Although NYB was first reported in 1955, little was known about its unique antimicrobial activity because it was before the synthesis of the first quinolone ('old quinolone'), nalidixic acid, in 1962. Following our re-discovery of NYB, we looked for other RAs among natural substances that act on quinolone-resistant bacteria. Commercially available flavones were screened against S. aureus, including quinolone-resistant strains, and their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were compared using the microbroth dilution method. Some of the flavones screened showed stronger antimicrobial activity against quinolone-resistant strains than against quinolone-susceptible ones. Amongst them, apigenin (API) was the most potent in its RA activity. DNA cleavage assay showed that API inhibited DNA gyrase harbouring the quinolone resistance mutation gyrA(Ser84Leu) but did not inhibit 'wild-type' DNA gyrase that is sensitive to levofloxacin. An API-susceptible S. aureus strain Mu50 was also selected using agar plates containing 20mg/L API. Whole-genome sequencing of selected mutant strains was performed and frequent back-mutations (reverse mutations) were found among API-resistant strains derived from the API-susceptible S. aureus strains. Here we report that API represents another molecular class of natural antibiotic having RA activity against quinolone-resistant bacteria. PMID:26526895

  3. Antibacterial and antibiotic-potentiation activities of the methanol extract of some cameroonian spices against Gram-negative multi-drug resistant phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The present work was designed to evaluate the antibacterial properties of the methanol extracts of eleven selected Cameroonian spices on multi-drug resistant bacteria (MDR), and their ability to potentiate the effect of some common antibiotics used in therapy. Results The extract of Cinnamomum zeylanicum against Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and AG100 strains showed the best activities, with the lowest minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 64??g/ml. The extract of Dorstenia psilurus was the most active when tested in the presence of an efflux pump inhibitor, phenylalanine Arginine-?- Naphtylamide (PA?N), a synergistic effect being observed in 56.25?% of the tested bacteria when it was combined with Erythromycin (ERY). Conclusion The present work evidently provides information on the role of some Cameroonian spices in the fight against multi-resistant bacteria. PMID:22709668

  4. PHCL4003: Anti-infective drugs: Drugs that kill invaders -2015 Spring Course Co-Directors

    E-print Network

    Marchant, Jonathan

    1 PHCL4003: Anti-infective drugs: Drugs that kill invaders - 2015 Spring Course Co to antimicrobial chemotherapy Jan. 26: 2. Principles of antibacterial drugs I: Drug targets and cytotoxicity Jan. 28: 3. Principles of antibacterial drugs II: Drug resistance Feb. 2: 4. Antibacterial drugs

  5. Changes of the Quinolones Resistance to Gram-positive Cocci Isolated during the Past 8 Years in the First Bethune Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiancheng; Chen, Qihui; Yao, Hanxin; Zhou, Qi

    This study was to investigate the quinolones resistance to gram-positive cocci isolated in the First Bethune Hospital during the past 8 years. Disk diffusion test was used to study the antimicrobial resistance. The data were analyzed by WHONET 5 software according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci (MRCNS) were 50.8%?83.3% and 79.4%?81.5%during the past 8 years, respectively. In recent 8 years, the quinolones resistance to gram-positive cocci had increased. Monitoring of the quinolones resistance to gram-positive cocci should be strengthened. The change of the antimicrobial resistance should be investigated in order to guide rational drug usage in the clinic and prevent bacterial strain of drug resistance from being transmitted.

  6. Morphology, drug release, antibacterial, cell proliferation, and histology studies of chamomile-loaded wound dressing mats based on electrospun nanofibrous poly(?-caprolactone)/polystyrene blends.

    PubMed

    Motealleh, Behrooz; Zahedi, Payam; Rezaeian, Iraj; Moghimi, Morvarid; Abdolghaffari, Amir Hossein; Zarandi, Mohammad Amin

    2014-07-01

    For the first time, it has been tried to achieve optimum conditions for electrospun poly(?-caprolactone)/polystyrene (PCL/PS) nanofibrous samples as active wound dressings containing chamomile via D-optimal design approach. In this work, systematic in vitro and in vivo studies were carried out by drug release rate, antibacterial and antifungal evaluations, cell culture, and rat wound model along with histology observation. The optimized samples were prepared under the following electrospinning conditions: PCL/PS ratio (65/35), PCL concentration 9%(w/v), PS concentration 14%(w/v), distance between the syringe needle tip and the collector 15.5 cm, applied voltage 18 kV, and solution flow rate 0.46 mL h(-1) . The FE-SEM micrographs showed electrospun PCL/PS (65/35) nanofibrous sample containing 15% chamomile had a minimum average diameter (?175 nm) compared to the neat samples (?268 nm). The drug released resulted in a gradual and high amount of chamomile from the optimized PCL/PS nanofibrous sample (?70%) in respect to PCL and PS nanofibers after 48 h. This claim was also confirmed by antibacterial and antifungal evaluations in which an inhibitory zone with a diameter of about 7.6 mm was formed. The rat wound model results also indicated that the samples loaded with 15% chamomile extract were remarkably capable to heal the wounds up to 99?±?0.5% after 14 days post-treatment periods. The adhesion of mesenchymal stem cells and their viability on the optimized samples were confirmed by MTT analysis. Also, the electrospun nanofibrous mats based on PCL/PS (65/35) showed a high efficiency in the wound closure and healing process compared to the reference sample, PCL/PS nanofibers without chamomile. Finally, the histology analysis revealed that the formation of epithelial tissues, the lack of necrosis and collagen fibers accumulation in the dermis tissues for the above optimized samples. PMID:24259351

  7. In vitro interaction of antifungal and antibacterial drugs against Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii before and after capsular induction.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Luana; Loreto, Érico S; Venturini, Tarcieli P; Azevedo, Maria I; Weiblen, Carla; Botton, Sonia A; Santurio, Janio M; Alves, Sydney H

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the synergistic interactions between amphotericin B (AMB) and azithromycin (AZM), daptomycin (DAP), linezolid (LNZ), minocycline (MINO), fluconazole (FLZ), flucytosine (5FC), linezolid (LZD), or tigecycline (TIG) against clinical isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii before and after capsule induction. High synergism (>75%) was observed for the combinations, AMB+5FC, AMB+TIG, AMB+AZM, AMB+LZD and AMB+MINO but only in the strains after capsule induction. The results show that the presence of the capsule may lower the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of antifungal agents, but antimicrobial activity can be improved by combining antifungal and antibacterial agents. PMID:26333356

  8. Orally Bioavailable 6-Chloro-7-methoxy-4(1H)-quinolones Efficacious against Multiple Stages of Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The continued proliferation of malaria throughout temperate and tropical regions of the world has promoted a push for more efficacious treatments to combat the disease. Unfortunately, more recent remedies such as artemisinin combination therapies have been rendered less effective due to developing parasite resistance, and new drugs are required that target the parasite in the liver to support the disease elimination efforts. Research was initiated to revisit antimalarials developed in the 1940s and 1960s that were deemed unsuitable for use as therapeutic agents as a result of poor understanding of both physicochemical properties and parasitology. Structure–activity and structure–property relationship studies were conducted to generate a set of compounds with the general 6-chloro-7-methoxy-2-methyl-4(1H)-quinolone scaffold which were substituted at the 3-position with a variety of phenyl moieties possessing various properties. Extensive physicochemical evaluation of the quinolone series was carried out to downselect the most promising 4(1H)-quinolones, 7, 62, 66, and 67, which possessed low-nanomolar EC50 values against W2 and TM90-C2B as well as improved microsomal stability. Additionally, in vivo Thompson test results using Plasmodium berghei in mice showed that these 4(1H)-quinolones were efficacious for the reduction of parasitemia at >99% after 6 days. PMID:25148516

  9. Anti-inflammatory drugs interacting with Zn (II) metal ion based on thiocyanate and azide ligands: Synthesis, spectroscopic studies, DFT calculations and antibacterial assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiniforoshan, Hossein; Tabrizi, Leila; Hadizade, Morteza; Sabzalian, Mohammad R.; Chermahini, Alireza Najafi; Rezapour, Mehdi

    2014-07-01

    Zinc (II) complexes with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) naproxen (nap) and ibuprofen (ibu) were synthesized in the presence of nitrogen donor ligands (thiocyanate or azide). The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopes. The binding modes of the ligands in complexes were established by means of molecular modeling of the complexes, and calculation of their IR, NMR and absorption spectra at DFT (TDDFT)/B3LYP level were studied. The experimental and calculated data verified monodentate binding through the carboxylic oxygen atoms of anti-inflammatory drugs in the zinc complexes. The calculated 1H, FT-IR and UV-Vis data are in better agreement with the experimental results, and confirm the predicted tetrahedral structures for the Zn (II) complexes. In addition to DFT calculations of complexes, natural bond orbital (NBO) was performed at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. Biological studies showed the antibacterial activity of zinc complexes against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains.

  10. Three-dimensional structures of unligated uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis at 1.4 Å resolution and its complex with an antibacterial drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mironov, A. S.; Betzel, C.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Uridine phosphorylases play an essential role in the cellular metabolism of some antibacterial agents. Acute infectious diseases (bubonic plague, yersiniosis, pseudotuberculosis, etc., caused by bacteria of the genus Yersinia) are treated using both sulfanilamide medicines and antibiotics, including trimethoprim. The action of an antibiotic on a bacterial cell is determined primarily by the character of its interactions with cellular components, including those which are not targets (for example, with pyrimidine phosphorylases). This type of interaction should be taken into account in designing drugs. The three-dimensional structure of uridine phosphorylase from the bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) with the free active site was determined for the first time by X-ray crystallography and refined at 1.40 Å resolution (DPI = 0.062 Å; ID PDB: 4OF4). The structure of the complex of YptUPh with the bacteriostatic drug trimethoprim was studied by molecular docking and molecular dynamics methods. The trimethoprim molecule was shown to be buffered by the enzyme YptUPh, resulting in a decrease in the efficiency of the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria of the genus Yersinia with trimethoprim.

  11. Association of mutation patterns in GyrA and ParC genes with quinolone resistance levels in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoying; Li, Zhen; Wei, Wan; Ma, Chunyan; Song, Xiaomin; Li, Shufen; He, Wenying; Tian, Jianjun; Huo, Xiaoyan

    2015-02-01

    The quinolone resistance of 19 lactic acid bacterial strains belonging to the genera Enterococcus and Lactobacillus isolated from the natural fermented koumiss and yoghurt were investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the quinolone resistance levels and to explore the association of the resistance with the mutation patterns in gyrA and parC genes, as is currently recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization Joint Expert Committee in Guidelines for Evaluation of Probiotics in Food for probiotic lactic acid bacteria drug resistance in 2001. The Oxford Cup method and double-tube dilution method were used to determine the quinolone resistance levels of the isolated strains. Generally, all of the 19 strains showed resistance towards norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin when the Oxford cup method was used, whereas the incidence was lower (to norfloxacin 89.5% and to ciprofloxacin 68.4%) when minimum inhibitory concentration breakpoints (CLSI M100-S23) were tested. Furthermore, gene sequencing was conducted on gyrA and parC of topoisomerase II of these isolated strains. The genetic basis for quinolone resistance may be closely related to mutations in gyrA genes as there were 10 mutation sites in amino-acid sequences encoded by gyrA genes in 10 quinolone resistance strains and 14 mutation sites in Enterococcus durans HZ28, whereas no typical mutations were detected in parC genes. PMID:25204345

  12. Challenges of Antibacterial Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Lynn L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The discovery of novel small-molecule antibacterial drugs has been stalled for many years. The purpose of this review is to underscore and illustrate those scientific problems unique to the discovery and optimization of novel antibacterial agents that have adversely affected the output of the effort. The major challenges fall into two areas: (i) proper target selection, particularly the necessity of pursuing molecular targets that are not prone to rapid resistance development, and (ii) improvement of chemical libraries to overcome limitations of diversity, especially that which is necessary to overcome barriers to bacterial entry and proclivity to be effluxed, especially in Gram-negative organisms. Failure to address these problems has led to a great deal of misdirected effort. PMID:21233508

  13. Electrochemical evaluation of antibacterial drugs as environment-friendly inhibitors for corrosion of carbon steel in HCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golestani, Gh.; Shahidi, M.; Ghazanfari, D.

    2014-07-01

    The effect of penicillin G, ampicillin and amoxicillin drugs on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel (ASTM 1015) in 1.0 mol L-1 hydrochloric acid solution was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and electrochemical noise (EN) techniques. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increasing inhibitor concentration. The effect of temperature on the rate of corrosion in the absence and presence of these drugs was also studied. Some thermodynamic parameters were computed from the effect of temperature on corrosion and inhibition processes. Adsorption of these inhibitors was found to obey Langmuir adsorption isotherm. There was a case of mixed mode of adsorption here but while penicillin was adsorbed mainly through chemisorption, two other drugs were adsorbed mainly through physisorption. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements indicated that the inhibitors were of mixed type. In addition, this paper suggests that the electrochemical noise (EN) technique under open circuit conditions as the truly noninvasive electrochemical method can be employed for the quantitative evaluation of corrosion inhibition. This was done by using the standard deviation of partial signal (SDPS) for calculation of the amount of noise charges at the particular interval of frequency, thereby obtaining the inhibition efficiency (IE) of an inhibitor. These IE values showed a reasonable agreement with those obtained from potentiodynamic polarization and EIS measurements.

  14. Prevalence and characterisation of quinolone resistance mechanisms in Salmonella spp.

    PubMed

    Wasyl, Dariusz; Hoszowski, Andrzej; Zaj?c, Magdalena

    2014-07-16

    The study was focused on characterisation of quinolone resistance mechanisms in Salmonella isolated from animals, food, and feed between 2008 and 2011. Testing of Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations revealed 6.4% of 2680 isolates conferring ciprofloxacin resistance. Simultaneously 37.7% and 40.8% were accounted for, respectively, nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin Non Wild-Type populations. Amplification and sequencing of quinolone resistance determining region of topoisomerases genes in 44 isolates identified multiple amino-acid substitutions in gyrA at positions Ser83 (N=22; ? Leu, ? Phe, ? Tyr), Asp87 (N=22; ? Asn, ? Gly, ? Tyr) and parC (Thr57Ser, N=23; Ala141Ser, N=1). No relevant mutations were identified in gyrB and parE. Twelve patterns combining one or two substitutions were related to neither serovar nor ciprofloxacin MIC. In 92 isolates suspected for plasmid mediated quinolone resistance two qnr alleles were found: qnrS1 (or qnrS3; N=50) and qnrB19 (or qnrB10; N=24). Additionally, two isolates with chromosomally encoded mechanisms carried qnrS1 and qnrS2. All tested isolates were negative for qnrA, qnrC, qnrD, qepA, aac(6')-Ib-cr. Both chromosomal and plasmid mediated quinolone resistance determinants were found in several Salmonella serovars and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis was used to assess phylogenetic similarity of selected isolates (N=82). Salmonella Newport was found to accumulate quinolone resistance determinants and the serovar was spreading clonally with either variable gyrA mutations, qnrS1/S3, or qnrB10/B19. Alternatively, various determinants are dispersed among related S. Enteritidis isolates. Antimicrobial selection pressure, multiple resistance determinants and scenarios for their acquisition and spread make extremely difficult to combat quinolone resistance. PMID:24613291

  15. Identification and characterization of a type III polyketide synthase involved in quinolone alkaloid biosynthesis from Aegle marmelos Correa.

    PubMed

    Resmi, Mohankumar Saraladevi; Verma, Priyanka; Gokhale, Rajesh S; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2013-03-01

    Quinolone alkaloids, found abundantly in the roots of bael (Aegle marmelos), possess various biological activities and have recently gained attention as potential lead molecules for novel drug designing. Here, we report the characterization of a novel Type III polyketide synthase, quinolone synthase (QNS), from A. marmelos that is involved in the biosynthesis of quinolone alkaloid. Using homology-based structural modeling, we identify two crucial amino acid residues (Ser-132 and Ala-133) at the putative QNS active site. Substitution of Ser-132 to Thr and Ala-133 to Ser apparently constricted the active site cavity resulting in production of naringenin chalcone from p-coumaroyl-CoA. Measurement of steady-state kinetic parameters demonstrates that the catalytic efficiency of QNS was severalfold higher for larger acyl-coenzymeA substrates as compared with smaller precursors. Our mutagenic studies suggest that this protein might have evolved from an evolutionarily related member of chalcone synthase superfamily by mere substitution of two active site residues. The identification and characterization of QNS offers a promising target for gene manipulation studies toward the production of novel alkaloid scaffolds. PMID:23329842

  16. Identification and Characterization of a Type III Polyketide Synthase Involved in Quinolone Alkaloid Biosynthesis from Aegle marmelos Correa*

    PubMed Central

    Resmi, Mohankumar Saraladevi; Verma, Priyanka; Gokhale, Rajesh S.; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    Quinolone alkaloids, found abundantly in the roots of bael (Aegle marmelos), possess various biological activities and have recently gained attention as potential lead molecules for novel drug designing. Here, we report the characterization of a novel Type III polyketide synthase, quinolone synthase (QNS), from A. marmelos that is involved in the biosynthesis of quinolone alkaloid. Using homology-based structural modeling, we identify two crucial amino acid residues (Ser-132 and Ala-133) at the putative QNS active site. Substitution of Ser-132 to Thr and Ala-133 to Ser apparently constricted the active site cavity resulting in production of naringenin chalcone from p-coumaroyl-CoA. Measurement of steady-state kinetic parameters demonstrates that the catalytic efficiency of QNS was severalfold higher for larger acyl-coenzymeA substrates as compared with smaller precursors. Our mutagenic studies suggest that this protein might have evolved from an evolutionarily related member of chalcone synthase superfamily by mere substitution of two active site residues. The identification and characterization of QNS offers a promising target for gene manipulation studies toward the production of novel alkaloid scaffolds. PMID:23329842

  17. Longitudinal surveillance of outpatient quinolone antimicrobial use in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Glass-Kaastra, Shiona K; Finley, Rita; Hutchinson, Jim; Patrick, David M; Weiss, Karl; Conly, John

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Because antimicrobial use is commonly associated with the development of antimicrobial resistance, monitoring the volume and patterns of use of these agents is important. OBJECTIVE: To assess the use of quinolone antimicrobials within Canadian provinces over time. METHODS: Antimicrobial prescribing data collected by IMS Health Canada were acquired from the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance and the Canadian Committee for Antimicrobial Resistance, and were used to calculate two yearly metrics: prescriptions per 1000 inhabitant-days and the mean defined daily doses (DDDs) per prescription. These measures were used to produce linear mixed models to assess differences among provinces and over time, while accounting for repeated measurements. RESULTS: The quinolone class of antimicrobials is used similarly among Canadian provinces. Year-to-year increases in quinolone prescribing occurred from 1995 to 2010, with a levelling off in the latter years. Year-to-year decreases in the DDDs per prescription were found to be significant from 2000 to 2010. DISCUSSION: Although the overall use of antimicrobials differs significantly among Canadian provinces, the use of the quinolone class does not vary at the provincial level. Results suggest that prescribing of ciprofloxacin may be a potential target for antimicrobial stewardship programs; however, decreases in the average DDDs per prescription suggest continued uptake of appropriate treatment guidelines. PMID:24855478

  18. Quinolone resistance and ornithine decarboxylation activity in lactose-negative Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gomig, Franciane; Galvão, Carolina Weigert; de Freitas, Denis Leandro; Labas, Larissa; Etto, Rafael Mazer; Esmerino, Luiz Antonio; de Lima, Marcelo Andrade; Appel, Marcia Helena; Zanata, Silvio Marques; Steffens, Maria Berenice Reynaud; Nader, Helena Bonciani; da Silveira, Rafael Bertoni

    2015-01-01

    Quinolones and fluoroquinolones are widely used to treat uropathogenic Escherichia coli infections. Bacterial resistance to these antimicrobials primarily involves mutations in gyrA and parC genes. To date, no studies have examined the potential relationship between biochemical characteristics and quinolone resistance in uropathogenic E. coli strains. The present work analyzed the quinolone sensitivity and biochemical activities of fifty-eight lactose-negative uropathogenic E. coli strains. A high percentage of the isolates (48.3%) was found to be resistant to at least one of the tested quinolones, and DNA sequencing revealed quinolone resistant determining region gyrA and parC mutations in the multi-resistant isolates. Statistical analyses suggested that the lack of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity is correlated with quinolone resistance. Despite the low number of isolates examined, this is the first study correlating these characteristics in lactose-negative E. coli isolates. PMID:26413057

  19. Targeting Integrin-Dependent Adhesion and Signaling with 3-Arylquinoline and 3-Aryl-2-Quinolone Derivatives: A new Class of Integrin Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Fiorucci, Sandrine; Lin, Xiaochen; Sadoul, Karin; Fournet, Guy; Bouvard, Daniel; Vinogradova, Olga; Joseph, Benoît; Block, Marc R.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the anti-migratory function of 3-aryl-2-quinolone derivatives, chemically close to flavonoids (Joseph et al., 2002). Herein we show that 3-arylquinoline or 3-aryl-2-quinolone derivatives disrupt cell adhesion in a dose dependent and reversible manner yet antagonized by artificial integrin activation such as manganese. Relying on this anti-adhesive activity, a Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) study was established on 20 different compounds to throw the bases of future optimization strategies. Active drugs efficiently inhibit platelet spreading, aggregation, and clot retraction, processes that rely on ?llb?3 integrin activation and clustering. In vitro these derivatives interfere with ?3 cytoplasmic tail interaction with kindlin-2 in pulldown assays albeit little effect was observed with pure proteins suggesting that the drugs may block an alternative integrin activation process that may not be directly related to kindlin recruitment. Ex vivo, these drugs blunt integrin signaling assayed using focal adhesion kinase auto-phosphorylation as a read-out. Hence, 3-arylquinoline and 3-aryl-2-quinolone series are a novel class of integrin activation and signaling antagonists. PMID:26509443

  20. Targeting Integrin-Dependent Adhesion and Signaling with 3-Arylquinoline and 3-Aryl-2-Quinolone Derivatives: A new Class of Integrin Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Fiorucci, Sandrine; Lin, Xiaochen; Sadoul, Karin; Fournet, Guy; Bouvard, Daniel; Vinogradova, Olga; Joseph, Benoît; Block, Marc R

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the anti-migratory function of 3-aryl-2-quinolone derivatives, chemically close to flavonoids (Joseph et al., 2002). Herein we show that 3-arylquinoline or 3-aryl-2-quinolone derivatives disrupt cell adhesion in a dose dependent and reversible manner yet antagonized by artificial integrin activation such as manganese. Relying on this anti-adhesive activity, a Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) study was established on 20 different compounds to throw the bases of future optimization strategies. Active drugs efficiently inhibit platelet spreading, aggregation, and clot retraction, processes that rely on ?llb?3 integrin activation and clustering. In vitro these derivatives interfere with ?3 cytoplasmic tail interaction with kindlin-2 in pulldown assays albeit little effect was observed with pure proteins suggesting that the drugs may block an alternative integrin activation process that may not be directly related to kindlin recruitment. Ex vivo, these drugs blunt integrin signaling assayed using focal adhesion kinase auto-phosphorylation as a read-out. Hence, 3-arylquinoline and 3-aryl-2-quinolone series are a novel class of integrin activation and signaling antagonists. PMID:26509443

  1. Iron(III) complexes: preparation, characterization, antibacterial activity and DNA-binding.

    PubMed

    Pansuriya, Pramod B; Patel, M N

    2008-04-01

    Iron(III) have been combined to well known quinolones (ciprofloxacin) and some Schiff bases with the help of coordination approach. Characterization of these compounds have been done using elemental analysis, magnetic measurements, thermogravimetric analysis, IR, UV-VIS, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectral investigation. Analytical studies suggest that the iron(III)-quinolone complexes assume a six-coordinated dimeric distorted octahedral geometry. All the compounds show a good antibacterial activity against broad range of bacteria like Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Salmonella typhi and Serratia marcescens, whereas no significant inhibition towards growth of fungal strains like Aspergillus Niger, Aspergillus flavus and Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Analyses of all these compounds show effective sperm herring DNA inhibition. PMID:18343909

  2. Antibacterial Activity of and Resistance to Small Molecule Inhibitors of the ClpP Peptidase

    E-print Network

    Compton, Corey L.

    There is rapidly mounting evidence that intracellular proteases in bacteria are compelling targets for antibacterial drugs. Multiple reports suggest that the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other actinobacteria ...

  3. Synthesis, Characterization, and Antibacterial Activities of Novel Sulfonamides Derived through Condensation of Amino Group Containing Drugs, Amino Acids, and Their Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Qadir, Muhammad; Ahmed, Mahmood; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Novel sulfonamides were developed and structures of the new products were confirmed by elemental and spectral analysis (FT-IR, ESI-MS, 1HNMR, and 13CNMR). In vitro, developed compounds were screened for their antibacterial activities against medically important gram (+) and gram (?) bacterial strains, namely, S. aureus, B. subtilis, E. coli, and K. pneumoniae. The antibacterial activities have been determined by measuring MIC values (?g/mL) and zone of inhibitions (mm). Among the tested compounds, it was found that compounds 5a and 9a have most potent activity against E. coli with zone of inhibition: 31 ± 0.12?mm (MIC: 7.81??g/mL) and 30 ± 0.12?mm (MIC: 7.81??g/mL), respectively, nearly as active as ciprofloxacin (zone of inhibition: 32 ± 0.12?mm). In contrast, all the compounds were totally inactive against the gram (+) B. subtilis. PMID:25802872

  4. Analysis of sulfonamides, trimethoprim, fluoroquinolones, quinolones, triphenylmethane dyes and methyltestosterone in fish and shrimp using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Storey, Joseph M; Clark, Susan B; Johnson, Aaron S; Andersen, Wendy C; Turnipseed, Sherri B; Lohne, Jack J; Burger, Robert J; Ayres, Patrick R; Carr, Justin R; Madson, Mark R

    2014-12-01

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) screening method is described for the detection and identification of 26 veterinary drugs in fish and other aquaculture products. The analytes include: 13 sulfonamides, trimethoprim, 3 fluoroquinolones, 3 quinolones, 3 triphenylmethane dyes, 2 leuco dye metabolites, and 1 hormone. In this method, tissue is mixed with EDTA-McIlvaine buffer, double-extracted with acetonitrile, p-toluenesulfonic (p-TSA) acid and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (TMPD), and analyzed using LC-MS/MS. Inclusion of p-TSA and TMPD in the extraction procedure was critical for simultaneous analysis of dyes with the other groups of veterinary drugs. The proposed procedure was validated as both a quantitative analysis method and as a semi-quantitative screening method for multiple fish and shrimp matrices. The method was applied to eight types of fish (catfish, eel, pangasius, sablefish, tilapia, swai, salmon, and trout) and shrimp at the appropriate level of concern: 10ng/g for sulfonamides, trimethoprim, and quinolones, 5ng/g for fluoroquinolones, 1ng/g for dyes and their metabolites, and 0.4ng/g for methyltestosterone. PMID:25310706

  5. Structural signature of Ser83Leu and Asp87Asn mutations in DNA gyrase from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and impact on quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Mehla, Kusum; Ramana, Jayashree

    2016-01-15

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is among the most frequent microorganisms causing traveler's diarrhea (TD). Quinolones are potent antimicrobial agents used for the treatment of TD. Resistance to quinolones is typically caused by substitutions in QRDR region of gyrA subunit of DNA gyrase. The aim of this study was to seek insights into the effect of these substitutions at structural level and their association with observed quinolone resistance. Majority of the ETEC strains have gyrA mutations at amino acid position 83 and 87. To understand the quinolone resistance mechanism at molecular level, we have studied the interaction of wild type and mutant forms of ETEC gyrA with nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin by molecular modeling using Discovery Studio and LeadIt. All the mutants had reduced affinity towards both ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid relative to the wild type due to the mutations introduced in gyrA. Besides Ser83 and Asp87, for nalidixic acid binding Arg91 and His45 residues were observed to be critical while in ciprofloxacin binding Lys42 and Arg91 residues played a significant role. Amino acid substitutions contribute to the emergence of drug resistance in sensitive strains by causing structural alterations leading to reduced affinity of the drug towards receptor. Analysis of the effect of amino acid substitutions at structural level is of utmost importance to establish possible associations between mutations and the diseases. These studies accelerate the identification of pharmaceutical targets for relevant treatments and could also be helpful in guiding the design of further experimental research. PMID:26424597

  6. Computational methods to identify new antibacterial targets.

    PubMed

    McPhillie, Martin J; Cain, Ricky M; Narramore, Sarah; Fishwick, Colin W G; Simmons, Katie J

    2015-01-01

    The development of resistance to all current antibiotics in the clinic means there is an urgent unmet need for novel antibacterial agents with new modes of action. One of the best ways of finding these is to identify new essential bacterial enzymes to target. The advent of a number of in silico tools has aided classical methods of discovering new antibacterial targets, and these programs are the subject of this review. Many of these tools apply a cheminformatic approach, utilizing the structural information of either ligand or protein, chemogenomic databases, and docking algorithms to identify putative antibacterial targets. Considering the wealth of potential drug targets identified from genomic research, these approaches are perfectly placed to mine this rich resource and complement drug discovery programs. PMID:24974974

  7. Problem Set 3 Answers 1. Why are DNA-targeted drugs only used to treat cancer and not as, say, antibacterial agents?

    E-print Network

    Gates, Kent. S.

    DNA-damaging drugs mentioned in Question 1). (b) However, some medicinal chemists believeCHEM 4170 Problem Set 3 Answers 1. Why are DNA-targeted drugs only used to treat cancer and not as-stranded DNA does not provide a structure to which the drug can bind... no binding, no high local concentration

  8. 4(1H)-Pyridone and 4(1H)-Quinolone Derivatives as Antimalarials with Erythrocytic, Exoerythrocytic, and Transmission Blocking Activities

    PubMed Central

    Monastyrskyi, Andrii; Kyle, Dennis E.; Manetsch, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the second leading cause of deaths in the world with malaria being responsible for approximately the same amount of deaths as cancer in 2012. Despite the success in malaria prevention and control measures decreasing the disease mortality rate by 45% since 2000, the development of single-dose therapeutics with radical cure potential is required to completely eradicate this deadly condition. Targeting multiple stages of the malaria parasite is becoming a primary requirement for new candidates in antimalarial drug discovery and development. Recently, 4(1H)-pyridone, 4(1H)-quinolone, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridone, and phenoxyethoxy-4(1H)-quinolone chemotypes have been shown to be antimalarials with blood stage activity, liver stage activity, and transmission blocking activity. Advancements in structure-activity relationship and structure-property relationship studies, biological evaluation in vitro and in vivo, as well as pharmacokinetics of the 4(1H)-pyridone and 4(1H)-quinolone chemotypes will be discussed. PMID:25116582

  9. A Theoretical-Experimental Study on the Structure and Activity of Certain Quinolones and the Interaction of Their Cu(II)-Complexes on a DNA Model

    PubMed Central

    Robles, J.; Martín-Polo, J.; Álvarez-Valtierra, L.; Hinojosa, L.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical electronic Structure methods have been employed to study the structure and activity of certain (free) quinolones and the interaction of their Cu(II)-complexes on a DNA model (Rhodamine 6G (rhod)). As a manner of assessing the generated geometries, the nalidixic acid geometrical parameters obtained were tested against the crystallographic ones and it was found that the average error in the calculated geometries is small. The present study allows us to (1) Rationalize the observed differences in antibiotic activities through their electronic hardnesses. (2) Suggest a plausible mechanism of action for these drugs through formation of a reactive intermediate (or carrier) which would consist of a quinolone anion coordinated to an adequate metal center (Cu(II) in this study). (3) We find that, through this model of DNA (modeled with rhod) the interaction seems to be mediated by an effective ?-? stacking. (4) Finally, an in vitro experiment was designed so that the intercalation process in DNA could be experimentally modeled as well. The quenching of the rhod fluorescence is proportional to the strength of the Cu(II)-complex-rhod interaction and therefore provides a quantitative measurement of the “intercalating” capacity of the quinolones and their copper complexes. These results agree well with the theoretical total adduct formation energies. PMID:18475962

  10. Computational Study of Quinolone Derivatives to Improve their Therapeutic Index as Anti-malaria Agents: QSAR and QSTR.

    PubMed

    Iman, Maryam; Davood, Asghar; Khamesipour, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a parasitic disease caused by five different species of Plasmodium. More than 40% of the world's population is at risk and malaria annual incidence is estimated to be more than two hundred million, malaria is one of the most important public health problems especially in children of the poorest parts of the world, annual mortality is about 1 million. The epidemiological status of the disease justifies to search for control measures, new therapeutic options and development of an effective vaccine. Chemotherapy options in malaria are limited, moreover, drug resistant rate is high. In spite of global efforts to develop an effective vaccine yet there is no vaccine available. In the current study, a series of quinolone derivatives were subjected to quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) and quantitative structure toxicity relationship (QSTR) analyses to identify the ideal physicochemical characteristics of potential anti-malaria activity and less cytotoxicity. Quinolone with desirable properties was built using HyperChem program, and conformational studies were performed through the semi-empirical method followed by the PM3 force field. Multi linear regression (MLR) was used as a chemo metric tool for quantitative structure activity relationship modeling and the developed models were shown to be statistically significant according to the validation parameters. The obtained QSAR model reveals that the descriptors PJI2, Mv, PCR, nBM, and VAR mainly affect the anti-malaria activity and descriptors MSD, MAXDP, and X1sol affect the cytotoxicity of the series of ligands. PMID:26330866

  11. Antibacterial kaolinite/urea/chlorhexidine nanocomposites: Experiment and molecular modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holešová, Sylva; Valášková, Marta; Hlavá?, Dominik; Madejová, Jana; Samlíková, Magda; Tokarský, Jonáš; Pazdziora, Erich

    2014-06-01

    Clay minerals are commonly used materials in pharmaceutical production both as inorganic carriers or active agents. The purpose of this study is the preparation and characterization of clay/antibacterial drug hybrids which can be further included in drug delivery systems for treatment oral infections. Novel nanocomposites with antibacterial properties were successfully prepared by ion exchange reaction from two types of kaolinite/urea intercalates and chlorhexidine diacetate. Intercalation compounds of kaolinite were prepared by reaction with solid urea in the absence of solvents (dry method) as well as with urea aqueous solution (wet method). The antibacterial activity of two prepared samples against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was evaluated by finding the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Antibacterial studies of both samples showed the lowest MIC values (0.01%, w/v) after 1 day against E. faecalis, E. coli and S. aureus. A slightly worse antibacterial activity was observed against P. aeruginosa (MIC 0.12%, w/v) after 1 day. Since samples showed very good antibacterial activity, especially after 1 day of action, this means that these samples can be used as long-acting antibacterial materials. Prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The experimental data are supported by results of molecular modelling.

  12. Antigiardial activity of novel triazolyl-quinolone-based chalcone derivatives: when oxygen makes the difference

    PubMed Central

    Bahadur, Vijay; Mastronicola, Daniela; Singh, Amit K.; Tiwari, Hemandra K.; Pucillo, Leopoldo P.; Sarti, Paolo; Singh, Brajendra K.; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Giardiasis is a common diarrheal disease worldwide caused by the protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis. It is urgent to develop novel drugs to treat giardiasis, due to increasing clinical resistance to the gold standard drug metronidazole (MTZ). New potential antiparasitic compounds are usually tested for their killing efficacy against G. intestinalis under anaerobic conditions, in which MTZ is maximally effective. On the other hand, though commonly regarded as an ‘anaerobic pathogen,’ G. intestinalis is exposed to relatively high O2 levels in vivo, living attached to the mucosa of the proximal small intestine. It is thus important to test the effect of O2 when searching for novel potential antigiardial agents, as outlined in a previous study [Bahadur et al. (2014) Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 58, 543]. Here, 45 novel chalcone derivatives with triazolyl-quinolone scaffold were synthesized, purified, and characterized by high resolution mass spectrometry, 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. Efficacy of the compounds against G. intestinalis trophozoites was tested under both anaerobic and microaerobic conditions, and selectivity was assessed in a counter-screen on human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. MTZ was used as a positive control in the assays. All the tested compounds proved to be more effective against the parasite in the presence of O2, with the exception of MTZ that was less effective. Under anaerobiosis eighteen compounds were found to be as effective as MTZ or more (up to three to fourfold); the same compounds proved to be up to >100-fold more effective than MTZ under microaerobic conditions. Four of them represent potential candidates for the design of novel antigiardial drugs, being highly selective against Giardia trophozoites. This study further underlines the importance of taking O2 into account when testing novel potential antigiardial compounds. PMID:25904901

  13. Antigiardial activity of novel triazolyl-quinolone-based chalcone derivatives: when oxygen makes the difference.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, Vijay; Mastronicola, Daniela; Singh, Amit K; Tiwari, Hemandra K; Pucillo, Leopoldo P; Sarti, Paolo; Singh, Brajendra K; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Giardiasis is a common diarrheal disease worldwide caused by the protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis. It is urgent to develop novel drugs to treat giardiasis, due to increasing clinical resistance to the gold standard drug metronidazole (MTZ). New potential antiparasitic compounds are usually tested for their killing efficacy against G. intestinalis under anaerobic conditions, in which MTZ is maximally effective. On the other hand, though commonly regarded as an 'anaerobic pathogen,' G. intestinalis is exposed to relatively high O2 levels in vivo, living attached to the mucosa of the proximal small intestine. It is thus important to test the effect of O2 when searching for novel potential antigiardial agents, as outlined in a previous study [Bahadur et al. (2014) Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 58, 543]. Here, 45 novel chalcone derivatives with triazolyl-quinolone scaffold were synthesized, purified, and characterized by high resolution mass spectrometry, (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. Efficacy of the compounds against G. intestinalis trophozoites was tested under both anaerobic and microaerobic conditions, and selectivity was assessed in a counter-screen on human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. MTZ was used as a positive control in the assays. All the tested compounds proved to be more effective against the parasite in the presence of O2, with the exception of MTZ that was less effective. Under anaerobiosis eighteen compounds were found to be as effective as MTZ or more (up to three to fourfold); the same compounds proved to be up to >100-fold more effective than MTZ under microaerobic conditions. Four of them represent potential candidates for the design of novel antigiardial drugs, being highly selective against Giardia trophozoites. This study further underlines the importance of taking O2 into account when testing novel potential antigiardial compounds. PMID:25904901

  14. Interplay between intrinsic and acquired resistance to quinolones in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    García-León, Guillermo; Salgado, Fabiola; Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Sánchez, María Blanca; Martínez, José Luis

    2014-05-01

    To analyse whether the mutation-driven resistance-acquisition potential of a given bacterium might be a function of its intrinsic resistome, quinolones were used as selective agents and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was chosen as a bacterial model. S.?maltophilia has two elements - SmQnr and SmeDEF - that are important in intrinsic resistance to quinolones. Using a battery of mutants in which either or both of these elements had been removed, the apparent mutation frequency for quinolone resistance and the phenotype of the selected mutants were found to be related to the intrinsic resistome and also depended on the concentration of the selector. Most mutants had phenotypes compatible with the overexpression of multidrug efflux pump(s); SmeDEF overexpression was the most common cause of quinolone resistance. Whole genome sequencing showed that mutations of the SmeRv regulator, which result in the overexpression of the efflux pump SmeVWX, are the cause of quinolone resistance in mutants not overexpressing SmeDEF. These results indicate that the development of mutation-driven antibiotic resistance is highly dependent on the intrinsic resistome, which, at least for synthetic antibiotics such as quinolones, did not develop as a response to the presence of antibiotics in the natural ecosystems in which S.?maltophilia evolved. PMID:24447641

  15. Occurrence of (fluoro)quinolones and (fluoro)quinolone resistance in soil receiving swine manure for 11 years.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yonggang; Yu, Wantai; Ma, Qiang; Zhou, Hua

    2015-10-15

    Because of the widespread use of antibiotics in animal breeding, the agricultural application of animal manure can lead to the introduction of antibiotics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes to the soil and surrounding environment, which may pose a threat to public health. In this study, we investigated the status of (fluoro)quinolone (FQ) residues and FQ resistance levels in soil with and without receiving long-term swine manure. Six FQs (pipemidic acid, lomefloxacin, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin) were only detected in manured soil, with individual concentrations ranging from below the detection limit to 27.2 ?g kg(-1) and increasing with the increase in swine manure application rates. Higher load rates of swine manure yielded a higher number of ciprofloxacin-resistant (CIPr) bacteria after spreading. A total of 24 CIPr bacterial isolates were obtained from the tested soil, which belonged to four phyla (Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes) or were related to nine different genera. Only 18 isolates from manured soil were positive for five plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes (aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrD, qepA, oqxA, and oqxB). To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine the occurrence of PMQR genes in FQ-resistant bacteria from the soil environment. A similar result was observed for the total DNA from soil, with the exception of aac(6')-Ib being detected in the control sample. The absolute and relative abundances of total PMQR genes also increased with fertilization quantity. Significant correlations were observed between FQ resistance levels and FQ concentrations. These results indicated that the agricultural application of swine manure led to FQ residues and enhanced FQ resistance. This investigation provides baseline data on FQ resistance profiles in soils receiving long-term swine manure. PMID:26042895

  16. Exploration of structure-based on imidazole core as antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yong-Tao; Wang, Zhong-Chang; Sang, Ya-Li; Tao, Xiang-Xiang; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Imidazole, a five-membered heterocycle having three carbon atoms, and two double bonds, having efficient antibacterial Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtili, Bacillus proteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Helicobacter pyloriurease etc, shows a broad-spectrum of antibacterial activities. To Search new antibacterial drugs to overcome resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics, to date hundreds of this sort of derivatives have been synthesized and possess potent antibacterial activity. As the structure of imidazole derivatives is various, the target of antibacterial is also diverse including ?-Lactamases, ?-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (FabH), DNA gyrase and topoisomerase, glutamate racemase and urease. In this review, we will discuss the emergence of resistance to antibiotics and attempt to summarize the main developments of imidazole derivatives in the past ten years. We hope that increasing knowledge of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) will be beneficial to the rational design of new generation of small molecule antibacterial drugs. PMID:24200359

  17. In vitro antibacterial activity of medicinal plant extracts against Escherichia coli strains from human clinical specimens and interactions with antimicrobial drugs.

    PubMed

    Ushimaru, P I; Barbosa, L N; Fernandes, A A H; Di Stasi, L C; Fernandes, A

    2012-01-01

    The biological properties of medicinal plants have been documented worldwide for many centuries. We aimed to evaluate interactions between crude extracts from Psidium guajava, Zingiber officinale, Cymbopogon citratus, Caryophyllus aromaticus, Mikania glomerata and Allium sativum samples and antimicrobial drugs against Escherichia coli strains. The susceptibility test performed was disc diffusion, and crude extracts were diluted (%v/v) into Müller-Hinton agar (MHA) at one quarter of the minimal inhibitory concentration for 90% (MIC(90%)) of E. coli strains found previously. Synergistic interactions were observed between C. citratus and polymyxin, and A. sativum extracts and gentamicin. The crude A. sativum extract was the only one that did not show any antagonism with the antimicrobial drugs. The results thus showed the potential use of these medicinal plants against E. coli strains, although antagonism with antimicrobial drugs is a negative aspect in the combined therapy of infectious diseases caused by E. coli. PMID:22011190

  18. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana from chickens in China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Zhao, Hongyu; Liu, Yuqi; Zhou, Xuping; Wang, Jinyuan; Liu, Tiantian; Beier, Ross C; Hou, Xiaolin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the quinolone resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana isolated from chickens in China. A total of 293 Salmonella strains were isolated from chicken farms and slaughterhouses in Shandong province of China, and 130 (44.4%) were characterized as Salmonella enterica Indiana (chicken farms, n=52 strains; slaughter houses, n=78 strains). All isolate serotypes were tested with the Kauffmann-White classification system and examined for susceptibility to the quinolones: nalidixic acid, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin. The resistance of the Salmonella Indiana strains to nalidixic acid, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin were 100, 73.1, 71.2, and 82.7%, and 100, 59.0, 79.5, and 80.2%, respectively. Selected quinolone resistant strains were evaluated for mutations in genes (gyrA, gyrB, parC, and marA) by DNA sequencing. The gyrA mutation was found in all isolates, the parC mutation was only found in some isolates, and the gyrB and marA mutations were not observed. Quinolone resistance was evaluated in the representative isolates by screening for the quinolone resistance determinants, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qepA, and aac (6?')-Ib-cr using PCR technology. The quinolone resistance determinants in Salmonella, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, and qepA were negative by PCR, but aac(6?')-Ib-cr had high detection rates of 90.4 and 96.2% in chicken farms and slaughterhouses, respectively. Salmonella Indiana containing the gyrA mutation was prevalent in farms and slaughterhouses and possessed a high frequency of the quinolone resistance determinant aac(6?')-Ib-cr. These bacteria may have originated from the same source. PMID:25701209

  19. Biotic inactivation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quinolone signal molecule.

    PubMed

    Soh, Eliza Ye-Chen; Chhabra, Siri R; Halliday, Nigel; Heeb, Stephan; Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S; Fetzner, Susanne; Cámara, Miguel; Chan, Kok-Gan; Williams, Paul

    2015-11-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, quorum sensing (QS) regulates the production of secondary metabolites, many of which are antimicrobials that impact on polymicrobial community composition. Consequently, quenching QS modulates the environmental impact of P.?aeruginosa. To identify bacteria capable of inactivating the QS signal molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS), a minimal medium containing PQS as the sole carbon source was used to enrich a Malaysian rainforest soil sample. This yielded an Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain (Q19) that inactivated PQS, yielding a new fluorescent compound (I-PQS) confirmed as PQS-derived using deuterated PQS. The I-PQS structure was elucidated using mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as 2-heptyl-2-hydroxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline-3,4-dione (HHQD). Achromobacter xylosoxidans?Q19 oxidized PQS congeners with alkyl chains ranging from C1 to C5 and also N-methyl PQS, yielding the corresponding 2-hydroxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline-3,4-diones, but was unable to inactivate the PQS precursor HHQ. This indicates that the hydroxyl group at position 3 in PQS is essential and that A.?xylosoxidans inactivates PQS via a pathway involving the incorporation of oxygen at C2 of the heterocyclic ring. The conversion of PQS to HHQD also occurred on incubation with 12/17 A.?xylosoxidans strains recovered from cystic fibrosis patients, with P.?aeruginosa and with Arthrobacter, suggesting that formation of hydroxylated PQS may be a common mechanism of inactivation. PMID:25809238

  20. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  1. Protective Effect of Qnr on Agents Other than Quinolones That Target DNA Gyrase.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, George A; Corcoran, Marian A; Hooper, David C

    2015-11-01

    Qnr is a plasmid-encoded and chromosomally determined protein that protects DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from inhibition by quinolones. Despite its prevalence worldwide and existence prior to the discovery of quinolones, its native function is not known. Other synthetic compounds and natural products also target bacterial topoisomerases. A number were studied as molecular probes to gain insight into how Qnr acts. Qnr blocked inhibition by synthetic compounds with somewhat quinolone-like structure that target the GyrA subunit, such as the 2-pyridone ABT-719, the quinazoline-2,4-dione PD 0305970, and the spiropyrimidinetrione pyrazinyl-alkynyl-tetrahydroquinoline (PAT), indicating that Qnr is not strictly quinolone specific, but Qnr did not protect against GyrA-targeting simocyclinone D8 despite evidence that both simocyclinone D8 and Qnr affect DNA binding to gyrase. Qnr did not affect the activity of tricyclic pyrimidoindole or pyrazolopyridones, synthetic inhibitors of the GyrB subunit, or nonsynthetic GyrB inhibitors, such as coumermycin A1, novobiocin, gyramide A, or microcin B17.Thus, in this set of compounds the protective activity of Qnr was confined to those that, like quinolones, trap gyrase on DNA in cleaved complexes. PMID:26239981

  2. Dual Mode Antibacterial Activity of Ion Substituted Calcium Phosphate Nanocarriers for Bone Infections

    PubMed Central

    Sampath Kumar, T. S.; Madhumathi, K.; Rubaiya, Y.; Doble, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential for the management of infectious diseases caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria, through the development of newer antibacterial materials and efficient modes of antibiotic delivery. Calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics are commonly used as bone substitutes due to their similarity to bone mineral and are widely researched upon for the treatment of bone infections associated with bone loss. CaPs can be used as local antibiotic delivery agents for bone infections and can be substituted with antibacterial ions in their crystal structure to have a wide spectrum, sustained antibacterial activity even against drug resistant bacteria. In the present work, a dual mode antibiotic delivery system with antibacterial ion substituted calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanoparticles has been developed. Antibacterial ions such as zinc, silver, and strontium have been incorporated into CDHA at concentrations of 6, 0.25–0.75, and 2.5–7.5 at. %, respectively. The samples were found to be phase pure, acicular nanoparticles of length 40–50?nm and width 5–6?nm approximately. The loading and release profile of doxycycline, a commonly used antibiotic, was studied from the nanocarriers. The drug release was studied for 5?days and the release profile was influenced by the ion concentrations. The release of antibacterial ions was studied over a period of 21?days. The ion substituted CDHA samples were tested for antibacterial efficacy on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by MIC/MBC studies and time-kill assay. AgCDHA and ZnCDHA showed high antibacterial activity against both bacteria, while SrCDHA was weakly active against S. aureus. Present study shows that the antibiotic release can provide the initial high antibacterial activity, and the sustained ion release can provide a long-term antibacterial activity. Such dual mode antibiotic and antibacterial ion release offers an efficient and potent way to treat an incumbent drug resistant infection. PMID:25984512

  3. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ?-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Bernhard; Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin; Jaenicke, Elmar; Schnell, Robert; Hunter, William N.; Brenk, Ruth

    2015-07-28

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa ?-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  4. Discovery, Synthesis, and Optimization of Antimalarial 4(1H)-Quinolone-3-Diarylethers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The historical antimalarial compound endochin served as a structural lead for optimization. Endochin-like quinolones (ELQ) were prepared by a novel chemical route and assessed for in vitro activity against multidrug resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum and against malaria infections in mice. Here we describe the pathway to discovery of a potent class of orally active antimalarial 4(1H)-quinolone-3-diarylethers. The initial prototype, ELQ-233, exhibited low nanomolar IC50 values against all tested strains including clinical isolates harboring resistance to atovaquone. ELQ-271 represented the next critical step in the iterative optimization process, as it was stable to metabolism and highly effective in vivo. Continued analoging revealed that the substitution pattern on the benzenoid ring of the quinolone core significantly influenced reactivity with the host enzyme. This finding led to the rational design of highly selective ELQs with outstanding oral efficacy against murine malaria that is superior to established antimalarials chloroquine and atovaquone. PMID:24720377

  5. Antibacterial monoclonal antibodies: the next generation?

    PubMed

    DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Sellman, Bret R

    2015-10-01

    There is a clear need for renewed efforts to combat the increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance. While the antibiotic resistance epidemic is due in part to the misuse of antibiotics, even proper empiric antibiotic therapy increases the selective pressure and potential for drug-resistance and spread of resistance mechanisms between bacteria. Antibiotic resistance coupled with the detrimental effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics on the healthy microbiome, have led the field to explore pathogen specific antibacterials such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Medical need along with advances in mAb discovery, engineering, and production have driven significant effort developing mAb-based antibacterials. If successful, they will provide physicians with precision weapons to combat bacterial infections and can help prevent a return to a pre-antibiotic era. PMID:26302478

  6. Restriction of the Conformational Dynamics of the Cyclic Acyldepsipeptide Antibiotics Improves Their Antibacterial Activity

    E-print Network

    Carney, Daniel W.

    The cyclic acyldepsipeptide (ADEP) antibiotics are a new class of antibacterial agents that kill bacteria via a mechanism that is distinct from all clinically used drugs. These molecules bind and dysregulate the activity ...

  7. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles from leaf extract of Mimusops elengi, Linn. for enhanced antibacterial activity against multi drug resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Prakash, P; Gnanaprakasam, P; Emmanuel, R; Arokiyaraj, S; Saravanan, M

    2013-08-01

    Green synthesis of metallic silver nanoparticles has attracted nowadays and alternative to physical and chemical approaches. In the present study, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized from leaf extract of Mimusops elengi, L. at room temperature. Formation of stable AgNPs at 1mM concentrations of silver nitrate (AgNO3) typically gave spherical shape particles with diameter range from 55 to 83nm. The kinetic properties of particle formation were proportional to the effect of concentration of AgNO3 solution. In order to identify the compounds responsible for the bioreduction of Ag(+) ion and the stabilization of AgNPs produced, the functional group present in Mimusops elengi, L. leaf extract was investigated using FTIR. The formation of nanoparticle was confirmed using the surface plasmon resonance band shown in UV-vis spectrophotometer. The topography and morphology of the particles were determined using scanning electron microscopy. The crystalline nature of nanoparticles was confirmed from the XRD pattern. Furthermore these green synthesized AgNPs were found to show higher antimicrobial efficacy against multi drug resistant clinical isolates. PMID:23563291

  8. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability ( R work = 16.2, R free = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  9. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ?-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Bernhard; Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin; Jaenicke, Elmar; Schnell, Robert; Hunter, William N.; Brenk, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa ?-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials. PMID:26249693

  10. The inactivation of RNase G reduces the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia susceptibility to quinolones by triggering the heat shock response

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, Alejandra; Corona, Fernando; Dias, Ricardo; Sánchez, Maria B.; Martínez, Jose L.

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone resistance is usually due to mutations in the genes encoding bacterial topoisomerases. However, different reports have shown that neither clinical quinolone resistant isolates nor in vitro obtained Stenotrophomonas maltophilia mutants present mutations in such genes. The mechanisms so far described consist on e?ux pumps’ overexpression. Our objective is to get information on novel mechanisms of S. maltophilia quinolone resistance. For this purpose, a transposon-insertion mutant library was obtained in S. maltophilia D457. One mutant presenting reduced susceptibility to nalidixic acid was selected. Inverse PCR showed that the inactivated gene encodes RNase G. Complementation of the mutant with wild-type RNase G allele restored the susceptibility to quinolones. Transcriptomic and real-time RT-PCR analyses showed that several genes encoding heat-shock response proteins were expressed at higher levels in the RNase defective mutant than in the wild-type strain. In agreement with this situation, heat-shock reduces the S. maltophilia susceptibility to quinolone. We can then conclude that the inactivation of the RNase G reduces the susceptibility of S. maltophilia to quinolones, most likely by regulating the expression of heat-shock response genes. Heat-shock induces a transient phenotype of quinolone resistance in S. maltophilia. PMID:26539164

  11. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana from chickens in China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to characterize the quinolone resistance of Salmonella Indiana isolated from chickens in China. A total of 130 Salmonella isolates were obtained from chicken farms and slaughterhouses in the Shandong Province of China. All isolate serotypes were tested according to the Kauf...

  12. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in gram-negative bacterial species: an update.

    PubMed

    Cattoir, Vincent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2009-01-01

    Resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones has been increasingly reported among human and veterinary isolates during the last three decades related to their wide clinical use. Until recently, the mechanisms of resistance to quinolones in Enterobacteriaceae were believed to be only chromosome-encoded, i.e. related to modifications of the molecular targets (DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV), decreased outer-membrane permeability (porin defect) and overexpression of naturally-occurring efflux. However, emergence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) has been reported since 1998. Three mechanisms are known to date: Qnr proteins, aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6')-Ib-cr, and efflux pump QepA. The Qnr proteins protect DNA gyrase and type IV topoisomerase from quinolone inhibition. Four types of Qnr protiens have been reported: QnrA (six variants), QnrB (19 variants), QnrC (one variant), and QnrS (three variants). The AAC(6')-Ib-cr determinant acetylates several fluoroquinolones, such as norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin. The protein AAC(6')-Ib-cr contains two amino acid substitutions as compared to the wild-type enzyme AAC(6')-Ib. Both Qnr and AAC(6')-Ib proteins have been reported worldwide. Lately reported, the plasmid-encoded QepA efflux pump may extrude hydrophilic fluoroquinolones (eg. norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and enrofloxacin). PMID:19275610

  13. Detection of Quinolone-Resistance Mutations In Salmonella Spp. Strains of Epidemic and Poultry Origin

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Roberta Barreiros; Magnani, Marciane; Ferrari, Rafaela Gomes; Kottwitz, Luciana Bill Mikito; Sartori, Daniele; Tognim, Maria Cristina Bronharo; de Oliveira, Tereza Cristina R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations into codons Aspartate-87 (62%) and Serine-83 (38%) in QRDR of gyrA were identified in 105 Salmonella strains resistant to nalidixic acid (94 epidemic and 11 of poultry origin). The results show a high incidence of mutations associated to quinolone resistance but suggest association with others mechanisms of resistance. PMID:24031623

  14. 7-Azetidinylquinolones as antibacterial agents. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Frigola, J; Parés, J; Corbera, J; Vañó, D; Mercè, R; Torrens, A; Más, J; Valentí, E

    1993-04-01

    A series of novel antibacterial quinolones and naphthyridones has been prepared which contain 7-azetidinyl substituents in place of the usual piperazine or aminopyrrolidine groups. These azetidinyl derivatives were evaluated for in vitro activity by determining minimum inhibitory concentrations against a variety of bacteria. In vivo efficacy in the mouse infection model and blood levels in the mouse were determined for several compounds. The influence on the structure-activity relationships of varying substituents in the azetidine ring and at position 8 (CH, CF, CCl, N) and N-1 (ethyl, fluoroethyl, cyclopropyl, tert-butyl, 4-fluorophenyl, and 2,4-difluorophenyl) was also studied. Compounds with outstandingly broad-spectrum activity, particularly against Gram-positive organisms, improved in vivo efficacy, and high blood levels were identified in this work. 7-Azetidinyl-8-chloroquinolones were considered as warranting further development. PMID:8464033

  15. Potent antibacterial nanoparticles for pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hong-Zheng; Chen, Wei-Yu; Wu, Ching-Yi; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2015-01-28

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria have emerged because of the prevalent use of antibacterial agents. Thus, new antibacterial agents and therapeutics that can treat bacterial infections are necessary. Vancomycin is a potent antibiotic. Unfortunately, some bacterial strains have developed their resistance toward vancomycin. Nevertheless, it has been demonstrated that vancomycin-immobilized nanoparticles (NPs) are capable to be used in inhibition of the cell growth of vancomycin-resistant bacterial strains through multivalent interactions. However, multistep syntheses are usually necessary to generate vancomycin-immobilized NPs. Thus, maintaining the antibiotic activity of vancomycin when the drug is immobilized on the surface of NPs is challenging. In this study, a facile approach to generate vancomycin immobilized gold (Van-Au) NPs through one-pot stirring of vancomycin with aqueous tetrachloroauric acid at pH 12 and 25 °C for 24 h was demonstrated. Van-Au NPs (8.4 ± 1.3 nm in size) were readily generated. The generated Van-Au NPs maintained their antibiotic activities and inhibited the cell growth of pathogens, which included Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. Furthermore, the minimum inhibitory concentration of the Van-Au NPs against bacteria was lower than that of free-form vancomycin. Staphylococcus aureus-infected macrophages were used as the model samples to examine the antibacterial activity of the Van-Au NPs. Macrophages have the tendency to engulf Van-Au NPs through endocytosis. The results showed that the cell growth of S. aureus in the macrophages was effectively inhibited, suggesting the potential of using the generated Van-Au NPs as antibacterial agents for bacterial infectious diseases. PMID:25584802

  16. Dose Escalation Study of the Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Nemonoxacin (TG-873870), a Novel Potent Broad-Spectrum Nonfluorinated Quinolone, in Healthy Volunteers?

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Luke; Chang, Li-Wen; Tsai, Cheng-Yuan; Hsu, Ching-Hung; Chung, David T.; Aronstein, William S.; Ajayi, Funmi; Kuzmak, Barbara; Lyon, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Nemonoxacin (TG-873870) is a novel nonfluorinated quinolone with potent broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, penicillin- and quinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, and vancomycin-intermediate and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of nemonoxacin were investigated in a double-blind, ascending-single-dose study involving 56 healthy subjects (48 males and 8 females) who were randomly assigned to 1 of 7 dose cohorts. In each successive cohort, two subjects received a placebo and six received single oral doses of 25, 50, 125, 250, 500, 1,000, or 1,500 mg nemonoxacin. Nemonoxacin was well tolerated up to the maximum dose of 1,500 mg. No severe or serious adverse events were observed. The most frequent adverse events were contact dermatitis, pruritus, and erythema. No clinically significant abnormalities were noted in the electrocardiograms, vital signs, or laboratory tests. The plasma concentrations increased over the dose range, and at 500 mg, the free area under the plasma concentration-time curve/MIC90 ratios and free maximum nemonoxacin concentration/MIC90 ratios against drug-sensitive/drug-resistant S. pneumoniae and S. aureus were greater than 227 and 24, respectively. The peak time and elimination half-life of nemonoxacin were 1 to 2 h and 9 to 16 h, respectively. The oral clearance was approximately 0.22 liter/h/kg. The plasma protein binding was approximately 16%. The results of this study support further evaluation of the multiple-dose safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of nemonoxacin. PMID:19884368

  17. Antibacterial polyelectrolyte-coated Mg alloys for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seraz, Md. S.; Asmatulu, R.; Chen, Z.; Ceylan, M.; Mahapatro, A.; Yang, S. Y.

    2014-04-01

    This study deals with two biomedical subjects: corrosion rates of polyelectrolyte-coated magnesium (Mg) alloys, mainly used for biomedical purposes, and antibacterial properties of these alloys. Thin sheets of Mg alloys were coated with cationic polyelectrolyte chitosan (CHI) and anionic polyelectrolyte carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) using a layer-by-layer coating method and then embedded with antibacterial agents under vacuum. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was employed to analyze these samples in order to detect their corrosion properties at different conditions. In the electrochemical analysis section, a corrosion rate of 72 mille inches per year was found in a salt solution for the sample coated with a 12 phosphonic acid self-assembled monolayer and 9 CHI/CMC multilayers. In the antibacterial tests, gentamicin was used to investigate the effects of the drug embedded with the coated surfaces against the Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. Antibacterial studies were tested using the disk diffusion method. Based on the standard diameter of the zone of inhibition chart, the antibacterial diffusion from the surface strongly inhibited bacterial growth in the regions. The largest recorded diameter of the zone of inhibition was 50 mm for the pre-UV treated and gentamicin-loaded sample, which is more than three times the standard diameter.

  18. Acylated flavonol glycosides from Tagetes minuta with antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Shahzadi, Irum; Shah, Mohammad M.

    2015-01-01

    Wild marigold (Tagetes minuta), a flowering plant of the family Asteraceae contains compounds of pharmaceutical and nutritional importance especially essential oils and flavonols. Identification, characterization of flavonols and determination of their antibacterial activity were major objectives of the current study. The isolation and purification of flavonols was accomplished using chromatographic techniques while structural elucidation was completed by LC–MS and NMR spectroscopy. The extracts and purified compounds were tested against various bacterial strains for antibacterial activity. A total of 19 flavonols were isolated from this species. Of these, 17 were of butanol and two of ethyl acetate extracts. Based on the concentration and purity, eight potential flavonols were selected and structurally elucidated. Four flavonols, 6-hydroxyquercetin 7-O-?-(6??-galloylglucopyranoside; 2), 6-hydroxykaempferol 7-O-?-glucopyranoside (5), 6-hydroxykaempferol 7-O-?-(6??-galloylglucopyranoside; 7), 6-hydroxyquercetin 7-O-?-(6??-caffeoylglucopyranoside; 9), were identified for the first time from T. minuta. Butanol and ethyl acetate extracts of flowers and seeds showed significant antibacterial activity against Micrococcus leteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas pikettii. Among the isolated flavonols only 1, 2, and 18 were found to possess significant antibacterial activity against M. luteus. The extracts and purified flavonols from T. minuta can be potential candidates for antibacterial drug discovery and support to ethnopharmacological use. PMID:26441652

  19. Synthesis, evaluation and molecular docking studies of amino acid derived N-glycoconjugates as antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Baig, Noorullah; Singh, Rajnish Prakash; Chander, Subhash; Jha, Prabhat Nath; Murugesan, Sankaranarayanan; Sah, Ajay K

    2015-12-01

    Six amino acid derived N-glycoconjugates of d-glucose were synthesized, characterized and tested for antibacterial activity against G(+)ve (Bacillus cereus) as well as G(-)ve (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) bacterial strains. All the tested compounds exhibited moderate to good antibacterial activity against these bacterial strains. The results were compared with the antibacterial activity of standard drug Chloramphenicol, where results of A5 (Tryptophan derived glycoconjugates) against E. coli and A4 (Isoleucine derived glycoconjugates) against K. pneumoniae bacterial strains are comparable with the standard drug molecule. In silico docking studies were also performed in order to understand the mode of action and binding interactions of these molecules. The docking studies revealed that, occupation of compound A5 at the ATP binding site of subunit GyrB (DNA gyrase, PDB ID: 3TTZ) via hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions may be the reason for its significant in vitro antibacterial activity. PMID:26476390

  20. Antibacterial efficacy of acridine derivatives conjugated with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Piyali; Chakraborty, Prabal Kumar; Saha, Partha; Ray, Pulak; Basu, Samita

    2014-10-01

    Adsorption of acridine derivatives viz. 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride hydrate (9AA-HCl), acridine yellow (AY), acridine orange (AO), and proflavine (Pro) on citrate stabilized gold nanoparticle surface were studied using different analytical techniques like UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The amine moiety of acridine derivative binds strongly to the gold nanoparticles as confirmed by spectroscopic studies. The plasmon band observed for the wine red colloidal gold at 525 nm in the UV-vis spectrum is characteristic of gold nanoparticles. However, with the addition of acridine derivatives the intensity of the absorption band at 525 nm decreases and a new peak emerges at red-end region - a signature of formation of gold-drug complex. The TEM images show the average size of citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles as 15-20 nm, which becomes larger in the presence of various drugs due to aggregation. From the thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) we have measured the number of drug molecules attached per gold nanoparticle (AuNP). These gold nanoparticles are very important as drug delivery vehicles and for clinical applications it is necessary to understand their activity in vivo. The antibacterial efficacy of drugs coated gold nanoparticles were studied against various strains of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. Among the four drugs, 9AA-HCl and AO showed antibacterial activity and for both of them the AuNP conjugated drug showed better antibacterial efficacy than the bare drug. Because of the high penetrating power and large surface area of Au(0), a single gold nanoparticle can adsorb multiple drug molecules, hence this total entity acts as a single group against the bacteria. PMID:25087507

  1. Quinolone-resistant Shigella flexneri isolated in a patient who travelled to India.

    PubMed

    Jeon, You La; Nam, You-sun; Lim, Gayoung; Cho, Sun Young; Kim, Yun-Tae; Jang, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Junyoung; Park, Misun; Lee, Hee Joo

    2012-09-01

    We report a recent case in which ciprofloxacin-resistant Shigella flexneri was isolated from a 23-yr-old female patient with a history of travel to India. Prior to her admission to our internal medicine department, she experienced symptoms of high fever and generalized weakness from continuous watery diarrhea that developed midway during the trip. S. flexneri was isolated from the stool culture. Despite initial treatment with ciprofloxacin, the stool cultures continued to show S. flexneri growth. In the susceptibility test for antibiotics of the quinolone family, the isolate showed resistance to ciprofloxacin (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC], 8 µg/mL), norfloxacin (MIC, 32 µg/mL), ofloxacin (MIC, 8 µg/mL), nalidixic acid (MIC, 256 µg/mL), and intermediate resistance to levofloxacin (MIC, 4 µg/mL). In molecular studies for quinolone resistance related genes, plasmid borne-quinolone resistance genes such as qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, aac(6')-Ib-cr, qepA, and oqxAB were not detected. Two mutations were observed in gyrA (248C?T, 259G?A) and 1 mutation in parC (239G?T). The molecular characteristics of the isolated S. flexneri showed that the isolate was more similar to the strains isolated from the dysentery outbreak in India than those isolated from Korea. PMID:22950074

  2. Antibacterial resistance: an emerging 'zoonosis'?

    PubMed

    Labro, Marie-Thérèse; Bryskier, Jean-Marie

    2014-12-01

    Antibacterial resistance is a worldwide threat, and concerns have arisen about the involvement of animal commensal and pathogenic bacteria in the maintenance and spread of resistance genes. However, beyond the facts related to the occurrence of resistant microorganisms in food, food-producing animals and companion animals and their transmission to humans, it is important to consider the vast environmental 'resistome', the selective pathways underlying the emergence of antibacterial resistance and how we can prepare answers for tomorrow. PMID:25348154

  3. Time for a change: addressing R&D and commercialization challenges for antibacterials.

    PubMed

    Payne, David J; Miller, Linda Federici; Findlay, David; Anderson, James; Marks, Lynn

    2015-06-01

    The antibacterial therapeutic area has been described as the perfect storm. Resistance is increasing to the point that our hospitals encounter patients infected with untreatable pathogens, the overall industry pipeline is described as dry and most multinational pharmaceutical companies have withdrawn from the area. Major contributing factors to the declining antibacterial industry pipeline include scientific challenges, clinical/regulatory hurdles and low return on investment. This paper examines these challenges and proposes approaches to address them. There is a need for a broader scientific agenda to explore new approaches to discover and develop antibacterial agents. Additionally, ideas of how industry and academia could be better integrated will be presented. While promising progress in the regulatory environment has been made, more streamlined regulatory paths are still required and the solutions will lie in global harmonization and clearly defined guidance. Creating the right incentives for antibacterial research and development is critical and a new commercial model for antibacterial agents will be proposed. One key solution to help resolve both the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and lack of new drug development are rapid, cost-effective, accurate point of care diagnostics that will transform antibacterial prescribing and enable more cost-effective and efficient antibacterial clinical trials. The challenges of AMR are too great for any one group to resolve and success will require leadership and partnerships among academia, industry and governments globally. PMID:25918443

  4. Evaluation of the antibacterial activity of patchouli oil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xian; Zhang, Xue; Yang, Shui-Ping; Liu, Wei-Qi

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the antimicrobial tests of patchouli oil were studied by using molecular docking technology and antimicrobial test in vitro. Five biological macromolecule enzymes, required by the bacteria in the process of biosynthesis were selected as target molecules. Five antibiotics benzylpenicillin, sulfadiazine, trimethoprim, rifampicin and ciprofloxacin, which are generally acknowledged as antibacterial drugs, were selected as reference compounds. The 3 three-dimensional (3D) structures of the 5 reference compounds and 26 compounds from patchouli oil were established by using surflex-dock software (8.1). And the 3D structures of five biological macromolecule enzymes derived from Protein Data Bank (PDB). Molecular docking was carried out between the 31 chemical compounds (ligands) and the 5 enzymes (receptors) by using surflex-dock function. Furthermore, the antibacterial effects of 31 chemical compounds were investigated by the scoring function after molecular docking was completed. By comparing the scoring result of 26 compounds in patchouli oil with 5 compared components, we inferred antibacterial activity in about 26 compounds in patchouli oil. On the other hand, six frequently-used pathogenic bacteria were selected for antimicrobial test in vitro, patchouli oil and its two major compounds: (-)-patchouli alcohol and pogostone, which their contents exceeded 60% in patchouli oil samples, were selected antibacterial agents. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were also determined. Molecular docking technology and antimicrobial test in vitro proved that patchouli oil had strong antimicrobial effects. Particularly, pogostone and (-)-patchouli alcohol have potent antimicrobial activity. PMID:24250637

  5. An expert panel report of a proposed scientific model demonstrating the effectiveness of antibacterial handwash products.

    PubMed

    Boyce, John M; Dupont, Herbert L; Massaro, Joseph; Sack, David; Schaffner, Donald W

    2012-10-01

    In 2005, a US Food and Drug Administration Nonprescription Drug Advisory Committee (NDAC) review of consumer antiseptic handwash product studies concluded that the data regarding existing products failed to demonstrate any association between specific log reductions of bacteria achieved by antiseptic handwashing and reduction of infection. The NDAC recommended that consumer antibacterial handwashing products should demonstrate a reduction in infection compared with non-antibacterial handwash products. In response to the NDAC review, a consumer product industry-sponsored expert panel meeting was held in October 2007 to review new methods for assessing the efficacy of antibacterial handwashes. The expert panel reviewed a newly proposed model for linking the effectiveness of antibacterial handwashing to infection reduction and made recommendations for conducting future studies designed to demonstrate the efficacy of antibacterial handwash formulations. The panel concluded that using the surrogate infection model to demonstrate efficacy has a sound scientific basis, that the use of Shigella flexneri as a test organism coupled with a modified hand contamination procedure is supported by published data, and that the model represents a realistic test for the efficacy of consumer antibacterial handwash products. This article summarizes the expert panel's deliberations, conclusions, and recommendations. PMID:22300895

  6. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn; Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-11-15

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ?27 ?M and 21 s(-1), respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases. PMID:26319870

  7. Antibacterial activities in various tissues of the horse mussel, Modiolus modiolus.

    PubMed

    Haug, Tor; Stensvåg, Klara; Olsen M, Ørjan M; Sandsdalen, Erling; Styrvold, Olaf B

    2004-02-01

    A search for antibacterial activity in different organs/tissues of the horse mussel, Modiolus modiolus, was conducted. Dried samples were extracted with 60% (v/v) acetonitrile, containing 0.1% (v/v) trifluoroacetic acid. Due to high salt content, two liquid phases were obtained; an acetonitrile-rich phase (ACN extract) and an aqueous phase. The aqueous phase was further subjected to solid phase extraction (SPE). Eluates from SPE and ACN extracts were tested for antibacterial, lysozyme, and toxic activity. Antibacterial activity was demonstrated in extracts from several tissues, including plasma, haemocytes, labial palps, byssus, mantle, and gills. Some of the extracts were sensitive to proteinase K treatment, indicating antibacterial peptides and/or proteins. Lysozyme-like activity and toxic activity against Artemia salina nauplii was detected in fractions from the gills, mantle, muscle, and haemocytes. Results from this study indicate that M. modiolus is a promising source for identifying novel drug lead compounds. PMID:15050841

  8. Substituted Hydroxyapatites with Antibacterial Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kolmas, Joanna; Groszyk, Ewa; Kwiatkowska-Ró?ycka, Dagmara

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructive surgery is presently struggling with the problem of infections located within implantation biomaterials. Of course, the best antibacterial protection is antibiotic therapy. However, oral antibiotic therapy is sometimes ineffective, while administering an antibiotic at the location of infection is often associated with an unfavourable ratio of dosage efficiency and toxic effect. Thus, the present study aims to find a new factor which may improve antibacterial activity while also presenting low toxicity to the human cells. Such factors are usually implemented along with the implant itself and may be an integral part of it. Many recent studies have focused on inorganic factors, such as metal nanoparticles, salts, and metal oxides. The advantages of inorganic factors include the ease with which they can be combined with ceramic and polymeric biomaterials. The following review focuses on hydroxyapatites substituted with ions with antibacterial properties. It considers materials that have already been applied in regenerative medicine (e.g., hydroxyapatites with silver ions) and those that are only at the preliminary stage of research and which could potentially be used in implantology or dentistry. We present methods for the synthesis of modified apatites and the antibacterial mechanisms of various ions as well as their antibacterial efficiency. PMID:24949423

  9. Ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and antibiotic resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Dobiasova, Hana; Kutilova, Iva; Piackova, Veronika; Vesely, Tomas; Cizek, Alois; Dolejska, Monika

    2014-07-16

    Growing ornamental fish industry is associated with public health concerns including extensive antibiotic use accompanied by increasing antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to analyze Aeromonas isolates from imported tropical ornamental fish and coldwater koi carps bred in the Czech Republic to assess the potential risk of ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQR) and antibiotic resistance plasmids. A collection of Aeromonas spp. with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC ? 0.05 mg/L) was selected for the detection of PMQR genes. Isolates harbouring PMQR genes were further analyzed for the additional antibiotic resistance, integron content, clonality, biofilm production and transferability of PMQR genes by conjugation and transformation. Comparative analysis of plasmids carrying PMQR genes was performed. Fifteen (19%, n=80) isolates from koi carps and 18 (24%, n=76) isolates from imported ornamental fish were positive for qnrS2, aac(6')-Ib-cr or qnrB17 genes. PMQR-positive isolates from imported ornamental fish showed higher MIC levels to quinolones, multiresistance and diverse content of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons compared to the isolates from the carps. Related IncU plasmids harbouring qnrS2 and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes were found in Aeromonas spp. from imported ornamental fish and koi carps from various geographical areas. Ornamental fish may represent a potential source of multiresistant bacteria and mobile genetic elements for the environment and for humans. PMID:24629900

  10. A potent, nonpeptidyl 1H-quinolone antagonist for the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    DeVita, R J; Walsh, T F; Young, J R; Jiang, J; Ujjainwalla, F; Toupence, R B; Parikh, M; Huang, S X; Fair, J A; Goulet, M T; Wyvratt, M J; Lo, J L; Ren, N; Yudkovitz, J B; Yang, Y T; Cheng, K; Cui, J; Mount, G; Rohrer, S P; Schaeffer, J M; Rhodes, L; Drisko, J E; McGowan, E; MacIntyre, D E; Vincent, S; Carlin, J R; Cameron, J; Smith, R G

    2001-03-15

    Extensive development of the structure-activity relationships of a screening lead determined three important pharmacophores for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor antagonist activity. Incorporation of the 3,4,5-trimethylphenyl group at the 3-position, 2-(2(S)-azetidinyl)ethoxy group at the 4-position, and N-4-pyrimidinylcarboxamide at the 6-position of the quinolone core resulted in the identification of 4-(2-(azetidin-2(S)-yl)ethoxy)-7-chloro-2-oxo-3-(3,4,5-trimethylphenyl)-1,2-dihydroquinoline-6-carboxylic acid pyrimidin-4-ylamide (1) as a potent antagonist of the GnRH receptor. A 10(4)-fold increase in in vitro binding affinity is observed for the GnRH receptor as compared to the initial screening lead. Compound 1 exhibits nanomolar binding activity and functional antagonism at the human receptor and is 7-fold less active at the rhesus receptor. Intravenous administration of compound 1 to rhesus monkeys results in a significant decrease of the serum levels of downstream hormones, luteinizing hormone (79% decrease in area under the curve) and testosterone (92% decrease in area under the curve), at a dose of 3 mg/kg. Quinolone 1 is a potent nonpeptidyl antagonist for the human GnRH receptor that is efficacious for the suppression of luteinizing hormone and testosterone in primates. PMID:11300873

  11. Effect of the quinolone coccidiostat decoquinate on the rearrangement of chromosomes of Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Del Cacho, E; Gallego, M; Pages, M; Monteagudo, L; Sánchez-Acedo, C

    2006-12-01

    The present report concerns our attempts to further study the effect of quinolone coccidiostats on the sporulation of Eimeria tenella oocysts by analyzing the meiotic behaviour of the chromosomes. To that end, synaptonemal complexes were analyzed by TEM applied to intact meiotic chromosomes. These were isolated after disruption of oocysts, which were harvested from decoquinate-medicated and non-medicated (control) birds. In oocysts from control birds, synaptonemal complexes appeared as the 14 bivalents of the normal karyotype. However, in oocysts from medicated birds, our synaptonemal complex analysis revealed a reciprocal translocation, which was observed as an irregular pairing of chromosome axes 5 and 12 resulting in quadrivalent and trivalent configurations. This finding suggests breakage points in chromosomes 5 and 12 and exchange of chromosomal segments. Furthermore, breakpoints in chromosome 12 resulted in telomere deletion. The chromosomal aberrations described in the present study may result in reduced sporulation since chromosomes involved in translocations segregate abnormally during meiosis. In addition, the results reported provide new evidence of the inhibitory effect of quinolones on the sporulation of E. tenella oocysts, since sporocysts were not formed. PMID:17005184

  12. Antibiotics Threaten Wildlife: Circulating Quinolone Residues and Disease in Avian Scavengers

    PubMed Central

    Lemus, Jesús Á.; Blanco, Guillermo; Grande, Javier; Arroyo, Bernardo; García-Montijano, Marino; Martínez, Felíx

    2008-01-01

    Antibiotic residues that may be present in carcasses of medicated livestock could pass to and greatly reduce scavenger wildlife populations. We surveyed residues of the quinolones enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin and other antibiotics (amoxicillin and oxytetracycline) in nestling griffon Gyps fulvus, cinereous Aegypius monachus and Egyptian Neophron percnopterus vultures in central Spain. We found high concentrations of antibiotics in the plasma of many nestling cinereous (57%) and Egyptian (40%) vultures. Enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were also found in liver samples of all dead cinereous vultures. This is the first report of antibiotic residues in wildlife. We also provide evidence of a direct association between antibiotic residues, primarily quinolones, and severe disease due to bacterial and fungal pathogens. Our results indicate that, by damaging the liver and kidney and through the acquisition and proliferation of pathogens associated with the depletion of lymphoid organs, continuous exposure to antibiotics could increase mortality rates, at least in cinereous vultures. If antibiotics ingested with livestock carrion are clearly implicated in the decline of the vultures in central Spain then it should be considered a primary concern for conservation of their populations. PMID:18197254

  13. Structure Based In Silico Analysis of Quinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Salmonella Typhi from India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Priyanka; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.; Kapil, Arti; Kaur, Punit

    2015-01-01

    Enteric fever is a major cause of morbidity in several parts of the Indian subcontinent. The treatment for typhoid fever majorly includes the fluoroquinolone group of antibiotics. Excessive and indiscriminate use of these antibiotics has led to development of acquired resistance in the causative organism Salmonella Typhi. The resistance towards fluoroquinolones is associated with mutations in the target gene of DNA Gyrase. We have estimated the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of commonly used fluoroquinolone representatives from three generations, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, for 100 clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhi from patients in the Indian subcontinent. The MICs have been found to be in the range of 0.032 to 8 ?g/ml. The gene encoding DNA Gyrase was subsequently sequenced and point mutations were observed in DNA Gyrase in the quinolone resistance determining region comprising Ser83Phe/Tyr and Asp87Tyr/Gly. The binding ability of these four fluoroquinolones in the quinolone binding pocket of wild type as well as mutant DNA Gyrase was computationally analyzed by molecular docking to assess their differential binding behaviour. This study has revealed that mutations in DNA Gyrase alter the characteristics of the binding pocket resulting in the loss of crucial molecular interactions and consequently decrease the binding affinity of fluoroquinolones with the target protein. The present study assists in understanding the underlying molecular and structural mechanism for decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility in clinical isolates as a consequence of mutations in DNA Gyrase. PMID:25962113

  14. Lack of efflux mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A.

    PubMed

    Baucheron, Sylvie; Monchaux, Isabelle; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A isolates from human patients in France displaying different levels of resistance to quinolones or fluoroquinolones were studied for resistance mechanisms to these antimicrobial agents. All resistant isolates carried either single or multiple target gene mutations (i.e., in gyrA, gyrB, or parC) correlating with the resistance levels observed. Active efflux, through upregulation of multipartite efflux systems, has also been previously reported as contributing mechanism for other serovars. Therefore, we investigated also the occurrence of non-target gene mutations in regulatory regions affecting efflux pump expression. However, no mutation was detected in these regions in both Typhi and Paratyphi isolates of this study. Besides, no overexpression of the major efflux systems was observed for these isolates. Nevertheless, a large deletion of 2334 bp was identified in the acrS-acrE region of all S. Typhi strains but which did not affect the resistance phenotype. As being specific to S. Typhi, this deletion could be used for specific molecular detection purposes. In conclusion, the different levels of quinolone or FQ resistance in both S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A seem to rely only on target modifications. PMID:24478769

  15. Antimycobacterial and Antibacterial Activity of Allium sativum Bulbs

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, V.; Phadatare, A. G.; Mukne, Alka

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the major public health problems faced globally. Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to antitubercular agents has called for an urgent need to investigate newer drugs to combat tuberculosis. Garlic (Allium sativum) is an edible plant which has generated a lot of curiosity throughout human history as a medicinal plant. Garlic contains sulfur compounds like allicin, ajoene, allylmethyltrisulfide, diallyltrisulfide, diallyldisulphide and others which exhibit various biological properties like antimicrobial, anticancer, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, antiinflammatory, hypoglycemic, and cardiovascular effects. According to various traditional systems of medicine, garlic is one of the established remedies for tuberculosis. The objective of the current study was to investigate in vitro antimycobacterial activity as well as anti-bacterial activity of various extracts rich in specific phytoconstituents from garlic. Preparation of garlic extracts was done based on the chemistry of the constituents and their stability. The estimation of in vitro antimycobacterial activity of different garlic extracts was done using Resazurin microtire plate assay technique whereas activity of garlic oil was evaluated by colony count method. The antibacterial activity of extracts and oil was estimated by zone of inhibition method. Extracts of garlic rich in allicin and ajoene showed appreciable antimycobacterial activity as compared to standard drugs. Garlic oil demonstrated significant antibacterial activity, particularly against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25035540

  16. [Antibacterial chemotherapy in anaerobic osteomyelitis caused by gunshot wounds].

    PubMed

    Shcherbin, F G; Makhson, N E; Petrakov, A A

    1990-05-01

    Thirty three patients with a 7-year history of chronic gunshot osteomyelitis were examined. Non-sporogenic anaerobes were isolated from 28 patients. Gram-positive cocci and gram-negative rods predominated in the anaerobic microflora. Radical surgical interventions combined with adequate antibacterial chemotherapy yielded satisfactory results. The postoperative cavities were drained to provide aerobic conditions in all the parts. Antibacterial drugs and in particular dioxidine solutions and KF were used locally. When antibioticograms were available 7 to 10 days after, the antibiotics in combination with enzymes such as terrylitin and lidase were used with constant irrigation of wounds with furacillin or boric acid solutions. In the empirical therapy, the following scheme was most frequently used: 600 mg of lincomycin, thrice, intramuscularly; 80 mg of gentamicin, thrice, intramuscularly and as an obligatory agent 500 mg of trichopol, thrice, orally. After availability of the antibioticograms the use of the antibiotics was adjusted and continued up to 10 to 12 days. In severe cases 0.1% solution of dioxidine was used intravenously drop-wise in a dose of 300 mg 2 times a day as well as tiberal or clindamycin, intravenously, drop-wise. The antibacterial drugs were added to the drainage until the latter was removed. Relapses of the disease over 4 years were observed only in 3 out of 26 operated patients. PMID:2383155

  17. Antimycobacterial and Antibacterial Activity of Allium sativum Bulbs.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, V; Phadatare, A G; Mukne, Alka

    2014-05-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the major public health problems faced globally. Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to antitubercular agents has called for an urgent need to investigate newer drugs to combat tuberculosis. Garlic (Allium sativum) is an edible plant which has generated a lot of curiosity throughout human history as a medicinal plant. Garlic contains sulfur compounds like allicin, ajoene, allylmethyltrisulfide, diallyltrisulfide, diallyldisulphide and others which exhibit various biological properties like antimicrobial, anticancer, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, antiinflammatory, hypoglycemic, and cardiovascular effects. According to various traditional systems of medicine, garlic is one of the established remedies for tuberculosis. The objective of the current study was to investigate in vitro antimycobacterial activity as well as anti-bacterial activity of various extracts rich in specific phytoconstituents from garlic. Preparation of garlic extracts was done based on the chemistry of the constituents and their stability. The estimation of in vitro antimycobacterial activity of different garlic extracts was done using Resazurin microtire plate assay technique whereas activity of garlic oil was evaluated by colony count method. The antibacterial activity of extracts and oil was estimated by zone of inhibition method. Extracts of garlic rich in allicin and ajoene showed appreciable antimycobacterial activity as compared to standard drugs. Garlic oil demonstrated significant antibacterial activity, particularly against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25035540

  18. Anti-bacterial Studies of Silver Nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    T. Theivasanthi; M. Alagar

    2011-01-01

    We discuss about the antibacterial activities of Silver nanoparticles and compare them on both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria in this investigation. The activities of Silver nanoparticles synthesized by electrolysis method are more in Gram (-) than Gram (+) bacteria. First time, we increase its antibacterial activities by using electrical power while on electrolysis synthesis and it is confirmed from its more antibacterial activities (For Escherichia coli bacteria). We investigate the changes of inner unit cell Lattice constant of Silver nanoparticles prepared in two different methods and its effects on antibacterial activities. We note that slight change of the lattice constant results in the enhancement of its antibacterial activities.

  19. Distribution and risk assessment of quinolone antibiotics in the soils from organic vegetable farms of a subtropical city, Southern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Lian; Xiang, Lei; Yan, Qing-Yun; Jiang, Yuan-Neng; Li, Yan-Wen; Huang, Xian-Pei; Li, Hui; Cai, Quan-Ying; Mo, Ce-Hui

    2014-07-15

    Organic fertilizer or manure containing antibiotics has been widely used in organic farms, but the distribution and potential impacts of antibiotics to the local environment are not well understood. In this study, four quinolone antibiotics in soil samples (n=69) from five organic vegetable farms in a subtropical city, Southern China, were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Our results indicated that quinolone compounds were ubiquitous in soil samples (detection frequency>97% for all compounds), and their concentrations ranged from not detectable to 42.0 ?g/kg. Among the targets, enrofloxacin (ENR) was the dominant compound, followed by ciprofloxacin (CIP) and norfloxacin (NOR). The average total concentrations of four compounds in the soils were affected by vegetable types and species cultivated, decreasing in the order of fruit>rhizome>leaf vegetables. Moreover, the average concentrations of quinolone compounds (except ENR) in open-field soils were higher than those in greenhouse soils. The concentrations of quinolone antibiotics in this study were lower than the ecotoxic effect trigger value (100 ?g/kg) proposed by the Veterinary Medicine International Coordination commission. Risk assessment based on the calculated risk quotients indicated that NOR, CIP, and ENR posed mainly medium to low risks to bacteria. PMID:24797736

  20. INCREASED RECOVERY OF FECAL QUINOLONE-RESISTANT ESCHERICHIA COLI IN CHILDREN USING A MACCONKEY-NALIDIXIC ACID SCREENING PLATE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Commensal bacteria may serve as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes. The possibility that these may be transferred to zoonotic pathogens is under study. Resistance to Quinolones is of particular interest because of their value in treating severe human infections. Methods: Plain M...

  1. Shifts in the Antibiotic Susceptibility, Serogroups, and Clonal Complexes of Neisseria meningitidis in Shanghai, China: A Time Trend Analysis of the Pre-Quinolone and Quinolone Eras

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Zou, Ying; Wang, Gangyi; Zhang, Xi; Xu, Xiaogang; Zhao, Miao; Hu, Fupin; Qu, Di; Chen, Min; Wang, Minggui

    2015-01-01

    Background Fluoroquinolones have been used broadly since the end of the 1980s and have been recommended for Neisseria meningitidis prophylaxis since 2005 in China. The aim of this study was to determine whether and how N. meningitidis antimicrobial susceptibility, serogroup prevalence, and clonal complex (CC) prevalence shifted in association with the introduction and expanding use of quinolones in Shanghai, a region with a traditionally high incidence of invasive disease due to N. meningitidis. Methods and Findings A total of 374 N. meningitidis isolates collected by the Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention between 1965 and 2013 were studied. Shifts in the serogroups and CCs were observed, from predominantly serogroup A CC5 (84%) in 1965–1973 to serogroup A CC1 (58%) in 1974–1985, then to serogroup C or B CC4821 (62%) in 2005–2013. The rates of ciprofloxacin nonsusceptibility in N. meningitidis disease isolates increased from 0% in 1965–1985 to 84% (31/37) in 2005–2013 (p < 0.001). Among the ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible isolates, 87% (27/31) were assigned to either CC4821 (n = 20) or CC5 (n = 7). The two predominant ciprofloxacin-resistant clones were designated ChinaCC4821-R1-C/B and ChinaCC5-R14-A. The ChinaCC4821-R1-C/B clone acquired ciprofloxacin resistance by a point mutation, and was present in 52% (16/31) of the ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible disease isolates. The ChinaCC5-R14-A clone acquired ciprofloxacin resistance by horizontal gene transfer, and was found in 23% (7/31) of the ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible disease isolates. The ciprofloxacin nonsusceptibility rate was 47% (7/15) among isolates from asymptomatic carriers, and nonsusceptibility was associated with diverse multi-locus sequence typing profiles and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. As detected after 2005, ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible strains were shared between some of the patients and their close contacts. A limitation of this study is that isolates from 1986–2004 were not available and that only a small sample of convenience isolates from 1965–1985 were available. Conclusions The increasing prevalence of ciprofloxacin resistance since 2005 in Shanghai was associated with the spread of hypervirulent lineages CC4821 and CC5. Two resistant meningococcal clones ChinaCC4821-R1-C/B and ChinaCC5-R14-A have emerged in Shanghai during the quinolone era. Ciprofloxacin should be utilized with caution for the chemoprophylaxis of N. meningitidis in China. PMID:26057853

  2. A Function of SmeDEF, the Major Quinolone Resistance Determinant of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Is the Colonization of Plant Roots

    PubMed Central

    García-León, Guillermo; Hernández, Alvaro; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Alavi, Peyman; Berg, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Quinolones are synthetic antibiotics, and the main cause of resistance to these antimicrobials is mutation of the genes encoding their targets. However, in contrast to the case for other organisms, such mutations have not been found in quinolone-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates, in which overproduction of the SmeDEF efflux pump is a major cause of quinolone resistance. SmeDEF is chromosomally encoded and highly conserved in all studied S. maltophilia strains; it is an ancient element that evolved over millions of years in this species. It thus seems unlikely that its main function would be resistance to quinolones, a family of synthetic antibiotics not present in natural environments until the last few decades. Expression of SmeDEF is tightly controlled by the transcriptional repressor SmeT. Our work shows that plant-produced flavonoids can bind to SmeT, releasing it from smeDEF and smeT operators. Antibiotics extruded by SmeDEF do not impede the binding of SmeT to DNA. The fact that plant-produced flavonoids specifically induce smeDEF expression indicates that they are bona fide effectors regulating expression of this resistance determinant. Expression of efflux pumps is usually downregulated unless their activity is needed. Since smeDEF expression is triggered by plant-produced flavonoids, we reasoned that this efflux pump may have a role in the colonization of plants by S. maltophilia. Our results showed that, indeed, deletion of smeE impairs S. maltophilia colonization of plant roots. Altogether, our results indicate that quinolone resistance is a recent function of SmeDEF and that colonization of plant roots is likely one original function of this efflux pump. PMID:24837376

  3. Cloning and structure-function analyses of quinolone- and acridone-producing novel type III polyketide synthases from Citrus microcarpa.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takahiro; Shimokawa, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Takashi; Kinjo, Keishi; Kato, Ryohei; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Morita, Hiroyuki; Abe, Ikuro

    2013-10-01

    Two novel type III polyketide synthases, quinolone synthase (QNS) and acridone synthase (ACS), were cloned from Citrus microcarpa (Rutaceae). The deduced amino acid sequence of C. microcarpa QNS is unique, and it shared only 56-60% identities with C. microcarpa ACS, Medicago sativa chalcone synthase (CHS), and the previously reported Aegle marmelos QNS. In contrast to the quinolone- and acridone-producing A. marmelos QNS, C. microcarpa QNS produces 4-hydroxy-N-methylquinolone as the "single product" by the one-step condensation of N-methylanthraniloyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA. However, C. microcarpa ACS shows broad substrate specificities and produces not only acridone and quinolone but also chalcone, benzophenone, and phloroglucinol from 4-coumaroyl-CoA, benzoyl-CoA, and hexanoyl-CoA, respectively. Furthermore, the x-ray crystal structures of C. microcarpa QNS and ACS, solved at 2.47- and 2.35-? resolutions, respectively, revealed wide active site entrances in both enzymes. The wide active site entrances thus provide sufficient space to facilitate the binding of the bulky N-methylanthraniloyl-CoA within the catalytic centers. However, the active site cavity volume of C. microcarpa ACS (760 ?(3)) is almost as large as that of M. sativa CHS (750 ?(3)), and ACS produces acridone by employing an active site cavity and catalytic machinery similar to those of CHS. In contrast, the cavity of C. microcarpa QNS (290 ?(3)) is significantly smaller, which makes this enzyme produce the diketide quinolone. These results as well as mutagenesis analyses provided the first structural bases for the anthranilate-derived production of the quinolone and acridone alkaloid by type III polyketide synthases. PMID:23963450

  4. Cloning and Structure-Function Analyses of Quinolone- and Acridone-producing Novel Type III Polyketide Synthases from Citrus microcarpa*

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Takahiro; Shimokawa, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Takashi; Kinjo, Keishi; Kato, Ryohei; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Morita, Hiroyuki; Abe, Ikuro

    2013-01-01

    Two novel type III polyketide synthases, quinolone synthase (QNS) and acridone synthase (ACS), were cloned from Citrus microcarpa (Rutaceae). The deduced amino acid sequence of C. microcarpa QNS is unique, and it shared only 56–60% identities with C. microcarpa ACS, Medicago sativa chalcone synthase (CHS), and the previously reported Aegle marmelos QNS. In contrast to the quinolone- and acridone-producing A. marmelos QNS, C. microcarpa QNS produces 4-hydroxy-N-methylquinolone as the “single product” by the one-step condensation of N-methylanthraniloyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA. However, C. microcarpa ACS shows broad substrate specificities and produces not only acridone and quinolone but also chalcone, benzophenone, and phloroglucinol from 4-coumaroyl-CoA, benzoyl-CoA, and hexanoyl-CoA, respectively. Furthermore, the x-ray crystal structures of C. microcarpa QNS and ACS, solved at 2.47- and 2.35-? resolutions, respectively, revealed wide active site entrances in both enzymes. The wide active site entrances thus provide sufficient space to facilitate the binding of the bulky N-methylanthraniloyl-CoA within the catalytic centers. However, the active site cavity volume of C. microcarpa ACS (760 ?3) is almost as large as that of M. sativa CHS (750 ?3), and ACS produces acridone by employing an active site cavity and catalytic machinery similar to those of CHS. In contrast, the cavity of C. microcarpa QNS (290 ?3) is significantly smaller, which makes this enzyme produce the diketide quinolone. These results as well as mutagenesis analyses provided the first structural bases for the anthranilate-derived production of the quinolone and acridone alkaloid by type III polyketide synthases. PMID:23963450

  5. Antibacterial properties of 3-(phenylsulfonyl)-2-pyrazinecarbonitrile.

    PubMed

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Majed, Hiwa; Conery, Annie L; Kim, Wooseong; Kwon, Bumsup; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Kelso, Michael J; Ausubel, Frederick M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-11-15

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains has heightened the need for new antimicrobial agents based on novel chemical scaffolds that are able to circumvent current modes of resistance. We recently developed a whole-animal drug-screening methodology in pursuit of this goal and now report the discovery of 3-(phenylsulfonyl)-2-pyrazinecarbonitrile (PSPC) as a novel antibacterial effective against resistant nosocomial pathogens. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of PSPC against Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecium were 4?g/mL and 8?g/mL, respectively, whereas the MICs were higher against the Gram-negative bacteria Klebsiella pneumoniae (64?g/mL), Acinetobacter baumannii (32?g/mL), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (>64?g/mL), and Enterobacter spp. (>64?g/mL). However, co-treatment of PSPC with the efflux pump inhibitor phenylalanine arginyl ?-naphthylamide (PA?N) or with sub-inhibitory concentrations of the lipopeptide antibiotic polymyxin B reduced the MICs of PSPC against the Gram-negative strains by >4-fold. A sulfide analog of PSPC (PSPC-1S) showed no antibacterial activity, whereas the sulfoxide analog (PSPC-6S) showed identical activity as PSPC across all strains, confirming structure-dependent activity for PSPC and suggesting a target-based mechanism of action. PSPC displayed dose dependent toxicity to both Caenorhabditis elegans and HEK-293 mammalian cells, culminating with a survival rate of 16% (100?g/mL) and 8.5% (64?g/mL), respectively, at the maximum tested concentration. However, PSPC did not result in hemolysis of erythrocytes, even at a concentration of 64?g/mL. Together these results support PSPC as a new chemotype suitable for further development of new antibiotics against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26459212

  6. Heterocyclic urea derivatives and methods of use thereof (WO2010142978).

    PubMed

    Supuran, Claudiu T; Scozzafava, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    A series of ureido derivatives incorporating a highly derivatized quinolone scaffold were prepared by a succession of original steps. The lead molecules of these compounds are the quinolone antibacterials of the nalidixic acid/ciprofloxacin type and they target, similar to these clinically used agents, the DNA gyrase/topoisomerase IV of pathogenic bacteria. These new quinolones are claimed to act as efficient antibacterials against a large number of drug-resistant bacteria such as Staphylococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Acinetobacter baumannii, Bacteroides bivius, Burkholderia spp., Chlamydia spp., Chlamydophila pneumoniae. PMID:22264034

  7. Interaction of vanadium (IV) solvates (L) with second-generation fluoroquinolone antibacterial drug ciprofloxacin: Spectroscopic, structure, thermal analyses, kinetics and biological evaluation (L = An, DMF, Py and Et3N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zordok, Wael A.

    2014-08-01

    The preparation and characterization of the new solid complexes [VO(CIP)2L]SO4?nH2O, where L = aniline (An), dimethylformamide (DMF), pyridine (Py) and triethylamine (Et3N) in the reaction of ciprofloxacin (CIP) with VO(SO4)2·2H2O in ethanol. The isolated complexes have been characterized with their melting points, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, magnetic properties, conductance measurements, UV-Vis. and 1H NMR spectroscopic methods and thermal analyses. The results supported the formation of the complexes and indicated that ciprofloxacin reacts as a bidentate ligand bound to the vanadium ion through the pyridone oxygen and one carboxylato oxygen. The activation energies, E*; entropies, ?S*; enthalpies, ?H*; Gibbs free energies, ?G*, of the thermal decomposition reactions have been derived from thermo gravimetric (TGA) and differential thermo gravimetric (DTG) curves, using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzeger methods. The lowest energy model structure of each complex has been proposed by using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/CEP-31G level of theory. The ligand and their metal complexes were also evaluated for their antibacterial activity against several bacterial species, such as Bacillus Subtilis (B. Subtilis), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Nesseria Gonorrhoeae (N. Gonorrhoeae), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Escherichia coli (E. coli).

  8. Pyrazinamide drug interacting with Co(III) and Zn(II) metal ions based on 2,2?-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline ligands: Synthesis, studies and crystal structure, DFT calculations and antibacterial assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiniforoshan, Hossein; Radani, Zahra Sadeghian; Tabrizi, Leila; Tavakol, Hossein; Sabzalian, Mohammad R.; Mohammadnezhad, Gholamhossein; Görls, Helmar; Plass, Winfried

    2015-02-01

    Three novel compounds, [Co(PZAH)(bipy)2](ClO4)2 (1), [Zn(PZAH)(bipy)2]ClO4 (2), [Zn(PZAH)(phen)2]ClO4 (3), which PZAH2 = pyrazinamide, bipy = 2,2?-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR and electronic absorption spectroscopies. The crystal structure of 1 has been determined in an orthorhombic Pbca space group. The binding modes of the ligands in complex 1 were established by means of molecular modeling of the complex, and calculation of their IR and absorption spectra DFT calculations. The calculated FT-IR and UV-Vis data are in good agreement with the experimental results, and confirmed the experimental one. In addition to DFT calculations of the complex 1, natural bond orbital (NBO) was performed to obtain atomic charges. Biological studies also showed the antibacterial activity of complexes 1-3 against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains.

  9. Synthesis, antifungal and antibacterial activity of novel 1,2,4-triazole derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Deepa; Jain, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    A large number of 1,2,4-triazole-containing ring system have been incorporated into a wide variety of therapeutically interesting drug candidates including anti-inflammatory, central nervous system stimulants, antianxiety, and antimicrobial agents. To overcome the rapid development of drug resistance, new agents should preferably have chemical characteristics that clearly differ from those of existing agents. Thus led to the design and synthesize the new antimicrobial agents. A novel series of Schiff bases based on of 4-(benzylideneamino)-5-phenyl-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol scaffold was prepared by heating thiocarbohydrazide and substituted benzoic acid and subsequently, treating with substituted benzaldehydes. Seventeen derivatives were synthesized and were biologically screened for antifungal and antibacterial activity. The newly synthesized derivatives of triazole showed antifungal activity against fungal species, Microsporum gypseum; and antibacterial activity against bacterial species, Staphylococcus aureus. It was observed that none of the compounds tested showed positive results for fungi Candida albicans fungi Aspergillus niger, nor against bacterial strain Escherichia coli. Strong antifungal effects were obtained for the synthesized compounds against M. gypseum and were superior or comparable to standard drug ketoconazole. Similarly, all of the synthesized compounds exhibit strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus and were superior or comparable to standard drug streptomycin. It was found that among the triazole derivatives so synthesized, six of them, showed antifungal activity superior to ketoconazole while one of them, showed antibacterial activity superior to streptomycin. Thus, these can be the potential new molecule as an antimicrobial agent. PMID:26317080

  10. Synthesis, antifungal and antibacterial activity of novel 1,2,4-triazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepa; Jain, D K

    2015-01-01

    A large number of 1,2,4-triazole-containing ring system have been incorporated into a wide variety of therapeutically interesting drug candidates including anti-inflammatory, central nervous system stimulants, antianxiety, and antimicrobial agents. To overcome the rapid development of drug resistance, new agents should preferably have chemical characteristics that clearly differ from those of existing agents. Thus led to the design and synthesize the new antimicrobial agents. A novel series of Schiff bases based on of 4-(benzylideneamino)-5-phenyl-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol scaffold was prepared by heating thiocarbohydrazide and substituted benzoic acid and subsequently, treating with substituted benzaldehydes. Seventeen derivatives were synthesized and were biologically screened for antifungal and antibacterial activity. The newly synthesized derivatives of triazole showed antifungal activity against fungal species, Microsporum gypseum; and antibacterial activity against bacterial species, Staphylococcus aureus. It was observed that none of the compounds tested showed positive results for fungi Candida albicans fungi Aspergillus niger, nor against bacterial strain Escherichia coli. Strong antifungal effects were obtained for the synthesized compounds against M. gypseum and were superior or comparable to standard drug ketoconazole. Similarly, all of the synthesized compounds exhibit strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus and were superior or comparable to standard drug streptomycin. It was found that among the triazole derivatives so synthesized, six of them, showed antifungal activity superior to ketoconazole while one of them, showed antibacterial activity superior to streptomycin. Thus, these can be the potential new molecule as an antimicrobial agent. PMID:26317080

  11. Oxabicyclooctane-Linked Novel Bacterial Topoisomerase Inhibitors as Broad Spectrum Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial resistance is eroding the clinical utility of existing antibiotics necessitating the discovery of new agents. Bacterial type II topoisomerase is a clinically validated, highly effective, and proven drug target. This target is amenable to inhibition by diverse classes of inhibitors with alternative and distinct binding sites to quinolone antibiotics, thus enabling the development of agents that lack cross-resistance to quinolones. Described here are novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs), which are a new class of gyrase and topo IV inhibitors and consist of three distinct structural moieties. The substitution of the linker moiety led to discovery of potent broad-spectrum NBTIs with reduced off-target activity (hERG IC50 > 18 ?M) and improved physical properties. AM8191 is bactericidal and selectively inhibits DNA synthesis and Staphylococcus aureus gyrase (IC50 = 1.02 ?M) and topo IV (IC50 = 10.4 ?M). AM8191 showed parenteral and oral efficacy (ED50) at less than 2.5 mg/kg doses in a S. aureus murine infection model. A cocrystal structure of AM8191 bound to S. aureus DNA-gyrase showed binding interactions similar to that reported for GSK299423, displaying a key contact of Asp83 with the basic amine at position-7 of the linker. PMID:24900889

  12. [Impact on public health of quinolone resistance in animal-origin bacteria].

    PubMed

    Orden Gutiérrez, J A; de la Fuente López, R

    2001-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are one of the most useful classes of antimicrobial agents used in human and animal medicine today, both because of their spectrum and their physicochemical properties. The use of quinolones in animals is a matter of special concern because it could contribute to the acquisition of resistance in foodborn bacteria (such as Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp. and Escherichia coli) and this, in turn, could lead to a reduction in the efficacy of such compounds in treating infections in humans. However, the causal relationship between the use of fluoroquinolones in veterinary medicine and the isolation of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria in humans has not been generally proven and, moreover, the use of fluoroquinolones in animals is only one of the many factors implicated in the resistance to these antimicrobials. Even so, the surveillance of fluoroquinolone resistance in bacteria isolated from animals and foods and the prudent use of these antimicrobials in animals should have the highest priority. PMID:11693069

  13. Complete Proteome of a Quinolone-Resistant Salmonella Typhimurium Phage Type DT104B Clinical Strain

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Susana; Nunes-Miranda, Júlio D.; Pinto, Luís; Santos, Hugo M.; de Toro, María; Sáenz, Yolanda; Torres, Carmen; Capelo, José Luis; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2014-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most common and widely distributed foodborne diseases. The emergence of Salmonella strains that are resistant to a variety of antimicrobials is a serious global public health concern. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive phage type 104 (DT104) is one of these emerging epidemic multidrug resistant strains. Here we collate information from the diverse and comprehensive range of experiments on Salmonella proteomes that have been published. We then present a new study of the proteome of the quinolone-resistant Se20 strain (phage type DT104B), recovered after ciprofloxacin treatment and compared it to the proteome of reference strain SL1344. A total of 186 and 219 protein spots were recovered from Se20 and SL1344 protein extracts, respectively, after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The signatures of 94% of the protein spots were successfully identified through matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Three antimicrobial resistance related proteins, whose genes were previously detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), were identified in the clinical strain. The presence of these proteins, dihydropteroate synthase type-2 (sul2 gene), aminoglycoside resistance protein A (strA gene) and aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib-cr4 (aac(6')-Ib-cr4 gene), was confirmed in the DT104B clinical strain. The aac(6')-Ib-cr4 gene is responsible for plasmid-mediated aminoglycoside and quinolone resistance. This is a preliminary analysis of the proteome of these two S. Typhimurium strains and further work is being developed to better understand how antimicrobial resistance is developing in this pathogen. PMID:25196519

  14. Molecular epidemiology of quinolon resistant strains of extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Durmaz, Suleyman; Percin, Duygu; Ercal, Baris Derya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clonal relationship of ESBL-producing and quinolone resistant E.coli strains and to investigate the risk factors for infections with these microorganisms. Methods: A total of 95 ESBL-producing and quinolone resistant E.coli strains isolated from various clinical specimens of inpatients and outpatients in our hospital were included in the study. Risk factors for infections with ESBL-producing E.coli and demographic data of the patients were obtained from hospital records. The rep-PCR method was used for the determination of the genetic relationship of the strains. Results: Of the strains included in the study, 33(34.7%) were isolated from inpatients and 62(65.3%) from outpatients. At least one risk factor has been identified in all patients for infection with ESBL producing E.coli and the mean of the risk factors of patients was 4.2. The most common risk factor was urinary catheter insertion (57.9%). The distribution of the strains in each clone was as fallows: clone A: 9(9.5%), clone B: 10(10.5%), clone C: 38(40%), clone D: 12(12.5%), clone E: 6(6.3%), clone F: 7(7.3%) and clone G 5(5.3%). The clones A, D and C (dominant clone) were isolated from hospital and community acquired infections. Clones E, F and G were identified as nosocomial clones. Conclusion: Infections with multidrug resistant bacteria may be related to the hospital although they were isolated from outpatients. Developing a medical record system is vitally important to prevent the occurence and spread of resistant bacterial infections in the community. PMID:26648988

  15. Antibacterial Surgical Silk Sutures Using a High-Performance Slow-Release Carrier Coating System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojie; Hou, Dandan; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Qian; Zou, Jiahan; Sun, Gang

    2015-10-14

    Sutures are a vital part for surgical operation, and suture-associated surgical site infections are an important issue of postoperative care. Antibacterial sutures have been proved to reduce challenging complications caused by bacterial infections. In recent decades, triclosan-free sutures have been on their way to commercialization. Alternative antibacterial substances are becoming relevant to processing surgical suture materials. Most of the antibacterial substances are loaded directly on sutures by dipping or coating methods. The aim of this study was to optimize novel antibacterial braided silk sutures based on levofloxacin hydrochloride and poly(?-caprolactone) by two different processing sequences, to achieve suture materials with slow-release antibacterial efficacy and ideal physical and handling properties. Silk strands were processed into sutures on a circular braiding machine, and antibacterial treatment was introduced alternatively before or after braiding by two-dipping-two-rolling method (M1 group and M2 group). The antibacterial activity and durability against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were tested. Drug release profiles were measured in phosphate buffer with different pH values, and release kinetics model was built to analyze the sustained drug release mechanism between the interface of biomaterials and the in vitro aqueous environment. Knot-pull tensile strength, thread-to-thread friction, and bending stiffness were determined to evaluate physical and handling properties of sutures. All coated sutures showed continuous antibacterial efficacy and slow drug release features for more than 5 days. Besides, treated sutures fulfilled U.S. Pharmacopoeia required knot-pull tensile strength. The thread-to-thread friction and bending stiffness for the M1 group changed slightly when compared with those of uncoated ones. However, physical and handling characteristics of the M2 group tend to approach those of monofilament ones. The novel suture showed acceptable in vitro cytotoxicity according to ISO 10993-5. Generally speaking, all coated sutures show potential in acting as antibacterial suture materials, and M1 group is proved to have a higher prospect for clinical applications. PMID:26378964

  16. Triaminotriazine DNA helicase inhibitors with antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    McKay, Geoffrey A; Reddy, Ranga; Arhin, Francis; Belley, Adam; Lehoux, Dario; Moeck, Greg; Sarmiento, Ingrid; Parr, Thomas R; Gros, Philippe; Pelletier, Jerry; Far, Adel Rafai

    2006-03-01

    Screening of a chemical library in a DNA helicase assay involving the Pseudomonas aeruginosa DnaB helicase provided a triaminotriazine inhibitor with good antibacterial activity but associated cytotoxicity toward mammalian cells. Synthesis of analogs provided a few inhibitors that retained antibacterial activity and demonstrated a significant reduction in cytotoxicity. The impact of serum and initial investigations toward a mode of action highlight several features of this class of compounds as antibacterials. PMID:16343901

  17. Antibacterial and Antifungal Compounds from Marine Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijian; Meng, Wei; Cao, Cong; Wang, Jian; Shan, Wenjun; Wang, Qinggui

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews 116 new compounds with antifungal or antibacterial activities as well as 169 other known antimicrobial compounds, with a specific focus on January 2010 through March 2015. Furthermore, the phylogeny of the fungi producing these antibacterial or antifungal compounds was analyzed. The new methods used to isolate marine fungi that possess antibacterial or antifungal activities as well as the relationship between structure and activity are shown in this review. PMID:26042616

  18. Synthesis of novel bisindolylmethane Schiff bases and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Imran, Syahrul; Taha, Muhammad; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Naz, Farzana; Hussain, Memona; Tauseef, Saima

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to develop new antibacterial drugs, some novel bisindolylmethane derivatives containing Schiff base moieties were prepared and screened for their antibacterial activity. The synthesis of the bisindolylmethane Schiff base derivatives 3-26 was carried out in three steps. First, the nitro group of 3,3'-((4-nitrophenyl)-methylene)bis(1H-indole) (1) was reduced to give the amino substituted bisindolylmethane 2 without affecting the unsaturation of the bisindolylmethane moiety using nickel boride in situ generated. Reduction of compound 1 using various catalysts showed that combination of sodium borohydride and nickel acetate provides the highest yield for compound 2. Bisindolylmethane Schiff base derivatives were synthesized by coupling various benzaldehydes with amino substituted bisindolylmethane 2. All synthesized compounds were characterized by various spectroscopic methods. The bisindolylmethane Schiff base derivatives were evaluated against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. Derivatives having halogen and nitro substituent display weak to moderate antibacterial activity against Salmonella typhi, S. paratyphi A and S. paratyphi B. PMID:25102118

  19. Alarmingly High Segregation Frequencies of Quinolone Resistance Alleles within Human and Animal Microbiomes Are Not Explained by Direct Clinical Antibiotic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Field, Wesley; Hershberg, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance poses a major threat to human health. It is therefore important to characterize the frequency of resistance within natural bacterial environments. Many studies have focused on characterizing the frequencies with which horizontally acquired resistance genes segregate within natural bacterial populations. Yet, very little is currently understood regarding the frequency of segregation of resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics. We surveyed a large number of metagenomic datasets extracted from a large variety of host-associated and non host-associated environments for such alleles conferring resistance to three groups of broad spectrum antibiotics: streptomycin, rifamycins, and quinolones. We find notable segregation frequencies of resistance alleles occurring within the target genes of each of the three antibiotics, with quinolone resistance alleles being the most frequent and rifamycin resistance alleles being the least frequent. Resistance allele frequencies varied greatly between different phyla and as a function of environment. The frequency of quinolone resistance alleles was especially high within host-associated environments, where it averaged an alarming ?40%. Within host-associated environments, resistance to quinolones was most often conferred by a specific resistance allele. High frequencies of quinolone resistance alleles were also found within hosts that were not directly treated with antibiotics. Therefore, the high segregation frequency of quinolone resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics in host-associated environments does not seem to be the sole result of clinical antibiotic usage. PMID:26019163

  20. Thiourea derivatives incorporating a hippuric acid moiety: synthesis and evaluation of antibacterial and antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Samir Y; El-Sharief, Marwa A M Sh; Basyouni, Wahid M; Fakhr, Issa M I; El-Gammal, Eman W

    2013-06-01

    New series of thiourea derivatives incorporating a hippuric acid moiety have been synthesized through the reaction of 4-hippuric acid isothiocyanate with various nitrogen nucleophiles such as aliphatic amines, aromatic amines, sulfa drugs, aminopyrazoles, phenylhydrazine and hydrazides. The synthesized compounds were tested against bacterial and fungal strains. Most of compounds, such as 2-(4-(3-(3-bromophenyl)thioureido)benzamido)acetic acid and 2-(4-(3-(4-(N-pyrimidin-2-ylsulfamoyl)phenyl)thioureido)benzamido)acetic acid, showed significant antibacterial and antifungal activities. These compounds comprise a new class of promising broad-spectrum antibacterial and antifungal agents. PMID:23644194

  1. Luminescent determination of quinolones in milk samples by liquid chromatography/post-column derivatization with terbium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yánez-Jácome, G S; Aguilar-Caballos, M P; Gómez-Hens, A

    2015-07-31

    The usefulness of terbium oxide nanoparticles (Tb4O7NPs) as post-column derivatizing reagent for the liquid chromatographic determination of residues of quinolone antibiotics in milk samples has been studied. Seven quinolones of veterinary use have been chosen as model analytes to develop this method. The derivatization step is based on the formation of luminescent chelates of quinolones with Tb4O7NPs, which are monitored at ?ex=340nm and ?em=545nm. Another relevant feature of the method is that the use of a 10-cm column and a ternary mixture of methanol, acetonitrile and acetic acid as mobile phase in gradient elution mode allow the chromatographic separation of the quinolones in about 13min, whereas previously described chromatographic methods require about 20min. The dynamic ranges of the calibration graphs and limits of detection are, respectively: 65-900ngmL(-1) and 35ngmL(-1) for marbofloxacin, 7.2-900ngmL(-1) and 2.5ngmL(-1) for ciprofloxacin, 6-900ngmL(-1) and 2ngmL(-1) for danofloxacin, 50-900ngmL(-1) and 20ngmL(-1) for enrofloxacin, 35-900ngmL(-1) and 12ngmL(-1) for sarafloxacin, 5-900ngmL(-1) and 2ngmL(-1) for oxolinic acid, and 7-900ngmL(-1) and 2.5ngmL(-1) for flumequine. The precision, established at two concentration levels of each analyte and expressed as the percentage of the relative standard deviation is in the range of 1.9-8.1% using standards, and of 3.4-10.7% in the presence of milk samples. The method has been satisfactorily applied to the analysis of skimmed, semi-skimmed and whole milk samples, with recoveries ranging from 89.0 to 106.5%. PMID:26077970

  2. Nematicidal activities of 4-quinolone alkaloids isolated from the aerial part of Triumfetta grandidens against Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ja Yeong; Dang, Quang Le; Choi, Yong Ho; Choi, Gyung Ja; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Cha, Byeongjin; Luu, Ngoc Hoang; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2015-01-14

    The methanol extract of the aerial part of Triumfetta grandidens (Tiliaceae) was highly active against Meloidogyne incognita, with second-stage juveniles (J2s) mortality of 100% at 500 ?g/mL at 48 h post-exposure. Two 4-quinolone alkaloids, waltherione E (1), a new alkaloid, and waltherione A (2), were isolated and identified as nematicidal compounds through bioassay-guided fractionation and instrumental analysis. The nematicidal activities of the isolated compounds against M. incognita were evaluated on the basis of mortality and effect on egg hatching. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited high mortalities against J2s of M. incognita, with EC50 values of 0.09 and 0.27 ?g/mL at 48 h, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 also exhibited a considerable inhibitory effect on egg hatching, which inhibited 91.9 and 87.4% of egg hatching, respectively, after 7 days of exposure at a concentration of 1.25 ?g/mL. The biological activities of the two 4-quinolone alkaloids were comparable to those of abamectin. In addition, pot experiments using the crude extract of the aerial part of T. grandidens showed that it completely suppressed the formation of gall on roots of plants at a concentration of 1000 ?g/mL. These results suggest that T. grandidens and its bioactive 4-quinolone alkaloids can be used as a potent botanical nematicide in organic agriculture. PMID:25494674

  3. Proteolytically activated anti-bacterial hydrogel microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Buhrman, Jason S.; Cook, Laura C.; Rayahin, Jamie E.; Federle, Michael J.; Gemeinhart, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogels are finding increased clinical utility as advances continue to exploit their favorable material properties. Hydrogels can be adapted for many applications, including surface coatings and drug delivery. Anti-infectious surfaces and delivery systems that actively destroy invading organisms are alternative ways to exploit the favorable material properties offered by hydrogels. Sterilization techniques are commonly employed to ensure the materials are non-infectious upon placement, but sterilization is not absolute and infections are still expected. Natural, anti-bacterial proteins have been discovered which have the potential to act as anti-infectious agents; however, the proteins are toxic and need localized release to have therapeutic efficacy without toxicity. In these studies, we explore the use of the glutathione s-transferase (GST) to anchor the bactericidal peptide, melittin, to the surface of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel microspheres. We show that therapeutic levels of protein can be anchored to the surface of the microspheres using the GST anchor. We compared the therapeutic efficacy of recombinant melittin released from PEGDA microspheres to melittin. We found that, when released by an activating enzyme, thrombin, recombinant melittin efficiently inhibits growth of the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes as effectively as melittin created by solid phase peptide synthesis. We conclude that a GST protein anchor can be used to immobilize functional protein to PEGDA microspheres and the protein will remain immobilized under physiological conditions until the protein is enzymatically released. PMID:23816641

  4. In vitro antibacterial effect of wasp (Vespa orientalis) venom

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The emergence of antibacterial resistance against several classes of antibiotics is an inevitable consequence of drug overuse. As antimicrobial resistance spreads throughout the globe, new substances will always be necessary to fight against multidrug-resistant microorganisms. Venoms of many animals have recently gained attention in the search for new antimicrobials to treat infectious diseases. Thefore, the present study aimed to study the antibacterial effects of wasp (Vespa orientalis) crude venom. Two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and two gram-negative ones (Escherichia coli and Klesiella pneumonia) were compared for their sensitivity to the venom by determining the inhibition zone (Kirby-Bauer method) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). A microbroth kinetic system based on continuous monitoring of changes in the optical density of bacterial growth was also used for determination of antimicrobial activity. Results The venom exhibited a well-recognized antimicrobial property against the tested bacterial strains. The inhibition zones were determined to be 12.6, 22.7, 22.4 and 10.2 mm for S. aureus, B. subtilis, E. coli and K. pneumonia, respectively. The corresponding MIC values were determined to be 64, 8, 64 and 128 ?g/mL, respectively. The MIC50 and MIC90 values of the venom were respectively determined to be 63.6 and 107 ?g/mL for S. aureus, 4.3 and 7.0 ?g/mL for B. subtilis, 45.3 and 65.7 ?g/mL for E. coli and 74.4 and 119.2 ?g/mL for K. pneumonia. Gram-positive bacteria were generally more sensitive to the venom than gram-negative ones. Conclusions Results revealed that the venom markedly inhibits the growth of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and could be considered a potential source for developing new antibacterial drugs. PMID:24955088

  5. Facile biofunctionalization of silver nanoparticles for enhanced antibacterial properties, endotoxin removal, and biofilm control

    PubMed Central

    Lambadi, Paramesh Ramulu; Sharma, Tarun Kumar; Kumar, Piyush; Vasnani, Priyanka; Thalluri, Sitaramanjaneya Mouli; Bisht, Neha; Pathania, Ranjana; Navani, Naveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases cause a huge burden on healthcare systems worldwide. Pathogenic bacteria establish infection by developing antibiotic resistance and modulating the host’s immune system, whereas opportunistic pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapt to adverse conditions owing to their ability to form biofilms. In the present study, silver nanoparticles were biofunctionalized with polymyxin B, an antibacterial peptide using a facile method. The biofunctionalized nanoparticles (polymyxin B-capped silver nanoparticles, PBSNPs) were assessed for antibacterial activity against multiple drug-resistant clinical strain Vibrio fluvialis and nosocomial pathogen P. aeruginosa. The results of antibacterial assay revealed that PBSNPs had an approximately 3-fold higher effect than the citrate-capped nanoparticles (CSNPs). Morphological damage to the cell membrane was followed by scanning electron microscopy, testifying PBSNPs to be more potent in controlling the bacterial growth as compared with CSNPs. The bactericidal effect of PBSNPs was further confirmed by Live/Dead staining assays. Apart from the antibacterial activity, the biofunctionalized nanoparticles were found to resist biofilm formation. Electroplating of PBSNPs onto stainless steel surgical blades retained the antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. Further, the affinity of polymyxin for endotoxin was exploited for its removal using PBSNPs. It was found that the prepared nanoparticles removed 97% of the endotoxin from the solution. Such multifarious uses of metal nanoparticles are an attractive means of enhancing the potency of antimicrobial agents to control infections. PMID:25834431

  6. Facile biofunctionalization of silver nanoparticles for enhanced antibacterial properties, endotoxin removal, and biofilm control.

    PubMed

    Lambadi, Paramesh Ramulu; Sharma, Tarun Kumar; Kumar, Piyush; Vasnani, Priyanka; Thalluri, Sitaramanjaneya Mouli; Bisht, Neha; Pathania, Ranjana; Navani, Naveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases cause a huge burden on healthcare systems worldwide. Pathogenic bacteria establish infection by developing antibiotic resistance and modulating the host's immune system, whereas opportunistic pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapt to adverse conditions owing to their ability to form biofilms. In the present study, silver nanoparticles were biofunctionalized with polymyxin B, an antibacterial peptide using a facile method. The biofunctionalized nanoparticles (polymyxin B-capped silver nanoparticles, PBSNPs) were assessed for antibacterial activity against multiple drug-resistant clinical strain Vibrio fluvialis and nosocomial pathogen P. aeruginosa. The results of antibacterial assay revealed that PBSNPs had an approximately 3-fold higher effect than the citrate-capped nanoparticles (CSNPs). Morphological damage to the cell membrane was followed by scanning electron microscopy, testifying PBSNPs to be more potent in controlling the bacterial growth as compared with CSNPs. The bactericidal effect of PBSNPs was further confirmed by Live/Dead staining assays. Apart from the antibacterial activity, the biofunctionalized nanoparticles were found to resist biofilm formation. Electroplating of PBSNPs onto stainless steel surgical blades retained the antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. Further, the affinity of polymyxin for endotoxin was exploited for its removal using PBSNPs. It was found that the prepared nanoparticles removed 97% of the endotoxin from the solution. Such multifarious uses of metal nanoparticles are an attractive means of enhancing the potency of antimicrobial agents to control infections. PMID:25834431

  7. Polymeric micellar nanoplatforms for Fenton reaction as a new class of antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Kim, Nam-Hong; Yang, Wonseok; Nah, Jae-Woon; Jang, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Dongwon

    2016-01-10

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by host phagocytes exert antibacterial action against a variety of pathogens and ROS-induced oxidative stress is the governing mechanism for the antibacterial activity of major bactericidal antibiotics. In particular, hydroxyl radical is a strong and nonselective oxidant which can damage biomolecules such as DNA, proteins and lipids. Ferrous ion is known to convert mild oxidant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into highly reactive and toxic hydroxyl radicals, referred to as Fenton reaction. Herein, we report a new class of antibacterial agents based on Fenton reaction-performing nanostructures, composed of H2O2-generating polymer (PCAE) and iron-containing ferrocene. Amphiphilic PCAE was designed to incorporate H2O2-generating cinnamaldehyde through acid-cleavable linkages and self-assemble to form thermodynamically stable micelles which could encapsulate ferrocene in their hydrophobic core. All the experiments in vitro display that ferrocene-loaded PCAE micelles produce hydroxyl radicals to kill Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa through membrane damages. Intraperitoneally injected ferrocene-loaded PCAE micelles significantly reduced the lung damages and therefore increased the survival rate of mice infected with drug resistant P. aeruginosa. Given their potent antibacterial activity, ferrocene-loaded PCAE micelles hold great potential as a new class of ROS-manipulating antibacterial agents. PMID:26639177

  8. Overcoming scientific and structural bottlenecks in antibacterial discovery and development

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is becoming an increasing threat, with too few novel antibiotics coming to market to replace those lost due to resistance development. Efforts by the pharmaceutical industry to screen for and design novel antibacterials have not been successful, with several companies minimizing or closing down their antibacterial research units, leading to a loss of skills and know-how. At the same time, antibiotic innovation in academia is not filling the void due to misaligned incentive structures and lack of vital knowledge of drug discovery. The scientific and structural difficulties in discovering new antibiotics have only begun to be appreciated in the latest years. Part of the problem has been a paradigm shift within both industry and academia to focus on ‘rational’ drug development with an emphasis on single targets and high-throughput screening of large chemical libraries, which may not be suited to target bacteria. The very particular aspects of ‘targeting an organism inside another organism’ have not been given enough attention. In this paper, researcher interviews have complemented literature studies to delve deeper into the specifics of the different scientific and structural barriers, and some potential solutions are offered. PMID:24646118

  9. Ciprofloxacin-Induced Antibacterial Activity Is Attenuated by Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Masadeh, Majed M.; Alzoubi, Karem H.; Khabour, Omar F.; Al-Azzam, Sayer I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Ciprofloxacin is a commonly used antibiotic for urinary tract infection that interacts with bacterial topoisomerases leading to oxidative radicals generation and bacterial cell death. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDEis), on the other hand, are commonly used drugs for the management of erectile dysfunction. The group includes agents such as sildenafil, vardenafil, and tadalafil. Objectives We investigated whether PDEi could interfere with the antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin. Methods PDEis were tested in several reference bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Acinetobacter baumannii, Proteus mirabilis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae utilizing a standard disc diffusion method and measuring both zones of inhibition and MIC. Results Results from both assays indicated that ciprofloxacin demonstrates potent activity against the tested reference bacteria. Additionally, when bacteria were treated with a combination of ciprofloxacin and sildenafil, tadalafil, or vardenafil, the zones of the combination inhibition were significantly reduced, whereas the MIC values were significantly greater than those of ciprofloxacin alone for all tested bacterial strains. In an attempt to examine the mechanism by which PDEis interfere with the action of ciprofloxacin, we utilized the in vitro E coli DNA gyrase cleavage assay. The results showed that PDEi drugs had no effect on ciprofloxacin’s inhibition of E coli gyrase activity. Conclusions Pretreatment of various reference bacterial cells with PDEis largely inhibited the antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin.

  10. Conformational analysis of a quinolonic ribonucleoside with anti-HSV-1 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane D.; Velloso, Marcia Helena R.; Leal, Kátia Z.; Azeredo, Rodrigo B. de V.; Sugiura, Makiko; Albuquerque, Magaly G.; Santos, Fernanda da C.; Souza, Maria Cecília B. V. de; Cunha, Anna Claudia; Seidl, Peter R.; Alencastro, Ricardo B. de; Ferreira, Vitor F.

    2011-01-01

    The infections caused by the Herpes Simplex Virus are one of the most common sources of diseases in adults and several natural nucleoside analogues are currently used in the treatment of these infections. In vitro tests of a series of quinolonic ribonucleosides derivatives synthesized by part of our group indicated that some of them have antiviral activity against HSV-1. The conformational analysis of bioactive compounds is extremely important in order to better understand their chemical structures and biological activity. In this work, we have carried out a nuclear relaxation NMR study of 6-Me ribonucleoside derivative in order to determine if the syn or anti conformation is preferential. The NMR analysis permits the determination of inter-atomic distances by using techniques which are based on nuclear relaxation and related phenomena. Those techniques are non-selective longitudinal or spin-lattice relaxation rates and NULL pulse sequence, which allow the determination of distances between pairs of hydrogen atoms. The results of NMR studies were compared with those obtained by molecular modeling.

  11. Stimuli-responsive self-assembling peptides made from antibacterial peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanfei; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Zhao, Xiaojun

    2013-06-01

    How to use bioactive peptide sequences as fundamental building blocks to make hydrogel materials which are stimuli-responsive? In this article, we provide a novel designed peptide comprising two antibacterial peptide sequences (KIGAKI)3-NH2 and a central tetrapeptide linker. Results show that balancing the forces of the electrostatic repulsion of the charged lysine residues against the hydrophobic collapse of the isoleucine and alanine residues and backbone ?-sheet hydrogen bonding allows the structural transition and formation of individually dispersed nanofibers. Circular Dichroism (CD) and rheology analysis demonstrated that the designed peptide can undergo an abrupt structural transition from a random coil to a stable unimolecular ?-hairpin conformation and subsequently form an elastic hydrogel when exposed to external stimuli such as pH, ionic strength and heat. The assembly kinetics of the obtained antibacterial sequence comprising peptide (ASCP) was studied by time-lapse Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Thioflavin T (ThT) binding assay. In addition, the inherent antibacterial activity of the peptide hydrogel was confirmed by the antibacterial assay against Escherichia coli. This example described epitomizes the use of bioactive peptide sequences in the design of finite self-assembled structures with potential inherent activity. These hydrogel materials may find applications in drug delivery, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.How to use bioactive peptide sequences as fundamental building blocks to make hydrogel materials which are stimuli-responsive? In this article, we provide a novel designed peptide comprising two antibacterial peptide sequences (KIGAKI)3-NH2 and a central tetrapeptide linker. Results show that balancing the forces of the electrostatic repulsion of the charged lysine residues against the hydrophobic collapse of the isoleucine and alanine residues and backbone ?-sheet hydrogen bonding allows the structural transition and formation of individually dispersed nanofibers. Circular Dichroism (CD) and rheology analysis demonstrated that the designed peptide can undergo an abrupt structural transition from a random coil to a stable unimolecular ?-hairpin conformation and subsequently form an elastic hydrogel when exposed to external stimuli such as pH, ionic strength and heat. The assembly kinetics of the obtained antibacterial sequence comprising peptide (ASCP) was studied by time-lapse Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Thioflavin T (ThT) binding assay. In addition, the inherent antibacterial activity of the peptide hydrogel was confirmed by the antibacterial assay against Escherichia coli. This example described epitomizes the use of bioactive peptide sequences in the design of finite self-assembled structures with potential inherent activity. These hydrogel materials may find applications in drug delivery, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1-S5. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00225j

  12. 78 FR 39737 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Antibacterial Therapies for Patients With Unmet Medical Need for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... bacteria). DATES: Although you can comment on any guidance at any time (see 21 CFR 10.115(g)(5)), to ensure... against a single genus or species of bacteria). Efforts to develop new antibacterial drugs have diminished in the past few decades. Because bacteria continue to develop resistance to available...

  13. A class of selective antibacterials derived from a protein kinase inhibitor pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. Richard; Dunham, Steve; Mochalkin, Igor; Banotai, Craig; Bowman, Matthew; Buist, Susan; Dunkle, Bill; Hanna, Debra; Harwood, H. James; Huband, Michael D.; Karnovsky, Alla; Kuhn, Michael; Limberakis, Chris; Liu, Jia Y.; Mehrens, Shawn; Mueller, W. Thomas; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Ogden, Adam; Ohren, Jeff; Prasad, J.V.N. Vara; Shelly, John A.; Skerlos, Laura; Sulavik, Mark; Thomas, V. Hayden; VanderRoest, Steve; Wang, LiAnn; Wang, Zhigang; Whitton, Amy; Zhu, Tong; Stover, C. Kendall

    2009-06-25

    As the need for novel antibiotic classes to combat bacterial drug resistance increases, the paucity of leads resulting from target-based antibacterial screening of pharmaceutical compound libraries is of major concern. One explanation for this lack of success is that antibacterial screening efforts have not leveraged the eukaryotic bias resulting from more extensive chemistry efforts targeting eukaryotic gene families such as G protein-coupled receptors and protein kinases. Consistent with a focus on antibacterial target space resembling these eukaryotic targets, we used whole-cell screening to identify a series of antibacterial pyridopyrimidines derived from a protein kinase inhibitor pharmacophore. In bacteria, the pyridopyrimidines target the ATP-binding site of biotin carboxylase (BC), which catalyzes the first enzymatic step of fatty acid biosynthesis. These inhibitors are effective in vitro and in vivo against fastidious Gram-negative pathogens including Haemophilus influenzae. Although the BC active site has architectural similarity to those of eukaryotic protein kinases, inhibitor binding to the BC ATP-binding site is distinct from the protein kinase-binding mode, such that the inhibitors are selective for bacterial BC. In summary, we have discovered a promising class of potent antibacterials with a previously undescribed mechanism of action. In consideration of the eukaryotic bias of pharmaceutical libraries, our findings also suggest that pursuit of a novel inhibitor leads for antibacterial targets with active-site structural similarity to known human targets will likely be more fruitful than the traditional focus on unique bacterial target space, particularly when structure-based and computational methodologies are applied to ensure bacterial selectivity.

  14. A Supramolecular Antibiotic Switch for Antibacterial Regulation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Haotian; Yuan, Huanxiang; Nie, Chenyao; Wang, Bing; Lv, Fengting; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu

    2015-11-01

    A supramolecular antibiotic switch is described that can reversibly "turn-on" and "turn-off" its antibacterial activity on demand, providing a proof-of-concept for a way to regulate antibacterial activity of biotics. The switch relies on supramolecular assembly and disassembly of cationic poly(phenylene vinylene) derivative (PPV) with cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) to regulate their different interactions with bacteria. This simple but efficient strategy does not require any chemical modification on the active sites of the antibacterial agent, and could also regulate the antibacterial activity of classical antibiotics or photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy. This supramolecular antibiotic switch may be a successful strategy to fight bacterial infections and decrease the emergence of bacterial resistance to antibiotics from a long-term point of view. PMID:26307170

  15. Antibacterial Coatings: Challenges, Perspectives, and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, M; Mantovani, D; Rosei, F

    2015-11-01

    Antibacterial coatings are rapidly emerging as a primary component of the global mitigation strategy of bacterial pathogens. Thanks to recent concurrent advances in materials science and biotechnology methodologies, and a growing understanding of environmental microbiology, an extensive variety of options are now available to design surfaces with antibacterial properties. However, progress towards a more widespread use in clinical settings crucially depends on addressing the key outstanding issues. We review release-based antibacterial coatings and focus on the challenges and opportunities presented by the latest generation of these materials. In particular, we highlight recent approaches aimed at controlling the release of antibacterial agents, imparting multi-functionality, and enhancing long-term stability. PMID:26463723

  16. Different Dynamic Patterns of ?-Lactams, Quinolones, Glycopeptides and Macrolides on Mouse Gut Microbial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Liao, Shuo-Xi; Peng, Xin; He, Yan; Chen, Yi-Ran; Shen, Hua-Fang; Su, Jin; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Yun-Xia; Zhang, Guo-Xia; Zhou, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The adverse impact of antibiotics on the gut microbiota has attracted extensive interest, particularly due to the development of microbiome research techniques in recent years. However, a direct comparison of the dynamic effects of various types of antibiotics using the same animal model has not been available. In the present study, we selected six antibiotics from four categories with the broadest clinical usage, namely, ?-lactams (Ceftriaxone Sodium, Cefoperazone/Sulbactam and meropenem), quinolones (ofloxacin), glycopeptides (vancomycin), and macrolides (azithromycin), to treat BALB/c mice. Stool samples were collected during and after the administration of antibiotics, and microbial diversity was analyzed through Illumina sequencing and bioinformatics analyses using QIIME. Both ? and ? diversity analyses showed that ceftriaxone sodium, cefoperazone/sulbactam, meropenem and vancomycin changed the gut microbiota dramatically by the second day of antibiotic administration whereas the influence of ofloxacin was trivial. Azithromycin clearly changed the gut microbiota but much less than vancomycin and the ?-lactams. In general, the community changes induced by the three ?-lactam antibiotics showed consistency in inhibiting Papillibacter, Prevotella and Alistipes while inducing massive growth of Clostridium. The low diversity and high Clostridium level might be an important cause of Clostridium difficile infection after usage of ?-lactams. Vancomycin was unique in that it inhibited Firmicutes, mainly the genus Clostridium. On the other hand, it induced the growth of Escherichia and effect lasted for months afterward. Azithromycin and meropenem induced the growth of Enterococcus. These findings will be useful for understanding the potential adverse effects of antibiotics on the gut microbiome and ensuring their better usage. PMID:25970622

  17. Susceptibility to ?-lactams and quinolones of Enterobacteriaceae isolated from urinary tract infections in outpatients.

    PubMed

    Marchisio, Martín; Porto, Ayelén; Joris, Romina; Rico, Marina; Baroni, María R; Di Conza, José

    2015-12-01

    The antibiotic susceptibility profile was evaluated in 71 Enterobacteriaceae isolates obtained from outpatient urine cultures in July 2010 from two health institutions in Santa Fe, Argentina. The highest rates of antibiotic resistance were observed for ampicillin (AMP) (69%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMS) (33%), and ciprofloxacin (CIP) (25%). Meanwhile, 21% of the isolates were resistant to three or more tested antibiotics families. Thirty integron-containing bacteria (42.3%) were detected, and a strong association with TMS resistance was found. Third generation cephalosporin resistance was detected in only one Escherichia coli isolate, and it was characterized as a blaCMY-2 carrier. No plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) was found. Resistance to fluoroquinolone in the isolates was due to alterations in QRDR regions. Two mutations in GyrA (S83L, D87N) and one in ParC (S80I) were observed in all CIP-resistant E. coli. It was determined to be the main phylogenetic groups in E. coli isolates. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values against nalidixic acid (NAL), levofloxacin (LEV), and CIP were determined for 63 uropathogenic E. coli isolates as MIC50 of 4 ?g/mL, 0.03125 ?g/mL, and 0.03125 ?g/mL, respectively, while the MIC90 values of the antibiotics were determined as 1024 ?g/mL, 64 ?g/mL, and 16 ?g/mL, respectively. An association between the phylogenetic groups, A and B1 with fluoroquinolone resistance was observed. These results point to the importance of awareness of the potential risk associated with empirical treatment with both the families of antibiotics. PMID:26691475

  18. Investigation of the 4-O-alkylamine substituent of non-peptide quinolone GnRH receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    DeVita, R J; Goulet, M T; Wyvratt, M J; Fisher, M H; Lo, J L; Yang, Y T; Cheng, K; Smith, R G

    1999-09-01

    Synthesis and in vitro activity of the enantiomers of quinolone GnRH antagonist (+/-)-1 are reported. Chiral amino alcohols were prepared from the appropriate cyclic D- or L-amino acids by the Amdt-Eistert homologation followed by reduction of the resulting esters. Incorporation of these pharmacophores was achieved via a novel Mitsunobu alkylation of 4-hydroxyquinolones. The key amine pharmacophore for binding to the rat GnRH receptor was most active in the S-configuration. Ring size was not important for potency with 4, 5, 6, and 7-membered ring amines exhibiting similar potency. PMID:10498221

  19. Antibacterial Activity of Geminized Amphiphilic Cationic Homopolymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Xuefeng; Yu, Danfeng; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Guang; Cui, Yingxian; Sun, Keji; Wang, Jinben; Yan, Haike

    2015-12-22

    The current study is aimed at investigating the effect of cationic charge density and hydrophobicity on the antibacterial and hemolytic activities. Two kinds of cationic surfmers, containing single or double hydrophobic tails (octyl chains or benzyl groups), and the corresponding homopolymers were synthesized. The antimicrobial activity of these candidate antibacterials was studied by microbial growth inhibition assays against Escherichia coli, and hemolysis activity was carried out using human red blood cells. It was interestingly found that the homopolymers were much more effective in antibacterial property than their corresponding monomers. Furthermore, the geminized homopolymers had significantly higher antibacterial activity than that of their counterparts but with single amphiphilic side chains in each repeated unit. Geminized homopolymers, with high positive charge density and moderate hydrophobicity (such as benzyl groups), combine both advantages of efficient antibacterial property and prominently high selectivity. To further explain the antibacterial performance of the novel polymer series, the molecular interaction mechanism is proposed according to experimental data which shows that these specimens are likely to kill microbes by disrupting bacterial membranes, leading them unlikely to induce resistance. PMID:26606647

  20. Multifunctional upconverting nanoparticles for near-infrared triggered and synergistic antibacterial resistance therapy.

    PubMed

    Yin, Meili; Li, Zhenhua; Ju, Enguo; Wang, Zhenzhen; Dong, Kai; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-09-18

    To integrate photodynamic therapy with photothermal therapy for improved multidrug-resistant bacteria therapy, we have constructed a novel multifunctional core/satellite nanostructure by decorating CuS nanoparticles onto the surface of NaYF4:Mn/Yb/Er@photosensitizer doped SiO2. This system exhibited a superior antibacterial activity towards drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. PMID:25068798

  1. Enhanced antibacterial activity of roxithromycin loaded pegylated poly lactide-co-glycolide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study The purpose of this study was to prepare pegylated poly lactide-co-glycolide (PEG-PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with roxithromycin (RXN) with appropriate physicochemical properties and antibacterial activity. Roxithromycin, a semi-synthetic derivative of erythromycin, is more stable than erythromycin under acidic conditions and exhibits improved clinical effects. Methods RXN was loaded in pegylated PLGA NPs in different drug;polymer ratios by solvent evaporation technique and characterized for their size and size distribution, surface charge, surface morphology, drug loading, in vitro drug release profile, and in vitro antibacterial effects on S. aureus, B. subtilis, and S. epidermidis. Results and conclusion NPs were spherical with a relatively mono-dispersed size distribution. The particle size of nanoparticles ranged from 150 to 200 nm. NPs with entrapment efficiency of up to 80.0±6.5% and drug loading of up to 13.0±1.0% were prepared. In vitro release study showed an early burst release of about 50.03±0.99% at 6.5 h and then a slow and steady release of RXN was observed after the burst release. In vitro antibacterial effects determined that the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of RXN loaded PEG-PLGA NPs were 9 times lower on S. aureus, 4.5 times lower on B. subtilis, and 4.5 times lower on S. epidermidis compared to RXN solution. In conclusion it was shown that polymeric NPs enhanced the antibacterial efficacy of RXN substantially. PMID:23351784

  2. ANTIBACTERIAL PROPERTIES AND DRYING EFFECTS OF FLAX DENIM AND ANTIBACTERIAL PROPERTIES OF NONWOVEN FLAX FABRIC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A modification of "AATCC Test Method 100-1999, Antibacterial Finishes on Textile Materials: Assessment of," was used for assaying the antibacterial properties of denim containing various flax levels. When the effect of drying was looked at, increased flax content did not improve the rate of drying ...

  3. A general ANN-based multitasking model for the discovery of potent and safer antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Speck-Planche, A; Cordeiro, M N D S

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have been one of the world's most dangerous and deadliest pathogens for mankind, nowadays giving rise to significant public health concerns. Given the prevalence of these microbial pathogens and their increasing resistance to existing antibiotics, there is a pressing need for new antibacterial drugs. However, development of a successful drug is a complex, costly, and time-consuming process. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR)-based approaches are valuable tools for shortening the time of lead compound identification but also for focusing and limiting time-costly synthetic activities and in vitro/vivo evaluations. QSAR-based approaches, supported by powerful statistical techniques such as artificial neural networks (ANNs), have evolved to the point of integrating dissimilar types of chemical and biological data. This chapter reports an overview of the current research and potential applications of QSAR modeling tools toward the rational design of more efficient antibacterial agents. Particular emphasis is given to the setup of multitasking models along with ANNs aimed at jointly predicting different antibacterial activities and safety profiles of drugs/chemicals under diverse experimental conditions. PMID:25502375

  4. PEGylated ofloxacin nanoparticles render strong antibacterial activity against many clinically important human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Marslin, Gregory; Revina, Ann Mary; Khandelwal, Vinoth Kumar Megraj; Balakumar, Krishnamoorthy; Sheeba, Caroline J; Franklin, Gregory

    2015-08-01

    The rise of bacterial resistance against important drugs threatens their clinical utility. Fluoroquinones, one of the most important classes of contemporary antibiotics has also reported to suffer bacterial resistance. Since the general mechanism of bacterial resistance against fluoroquinone antibiotics (e.g. ofloxacin) consists of target mutations resulting in reduced membrane permeability and increased efflux by the bacteria, strategies that could increase bacterial uptake and reduce efflux of the drug would provide effective treatment. In the present study, we have compared the efficiencies of ofloxacin delivered in the form of free drug (OFX) and as nanoparticles on bacterial uptake and antibacterial activity. Although both poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (OFX-PLGA) and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (OFX-mPEG-PLGA) nanoformulations presented improved bacterial uptake and antibacterial activity against all the tested human bacterial pathogens, namely, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus, OFX-mPEG-PLGA showed significantly higher bacterial uptake and antibacterial activity compared to OFX-PLGA. We have also found that mPEG-PLGA nanoencapsulation could significantly inhibit Bacillus subtilis resistance development against OFX. PMID:26005932

  5. Stimuli-responsive self-assembling peptides made from antibacterial peptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanfei; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Zhao, Xiaojun

    2013-07-21

    How to use bioactive peptide sequences as fundamental building blocks to make hydrogel materials which are stimuli-responsive? In this article, we provide a novel designed peptide comprising two antibacterial peptide sequences (KIGAKI)3-NH2 and a central tetrapeptide linker. Results show that balancing the forces of the electrostatic repulsion of the charged lysine residues against the hydrophobic collapse of the isoleucine and alanine residues and backbone ?-sheet hydrogen bonding allows the structural transition and formation of individually dispersed nanofibers. Circular Dichroism (CD) and rheology analysis demonstrated that the designed peptide can undergo an abrupt structural transition from a random coil to a stable unimolecular ?-hairpin conformation and subsequently form an elastic hydrogel when exposed to external stimuli such as pH, ionic strength and heat. The assembly kinetics of the obtained antibacterial sequence comprising peptide (ASCP) was studied by time-lapse Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Thioflavin T (ThT) binding assay. In addition, the inherent antibacterial activity of the peptide hydrogel was confirmed by the antibacterial assay against Escherichia coli. This example described epitomizes the use of bioactive peptide sequences in the design of finite self-assembled structures with potential inherent activity. These hydrogel materials may find applications in drug delivery, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:23739953

  6. Purification, characterization and antibacterial activity of L-amino acid oxidase from Cerastes cerastes.

    PubMed

    Hanane-Fadila, Ziad-Meziane; Fatima, Laraba-Djebari

    2014-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance presents a real problem in which new antibacterial molecules from natural secretions could be beneficial in the development of new drugs. In this study, Cerastes cerastes venom was investigated for its antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by measuring the halo inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). An L-amino acid oxidase (CcLAAO) was purified from this venom using three chromatographic steps; its homogeneity (60 kDa) was confirmed by SDS-PAGE. LC-MS/MS analysis of CcLAAO showed similarities with other LAAO enzymes from Echis ocellatus and Viridovipera stejnegeri venoms. CcLAAO presents an antibacterial activity against three bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) with MIC values of 10, 10, and 20 ?g/mL, respectively. However, no effect was observed against Escherichia coli and yeast strains. Kinetic parameters of CcLAAO evaluated on L-leucine at pH 8.0 and 20°C were Km = 0.06 mmol and Vmax = 164 mmol/min. PMID:24817275

  7. In Vitro Study to Evaluate Antibacterial and Non-haemolytic Activities of Four Iranian Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sepahi, S; Ghorani-Azam, A; Sepahi, S; Asoodeh, A; Rostami, S

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Aqueous extracts of four medicinal plants including Ferula gummosa, Echinophora orientalis, Nasturtium microphyllum and Verbascum thapsus were used to determine their antibacterial activities and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The aim of this study was to assess antibacterial activity of extracts of four medicinal plants against a Gram-positive and a Gram-negative bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus PTCC1431, and Escherichia coli HP101BA 7601c). Methods: Radial diffusion assay was used to assess the antibacterial activity of extracted samples. Haemolysis assay was also used to examine their nontoxic effects on human red blood cells. Results: This study showed that all the mentioned plants have satisfactory antibacterial effects against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Minimum inhibitory concentration values of these samples were less than 750 ?g/mL. In addition, no significant haemolytic activity was observed at their MIC values. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that all these studied plants have good potential for further studies for drug discovery. PMID:25429470

  8. In vitro antibacterial activity of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis flower extract against human pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ruban, P; Gajalakshmi, K

    2012-01-01

    Objective To access the in vitro antibacterial activity of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis (H. rosa- sinensis) flower extract against human pathogens. Methods Antibacterial activity was evaluated by using disc and agar diffusion methods. The protein was run through poly acrylmide gel electrophoresis to view their protein profile. Results The results showed that the cold extraction illustrates a maximum zone of inhibition against Bacillus subtillis (B. subtillis), Escherichia coli (E. coli) viz., (17.00 ± 2.91), (14.50 ± 1.71) mm, followed by hot extraction against, E. coli, Salmonella sp. as (11.66 ± 3.14), (10.60 ± 3.09) mm. In methanol extraction showed a highest zone of inhibition recorded against B. subtillis, E. coli as (18.86 ± 0.18), (18.00 ± 1.63) mm pursued by ethanol extraction showed utmost zone of inhibition recorded against Salmonella sp. at (20.40 ± 1.54) mm. The crude protein from flower showed a maximum inhibitory zone observed against Salmonella sp., E. coli viz., (16.55 ± 1.16), (14.30 ± 2.86) mm. The flower material can be taken as an alternative source of antibacterial agent against the human pathogens. Conclusions The extracts of the H. rosa-sinensis are proved to have potential antibacterial activity, further studies are highly need for the drug development. PMID:23569938

  9. Molecular characterization of quinolone resistance mechanisms and extended-spectrum ?-lactamase production in Escherichia coli isolated from dogs.

    PubMed

    Meireles, D; Leite-Martins, L; Bessa, L J; Cunha, S; Fernandes, R; de Matos, A; Manaia, C M; Martins da Costa, P

    2015-08-01

    The increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistances is now a worldwide problem. Investigating the mechanisms by which pets harboring resistant strains may receive and/or transfer resistance determinants is essential to better understanding how owners and pets can interact safely. Here, we characterized the genetic determinants conferring resistance to ?-lactams and quinolones in 38 multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from fecal samples of dogs, through PCR and sequencing. The most frequent genotype included the ?-lactamase groups TEM (n=5), and both TEM+CTX-M-1 (n=5). Within the CTX-M group, we identified the genes CTX-M-32, CTX-M-1, CTX-M-15, CTX-M-55/79, CTX-M-14 and CTX-M-2/44. Thirty isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin presented two mutations in the gyrA gene and one or two mutations in the parC gene. A mutation in gyrA (reported here for the first time), due to a transversion and transition (TCG?GTG) originating a substitution of a serine by a valine in position 83 was also detected. The plasmid-encoded quinolone resistance gene, qnrs1, was detected in three isolates. Dogs can be a reservoir of genetic determinants conferring antimicrobial resistance and thus may play an important role in the spread of antimicrobial resistance to humans and other co-habitant animals. PMID:25999092

  10. Quinolone-resistant Salmonella typhi in Viet Nam: molecular basis of resistance and clinical response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Wain, J; Hoa, N T; Chinh, N T; Vinh, H; Everett, M J; Diep, T S; Day, N P; Solomon, T; White, N J; Piddock, L J; Parry, C M

    1997-12-01

    Nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella typhi (NARST) was first isolated in Viet Nam in 1993. Analysis of the quinolone resistance-determining region of gyrA in 20 NARST isolates by polymerase chain reaction and single-stranded conformational polymorphism yielded two novel patterns: pattern II corresponding to a point mutation at nucleotide 87 Asp-->Gly (n = 17), and pattern III corresponding to a point mutation at nucleotide 83 Ser-->Phe (n = 3). In trials of short-course ofloxacin therapy for uncomplicated typhoid, 117 (78%) of 150 patients were infected with multidrug-resistant S. typhi, 18 (15%) of which were NARST. The median time to fever clearance was 156 hours (range, 30-366 hours) for patients infected with NARST and 84 hours (range, 12-378 hours) for those infected with nalidixic acid-susceptible strains (P < .001). Six (33.3%) of 18 NARST infections required retreatment, whereas 1 (0.8%) of 132 infections due to susceptible strains required retreatment (relative risk = 44; 95% confidence interval = 5.6-345; P < .0001). We recommend that short courses of quinolones not be used in patients infected with NARST. PMID:9431387

  11. Synthesis of Chromone, Quinolone, and Benzoxazinone Sulfonamide Nucleosides as Conformationally Constrained Inhibitors of Adenylating Enzymes Required for Siderophore Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Engelhart, Curtis A.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2013-01-01

    MbtA catalyzes the first committed step of mycobactin biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and is responsible for the incorporation of salicylic acid into the mycobactin siderophores. 5?-O-[N-(Salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine (Sal-AMS) is an extremely potent nucleoside inhibitor of MbtA that possesses excellent activity against whole-cell Mtb, but suffers from poor bioavailability. In an effort to improve the bioavailability, we have designed four conformationally constrained analogues of Sal-AMS that remove two rotatable bonds and the ionized sulfamate group based on computational and structural studies. Herein we describe the synthesis, biochemical, and microbiological evaluation of chromone-, quinolone-, and benzoxazinone-3-sulfonamide derivatives of Sal-AMS. We developed new chemistry to assemble these three heterocycles from common ?-ketosulfonamide intermediates. The synthesis of the chromone- and quinolone-3-sulfonamide intermediates features formylation of a ?-ketosulfonamide employing dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal to afford an enaminone that can react intramolecularly with a phenol or intermolecularly with a primary amine via addition-elimination reaction(s). The benzoxazinone-3-sulfonamide was prepared by nitrosation of a ?-ketosulfonamide followed by intramolecular nucleophilic aromatic substitution. Mitsunobu coupling of these bicyclic sulfonamides with a protected adenosine derivative followed by global deprotection provides a concise synthesis of the respective inhibitors. PMID:23805993

  12. Breakage-Reunion Domain of Streptococcus pneumoniae Topoisomerase IV: Crystal Structure of a Gram-Positive Quinolone Target

    PubMed Central

    Achari, Aniruddha; Yang, Cheng; Ferrara, Joseph D.; Fisher, L. Mark; Sanderson, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    The 2.7 Å crystal structure of the 55-kDa N-terminal breakage-reunion domain of topoisomerase (topo) IV subunit A (ParC) from Streptococcus pneumoniae, the first for the quinolone targets from a gram-positive bacterium, has been solved and reveals a ‘closed’ dimer similar in fold to Escherichia coli DNA gyrase subunit A (GyrA), but distinct from the ‘open’ gate structure of Escherichia coli ParC. Unlike GyrA whose DNA binding groove is largely positively charged, the DNA binding site of ParC exhibits a distinct pattern of alternating positively and negatively charged regions coincident with the predicted positions of the grooves and phosphate backbone of DNA. Based on the ParC structure, a new induced-fit model for sequence-specific recognition of the gate (G) segment by ParC has been proposed. These features may account for the unique DNA recognition and quinolone targeting properties of pneumococcal type II topoisomerases compared to their gram-negative counterparts. PMID:17375187

  13. 76 FR 59406 - Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ...antibacterials for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and the draft document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia: Developing Drugs for Treatment,'' published March 2009...

  14. 76 FR 76894 - New Animal Drugs for Use in Animal Feeds; Tilmicosin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ...the following warnings: (i) Do not allow horses or other equines access to feeds containing tilmicosin. (ii) Use of antibacterial drugs in the absence of a susceptible bacterial infection is unlikely to provide benefit to treated animals and may...

  15. 78 FR 48174 - Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ...Agenda: The purpose of the meeting on October 17, 2013, is to discuss susceptibility interpretive criteria for systemic antibacterial drugs and for dosing recommendations in product labeling. We will seek input on the role of pharmacokinetic data in...

  16. In Vitro Activity of Five Quinolones and Analysis of the Quinolone Resistance-Determining Regions of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE in Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum Clinical Isolates from Perinatal Patients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Yasuhiro; Nakura, Yukiko; Wakimoto, Tetsu; Nomiyama, Makoto; Tokuda, Tsugumichi; Takayanagi, Toshimitsu; Shiraishi, Jun; Wasada, Kenshi; Kitajima, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Tomio; Nakayama, Masahiro; Mitsuda, Nobuaki; Nakanishi, Isao; Takeuchi, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Ureaplasma spp. cause several disorders, such as nongonococcal urethritis, miscarriage, and preterm delivery with lung infections in neonates, characterized by pathological chorioamnionitis in the placenta. Although reports on antibiotic resistance in Ureaplasma are on the rise, reports on quinolone-resistant Ureaplasma infections in Japan are limited. The purpose of this study was to determine susceptibilities to five quinolones of Ureaplasma urealyticum and Ureaplasma parvum isolated from perinatal samples in Japan and to characterize the quinolone resistance-determining regions in the gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes. Out of 28 clinical Ureaplasma strains, we isolated 9 with high MICs of quinolones and found a single parC gene mutation, resulting in the change S83L. Among 158 samples, the ParC S83L mutation was found in 37 samples (23.4%), including 1 sample harboring a ParC S83L–GyrB P462S double mutant. Novel mutations of ureaplasmal ParC (S83W and S84P) were independently found in one of the samples. Homology modeling of the ParC S83W mutant suggested steric hindrance of the quinolone-binding pocket (QBP), and de novo prediction of peptide structures revealed that the ParC S84P may break/kink the formation of the ?4 helix in the QBP. Further investigations are required to unravel the extent and mechanism of antibiotic resistance of Ureaplasma spp. in Japan. PMID:25645833

  17. A new antibacterial benzophenone glycoside from Psidium guajava (Linn.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Ukwueze, Stanley E; Osadebe, Patience O; Okoye, Festus B C

    2015-01-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of methanol extract from the leaves of Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae) yielded a new benzophenone glycoside, Guajaphenone A (2) together with two known compounds, Garcimangosone D (1) and Guaijaverin (3). Their structures were elucidated by analysis of spectroscopic data including 1D and 2D NMR and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The isolated compounds were screened against standard strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using broth dilution assay method, and the MIC values determined and compared with reference antibiotic ceftriaxone. They were found to have significant antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with all of them showing better activities against S. aureus, but displaying weaker activities, in comparison to ceftriaxone. However, despite reduced effect of these compounds against the organisms, this work opens the perspective to use these molecules as 'leads' for the design of novel and selective drug candidates for some tropical infectious diseases. PMID:25631395

  18. Unveiling the Mode of Action of Two Antibacterial Tanshinone Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongdong; Zhang, Wuxia; Wang, Tingting; Li, Na; Mu, Haibo; Zhang, Jiwen; Duan, Jinyou

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 2-(N-pyrrolidine-alkyl) tanshinones bearing pyrrolidine groups were synthesized and the antibacterial mechanism was explored. These derivatives selectively elicited antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. Moreover, their antibacterial activities were time-, concentration-dependent and persistent. It appeared that Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radicals were involved, and the disruption of cell membranes was observed. This study indicates that 2-(N-pyrrolidine-alkyl) tanshinones might be potential candidates as antibacterial agents. PMID:26263982

  19. Development of a copper-catalyzed amidation-base-promoted cyclization sequence for the synthesis of 2-aryl- and 2-vinyl1-4 quinolones

    E-print Network

    Jones, Carrie Preston

    2007-01-01

    A direct two-step method for the preparation of 2-aryl- and 2-vinyl-4-quinolones that utilizes a copper-catalyzed amidation of ortho-halophenones followed by a base-promoted Camps cyclization of the resulting N-(2-keto-aryl)amides ...

  20. Antibacterial Labdane Diterpenoids from Vitex vestita.

    PubMed

    Corlay, Nina; Lecsö-Bornet, Marylin; Leborgne, Erell; Blanchard, Florent; Cachet, Xavier; Bignon, Jérôme; Roussi, Fanny; Butel, Marie-Jose; Awang, Khalijah; Litaudon, Marc

    2015-06-26

    A large-scale in vitro screening of tropical plants using an antibacterial assay permitted the selection of several species with significant antibacterial activities. Bioassay-guided purification of the dichloromethane extract of the leaves of the Malaysian species Vitex vestita, led to the isolation of six new labdane-type diterpenoids, namely, 12-epivitexolide A (2), vitexolides B and C (3 and 4), vitexolide E (8), and vitexolins A and B (5 and 6), along with six known compounds, vitexolides A (1) and D (7), acuminolide (9), 3?-hydroxyanticopalic acid (10), 8?-hydroxyanticopalic acid (11), and 6?-hydroxyanticopalic acid (12). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR analyses and HRMS experiments. Both variable-temperature NMR spectroscopic studies and chemical modifications were performed to investigate the dynamic epimerization of the ?-hydroxybutenolide moiety of compounds 1-4. Compounds were assayed against a panel of 46 Gram-positive strains. Vitexolide A (1) exhibited the most potent antibacterial activity with minimal inhibitory concentration values ranging from 6 to 96 ?M, whereas compounds 2 and 6-9 showed moderate antibacterial activity. The presence of a ?-hydroxyalkyl-?-hydroxybutenolide subunit contributed significantly to antibacterial activity. Compounds 1-4 and 6-9 showed cytotoxic activities against the HCT-116 cancer cell line (1 < IC50s < 10 ?M) and human fetal lung fibroblast MRC5 cell line (1 < IC50s < 10 ?M for compounds 1, 2, 7, 8, and 9). PMID:26034885

  1. A Comparison between Antibacterial Activity of Propolis and Aloe vera on Enterococcus faecalis (an In Vitro Study)

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Maryam; Amin Marashi, Mahmood; Zabihi, Ebrahim; Issazadeh, Maryam; Khafri, Soraya

    2013-01-01

    Removing the bacteria, including Enterococcus faecalis, from the root canal is one of the important aims in endodontic treatment.We aimed to compare the antibacterial activity of Chlorhexidine with two natural drugs. The antibacterial activities of three different propolis extracts (alcohol concentrations: 0, 15, 40%) and Aloe vera gel on E. faecalis were compared using three methods: disk diffusion, microdilution and direct contact test. In addition to the above bacterium, the Aloe vera gel effect on Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans was evaluated. Disk diffusion test revealed that propolis ethanolic extracts (the alcohol concentration of 15 and 40%) and Aloe vera gel have antibacterial activities but aqueous extract of propolis did not show any effect in this test. The MICs for propolis ethanolic extracts, Aloe vera gel and aqueous extract of propolis (0% alcohol) were 313 µg/ml, 750 µg/ml, 2250 µg/ml, and ? 500 µg/ml respectively, much higher than the Chlorhexidine one. In direct contact test, contrary to Aloe vera, all three propolis extracts showed antibacterial effects on E. faecalis. The Aloe vera gel also showed significant antibacterial effect on S.aureus and S.mutans. The hydroalcoholic extracts of propolis and Aloe vera gel had antibacterial effects on E. faecalis, however, propolis is more potent than Aloe vera. The antibacterial effect of Aloe vera on S. aureus and S. mutans is low (MIC ? 2250 µg/ml). Appropriate concentrations of alcoholic extracts of propolis and some fractions of Aloe vera gel might be good choices for disinfecting the root canal in endodontic treatments. PMID:24551800

  2. Characterization of green synthesized nano-formulation (ZnO-A. vera) and their antibacterial activity against pathogens.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yiguang; Yao, Jun; Russel, Mohammad; Chen, Ke; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2015-03-01

    The application of nanotechnology in medicine has recently been a breakthrough in therapeutic drugs formulation. This paper presents the structural and optical characterization of a new green nano-formulation (ZnO-Aloe vera) with considerable antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria. Its particle structure, size and morphology were characterized by XRD, TEM and SEM. And optical absorption spectra and photoluminescence were measured synchronously. Their antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was also investigated using thermokinetic profiling and agar well diffusion method. The nano-formulation is spherical shape and hexagonal with a particle size ranging from 25 to 65 nm as well as an increased crystallite size of 49 nm. For antibacterial activity, the maximum inhibition zones of ZnO and ZnO+A. vera are 18.33 and 26.45 mm for E. coli, 22.11 and 28.12 mm for S. aureus (p<0.05). Considering Pmax, Qt and k, ZnO+A. vera nano-formulation has a significant (p < 0.05) antibacterial effect against S. aureus almost at all concentration and against E. coli at 15 and 25mg/L. ZnO+A. vera nano-formulation is much more toxic against S. aureus than E. coli, with an IC50 of 13.12 mg/L and 21.31 mg/L, respectively. The overall results reveal that the ZnO-A. vera nano-formulation has good surface energy, crystallinity, transmission, and enriched antibacterial activities. Their antibacterial properties are possibly relevant to particle size, microstructural ionization, the crystal formation and the Gram property of pathogens. This ZnO-A. vera nano-formulation could be utilized effectively as a spectral and significant antibacterial agent for pathogens in future medical and environmental concerns. PMID:25723342

  3. Mobilizable IncQ-related plasmid carrying a new quinolone resistance gene, qnrS2, isolated from the bacterial community of a wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Bönemann, Gabriele; Stiens, Michael; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2006-09-01

    Plasmid-encoded quinolone resistance was previously reported for different bacteria isolated from patients not only in the United States and Asia but also in Europe. Here we describe the isolation, by applying a new selection strategy, of the quinolone resistance plasmid pGNB2 from an activated sludge bacterial community of a wastewater treatment plant in Germany. The hypersensitive Escherichia coli strain KAM3 carrying a mutation in the multidrug efflux system genes acrAB was transformed with total plasmid DNA preparations isolated from activated sludge bacteria and subsequently selected on medium containing the fluoroquinolone norfloxacin. This approach resulted in the isolation of plasmid pGNB2 conferring decreased susceptibility to nalidixic acid and to different fluoroquinolones. Analysis of the pGNB2 nucleotide sequence revealed that it is 8,469 bp in size and has a G+C content of 58.2%. The plasmid backbone is composed of a replication initiation module (repA-repC) belonging to the IncQ-family and a two-component mobilization module that confers horizontal mobility to the plasmid. In addition, plasmid pGNB2 carries an accessory module consisting of a transposon Tn1721 remnant and the quinolone resistance gene, qnrS2, that is 92% identical to the qnrS gene located on plasmid pAH0376 from Shigella flexneri 2b. QnrS2 belongs to the pentapeptide repeat protein family and is predicted to protect DNA-gyrase activity against quinolones. This is not only the first report on a completely sequenced plasmid mediating quinolone resistance isolated from an environmental sample but also on the first qnrS-like gene detected in Europe. PMID:16940104

  4. Mobilizable IncQ-Related Plasmid Carrying a New Quinolone Resistance Gene, qnrS2, Isolated from the Bacterial Community of a Wastewater Treatment Plant

    PubMed Central

    Bönemann, Gabriele; Stiens, Michael; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Plasmid-encoded quinolone resistance was previously reported for different bacteria isolated from patients not only in the United States and Asia but also in Europe. Here we describe the isolation, by applying a new selection strategy, of the quinolone resistance plasmid pGNB2 from an activated sludge bacterial community of a wastewater treatment plant in Germany. The hypersensitive Escherichia coli strain KAM3 carrying a mutation in the multidrug efflux system genes acrAB was transformed with total plasmid DNA preparations isolated from activated sludge bacteria and subsequently selected on medium containing the fluoroquinolone norfloxacin. This approach resulted in the isolation of plasmid pGNB2 conferring decreased susceptibility to nalidixic acid and to different fluoroquinolones. Analysis of the pGNB2 nucleotide sequence revealed that it is 8,469 bp in size and has a G+C content of 58.2%. The plasmid backbone is composed of a replication initiation module (repA-repC) belonging to the IncQ-family and a two-component mobilization module that confers horizontal mobility to the plasmid. In addition, plasmid pGNB2 carries an accessory module consisting of a transposon Tn1721 remnant and the quinolone resistance gene, qnrS2, that is 92% identical to the qnrS gene located on plasmid pAH0376 from Shigella flexneri 2b. QnrS2 belongs to the pentapeptide repeat protein family and is predicted to protect DNA-gyrase activity against quinolones. This is not only the first report on a completely sequenced plasmid mediating quinolone resistance isolated from an environmental sample but also on the first qnrS-like gene detected in Europe. PMID:16940104

  5. Cytotoxic and antibacterial effects of orthodontic appliances.

    PubMed

    Grimsdottir, M R; Hensten-Pettersen, A

    1993-08-01

    The cytotoxic and antibacterial effects of orthodontic appliances were assessed. Metallic devices used in orthodontics, such as molar bands, brackets, and archwires were tested by the agar overlay cytotoxicity test with mouse fibroblast cells. The same devices were tested for antibacterial effect with Streptococcus mutans and S. sanguis. The multicomponent devices, which are bonded with silver- and copper-based brazing alloys, were more cytotoxic than the single-component devices, probably because copper is more cytotoxic than nickel. The devices had a definite, but low, antibacterial effect, as compared with the 0.05% chlorhexidine positive control. A cytotoxic effect of the devices per se might contribute to a localized gingivitis. It is uncertain whether orthodontic devices have any significant inhibitory effect on dental plaque viability. PMID:8362202

  6. Injectable Bioadhesive Hydrogels with Innate Antibacterial Properties

    PubMed Central

    Giano, Michael C.; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Medina, Scott H.; Sarhane, Karim A.; Christensen, Joani M.; Yamada, Yuji; Brandacher, Gerald; Schneider, Joel P.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infections cause significant postoperative morbidity and increased healthcare costs. Bioadhesives used to fill surgical voids and support wound healing are typically devoid of antibacterial activity. Here, we report novel syringe-injectable bioadhesive hydrogels with inherent antibacterial properties prepared from mixing polydextran aldehyde (PDA) and branched polyethylenimine (PEI). These adhesives kill both Gram-negative and Gram–positive bacteria, while sparing human erythrocytes. An optimal composition of 2.5 wt % oxidized dextran and 6.9 wt % PEI sets within seconds forming a mechanically rigid (~1700 Pa) gel offering a maximum adhesive stress of ~ 2.8 kPa. A murine infection model showed that the adhesive is capable of killing S. pyogenes introduced subcutaneously at the bioadhesive’s surface, with minimal inflammatory response. The adhesive was also effective in a cecal ligation and puncture model, preventing sepsis and significantly improving survival. These bioadhesives represent novel, inherently antibacterial materials for wound filling applications. PMID:24958189

  7. Antibacterial nanofiber materials activated by light.

    PubMed

    Jesenská, So?a; Plíštil, Lukáš; Kubát, Pavel; Lang, Kamil; Brožová, Libuše; Popelka, St?pán; Szatmáry, Lórant; Mosinger, Ji?í

    2011-12-15

    Electrospun polymeric nanofiber materials doped with 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) photosensitizer were prepared from four different polymers and were characterized with microscopic methods, steady-state, and time-resolved fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. The polymers used included polyurethane Larithane™ (PUR), polystyrene (PS), polycaprolactone (PCL), and polyamide 6 (PA6). The antibacterial activity of all nanofiber materials against E. coli was activated by visible light and it was dependent on oxygen permeability/diffusion coefficients and the diameter of the polymeric nanofibers. This activity is based on oxidation ability of singlet oxygen O?(¹?(g)) that is generated upon irradiation. All tested nanofiber materials exhibited prolonged antibacterial properties, even in the dark after long-duration irradiation. The post-irradiation effect was explained by the photogeneration of H?O?, which provided the material with long-lasting antibacterial properties. PMID:21972201

  8. Evaluation of antioxidant, antibacterial, and antidiabetic potential of two traditional medicinal plants of India: Swertia cordata and Swertia chirayita

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Priyanka; Abdulsalam, Fatima I.; Pandey, D. K.; Bhattacharjee, Aniruddha; Eruvaram, Naveen Reddy; Malik, Tabarak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Swertia cordata and Swertia chirayita are temperate Himalayan medicinal plants used as potent herbal drugs in Indian traditional systems of medicine (Ayurvedic, Unani and Siddha). Objective: Assessment of Antioxidant, antibacterial, and antidiabetic potential of Swertia cordata and Swertia chirayita. Materials and Methods: Phytochemicals of methanolic and aqueous extracts of the two Swertia species were analyzed. The antioxidant potential of all the extracts was assessed by measuring total phenolic content, total flavonoid content and free radical scavenging potential was assessed by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrilhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, antibacterial activity was assessed against various pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria in vitro by Kirby-Bauer agar well diffusion method and antidiabetic activity was assessed by ?-amylase inhibition. Results: Methanolic leaf extracts of both the species of Swertia contain significant antibacterial as well as anti-diabetic potential, whereas methanolic root extracts of both species were found to have potential antioxidant activity. However, Swertia chirayita showed better activities than Swertia cordata although both species have good reputation in traditional Indian medicine. Conclusion: Both the species are having high medicinal potential in terms of their antioxidant, antibacterial and antidiabetic activities. Studies are required to further elucidate antioxidant, anti-diabetic and antibacterial potentials using various in-vitro, in-vivo biochemical and molecular biology techniques. PMID:26109789

  9. Actinopyga lecanora Hydrolysates as Natural Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Raheleh; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-01-01

    Actinopyga lecanora, a type of sea cucumber commonly known as stone fish with relatively high protein content, was explored as raw material for bioactive peptides production. Six proteolytic enzymes, namely alcalase, papain, pepsin, trypsin, bromelain and flavourzyme were used to hydrolyze A. lecanora at different times and their respective degrees of hydrolysis (DH) were calculated. Subsequently, antibacterial activity of the A. lecanora hydrolysates, against some common pathogenic Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pseudomonas sp.) were evaluated. Papain hydrolysis showed the highest DH value (89.44%), followed by alcalase hydrolysis (83.35%). Bromelain hydrolysate after one and seven hours of hydrolysis exhibited the highest antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas sp., P. aeruginosa and E. coli at 51.85%, 30.07% and 30.45%, respectively compared to the other hydrolysates. Protein hydrolysate generated by papain after 8 h hydrolysis showed maximum antibacterial activity against S. aureus at 20.19%. The potent hydrolysates were further fractionated using RP-HPLC and antibacterial activity of the collected fractions from each hydrolysate were evaluated, wherein among them only three fractions from the bromelain hydrolysates exhibited inhibitory activities against Pseudomonas sp., P. aeruginosa and E. coli at 24%, 25.5% and 27.1%, respectively and one fraction of papain hydrolysate showed antibacterial activity of 33.1% against S. aureus. The evaluation of the relationship between DH and antibacterial activities of papain and bromelain hydrolysates revealed a meaningful correlation of four and six order functions. PMID:23222684

  10. Antibacterial active compounds from Hypericum ascyron L. induce bacterial cell death through apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Mei; Luo, Xue-Gang; Si, Chuan-Ling; Wang, Nan; Zhou, Hao; He, Jun-Fang; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2015-01-01

    Hypericum ascyron L. has been used as a traditional medicine for the treatment of wounds, swelling, headache, nausea and abscesses in China for thousands of years. However, modern pharmacological studies are still necessary to provide a scientific basis to substantiate their traditional use. In this study, the mechanism underlying the antimicrobial effect of the antibacterial activity compounds from H. ascyron L. was investigated. Bioguided fractionation of the extract from H. ascyron L. afforded antibacterial activity fraction 8. The results of cup plate analysis and MTT assay showed that the MIC and MBC of fraction 8 is 5 mg/mL. Furthermore, using Annexin V-FITC/PI, TUNEL labeling and DNA gel electrophoresis, we found that cell death with apoptosis features similar to those in eucaryon could be induced in bacteria strains after exposure to the antibacterial activity compounds from H. ascyron L. at moderate concentration. In addition, we further found fraction 8 could disrupt the cell membrane potential indicate that fraction 8 exerts pro-apoptotic effects through a membrane-mediated apoptosis pathway. Finally, quercetin and kaempferol 3-O-?-(2?-acetyl)-galactopyranoside, were identified from fraction 8 by means of Mass spectrometry and Nuclear magnetic resonance. To our best knowledge, this study is the first to show that Kaempferol 3-O-?-(2?-acetyl)-galactopyranoside coupled with quercetin had significant antibacterial activity via apoptosis pathway, and it is also the first report that Kaempferol 3-O-?-(2?-acetyl)-galactopyranoside was found in clusiacea. Our data might provide a rational base for the use of H. ascyron L. in clinical, and throw light on the development of novel antibacterial drugs. PMID:25916905

  11. Injectable bioadhesive hydrogels with innate antibacterial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giano, Michael C.; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Medina, Scott H.; Sarhane, Karim A.; Christensen, Joani M.; Yamada, Yuji; Brandacher, Gerald; Schneider, Joel P.

    2014-06-01

    Surgical site infections cause significant postoperative morbidity and increased healthcare costs. Bioadhesives used to fill surgical voids and support wound healing are typically devoid of antibacterial activity. Here we report novel syringe-injectable bioadhesive hydrogels with inherent antibacterial properties prepared from mixing polydextran aldehyde and branched polyethylenimine. These adhesives kill both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, while sparing human erythrocytes. An optimal composition of 2.5?wt% oxidized dextran and 6.9?wt% polyethylenimine sets within seconds forming a mechanically rigid (~\

  12. Prevalence and characterization of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in Salmonella isolated from poultry in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Cho, Jae Keun; Kim, Ki Seuk

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes qnr, aac(6')-Ib-cr, and qepA in a total of 185 non-duplicate Salmonella spp. isolated from hatcheries, poultry farms, and poultry slaughterhouses during the period 2001 to 2010 in Korea. Additionally, mutation analysis of quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDRs), conjugation experiments, and plasmid analysis were performed in the PMQR-positive isolates. Among the 185 isolates, six (3.2%) contained qnr genes (two qnrB4 and four qnrS1) but none carried the aac(6')-Ib-cr or qepA genes. Among the six PMQR-positive isolates, one showed a single mutation (Ser83-Phe substitution) in the QRDRs of gyrA. Among them, three were non-susceptible (intermediate or resistant) to nalidixic acid (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ?256 µg/ml), ciprofloxacin (MIC 2 µg/ml), and levofloxacin (MIC 4 µg/ml), but others were susceptible to all of the three fluoroquinolones. They were resistant to six or more antimicrobial agents tested and were able to transfer quinolone resistance to recipient Escherichia coli J53 by conjugation. By performing a hybridization test, plasmids harbouring qnrB4 and qnrS1 genes were less than 8 kb and about 70 kb in size, respectively. The horizontal dissemination of qnrS1 gene was mediated by IncN plasmid. Compared with the recipient strain, MICs of the transconjugants increased two-fold to four-fold for nalidixic acid, and eight-fold to 16-fold for ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. This report is the first to describe the detection of qnr genes in Salmonella spp. isolated from poultry in Korea. Widespread horizontal transfer of these genes among bacteria may be a serious public health concern because these can rapidly increase fluoroquinolone resistance. To ensure the public health, it is essential to continuously survey and carefully monitor the spread of PMQR genes in Salmonella from poultry. PMID:23607509

  13. Interference of Antibacterial Agents with Phagocyte Functions: Immunomodulation or “Immuno-Fairy Tales”?

    PubMed Central

    Labro, Marie-Thérése

    2000-01-01

    Professional phagocytes (polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages) are a main component of the immune system. These cells are involved in both host defenses and various pathological settings characterized by excessive inflammation. Accordingly, they are key targets for immunomodulatory drugs, among which antibacterial agents are promising candidates. The basic and historical concepts of immunomodulation will first be briefly reviewed. Phagocyte complexity will then be unravelled (at least in terms of what we know about the origin, subsets, ambivalent roles, functional capacities, and transductional pathways of this cell and how to explore them). The core subject of this review will be the many possible interactions between antibacterial agents and phagocytes, classified according to demonstrated or potential clinical relevance (e.g., neutropenia, intracellular accumulation, and modulation of bacterial virulence). A detailed review of direct in vitro effects will be provided for the various antibacterial drug families, followed by a discussion of the clinical relevance of these effects in two particular settings: immune deficiency and inflammatory diseases. The prophylactic and therapeutic use of immunomodulatory antibiotics will be considered before conclusions are drawn about the emerging (optimistic) vision of future therapeutic prospects to deal with largely unknown new diseases and new pathogens by using new agents, new techniques, and a better understanding of the phagocyte in particular and the immune system in general. PMID:11023961

  14. Preparation and Antibacterial Activity Evaluation of 18-?-glycyrrhetinic Acid Loaded PLGA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Darvishi, Behrad; Manoochehri, Saeed; Kamalinia, Golnaz; Samadi, Nasrin; Amini, Mohsen; Mostafavi, Seyyed Hossein; Maghazei, Shahab; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles loaded with 18-?-glycyrrhetinic acid (GLA) with appropriate physicochemical properties and antimicrobial activity. GLA loaded PLGA nanoparticles were prepared with different drug to polymer ratios, acetone contents and sonication times and the antibacterial activity of the developed nanoparticles was examined against different gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. The antibacterial effect was studied using serial dilution technique to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration of nanoparticles. Results demonstrated that physicochemical properties of nanoparticles were affected by the above mentioned parameters where nanoscale size particles ranging from 175 to 212 nm were achieved. The highest encapsulation efficiency (53.2 ± 2.4%) was obtained when the ratio of drug to polymer was 1:4. Zeta potential of the developed nanoparticles was fairly negative (-11±1.5). In-vitro release profile of nanoparticles showed two phases: an initial phase of burst release for 10 h followed by a slow release pattern up to the end. The antimicrobial results revealed that the nanoparticles were more effective than pure GLA against P. aeuroginosa, S. aureus and S. epidermidis. This improvement in antibacterial activity of GLA loaded nanoparticles when compared to pure GLA may be related to higher nanoparticles penetration into infected cells and a higher amount of GLA delivery in its site of action. Herein, it was shown that GLA loaded PLGA nanoparticles displayed appropriate physicochemical properties as well as an improved antimicrobial effect. PMID:25901144

  15. Investigation of antibacterial mechanism and identification of bacterial protein targets mediated by antibacterial medicinal plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ann-Li; Ooh, Keng-Fei; Ong, Hean-Chooi; Chai, Tsun-Thai; Wong, Fai-Chu

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated the antibacterial mechanism and potential therapeutic targets of three antibacterial medicinal plants. Upon treatment with the plant extracts, bacterial proteins were extracted and resolved using denaturing gel electrophoresis. Differentially-expressed bacterial proteins were excised from the gels and subjected to sequence analysis by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. From our study, seven differentially expressed bacterial proteins (triacylglycerol lipase, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, flagellin, outer membrane protein A, stringent starvation protein A, 30S ribosomal protein s1 and 60 kDa chaperonin) were identified. Additionally, scanning electron microscope study indicated morphological damages induced on bacterial cell surfaces. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first time these bacterial proteins are being reported, following treatments with the antibacterial plant extracts. Further studies in this direction could lead to the detailed understanding of their inhibition mechanism and discovery of target-specific antibacterial agents. PMID:25976788

  16. Synthesis, antibacterial activity, antibacterial mechanism and food applications of ZnO nanoparticles: a review.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lu-E; Li, Zhen-Hua; Zheng, Wei; Zhao, Yi-Fan; Jin, Yong-Fang; Tang, Zhen-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial contamination reduces the shelf-life of foods and presents serious risks to human health. Nanotechnology provides the opportunity for the development of new antibacterial agents. Nano-inorganic metal oxides have shown the potential to reduce bacterial contamination of foods. When the particle size of materials decreases from the micrometre to the nanometre range, nano-functional properties such as diffusivity, mechanical strength, chemical reactivity and biological properties are improved. Significantly, ZnO has been used in many applications with particular success. Many studies have shown that ZnO nanoparticles have enhanced antibacterial activity. This review discusses the main synthetic methods, antibacterial activity, antibacterial mechanisms and food applications of ZnO nanoparticles. PMID:24219062

  17. Total synthesis of albicidin: a lead structure from Xanthomonas albilineans for potent antibacterial gyrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kretz, Julian; Kerwat, Dennis; Schubert, Vivien; Grätz, Stefan; Pesic, Alexander; Semsary, Siamak; Cociancich, Stéphane; Royer, Monique; Süssmuth, Roderich D

    2015-02-01

    The peptide antibiotic albicidin, which is synthesized by the plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas albilineans, displays remarkable antibacterial activity against various Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms. The low amounts of albicidin obtainable from the producing organism or through heterologous expression are limiting factors in providing sufficient material for bioactivity profiling and structure-activity studies. Therefore, we developed a convergent total synthesis route toward albicidin. The unexpectedly difficult formation of amide bonds between the aromatic amino acids was achieved through a triphosgene-mediated coupling strategy. The herein presented synthesis of albicidin confirms the previously determined chemical structure and underlines the extraordinary antibacterial activity of this compound. The synthetic protocol will provide multigram amounts of albicidin for further profiling of its drug properties. PMID:25504839

  18. Synthesis of biscoumarin and dihydropyran derivatives with promising antitumor and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Sui, Yun-Peng; Xin, Jia-Jia; Du, Xin-Liang; Li, Jiang-Tao; Huo, Hai-Ru; Ma, Hai; Wang, Wei-Hao; Zhou, Hai-Yu; Zhan, Hong-Dan; Wang, Zhu-Ju; Li, Chun; Sui, Feng; Li, Xia

    2015-12-01

    Two series of biscoumarin (1-3) and dihydropyran (4-12) derivatives were successfully synthesized as new antitumor and antibacterial agents. The molecular structures of four representative compounds 2, 4, 7 and 10 were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction study. The synthesized compounds (1-12) were evaluated for their antitumor activities against human intestinal epithelial adenocarcinoma cell line (HuTu80), mammary adenocarcinoma cell line (4T1) and pancreatic cancer cell line (PANC1) and antibacterial activities against one drug-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus ATCC 29213) strain and three MRSA strains (MRSA XJ 75302, Mu50, USA 300 LAC). The further mechanism study demonstrated that the most potent compound 1 could obviously inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells via the mechanism to induce apoptosis. PMID:26522947

  19. Facile synthesis of antibacterial chitosan/CuO bio-nanocomposite hydrogel beads.

    PubMed

    Farhoudian, Sana; Yadollahi, Mehdi; Namazi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    CuO nanoparticles were synthesized in situ during the formation of physically cross-linked chitosan hydrogel beads using sodium tripolyphosphate as the cross-linker. The aim of the study was to investigate whether these nanocomposite beads have the potential to be used in drug delivery applications. The formation of CuO nanoparticles (CuONPs) in the hydrogels was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy studies. SEM micrographs revealed the formation of CuONPs with size range of 10-25nm within the hydrogel matrix. Furthermore, the antibacterial and swelling properties of the beads were studied. The prepared nanocomposite hydrogels showed a pH sensitive swelling behavior. The CuO nanocomposite hydrogels have rather higher swelling in different aqueous solutions in comparison with neat hydrogel. The nanocomposite hydrogels demonstrated good antibacterial effects against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. PMID:26454107

  20. Sesbania grandiflora leaf extract mediated green synthesis of antibacterial silver nanoparticles against selected human pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, J.; Paul Das, M.; Velusamy, P.

    2013-03-01

    Simple, effective and rapid approach for the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using leaf extract of Sesbania grandiflora and their in vitro antibacterial activity against selected human pathogens has been demonstrated in the study. Various instrumental techniques were adopted to characterize the synthesized AgNPs viz. UV-Vis, FTIR, XRD, TEM, EDX and AFM. Surface Plasmon spectra for AgNPs are centered at 422 nm with dark brown color. The synthesized AgNPs were found to be spherical in shape with size in the range of 10-25 nm. The presence of water soluble proteins in the leaf extract was identified by FTIR which were found to be responsible for the reduction of silver ions (Ag+) to AgNPs. Moreover, the synthesized AgNPs showed potent antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria such as Salmonella enterica and Staphylococcus aureus.

  1. Lead structures for new antibacterials: stereocontrolled synthesis of a bioactive muraymycin analogue.

    PubMed

    Spork, Anatol P; Büschleb, Martin; Ries, Oliver; Wiegmann, Daniel; Boettcher, Stefan; Mihalyi, Agnes; Bugg, Timothy D H; Ducho, Christian

    2014-11-17

    Naturally occurring muraymycin nucleoside antibiotics represent a promising class of novel antibacterial agents. The structural complexity suggests the investigation of simplified analogues as potential lead structures, which can then be further optimized towards highly potent antimicrobials. Herein we report studies on muraymycin-derived potential lead structures lacking an aminoribose motif found in most naturally occurring muraymycins. We have identified a 5'-defunctionalized motif to be ideal in terms of stability and chemical accessibility and have synthesized a full-length muraymycin analogue based on this structure using a novel fully stereocontrolled route. The obtained 5'-deoxy analogue of the natural product muraymycin C4 showed good inhibitory properties towards the bacterial target protein MraY, sufficient pharmacokinetic stability and no cytotoxicity against human cells, thus making it a promising lead for antibacterial drug development. PMID:25318977

  2. Simultaneous determination of multiple (fluoro)quinolone antibiotics in food samples by a one-step fluorescence polarization immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Mi, Tiejun; Wang, Zhanhui; Eremin, Sergei A; Shen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Suxia

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes a rapid one-step fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) for the simultaneous determination of multiple (fluoro)quinolone antibiotics (FQs) in food samples. Several fluorescent tracers were synthesized and evaluated in the FPIA method based on a broad-specificity of monoclonal antibodies toward FQs. The heterogeneous tracer, SAR-5-FAM, was considered as the optimal choice to prepare the immunocomplex single reagent, which allows a rapid and sensitive displacement reaction by addition of analytes. Optimized single-reagent FPIA exhibited broad cross-reactivities in the range of 7.8-172.2% with 16 FQs tested and was capable of determining most FQs at the level of maximum residue limits. Recoveries for spiked milk and chicken muscle samples were from 77.8 to 116%, with relative standard deviation lower than 17.4%. Therefore, this method could be applicable in routine screening analysis of multiple FQ residues in food samples. PMID:24050679

  3. Identification of 4-quinolone derivatives as inhibitors of reactive oxygen species production from human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Onda, Kenichi; Narazaki, Fumie; Ishibashi, Naoki; Nakanishi, Keita; Sawada, Yuki; Imamura, Ken-ichiro; Momose, Kazuhiro; Furukawa, Shigetada; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Yuda, Masamichi; Kayakiri, Hiroshi; Ohta, Mitsuaki

    2011-11-15

    Oxidative stress is widely recognized as being associated with a number of disorders, including metabolic dysfunction and atherosclerosis. A series of substituted 4-quinolone derivatives were prepared and evaluated as inhibitors of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). One compound in particular, 2-({[4-(3-hydroxy-3-methylbutoxy)pyridin-2-yl]oxy}methyl)-3-methylquinolin-4(1H)-one (25b), inhibited ROS production from HUVECs with an IC(50) of 140 nM. This compound also exhibited low CYP2D6 inhibitory activity, high aqueous solubility, and good in vitro metabolic stability. An in vivo pharmacokinetic study of this compound in SD rats revealed high oral bioavailability and a long plasma half-life. PMID:21963985

  4. Quinolone Resistance of Salmonella enterica Serovar Virchow Isolates from Humans and Poultry in Israel: Evidence for Clonal Expansion?

    PubMed Central

    Solnik-Isaac, Hadas; Weinberger, Miriam; Tabak, Mina; Ben-David, Alon; Shachar, Dina; Yaron, Sima

    2007-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Virchow is highly prevalent in humans and farm animals in Israel. In addition to high rates of resistance to multiple antibiotics, this serovar exhibits a high incidence of resistance to nalidixic acid. More than 90% of Salmonella serovar Virchow isolates of human and poultry origin obtained from 1997 to 2004 were resistant to nalidixic acid (MIC ? 128 ?g/ml), with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC between 0.125 and 0.250 ?g/ml). Most isolates belonged to two predominant, closely related pulsed-field gel electrophoresis image types. Investigation of the mechanisms of quinolone resistance revealed that this pathogen probably emerged from a parental clone that overproduced the AcrAB efflux pump and had a single point mutation in gyrA leading to the Asp87Tyr substitution. The close resemblance between human and poultry isolates points to poultry as a likely source of Salmonella serovar Virchow in the food chain. PMID:17596371

  5. Antibacterial and antioxidant activities of Musa sp. leaf extracts against multidrug resistant clinical pathogens causing nosocomial infection

    PubMed Central

    Karuppiah, Ponmurugan; Mustaffa, Muhammed

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate different Musa sp. leave extracts of hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol were evaluated for antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant pathogens causing nosocomial infection by agar well diffusion method and also antioxidant activities. Methods The four different Musa species leaves were extracted with hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol. Antibacterial susceptibility test, minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum inhibitory bacterial concentration were determined by agar well diffusion method. Total phenolic content and in vitro antioxidant activity was determined. Results All the Musa sp. extracts showed moderate antibacterial activities expect Musa paradisiaca with the inhibition zone ranging from 8.0 to 18.6 mm. Among four species ethyl acetate extracts of Musa paradisiaca showed highest activity against tested pathogens particularly E. coli, P. aeruginosa and Citrobacter sp. The minimum inhibitory concentrations were within the value of 15.63- 250 µg/mL and minimum bactericidal concentrations were ranging from 31.25- 250 µg/mL. Antioxidant activity of Musa acuminate exhibited maximum activity among other three Musa species. Conclusions The present study concluded that among the different Musa species, Musa paradisiaca displayed efficient antibacterial activity followed by Musa acuminata against multi-drug resistant nosocomial infection causing pathogens. Further, an extensive study is needed to identify the bioactive compounds, mode of action and toxic effect in vivo of Musa sp. PMID:23998016

  6. An integrated microfluidic system for diagnosis of the resistance of Helicobacter pylori to quinolone-based antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chih-Yu; Wang, Chih-Hung; Che, Yu-Jui; Kao, Cheng-Yen; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2016-04-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a species of bacteria that can colonize the human stomach mucosa. It is closely associated with gastric diseases such as ulcer and inflammation. Recently, some H. pylori strains were found to express resistance to a family of antibiotics known as quinolones due to single-point mutations. Although traditional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and molecular diagnostic-based approaches can be used to determine the presence and abundance of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori strains, such processes are relatively expensive, labor-intensive, and require bulky and costly equipment. This study therefore reports an advanced diagnostic assay performed on an integrated microfluidic system for rapid detection of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori. The assay features three components: (1) nucleic acid extraction by specific probe-conjugated magnetic beads, (2) amplification of the target deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragments by using single-nucleotide-polymorphism polymerase chain reaction (SNP-PCR), and (3) optical detection of the PCR products. The device integrates several microfluidic components including micro-pumps, normally-closed micro-valves, and reaction chambers such that the entire diagnostic assay can be automatically executed on a single microfluidic system within one hour with detection limits of 10(0), 10(2), and 10(2) bacterial cells for H. pylori detection and two different SNP sites strains. Three PCR-based assays for determining presence of H. pylori infection and two DNA single-point mutation assays aimed at determining whether the infected strains were resistant to quinolone can be performed simultaneously on a single chip, suggesting that this microfluidic system could be a promising tool for rapid diagnosis of the presence of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori strains. PMID:26630283

  7. Chemical biology Antibacterial sugar-tipped

    E-print Network

    Davis, Ben G.

    Chemical biology Antibacterial sugar-tipped trees J. Am. Chem. Soc. 126, 4750­4751 (2004) Enzymes proteins in the bacterial cell walls, which bind to sugar (galactose) molecules. Rendle et al. figured on the proteases. Dendrons with two, three or four sugar tips give the enzyme a secure hold, with two tips being

  8. New antibacterial agents derived from the DNA gyrase inhibitor cyclothialidine.

    PubMed

    Angehrn, Peter; Buchmann, Stefan; Funk, Christoph; Goetschi, Erwin; Gmuender, Hans; Hebeisen, Paul; Kostrewa, Dirk; Link, Helmut; Luebbers, Thomas; Masciadri, Raffaello; Nielsen, Joergen; Reindl, Peter; Ricklin, Fabienne; Schmitt-Hoffmann, Anne; Theil, Frank-Peter

    2004-03-11

    Cyclothialidine (1, Ro 09-1437) is a potent DNA gyrase inhibitor that was isolated from Streptomyces filipinensis NR0484 and is a member of a new family of natural products. It acts by competitively inhibiting the ATPase activity exerted by the B subunit of DNA gyrase but barely exhibits any growth inhibitory activity against intact bacterial cells, presumably due to insufficient permeation of the cytoplasmic membrane. To explore the antibacterial potential of 1, we developed a flexible synthetic route allowing for the systematic modification of its structure. From a first set of analogues, structure-activity relationships (SAR) were established for different substitution patterns, and the 14-hydroxylated, bicyclic core (X) of 1 seemed to be the structural prerequisite for DNA gyrase inhibitory activity. The variation of the lactone ring size, however, revealed that activity can be found among 11- to 16-membered lactones, and even seco-analogues were shown to maintain some enzyme inhibitory properties, thereby reducing the minimal structural requirements to a rather simple, hydroxylated benzyl sulfide (XI). On the basis of these "minimal structures" a modification program afforded a number of inhibitors that showed in vitro activity against Gram-positive bacteria. The best activities were displayed by 14-membered lactones, and representatives of this subclass exhibit excellent and broad in vitro antibacterial activity against Gram-positive pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Enterococcus faecalis, and overcome resistance against clinically used drugs. By improving the pharmacokinetic properties of the most active compounds (94, 97), in particular by lowering their lipophilic properties, we were able to identify congeners of cyclothialidine (1) that showed efficacy in vivo. PMID:14998336

  9. L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DapL): a putative target for the development of narrow-spectrum antibacterial compounds

    PubMed Central

    Triassi, Alexander J.; Wheatley, Matthew S.; Savka, Michael A.; Gan, Han Ming; Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Hudson, André O.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the urgent need for sustained development of novel antibacterial compounds to combat the drastic rise in antibiotic resistant and emerging bacterial infections, only a few clinically relevant antibacterial drugs have been recently developed. One of the bottlenecks impeding the development of novel antibacterial compounds is the identification of new enzymatic targets. The nutritionally essential amino acid anabolic pathways, for example lysine biosynthesis, provide an opportunity to explore the development of antibacterial compounds, since human genomes do not possess the genes necessary to synthesize these amino acids de novo. The diaminopimelate (DAP)/lysine (lys) anabolic pathways are attractive targets for antibacterial development since the penultimate lys precursor meso-DAP (m-DAP) is a cross-linking amino acid in the peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall of most Gram-negative bacteria and lys plays a similar role in the PG of most Gram-positive bacteria, in addition to its role as one of the 20 proteogenic amino acids. The L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DapL) pathway was recently identified as a novel variant of the DAP/lys anabolic pathways. The DapL pathway has been identified in the pathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus; Chlamydia, Leptospira, and Treponema. The dapL gene has been identified in the genomes of 381 or approximately 13% of the 2771 bacteria that have been sequenced, annotated and reposited in the NCBI database, as of May 23, 2014. The narrow distribution of the DapL pathway in the bacterial domain provides an opportunity for the development and or discovery of narrow spectrum antibacterial compounds. PMID:25309529

  10. Prevalence of Smqnr and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in clinical isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia from Japan: novel variants of Smqnr

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, H.; Yano, H.; Tanouchi, A.; Kakuta, R.; Endo, S.; Ichimura, S.; Ogawa, M.; Shimojima, M.; Inomata, S.; Ozawa, D.; Aoyagi, T.; Weber, D.J.; Kaku, M.

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an important pathogen in healthcare-associated infections. S. maltophilia may contain Smqnr, a quinolone resistance gene encoding the pentapeptide repeat protein, which confers low-level quinolone resistance upon expression in a heterologous host. We investigated the prevalence of Smqnr and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants in S. maltophilia isolates from Japan. A total of 181 consecutive and nonduplicate clinical isolates of S. maltophilia were collected from four areas of Japan. The antimicrobial susceptibility profiles for these strains were determined. PCR was conducted for Smqnr and PMQR genes, including qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrS,aac(6?)-Ib and qepA. PCR products for Smqnr and aac(6?)-Ib were sequenced. For the S. maltophilia isolates containing Smqnr, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed using XbaI. Resistance rates to ceftazidime, levofloxacin, trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol and minocycline were 67.4%, 6.1%, 17.7%, 8.8% and 0%, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration required to inhibit the growth of 50% and 90% of organisms were 0.5 and 2 mg/L for moxifloxacin but 1 and 4 mg/L for levofloxacin, respectively. Smqnr was detected in 104 of the 181 S. maltophilia isolates (57.5%), and the most frequent was Smqnr6, followed by Smqnr8 and Smqnr11. Eleven novel variants from Smqnr48 to Smqnr58 were detected. The 24 Smqnr-containing S. maltophilia isolates were typed by PFGE and divided into 21 unique types. Nine S. maltophilia isolates (5.0%) carried aac(6?)-Ib-cr. No qnr or qepA genes were detected. This study describes a high prevalence of Smqnr and novel variants of Smqnr among S. maltophilia from Japan. Continuous antimicrobial surveillance and further molecular epidemiological studies on quinolone resistance in S. maltophilia are needed. PMID:26110061

  11. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes and Antibiotic Residues in Wastewater and Soil Adjacent to Swine Feedlots: Potential Transfer to Agricultural Lands

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Wang, Thanh; Shao, Bing; Shen, Jianzhong; Wang, Shaochen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inappropriate use of antibiotics in swine feed could cause accelerated emergence of antibiotic resistance genes, and agricultural application of swine waste could spread antibiotic resistance genes to the surrounding environment. Objectives: We investigated the distribution of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes from swine feedlots and their surrounding environment. Methods: We used a culture-independent method to identify PMQR genes and estimate their levels in wastewater from seven swine feedlot operations and corresponding wastewater-irrigated farm fields. Concentrations of (fluoro)quinolones in wastewater and soil samples were determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography–electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Results: The predominant PMQR genes in both the wastewater and soil samples were qnrD, qepA, and oqxB, whereas qnrS and oqxA were present only in wastewater samples. Absolute concentrations of all PMQR genes combined ranged from 1.66 × 107 to 4.06 × 108 copies/mL in wastewater and 4.06 × 106 to 9.52 × 107 copies/g in soil. Concentrations of (fluoro)quinolones ranged from 4.57 to 321 ng/mL in wastewater and below detection limit to 23.4 ng/g in soil. Significant correlations were found between the relative abundance of PMQR genes and (fluoro)quinolone concentrations (r = 0.71, p = 0.005) and the relative abundance of PMQR genes in paired wastewater and agricultural soil samples (r = 0.91, p = 0.005). Conclusions: Swine feedlot wastewater may be a source of PMQR genes that could facilitate the spread of antibiotic resistance. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the occurrence of PMQR genes in animal husbandry environments using a culture-independent method. PMID:22569244

  12. The Real Practice of Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Prostate Biopsy in Korea Where the Prevalence of Quinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli Is High

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Bae, Sang Rak; Choi, Woo Suk; Paick, Sung Hyun; Kim, Hyeong Gon; Loh, Yong Soo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Transrectal ultrasonography-guided prostate biopsy (TRUS-Bx) is an essential procedure for diagnosing prostate cancer. The American Urological Association (AUA) Guideline recommends fluoroquinolone alone for 1 day during TRUS-Bx. However, this recommendation may not be appropriate in regions where the prevalence of quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli is high. We investigated the real practice of antibiotic prophylaxis for TRUS-Bx in Korea. Materials and Methods A total of 77 hospitals performing TRUS-Bx were identified and an e-mail was sent to the Urology Department of those hospitals. The questions in the e-mail included the choice of antibiotics before and after the procedure and the duration of antibiotic therapy after TRUS-Bx. Results A total of 54 hospitals (70.0%) responded to the e-mail. Before TRUS-Bx, all hospitals administered intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis. The percentage of hospitals that used quinolone, cephalosporin, and aminoglycoside alone was 48.1%, 20.4%, and 9.3%, respectively. The percentage of hospitals that used two or more antibiotics was 22.2%. After biopsy, all 54 hospitals prescribed oral antibiotics. The percentage of hospitals that prescribed quinolone alone, cephalosporin alone, or a combination of two or more antibiotics was 77.8%, 20.4%, and 1.8%, respectively. The duration of antibiotic use was more than 3 days in most hospitals (79.6%). Only four hospitals (7.4%) followed the AUA recommendation of a 1-day regimen. Conclusions The AUA recommendation was not followed by most hospitals in Korea. This clinical behavior might reflect the high quinolone resistance rate in Korea, and further studies on the most efficient prophylactic antibiotics after TRUS-Bx in Korea are warranted. PMID:25237461

  13. Prevalence of Smqnr and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in clinical isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia from Japan: novel variants of Smqnr.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, H; Yano, H; Tanouchi, A; Kakuta, R; Endo, S; Ichimura, S; Ogawa, M; Shimojima, M; Inomata, S; Ozawa, D; Aoyagi, T; Weber, D J; Kaku, M

    2015-09-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an important pathogen in healthcare-associated infections. S. maltophilia may contain Smqnr, a quinolone resistance gene encoding the pentapeptide repeat protein, which confers low-level quinolone resistance upon expression in a heterologous host. We investigated the prevalence of Smqnr and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants in S. maltophilia isolates from Japan. A total of 181 consecutive and nonduplicate clinical isolates of S. maltophilia were collected from four areas of Japan. The antimicrobial susceptibility profiles for these strains were determined. PCR was conducted for Smqnr and PMQR genes, including qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrS, aac(6')-Ib and qepA. PCR products for Smqnr and aac(6')-Ib were sequenced. For the S. maltophilia isolates containing Smqnr, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed using XbaI. Resistance rates to ceftazidime, levofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol and minocycline were 67.4%, 6.1%, 17.7%, 8.8% and 0%, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration required to inhibit the growth of 50% and 90% of organisms were 0.5 and 2 mg/L for moxifloxacin but 1 and 4 mg/L for levofloxacin, respectively. Smqnr was detected in 104 of the 181 S. maltophilia isolates (57.5%), and the most frequent was Smqnr6, followed by Smqnr8 and Smqnr11. Eleven novel variants from Smqnr48 to Smqnr58 were detected. The 24 Smqnr-containing S. maltophilia isolates were typed by PFGE and divided into 21 unique types. Nine S. maltophilia isolates (5.0%) carried aac(6')-Ib-cr. No qnr or qepA genes were detected. This study describes a high prevalence of Smqnr and novel variants of Smqnr among S. maltophilia from Japan. Continuous antimicrobial surveillance and further molecular epidemiological studies on quinolone resistance in S. maltophilia are needed. PMID:26110061

  14. Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes among Extended-Spectrum ?-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Human Isolates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shams, Ehsaneh; Firoozeh, Farzaneh; Moniri, Rezvan; Zibaei, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and molecular characterization of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes (qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, aac(6?)-Ib-cr, and qepA) among ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in Kashan, Iran. A total of 185 K. pneumoniae isolates were tested for quinolone resistance and ESBL-producing using the disk diffusion method and double disk synergy (DDST) confirmatory test. ESBL-producing strains were further evaluated for the blaCTX-M genes. The PCR method was used to show presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and the purified PCR products were sequenced. Eighty-seven ESBL-producing strains were identified by DDST confirmatory test and majority (70, 80.5%) of which carried blaCTX-M genes including CTX-M-1 (60%), CTX-M-2 (42.9%), and CTX-M-9 (34.3%). Seventy-seven ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates harbored PMQR genes, which mostly consisted of aac(6?)-Ib-cr (70.1%) and qnrB (46.0%), followed by qnrS (5.7%). Among the 77 PMQR-positive isolates, 27 (35.1%) and 1 (1.3%) carried 2 and 3 different PMQR genes, respectively. However, qnrA and qepA were not found in any isolate. Our results highlight high ESBL occurrence with CTX-M type and high frequency of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes among ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates in Kashan. PMID:26618005

  15. Persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during ciprofloxacin therapy of a cystic fibrosis patient: transient resistance to quinolones and protein F-deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, S; Malouin, F; Rabin, H R; Schollaardt, T; Parr, T R; Bryan, L E

    1990-06-01

    The mechanism of persistence was characterized in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates obtained ten days before (4405), on the tenth day of (4419), and four days after (4478) ciprofloxacin therapy in a cystic fibrosis patient. Isolate 4419 showed a 16-fold increase in resistance to ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and nalidixic acid. The outer membrane of 4419 had no detectable protein F. A modified lipopolysaccharide profile, a longer lag phase before growth and a slower generation time were also noted for isolate 4419. Cell surface hydrophobicity was increased by 20% in 4419 whereas uptake of [14C]ciprofloxacin was equivalent in all three isolates. Ciprofloxacin doses causing 50% inhibition of DNA synthesis were proportional to MICs for each isolate indicating that the DNA gyrase of 4419 was resistant to quinolones. A quinolone-susceptible revertant of 4419 remained deficient in protein F. Protein F-deficiency was not associated with resistance to quinolones, nor to other antibiotics, supporting the view that it plays little role in outer membrane permeability to antibiotics. PMID:2115039

  16. Association of Transferable Quinolone Resistance Determinant qnrB19 with Extended-Spectrum ?-Lactamases in Salmonella Give and Salmonella Heidelberg in Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    González, Fanny

    2013-01-01

    Four nontyphoidal Salmonella strains with resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and nonclassical quinolone resistance phenotype were studied. Two S. Give were isolated from pediatric patients with acute gastroenteritis, and two S. Heidelberg were recovered from raw chicken meat. Phenotypic characterization included antimicrobial susceptibility testing and detection of extended-spectrum ?-lactamases (ESBLs) by the double-disc synergy method. The detection of quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDR) of gyrA, gyrB, and gyrC genes, blaESBLs genes, and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants was carried out by molecular methods. Plasmid analysis included Southern blot and restriction patterns. Transferability of resistance genes was examined by transformation. blaTEM-1 + blaSHV-12 genes were detected in S. Give SG9611 and blaTEM-1 + blaCTX-M-2 in the other three strains: S. Give SG9811, S. Heidelberg SH7511, and SH7911. Regardless of origin and serovars, the qnrB19 gene was detected in the 4 strains studied. All determinants of resistance were localized in plasmids and successfully transferred by transformation. This study highlights the circulation of qnrB19 associated with blaTEM-1, blaSHV-12, and blaCTX-M-2 in S. Give and S. Heidelberg in Venezuela. The recognition of factors associated with increasing resistance and the study of the molecular mechanisms involved can lead to a more focused use of antimicrobial agents. PMID:24187555

  17. In vitro synergistic antibacterial action of certain combinations of gentamicin and essential oils.

    PubMed

    Rosato, A; Piarulli, M; Corbo, F; Muraglia, M; Carone, A; Vitali, M E; Vitali, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the existence of synergistic antibacterial effect between four essential oils (Aniba rosaeodora, Melaleuca alternifolia, Origanum vulgare, and Pelargonium graveolens) individually combined with the antibacterial drug Gentamicin. We investigated the effectiveness in vitro of the association of essential oil/Gentamicin, against fifteen different strains of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The antibacterial effects of these oils in combination with Gentamicin were evaluated by using the MHB microdilution method, while gas chromatography (GC) and GC/Mass spectrometry were used to analyze the chemical composition of the oils. A synergistic interaction was observed against all tested strains with the associations between the essential oils Aniba rosaeodora/Gentamicin and Pelargonium graveolens/Gentamicin. In particular a very strong synergistic interaction was observed against Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606 (FIC index = 0.11). In contrast, the essential oils Origanum vulgare and Melaleuca alternifolia in association with Gentamicin were less effective on bacterial species growth. In vitro interaction can improve the antimicrobial effectiveness of the Gentamicin and may contribute to reduce its dose correlated to side effects. PMID:20666717

  18. In Vitro antibacterial and in Vivo cytotoxic activities of Grewia paniculata

    PubMed Central

    Nasrin, Mahmuda; Dash, Pritesh Ranjan; Ali, Mohammad Shawkat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Grewia paniculata (Family: Malvaceae) has been used to treat inflammation, respiratory disorders and fever. It is additionally employed for other health conditions including colds, diarrhea and as an insecticide in Bangladesh. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of different extracts of Grewia paniculata. Materials and Methods: The antibacterial activity was evaluated against both gram negative and gram positive bacteria using disc diffusion method by determination of the diameter of zone of inhibition. Cytotoxic activity was performed by brine shrimp (Artemia salina) lethality bioassay. Results: In disc diffusion method, all the natural products (400 ?g/disc) showed moderate to potent activity against all the tested bacteria. The ethanol extract of bark (EEB) and ethanol fraction of bark (EFB) (400 ?g/disc) exhibited highest activity against Shigella dysenteriae with a zone of inhibition of 23±1.63 mm and 23±1.77 mm respectively. In the brine shrimp lethality bioassay all the extracts showed moderate cytotoxic activity when compared with the standard drug vincristin sulphate. For example, LC50 value of the ethanol fraction of bark (EFB) was 3.01 ?g/ml while the LC50 of vincristine sulphate was 0.52 ?g/ml. Conclusions: The results suggest that all the natural products possess potent antibacterial and moderate cytotoxic. PMID:25949950

  19. Alternative Strategies for Proof-of-Principle Studies of Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2014-01-01

    The proof that a new antibacterial agent is not only active in vitro but also effective in vivo under clinically relevant conditions is currently provided (i) by using appropriate nonclinical models of infection and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) analysis providing evidence of the likelihood of clinical efficacy and (ii) by examining the study drug in exploratory clinical trials, as well as dose and schedule finding during phase II of clinical development. This approach is both time-consuming and costly. Furthermore, PK-PD targets for any novel antibacterial agent cannot be derived from studies with experimental animals. Therefore, alternative strategies have to be identified to prove the principle that a novel antibacterial agent is active under clinically relevant conditions. This review summarizes evidence that the quantitative analysis of shifts in the viable counts of pathogens in infected patients or the evaluation of the PD effect of an investigational agent on indicator organisms of the human resident microflora or colonizers of healthy volunteers, if paralleled with PK monitoring of serum and the target site, provides an alternative to a classical proof-of-principle study in the course of a phase II study program. PMID:24867989

  20. Antibacterial Prenylated Acylphloroglucinols from Psorothamnus fremontii.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Ravu, Ranga Rao; Xu, Qiong-Ming; Ganji, Suresh; Jacob, Melissa R; Khan, Shabana I; Yu, Bo-Yang; Li, Xing-Cong

    2015-11-25

    Psorothatins A-C (1-3), three antibacterial prenylated acylphloroglucinol derivatives, were isolated from the native American plant Psorothamnus fremontii. They feature an unusual ?,?-epoxyketone functionality and a ?-hydroxy-?,?-unsaturated ketone structural moiety. The latter forms a pseudo-six-membered heterocyclic ring due to strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding, as indicated by the long-range proton-carbon correlations in the NMR experiments. Psorothatin C (3) was the most active compound against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, with IC50 values in the range 1.4-8.8 ?g/mL. The first total synthesis of 3 described herein permits future access to structural analogues with potentially improved antibacterial activities. PMID:26469557

  1. Cytocompatibility and Antibacterial Properties of Capping Materials

    PubMed Central

    Arciola, Carla Renata; Monaco, Annachiara; Lombardini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the antimicrobial activity and cytocompatibility of six different pulp-capping materials: Dycal (Dentsply), Calcicur (Voco), Calcimol LC (Voco), TheraCal LC (Bisco), MTA Angelus (Angelus), and Biodentine (Septodont). To evaluate antimicrobial activity, materials were challenged in vitro with Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, and Streptococcus sanguis in the agar disc diffusion test. Cytocompatibility of the assayed materials towards rat MDPC-23 cells was evaluated at different times by both MTT and apoptosis assays. Results significantly differed among the different materials tested. Both bacterial growth inhibition halos and cytocompatibility performances were significantly different among materials with different composition. MTA-based products showed lower cytotoxicity and valuable antibacterial activity, different from calcium hydroxide-based materials, which exhibited not only higher antibacterial activity but also higher cytotoxicity. PMID:24959601

  2. What Makes a Natural Clay Antibacterial?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (<200 nm), illite-smectite and reduced iron phases. The role of clay minerals in the bactericidal process is to buffer the aqueous pH and oxidation state to conditions that promote Fe2+ solubility. Chemical analyses of E. coli killed by aqueous leachates of an antibacterial clay show that intracellular concentrations of Fe and P are elevated relative to controls. Phosphorus uptake by the cells supports a regulatory role of polyphosphate or phospholipids in controlling Fe2+. Fenton reaction products can degrade critical cell components, but we deduce that extracellular processes do not cause cell death. Rather, Fe2+ overwhelms outer membrane regulatory proteins and is oxidized when it enters the cell, precipitating Fe3+ and producing lethal hydroxyl radicals. PMID:21413758

  3. Glucosamine sulfate--environmental antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Rozin, Alexander P

    2009-10-01

    We have recently showed antibacterial activity against E. coli in vitro of a trademark Mega-Gluflex-containing glucosamine sulfate (GS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS). The purpose of this study was to examine the antibacterial activity of GS as a new trademark Arthryl (Manufacturer Rottapharm Ltd, Ireland; Distributor in Israel Rafa Laboratories Ltd) in vitro. We used cabbage and chicken broths and milk (every media of 20 ml) left opened for 1 week with and without Arthryl supplements 1,500 mg, the content of one package of the medication. A similar volume (20 ml) is ingested in taking the medication. Experiments with three repeatable results were taken for consideration. Arthryl inhibited environmental bacterial colonies' growth in every media but fungi growth was not impaired. Milk stayed liquid for the whole week with supplement of the Arthryl compared with sour milk transformation without Arthryl. Sample B showed inhibitory properties of the bacterial colonies on the fungi growth. The sample with Arthryl showed progressive growth of fungi without bacterial growth after 10 days of follow up compared with bacterial growth on media without Arthryl. Glucosamine sulfate as a new trademark Arthryl has environmental antibacterial properties but does not inhibit growth of fungal colonies. PMID:19495827

  4. Antibacterial efficacy of raw and processed honey.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, D P; Thakur, V; Brar, S K

    2011-01-01

    In vitro antibacterial activity of methanol, ethanol, and ethyl acetate extracts of raw and processed honey was tested against Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Micrococcus luteus) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella typhi). Both types of honey showed antibacterial activity against tested organisms with the zone of inhibition (ZOI) ranging from 6.94 to 37.94?mm, while E. coli, S. typhi, and P. aeruginosa showed that sensibility towards all the extracts with ZOI ranges between 13.09 to 37.94?mm. The methanol extract showed more potent activity than other organic extracts. Gram-negative bacteria were found to be more susceptible as compared to Gram-positive bacteria except E. faecalis. The broth microdilution assay gave minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) value of 625??g/mL, while the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) ranges between 625??g/mL 2500??g/mL. The study showed that honey has antibacterial activity (bacteriostatic and bactericidal effect), similar to antibiotics, against test organisms and provides alternative therapy against certain bacteria. PMID:21350671

  5. Honey: its medicinal property and antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Manisha Deb; Mandal, Shyamapada

    2011-01-01

    Indeed, medicinal importance of honey has been documented in the world's oldest medical literatures, and since the ancient times, it has been known to possess antimicrobial property as well as wound-healing activity. The healing property of honey is due to the fact that it offers antibacterial activity, maintains a moist wound condition, and its high viscosity helps to provide a protective barrier to prevent infection. Its immunomodulatory property is relevant to wound repair too. The antimicrobial activity in most honeys is due to the enzymatic production of hydrogen peroxide. However, another kind of honey, called non-peroxide honey (viz., manuka honey), displays significant antibacterial effects even when the hydrogen peroxide activity is blocked. Its mechanism may be related to the low pH level of honey and its high sugar content (high osmolarity) that is enough to hinder the growth of microbes. The medical grade honeys have potent in vitro bactericidal activity against antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing several life-threatening infections to humans. But, there is a large variation in the antimicrobial activity of some natural honeys, which is due to spatial and temporal variation in sources of nectar. Thus, identification and characterization of the active principle(s) may provide valuable information on the quality and possible therapeutic potential of honeys (against several health disorders of humans), and hence we discussed the medicinal property of honeys with emphasis on their antibacterial activities. PMID:23569748

  6. Fabrication of magnetite-based core-shell coated nanoparticles with antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Grumezescu, A M; Cristescu, R; Chifiriuc, M C; Dorcioman, G; Socol, G; Mihailescu, I N; Mihaiescu, D E; Ficai, A; Vasile, O R; Enculescu, M; Chrisey, D B

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of biofunctionalized magnetite core/sodium lauryl sulfate shell/antibiotic adsorption-shell nanoparticles assembled thin coatings by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation for antibacterial drug-targeted delivery. Magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized and subsequently characterized by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The obtained thin coatings have been investigated by FTIR and scanning electron microscope, and tested by in vitro biological assays, for their influence on in vitro bacterial biofilm development and cytotoxicity on human epidermoid carcinoma (HEp2) cells. PMID:25797361

  7. Antibacterial activity of traditional medicinal plants used by Haudenosaunee peoples of New York State

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance, as well as the evolution of new strains of disease causing agents, is of great concern to the global health community. Our ability to effectively treat disease is dependent on the development of new pharmaceuticals, and one potential source of novel drugs is traditional medicine. This study explores the antibacterial properties of plants used in Haudenosaunee traditional medicine. We tested the hypothesis that extracts from Haudenosaunee medicinal plants used to treat symptoms often caused by bacterial infection would show antibacterial properties in laboratory assays, and that these extracts would be more effective against moderately virulent bacteria than less virulent bacteria. Methods After identification and harvesting, a total of 57 different aqueous extractions were made from 15 plant species. Nine plant species were used in Haudenosaunee medicines and six plant species, of which three are native to the region and three are introduced, were not used in traditional medicine. Antibacterial activity against mostly avirulent (Escherichia coli, Streptococcus lactis) and moderately virulent (Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus) microbes was inferred through replicate disc diffusion assays; and observed and statistically predicted MIC values were determined through replicate serial dilution assays. Results Although there was not complete concordance between the traditional use of Haudenosaunee medicinal plants and antibacterial activity, our data support the hypothesis that the selection and use of these plants to treat disease was not random. In particular, four plant species exhibited antimicrobial properties as expected (Achillea millefolium, Ipomoea pandurata, Hieracium pilosella, and Solidago canadensis), with particularly strong effectiveness against S. typhimurium. In addition, extractions from two of the introduced species (Hesperis matronalis and Rosa multiflora) were effective against this pathogen. Conclusions Our data suggest that further screening of plants used in traditional Haudenosaunee medicine is warranted, and we put forward several species for further investigation of activity against S. typhimurium (A. millefolium, H. matronalis, I. pandurata, H. pilosella, R. multiflora, S. canadensis). PMID:21054887

  8. Drug-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Cock, Hannah R

    2015-08-01

    Drug-induced status epilepticus (SE) is a relatively uncommon phenomenon, probably accounting for less than 5% of all SE cases, although limitations in case ascertainment and establishing causation substantially weaken epidemiological estimates. Some antiepileptic drugs, particularly those with sodium channel or GABA(?-aminobutyric acid)-ergic properties, frequently exacerbate seizures and may lead to SE if used inadvertently in generalized epilepsies or less frequently in other epilepsies. Tiagabine seems to have a particular propensity for triggering nonconvulsive SE sometimes in patients with no prior history of seizures. In therapeutic practice, SE is most commonly seen in association with antibiotics (cephalosporins, quinolones, and some others) and immunotherapies/chemotherapies, the latter often in the context of a reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Status epilepticus following accidental or intentional overdoses, particularly of antidepressants or other psychotropic medications, has also featured prominently in the literature: whilst there are sometimes fatal consequences, this is more commonly because of cardiorespiratory or metabolic complications than as a result of seizure activity. A high index of suspicion is required in identifying those at risk and in recognizing potential clues from the presentation, but even with a careful analysis of patient and drug factors, establishing causation can be difficult. In addition to eliminating the potential trigger, management should be as for SE in any other circumstances, with the exception that phenobarbitone is recommended as a second-line treatment for suspected toxicity-related SE where the risk of cardiovascular complications is higher anyways and may be exacerbated by phenytoin. There are also specific recommendations/antidotes in some situations. The outcome of drug-induced status epilepticus is mostly good when promptly identified and treated, though less so in the context of overdoses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". PMID:26210064

  9. Club Drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rohypnol, ketamine, as well as MDMA (ecstasy) and methamphetamine ( Drug Facts: Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug ... Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2010). Methamphetamine is a powerfully addictive stimulant associated with serious ...

  10. Concentration Ranges of Antibacterial Cations for Showing the Highest Antibacterial Efficacy but the Least Cytotoxicity against Mammalian Cells: Implications for a New Antibacterial Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chengyun; Wang, Xiaolan; Li, Lihua; Zhu, Ye; Li, Mei; Yu, Peng; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Zhengnan; Chen, Junqi; Tan, Guoxin; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yingjun; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-09-21

    Antibacterial metal ions, such as Ag(+), Zn(2+) and Cu(2+), have been extensively used in medical implants and devices due to their strong broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. However, it is still a controversial issue as to whether they can show the desired antibacterial activity while being toxic to mammalian cells. It is very important to balance their antibacterial effectiveness with minimal damage to mammalian cells. Toward this end, this study is to identify the suitable concentrations of these three ions at which they can effectively kill two types of clinically relevant bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli)) but show no obvious cytotoxicity on fibroblasts. Such concentration ranges are found to be 2.5 × 10(-7) M-10(-6) M, 10(-5) M-10(-4) M, and 10(-5) M-10(-4) M for Ag(+), Zn(2+), and Cu(2+), respectively. Investigation of their antibacterial mechanism shows that these three metal ions all show antibacterial property through a mechanism of damaging bacterial cell membranes by the generation of reactive oxygen species but surprisingly preserving the integrity of bacterial genomic DNA. The encouraging results indicate that antibacterial metal ions with controlled concentrations can bring considerable benefits to biomedical applications. PMID:26258952

  11. Bay Y 3118, a new quinolone derivative, rapidly eradicates Listeria monocytogenes from infected mice and L929 cells.

    PubMed

    Nichterlein, T; Kretschmar, M; Budeanu, C; Bauer, J; Linss, W; Hof, H

    1994-07-01

    Bay Y 3118 is a new quinolone derivative with pronounced activity against gram-positive bacteria including the facultatively intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. Bay Y 3118 was tested in vitro and in animal models of listeriosis. All strains of L. monocytogenes and other Listeria spp. were highly susceptible in vitro; the MICs for these organisms ranged from 0.062 to 0.25 micrograms/ml. Bay Y 3118 was rapidly bactericidal in vitro, with a postantibiotic effect occurring for 3 h after removal of the antibiotic. L. monocytogenes was eliminated from infected L929 cells treated with Bay Y 3118, suggesting a bactericidal effect on the listeriae in these cells. Immunocompetent mice were rapidly cured by treatment with 4 mg every 12 h. Concomitantly, the levels of interleukin 6 and gamma interferon in mouse sera declined rapidly. In immunocompetent mice, treatment with 2 mg of Bay Y 3118 every 12 h resulted in a greater initial reduction in the listerial counts in the organs than treatment with 2 mg of ampicillin every 12 h. Bay Y 3118 completely eliminated L. monocytogenes from the livers and spleens of chronically infected nude mice. However, some of the bacteria reappeared after the cessation of therapy. In conclusion, Bay Y 3118 is an excellent candidate substance for the therapy of infections caused by facultatively intracellular gram-positive bacteria such as L. monocytogenes. PMID:7979279

  12. Bay Y 3118, a new quinolone derivative, rapidly eradicates Listeria monocytogenes from infected mice and L929 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nichterlein, T; Kretschmar, M; Budeanu, C; Bauer, J; Linss, W; Hof, H

    1994-01-01

    Bay Y 3118 is a new quinolone derivative with pronounced activity against gram-positive bacteria including the facultatively intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. Bay Y 3118 was tested in vitro and in animal models of listeriosis. All strains of L. monocytogenes and other Listeria spp. were highly susceptible in vitro; the MICs for these organisms ranged from 0.062 to 0.25 micrograms/ml. Bay Y 3118 was rapidly bactericidal in vitro, with a postantibiotic effect occurring for 3 h after removal of the antibiotic. L. monocytogenes was eliminated from infected L929 cells treated with Bay Y 3118, suggesting a bactericidal effect on the listeriae in these cells. Immunocompetent mice were rapidly cured by treatment with 4 mg every 12 h. Concomitantly, the levels of interleukin 6 and gamma interferon in mouse sera declined rapidly. In immunocompetent mice, treatment with 2 mg of Bay Y 3118 every 12 h resulted in a greater initial reduction in the listerial counts in the organs than treatment with 2 mg of ampicillin every 12 h. Bay Y 3118 completely eliminated L. monocytogenes from the livers and spleens of chronically infected nude mice. However, some of the bacteria reappeared after the cessation of therapy. In conclusion, Bay Y 3118 is an excellent candidate substance for the therapy of infections caused by facultatively intracellular gram-positive bacteria such as L. monocytogenes. Images PMID:7979279

  13. Plasmin digest of ?-casein as a source of antibacterial peptides.

    PubMed

    Sedaghati, Marjaneh; Ezzatpanah, Hamid; Boojar, Masoud Mashhadi Akbar; Ebrahimi, Maryam Tajabadi; Aminafshar, Mehdi

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the antibacterial properties of plasmin, the plasmin hydrolysis of bovine ?-casein and the fractions (named ?C1, ?C2, ?C3, ?C4, and ?C5) liberated from it using RP-HPLC. The target bacteria were Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus (pathogenic), Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus acidophilus (probiotic). Three peptides (kC1, kC3, and kC4) were found to have antibacterial activity, with ?C3 peptide being the most active. The plasmin digest of bovine ?-casein proved to be stronger than any of its fractions in terms of antibacterial potential. Measurement of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) showed that Gram-positive bacteria are generally more sensitive to antibacterial activity than Gram-negative bacteria. The MIC of nisin, as a bacteriocin peptide, was also measured. The three antibacterial peptides were identified using LC-Mass. The molecular mass of kC1, kC3, and kC4 corresponded to the f(17-21), f(22-24), and f(1-3) of bovine ?-casein, respectively. It was also found that the positive charge and hydrophobicity of a peptide are not key factors in antibacterial activity. On the whole, the present study demonstrated that the plasmin digest of ?-casein has a high antibacterial potential and can be considered as a natural antibacterial agent in the food chain. PMID:24642261

  14. Antibacterial activity of metal complexes of benzil and benzoin thiosemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Offiong, O E; Martelli, S

    1994-01-01

    The metal (II) complexes of benzyl and benzoin thiosemicarbazones have been synthesized and characterized. They were studied for their antibacterial, antifungal and amoebicidal activity in vitro and for their toxicity in vivo. The ligands and their metal complexes exhibited low antibacterial and amoebicidal activity. The metal chelates of benzoin thiosemicarbazone seem to be the most active compounds. PMID:7945719

  15. Flame retardant antibacterial cotton high-loft nonwoven fabrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flame retardant treated gray cotton fibers were blended with antibacterial treated gray cotton fibers and polyester/polyester sheath/core bicomponent fibers to form high-loft fabrics. The high flame retardancy (FR) and antibacterial property of these high lofts were evaluated by limiting oxygen inde...

  16. Artificial activation of toxinantitoxin systems as an antibacterial strategy

    E-print Network

    Hergenrother, Paul J.

    Artificial activation of toxin­antitoxin systems as an antibacterial strategy Julia J. Williams1 genomes has been revealed. The exploitation of TA systems as an antibacterial strategy via artificial advances, and challenges associated with artificial toxin activation. Toxin­antitoxin systems

  17. TESTING FOR ANTIBACTERIAL PROPERTIES OF COTTON/FLAX DENIM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The AATCC Test Method 100-1999,"Antibacterial Finishes on Textile Materials: Assessment of", was adapted to the resources available to our laboratory in order to measure the antimicrobial properties of fabric made from flax and cotton blends. The general method for assessing the antibacterial tende...

  18. Synthesis and characterization of antibacterial dental monomers and composites

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yapin; Liao, Sumei; Wen, Zezhang T.; Fan, Yuwei

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to synthesize antibacterial methacrylate and methacrylamide monomers and formulate antibacterial fluoride-releasing dental composites. Three antibacterial methacrylate or methacrylamide monomers containing long-chain quaternary ammonium fluoride, 1,2-methacrylamido-N,N,N-trimethyldodecan-1-aminium fluoride (monomer I), N-benzyl-11-(methacryloyloxy)-N,N-dimethylundecan-1-aminium fluoride (monomer II), and methacryloxyldecylpyridinium fluoride (monomer III) have been synthesized and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS). The cytotoxicity test and bactericidal test against Streptococcus mutans indicate that antibacterial monomer II is superior to monomers I and III. A series of dental composites containing 0–6% of antibacterial monomer II have been formulated and tested for degree of conversion (DC), flexure strength, water sorption, solubility, and inhibition of S. mutans biofilms. An antibacterial fluoride-releasing dental composite has also been formulated and tested for flexure strength and fluoride release. The dental composite containing 3% of monomer II has a significant effect against S. mutans biofilm formation without major adverse effects on its physical and mechanical properties. The new antibacterial monomers can be used together with the fluoride-releasing monomers containing a ternary zirconiun- fluoride chelate to formulate a new antibacterial fluoride- releasing dental composite. Such a new dental composite is expected to have higher anticaries efficacy and longer service life. PMID:22447582

  19. Promises and failures of gallium as an antibacterial agent.

    PubMed

    Minandri, Fabrizia; Bonchi, Carlo; Frangipani, Emanuela; Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Gallium has a long history as a diagnostic and chemotherapeutic agent. The pharmacological properties of Ga(III) rely on chemical mimicry; when Ga(III) is exogenously supplied to living cells it can replace Fe(III) within target molecules, thereby perturbing bacterial metabolism. Ga(III)-induced metabolic distresses are dramatic in fast-growing cells, like bacterial cells. Interest in the antibacterial properties of Ga(III) has been raised by the compelling need for novel drugs to combat multidrug-resistant bacteria and by the shortage of new antibiotic candidates in the pharmaceutical pipeline. Ga(III) activity has been demonstrated, both in vitro and in animal models of infections, on several bacterial pathogens, also including intracellular and biofilm-forming bacteria. Ga(III) activity is affected by iron availability and the metabolic state of the cell, being maximal in iron-poor media and in respiring cells. Synergism between Ga(III) and antibiotics holds promise as last resort therapy for infections sustained by pandrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:24762310

  20. Exploring anti-bacterial compounds against intracellular Legionella.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher F; Kicka, Sébastien; Trofimov, Valentin; Berschl, Kathrin; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Ackermann, Nikolaus; Hedberg, Christian; Cosson, Pierre; Soldati, Thierry; Hilbi, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous fresh-water bacterium which reproduces within its erstwhile predators, environmental amoeba, by subverting the normal pathway of phagocytosis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms which confer resistance to amoeba are apparently conserved and also allow replication within macrophages. Thus, L. pneumophila can act as an 'accidental' human pathogen and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. The intracellular localisation of L. pneumophila protects it from some antibiotics, and this fact must be taken into account to develop new anti-bacterial compounds. In addition, the intracellular lifestyle of L. pneumophila may render the bacteria susceptible to compounds diminishing bacterial virulence and decreasing intracellular survival and replication of this pathogen. The development of a single infection cycle intracellular replication assay using GFP-producing L. pneumophila and Acanthamoebacastellanii amoeba is reported here. This fluorescence-based assay allows for continuous monitoring of intracellular replication rates, revealing the effect of bacterial gene deletions or drug treatment. To examine how perturbations of the host cell affect L. pneumophila replication, several known host-targeting compounds were tested, including modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, vesicle scission and Ras GTPase localisation. Our results reveal a hitherto unrealized potential antibiotic property of the ?-lactone-based Ras depalmitoylation inhibitor palmostatin M, but not the closely related inhibitor palmostatin B. Further characterisation indicated that this compound caused specific growth inhibition of Legionella and Mycobacterium species, suggesting that it may act on a common bacterial target. PMID:24058631

  1. Antibacterial Activity of and Resistance to Small Molecule Inhibitors of the ClpP Peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Corey L.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Sauer, Robert T.; Sello, Jason K.

    2014-01-01

    There is rapidly mounting evidence that intracellular proteases in bacteria are compelling targets for antibacterial drugs. Multiple reports suggest that the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other actinobacteria may be particularly sensitive to small molecules that perturb the activities of self-compartmentalized peptidases, which catalyze intracellular protein turnover as components of ATP-dependent proteolytic machines. Here, we report chemical syntheses and evaluations of structurally diverse ?-lactones, which have a privileged structure for selective, suicide inhibition of the self-compartmentalized ClpP peptidase. ?-lactones with certain substituents on the ?- and ?-carbons were found to be toxic to M. tuberculosis. Using an affinity-labeled analog of a bioactive ?-lactone in a series of chemical proteomic experiments, we selectively captured the ClpP1P2 peptidase from live cultures of two different actinobacteria that are related to M. tuberculosis. Importantly, we found that the growth inhibitory ?-lactones also inactivate the M. tuberculosis ClpP1P2 peptidase in vitro via formation of a covalent adduct at the ClpP2 catalytic serine. Given the potent antibacterial activity of these compounds and their medicinal potential, we sought to identify innate mechanisms of resistance. Using a genome mining strategy, we identified a genetic determinant of ?-lactone resistance in Streptomyces coelicolor, a non-pathogenic relative of M. tuberculosis. Collectively, these findings validate the potential of ClpP inhibition as a strategy in antibacterial drug development and define a mechanism by which bacteria could resist the toxic effects of ClpP inhibitors. PMID:24047344

  2. Methyl-Hydroxylamine as an Efficacious Antibacterial Agent That Targets the Ribonucleotide Reductase Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Julián, Esther; Baelo, Aida; Gavaldà, Joan; Torrents, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria has encouraged vigorous efforts to develop antimicrobial agents with new mechanisms of action. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is a key enzyme in DNA replication that acts by converting ribonucleotides into the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA replication and repair. RNR has been extensively studied as an ideal target for DNA inhibition, and several drugs that are already available on the market are used for anticancer and antiviral activity. However, the high toxicity of these current drugs to eukaryotic cells does not permit their use as antibacterial agents. Here, we present a radical scavenger compound that inhibited bacterial RNR, and the compound's activity as an antibacterial agent together with its toxicity in eukaryotic cells were evaluated. First, the efficacy of N-methyl-hydroxylamine (M-HA) in inhibiting the growth of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was demonstrated, and no effect on eukaryotic cells was observed. M-HA showed remarkable efficacy against Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, given the M-HA activity against these two bacteria, our results showed that M-HA has intracellular antimycobacterial activity against BCG-infected macrophages, and it is efficacious in partially disassembling and inhibiting the further formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Furthermore, M-HA and ciprofloxacin showed a synergistic effect that caused a massive reduction in a P. aeruginosa biofilm. Overall, our results suggest the vast potential of M-HA as an antibacterial agent, which acts by specifically targeting a bacterial RNR enzyme. PMID:25782003

  3. Antibacterial properties of Ag nanoparticle loaded multilayers and formation of magnetically directed antibacterial microparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daeyeon; Cohen, Robert E; Rubner, Michael F

    2005-10-11

    Antibacterial coatings based on hydrogen-bonded multilayers containing in situ synthesized Ag nanoparticles were created on planar surfaces and on magnetic colloidal particles. We report the antibacterial properties of these coatings, determined using a disk-diffusion (Kirby-Bauer) test, as a function of the film thickness and the concentration of Ag nanoparticles in the hydrogen-bonded multilayers. The zone of inhibition (ZoI) determined by the disk-diffusion test increases as the thickness of the multilayer film is increased. Results obtained for the values of the ZoI as a function of film thickness can be described adequately with a simple diffusion model (i.e., the square of the zone of inhibition (ZoI) depended linearly on the logarithm of the thickness of the silver-loaded films). This observation suggests that, in order to incrementally increase the ZoI, an exponentially increasing amount of Ag is required within the multilayers. In general, there was no statistically significant correlation between the zone of inhibition and the number of Ag loading and reduction cycles. The duration of sustained release of antibacterial Ag ions from these coatings, however, could be prolonged by increasing the total supply of zerovalent silver in the films via multiple loading and reduction cycles. These results indicate that the release of silver is controlled by an oxidation mechanism at the surface of the nanoparticles and that repeated loading and reduction of silver leads preferentially to growth of the existing silver nanoparticles in the film as opposed to nucleation of new Ag nanoparticles. We also show that magnetic microspheres coated with silver nanoparticle loaded hydrogen-bonded multilayer thin films can be used to deliver antibacterial agents to specific locations. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nanocomposite coated microspheres was determined by the agar dilution technique: antibacterial magnetic microspheres with higher concentrations of Ag nanoparticles exhibited lower MIC values. PMID:16207049

  4. Developing of a novel antibacterial agent by functionalization of graphene oxide with guanidine polymer with enhanced antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Sun, Shiyu; Dong, Alideertu; Hao, Yanping; Shi, Shuangqiang; Sun, Zijia; Gao, Ge; Chen, Yuxin

    2015-11-01

    New materials with excellent antibacterial activity attract numerous research interests. Herein, a facile synthetic method of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride (PHGC) dual-polymer-functionalized graphene oxide (GO) (GO-PEG-PHGC), a novel antibacterial material, was reported. The as-prepared products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray pattern (XRD) and elemental analysis. The antibacterial effect on the bacterial strain was investigated by incubating both Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). The results show that GO-PEG-PHGC has enhanced antibacterial activity when compared to GO, GO-PEG or GO-PHGC alone. The improved antibacterial activity was described to be related to a better dispersion of GO-PEG-PHGC in the presence of PEG. This better dispersion leads to a greater contact between the bacteria membrane and nanomaterials, therefore leading to greater cell damage. Not only Gram-negative bacteria but also Gram-positive bacteria are greatly inhibited by this antibacterial agent. With the powerful antibacterial activity as well as its low cost and facile preparation, the GO-PEG-PHGC as a novel antibacterial agent can find potential application in the areas of healthcare and environmental engineering.

  5. What makes a natural clay antibacterial?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Port-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical analyses of E. coli killed by aqueous leachates of an antibacterial clay show that intracellular concentrations of Fe and P are elevated relative to controls. Phosphorus uptake by the cells supports a regulatory role of polyphosphate or phospholipids in controlling Fe2+. Fenton reaction products can degrade critical cell components, but we deduce that extracellular processes do not cause cell death. Rather, Fe2+ overwhelms outer membrane regulatory proteins and is oxidized when it enters the cell, precipitating Fe3+ and producing lethal hydroxyl radicals.

  6. Antibacterial efficiency of vermiculite/chlorhexidine nanocomposites and results of the in vivo test of harmlessness of vermiculite.

    PubMed

    Holešová, Sylva; Stembírek, Jan; Bartošová, Ladislava; Pražanová, Gabriela; Valášková, Marta; Samlíková, Magda; Pazdziora, Erich

    2014-09-01

    Clay minerals have been proposed as very useful materials for modulating drug delivery. These are the commonly used materials in pharmaceutical production both as inorganic carriers or active agents. We focused on the development of suitable long-acting material for local treatment of oral infection where clay minerals act as inorganic drug carriers. Organovermiculites with antibacterial activity were prepared by ion exchange reactions using different concentrations of chlorhexidine diacetate. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermal analysis (TGA). The antibacterial activity was evaluated by finding the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). All studied organoclays possessed good antibacterial activity after 24h exposure against Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and particularly against Staphylococcus aureus. Pseudomonas aeruginosa however proved very resistant as only the sample with the highest concentration of CA that successfully inhibited bacterial growth. Furthermore, clay mineral vermiculite was subjected to in vivo toxicological analysis and its influence on gastrointestinal tract during its oral application was investigated. Tissue samples from buccal mucosa, tongue, esophagus, stomach, terminal duodenum, small intestine, caecum, distal colon and liver were subjected to histological examination, both macroscopically and microscopically. Neither systemic nor local reactions were observed. Therefore the toxicity of vermiculite to a mammal model organism can be excluded. PMID:25063143

  7. Development of biodegradable antibacterial cellulose based hydrogel membranes for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Laçin, Nelisa Türko?lu

    2014-06-01

    Cellulose-based hydrogels have wide applications in tissue engineering and controlled delivery systems. In this study, chloramphenicol (CAP) loaded 2,3 dialdehyde cellulose (DABC) hydrogel membranes were prepared, characterized and their antibacterial efficacy was evaluated. Bacterial cellulose (BC) secreted by Acetobacter xylinum was modified to become DABC by oxidation via the sodium metaperiodate method. CAP-BC and CAP-DABC interactions were illustrated via ATR-FTIR analysis. Water retention capacity of BC and DABC membranes were determined as 65.6±1.6% and 5.3±0.3%, respectively. CAP release profiles were determined via HPLC analysis. The drug-loading capacities of BC and DABC membranes were 5mg/cm(2) and 0.1mg/cm(2), respectively. Membranes released 99-99.5% of the contained CAP within 24h and an initial burst release effect was not observed. In vitro antibacterial tests of BC and DABC, both CAP-loaded, demonstrated their ability to inhibit bacterial growth for a prolonged duration. Antimicrobial effect against bacteria was still prevalent after 3 days of incubation period with disc diffusion tests. The MTT test results reveal that fibroblast adhesion and proliferation on CAP-loaded DABC membranes were noticeably higher than CAP-loaded BC membrane. This newly developed drug containing DABC membranes seem to be highly suitable for wound healing due to its unique properties of biodegradability, biocompatibility, and antimicrobial effectiveness. PMID:24631550

  8. Discovery of Antibacterial Biotin Carboxylase Inhibitors by Virtual Screening and Fragment-Based Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Mochalkin, Igor; Miller, J. Richard; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Thanabal, Venkataraman; Erdman, Paul; Cox, Philip B.; Prasad, J.V.N. Vara; Lightle, Sandra; Huband, Michael D.; Stover, C. Kendall; Pfizer

    2009-07-24

    As part of our effort to inhibit bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis through the recently validated target biotin carboxylase, we employed a unique combination of two emergent lead discovery strategies. We used both de novo fragment-based drug discovery and virtual screening, which employs 3D shape and electrostatic property similarity searching. We screened a collection of unbiased low-molecular-weight molecules and identified a structurally diverse collection of weak-binding but ligand-efficient fragments as potential building blocks for biotin carboxylase ATP-competitive inhibitors. Through iterative cycles of structure-based drug design relying on successive fragment costructures, we improved the potency of the initial hits by up to 3000-fold while maintaining their ligand-efficiency and desirable physicochemical properties. In one example, hit-expansion efforts resulted in a series of amino-oxazoles with antibacterial activity. These results successfully demonstrate that virtual screening approaches can substantially augment fragment-based screening approaches to identify novel antibacterial agents.

  9. Enhanced Cellular Cytotoxicity and Antibacterial Activity of 18-?-Glycyrrhetinic Acid by Albumin-conjugated PLGA Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Darvishi, B; Manoochehri, S; Esfandyari-Manesh, M; Samadi, N; Amini, M; Atyabi, F; Dinarvand, R

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to encapsulate 18-?-Glycyrrhetinic acid (GLA) in albumin conjugated poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles by a modified nanoprecipitation method. Nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by different drug to polymer ratios, human serum albumin (HSA) content, dithiothreitol (as producer of free thiol groups) content, and acetone (as non-solvent in nanoprecipitation). NPs with a size ranging from 126 to 174?nm were achieved. The highest entrapment efficiency (89.4±4.2%) was achieved when the ratio of drug to polymer was 1:4. The zeta potential of NPs was fairly negative (-8 to -12). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry proved the conjugation of HSA to PLGA NPs. In vitro release profile of NPs showed 2 phases: an initial burst for 4?h (34-49%) followed by a slow release pattern up to the end. The antibacterial effects of NPs against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were studied by microdilution method. The GLA-loaded NPs showed more antibacterial effect than pure GLA (2-4 times). The anticancer MTT test revealed that GLA-loaded NPs were approximately 9 times more effective than pure GLA in Hep G2 cells. PMID:25607747

  10. Comparative Analysis of Viperidae Venoms Antibacterial Profile: a Short Communication for Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Bruno L.; Santos, Dilvani O.; dos Santos, André Luis; Rodrigues, Carlos R.; de Freitas, Cícero C.; Cabral, Lúcio M.; Castro, Helena C.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial infections involving multidrug-resistant strains are one of the ten leading causes of death and an important health problem in need for new antibacterial sources and agents. Herein, we tested and compared four snake venoms (Agkistrodon rhodostoma, Bothrops jararaca, B. atrox and Lachesis muta) against 10 Gram-positive and Gram-negative drug-resistant clinical bacteria strains to identify them as new sources of potential antibacterial molecules. Our data revealed that, as efficient as some antibiotics currently on the market (minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 1–32 ?g mL?1), A. rhodostoma and B. atrox venoms were active against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis (MIC = 4.5 ?g mL?1), while B. jararaca inhibited S. aureus growth (MIC = 13 ?g ml?1). As genomic and proteomic technologies are improving and developing rapidly, our results suggested that A. rhodostoma, B. atrox and B. jararaca venoms and glands are feasible sources for searching antimicrobial prototypes for future design new antibiotics against drug-resistant clinical bacteria. They also point to an additional perspective to fully identify the pharmacological potential of these venoms by using different techniques. PMID:18955360

  11. [Brown Seaweeds as a Source of New Pharmaceutical Substances with Antibacterial Action].

    PubMed

    Besednova, N N; Kuznetsova, T A; Zaporozhets, T S; Zvyagintseva, T N

    2015-01-01

    At present the increase of antibiotic resistance in infection agents to antimicrobial drugs requires discovery of new antimicrobial substances with improved pharmacological properties and novel mechanisms of action, to which microorganisms do not develop resistance. Three areas are of interest for the search: recovery of new compounds from natural objects, including aquatic organisms, chemical modification of the known antibiotic molecules, discovery of compounds with antimicrobial activity among some new chemical structures which have no analogues in nature. The review is mainly concerned with discussion of antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal activity of sulfated polysaccharides (fucoidans) and extracts of brown, red and green algae, as well as of antioxidant, antiinflammatory, immunomodulatory and antiendotoxin properties that contribute to their antiinfective action. Such an activity makes fucoidans promising as a basis for developing new drugs for therapy of infectious diseases. PMID:26415381

  12. (Dis)similar Analogues of Riboswitch Metabolites as Antibacterial Lead Compounds.

    PubMed

    Matzner, Daniel; Mayer, Günter

    2015-04-23

    The rise of antimicrobial resistance in human pathogenic bacteria has increased the necessity for the discovery of novel, yet unexplored antibacterial drug targets. Riboswitches, which are embedded in untranslated regions of bacterial messenger RNA (mRNA), represent such an interesting target structure. These RNA elements regulate gene expression upon binding to natural metabolites, second messengers, and inorganic ions, such as fluoride with high affinity and in a highly discriminative manner. Recently, efforts have been directed toward the identification of artificial riboswitch activators by establishing high-throughput screening assays, fragment-based screening, and structure-guided ligand design approaches. Emphasis in this review is placed on the special requirements and synthesis of new potential antibiotic drugs that target riboswitches in which dissimilarity is an important aspect in the design of potential lead compounds. PMID:25603286

  13. Synthesis, characterization, controlled release, and antibacterial studies of a novel streptomycin chitosan magnetic nanoantibiotic

    PubMed Central

    Hussein-Al-Ali, Samer Hasan; Zowalaty, Mohamed Ezzat El; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Ismail, Maznah; Webster, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the preparation, characterization, and controlled release of a streptomycin-chitosan-magnetic nanoparticle-based antibiotic in an effort to improve the treatment of bacterial infections. Specifically, chitosan-magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by an incorporation method and were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and vibrating sample magnetometry. Streptomycin was incorporated into the nanoparticles to form a streptomycin-coated chitosan-magnetic nanoparticle (Strep-CS-MNP) nanocomposite. The release profiles showed an initially fast release, which became slower as time progressed. The percentage of drug released after 350 minutes was around 100%, and the best fit mathematical model for drug release was the pseudo-second order model. The Strep-CS-MNP nanocomposite showed enhanced antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This study forms a significant basis for further investigation of the Strep-CS-MNP nanocomposite in the treatment of various bacterial infections. PMID:24549109

  14. Drug allergies

    MedlinePLUS

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... Adverse reactions to drugs are common. (adverse means unwanted or unexpected.) Almost any drug can cause an adverse reaction. Reactions range from irritating ...

  15. Dissemination of Extended-Spectrum ?-Lactamases and Quinolone Resistance Genes Among Clinical Isolates of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sedighi, Iraj; Arabestani, Mohammad Reza; Rahimbakhsh, Ali; Karimitabar, Zahra; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common childhood bacterial infections and Escherichia coli is the major pathogen. Producing ?-lactamase enzymes are the most common mechanism of bacterial resistance. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of Extended-Spectrum ?-Lactamases (ESBLs) and Quinolone Resistance (qnr) genes in E. coli strains isolated from UTIs. Materials and Methods: In this study, a total of 120 isolates of E. coli from urinary tract infections of the children were collected at Besat Hospital in Hamadan, Iran, from October 2010 to October 2011. The bacterial isolates were identified by standard biochemical methods. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined by disk diffusion method, and ESBLs-producing was confirmed phenotypically using the double-disk synergy (DDS) test. The presence and identification of ESBLs and qnr genes were determined by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Results: The highest sensitivity was seen to imipenem (96.7%), amikacin (92.5%), nitrofurantoin (93.3%), ofloxacin (81.7%), gentamicin norfloxacin (70.8%), and ciprofloxacin (79.2%). In contrast, the highest rate of resistance was seen to co-trimoxazole (77%) and nalidixic acid (40.9%). The results showed that 6 (2.18%) and 4 (1.12%) isolates of ESBL-producing E. coli were positive with respect to having qnrB and qnrS genes, respectively. No isolates was found to have qnrA. Conclusions: CTX-M was the most prevalent ESBL genotype in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) isolated from UTI. In addition, a high frequency of qnr genes among ESBL-producing E. coli was identified in this study. In order to avoid treatment failures, we recommend using phenotypic and molecular methods to diagnose these enzymes and qnr genes. PMID:26421128

  16. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of 1-Hydroxy-2-Alkyl-4(1H)Quinolone Derivatives against Toxoplasma gondii?

    PubMed Central

    Bajohr, Lara Liv; Ma, Ling; Platte, Christian; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Tietze, Lutz F.; Groß, Uwe; Bohne, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    1-Hydroxy-2-dodecyl-4(1H)quinolone (HDQ) was recently identified as a Toxoplasma gondii inhibitor. We describe here two novel 1-hydroxyquinolones, which displayed 50% inhibitory concentrations 10- and 5-fold lower than that of HDQ. In a mouse model of acute toxoplasmosis, these two compounds and HDQ reduced the percentages of infected peritoneal cells and decreased the parasite loads in lungs and livers. Compound B showed a tendency toward lowering parasite loads in brains in a mouse model of toxoplasmic encephalitis. PMID:19884369

  17. In vitro and in vivo activities of 1-hydroxy-2-alkyl-4(1H)quinolone derivatives against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Bajohr, Lara Liv; Ma, Ling; Platte, Christian; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Tietze, Lutz F; Gross, Uwe; Bohne, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    1-Hydroxy-2-dodecyl-4(1H)quinolone (HDQ) was recently identified as a Toxoplasma gondii inhibitor. We describe here two novel 1-hydroxyquinolones, which displayed 50% inhibitory concentrations 10- and 5-fold lower than that of HDQ. In a mouse model of acute toxoplasmosis, these two compounds and HDQ reduced the percentages of infected peritoneal cells and decreased the parasite loads in lungs and livers. Compound B showed a tendency toward lowering parasite loads in brains in a mouse model of toxoplasmic encephalitis. PMID:19884369

  18. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activities of Antibacterial Peptides with a Spiropyran Fluorescence Probe

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Zhu, Yu; Yang, Danling; Zou, Rongfeng; Wu, Junchen; Tian, He

    2014-01-01

    In this report, antibacterial peptides1-3 were prepared with a spiropyran fluorescence probe. The probe exhibits a change in fluorescence when isomerized from a colorless spiro-form (spiropyran, Sp) to a colored open-form (merocyanine, Mc) under different chemical environments, which can be used to study the mechanism of antimicrobial activity. Peptides 1-3 exhibit a marked decrease in antimicrobial activity with increasing alkyl chain length. This is likely due to the Sp-Mc isomers in different polar environments forming different aggregate sizes in TBS, as demonstrated by time-dependent dynamic light scattering (DLS). Moreover, peptides 1-3 exhibited low cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity. These probe-modified peptides may provide a novel approach to study the effect of structural changes on antibacterial activity, thus facilitating the design of new antimicrobial agents to combat bacterial infection. PMID:25358905

  19. Analysis of the phenotypes in field populations of Eimeria acervulina expressing dual drug-resistance to decoquinate and clopidol.

    PubMed

    Williams, R B

    1998-01-01

    Two strains of Eimeria acervulina were derived from samples collected from broiler houses where chicken flocks were being medicated with decoquinate (a quinolone); previous flocks in the same houses had been medicated with clopidol (a pyridone). The strains were found to be resistant to both drugs. In the laboratory, a dichotomous series of selection passages through chicks medicated with decoquinate or clopidol was used to demonstrate that both the original field populations of E, acervulina included at least some parasites that expressed simultaneous resistance to both drugs, rather than comprising subpopula-tions that were each resistant only to one drug or the other. This is the first time that a phenotypic analysis of the individuals in an eimerian population has been carried out. The relevance of this finding to the efficacy of Lerbek, a synergistic mixture of clopidol and methyl benzoquate (another quinolone), originally introduced in an attempt to delay the emergence of drug-resistant coccidia, is discussed. It is concluded that Lerbek would have been completely effective if resistance to neither of its components had already emerged before Lerbek was launched; some efficacy would also have been retained if resistance to only one of its components had already developed. However, if resistance to both components had already developed, the dual resistance of some individual parasites would have rendered Lerbek less effective than if all parasites were resistant only to one or the other of its components. PMID:18483966

  20. Evaluation of antibacterial and anthelmintic activities with total phenolic contents of Piper betel leaves

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Kazi Nahid; Karmakar, Palash; Das, Abhijit; Anonna, Shamima Nasrin; Shoma, Sharmin Akter; Sattar, Mohammad Mafruhi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The study was conducted to investigate the antibacterial and anthelmintic activities and to determine total phenolic contents of methanolic extract of Piper betel leaves. Materials and Methods: The extract was subjected to assay for antibacterial activity using both gram positive and gram negative bacterial strains through disc diffusion method; anthelmintic activity with the determination of paralysis and death time using earthworm (Pheritima posthuma) at five different concentrations and the determination of total phenolic contents using the Folin-ciocalteau method. Results: The extract showed significant (p<0.01) zone of inhibitions against gram positive Staphylococcus aureus [(6.77±0.25) mm] and Gram negative Escherichia coli [(8.53±0.25) mm], Salmonella typhi [(5.20±0.26) mm], Shigella dysenteriae [(11.20±0.26) mm] compared to positive control Azithromycin (ranging from 20.10±0.17 to 25.20±0.35 mm) while no zone inhibitory activity was found for both the extract and the standard drug against Gram positive Bacillus cereus. The extract also showed potent anthelmintic activity requiring less time for paralysis and death compared to the standard drug albendazole (10 mg/ml). At concentrations 10, 20, 40, 60 and 80 mg/ml, leaves extract showed paralysis at mean time of 9.83±0.60, 8.50±0.29, 6.60±0.17, 6.20±0.44 and 4.16±0.60; death at 11.33±0.88, 9.67±0.33, 7.83±0.17, 7.16±0.60 and 5.16±0.72 minutes, respectively. Whereas the standard drug showed paralysis and death at 19.33±0.71 and 51.00±0.23 minutes respectively. The extract confirmed the higher concentration of phenolic contents (124.42±0.14 mg of GAE /g of extract) when screened for total phenolic compounds. Conclusion: As results confirmed potential antibacterial and anthelmintic activities of Piper betel leaves extract, therefore it may be processed for further drug research. PMID:25386394

  1. Molecular imaging of human tumor cells that naturally overexpress type 2 cannabinoid receptors using a quinolone-based near-infrared fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Shao, Pin; Zhang, Shaojuan; Ling, Xiaoxi; Bai, Mingfeng

    2014-07-01

    Cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2R) hold promise as therapeutic targets for treating diverse diseases, such as cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, pain, inflammation, osteoporosis, psychiatric disorders, addiction, and immune disorders. However, the fundamental role of CBR in the regulation of diseases remains unclear, largely due to a lack of reliable imaging tools for the receptors. The goal of this study was to develop a CBR-targeted molecular imaging probe and evaluate the specificity of the probe using human tumor cells that naturally overexpress CBR. To synthesize the CBR-targeted probe (NIR760-Q), a conjugable CBR ligand based on the quinolone structure was first prepared, followed by bioconjugation with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, NIR760. In vitro fluorescence imaging and competitive binding studies showed higher uptake of NIR760-Q than free NIR760 dye in Jurkat human acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia cells. In addition, the high uptake of NIR760-Q was significantly inhibited by the blocking agent, 4-quinolone-3-carboxamide, indicating specific binding of NIR760-Q to the target receptors. These results indicate that the NIR760-Q has potential in diagnostic imaging of CBR positive cancers and elucidating the role of CBR in the regulation of disease progression.

  2. Trace analysis of trimethoprim and sulfonamide, macrolide, quinolone, and tetracycline antibiotics in chlorinated drinking water using liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ye, Z.; Weinberg, H.S.; Meyer, M.T.

    2007-01-01

    A multirun analytical method has been developed and validated for trace determination of 24 antibiotics including 7 sulfonamides, 3 macrolides, 7 quinolones, 6 tetracyclines, and trimethoprim in chlorine-disinfected drinking water using a single solid-phase extraction method coupled to liquid chromatography with positive electrospray tandem mass spectrometry detection. The analytes were extracted by a hydrophilic-lipophilic balanced resin and eluted with acidified methanol (0.1% formic acid), resulting in analyte recoveries generally above 90%. The limits of quantitation were mostly below 10 ng/L in drinking water. Since the concentrated sample matrix typically caused ion suppression during electrospray ionization, the method of standard addition was used for quantitation. Chlorine residuals in drinking water can react with some antibiotics, but ascorbic acid was found to be an effective chlorine quenching agent without affecting the analysis and stability of the antibiotics in water. A preliminary occurrence study using this method revealed the presence of some antibiotics in drinking waters, including sulfamethoxazole (3.0-3.4 ng/L), macrolides (1.4-4.9 ng/L), and quinolones (1.2-4.0 ng/L). ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  3. Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Morales-Nava, Rosmarbel; Diener, Christian; Schreiber, Gabriele; Gonzalez, Zyanya D.; Lara Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Ortega Blake, Ivan; Pantoja, Omar; Volkmer, Rudolf; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and cationic antibacterial peptides (CAP) have similar physicochemical properties and yet it is not understood how such similar peptides display different activities. To address this question, we used Iztli peptide 1 (IP-1) because it has both CPP and CAP activities. Combining experimental and computational modeling of the internalization of IP-1, we show it is not internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, yet it permeates into many different cell types, including fungi and human cells. We also show that IP-1 makes pores in the presence of high electrical potential at the membrane, such as those found in bacteria and mitochondria. These results provide the basis to understand the functional redundancy of CPPs and CAPs. PMID:24706763

  4. Antibacterial effect of five Zingiberaceae essential oils.

    PubMed

    Norajit, Krittika; Laohakunjit, Natta; Kerdchoechuen, Orapin

    2007-01-01

    Essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation and two different solvent extractions (petroleum ether and ethanol) from five Zingiberaceae species: ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe.), galanga (Alpinia galanga Sw.), turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), kaempferia (Boesenbergia pandurata Holtt.) and bastard cardamom (Amomum xanthioides Wall.) was characterized. Volatile components of all extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The major components of ginger, turmeric, galangal, bastard cardamom and kaempferia were zingiberene, turmerone, methyl chavicol, and gamma-terpinene, respectively. Their antibacterial effects towards Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and Listeria monocytogenes were tested by a disc diffusion assay. Essential oil of kaempferia and bastard cardamom obtained by hydrodistillation extraction could inhibit growth of all tested bacteria. Essential oil of ginger extracted by hydrodistillation had the highest efficiency against three positive strains of bacteria (S. aureus, B. cereus and L. monocytogenes), with a minimum concentration to inhibit B. cereus and L. monocytogenes of 6.25 mg/mL. PMID:17960105

  5. Antibacterial Mechanisms of Polymyxin and Bacterial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wangrong; Fang, Shisong; Qiu, Juanping

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance in pathogens is an increasingly significant threat for human health. Indeed, some strains are resistant to almost all currently available antibiotics, leaving very limited choices for antimicrobial clinical therapy. In many such cases, polymyxins are the last option available, although their use increases the risk of developing resistant strains. This review mainly aims to discuss advances in unraveling the mechanisms of antibacterial activity of polymyxins and bacterial tolerance together with the description of polymyxin structure, synthesis, and structural modification. These are expected to help researchers not only develop a series of new polymyxin derivatives necessary for future medical care, but also optimize the clinical use of polymyxins with minimal resistance development. PMID:25664322

  6. Cationic nanofibrillar cellulose with high antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Chaker, Achraf; Boufi, Sami

    2015-10-20

    Cationic nanofibrillar cellulose (C-NFC) has been prepared via a high pressure homogenization using quaternized cellulose fibers with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride. It has been shown that the quaternization of dried softwood pulp facilitated the defibrillation processes and prevented clogging of the homogenizer. The effects of the trimethylammonium chloride content on the fibrillation yield, the transparency degree of the gel, the rheological behavior of the NFC suspension and their electrokinetic properties were investigated. AFM observation showed that the NFC suspension consisted of individualized cellulose I nanofibrils 4-5nm in width and length in the micronic scale. In addition to their strong reinforcing potential, the inclusion of C-NFC into a polymer matrix was shown to efficiently enhance the antibacterial activity. The reinforcing potential of C-NFC, studied by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), was compared to anionic NFC and the difference was explained in terms of the nanofibrils capacities to build up a strong networks held by hydrogen bonding. PMID:26256179

  7. Production of novel antibacterial liamocins by strains of Aureobasidium pullulans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Certain strains of Aureobasidium pullulans produce liamocins, heavier-than-water “oils” that accumulate in liquid cultures. Liamocins are surface active, and inhibit mammalian cancer cell lines. Recently, we discovered that liamocins have antibacterial activity with specificity against Streptococcus...

  8. Alkalization is responsible for antibacterial effects of corroding magnesium.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Muhammad Imran; Eifler, Rainer; Rais, Bushra; Mueller, Peter P

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium alloys are presently investigated as potential medical implant materials for temporary applications. Magnesium has been reported to have antibacterial activities and could therefore be used to prevent antibiotic treatment-resistant bacterial implant infections. For characterizing the effects of magnesium on infectious bacteria, bioluminescent S. aureus or P. aeruginosa were employed. The proliferation of both types of bacteria was suppressed in the presence of metallic magnesium and also in aqueous magnesium corrosion extracts. Of the two soluble corrosion products, magnesium ions were well tolerated while antibacterial activities correlated with increased pH levels of the supernatants. The alkaline pH alone was sufficient for the antibacterial effects which were completely abolished when the pH of the corrosion supernatants was neutralized. These results demonstrate that pH increases are necessary and sufficient for the antibacterial activity of metallic magnesium. In an animal model magnesium implants showed an enhanced but variable resistance to bacterial colonization. PMID:25974048

  9. Phytochemical constituents and antibacterial activity of some green leafy vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ramesa Shafi; Al-Daihan, Sooad

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial activity and photochemicals of five green leafy vegetables against a panel of five bacteria strains. Methods Disc diffusion method was used to determine the antibacterial activity, while kanamycin was used as a reference antibiotic. The phytochemical screening of the extracts was performed using standard methods. Results All methanol extracts were found active against all the test bacterial strains. Overall maximum extracts shows antibacterial activity which range from 6 to 15 mm. Proteins and carbohydrates was found in all the green leaves, whereas alkaloid, steroids, saponins, flavonoids, tannins were found in most of the test samples. Conclusions The obtain result suggests that green leafy vegetables have moderate antibacterial activity and contain various pharmacologically active compounds and thus provide the scientific basis for the traditional uses of the studied vegetables in the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:25182436

  10. An antibacterial hydroxy fusidic acid analogue from Acremonium crotocinigenum

    E-print Network

    Griffith, Gareth

    against a panel of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA reserved. Keywords: Acremonium crotocinigenum; Fusidane triterpene; Fusidic acid; Antibacterial; MRSA; MDR, fusidic acid, a widely used therapeutic for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections

  11. Antibacterial substances from marine algae isolated from Jeddah coast of Red sea, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Saif, Sarah Saleh Abdu-Llah; Abdel-Raouf, Nevein; El-Wazanani, Hend A; Aref, Ibrahim A

    2014-01-01

    Marine algae are known to produce a wide variety of bioactive secondary metabolites and several compounds have been derived from them for prospective development of novel drugs by the pharmaceutical industries. However algae of the Red sea have not been adequately explored for their potential as a source of bioactive substances. In this context Ulva reticulata, Caulerpa occidentalis, Cladophora socialis, Dictyota ciliolata, and Gracilaria dendroides isolated from Red sea coastal waters of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, were evaluated for their potential for bioactivity. Extracts of the algae selected for the study were prepared using ethanol, chloroform, petroleum ether and water, and assayed for antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli ATCC 25322, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Stapylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. It was found that chloroform was most effective followed by ethanol, petroleum ether and water for the preparation of algal extract with significant antibacterial activities, respectively. Results also indicated that the extracts of red alga G. dendroides were more efficient against the tested bacterial strains followed by green alga U. reticulata, and brown algae D. ciliolata. Chemical analyses showed that G. dendroides recorded the highest percentages of the total fats and total proteins, followed by U. reticulata, and D. ciliolate. Among the bioflavonoids determined Rutin, Quercetin and Kaempherol were present in high percentages in G. dendroides, U. reticulata, and D. ciliolate. Estimation of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids revealed that palmitic acid was present in highest percentage in all the algal species analyzed. Amino acid analyses indicated the presence of free amino acids in moderate contents in all the species of algae. The results indicated scope for utilizing these algae as a source of antibacterial substances. PMID:24596500

  12. Determination of antibacterial activity of polyenzyme preparations Gumseb using in vitro methods.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Antita; Shahane, Varsha; Gore, Varsha; Kagal, Anju; Risbud, Shilpa; Bharadwaj, Renu

    A novel polyenzyme formulation Gumseb developed by Advanced Enzyme Technologies Ltd, Thane and Speciality Biochemicals Co., USA, was tested for antibacterial properties using ATCC strains and clinical isolates of Salmonella typhi, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae. A modified antibiotic susceptibility test was used for the purpose. S. aureus, S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae were found to be sensitive to the formulation at the chosen concentration. Next, to study the interaction between Gumseb and currently used antibiotic, a checkerboard Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) was carried out for each organism. The assay was carried out with the aim of establishing whether the polyenzyme formulation had any potentiating effect on the antibiotic of choice. Synergistic effect was established when Gumseb was used in conjunction with penicillin against S. pyogenes. Partial synergy was established when it was used in conduction with Ceftazidime against P. aeruginosa and with Ciprofloxacin against methicillin sensitive, coagulase positive S. aureus. Antagonism was established when it was used in conjunction with Ampicillin against E. coli, with Ciprofloxacin against S. typhi and coagulase negative staphylococcal strain. The results indicate that Gumseb can be used in conjunction with those antibiotics with which a synergistic or a partially synergistic effect could be shown, as in the case of P. aerugionosa and S. aureus. These findings have particular importance since these organisms are responsible for hospital based infections and are notorious for antibiotic resistance. In cases where antagonism was established, it should not be used in combination with that particular antibiotic. However, it can be used individually since it has proved to have antibacterial activity and MIC could be determined for all five commonly encountered pathogens. Therefore, it has the potential of being a novel broad range antibacterial drug. These findings are significant given the alarming rise in incidence of antibiotic resistance in most clinically important pathogens. PMID:18697725

  13. Antibacterial substances from marine algae isolated from Jeddah coast of Red sea, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saif, Sarah Saleh Abdu-llah; Abdel-Raouf, Nevein; El-Wazanani, Hend A.; Aref, Ibrahim A.

    2013-01-01

    Marine algae are known to produce a wide variety of bioactive secondary metabolites and several compounds have been derived from them for prospective development of novel drugs by the pharmaceutical industries. However algae of the Red sea have not been adequately explored for their potential as a source of bioactive substances. In this context Ulva reticulata, Caulerpa occidentalis, Cladophora socialis, Dictyota ciliolata, and Gracilaria dendroides isolated from Red sea coastal waters of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, were evaluated for their potential for bioactivity. Extracts of the algae selected for the study were prepared using ethanol, chloroform, petroleum ether and water, and assayed for antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli ATCC 25322, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Stapylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. It was found that chloroform was most effective followed by ethanol, petroleum ether and water for the preparation of algal extract with significant antibacterial activities, respectively. Results also indicated that the extracts of red alga G. dendroides were more efficient against the tested bacterial strains followed by green alga U. reticulata, and brown algae D. ciliolata. Chemical analyses showed that G. dendroides recorded the highest percentages of the total fats and total proteins, followed by U. reticulata, and D. ciliolate. Among the bioflavonoids determined Rutin, Quercetin and Kaempherol were present in high percentages in G. dendroides, U. reticulata, and D. ciliolate. Estimation of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids revealed that palmitic acid was present in highest percentage in all the algal species analyzed. Amino acid analyses indicated the presence of free amino acids in moderate contents in all the species of algae. The results indicated scope for utilizing these algae as a source of antibacterial substances. PMID:24596500

  14. Antibacterial efficacy of silver nanoparticles against Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattabi, Rani M.; Thilipan, G. Arun Kumar; Bhat, Vinayachandra; Sridhar, K. R.; Pattabi, Manjunatha

    2013-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized by subjecting an aqueous solution of AgNO3 and polyvinyl alcohol to irradiation from an UV lamp has been studied for its antibacterial potential against Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli). The diameter of the zone of inhibition is found to depend on both the irradiation time and the nanoparticle concentration. As the synthesis method adopted uses no toxic reagents, these particles may serve as promising candidates in the search for better antibacterial agents.

  15. Antibacterial effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles combined with ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seil, Justin T.; Webster, Thomas J.

    2012-12-01

    Using Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), the present study investigated the antibacterial effect of ZnO nanoparticles both in the absence and presence of ultrasound stimulation. While the antibacterial effect of control nanoparticle chemistries (Al2O3) alone was either weak or unobservable under the conditions tested, the antibacterial effect of ZnO alone was significant, providing over a four log reduction (equivalent to antibiotics) compared to no treatment after just 8 h. The antibacterial effect was enhanced as ZnO particle diameter decreased. Specifically, when testing the antibacterial effect against bacteria populations relevant to infection, a 500 ?g ml-1 dose of zinc oxide nanoparticles with a diameter of 20 nm reduced S. aureus populations by four orders of magnitude after 8 and 24 h, compared to control groups with no nanoparticles. This was accomplished without the use of antibiotics, to which bacteria are developing a resistance anyway. The addition of ultrasound stimulation further reduced the number of viable colony-forming units present in a planktonic cell suspension by 76% compared to nanoparticles alone. Lastly, this study provided a mechanism for how ZnO nanoparticles in the presence of ultrasound decrease bacteria functions by demonstrating greater hydrogen peroxide generation by S. aureus compared to controls. These results indicated that small-diameter ZnO nanoparticles exhibited strong antibacterial properties that can be additionally enhanced in the presence of ultrasound and, thus, should be further studied for a wide range of medical device anti-infection applications.

  16. CysB Negatively Affects the Transcription of pqsR and Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal Production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, John M.; Hudson, L. Lynn; Wells, Greg; Coleman, James P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that is ubiquitous in the environment, and it is an opportunistic pathogen that can infect a variety of hosts, including humans. During the process of infection, P. aeruginosa coordinates the expression of numerous virulence factors through the production of multiple cell-to-cell signaling molecules. The production of these signaling molecules is linked through a regulatory network, with the signal N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone and its receptor LasR controlling the induction of a second acyl-homoserine lactone signal and the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). LasR-mediated control of PQS occurs partly by activating the transcription of pqsR, a gene that encodes the PQS receptor and is necessary for PQS production. We show that LasR interacts with a single binding site in the pqsR promoter region and that it does not influence the transcription of the divergently transcribed gene, nadA. Using DNA affinity chromatography, we identified additional proteins that interact with the pqsR-nadA intergenic region. These include the H-NS family members MvaT and MvaU, and CysB, a transcriptional regulator that controls sulfur uptake and cysteine biosynthesis. We show that CysB interacts with the pqsR promoter and that CysB represses pqsR transcription and PQS production. Additionally, we provide evidence that CysB can interfere with the activation of pqsR transcription by LasR. However, as seen with other CysB-regulated genes, pqsR expression was not differentially regulated in response to cysteine levels. These findings demonstrate a novel role for CysB in influencing cell-to-cell signal production by P. aeruginosa. IMPORTANCE The production of PQS and other 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolone (HAQs) compounds is a key component of the P. aeruginosa cell-to-cell signaling network, impacts multiple physiological functions, and is required for virulence. PqsR directly regulates the genes necessary for HAQ production, but little is known about the regulation of pqsR. We identified CysB as a novel regulator of pqsR and PQS production, but, unlike other CysB-controlled genes, it does not appear to regulate pqsR in response to cysteine. This implies that CysB functions as both a cysteine-responsive and cysteine-unresponsive regulator in P. aeruginosa. PMID:25845844

  17. Sulfa drugs as inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase: new targets for the old drugs.

    PubMed

    al-Rashida, Mariya; Hussain, Sajad; Hamayoun, Mehwish; Altaf, Aisha; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2014-01-01

    Sulfa drugs are well-known antibacterial agents containing N-substituted sulfonamide group on para position of aniline ring (NH2RSO2NHR'). In this study 2,4-dichloro-1,3,5-triazine derivatives of sulfa drugs, sulfamerazine (1b), sulfaquinoxaline (2b), sulfadiazine (3b), sulfadimidine (4b), and sulfachloropyrazine (5b) (1a-5a) were synthesized and characterized. Their carbonic anhydrase inhibition activity was evaluated against bovine cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isozyme II (bCA II). For the sake of comparison the CA inhibition activity of the parent sulfa drugs (1b-5b) was also evaluated. A significant increase in CA inhibition activity of sulfa drugs was observed upon substitution with 2,4-dichloro-1,3,5-triazine moiety. Molecular docking studies were carried out to highlight binding site interactions. ADME properties were calculated to evaluate drug likeness of the compounds. PMID:25538942

  18. Discovery of a Novel Class of Boron-Based Antibacterials with Activity against Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Vincent; Crépin, Thibaut; Palencia, Andrés; Cusack, Stephen; Akama, Tsutomu; Baker, Stephen J.; Bu, Wei; Feng, Lisa; Freund, Yvonne R.; Liu, Liang; Meewan, Maliwan; Mohan, Manisha; Mao, Weimin; Rock, Fernando L.; Sexton, Holly; Sheoran, Anita; Zhang, Yanchen; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Zhou, Yasheen; Nieman, James A.; Anugula, Mahipal Reddy; Keramane, El Mehdi; Savariraj, Kingsley; Reddy, D. Shekhar; Sharma, Rashmi; Subedi, Rajendra; Singh, Rajeshwar; O'Leary, Ann; Simon, Nerissa L.; De Marsh, Peter L.; Mushtaq, Shazad; Warner, Marina; Livermore, David M.; Plattner, Jacob J.

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria cause approximately 70% of the infections in intensive care units. A growing number of bacterial isolates responsible for these infections are resistant to currently available antibiotics and to many in development. Most agents under development are modifications of existing drug classes, which only partially overcome existing resistance mechanisms. Therefore, new classes of Gram-negative antibacterials with truly novel modes of action are needed to circumvent these existing resistance mechanisms. We have previously identified a new a way to inhibit an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase, leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), in fungi via the oxaborole tRNA trapping (OBORT) mechanism. Herein, we show how we have modified the OBORT mechanism using a structure-guided approach to develop a new boron-based antibiotic class, the aminomethylbenzoxaboroles, which inhibit bacterial leucyl-tRNA synthetase and have activity against Gram-negative bacteria by largely evading the main efflux mechanisms in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The lead analogue, AN3365, is active against Gram-negative bacteria, including Enterobacteriaceae bearing NDM-1 and KPC carbapenemases, as well as P. aeruginosa. This novel boron-based antibacterial, AN3365, has good mouse pharmacokinetics and was efficacious against E. coli and P. aeruginosa in murine thigh infection models, which suggest that this novel class of antibacterials has the potential to address this unmet medical need. PMID:23295920

  19. Antibacterial Activity of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Endolysin P28 against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongling; Zhu, Chaoyang; Chen, Jingyi; Ye, Xing; Huang, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Maltocin P28 is a phage-tail like bacteriocin produced by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia P28. The ORF8 of maltocin P28 gene cluster is predicted to encode an endolysin and we name it endolysin P28. Sequence analysis revealed that it contains the lysozyme_like superfamily conserved domain. Endolysin P28 has the four consensus motifs as that of Escherichia coli phage lambda gpR. In this study, endolysin P28 was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and purified with a C-terminal oligo-histidine tag. The antibacterial activity of endolysin P28 increased as the temperature rose from 25 to 45°C. Thermostability assays showed that endolysin P28 was stable up to 50°C, while its residual activity was reduced by 55% after treatment at 70°C for 30 min. Acidity and high salinity could enhance its antibacterial activity. Endolysin P28 exhibited a broad antibacterial activity against 14 out of 16 tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria besides S. maltophilia. Moreover, it could effectively lyse intact Gram-negative bacteria in the absence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid as an outer membrane permeabilizer. Therefore, the characteristics of endolysin P28 make it a potential therapeutic agent against multi-drug-resistant pathogens. PMID:26635765

  20. A fatty acid from the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum is antibacterial against diverse bacteria including multi-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Desbois, Andrew P; Mearns-Spragg, Andrew; Smith, Valerie J

    2009-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria, such as multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which are not susceptible to most conventional antibiotics, are causing increased concern in healthcare institutions worldwide. The discovery of novel antibacterial compounds for biomedical exploitation is one avenue that is being pursued to combat these problematic bacteria. Marine eukaryotic microalgae are known to produce numerous useful products but have attracted little attention in the search for novel antibiotic compounds. Cell lysates of the marine diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin, have been reported to display antibacterial activity in vitro, but the compounds responsible have not been fully identified. In this paper, using column chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, we report the isolation of an antibacterial fatty acid. Mass spectrometry and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed it to be the polyunsaturated fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). We show that EPA is active against a range of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including MRSA, at micromolar concentrations. These data indicate that it could find application in the topical and systemic treatment of drug-resistant bacterial infections. PMID:18575935

  1. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... problem is interactions, which may occur between Two drugs, such as aspirin and blood thinners Drugs and food, such as statins and grapefruit Drugs and supplements, such as gingko and blood thinners ...

  2. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePLUS

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 4/29/2015; last reviewed 4/29/2015) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  3. Drug Facts

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Weed, Pot) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What ... About Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Marijuana Meth Pain Medicines Tobacco Other Drugs You can call 1-800- ...

  4. Oxidative stress and antibacterial properties of a graphene oxide-cystamine nanohybrid

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; An, Seong Soo A; Yi, Dong Kee

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress can damage proteins, DNA, and lipids, and is involved in the progression of many diseases. Damage to infected cells caused by oxidative stress is related to increased levels of reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide. During oxidative stress, hydrogen peroxide levels are often increased and catalase level decreased inside cells. This can lead to the death of skin and other cells. Hydrophobic low molecular weight compounds are useful in treating hemorrhagic conditions of the skin. To this end, cystamine has been successfully conjugated with graphene oxide (GO) as a drug carrier. The current study used the microdilution method to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations of cystamine-conjugated GO against four types of pathogenic bacteria. Minimum inhibitory concentrations values were 1 ?g/mL against Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, 6 ?g/mL against Enterococcus faecalis, and 4 ?g/mL against Bacillus subtilis. Toxicity of the conjugate against squamous cell carcinoma 7 cells was minimal at low concentrations, but increased in a dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrated that our protocol produced a cystamine-conjugated GO with low cytotoxicity, but strong reactive oxygen species effects and high antibacterial activity. This nanohybrid may be useful in the treatment of dermatological disorders. Moreover, this class of nanohybrid may have other biomedical applications due to their low cytotoxicity and high antibacterial activity. PMID:25609960

  5. Exogenous pulmonary surfactant as a vehicle for antimicrobials: assessment of surfactant-antibacterial interactions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Birkun, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its unique surface-active properties, an exogenous pulmonary surfactant may become a promising drug delivery agent, in particular, acting as a vehicle for antibiotics in topical treatment of pneumonia. The purpose of this study was to assess a mutual influence of natural surfactant preparation and three antibiotics (amikacin, cefepime, and colistimethate sodium) in vitro and to identify appropriate combination(s) for subsequent in vivo investigations of experimental surfactant/antibiotic mixtures. Influence of antibiotics on surface-active properties of exogenous surfactant was assessed using the modified Pattle method. Effects of exogenous surfactant on antibacterial activity of antimicrobials against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were evaluated using conventional microbiologic procedures. Addition of amikacin or cefepime to surfactant had no significant influence on surface-active properties of the latter. Obvious reduction of surface-active properties was confirmed for surfactant/colistimethate composition. When suspended with antibiotics, surfactant either had no impact on their antimicrobial activity (amikacin) or exerted mild to moderate influence (reduction of cefepime bactericidal activity and increase of colistimethate bacteriostatic activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa). Considering favorable compatibility profile, the surfactant/amikacin combination is advisable for subsequent investigation of joint surfactant/antibacterial therapy in animals with bacterial pneumonia. PMID:24876994

  6. Exogenous Pulmonary Surfactant as a Vehicle for Antimicrobials: Assessment of Surfactant-Antibacterial Interactions In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its unique surface-active properties, an exogenous pulmonary surfactant may become a promising drug delivery agent, in particular, acting as a vehicle for antibiotics in topical treatment of pneumonia. The purpose of this study was to assess a mutual influence of natural surfactant preparation and three antibiotics (amikacin, cefepime, and colistimethate sodium) in vitro and to identify appropriate combination(s) for subsequent in vivo investigations of experimental surfactant/antibiotic mixtures. Influence of antibiotics on surface-active properties of exogenous surfactant was assessed using the modified Pattle method. Effects of exogenous surfactant on antibacterial activity of antimicrobials against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were evaluated using conventional microbiologic procedures. Addition of amikacin or cefepime to surfactant had no significant influence on surface-active properties of the latter. Obvious reduction of surface-active properties was confirmed for surfactant/colistimethate composition. When suspended with antibiotics, surfactant either had no impact on their antimicrobial activity (amikacin) or exerted mild to moderate influence (reduction of cefepime bactericidal activity and increase of colistimethate bacteriostatic activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa). Considering favorable compatibility profile, the surfactant/amikacin combination is advisable for subsequent investigation of joint surfactant/antibacterial therapy in animals with bacterial pneumonia. PMID:24876994

  7. In vitro effects on biofilm viability and antibacterial and antiadherent activities of silymarin.

    PubMed

    Evren, Ebru; Yurtcu, Erkan

    2015-07-01

    Limited treatment options in infectious diseases caused by resistant microorganisms created the need to search new approaches. Several herbal extracts are studied for their enormous therapeutic potential. Silymarin extract, from Silybum marianum (milk thistle), is an old and a new remedy for this goal. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the antibacterial and antiadherent effects of silymarin besides biofilm viability activity on standard bacterial strains. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC), antiadherent/antibiofilm activity, and effects on biofilm viability of silymarin were evaluated against standard bacterial strains. MIC values were observed between 60 and >241 ?g/mL (0.25->1 mmol/L). Gram-positive bacteria were inhibited at concentrations between 60 and 120 ?g/mL. Gram-negative bacteria were not inhibited by the silymarin concentrations included in this study. MBC values for Gram-positive bacteria were greater than 241 ?g/mL. Adherence/biofilm formations were decreased to 15 ?g/mL silymarin concentration when compared with silymarin-untreated group. Silymarin reduced the biofilm viabilities to 13 and 46 % at 1 and 0.5 mmol/L concentrations, respectively. We demonstrated that silymarin shows antibacterial and antiadherent/antibiofilm activity against certain standard bacterial strains which may be beneficial when used as a dietary supplement or a drug. PMID:25937395

  8. Silver nanoparticle based antibacterial methacrylate hydrogels potential for bone graft applications.

    PubMed

    González-Sánchez, M Isabel; Perni, Stefano; Tommasi, Giacomo; Morris, Nathanael Glyn; Hawkins, Karl; López-Cabarcos, Enrique; Prokopovich, Polina

    2015-05-01

    Infections are frequent and very undesired occurrences after orthopedic procedures; furthermore, the growing concern caused by the rise in antibiotic resistance is progressively dwindling the efficacy of such drugs. Artificial bone graft materials could solve some of the problems associated with the gold standard use of natural bone graft such as limited bone material, pain at the donor site and rejections if donor tissue is used. We have previously described new acrylate base nanocomposite hydrogels as bone graft materials. In the present paper, we describe the integration of silver nanoparticles in the polymeric mineralized biomaterial to provide non-antibiotic antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Two different crosslinking degrees were tested and the silver nanoparticles were integrated into the composite matrix by means of three different methods: entrapment in the polymeric hydrogel before the mineralization; diffusion during the process of calcium phosphate crystallization and adsorption post-mineralization. The latter being generally the most effective method of encapsulation; however, the adsorption of silver nanoparticles inside the pores of the biomaterial led to a decreasing antibacterial activity for adsorption time longer than 2 days. PMID:25746278

  9. Silver nanoparticle based antibacterial methacrylate hydrogels potential for bone graft applications

    PubMed Central

    González-Sánchez, M. Isabel; Perni, Stefano; Tommasi, Giacomo; Morris, Nathanael Glyn; Hawkins, Karl; López-Cabarcos, Enrique; Prokopovich, Polina

    2015-01-01

    Infections are frequent and very undesired occurrences after orthopedic procedures; furthermore, the growing concern caused by the rise in antibiotic resistance is progressively dwindling the efficacy of such drugs. Artificial bone graft materials could solve some of the problems associated with the gold standard use of natural bone graft such as limited bone material, pain at the donor site and rejections if donor tissue is used. We have previously described new acrylate base nanocomposite hydrogels as bone graft materials. In the present paper, we describe the integration of silver nanoparticles in the polymeric mineralized biomaterial to provide non-antibiotic antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Two different crosslinking degrees were tested and the silver nanoparticles were integrated into the composite matrix by means of three different methods: entrapment in the polymeric hydrogel before the mineralization; diffusion during the process of calcium phosphate crystallization and adsorption post-mineralization. The latter being generally the most effective method of encapsulation; however, the adsorption of silver nanoparticles inside the pores of the biomaterial led to a decreasing antibacterial activity for adsorption time longer than 2 days. PMID:25746278

  10. New INH-pyrazole analogs: Design, synthesis and evaluation of antitubercular and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Nagabhushana; Ramprasad, Jurupula; Dalimba, Udayakumar

    2015-12-01

    With the aim of developing promising antitubercular and antibacterial leads, we have designed and synthesized a new series of isonicotinohydrazide based pyrazole derivatives (5a-r). All new derivatives (4a-b and 5a-r) were screened for in vitro antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (MTB) strain. Four compounds 5j, 5k, 5l and 4b emerged as promising antitubercular agents with MIC of ?4.9?M which is much lower than the MIC of the first line antitubercular drug, ethambutol. The 3-chlorophenyl substituent at position-3 of the pyrazole ring enhanced the antiTB activity of the molecules. Three derivatives 5b, 5k and 4b exhibited promising antibacterial activity against the tested bacterial strains. The active molecules were nontoxic to normal Vero cells and showed high selectivity index (>160). The structure and antitubercular activity relationship was further supported by in silico molecular docking study of the active compounds against enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (InhA) enzyme of M. tuberculosis. PMID:26520663

  11. Wound-dressing materials with antibacterial activity from electrospun polyurethane-dextran nanofiber mats containing ciprofloxacin HCl.

    PubMed

    Unnithan, Afeesh R; Barakat, Nasser A M; Pichiah, P B Tirupathi; Gnanasekaran, Gopalsamy; Nirmala, R; Cha, Youn-Soo; Jung, Che-Hun; El-Newehy, Mohamed; Kim, Hak Yong

    2012-11-01

    Dextran is a versatile biomacromolecule for preparing electrospun nanofibrous membranes by blending with either water-soluble bioactive agents or hydrophobic biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications. In this study, an antibacterial electrospun scaffold was prepared by electrospinning of a solution composed of dextran, polyurethane (PU) and ciprofloxacin HCl (CipHCl) drug. The obtained nanofiber mats have good morphology. The mats were characterized by various analytical techniques. The interaction parameters between fibroblasts and the PU-dextran and PU-dextran-drug scaffolds such as viability, proliferation, and attachment were investigated. The results indicated that the cells interacted favorably with the scaffolds especially the drug-containing one. Moreover, the composite mat showed good bactericidal activity against both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Overall, our results conclude that the introduced scaffold might be an ideal biomaterial for wound dressing applications. PMID:22944448

  12. Facile green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using seed aqueous extract of Pistacia atlantica and its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Babak; Rostami, Amir; Momeni, S S

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we describe the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) using seed aqueous extract of Pistacia atlantica (PA) and its antibacterial activity. UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray energy dispersive spectrophotometer (EDAX) were performed to ascertain the formation of Ag-NPs. It was observed that the growths of Ag-NPs are stopped within 35 min of reaction time. The synthesized Ag-NPs were characterized by a peak at 446 nm in the UV-visible spectrum. XRD confirmed the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles of 27 nm size. The XRD peaks at 38°, 44°, 64° and 77° can be indexed to the (111), (200), (220) and (311) Bragg's reflections of cubic structure of metallic silver, respectively. The FTIR result clearly showed that the extracts containing OH as a functional group act in capping the nanoparticles synthesis. Antibacterial activities of Ag-NPs were tested against the growth of Gram-positive (S. aureus) using SEM. The inhibition was observed in the Ag-NPs against S. aureus. The results suggest that the synthesized Ag-NPs act as an effective antibacterial agent. It is confirmed that Ag-NPs are capable of rendering high antibacterial efficacy and hence has a great potential in the preparation of used drugs against bacterial diseases. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), indicated that, the most strains of S. aureus was damaged and extensively disappeared by addition of Ag-NPs. The results confirmed that the (PA) is a very good eco friendly and nontoxic source for the synthesis of Ag-NPs as compared to the conventional chemical/physical methods. PMID:25022505

  13. Exploring the Antibacterial and Antifungal Potential of Jellyfish-Associated Marine Fungi by Cultivation-Dependent Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yang; Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    Fungi isolated from marine invertebrates are of considerable importance as new promising sources of unique secondary metabolites with significant biomedical potential. However, the cultivable fungal community harbored in jellyfish was less investigated. In this work, we seek to recover symbiotic fungi from different tissues of jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai. A total of seven morphotypes were isolated, which were assigned into four genera (Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Purpureocillium, and Tilletiopsis) from two phyla (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) by comparing the rDNA-ITS sequences with the reference sequences in GenBank. The most fungi were found in the inner tissues of subumbrella. Two of the cultivation-independent procedures, changing media type and co-cultivation, were employed to maximize the complexity of metabolites. Thus, thirteen EtOAc gum were obtained and fingerprinted by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) equipped with a photodiode array (PDA) detector. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of these complex mixtures were tested against a panel of bacterial and fungal pathogens. The antimicrobial results showed that all of the 13 EtOAc extracts displayed different levels of antibacterial activity, three of which exhibited strong to significant antibacterial activity to the bacterial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella entrica. Antifungal activity indicated that the EtOAc extracts from pure culture of Aspergillus versicolor and co-culture of A. versicolor and Tilletiopsis sp. in rice media were promising for searching new compounds, with the maximal mycelial growth inhibition of 82.32% ± 0.61% for Rhizoctonia solani and 48.41% ± 11.02% for Botrytis cinerea at 200 ?g/ml, respectively. This study is the first report on the antibacterial and antifungal activity of jellyfish-associated fungi and allows the first sight into cultivable fungal community residing in jellyfish. Induced metabolites by cultivation-dependent approaches provides a new reservoir for drug discovery from jellyfish-derived fungi. PMID:26637162

  14. Facile green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using seed aqueous extract of Pistacia atlantica and its antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Babak; Rostami, Amir; Momeni, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we describe the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) using seed aqueous extract of Pistacia atlantica (PA) and its antibacterial activity. UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray energy dispersive spectrophotometer (EDAX) were performed to ascertain the formation of Ag-NPs. It was observed that the growths of Ag-NPs are stopped within 35 min of reaction time. The synthesized Ag-NPs were characterized by a peak at 446 nm in the UV-visible spectrum. XRD confirmed the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles of 27 nm size. The XRD peaks at 38°, 44°, 64° and 77° can be indexed to the (1 1 1), (2 0 0), (2 2 0) and (3 1 1) Bragg's reflections of cubic structure of metallic silver, respectively. The FTIR result clearly showed that the extracts containing OH as a functional group act in capping the nanoparticles synthesis. Antibacterial activities of Ag-NPs were tested against the growth of Gram-positive (S. aureus) using SEM. The inhibition was observed in the Ag-NPs against S. aureus. The results suggest that the synthesized Ag-NPs act as an effective antibacterial agent. It is confirmed that Ag-NPs are capable of rendering high antibacterial efficacy and hence has a great potential in the preparation of used drugs against bacterial diseases. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), indicated that, the most strains of S. aureus was damaged and extensively disappeared by addition of Ag-NPs. The results confirmed that the (PA) is a very good eco friendly and nontoxic source for the synthesis of Ag-NPs as compared to the conventional chemical/physical methods.

  15. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of tert-butyl [1-benzyl-2[(4-aryl-2-thiazolyl)hydrazono]ethyl]carbamate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Turan-Zitouni, Gülhan; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Chevallet, Pierre; Martinez, Jean; Kaplancikli, Zafer Asim; Ozdemir, Ahmet; Arslanyolu, Muhittin; Yildiz, Mehmet Taha

    2007-06-01

    The increasing clinical importance of drug-resistant fungal and bacterial pathogens has lent additional urgency to microbiological research and new antibacterial compound development. For this purpose, new tert-butyl[1-benzyl-2[(4-aryl-2-thiazolyl)hydrazono]ethyl]carbamate derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for antibacterial activity. The reaction of Boc-L-phenylalaninal with thiosemicarbazide gave the thiosemicarbazone which furnished the title compounds by reaction with phenacyl bromides. The newly synthesized compounds were screened for antibacterial activity and toxicity. While microdilution broth susceptibility assay was used for the antibacterial activity evaluation of the compounds against the strains E. coli (NRRL B-3704), M. luteus (NRRL B-4375), B. cereus (NRRL B-3711), P. aeruginosa (NRRL B-23), and S. fecalis (NRRL B-14617), the Artemia salina 96-well assay was used to determine cytotoxicities of the compounds. Observations obtained from the bioassays showed that some of the compounds are highly active against E. coli, M. luteus, and B. cereus when compared with the control agent and showed low toxicity. PMID:17562564

  16. Who will develop new antibacterial agents?

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Stewart T.

    2014-01-01

    The golden age of antimicrobial drug development is a distant memory, and the likelihood of there being another seems slim. In part, this is because the pharmaceutical industry, which has now adopted an unsustainable business model, abandoned the anti-infective sector, and the pipeline is almost empty. The contribution to this crisis of national governments, health agencies and funders also merits discussion. Much of the basis for drug discovery is funded by the public sector, thereby generating intellectual property and leads for drug development that are often not pursued owing to funding gaps. In particular, the cost of testing drug efficacy in clinical trials is beyond the means of most companies and organizations. Lack of a concerted international effort to develop new antimicrobials is particularly alarming at a time when multidrug-resistant bacteria threaten all areas of human medicine globally. Here, the steps that led to this situation are retraced, and some possible solutions to the dilemma are proposed. PMID:24821916

  17. Cinoxacin: In Vitro Antibacterial Studies of a New Synthetic Organic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Lumish, Robert M.; Norden, Carl W.

    1975-01-01

    Cinoxacin (compound 64716) is a synthetic organic acid with antibacterial activity against most aerobic gram-negative bacilli. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of cinoxacin (agar-dilution method) were determined for 419 strains. Escherichia coli was the most susceptible group of organisms. The majority of Klebsiella sp., Enterobacter sp., Proteus sp., and Serratia marcescens were inhibited by 8 ?g of cinoxacin per ml. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and all gram-positive isolates tested were resistant to 64 ?g or less of cinoxacin per ml. Zones of inhibition using a 30-?g disk correlated well with agar-dilution minimal inhibitory concentrations (r = ?0.9). Cinoxacin was bactericidal when tested with inocula of 5 × 106 organisms per ml. Resistance to cinoxacin was readily developed in all three strains tested by serial passage on drug-containing agar. The in vitro properties of this agent were similar to those of nalidixic acid. PMID:1094949

  18. Cytotoxic, antibacterial and antioxidant activities of extracts of the bark of Melia azedarach (China Berry).

    PubMed

    Zahoor, Muhammad; Ahmed, Manzoor; Naz, Sumaira; Ayaz, Musarrat

    2015-01-01

    Nature provides a variety of drugs and medicinal agents derived from plants. This study was conducted to determine antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of extracts of Melia azedarach bark with methanol/water (9:1 v/v), chloroform, butanol, hexane, water and ethyl acetate. For the determination of the antimicrobial activities, the agar well diffusion method was employed. Cytotoxicity was studied by brine shrimp lethality assay; antioxidant activities were measured using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl. The chloroform extract was active against Enterobacter aerogenes and Proteus mirabilis, the ethyl acetate extract had highest antibacterial spectrum against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the n-hexane extract had highest inhibition against E. aerogenes, the aqueous extract showed highest activities against P. mirabilis, the butanol fraction showed highest activities against E. aerogenes and the methanolic extract was highly active against P. mirabilis. PMID:25426766

  19. Antibacterial action of doped CoFe2O4 nanocrystals on multidrug resistant bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Velho-Pereira, S; Noronha, A; Mathias, A; Zakane, R; Naik, V; Naik, P; Salker, A V; Naik, S R

    2015-07-01

    The bactericidal effect of pristine and doped cobalt ferrite nanoparticles has been evaluated against multiple drug resistant clinical strains by assessing the number of colony-forming units (CFU). Monophasic polycrystalline ferrites have been prepared by the malate-glycolate sol-gel autocombustion method as confirmed by the X-ray diffraction study. Various changes occurring during the preparative stages have been demonstrated using TG-DTA analysis which is well complemented by the FTIR spectroscopy. The antibacterial studies carried out demonstrate a bactericidal effect of the nanoparticles wherein the number of CFU has been found to decrease with doping. Cellular distortions have been revealed through SEM. Variation in the number of CFU with dopant type has also been reported herein. PMID:25953569

  20. Rapid Bioassay-Guided Isolation of Antibacterial Clerodane Type Diterpenoid from Dodonaea viscosa (L.) Jaeq.

    PubMed

    Khurram, Muhammad; Lawton, Linda A; Edwards, Christine; Iriti, Marcello; Hameed, Abdul; Khan, Murad A; Khan, Farman A; Rahman, Shafiq Ur

    2015-01-01

    Plant extracts are complex matrices and, although crude extracts are widely in use, purified compounds are pivotal in drug discovery. This study describes the application of automated preparative-HPLC combined with a rapid off-line bacterial bioassay, using reduction of a tetrazolium salt as an indicator of bacterial metabolism. This approach enabled the identification of fractions from Dodonaea viscosa that were active against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, which, ultimately, resulted in the identification of a clerodane type diterpenoid, 6?-hydroxy-15,16-epoxy-5?, 8?, 9?, 10?-cleroda-3, 13(16), 14-trien-18-oic acid, showing bacteriostatic activity (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 64-128 µg/mL) against test bacteria. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on antibacterial activity of this metabolite from D. viscosa. PMID:26343638

  1. Rapid Bioassay-Guided Isolation of Antibacterial Clerodane Type Diterpenoid from Dodonaea viscosa (L.) Jaeq.

    PubMed Central

    Khurram, Muhammad; Lawton, Linda A.; Edwards, Christine; Iriti, Marcello; Hameed, Abdul; Khan, Murad A.; Khan, Farman A.; ur Rahman, Shafiq

    2015-01-01

    Plant extracts are complex matrices and, although crude extracts are widely in use, purified compounds are pivotal in drug discovery. This study describes the application of automated preparative-HPLC combined with a rapid off-line bacterial bioassay, using reduction of a tetrazolium salt as an indicator of bacterial metabolism. This approach enabled the identification of fractions from Dodonaea viscosa that were active against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, which, ultimately, resulted in the identification of a clerodane type diterpenoid, 6?-hydroxy-15,16-epoxy-5?, 8?, 9?, 10?-cleroda-3, 13(16), 14-trien-18-oic acid, showing bacteriostatic activity (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 64–128 µg/mL) against test bacteria. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on antibacterial activity of this metabolite from D. viscosa. PMID:26343638

  2. Plant-mediated biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Prosopis farcta extract and its antibacterial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miri, Abdolhossein; Sarani, Mina; Rezazade Bazaz, Mahere; Darroudi, Majid

    2015-04-01

    "Green" synthesis of metal nanoparticles has become a promising synthetic strategy in nanoscience and nanotechnology in recent years. In this work, silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) were synthesized from extract of Prosopis farcta at room temperature. Formation of Ag-NPs at 1 mM concentration of AgNO3 gave spherical shape nanoparticles with mean diameter about 10.8 nm. The formation of nanoparticle was confirmed by the surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) band illustrated in UV-vis spectrophotometer. The morphology and size of the Ag-NPs were determined using high magnification transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystalline structure of obtained nanoparticles was investigated using the powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) pattern. In addition, these green synthesized Ag-NPs were found to show higher antibacterial activity against multi drug resistant clinical isolates.

  3. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug ...

  4. Generic Drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    Generic Drugs: The Same Medicine for Less Money What is a generic drug? A generic is a copy of a brand-name drug. A brand- name drug has a patent. When ... benefit to your health, and you will save money. 7KH IHGHUDO )RRG DQG 'UXJ $GPLQLVWUDWLRQ )'$ UHJXODWHV ERWK ...

  5. Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities of Makaluvamine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Nadkarni, Dwayaja H.; Wu, Hui; Velu, Sadanandan E.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a key etiological agent in the formation of dental caries. The major virulence factor is its ability to form biofilms. Inhibition of S. mutans biofilms offers therapeutic prospects for the treatment and the prevention of dental caries. In this study, 14 analogs of makaluvamine, a marine alkaloid, were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against S. mutans and for their ability to inhibit S. mutans biofilm formation. All analogs contained the tricyclic pyrroloiminoquinone core of makaluvamines. The structural variations of the analogs are on the amino substituents at the 7-position of the ring and the inclusion of a tosyl group on the pyrrole ring N of the makaluvamine core. The makaluvamine analogs displayed biofilm inhibition with IC50 values ranging from 0.4 ?M to 88 ?M. Further, the observed bactericidal activity of the majority of the analogs was found to be consistent with the anti-biofilm activity, leading to the conclusion that the anti-biofilm activity of these analogs stems from their ability to kill S. mutans. However, three of the most potent N-tosyl analogs showed biofilm IC50 values at least an order of magnitude lower than that of bactericidal activity, indicating that the biofilm activity of these analogs is more selective and perhaps independent of bactericidal activity. PMID:25767719

  6. Mechanism of antibacterial activity of copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Chakraborty, Ruchira; Basu, Tarakdas

    2014-04-01

    In a previous communication, we reported a new method of synthesis of stable metallic copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs), which had high potency for bacterial cell filamentation and cell killing. The present study deals with the mechanism of filament formation and antibacterial roles of Cu-NPs in E. coli cells. Our results demonstrate that NP-mediated dissipation of cell membrane potential was the probable reason for the formation of cell filaments. On the other hand, Cu-NPs were found to cause multiple toxic effects such as generation of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA degradation in E. coli cells. In vitro interaction between plasmid pUC19 DNA and Cu-NPs showed that the degradation of DNA was highly inhibited in the presence of the divalent metal ion chelator EDTA, which indicated a positive role of Cu2+ ions in the degradation process. Moreover, the fast destabilization, i.e. the reduction in size, of NPs in the presence of EDTA led us to propose that the nascent Cu ions liberated from the NP surface were responsible for higher reactivity of the Cu-NPs than the equivalent amount of its precursor CuCl2; the nascent ions were generated from the oxidation of metallic NPs when they were in the vicinity of agents, namely cells, biomolecules or medium components, to be reduced simultaneously.

  7. Antiseptic mouthwashes: in vitro antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Evandro; Nascimento, Andresa P; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane M; Razaboni, Ana M; de Andrade, Denise; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2015-08-01

    Mouthwashes are used as an adjunct to tooth brushing for improving breath and preventing oral diseases. The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro Maximum Inhibitory Dilution (MID) of 3 mouthwashes with different active ingredients against mutans streptococci (MS). The products analyzed were PeriogardR, CepacolR and PlaxR Fresh Mint. Their antibacterial activity was assessed in duplicate in 96-well microtiter plates against 36 clinical isolates of MS. Each mouthwash was submitted to a serial two-fold dilution (1/2.5 to 1/5120) using double concentration of Tryptose Soy Broth with 1.0% yeast extract. The final volume in each well was 100 mL plus 5 mL of a bacterial suspension, equivalent to 107 CFU/mL. They were incubated microaerobically at 37oC for 48 hours and the MIDs determined. MID was 1/320 for PeriogardR and CepacolR, and 1/20 for PlaxR. Statistical analysis revealed that the MID of PeriogardR MID did not differ from that of CepacolR (p>0.05), and was higher than that of PlaxR (p<0.05). In conclusion, the antiseptic mouthwashes containing chlorhexidine (PeriogardR) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CepacolR) had higher in vitroantibacterial activity (MID) against MS than the antiseptic mouthwash containing triclosan (PlaxR), according to microbiological method employed. PMID:26355890

  8. Drug diversion.

    PubMed

    Wood, Danielle

    2015-10-01

    Prescription drug diversion has significant health, legal and social implications. Deaths from misuse of prescription drugs account for a significant proportion of overdose deaths. The drugs most commonly involved are analgesics, particularly opioids, and psychoactive drugs, particularly benzodiazepines. Diverted drugs are most often sourced from a family member or friend, but are also sourced from overseas pharmacies or laboratories, or bought from drug dealers. Drug diversion can be mitigated by good prescribing practices. Systems for monitoring the prescribing and dispensing of medicines are being instituted across Australia. PMID:26648654

  9. Drug diversion

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Prescription drug diversion has significant health, legal and social implications. Deaths from misuse of prescription drugs account for a significant proportion of overdose deaths. The drugs most commonly involved are analgesics, particularly opioids, and psychoactive drugs, particularly benzodiazepines. Diverted drugs are most often sourced from a family member or friend, but are also sourced from overseas pharmacies or laboratories, or bought from drug dealers. Drug diversion can be mitigated by good prescribing practices. Systems for monitoring the prescribing and dispensing of medicines are being instituted across Australia. PMID:26648654

  10. Layer-by-layer assemblies for antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoying; Jun Loh, Xian

    2015-12-10

    The adhesion and proliferation of bacteria on various artificial surfaces affects the functionality of these specific interfaces. To overcome the problems caused by bacterial growth on these surfaces, various antibacterial coatings were developed. In this review, we summarized most of the antibacterial surfaces prepared by the Layer-by-Layer (LbL) assembly approach and classified these LbL films based on their antibacterial mechanisms. In the first group, the bactericidal LbL assemblies which incorporate various biocides including heavy metals, antibiotics, cationic molecules, antimicrobial peptides and enzymes are able to kill surrounding or contacted bacteria. In the second group, we focused on the physical aspects of film surfaces. Bacterial adhesion resistant LbL films have been fabricated to adjust the substrate surface properties such as surface free energy (or wettability), roughness, and surface charge which may affect the adhesion of bacteria. Furthermore, as an enhancement in the antibacterial efficiency, multifunctional LbL assemblies combining both bactericidal and adhesion resistant functionalities were discussed. The advantages and limitations of these antibacterial LbL assemblies were summarized and subsequently directions for future development were proposed. PMID:26415703

  11. Antibacterial activity of garlic powder against Escherichia coli O-157.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, J; Kita, T; Ishita, K; Uchisawa, H; Matsue, H

    1999-12-01

    The antibacterial activity of garlic powder against O-157 was tested by using garlic bulbs post-harvested 1 y. O-157 at 10(6-7) cfu/mL perished after incubation for 24 h with a 1% solution of garlic powder. The use of powder from fresh garlic was more effective for antibacterial activity than that from old garlic; the 1% solution of fresh garlic powder eradicating the O-157 in 6 h. The antibacterial activity was resistant to heat treatment of 100 degrees C for 20 min. The water-soluble components of garlic powder were fractionated into three fractions (Fr. 1-3) by Sephadex G-100 column chromatography, among which Fr. 3 showed antibacterial activity against O-157 but the other fractions were scarce in activity. The antibacterial activity was also shown against other types of pathogenic bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Salmonella enteritidis, and Candida albicans. Thus, the practical use of garlic powder is expected to prevent bacteria-caused food poisoning. PMID:10737231

  12. Evaluation of the antibacterial effects of vancomycin hydrochloride released from agar-gelatin-bioactive glass composites.

    PubMed

    Rivadeneira, Josefina; Di Virgilio, Ana Laura; Audisio, M Carina; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Gorustovich, Alejandro A

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the perfomance of agar-gelatin (AG) composites and AG-containing 45S5 bioactive glass (BG) microparticles (AGBG) in relation to their water uptake capacity, sustained release of a drug over time, and antibacterial effects. The composites were fabricated by the gel-casting method. To impart the local drug release capacity, vancomycin hydrochloride (VC) was loaded in the composites in concentrations of 0.5 and 1?mg?ml(-1). VC release was assessed in distilled water at 37?°C up to 72?h and quantified spectrophotometrically. The antibacterial activity of composites was evaluated by the inhibition zone test and the plate count method. The experiments were performed in vitro up to 48?h on three staphylococcus strains: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC29213, S. aureus ATCC6538 and Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC12228. The results showed that the addition of BG to AG composites did not affect the degree of water uptake. The release of VC was significantly affected by the presence of BG. VC release was higher from AGBGVC films than from AGVC ones over prolonged incubation times. Bacterial inhibition zones were found around the composites. The halos were larger when the cells were put in contact with AGVC composites than when they were put in contact with AGBGVC ones. Nevertheless, the viable count method demonstrated that the composites inhibited Staphylococcus cell growth with no statistical differences. In conclusion, the addition of BG did not reflect an improvement in the parameters studied. On the other hand, composites loaded with VC would have a role in prophylaxis against bacterial infection. PMID:25586240

  13. Validation of a method for the analysis of quinolones residues in bovine muscle by liquid chromatography with electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Rubies, A; Vaquerizo, R; Centrich, F; Compañó, R; Granados, M; Prat, M D

    2007-04-15

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination and confirmation of nine quinolones was optimised and validated according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Analytes were extracted from veal muscle with water and extracts purified with 96-well plates Oasis HLB cartridges. Separation was carried out in a silica-based C(18) column (50mmx2.1mm) with mobile phases consisting of water/acetonitrile mixtures containing acetic acid. Linear calibration curves in the ranges 4-400 and 50-800ngg(-1), with correlation coefficients at least 0.995, were obtained for all the analytes. At concentration levels above 10ngg(-1), quantification errors were lower than 10% and repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility standard deviations below 6% and 10%, respectively. Decision limits and detection capabilities are reported. PMID:19071613

  14. Insights through AM1 calculations into the structural requirement of 3,4,6-substituted-2-quinolone analogs towards FMS kinase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arun Kumar; Sabarwal, Neetu; Agrawal, Yogesh P; Prachand, Sumeet; Jain, Sanjay

    2010-08-01

    In the present work, we focused on quantification of activity of 3,4,6-substituted-2-quinolone derivatives with reference to structural properties. The multi-variant regression expressions were developed through sequential multiple linear regression technique, considering adjustable correlation coefficient (r(adj)(2)). The amalgamated best fit consensus scoring function showed coefficient of determination (0.891), leave one out cross validated squared correlation coefficient (0.776) and external predictivity value (0.668). The detailed structural investigation revealed that the FMS kinase inhibitory activity is predominantly explained by the topological descriptor, functional group, RDF and MoRSE code. The structural insights gleaned from the study could be usefully employed to design inhibitors with a much more enhanced potency. PMID:20537436

  15. Antibacterial activity and biological performance of a novel antibacterial coating containing a halogenated furanone compound loaded poly(L-lactic acid) nanoparticles on microarc-oxidized titanium

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yicheng; Zhao, Xianghui; Liu, Xianghui; Sun, Weige; Ren, Huifang; Gao, Bo; Wu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Titanium implants have been widely used for many medical applications, but bacterial infection after implant surgery remains one of the most common and intractable complications. To this end, long-term antibacterial ability of the implant surface is highly desirable to prevent implant-associated infection. In this study, a novel antibacterial coating containing a new antibacterial agent, (Z-)-4-bromo-5-(bromomethylene)-2(5H)-furanone loaded poly(L-lactic acid) nanoparticles, was fabricated on microarc-oxidized titanium for this purpose. The antibacterial coating produced a unique inhibition zone against Staphylococcus aureus throughout a 60-day study period, which is normally long enough to prevent the infection around implants in the early and intermediate stages. The antibacterial rate for adherent S. aureus was about 100% in the first 10 days and constantly remained over 90% in the following 20 days. Fluorescence staining of adherent S. aureus also confirmed the excellent antibacterial ability of the antibacterial coating. Moreover, in vitro experiments showed an enhanced osteoblast adhesion and proliferation on the antibacterial coating, and more notable cell spread was observed at the early stage. It is therefore concluded that the fabricated antibacterial coating, which exhibits relatively long-term antibacterial ability and excellent biological performance, is a potential and promising strategy to prevent implant-associated infection. PMID:25632231

  16. USING THE REACTIVE DYE METHOD TO COVALENTLY ATTACH ANTIBACTERIAL COMPOUNDS TO COTTON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For a long time, fibers and fabric with naturally antibacterial properties or treatments to provide antibacterial properties were the main emphasis where the quality and durability of the textile material was the main concern. The textile industry has since been attempting to develop antibacterial ...

  17. Fijimycins AC, three antibacterial etamycin-class depsipeptides from a marine-derived Streptomyces sp.

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    : Antibacterial depsipeptides MRSA activity Etamycin class antibacterials a b s t r a c t Three new depsipeptides antibacterial activity against three methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains with MIC100 caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a growing problem of potential urgency

  18. Molecular characterisation of the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of the parC gene locus in viridans-group streptococci.

    PubMed

    Murayama, M; Maeda, Y; Goldsmith, C E; Coulter, W A; Masons, C; Millar, B C; Matsuda, M; Moore, J E

    2011-01-01

    Forty-eight isolates of viridans-group streptococci (VGS) from adults and children in the community are examined for their resistance to ciprofloxacin phenotypically by determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). In addition, the parC gene locus is amplified and sequenced in all isolates and mutations noted. Overall, 44 VGS organisms were found to be susceptible to ciprofloxacin by the broth microdilution method, and the remaining four strains had intermediate susceptibility. Reduced MICs were observed with intermediate strains when reserpine was added to the broth, inhibiting any efflux activity. Overall, the effect of adding reserpine to the broth medium was to add one doubling dilution to the MIC in the case of Streptococcus mitis, S. oralis and S. salivarius, as well as to increase the MIC by two doubling dilutions in two of the three S. parasanguinis isolates. Amino acid sequence analysis of the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of the parC gene locus showed good correlation to the phenotypic resistance to ciprofloxacin, where no confirmed mutation conferring quinolone resistance was found. Eleven amino acid positions showed discordance with S. pneumoniae R6 and eight (S52, F55, S58, N91, E135, K137, F141 and S167) were common in the VGS species examined. In addition, minor substitutions were found at three positions (D51, T54 and V86). In conclusion, this study demonstrates the low occurrence of ciprofloxacin resistance in a population of VGS isolated from the community. In addition, several silent mutations were noted in VGS organisms without any increase in MIC against ciprofloxacin. PMID:21950200

  19. Evaluation of antibacterial and cytotoxic activity of Artemisia nilagirica and Murraya koenigii leaf extracts against mycobacteria and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Artemisia nilagirica (Asteraceae) and Murraya koenigii (Rutaceae) are widely distributed in eastern region of India. Leaves of Artemisia nilagirica plant are used to treat cold and cough by the local tribal population in east India. Murraya koenigii is an edible plant previously reported to have an antibacterial activity. Pathogenic strains of mycobacteria are resistant to most of the conventional antibiotics. Therefore, it is imperative to identify novel antimycobacterial molecules to treat mycobacterial infection. Methods In this study, ethanol, petroleum ether and water extracts of Artemisia nilagirica and Murraya koenigii were tested for antibacterial activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG in synergy with first line anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs, and for cytotoxic activities on mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Antibacterial activity was determined by colony forming unit (CFU) assay. Intracellular survival assay was performed by infecting RAW264.7 cells with M. smegmatis before and after treatment with plant extracts. Cytotoxity was checked by MTT [3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide] assay. Genotoxicity was studied by DAPI staining and COMET assay using mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cell line. Cell apoptosis was checked by Annexin-V/FITC dual staining method. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production was checked by DCFH staining and Griess reagent, respectively. Results Ethanol extracts of A. nilagirica (IC50 300 ?g/ml) and M. koenigii (IC50 400 ?g/ml) were found to be more effective against Mycobacterium smegmatis as compared to petroleum ether and water extracts. M. koenigii extract showed maximum activity against M. bovis BCG in combination with a first line anti-TB drug rifampicin. M. koenigii leaf extract also exerted more cytototoxic (IC50 20 ?g/ml), genotoxic and apoptosis in mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cell line. Treatment of mouse macrophages with A. nilagirica extract increased intracellular killing of M. smegmatis by inducing production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. Conclusions Ethanol extracts of A. nilagirica and M. koenigii were found to be more effective against mycobacteria. As compared to A. nilagirica, M. koenigii ethanol extract exhibited significant synergistic antibacterial activity against M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG in combination with anti-tuberculosis drug rifampicin, and also showed increased cytotoxicity, DNA damage and apoptosis in mouse macrophages. PMID:24597853

  20. Antibiotic-containing polymers for localized, sustained drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Stebbins, Nicholas D.; Ouimet, Michelle A.; Uhrich, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Many currently used antibiotics suffer from issues such as systemic toxicity, short half-life, and increased susceptibility to bacterial resistance. Although most antibiotic classes are administered systemically through oral or intravenous routes, a more efficient delivery system is needed. This review discusses the chemical conjugation of antibiotics to polymers, achieved by forming covalent bonds between antibiotics and a pre-existing polymer or by developing novel antibiotic-containing polymers. Through conjugating antibiotics to polymers, unique polymer properties can be taken advantage of. These polymeric antibiotics display controlled, sustained drug release and vary in antibiotic class type, synthetic method, polymer composition, bond lability, and antibacterial activity. The polymer synthesis, characterization, drug release, and antibacterial activities, if applicable, will be presented to offer a detailed overview of each system. PMID:24751888

  1. Characterization of enhanced antibacterial effects of novel silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Siddhartha; Bera, Tanmay; Roy, Arnab; Singh, Gajendra; Ramachandrarao, P.; Dash, Debabrata

    2007-06-01

    In the present study, we report the preparation of silver nanoparticles in the range of 10-15 nm with increased stability and enhanced anti-bacterial potency. The morphology of the nanoparticles was characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles used in this study was found to be far more potent than that described in the earlier reports. This effect was dose dependent and was more pronounced against gram-negative bacteria than gram-positive organisms. Although bacterial cell lysis could be one of the reasons for the observed antibacterial property, nanoparticles also modulated the phosphotyrosine profile of putative bacterial peptides, which could thus affect bacterial signal transduction and inhibit the growth of the organisms.

  2. Antifungal and Antibacterial Metabolites from a French Poplar Type Propolis

    PubMed Central

    Boisard, Séverine; Le Ray, Anne-Marie; Landreau, Anne; Kempf, Marie; Cassisa, Viviane; Flurin, Catherine; Richomme, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    During this study, the in vitro antifungal and antibacterial activities of different extracts (aqueous and organic) obtained from a French propolis batch were evaluated. Antifungal activity was evaluated by broth microdilution on three pathogenic strains: Candida albicans, C. glabrata, and Aspergillus fumigatus. Antibacterial activity was assayed using agar dilution method on 36 Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains including Staphylococcus aureus. Organic extracts showed a significant antifungal activity against C. albicans and C. glabrata (MIC80 between 16 and 31?µg/mL) but only a weak activity towards A. fumigatus (MIC80 = 250?µg/mL). DCM based extracts exhibited a selective Gram-positive antibacterial activity, especially against S. aureus (SA) and several of its methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) strains (MIC100 30–97?µg/mL). A new and active derivative of catechin was also identified whereas a synergistic antimicrobial effect was noticed during this study. PMID:25873978

  3. Antibacterial gold nanoparticles-biomass assisted synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Badwaik, Vivek D; Willis, Chad B; Pender, Dillon S; Paripelly, Rammohan; Shah, Monic; Kherde, Yogesh A; Vangala, Lakshmisri M; Gonzalez, Matthew S; Dakshinamurthy, Rajalingam

    2013-10-01

    Xylose is a natural monosaccharide found in biomass such as straw, pecan shells, cottonseed hulls, and corncobs. Using this monosaccharide, we report the facile, green synthesis and characterization of stable xylose encapsulated gold nanoparticles (Xyl-GNPs) with potent antibacterial activity. Xyl-GNPs were synthesized using the reduction property of xylose in an aqueous solution containing choloraurate anions carried out at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. These nanoparticles were stable and near spherical in shape with an average diameter of 15 +/- 5 nm. Microbiological assay results showed the concentration dependent antibacterial activity of these particles against both Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus epidermidis) bacteria. Thus the facile, environmentally friendly Xyl-GNPs have many potential applications in chemical and biomedical industries, particularly in the development of antibacterial agents in the field of biomedicine. PMID:24015501

  4. Investigation of pseudo boehmite nanoparticles as an antibacterial agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Wu, Dudu; Chen, Jiaxi

    2015-06-01

    Pseudo boehmite nanoparticles were synthesized by using bovine serum albumin as the structure-directing agent. The morphology and crystal phase of the pseudo boehmite nanoparticles were determined by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractograms and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The antibacterial behaviors of pseudo boehmite nanoparticles were investigated using Escherichia coli (gram-negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (gram-positive) as model organisms. The results indicated that the synthesized pseudo boehmite nanoparticles showed high antibacterial activity when compared to plain aluminum oxide, which was assessed by measuring the growth inhibition and testing the zone of inhibition. The plausible mechanism of antibacterial behavior was attributed to the generation of reactive oxygen species by pseudo boehmite nanoparticles.

  5. Cellulosic/wool pigment prints with remarkable antibacterial functionalities.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, N A; Eid, B M; Khalil, H M

    2015-01-22

    Several bio-active agents namely choline chloride, triclosan derivative, PEG-600 and 4-hydroxybenzophenone were successfully included into solvent-free pigment formulations, in a single-stage process, followed by screen printing and microwave-fixation to obtain antibacterial functionalized cellulosic/wool pigment prints. Results obtained signify that both the improvement in functionalization and coloration properties are governed by type of antibacterial agent, kind of substrate as well as pigment colorant. The imparted antibacterial activity of the loaded bio-active agents follows the decreasing order: G+ve (Staphylococcus aureus)>G-ve (Escherichia coli), keeping other parameters constant. The imparted functional and coloration properties showed no significant decrease even after 15 washings. Mode of interactions among the nominated substrates, the pigment paste constituents and the bioactive agents were also proposed. PMID:25439932

  6. Modified bamboo rayon-copper nanoparticle composites as antibacterial textiles.

    PubMed

    Teli, M D; Sheikh, Javed

    2013-10-01

    In the current study the bamboo rayon fabric grafted with acrylamide was utilized as a backbone to immobilize copper nanoprticles. The grafted bamboo rayon was first treated with CuSO4 followed by chemical reduction. The modified product was characterized using FTIR, TGA and SEM. The characteristic color developed after reduction was measured spectrophotometrically. The grafted bamboo rayon with Cu nanoparticles was then evaluated for antibacterial activity against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria and the durability of their antibacterial activity after washing. The product showed antibacterial activity against both types of bacterias which was found to be durable till 50 washes. The material can be claimed as suitable candidate for medical textile applications to prevent cross-infections. PMID:23916646

  7. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity of Novel Quaternary Ammonium Pyridoxine Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Shtyrlin, Nikita V; Sapozhnikov, Sergey V; Koshkin, Sergey A; Iksanova, Alfiya G; Sabirov, Arthur H; Kayumov, Airat R; Nureeva, Aliya A; Zeldi, Marina I; Shtyrlin, Yurii G

    2015-01-01

    A series of 26 quaternary ammonium pyridoxine derivatives were synthesized and their cytotoxicity and antibacterial activities against clinically relevant bacterial strains were tested in vitro. The antibacterial activity of mono-ammonium salts increased with the rise of the lipophilicity and compound 3,3,5-trimethyl-8,8-dioctyl-1,7,8,9-tetrahydro-[1,3]dioxino[5,4-d]pyrrolo[3,4-b]pyridin-8- ium chloride (2d) reaches a maximum among them. Bis-ammonium salt of pyridoxine 4 with two dimethyloctylamine groups also demonstrated high antibacterial activity despite lower lipophilicity. The results of MTT assay indicated that HEK 293 cells were more sensitive than HSF to quaternary ammonium pyridoxine derivatives. Compounds 2d and 4 did not induce the damage of the DNA and might be of interest in the development of new antimicrobials. PMID:25938426

  8. Drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Boobis, Alan; Watelet, Jean-Baptiste; Whomsley, Rhys; Benedetti, Margherita Strolin; Demoly, Pascal; Tipton, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Drugs for allergy are often taken in combination with other drugs, either to treat allergy or other conditions. In common with many pharmaceuticals, most such drugs are subject to metabolism by P450 enzymes and to transmembrane transport. This gives rise to considerable potential for drug-drug interactions, to which must be added consideration of drug-diet interactions. The potential for metabolism-based drug interactions is increasingly being taken into account during drug development, using a variety of in silico and in vitro approaches. Prediction of transporter-based interactions is not as advanced. The clinical importance of a drug interaction will depend upon a number of factors, and it is important to address concerns quantitatively, taking into account the therapeutic index of the compound. PMID:19601724

  9. Cytotoxic and antibacterial activities of the analogues of pogostone.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zheng-Wei; Peng, Cheng; Dai, Min; Han, Bo

    2015-10-01

    Six new (A5-A6, A8-A11) and six known (A1-A4, A7, PO) ?-pyrone compounds were synthesized with dehydroacetate and aldehydes in tetrahydrofuran at room temperature. And their structures were determined by (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR and mass spectroscopy. In the bioscreening experiments, ten compounds (A1-A5, PO, A7-A10) exhibited antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 4-512mg/L, and nine compounds (A1-A5, PO, A7-A8, A10) exhibited antibacterial activities against Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) ATCC 43300 with MIC values of 4-256mg/L. Moreover, compound A10 showed the highest antibacterial activity against S. aureus ATCC 25923 and MRSA with MIC values of 4mg/L, while the MIC values of Amoxicillin were 8mg/L and >256mg/L, respectively. Two compounds (A8 and PO) exhibited antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 with MIC values of 32-512mg/L. However, only one compound (A8) exhibited significant antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa CVCC 3360 with MIC value of 256mg/L. Moreover, A10 exhibited significant inhibition of proliferation in the four cell lines MCF-10, A549, A2780 and MFC, and showed stronger inhibitive activity of these four selected cell lines than cisplatin in the cytotoxic assay. Thus, this study suggests that pogostone analogues, especially A10, represented a kind of promising antibacterial and antineoplastic agents. PMID:26272659

  10. Effects of Drug Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hurts Unborn Children Drug Abuse Hurts Your Health Drug Abuse Hurts Bodies Drug Abuse Hurts Brains Drug Abuse and Mental ... Hurts Unborn Children Drug Abuse Hurts Your Health Drug Abuse Hurts Bodies Drug Abuse Hurts Brains Drug Abuse and Mental ...

  11. Endophytic fungi: a reservoir of antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Sunil K.; Verekar, Shilpa A.; Bhave, Sarita V.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug drug resistant bacteria are becoming increasingly problematic particularly in the under developed countries of the world. The most important microorganisms that have seen a geometric rise in numbers are Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium, Penicillin resistant Streptococcus pneumonia and multiple drug resistant tubercule bacteria to name a just few. New drug scaffolds are essential to tackle this every increasing problem. These scaffolds can be sourced from nature itself. Endophytic fungi are an important reservoir of therapeutically active compounds. This review attempts to present some data relevant to the problem. New, very specific and effective antibiotics are needed but also at an affordable price! A Herculean task for researchers all over the world! In the Asian subcontinent indigenous therapeutics that has been practiced over the centuries such as Ayurveda have been effective as “handed down data” in family generations. May need a second, third and more “in-depth investigations?” PMID:25620957

  12. Recycling antibiotics into GUMBOS: A new combination strategy to combat multi-drug resistant bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria, coupled with the lack of new antibiotics in development, is fast evolving into a global crisis. New strategies utilizing existing antibacterial agents are urgently needed. We propose one such strategy in which four outmoded ß-lactam antibiotics (amp...

  13. Deuterated Drugs.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2015-09-01

    Many drugs are carbon-based, and carbon-hydrogen bonding is particularly relevant for understanding important properties of drug molecules. Deuteration refers to the selective replacement of protium hydrogen isotope atoms in small-molecule drugs with deuterium hydrogen isotope atoms. Deuteration of a drug is most likely to affect pharmacokinetic properties, such as metabolism, rather than its pharmacodynamic effects. For this reason, the metabolism of certain drugs may be favorably influenced when deuterium is substituted for protium, resulting in improved safety, tolerability, or efficacy. Examples of deuterated drugs that have been evaluated in clinical studies include paroxetine, tetrabenazine, and dextromethorphan. PMID:26325169

  14. Antibacterial activity of plant extracts from Brazilian southeast region.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Denilson F; Pereira, Aline C; Figueiredo, Henrique C P; Carvalho, Douglas A; Silva, Greiciele; Nunes, Alexandro S; Alves, Dejane S; Carvalho, Hudson W P

    2007-02-01

    A screening was conducted with 26 plants collected in the Brazilian southeast region, to identify plant extracts with antibacterial properties against Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Initially, the agar diffusion method was employed. Then, those extracts presenting activity were submitted to a broth microdilution assay to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC). It was observed that 13 of the tested extracts showed antibacterial activity. The best results were obtained with those from Lantana lilacina and Phyllanthus tenellus. PMID:17169500

  15. Discovery of an ultra-short linear antibacterial tetrapeptide with anti-MRSA activity from a structure-activity relationship study.

    PubMed

    Lau, Qiu Ying; Ng, Fui Mee; Cheong, Jin Wei Darryl; Yap, Yi Yong Alvin; Tan, Yoke Yan Fion; Jureen, Roland; Hill, Jeffrey; Chia, Cheng San Brian

    2015-11-13

    The overuse and misuse of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria, including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the primary pathogen responsible for human skin and soft-tissue infections. Antibacterial peptides are known to kill bacteria by rapidly disrupting their membranes and are deemed plausible alternatives to conventional antibiotics. One advantage of their membrane-targeting mode of action is that bacteria are unlikely to develop resistance as changing their cell membrane structure and morphology would likely involve extensive genetic mutations. However, major concerns in using peptides as antibacterial drugs include their instability towards plasma proteases, toxicity towards human cells due to their membrane-targeting mode of action and high manufacturing cost. These concerns can be mitigated by developing peptides as topical agents, by the judicial selection of amino acids and developing very short peptides respectively. In this preliminary report, we reveal a linear, non-hemolytic tetrapeptide with rapid bactericidal activity against MRSA developed from a structure-activity relationship study based on the antimicrobial hexapeptide WRWRWR-NH2. Our finding opens promising avenues for the development of ultra-short antibacterials to treat multidrug-resistant MRSA skin and soft tissue infections. PMID:26489599

  16. Antibacterial activity of sulfamethoxazole transformation products (TPs): general relevance for sulfonamide TPs modified at the para position.

    PubMed

    Majewsky, Marius; Wagner, Danny; Delay, Markus; Bräse, Stefan; Yargeau, Viviane; Horn, Harald

    2014-10-20

    Sulfonamide antibiotics undergo transformation in the aquatic environment through biodegradation, photolysis, or hydrolysis. In this study, the residual antibacterial activity of 11 transformation products (TPs) of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) was investigated with regard to their in vitro growth and luminescence inhibition on Vibrio fischeri (30 min and 24 h exposure). Two transformation products, 4-hydroxy-SMX and N(4)-hydroxy-acetyl-SMX, were synthesized in-house and confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Results of individual compound experiments showed that TPs modified at the para amino group still exhibit clear antibacterial effects, whereas TPs resulting from breakdown of the SMX structure lost this mechanism of action. 4-NO2- and 4-OH-SMX were found to inhibit growth to a clearly greater extent than the parent compound, SMX. In contrast, the N(4)-acetyl- and N(4)-hydroxy-acetyl-derivatives retain less than 10 and 5% of the effect of SMX on growth and luminescence inhibition, respectively. The effect of a mixture of para-modified TPs was observed to be additive. Considering the homologous series of sulfa drugs widely prescribed and their common mechanism of action, the potential environmental impact must consider the total amount of sulfonamide antibiotics and their derivative TPs, which might end up in a water body. Extrapolating the results obtained here for the para TPs of SMX to other sulfa drugs and determining the persistence and occurrence of these compounds in the aquatic environment is required for improved risk assessment. PMID:25211553

  17. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Infographics » Drugged Driving Drugged Driving Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Top Right Figure : In 2009, ... crash than those who don't smoke. Bottom Text: Develop Social Strategies Offer to be a designated ...

  18. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Abused Drugs Charts Emerging Trends Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... and decrease motor coordination. Drivers who have used cocaine or methamphetamine can be aggressive and reckless when ...

  19. Prescription Drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search Home + Drug Facts Anabolic Steroids Bath Salts Cocaine Cough and Cold Medicine (DXM and Codeine Syrup) ... Map Home Drug Facts Anabolic Steroids Bath Salts Cocaine Cough and Cold Medicine (DXM and Codeine Syrup) ...

  20. Drug Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How it's manufactured Results of animal testing and clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying online from only legitimate pharmacies and taking your medicines correctly.

  1. Re-engineering nalidixic acid's chemical scaffold: A step towards the development of novel anti-tubercular and anti-bacterial leads for resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Peraman, Ramalingam; Varma, Raghu Veer; Reddy, Y Padmanabha

    2015-10-01

    Occurrence of antibacterial and antimycobacterial resistance stimulated a thrust to discover new drugs for infectious diseases. Herein we report the work on re-engineering nalidixic acid's chemical scaffold for newer leads. Stepwise clubbing of quinoxaline, 1,2,4-triazole/1,3,4-oxadiazole with nalidixic acid yielded better compounds. Compounds were screened against ciprofloxacin resistant bacteria and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv species. Results were obtained as minimum inhibitory concentration, it was evident that molecule with quinoxaline linked azide as side chain served as antitubercular lead (<6.25 ?g/ml) whilst molecule with oxadiazole or triazole linked quinoxaline side chain served as anti-bacterial lead. Few compounds were significantly active against Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris with MIC less than 0.06 ?g/ml and relatively potent than ciprofloxacin. No true compound was potentially active against Salmonella species as compared to amoxicillin. PMID:26277407

  2. Advances in MRSA drug discovery: where are we and where do we need to be?

    PubMed Central

    Kurosu, Michio; Siricilla, Shajila; Mitachi, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been on the increase during the past decade, due to the steady growth of the elderly and immunocompromised patients, and the emergence of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) bacterial strains. Although, only a limited number of anti-MRSA drugs are available, a number of different combination antimicrobial drug regimens have been used to treat serious MRSA infections. Thus, addition of several new antistaphylococcal drugs into clinical practice should broaden therapeutic options. Because MRSA is one of the most common and problematic bacteria associated with increasing antimicrobial resistance, continuous efforts on discovery of lead compounds as well as development of alternative therapies and faster diagnostics to ensure effective antistaphylococcal therapy are required. Areas covered This article summarizes the FDA approved drugs to treat MRSA infections, the drugs in clinical trials, and the drug leads for MRSA and related Gram-positive bacterial infections. In addition, the mode of action of antistaphylococcal molecules and resistant mechanisms of some molecules are briefly discussed. Expert opinion The number of pipeline drugs presently undergoing clinical trials is not particularly encouraging. There are limited and rather expensive therapeutic options for the infections by MRSA in the critically ill. This review article provides an update on antistaphylococcal drugs in clinical trials and antibacterial molecules effective against Gram-positive bacteria including MRSA. The structural and biological information of antibacterials summarized here are very useful for designing drug leads to develop into new anti-MRSA drugs. PMID:23829425

  3. Drug allergy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Drug allergy encompasses a spectrum of immunologically-mediated hypersensitivity reactions with varying mechanisms and clinical presentations. This type of adverse drug reaction (ADR) not only affects patient quality of life, but may also lead to delayed treatment, unnecessary investigations, and even mortality. Given the myriad of symptoms associated with the condition, diagnosis is often challenging. Therefore, referral to an allergist experienced in the identification, diagnosis and management of drug allergy is recommended if a drug-induced allergic reaction is suspected. Diagnosis relies on a careful history and physical examination. In some instances, skin testing, graded challenges and induction of drug tolerance procedures may be required. The most effective strategy for the management of drug allergy is avoidance or discontinuation of the offending drug. When available, alternative medications with unrelated chemical structures should be substituted. Cross-reactivity among drugs should be taken into consideration when choosing alternative agents. Additional therapy for drug hypersensitivity reactions is largely supportive and may include topical corticosteroids, oral antihistamines and, in severe cases, systemic corticosteroids. In the event of anaphylaxis, the treatment of choice is injectable epinephrine. If a particular drug to which the patient is allergic is indicated and there is no suitable alternative, induction of drug tolerance procedures may be considered to induce temporary tolerance to the drug. This article provides a backgrounder on drug allergy and strategies for the diagnosis and management of some of the most common drug-induced allergic reactions, such allergies to penicillin, sulfonamides, cephalosporins, radiocontrast media, local anesthetics, general anesthetics, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:22165859

  4. Antibacterial activity of Nymphaea nouchali (Burm. f) flower

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The present work aimed to find out the antibacterial activity of Nymphaea nouchali flower on human and plant pathogenic bacteria. Methods Antibacterial potency of methanol, acetone, ethyl acetate and petroleum spirit extracts of Nymphaea nouchali flower has been tested against four human pathogenic bacteria Bacillus subtilis (FO 3026) Escherichia coli (IFO 3007), Klebsiella pneumonia (ATTC 10031) and Sarcina lutea (IFO 3232) and one plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris (IAM 1671) by disc diffusion assay. Zone of inhibition produced by different extracts against the test bacteria was measured and compared with standard antibiotic disc. Results Methanol extract possessed better antibacterial activity against two pathogenic bacteria, B. subtilis (FO 3026) and S. lutea (IFO 3232) than commercial antibiotic nalidixic acid. Acetone extract showed moderate sensitivity whereas B. subtilis (FO 3026), S. lutea (IFO 3232) and X. campestris (IAM 1671) showed resistance to ethyl acetate and petroleum spirit extracts. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of various extracts were ranged between 128–2048 ?gml-1. Conclusions Nymphaea nouchali flower could be a potential candidate for future development of novel broad spectrum antibacterial herbal formulation. PMID:24099586

  5. Recent advances in engineering topography mediated antibacterial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Jafar; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2015-09-01

    The tendency of bacterial cells to adhere and colonize a material surface leading to biofilm formation is a fundamental challenge underlying many different applications including microbial infections associated with biomedical devices and products. Although, bacterial attachment to surfaces has been extensively studied in the past, the effect of surface topography on bacteria-material interactions has received little attention until more recently. We review the recent progress in surface topography based approaches for engineering antibacterial surfaces. Biomimicry of antibacterial surfaces in nature is a popular strategy. Whereas earlier endeavors in the field aimed at minimizing cell attachment, more recent efforts have focused on developing bactericidal surfaces. However, not all such topography mediated bactericidal surfaces are necessarily cytocompatible thus underscoring the need for continued efforts for research in this area for developing antibacterial and yet cytocompatible surfaces for use in implantable biomedical applications. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the current strategies and challenges in the emerging field of topography mediated antibacterial surfaces.

  6. Recent advances in engineering topography mediated antibacterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Jafar; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2015-10-14

    The tendency of bacterial cells to adhere and colonize a material surface leading to biofilm formation is a fundamental challenge underlying many different applications including microbial infections associated with biomedical devices and products. Although, bacterial attachment to surfaces has been extensively studied in the past, the effect of surface topography on bacteria-material interactions has received little attention until more recently. We review the recent progress in surface topography based approaches for engineering antibacterial surfaces. Biomimicry of antibacterial surfaces in nature is a popular strategy. Whereas earlier endeavors in the field aimed at minimizing cell attachment, more recent efforts have focused on developing bactericidal surfaces. However, not all such topography mediated bactericidal surfaces are necessarily cytocompatible thus underscoring the need for continued efforts for research in this area for developing antibacterial and yet cytocompatible surfaces for use in implantable biomedical applications. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the current strategies and challenges in the emerging field of topography mediated antibacterial surfaces. PMID:26372264

  7. Chitosan-based nanofibrous membranes for antibacterial filter applications.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ashleigh; Oldinski, Rachael; Ma, Hongyan; Bryers, James D; Zhang, Miqin

    2013-01-30

    Nanofibrous membranes have drawn considerable interest for filtration applications due to their ability to withstand high fluid flux while removing micro- and nano-sized particulates from solution. The desire to introduce an antibacterial function into water filter applications presents a challenge to widespread application of fibrous membranes because the addition of chemicals or biocides may produce harmful byproducts downstream. Here, we report the development of chitosan-polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibrous membranes to utilize the natural antibacterial property of chitosan for antibacterial water filtration. Chitosan-PCL fibers with diameters of 200-400 nm and chitosan contents of 25, 50 and 75 wt% were prepared by electrospinning. In a series of bacterial challenge tests, chitosan-PCL fibrous membranes significantly reduced Staphylococcus aureus adhesion compared to PCL fibrous membranes. In water permeability and particulate size removal tests, fibrous membranes with 25% chitosan supported the greatest water flux (?7000 L/h/m(2)) with 100% removal of 300-nm particulates, while maintaining the membrane integrity. This study demonstrates the potential of chitosan-PCL nanofibrous membranes as pre-filters for water filtration systems that demonstrate combinatorial filtration and intrinsic antibacterial advantages. PMID:23218292

  8. Recent advances in engineering topography mediated antibacterial surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    The tendency of bacterial cells to adhere and colonize a material surface leading to biofilm formation is a fundamental challenge underlying many different applications including microbial infections associated with biomedical devices and products. Although, bacterial attachment to surfaces has been extensively studied in the past, the effect of surface topography on bacteria–material interactions has received little attention until more recently. We review the recent progress in surface topography based approaches for engineering antibacterial surfaces. Biomimicry of antibacterial surfaces in nature is a popular strategy. Whereas earlier endeavors in the field aimed at minimizing cell attachment, more recent efforts have focused on developing bactericidal surfaces. However, not all such topography mediated bactericidal surfaces are necessarily cytocompatible thus underscoring the need for continued efforts for research in this area for developing antibacterial and yet cytocompatible surfaces for use in implantable biomedical applications. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the current strategies and challenges in the emerging field of topography mediated antibacterial surfaces. PMID:26372264

  9. Antibacterial resistance in sub-Saharan Africa: an underestimated emergency

    PubMed Central

    Kariuki, Samuel; Dougan, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Antibacterial resistance–associated infections are known to increase morbidity and mortality and cost of treatment and to potentially put others in the community at higher risk of infections. In high-income countries, where the burden of infectious diseases is relatively modest, resistance to first-line antibacterial agents is usually overcome by use of second- and third-line agents. However, in developing countries where the burden of infectious diseases is high, patients with antibacterial-resistant infections may be unable to obtain or afford effective second-line treatments. In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), the situation is aggravated by poor hygiene, unreliable water supplies, civil conflicts, and increasing numbers of immunocompromised people, such as those with HIV, which facilitate both the evolution of resistant pathogens and their rapid spread in the community. Due to limited capacity for disease detection and surveillance, the burden of illnesses due to treatable bacterial infections, their specific etiologies, and the awareness of antibacterial resistance is less well established in most of SSA, and therefore the ability to mitigate their consequences is significantly limited. PMID:24628272

  10. Antibacterial Compounds from Marine Vibrionaceae Isolated on a Global Expedition

    PubMed Central

    Wietz, Matthias; Mansson, Maria; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H.; Larsen, Thomas O.; Gram, Lone

    2010-01-01

    On a global research expedition, over 500 bacterial strains inhibitory towards pathogenic bacteria were isolated. Three hundred of the antibacterial strains were assigned to the Vibrionaceae family. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the phylogeny and bioactivity of five Vibrionaceae strains with pronounced antibacterial activity. These were identified as Vibrio coralliilyticus (two strains), V. neptunius (two strains), and Photobacterium halotolerans (one strain) on the basis of housekeeping gene sequences. The two related V. coralliilyticus and V. neptunius strains were isolated from distant oceanic regions. Chemotyping by LC-UV/MS underlined genetic relationships by showing highly similar metabolite profiles for each of the two V. coralliilyticus and V. neptunius strains, respectively, but a unique profile for P. halotolerans. Bioassay-guided fractionation identified two known antibiotics as being responsible for the antibacterial activity; andrimid (from V. coralliilyticus) and holomycin (from P. halotolerans). Despite the isolation of already known antibiotics, our findings show that marine Vibrionaceae are a resource of antibacterial compounds and may have potential for future natural product discovery. PMID:21339958

  11. Antibacterial activity of northern Ontario medicinal plant extracts

    E-print Network

    Qin, Wensheng

    University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada P7B 5E1; and 2 Department of Chemistry, Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada P7B 5E1. Received 7 August 2013, accepted 19. 94: 417Á424. In the present study, the antibacterial activity (in vitro) of the leaf and/or flower

  12. On the antibacterial activity of roots of Capparis spinosa L.

    PubMed

    Boga, Carla; Forlani, Luciano; Calienni, Rocco; Hindley, Teresa; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro; Tozzi, Silvia; Zanna, Nicola

    2011-02-01

    A decoction of Capparis spinosa L. roots, widely used in the traditional folk medicine of southern Italy, was prepared and submitted to antibacterial activity tests, which showed an interesting bacteriostatic activity on the growth of Deinococcus radiophilus. Heterocyclic compounds were also recovered from the chloroformic extract of the roots. PMID:21328135

  13. New antibacterial pentacyclic triterpenes from Myricaria elegans Royle. (tamariscineae).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Manzoor; Ahmad, Waqar; Khan, Salimullah; Zeeshan, Muhammad; Obaidullah; Nisar, Muhammad; Shaheen, Farzana; Ahmad, Mansoor

    2008-12-01

    Two new pentacyclic triterpenes eleganene-A (1) and eleganene-B (2), along with four known pentacyclic triterpenes betulin (3), ursolic acid (4), erythrodiol (5) and corosolic acid (6) were isolated from the aerial parts of Myricaria elegans. These compounds exhibited significant antibacterial activity. The structure of compounds 1 and 2 were deduced on the basis of their spectral analysis. PMID:18608775

  14. Chitosan-based nanofibrous membranes for antibacterial filter applications

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ashleigh; Oldinski, Rachael; Ma, Hongyan; Bryers, James D.; Zhang, Miqin

    2013-01-01

    Nanofibrous membranes have drawn considerable interest for filtration applications due to their ability to withstand high fluid flux while removing micro- and nano-sized particulates from solution. The desire to introduce an antibacterial function into water filter applications presents a challenge to widespread application of fibrous membranes because the addition of chemicals or biocides may produce harmful byproducts downstream. Here, we report the development of chitosan-polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibrous membranes to utilize the natural antibacterial property of chitosan for antibacterial water filtration. Chitosan-PCL fibers with diameters of 200–400 nm and chitosan contents of 25, 50 and 75 wt% were prepared by electrospinning. In a series of bacterial challenge tests, chitosan-PCL fibrous membranes significantly reduced Staphylococcus aureus adhesion compared to PCL fibrous membranes. In water permeability and particulate size removal tests, fibrous membranes with 25% chitosan supported the greatest water flux (~7000 L/hr/m2) with 100% removal of 300-nm particulates, while maintaining the membrane integrity. This study demonstrates the potential of chitosan-PCL nanofibrous membranes as pre-filters for water filtration systems that demonstrate combinatorial filtration and intrinsic antibacterial advantages. PMID:23218292

  15. Antibacterial Activity of Fullerene Water Suspensions: Effects of

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Antibacterial Activity of Fullerene Water Suspensions: Effects of Preparation Method and Particle and Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 Fullerene research in biological systems has to aggregate, forming stable fullerene water suspensions (FWS) whose properties differ from those of bulk solid

  16. Antibacterial activity of Lawsonia inermis Linn (Henna) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Habbal, O; Hasson, SS; El-Hag, AH; Al-Mahrooqi, Z; Al-Hashmi, N; Al-Bimani, Z; Al-Balushi, MS; Al-Jabri, AA

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial activity of henna (Lawsonia inermis Linn) obtained from different regions of Oman against a wide array of micro-organisms. Methods Fresh henna samples were obtained from different regions of Oman as leaves and seeds. 100 g fresh and dry leaves and 50 g of fresh and dry seeds were separately soaked in 500 mL of ethanol for three days, respectively, with frequent agitation. The mixture was filtered, and the crude extract was collected. The crude extract was then heated, at 48 °C in a water bath to evaporate its liquid content. The dry crude henna extract was then tested for its antibacterial activity using well-diffusion antibiotic susceptibility technique. Henna extracts were investigated for their antibacterial activity at different concentrations against a wide array of different micro-organisms including a laboratory standard bacterial strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (NCTC 10662) (P. aeruginosa) and eleven fresh clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa obtained from patients attending the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH). 2-Hydroxy-p-Nathoqinone-Tech (2-HPNT, MW=174.16, C10H6O3) was included as control (at 50% concentration) along with the henna samples tested. Results Henna samples demonstrated antibacterial activity against all isolates but the highest susceptibility was against P. aeruginosa with henna samples obtained from Al-sharqyia region. Conclusions Omani henna from Al-sharqyia region demonstrates high in vitro anti-P. aeruginosa activity compared with many henna samples from different regions of Oman. PMID:23569753

  17. Negligible Particle-Specific Antibacterial Activity of Silver Nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    -spectrum antimicrobial agent, silver nano- particles (AgNPs) are currently the most widely commercialized nanomaterial.1 of silver ions from the crystalline core of silver nanoparticles contribute to the toxicityNegligible Particle-Specific Antibacterial Activity of Silver Nanoparticles Zong-ming Xiu, Qing

  18. Antibacterial and antioxidant activities of Vaccinium corymbosum L. leaf extract

    PubMed Central

    Pervin, Mehnaz; Hasnat, Md Abul; Lim, Beong Ou

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate antibacterial and antioxidant activity of the leaf extract of tropical medicinal herb and food plant Vaccinium corymbosum L. (V. corymbosum). Methods Free radical scavenging activity on DPPH, ABTS, and nitrites were used to analyse phenoic and flavonoid contents of leaf extract. Other focuses included the determination of antioxidant enzymatic activity (SOD, CAT and GPx), metal chelating activity, reduction power, lipid peroxidation inhibition and the prevention of oxidative DNA damage. Antibacterial activity was determined by using disc diffusion for seven strains of bacteria. Results Results found that V. corymbosum leaf extract had significant antibacterial activity. The tested extract displayed the highest activity (about 23.18 mm inhibition zone) against Salmonella typhymurium and the lowest antibacterial activity was observed against Enterococcus faecalis (about 14.08 mm inhibition zone) at 10 mg/ disc. The IC50 values for DPPH, ABTS and radical scavenging activity were 0.120, 0.049 and 1.160 mg/mL, respectively. V. corymbosum leaf extract also showed dose dependent reduction power, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage prevention and significant antioxidant enzymatic activity. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that leaf extract of V. corymbosum could be used as an alternative therapy for antibiotic-resistant bacteria and help prevent various free radical related diseases.

  19. Enhancement of bismuth antibacterial activity with lipophilic thiol chelators.

    PubMed Central

    Domenico, P; Salo, R J; Novick, S G; Schoch, P E; Van Horn, K; Cunha, B A

    1997-01-01

    The antibacterial properties of bismuth are greatly enhanced when bismuth is combined with certain lipophilic thiol compounds. Antibacterial activity was enhanced from 25- to 300-fold by the following seven different thiols, in order of decreasing synergy: 1,3-propanedithiol, dimercaprol (BAL), dithiothreitol, 3-mercapto-2-butanol, beta-mercaptoethanol, 1-monothioglycerol, and mercaptoethylamine. The dithiols produced the greatest synergy with bismuth at optimum bismuth-thiol molar ratios of from 3:1 to 1:1. The monothiols were generally not as synergistic and required molar ratios of from 1:1 to 1:4 for optimum antibacterial activity. The most-active mono- or dithiols were also the most soluble in butanol. The intensity of the yellow formed by bismuth-thiol complexes reflected the degree of chelation and correlated with antibacterial potency at high molar ratios. The bismuth-BAL compound (BisBAL) was active against most bacteria, as assessed by broth dilution, agar diffusion, and agar dilution analyses. Staphylococci (MIC, 5 to 7 microM Bi3+) and Helicobacter pylori (MIC, 2.2 microM) were among the most sensitive bacteria. Gram-negative bacteria were sensitive (MIC, < 17 microM). Enterococci were relatively resistant (MIC, 63 microM Bi3+). The MIC range for anaerobes was 15 to 100 microM Bi3+, except for Clostridium difficile (MIC, 7.5 microM). Bactericidal activity averaged 29% above the MIC. Bactericidal activity increased with increasing pH and/or increasing temperature. Bismuth-thiol solubility, stability, and antibacterial activity depended on pH and the bismuth-thiol molar ratio. BisBAL was stable but ineffective against Escherichia coli at pH 4. Activity and instability (reactivity) increased with increasing alkalinity. BisBAL was acid soluble at a molar ratio of greater than 3:2 and alkaline soluble at a molar ratio of less than 2:3. In conclusion, certain lipophilic thiol compounds enhanced bismuth antibacterial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria. The activity, solubility, and stability of BisBAL were strongly dependent on the pH, temperature, and molar ratio. Chelation of bismuth with certain thiol agents enhanced the solubility and lipophilicity of this cationic heavy metal, thereby significantly enhancing its potency and versatility as an antibacterial agent. PMID:9257744

  20. Time-dependent diaryl ether inhibitors of InhA: SAR studies of enzyme inhibition, antibacterial activity, and in vivo efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Pan; Knudson, Susan; Bommineni, Gopal R.; Li, Huei-Jiun; Lai, Cheng-Tsung; Liu, Nina; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; Simmerling, Carlos; Patil, Sachindra S.; Slayden, Richard A.; Tonge, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The diaryl ethers are a novel class of antituberculosis drug candidates that inhibit InhA, the enoyl-ACP reductase involved in the fatty acid biosynthesis (FASII) pathway, and have antibacterial activity against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In the present work we demonstrate that two time-dependent B-ring modified diaryl ether InhA inhibitors have antibacterial activity in a mouse model of TB infection when delivered by intraperitoneal injection. We propose that the efficacy of these compounds is related to their residence time on the enzyme, and to identify structural features that modulate drug-target residence time in this system, we have explored the inhibition of InhA by a series of B-ring modified analogues. Seven ortho substituted compounds were found to be time dependent inhibitors of InhA where the slow step leading to the final EI* complex is thought to correlate with closure and ordering of the InhA substrate binding loop. A detailed mechanistic understanding of the molecular basis for residence time in this system will facilitate the development of InhA inhibitors with improved in vivo activity. PMID:24616444

  1. Development of an antibacterial root canal filling system containing MDPB.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, R; Kitagawa, H; Izutani, N; Hirose, N; Hayashi, M; Imazato, S

    2014-12-01

    An antibacterial monomer 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinum bromide (MDPB)-containing experimental, chemically cured primer was prepared to develop a new resin-based root canal filling system. This study investigated the antibacterial effects of the MDPB-containing primer (experimental primer [EP]) against Enterococcus faecalis and assessed the in vitro bonding and sealing abilities of the filling system, consisting of EP and a Bis-GMA-based sealer resin. Antibacterial effects of EP were evaluated by contact with planktonic or adherent bacteria for 30 or 60 sec, and the viable bacterial number was counted. The antibacterial effects against E. faecalis in dentinal tubules were also assessed, according to a root canal infection model. Bonding and sealing abilities of the experimental filling system were examined by microtensile bond strength tests and leakage tests based on fluid filtration methods. Significantly greater reduction in viable bacteria in planktonic and adherent form was obtained by short-period contact with EP compared with the control primer (without MDPB) or with the proprietary (Epiphany) primer (p < .05). Significantly greater bactericidal effects of the EP inside the dentinal tubule of root, as opposed to the control primer or Epiphany primer, were confirmed according to a root canal infection model (p < .05), and 100% killing of E. faecalis could be obtained by the application of EP after irrigation with a 5% sodium hypochlorite solution. The experimental endodontic filling system demonstrated significantly greater bond strength to root dentin than Epiphany sealer system (Epiphany primer and Epiphany Root Canal Sealant; p < .05), showing formation of resin tags and a hybridized layer. Leakage tests clarified that the experimental system provided excellent sealing. This study confirmed that the MDPB-containing experimental antibacterial primer has the ability to effectively disinfect the root canal. Additionally, the experimental root canal filling system employing this primer and the Bis-GMA-based sealer resin is useful for achieving good sealing, suggesting its possible benefit for successful endodontic treatments. PMID:25192898

  2. The Wound Healing and Antibacterial Activity of Five Ethnomedical Calophyllum inophyllum Oils: An Alternative Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Infected Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Léguillier, Teddy; Lecsö-Bornet, Marylin; Lémus, Christelle; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Lebouvier, Nicolas; Hnawia, Edouard; Nour, Mohammed; Aalbersberg, William; Ghazi, Kamelia; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Rat, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Background Calophyllum inophyllum L. (Calophyllaceae) is an evergreen tree ethno-medically used along the seashores and islands of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, especially in Polynesia. Oil extracted from the seeds is traditionally used topically to treat a wide range of skin injuries from burn, scar and infected wounds to skin diseases such as dermatosis, urticaria and eczema. However, very few scientific studies reported and quantified the therapeutic properties of Calophyllum inophyllum oil (CIO). In this work, five CIO from Indonesia (CIO1), Tahiti (CIO2, 3), Fiji islands (CIO4) and New Caledonia (CIO5) were studied and their cytotoxic, wound healing, and antibacterial properties were presented in order to provide a scientific support to their traditional use and verify their safety. Methods The safety of the five CIO was ascertained using the Alamar blue assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO wound healing properties were determined using the scratch test assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO-stimulated antibacterial innate immune response was evaluated using ELISA by measuring ? defensin-2 release in human derivative macrophage cells. CIO antibacterial activity was tested using oilogramme against twenty aerobic Gram- bacteria species, twenty aerobic Gram+ bacteria species, including a multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and two anaerobic Gram+ bacteria species e.g. Propionibacterium acnes and Propionibacterium granulosum. To detect polarity profile of the components responsible of the antibacterial activity, we performed bioautography against a Staphylococcus aureus strain. Results Based on Alamar Blue assay, we showed that CIO can be safely used on keratinocyte cells between 2.7% and 11.2% depending on CIO origin. Concerning the healing activity, all the CIO tested accelerated in vitro wound closure, the healing factor being 1.3 to 2.1 higher compared to control when keratinocytes were incubated after scratch with CIO at 0.1%. Furthermore, our results showed that CIO exhibit two distinct antibacterial effects: one against Gram+ bacteria by direct inhibition of mitotic growth and another potent effect against Gram- bacteria due to increased release of ?-defensin 2 peptide by macrophages. Interestingly, the needed concentrations of CIO to inhibit bacteria growth and to promote wound healing are lower than concentrations exhibiting cytotoxic effects on keratinocyte cells. Finally, we performed bioautography assay against Staphylococcus aureus to determine polarity profile of the components responsible for CIO antibacterial activity. Our results showed for the five tested CIO that components responsible of the bacterial growth inhibition are the more polar one on the TLC chromatographic profile and are contained in the resinous fraction of the oil. Conclusions This study was conducted to evaluate cytotoxicity, wound healing and antibacterial properties of five CIO traditionally used to treat infected wounds. Using cell and bacteria cultures, we confirmed the pharmacological effects of CIO as wound healing and antimicrobial agent. Moreover, we showed that concentration of CIO needed to exhibit therapeutic effects are lower than concentrations exhibiting cytotoxic effects in vitro. For the first time, this study provides support for traditional uses of CIO. These wound healing and antibiotic properties make CIO a valuable candidate to treat infected wounds especially in tropical areas. PMID:26406588

  3. Synergistic antibacterial effect of curcumin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mun, Su-Hyun; Joung, Dae-Ki; Kim, Yong-Sik; Kang, Ok-Hwa; Kim, Sung-Bae; Seo, Yun-Soo; Kim, Youn-Chul; Lee, Dong-Sung; Shin, Dong-Won; Kweon, Kee-Tae; Kwon, Dong-Yeul

    2013-06-15

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are spread among infected patients, with infection rates increasing at an alarming rate. Furthermore, increased resistance to antibiotics has resulted in serious challenges in the treatment of infectious diseases worldwide. Under the selection pressure of exposure to antibiotics, microorganisms evolve to survive against the new conditions imposed by therapy. Therefore, there exists a need to develop alternative natural or combination drug therapies. Curcumin (CCM), a natural polyphenolic flavonoid isolated from the rhizome of a plant, Curcuma longa Linné., has been found to possess many beneficial biological activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the synergistic effect of curcumin and antibiotics as well as to determine the antibacterial activity of CCM against specific MRSA strains. The antibacterial activity of CCM was assessed by the broth microdilution method (by calculating the minimal inhibitory concentration [MIC]), checkerboard dilution test, and time-kill assay. Antimicrobial activity of CCM was observed against all tested strains. The MICs of CCM against 10 strains of S. aureus ranged from 125 to 250 ?g/ml. In the checkerboard test, CCM markedly reduced the MICs of the antibiotics oxacillin (OXI), ampicillin (AMP), ciprofloxacin (CIP), and norfloxacin (NOR) used against MRSA. The time-kill curves showed that a combined CCM and OXI treatment reduced the bacterial counts below the lowest detectable limit after 24h. This study suggested that CCM reduced the MICs of several antibiotics tested, notably of OXI, AMP, CIP, and NOR, and that CCM in combination with antibiotics could lead to the development of new combination of antibiotics against MRSA infection. PMID:23537748

  4. Novel Polymyxin Derivatives Carrying Only Three Positive Charges Are Effective Antibacterial Agents ?

    PubMed Central

    Vaara, Martti; Fox, John; Loidl, Günther; Siikanen, Osmo; Apajalahti, Juha; Hansen, Frank; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Nagai, Junya; Takano, Mikihisa; Vaara, Timo

    2008-01-01

    The lack of novel antibiotics against gram-negative bacteria has reinstated polymyxins as the drugs of last resort to treat serious infections caused by extremely multiresistant gram-negative organisms. However, polymyxins are nephrotoxic, and this feature may complicate therapy or even require its discontinuation. Like that of aminoglycosides, the nephrotoxicity of polymyxins might be related to the highly cationic nature of the molecule. Colistin and polymyxin B carry five positive charges. Here we show that novel polymyxin derivatives carrying only three positive charges are effective antibacterial agents. NAB739 has a cyclic peptide portion identical to that of polymyxin B, but in the linear portion of the peptide, it carries the threonyl-d-serinyl residue (no cationic charges) instead of the diaminobutyryl-threonyl-diaminobutyryl residue (two cationic charges). The MICs of NAB739 for 17 strains of Escherichia coli were identical, or very close, to those of polymyxin B. Furthermore, NAB739 was effective against other polymyxin-susceptible strains of Enterobacteriaceae and against Acinetobacter baumannii. At subinhibitory concentrations, it dramatically sensitized A. baumannii to low concentrations of antibiotics such as rifampin, clarithromycin, vancomycin, fusidic acid, and meropenem. NAB739 methanesulfonate was a prodrug analogous to colistin methanesulfonate. NAB740 was the most active derivative against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. NAB7061 (linear portion of the peptide, threonyl-aminobutyryl) lacked direct antibacterial activity but sensitized the targets to hydrophobic antibiotics by factors up to 2,000. The affinities of the NAB compounds for isolated rat kidney brush border membrane were significantly lower than that of polymyxin B. PMID:18591267

  5. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Aerosolized Antibacterial Agents in Chronically Infected Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacteria adapt to growth in lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) by selection of heterogeneously resistant variants that are not detected by conventional susceptibility testing but are selected for rapidly during antibacterial treatment. Therefore, total bacterial counts and antibiotic susceptibilities are misleading indicators of infection and are not helpful as guides for therapy decisions or efficacy endpoints. High drug concentrations delivered by aerosol may maximize efficacy, as decreased drug susceptibilities of the pathogens are compensated for by high target site concentrations. However, reductions of the bacterial load in sputum and improvements in lung function were within the same ranges following aerosolized and conventional therapies. Furthermore, the use of conventional pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) surrogates correlating pharmacokinetics in serum with clinical cure and presumed or proven eradication of the pathogen as a basis for PK/PD investigations in CF patients is irrelevant, as minimization of systemic exposure is one of the main objectives of aerosolized therapy; in addition, bacterial pathogens cannot be eradicated, and chronic infection cannot be cured. Consequently, conventional PK/PD surrogates are not applicable to CF patients. It is nonetheless obvious that systemic exposure of patients, with all its sequelae, is minimized and that the burden of oral treatment for CF patients suffering from chronic infections is reduced. PMID:25278574

  6. ZnO nanoparticle incorporated nanostructured metallic titanium for increased mesenchymal stem cell response and antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizabeth, Elmy; Baranwal, Gaurav; Krishnan, Amit G.; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Manitha

    2014-03-01

    Recent trends in titanium implants are towards the development of nanoscale topographies that mimic the nanoscale properties of bone tissue. Although the nanosurface promotes the integration of osteoblast cells, infection related problems can also occur, leading to implant failure. Therefore it is imperative to reduce bacterial adhesion on an implant surface, either with or without the use of drugs/antibacterial agents. Herein, we have investigated two different aspects of Ti surfaces in inhibiting bacterial adhesion and concurrently promoting mammalian cell adhesion. These include (i) the type of nanoscale topography (Titania nanotube (TNT) and Titania nanoleaf (TNL)) and (ii) the presence of an antibacterial agent like zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnOnp) on Ti nanosurfaces. To address this, periodically arranged TNT (80-120 nm) and non-periodically arranged TNL surfaces were generated by the anodization and hydrothermal techniques respectively, and incorporated with ZnOnp of different concentrations (375 ?M, 750 ?M, 1.125 mM and 1.5 mM). Interestingly, TNL surfaces decreased the adherence of staphylococcus aureus while increasing the adhesion and viability of human osteosarcoma MG63 cell line and human mesenchymal stem cells, even in the absence of ZnOnp. In contrast, TNT surfaces exhibited an increased bacterial and mammalian cell adhesion. The influence of ZnOnp on these surfaces in altering the bacterial and cell adhesion was found to be concentration dependent, with an optimal range of 375-750 ?M. Above 750 ?M, although bacterial adhesion was reduced, cellular viability was considerably affected. Thus our study helps us to infer that nanoscale topography by itself or its combination with an optimal concentration of antibacterial ZnOnp would provide a differential cell behavior and thereby a desirable biological response, facilitating the long term success of an implant.

  7. Novel green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Citrullus lanatus rind and investigation of proteasome inhibitory activity, antibacterial, and antioxidant potential.

    PubMed

    Patra, Jayanta Kumar; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Biological synthesis of nanoparticles using nontoxic, eco-friendly approaches is gaining importance owing to their fascinating biocompatibility and environmentally benign nature. This study describes the green synthesis approach for synthesis of gold nanoparticles (ANPs) using aqueous extract of the rind of watermelon as a fruit waste and evaluate its biopotential in terms of proteasome inhibitory activity, antibacterial, and antioxidant potential. The synthesized ANPs were characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The surface plasmon resonance spectra of ANPs were obtained at 560 nm. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed that particles had a spherical shape and have a size distribution of 20-140 nm, followed by the elemental analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the crystallite nature of the ANPs and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the involvement of bioactive compounds from watermelon rind in the synthesis, capping, and stabilization of ANPs. ANPs exhibited potential antibacterial activity against five different foodborne pathogenic bacteria with diameter of inhibition zones ranged between 9.23 and 11.58 mm. They also displayed strong synergistic antibacterial activity together with kanamycin (11.93-21.08 mm inhibition zones) and rifampicin (10.32-24.84 mm inhibition zones). ANPs displayed strong antioxidant activity in terms of DPPH radical scavenging (24.69%), nitric oxide scavenging (25.62%), ABTS scavenging (29.42%), and reducing power. Significantly high proteasome inhibitory potential of the ANPs (28.16%) could be highly useful for cancer treatment and targeted cancer drug delivery. Overall, results highlight a potential low-cost green method of synthesizing ANPs from food waste materials. Significant biopotentials of synthesized ANPs could make it a potential candidate for its application in the biomedical, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, and food sectors. PMID:26664116

  8. Novel green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Citrullus lanatus rind and investigation of proteasome inhibitory activity, antibacterial, and antioxidant potential

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Jayanta Kumar; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Biological synthesis of nanoparticles using nontoxic, eco-friendly approaches is gaining importance owing to their fascinating biocompatibility and environmentally benign nature. This study describes the green synthesis approach for synthesis of gold nanoparticles (ANPs) using aqueous extract of the rind of watermelon as a fruit waste and evaluate its biopotential in terms of proteasome inhibitory activity, antibacterial, and antioxidant potential. The synthesized ANPs were characterized using UV–vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The surface plasmon resonance spectra of ANPs were obtained at 560 nm. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed that particles had a spherical shape and have a size distribution of 20–140 nm, followed by the elemental analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the crystallite nature of the ANPs and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the involvement of bioactive compounds from watermelon rind in the synthesis, capping, and stabilization of ANPs. ANPs exhibited potential antibacterial activity against five different foodborne pathogenic bacteria with diameter of inhibition zones ranged between 9.23 and 11.58 mm. They also displayed strong synergistic antibacterial activity together with kanamycin (11.93–21.08 mm inhibition zones) and rifampicin (10.32–24.84 mm inhibition zones). ANPs displayed strong antioxidant activity in terms of DPPH radical scavenging (24.69%), nitric oxide scavenging (25.62%), ABTS scavenging (29.42%), and reducing power. Significantly high proteasome inhibitory potential of the ANPs (28.16%) could be highly useful for cancer treatment and targeted cancer drug delivery. Overall, results highlight a potential low-cost green method of synthesizing ANPs from food waste materials. Significant biopotentials of synthesized ANPs could make it a potential candidate for its application in the biomedical, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, and food sectors. PMID:26664116

  9. In vitro antibacterial activity and acute toxicity studies of aqueous-methanol extract of Sida rhombifolia Linn. (Malvaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many bacteria among the Enterobacteria family are involved in infectious diseases and diarrhoea. Most of these bacteria become resistant to the most commonly used synthetic drugs in Cameroon. Natural substances seem to be an alternative to this problem. Thus the aim of this research was to investigate the in vitro antibacterial activity of the methanol and aqueous-methanol extracts of Sida rhombifolia Linn (Malvaceae) against seven pathogenic bacteria involved in diarrhoea. Acute toxicity of the most active extract was determined and major bioactive components were screened. Methods The agar disc diffusion and the agar dilution method were used for the determination of inhibition diameters and the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MICs) respectively. The acute toxicity study was performed according WHO protocol. Results The aqueous-methanol extract (1v:4v) was the most active with diameters of inhibition zones ranging from 8.7 - 23.6 mm, however at 200 ?g/dic this activity was relatively weak compared to gentamycin. The MICs of the aqueous-methanol extract (1v:4v) varied from 49.40 to 78.30 ?g/ml. Salmonella dysenteriae was the most sensitive (49.40 ?g/ml). For the acute toxicity study, no deaths of rats were recorded. However, significant increase of some biochemical parameters such as aspartate amino-transferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and creatinine (CRT) were found. The phytochemical analysis of the aqueous methanol extract indicated the presence of tannins, polyphenols, alkaloids, glycosides, flavonoids and saponins Conclusion The results showed that the aqueous-methanol extract of S. rhombifolia exhibited moderate antibacterial activity. Some toxic effects were found when rats received more than 8 g/kg bw of extract. Antibacterial; Enterobacteria; Acute toxicity; Phytochemical analysis PMID:20663208

  10. Drug Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NBOD2, a program developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to solve equations of motion coupled N-body systems is used by E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. to model potential drugs as a series of elements. The program analyses the vibrational and static motions of independent components in drugs. Information generated from this process is used to design specific drugs to interact with enzymes in designated ways.

  11. Reversing resistance: The next generation antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neel Jayesh

    2015-01-01

    Irrational antibiotic usage has led to vast spread resistance to available antibiotics, but we refuse to slide back to “preantibiotic era.” The threat is serious with the “Enterococcus, Staphylococcous, Klebsiella, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas and Enterobacter” organisms causing nosocomial infections that are difficult to treat because of the production of extended spectrum ?-lactamases, carbapenamases and metallo-?-lactamases. Facing us is a situation where soon multidrug resistance would have spread across the globe with no antibiotics to withstand it. The infectious disease society of America and Food and Drug Administration have taken initiatives like the 10 × ‘20 where they plan to develop 10 new antibiotics by the year 2020. Existing classes of antibiotics against resistant bacteria include the carbapenems, oxazolidinones, glycopeptides, monobactams, streptogramins and daptomycin. Newer drugs in existing classes of antibiotics such as cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, glycopeptides and ?-lactamase inhibitors continue to get synthesized. The situation demands newer targets against bacterial machinery. Some of them include the peptidoglycantransferase, outer membrane protein of Pseudomonas, tRNA synthase, fatty acid synthase and mycobacterial ATP synthase. To curb the irrational and excessive usage of presently available antibiotics should be a priority if they are still to be kept in usage for the future. PMID:26069360

  12. Larvicidal activity of synthetic disinfectants and antibacterial soaps against mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Xue, Rui-De; Qualls, Whitney A

    2013-01-01

    Seven commercial synthetic disinfectant and antibacterial soap products were evaluated as mosquito larvicides against Culex quinquefasciatus Say in the laboratory. Three aerosol disinfectant products, at 0.01% concentration resulted in 58-76% mortality of laboratory-reared fourth instar mosquito larvae at 24 h posttreatment. Four antibacterial soap products at 0.0001% concentration resulted in 88-100% larval mortality at 24 h posttreatment. The active ingredient of the antibacterial soap products, triclosan (0.1%) resulted in 74% larval mortality. One of the antibacterial soap products, Equate caused the highest mosquito larval mortality in the laboratory. Equate antibacterial soap at the application rate of 0.000053 ppm resulted in 90% mortality of the introduced fourth instar larvae of Cx. quinquesfasicatus in the outdoor pools. In laboratory and field bioassays, the antibacterial soap resulted in significant larval mosquito mortality. PMID:23427662

  13. [Drug dependence and psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Giraud, M J; Lemonnier, E; Bigot, T

    1994-11-01

    Although the utility of psychotropic drugs has been well demonstrated, caution must still be exercised in their use. Among their potential risks, drug dependency must be kept in mind. This risk is well accepted with regard to benzodiazepines, and it appeared useful to study the potential risk for antidepressants, neuroleptics and thymoregulatory agents. Whatever the drug, the predominant factor appears to be psychological dependency. Prevention of drug dependency is most often achieved by informing the patient, limiting the length of use of the drug, making regular reevaluation of symptoms and of drug indication, and frequently be establishing a "treatment contract". The importance of the patient-physician relationship in the prescription of such treatment must be underlined. PMID:7984941

  14. Synthesis of oxidant prone nanosilver to develop H2O2 responsive drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Faheem; Wang, Aifei; Miao, Lu; Wang, Pengyuan; Li, Qin; Liu, Jia; Du, Jianshi; Zhu, Guangshan

    2015-01-13

    Our immune system uses toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to kill off bacterial invaders. In this contribution, we intended to integrate ROS producing capability of immune system with oxidant-sensitive nature of antibacterial silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) to develop an oxidant drug delivery system. Prior to execute this strategy, we have developed an efficient one-pot synthetic protocol to produce ultrasmall (5 nm), water-stable, and oxidant-prone Ag NPs. Notably, the yield of as-synthesized Ag NPs is 10-fold higher than standard citrate reduction route. The resulting therapeutically active and well-dispersed Ag NPs are used as nanolids to cap the drug loaded nanochannels of porous silica. Upon exposing to H2O2, dissolution-accompanied aggregation of Ag nanolids unleashes the encapsulated therapeutic entities from channels of nanocarrier. Combination of antibacterial and anti-inflammatory drugs in single nanocarriers can potentially augment the effectiveness of various therapies. PMID:25486873

  15. DFT study of the per-6-amino-?-cyclodextrin as catalyst in synthesis of 2-aryl-2,3-dihydro-4-quinolones.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yali; Wang, Xueye; Liu, Na

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis of 2-aryl-2,3-dihydro-4-quinolones in the presence of per-6-amino-?-cyclodextrin (per-6-ABCD) as catalyst can improve selectivity and yield. The interaction between per-6-ABCD and benzaldehyde or o-aminoacetophenone plays an important role in this reaction. This paper studies the complexes of per-6-ABCD with benzaldehyde and o-aminoacetophenone using density functional theory (DFT) method. The reaction process is investigated by studying the energy of the reactants and the product. Hydrogen bonds are researched on the basis of natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis, the results propose the donor-acceptor interactions of complex. The Mulliken charge and frontier orbital are employed for revealing the charge distribution. In addition, (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)CNMR) spectroscopy shows that the carbon atom on the aldehyde group for benzaldehyde, carbonyl group and the carbon atom connected with carbonyl group for o-aminoacetophenone are apparently activated in the cavity of per-6-ABCD. The probable catalytic mechanism of per-6-ABCD is discussed in terms of the calculated parameters. PMID:25138375

  16. Amino acid substitutions in gyrA and parC associated with quinolone resistance in nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella isolates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to identify and characterize amino acid substitutions in gyrA and parC related with quinolone resistance of 27 nalidixic acid-resistant (NaR) Salmonella isolates collected in poultry slaughterhouses in Korea. A total of 51 Salmonella isolates were detected from 44.8% (47/105) of the total samples from 15 poultry slaughterhouses examined, among which 27 (52.9%) NaR isolates were detected while ciprofloxacin (Cip) resistance was not present in the isolates. These 27 NaR isolates of DNA sequencing revealed that it contained three types of gyrA mutations in only D87 codon. Mutations in the D87 codon resulted in substitutions to G in most of the isolates, but D87Y and D87N exchanges were also detected. Although Cip resistance was absent, reduced susceptibility characterized by mutations in gyrA was apparent among Salmonella isolates from poultry slaughterhouses in Korea. PMID:24237626

  17. Successful international clones of blaCTX-M-15-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae with coexpression of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants in Tehran hospitals.

    PubMed

    Nematzadeh, Shoeib; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh; Iversen, Aina; Giske, Christian G

    2015-12-01

    The dissemination of plasmid-mediated multidrug resistance in Enterobacteriaceae is a major public health concern. We investigated the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR), 16S rRNA methylases, CTX-M, and acquired AmpC enzymes in ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=40) from Tehran hospitals. Plasmid replicon typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were carried out for typing. CTX-M group 1 (confirmed as blaCTX-M-15 in selected isolates) was found in 35/40 isolates. Thirty-two isolates hosted PMQR genes. Twenty isolates featured aac(6')-Ib-CR only; 9 isolates had aac(6')-Ib-CR and qnrB; 2 isolates had aac(6')-Ib-CR and qnrS; and 1 isolate had aac(6')-Ib-CR, qnrS, and qepA. The 16S rRNA methylase RmtB was found in 1 isolate; and acquired AmpC enzymes, in 6 isolates. PFGE detected 7 pulsotypes, the largest corresponded to sequence type 16. The successful clone ST101 was also found. The emergence of successful clones of K. pneumoniae in Tehran hospitals is concerning. PMID:26458278

  18. Advances in Computational Structure-Based Drug Design and Application in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wu, Mian-Bin; Zhang, Ri-Hao; Chen, Zheng-Jie; Hua, Chen; Lin, Jian-Ping; Yang, Li-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the increasing and widespread bacterial resistance to clinical medicines and the urgent need for cures of intractable diseases, there is a dramatic decline in the numbers of drugs reaching the market or clinical trials. Accordingly, it has become imperative to discover more rational and efficient strategies to design and develop novel drugs. Structure-based drug design/discovery (SBDD) is one of the computer-aided methods, by which novel drugs are designed or discovered based on the knowledge of 3D structures of the relevant specific targets. During the past few decades, the great potentials and success of SBDD have been seen in the field of drug discovery. In this review, we present an overview of the key mechanisms of SBDD, the frequently used computer programs in SBDD and the reported successful cases. Finally, several typical design processes of lead components from SBDD are also highlighted in detail, such as the discovery of inhibitors of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), antibacterial drugs, and anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26303430

  19. Drug Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legal Memorandum, 1987

    1987-01-01

    A number of legal issues are involved in conducting a drug testing program to determine whether students--and occasionally teachers--are using illegal drugs. Two legal issues have been raised concerning the accuracy of the urinalysis test: whether it is chemically accurate and whether appropriate procedures have been followed to make certain that…

  20. Drug Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sardana, Raj K.

    This autoinstructional lesson deals with the study of such drugs as marijuana and LSD, with emphasis on drug abuse. It is suggested that it can be used in science classes at the middle level of school. No prerequisites are suggested. The teacher's guide lists the behavioral objectives, the equipment needed to complete the experience and suggests…

  1. Antineoplastic Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  2. Exchangeable Ions Are Responsible for the In Vitro Antibacterial Properties of Natural Clay Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Caitlin C.; Haydel, Shelley E.

    2013-01-01

    We have identified a natural clay mixture that exhibits in vitro antibacterial activity against a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens. We collected four samples from the same source and demonstrated through antibacterial susceptibility testing that these clay mixtures have markedly different antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Here, we used X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma – optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and – mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to characterize the mineralogical and chemical features of the four clay mixture samples. XRD analyses of the clay mixtures revealed minor mineralogical differences between the four samples. However, ICP analyses demonstrated that the concentrations of many elements, Fe, Co, Cu, Ni, and Zn, in particular, vary greatly across the four clay mixture leachates. Supplementation of a non-antibacterial leachate containing lower concentrations of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn to final ion concentrations and a pH equivalent to that of the antibacterial leachate generated antibacterial activity against E. coli and MRSA, confirming the role of these ions in the antibacterial clay mixture leachates. Speciation modeling revealed increased concentrations of soluble Cu2+ and Fe2+ in the antibacterial leachates, compared to the non-antibacterial leachates, suggesting these ionic species specifically are modulating the antibacterial activity of the leachates. Finally, linear regression analyses comparing the log10 reduction in bacterial viability to the concentration of individual ion species revealed positive correlations with Zn2+ and Cu2+ and antibacterial activity, a negative correlation with Fe3+, and no correlation with pH. Together, these analyses further indicate that the ion concentration of specific species (Fe2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+) are responsible for antibacterial activity and that killing activity is not solely attributed to pH. PMID:23691149

  3. An in vivo platform for rapid high-throughput antitubercular drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Kevin; Cosma, Christine L; Troll, Mark A; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2012-07-26

    Treatment of tuberculosis, like other infectious diseases, is increasingly hindered by the emergence of drug resistance. Drug discovery efforts would be facilitated by facile screening tools that incorporate the complexities of human disease. Mycobacterium marinum-infected zebrafish larvae recapitulate key aspects of tuberculosis pathogenesis and drug treatment. Here, we develop a model for rapid in vivo drug screening using fluorescence-based methods for serial quantitative assessment of drug efficacy and toxicity. We provide proof-of-concept that both traditional bacterial-targeting antitubercular drugs and newly identified host-targeting drugs would be discovered through the use of this model. We demonstrate the model's utility for the identification of synergistic combinations of antibacterial drugs and demonstrate synergy between bacterial- and host-targeting compounds. Thus, the platform can be used to identify new antibacterial agents and entirely new classes of drugs that thwart infection by targeting host pathways. The methods developed here should be widely applicable to small-molecule screens for other infectious and noninfectious diseases. PMID:22840407

  4. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, structural studies and antibacterial and antitumor activities of diorganotin complexes with 3-methoxysalicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandani, Marzieh; Sedaghat, Tahereh; Erfani, Nasrollah; Haghshenas, Mohammad Reza; Khavasi, Hamid Reza

    2013-04-01

    Three organotin(IV) complexes, Ph2Sn(mstsc) (1), Me2Sn(mstsc) (2) and Bu2Sn(mstsc) (3), have been synthesized from reaction of R2SnCl2 (R = Ph, Me and Bu) with 3-methoxysalicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (H2mstsc). The synthesized complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis and FT-IR, 1H, 13C and 119Sn NMR spectroscopy. The structures of 2 and 3 have been also confirmed by X-ray crystallography. On the basis of spectral and structural data thiosemicarbazone acts as a tridentate dianionic ligand and coordinates to tin through phenolic oxygen, the azomethine nitrogen and thiolate sulfur atoms. The metal coordination geometry for 2 and 3 is described as distorted square pyramid and the crystal lattices are stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen bands. On the basis of 119Sn NMR data, coordination number of tin retains five in solution. The in vitro antibacterial activity of ligand and its complexes has been evaluated against one Gram-positive and three Gram-negative bacteria. Complex 2 exhibited good activity along with the standard antibacterial drugs. The in vitro cytotoxicities of the synthesized compounds against Jurkat cells were evaluated by the standard WST-1 assay. The activity decreases in the order 3 > 1 > 2 = H2mstsc.

  5. Nahua indian medicinal plants (Mexico): Inhibitory activity on NF-?B as an anti-inflammatory model and antibacterial effects.

    PubMed

    Bork, P M; Schmitz, M L; Weimann, C; Kist, M; Heinrich, M

    1996-11-01

    Selected plants documented as medicinal in an ethnobotanical study with the Nahua of the Sierra de Zongolica (Veracruz, Mexico) were evaluated for anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activity. One of the potential sides of action of anti-inflammatory drugs is the transcription factor NF-?B. This factor is essential for the immune, inflammatory, and acute phase responses. We therefore tested extracts from a total of 28 plants used by the Nahua Indians for their potential effect on the activation of the transcription factor NF-?B. The leaves of Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.) A. Gray (Asteraceae) was the only extract which showed inhibitory activity. Nonspecific DNA binding activities were not noticably influenced. Phytochemical studies to isolate the active principle and further biochemical studies in order to better understand the mode of action of this NF-?B inhibitor have been initiated. Five plants showed noteworthy antibacterial activity against some pathogenic (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25933 and Yersinia enterocolitica 03) and nonpathogenic (E. coli DSM 1077, Micrococcus luteus DSM 348) microorganism: Acacia cornigera, Cuscuta tinctoria, Ludwigia octovalvis, Lysiloma divaricata, and Tithonia diversifolia. PMID:23195081

  6. Toxicity Evaluation of a New Zn-Doped CuO Nanocomposite With Highly Effective Antibacterial Properties.

    PubMed

    Mantecca, Paride; Moschini, Elisa; Bonfanti, Patrizia; Fascio, Umberto; Perelshtein, Ilana; Lipovsky, Anat; Chirico, Giuseppe; Bacchetta, Renato; Del Giacco, Luca; Colombo, Anita; Gedanken, Aharon

    2015-07-01

    The increased resistances to conventional antibiotics determine a strong need for new antibacterials, and specific syntheses at the nanoscale promise to be helpful in this field. A novel Zinc-doped Copper oxide nanocomposite (nZn-CuO) has been recently sonochemically synthesized and successfully tested also against multi-drug resistant bacteria. After synthesis and characterization of the physicochemical properties, the new nZn-CuO is here evaluated by the Frog Embyo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus test for its toxicological potential and this compared with that of nCuO and nZnO synthesized under the same conditions. No lethal effects are observed, while malformations and growth retardation slightly increase after nZn-CuO exposure. Nevertheless, these effects are smaller than those of nZnO. NP uptake by embryo tissues increase significantly with increasing NP concentrations, while no significant accumulation and adverse effects are seen after exposure to soluble Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) at the concentrations dissolved from the NPs. Key oxidative response genes are upregulated by nZn-CuO, as well as by nCuO and nZnO, suggesting the common mechanism of action. Considering the enhanced biocidal activity shown by the nanocomposite, together with the results presented in this study, we can affirm that the doping of the metal oxide nanoparticles should be considered a useful tool to engineer a safer nano-antibacterial. PMID:25820130

  7. Salicylanilide carbamates: Promising antibacterial agents with high in vitro activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Zadrazilova, Iveta; Pospisilova, Sarka; Masarikova, Martina; Imramovsky, Ales; Ferriz, Juana Monreal; Vinsova, Jarmila; Cizek, Alois; Jampilek, Josef

    2015-09-18

    A series of twenty-one salicylanilide N-alkylcarbamates was assessed for novel antibacterial characteristics against three clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and S. aureus ATCC 29213 as the reference and quality control strain. The minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by the broth dilution micro-method with subsequent subcultivation of aliquots to assess minimum bactericidal concentration. The bactericidal kinetics was established by time-kill assay. Ampicillin, ciprofloxacin and vancomycin were used as reference antibacterial drugs. All the tested compounds exhibited highly potent anti-MRSA activity (? 0.008-4 ?g/mL) comparable or up to 250× higher than that of vancomycin, the standard in the treatment of serious MRSA infections. 4-Chloro-2-(3,4-dichlorophenylcarbamoyl)phenyl butylcarbamate and 4-chloro-2-(3,4-dichlorophenylcarbamoyl)phenyl ethylcarbamate were the most active compounds. In most cases, compounds provided reliable bacteriostatic activity, except for 4-chloro-2-(4-chlorophenylcarbamoyl)phenyl decylcarbamate exhibiting bactericidal effect at 8h (for clinical isolate of MRSA 63718) and at 24h (for clinical isolates of MRSA SA 630 and MRSA SA 3202) at 4× MIC. Structure-activity relationships are discussed. PMID:26079401

  8. Antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of ten Cameroonian vegetables against Gram-negative multidrug-resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many edible plants are used in Cameroon since ancient time to control microbial infections. This study was designed at evaluating the antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of ten Cameroonian vegetables against a panel of twenty nine Gram negative bacteria including multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains. Methods The broth microdilution method was used to determine the Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) and the Minimal Bactericidal Concentrations (MBC) of the studied extracts. When chloramphenicol was used as a reference antibiotic, the MICs were also determined in the presence of Phenylalanine-Arginine ?-Naphtylamide (PA?N), an efflux pumps inhibitor (EPI). The phytochemical screening of the extracts was performed using standard methods. Results All tested extracts exhibited antibacterial activities, with the MIC values varying from 128 to 1024 mg/L. The studied extracts showed large spectra of action, those from L. sativa, S. edule, C. pepo and S. nigrum being active on all the 29 bacterial strains tested meanwhile those from Amaranthus hybridus, Vernonia hymenolepsis, Lactuca.carpensis and Manihot esculenta were active on 96.55% of the strains used. The plant extracts were assessed for the presence of large classes of secondary metabolites: alkaloids, anthocyanins, anthraquinones, flavonoids, phenols, saponins, steroids, tannins and triterpenes. Each studied plant extract was found to contain compounds belonging to at least two of the above mentioned classes. Conclusion These results confirm the traditional claims and provide promising baseline information for the potential use of the tested vegetables in the fight against bacterial infections involving MDR phenotypes. PMID:23368430

  9. Coumarin-based Inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis and Staphylococcus aureus Replicative DNA Helicase: Chemical Optimization, Biological Evaluation, and Antibacterial Activities

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Pai, Ramdas; Di, Ming; Aiello, Daniel; Barnes, Marjorie H.; Butler, Michelle M.; Tashjian, Tommy F.; Peet, Norton P.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Moir, Donald T.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of drug-resistant bacterial infections demands the development of new antibacterials that are not subject to existing mechanisms of resistance. Previously, we described coumarin-based inhibitors of an underexploited bacterial target, namely, the replicative helicase. Here we report the synthesis and evaluation of optimized coumarin-based inhibitors with 9–18-fold increased potency against S. aureus (Sa) and B. anthracis (Ba) helicases. Compounds 20 and 22 provided the best potency, with IC50 values of 3 and 1 µM, respectively, against the DNA duplex strand-unwinding activities of both B. anthracis and S. aureus helicases without affecting the single strand DNA-stimulated ATPase activity. Selectivity index (SI = CC50/MIC) values against S. aureus and B. anthracis for compound 20 were 33 and 66 and for compound 22 were 20 and 40, respectively. In addition, compounds 20 and 22 demonstrated potent antibacterial activity against multiple ciprofloxacin-resistant MRSA strains with MIC values ranging between 0.5–4.2 µg/mL. PMID:23231076

  10. Antioxidant and antibacterial potential of pomegranate peel extracts.

    PubMed

    Malviya, Shalini; Arvind; Jha, Alok; Hettiarachchy, Navam

    2014-12-01

    Pomegranate peels of Ganesh variety were subjected to extraction using different solvents viz. water, methanol and ethanol either alone or in combination with water. The extraction yield, antioxidant activity (DPPH and ABTS inhibition) and total phenolic contents were evaluated. Highest yield was obtained from 50 % ethanol: 50 % water (16.3?±?1.99 %). The DPPH and ABTS inhibition activity was found to be the highest for methanol and 70 % ethanol: 30 % water extract (79.5?±?6.5; 94.6?±?6.10), respectively. The phenolic content was the highest in the aqueous extract (438.3?±?14.15). The antibacterial activity of peel extracts was tested against four bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes, Salmonella typhi and Klebsiella pneumoniae and the extracts demonstrated remarkable antibacterial activities against all the tested bacterial strains. The 70 % ethanol: 30 % water and 100 % water extract had a higher antioxidant activity and phenolic content and has the potential for nutraceutical application. PMID:25477693

  11. Antibacterial activity of Citrus limonum fruit juice extract.

    PubMed

    Okeke, Malachy Ifeanyi; Okoli, Arinze Stanley; Eze, Edith Nneka; Ekwume, Grace Chinwe; Okosa, Evangelin Uchena; Iroegbu, Christian Ukwuoma

    2015-09-01

    The fruit juice extract of Citrus limonum was investigated for antibacterial activity. The antibacterial activity of the extract on ten strains of bacteria was determined by both agar well diffusion and macro-broth dilution methods. The extract was variously bacteriostatic and bactericidal against Bacillussubtilis ATCC 6051, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 12600, Escherichia coli ATCC 11775, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 10145 as well as locally isolated clinical strains of the above bacteria and Salmonella kintambo (Human: 13, 23: mt:-), Salmonella typhi and Proteus sp. The MICs ranged from 0.78 mg/ml to 50mg/ml; MBCs, 25.0mg/ml to >100mg/ml and MBC/MIC ratios 2.0 to >16.0. These results provide scientific justification for the medicinal use of Citrus limonum fruit juice by Nigerian herbalists in the treatment of diseases in which strains of the test organisms have been implicated as etiologic agents. PMID:26408878

  12. Plasmonic gold nanoparticles modified titania nanotubes for antibacterial application

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jinhua; Zhou, Huaijuan; Qian, Shi; Liu, Ziwei; Feng, Jingwei; Jin, Ping E-mail: xyliu@mail.sic.ac.cn; Liu, Xuanyong E-mail: xyliu@mail.sic.ac.cn

    2014-06-30

    Close-packed TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays are prepared on metallic Ti surface by electrochemical anodization. Subsequently, by magnetron sputtering, Au nanoparticles are coated onto the top sidewall and tube inwall. The Au@TiO{sub 2} systems can effectively kill Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli in darkness due to the existence of Au nanoparticles. On the basis of classical optical theories, the antibacterial mechanism is proposed from the perspective of localized surface plasmon resonance. Respiratory electrons of bacterial membrane transfer to Au nanoparticles and then to TiO{sub 2}, which makes bacteria steadily lose electrons until death. This work provides insights for the better understanding and designing of noble metal nanoparticles-based plasmonic heterostructures for antibacterial application.

  13. Screening of Yemeni medicinal plants for antibacterial and cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Ali, N A; Jülich, W D; Kusnick, C; Lindequist, U

    2001-02-01

    Ethanolic extracts of 20 selected plant species used by Yemeni traditional healers to treat infectious diseases were screened for their antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as for cytotoxic activity. Fourteen of the ethanolic extracts showed variable degrees of antibacterial activity. The active ethanolic extracts were partitioned between ethyl acetate and water for a first separation. The ethyl acetate extract of Lawsonia inermis was found to be the most active one against all bacteria in the test system. Other promising results could be obtained from extracts of Aloe perryi, Indigofera oblongifolia, Meriandra benghalensis and Ziziphus spina christi. Additionally, the ethanolic extracts of the 20 plants under investigation were tested for their cytotoxic effects on FL-cells using the neutral red assay. Extracts of Calotropis procera, Chenopodium murale, Pulicaria orientalis, Tribulus terrestris and Withania somniferum displayed a remarkable activity. PMID:11167035

  14. Antibacterial alkaloids from Artabotrys crassifolius Hook.f. & Thomson.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kok Kwan; Khoo, Teng Jing; Rajagopal, Mogana; Wiart, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Chloroform extract of bark of Artabotrys crassifolius Hook.f. & Thomson exhibited antibacterial activities against both American Type Culture Collection and clinical bacterial strains in vitro with zones of inhibition ranging from 7 to 14 mm. Further analysis of this extract yielded artabotrine, liridine, lysicamine and atherospermidine. Artabotrine displayed a broad array of antibacterial activity mostly against Gram-positive bacteria with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 1.25 ?g/mL to 5 ?g/mL. Of note, artabotrine, liridine and lysicamine are bactericidal against Gram-negative extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella with MIC values equal 2.5, 2.5 and 10 ?g/mL, respectively, and minimum bactericidal concentrations values equal to 2.5, 5 and 20 ?g/mL. PMID:25738993

  15. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of sulfonamides. SAR and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boufas, Wahida; Dupont, Nathalie; Berredjem, Malika; Berrezag, Kamel; Becheker, Imène; Berredjem, Hajira; Aouf, Nour-Eddine

    2014-09-01

    A series of substituted sulfonamide derivatives were synthesized from chlorosulfonyl isocyanate (CSI) in tree steps (carbamoylation, sulfamoylation and deprotection). Antibacterial activity in vitro of some newly formed compounds investigated against clinical strains Gram-positive and Gram-negative: Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus applying the method of dilution and minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) methods. These compounds have significant bacteriostatic activity with totalities of bacterial strains used. DFT calculations with B3LYP/6-31G(d) level have been used to analyze the electronic and geometric characteristics deduced for the stable structure of three compounds presenting conjugation between a nitrogen atom N through its lone pair and an aromatic ring next to it. The principal quantum chemical descriptors have been correlated with the antibacterial activity.

  16. In vitro antibacterial activity of concentrated polyethylene glycol 400 solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Chirife, J; Herszage, L; Joseph, A; Bozzini, J P; Leardini, N; Kohn, E S

    1983-01-01

    It was found that concentrated polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400) solutions have significant antibacterial activity against various pathogenic bacteria, including Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus. This effect might be attributed to two effects: lowering of water activity and, superimposed on this, the specific action of PEG-400 molecules on bacterial cells. Phase-contrast microscopic observations of cells placed in contact with PEG 400 revealed clumping and morphological changes of bacterial cells. The larger changes in appearance were evidenced by the species which were more rapidly killed by PEG 400. The results obtained suggested that concentrated PEG 400 solutions may have a potential value in medicine as a topical antibacterial agent. The feasibility of this application is the subject of present investigation. Images PMID:6638996

  17. PK/PD models in antibacterial development

    PubMed Central

    Velkov, Tony; Bergen, Phillip; Lora-Tamayo, Jaime; Landersdorfer, Cornelia B.; Li, Jian

    2013-01-01

    There is an urgent need for novel antibiotics to treat life-threatening infections caused by bacterial ‘superbugs’. Validated in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) and animal infection models have been employed to identify the most predictive PK/PD indices and serve as key tools in the antibiotic development process. The results obtained can be utilized for optimizing study designs in order to minimize the cost and duration of clinical trials. This review outlines the key in vitro PK/PD and animal infection models which have been extensively used in antibiotic discovery and development. These models have shown great potential in accelerating drug development programs and will continue to make significant contributions to antibiotic development. PMID:23871724

  18. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... studies on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group (ARLG) Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Resources for Researchers NIAID Antimicrobial Resistance Funding Information National Strategy for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (PDF) National Action ...

  19. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... studies on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group (ARLG) Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Resources for Researchers NIAID Antimicrobial Resistance Funding Information National Strategy for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (PDF) National Action ...

  20. Sonochemical coating of textile fabrics with antibacterial nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddow, Jamie; Singh, Gagandeep; Blanes, María; Molla, Korina; Perelshtein, Ilana; Gedanken, Aharon; Joyce, Eadaoin; Mason, Timothy

    2012-05-01

    The high incidence of hospital-acquired infections places a huge financial burden on our healthcare systems. These infections are also responsible for many millions of deaths each year. Antibacterial fabrics for use in medical textiles, such as hospital uniforms, bedding and wound dressings, can provide a useful weapon in the on-going fight against these infections. The aim of this EU funded Framework 7 project is to develop a pilot line sonochemical coating machine for the production of antibacterial fabrics. The sonochemical coating technology under development is based on a lab scale process that was developed at Bar-Ilan University (BIU). It involves two processes that are driven by acoustic cavitation; the in situ generation of the metal oxide (MO) nanoparticles and the simultaneous high velocity propulsion of these nanoparticles onto a fabric leading to impregnation. Here we report on a comparison of 2 different MO nanoparticle coatings, ZnO and CuO, that were sonochemically applied on to a plain cotton fabric. Both of these coatings were prepared by BIU. In this work, the antibacterial efficacy of the coated fabrics was quantitatively assessed using the absorption method from BS EN ISO 20743:2007. Both types of metal oxide nanoparticle displayed antibacterial activity against all of the test bacteria with particularly high levels of bacterial reduction observed with the CuO coating. The results presented here are from an EU Framework 7 funded project (SONO, EU Project Number: 228730). The project is a collaboration between 17 partner organizations from 10 different European countries. Further details can be found on the project website at: www.fp7-sono.eu.

  1. Highly antibacterial UHMWPE surfaces by implantation of titanium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V.; Giuffreda, E.; Velardi, L.; Alifano, P.; Talà, A.; Tredici, S. M.

    2014-07-01

    The spreading of pathogens represents a serious threat for human beings. Consequently, efficient antimicrobial surfaces are needed in order to reduce risks of contracting severe diseases. In this work we present the first evidences of a new technique to obtain a highly antibacterial Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) based on a non-stoichiometric titanium oxide coating, visible-light responsive, obtained through ion implantation.

  2. Antibacterial Activity of a Cardanol from Thai Apis mellifera Propolis

    PubMed Central

    Boonsai, Pattaraporn; Phuwapraisirisan, Preecha; Chanchao, Chanpen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Propolis is a sticky, dark brown resinous residue made by bees that is derived from plant resins. It is used to construct and repair the nest, and in addition possesses several diverse bioactivities. Here, propolis from Apis mellifera from Nan province, Thailand, was tested for antibacterial activity against Gram+ve (Staphylococcus aureus and Paenibacillus larvae) and Gram-ve (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Materials and methods: The three bacterial isolates were confirmed for species designation by Gram staining and analysis of the partial sequence of 16S rDNA. Propolis was sequentially extracted by methanol, dichloromethane and hexane. The antibacterial activity was determined by agar well diffusion and microbroth dilution assays using streptomycin as a positive control. The most active crude extract was further purified by quick column and adsorption chromatography. The apparent purity of each bioactive fraction was tested by thin layer chromatography. The chemical structure of the isolated bioactive compound was analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Results: Crude methanol extract of propolis showed the best antibacterial activity with a minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) value of 5 mg/mL for S. aureus and E. coli and 6.25 mg/mL for P. larvae. After quick column chromatography, only three active fractions were inhibitory to the growth of S. aureus and E. coli with MIC values of 6.25 and 31.3 µg/mL, respectively. Further adsorption chromatography yielded one pure bioactive fraction (A1A) with an IC50 value of 0.175 µg/mL for E. coli and 0.683 µg/mL for P. larvae, and was determined to be cardanol by NMR analysis. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed unusual shaped (especially in dividing cells), damaged and dead cells in cardanol-treated E. coli. Conclusion: Thai propolis contains a promising antibacterial agent. PMID:24578609

  3. Plasma sprayed rutile titania-nanosilver antibacterial coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinjin; Zhao, Chengjian; Zhou, Jingfang; Li, Chunxia; Shao, Yiran; Shi, Chao; Zhu, Yingchun

    2015-11-01

    Rutile titania (TiO2) coatings have superior mechanical properties and excellent stability that make them preferential candidates for various applications. In order to prevent infection arising from bacteria, significant efforts have been focused on antibacterial TiO2 coatings. In the study, titania-nanosilver (TiO2/Ag) coatings with five different kinds of weight percentages of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were prepared by plasma spray. The feedstock powders, which had a composition of rutile TiO2 powders containing 1-10,000 ppm AgNPs, were double sintered and deposited on stainless steel substrates with optimized spraying parameters. X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to analysize the phase composition and surface morphology of TiO2/Ag powders and coatings. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were employed to examine the antibacterial activity of the as-prepared coatings by bacterial counting method. The results showed that silver existed homogeneously in the TiO2/Ag coatings and no crystalline changed happened in the TiO2 structure. The reduction ratios on the TiO2/Ag coatings with 10 ppm AgNPs were as high as 94.8% and 95.6% for E. coli and S. aureus, respectively, and the TiO2/Ag coatings with 100-1000 ppm AgNPs exhibited 100% bactericidal activity against E. coli and S. aureus, which indicated the TiO2/Ag coatings with more than 10 ppm AgNPs had strong antibacterial activity. Moreover, the main factors influencing the antibacterial properties of TiO2/Ag coatings were discussed with grain size and the content of silver as well as the microstructure of the coatings.

  4. Eleucine indica Possesses Antioxidant, Antibacterial and Cytotoxic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubairi, Adel S.; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Peng, Chew Yuan; Mohan, Syam; Elhassan, Manal Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    The use of evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine is increasing rapidly. Eleucine indica (EI) is traditionally used in ailments associated with liver and kidneys. The therapeutic benefit of the medicinal plants is often attributed to their antioxidant properties. Therefore, the aim of this study was to screen the hexane, dicholoromethane, ethyl acetate (EA) and methanol extracts (MeTH) of EI for their antioxidant, antibacterial and anti-cancer effects using total phenolic contents (TPCs) and DPPH, disc diffusion method and MTT cytotoxicity assays, respectively. The MeTH was showed to have the highest TPC and scavenging activity (77.7%) on DPPH assay, followed by EA (64.5%), hexane (47.19%) and DCM (40.83%) extracts, whereas the MeTH showed no inhibitory effect on all tested bacteria strains. However, the EA extract exhibited a broad spectrum antibacterial activity against all tested bacteria except Bacillus subtilis, in which this bacterium was found to be resistant to all EI extracts. Meanwhile, hexane extract was demonstrated to have a remarkable antibacterial activity against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, while the dicholoromethane extract did not exhibit significant activity against P. aeruginosa. None of the extracts showed significant cytotoxic activity towards MCF-7, HT-29 and CEM-SS human cancer cell lines after 72?h incubation time (IC50 > 30??g/ml). These results demonstrate that the extract prepared from the EI possesses antioxidant activity in vitro in addition to antibacterial properties. Further investigations are needed to verify the antioxidant effects in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19617201

  5. GENETIC BASIS OF MURINE ANTIBACTERIAL DEFENSE TO STREPTOCOCCAL LUNG INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate the effect of genetic background and toll-like receptor 2 on antibacterial defense to streptococcal infection, eight genetically diverse strains of mice (A/J, DBA/2J, CAST/Ei, FVB/NJ, BALB/cJ, C57BL/6J, 129/SvImJ, and C3H/HeJ) and tlr2-deficient mice (C57BL/6

  6. Evaluation of antibacterial properties of Barium Zirconate Titanate (BZT) nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Simin; Aghayan, Mahdi; Ghorani-Azam, Adel; Behdani, Mohammad; Asoodeh, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    So far, the antibacterial activity of some organic and inorganic compounds has been studied. Barium zirconate titanate [Ba(ZrxTi1-x)O3] (x = 0.05) nanoparticle is an example of inorganic materials. In vitro studies have provided evidence for the antibacterial activity of this nanoparticle. In the current study, the nano-powder was synthesized by sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction showed that the powder was single-phase and had a perovskite structure at the calcination temperature of 1000 °C. Antibacterial activity of the desired nanoparticle was assessed on two gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus PTCC1431 and Micrococcus luteus PTCC1625) and two gram-negative (Escherichia coli HP101BA 7601c and clinically isolated Klebsiella pneumoniae) bacteria according to Radial Diffusion Assay (RDA). The results showed that the antibacterial activity of BZT nano-powder on both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria was acceptable. The minimum inhibitory concentration of this nano-powder was determined. The results showed that MIC values for E. coli, K. pneumoniae, M. luteus and S. aureus were about 2.3 ?g/mL, 7.3 ?g/mL, 3 ?g/mL and 12 ?g/mL, respectively. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was also evaluated and showed that the growth of E. coli, K. pneumoniae, M. luteus and S. aureus could be decreased at 2.3, 14, 3 and 18 ?g/mL of BZT. Average log reduction in viable bacteria count in time-kill assay ranged between 6 Log10 cfu/mL to zero after 24 h of incubation with BZT nanoparticle. PMID:25763046

  7. Antibacterial activities of persimmon extracts relate with their hydrogen peroxide concentration.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hidetoshi; Takasaki, Makiko; Tajima, Noriko; Fukamachi, Haruka; Igarashi, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Persimmon, a deciduous tree of the family Ebenaceae, is found throughout East Asia and contains high levels of tannins. This class of natural compounds exhibit favorable toxicity profiles along with bactericidal activity without the emergence of resistant bacteria, suggesting potential medical applications. Consistent with these observations, persimmon leaves show antibacterial activity. However, the mechanism of persimmon antibacterial activity remains unknown. In the present work, we demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of persimmon reflects the generation of reactive oxygen from tannins. The identification and quantification of reactive oxygen generated from persimmon and the level of antibacterial activity were determined. PMID:24805207

  8. Investigation of antibacterial activity of cotton fabric incorporating nano silver colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh, Ngo Vo Ke; Thi Phuong Phong, Nguyen

    2009-09-01

    In this work, silver nanoparticles were prepared by polyol process with microwave heating and incorporated on cotton fabric surfaces. The antibacterial performance of the antibacterial cotton fabric was tested for different concentration of nano-sized silver colloid, contact time germs, and washing times. It was found that antibacterial activity increased with the increasing concentration of nano-sized silver colloid. The antibacterial fabric with 758 mg/kg of silver nanoparticles on surface cotton was highly effective in killing test bacteria and had excellent water resisting property.

  9. Design, development and synthesis of mixed bioconjugates of piperic acid-glycine, curcumin-glycine/alanine and curcumin-glycine-piperic acid and their antibacterial and antifungal properties.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Satyendra; Narain, Upma; Mishra, Roli; Misra, Krishna

    2005-03-01

    In the present communication different curcumin bioconjugates viz. 4,4'-di-O-glycinoyl-curcumin, 4,4'-di-O-d-alaninoyl-curcumin, 4,4'-di-O-(glycinoyl-di-N-piperoyl)-curcumin, 4,4'-di-O-piperoyl curcumin, curcumin-4,4'-di-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside, 4,4'-di-O-acetyl-curcumin along with piperoyl glycine, have been synthesised and characterised by spectra UV, (1)H NMR and elemental analysis. All the covalent bonds used are biodegradable. This makes these derivatives as potent prodrugs, which can get hydrolysed at the target sites. These bioconjugates were tested in vitro against different bacteria and fungi. The 4,4'-di-O-(glycinoyl-di-N-piperoyl)-curcumin and 4,4'-di-O-acetyl-curcumin are more effective than Cefepime, an antibacterial drug available in market, at the same concentration. The 4,4'-di-O-(glycinoyl-di-N-piperoyl)-curcumin and 4,4'-di-O-piperoyl curcumin had antifungal activity in vitro almost comparable with fluconazole, the most popular antifungal drug. The enhanced activity of these bioconjugates vis-a-vis the parent molecule that is curcumin may be due to improved cellular uptake or reduced metabolism of these bioconjugates resulting in building up of enough concentration inside the infected cells. It opens a new era for exploring suitably designed curcumin bioconjugates as potential antibacterial/antifungal drugs. PMID:15698763

  10. The effect of antibacterial and non-antibacterial compounds alone or associated with antifugals upon fungi

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Maria M.; Teixeira-Santos, Rita; Silva, Ana P.; Cruz, Luisa; Ricardo, Elisabete; Pina-Vaz, Cidália; Rodrigues, Acácio G.

    2015-01-01

    During the last 30 years the incidence of fungal infections has increased dramatically. While the antifungal therapeutic options available are somewhat reduced, most pathogenic microorganisms have an incredible capacity to mutate and acquire resistance. In addition, multiple drugs are often required concomitantly to manage clinically complex disorders. The combination of antibiotics or other compounds with antifungal drugs, simultaneously or sequentially, is commonly adopted in clinical practice, although without a full knowledge of the consequences. Thus, the role of combined therapy and the effect of antibiotics upon fungal growth promotion need to be critically evaluated and understood in order to avoid undesirable drug interactions. With this review we intend discuss the studies that report about antibiotics inhibiting fungal growth, as well as studies describing the synergistic effect of the combined therapy, i.e., associations between antibiotics or other compounds with antifungal drugs. Alternative therapeutic protocols for fungal disease could be designed, taking advantage of such drug combinations. Critical revision of previously published data is crucial in order to define future research strategies. PMID:26191055

  11. Synergistic Antibacterial Effect between Silibinin and Antibiotics in Oral Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Soo; Jang, Kyeung-Ae; Cha, Jeong-Dan

    2012-01-01

    Silibinin is a composition of the silymarin group as a hepatoprotective agent, and it exhibits various biological activities, including antibacterial activity. In this study, the antibacterial activities of silibinin were investigated in combination with two antimicrobial agents against oral bacteria. Silibinin was determined with MIC and MBC values ranging from 0.1 to 3.2 and 0.2 to 6.4??g/mL, ampicillin from 0.125 to 64 and 0.5 to 64??g/mL, gentamicin from 2 to 256 and 4 to 512??g/mL, respectively. The ranges of MIC50 and MIC90 were 0.025–0.8??g/mL and 0.1–3.2??g/mL, respectively. The antibacterial activities of silibinin against oral bacteria were assessed using the checkerboard and time-kill methods to evaluate the synergistic effects of treatment with ampicillin or gentamicin. The results were evaluated showing that the combination effects of silibinin with antibiotics were synergistic (FIC index <0.5) against all tested oral bacteria. Furthermore, a time-kill study showed that the growth of the tested bacteria was completely attenuated after 2–6?h of treatment with the MBC of silibinin, regardless of whether it was administered alone or with ampicillin or gentamicin. These results suggest that silibinin combined with other antibiotics may be microbiologically beneficial and not antagonistic. PMID:21941436

  12. Phytochemical analysis, antioxidant and antibacterial effects of sea buckthorn berries.

    PubMed

    Chaman, Saadia; Syed, Nawazish-I-Husain; Danish, Zeeshan; Khan, Farrakh Zia

    2011-07-01

    Sea buckthorn berries are therapeutically used as folk medicine for a variety of diseases, however, the scientific evidence is hardly available to support their role. This study explored their chemical constituents and their role as antioxidant and antibacterial agents. Three common solvents such as petroleum ether (40° - 60°C), chloroform and methanol were successively used for the extraction of active principles from sea buckthorn berries. Five major fractions (F1-F5) were isolated from the active methanol extract by column and thin layer chromatography. An attempt was made to identify the chemical nature of pooled fractions by available spectral means. Antioxidant potential of methanol extract and its fractions was measured by DPPH, formation of phosphomolybdenum complex and TBA methods. The hole-plate diffussion method was used to find out the antibacterial activity. A very brief structure-activity relationship of the potent antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds is discussed. Methanolic extract and its fractions contain numerous phenolic compounds such as flavonoids, which may be responsible for antioxidant and antibacterial effects. PMID:21715268

  13. Antibacterial gene transfer across the tree of life

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Jason A; Funkhouser-Jones, Lisa J; Brileya, Kristen; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Bordenstein, Seth R

    2014-01-01

    Though horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is widespread, genes and taxa experience biased rates of transferability. Curiously, independent transmission of homologous DNA to archaea, bacteria, eukaryotes, and viruses is extremely rare and often defies ecological and functional explanations. Here, we demonstrate that a bacterial lysozyme family integrated independently in all domains of life across diverse environments, generating the only glycosyl hydrolase 25 muramidases in plants and archaea. During coculture of a hydrothermal vent archaeon with a bacterial competitor, muramidase transcription is upregulated. Moreover, recombinant lysozyme exhibits broad-spectrum antibacterial action in a dose-dependent manner. Similar to bacterial transfer of antibiotic resistance genes, transfer of a potent antibacterial gene across the universal tree seemingly bestows a niche-transcending adaptation that trumps the barriers against parallel HGT to all domains. The discoveries also comprise the first characterization of an antibacterial gene in archaea and support the pursuit of antibiotics in this underexplored group. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04266.001 PMID:25422936

  14. Mussel-Inspired Silver-Releasing Antibacterial Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Fullenkamp, Dominic E.; Rivera, José G.; Gong, Yong-kuan; Lau, K. H. Aaron; He, Lihong; Varshney, Rahul; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2012-01-01

    A silver-releasing antibacterial hydrogel was developed that simultaneously allowed for silver nanoparticle formation and gel curing. Water-soluble polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers were synthesized that contain reactive catechol moieties, inspired by mussel adhesive proteins, where the catechol containing amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) plays an important role in the ability of the mussel to adhere to almost any surface in an aqueous environment. We utilized silver nitrate to oxidize polymer catechols, leading to covalent cross-linking and hydrogel formation with simultaneous reduction of Ag(I). Silver release was sustained for periods of at least two weeks in PBS solution. Hydrogels were found to inhibit bacterial growth, consistent with the well-known antibacterial properties of silver, while not significantly affecting mammalian cell viability. In addition, thin hydrogel films were found to resist bacterial and mammalian cell attachment, consistent with the antifouling properties of PEG. We believe these materials have a strong potential for antibacterial biomaterial coatings and tissue adhesives, due to the material-independent adhesive properties of catechols. PMID:22374454

  15. Effects of Quaternary Ammonium Chain Length on Antibacterial Bonding Agents

    PubMed Central

    Li, F.; Weir, M.D.; Xu, H.H.K.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to synthesize new quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs) with systematically varied alkyl chain lengths (CL) and to investigate, for the first time, the CL effects on antibacterial efficacy, cytotoxicity, and dentin bond strength of bonding agents. QAMs were synthesized with CL of 3 to 18 and incorporated into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) bonding agent. The cured resins were inoculated with Streptococcus mutans. Bacterial early attachment was investigated at 4 hrs. Biofilm colony-forming units (CFU) were measured after 2 days. With CL increasing from 3 to 16, the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration were decreased by 5 orders of magnitude. Incorporating QAMs into SBMP reduced bacterial early attachment, with the least colonization at CL = 16. Biofilm CFU for CL = 16 was 4 log lower than SBMP control (p < .05). All groups had similar dentin bond strengths (p > .1). The new antibacterial materials had fibroblast/odontoblast viability similar to that of commercial controls. In conclusion, increasing the chain length of new QAMs in bonding agents greatly increased the antibacterial efficacy. A reduction in Streptococcus mutans biofilm CFU by 4 log could be achieved, without compromising bond strength and cytotoxicity. New QAM-containing bonding agents are promising for a wide range of restorations to inhibit biofilms. PMID:23958761

  16. In vitro antibacterial activity of different pulp capping materials

    PubMed Central

    Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Ceci, Matteo; Dagna, Alberto; Chiesa, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background Direct pulp capping involves the application of a dental material to seal communications between the exposed pulp and the oral cavity (mechanical and carious pulp exposures) in an attempt to act as a barrier, protect the dental pulp complex and preserve its vitality. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare, by the agar disc diffusion test, the antimicrobial activity of six different pulp-capping materials: Dycal (Dentsply), Calcicur (Voco), Calcimol LC (Voco), TheraCal LC (Bisco), MTA Angelus (Angelus), Biodentine (Septodont). Material and Methods Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mutans strains were selected to evaluate the antimicrobial activity by the agar disc diffusion test of different pulp capping materials. Paper disks were impregnated whit each pulp capping materials and placed onto culture agar-plates pre-adsorbed with bacterial cells and further incubated for 24 h at 37°C. The growth inhibition zones around each pulp capping materials were recorded and compared for each bacterial strain. Results For the investigation of the antibacterial properties the ANOVA showed the presence of significant differences among the various materials. Tukey test showed that MTA-based materials induced lower growth inhibition zones. Conclusions MTA-based products show a discrete antibacterial activity varying from calcium hydroxide-based materials which present an higher antibacterial activity. Key words:Agar disc diffusion test, antimicrobial activity, calcium hydroxide, MTA, pulp capping materials. PMID:26644833

  17. Screening of some Kenyan medicinal plants for antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Wagate, Cyrus G; Mbaria, James M; Gakuya, Daniel W; Nanyingi, Mark O; Kareru, P G; Njuguna, Anne; Gitahi, Nduhiu; Macharia, James K; Njonge, Francis K

    2010-01-01

    Eleven medicinal plants used by traditional healers in Machakos and Kitui District were screened, namely: Ajuga remota Benth, Aloe secundiflora Engl, Amaranthus hybridus L, Cassia didymobotrya Fes, Croton macrostachyus Del, Entada leptostachya Harms, Erythrina abyssinica DC, Harrisonia abyssinica Oliv, Schkuhria pinnata O. Ktze, Terminalia kilimandscharica Engl and Ziziphus abyssinica Hochst for potential antibacterial activity against four medically important bacterial strains, namely: Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Micrococcus lutea ATCC 9341 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. The antibacterial activity of methanol extracts was determined as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The plant extracts were more active against Gram-positive (G+) than Gram-negative (G-) bacteria. The positive controls were streptomycin and benzylpenicillin for G- and G+ bacteria, respectively, both had a significant MIC at <1 mg/mL. The most susceptible bacteria were B. cereus, followed by M. lutea, while the most resistant bacteria were Ps. aeruginosa, followed by E. coli. The present study supports the use of these plants by the herbalists in the management of bacterial ailments. H. abyssinica and T. kilimandscharica showed the best antibacterial activity; hence these plants can be further subjected to phytochemical and pharmacological evaluation. PMID:19548257

  18. Screening of solvent dependent antibacterial activity of Prunus domestica.

    PubMed

    Yaqeen, Zahra; Naqvi, Naim-ul-Hasan; Sohail, Tehmina; Rehman, Zakir-ur; Fatima, Nudrat; Imran, Hina; Rehman, Atiqur

    2013-03-01

    Fruit of Prunus domestica was extracted in ethanol. The ethanol extract was further extracted with two solvents ethyl acetate and chloroform. The crude ethanol extract and two fractions (ethyl acetate and chloroform) were screened for their antibacterial activity using the agar well diffusion method .They were tested against nine bacteria; five Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcuc intermedius, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus pumilus) and four Gram negative bacteria (Eschrichia coli, Proteus mirabilis Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhi and Klebsiela pneumoniae). The susceptibility of microorganisms to all three fractions was compared with each other and with standard antibiotic (Ampicillin) Among all fractions ethyl acetate exhibited highest antibacterial activity (average zone of inhibition 34.57mm ± 1.3) while ethyl alcohol exhibited least antibacterial activity (average zone of inhibition 17.42mm ± 3.3). Minimum inhibitory concentration of ethanol, ethyl acetate and chloroform fractions was found in the range of 78 ? g/ml to 2500 ? gl/ml against gram positive and gram negative bacteria. PMID:23455215

  19. Antibacterial and antitumour activities of some plants grown in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Usta, Canan; Yildirim, Arzu Birinci; Turker, Arzu Ucar

    2014-01-01

    Screening of antibacterial and antitumour activities of 33 different extracts prepared with three types of solvents (water, ethanol and methanol) was conducted. The extracts were obtained from 11 different plant species grown in Turkey: Eryngium campestre L., Alchemilla mollis (Buser) Rothm., Dorycnium pentaphyllum Scop., Coronilla varia L., Onobrychis oxyodonta Boiss., Fritillaria pontica Wahlenb., Asarum europaeum L., Rhinanthus angustifolius C. C. Gmelin, Doronicum orientale Hoffm., Campanula glomerata L. and Campanula olympica Boiss. Antibacterial activity against six bacteria was evaluated: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis by using disc diffusion and well diffusion methods. S. aureus and S. epidermidis were most sensitive to the methanolic extract from A. europaeum. S. pyogenes was vulnerable to all used extracts of D. orientale. In addition, ethanolic or methanolic extracts of E. campestre, A. mollis, D. pentaphyllum, C. varia, R. angustifolius, C. glomerata and C. olympica displayed strong antibacterial activity against at least one of the tested gram-negative bacteria. The methanolic extract from R. angustifolius showed a broad-spectrum activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Antitumour activity was evaluated with Agrobacterium-tumefaciens-induced potato disc tumour assay. Best antitumour activity was obtained with the aqueous extract from A. europaeum and methanolic extract from E. campestre (100% and 86% tumour inhibition, respectively).

  20. [Diagnostic markers and assessment of efficacy of antibacterial therapy].

    PubMed

    Bodmann, K-F

    2014-04-01

    In anti-infective therapy, there is a need for objective diagnostic markers to guide the appropriate selection and duration of antibacterial treatment. In the diagnosis and treatment of bacterial infections, three aspects must be considered: the appropriateness of antibacterial therapy, the initiation and evaluation of an effective initial therapy, and termination of the antimicrobial treatment. Repetitive monitoring of procalcitonin (PCT) has been proposed as such a marker in conjunction with the clinical presentation and microbiological sampling of blood, urine, and/or sputum. Different threshold values for PCT in pulmonary infections vs. severe systemic infections (e.g., sepsis) have been proposed. However, a single PCT determination is not sufficient, only consecutive measurements can give feedback of the appropriateness and success of the antibacterial therapy. Furthermore, it is important to realize that besides bacterial infection, other disease states can elevate PCT levels. Examples are calcitonin-producing tumors, medullary C-cell thyroid carcinoma, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). PCT can also be elevated in fungal infections. On the other hand, localized and encapsulated infections (e.g., abscess, endocarditis and early stages of infections) can be associated with lowered PCT values. PMID:24699883

  1. Nano zinc oxide-sodium alginate antibacterial cellulose fibres.

    PubMed

    Varaprasad, Kokkarachedu; Raghavendra, Gownolla Malegowd; Jayaramudu, Tippabattini; Seo, Jongchul

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, antibacterial cellulose fibres were successfully fabricated by a simple and cost-effective procedure by utilizing nano zinc oxide. The possible nano zinc oxide was successfully synthesized by precipitation technique and then impregnated effectively over cellulose fibres through sodium alginate matrix. XRD analysis revealed the 'rod-like' shape alignment of zinc oxide with an interplanar d-spacing of 0.246nm corresponding to the (101) planes of the hexagonal wurtzite structure. TEM analysis confirmed the nano dimension of the synthesized zinc oxide nanoparticles. The presence of nano zinc oxide over cellulose fibres was evident from the SEM-EDS experiments. FTIR and TGA studies exhibited their effective bonding interaction. The tensile stress-strain curves data indicated the feasibility of the fabricated fibres for longer duration utility without any significant damage or breakage. The antibacterial studies against Escherichia coli revealed the excellent bacterial devastation property. Further, it was observed that when all the parameters remained constant, the variation of sodium alginate concentration showed impact in devastating the E. coli. In overall, the fabricated nano zinc oxide-sodium alginate cellulose fibres can be effectively utilized as antibacterial fibres for biomedical applications. PMID:26453887

  2. The mechanism of antibacterial activity of tetrandrine against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Seob; Han, Sin-Hee; Lee, Su-Hwan; Kim, Young-Guk; Park, Chung-Berm; Kang, Ok-Hwa; Keum, Joon-Ho; Kim, Sung-Bae; Mun, Su-Hyun; Seo, Yun-Soo; Myung, Noh-Yil; Kwon, Dong-Yeul

    2012-08-01

    Tetrandrine (TET) is a bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid derived from the radix of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. TET performs a wide spectrum of biological activities. The radix of S. tetrandrae has been used traditionally in Asia, including Korea, to treat congestive circulatory disorders and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the mechanism of antibacterial activity of tetrandrine against Staphylococcus aureus. The mechanism was investigated by studying the effects of TET in combination with detergent or membrane potential un-couplers. In addition, the direct involvement of peptidoglycan (PGN) was assessed in titration assays. TET activity against S. aureus was 125-250??g/mL, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the two reference strains was 250??g/mL. The OD(600) of each suspension treated with a combination of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), tris(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane (TRIS), and Triton X-100 (TX) with TET (0.25×MIC) had been reduced from 43% to 96%. Additional structure-function studies on the antibacterial activity of TET in combination with other agents may lead to the discovery of more effective antibacterial agents. PMID:22845553

  3. Tunable drug loading and release from polypeptide multilayer nanofilms

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bingbing; Li, Bingyun

    2009-01-01

    Polypeptide multilayer nanofilms were prepared using electrostatic layer-by-layer self-assembly nanotechnology. Small charged drug molecules (eg, cefazolin, gentamicin, and methylene blue) were loaded in polypeptide multilayer nanofilms. Their loading and release were found to be pH-dependent and could also be controlled by changing the number of film layers and drug incubation time, and applying heat-treatment after film formation. Antibioticloaded polypeptide multilayer nanofilms showed controllable antibacterial properties against Staphylococcus aureus. The developed biodegradable polypeptide multilayer nanofilms are capable of loading both positively- and negatively-charged drug molecules and promise to serve as drug delivery systems on biomedical devices for preventing biomedical device-associated infection, which is a significant clinical complication for both civilian and military patients. PMID:19421369

  4. Antibacterial Compounds of Canadian Honeys Target Bacterial Cell Wall Inducing Phenotype Changes, Growth Inhibition and Cell Lysis That Resemble Action of ?-Lactam Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin

    2014-01-01

    Honeys show a desirable broad spectrum activity against Gram-positive and negative bacteria making antibacterial activity an intrinsic property of honey and a desirable source for new drug development. The cellular targets and underlying mechanism of action of honey antibacterial compounds remain largely unknown. To facilitate the target discovery, we employed a method of phenotypic profiling by directly comparing morphological changes in Escherichia coli induced by honeys to that of ampicillin, the cell wall-active ?-lactam of known mechanism of action. Firstly, we demonstrated the purity of tested honeys from potential ?-lactam contaminations using quantitative LC-ESI-MS. Exposure of log-phase E. coli to honey or ampicillin resulted in time- and concentration-dependent changes in bacterial cell shape with the appearance of filamentous phenotypes at sub-inhibitory concentrations and spheroplasts at the MBC. Cell wall destruction by both agents, clearly visible on microscopic micrographs, was accompanied by increased permeability of the lipopolysaccharide outer membrane as indicated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). More than 90% E. coli exposed to honey or ampicillin became permeable to propidium iodide. Consistently with the FACS results, both honey-treated and ampicillin-treated E. coli cells released lipopolysaccharide endotoxins at comparable levels, which were significantly higher than controls (p<0.0001). E. coli cells transformed with the ampicillin-resistance gene (?–lactamase) remained sensitive to honey, displayed the same level of cytotoxicity, cell shape changes and endotoxin release as ampicillin-sensitive cells. As expected, ?–lactamase protected the host cell from antibacterial action of ampicillin. Thus, both honey and ampicillin induced similar structural changes to the cell wall and LPS and that this ability underlies antibacterial activities of both agents. Since the cell wall is critical for cell growth and survival, honey active compounds would be highly applicable for therapeutic purposes while differences in the mode of action between honey and ampicillin may provide clinical advantage in eradicating ?-lactam-resistant pathogens. PMID:25191847

  5. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations of antimicrobial drug therapy in cancer patients with kidney dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Frieder; Schröppel, Bernd; Ludwig, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cancer have a high inherent risk of infectious complications. In addition, the incidence of acute and chronic kidney dysfunction rises in this population. Anti-infective drugs often require dosing modifications based on an estimate of kidney function, usually the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, there is still no preferential GFR formula to be used, and in acute kidney injury there is always a considerable time delay between true kidney function and estimated GFR. In most cases, the anti-infective therapy should start with an immediate and high loading dose. Pharmacokinetic as well as pharmacodynamic principles must be applied for further dose adjustment. Anti-infective drugs with time-dependent action should be given with the target of high trough concentrations (e.g., beta lactam antibiotics, penems, vancomycin, antiviral drugs). Anti-infective drugs with concentration-dependent action should be given with the target of high peak concentrations (e.g., aminoglycosides, daptomycin, colistin, quinolones). Our group created a pharmacokinetic database, called NEPharm, hat serves as a reference to obtain reliable dosing regimens of anti-infective drugs in kidney dysfunction as well as renal replacement therapy. To avoid the risk of either too low or too infrequent peak concentrations, we prefer the eliminated fraction rule for dose adjustment calculations. PMID:26167456

  6. Kibdelomycin Is a Bactericidal Broad-Spectrum Aerobic Antibacterial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Dayananth, Priya; Balibar, Carl J.; Garlisi, Charles G.; Lu, Jun; Kishii, Ryuta; Takei, Masaya; Fukuda, Yasumichi; Ha, Sookhee; Young, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics continues to grow and pose serious challenges, while the discovery rate for new antibiotics declines. Kibdelomycin is a recently discovered natural-product antibiotic that inhibits bacterial growth by inhibiting the bacterial DNA replication enzymes DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. It was reported to be a broad-spectrum aerobic Gram-positive agent with selective inhibition of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium difficile. We have extended the profiling of kibdelomycin by using over 196 strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative aerobic pathogens recovered from worldwide patient populations. We report the MIC50s, MIC90s, and bactericidal activities of kibdelomycin. We confirm the Gram-positive spectrum and report for the first time that kibdelomycin shows strong activity (MIC90, 0.125 ?g/ml) against clinical strains of the Gram-negative nonfermenter Acinetobacter baumannii but only weak activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We confirm that well-characterized resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae show no cross-resistance to kibdelomycin and quinolones and coumarin antibiotics. We also show that kibdelomycin is not subject to efflux in Pseudomonas, though it is in Escherichia coli, and it is generally affected by the outer membrane permeability entry barrier in the nonfermenters P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii, which may be addressable by structure-based chemical modification. PMID:25845866

  7. In vitro antibacterial activity of AZD0914, a new spiropyrimidinetrione DNA gyrase/topoisomerase inhibitor with potent activity against Gram-positive, fastidious Gram-Negative, and atypical bacteria.

    PubMed

    Huband, Michael D; Bradford, Patricia A; Otterson, Linda G; Basarab, Gregory S; Kutschke, Amy C; Giacobbe, Robert A; Patey, Sara A; Alm, Richard A; Johnstone, Michele R; Potter, Marie E; Miller, Paul F; Mueller, John P

    2015-01-01

    AZD0914 is a new spiropyrimidinetrione bacterial DNA gyrase/topoisomerase inhibitor with potent in vitro antibacterial activity against key Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus agalactiae), fastidious Gram-negative (Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria gonorrhoeae), atypical (Legionella pneumophila), and anaerobic (Clostridium difficile) bacterial species, including isolates with known resistance to fluoroquinolones. AZD0914 works via inhibition of DNA biosynthesis and accumulation of double-strand cleavages; this mechanism of inhibition differs from those of other marketed antibacterial compounds. AZD0914 stabilizes and arrests the cleaved covalent complex of gyrase with double-strand broken DNA under permissive conditions and thus blocks religation of the double-strand cleaved DNA to form fused circular DNA. Whereas this mechanism is similar to that seen with fluoroquinolones, it is mechanistically distinct. AZD0914 exhibited low frequencies of spontaneous resistance in S. aureus, and if mutants were obtained, the mutations mapped to gyrB. Additionally, no cross-resistance was observed for AZD0914 against recent bacterial clinical isolates demonstrating resistance to fluoroquinolones or other drug classes, including macrolides, ?-lactams, glycopeptides, and oxazolidinones. AZD0914 was bactericidal in both minimum bactericidal concentration and in vitro time-kill studies. In in vitro checkerboard/synergy testing with 17 comparator antibacterials, only additivity/indifference was observed. The potent in vitro antibacterial activity (including activity against fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates), low frequency of resistance, lack of cross-resistance, and bactericidal activity of AZD0914 support its continued development. PMID:25385112

  8. Antibacterial and antiviral study of dialdehyde polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Le

    Concerns for microbial contamination and infection to the general population, especially the spread of drug-resistant microorganisms, have greatly increased. Polymeric biocides have been found to be a feasible strategy to inactivate drug-resistant bacteria. However, current polymeric biocide systems involve multi-step chemical reactions and they are not cost-effective. Desirable antimicrobial systems need to be designed to be environmentally friendly, broad-spectrum effective against microorganisms, flexible for various delivery methods and economically affordable. We demonstrated that dialdehyde polysaccharides (including dialdehyde starch and dialdehdye cellulose) were broad-spectrum polymeric biocides against gram-positive/negative bacteria, bacteriophages and human virus. These polymers can be easily converted from starch and cellulose through one-step periodate oxidation. Destructions of microorganism by dialdehyde polysaccharides have been achieved in aqueous suspension or by solid surface contact. The dialdehdye functions of dialdehdye polysaccharides were found to be the dominant action against microorganism. The reactivity of the dialdehyde functionality was found to be pH-dependent as well as related to the dispersion of dialdehyde polysaccharides. Degradation of dialdehyde starch during cooking was confirmed. Degradation of dialdehyde starch was more liable in alkaline condition. Carboxylic acid and conjugated aldehyde functionalities were the two main degradation products, confirmed from the spectroscopic studies. The pH effect on the polysaccharide structure and the corresponding antimicrobial activity was very complicated. No decisive conclusions could be obtained from this study. Liner inactivation kinetics was found for dialdehyde starch aqueous suspension against bacteria. This linear inactivation kinetics was derived from the pseudo-first chemical reaction between the dialdehyde starch and the bacteria. The established inactivation kinetics was successfully predicated the response of bacteria to dialdehyde starch with time. Inactivation of bacteria by dialdehyde starch was speculated to be the crosslinking-interaction between the dialdehyde starch and the bacterial surface. Amino groups of bacterial surfaces were blocked by dialdehyde starch. This crosslinking action was also suggested from the preliminary study of the bacterial dehydrogenase activity. However, membrane damage was found in the dialdehdye starch treated bacteria from the fluorescent study.

  9. Antibacterial nanocarriers of resveratrol with gold and silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Park, Sohyun; Cha, Song-Hyun; Cho, Inyoung; Park, Soomin; Park, Yohan; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the preparation of resveratrol nanocarrier systems and the evaluation of their in vitro antibacterial activities. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for resveratrol nanocarrier systems were synthesized using green synthetic routes. During the synthesis steps, resveratrol was utilized as a reducing agent to chemically reduce gold and silver ions to AuNPs and AgNPs. This system provides green and eco-friendly synthesis routes that do not involve additional chemical reducing agents. Resveratrol nanocarriers with AuNPs (Res-AuNPs) and AgNPs (Res-AgNPs) were observed to be spherical and to exhibit characteristic surface plasmon resonance at 547nm and at 412-417nm, respectively. The mean size of the nanoparticles ranged from 8.32 to 21.84nm, as determined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The face-centered cubic structure of the Res-AuNPs was confirmed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction. Fourier-transform infrared spectra indicated that the hydroxyl groups and CC in the aromatic ring of resveratrol were involved in the reduction reaction. Res-AuNPs retained excellent colloidal stability during ultracentrifugation and re-dispersion, suggesting that resveratrol also played a role as a capping agent. Zeta potentials of Res-AuNPs and Res-AgNPs were in the range of -20.58 to -48.54mV. Generally, against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, the Res-AuNPs and Res-AgNPs exhibited greater antibacterial activity compared to that of resveratrol alone. Among the tested strains, the highest antibacterial activity of the Res-AuNPs was observed against Streptococcus pneumoniae. The addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate during the synthesis of Res-AgNPs slightly increased their antibacterial activity. These results suggest that the newly developed resveratrol nanocarrier systems with metallic nanoparticles show potential for application as nano-antibacterial agents with enhanced activities. PMID:26478416

  10. Lithocholic acid and derivatives: Antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Patrícia G G; Lemos, Telma L G; Almeida, Macia C S; de Souza, Juliana M O; Bizerra, Ayla M C; Santiago, Gilvandete M P; da Costa, José G M; Coutinho, Henrique D M

    2015-12-01

    In order to develop bioactive lithocholic acid derivatives, we prepared fifteen semi-synthetic compounds through modification at C-3 and/or C-24. The reactions showed yields ranging from 37% to 100%. The structures of all compounds obtained were identified on the basis of their spectral data (IR, MS, 1D- and 2D-NMR). The activity of lithocholic acid and derivatives was evaluated against the growth of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The derivative 3?-formyloxy-5?-cholan-24-oic acid (LA-06) showed the best activity, with MIC values of 0.0790mM against E. coli (Ec 27) and B. cereus in both cases, and 0.0395mM against S. aureus (ATCC 12692). Lithocholic acid and the derivatives with MIC?1.2mM were evaluated on the susceptibility of some bacterial pathogens to the aminoglycoside antibiotics neomycin, amikacin and gentamicin was evaluated. There are no previously reported studies about these compounds as modifiers of the action of antibiotics or any other drugs. PMID:26216208

  11. Omitted doses as an unintended consequence of a hospital restricted antibacterial system: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Neil; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Jacklin, Ann; Wilcock, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of omitted doses of antibacterial agents and explore a number of risk factors, including the effect of a restricted antibacterial system. Methods Antibacterial data were extracted from a hospital electronic prescribing and medication administration system for the period 1 January to 30 April 2014. Percentage dose omission rates were calculated. Omission rates for the first dose of antibacterial courses were analysed using logistic regression to identify any correlation between first dose omission rates and potential risk factors, including the antibacterials' restriction status and whether or not they were ward stock. Results The study included 90?761 antibacterial doses. Of these, 6535 (7.2%) were documented as having been omitted; omission of 847 (0.9% of 90?761) was due to medication being unavailable. Non-restricted, ward stock antibacterials had the lowest frequency of omission, with 6.2% (271 of 4391) first doses omitted. The prevalence was 10.4% (27 of 260) for restricted, ward-stock antibacterials (OR?=?1.6, 95% CI?=?1.0–2.4, P?=?0.027) and 15.5% (53 of 341) for non-restricted, non-ward stock antibacterials (OR?=?2.7, 95% CI?=?2.0–3.7, P?antibacterials had the highest frequency (30.7%, 71 of 231; OR?=?6.2, 95% CI?=?4.5–8.4, P?Antibacterials not stocked in clinical areas were significantly more likely to be omitted. The prevalence of omitted doses increased further if the antibiotic was also restricted. To achieve safe, effective antimicrobial use, a balance is needed between promoting antimicrobial stewardship and preventing unintended omitted doses. PMID:26316382

  12. Drug Interactions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... taking. Also, be sure that your care providers review ALL medications, drugs, and supplements or herbs you are ... of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, and the International Association of Providers of ...

  13. Antibacterial Peptide Microcin J25 (MCCJ25) Inhibits Transcription by Binding within, and Obstructing, the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta; Sineva, Elena; Knight, Jennifer; Levy, Ronald L.; Ebright, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The antibacterial peptide microcin J25 (MccJ25) inhibits transcription by bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). Biochemical results indicate that inhibition of transcription occurs at the level of NTP uptake or NTP binding by RNAP. Genetic results indicate that inhibition of transcription requires an extensive determinant, comprising more than fifty amino acid residues, within the RNAP secondary channel (also known as the “NTP-uptake channel” or “pore”). Biophysical results indicate that inhibition of transcription involves binding of MccJ25 within the RNAP secondary channel. Molecular modelling indicates that binding of MccJ25 within the RNAP secondary channel obstructs the RNAP secondary channel. We conclude that MccJ25 inhibits transcription by binding within, and obstructing, the RNAP secondary channel--acting essentially as a “cork in a bottle.” Obstruction of the RNAP secondary channel represents an attractive target for drug discovery. PMID:15200952

  14. Optimization and evaluation of bioactive drug-loaded polymeric nanoparticles for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Rani, Ruma; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Dhingra, Dinesh; Kumar, Sandeep

    2015-07-01

    The premise of the present study was to suitably select or modify the constitution of the polymer matrix to achieve significantly high entrapment of hydrophilic drugs within polymeric nanoparticles (NPs). Glycyrrhizin (GL), the bioactive drug was selected as a representative hydrophilic drug. Ionotropic gelation technique was used for the preparation of glycyrrhizin-loaded NPs. Concentration of polymers were optimized by 3-level factorial design which affected the particle size and encapsulation efficiency. The formulation was subjected to morphological, physiochemical and in vitro drug release studies. Mean particle size of nanoparticles was around 181 nm as estimated with particle size analyzer. TEM observations revealed spherical shape and size in the range of 140-200 nm. Fourier transform-infrared analysis did not reveal any chemical interaction among the drug and polymers used for the nano-formulation. A release study conducted in vitro over a period of 24 h indicated primarily burst release after that controlled release of glycyrrhizin from the formulation. Antibacterial activities of glycyrrhizin, blank chitosan-gum arabic NPs and glycyrrhizin-loaded chitosan-gum arabic NPs were tested against two Gram negative and two Gram positive bacteria. The study demonstrates the benefit of excipient screening techniques in improving entrapment efficiency of a hydrophilic drug. PMID:25881957

  15. Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cosmetics Tobacco Products Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products FDA Home Drug Databases Drugs@FDA - FAQ | Instructions | ... 6332) Contact FDA For Government For Press Combination Products Advisory Committees Science & Research Regulatory Information Safety Emergency ...

  16. Drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Andreas J

    2014-01-01

    Before the arrival of modern pharmacotherapy, drug hypersensitivity reactions were virtually unknown. Toxicity from the many plant-, animal- and inorganic material-derived remedies must have been much more common. One famous example is the intoxications from mercury, which has been used in many ailments, but particularly for the treatment of syphilis. It was only in the 19th century when more and more active principles from e.g. plants were identified, and when the observations of skin reactions became more prevalent. In 1877, Heinrich Köbner used for the first time the term 'drug exanthema' (Arznei-Exanthem). Since then, many different types of exanthemas from the mild macular-papular forms to the severe life-threatening bullous exanthemas such as toxic epidermal necrolysis have been observed from numerous drugs. The systematic investigation of severe drug reactions has only started in the second half of the 20th century, parallel to the increasing knowledge in immunology. Drug hypersensitivity reactions still remain one of the most challenging problems in allergology due to their manifold clinical manifestations and their very diverse pathophysiology. The introduction of new drugs and in turn the emergence of new hypersensitivity reactions will remain a challenge in the future. PMID:24925392

  17. Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Determinants and OqxAB Efflux Pumps among Extended-Spectrum ?-Lactamase Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolated from Patients with Nosocomial Urinary Tract Infection in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Azad, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) plays an important role in the development of clinical resistance to quinolone. The aim of this study was to investigate PMQR determinants among extended-spectrum ?-lactamases- (ESBL-) producing Klebsiella pneumoniae recovered from patients with nosocomial urinary tract infection (UTI). Methods. A total of 247 ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates were collected from 750 patients with UTI. ESBL production was confirmed by double disc synergy test and combined disc diffusion test. The prevalence of PMQR determinants among ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae was assessed using PCR method. Results. The rates of resistance to antimicrobial agents in present study varied from 14.2% to 98.8%. In comparison with other PMQR genotypes, the frequency of aac(6?)-Ib (68.8%) was strikingly high. Of the 247 isolates tested, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, and qepA genes were present in 3.6%, 1.6%, 1.2, and 2%, respectively. oqxA and oqxB were detected in 56.7% and 54.6% of isolates. The predominant coexisting ESBL and PMQR profile among our isolates included blaCTX-M and aac(6?)-Ib, oqxA, oqxB (28.3%) and blaTEM, blaSHV and aac(6?)-Ib, oqxA, and oqxB (19.4%) profile.??Conclusion. Given the linkage observed between resistance to quinolones and beta lactam antibiotics, therapeutic protocol with fluoroquinolones and beta lactam antibiotics should be seriously revised in Tehran hospitals. PMID:26301114

  18. Multiclass method for the determination of quinolones and ?-lactams, in raw cow milk using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Junza, Alexandra; Dorival-García, Noemí; Zafra-Gómez, Alberto; Barrón, Dolores; Ballesteros, Oscar; Barbosa, José; Navalón, Alberto

    2014-08-22

    An analytical method based on a sample treatment by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) followed by ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis (UHPLC-MS/MS) for the determination of 17 quinolones and 14 ?-lactams (penicillins and cephalosporins) in raw cow milk, was validated according to the European Commission guidelines as cited in the Decision 2002/657/EC. The extraction efficiency of the DLLME depends on several parameters such as the nature and volumes of extractant and dispersive solvents, pH, concentration of salt, shaking time and time of centrifugation. These variables were accurately optimized using multivariate optimization strategies. A Plackett-Burman design to select the most influential parameters and a Doehlert design to obtain the optimum conditions have been applied. Two different pH values were used for the extraction of compounds (pH 3 for acidic quinolones and ?-lactams and pH 8 for amphoteric quinolones). The method was validated using matrix-matched standard calibration followed by a recovery assay with spiked samples. The limits of quantification found ranged from 0.3 ng g(-1) for amoxicillin to 6.6 ng g(-1) for ciprofloxacin, and the precision was lower than 15% in all cases as is required by the European Regulation. The decision limits (CC?) ranged between 4.1 and 104.8 ng g(-1), while detection capabilities (CC?) from 4.2 to 109.7 ng g(-1). These values were very close to the corresponding maximum residue limits (MLRs) for the studied antibiotics. Recoveries between 72 and 110% were also obtained. Finally, in order to evaluate the applicability of the method, 28 raw cow milk samples were analysed and it was observed that 28% of the samples were positive. However, only 11% were considered non-compliant with the current EU legislation (Commission Regulation 37/2010), due to some milk samples corresponded to treated cows with these antibiotics. PMID:24997113

  19. Seawater is a reservoir of multi-resistant Escherichia coli, including strains hosting plasmid-mediated quinolones resistance and extended-spectrum beta-lactamases genes

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Marta S.; Pereira, Anabela; Araújo, Susana M.; Castro, Bruno B.; Correia, António C. M.; Henriques, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine antibiotic resistance (AR) dissemination in coastal water, considering the contribution of different sources of fecal contamination. Samples were collected in Berlenga, an uninhabited island classified as Natural Reserve and visited by tourists for aquatic recreational activities. To achieve our aim, AR in Escherichia coli isolates from coastal water was compared to AR in isolates from two sources of fecal contamination: human-derived sewage and seagull feces. Isolation of E. coli was done on Chromocult agar. Based on genetic typing 414 strains were established. Distribution of E. coli phylogenetic groups was similar among isolates of all sources. Resistances to streptomycin, tetracycline, cephalothin, and amoxicillin were the most frequent. Higher rates of AR were found among seawater and feces isolates, except for last-line antibiotics used in human medicine. Multi-resistance rates in isolates from sewage and seagull feces (29 and 32%) were lower than in isolates from seawater (39%). Seawater AR profiles were similar to those from seagull feces and differed significantly from sewage AR profiles. Nucleotide sequences matching resistance genes blaTEM, sul1, sul2, tet(A), and tet(B), were present in isolates of all sources. Genes conferring resistance to 3rd generation cephalosporins were detected in seawater (blaCTX-M-1 and blaSHV-12) and seagull feces (blaCMY-2). Plasmid-mediated determinants of resistance to quinolones were found: qnrS1 in all sources and qnrB19 in seawater and seagull feces. Our results show that seawater is a relevant reservoir of AR and that seagulls are an efficient vehicle to spread human-associated bacteria and resistance genes. The E. coli resistome recaptured from Berlenga coastal water was mainly modulated by seagulls-derived fecal pollution. The repertoire of resistance genes covers antibiotics critically important for humans, a potential risk for human health. PMID:25191308

  20. Usefulness of D-optimal designs and multicriteria optimization in laborious analytical procedures. Application to the extraction of quinolones from eggs.

    PubMed

    García, Inmaculada; Sarabia, Luis; Cruz Ortiz, M; Aldama, J Manuel

    2005-09-01

    An analytical method has been developed to extract ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin from eggs. The aim of this work is to determine the experimental conditions of extraction providing high recoveries with small standard deviations. An experimental design based on the D-optimality criterion and replicated three times was built to evaluate the effect of five factors related to the extraction which is the most inaccurate stage of the procedure. This non-classical design is needed because there are several practical constraints: (i) the extraction procedure is time-consuming, quinolones are not stable and the design must be performed in a single working session. (ii) The tube capacity of the centrifuge is 6, so the number of experiments will be 6 or a multiple of 6. In the optimal experimental conditions, the extraction is performed once with 5 ml of methanol. Then, fatty acids are removed with a mixture of hexane/ether. Analytes are finally separated and detected by HPLC-fluorescence without the additional step of purification by solid-phase extraction (SPE). Under these conditions, the mean recovery is 64% and 70% and the standard deviation 5% and 4% for ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin, respectively. The capability of decision, CCalpha, is 3.1 and 2.8 microg kg(-1) of ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin, respectively. The capability of detection, CCbeta, is 7.8 and 7.0 microg kg(-1) of ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin, respectively. In both cases the probabilities of false positive, alpha, and of false negative, beta, were fixed at 0.05. PMID:16106698