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Sample records for quorum-sensing system insight

  1. A Variant Quorum Sensing System in Aeromonas veronii MTCC 3249

    PubMed Central

    Jangid, Kamlesh; Parameswaran, Perunninakulath S.; Shouche, Yogesh S.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the quorum sensing control in Aeromonas veronii MTCC 3249, originally isolated as A. culicicola from the midgut of Culex quinquefasciatus. Based on biosensor assays, the bacterium showed constant production of multiple acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) with increasing cell-density. The luxRI gene homologs, acuR (A. culicicola transcriptional Regulator) and acuI (A. culicicola autoInducer) were successfully amplified by inverse-PCR. Sequence analysis indicated acuRI were divergent from all known quorum sensing gene homologs in Aeromonas. Two localized regions in the C-terminal autoinducer binding domain of acuR showed indels suggesting variations in autoinducer specificity. Further, only a single copy of the quorum sensing genes was detected, suggesting a tight regulation of mechanisms under its control. Chromatography and further chemical analysis identified two AHLs in the culture supernatant: 6-carboxy-HHL (homoadipyl homoserine lactone), a novel AHL, and N-tetradecanoylhomoserine lactone. The existence of a potentially variant quorum sensing system might therefore, reflect in some way the ecological strategies adopted by this bacterium in the mosquito midgut. PMID:22666003

  2. [Research progress of new antibacterial drugs that target bacterial quorum sensing systems].

    PubMed

    Yin, Shou-Liang; Chang, Ya-Jing; Deng, Su-Ping; Wang, Qing-Chi; Yu, Wen-Gong; Gong, Qian-Hong

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, antibiotic resistance of bacteria has become a global health crisis. Especially, the new class of "superbug" was found in South Asia, which is resistant to almost known antibiotics and causes worldwide alarm. Through the underlying mechanisms of bacterial pathogenecity, the expression of many pathogen virulence factors is regulated by the process of quorum sensing. Screening efficient quorum sensing inhibitors is an especially compelling approach to the future treatment of bacterial infections and antibiotic resistance. This article focuses on bacterial quorum sensing system, quorum sensing screening model for in vitro and evaluation of animal models in vivo, recent research of quorum sensing inhibitors and so on. PMID:21882519

  3. Quorum sensing signal-response systems in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Papenfort, Kai; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-08-11

    Bacteria use quorum sensing to orchestrate gene expression programmes that underlie collective behaviours. Quorum sensing relies on the production, release, detection and group-level response to extracellular signalling molecules, which are called autoinducers. Recent work has discovered new autoinducers in Gram-negative bacteria, shown how these molecules are recognized by cognate receptors, revealed new regulatory components that are embedded in canonical signalling circuits and identified novel regulatory network designs. In this Review we examine how, together, these features of quorum sensing signal-response systems combine to control collective behaviours in Gram-negative bacteria and we discuss the implications for host-microbial associations and antibacterial therapy. PMID:27510864

  4. Specificity and complexity in bacterial quorum-sensing systems

    PubMed Central

    Hawver, Lisa A.; Jung, Sarah A.; Ng, Wai-Leung

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a microbial cell-to-cell communication process that relies on the production and detection of chemical signals called autoinducers (AIs) to monitor cell density and species complexity in the population. QS allows bacteria to behave as a cohesive group and coordinate collective behaviors. While most QS receptors display high specificity to their AI ligands, others are quite promiscuous in signal detection. How do specific QS receptors respond to their cognate signals with high fidelity? Why do some receptors maintain low signal recognition specificity? In addition, many QS systems are composed of multiple intersecting signaling pathways: what are the benefits of preserving such a complex signaling network when a simple linear ‘one-to-one’ regulatory pathway seems sufficient to monitor cell density? Here, we will discuss different molecular mechanisms employed by various QS systems that ensure productive and specific QS responses. Moreover, the network architectures of some well-characterized QS circuits will be reviewed to understand how the wiring of different regulatory components achieves different biological goals. PMID:27354348

  5. On the Influence of Quorum Sensing in the Competition Between Bacteria and Immune System of Invertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergola, Paolo; Zhang, Juan; Cerasuolo, Marianna; Ma, Zhien

    2008-07-01

    The competition between bacteria and innate immune system of invertebrate animals is described by means of ODEs. Two different systems are considered corresponding to the absence or the presence of Quorum Sensing (Q.S.) mechanism. Qualitative properties of the solutions of both systems as well as the stability of their meaningful equilibria are analyzed. By constructing suitable Lyapunov functions, global asymptotic stability results have been proved when the quorum sensing is absent. In order to better illustrate the dynamics of competition, some numerical simulations, obtained by means of MATHEMATICA (Wolfram Research, 1989) are presented.

  6. Metagenomic approaches to understanding phylogenetic diversity in quorum sensing

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Nobutada

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing, a form of cell–cell communication among bacteria, allows bacteria to synchronize their behaviors at the population level in order to control behaviors such as luminescence, biofilm formation, signal turnover, pigment production, antibiotics production, swarming, and virulence. A better understanding of quorum-sensing systems will provide us with greater insight into the complex interaction mechanisms used widely in the Bacteria and even the Archaea domain in the environment. Metagenomics, the use of culture-independent sequencing to study the genomic material of microorganisms, has the potential to provide direct information about the quorum-sensing systems in uncultured bacteria. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of quorum sensing focused on phylogenetic diversity, and presents examples of studies that have used metagenomic techniques. Future technologies potentially related to quorum-sensing systems are also discussed. PMID:24429899

  7. Quorum-sensing in yeast and its potential in wine making.

    PubMed

    Avbelj, Martina; Zupan, Jure; Raspor, Peter

    2016-09-01

    This mini-review synthesises the present knowledge of microbial quorum-sensing, with a specific focus on quorum-sensing in yeast, and especially in wine yeast. In vine and wine ecosystems, yeast co-interact with a large variety of microorganisms, thereby affecting the fermentation process and, consequently, the flavour of the wine. The precise connections between microbial interactions and quorum-sensing remain unclear, but we describe here how and when some species start to produce quorum-sensing molecules to synchronously adapt their collective behaviour to new conditions. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the quorum-sensing molecules were identified as 2-phenylethanol and tryptophol. However, it was recently shown that also a quorum-sensing molecule formerly identified only in Candida albicans, tyrosol, appears to be regulated in S. cerevisiae according to cell density. This review describes the methods for detection and quantification of those quorum-sensing molecules, their underlying mechanisms of action, and their genetic background. It also examines the external stimuli that evoke the quorum-sensing mechanism in the wine-processing environment. The review closes with insight into the biotechnological applications that are already making use of the advantages of quorum-sensing systems and indicates the important questions that still need to be addressed in future research into quorum-sensing. PMID:27507587

  8. Bacterial quorum sensing and biofilm formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quorum sensing is a cell density-dependent signaling system by which bacteria can regulate gene expression through the production, secretion, and subsequent detection of extracellular signaling molecules called autoinducers. Bacteria use quorum sensing to regulate various physiological activities, ...

  9. Mycofabricated biosilver nanoparticles interrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Braj R.; Singh, Brahma N.; Singh, Akanksha; Khan, Wasi; Naqvi, Alim H.; Singh, Harikesh B.

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical communication process that Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses to regulate virulence and biofilm formation. Disabling of QS is an emerging approach for combating its pathogenicity. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely applied as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi, but not for the attenuation of bacterial QS. Here we mycofabricated AgNPs (mfAgNPs) using metabolites of soil fungus Rhizopus arrhizus BRS-07 and tested their effect on QS-regulated virulence and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Transcriptional studies demonstrated that mfAgNPs reduced the levels of LasIR-RhlIR. Treatment of mfAgNPs inhibited biofilm formation, production of several virulence factors (e.g. LasA protease, LasB elastrase, pyocyanin, pyoverdin, pyochelin, rhamnolipid, and alginate) and reduced AHLs production. Further genes quantification analyses revealed that mfAgNPs significantly down-regulated QS-regulated genes, specifically those encoded to the secretion of virulence factors. The results clearly indicated the anti-virulence property of mfAgNPs by inhibiting P. aeruginosa QS signaling. PMID:26347993

  10. Mycofabricated biosilver nanoparticles interrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Singh, Braj R; Singh, Brahma N; Singh, Akanksha; Khan, Wasi; Naqvi, Alim H; Singh, Harikesh B

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical communication process that Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses to regulate virulence and biofilm formation. Disabling of QS is an emerging approach for combating its pathogenicity. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely applied as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi, but not for the attenuation of bacterial QS. Here we mycofabricated AgNPs (mfAgNPs) using metabolites of soil fungus Rhizopus arrhizus BRS-07 and tested their effect on QS-regulated virulence and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Transcriptional studies demonstrated that mfAgNPs reduced the levels of LasIR-RhlIR. Treatment of mfAgNPs inhibited biofilm formation, production of several virulence factors (e.g. LasA protease, LasB elastrase, pyocyanin, pyoverdin, pyochelin, rhamnolipid, and alginate) and reduced AHLs production. Further genes quantification analyses revealed that mfAgNPs significantly down-regulated QS-regulated genes, specifically those encoded to the secretion of virulence factors. The results clearly indicated the anti-virulence property of mfAgNPs by inhibiting P. aeruginosa QS signaling. PMID:26347993

  11. Three Parallel Quorum-Sensing Systems Regulate Gene Expression in Vibrio harveyi†

    PubMed Central

    Henke, Jennifer M.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2004-01-01

    In a process called quorum sensing, bacteria communicate using extracellular signal molecules termed autoinducers. Two parallel quorum-sensing systems have been identified in the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi. System 1 consists of the LuxM-dependent autoinducer HAI-1 and the HAI-1 sensor, LuxN. System 2 consists of the LuxS-dependent autoinducer AI-2 and the AI-2 detector, LuxPQ. The related bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, a human pathogen, possesses System 2 (LuxS, AI-2, and LuxPQ) but does not have obvious homologues of V. harveyi System 1. Rather, System 1 of V. cholerae is made up of the CqsA-dependent autoinducer CAI-1 and a sensor called CqsS. Using a V. cholerae CAI-1 reporter strain we show that many other marine bacteria, including V. harveyi, produce CAI-1 activity. Genetic analysis of V. harveyi reveals cqsA and cqsS, and phenotypic analysis of V. harveyi cqsA and cqsS mutants shows that these functions comprise a third V. harveyi quorum-sensing system that acts in parallel to Systems 1 and 2. Together these communication systems act as a three-way coincidence detector in the regulation of a variety of genes, including those responsible for bioluminescence, type III secretion, and metalloprotease production. PMID:15466044

  12. Intra-Species Bacterial Quorum Sensing Studied at Single Cell Level in a Double Droplet Trapping System

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yunpeng; Patil, Santoshkumar N.; Bowden, Steven D.; Poulter, Simon; Pan, Jie; Salmond, George P. C.; Welch, Martin; Huck, Wilhelm T. S.; Abell, Chris

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the intra-species bacterial quorum sensing at the single cell level using a double droplet trapping system. Escherichia coli transformed to express the quorum sensing receptor protein, LasR, were encapsulated in microdroplets that were positioned adjacent to microdroplets containing the autoinducer, N-(3-oxododecanoyl)- l-homoserine lactone (OdDHL). Functional activation of the LasR protein by diffusion of the OdDHL across the droplet interface was measured by monitoring the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) from a LasR-dependent promoter. A threshold concentration of OdDHL was found to induce production of quorum-sensing associated GFP by E. coli. Additionally, we demonstrated that LasR-dependent activation of GFP expression was also initiated when the adjacent droplets contained single E. coli transformed with the OdDHL synthase gene, LasI, representing a simple quorum sensing circuit between two droplets. PMID:23698779

  13. Expression and Quorum Sensing Regulation of Type III Secretion System Genes of Vibrio harveyi during Infection of Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Ruwandeepika, H. A. Darshanee; Karunasagar, Indrani; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems enable pathogens to inject their virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The type III secretion system of Vibrio harveyi, a major pathogen of aquatic organisms and a model species in quorum sensing studies, is repressed by the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR. In this study, we found that during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, the expression levels of three type III secretion operons in V. harveyi increased within the first 12h after challenge and decreased again thereafter. The in vivo expression levels were highest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in low cell density configuration (minimal LuxR levels) and lowest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in the high cell density configuration (maximal LuxR levels), which is consistent with repression of type III secretion by LuxR. Remarkably, in vivo expression levels of the type III secretion system genes were much (> 1000 fold) higher than the in vitro expression levels, indicating that (currently unknown) host factors significantly induce the type III secretion system. Given the fact that type III secretion is energy-consuming, repression by the quorum sensing master regulators might be a mechanism to save energy under conditions where it does not provide an advantage to the cells. PMID:26636765

  14. Expression and Quorum Sensing Regulation of Type III Secretion System Genes of Vibrio harveyi during Infection of Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Ruwandeepika, H A Darshanee; Karunasagar, Indrani; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems enable pathogens to inject their virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The type III secretion system of Vibrio harveyi, a major pathogen of aquatic organisms and a model species in quorum sensing studies, is repressed by the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR. In this study, we found that during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, the expression levels of three type III secretion operons in V. harveyi increased within the first 12h after challenge and decreased again thereafter. The in vivo expression levels were highest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in low cell density configuration (minimal LuxR levels) and lowest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in the high cell density configuration (maximal LuxR levels), which is consistent with repression of type III secretion by LuxR. Remarkably, in vivo expression levels of the type III secretion system genes were much (> 1000 fold) higher than the in vitro expression levels, indicating that (currently unknown) host factors significantly induce the type III secretion system. Given the fact that type III secretion is energy-consuming, repression by the quorum sensing master regulators might be a mechanism to save energy under conditions where it does not provide an advantage to the cells. PMID:26636765

  15. Phylogenetically Novel LuxI/LuxR-Type Quorum Sensing Systems Isolated Using a Metagenomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nasuno, Eri; Fujita, Masaki J.; Nakatsu, Cindy H.; Kamagata, Yoichi; Hanada, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    A great deal of research has been done to understand bacterial cell-to-cell signaling systems, but there is still a large gap in our current knowledge because the majority of microorganisms in natural environments do not have cultivated representatives. Metagenomics is one approach to identify novel quorum sensing (QS) systems from uncultured bacteria in environmental samples. In this study, fosmid metagenomic libraries were constructed from a forest soil and an activated sludge from a coke plant, and the target genes were detected using a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based Escherichia coli biosensor strain whose fluorescence was screened by spectrophotometry. DNA sequence analysis revealed two pairs of new LuxI family N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL) synthases and LuxR family transcriptional regulators (clones N16 and N52, designated AubI/AubR and AusI/AusR, respectively). AubI and AusI each produced an identical AHL, N-dodecanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL), as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry. Phylogenetic analysis based on amino acid sequences suggested that AusI/AusR was from an uncultured member of the Betaproteobacteria and AubI/AubR was very deeply branched from previously described LuxI/LuxR homologues in isolates of the Proteobacteria. The phylogenetic position of AubI/AubR indicates that they represent a QS system not acquired recently from the Proteobacteria by horizontal gene transfer but share a more ancient ancestry. We demonstrated that metagenomic screening is useful to provide further insight into the phylogenetic diversity of bacterial QS systems by describing two new LuxI/LuxR-type QS systems from uncultured bacteria. PMID:22983963

  16. The Crystal Structure of Burkholderia cenocepacia DfsA Provides Insights into Substrate Recognition and Quorum Sensing Fatty Acid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Francesca; Scoffone, Viola C; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Fumagalli, Marco; Buroni, Silvia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Forneris, Federico

    2016-06-14

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is a major concern among respiratory tract infections in cystic fibrosis patients. This pathogen is particularly difficult to treat because of its high level of resistance to the clinically relevant antimicrobial agents. In B. cenocepacia, the quorum sensing cell-cell communication system is involved in different processes that are important for bacterial virulence, such as biofilm formation and protease and siderophore production. Targeting the enzymes involved in this process represents a promising therapeutic approach. With the aim of finding effective quorum sensing inhibitors, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of B. cenocepacia diffusible factor synthase A, DfsA. This bifunctional crotonase (dehydratase/thioesterase) produces the characteristic quorum sensing molecule of B. cenocepacia, cis-2-dodecenoic acid or BDSF, starting from 3-hydroxydodecanoyl-acyl carrier protein. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure revealed the presence of a lipid molecule in the catalytic site of the enzyme, which was identified as dodecanoic acid. Our biochemical characterization shows that DfsA is able to use dodecanoyl-acyl carrier protein as a substrate, demonstrating that dodecanoic acid, the product of this reaction, is released very slowly from the DfsA active site, therefore acting as a DfsA inhibitor. This molecule shows an unprecedented conformational arrangement inside the DfsA active site. In contrast with previous hypotheses, our data illustrate how DfsA and closely related homologous enzymes can recognize long hydrophobic substrates without large conformational changes or assistance by additional regulator molecules. The elucidation of the substrate binding mode in DfsA provides the starting point for structure-based drug discovery studies targeting B. cenocepacia quorum sensing-assisted virulence. PMID:27198181

  17. Roles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa las and rhl Quorum-Sensing Systems in Control of Twitching Motility

    PubMed Central

    Glessner, Alex; Smith, Roger S.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Robinson, Jayne B.

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium and an important human pathogen. The production of several virulence factors by P. aeruginosa is controlled through two quorum-sensing systems, las and rhl. We have obtained evidence that both the las and rhl quorum-sensing systems are also required for type 4 pilus-dependent twitching motility and infection by the pilus-specific phage D3112cts. Mutants which lack the ability to synthesize PAI-1, PAI-2, or both autoinducers were significantly or greatly impaired in twitching motility and in susceptibility to D3112cts. Twitching motility and phage susceptibility in the autoinducer-deficient mutants were partially restored by exposure to exogenous PAI-1 and PAI-2. Both twitching motility and infection by pilus-specific phage are believed to be dependent on the extension and retraction of polar type 4 pili. Western blot analysis of whole-cell lysates and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays of intact cells were used to measure the amounts of pilin on the cell surfaces of las and rhl mutants relative to that of the wild type. It appears that PAI-2 plays a crucial role in twitching motility and phage infection by affecting the export and assembly of surface type 4 pili. The ability of P. aeruginosa cells to adhere to human bronchial epithelial cells was also found to be dependent on the rhl quorum-sensing system. Microscopic analysis of twitching motility indicated that mutants which were unable to synthesize PAI-1 were defective in the maintenance of cellular monolayers and migrating packs of cells. Thus, PAI-1 appears to have an essential role in maintaining cell-cell spacing and associations required for effective twitching motility. PMID:10049396

  18. Quorum Sensing in Extreme Environments

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Kate; Charlesworth, James C.; LeBard, Rebecca; Visscher, Pieter T.; Burns, Brendan P.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communication, particularly that of quorum sensing, plays an important role in regulating gene expression in a range of organisms. Although this phenomenon has been well studied in relation to, for example, virulence gene regulation, the focus of this article is to review our understanding of the role of microbial communication in extreme environments. Cell signaling regulates many important microbial processes and may play a pivotal role in driving microbial functional diversity and ultimately ecosystem function in extreme environments. Several recent studies have characterized cell signaling in modern analogs to early Earth communities (microbial mats), and characterization of cell signaling systems in these communities may provide unique insights in understanding the microbial interactions involved in function and survival in extreme environments. Cell signaling is a fundamental process that may have co-evolved with communities and environmental conditions on the early Earth. Without cell signaling, evolutionary pressures may have even resulted in the extinction rather than evolution of certain microbial groups. One of the biggest challenges in extremophile biology is understanding how and why some microbial functional groups are located where logically they would not be expected to survive, and tightly regulated communication may be key. Finally, quorum sensing has been recently identified for the first time in archaea, and thus communication at multiple levels (potentially even inter-domain) may be fundamental in extreme environments. PMID:25371335

  19. Baicalein Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and the Quorum Sensing System In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke; Hou, Changchun; Cai, Shuangqi; Huang, Yingying; Du, Zhongye; Huang, Hong; Kong, Jinliang; Chen, Yiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formed by Staphylococcus aureus significantly enhances antibiotic resistance by inhibiting the penetration of antibiotics, resulting in an increasingly serious situation. This study aimed to assess whether baicalein can prevent Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and whether it may have synergistic bactericidal effects with antibiotics in vitro. To do this, we used a clinically isolated strain of Staphylococcus aureus 17546 (t037) for biofilm formation. Virulence factors were detected following treatment with baicalein, and the molecular mechanism of its antibiofilm activity was studied. Plate counting, crystal violet staining, and fluorescence microscopy revealed that 32 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL baicalein clearly inhibited 3- and 7-day biofilm formation in vitro. Moreover, colony forming unit count, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy showed that vancomycin (VCM) and baicalein generally enhanced destruction of biofilms, while VCM alone did not. Western blotting and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses (RTQ-PCR) confirmed that baicalein treatment reduced staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) and α-hemolysin (hla) levels. Most strikingly, real-time qualitative polymerase chain reaction data demonstrated that 32 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL baicalein downregulated the quorum-sensing system regulators agrA, RNAIII, and sarA, and gene expression of ica, but 16 μg/mL baicalein had no effect. In summary, baicalein inhibited Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation, destroyed biofilms, increased the permeability of vancomycin, reduced the production of staphylococcal enterotoxin A and α-hemolysin, and inhibited the quorum sensing system. These results support baicalein as a novel drug candidate and an effective treatment strategy for Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated infections. PMID:27128436

  20. Optimal Census by Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Taillefumier, Thibaud; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing is the regulation of gene expression in response to changes in cell density. To measure their cell density, bacterial populations produce and detect diffusible molecules called autoinducers. Individual bacteria internally represent the external concentration of autoinducers via the level of monitor proteins. In turn, these monitor proteins typically regulate both their own production and the production of autoinducers, thereby establishing internal and external feedbacks. Here, we ask whether feedbacks can increase the information available to cells about their local density. We quantify available information as the mutual information between the abundance of a monitor protein and the local cell density for biologically relevant models of quorum sensing. Using variational methods, we demonstrate that feedbacks can increase information transmission, allowing bacteria to resolve up to two additional ranges of cell density when compared with bistable quorum-sensing systems. Our analysis is relevant to multi-agent systems that track an external driver implicitly via an endogenously generated signal. PMID:25965377

  1. Evolution of Microbial Quorum Sensing to Human Global Quorum Sensing: An Insight into How Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication Might Be Linked to the Global Metabolic Disease Crisis.

    PubMed

    Trosko, James E

    2016-01-01

    The first anaerobic organism extracted energy for survival and reproduction from its source of nutrients, with the genetic means to ensure protection of its individual genome but also its species survival. While it had a means to communicate with its community via simple secreted molecules ("quorum sensing"), the eventual shift to an aerobic environment led to multi-cellular metazoan organisms, with evolutionary-selected genes to form extracellular matrices, stem cells, stem cell niches, and a family of gap junction or "connexin" genes. These germinal and somatic stem cells responded to extracellular signals that triggered intra-cellular signaling to regulate specific genes out of the total genome. These extra-cellular induced intra-cellular signals also modulated gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in order to regulate the new cellular functions of symmetrical and asymmetrical cell division, cell differentiation, modes of cell death, and senescence. Within the hierarchical and cybernetic concepts, differentiated by neurons organized in the brain of the Homo sapiens, the conscious mind led to language, abstract ideas, technology, myth-making, scientific reasoning, and moral decision-making, i.e., the creation of culture. Over thousands of years, this has created the current collision between biological and cultural evolution, leading to the global "metabolic disease" crisis. PMID:27314399

  2. A Synthetic Quorum Sensing System Reveals a Potential Private Benefit for Public Good Production in a Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Kwan, Anna; Xu, Amy; Süel, Gürol M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predominantly reside in microbial communities known as biofilms, where cells are encapsulated and protected by the extracellular matrix (ECM). While all biofilm cells benefit from the ECM, only a subgroup of cells carries the burden of producing this public good. This dilemma provokes the question of how these cells balance the cost of ECM production. Here we show that ECM producing cells have a higher gene expression response to quorum sensing (QS) signals, which can lead to a private benefit. Specifically, we constructed a synthetic quorum-sensing system with designated “Sender” and “Receiver” cells in Bacillus subtilis. This synthetic QS system allowed us to uncouple and independently investigate ECM production and QS in both biofilms and single cells. Results revealed that ECM production directly enhances the response to QS signals, which may offset the cost of ECM production. PMID:26196509

  3. The effect of quorum sensing system for growth competitiveness on Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed

    Ping, Xu; Jing, Yang; Lilan, Lu; Erling, Feng; Hengliang, Wang; Ying, Lu; Li, Zhu

    2015-05-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) regulates the onset of bacterial social responses related to cell density. Comparison between the gene sequences of all components of QS system of Escherichia coli and Shigella strains, shows that the QS system is generally lost or mutated in Shigella. Since AI-2 is produced and processed by the lsr operon, we analyzed the potential function of the lsr operon. We first detected AI-2 in Shigella flexneri 2a strain 301 through the reporter bacteria Vibrio harveyi BB170, indicating that S. flexneri can produce AI-2. Then, the lsr operon of E. coli MG1655 was cloned into S. flexneri using the Golden Gate method. Colony counting experiments showed that the QS system recovery strain had growth advantage over the wild-type strain when they were mixed and cultured. The preliminary comparative proteomics analysis showed that the lsr operon could be expressed and the abundance of stress response proteins also changed when the QS system was introduced into S. flexneri. PMID:25998438

  4. Relationships between the Regulatory Systems of Quorum Sensing and Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cell–cell communications, known as quorum sensing (QS) in bacteria, involve the signal molecules as chemical languages and the corresponding receptors as transcriptional regulators. In Gram-negative bacteria, orphan LuxR receptors recognize signals more than just acylhomoserine lactones, and modulate interspecies and interkingdom communications. Whereas, in the Gram-positive Streptomyces, pseudo gamma-butyrolactones (GBLs) receptors bind antibiotics other than GBL signals, and coordinate antibiotics biosynthesis. By interacting with structurally diverse molecules like antibiotics, the TetR family receptors regulate multidrug resistance (MDR) by controlling efflux pumps. Antibiotics at subinhibitory concentration may act as signal molecules; while QS signals also have antimicrobial activity at high concentration. Moreover, the QS and MDR systems may share the same exporters to transport molecules. Among these orphan LuxR, pseudo GBL receptors, and MDR regulators, although only with low sequence homology, they have some structure similarity and function correlation. Therefore, perhaps there might be evolutionary relationship and biological relevance between the regulatory systems of QS and MDR. Since the QS systems become new targets for antimicrobial strategy, it would expand our understanding about the evolutionary history of these regulatory systems. PMID:27379084

  5. Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAL5 possesses an active quorum sensing regulatory system.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Elisa V; Nieto Peñalver, Carlos G; Leguina, Ana C; Irazusta, Verónica P; de Figueroa, Lucía I C

    2014-09-01

    The endophytic bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus colonizes a broad range of host plants. Its plant growth-promoting capability is related to the capacity to perform biological nitrogen fixation, the biosynthesis of siderophores, antimicrobial substances and the solubilization of mineral nutrients. Colonization of and survival in these endophytic niche requires a complex regulatory network. Among these, quorum sensing systems (QS) are signaling mechanisms involved in the control of several genes related to microbial interactions, host colonization and stress survival. G. diazotrophicus PAL5 possesses a QS composed of a luxR and a luxI homolog, and produces eight molecules from the AHL family as QS signals. In this report data are provided showing that glucose concentration modifies the relative levels of these signal molecules. The activity of G. diazotrophicus PAL5 QS is also altered in presence of other carbon sources and under saline stress conditions. Inactivation of the QS system of G. diazotrophicus PAL5 by means of a quorum quenching strategy allowed the identification of extracellular and intracellular proteins under the control of this regulatory mechanism. PMID:24974195

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lon and ClpXP proteases: roles in linking carbon catabolite repression system with quorum-sensing system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nana; Lan, Lefu

    2016-02-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) plays critical roles in virulence gene expression and the pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important human pathogen. However, the regulatory effects, especially that occur directly upstream of the QS system, remain largely unknown. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of the key component of carbon catabolite repression (CCR) system and protein quality control (PQC) system in regulating the QS system in P. aeruginosa. We propose that PQC proteases Lon and ClpXP may have an important role in linking CCR with QS, and thus contribute to the integration of nutritional cues into the regulatory network governing the virulence factors expression in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26045103

  7. The Vibrio harveyi quorum-sensing system uses shared regulatory components to discriminate between multiple autoinducers

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Christopher M.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2006-01-01

    The quorum-sensing bacterium Vibrio harveyi produces and responds to three autoinducers (AIs), and this sensory information converges to control the expression of bioluminescence, biofilm formation, type III secretion (TTS), and protease production. The AIs are detected by cognate sensor histidine kinases that all relay phosphate to the shared response regulator LuxO. LuxO indirectly represses the master regulator of quorum sensing, LuxR, through the activation of multiple genes encoding small regulatory RNAs (called qrr genes for Quorum Regulatory RNA). Here we use differential fluorescence induction to identify 50 quorum-sensing-controlled promoters. Some promoters only showed significant responses in the simultaneous presence of all three AIs, while others displayed substantial responses to the individual AIs. A differential response to each AI input state was also observed for qrr and luxR expression and LuxR protein production. Individual cell analyses revealed that, in each case, all the bacteria in the population respond in unison to the various AI inputs. We propose that the V. harveyi quorum-sensing transition is not switch-like but rather operates in a graded manner, and that this signaling arrangement, which uses shared regulatory proteins, nonetheless provides V. harveyi a mechanism to respond uniquely to different AI input states. PMID:17015436

  8. The response of Serratia marcescens JG to environmental changes by quorum sensing system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shu-Jing; Liu, Hui-Jun; Weng, Cai-Hong; Lai, Chun-Fen; Ai, Liu-Ying; Liu, Yu-Chen; Zhu, Hu

    2016-08-01

    Many bacterial cells are known to regulate their cooperative behaviors and physiological processes through a molecular mechanism called quorum sensing. Quorum sensing in Serratia marcescens JG is mediated by the synthesis of autoinducer 2 (AI-2) which is a furanosyl borate diester. In this study, the response of quorum sensing in S. marcescens JG to environment changes such as the initial pH, carbon sources and boracic acid was investigated by a bioreporter and real-time PCR analysis. The results show that glucose can affect AI-2 synthesis to the greatest extent, and 2.0 % glucose can stimulate S. marcescens JG to produce more AI-2, with a 3.5-fold increase in activity compared with control culture. Furthermore, the response of quorum sensing to changes in glucose concentration was performed by changing the amount of luxS RNA transcripts. A maximum of luxS transcription appeared during the exponential growth phase when the glucose concentration was 20.0 g/L. AI-2 production was also slightly impacted by the low initial pH. It is significant for us that the addition of boracic acid at microdosage (0.1-0.2 g/L) can also induce AI-2 synthesis, which probably demonstrated the feasible fact that the 4,5-dihydroxy-2, 3-pentanedione cyclizes by the addition of borate and the loss of water, is hydrated and is converted to the final AI-2 in S. marcescens JG. PMID:27020680

  9. Staphylococcus epidermidis agr Quorum-Sensing System: Signal Identification, Cross Talk, and Importance in Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Michael E.; Todd, Daniel A.; Schaeffer, Carolyn R.; Paharik, Alexandra E.; Van Dyke, Michael J.; Büttner, Henning; Dunman, Paul M.; Rohde, Holger; Cech, Nadja B.; Fey, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is an opportunistic pathogen that is one of the leading causes of medical device infections. Global regulators like the agr quorum-sensing system in this pathogen have received a limited amount of attention, leaving important questions unanswered. There are three agr types in S. epidermidis strains, but only one of the autoinducing peptide (AIP) signals has been identified (AIP-I), and cross talk between agr systems has not been tested. We structurally characterized all three AIP types using mass spectrometry and discovered that the AIP-II and AIP-III signals are 12 residues in length, making them the largest staphylococcal AIPs identified to date. S. epidermidis agr reporter strains were developed for each system, and we determined that cross-inhibitory interactions occur between the agr type I and II systems and between the agr type I and III systems. In contrast, no cross talk was observed between the type II and III systems. To further understand the outputs of the S. epidermidis agr system, an RNAIII mutant was constructed, and microarray studies revealed that exoenzymes (Ecp protease and Geh lipase) and low-molecular-weight toxins were downregulated in the mutant. Follow-up analysis of Ecp confirmed the RNAIII is required to induce protease activity and that agr cross talk modulates Ecp activity in a manner that mirrors the agr reporter results. Finally, we demonstrated that the agr system enhances skin colonization by S. epidermidis using a porcine model. This work expands our knowledge of S. epidermidis agr system function and will aid future studies on cell-cell communication in this important opportunistic pathogen. PMID:25070736

  10. Decoding the genetic and functional diversity of the DSF quorum-sensing system in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    PubMed Central

    Huedo, Pol; Yero, Daniel; Martinez-Servat, Sònia; Ruyra, Àngels; Roher, Nerea; Daura, Xavier; Gibert, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia uses the Diffusible Signal Factor (DSF) quorum sensing (QS) system to mediate intra- and inter-specific signaling and regulate virulence-related processes. The components of this system are encoded by the rpf cluster, with genes rpfF and rpfC encoding for the DSF synthase RpfF and sensor RpfC, respectively. Recently, we have shown that there exist two variants of the rpf cluster (rpf-1 and rpf-2), distinguishing two groups of S. maltophilia strains. Surprisingly, only rpf-1 strains produce detectable DSF, correlating with their ability to control biofilm formation, swarming motility and virulence. The evolutive advantage of acquiring two different rpf clusters, the phylogenetic time point and mechanism of this acquisition and the conditions that activate DSF production in rpf-2 strains, are however not known. Examination of this cluster in various species suggests that its variability originated most probably by genetic exchange between rhizosphere bacteria. We propose that rpf-2 variant strains make use of a strategy recently termed as “social cheating.” Analysis of cellular and extracellular fatty acids (FAs) of strains E77 (rpf-1) and M30 (rpf-2) suggests that their RpfFs have also a thioesterase activity that facilitates the release of unspecific FAs to the medium in addition to DSF. Production of DSF in rpf-1 strains appears in fact to be modulated by some of these extracellular FAs in addition to other factors such as temperature and nutrients, while in rpf-2 strains DSF biosynthesis is derepressed only upon detection of DSF itself, suggesting that they require cohabitation with DSF-producer bacteria to activate their DSF regulatory machinery. Finally, we show that the mixed rpf-1/rpf-2 population presents synergism in DSF production and virulence capacity in an in vivo infection model. Recovery and quantification of DSF from co-infected animals correlates with the observed mortality rate. PMID:26284046

  11. Targeting agr- and agr-Like Quorum Sensing Systems for Development of Common Therapeutics to Treat Multiple Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Brian; Hall, Pamela; Gresham, Hattie

    2013-01-01

    Invasive infection by the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is controlled by a four gene operon, agr that encodes a quorum sensing system for the regulation of virulence. While agr has been well studied in S. aureus, the contribution of agr homologues and analogues in other Gram-positive pathogens is just beginning to be understood. Intriguingly, other significant human pathogens, including Clostridium perfringens, Listeria monocytogenes, and Enterococcus faecalis contain agr or analogues linked to virulence. Moreover, other significant human Gram-positive pathogens use peptide based quorum sensing systems to establish or maintain infection. The potential for commonality in aspects of these signaling systems across different species raises the prospect of identifying therapeutics that could target multiple pathogens. Here, we review the status of research into these agr homologues, analogues, and other peptide based quorum sensing systems in Gram-positive pathogens as well as the potential for identifying common pathways and signaling mechanisms for therapeutic discovery. PMID:23598501

  12. Genomic Insights of Pectobacterium carotovorum Strain M022 Quorum-Sensing Activity through Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Tan, Wen-Si

    2015-01-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum is known to cause serious damage to various major crops worldwide. Here, we report the draft genome of Pectobacterium carotovorum strain M022, a freshwater isolate from a Malaysian waterfall, which has been reported as a plant pathogen and is able to communicate with N-acylhomoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing. PMID:25676763

  13. Insights into the Quorum-Sensing Activity in Aeromonas hydrophila Strain M013 as Revealed by Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen-Si; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila species can be found in warm climates and can survive in different environments. They possess the ability to communicate within their populations, which is known as quorum sensing. In this work, we present the draft genome sequence of A. hydrophila M013, a bacterium isolated from a Malaysian tropical rainforest waterfall. PMID:25555739

  14. Quorum-Sensing Synchronization of Synthetic Toggle Switches: A Design Based on Monotone Dynamical Systems Theory.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Evgeni V; Sontag, Eduardo D

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic constructs in biotechnology, biocomputing, and modern gene therapy interventions are often based on plasmids or transfected circuits which implement some form of "on-off" switch. For example, the expression of a protein used for therapeutic purposes might be triggered by the recognition of a specific combination of inducers (e.g., antigens), and memory of this event should be maintained across a cell population until a specific stimulus commands a coordinated shut-off. The robustness of such a design is hampered by molecular ("intrinsic") or environmental ("extrinsic") noise, which may lead to spontaneous changes of state in a subset of the population and is reflected in the bimodality of protein expression, as measured for example using flow cytometry. In this context, a "majority-vote" correction circuit, which brings deviant cells back into the required state, is highly desirable, and quorum-sensing has been suggested as a way for cells to broadcast their states to the population as a whole so as to facilitate consensus. In this paper, we propose what we believe is the first such a design that has mathematically guaranteed properties of stability and auto-correction under certain conditions. Our approach is guided by concepts and theory from the field of "monotone" dynamical systems developed by M. Hirsch, H. Smith, and others. We benchmark our design by comparing it to an existing design which has been the subject of experimental and theoretical studies, illustrating its superiority in stability and self-correction of synchronization errors. Our stability analysis, based on dynamical systems theory, guarantees global convergence to steady states, ruling out unpredictable ("chaotic") behaviors and even sustained oscillations in the limit of convergence. These results are valid no matter what are the values of parameters, and are based only on the wiring diagram. The theory is complemented by extensive computational bifurcation analysis, performed for a

  15. Quorum-Sensing Synchronization of Synthetic Toggle Switches: A Design Based on Monotone Dynamical Systems Theory

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, Evgeni V.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic constructs in biotechnology, biocomputing, and modern gene therapy interventions are often based on plasmids or transfected circuits which implement some form of “on-off” switch. For example, the expression of a protein used for therapeutic purposes might be triggered by the recognition of a specific combination of inducers (e.g., antigens), and memory of this event should be maintained across a cell population until a specific stimulus commands a coordinated shut-off. The robustness of such a design is hampered by molecular (“intrinsic”) or environmental (“extrinsic”) noise, which may lead to spontaneous changes of state in a subset of the population and is reflected in the bimodality of protein expression, as measured for example using flow cytometry. In this context, a “majority-vote” correction circuit, which brings deviant cells back into the required state, is highly desirable, and quorum-sensing has been suggested as a way for cells to broadcast their states to the population as a whole so as to facilitate consensus. In this paper, we propose what we believe is the first such a design that has mathematically guaranteed properties of stability and auto-correction under certain conditions. Our approach is guided by concepts and theory from the field of “monotone” dynamical systems developed by M. Hirsch, H. Smith, and others. We benchmark our design by comparing it to an existing design which has been the subject of experimental and theoretical studies, illustrating its superiority in stability and self-correction of synchronization errors. Our stability analysis, based on dynamical systems theory, guarantees global convergence to steady states, ruling out unpredictable (“chaotic”) behaviors and even sustained oscillations in the limit of convergence. These results are valid no matter what are the values of parameters, and are based only on the wiring diagram. The theory is complemented by extensive computational bifurcation

  16. Quorum sensing control of Type VI secretion factors restricts the proliferation of quorum-sensing mutants.

    PubMed

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Schneider, Emily; Greenberg, E Peter

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis uses acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing systems to regulate hundreds of genes. Here we show that cell-cell contact-dependent type VI secretion (T6S) toxin-immunity systems are among those activated by quorum sensing in B. thailandensis. We also demonstrate that T6S is required to constrain proliferation of quorum sensing mutants in colony cocultures of a BtaR1 quorum-sensing signal receptor mutant and its parent. However, the BtaR1 mutant is not constrained by and outcompetes its parent in broth coculture, presumably because no cell contact occurs and there is a metabolic cost associated with quorum sensing gene activation. The increased fitness of the wild type over the BtaR1 mutant during agar surface growth is dependent on an intact T6SS-1 apparatus. Thus, quorum sensing activates B. thailandensis T6SS-1 growth inhibition and this control serves to police and constrain quorum-sensing mutants. This work defines a novel role for T6SSs in intraspecies mutant control. PMID:27183270

  17. Quorum sensing control of Type VI secretion factors restricts the proliferation of quorum-sensing mutants

    PubMed Central

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Schneider, Emily; Greenberg, E Peter

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis uses acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing systems to regulate hundreds of genes. Here we show that cell-cell contact-dependent type VI secretion (T6S) toxin-immunity systems are among those activated by quorum sensing in B. thailandensis. We also demonstrate that T6S is required to constrain proliferation of quorum sensing mutants in colony cocultures of a BtaR1 quorum-sensing signal receptor mutant and its parent. However, the BtaR1 mutant is not constrained by and outcompetes its parent in broth coculture, presumably because no cell contact occurs and there is a metabolic cost associated with quorum sensing gene activation. The increased fitness of the wild type over the BtaR1 mutant during agar surface growth is dependent on an intact T6SS-1 apparatus. Thus, quorum sensing activates B. thailandensis T6SS-1 growth inhibition and this control serves to police and constrain quorum-sensing mutants. This work defines a novel role for T6SSs in intraspecies mutant control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14712.001 PMID:27183270

  18. A Modular View of the Diversity of Cell-Density-Encoding Schemes in Bacterial Quorum-Sensing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Drees, Bastian; Reiger, Matthias; Jung, Kirsten; Bischofs, Ilka B.

    2014-01-01

    Certain environmental parameters are accessible to cells only indirectly and require an encoding step for cells to retrieve the relevant information. A prominent example is the phenomenon of quorum sensing by microorganisms, where information about cell density is encoded by means of secreted signaling molecules. The mapping of cell density to signal molecule concentration and the corresponding network modules involved have been at least partially characterized in many bacteria, and vary markedly between different systems. In this study, we investigate theoretically how differences in signal transport, signal modification, and site of signal detection shape the encoding function and affect the sensitivity and the noise characteristics of the cell-density-encoding process. We find that different modules are capable of implementing both fairly basic as well as more complex encoding schemes, whose qualitative characteristics vary with cell density and are linked to network architecture, providing the basis for a hierarchical classification scheme. We exploit the tight relationship between encoding behavior and network architecture to constrain the network topology of partially characterized natural systems, and verify one such prediction by showing experimentally that Vibrio harveyi is capable of importing Autoinducer 2. The framework developed in this research can serve not only to guide reverse engineering of natural systems but also to stimulate the design of synthetic systems and generally facilitate a better understanding of the complexities arising in the quorum-sensing process because of variations in the physical organization of the encoder network module. PMID:24988360

  19. The QseBC Quorum Sensing System is Involved in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Colonization of the Swine Gastrointestinal Tract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The response of bacteria to hormone-like, chemical molecules is termed quorum sensing, a mechanism for cell-to-cell communication that includes sensing the host environment. In the gastrointestinal tract, at least two quorum sensing molecules are present that activate the bacterial QseBC quorum sen...

  20. Escherichia coli O157:H7 lacking qseBC encoded quorum sensing system outcompetes the parent strain in colonization of cattle intestine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The qseBC encoded quorum-sensing system (QS) regulates motility of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 in response to bacterial autoinducer-3 (AI-3) and mammalian stress hormones epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE). The qseC gene encodes a sensory kinase that post-autophosphorylati...

  1. Quorum Sensing and Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Nazzaro, Filomena; Fratianni, Florinda; Coppola, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Most infectious diseases are caused by bacteria, which proliferate within quorum sensing (QS)-mediated biofilms. Efforts to block QS in bacteria and disrupt biofilms have enabled the identification of bioactive molecules that are also produced by plants. This mini review primarily focuses on natural QS inhibitors, which display potential for treating bacterial infections and also enhance the safety of food supply. PMID:23774835

  2. The VarS/VarA two-component system modulates the activity of the Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing transcriptional regulator HapR

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Amy M.; Liu, Zhi; Cai, Tao

    2011-01-01

    The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae uses quorum sensing to regulate the expression of a number of phenotypes, including virulence factor production, in response to changes in cell density. It produces small molecules called autoinducers that increase in concentration as cell density increases, and these autoinducers bind to membrane sensors once they reach a certain threshold. This binding leads to signalling through a downstream phosphorelay pathway to alter the expression of the transcriptional regulator HapR. Previously, it was shown that the VarS/VarA two-component system acts on a component of the phosphorelay pathway upstream of HapR to regulate HapR expression levels. Here, we show that in addition to this mechanism of regulation, VarS and VarA also indirectly modulate HapR protein activity. This modulation is mediated by the small RNA CsrB but is independent of the known quorum-sensing system that links the autoinducers to HapR. Thus, the VarS/VarA two-component system intersects with the quorum-sensing network at two levels. In both cases, the effect of VarS and VarA on quorum sensing is dependent on the Csr small RNAs, which regulate carbon metabolism, suggesting that V. cholerae may integrate nutrient status and cell density sensory inputs to tailor its gene expression profile more precisely to surrounding conditions. PMID:21393367

  3. Quorum sensing: How bacteria can coordinate activity and synchronize their response to external signals?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Nair, Satish K

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing is used by a large variety of bacteria to regulate gene expression in a cell-density-dependent manner. Bacteria can synchronize population behavior using small molecules called autoinducers that are produced by cognate synthases and recognized by specific receptors. Quorum sensing plays critical roles in regulating diverse cellular functions in bacteria, including bioluminescence, virulence gene expression, biofilm formation, and antibiotic resistance. The best-studied autoinducers are acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) molecules, which are the primary quorum sensing signals used by Gram-negative bacteria. In this review we focus on the AHL-dependent quorum sensing system and highlight recent progress on structural and mechanistic studies of AHL synthases and the corresponding receptors. Crystal structures of LuxI-type AHL synthases provide insights into acyl-substrate specificity, but the current knowledge is still greatly limited. Structural studies of AHL receptors have facilitated a more thorough understanding of signal perception and established the molecular framework for the development of quorum sensing inhibitors. PMID:22825856

  4. Custom-Made Quorum Sensing for a Eukaryote.

    PubMed

    May, Robin C

    2016-06-01

    Quorum-sensing systems, common in prokaryotes, enable bacteria to coordinately regulate behavior with population density. Reporting recently in Cell Host & Microbe, Homer et al. (2016) characterize an elegant eukaryotic quorum-sensing pathway in the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans. PMID:27270036

  5. The Evolution of Quorum Sensing as a Mechanism to Infer Kinship

    PubMed Central

    Schluter, Jonas; Schoech, Armin P.; Foster, Kevin R.; Mitri, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria regulate many phenotypes via quorum sensing systems. Quorum sensing is typically thought to evolve because the regulated cooperative phenotypes are only beneficial at certain cell densities. However, quorum sensing systems are also threatened by non-cooperative “cheaters” that may exploit quorum-sensing regulated cooperation, which begs the question of how quorum sensing systems are maintained in nature. Here we study the evolution of quorum sensing using an individual-based model that captures the natural ecology and population structuring of microbial communities. We first recapitulate the two existing observations on quorum sensing evolution: density-dependent benefits favor quorum sensing but competition and cheating will destabilize it. We then model quorum sensing in a dense community like a biofilm, which reveals a novel benefit to quorum sensing that is intrinsically evolutionarily stable. In these communities, competing microbial genotypes gradually segregate over time leading to positive correlation between density and genetic similarity between neighboring cells (relatedness). This enables quorum sensing to track genetic relatedness and ensures that costly cooperative traits are only activated once a cell is safely surrounded by clonemates. We hypothesize that under similar natural conditions, the benefits of quorum sensing will not result from an assessment of density but from the ability to infer kinship. PMID:27120081

  6. Crystal Structure of SmcR, a Quorum-sensing Master Regulator of Vibrio vulnificus, Provides Insight into Its Regulation of Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoonjeong; Kim, Byoung Sik; Park, Yu Jin; Choi, Won-Chan; Hwang, Jungwon; Kang, Beom Sik; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Choi, Sang Ho; Kim, Myung Hee

    2010-01-01

    Quorum sensing has been implicated as an important global regulatory system controlling the expression of numerous virulence factors in bacterial pathogens. SmcR, a homologue of Vibrio harveyi LuxR, has been proposed as a quorum-sensing master regulator of Vibrio vulnificus, an opportunistic human pathogen. Previous studies demonstrated that SmcR is essential for the survival and pathogenesis of V. vulnificus, indicating that inhibiting SmcR is an attractive approach to combat infections by the bacteria. Here, we determined the crystal structure of SmcR at 2.1 Å resolution. The protein structure reveals a typical TetR superfamily fold consisting of an N-terminal DNA binding domain and a C-terminal dimerization domain. In vivo and in vitro functional analysis of the dimerization domain suggested that dimerization of SmcR is vital for its biological regulatory function. The N-terminal DNA recognition and binding residues were assigned based on the protein structure and the results of in vivo and in vitro mutagenesis experiments. Furthermore, protein-DNA interaction experiments suggested that SmcR may have a sophisticated mechanism that enables the protein to recognize each of its many target operators with different affinities. PMID:20178981

  7. Quadruple quorum-sensing inputs control Vibrio cholerae virulence and maintain system robustness.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sarah A; Chapman, Christine A; Ng, Wai-Leung

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria use quorum sensing (QS) for cell-cell communication to carry out group behaviors. This intercellular signaling process relies on cell density-dependent production and detection of chemical signals called autoinducers (AIs). Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, detects two AIs, CAI-1 and AI-2, with two histidine kinases, CqsS and LuxQ, respectively, to control biofilm formation and virulence factor production. At low cell density, these two signal receptors function in parallel to activate the key regulator LuxO, which is essential for virulence of this pathogen. At high cell density, binding of AIs to their respective receptors leads to deactivation of LuxO and repression of virulence factor production. However, mutants lacking CqsS and LuxQ maintain a normal LuxO activation level and remain virulent, suggesting that LuxO is activated by additional, unidentified signaling pathways. Here we show that two other histidine kinases, CqsR (formerly known as VC1831) and VpsS, act upstream in the central QS circuit of V. cholerae to activate LuxO. V. cholerae strains expressing any one of these four receptors are QS proficient and capable of colonizing animal hosts. In contrast, mutants lacking all four receptors are phenotypically identical to LuxO-defective mutants. Importantly, these four functionally redundant receptors act together to prevent premature induction of a QS response caused by signal perturbations. We suggest that the V. cholerae QS circuit is composed of quadruple sensory inputs and has evolved to be refractory to sporadic AI level perturbations. PMID:25874462

  8. Structure-Function Analysis of Peptide Signaling in the Clostridium perfringens Agr-Like Quorum Sensing System

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Menglin; Li, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The accessory growth regulator (Agr)-like quorum sensing (QS) system of Clostridium perfringens controls the production of many toxins, including beta toxin (CPB). We previously showed (J. E. Vidal, M. Ma, J. Saputo, J. Garcia, F. A. Uzal, and B. A. McClane, Mol Microbiol 83:179–194, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2958.2011.07925.x) that an 8-amino-acid, AgrD-derived peptide named 8-R upregulates CPB production by this QS system. The current study synthesized a series of small signaling peptides corresponding to sequences within the C. perfringens AgrD polypeptide to investigate the C. perfringens autoinducing peptide (AIP) structure-function relationship. When both linear and cyclic ring forms of these peptides were added to agrB null mutants of type B strain CN1795 or type C strain CN3685, the 5-amino-acid peptides, whether in a linear or ring (thiolactone or lactone) form, induced better signaling (more CPB production) than peptide 8-R for both C. perfringens strains. The 5-mer thiolactone ring peptide induced faster signaling than the 5-mer linear peptide. Strain-related variations in sensing these peptides were detected, with CN3685 sensing the synthetic peptides more strongly than CN1795. Consistent with those synthetic peptide results, Transwell coculture experiments showed that CN3685 exquisitely senses native AIP signals from other isolates (types A, B, C, and D), while CN1795 barely senses even its own AIP. Finally, a C. perfringens AgrD sequence-based peptide with a 6-amino-acid thiolactone ring interfered with CPB production by several C. perfringens strains, suggesting potential therapeutic applications. These results indicate that AIP signaling sensitivity and responsiveness vary among C. perfringens strains and suggest C. perfringens prefers a 5-mer AIP to initiate Agr signaling. IMPORTANCE Clostridium perfringens possesses an Agr-like quorum sensing (QS) system that regulates virulence, sporulation, and toxin production. The

  9. A new quorum-sensing system (TprA/PhrA) for Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 that regulates a lantibiotic biosynthesis gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Sharon E; Perez, Amilcar J; Tsui, Ho-Ching T; Sinha, Dhriti; Smiley, David L; DiMarchi, Richard D; Winkler, Malcolm E; Lazazzera, Beth A

    2015-07-01

    The Phr peptides of the Bacillus species mediate quorum sensing, but their identification and function in other species of bacteria have not been determined. We have identified a Phr peptide quorum-sensing system (TprA/PhrA) that controls the expression of a lantibiotic gene cluster in the Gram-positive human pathogen, Streptococcus pneumoniae. Lantibiotics are highly modified peptides that are part of the bacteriocin family of antimicrobial peptides. We have characterized the basic mechanism for a Phr-peptide signaling system in S. pneumoniae and found that it induces the expression of the lantibiotic genes when pneumococcal cells are at high density in the presence of galactose, a main sugar of the human nasopharynx, a highly competitive microbial environment. Activity of the Phr peptide system is not seen when pneumococcal cells are grown with glucose, the preferred carbon source and the most prevalent sugar encountered by S. pneumoniae during invasive disease. Thus, the lantibiotic genes are expressed under the control of both cell density signals via the Phr peptide system and nutritional signals from the carbon source present, suggesting that quorum sensing and the lantibiotic machinery may help pneumococcal cells compete for space and resources during colonization of the nasopharynx. PMID:25869931

  10. Effects of Quorum Sensing Systems on Regulatory T Cells in Catheter-Related Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infection Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lei; Xiang, Qingqing; Ai, Qing; Wang, Zhengli; Zhang, Yunhui; Lu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Quorum sensing (QS) systems play an important role in modulating biofilm formation. Recent studies have found that the QS molecules had complex effects on the host immune systems. In addition, regulatory T cells (Tregs), known as important negative regulators in the immune system, have been found upregulated in multiple chronic infections. Therefore, the QS systems were hypothesized to be involved in modulating Tregs in biofilm-associated infections. Object. To explore the effects of QS systems on Tregs in catheter-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection rat models. Method. Catheter-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection rat models were established; the bacterial clearance rates, total cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, pathological changes of lungs, and the levels of Foxp3, TGF-β1, and IL-10 in PAO1 strain group were examined and compared with the QS-mutant ΔlasRΔrhlR and ΔlasIΔrhlI groups. Results. In PAO1 group, the bacterial clearance rates were lower, total cell counts were higher, pathological changes were severer, and the levels of Foxp3, TGF-β1, and IL-10 were significantly higher compared with QS-mutant groups (p < 0.05). No significant difference was observed between the two QS-mutant groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion. QS systems can trigger host immune system, accompanied with the upregulation of Tregs. PMID:27069314

  11. Social Evolution Selects for Redundancy in Bacterial Quorum Sensing.

    PubMed

    Even-Tov, Eran; Omer Bendori, Shira; Valastyan, Julie; Ke, Xiaobo; Pollak, Shaul; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Bassler, Bonnie L; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-02-01

    Quorum sensing is a process of chemical communication that bacteria use to monitor cell density and coordinate cooperative behaviors. Quorum sensing relies on extracellular signal molecules and cognate receptor pairs. While a single quorum-sensing system is sufficient to probe cell density, bacteria frequently use multiple quorum-sensing systems to regulate the same cooperative behaviors. The potential benefits of these redundant network structures are not clear. Here, we combine modeling and experimental analyses of the Bacillus subtilis and Vibrio harveyi quorum-sensing networks to show that accumulation of multiple quorum-sensing systems may be driven by a facultative cheating mechanism. We demonstrate that a strain that has acquired an additional quorum-sensing system can exploit its ancestor that possesses one fewer system, but nonetheless, resume full cooperation with its kin when it is fixed in the population. We identify the molecular network design criteria required for this advantage. Our results suggest that increased complexity in bacterial social signaling circuits can evolve without providing an adaptive advantage in a clonal population. PMID:26927849

  12. Social Evolution Selects for Redundancy in Bacterial Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Valastyan, Julie; Ke, Xiaobo; Pollak, Shaul; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a process of chemical communication that bacteria use to monitor cell density and coordinate cooperative behaviors. Quorum sensing relies on extracellular signal molecules and cognate receptor pairs. While a single quorum-sensing system is sufficient to probe cell density, bacteria frequently use multiple quorum-sensing systems to regulate the same cooperative behaviors. The potential benefits of these redundant network structures are not clear. Here, we combine modeling and experimental analyses of the Bacillus subtilis and Vibrio harveyi quorum-sensing networks to show that accumulation of multiple quorum-sensing systems may be driven by a facultative cheating mechanism. We demonstrate that a strain that has acquired an additional quorum-sensing system can exploit its ancestor that possesses one fewer system, but nonetheless, resume full cooperation with its kin when it is fixed in the population. We identify the molecular network design criteria required for this advantage. Our results suggest that increased complexity in bacterial social signaling circuits can evolve without providing an adaptive advantage in a clonal population. PMID:26927849

  13. The DSF type quorum sensing signalling system RpfF/R regulates diverse phenotypes in the opportunistic pathogen Cronobacter

    PubMed Central

    Suppiger, Angela; Eshwar, Athmanya Konegadde; Stephan, Roger; Kaever, Volkhard; Eberl, Leo; Lehner, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Several bacterial pathogens produce diffusible signal factor (DSF)-type quorum sensing (QS) signals to control biofilm formation and virulence. Previous work showed that in Burkholderia cenocepacia the RpfFBc/RpfR system is involved in sensing and responding to DSF signals and that this signal/sensor gene pair is highly conserved in several bacterial species including Cronobacter spp. Here we show that C. turicensis LMG 23827T possesses a functional RpfF/R system that is involved in the regulation of various phenotypes, including colony morphology, biofilm formation and swarming motility. In vivo experiments using the zebrafish embryo model revealed a role of this regulatory system in virulence of this opportunistic pathogen. We provide evidence that the RpfF/R system modulates the intracellular c-di-GMP level of the organism, an effect that may underpin the alteration in phenotype and thus the regulated phenotypes may be a consequence thereof. This first report on an RpfF/R-type QS system of an organism outside the genus Burkholderia revealed that both the underlying molecular mechanisms as well as the regulated functions show a high degree of conservation. PMID:26725701

  14. The DSF type quorum sensing signalling system RpfF/R regulates diverse phenotypes in the opportunistic pathogen Cronobacter.

    PubMed

    Suppiger, Angela; Eshwar, Athmanya Konegadde; Stephan, Roger; Kaever, Volkhard; Eberl, Leo; Lehner, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Several bacterial pathogens produce diffusible signal factor (DSF)-type quorum sensing (QS) signals to control biofilm formation and virulence. Previous work showed that in Burkholderia cenocepacia the RpfFBc/RpfR system is involved in sensing and responding to DSF signals and that this signal/sensor gene pair is highly conserved in several bacterial species including Cronobacter spp. Here we show that C. turicensis LMG 23827(T) possesses a functional RpfF/R system that is involved in the regulation of various phenotypes, including colony morphology, biofilm formation and swarming motility. In vivo experiments using the zebrafish embryo model revealed a role of this regulatory system in virulence of this opportunistic pathogen. We provide evidence that the RpfF/R system modulates the intracellular c-di-GMP level of the organism, an effect that may underpin the alteration in phenotype and thus the regulated phenotypes may be a consequence thereof. This first report on an RpfF/R-type QS system of an organism outside the genus Burkholderia revealed that both the underlying molecular mechanisms as well as the regulated functions show a high degree of conservation. PMID:26725701

  15. The impact of the competence quorum sensing system on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilms varies depending on the experimental model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Different models for biofilm in Streptococcus pneumoniae have been described in literature. To permit comparison of experimental data, we characterised the impact of the pneumococcal quorum-sensing competence system on biofilm formation in three models. For this scope, we used two microtiter and one continuous culture biofilm system. Results In both microtiter models the competence system influences stability and structure of biofilm in the late attachment phase and synthetic competence stimulating peptide (CSP) restored wild type phenotypes in the comC mutants unable to produce the peptide. Early attachment of single cells to well bottoms was found for both systems to be competence independent, while later phases, including microcolony formation correlated to an intact competence system. The continuous culture biofilm model was not affected by mutations in the competence locus, but deletion of capsule had a significant impact in this model. Conclusions Since biofilm remains a largely uncharacterised multi-parameter phenotype it appears to be advisable to exploit more than one model in order to draw conclusion of possible relevance of specific genotypes on pneumococcal physiology. PMID:21492426

  16. A mathematical model and quantitative comparison of the small RNA circuit in the Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Hunter, G A M; Vasquez, F Guevara; Keener, J P

    2013-08-01

    Quorum sensing is the process by which bacteria regulate their gene expression based on the local cell-population density. The quorum sensing systems of Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae are comprised of a phosphorelay cascade coupled to a small RNA (sRNA) circuit. The sRNA circuit contains multiple quorum regulated small RNA (Qrr) that regulate expression of the homologous master transcriptional regulators LuxR (in V. harveyi) and HapR (in V. cholerae). Their quorum sensing systems are topologically similar and homologous thereby making it difficult to understand why repression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr. In this work we formulate and parameterize a novel mathematical model of the V. harveyi and V. cholerae sRNA circuit. We parameterize the model by fitting it to a variety of empirical data from both species. We show that we can distinguish all of the parameters and that the parameterizations (one for each species) are robust to errors in the data. We then use our model to propose some experiments to identify and explain kinetic differences between the species. We find that V. cholerae Qrr are more abundant and more sensitive to changes in LuxO than V. harveyi Qrr and argue that this is why expression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr. PMID:23820088

  17. A mathematical model and quantitative comparison of the small RNA circuit in the Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, G. A. M.; Guevara Vasquez, F.; Keener, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    Quorum sensing is the process by which bacteria regulate their gene expression based on the local cell-population density. The quorum sensing systems of Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae are comprised of a phosphorelay cascade coupled to a small RNA (sRNA) circuit. The sRNA circuit contains multiple quorum regulated small RNA (Qrr) that regulate expression of the homologous master transcriptional regulators LuxR (in V. harveyi) and HapR (in V. cholerae). Their quorum sensing systems are topologically similar and homologous thereby making it difficult to understand why repression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr. In this work we formulate and parameterize a novel mathematical model of the V. harveyi and V. cholerae sRNA circuit. We parameterize the model by fitting it to a variety of empirical data from both species. We show that we can distinguish all of the parameters and that the parameterizations (one for each species) are robust to errors in the data. We then use our model to propose some experiments to identify and explain kinetic differences between the species. We find that V. cholerae Qrr are more abundant and more sensitive to changes in LuxO than V. harveyi Qrr and argue that this is why expression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr.

  18. Cis-2-dodecenoic acid signal modulates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa through interference with quorum sensing systems and T3SS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cis-2-dodecenoic acid (BDSF) is well known for its important functions in intraspecies signaling in Burkholderia cenocepacia. Previous work has also established an important role of BDSF in interspecies and inter-kingdom communications. It was identified that BDSF modulates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, how BDSF interferes with virulence of P. aeruginosa is still not clear. Results We report here that BDSF mediates the cross-talk between B. cenocepacia and P. aeruginosa through interference with quorum sensing (QS) systems and type III secretion system (T3SS) of P. aeruginosa. Bioassay results revealed that exogenous addition of BDSF not only reduced the transcriptional expression of the regulator encoding gene of QS systems, i.e., lasR, pqsR, and rhlR, but also simultaneously decreased the production of QS signals including 3-oxo-C12-HSL, Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) and C4-HSL, consequently resulting in the down-regulation of biofilm formation and virulence factor production of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, BDSF and some of its derivatives are also capable of inhibiting T3SS of P. aeruginosa at a micromolar level. Treatment with BDSF obviously reduced the virulence of P. aeruginosa in both HeLa cell and zebrafish infection models. Conclusions These results depict that BDSF modulates virulence of P. aeruginosa through interference with QS systems and T3SS. PMID:24134835

  19. Quorum sensing systems differentially regulate the production of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1201.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuang; Zhou, Lian; Jin, Kaiming; Jiang, Haixia; He, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201 is a newly identified rhizobacterium that produces high levels of the secondary metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), the newly registered biopesticide Shenqinmycin. PCA production in liquid batch cultures utilizing a specialized PCA-promoting medium (PPM) typically occurs after the period of most rapid growth, and production is regulated in a quorum sensing (QS)-dependent manner. PA1201 contains two PCA biosynthetic gene clusters phz1 and phz2; both clusters contribute to PCA production, with phz2 making a greater contribution. PA1201 also contains a complete set of genes for four QS systems (LasI/LasR, RhlI/RhlR, PQS/MvfR, and IQS). By using several methods including gene deletion, the construction of promoter-lacZ fusion reporter strains, and RNA-Seq analysis, this study investigated the effects of the four QS systems on bacterial growth, QS signal production, the expression of phz1 and phz2, and PCA production. The possible mechanisms for the strain- and condition-dependent expression of phz1 and phz2 were discussed, and a schematic model was proposed. These findings provide a basis for further genetic engineering of the QS systems to improve PCA production. PMID:27456813

  20. Quorum sensing systems differentially regulate the production of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1201

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shuang; Zhou, Lian; Jin, Kaiming; Jiang, Haixia; He, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201 is a newly identified rhizobacterium that produces high levels of the secondary metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), the newly registered biopesticide Shenqinmycin. PCA production in liquid batch cultures utilizing a specialized PCA-promoting medium (PPM) typically occurs after the period of most rapid growth, and production is regulated in a quorum sensing (QS)-dependent manner. PA1201 contains two PCA biosynthetic gene clusters phz1 and phz2; both clusters contribute to PCA production, with phz2 making a greater contribution. PA1201 also contains a complete set of genes for four QS systems (LasI/LasR, RhlI/RhlR, PQS/MvfR, and IQS). By using several methods including gene deletion, the construction of promoter-lacZ fusion reporter strains, and RNA-Seq analysis, this study investigated the effects of the four QS systems on bacterial growth, QS signal production, the expression of phz1 and phz2, and PCA production. The possible mechanisms for the strain- and condition-dependent expression of phz1 and phz2 were discussed, and a schematic model was proposed. These findings provide a basis for further genetic engineering of the QS systems to improve PCA production. PMID:27456813

  1. [Quorum sensing systems of regulation, synthesis of phenazine antibiotics, and antifungal (corrected) activity in rhizospheric bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449].

    PubMed

    Veselova, M a; Klein, Sh; Bass, I A; Lipasova, V A; Metlitskaia, A Z; Ovadis, M I; Chernin, L S; Khmel', I A

    2008-12-01

    Strain Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449, an antagonist of a broad spectrum of phytopathogenic microorganisms isolated from the maize rhizosphere, was shown to produce three phenazine antibiotics: phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), 2-hydroxylphenazine-1-carboxylic acid (2-OH-PCA), and 2-hydroxylphenazine (2-OH-PHZ). Two Quorum Sensing (QS) systems of regulation were identified: PhzIR and CsaI/R. Genes phzI and csaI were cloned and sequenced. Cells of strain 449 synthesize at least three types of AHL: N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-AHL), N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-AHL), and N-(3-oxo-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (30C6-AHL). Transposon mutagenesis was used to generate mutants of strain 449 deficient in synthesis of phenazines, which carried inactivated phzA and phzB genes of the phenazine operon and gene phzO. Mutations phzA- and phzB-caused a drastic reduction in the antagonistic activity of bacteria toward phytopathogenic fungi. Both mutants lost the ability to protect cucumber and leguminous plants against phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. These results suggest a significant role of phenazines in the antagonistic activity of P. chlororaphis 449. PMID:19178080

  2. Molecular Insights into the Impact of Oxidative Stress on the Quorum-Sensing Regulator Protein LasR.

    PubMed

    Kafle, Prapti; Amoh, Amanda N; Reaves, Jocelyn M; Suneby, Emma G; Tutunjian, Kathryn A; Tyson, Reed L; Schneider, Tanya L

    2016-05-27

    The LasR regulator protein functions at the top of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing hierarchy and is implicated in promoting bacterial virulence. Of note is recent evidence that this transcription factor may also respond to oxidative stress. Here, all cysteines in LasR were inspected to deduce their redox sensitivity and to probe the connection between stress response and LasR activity using purified LasR and individual LasR domains. Cys(79) in the ligand binding domain of LasR appears to be important for ligand recognition and folding of this domain to potentiate DNA binding but does not seem to be sensitive to oxidative stress when bound to its native ligand. Two cysteines in the DNA binding domain of LasR do form a disulfide bond when treated with hydrogen peroxide, and formation of this Cys(201)-Cys(203) disulfide bond appears to disrupt the DNA binding activity of the transcription factor. Mutagenesis of either of these cysteines leads to expression of a protein that no longer binds DNA. A cell-based reporter assay linking LasR function with β-galactosidase activity gave results consistent with those obtained with purified LasR. This work provides a possible mechanism for oxidative stress response by LasR and indicates that multiple cysteines within the protein may prove to be useful targets for disabling its activity. PMID:27053110

  3. A novel pheromone quorum-sensing system controls the development of natural competence in Streptococcus thermophilus and Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Laetitia; Boutry, Céline; de Frahan, Marie Henry; Delplace, Brigitte; Fremaux, Christophe; Horvath, Philippe; Boyaval, Patrick; Hols, Pascal

    2010-03-01

    In streptococcal species, the key step of competence development is the transcriptional induction of comX, which encodes the alternative sigma factor sigma(X), which positively regulates genes necessary for DNA transformation. In Streptococcus species belonging to the mitis and mutans groups, induction of comX relies on the activation of a three-component system consisting of a secreted pheromone, a histidine kinase, and a response regulator. In Streptococcus thermophilus, a species belonging to the salivarius group, the oligopeptide transporter Ami is essential for comX expression under competence-inducing conditions. This suggests a different regulation pathway of competence based on the production and reimportation of a signal peptide. The objective of our work was to identify the main actors involved in the early steps of comX induction in S. thermophilus LMD-9. Using a transcriptomic approach, four highly induced early competence operons were identified. Among them, we found a Rgg-like regulator (Ster_0316) associated with a nonannotated gene encoding a 24-amino-acid hydrophobic peptide (Shp0316). Through genetic deletions, we showed that these two genes are essential for comX induction. Moreover, addition to the medium of synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal part of Shp0316 restored comX induction and transformation of a Shp0316-deficient strain. These peptides also induced competence in S. thermophilus and Streptococcus salivarius strains that are poorly transformable or not transformable. Altogether, our results show that Ster_0316 and Shp0316, renamed ComRS, are the two members of a novel quorum-sensing system responsible for comX induction in species from the salivarius group, which differs from the classical phosphorelay three-component system identified previously in streptococci. PMID:20023010

  4. A Novel Pheromone Quorum-Sensing System Controls the Development of Natural Competence in Streptococcus thermophilus and Streptococcus salivarius▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Laetitia; Boutry, Céline; de Frahan, Marie Henry; Delplace, Brigitte; Fremaux, Christophe; Horvath, Philippe; Boyaval, Patrick; Hols, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    In streptococcal species, the key step of competence development is the transcriptional induction of comX, which encodes the alternative sigma factor σX, which positively regulates genes necessary for DNA transformation. In Streptococcus species belonging to the mitis and mutans groups, induction of comX relies on the activation of a three-component system consisting of a secreted pheromone, a histidine kinase, and a response regulator. In Streptococcus thermophilus, a species belonging to the salivarius group, the oligopeptide transporter Ami is essential for comX expression under competence-inducing conditions. This suggests a different regulation pathway of competence based on the production and reimportation of a signal peptide. The objective of our work was to identify the main actors involved in the early steps of comX induction in S. thermophilus LMD-9. Using a transcriptomic approach, four highly induced early competence operons were identified. Among them, we found a Rgg-like regulator (Ster_0316) associated with a nonannotated gene encoding a 24-amino-acid hydrophobic peptide (Shp0316). Through genetic deletions, we showed that these two genes are essential for comX induction. Moreover, addition to the medium of synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal part of Shp0316 restored comX induction and transformation of a Shp0316-deficient strain. These peptides also induced competence in S. thermophilus and Streptococcus salivarius strains that are poorly transformable or not transformable. Altogether, our results show that Ster_0316 and Shp0316, renamed ComRS, are the two members of a novel quorum-sensing system responsible for comX induction in species from the salivarius group, which differs from the classical phosphorelay three-component system identified previously in streptococci. PMID:20023010

  5. The CpAL Quorum Sensing System Regulates Production of Hemolysins CPA and PFO To Build Clostridium perfringens Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Shak, Joshua R.; Canizalez-Roman, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens strains produce severe diseases, including myonecrosis and enteritis necroticans, in humans and animals. Diseases are mediated by the production of potent toxins that often damage the site of infection, e.g., skin epithelium during myonecrosis. In planktonic cultures, the regulation of important toxins, such as CPA, CPB, and PFO, is controlled by the C. perfringens Agr-like (CpAL) quorum sensing (QS) system. Strains also encode a functional LuxS/AI-2 system. Although C. perfringens strains form biofilm-like structures, the regulation of biofilm formation is poorly understood. Therefore, our studies investigated the role of CpAL and LuxS/AI-2 QS systems and of QS-regulated factors in controlling the formation of biofilms. We first demonstrate that biofilm production by reference strains differs depending on the culture medium. Increased biomass correlated with the presence of extracellular DNA in the supernatant, which was released by lysis of a fraction of the biofilm population and planktonic cells. Whereas ΔagrB mutant strains were not able to produce biofilms, a ΔluxS mutant produced wild-type levels. The transcript levels of CpAL-regulated cpa and pfoA genes, but not cpb, were upregulated in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures. Accordingly, Δcpa and ΔpfoA mutants, in type A (S13) or type C (CN3685) backgrounds, were unable to produce biofilms, whereas CN3685Δcpb made wild-type levels. Biofilm formation was restored in complemented Δcpa/cpa and ΔpfoA/pfoA strains. Confocal microscopy studies further detected CPA partially colocalizing with eDNA on the biofilm structure. Thus, CpAL regulates biofilm formation in C. perfringens by increasing levels of certain toxins required to build biofilms. PMID:25824838

  6. Quorum-Sensing Regulation of Constitutive Plantaricin by Lactobacillus plantarum Strains under a Model System for Vegetables and Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Rizzello, Carlo G.; Filannino, Pasquale; Calasso, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the regulatory system of bacteriocin synthesis by Lactobacillus plantarum strains in vegetables and fruits in a model system. Sterile and neutralized cell-free supernatant (CFS) from L. plantarum strains grown in MRS broth showed in vitro antimicrobial activities toward various indicator strains. The highest activity was that of L. plantarum C2. The antimicrobial activity was further assayed on vegetable and fruit agar plates (solid conditions) and in juices (liquid conditions). A regulatory mechanism of bacteriocin synthesis via quorum sensing was hypothesized. The synthesis of antimicrobial compounds seemed to be constitutive under solid conditions of growth on vegetable and fruit agar plates. In contrast, it depended on the size of the inoculum when L. plantarum C2 was grown in carrot juice. Only the inoculum of ca. 9.0 log CFU ml−1 produced detectable activity. The genes plnA, plnEF, plnG, and plnH were found in all L. plantarum strains. The genes plnJK and plnN were detected in only three or four strains. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography purification and mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of a mixture of eight peptides in the most active fraction of the CFS from L. plantarum C2. Active peptides were encrypted into bacteriocin precursors, such as plantaricins PlnJ/K and PlnH and PlnG, which are involved in the ABC transport system. A real-time PCR assay showed an increase in the expression of plnJK and plnG during growth of L. plantarum C2 in carrot juice. PMID:24242246

  7. Investigation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signaling system for identifying multiple inhibitors using molecular docking and structural analysis methodology.

    PubMed

    Soheili, Vahid; Bazzaz, Bibi Sedigheh Fazly; Abdollahpour, Nooshin; Hadizadeh, Farzin

    2015-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen and a common Gram-negative bacterium in hospital-acquired infections. It causes death in many burn victims, cystic-fibrosis and neutropenic-cancer patients. It is known that P. aeruginosa biofilm maturation and production of cell-associated and extracellular virulence factors such as pyocyanin, elastase and rhamnolipids are under the control of a quorum-sensing (QS) system. Among several proteins involved in the Pseudomonas QS mechanism, LasR and PqsE play an important role in its cascade signaling system. They can cause increases in QS factors, biofilm maturation, and the production of virulence factors. Therefore, inhibition of these proteins can reduce the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa. According to the structure of corresponding auto-inducers bound to these proteins, in silico calculations were performed with some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to estimate possible interactions and find the co-inhibitors of LasR and PqsE. The results showed that oxicams (Piroxicam and Meloxicam) can interact well with active sites of both proteins with the Ki of 119.43 nM and 4.0 μM for Meloxicam and 201.39 nM and 4.88 μM against LasR and PqsE, respectively. These findings suggested that Piroxicam and Meloxicam can be used as potential inhibitors for control of the P. aeruginosa QS signaling system and biofilm formation, and may be used in the design of multiple inhibitors. PMID:26358567

  8. Identification and characterization of naturally occurring DSF-family quorum sensing signal turnover system in the phytopathogen Xanthomonas.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lian; Wang, Xing-Yu; Sun, Shuang; Yang, Li-Chao; Jiang, Bo-Le; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-11-01

    Molecules of the diffusible signal factor (DSF)-family are a class of quorum sensing (QS) signals used by the phytopathogens Xanthomonas. Studies during the last decade have outlined how Xanthomonas cells enter the QS phase. However, information on the mechanism underlying its exit from the QS phase is limited. RpfB has recently been reported as a fatty acyl-CoA ligase (FCL) that activates a wide range of fatty acids to their CoA esters in vitro. Here, we establish an improved quantification assay for DSF-family signals using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in X. campestris pv. campestris (Xcc). We first demonstrated that RpfB represents a naturally occurring DSF-family signal turnover system. RpfB effectively turns over DSF-family signals DSF and BDSF in vivo. RpfB FCL enzymatic activity is required for DSF and BDSF turnover. Deletion of rpfB slightly increased Xcc virulence in the Chinese radish and overexpression of rpfB significantly decreased virulence. We further showed that the expression of rpfB is growth phase-dependent, and its expression is significantly enhanced when Xcc cells enter the stationary phase. DSF regulates rpfB expression in a concentration-dependent manner. rpfB expression is also negatively regulated by the DSF signalling components RpfC, RpfG and Clp. The global transcription factor Clp directly binds to the AATGC-tgctgc-GCATC motif in the promoter region of rpfB to repress its expression. Finally, RpfB-dependent signal turnover system was detected in a wide range of bacterial species, suggesting that it is a conserved mechanism. PMID:26234930

  9. Quorum sensing regulates the osmotic stress response in Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    van Kessel, Julia C; Rutherford, Steven T; Cong, Jian-Ping; Quinodoz, Sofia; Healy, James; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria use a chemical communication process called quorum sensing to monitor cell density and to alter behavior in response to fluctuations in population numbers. Previous studies with Vibrio harveyi have shown that LuxR, the master quorum-sensing regulator, activates and represses >600 genes. These include six genes that encode homologs of the Escherichia coli Bet and ProU systems for synthesis and transport, respectively, of glycine betaine, an osmoprotectant used during osmotic stress. Here we show that LuxR activates expression of the glycine betaine operon betIBA-proXWV, which enhances growth recovery under osmotic stress conditions. BetI, an autorepressor of the V. harveyi betIBA-proXWV operon, activates the expression of genes encoding regulatory small RNAs that control quorum-sensing transitions. Connecting quorum-sensing and glycine betaine pathways presumably enables V. harveyi to tune its execution of collective behaviors to its tolerance to stress. PMID:25313392

  10. Quorum Sensing Regulates the Osmotic Stress Response in Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Steven T.; Cong, Jian-Ping; Quinodoz, Sofia; Healy, James

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria use a chemical communication process called quorum sensing to monitor cell density and to alter behavior in response to fluctuations in population numbers. Previous studies with Vibrio harveyi have shown that LuxR, the master quorum-sensing regulator, activates and represses >600 genes. These include six genes that encode homologs of the Escherichia coli Bet and ProU systems for synthesis and transport, respectively, of glycine betaine, an osmoprotectant used during osmotic stress. Here we show that LuxR activates expression of the glycine betaine operon betIBA-proXWV, which enhances growth recovery under osmotic stress conditions. BetI, an autorepressor of the V. harveyi betIBA-proXWV operon, activates the expression of genes encoding regulatory small RNAs that control quorum-sensing transitions. Connecting quorum-sensing and glycine betaine pathways presumably enables V. harveyi to tune its execution of collective behaviors to its tolerance to stress. PMID:25313392

  11. Effect of low Reynolds number flow on the quorum sensing behavior of sessile bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingremeau, Francois; Minyoung, Kevin Kim; Bassler, Bonnie; Stone, Howard; Mechanical; Aerospace Engineering, Complex fluids Group Team; Molecular Biology Lab Team

    2014-11-01

    Sessile and planktonic bacteria can be sensitive to the bacteria cell density around them through a chemical mediated communication called quorum sensing. When the quorum sensing molecules reach a certain value, the metabolism of the bacteria changes. Quorum sensing is usually studied in static conditions or in well mixed environments. However, bacteria biofilms can form in porous media or in the circulatory system of an infected body: quorum sensing in such flowing environment at low Reynolds number is not well studied. Using microfluidic devices, we observe how the flow of a pure media affects quorum sensing of bacteria attached to the wall. The biofilm formation is quantified by measuring the optical density in brightfield microscopy and the quorum sensing gene expression is observed through the fluorescence of a green fluorescent protein, which is a reporter for one of the quorum sensing genes. We measured without flow the amount of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm when the quorum sensing gene expression starts. In contrast, when the media is flowing in the microchannel, the quorum sensing expression is delayed. This effect can be understood and modelled by considering the diffusion of the quorum sensing molecules in the biofilm and their convection by the flowing media.

  12. A Mathematical Model of Quorum Sensing Induced Biofilm Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Emerenini, Blessing O.; Hense, Burkhard A.; Kuttler, Christina; Eberl, Hermann J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cell dispersal (or detachment) is part of the developmental cycle of microbial biofilms. It can be externally or internally induced, and manifests itself in discrete sloughing events, whereby many cells disperse in an instance, or in continuous slower dispersal of single cells. One suggested trigger of cell dispersal is quorum sensing, a cell-cell communication mechanism used to coordinate gene expression and behavior in groups based on population densities. Method To better understand the interplay of colony growth and cell dispersal, we develop a dynamic, spatially extended mathematical model that includes biofilm growth, production of quorum sensing molecules, cell dispersal triggered by quorum sensing molecules, and re-attachment of cells. This is a highly nonlinear system of diffusion-reaction equations that we study in computer simulations. Results Our results show that quorum sensing induced cell dispersal can be an efficient mechanism for bacteria to control the size of a biofilm colony, and at the same time enhance its downstream colonization potential. In fact we find that over the lifetime of a biofilm colony the majority of cells produced are lost into the aqueous phase, supporting the notion of biofilms as cell nurseries. We find that a single quorum sensing based mechanism can explain both, discrete dispersal events and continuous shedding of cells from a colony. Moreover, quorum sensing induced cell dispersal affects the structure and architecture of the biofilm, for example it might lead to the formation of hollow inner regions in a biofilm colony. PMID:26197231

  13. The mucoid switch in Pseudomonas aeruginosa represses quorum sensing systems and leads to complex changes to stationary phase virulence factor regulation.

    PubMed

    Ryall, Ben; Carrara, Marta; Zlosnik, James E A; Behrends, Volker; Lee, Xiaoyun; Wong, Zhen; Lougheed, Kathryn E; Williams, Huw D

    2014-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronically infects the airways of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients during which it adapts and undergoes clonal expansion within the lung. It commonly acquires inactivating mutations of the anti-sigma factor MucA leading to a mucoid phenotype, caused by excessive production of the extracellular polysaccharide alginate that is associated with a decline in lung function. Alginate production is believed to be the key benefit of mucA mutations to the bacterium in the CF lung. A phenotypic and gene expression characterisation of the stationary phase physiology of mucA22 mutants demonstrated complex and subtle changes in virulence factor production, including cyanide and pyocyanin, that results in their down-regulation upon entry into stationary phase but, (and in contrast to wildtype strains) continued production in prolonged stationary phase. These findings may have consequences for chronic infection if mucoid P. aeruginosa were to continue to make virulence factors under non-growing conditions during infection. These changes resulted in part from a severe down-regulation of both AHL-and AQ (PQS)-dependent quorum sensing systems. In trans expression of the cAMP-dependent transcription factor Vfr restored both quorum sensing defects and virulence factor production in early stationary phase. Our findings have implications for understanding the evolution of P. aeruginosa during CF lung infection and it demonstrates that mucA22 mutation provides a second mechanism, in addition to the commonly occurring lasR mutations, of down-regulating quorum sensing during chronic infection this may provide a selection pressure for the mucoid switch in the CF lung. PMID:24852379

  14. The Mucoid Switch in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Represses Quorum Sensing Systems and Leads to Complex Changes to Stationary Phase Virulence Factor Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ryall, Ben; Carrara, Marta; Zlosnik, James E. A.; Behrends, Volker; Lee, Xiaoyun; Wong, Zhen; Lougheed, Kathryn E.; Williams, Huw D.

    2014-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronically infects the airways of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients during which it adapts and undergoes clonal expansion within the lung. It commonly acquires inactivating mutations of the anti-sigma factor MucA leading to a mucoid phenotype, caused by excessive production of the extracellular polysaccharide alginate that is associated with a decline in lung function. Alginate production is believed to be the key benefit of mucA mutations to the bacterium in the CF lung. A phenotypic and gene expression characterisation of the stationary phase physiology of mucA22 mutants demonstrated complex and subtle changes in virulence factor production, including cyanide and pyocyanin, that results in their down-regulation upon entry into stationary phase but, (and in contrast to wildtype strains) continued production in prolonged stationary phase. These findings may have consequences for chronic infection if mucoid P. aeruginosa were to continue to make virulence factors under non-growing conditions during infection. These changes resulted in part from a severe down-regulation of both AHL-and AQ (PQS)-dependent quorum sensing systems. In trans expression of the cAMP-dependent transcription factor Vfr restored both quorum sensing defects and virulence factor production in early stationary phase. Our findings have implications for understanding the evolution of P. aeruginosa during CF lung infection and it demonstrates that mucA22 mutation provides a second mechanism, in addition to the commonly occurring lasR mutations, of down-regulating quorum sensing during chronic infection this may provide a selection pressure for the mucoid switch in the CF lung. PMID:24852379

  15. Quorum sensing regulation in Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Garde, Christian; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael; Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Hentzer, Morten; Claussen, Anetta; Sneppen, Kim; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Sams, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    We present detailed results on the C4-HSL-mediated quorum sensing (QS) regulatory system of the opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila. This bacterium contains a particularly simple QS system that allows for a detailed modeling of kinetics. In a model system (i.e., the Escherichia coli monitor strain MH205), the C4-HSL production of A. hydrophila is interrupted by fusion of gfp(ASV). In the present in vitro study, we measure the response of the QS regulatory ahyRI locus in the monitor strain to predetermined concentrations of C4-HSL signal molecules. A minimal kinetic model describes the data well. It can be solved analytically, providing substantial insight into the QS mechanism: at high concentrations of signal molecules, a slow decay of the activated regulator sets the timescale for the QS regulation loop. Slow saturation ensures that, in an A. hydrophila cell, the QS system is activated only by signal molecules produced by other A. hydrophila cells. Separate information on the ahyR and ahyI loci can be extracted, thus allowing the probe to be used in identifying the target when testing QS inhibitors. PMID:20064524

  16. Virulence and in planta movement of Xanthomonas hortorum pv. pelargonii are affected by the diffusible signal factor (DSF)-dependent quorum sensing system.

    PubMed

    Barel, Victoria; Chalupowicz, Laura; Barash, Isaac; Sharabani, Galit; Reuven, Michal; Dror, Orit; Burdman, Saul; Manulis-Sasson, Shulamit

    2015-09-01

    Xanthomonas hortorum pv. pelargonii (Xhp), the causal agent of bacterial blight in pelargonium, is the most threatening bacterial disease of this ornamental worldwide. To gain an insight into the regulation of virulence in Xhp, we have disrupted the quorum sensing (QS) genes, which mediate the biosynthesis and sensing of the diffusible signal factor (DSF). Mutations in rpfF (encoding the DSF synthase) and rpfC (encoding the histidine sensor kinase of the two-component system RfpC/RpfG) and overexpression of rpfF showed a significant reduction in incidence and severity of the disease on pelargonium. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images of inoculated plants with a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labelled wild-type strain showed that the pathogen is homogeneously dispersed in the lumen of xylem vessels, reaching the apex and invading the intercellular spaces of the leaf mesophyll tissue within 21 days. In contrast, the rpfF and rpfC knockout mutants, as well as the rpfF-overexpressing strain, remained confined to the vicinity of the inoculation site. The rpfF and rpfC mutants formed large incoherent aggregates in the xylem vessels that might interfere with upward movement of the bacterium within the plant. Both mutants also formed extended aggregates under in vitro conditions, whereas the wild-type strain formed microcolonies. Expression levels of putative virulence genes in planta were substantially reduced within 48 h after inoculation with the QS mutants when compared with the wild-type. The results presented indicate that an optimal DSF concentration is crucial for successful colonization and virulence of Xhp in pelargonium. PMID:25530086

  17. Quorum Sensing Inhibition, Relevance to Periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Yada, Sudheer; Kamalesh, B; Sonwane, Siddharth; Guptha, Indra; Swetha, R K

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing helps bacteria to communicate with each other and in coordinating their behavior. Many diseases of human beings, plants, and animals are mediated by quorum sensing. Various approaches are being tried to inhibit this communication to control the diseases caused by bacteria. Periodontal pathogens also communicate through quorum sensing and new approaches to treat periodontal disease using quorum sensing inhibition need to explored. PMID:25709373

  18. A Comparative Analysis of Synthetic Quorum Sensing Modulators in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: New Insights into Mechanism, Active Efflux Susceptibility, Phenotypic Response, and Next-Generation Ligand Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical signaling mechanism that allows bacterial populations to coordinate gene expression in response to social and environmental cues. Many bacterial pathogens use QS to initiate infection at high cell densities. Over the past two decades, chemical antagonists of QS in pathogenic bacteria have attracted substantial interest for use both as tools to further elucidate QS mechanisms and, with further development, potential anti-infective agents. Considerable recent research has been devoted to the design of small molecules capable of modulating the LasR QS receptor in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These molecules hold significant promise in a range of contexts; however, as most compounds have been developed independently, comparative activity data for these compounds are scarce. Moreover, the mechanisms by which the bulk of these compounds act are largely unknown. This paucity of data has stalled the choice of an optimal chemical scaffold for further advancement. Herein, we submit the best-characterized LasR modulators to standardized cell-based reporter and QS phenotypic assays in P. aeruginosa, and we report the first comprehensive set of comparative LasR activity data for these compounds. Our experiments uncovered multiple interesting mechanistic phenomena (including a potential alternative QS-modulatory ligand binding site/partner) that provide new, and unexpected, insights into the modes by which many of these LasR ligands act. The lead compounds, data trends, and mechanistic insights reported here will significantly aid the design of new small molecule QS inhibitors and activators in P. aeruginosa, and in other bacteria, with enhanced potencies and defined modes of action. PMID:26491787

  19. Interfering with Bacterial Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Kerstin; Steinbach, Anke; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) describes the exchange of chemical signals in bacterial populations to adjust the bacterial phenotypes according to the density of bacterial cells. This serves to express phenotypes that are advantageous for the group and ensure bacterial survival. To do so, bacterial cells synthesize autoinducer (AI) molecules, release them to the environment, and take them up. Thereby, the AI concentration reflects the cell density. When the AI concentration exceeds a critical threshold in the cells, the AI may activate the expression of virulence-associated genes or of luminescent proteins. It has been argued that targeting the QS system puts less selective pressure on these pathogens and should avoid the development of resistant bacteria. Therefore, the molecular components of QS systems have been suggested as promising targets for developing new anti-infective compounds. Here, we review the QS systems of selected gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, namely, Vibrio fischeri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, and discuss various antivirulence strategies based on blocking different components of the QS machinery. PMID:26819549

  20. Interfering with Bacterial Quorum Sensing.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Kerstin; Steinbach, Anke; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) describes the exchange of chemical signals in bacterial populations to adjust the bacterial phenotypes according to the density of bacterial cells. This serves to express phenotypes that are advantageous for the group and ensure bacterial survival. To do so, bacterial cells synthesize autoinducer (AI) molecules, release them to the environment, and take them up. Thereby, the AI concentration reflects the cell density. When the AI concentration exceeds a critical threshold in the cells, the AI may activate the expression of virulence-associated genes or of luminescent proteins. It has been argued that targeting the QS system puts less selective pressure on these pathogens and should avoid the development of resistant bacteria. Therefore, the molecular components of QS systems have been suggested as promising targets for developing new anti-infective compounds. Here, we review the QS systems of selected gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, namely, Vibrio fischeri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, and discuss various antivirulence strategies based on blocking different components of the QS machinery. PMID:26819549

  1. Specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity (A QSI) of thiophenones and their therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Scheie, Anne Aamdal; Benneche, Tore; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Disease caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens is becoming a serious problem, both in human and veterinary medicine. The inhibition of quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, is a promising alternative strategy to control disease. In this study, we determined the quorum sensing-disrupting activity of 20 thiophenones towards the quorum sensing model bacterium V. harveyi. In order to exclude false positives, we propose a new parameter (AQSI) to describe specific quorum sensing activity. AQSI is defined as the ratio between inhibition of quorum sensing-regulated activity in a reporter strain and inhibition of the same activity when it is independent of quorum sensing. Calculation of AQSI allowed to exclude five false positives, whereas the six most active thiophenones (TF203, TF307, TF319, TF339, TF342 and TF403) inhibited quorum sensing at 0.25 μM, with AQSI higher than 10. Further, we determined the protective effect and toxicity of the thiophenones in a highly controlled gnotobiotic model system with brine shrimp larvae. There was a strong positive correlation between the specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity of the thiophenones and the protection of brine shrimp larvae against pathogenic V. harveyi. Four of the most active quorum sensing-disrupting thiophenones (TF 203, TF319, TF339 and TF342) were considered to be promising since they have a therapeutic potential of at least 10. PMID:26647822

  2. Specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity (AQSI) of thiophenones and their therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; Aamdal Scheie, Anne; Benneche, Tore; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Disease caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens is becoming a serious problem, both in human and veterinary medicine. The inhibition of quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, is a promising alternative strategy to control disease. In this study, we determined the quorum sensing-disrupting activity of 20 thiophenones towards the quorum sensing model bacterium V. harveyi. In order to exclude false positives, we propose a new parameter (AQSI) to describe specific quorum sensing activity. AQSI is defined as the ratio between inhibition of quorum sensing-regulated activity in a reporter strain and inhibition of the same activity when it is independent of quorum sensing. Calculation of AQSI allowed to exclude five false positives, whereas the six most active thiophenones (TF203, TF307, TF319, TF339, TF342 and TF403) inhibited quorum sensing at 0.25 μM, with AQSI higher than 10. Further, we determined the protective effect and toxicity of the thiophenones in a highly controlled gnotobiotic model system with brine shrimp larvae. There was a strong positive correlation between the specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity of the thiophenones and the protection of brine shrimp larvae against pathogenic V. harveyi. Four of the most active quorum sensing-disrupting thiophenones (TF 203, TF319, TF339 and TF342) were considered to be promising since they have a therapeutic potential of at least 10. PMID:26647822

  3. Two quorum sensing systems control biofilm formation and virulence in members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    PubMed Central

    Suppiger, Angela; Schmid, Nadine; Aguilar, Claudio; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo

    2013-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) consists of 17 closely related species that are problematic opportunistic bacterial pathogens for cystic fibrosis patients and immunocompromised individuals. These bacteria are capable of utilizing two different chemical languages: N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and cis-2-unsaturated fatty acids. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the underlying molecular architectures of these communication systems, showing how they are interlinked and discussing how they regulate overlapping as well as specific sets of genes. A particular focus is laid on the role of these signaling systems in the formation of biofilms, which are believed to be highly important for chronic infections. We review genes that have been implicated in the sessile lifestyle of this group of bacteria. The new emerging role of the intracellular second messenger cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) as a downstream regulator of the fatty acid signaling cascade and as a key factor in biofilm formation is also discussed. PMID:23799665

  4. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by quorum sensing inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hentzer, Morten; Wu, Hong; Andersen, Jens Bo; Riedel, Kathrin; Rasmussen, Thomas B.; Bagge, Niels; Kumar, Naresh; Schembri, Mark A.; Song, Zhijun; Kristoffersen, Peter; Manefield, Mike; Costerton, John W.; Molin, Søren; Eberl, Leo; Steinberg, Peter; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Traditional treatment of infectious diseases is based on compounds that kill or inhibit growth of bacteria. A major concern with this approach is the frequent development of resistance to antibiotics. The discovery of communication systems (quorum sensing systems) regulating bacterial virulence has afforded a novel opportunity to control infectious bacteria without interfering with growth. Compounds that can override communication signals have been found in the marine environment. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as an example of an opportunistic human pathogen, we show that a synthetic derivate of natural furanone compounds can act as a potent antagonist of bacterial quorum sensing. We employed GeneChip® microarray technology to identify furanone target genes and to map the quorum sensing regulon. The transcriptome analysis showed that the furanone drug specifically targeted quorum sensing systems and inhibited virulence factor expression. Application of the drug to P.aeruginosa biofilms increased bacterial susceptibility to tobramycin and SDS. In a mouse pulmonary infection model, the drug inhibited quorum sensing of the infecting bacteria and promoted their clearance by the mouse immune response. PMID:12881415

  5. The fsr Quorum-Sensing System and Cognate Gelatinase Orchestrate the Expression and Processing of Proprotein EF_1097 into the Mature Antimicrobial Peptide Enterocin O16

    PubMed Central

    Dundar, Halil; Brede, Dag A.; La Rosa, Sabina Leanti; El-Gendy, Ahmed Osama; Diep, Dzung B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A novel antimicrobial peptide designated enterocin O16 was purified from Enterococcus faecalis. Mass spectrometry showed a monoisotopic mass of 7,231 Da, and N-terminal Edman degradation identified a 29-amino-acid sequence corresponding to residues 90 to 119 of the EF_1097 protein. Bioinformatic analysis showed that enterocin O16 is composed of the 68 most C-terminal residues of the EF_1097 protein. Introduction of an in-frame isogenic deletion in the ef1097 gene abolished the production of enterocin O16. Enterocin O16 has a narrow inhibitory spectrum, as it inhibits mostly lactobacilli. Apparently, E. faecalis is intrinsically resistant to the antimicrobial peptide, as no immunity connected to the production of enterocin O16 could be identified. ef1097 has previously been identified as one of three loci regulated by the fsr quorum-sensing system. The introduction of a nonsense mutation into fsrB consistently impaired enterocin O16 production, but externally added gelatinase biosynthesis-activating pheromone restored the antimicrobial activity. Functional genetic analysis showed that the EF_1097 proprotein is processed extracellularly into enterocin O16 by the metalloprotease GelE. Thus, it is evident that the fsr quorum-sensing system constitutes the regulatory unit that controls the expression of the EF_1097 precursor protein and the protease GelE and that the latter is required for the formation of enterocin O16. On the basis of these results, this study identified antibacterial antagonism as a novel aspect related to the function of fsr and provides a rationale for why ef1097 is part of the fsr regulon. IMPORTANCE The fsr quorum-sensing system modulates important physiological functions in E. faecalis via the activity of GelE. The present study presents a new facet of fsr signaling. The system controls the expression of three primary target operons (fsrABCD, gelE-sprE, and ef1097-ef1097b). We demonstrate that the concerted expression of these operons

  6. Novel linear polymers able to inhibit bacterial quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Cavaleiro, Eliana; Duarte, Ana Sofia; Esteves, Ana Cristina; Correia, António; Whitcombe, Michael J; Piletska, Elena V; Piletsky, Sergey A; Chianella, Iva

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial phenotypes, such as biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance and virulence expression, are associated with quorum sensing. Quorum sensing is a density-dependent regulatory system of gene expression controlled by specific signal molecules, such as N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), produced and released by bacteria. This study reports the development of linear polymers capable to attenuate quorum sensing by adsorption of AHLs. Linear polymers were synthesized using MMA as backbone monomer and methacrylic acid and itaconic acid as functional monomers. Two different quorum sensing-controlled phenotypes, Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence and Aeromonas hydrophila biofilm formation, were evaluated to test the polymers' efficiency. Results showed that both phenotypes were significantly affected by the polymers, with the itaconic acid-containing material being more effective than the methacrylic acid one. The polymer inhibitory effects were reverted by the addition of lactones, confirming attenuation of quorum sensing through sequestration of signal molecules. The polymers also showed no cytotoxicity when tested using a mammalian cell line. PMID:25626858

  7. Integrated analysis of bacterial quorum-sensing networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Rahul

    2005-11-01

    The regulation of gene expression is fundamental to most processes in cellular biology. At the transcriptional level, regulation occurs by the binding of specific proteins called transcription factors to DNA. Post-transcriptional regulation is often carried out by small RNAs which have become the focus of intense research activity recently. The talk will discuss the physics and biology of these two regulatory mechanisms by focusing on a specific biological system: quorum-sensing networks in bacteria. Quorum sensing is the process by which bacteria communicate to regulate gene expression in response to cell population density. Using an integrated approach which combines computational modeling, bioinformatics and experimental molecular biology, we are studying quorum-sensing pathways in bacteria. This approach led to the discovery of multiple regulatory small RNAs which are an integral part of the quorum-sensing pathway in Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio harveyi. Modeling of regulation of and by small RNAs in quorum sensing reveals the circuit characteristics controlling the transition from the low cell-density response to the high cell-density response.

  8. Membrane Topology and Structural Insights into the Peptide Pheromone Receptor ComD, A Quorum-Sensing Histidine Protein Kinase of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaofeng; Tian, Xiao-Lin; Cyr, Kayla; Liu, Tianlei; Lin, William; Tziolas, Geoffrey; Li, Yung-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing activation by signal pheromone (CSP) in Streptococcus mutans depends on the membrane-associated receptor ComD, which senses the signal and triggers the signaling cascade for bacteriocin production and other cell density-dependent activities. However, the mechanism of the signal recognition via the ComD receptor in this species is nearly unexplored. Here, we show that the membrane domain of the ComD protein forms six transmembrane segments with three extracellular loops, loopA, loopB and loopC. By structural and functional analyses of these extracellular loops, we demonstrate that both loopC and loopB are required for CSP recognition, while loopA plays little role in CSP detection. A deletion or substitution mutation of four residues NVIP in loopC abolishes CSP recognition for quorum sensing activities. We conclude that both loopC and loopB are required for forming the receptor and residues NVIP of loopC are essential for CSP recognition and quorum sensing activation in S. mutans. PMID:27199267

  9. Membrane Topology and Structural Insights into the Peptide Pheromone Receptor ComD, A Quorum-Sensing Histidine Protein Kinase of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Gaofeng; Tian, Xiao-Lin; Cyr, Kayla; Liu, Tianlei; Lin, William; Tziolas, Geoffrey; Li, Yung-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing activation by signal pheromone (CSP) in Streptococcus mutans depends on the membrane-associated receptor ComD, which senses the signal and triggers the signaling cascade for bacteriocin production and other cell density-dependent activities. However, the mechanism of the signal recognition via the ComD receptor in this species is nearly unexplored. Here, we show that the membrane domain of the ComD protein forms six transmembrane segments with three extracellular loops, loopA, loopB and loopC. By structural and functional analyses of these extracellular loops, we demonstrate that both loopC and loopB are required for CSP recognition, while loopA plays little role in CSP detection. A deletion or substitution mutation of four residues NVIP in loopC abolishes CSP recognition for quorum sensing activities. We conclude that both loopC and loopB are required for forming the receptor and residues NVIP of loopC are essential for CSP recognition and quorum sensing activation in S. mutans. PMID:27199267

  10. Lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid as potential quorum sensing inhibitor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gökalsın, Barış; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-09-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease and it affects the respiratory and digestive systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in Cystic Fibrosis are presented as the main cause for high mortality and morbidity rates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations can regulate their virulence gene expressions via the bacterial communication system: quorum sensing. Inhibition of quorum sensing by employing quorum sensing inhibitors can leave the bacteria vulnerable. Therefore, determining natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors is essential. Lichens have ethnobotanical value for their medicinal properties and it is possible that their secondary metabolites have quorum sensing inhibitor properties. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid to reduce the expressions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors by inhibiting quorum sensing. For this purpose, fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR analyses were conducted for comparison. Results indicate that evernic acid is capable of inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems. PMID:27465850

  11. Quorum Sensing Regulates Type III Secretion in Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Henke, Jennifer M.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2004-01-01

    In a process known as quorum sensing, bacteria communicate with one another by producing, releasing, detecting, and responding to signal molecules called autoinducers. Vibrio harveyi, a marine pathogen, uses two parallel quorum-sensing circuits, each consisting of an autoinducer-sensor pair, to control the expression of genes required for bioluminescence and a number of other target genes. Genetic screens designed to discover autoinducer-regulated targets in V. harveyi have revealed genes encoding components of a putative type III secretion (TTS) system. Using transcriptional reporter fusions and TTS protein localization studies, we show that the TTS system is indeed functional in V. harveyi and that expression of the genes encoding the secretion machinery requires an intact quorum-sensing signal transduction cascade. The newly completed genome of the closely related marine bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus, which is a human pathogen, shows that it possesses the genes encoding both of the V. harveyi-like quorum-sensing signaling circuits and that it also has a TTS system similar to that of V. harveyi. We show that quorum sensing regulates TTS in V. parahaemolyticus. Previous reports connecting quorum sensing to TTS in enterohemorrhagic and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli show that quorum sensing activates TTS at high cell density. Surprisingly, we find that at high cell density (in the presence of autoinducers), quorum sensing represses TTS in V. harveyi and V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:15175293

  12. [Quorum sensing in bacteria and yeast].

    PubMed

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; Eiros Bouza, José María

    2013-10-19

    Bacterial sets are complex dynamic systems, which interact with each other and through the interaction, bacteria coexist, collaborate, compete and share information in a coordinated manner. A way of bacterial communication is quorum sensing. Through this mechanism the bacteria can recognize its concentration in a given environment and they can decide the time at which the expression of a particular set of genes should be started for developing a specific and simultaneous response. The result of these interconnections raises properties that cannot be explained from a single isolated bacterial cell. PMID:23622893

  13. The BlcC (AttM) lactonase of Agrobacterium tumefaciens does not quench the quorum-sensing system that regulates Ti plasmid conjugative transfer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sharik R; Farrand, Stephen K

    2009-02-01

    The conjugative transfer of Agrobacterium plasmids is controlled by a quorum-sensing system consisting of TraR and its acyl-homoserine lactone (HSL) ligand. The acyl-HSL is essential for the TraR-mediated activation of the Ti plasmid Tra genes. Strains A6 and C58 of Agrobacterium tumefaciens produce a lactonase, BlcC (AttM), that can degrade the quormone, leading some to conclude that the enzyme quenches the quorum-sensing system. We tested this hypothesis by examining the effects of the mutation, induction, or mutational derepression of blcC on the accumulation of acyl-HSL and on the conjugative competence of strain C58. The induction of blc resulted in an 8- to 10-fold decrease in levels of extracellular acyl-HSL but in only a twofold decrease in intracellular quormone levels, a measure of the amount of active intracellular TraR. The induction or mutational derepression of blc as well as a null mutation in blcC had no significant effect on the induction of or continued transfer of pTiC58 from donors in any stage of growth, including stationary phase. In matings performed in developing tumors, wild-type C58 transferred the Ti plasmid to recipients, yielding transconjugants by 14 to 21 days following infection. blcC-null donors yielded transconjugants 1 week earlier, but by the following week, transconjugants were recovered at numbers indistinguishable from those of the wild type. Donors mutationally derepressed for blcC yielded transconjugants in planta at numbers 10-fold lower than those for the wild type at weeks 2 and 3, but by week 4, the two donors showed no difference in recoverable transconjugants. We conclude that BlcC has no biologically significant effect on Ti plasmid transfer or its regulatory system. PMID:19011037

  14. Can the Natural Diversity of Quorum-Sensing Advance Synthetic Biology?

    PubMed Central

    Davis, René Michele; Muller, Ryan Yue; Haynes, Karmella Ann

    2015-01-01

    Quorum-sensing networks enable bacteria to sense and respond to chemical signals produced by neighboring bacteria. They are widespread: over 100 morphologically and genetically distinct species of eubacteria are known to use quorum sensing to control gene expression. This diversity suggests the potential to use natural protein variants to engineer parallel, input-specific, cell–cell communication pathways. However, only three distinct signaling pathways, Lux, Las, and Rhl, have been adapted for and broadly used in engineered systems. The paucity of unique quorum-sensing systems and their propensity for crosstalk limits the usefulness of our current quorum-sensing toolkit. This review discusses the need for more signaling pathways, roadblocks to using multiple pathways in parallel, and strategies for expanding the quorum-sensing toolbox for synthetic biology. PMID:25806368

  15. Can the natural diversity of quorum-sensing advance synthetic biology?

    PubMed

    Davis, René Michele; Muller, Ryan Yue; Haynes, Karmella Ann

    2015-01-01

    Quorum-sensing networks enable bacteria to sense and respond to chemical signals produced by neighboring bacteria. They are widespread: over 100 morphologically and genetically distinct species of eubacteria are known to use quorum sensing to control gene expression. This diversity suggests the potential to use natural protein variants to engineer parallel, input-specific, cell-cell communication pathways. However, only three distinct signaling pathways, Lux, Las, and Rhl, have been adapted for and broadly used in engineered systems. The paucity of unique quorum-sensing systems and their propensity for crosstalk limits the usefulness of our current quorum-sensing toolkit. This review discusses the need for more signaling pathways, roadblocks to using multiple pathways in parallel, and strategies for expanding the quorum-sensing toolbox for synthetic biology. PMID:25806368

  16. Vibrio harveyi quorum sensing: a coincidence detector for two autoinducers controls gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Kenny C.; Wingreen, Ned S.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2003-01-01

    In a process called quorum sensing, bacteria communicate with one another by exchanging chemical signals called autoinducers. In the bioluminescent marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi, two different auto inducers (AI-1 and AI-2) regulate light emission. Detection of and response to the V.harveyi autoinducers are accomplished through two two-component sensory relay systems: AI-1 is detected by the sensor LuxN and AI-2 by LuxPQ. Here we further define the V.harveyi quorum-sensing regulon by identifying 10 new quorum-sensing-controlled target genes. Our examination of signal processing and integration in the V.harveyi quorum-sensing circuit suggests that AI-1 and AI-2 act synergistically, and that the V.harveyi quorum-sensing circuit may function exclusively as a ‘coincidence detector’ that discriminates between conditions in which both autoinducers are present and all other conditions. PMID:12574123

  17. Quorum Sensing Peptides Selectively Penetrate the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Verbeke, Frederick; Stalmans, Sofie; Gevaert, Bert; Janssens, Yorick; Van De Wiele, Christophe; Peremans, Kathelijne; Burvenich, Christian; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria communicate with each other by the use of signaling molecules, a process called ‘quorum sensing’. One group of quorum sensing molecules includes the oligopeptides, which are mainly produced by Gram-positive bacteria. Recently, these quorum sensing peptides were found to biologically influence mammalian cells, promoting i.a. metastasis of cancer cells. Moreover, it was found that bacteria can influence different central nervous system related disorders as well, e.g. anxiety, depression and autism. Research currently focuses on the role of bacterial metabolites in this bacteria-brain interaction, with the role of the quorum sensing peptides not yet known. Here, three chemically diverse quorum sensing peptides were investigated for their brain influx (multiple time regression technique) and efflux properties in an in vivo mouse model (ICR-CD-1) to determine blood-brain transfer properties: PhrCACET1 demonstrated comparatively a very high initial influx into the mouse brain (Kin = 20.87 μl/(g×min)), while brain penetrabilities of BIP-2 and PhrANTH2 were found to be low (Kin = 2.68 μl/(g×min)) and very low (Kin = 0.18 μl/(g×min)), respectively. All three quorum sensing peptides were metabolically stable in plasma (in vitro) during the experimental time frame and no significant brain efflux was observed. Initial tissue distribution data showed remarkably high liver accumulation of BIP-2 as well. Our results thus support the potential role of some quorum sensing peptides in different neurological disorders, thereby enlarging our knowledge about the microbiome-brain axis. PMID:26536593

  18. Fungal dimorphism in the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium rileyi: Detection of an in vivo quorum-sensing system.

    PubMed

    Boucias, D; Liu, S; Meagher, R; Baniszewski, J

    2016-05-01

    This investigation documents the expression of the in vivo dimorphic program exhibited by the insect mycopathogen Metarhizium rileyi. This insect mycopathogen represents the key mortality factor regulating various caterpillar populations in legumes, including subtropical and tropical soybeans. Using two hosts and M. rileyi isolates, we have measured M. rileyi growth rates under in vivo and in vitro conditions and have assessed the pathogen's impact on host fitness. Significantly, the hyphal bodies-to-mycelia transition that occurs at the late infection stage is regulated by a quorum-sensing molecule(s) (QSM) that triggers hyphal bodies (Hb) to synchronously switch to the tissue-invasive mycelia. Within hours of this transition, the host insect succumbs to mycosis. The production of the QS chemical(s) occurs when a quorum of Hb is produced in the hemolymph (late-stage infection). Furthermore, the QS activity detected in late-stage infected sera is unique and is unrelated to any known fungal QSM. The lack of similar QS activity from conditioned media of M. rileyi suggests that the chemical signal(s) that mediates the dimorphic switch is produced by host tissues in response to a quorum of hyphal bodies produced in the host hemolymph. The serum-based QS activity is retained after lyophilization, mild heat treatment, and proteinase digestion. However, attempts to extract/identify the QSM have been unsuccessful. Results suggest that the observed hyphal body-to-mycelia transition is a multi-step process involving more than one chemical signal. PMID:27018146

  19. Subinhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin targets quorum sensing system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa causing inhibition of biofilm formation & reduction of virulence

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Parul; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa lead to persistent infections. Use of antibiotics for the treatment of biofilm induced infection poses a threat towards development of resistance. Therefore, the research is directed towards exploring the property of antibiotics which may alter the virulence of an organism besides altering its growth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of subinhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin (CIP) in inhibiting biofilm formation and virulence of P. aeruginosa. Methods: Antibiofilm potential of subinhibitory concentration of CIP was evaluated in terms of log reduction, biofilm forming capacity and coverslip assay. P. aeruginosa isolates (grown in the presence and absence of sub-MIC of CIP) were also evaluated for inhibition in motility, virulence factor production and quorum sensing (QS) signal production. Results: Sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) of CIP significantly reduced the motility of P. aeruginosa stand and strain and clinical isolates and affected biofilm forming capacity. Production of protease, elastase, siderophore, alginate, and rhamnolipid was also significantly reduced by CIP. Interpretation & conclusions: Reduction in virulence factors and biofilm formation was due to inhibition of QS mechanism which was indicated by reduced production of QS signal molecules by P. aeruginosa in presence of subinhibitory concentration of CIP. PMID:27488009

  20. Evidence that the Agr-like quorum sensing system regulates the toxin production, cytotoxicity and pathogenicity of Clostridium perfringens type C isolate CN3685.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Jorge E; Ma, Menglin; Saputo, Julian; Garcia, Jorge; Uzal, Francisco A; McClane, Bruce A

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens possesses at least two functional quorum sensing (QS) systems, i.e. an Agr-like system and a LuxS-dependent AI-2 system. Both of those QS systems can reportedly control in vitro toxin production by C. perfringens but their importance for virulence has not been evaluated. Therefore, the current study assessed whether these QS systems might regulate the pathogenicity of CN3685, a C. perfringens type C strain. Since type C isolates cause both haemorrhagic necrotic enteritis and fatal enterotoxemias (where toxins produced in the intestines are absorbed into the circulation to target other internal organs), the ability of isogenic agrB or luxS mutants to cause necrotizing enteritis in rabbit small intestinal loops or enterotoxemic lethality in mice was evaluated. Results obtained strongly suggest that the Agr-like QS system, but not the LuxS-dependent AI-2 QS system, is required for CN3685 to cause haemorrhagic necrotizing enteritis, apparently because the Agr-like system regulates the production of beta toxin, which is essential for causing this pathology. The Agr-like system, but not the LuxS-mediated AI-2 system, was also important for CN3685 to cause fatal enterotoxemia. These results provide the first direct evidence supporting a role for any QS system in clostridial infections. PMID:22150719

  1. Quorum-sensing-directed protein expression in Serratia proteamaculans B5a.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Allan B; Riedel, Kathrin; Eberl, Leo; Flodgaard, Lars R; Molin, Søren; Gram, Lone; Givskov, Michael

    2003-02-01

    N-Acyl-L-homoserine-lactone-producing Serratia species are frequently encountered in spoiling foods of vegetable and protein origin. The role of quorum sensing in the food spoiling properties of these bacteria is currently being investigated. A set of luxR luxI homologous genes encoding a putative quorum sensor was identified in the N-(3-oxo-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL)-producing Serratia proteamaculans strain B5a. The 3-oxo-C6-HSL synthase SprI showed 79 % similarity with EsaI from Pantoea stewartii and the putative regulatory protein SprR was 86 % similar to the SpnR of Serratia marcescens. Proteome analysis suggested that the presence of at least 39 intracellular proteins was affected by the 3-oxo-C6-HSL-based quorum sensing system. The lipB-encoded secretion system was identified as one target gene of the quorum sensing system. LipB was required for the production of extracellular lipolytic and proteolytic activities, thus rendering the production of food-deterioration-relevant exoenzymes indirectly under the control of quorum sensing. Strain B5a caused quorum-sensing-controlled spoilage of milk. Furthermore, chitinolytic activity was controlled by quorum sensing. This control appeared to be direct and not mediated via LipB. The data presented here demonstrate that quorum-sensing-controlled exoenzymic activities affect food quality. PMID:12624209

  2. A Quorum Sensing-Disrupting Brominated Thiophenone with a Promising Therapeutic Potential to Treat Luminescent Vibriosis

    PubMed Central

    Defoirdt, Tom; Benneche, Tore; Brackman, Gilles; Coenye, Tom; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Scheie, Anne Aamdal

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is amongst the most important bacterial pathogens in aquaculture. Novel methods to control this pathogen are needed since many strains have acquired resistance to antibiotics. We previously showed that quorum sensing-disrupting furanones are able to protect brine shrimp larvae against vibriosis. However, a major problem of these compounds is that they are toxic toward higher organisms and therefore, they are not safe to be used in aquaculture. The synthesis of brominated thiophenones, sulphur analogues of the quorum sensing-disrupting furanones, has recently been reported. In the present study, we report that these compounds block quorum sensing in V. harveyi at concentrations in the low micromolar range. Bioluminescence experiments with V. harveyi quorum sensing mutants and a fluorescence anisotropy assay indicated that the compounds disrupt quorum sensing in this bacterium by decreasing the ability of the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR to bind to its target promoter DNA. In vivo challenge tests with gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae showed that thiophenone compound TF310, (Z)-4-((5-(bromomethylene)-2-oxo-2,5-dihydrothiophen-3-yl)methoxy)-4-oxobutanoic acid, completely protected the larvae from V. harveyi BB120 when dosed to the culture water at 2.5 µM or more, whereas severe toxicity was only observed at 250 µM. This makes TF310 showing the highest therapeutic index of all quorum sensing-disrupting compounds tested thus far in our brine shrimp model system. PMID:22848604

  3. Multiple small RNAs act additively to integrate sensory information and control quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Kimberly C.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2007-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a cell–cell communication mechanism that bacteria use to collectively regulate gene expression and, at a higher level, to coordinate group behavior. In the bioluminescent marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi, sensory information from three independent quorum-sensing systems converges on the shared response regulator LuxO. When LuxO is phosphorylated, it activates the expression of a putative repressor that destabilizes the mRNA encoding the master quorum-sensing transcriptional regulator LuxR. In the closely related species Vibrio cholerae, this repressor was revealed to be the RNA chaperone Hfq together with four small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) called Qrr1–4 (quorum regulatory RNA). Here, we identify five Qrr sRNAs that control quorum sensing in V. harveyi. Mutational analysis reveals that only four of the five Qrrs are required for destabilization of the luxR mRNA. Surprisingly, unlike in V. cholerae where the sRNAs act redundantly, in V. harveyi, the Qrr sRNAs function additively to control quorum sensing. This latter mechanism produces a gradient of LuxR that, in turn, enables differential regulation of quorum-sensing target genes. Other regulators appear to be involved in control of V. harveyi qrr expression, allowing the integration of additional sensory information into the regulation of quorum-sensing gene expression. PMID:17234887

  4. Monitoring of Vibrio harveyi quorum sensing activity in real time during infection of brine shrimp larvae

    PubMed Central

    Defoirdt, Tom; Sorgeloos, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, has been linked to the virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Indeed, in vitro experiments have shown that many bacterial pathogens regulate the expression of virulence genes by this cell-to-cell communication process. Moreover, signal molecules have been detected in samples retrieved from infected hosts and quorum sensing disruption has been reported to result in reduced virulence in different host–pathogen systems. However, data on in vivo quorum sensing activity of pathogens during infection of a host are currently lacking. We previously reported that quorum sensing regulates the virulence of Vibrio harveyi in a standardised model system with gnotobiotic brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) larvae. Here, we monitored quorum sensing activity in Vibrio harveyi during infection of the shrimp, using bioluminescence as a read-out. We found that wild-type Vibrio harveyi shows a strong increase in quorum sensing activity early during infection. In this respect, the bacteria behave remarkably similar in different larvae, despite the fact that only half of them survive the infection. Interestingly, when expressed per bacterial cell, Vibrio harveyi showed around 200-fold higher maximal quorum sensing-regulated bioluminescence when associated with larvae than in the culture water. Finally, the in vivo quorum sensing activity of mutants defective in the production of one of the three signal molecules is consistent with their virulence, with no detectable in vivo quorum sensing activity in AI-2- and CAI-1-deficient mutants. These results indicate that AI-2 and CAI-1 are the dominant signals during infection of brine shrimp. PMID:22673627

  5. Monitoring of Vibrio harveyi quorum sensing activity in real time during infection of brine shrimp larvae.

    PubMed

    Defoirdt, Tom; Sorgeloos, Patrick

    2012-12-01

    Quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, has been linked to the virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Indeed, in vitro experiments have shown that many bacterial pathogens regulate the expression of virulence genes by this cell-to-cell communication process. Moreover, signal molecules have been detected in samples retrieved from infected hosts and quorum sensing disruption has been reported to result in reduced virulence in different host-pathogen systems. However, data on in vivo quorum sensing activity of pathogens during infection of a host are currently lacking. We previously reported that quorum sensing regulates the virulence of Vibrio harveyi in a standardised model system with gnotobiotic brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) larvae. Here, we monitored quorum sensing activity in Vibrio harveyi during infection of the shrimp, using bioluminescence as a read-out. We found that wild-type Vibrio harveyi shows a strong increase in quorum sensing activity early during infection. In this respect, the bacteria behave remarkably similar in different larvae, despite the fact that only half of them survive the infection. Interestingly, when expressed per bacterial cell, Vibrio harveyi showed around 200-fold higher maximal quorum sensing-regulated bioluminescence when associated with larvae than in the culture water. Finally, the in vivo quorum sensing activity of mutants defective in the production of one of the three signal molecules is consistent with their virulence, with no detectable in vivo quorum sensing activity in AI-2- and CAI-1-deficient mutants. These results indicate that AI-2 and CAI-1 are the dominant signals during infection of brine shrimp. PMID:22673627

  6. The RpfB-Dependent Quorum Sensing Signal Turnover System Is Required for Adaptation and Virulence in Rice Bacterial Blight Pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-Yu; Zhou, Lian; Yang, Jun; Ji, Guang-Hai; He, Ya-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the bacterial blight pathogen of rice, produces diffusible signal factor (DSF) family quorum sensing signals to regulate virulence. The biosynthesis and perception of DSF family signals require components of the rpf (regulation of pathogenicity factors) cluster. In this study, we report that RpfB plays an essential role in DSF family signal turnover in X. oryzae pv. oryzae PXO99A. The production of DSF family signals was boosted by deletion of the rpfB gene and was abolished by its overexpression. The RpfC/RpfG-mediated DSF signaling system negatively regulates rpfB expression via the global transcription regulator Clp, whose activity is reversible in the presence of cyclic diguanylate monophosphate. These findings indicate that the DSF family signal turnover system in PXO99A is generally consistent with that in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. Moreover, this study has revealed several specific roles of RpfB in PXO99A. First, the rpfB deletion mutant produced high levels of DSF family signals but reduced extracellular polysaccharide production, extracellular amylase activity, and attenuated pathogenicity. Second, the rpfB/rpfC double-deletion mutant was partially deficient in xanthomonadin production. Taken together, the RpfB-dependent DSF family signal turnover system is a conserved and naturally presenting signal turnover system in Xanthomonas spp., which plays unique roles in X. oryzae pv. oryzae adaptation and pathogenesis. PMID:26667598

  7. Control of the Type 3 Secretion System in Vibrio harveyi by Quorum Sensing through Repression of ExsA ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Christopher M.; Wu, Julie T.; Ramsey, Meghan E.; Harris, Rebecca C.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2010-01-01

    The type 3 secretion system (T3SS) genes of Vibrio harveyi are activated at low cell density and repressed at high cell density by quorum sensing (QS). Repression requires LuxR, the master transcriptional regulator of QS-controlled genes. Here, we determine the mechanism underlying the LuxR repression of the T3SS system. Using a fluorescence-based cell sorting approach, we isolated V. harveyi mutants that are unable to express T3SS genes at low cell density and identified two mutations in the V. harveyi exsBA operon. While LuxR directly represses the expression of exsBA, complementation and epistasis analyses reveal that it is the repression of exsA expression, but not exsB expression, that is responsible for the QS-mediated repression of T3SS genes at high cell density. The present work further defines the genes in the V. harveyi QS regulon and elucidates a mechanism demonstrating how multiple regulators can be linked in series to direct the expression of QS target genes specifically at low or high cell density. PMID:20543047

  8. The AHL- and BDSF-Dependent Quorum Sensing Systems Control Specific and Overlapping Sets of Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia H111

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Claudio; Carlier, Aurelien L.; Grunau, Alexander; Omasits, Ulrich; Zhang, Lian-Hui; Ahrens, Christian H.; Eberl, Leo

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing in Burkholderia cenocepacia H111 involves two signalling systems that depend on different signal molecules, namely N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and the diffusible signal factor cis-2-dodecenoic acid (BDSF). Previous studies have shown that AHLs and BDSF control similar phenotypic traits, including biofilm formation, proteolytic activity and pathogenicity. In this study we mapped the BDSF stimulon by RNA-Seq and shotgun proteomics analysis. We demonstrate that a set of the identified BDSF-regulated genes or proteins are also controlled by AHLs, suggesting that the two regulons partially overlap. The detailed analysis of two mutually regulated operons, one encoding three lectins and the other one encoding the large surface protein BapA and its type I secretion machinery, revealed that both AHLs and BDSF are required for full expression, suggesting that the two signalling systems operate in parallel. In accordance with this, we show that both AHLs and BDSF are required for biofilm formation and protease production. PMID:23185499

  9. Modulation of Quorum Sensing in Acylhomoserine Lactone-Producing or -Degrading Tobacco Plants Leads to Alteration of Induced Systemic Resistance Elicited by the Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens 90-166

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Choong-Min; Choi, Hye Kyung; Lee, Chi-Ho; Murphy, John F.; Lee, Jung-Kee; Kloepper, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous root-associated bacteria (rhizobacteria) are known to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) in plants. Bacterial cell-density-dependent quorum sensing (QS) is thought to be important for ISR. Here, we investigated the role of QS in the ISR elicited by the rhizobacterium, Serratia marcescens strain 90–166, in tobacco. Since S. marcescens 90–166 produces at least three QS signals, QS-mediated ISR in strain 90–166 has been difficult to understand. Therefore, we investigated the ISR capacity of two transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants that contained either bacterial acylhomoserine lactone-producing (AHL) or -degrading (AiiA) genes in conjunction with S. marcescens 90–166 to induce resistance against bacterial and viral pathogens. Root application of S. marcescens 90–166 increased ISR to the bacterial pathogens, Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, in AHL plants and decreased ISR in AiiA plants. In contrast, ISR to Cucumber mosaic virus was reduced in AHL plants treated with S. marcescens 90–166 but enhanced in AiiA plants. Taken together, these data indicate that QS-dependent ISR is elicited by S. marcescens 90–166 in a pathogen-dependent manner. This study provides insight into QS-dependent ISR in tobacco elicited by S. marcescens 90–166. PMID:25288945

  10. Quorum sensing in plant-pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Von Bodman, Susanne B; Bauer, W Dietz; Coplin, David L

    2003-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) allows bacteria to assess their local population density and/or physical confinement via the secretion and detection of small, diffusible signal molecules. This review describes how phytopathogenic bacteria have incorporated QS mechanisms into complex regulatory cascades that control genes for pathogenicity and colonization of host surfaces. Traits regulated by QS include the production of extracellular polysaccharides, degradative enzymes, antibiotics, siderophores, and pigments, as well as Hrp protein secretion, Ti plasmid transfer, motility, biofilm formation, and epiphytic fitness. Since QS regulatory systems are often required for pathogenesis, interference with QS signaling may offer a means of controlling bacterial diseases of plants. Several bacterial pathogens of plants that have been intensively studied and have revealed information of both fundamental and practical importance are reviewed here: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Pantoea stewartii, Erwinia carotovora, Ralstonia solanacearum, Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Xanthomonas campestris. PMID:12730390

  11. Evolution of resistance to quorum sensing inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Vipin C.; Wood, Thomas K.; Kumar, Prasun

    2013-01-01

    The major cause of mortality and morbidity in human beings is bacterial infection. Bacteria have developed resistance to most of the antibiotics primarily due to large scale and “indiscriminate” usage. The need is to develop novel mechanisms to treat bacterial infections. The expression of pathogenicity during bacterial infections is mediated by a cell density dependent phenomenon known as quorum sensing (QS). A wide array of QS systems (QSS) is operative in expressing the virulent behavior of bacterial pathogens. Each QSS may be mediated largely by a few major signals along with others produced in minuscule quantities. Efforts to target signal molecules and their receptors have proved effective in alleviating the virulent behavior of such pathogenic bacteria. These QS inhibitors (QSIs) have been reported to be effective in influencing the pathogenicity without affecting bacterial growth. However, evidence is accumulating that bacteria may develop resistance to QSIs. The big question is whether QSIs will meet the same fate as antibiotics? PMID:24194099

  12. Genome Sequence of the Sponge-Associated Ruegeria halocynthiae Strain MOLA R1/13b, a Marine Roseobacter with Two Quorum-Sensing-Based Communication Systems

    PubMed Central

    Doberva, Margot; Sanchez-Ferandin, Sophie; Ferandin, Yoan; Intertaglia, Laurent; Croué, Julie; Suzuki, Marcelino; Lebaron, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Ruegeria halocynthiae MOLA R1/13b is an alphaproteobacterium isolated from the Mediterranean sea sponge Crambe crambe. We report here the genome sequence and its annotation, revealing the presence of quorum-sensing genes. This is the first report of the full genome of a Ruegeria halocynthiae strain. PMID:25301648

  13. Genome Sequence of the Sponge-Associated Ruegeria halocynthiae Strain MOLA R1/13b, a Marine Roseobacter with Two Quorum-Sensing-Based Communication Systems.

    PubMed

    Doberva, Margot; Sanchez-Ferandin, Sophie; Ferandin, Yoan; Intertaglia, Laurent; Croué, Julie; Suzuki, Marcelino; Lebaron, Philippe; Lami, Raphaël

    2014-01-01

    Ruegeria halocynthiae MOLA R1/13b is an alphaproteobacterium isolated from the Mediterranean sea sponge Crambe crambe. We report here the genome sequence and its annotation, revealing the presence of quorum-sensing genes. This is the first report of the full genome of a Ruegeria halocynthiae strain. PMID:25301648

  14. The Role of the QseC Sensor Kinase in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Quorum Sensing and Swine Colonization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    At least two quorum sensing molecules, autoinducer-3 (AI-3) and norepinephrine (NE), are present in the gastrointestinal tract and activate the E. coli QseBC quorum sensing system. AI-3 is produced by enteric bacteria, whereas NE is produced by the animal host, often during stress. Both 10% pre-co...

  15. Regulon Studies and In Planta Role of the BraI/R Quorum-Sensing System in the Plant-Beneficial Burkholderia Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Bruna G.; Mitter, Birgit; Talbi, Chouhra; Sessitsch, Angela; Bedmar, Eulogio J.; Halliday, Nigel; James, Euan K.; Cámara, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The genus Burkholderia is composed of functionally diverse species, and it can be divided into several clusters. One of these, designated the plant-beneficial-environmental (PBE) Burkholderia cluster, is formed by nonpathogenic species, which in most cases have been found to be associated with plants. It was previously established that members of the PBE group share an N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing (QS) system, designated BraI/R, that produces and responds to 3-oxo-C14-HSL (OC14-HSL). Moreover, some of them also possess a second AHL QS system, designated XenI2/R2, producing and responding to 3-hydroxy-C8-HSL (OHC8-HSL). In the present study, we performed liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis to determine which AHL molecules are produced by each QS system of this group of bacteria. The results showed that XenI2/R2 is mainly responsible for the production of OHC8-HSL and that the BraI/R system is involved in the production of several different AHLs. This analysis also revealed that Burkholderia phymatum STM815 produces greater amounts of AHLs than the other species tested. Further studies showed that the BraR protein of B. phymatum is more promiscuous than other BraR proteins, responding equally well to several different AHL molecules, even at low concentrations. Transcriptome studies with Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 and B. phymatum STM815 revealed that the BraI/R regulon is species specific, with exopolysaccharide production being the only common phenotype regulated by this system in the PBE cluster. In addition, BraI/R was shown not to be important for plant nodulation by B. phymatum strains or for endophytic colonization and growth promotion of maize by B. phytofirmans PsJN. PMID:23686262

  16. Role of the Agr-like quorum-sensing system in regulating toxin production by Clostridium perfringens type B strains CN1793 and CN1795.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianming; McClane, Bruce A

    2012-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens type B causes enteritis and enterotoxemia in domestic animals. By definition, these bacteria must produce alpha toxin (CPA), beta toxin (CPB) and epsilon toxin (ETX) although most type B strains also produce perfringolysin O (PFO) and beta2 toxin (CPB2). A recently identified Agr-like quorum-sensing (QS) system in C. perfringens controls all toxin production by surveyed type A, C, and D strains, but whether this QS is involved in regulating toxin production by type B strains has not been explored. Therefore, the current study introduced agrB null mutations into type B strains CN1795 and CN1793. Both type B agrB null mutants exhibited reduced levels of CPB, PFO, and CPA in their culture supernatants, and this effect was reversible by complementation. The reduced presence of CPB in culture supernatant involved decreased cpb transcription. In contrast, the agrB null mutants of both type B strains retained wild-type production levels of ETX and CPB2. In a Caco-2 cell model of enteritis, culture supernatants of the type B agrB null mutants were less cytotoxic than supernatants of their wild-type parents. However, in an MDCK cell in vitro model for enterotoxemic effects, supernatants from the agrB null mutants or wild-type parents were equally cytotoxic after trypsin activation. Coupling these and previous results, it is now evident that strain-dependent variations exist in Agr-like QS system regulation of C. perfringens toxin production. The cell culture results further support a role for trypsin in determining which toxins contribute to disease involving type B strains. PMID:22689820

  17. Role of the Agr-Like Quorum-Sensing System in Regulating Toxin Production by Clostridium perfringens Type B Strains CN1793 and CN1795

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianming

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type B causes enteritis and enterotoxemia in domestic animals. By definition, these bacteria must produce alpha toxin (CPA), beta toxin (CPB) and epsilon toxin (ETX) although most type B strains also produce perfringolysin O (PFO) and beta2 toxin (CPB2). A recently identified Agr-like quorum-sensing (QS) system in C. perfringens controls all toxin production by surveyed type A, C, and D strains, but whether this QS is involved in regulating toxin production by type B strains has not been explored. Therefore, the current study introduced agrB null mutations into type B strains CN1795 and CN1793. Both type B agrB null mutants exhibited reduced levels of CPB, PFO, and CPA in their culture supernatants, and this effect was reversible by complementation. The reduced presence of CPB in culture supernatant involved decreased cpb transcription. In contrast, the agrB null mutants of both type B strains retained wild-type production levels of ETX and CPB2. In a Caco-2 cell model of enteritis, culture supernatants of the type B agrB null mutants were less cytotoxic than supernatants of their wild-type parents. However, in an MDCK cell in vitro model for enterotoxemic effects, supernatants from the agrB null mutants or wild-type parents were equally cytotoxic after trypsin activation. Coupling these and previous results, it is now evident that strain-dependent variations exist in Agr-like QS system regulation of C. perfringens toxin production. The cell culture results further support a role for trypsin in determining which toxins contribute to disease involving type B strains. PMID:22689820

  18. Characterisation of two quorum sensing systems in the endophytic Serratia plymuthica strain G3: differential control of motility and biofilm formation according to life-style

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS) systems have been described in many plant-associated Gram-negative bacteria to control certain beneficial phenotypic traits, such as production of biocontrol factors and plant growth promotion. However, the role of AHL-mediated signalling in the endophytic strains of plant-associated Serratia is still poorly understood. An endophytic Serratia sp. G3 with biocontrol potential and high levels of AHL signal production was isolated from the stems of wheat and the role of QS in this isolate was determined. Results Strain G3 classified as Serratia plymuthica based on 16S rRNA was subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Using primers to conserved sequences of luxIR homologues from the Serratia genus, splIR and spsIR from the chromosome of strain G3 were cloned and sequenced. AHL profiles from strain G3 and Escherichia coli DH5α expressing splI or spsI from recombinant plasmids were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This revealed that the most abundant AHL signals produced by SplI in E. coli were N-3-oxo-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL), N-3-oxo-heptanoylhomoserine lactone (3-oxo-C7-HSL), N-3-hydroxy-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (3-hydroxy-C6-HSL), N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6-HSL), and N-heptanoyl homoserine lactone (C7-HSL); whereas SpsI was primarily responsible for the synthesis of N-butyrylhomoserine lactone (C4-HSL) and N-pentanoylhomoserine lactone (C5-HSL). Furthermore, a quorum quenching analysis by heterologous expression of the Bacillus A24 AiiA lactonase in strain G3 enabled the identification of the AHL-regulated biocontrol-related traits. Depletion of AHLs with this lactonase resulted in altered adhesion and biofilm formation using a microtiter plate assay and flow cells coupled with confocal laser scanning microscopy respectively. This was different from the closely related S. plymuthica strains HRO-C48 and RVH1, where biofilm formation for both strains is

  19. Improved quorum sensing capacity by culturing Vibrio harveyi in microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meng; Song, Huiyi; Liu, Xiudong; Yu, Weiting; Ma, Xiaojun

    2016-04-01

    Microcapsule entrapped low density cells with culture (ELDCwc), different from free cell culture, conferred stronger stress resistance and improved cell viability of microorganisms. In this paper, the quorum sensing (QS) system of Vibrio harveyi was used to investigate changes when cells were cultured in microcapsules. Cells in ELDCwc group grew into cell aggregates, which facilitated cell-cell communication and led to increased bioluminescence intensity. Moreover, the luxS-AI-2 system, a well-studied QS signal pathway, was detected as both luxS gene and the AI-2 signaling molecule, and the results were analyzed with respect to QS capacity of unit cell. The V. harveyi of ELDCwc also showed higher relative gene expression and stronger quorum sensing capacity when compared with free cells. In conclusion, the confined microcapsule space can promote the cell aggregates formation, reduce cell-cell communication distance and increase local concentration of signal molecule, which are beneficial to bacterial QS. PMID:26364746

  20. Plant-Derived Natural Products as Sources of Anti-Quorum Sensing Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Yin, Wai-Fong; Tan, Li Ying; Krishnan, Thiba; Chong, Yee Meng; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a system of stimuli and responses in relation to bacterial cell population density that regulates gene expression, including virulence determinants. Consequently, quorum sensing has been an attractive target for the development of novel anti-infective measures that do not rely on the use of antibiotics. Anti-quorum sensing has been a promising strategy to combat bacterial infections as it is unlikely to develop multidrug resistant pathogens since it does not impose any selection pressure. A number of anti-quorum sensing approaches have been documented and plant-based natural products have been extensively studied in this context. Plant matter is one of the major sources of chemicals in use today in various industries, ranging from the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food biotechnology to the textile industries. Just like animals and humans, plants are constantly exposed to bacterial infections, it is therefore logical to expect that plants have developed sophisticated of chemical mechanisms to combat pathogens. In this review, we have surveyed the various types of plant-based natural products that exhibit anti-quorum sensing properties and their anti-quorum sensing mechanisms. PMID:23669710

  1. Quorum sensing in group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Juan Cristobal; Federle, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread phenomenon in the microbial world that has important implications in the coordination of population-wide responses in several bacterial pathogens. In Group A Streptococcus (GAS), many questions surrounding QS systems remain to be solved pertaining to their function and their contribution to the GAS lifestyle in the host. The QS systems of GAS described to date can be categorized into four groups: regulator gene of glucosyltransferase (Rgg), Sil, lantibiotic systems, and LuxS/AI-2. The Rgg family of proteins, a conserved group of transcription factors that modify their activity in response to signaling peptides, has been shown to regulate genes involved in virulence, biofilm formation and competence. The sil locus, whose expression is regulated by the activity of signaling peptides and a putative two-component system (TCS), has been implicated on regulating genes involved with invasive disease in GAS isolates. Lantibiotic regulatory systems are involved in the production of bacteriocins and their autoregulation, and some of these genes have been shown to target both bacterial organisms as well as processes of survival inside the infected host. Finally AI-2 (dihydroxy pentanedione, DPD), synthesized by the LuxS enzyme in several bacteria including GAS, has been proposed to be a universal bacterial communication molecule. In this review we discuss the mechanisms of these four systems, the putative functions of their targets, and pose critical questions for future studies. PMID:25309879

  2. Can resistance against quorum-sensing interference be selected?

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2016-01-01

    Quorum-sensing (QS) interference is a novel therapy to fight bacterial infections that, unlike conventional antibiotic treatments, is focused on reducing the damage caused by pathogens (virulence) rather than focused on inhibiting their growth. Given this ideal, it was predicted that this approach will be impervious to or at least much less prone to resistance in bacterial populations. However, recently, resistance mechanisms against well-characterized quorum quenchers (QQs) have been found in the laboratory as well as in clinical strains, demonstrating that the rise of resistance against these kinds of compounds is possible. Nevertheless, it has been argued that even if resistance mechanisms against QS interference exist, this fact does not guarantee that resistance will spread. In the present work, we discuss recent insights derived from the latest experiments to address this question. In addition, we explain how environmental conditions like the stress produced by the host immune system may influence the selection of resistance and eventually lead to the selection of QS interference-resistant bacteria in a clinical setting. PMID:26023871

  3. Role of quorum sensing in bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Juárez, Israel; Maeda, Toshinari; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; Tomás, María; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; Wood, Thomas K; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell communication that is widely used by bacterial pathogens to coordinate the expression of several collective traits, including the production of multiple virulence factors, biofilm formation, and swarming motility once a population threshold is reached. Several lines of evidence indicate that QS enhances virulence of bacterial pathogens in animal models as well as in human infections; however, its relative importance for bacterial pathogenesis is still incomplete. In this review, we discuss the present evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments in animal models, as well as from clinical studies, that link QS systems with human infections. We focus on two major QS bacterial models, the opportunistic Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus, which are also two of the main agents responsible of nosocomial and wound infections. In addition, QS communication systems in other bacterial, eukaryotic pathogens, and even immune and cancer cells are also reviewed, and finally, the new approaches proposed to combat bacterial infections by the attenuation of their QS communication systems and virulence are also discussed. PMID:26244150

  4. Role of quorum sensing in bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Juárez, Israel; Maeda, Toshinari; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; Tomás, María; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; Wood, Thomas K; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-07-16

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell communication that is widely used by bacterial pathogens to coordinate the expression of several collective traits, including the production of multiple virulence factors, biofilm formation, and swarming motility once a population threshold is reached. Several lines of evidence indicate that QS enhances virulence of bacterial pathogens in animal models as well as in human infections; however, its relative importance for bacterial pathogenesis is still incomplete. In this review, we discuss the present evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments in animal models, as well as from clinical studies, that link QS systems with human infections. We focus on two major QS bacterial models, the opportunistic Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus, which are also two of the main agents responsible of nosocomial and wound infections. In addition, QS communication systems in other bacterial, eukaryotic pathogens, and even immune and cancer cells are also reviewed, and finally, the new approaches proposed to combat bacterial infections by the attenuation of their QS communication systems and virulence are also discussed. PMID:26244150

  5. Quorum Quenching Enzymes and Their Application in Degrading Signal Molecules to Block Quorum Sensing-Dependent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fang; Gao, Yuxin; Chen, Xiaoyi; Yu, Zhimin; Li, Xianzhen

    2013-01-01

    With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria, the available options for treating bacterial infections have become very limited, and the search for a novel general antibacterial therapy has received much greater attention. Quorum quenching can be used to control disease in a quorum sensing system by triggering the pathogenic phenotype. The interference with the quorum sensing system by the quorum quenching enzyme is a potential strategy for replacing traditional antibiotics because the quorum quenching strategy does not aim to kill the pathogen or limit cell growth but to shut down the expression of the pathogenic gene. Quorum quenching enzymes have been identified in quorum sensing and non-quorum sensing microbes, including lactonase, acylase, oxidoreductase and paraoxonase. Lactonase is widely conserved in a range of bacterial species and has variable substrate spectra. The existence of quorum quenching enzymes in the quorum sensing microbes can attenuate their quorum sensing, leading to blocking unnecessary gene expression and pathogenic phenotypes. In this review, we discuss the physiological function of quorum quenching enzymes in bacterial infection and elucidate the enzymatic protection in quorum sensing systems for host diseases and their application in resistance against microbial diseases. PMID:24065091

  6. Quorum Sensing Inhibition and Structure-Activity Relationships of β-Keto Esters.

    PubMed

    Forschner-Dancause, Stephanie; Poulin, Emily; Meschwitz, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Traditional therapeutics to treat bacterial infections have given rise to multi-drug resistant pathogens, which pose a major threat to human and animal health. In several pathogens, quorum sensing (QS)-a cell-cell communication system in bacteria-controls the expression of genes responsible for pathogenesis, thus representing a novel target in the fight against bacterial infections. Based on the structure of the autoinducers responsible for QS activity and other QS inhibitors, we hypothesize that β-keto esters with aryl functionality could possess anti-QS activity. A panel of nineteen β-keto ester analogs was tested for the inhibition of bioluminescence (a QS-controlled phenotype) in the marine pathogen Vibrio harveyi. Initial screening demonstrated the need of a phenyl ring at the C-3 position for antagonistic activity. Further additions to the phenyl ring with 4-substituted halo groups or a 3- or 4-substituted methoxy group resulted in the most active compounds with IC50 values ranging from 23 µM to 53 µM. The compounds additionally inhibit green fluorescent protein production by E. coli JB525. Evidence is presented that aryl β-keto esters may act as antagonists of bacterial quorum sensing by competing with N-acyl homoserine lactones for receptor binding. Expansion of the β-keto ester panel will enable us to obtain more insight into the structure-activity relationships needed to allow for the development of novel anti-virulence agents. PMID:27463706

  7. The ppuI-rsaL-ppuR quorum-sensing system regulates cellular motility, pectate lyase activity, and virulence in potato opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas sp. StFLB209.

    PubMed

    Kato, Taro; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Someya, Nobutaka; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. StFLB209 was isolated from potato leaf as an N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-producing bacterium and showed a close phylogenetic relationship with P. cichorii, a known plant pathogen. Although there are no reports of potato disease caused by pseudomonads in Japan, StFLB209 was pathogenic to potato leaf. In this study, we reveal the complete genome sequence of StFLB209, and show that the strain possesses a ppuI-rsaL-ppuR quorum-sensing system, the sequence of which shares a high similarity with that of Pseudomonas putida. Disruption of ppuI results in a loss of AHL production as well as remarkable reduction in motility. StFLB209 possesses strong pectate lyase activity and causes maceration on potato tuber and leaf, which was slightly reduced in the ppuI mutant. These results suggest that the quorum-sensing system is well conserved between StFLB209 and P. putida and that the system is essential for motility, full pectate lyase activity, and virulence in StFLB209. PMID:25485871

  8. Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Quorum Sensing with Nonpeptidic Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A series of 3-oxo-C12-HSL, tetramic acid, and tetronic acid analogues were synthesized to gain insights into the structural requirements for quorum sensing inhibition in Staphylococcus aureus. Compounds active against agr were noncompetitive inhibitors of the autoinducing peptide (AIP) activated AgrC receptor, by altering the activation efficacy of the cognate AIP-1. They appeared to act as negative allosteric modulators and are exemplified by 3-tetradecanoyltetronic acid 17, which reduced nasal cell colonization and arthritis in a murine infection model. PMID:24592914

  9. AI-2 Quorum Sensing in Campylobacter jejuni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quorum sensing response modulates many physiological attributes, such as bacterial virulence/pathogenesis, competence, and biofilm formation, when the bacterial population has reached a certain threshold. Among the various signaling compounds, autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is produced by most bacterial spec...

  10. A Strategy for Antagonizing Quorum Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    G Chen; L Swem; D Swem; D Stauff; C OLoughlin; P Jeffrey; B Bassler; F Hughson

    2011-12-31

    Quorum-sensing bacteria communicate via small molecules called autoinducers to coordinate collective behaviors. Because quorum sensing controls virulence factor expression in many clinically relevant pathogens, membrane-permeable quorum sensing antagonists that prevent population-wide expression of virulence genes offer a potential route to novel antibacterial therapeutics. Here, we report a strategy for inhibiting quorum-sensing receptors of the widespread LuxR family. Structure-function studies with natural and synthetic ligands demonstrate that the dimeric LuxR-type transcription factor CviR from Chromobacterium violaceum is potently antagonized by molecules that bind in place of the native acylated homoserine lactone autoinducer, provided that they stabilize a closed conformation. In such conformations, each of the two DNA-binding domains interacts with the ligand-binding domain of the opposing monomer. Consequently, the DNA-binding helices are held apart by {approx}60 {angstrom}, twice the {approx}30 {angstrom} separation required for operator binding. This approach may represent a general strategy for the inhibition of multidomain proteins.

  11. Maniwamycins: new quorum-sensing inhibitors against Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 were isolated from Streptomyces sp. TOHO-M025.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Atsushi; Murakami, Chikana; Anzai, Yojiro; Kato, Fumio

    2016-05-01

    Quorum sensing is an important microbial signaling system that controls the expression of many virulence genes. Maniwamycins C-F, new compounds and quorum-sensing inhibitors, were isolated from the culture broth of Streptomyces sp. TOHO-M025 using a silica gel column and preparative HPLC. The structures of maniwamycins were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses, including NMR. The compounds each have an azoxy moiety. All maniwamycins inhibited violacein synthesis, which is controlled by quorum sensing, in Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. PMID:26648117

  12. Quorum Sensing: An Under-Explored Phenomenon in the Phylum Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Polkade, Ashish V.; Mantri, Shailesh S.; Patwekar, Umera J.; Jangid, Kamlesh

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is known to play a major role in the regulation of secondary metabolite production, especially, antibiotics, and morphogenesis in the phylum Actinobacteria. Although it is one of the largest bacterial phylum, only 25 of the 342 genera have been reported to use quorum sensing. Of these, only nine have accompanying experimental evidence; the rest are only known through bioinformatic analysis of gene/genome sequences. It is evident that this important communication mechanism is not extensively explored in Actinobacteria. In this review, we summarize the different quorum sensing systems while identifying the limitations of the existing screening strategies and addressing the improvements that have taken place in this field in recent years. The γ-butyrolactone system turned out to be almost exclusively limited to this phylum. In addition, methylenomycin furans, AI-2 and other putative AHL-like signaling molecules are also reported in Actinobacteria. The lack of existing screening systems in detecting minute quantities and of a wider range of signaling molecules was a major reason behind the limited information available on quorum sensing in this phylum. However, recent improvements in screening strategies hold a promising future and are likely to increase the discovery of new signaling molecules. Further, the quorum quenching ability in many Actinobacteria has a great potential in controlling the spread of plant and animal pathogens. A systematic and coordinated effort is required to screen and exploit the enormous potential that quorum sensing in the phylum Actinobacteria has to offer for human benefit. PMID:26904007

  13. Inhibition of bacterial quorum sensing and biofilm formation by extracts of neotropical rainforest plants.

    PubMed

    Ta, Chieu Anh; Freundorfer, Marie; Mah, Thien-Fah; Otárola-Rojas, Marco; Garcia, Mario; Sanchez-Vindas, Pablo; Poveda, Luis; Maschek, J Alan; Baker, Bill J; Adonizio, Allison L; Downum, Kelsey; Durst, Tony; Arnason, John T

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial biofilms are responsible for many persistent infections by many clinically relevant pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Biofilms are much more resistant to conventional antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. Quorum sensing, an intercellular communication system, controls pathogenesis and biofilm formation in most bacterial species. Quorum sensing provides an important pharmacological target since its inhibition does not provide a selective pressure for resistance. In this study, we investigated the quorum sensing and biofilm inhibitory activities of 126 plant extracts from 71 species collected from neotropical rainforests in Costa Rica. Quorum sensing and biofilm interference were assessed using a modified disc diffusion bioassay with Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12,472 and a spectrophotometric bioassay with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, respectively. Species with significant anti-quorum sensing and/or anti-biofilm activities belonged to the Meliaceae, Melastomataceae, Lepidobotryaceae, Sapindaceae, and Simaroubaceae families. IC50 values ranged from 45 to 266 µg/mL. Extracts of these active species could lead to future development of botanical treatments for biofilm-associated infections. PMID:24488718

  14. The effect of the chemical, biological, and physical environment on quorum sensing in structured microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Horswill, Alexander R.; Stoodley, Paul; Stewart, Philip S.

    2006-01-01

    As researchers attempt to study quorum sensing in relevant clinical or environmental settings, it is apparent that many factors have the potential to affect signaling. These factors span a range of physical, chemical, and biological variables that can impact signal production, stability and distribution. Optimizing experimental systems to natural or clinical environments may be crucial for defining when and where quorum sensing occurs. These points are illustrated in our case study of S. aureus signaling in biofilms, where signal stability may be affected by the host environment. The basic signaling schemes have been worked out at the molecular level for a few of the major quorum-sensing systems. As these studies continue to refine our understanding of these mechanisms, an emerging challenge is to identify if and when the local environment can affect signaling. PMID:17047948

  15. Facultative cheating supports the coexistence of diverse quorum-sensing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Shaul; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Even-Tov, Eran; Lipsman, Valeria; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing enables bacteria to cooperate in a density-dependent manner via the group-wide secretion and detection of specific autoinducer molecules. Many bacterial species show high intraspecific diversity of autoinducer–receptor alleles, called pherotypes. The autoinducer produced by one pherotype activates its coencoded receptor, but not the receptor of another pherotype. It is unclear what selection forces drive the maintenance of pherotype diversity. Here, we use the ComQXPA system of Bacillus subtilis as a model system, to show that pherotype diversity can be maintained by facultative cheating—a minority pherotype exploits the majority, but resumes cooperation when its frequency increases. We find that the maintenance of multiple pherotypes by facultative cheating can persist under kin-selection conditions that select against “obligate cheaters” quorum-sensing response null mutants. Our results therefore support a role for facultative cheating and kin selection in the evolution of quorum-sensing diversity. PMID:26787913

  16. Glycation Reactivity of a Quorum-Sensing Signaling Molecule.

    PubMed

    Tsuchikama, Kyoji; Gooyit, Major; Harris, Tyler L; Zhu, Jie; Globisch, Daniel; Kaufmann, Gunnar F; Janda, Kim D

    2016-03-14

    Reported herein is that (4S)-4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD) can undergo a previously undocumented non-enzymatic glycation reaction. Incubation of DPD with viral DNA or the antibiotic gramicidin S resulted in significant biochemical alterations. A protein-labeling method was consequently developed that facilitated the identification of unrecognized glycation targets of DPD in a prokaryotic system. These results open new avenues toward tracking and understanding the fate and function of the elusive quorum-sensing signaling molecule. PMID:26890076

  17. A nitric oxide-responsive quorum sensing circuit in Vibrio harveyi regulates flagella production and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Henares, Bernadette M; Xu, Yueming; Boon, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    Cell signaling plays an important role in the survival of bacterial colonies. They use small molecules to coordinate gene expression in a cell density dependent manner. This process, known as quorum sensing, helps bacteria regulate diverse functions such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation and virulence. In Vibrio harveyi, a bioluminescent marine bacterium, four parallel quorum-sensing systems have been identified to regulate light production. We have previously reported that nitric oxide (NO), through the H-NOX/HqsK quorum sensing pathway contributes to light production in V. harveyi through the LuxU/LuxO/LuxR quorum sensing pathway. In this study, we show that nitric oxide (NO) also regulates flagellar production and enhances biofilm formation. Our data suggest that V. harveyi is capable of switching between lifestyles to be able to adapt to changes in the environment. PMID:23965964

  18. A Nitric Oxide-Responsive Quorum Sensing Circuit in Vibrio harveyi Regulates Flagella Production and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Henares, Bernadette M.; Xu, Yueming; Boon, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Cell signaling plays an important role in the survival of bacterial colonies. They use small molecules to coordinate gene expression in a cell density dependent manner. This process, known as quorum sensing, helps bacteria regulate diverse functions such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation and virulence. In Vibrio harveyi, a bioluminescent marine bacterium, four parallel quorum-sensing systems have been identified to regulate light production. We have previously reported that nitric oxide (NO), through the H-NOX/HqsK quorum sensing pathway contributes to light production in V. harveyi through the LuxU/LuxO/LuxR quorum sensing pathway. In this study, we show that nitric oxide (NO) also regulates flagellar production and enhances biofilm formation. Our data suggest that V. harveyi is capable of switching between lifestyles to be able to adapt to changes in the environment. PMID:23965964

  19. Quorum Sensing Controls Swarming Motility of Burkholderia glumae through Regulation of Rhamnolipids.

    PubMed

    Nickzad, Arvin; Lépine, François; Déziel, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae is a plant pathogenic bacterium that uses an acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing system to regulate protein secretion, oxalate production and major virulence determinants such as toxoflavin and flagella. B. glumae also releases surface-active rhamnolipids. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia thailandensis, rhamnolipids, along with flagella, are required for the social behavior called swarming motility. In the present study, we demonstrate that quorum sensing positively regulates the production of rhamnolipids in B. glumae and that rhamnolipids are necessary for swarming motility also in this species. We show that a rhlA- mutant, which is unable to produce rhamnolipids, loses its ability to swarm, and that this can be complemented by providing exogenous rhamnolipids. Impaired rhamnolipid production in a quorum sensing-deficient B. glumae mutant is the main factor responsible for its defective swarming motility behaviour. PMID:26047513

  20. Ultrasensitivity and noise amplification in a model of V. harveyi quorum sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze ultrasensitivity in a model of Vibrio harveyi quorum sensing. We consider a feedforward model consisting of two biochemical networks per cell. The first represents the interchange of a signaling molecule (autoinducer) between the cell cytoplasm and an extracellular domain and the binding of intracellular autoinducer to cognate receptors. The unbound and bound receptors within each cell act as kinases and phosphotases, respectively, which then drive a second biochemical network consisting of a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle. We ignore subsequent signaling pathways associated with gene regulation and the possible modification in the production rate of an autoinducer (positive feedback). We show how the resulting quorum sensing system exhibits ultrasensitivity with respect to changes in cell density. We also demonstrate how quorum sensing can protect against the noise amplification of fast environmental fluctuations in comparison to a single isolated cell.

  1. Quorum Sensing in the Context of Food Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Skandamis, Panagiotis N.

    2012-01-01

    Food spoilage may be defined as a process that renders a product undesirable or unacceptable for consumption and is the outcome of the biochemical activity of a microbial community that eventually dominates according to the prevailing ecological determinants. Although limited information are reported, this activity has been attributed to quorum sensing (QS). Consequently, the potential role of cell-to-cell communication in food spoilage and food safety should be more extensively elucidated. Such information would be helpful in designing approaches for manipulating these communication systems, thereby reducing or preventing, for instance, spoilage reactions or even controlling the expression of virulence factors. Due to the many reports in the literature on the fundamental features of QS, e.g., chemistry and definitions of QS compounds, in this minireview, we only allude to the types and chemistry of QS signaling molecules per se and to the (bioassay-based) methods of their detection and quantification, avoiding extensive documentation. Conversely, we attempt to provide insights into (i) the role of QS in food spoilage, (ii) the factors that may quench the activity of QS in foods and review the potential QS inhibitors that might “mislead” the bacterial coordination of spoilage activities and thus may be used as biopreservatives, and (iii) the future experimental approaches that need to be undertaken in order to explore the “gray” or “black” areas of QS, increase our understanding of how QS affects microbial behavior in foods, and assist in finding answers as to how we can exploit QS for the benefit of food preservation and food safety. PMID:22706047

  2. Exploiting Quorum Sensing To Confuse Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    LaSarre, Breah

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell-cell communication, or quorum sensing, is a widespread phenomenon in bacteria that is used to coordinate gene expression among local populations. Its use by bacterial pathogens to regulate genes that promote invasion, defense, and spread has been particularly well documented. With the ongoing emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens, there is a current need for development of alternative therapeutic strategies. An antivirulence approach by which quorum sensing is impeded has caught on as a viable means to manipulate bacterial processes, especially pathogenic traits that are harmful to human and animal health and agricultural productivity. The identification and development of chemical compounds and enzymes that facilitate quorum-sensing inhibition (QSI) by targeting signaling molecules, signal biogenesis, or signal detection are reviewed here. Overall, the evidence suggests that QSI therapy may be efficacious against some, but not necessarily all, bacterial pathogens, and several failures and ongoing concerns that may steer future studies in productive directions are discussed. Nevertheless, various QSI successes have rightfully perpetuated excitement surrounding new potential therapies, and this review highlights promising QSI leads in disrupting pathogenesis in both plants and animals. PMID:23471618

  3. Assessment of Anti-Quorum Sensing Activity for Some Ornamental and Medicinal Plants Native to Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Ahmed A.; Shaaban, Mona I.; Hashish, Nadia E.; Amer, Mohamed A.; Lahloub, Mohamed-Farid

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of some plant extracts on the bacterial communication system, expressed as quorum sensing (QS) activity. Quorum sensing has a directly proportional effect on the amount of certain compounds, such as pigments, produced by the bacteria. Alcohol extracts of 23 ornamental and medicinal plants were tested for anti-QS activity by the Chromobacterium violaceum assay using the agar cup diffusion method. The screening revealed the anti-QS activity of six plants; namely the leaves of Adhatoda vasica Nees, Bauhinia purpurea L., Lantana camara L., Myoporum laetum G. Forst.; the fruits of Piper longum L.; and the aerial parts of Taraxacum officinale F.H. Wigg. PMID:23641343

  4. A model for signal transduction during quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Suman K.; Fenley, Andrew T.; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2009-12-01

    We present a framework for analyzing luminescence regulation during quorum sensing in the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Using a simplified model for signal transduction in the quorum sensing pathway, we identify key dimensionless parameters that control the system's response. These parameters are estimated using experimental data on luminescence phenotypes for different mutant strains. The corresponding model predictions are consistent with results from other experiments which did not serve as input for determining model parameters. Furthermore, the proposed framework leads to novel testable predictions for luminescence phenotypes and for responses of the network to different perturbations.

  5. Quorum sensing inhibitory potential and molecular docking studies of sesquiterpene lactones from Vernonia blumeoides.

    PubMed

    Aliyu, Abubakar Babando; Koorbanally, Neil Anthony; Moodley, Brenda; Singh, Parvesh; Chenia, Hafizah Yousuf

    2016-06-01

    The increasing incidence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial pathogens has focused research on the suppression of bacterial virulence via quorum sensing inhibition strategies, rather than the conventional antimicrobial approach. The anti-virulence potential of eudesmanolide sesquiterpene lactones previously isolated from Vernonia blumeoides was assessed by inhibition of quorum sensing and in silico molecular docking. Inhibition of quorum sensing-controlled violacein production in Chromobacterium violaceum was quantified using violacein inhibition assays. Qualitative modulation of quorum sensing activity and signal synthesis was investigated using agar diffusion double ring assays and C. violaceum and Agrobacterium tumefaciens biosensor systems. Inhibition of violacein production was concentration-dependent, with ⩾90% inhibition being obtained with ⩾2.4mgml(-1) of crude extracts. Violacein inhibition was significant for the ethyl acetate extract with decreasing inhibition being observed with dichloromethane, hexane and methanol extracts. Violacein inhibition ⩾80% was obtained with 0.071mgml(-1) of blumeoidolide B in comparison with ⩾3.6mgml(-1) of blumeoidolide A. Agar diffusion double ring assays indicated that only the activity of the LuxI synthase homologue, CviI, was modulated by blumeoidolides A and B, and V. blumeoides crude extracts, suggesting that quorum sensing signal synthesis was down-regulated or competitively inhibited. Finally, molecular docking was conducted to explore the binding conformations of sesquiterpene lactones into the binding sites of quorum sensing regulator proteins, CviR and CviR'. The computed binding energy data suggested that the blumeoidolides have a tendency to inhibit both CviR and CviR' with varying binding affinities. Vernonia eudesmanolide sesquiterpene lactones have the potential to be novel therapeutic agents, which might be important in reducing virulence and pathogenicity of drug-resistant bacteria in

  6. RETRACTED ARTICLE: Quorum-sensing of bacteria and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guoliang; Su, Mingxia

    2009-12-01

    Quorum sensing, or auto induction, as a cell density dependent signaling mechanism in many microorganisms, is triggered via auto inducers which passively diffuse across the bacterial envelope and therefore intracellulaly accumulate only at higher bacterial densities to regulate specialized processes such as genetic competence, bioluminescence, virulence and sporulation. N-acyl homoserine lactones are the most common type of signal molecules. Aquaculture is one of the fastest-growing food-producing industries, but disease outbreaks caused by pathogenic bacteria are a significant constraint on the development of the sector worldwide. Many of these pathogens have been found to be controlled by their quorum sensing systems. As there is relevance between the pathogenic bacteria's virulence factor expression and their auto inducers, quorum quenching is a new effective anti-infective strategy to control infections caused by bacterial pathogens in aquaculture. The techniques used to do this mainly include the following: (1) the inhibition of signal molecule biosynthesis, (2) blocking signal transduction, and (3) chemical inactivation and biodegradation of signal molecules. To provide a basis for finding alternative means of controlling aquatic diseases by quorum quenching instead of treatment by antibiotics and disinfectants, we will discuss the examination, purification and identification of auto inducers in this paper.

  7. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices. PMID:20580207

  8. Impact of Environmental Cues on Staphylococcal Quorum Sensing and Biofilm Development.

    PubMed

    Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S; Horswill, Alexander R

    2016-06-10

    Staphylococci are commensal bacteria that colonize the epithelial surfaces of humans and many other mammals. These bacteria can also attach to implanted medical devices and develop surface-associated biofilm communities that resist clearance by host defenses and available chemotherapies. These communities are often associated with persistent staphylococcal infections that place a tremendous burden on the healthcare system. Understanding the regulatory program that controls staphylococcal biofilm development, as well as the environmental conditions that modulate this program, has been a focal point of research in recent years. A central regulator controlling biofilm development is a peptide quorum-sensing system, also called the accessory gene regulator or agr system. In the opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, the agr system controls production of exo-toxins and exo-enzymes essential for causing infections, and simultaneously, it modulates the ability of this pathogen to attach to surfaces and develop a biofilm, or to disperse from the biofilm state. In this review, we explore advances on the interconnections between the agr quorum-sensing system and biofilm mechanisms, and topics covered include recent findings on how different environmental conditions influence quorum sensing, the impact on biofilm development, and ongoing questions and challenges in the field. As our understanding of the quorum sensing and biofilm interconnection advances, there are growing opportunities to take advantage of this knowledge and develop therapeutic approaches to control staphylococcal infections. PMID:27129223

  9. MicroBQs: a centralized database for use in studying bacterial biofilms and quorum sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofilm formation in many bacterial species may be negatively or positively regulated by cell-to-cell signaling systems referred to as quorum sensing (QS). To assist in understanding research related to biofilms, QS, and the role of QS in biofilm formation, a comprehensive, centralized database, kn...

  10. Effects of natural and chemically synthesized furanones on quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Daniel; Grossmann, Gilles; Séquin, Urs; Brandl, Helmut; Bachofen, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    Background Cell to cell signaling systems in Gram-negative bacteria rely on small diffusible molecules such as the N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHL). These compounds are involved in the production of antibiotics, exoenzymes, virulence factors and biofilm formation. They belong to the class of furanone derivatives which are frequently found in nature as pheromones, flavor compounds or secondary metabolites. To obtain more information on the relation between molecular structure and quorum sensing, we tested a variety of natural and chemically synthesized furanones for their ability to interfere with the quorum sensing mechanism using a quantitative bioassay with Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 for antagonistic and agonistic action. We were looking at the following questions: 1. Do these compounds affect growth? 2) Do these compounds activate the quorum sensing system of C. violaceum CV026? 3) Do these compounds inhibit violacein formation induced by the addition of the natural inducer N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (HHL)? 4) Do these compounds enhance violacein formation in presence of HHL? Results The naturally produced N-acylhomoserine lactones showed a strong non-linear concentration dependent influence on violacein production in C. violaceum with a maximum at 3.7*10-8 M with HHL. Apart from the N-acylhomoserine lactones only one furanone (emoxyfurane) was found to simulate N-acylhomoserine lactone activity and induce violacein formation. The most effective substances acting negatively both on growth and quorum sensing were analogs and intermediates in synthesis of the butenolides from Streptomyces antibioticus. Conclusion As the regulation of many bacterial processes is governed by quorum sensing systems, the finding of natural and synthetic furanones acting as agonists or antagonists suggests an interesting tool to control and handle detrimental AHL induced effects. Some effects are due to general toxicity; others are explained by a competitive interaction for Lux

  11. SigMol: repertoire of quorum sensing signaling molecules in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Akanksha; Kaur, Karambir; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a widespread phenomenon in prokaryotes that helps them to communicate among themselves and with eukaryotes. It is driven through quorum sensing signaling molecules (QSSMs) in a density dependent manner that assists in numerous biological functions like biofilm formation, virulence factors secretion, swarming motility, bioluminescence, etc. Despite immense implications, dedicated resources of QSSMs are lacking. Therefore, we have developed SigMol (http://bioinfo.imtech.res.in/manojk/sigmol), a specialized repository of these molecules in prokaryotes. SigMol harbors information on QSSMs pertaining to different quorum sensing signaling systems namely acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), diketopiperazines (DKPs), 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs), diffusible signal factors (DSFs), autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and others. Database contains 1382 entries of 182 unique signaling molecules from 215 organisms. It encompasses biological as well as chemical aspects of signaling molecules. Biological information includes genes, preliminary bioassays, identification assays and applications, while chemical detail comprises of IUPAC name, SMILES and structure. We have provided user-friendly browsing and searching facilities for easy data retrieval and comparison. We have gleaned information of diverse QSSMs reported in literature at a single platform ‘SigMol’. This comprehensive resource will assist the scientific community in understanding intraspecies, interspecies or interkingdom networking and further help to unfold different facets of quorum sensing and related therapeutics. PMID:26490957

  12. SigMol: repertoire of quorum sensing signaling molecules in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Akanksha; Kaur, Karambir; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a widespread phenomenon in prokaryotes that helps them to communicate among themselves and with eukaryotes. It is driven through quorum sensing signaling molecules (QSSMs) in a density dependent manner that assists in numerous biological functions like biofilm formation, virulence factors secretion, swarming motility, bioluminescence, etc. Despite immense implications, dedicated resources of QSSMs are lacking. Therefore, we have developed SigMol (http://bioinfo.imtech.res.in/manojk/sigmol), a specialized repository of these molecules in prokaryotes. SigMol harbors information on QSSMs pertaining to different quorum sensing signaling systems namely acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), diketopiperazines (DKPs), 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs), diffusible signal factors (DSFs), autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and others. Database contains 1382: entries of 182: unique signaling molecules from 215: organisms. It encompasses biological as well as chemical aspects of signaling molecules. Biological information includes genes, preliminary bioassays, identification assays and applications, while chemical detail comprises of IUPAC name, SMILES and structure. We have provided user-friendly browsing and searching facilities for easy data retrieval and comparison. We have gleaned information of diverse QSSMs reported in literature at a single platform 'SigMol'. This comprehensive resource will assist the scientific community in understanding intraspecies, interspecies or interkingdom networking and further help to unfold different facets of quorum sensing and related therapeutics. PMID:26490957

  13. A negative regulator mediates quorum-sensing control of exopolysaccharide production in Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii.

    PubMed

    von Bodman, S B; Majerczak, D R; Coplin, D L

    1998-06-23

    Classical quorum-sensing (autoinduction) regulation, as exemplified by the lux system of Vibrio fischeri, requires N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals to stimulate cognate transcriptional activators for the cell density-dependent expression of specific target gene systems. For Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, a bacterial pathogen of sweet corn and maize, the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) stewartan is a major virulence factor, and its production is controlled by quorum sensing in a population density-dependent manner. Two genes, esaI and esaR, encode essential regulatory proteins for quorum sensing. EsaI is the AHL signal synthase, and EsaR is the cognate gene regulator. esaI, DeltaesaR, and DeltaesaI-esaR mutations were constructed to establish the regulatory role of EsaR. We report here that strains containing an esaR mutation produce high levels of EPS independently of cell density and in the absence of the AHL signal. Our data indicate that quorum-sensing regulation in P. s. subsp. stewartii, in contrast to most other described systems, uses EsaR to repress EPS synthesis at low cell density, and that derepression requires micromolar amounts of AHL. In addition, derepressed esaR strains, which synthesize EPS constitutively at low cell densities, were significantly less virulent than the wild-type parent. This finding suggests that quorum sensing in P. s. subsp. stewartii may be a mechanism to delay the expression of EPS during the early stages of infection so that it does not interfere with other mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:9636211

  14. Individual-based model for quorum sensing with background flow.

    PubMed

    Uecker, Hannes; Uecke, Hannes; Müller, Johannes; Hense, Burkhard A

    2014-07-01

    Quorum sensing is a wide-spread mode of cell-cell communication among bacteria in which cells release a signalling substance at a low rate. The concentration of this substance allows the bacteria to gain information about population size or spatial confinement. We consider a model for N cells which communicate with each other via a signalling substance in a diffusive medium with a background flow. The model consists of an initial boundary value problem for a parabolic PDE describing the exterior concentration u of the signalling substance, coupled with N ODEs for the masses ai of the substance within each cell. The cells are balls of radius R in R3, and under some scaling assumptions we formally derive an effective system of N ODEs describing the behaviour of the cells. The reduced system is then used to study the effect of flow on communication in general, and in particular for a number of geometric configurations. PMID:24849771

  15. The use of quorum sensing to improve vaccine immune response.

    PubMed

    Sturbelle, R T; Conceição, R C S; Da Rosa, M C; Roos, T B; Dummer, L; Leite, F P L

    2013-12-17

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is an important cause of diarrhea in both newborn and post-weaning pigs, it is also responsible for economic losses on farms worldwide. Vaccines that use ETEC virulence factors have been well documented, and several vaccines containing inactivated bacteria with protective antigens, or purified (isolated) antigens are available on the market. Vaccination of pregnant sows is widely seen as an effective strategy for the control of the disease. Yet these vaccines very often do not lead to efficient protection. In this study, we produced an ETEC bacterin with the use of quorum sensing (QS), and observed a significant expression of F4 adhesin, and heat-labile toxin (LT) in the cultures when compared to the controls. Mice, and pigs vaccinated with the QS bacterin demonstrated higher antibody titers against these antigens when compared with commercial and control bacterin. Our results suggest that the system might bring promising improvements in ETEC bacterin efficacy. PMID:24188753

  16. How Quorum Sensing Connects Sporulation to Necrotrophism in Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Poncet, Sandrine; Lazar, Noureddine; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès; Gohar, Michel; Lereclus, Didier; Nessler, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria use quorum sensing to coordinate adaptation properties, cell fate or commitment to sporulation. The infectious cycle of Bacillus thuringiensis in the insect host is a powerful model to investigate the role of quorum sensing in natural conditions. It is tuned by communication systems regulators belonging to the RNPP family and directly regulated by re-internalized signaling peptides. One such RNPP regulator, NprR, acts in the presence of its cognate signaling peptide NprX as a transcription factor, regulating a set of genes involved in the survival of these bacteria in the insect cadaver. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of NprX and independently of its transcriptional activator function, NprR negatively controls sporulation. NprR inhibits expression of Spo0A-regulated genes by preventing the KinA-dependent phosphorylation of the phosphotransferase Spo0F, thus delaying initiation of the sporulation process. This NprR function displays striking similarities with the Rap proteins, which also belong to the RNPP family, but are devoid of DNA-binding domain and indirectly control gene expression via protein-protein interactions in Bacilli. Conservation of the Rap residues directly interacting with Spo0F further suggests a common inhibition of the sporulation phosphorelay. The crystal structure of apo NprR confirms that NprR displays a highly flexible Rap-like structure. We propose a molecular regulatory mechanism in which key residues of the bifunctional regulator NprR are directly and alternatively involved in its two functions. NprX binding switches NprR from a dimeric inhibitor of sporulation to a tetrameric transcriptional activator involved in the necrotrophic lifestyle of B. thuringiensis. NprR thus tightly coordinates sporulation and necrotrophism, ensuring survival and dissemination of the bacteria during host infection. PMID:27483473

  17. How Quorum Sensing Connects Sporulation to Necrotrophism in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Perchat, Stéphane; Talagas, Antoine; Poncet, Sandrine; Lazar, Noureddine; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès; Gohar, Michel; Lereclus, Didier; Nessler, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Bacteria use quorum sensing to coordinate adaptation properties, cell fate or commitment to sporulation. The infectious cycle of Bacillus thuringiensis in the insect host is a powerful model to investigate the role of quorum sensing in natural conditions. It is tuned by communication systems regulators belonging to the RNPP family and directly regulated by re-internalized signaling peptides. One such RNPP regulator, NprR, acts in the presence of its cognate signaling peptide NprX as a transcription factor, regulating a set of genes involved in the survival of these bacteria in the insect cadaver. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of NprX and independently of its transcriptional activator function, NprR negatively controls sporulation. NprR inhibits expression of Spo0A-regulated genes by preventing the KinA-dependent phosphorylation of the phosphotransferase Spo0F, thus delaying initiation of the sporulation process. This NprR function displays striking similarities with the Rap proteins, which also belong to the RNPP family, but are devoid of DNA-binding domain and indirectly control gene expression via protein-protein interactions in Bacilli. Conservation of the Rap residues directly interacting with Spo0F further suggests a common inhibition of the sporulation phosphorelay. The crystal structure of apo NprR confirms that NprR displays a highly flexible Rap-like structure. We propose a molecular regulatory mechanism in which key residues of the bifunctional regulator NprR are directly and alternatively involved in its two functions. NprX binding switches NprR from a dimeric inhibitor of sporulation to a tetrameric transcriptional activator involved in the necrotrophic lifestyle of B. thuringiensis. NprR thus tightly coordinates sporulation and necrotrophism, ensuring survival and dissemination of the bacteria during host infection. PMID:27483473

  18. Information processing and signal integration in bacterial quorum sensing

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Pankaj; Goyal, Sidhartha; Long, Tao; Bassler, Bonnie L; Wingreen, Ned S

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria communicate using secreted chemical signaling molecules called autoinducers in a process known as quorum sensing. The quorum-sensing network of the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi uses three autoinducers, each known to encode distinct ecological information. Yet how cells integrate and interpret the information contained within these three autoinducer signals remains a mystery. Here, we develop a new framework for analyzing signal integration on the basis of information theory and use it to analyze quorum sensing in V. harveyi. We quantify how much the cells can learn about individual autoinducers and explain the experimentally observed input–output relation of the V. harveyi quorum-sensing circuit. Our results suggest that the need to limit interference between input signals places strong constraints on the architecture of bacterial signal-integration networks, and that bacteria probably have evolved active strategies for minimizing this interference. Here, we analyze two such strategies: manipulation of autoinducer production and feedback on receptor number ratios. PMID:19920810

  19. The Vibrio campbellii quorum sensing signals have a different impact on virulence of the bacterium towards different crustacean hosts.

    PubMed

    Pande, Gde Sasmita Julyantoro; Natrah, Fatin Mohd Ikhsan; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2013-12-27

    Pathogenic bacteria communicate with small signal molecules in a process called quorum sensing, and they often use different signal molecules to regulate virulence gene expression. Vibrio campbellii, one of the major pathogens of aquatic organisms, regulates virulence gene expression by a three channel quorum sensing system. Here we show that although they use a common signal transduction cascade, the signal molecules have a different impact on the virulence of the bacterium towards different hosts, i.e. the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana and the commercially important giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. These results suggest that the use of multiple types of signal molecules to regulate virulence gene expression is one of the features that allow bacteria to infect different hosts. Our findings emphasize that it is highly important to study the efficacy of quorum sensing inhibitors as novel biocontrol agents under conditions that are as close as possible to the clinical situation. PMID:24055027

  20. Zingerone silences quorum sensing and attenuates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Kumar, Rajnish; Kumar, Manoj; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an imperative role in virulence factor, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Blocking quorum sensing pathways are viewed as viable anti-virulent therapy in association with traditional antimicrobial therapy. Anti-quorum sensing dietary phytochemicals with may prove to be a safe and viable choice as anti-virulent drug candidates. Previously, our lab proved zingerone as potent anti-biofilm agent hence; further its anti-virulent and anti-quorum activities were evaluated. Zingerone, besides decreasing swimming, swarming and twitching phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1, reduced biofilm forming capacity and production of virulence factors including rhamnolipid, elastase, protease, pyocyanin, cell free and cell bound hemolysin (p<0.001) indicating anti-virulent property attributing towards attenuation of virulence of P. aeruginosa. Further zingerone not only had marked effect on the production of quorum sensing signal molecules by clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa but also showed significant interference with the activation of QS reporter strains. To study the mechanism of blocking quorum sensing cascade, in silico analysis was carried out. Anti-QS activity was attributed to interference with the ligand receptor interaction of zingerone with QS receptors (TraR, LasR, RhlR and PqsR). Zingerone showed a good comparative docking score to respective autoinducer molecules which was even higher than that of vanillin, a proven anti-quorum sensing phytochemical. The results of the present study revealed the anti-quorum sensing activity of zingerone targeting ligand-receptor interaction, hence proposing zingerone as a suitable anti-virulent drug candidate against P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:25704369

  1. Lack of AHL-based quorum sensing in Pseudomonas fluorescens isolated from milk.

    PubMed

    Martins, Maurilio L; Pinto, Uelinton M; Riedel, Kathrin; Vanetti, Maria C D; Mantovani, Hilário C; de Araújo, Elza F

    2014-01-01

    Numerous bacteria coordinate gene expression in response to small signalling molecules in many cases known as acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), which accumulate as a function of cell density in a process known as quorum sensing. This work aimed to determine if phenotypes that are important to define microbial activity in foods such as biofilm formation, swarming motility and proteolytic activity of two Pseudomonas fluorescens strains, isolated from refrigerated raw milk, are influenced by AHL molecules. The tested P. fluorescens strains did not produce AHL molecules in none of the evaluated media. We found that biofilm formation was dependent on the culture media, but it was not influenced by AHLs. Our results indicate that biofilm formation, swarming motility and proteolytic activity of the tested P. fluorescens strains are not regulated by acyl-homoserine lactones. It is likely that AHL-dependent quorum sensing system is absent from these strains. PMID:25477941

  2. Repellent and Anti-quorum Sensing Activity of Six Aromatic Plants Occurring in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Ceballos, Leonor; Caballero-Gallardo, Karina; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2015-10-01

    Essential oils (EOs) are widely used as biopesticides and to control bacterial infections. This study describes the ability of six EOs isolated from plants cultivated in Colombia to perform as repellents against Ulomoides dermestoides and as quorum sensing (QS) inhibitors. EOs from Aloysia triphylla, Cymbopogon nardus, Lippia origanoides, Hyptis suaveolens, Swinglea glutinosa and Eucalyptus globulus were repellents classified as Class IV, IV, IV, III, II, and II, respectively, whereas the commercial repellent IR3535 only reached Class II after 2 h exposure. All EOs presented small, but significant inhibitory properties against the QS system in Escherichia coli (pJBA132) at 25 μg/mL after 4 h exposure. These data suggest evaluated EOs from Colombia are sustainable, promising new sources of natural repellents and could be important as anti-quorum sensing molecules. PMID:26669119

  3. Lack of AHL-based quorum sensing in Pseudomonas fluorescens isolated from milk

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Maurilio L.; Pinto, Uelinton M.; Riedel, Kathrin; Vanetti, Maria C.D.; Mantovani, Hilário C.; de Araújo, Elza F.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous bacteria coordinate gene expression in response to small signalling molecules in many cases known as acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), which accumulate as a function of cell density in a process known as quorum sensing. This work aimed to determine if phenotypes that are important to define microbial activity in foods such as biofilm formation, swarming motility and proteolytic activity of two Pseudomonas fluorescens strains, isolated from refrigerated raw milk, are influenced by AHL molecules. The tested P. fluorescens strains did not produce AHL molecules in none of the evaluated media. We found that biofilm formation was dependent on the culture media, but it was not influenced by AHLs. Our results indicate that biofilm formation, swarming motility and proteolytic activity of the tested P. fluorescens strains are not regulated by acyl-homoserine lactones. It is likely that AHL-dependent quorum sensing system is absent from these strains. PMID:25477941

  4. Hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry for quantitative measurement of quorum sensing inhibition.

    PubMed

    Todd, Daniel A; Zich, David B; Ettefagh, Keivan A; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S; Horswill, Alexander R; Cech, Nadja B

    2016-08-01

    Drug resistant bacterial infections cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, and new strategies are needed for the treatment of these infections. The anti-virulence approach, which targets non-essential virulence factors in bacteria, has been proposed as one way to combat the problem of antibiotic resistance. Virulence in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and many other Gram-positive bacterial pathogens is controlled by the quorum sensing system. Thus, there is excellent therapeutic potential for compounds that target this system. With this project, we have developed and validated a novel approach for measuring quorum sensing inhibition in vitro. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) was employed to directly measure one of the important outputs of the quorum sensing system in MRSA, auto-inducing peptide I (AIP I) in bacterial cultures. The method for AIP detection was validated and demonstrated limits of detection and quantification of range of 0.0035μM and 0.10μM, respectively. It was shown that the known quorum sensing inhibitor ambuic acid inhibited AIP I production by a clinically relevant strain of MRSA, with an IC50 value of 2.6±0.2μM. The new method performed similarly to previously published methods using GFP reporter assays, but has the advantage of being applicable without the need for engineering of a reporter strain. Additionally, the mass spectrometry-based method could be applicable in situations where interference by the inhibitor prevents the application of fluorescence-based methods. PMID:27237773

  5. N-Acylhomoserine lactones involved in quorum sensing control the type VI secretion system, biofilm formation, protease production, and in vivo virulence in a clinical isolate of Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Khajanchi, Bijay K.; Sha, Jian; Kozlova, Elena V.; Erova, Tatiana E.; Suarez, Giovanni; Sierra, Johanna C.; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Horneman, Amy J.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we delineated the role of N-acylhomoserine lactone(s) (AHLs)-mediated quorum sensing (QS) in the virulence of diarrhoeal isolate SSU of Aeromonas hydrophila by generating a double knockout ΔahyRI mutant. Protease production was substantially reduced in the ΔahyRI mutant when compared with that in the wild-type (WT) strain. Importantly, based on Western blot analysis, the ΔahyRI mutant was unable to secrete type VI secretion system (T6SS)-associated effectors, namely haemolysin coregulated protein and the valine-glycine repeat family of proteins, while significant levels of these effectors were detected in the culture supernatant of the WT A. hydrophila. In contrast, the production and translocation of the type III secretion system (T3SS) effector AexU in human colonic epithelial cells were not affected when the ahyRI genes were deleted. Solid surface-associated biofilm formation was significantly reduced in the ΔahyRI mutant when compared with that in the WT strain, as determined by a crystal violet staining assay. Scanning electron microscopic observations revealed that the ΔahyRI mutant was also defective in the formation of structured biofilm, as it was less filamentous and produced a distinct exopolysaccharide on its surface when compared with the structured biofilm produced by the WT strain. These effects of AhyRI could be complemented either by expressing the ahyRI genes in trans or by the exogeneous addition of AHLs to the ΔahyRI/ahyR+ complemented strain. In a mouse lethality experiment, 50 % attenuation was observed when we deleted the ahyRI genes from the parental strain of A. hydrophila. Together, our data suggest that AHL-mediated QS modulates the virulence of A. hydrophila SSU by regulating the T6SS, metalloprotease production and biofilm formation. PMID:19729404

  6. Identification of quorum sensing-controlled genes in Burkholderia ambifaria

    PubMed Central

    Chapalain, Annelise; Vial, Ludovic; Laprade, Natacha; Dekimpe, Valérie; Perreault, Jonathan; Déziel, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) comprises strains with a virulence potential toward immunocompromised patients as well as plant growth–promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Owing to the link between quorum sensing (QS) and virulence, most studies among Bcc species have been directed toward QS of pathogenic bacteria. We have investigated the QS of B. ambifaria, a PGPR only infrequently recovered from patients. The cepI gene, responsible for the synthesis of the main signaling molecule N-octanoylhomoserine lactone (C8-HSL), was inactivated. Phenotypes of the B. ambifaria cepI mutant we observed, such as increased production of siderophores and decreased proteolytic and antifungal activities, are in agreement with those of other Bcc cepI mutants. The cepI mutant was then used as background strain for a whole-genome transposon-insertion mutagenesis strategy, allowing the identification of 20 QS-controlled genes, corresponding to 17 loci. The main functions identified are linked to antifungal and antimicrobial properties, as we have identified QS-controlled genes implicated in the production of pyrrolnitrin, burkholdines (occidiofungin-like molecules), and enacyloxins. This study provides insights in the QS-regulated functions of a PGPR, which could lead to beneficial potential biotechnological applications. PMID:23382083

  7. A Burkholderia cenocepacia orphan LuxR homolog is involved in quorum-sensing regulation.

    PubMed

    Malott, Rebecca J; O'Grady, Eoin P; Toller, Jessica; Inhülsen, Silja; Eberl, Leo; Sokol, Pamela A

    2009-04-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia utilizes quorum sensing to control gene expression, including the expression of genes involved in virulence. In addition to CepR and CciR, a third LuxR homolog, CepR2, was found to regulate gene expression and virulence factor production. All B. cenocepacia strains examined contained this orphan LuxR homolog, which was not associated with an adjacent N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthase gene. Expression of cepR2 was negatively autoregulated and was negatively regulated by CciR in strain K56-2. Microarray analysis and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR determined that CepR2 did not influence expression of cepIR or cciIR. However, in strain K56-2, CepR2 negatively regulated expression of several known quorum-sensing-controlled genes, including genes encoding zinc metalloproteases. CepR2 exerted positive and negative regulation on genes on three chromosomes, including strong negative regulation of a gene cluster located adjacent to cepR2. In strain H111, which lacks the CciIR quorum-sensing system, CepR2 positively regulated pyochelin production by controlling transcription of one of the operons required for the biosynthesis of the siderophore in an N-acyl-homoserine lactone-independent manner. CepR2 activation of a luxI promoter was demonstrated in a heterologous Escherichia coli host, providing further evidence that CepR2 can function in the absence of signaling molecules. This study demonstrates that the orphan LuxR homolog CepR2 contributes to the quorum-sensing regulatory network in two distinct strains of B. cenocepacia. PMID:19201791

  8. Inactivation of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signal by human airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Carlene K.; Ozer, Egon A.; Welsh, Michael J.; Zabner, Joseph; Greenberg, E. P.

    2004-01-01

    Mammalian airways protect themselves from bacterial infection by using multiple defense mechanisms including antimicrobial peptides, mucociliary clearance, and phagocytic cells. We asked whether airways might also target a key bacterial cell-cell communication system, quorum-sensing. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses two quorum-sensing molecules, N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) and N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), to control production of extracellular virulence factors and biofilm formation. We found that differentiated human airway epithelia inactivated 3OC12-HSL. Inactivation was selective for acyl-HSLs with certain acyl side chains, and C4-HSL was not inactivated. In addition, the capacity for inactivation varied widely in different cell types. 3OC12-HSL was inactivated by a cell-associated activity rather than a secreted factor. These data suggest that the ability of human airway epithelia to inactivate quorum-sensing signal molecules could play a role in the innate defense against bacterial infection. PMID:14970327

  9. Rule–based regulatory and metabolic model for Quorum sensing in P. aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the pathogen P. aeruginosa, the formation of virulence factors is regulated via Quorum sensing signaling pathways. Due to the increasing number of strains that are resistant to antibiotics, there is a high interest to develop novel antiinfectives. In the combat of resistant bacteria, selective blockade of the bacterial cell–to–cell communication (Quorum sensing) has gained special interest as anti–virulence strategy. Here, we modeled the las, rhl, and pqs Quorum sensing systems by a multi–level logical approach to analyze how enzyme inhibitors and receptor antagonists effect the formation of autoinducers and virulence factors. Results Our rule–based simulations fulfill the behavior expected from literature considering the external level of autoinducers. In the presence of PqsBCD inhibitors, the external HHQ and PQS levels are indeed clearly reduced. The magnitude of this effect strongly depends on the inhibition level. However, it seems that the pyocyanin pathway is incomplete. Conclusions To match experimental observations we suggest a modified network topology in which PqsE and PqsR acts as receptors and an autoinducer as ligand that up–regulate pyocyanin in a concerted manner. While the PQS biosynthesis is more appropriate as target to inhibit the HHQ and PQS formation, blocking the receptor PqsR that regulates the biosynthesis reduces the pyocyanin level stronger. PMID:23965312

  10. Quorum Sensing Inhibiting Activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus Isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ramadan; Shaaban, Mona I; Abdel Bar, Fatma M; El-Mahdy, Areej M; Shokralla, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1-V6) of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR, and Mass spectrometry), as behenic acid (docosanoic acid), borrelidin, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease, and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA, and pqsR). Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and anti

  11. Quorum Sensing Inhibiting Activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ramadan; Shaaban, Mona I.; Abdel Bar, Fatma M.; El-Mahdy, Areej M.; Shokralla, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1–V6) of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR, and Mass spectrometry), as behenic acid (docosanoic acid), borrelidin, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease, and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA, and pqsR). Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and anti

  12. Chemical probes of quorum sensing: from compound development to biological discovery.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Michael A; Blackwell, Helen E

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria can utilize chemical signals to coordinate the expression of group-beneficial behaviors in a method of cell-cell communication called quorum sensing (QS). The discovery that QS controls the production of virulence factors and biofilm formation in many common pathogens has driven an explosion of research aimed at both deepening our fundamental understanding of these regulatory networks and developing chemical agents that can attenuate QS signaling. The inherently chemical nature of QS makes studying these pathways with small molecule tools a complementary approach to traditional microbiology techniques. Indeed, chemical tools are beginning to yield new insights into QS regulation and provide novel strategies to inhibit QS. Here, we review the most recent advances in the development of chemical probes of QS systems in Gram-negative bacteria, with an emphasis on the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa We first describe reports of novel small molecule modulators of QS receptors and QS signal synthases. Next, in several case studies, we showcase how chemical tools have been deployed to reveal new knowledge of QS biology and outline lessons for how researchers might best target QS to combat bacterial virulence. To close, we detail the outstanding challenges in the field and suggest strategies to overcome these issues. PMID:27268906

  13. Quorum Sensing Desynchronization Leads to Bimodality and Patterned Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Quan, David N.; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Bentley, William E.

    2016-01-01

    Quorum Sensing (QS) drives coordinated phenotypic outcomes among bacterial populations. Its role in mediating infectious disease has led to the elucidation of numerous autoinducers and their corresponding QS signaling pathways. Among them, the Lsr (LuxS-regulated) QS system is conserved in scores of bacteria, and its signal molecule, autoinducer-2 (AI-2), is synthesized as a product of 1-carbon metabolism. Lsr signal transduction processes, therefore, may help organize population scale activities in numerous bacterial consortia. Conceptions of how Lsr QS organizes population scale behaviors remain limited, however. Using mathematical simulations, we examined how desynchronized Lsr QS activation, arising from cell-to-cell population heterogeneity, could lead to bimodal Lsr signaling and fractional activation. This has been previously observed experimentally. Governing these processes are an asynchronous AI-2 uptake, where positive intracellular feedback in Lsr expression is combined with negative feedback between cells. The resulting activation patterns differ from that of the more widely studied LuxIR system, the topology of which consists of only positive feedback. To elucidate differences, both QS systems were simulated in 2D, where cell populations grow and signal each other via traditional growth and diffusion equations. Our results demonstrate that the LuxIR QS system produces an ‘outward wave’ of autoinduction, and the Lsr QS system yields dispersed autoinduction from spatially-localized secretion and uptake profiles. In both cases, our simulations mirror previously demonstrated experimental results. As a whole, these models inform QS observations and synthetic biology designs. PMID:27071007

  14. Pandoraea sp. Strain E26: Discovery of Its Quorum-Sensing Properties via Whole-Genome Sequence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Yin, Wai-Fong; Tee, Kok Keng; Chang, Chien-Yi; Priya, Kumutha

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Pandoraea sp. strain E26 isolated from a former landfill site, sequenced by the Illumina MiSeq platform. This genome sequence will be useful to further understand the quorum-sensing system of this isolate. PMID:26021935

  15. Quorum sensing in water and wastewater treatment biofilms.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lin; Wu, Zhuoying; Yu, Xin

    2013-04-01

    Fixed film processes and activated sludge processes are two main families of wastewater treatment systems which all refer to the heterogeneous microbial communities. Meanwhile, biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) and biofouling in membrane systems are significant problems in the water and wastewater treatment which reduce the microbial quality of drinking water and limit the development of membrane system respectively. Since biofilms and quorum sensing (QS) as two microbial social behaviors have been inextricably linked, a number of studies have focused on the role of QS signaling and QS inhibition in the processes of water and wastewater treatment, which will help us engineer these biological treatment processes successfully and develop promising approaches for control of microbial adhesion, colonization and biofilm formation. This review gives a summary of recent known QS mechanisms and their role in biofilm formation for different species. Particular attentions are dedicated to the signaling molecules involved in some microbial granulation processes and the potential applications by some of their natural and synthetic analogues in the treatment of membrane biofouling. PMID:24620615

  16. Functions and regulation of quorum-sensing in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Julien; Faure, Denis

    2014-01-01

    In Agrobacterium tumefaciens, horizontal transfer and vegetative replication of oncogenic Ti plasmids involve a cell-to-cell communication process called quorum-sensing (QS). The determinants of the QS-system belong to the LuxR/LuxI class. The LuxI-like protein TraI synthesizes N-acyl-homoserine lactone molecules which act as diffusible QS-signals. Beyond a threshold concentration, these molecules bind and activate the LuxR-like transcriptional regulator TraR, thereby initiating the QS-regulatory pathway. For the last 20 years, A. tumefaciens has stood as a prominent model in the understanding of the LuxR/LuxI type of QS systems. A number of studies also unveiled features which are unique to A. tumefaciens QS, some of them being directly related to the phytopathogenic lifestyle of the bacteria. In this review, we will present the current knowledge of QS in A. tumefaciens at both the genetic and molecular levels. We will also describe how interactions with plant host modulate the QS pathway of A. tumefaciens, and discuss what could be the advantages for the agrobacteria to use such a tightly regulated QS-system to disseminate the Ti plasmids. PMID:24550924

  17. Parallel quorum sensing signaling pathways in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sarah A; Hawver, Lisa A; Ng, Wai-Leung

    2016-05-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a microbial signaling process for monitoring population density and complexity. Communication among bacterial cells via QS relies on the production, secretion, and detection of small molecules called autoinducers. Many bacteria have evolved their QS systems with different network architectures to incorporate information from multiple signals. In the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, at least four parallel signaling pathways converge to control the activity of a single regulator to modulate its QS response. By integrating multiple signal inputs, it is believed that Vibrio species can survey intra-species, intra-genus, and inter-species populations and program their gene expression accordingly. Our recent studies suggest that this "many-to-one" circuitry is also important for maintaining the integrity of the input-output relationship of the system and minimizes premature commitment to QS due to signal perturbation. Here we discuss the implications of this specific parallel network setup for V. cholerae intercellular communication and how this system arrangement affects our approach to manipulate the QS response of this clinically important pathogen. PMID:26545759

  18. Identification of quorum-sensing regulated proteins in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Arevalo-Ferro, Catalina; Hentzer, Morten; Reil, Gerold; Görg, Angelika; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Givskov, Michael; Riedel, Kathrin; Eberl, Leo

    2003-12-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen which is responsible for severe nosocomial infections in immunocompromised patients and is the major pathogen in cystic fibrosis. The bacterium utilizes two interrelated quorum-sensing (QS) systems, which rely on N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules, to control the expression of virulence factors and biofilm development. In this study, we compared the protein patterns of the intracellular, extracellular and surface protein fractions of the PAO1 parent strain with those of an isogenic lasI rhlI double mutant by means of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). This analysis showed that the intensities of 23.7% of all detected protein spots differed more than 2.5-fold between the two strains. We only considered those protein spots truly QS regulated that were changed in the mutant in the absence of signal molecules but were rescued to the wild-type situation when the medium was supplemented with AHLs. These protein spots were characterized by MALDI-TOF peptide mapping. Twenty-seven proteins were identified that were previously reported to be AHL controlled, among them several well-characterized virulence factors. For one of the identified proteins, the serine protease PrpL, a biochemical assay was established to verify that expression of this factor is indeed QS regulated. Furthermore, it is shown that the quorum-sensing blocker C-30 specifically interferes with the expression of 67% of the AHL-controlled protein spots of the surface fraction, confirming the high specificity of the compound. Importantly, 20 novel QS-regulated proteins were identified, many of which are involved in iron utilization, suggesting a link between quorum sensing and the iron regulatory system. Two of these proteins, PhuR and HasAp, are components of the two distinct haem-uptake systems present in P. aeruginosa. In agreement with the finding that both proteins are positively regulated by the

  19. Links between Anr and Quorum Sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, John H.; Dolben, Emily F.; Smith, T. Jarrod; Bhuju, Sabin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the transcription factor Anr controls the cellular response to low oxygen or anoxia. Anr activity is high in oxygen-limited environments, including biofilms and populations associated with chronic infections, and Anr is necessary for persistence in a model of pulmonary infection. In this study, we characterized the Anr regulon in biofilm-grown cells at 1% oxygen in the laboratory strain PAO1 and in a quorum sensing (QS)-deficient clinical isolate, J215. As expected, transcripts related to denitrification, arginine fermentation, high-affinity cytochrome oxidases, and CupA fimbriae were lower in the Δanr derivatives. In addition, we observed that transcripts associated with quorum sensing regulation, iron acquisition and storage, type VI secretion, and the catabolism of aromatic compounds were also differentially expressed in the Δanr strains. Prior reports have shown that quorum sensing-defective mutants have higher levels of denitrification, and we found that multiple Anr-regulated processes, including denitrification, were strongly inversely proportional to quorum sensing in both transcriptional and protein-based assays. We also found that in LasR-defective strains but not their LasR-intact counterparts, Anr regulated the production of the 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines, which play roles in quorum sensing and interspecies interactions. These data show that Anr was required for the expression of important metabolic pathways in low-oxygen biofilms, and they reveal an expanded and compensatory role for Anr in the regulation of virulence-related genes in quorum sensing mutants, such as those commonly isolated from infections. IMPORTANCE Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute ocular, soft tissue, and pulmonary infections, as well as chronic infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa uses quorum sensing (QS) to regulate virulence, but mutations in the gene encoding the master regulator of QS, lasR, are frequently

  20. Quorum Sensing in Some Representative Species of Halomonadaceae

    PubMed Central

    Tahrioui, Ali; Schwab, Melanie; Quesada, Emilia; Llamas, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication, or quorum-sensing (QS), systems are employed by bacteria for promoting collective behaviour within a population. An analysis to detect QS signal molecules in 43 species of the Halomonadaceae family revealed that they produced N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), which suggests that the QS system is widespread throughout this group of bacteria. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis of crude AHL extracts, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 (pZLR4) as biosensor strain, resulted in different profiles, which were not related to the various habitats of the species in question. To confirm AHL production in the Halomonadaceae species, PCR and DNA sequencing approaches were used to study the distribution of the luxI-type synthase gene. Phylogenetic analysis using sequence data revealed that 29 of the species studied contained a LuxI homolog. Phylogenetic analysis showed that sequences from Halomonadaceae species grouped together and were distinct from other members of the Gammaproteobacteria and also from species belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. PMID:25371343

  1. Integration of Metabolic and Quorum Sensing Signals Governing the Decision to Cooperate in a Bacterial Social Trait.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Kerry E; Monaco, Hilary; van Ditmarsch, Dave; Deforet, Maxime; Xavier, Joao B

    2015-05-01

    Many unicellular organisms live in multicellular communities that rely on cooperation between cells. However, cooperative traits are vulnerable to exploitation by non-cooperators (cheaters). We expand our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that allow multicellular systems to remain robust in the face of cheating by dissecting the dynamic regulation of cooperative rhamnolipids required for swarming in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We combine mathematical modeling and experiments to quantitatively characterize the integration of metabolic and population density signals (quorum sensing) governing expression of the rhamnolipid synthesis operon rhlAB. The combined computational/experimental analysis reveals that when nutrients are abundant, rhlAB promoter activity increases gradually in a density dependent way. When growth slows down due to nutrient limitation, rhlAB promoter activity can stop abruptly, decrease gradually or even increase depending on whether the growth-limiting nutrient is the carbon source, nitrogen source or iron. Starvation by specific nutrients drives growth on intracellular nutrient pools as well as the qualitative rhlAB promoter response, which itself is modulated by quorum sensing. Our quantitative analysis suggests a supply-driven activation that integrates metabolic prudence with quorum sensing in a non-digital manner and allows P. aeruginosa cells to invest in cooperation only when the population size is large enough (quorum sensing) and individual cells have enough metabolic resources to do so (metabolic prudence). Thus, the quantitative description of rhlAB regulatory dynamics brings a greater understating to the regulation required to make swarming cooperation stable. PMID:26102206

  2. Integration of Metabolic and Quorum Sensing Signals Governing the Decision to Cooperate in a Bacterial Social Trait

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Kerry E.; Monaco, Hilary; van Ditmarsch, Dave; Deforet, Maxime; Xavier, Joao B.

    2015-01-01

    Many unicellular organisms live in multicellular communities that rely on cooperation between cells. However, cooperative traits are vulnerable to exploitation by non-cooperators (cheaters). We expand our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that allow multicellular systems to remain robust in the face of cheating by dissecting the dynamic regulation of cooperative rhamnolipids required for swarming in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We combine mathematical modeling and experiments to quantitatively characterize the integration of metabolic and population density signals (quorum sensing) governing expression of the rhamnolipid synthesis operon rhlAB. The combined computational/experimental analysis reveals that when nutrients are abundant, rhlAB promoter activity increases gradually in a density dependent way. When growth slows down due to nutrient limitation, rhlAB promoter activity can stop abruptly, decrease gradually or even increase depending on whether the growth-limiting nutrient is the carbon source, nitrogen source or iron. Starvation by specific nutrients drives growth on intracellular nutrient pools as well as the qualitative rhlAB promoter response, which itself is modulated by quorum sensing. Our quantitative analysis suggests a supply-driven activation that integrates metabolic prudence with quorum sensing in a non-digital manner and allows P. aeruginosa cells to invest in cooperation only when the population size is large enough (quorum sensing) and individual cells have enough metabolic resources to do so (metabolic prudence). Thus, the quantitative description of rhlAB regulatory dynamics brings a greater understating to the regulation required to make swarming cooperation stable. PMID:26102206

  3. Local and global consequences of flow on bacterial quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minyoung Kevin; Ingremeau, François; Zhao, Aishan; Bassler, Bonnie L; Stone, Howard A

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria use a chemical communication process called quorum sensing (QS) to control collective behaviours such as pathogenesis and biofilm formation(1,2). QS relies on the production, release and group-wide detection of signal molecules called autoinducers. To date, studies of bacterial pathogenesis in well-mixed cultures have revealed virulence factors and the regulatory circuits controlling them, including the overarching role of QS(3). Although flow is ubiquitous to nearly all living systems(4), much less explored is how QS influences pathogenic traits in scenarios that mimic host environments, for example, under fluid flow and in complex geometries. Previous studies(5-7) have shown that sufficiently strong flow represses QS. Nonetheless, it is not known how QS functions under constant or intermittent flow, how it varies within biofilms or as a function of position along a confined flow, or how surface topography (grooves, crevices, pores) influence QS-mediated communication. We explore these questions using two common pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Vibrio cholerae. We identify conditions where flow represses QS and other conditions where QS is activated despite flow, including characterizing geometric and topographic features that influence the QS response. Our studies highlight that, under flow, genetically identical cells do not exhibit phenotypic uniformity with respect to QS in space and time, leading to complex patterns of pathogenesis and colonization. Understanding the ramifications of spatially and temporally non-uniform QS responses in realistic environments will be crucial for successful deployment of synthetic pro- and anti-QS strategies. PMID:27571752

  4. Local and Global Consequences of Flow on Bacterial Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minyoung Kevin; Ingremeau, Francois; Zhao, Aishan; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria use a chemical communication process called quorum sensing (QS) to control collective behaviours, such as pathogenesis and biofilm formation1,2. QS relies on the production, release, and group-wide detection of signal molecules called autoinducers. To date, studies of bacterial pathogenesis in well-mixed cultures have revealed virulence factors and the regulatory circuits controlling them, including the overarching role of QS3. Although flow is ubiquitous to nearly all living systems4, much less explored is how QS influences pathogenic traits in scenarios that mimic host environments, for example, under fluid flow and in complex geometries. Previous studies have showed that sufficiently strong flow represses QS5–7. Nonetheless, it is not known how QS functions under constant or intermittent flow, how it varies within biofilms or as a function of position along a confined flow, or how surface topography (grooves, crevices, pores) influence QS-mediated communication. We explore these questions using two common pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Vibrio cholerae. We identify conditions where flow represses QS and other conditions where QS is activated despite flow, including characterizing geometric and topographic features that influence the QS response. Our studies highlight that, under flow, genetically identical cells do not exhibit phenotypic uniformity with respect to QS in space and time, leading to complex patterns of pathogenesis and colonization. Understanding the ramifications of spatially and temporally non-uniform QS responses in realistic environments will be crucial for successful deployment of synthetic pro- and anti-QS strategies. PMID:27571752

  5. Identification of five structurally unrelated quorum-sensing inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a natural-derivative database.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Chua, Song-Lin; Chen, Yicai; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Nielsen, Thomas E; Yang, Liang; Givskov, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Bacteria communicate by means of small signal molecules in a process termed quorum sensing (QS). QS enables bacteria to organize their activities at the population level, including the coordinated secretion of virulence factors. Certain small-molecule compounds, known as quorum-sensing inhibitors (QSIs), have been shown to effectively block QS and subsequently attenuate the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as increasing its susceptibility to both antibiotics and the immune system. In this study, a structure-based virtual screening (SB-VS) approach was used for the discovery of novel QSI candidates. Three-dimensional structures of 3,040 natural compounds and their derivatives were obtained, after which molecular docking was performed using the QS receptor LasR as a target. Based on docking scores and molecular masses, 22 compounds were purchased to determine their efficacies as quorum-sensing inhibitors. Using a live reporter assay for quorum sensing, 5 compounds were found to be able to inhibit QS-regulated gene expression in P. aeruginosa in a dose-dependent manner. The most promising compound, G1, was evaluated by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis, and it was found to significantly affect the abundance of 46 proteins (19 were upregulated; 27 were downregulated) in P. aeruginosa PAO1. It specifically reduced the expression of several quorum-sensing-regulated virulence factors, such as protease IV, chitinase, and pyoverdine synthetases. G1 was also able to reduce extracellular DNA release and inhibited the secretion of the virulence factor, elastase, whose expression is regulated by LasR. These results demonstrate the utility of SB-VS for the discovery of target-specific QSIs. PMID:24002091

  6. Exposure to static magnetic field stimulates quorum sensing circuit in luminescent Vibrio strains of the Harveyi clade.

    PubMed

    Talà, Adelfia; Delle Side, Domenico; Buccolieri, Giovanni; Tredici, Salvatore Maurizio; Velardi, Luciano; Paladini, Fabio; De Stefano, Mario; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Alifano, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the evidence of electron-dense magnetic inclusions with polyhedral shape in the cytoplasm of Harveyi clade Vibrio strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with marine organisms, led us to investigate the behavior of this bacterium under exposure to static magnetic fields ranging between 20 and 2000 Gauss. When compared to sham-exposed, the light emission of magnetic field-exposed bacteria growing on solid medium at 18°C ±0.1°C was increased up to two-fold as a function of dose and growth phase. Stimulation of bioluminescence by magnetic field was more pronounced during the post-exponential growth and stationary phase, and was lost when bacteria were grown in the presence of the iron chelator deferoxamine, which caused disassembly of the magnetic inclusions suggesting their involvement in magnetic response. As in luminescent Vibrio spp. bioluminescence is regulated by quorum sensing, possible effects of magnetic field exposure on quorum sensing were investigated. Measurement of mRNA levels by reverse transcriptase real time-PCR demonstrated that luxR regulatory gene and luxCDABE operon coding for luciferase and fatty acid reductase complex were significantly up-regulated in magnetic field-exposed bacteria. In contrast, genes coding for a type III secretion system, whose expression was negatively affected by LuxR, were down-regulated. Up-regulation of luxR paralleled with down-regulation of small RNAs that mediate destabilization of luxR mRNA in quorum sensing signaling pathways. The results of experiments with the well-studied Vibrio campbellii strain BB120 (originally classified as Vibrio harveyi) and derivative mutants unable to synthesize autoinducers suggest that the effects of magnetic fields on quorum sensing may be mediated by AI-2, the interspecies quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:24960170

  7. Identification of Five Structurally Unrelated Quorum-Sensing Inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a Natural-Derivative Database

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Chua, Song-Lin; Chen, Yicai; Rice, Scott A.; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Nielsen, Thomas E.; Givskov, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria communicate by means of small signal molecules in a process termed quorum sensing (QS). QS enables bacteria to organize their activities at the population level, including the coordinated secretion of virulence factors. Certain small-molecule compounds, known as quorum-sensing inhibitors (QSIs), have been shown to effectively block QS and subsequently attenuate the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as increasing its susceptibility to both antibiotics and the immune system. In this study, a structure-based virtual screening (SB-VS) approach was used for the discovery of novel QSI candidates. Three-dimensional structures of 3,040 natural compounds and their derivatives were obtained, after which molecular docking was performed using the QS receptor LasR as a target. Based on docking scores and molecular masses, 22 compounds were purchased to determine their efficacies as quorum-sensing inhibitors. Using a live reporter assay for quorum sensing, 5 compounds were found to be able to inhibit QS-regulated gene expression in P. aeruginosa in a dose-dependent manner. The most promising compound, G1, was evaluated by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis, and it was found to significantly affect the abundance of 46 proteins (19 were upregulated; 27 were downregulated) in P. aeruginosa PAO1. It specifically reduced the expression of several quorum-sensing-regulated virulence factors, such as protease IV, chitinase, and pyoverdine synthetases. G1 was also able to reduce extracellular DNA release and inhibited the secretion of the virulence factor, elastase, whose expression is regulated by LasR. These results demonstrate the utility of SB-VS for the discovery of target-specific QSIs. PMID:24002091

  8. Exposure to Static Magnetic Field Stimulates Quorum Sensing Circuit in Luminescent Vibrio Strains of the Harveyi Clade

    PubMed Central

    Talà, Adelfia; Delle Side, Domenico; Buccolieri, Giovanni; Tredici, Salvatore Maurizio; Velardi, Luciano; Paladini, Fabio; De Stefano, Mario; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Alifano, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the evidence of electron-dense magnetic inclusions with polyhedral shape in the cytoplasm of Harveyi clade Vibrio strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with marine organisms, led us to investigate the behavior of this bacterium under exposure to static magnetic fields ranging between 20 and 2000 Gauss. When compared to sham-exposed, the light emission of magnetic field-exposed bacteria growing on solid medium at 18°C ±0.1°C was increased up to two-fold as a function of dose and growth phase. Stimulation of bioluminescence by magnetic field was more pronounced during the post-exponential growth and stationary phase, and was lost when bacteria were grown in the presence of the iron chelator deferoxamine, which caused disassembly of the magnetic inclusions suggesting their involvement in magnetic response. As in luminescent Vibrio spp. bioluminescence is regulated by quorum sensing, possible effects of magnetic field exposure on quorum sensing were investigated. Measurement of mRNA levels by reverse transcriptase real time-PCR demonstrated that luxR regulatory gene and luxCDABE operon coding for luciferase and fatty acid reductase complex were significantly up-regulated in magnetic field-exposed bacteria. In contrast, genes coding for a type III secretion system, whose expression was negatively affected by LuxR, were down-regulated. Up-regulation of luxR paralleled with down-regulation of small RNAs that mediate destabilization of luxR mRNA in quorum sensing signaling pathways. The results of experiments with the well-studied Vibrio campbellii strain BB120 (originally classified as Vibrio harveyi) and derivative mutants unable to synthesize autoinducers suggest that the effects of magnetic fields on quorum sensing may be mediated by AI-2, the interspecies quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:24960170

  9. Individual and combined roles of the master regulators AphA and LuxR in control of the Vibrio harveyi quorum-sensing regulon.

    PubMed

    van Kessel, Julia C; Rutherford, Steven T; Shao, Yi; Utria, Alan F; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2013-02-01

    Bacteria use a chemical communication process called quorum sensing to control transitions between individual and group behaviors. In the Vibrio harveyi quorum-sensing circuit, two master transcription factors, AphA and LuxR, coordinate the quorum-sensing response. Here we show that AphA regulates 167 genes, LuxR regulates 625 genes, and they coregulate 77 genes. LuxR strongly controls genes at both low cell density and high cell density, suggesting that it is the major quorum-sensing regulator. In contrast, AphA is absent at high cell density and acts to fine-tune quorum-sensing gene expression at low cell density. We examined two loci as case studies of coregulation by AphA and LuxR. First, AphA and LuxR directly regulate expression of the genes encoding the quorum-regulatory small RNAs Qrr2, Qrr3, and Qrr4, the consequence of which is a specifically timed transition between the individual and the group life-styles. Second, AphA and LuxR repress type III secretion system genes but at different times and to different extents. The consequence of this regulation is that type III secretion is restricted to a peak at mid-cell density. Thus, the asymmetric production of AphA and LuxR coupled with differences in their strengths and timing of target gene regulation generate a precise temporal pattern of gene expression. PMID:23204455

  10. Individual and Combined Roles of the Master Regulators AphA and LuxR in Control of the Vibrio harveyi Quorum-Sensing Regulon

    PubMed Central

    van Kessel, Julia C.; Rutherford, Steven T.; Shao, Yi; Utria, Alan F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria use a chemical communication process called quorum sensing to control transitions between individual and group behaviors. In the Vibrio harveyi quorum-sensing circuit, two master transcription factors, AphA and LuxR, coordinate the quorum-sensing response. Here we show that AphA regulates 167 genes, LuxR regulates 625 genes, and they coregulate 77 genes. LuxR strongly controls genes at both low cell density and high cell density, suggesting that it is the major quorum-sensing regulator. In contrast, AphA is absent at high cell density and acts to fine-tune quorum-sensing gene expression at low cell density. We examined two loci as case studies of coregulation by AphA and LuxR. First, AphA and LuxR directly regulate expression of the genes encoding the quorum-regulatory small RNAs Qrr2, Qrr3, and Qrr4, the consequence of which is a specifically timed transition between the individual and the group life-styles. Second, AphA and LuxR repress type III secretion system genes but at different times and to different extents. The consequence of this regulation is that type III secretion is restricted to a peak at mid-cell density. Thus, the asymmetric production of AphA and LuxR coupled with differences in their strengths and timing of target gene regulation generate a precise temporal pattern of gene expression. PMID:23204455

  11. Colostrum Hexasaccharide, a Novel Staphylococcus aureus Quorum-Sensing Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, A.; Deepak, D.; Singh, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of quorum-sensing (QS) systems regulating antibiotic resistance and virulence factors (VFs) has afforded a novel opportunity to prevent bacterial pathogenicity. Dietary molecules have been demonstrated to attenuate QS circuits of bacteria. But, to our knowledge, no study exploring the potential of colostrum hexasaccharide (CHS) in regulating QS systems has been published. In this study, we analyzed CHS for inhibiting QS signaling in Staphylococcus aureus. We isolated and characterized CHS from mare colostrum by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography evaporative light-scattering detection (RP-HPLC-ELSD), 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Antibiofilm activity of CHS against S. aureus and its possible interference with bacterial QS systems were determined. The inhibition and eradication potentials of the biofilms were studied by microscopic analyses and quantified by 96-well-microtiter-plate assays. Also, the ability of CHS to interfere in bacterial QS by degrading acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), one of the most studied signal molecules for Gram-negative bacteria, was evaluated. The results revealed that CHS exhibited promising inhibitory activities against QS-regulated secretion of VFs, including spreading ability, hemolysis, protease, and lipase activities, when applied at a rate of 5 mg/ml. The results of biofilm experiments indicated that CHS is a strong inhibitor of biofilm formation and also has the ability to eradicate it. The potential of CHS to interfere with bacterial QS systems was also examined by degradation of AHLs. Furthermore, it was documented that CHS decreased antibiotic resistance in S. aureus. The results thus give a lead that mare colostrum can be a promising source for isolating a next-generation antibacterial. PMID:25645850

  12. Modulation of Host Biology by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules: Messengers or Traitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi-Chia; Chan, Kok-Gan; Chang, Chien-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cells sense their population density and respond accordingly by producing various signal molecules to the surrounding environments thereby trigger a plethora of gene expression. This regulatory pathway is termed quorum sensing (QS). Plenty of bacterial virulence factors are controlled by QS or QS-mediated regulatory systems and QS signal molecules (QSSMs) play crucial roles in bacterial signaling transduction. Moreover, bacterial QSSMs were shown to interfere with host cell signaling and modulate host immune responses. QSSMs not only regulate the expression of bacterial virulence factors but themselves act in the modulation of host biology that can be potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26617576

  13. Engineering quorum sensing signaling of Pseudomonas for enhanced wastewater treatment and electricity harvest: A review.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yang-Chun; Wu, Xiang-Yang; Sun, Jian-Zhong; Cao, Ying-Xiu; Song, Hao

    2015-12-01

    Cell-cell communication that enables synchronized population behaviors in microbial communities dictates various biological processes. It is of great interest to unveil the underlying mechanisms of fine-tuning cell-cell communication to achieve environmental and energy applications. Pseudomonas is a ubiquitous microbe in environments that had wide applications in bioremediation and bioenergy generation. The quorum sensing (QS, a generic cell-cell communication mechanism) systems of Pseudomonas underlie the aromatics biodegradation, denitrification and electricity harvest. Here, we reviewed the recent progresses of the genetic strategies in engineering QS circuits to improve efficiency of wastewater treatment and the performance of microbial fuel cells. PMID:25455678

  14. A functional and phylogenetic comparison of quorum sensing related genes in Brucella melitensis 16M.

    PubMed

    Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2014-08-01

    A quorum-sensing (QS) system is involved in Brucella melitensis survival inside the host cell. Two transcriptional regulators identified in B. melitensis, BlxR and VjbR, regulate the expression of virB, an operon required for bacterial intracellular persistence. In this work, 628 genes affected by VjbR and 124 by BlxR were analyzed to gain insights into their functional and taxonomical distributions among the Bacteria and Archaea cellular domains. In this regard, the Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) genes and orthologous genes in 789 nonredundant bacterial and archaeal genomes were obtained and compared against a group of randomly selected genes. From these analyses, we found 71 coaffected genes between VjbR and BlxR. In the COG comparison, VjbR activated genes associated with intracellular trafficking, secretion and vesicular transport and defense mechanisms, while BlxR affected genes related to energy production and conversion (with an equal effect) and translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis, posttranslational modifications and carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism (with a negative effect). When the taxonomical distribution of orthologous genes was evaluated, the VjbR- and BlxR-related genes presented more orthologous genes in Crenarchaeota (Archaea), Firmicutes, and Tenericutes and fewer genes in Proteobacteria than expected by chance. These findings suggest that QS system exert a fine-tuning modulation of gene expression, by which VjbR activates genes related to infection persistence and defense, while BlxR represses general bacterial metabolism for intracellular adaptations. Finally, these affected genes present a degree of presence among Bacteria and Archaea genomes that is different from that expected by chance. PMID:24994008

  15. Noisy neighbourhoods: quorum sensing in fungal–polymicrobial infections

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Emily F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Quorum sensing was once considered a way in which a species was able to sense its cell density and regulate gene expression accordingly. However, it is now becoming apparent that multiple microbes can sense particular quorum‐sensing molecules, enabling them to sense and respond to other microbes in their neighbourhood. Such interactions are significant within the context of polymicrobial disease, in which the competition or cooperation of microbes can alter disease progression. Fungi comprise a small but important component of the human microbiome and are in constant contact with bacteria and viruses. The discovery of quorum‐sensing pathways in fungi has led to the characterization of a number of interkingdom quorum‐sensing interactions. Here, we review the recent developments in quorum sensing in medically important fungi, and the implications these interactions have on the host's innate immune response. PMID:26243526

  16. In vitro anti-quorum sensing activity of phytol.

    PubMed

    Pejin, Boris; Ciric, Ana; Glamoclija, Jasmina; Nikolic, Milos; Sokovic, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Anti-quorum sensing activity of the diterpene phytol was evaluated in vitro for the first time. This compound (at three sub-MIC concentrations - 0.5, 0.25 and 0.125 MIC, respectively) reduced the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm in the range of 74.00-84.33% exhibiting higher activity than the both positive controls used, streptomycin and ampicillin. Phytol (0.5 MIC) also effectively reduced P. aeruginosa twitching and flagella motility. Indeed, the bacteria treated were incapable of producing a twitching zone and had almost round, smooth and regular colony edges. Finally, the tested compound (0.5 MIC) exhibited good P. aeruginosa pyocyanin inhibitory activity (51.94%) practically to the same extent as streptomycin (52.09%). According to the experimental data obtained, this phytol property may inspire design of medical foods targeting P. aeruginosa quorum sensing activity. PMID:25103916

  17. Synergistic activation of quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Mandabi, Aviad; Ganin, Hadas; Meijler, Michael M

    2015-09-15

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) has been suggested to serve as a ubiquitous quorum sensing (QS) signal that mediates intra- and interspecies cross-talk between bacteria. To add tools for the study of its function in bacterial communication, we present a new and an improved synthetic route to AI-2 and aromatic analogues. We used this strategy to prepare naphthyl-DPD, and observed remarkably high synergistic activity at low nanomolar concentrations for this analogue in Vibrio harveyi. PMID:26248803

  18. The Quorum Sensing Regulator CinR Hierarchically Regulates Two Other Quorum Sensing Pathways in Ligand-Dependent and -Independent Fashions in Rhizobium etli

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huiming; Mao, Yiling; Zhu, Qingcheng; Ling, Jun; Zhang, Na; Naseer, Nawar

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many rhizobial species use complex N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS) systems to monitor their population density and regulate their symbiotic interactions with their plant hosts. There are at least three LuxRI-type regulatory systems in Rhizobium etli CFN42: CinRI, RaiRI, and TraRI. In this study, we show that CinI, RaiI, and TraI are responsible for synthesizing all AHLs under the tested conditions. The activation of these AHL synthase genes requires their corresponding LuxR-type counterparts. We further demonstrate that CinRI is at the top of the regulatory cascade that activates RaiRI and TraRI QS systems. Moreover, we discovered that CinR possesses a specific affinity to bind cinI promoter in the absence of its cognate AHL ligand, thereby activating cinI transcription. Addition of AHLs leads to improved binding to the cinI promoter and enhanced cinI expression. Furthermore, we found that compared to the wild type, the cinR mutation displayed reduced nodule formation, and cinR, raiR, and traI mutants show significantly lower levels of nitrogen fixation activity than the wild type. These results suggest that the complex QS regulatory systems in R. etli play an important role in its symbiosis with legume hosts. IMPORTANCE Many bacteria use quorum sensing (QS) to monitor their cell densities and coordinately regulate a number of physiological functions. Rhizobia often have diverse and complex LuxR/LuxI-type quorum sensing systems that may be involved in symbiosis and N2 fixation. In this study, we identified three LuxR/LuxI-type QS systems in Rhizobium etli CFN42: CinRI, RaiRI, and TraRI. We established a complex network of regulation between these QS components and found that these QS systems played important roles in symbiosis processes. PMID:25691531

  19. Negative Feedback in the Vibrio harveyi Quorum-Sensing Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Shu-Wen; Schaffer, Jessie; Wingreen, Ned; Bassler, Bonnie; Phuan Ong, Nai

    2010-03-01

    Quorum sensing is the mechanism by which bacteria communicate and synchronize group behaviors. Multiple feedbacks have been identified in the model quorum-sensing bacterium Vibrio harveyi, but it has been unclear how these feedbacks interact in individual cells to control the fidelity of signal transduction. We measured the copy number distribution of the master regulators to quantify the activity of the signaling network. We find that the feedbacks affect the production rate, level, and noise of the core quorum-sensing components. Using fluorescence time-lapse microscopy, we directly observed the master regulator in individual cells, and analyzed the persistence of heterogeneity in terms of the normalized time-delayed direct correlation. Our findings suggest that feedback from small regulatory RNAs regulates a receptor to control the noise level in signal transduction. We further tested this model by re-engineering the gene circuit to specifically diminish this feedback. We conclude that negative feedbacks mediated by sRNAs permit fine-tuning of gene regulation, thereby increasing the fidelity of signal transduction.

  20. Impact of quorum sensing on fitness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Heurlier, Karin; Dénervaud, Valérie; Haas, Dieter

    2006-04-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, cell-cell communication based on N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules (termed quorum sensing) is known to control the production of extracellular virulence factors. Hence, in pathogenic interactions with host organisms, the quorum-sensing (QS) machinery can confer a selective advantage on P. aeruginosa. However, as shown by transcriptomic and proteomic studies, many intracellular metabolic functions are also regulated by quorum sensing. Some of these serve to regenerate the AHL precursors methionine and S-adenosyl-methionine and to degrade adenosine via inosine and hypoxanthine. The fact that a significant percentage of clinical and environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa is defective for QS because of mutation in the major QS regulatory gene lasR, raises the question of whether the QS machinery can have a negative impact on the organism's fitness. In vitro, lasR mutants have a higher probability to escape lytic death in stationary phase under alkaline conditions than has the QS-proficient wild type. Similar selective forces might also operate in natural environments. PMID:16503417

  1. Regulation of Yersina pestis Virulence by AI-2 Mediated Quorum Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Segelke, B; Hok, S; Lao, V; Corzett, M; Garcia, E

    2010-03-29

    The proposed research was motivated by an interest in understanding Y. pestis virulence mechanisms and bacteria cell-cell communication. It is expected that a greater understanding of virulence mechanisms will ultimately lead to biothreat countermeasures and novel therapeutics. Y. pestis is the etiological agent of plague, the most devastating disease in human history. Y. pestis infection has a high mortality rate and a short incubation before mortality. There is no widely available and effective vaccine for Y. pestis and multi-drug resistant strains are emerging. Y. pestis is a recognized biothreat agent based on the wide distribution of the bacteria in research laboratories around the world and on the knowledge that methods exist to produce and aerosolize large amounts of bacteria. We hypothesized that cell-cell communication via signaling molecules, or quorum sensing, by Y. pestis is important for the regulation of virulence factor gene expression during host invasion, though a causative link had never been established. Quorum sensing is a mode of intercellular communication which enables orchestration of gene expression for many bacteria as a function of population density and available evidence suggests there may be a link between quorum sensing and regulation of Y. pesits virulence. Several pathogenic bacteria have been shown to regulate expression of virulence factor genes, including genes encoding type III secretion, via quorum sensing. The Y. pestis genome encodes several cell-cell signaling pathways and the interaction of at least three of these are thought to be involved in one or more modes of host invasion. Furthermore, Y. pestis gene expression array studies carried out at LLNL have established a correlation between expression of known virulence factors and genes involved in processing of the AI-2 quorum sensing signal. This was a basic research project that was intended to provide new insights into bacterial intercellular communication and how it is

  2. Structural and Mechanistic Roles of Novel Chemical Ligands on the SdiA Quorum-Sensing Transcription Regulator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nguyen, Y.; Nguyen, Nam X.; Rogers, Jamie L.; Liao, Jun; MacMillan, John B.; Jiang, Youxing; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2015-05-19

    Bacteria engage in chemical signaling, termed quorum sensing (QS), to mediate intercellular communication, mimicking multicellular organisms. The LuxR family of QS transcription factors regulates gene expression, coordinating population behavior by sensing endogenous acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). However, some bacteria (such as Escherichia coli) do not produce AHLs. These LuxR orphans sense exogenous AHLs but also regulate transcription in the absence of AHLs. Importantly, this AHL-independent regulatory mechanism is still largely unknown. Here we present several structures of one such orphan LuxR-type protein, SdiA, from enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), in the presence and absence of AHL. SdiA is actually not inmore » an apo state without AHL but is regulated by a previously unknown endogenous ligand, 1-octanoyl-rac-glycerol (OCL), which is ubiquitously found throughout the tree of life and serves as an energy source, signaling molecule, and substrate for membrane biogenesis. While exogenous AHL renders to SdiA higher stability and DNA binding affinity, OCL may function as a chemical chaperone placeholder that stabilizes SdiA, allowing for basal activity. Structural comparison between SdiA-AHL and SdiA-OCL complexes provides crucial mechanistic insights into the ligand regulation of AHL-dependent and -independent function of LuxR-type proteins. Importantly, in addition to its contribution to basic science, this work has implications for public health, inasmuch as the SdiA signaling system aids the deadly human pathogen EHEC to adapt to a commensal lifestyle in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of cattle, its main reservoir. These studies open exciting and novel avenues to control shedding of this human pathogen in the environment. IMPORTANCE Quorum sensing refers to bacterial chemical signaling. The QS acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals are recognized by LuxR-type receptors that regulate gene transcription. However, some bacteria have orphan Lux

  3. Structural and Mechanistic Roles of Novel Chemical Ligands on the SdiA Quorum-Sensing Transcription Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Y.; Nguyen, Nam X.; Rogers, Jamie L.; Liao, Jun; MacMillan, John B.; Jiang, Youxing; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2015-05-19

    Bacteria engage in chemical signaling, termed quorum sensing (QS), to mediate intercellular communication, mimicking multicellular organisms. The LuxR family of QS transcription factors regulates gene expression, coordinating population behavior by sensing endogenous acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). However, some bacteria (such as Escherichia coli) do not produce AHLs. These LuxR orphans sense exogenous AHLs but also regulate transcription in the absence of AHLs. Importantly, this AHL-independent regulatory mechanism is still largely unknown. Here we present several structures of one such orphan LuxR-type protein, SdiA, from enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), in the presence and absence of AHL. SdiA is actually not in an apo state without AHL but is regulated by a previously unknown endogenous ligand, 1-octanoyl-rac-glycerol (OCL), which is ubiquitously found throughout the tree of life and serves as an energy source, signaling molecule, and substrate for membrane biogenesis. While exogenous AHL renders to SdiA higher stability and DNA binding affinity, OCL may function as a chemical chaperone placeholder that stabilizes SdiA, allowing for basal activity. Structural comparison between SdiA-AHL and SdiA-OCL complexes provides crucial mechanistic insights into the ligand regulation of AHL-dependent and -independent function of LuxR-type proteins. Importantly, in addition to its contribution to basic science, this work has implications for public health, inasmuch as the SdiA signaling system aids the deadly human pathogen EHEC to adapt to a commensal lifestyle in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of cattle, its main reservoir. These studies open exciting and novel avenues to control shedding of this human pathogen in the environment. IMPORTANCE Quorum sensing refers to bacterial chemical signaling. The QS acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals are recognized by LuxR-type receptors that regulate gene transcription. However, some bacteria have orphan LuxR-type receptors and

  4. Inhibition of biofilm development of uropathogens by curcumin - an anti-quorum sensing agent from Curcuma longa.

    PubMed

    Packiavathy, Issac Abraham Sybiya Vasantha; Priya, Selvam; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Ravi, Arumugam Veera

    2014-04-01

    Urinary tract infection is caused primarily by the quorum sensing (QS)-dependent biofilm forming ability of uropathogens. In the present investigation, an anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) agent curcumin from Curcuma longa (turmeric) was shown to inhibit the biofilm formation of uropathogens, such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, Proteus mirabilis and Serratia marcescens, possibly by interfering with their QS systems. The antibiofilm potential of curcumin on uropathogens as well as its efficacy in disturbing the mature biofilms was examined under light microscope and confocal laser scanning microscope. The treatment with curcumin was also found to attenuate the QS-dependent factors, such as exopolysaccharide production, alginate production, swimming and swarming motility of uropathogens. Furthermore, it was documented that curcumin enhanced the susceptibility of a marker strain and uropathogens to conventional antibiotics. PMID:24262582

  5. Silencing quorum sensing and ICE mobility through antiactivation and ribosomal frameshifting

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Joshua P; Ronson, Clive W

    2015-01-01

    Mobile genetic elements run an evolutionary gauntlet to maintain their mobility in the face of selection against their selfish dissemination but, paradoxically, they can accelerate the adaptability of bacteria through the gene-transfer events that they facilitate. These temporally conflicting evolutionary forces have shaped exquisite regulation systems that silence mobility and maximize the competitive fitness of the host bacterium, but maintain the ability of the element to deliver itself to a new host should the opportunity arise. Here we review the excision regulation system of the Mesorhizobium loti symbiosis island ICEMlSymR7A, a 502-kb integrative and conjugative element (ICE) capable of converting non-symbiotic mesorhizobia into plant symbionts. ICEMlSymR7A excision is activated by quorum sensing, however, both quorum sensing and excision are strongly repressed in the vast majority of cells by dual-target antiactivation and programmed ribosomal-frameshifting mechanisms. We examine these recently discovered regulatory features under the light of natural selection and discuss common themes that can be drawn from recent developments in ICE biology. PMID:26942047

  6. Anti-quorum sensing activity of essential oils from Colombian plants.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Colorado, Beatriz; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus; Stashenko, Elena E; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Kunze, Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    Essential oils from Colombian plants were characterised by GC-MS, and assayed for anti-quorum sensing activity in bacteria sensor strains. Two major chemotypes were found for Lippia alba, the limonene-carvone and the citral (geranial-neral). For other species, the main components included α-pinene (Ocotea sp.), β-pinene (Swinglea glutinosa), cineol (Elettaria cardamomun), α-zingiberene (Zingiber officinale) and pulegone (Minthostachys mollis). Several essential oils presented promising inhibitory properties for the short chain AHL quorum sensing (QS) system, in Escherichia coli containing the biosensor plasmid pJBA132, in particular Lippia alba. Moderate activity as anti-QS using the same plasmid, were also found for selected constituents of essential oils studied here, such as citral, carvone and α-pinene, although solely at the highest tested concentration (250 µg mL(-1)). Only citral presented some activity for the long chain AHL QS system, in Pseudomonas putida containing the plasmid pRK-C12. In short, essential oils from Colombian flora have promising properties as QS modulators. PMID:21936639

  7. A direct pre-screen for marine bacteria producing compounds inhibiting quorum sensing reveals diverse planktonic bacteria that are bioactive.

    PubMed

    Linthorne, Jamie S; Chang, Barbara J; Flematti, Gavin R; Ghisalberti, Emilio L; Sutton, David C

    2015-02-01

    A promising new strategy in antibacterial research is inhibition of the bacterial communication system termed quorum sensing. In this study, a novel and rapid pre-screening method was developed to detect the production of chemical inhibitors of this system (quorum-quenching compounds) by bacteria isolated from marine and estuarine waters. This method involves direct screening of mixed populations on an agar plate, facilitating specific isolation of bioactive colonies. The assay showed that between 4 and 46 % of culturable bacteria from various samples were bioactive, and of the 95 selectively isolated bacteria, 93.7 % inhibited Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence without inhibiting growth, indicating potential production of quorum-quenching compounds. Of the active isolates, 21 % showed further activity against quorum-sensing-regulated pigment production by Serratia marcescens. The majority of bioactive isolates were identified by 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) amplification and sequencing as belonging to the genera Vibrio and Pseudoalteromonas. Extracts of two strongly bioactive Pseudoalteromonas isolates (K1 and B2) were quantitatively assessed for inhibition of growth and quorum-sensing-regulated processes in V. harveyi, S. marcescens and Chromobacterium violaceum. Extracts of the isolates reduced V. harveyi bioluminescence by as much as 98 % and C. violaceum pigment production by 36 % at concentrations which had no adverse effect on growth. The activity found in the extracts indicated that the isolates may produce quorum-quenching compounds. This study further supports the suggestion that quorum quenching may be a common attribute among culturable planktonic marine and estuarine bacteria. PMID:25082352

  8. The plant pathogen Pantoea ananatis produces N-acylhomoserine lactone and causes center rot disease of onion by quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Yuta; Yamazaki, Go; Ishida, Akio; Kato, Norihiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2007-11-01

    A number of gram-negative bacteria have a quorum-sensing system and produce N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL) that they use them as a quorum-sensing signal molecule. Pantoea ananatis is reported as a common colonist of wheat heads at ripening and causes center rot of onion. In this study, we demonstrated that P. ananatis SK-1 produced two AHLs, N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL) and N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL). We cloned the AHL-synthase gene (eanI) and AHL-receptor gene (eanR) and revealed that the deduced amino acid sequence of EanI/EanR showed high identity to those of EsaI/EsaR from P. stewartii. EanR repressed the ean box sequence and the addition of AHLs resulted in derepression of ean box. Inactivation of the chromosomal eanI gene in SK-1 caused disruption of exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis, biofilm formation, and infection of onion leaves, which were recovered by adding exogenous 3-oxo-C6-HSL. These results demonstrated that the quorum-sensing system involved the biosynthesis of EPS, biofilm formation, and infection of onion leaves in P. ananatis SK-1. PMID:17827290

  9. Production of Quorum Sensing Inhibitors in Growing Onion Bulbs Infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa E (HQ324110)

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Alla, Mohamed H.; Bashandy, Shymaa R.

    2012-01-01

    Eighteen organic compounds were present in growing onion bulbs cultivar Giza 6 infected with P. aeruginosa, but only fourteen of them are present in dry infected onion bulbs; however, four compounds were missing in dry onion. The missing compounds in dry infected onion bulbs are pantolactone, 4,5-dihydro-4,5-dimethylfuran-2(3H)-one, myristic acid, and linoleic acid. All of them were detected in growing onion (living cell) during Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, and it is hypothesized that it may be produced by plants and act as defence system. Pantolactone and myristic acid were selected to explore their effects on growth and virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Exogenous application of pantolactone and myristic acid significantly inhibited pyocyanin production, protease, and lipase and polygalacturonase activity but did not have any significant effects on bacterial growth. The inhibition of virulence factors without reduction in bacterial growth may be providing strong support that these chemical molecules are general quorum sensing inhibitors than an antibacterial effect. Disruption of quorum sensing of pathogen indicates that this new approach has potential in fighting bacterial infections in human and plants. PMID:23724316

  10. Sustained Release of a Novel Anti-Quorum-Sensing Agent against Oral Fungal Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Mark; Shenderovich, Julia; Al-Quntar, Abed Al Aziz; Friedman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Thiazolidinedione-8 (S-8) has recently been identified as a potential anti-quorum-sensing/antibiofilm agent against bacteria and fungi. Based on these results, we investigated the possibility of incorporating S-8 in a sustained-release membrane (SRM) to increase its pharmaceutical potential against Candida albicans biofilm. We demonstrated that SRM containing S-8 inhibits fungal biofilm formation in a time-dependent manner for 72 h, due to prolonged release of S-8. Moreover, the SRM effectively delivered the agent in its active form to locations outside the membrane reservoir. In addition, eradication of mature biofilm by the SRM containing S-8 was also significant. Of note, S-8-containing SRM affected the characteristics of mature C. albicans biofilm, such as thickness, exopolysaccharide (EPS) production, and morphogenesis of fungal cells. The concept of using an antibiofilm agent with no antifungal activity incorporated into a sustained-release delivery system is new in medicine and dentistry. This concept of an SRM containing a quorum-sensing quencher with an antibiofilm effect could pave the way for combating oral fungal infectious diseases. PMID:25645835

  11. Lead Precipitation by Vibrio harveyi: Evidence for Novel Quorum-Sensing Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mire, Chad E.; Tourjee, Jeanette A.; O'Brien, William F.; Ramanujachary, Kandalam V.; Hecht, Gregory B.

    2004-01-01

    Three pleiotropic, quorum sensing-defective Vibrio harveyi mutants were observed to precipitate soluble Pb2+ as an insoluble compound. The compound was purified and subjected to X-ray diffraction and elemental analyses. These assays identified the precipitated compound as Pb9(PO4)6, an unusual and complex lead phosphate salt that is produced synthetically at temperatures of ca. 200°C. Regulation of the precipitation phenotype was also examined. Introduction of a luxO::kan allele into one of the mutants abolished lead precipitation, indicating that the well-characterized autoinducer 1 (AI1)-AI2 quorum-sensing system can block lead precipitation in dense cell populations. Interestingly, the V. harveyi D1 mutant, a strain defective for secretion of both AI1 and AI2, was shown to be an effective trans inhibitor of lead precipitation. This suggests that a previously undescribed V. harveyi autoinducer, referred to as AI3, can also negatively regulate lead precipitation. Experiments with heterologous bacterial populations demonstrated that many different species are capable of trans regulating the V. harveyi lead precipitation phenotype. Moreover, one of the V. harveyi mutants in this study exhibited little or no response to intercellular signals from other V. harveyi inocula but was quite responsive to some of the heterologous bacteria. Based on these observations, we propose that V. harveyi carries at least one quorum sensor that is specifically dedicated to receiving cross-species communication. PMID:14766565

  12. Quorum-Sensing Regulation of the Production of Blp Bacteriocins in Streptococcus thermophilus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Laetitia; Boutry, Céline; Guédon, Eric; Guillot, Alain; Ibrahim, Mariam; Grossiord, Benoît; Hols, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    The blp gene cluster identified in the genome sequences of Streptococcus thermophilus (blpSt) LMG18311, CNRZ1066, and LMD-9 displays all the characteristics of a class II bacteriocin locus. In the present study, we showed that the blpSt locus is only fully functional in strain LMD-9 and regulates the production of antimicrobial peptides that inhibit strains LMG18311 and CNRZ1066. The blpSt cluster of LMD-9 contains 23 genes that are transcriptionally organized in six operons: blpABCSt (peptide transporter genes and pheromone gene); blpRHSt (two-component regulatory system genes); blpDSt-orf1, blpUSt-orf3, and blpE-FSt (bacteriocin precursors and immunity genes); and blpG-XSt (unknown function). All the operons, except the regulatory unit blpRHSt, were shown to be coregulated at the transcriptional level by a quorum-sensing mechanism involving the mature S. thermophilus pheromone BlpC* (BlpC*St), which was extracellularly detected as two active forms (30 and 19 amino acids). These operons are differentially transcribed depending on growth phase and pheromone concentration. They all contain a motif with two imperfect direct repeats in their mapped promoter regions that could serve as binding sites of the response regulator BlpRSt. Through the construction of deletion mutants, the blpSt locus of strain LMD-9 was shown to encode all the essential functions associated with bacteriocin production, quorum-sensing regulation, and immunity. PMID:17693498

  13. Mini Review of Phytochemicals and Plant Taxa with Activity as Microbial Biofilm and Quorum Sensing Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ta, Chieu Anh Kim; Arnason, John Thor

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms readily form on many surfaces in nature including plant surfaces. In order to coordinate the formation of these biofilms, microorganisms use a cell-to-cell communication system called quorum sensing (QS). As formation of biofilms on vascular plants may not be advantageous to the hosts, plants have developed inhibitors to interfere with these processes. In this mini review, research papers published on plant-derived molecules that have microbial biofilm or quorum sensing inhibition are reviewed with the objectives of determining the biosynthetic classes of active compounds, their biological activity in assays, and their families of occurrence and range. The main findings are the identification of plant phenolics, including benzoates, phenyl propanoids, stilbenes, flavonoids, gallotannins, proanthocyanidins and coumarins as important inhibitors with both activities. Some terpenes including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and triterpenes also have anti-QS and anti-biofilm activities. Relatively few alkaloids were reported. Quinones and organosulfur compounds, especially from garlic, were also active. A common feature is the polar nature of these compounds. Phytochemicals with these activities are widespread in Angiosperms in temperate and tropical regions, but gymnosperms, bryophytes and pteridophytes were not represented. PMID:26712734

  14. Composition, anti-quorum sensing and antimicrobial activity of essential oils from Lippia alba

    PubMed Central

    Olivero-Verbel, Jesus; Barreto-Maya, Ana; Bertel-Sevilla, Angela; Stashenko, Elena E.

    2014-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens have the ability to produce N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) as signal molecules for quorum sensing (QS). This cell-cell communication system allows them to coordinate gene expression and regulate virulence. Strategies to inhibit QS are promising for the control of infectious diseases or antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) and antibacterial potential of five essential oils isolated from Lippia alba on the Tn-5 mutant of Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, and on the growth of the gram-positive bacteria S. aureus ATCC 25923. The anti-QS activity was detected through the inhibition of the QS-controlled violacein pigment production by the sensor bacteria. Results showed that two essential oils from L. alba, one containing the greatest geranial:neral and the other the highest limonene:carvone concentrations, were the most effective QS inhibitors. Both oils also had small effects on cell growth. Moreover, the geranial/neral chemotype oil also produced the maximum zone of growth inhibition against S. aureus ATCC 25923. These data suggest essential oils from L. alba have promising properties as QS modulators, and present antibacterial activity on S. aureus. PMID:25477905

  15. DqsIR quorum sensing-mediated gene regulation of the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans in response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Dai, Shang; Tian, Bing; Li, Tao; Yu, Jiangliu; Liu, Chengzhi; Wang, Liangyan; Xu, Hong; Zhao, Ye; Hua, Yuejin

    2016-05-01

    Here, we show that AHLs can be employed by Deinococcus radiodurans, which belongs to the unique phylum Deinococcus-Thermus and is known for its cellular resistance to environmental stresses. An AHL-mediated quorum-sensing system (DqsI/DqsR) was identified in D. radiodurans. We found that under non-stress conditions, the AHL level was "shielded" by quorum quenching enzymes, whereas AHLs accumulated when D. radiodurans was exposed to oxidative stress. Upon exposure to H2 O2 , AHL synthetic enzymes (DqsI) were immediately induced, while the expression of quorum-quenching enzymes began to increase approximately 30 min after exposure to H2 O2 , as shown by time-course analyses of gene expression. Both dqsI mutant (DMDqsI) and dqsR mutant (MDqsR) were more sensitive to oxidative stress compared with the wild-type strain. Exogenous AHLs (5 μM) could completely restore the survival fraction of DMDqsI under oxidative stress. RNA-seq analysis showed that a number of genes involved in stress-response, cellular cleansing, and DNA repair had altered transcriptional levels in MDqsR. The DqsR, acting as a regulator of quorum sensing, controls gene expression along with AHLs. Hence, the DqsIR-mediated quorum sensing that mediates gene regulation is an adaptive strategy for D. radiodurans in response to oxidative stresses and is conserved in the extremophilic Deinococcus bacteria. PMID:26789904

  16. Microarray Analysis of Quorum-Sensing Regulated Gene Expression in Campylobacter jejuni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quorum-sensing (QS) is defined as cell-to-cell communication in response to population density in bacteria. Autoinducer-2 (AI-2)-dependent quorum-sensing has been shown to control a variety of cellular processes such as expression of virulence factors, toxin production, biofilm formation, and swarm...

  17. Novel AI-2 quorum sensing inhibitors in Vibrio harveyi identified through structure-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peng; Peng, Hanjing; Ni, Nanting; Wang, Binghe; Li, Minyong

    2012-10-15

    In this letter, a high-throughput virtual screening was accomplished to identify potent inhibitors against AI-2 quorum sensing on the basis of Vibrio harveyi LuxPQ crystal structure. Seven compounds were found to inhibit AI-2 quorum sensing with IC(50) values in the micromolar range, and presented low cytotoxicity or no cytotoxicity in V. harveyi. PMID:22963763

  18. Drimendiol, a drimane sesquiterpene with quorum sensing inhibition activity.

    PubMed

    Paza, Cristian; Cárcamo, Gerardo; Silva, Mario; Becerra, José; Urrutia, Homero; Sossa, Katherine

    2013-02-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a regulatory mechanism that enables bacteria to make collective decisions such as an increase in virulence factors and biofilm production. Inhibitors of QS are important research tools in the discovery of new potential anti-bacterial agents. Polygodial, drimenol and drimendiol are drimane sesquiterpenoids isolated from Drimys winteri, a Chilean native tree. Their QS activity, when tested on Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472, showed that drimendiol is an inhibitor of QS, decreasing violaceine production in C violaceum and decreasing biofilm formation of Pseudomonas syringae strains. Consequently it increased the biocide effects of CuSO4 on biofilms of P. syringae. PMID:23513712

  19. 6-Gingerol reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and virulence via quorum sensing inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han-Shin; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Byun, Youngjoo; Park, Hee-Deung

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms and produces virulence factors via quorum sensing (QS). Interfering with normal QS interactions between signal molecules and their cognate receptors is a developing strategy for attenuating its virulence. Here we tested the hypothesis that 6-gingerol, a pungent oil of fresh ginger, reduces biofilm formation and virulence by antagonistically binding to P. aeruginosa QS receptors. In silico studies demonstrated molecular binding occurs between 6-gingerol and the QS receptor LasR through hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. Experimentally 6-gingerol reduced biofilm formation, several virulence factors (e.g., exoprotease, rhamnolipid, and pyocyanin), and mice mortality. Further transcriptome analyses demonstrated that 6-gingerol successfully repressed QS-induced genes, specifically those related to the production of virulence factors. These results strongly support our hypothesis and offer insight into the molecular mechanism that caused QS gene repression. PMID:25728862

  20. Defective quorum sensing of acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells: evidence of collective behavior of leukemic populations as semi-autonomous aberrant ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sapan J; Dao, Su; Darie, Costel C; Clarkson, Bayard D

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a generic term used to describe cell-cell communication and collective decision making by bacterial and social insects to regulate the expression of specific genes in controlling cell density and other properties of the populations in response to nutrient supply or changes in the environment. QS mechanisms also have a role in higher organisms in maintaining homeostasis, regulation of the immune system and collective behavior of cancer cell populations. In the present study, we used a p190(BCR-ABL) driven pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL3) cell line derived from the pleural fluid of a terminally ill patient with ALL to test the QS hypothesis in leukemia. ALL3 cells don't grow at low density (LD) in liquid media but grow progressively faster at increasingly high cell densities (HD) in contrast to other established leukemic cell lines that grow well at very low starting cell densities. The ALL3 cells at LD are poised to grow but shortly die without additional stimulation. Supernates of ALL3 cells (HDSN) and some other primary cells grown at HD stimulate the growth of the LD ALL3 cells without which they won't survive. To get further insight into the activation processes we performed microarray analysis of the LD ALL3 cells after stimulation with ALL3 HDSN at days 1, 3, and 6. This screen identified several candidate genes, and we linked them to signaling networks and their functions. We observed that genes involved in lipid, cholesterol, fatty acid metabolism, and B cell activation are most up- or down-regulated upon stimulation of the LD ALL3 cells using HDSN. We also discuss other pathways that are differentially expressed upon stimulation of the LD ALL3 cells. Our findings suggest that the Ph+ ALL population achieves dominance by functioning as a collective aberrant ecosystem subject to defective quorum-sensing regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27429840

  1. Defective quorum sensing of acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells: evidence of collective behavior of leukemic populations as semi-autonomous aberrant ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapan J; Dao, Su; Darie, Costel C; Clarkson, Bayard D

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a generic term used to describe cell-cell communication and collective decision making by bacterial and social insects to regulate the expression of specific genes in controlling cell density and other properties of the populations in response to nutrient supply or changes in the environment. QS mechanisms also have a role in higher organisms in maintaining homeostasis, regulation of the immune system and collective behavior of cancer cell populations. In the present study, we used a p190BCR-ABL driven pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL3) cell line derived from the pleural fluid of a terminally ill patient with ALL to test the QS hypothesis in leukemia. ALL3 cells don’t grow at low density (LD) in liquid media but grow progressively faster at increasingly high cell densities (HD) in contrast to other established leukemic cell lines that grow well at very low starting cell densities. The ALL3 cells at LD are poised to grow but shortly die without additional stimulation. Supernates of ALL3 cells (HDSN) and some other primary cells grown at HD stimulate the growth of the LD ALL3 cells without which they won’t survive. To get further insight into the activation processes we performed microarray analysis of the LD ALL3 cells after stimulation with ALL3 HDSN at days 1, 3, and 6. This screen identified several candidate genes, and we linked them to signaling networks and their functions. We observed that genes involved in lipid, cholesterol, fatty acid metabolism, and B cell activation are most up- or down-regulated upon stimulation of the LD ALL3 cells using HDSN. We also discuss other pathways that are differentially expressed upon stimulation of the LD ALL3 cells. Our findings suggest that the Ph+ ALL population achieves dominance by functioning as a collective aberrant ecosystem subject to defective quorum-sensing regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27429840

  2. The Vibrio harveyi bioassay used routinely to detect AI-2 quorum sensing inhibition is confounded by inconsistent normalization across marine matrices.

    PubMed

    Blair, Walter M; Doucette, Gregory J

    2013-03-01

    The Vibrio harveyi autoinducer-2 (AI-2) bioassay is used routinely to screen for inhibition of the AI-2 quorum sensing system. The present study utilizes three well-described bacterial strains to demonstrate that inconsistent normalization across matrices undermines the assay's use in screening marine samples for AI-2 inhibition. PMID:23305926

  3. Bacterial quorum sensing: its role in virulence and possibilities for its control.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Steven T; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2012-11-01

    Quorum sensing is a process of cell-cell communication that allows bacteria to share information about cell density and adjust gene expression accordingly. This process enables bacteria to express energetically expensive processes as a collective only when the impact of those processes on the environment or on a host will be maximized. Among the many traits controlled by quorum sensing is the expression of virulence factors by pathogenic bacteria. Here we review the quorum-sensing circuits of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Vibrio cholerae. We outline these canonical quorum-sensing mechanisms and how each uniquely controls virulence factor production. Additionally, we examine recent efforts to inhibit quorum sensing in these pathogens with the goal of designing novel antimicrobial therapeutics. PMID:23125205

  4. Novel mechanisms of controlling the activities of the transcription factors Spo0A and ComA by the plasmid-encoded quorum sensing regulators Rap60-Phr60 in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Boguslawski, Kristina M.; Hill, Patrick A.; Griffith, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacillus subtilis and its closest relatives have multiple rap-phr quorum sensing gene pairs that coordinate a variety of physiological processes with population density. Extra-chromosomal rap-phr genes are also present on mobile genetic elements, yet relatively little is known about their function. In this work, we demonstrate that Rap60-Phr60 from plasmid pTA1060 coordinates a variety of biological processes with population density including sporulation, cannibalism, biofilm formation and genetic competence. Similar to other Rap proteins that control sporulation, Rap60 modulates phosphorylation of the transcription factor Spo0A by acting as a phosphatase of Spo0F~P, an intermediate of the sporulation phosphorelay system. Additionally, Rap60 plays a noncanonical role in regulating the autophosphorylation of the sporulation-specific kinase KinA, a novel activity for Rap proteins. In contrast, Rap proteins that modulate genetic competence interfere with DNA binding by the transcription factor ComA. Rap60 regulates the activity of ComA in a unique manner by forming a Rap60–ComA–DNA ternary complex that inhibits transcription of target genes. Taken together, this work provides new insight into two novel mechanisms of regulating Spo0A and ComA by Rap60 and expands our general understanding of how plasmid-encoded quorum sensing pairs regulate important biological processes. PMID:25598361

  5. Novel mechanisms of controlling the activities of the transcription factors Spo0A and ComA by the plasmid-encoded quorum sensing regulators Rap60-Phr60 in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Kristina M; Hill, Patrick A; Griffith, Kevin L

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus subtilis and its closest relatives have multiple rap-phr quorum sensing gene pairs that coordinate a variety of physiological processes with population density. Extra-chromosomal rap-phr genes are also present on mobile genetic elements, yet relatively little is known about their function. In this work, we demonstrate that Rap60-Phr60 from plasmid pTA1060 coordinates a variety of biological processes with population density including sporulation, cannibalism, biofilm formation and genetic competence. Similar to other Rap proteins that control sporulation, Rap60 modulates phosphorylation of the transcription factor Spo0A by acting as a phosphatase of Spo0F∼P, an intermediate of the sporulation phosphorelay system. Additionally, Rap60 plays a noncanonical role in regulating the autophosphorylation of the sporulation-specific kinase KinA, a novel activity for Rap proteins. In contrast, Rap proteins that modulate genetic competence interfere with DNA binding by the transcription factor ComA. Rap60 regulates the activity of ComA in a unique manner by forming a Rap60-ComA-DNA ternary complex that inhibits transcription of target genes. Taken together, this work provides new insight into two novel mechanisms of regulating Spo0A and ComA by Rap60 and expands our general understanding of how plasmid-encoded quorum sensing pairs regulate important biological processes. PMID:25598361

  6. The Phosphorylation Flow of the Vibrio harveyi Quorum-Sensing Cascade Determines Levels of Phenotypic Heterogeneity in the Population

    PubMed Central

    Plener, Laure; Lorenz, Nicola; Reiger, Matthias; Ramalho, Tiago; Gerland, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quorum sensing (QS) is a communication process that enables a bacterial population to coordinate and synchronize specific behaviors. The bioluminescent marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi integrates three autoinducer (AI) signals into one quorum-sensing cascade comprising a phosphorelay involving three hybrid sensor kinases: LuxU; LuxO, an Hfq/small RNA (sRNA) switch; and the transcriptional regulator LuxR. Using a new set of V. harveyi mutants lacking genes for the AI synthases and/or sensors, we assayed the activity of the quorum-sensing cascade at the population and single-cell levels, with a specific focus on signal integration and noise levels. We found that the ratios of kinase activities to phosphatase activities of the three sensors and, hence, the extent of phosphorylation of LuxU/LuxO are important not only for the signaling output but also for the degree of noise in the system. The pools of phosphorylated LuxU/LuxO per cell directly determine the amounts of sRNAs produced and, consequently, the copy number of LuxR, generating heterogeneous quorum-sensing activation at the single-cell level. We conclude that the ability to drive the heterogeneous expression of QS-regulated genes in V. harveyi is an inherent feature of the architecture of the QS cascade. IMPORTANCE V. harveyi possesses one of the most complex quorum-sensing (QS) cascades known, using three different autoinducers (AIs) to control the induction of, e.g., bioluminescence, virulence factors, and biofilm and exoprotease production. We constructed various V. harveyi mutants to study the impact of each component and subsystem of the QS signaling cascade on QS activation at the population and single-cell levels. We found that the output was homogeneous only in the presence of all AIs. In the absence of any one AI, QS activation varied from cell to cell, resulting in phenotypic heterogeneity. This study elucidates a molecular design principle which enables a tightly integrated signaling

  7. Bacterial quorum sensing and metabolic slowing in a cooperative population

    PubMed Central

    An, Jae Hyung; Goo, Eunhye; Kim, Hongsup; Seo, Young-Su; Hwang, Ingyu

    2014-01-01

    Acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing (QS) controls the production of numerous intra- and extracellular products across many species of Proteobacteria. Although these cooperative activities are often costly at an individual level, they provide significant benefits to the group. Other potential roles for QS include the restriction of nutrient acquisition and maintenance of metabolic homeostasis of individual cells in a crowded but cooperative population. Under crowded conditions, QS may function to modulate and coordinate nutrient utilization and the homeostatic primary metabolism of individual cells. Here, we show that QS down-regulates glucose uptake, substrate level and oxidative phosphorylation, and de novo nucleotide biosynthesis via the activity of the QS-dependent transcriptional regulator QsmR (quorum sensing master regulator R) in the rice pathogen Burkholderia glumae. Systematic analysis of glucose uptake and core primary metabolite levels showed that QS deficiency perturbed nutrient acquisition, and energy and nucleotide metabolism, of individuals within the group. The QS mutants grew more rapidly than the wild type at the early exponential stage and outcompeted wild-type cells in coculture. Metabolic slowing of individuals in a QS-dependent manner indicates that QS acts as a metabolic brake on individuals when cells begin to mass, implying a mechanism by which AHL-mediated QS might have evolved to ensure homeostasis of the primary metabolism of individuals under crowded conditions. PMID:25267613

  8. Quorum sensing positively regulates flagellar motility in pathogenic Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Vibrios belonging to the Harveyi clade are among the major pathogens of aquatic organisms. Quorum sensing (QS) is essential for virulence of V. harveyi towards different hosts. However, most virulence factors reported to be controlled by QS to date are negatively regulated by QS, therefore suggesting that their impact on virulence is limited. In this study, we report that QS positively regulates flagellar motility. We found that autoinducer synthase mutants showed significantly lower swimming motility than the wild type, and the swimming motility could be restored by adding synthetic signal molecules. Further, motility of a luxO mutant with inactive QS (LuxO D47E) was significantly lower than that of the wild type and of a luxO mutant with constitutively maximal QS activity (LuxO D47A). Furthermore, we found that the expression of flagellar genes (both early, middle and late genes) was significantly lower in the luxO mutant with inactive QS when compared with wild type and the luxO mutant with maximal QS activity. Motility assays and gene expression also revealed the involvement of the quorum-sensing master regulator LuxR in the QS regulation of motility. Finally, the motility inhibitor phenamil significantly decreased the virulence of V. harveyi towards gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae. PMID:24528485

  9. Functional Amyloids Keep Quorum-sensing Molecules in Check*

    PubMed Central

    Seviour, Thomas; Hansen, Susan Hove; Yang, Liang; Yau, Yin Hoe; Wang, Victor Bochuan; Stenvang, Marcel R.; Christiansen, Gunna; Marsili, Enrico; Givskov, Michael; Chen, Yicai; Otzen, Daniel E.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Geifman-Shochat, Susana; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Dueholm, Morten S.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which extracellular metabolites, including redox mediators and quorum-sensing signaling molecules, traffic through the extracellular matrix of biofilms is poorly explored. We hypothesize that functional amyloids, abundant in natural biofilms and possessing hydrophobic domains, retain these metabolites. Using surface plasmon resonance, we demonstrate that the quorum-sensing (QS) molecules, 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone and N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, and the redox mediator pyocyanin bind with transient affinity to functional amyloids from Pseudomonas (Fap). Their high hydrophobicity predisposes them to signal-amyloid interactions, but specific interactions also play a role. Transient interactions allow for rapid association and dissociation kinetics, which make the QS molecules bioavailable and at the same time secure within the extracellular matrix as a consequence of serial bindings. Retention of the QS molecules was confirmed using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1-based 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone and N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone reporter assays, showing that Fap fibrils pretreated with the QS molecules activate the reporters even after sequential washes. Pyocyanin retention was validated by electrochemical analysis of pyocyanin-pretreated Fap fibrils subjected to the same washing process. Results suggest that QS molecule-amyloid interactions are probably important in the turbulent environments commonly encountered in natural habitats. PMID:25586180

  10. Computer-Aided Identification of Recognized Drugs as Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Sensing Inhibitors▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liang; Rybtke, Morten Theil; Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Hentzer, Morten; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by the use of small-molecule quorum-sensing inhibitors (referred to as the antipathogenic drug principle) is likely to play a role in future treatment strategies for chronic infections. In this study, structure-based virtual screening was used in a search for putative quorum-sensing inhibitors from a database comprising approved drugs and natural compounds. The database was built from compounds which showed structural similarities to previously reported quorum-sensing inhibitors, the ligand of the P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing receptor LasR, and a quorum-sensing receptor agonist. Six top-ranking compounds, all recognized drugs, were identified and tested for quorum-sensing-inhibitory activity. Three compounds, salicylic acid, nifuroxazide, and chlorzoxazone, showed significant inhibition of quorum-sensing-regulated gene expression and related phenotypes in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the identified compounds have the potential to be used as antipathogenic drugs. Furthermore, the results indicate that structure-based virtual screening is an efficient tool in the search for novel compounds to combat bacterial infections. PMID:19364871

  11. Computer-aided identification of recognized drugs as Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Rybtke, Morten Theil; Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Hentzer, Morten; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2009-06-01

    Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by the use of small-molecule quorum-sensing inhibitors (referred to as the antipathogenic drug principle) is likely to play a role in future treatment strategies for chronic infections. In this study, structure-based virtual screening was used in a search for putative quorum-sensing inhibitors from a database comprising approved drugs and natural compounds. The database was built from compounds which showed structural similarities to previously reported quorum-sensing inhibitors, the ligand of the P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing receptor LasR, and a quorum-sensing receptor agonist. Six top-ranking compounds, all recognized drugs, were identified and tested for quorum-sensing-inhibitory activity. Three compounds, salicylic acid, nifuroxazide, and chlorzoxazone, showed significant inhibition of quorum-sensing-regulated gene expression and related phenotypes in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the identified compounds have the potential to be used as antipathogenic drugs. Furthermore, the results indicate that structure-based virtual screening is an efficient tool in the search for novel compounds to combat bacterial infections. PMID:19364871

  12. Coral-associated bacteria, quorum sensing disrupters, and the regulation of biofouling.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Karina; Pavlov, Valentina; Marks, Robert S; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2013-01-01

    Marine biofouling, the settlement of microorganisms and macroorganisms on structures submerged in seawater, although economically detrimental, is a successful strategy for survival in hostile environments, where coordinated bacterial communities establish biofilms via the regulation of quorum sensing (QS) communication systems. The inhibition of QS activity among bacteria isolated from different coral species was investigated to gain further insight into its potency in the attenuation, or even the prevention, of undesirable biofouling on marine organisms. It is hypothesized that coral mucus/microorganism interactions are competitive, suggesting that the dominant communities secrete QS disruptive compounds. One hundred and twenty bacterial isolates were collected from healthy coral species and screened for their ability to inhibit QS using three bioreporter strains. Approximately 12, 11, and 24% of the isolates exhibited anti-QS activity against Escherichia coli pSB1075, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens KYC55 indicator strains, respectively. Isolates with positive activity against the bioluminescent monitor strains were scanned via a cytotoxic/genotoxic, E. coli TV1061 and DPD2794 antimicrobial panel. Isolates detected by C. violaceum CV026 and A. tumefaciens KYC55 reporter strains were tested for their ability to inhibit the growth of these reporter strains, which were found to be unaffected. Tests of the Favia sp. coral isolate Fav 2-50-7 (>98% similarity to Vibrio harveyi) for its ability to attenuate the formation of biofilm showed extensive inhibitory activity against biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. To ascertain the stability and general structure of the active compound, cell-free culture supernatants exposed to an increasing temperature gradient or to digestion by proteinase K, were shown to maintain potent QS attenuation and the ability to inhibit the growth of biofilms. Mass spectrometry confirmed

  13. Inhibiting N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthesis and quenching Pseudomonas quinolone quorum sensing to attenuate virulence

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Liu, Yi-Chia; Chang, Chien-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria sense their own population size, tune the expression of responding genes, and behave accordingly to environmental stimuli by secreting signaling molecules. This phenomenon is termed as quorum sensing (QS). By exogenously manipulating the signal transduction bacterial population behaviors could be controlled, which may be done through quorum quenching (QQ). QS related regulatory networks have been proven their involvement in regulating many virulence determinants in pathogenic bacteria in the course of infections. Interfering with QS signaling system could be a novel strategy against bacterial infections and therefore requires more understanding of their fundamental mechanisms. Here we review the development of studies specifically on the inhibition of production of N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL), a common proteobacterial QS signal. The opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, equips the alkylquinolone (AQ)-mediated QS which also plays crucial roles in its pathogenicity. The studies in QQ targeting on AQ are also discussed. PMID:26539190

  14. The role of quorum sensing in Escherichia coli (ETEC) virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Sturbelle, Régis Tuchtenhagen; de Avila, Luciana Farias da Costa; Roos, Talita Bandeira; Borchardt, Jéssica Lopes; da Conceição, Rita de Cássia dos Santos; Dellagostin, Odir Antonio; Leite, Fábio Pereira Leivas

    2015-11-18

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a signaling system among bacteria mediated by auto-inducer substances (AI). Whenever the concentration of these molecules reaches a threshold corresponding to a high cell density or quorum, the whole population starts a coordinated expression of specific genes. Studies have shown that epinephrine is also responsible for activating specific bacterial genes. This work aimed to investigate the role of conditioned medium (containing AI), epinephrine and their association on growth, motility, F4 fimbriae and heat-labile toxin (LT) expression on enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC, E68). A significant increase in motility, F4 and LT expression, was observed in the ETEC culture supplemented with conditioned medium and epinephrine. These findings suggest that ETEC uses some components of conditioned medium (e.g., AI molecules), host molecules (epinephrine), and their association to modulate the expression of important virulence genes. PMID:26386492

  15. Chemical Genetics Reveals Environment-Specific Roles for Quorum Sensing Circuits in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Michael A; Blackwell, Helen E

    2016-03-17

    Nutritional cues differentially influence the activities of the three quorum sensing (QS) circuits-Las, Rhl, and Pqs-in the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A full understanding of how these systems work together to tune virulence factor production to the environment is lacking. Here, we used chemical probes to evaluate the contribution of each QS circuit to virulence in wild-type P. aeruginosa under defined environmental conditions. Our results indicate that Rhl and Pqs drive virulence factor production in phosphate- and iron-limiting environments, while Las has a minor influence. Consequently, simultaneous inhibition of Rhl and Pqs can attenuate virulence in environments where Las inhibition fails. The activity trends generated in this study can be extrapolated to predict QS inhibitor activity in infection-relevant environments, such as cystic fibrosis sputum. These results indicate that environmental signals can drastically alter the efficacy of small-molecule QS inhibitors in P. aeruginosa and possibly other pathogens. PMID:26905657

  16. Pseudomonas cremoricolorata Strain ND07 Produces N-acyl Homoserine Lactones as Quorum Sensing Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Yunos, Nina Yusrina Muhamad; Tan, Wen-Si; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Mohamad, Nur Izzati; Tan, Pui-Wan; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial cell-to-cell communication system controlling QS-mediated genes which is synchronized with the population density. The regulation of specific gene activity is dependent on the signaling molecules produced, namely N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). We report here the identification and characterization of AHLs produced by bacterial strain ND07 isolated from a Malaysian fresh water sample. Molecular identification showed that strain ND07 is clustered closely to Pseudomonas cremoricolorata. Spent culture supernatant extract of P. cremoricolorata strain ND07 activated the AHL biosensor Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Using high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, it was confirmed that P. cremoricolorata strain ND07 produced N-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL) and N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation on the production of C10-HSL in P. cremoricolorata strain ND07. PMID:24984061

  17. Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Quorum Sensing in the Roseobacter Clade

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Jindong; Liu, Yue; Fuqua, Clay; Hill, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Roseobacter clade are ecologically important and numerically abundant in coastal environments and can associate with marine invertebrates and nutrient-rich marine snow or organic particles, on which quorum sensing (QS) may play an important role. In this review, we summarize current research progress on roseobacterial acyl-homoserine lactone-based QS, particularly focusing on three relatively well-studied representatives, Phaeobacter inhibens DSM17395, the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11 and the dinoflagellate symbiont Dinoroseobacter shibae. Bioinformatic survey of luxI homologues revealed that over 80% of available roseobacterial genomes encode at least one luxI homologue, reflecting the significance of QS controlled regulatory pathways in adapting to the relevant marine environments. We also discuss several areas that warrant further investigation, including studies on the ecological role of these diverse QS pathways in natural environments. PMID:24402124

  18. Quorum Sensing Activity of Enterobacter asburiae Isolated from Lettuce Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Yin Yin; Sulaiman, Joanita; Chen, Jian Woon; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial communication or quorum sensing (QS) is achieved via sensing of QS signaling molecules consisting of oligopeptides in Gram-positive bacteria and N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) in most Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, Enterobacteriaceae isolates from Batavia lettuce were screened for AHL production. Enterobacter asburiae, identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was found to produce short chain AHLs. High resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of the E. asburiae spent supernatant confirmed the production of N-butanoyl homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) and N–hexanoyl homoserine lactone (C6-HSL). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of AHL production by E. asburiae. PMID:24152877

  19. Quorum Sensing Inhibitors for Staphylococcus aureus from Italian Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Quave, Cassandra L.; Plano, Lisa R.W.; Bennett, Bradley C.

    2010-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality estimates due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections continue to rise. Therapeutic options are limited by antibiotic resistance. Anti-pathogenic compounds, which inhibit quorum sensing (QS) pathways, may be a useful alternative to antibiotics. Staphylococcal QS is encoded by the agr locus and is responsible for the production of δ-hemolysin. Quantification of δ-hemolysin found in culture supernatants permits the analysis of agr activity at the translational, rather than transcriptional, level. We employed RP-HPLC techniques to investigate the anti-QS activity of 168 extracts from 104 Italian plants through quantification of δ-hemolysin. Extracts from three medicinal plants (Ballota nigra, Castanea sativa, and Sambucus ebulus) exhibited a dose-dependent response in the production of δ-hemolysin, indicating strong anti-QS activity in a pathogenic MRSA isolate. PMID:20645243

  20. Studying bacterial quorum-sensing at the single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfino Perez, Pablo; Pelakh, Leslie; Young, Jonathan; Johnson, Elaine; Hagen, Stephen

    2010-03-01

    Like many bacterial species, Vibrio fischeri can detect its own population density through a quorum sensing (QS) mechanism. The bacterium releases a signal molecule (AI, autoinducer), which accumulates at high population density and triggers a genetic switch. In V.fischeri this leads to bioluminescence. Little is known about how stochastic gene expression affects QS at the level of single cells. We are imaging the luminescence of individual V.fischeri cells in a flow chamber and directly measuring the intercell variability in AI activation of the QS circuit. Our single-cell luminescence experiments allow us to track cells over time and characterize variations in their response to AI levels. We find heterogeneous response to the external signal: at a given AI concentration some cells may be strongly luminescent while others are virtually dark. The analysis of noise in the individual cell response can eventually lead to a better understanding of how cells use QS to gather information about their environment.

  1. Fine-Tuning Covalent Inhibition of Bacterial Quorum Sensing.

    PubMed

    Amara, Neri; Gregor, Rachel; Rayo, Josep; Dandela, Rambabu; Daniel, Erik; Liubin, Nina; Willems, H Marjo E; Ben-Zvi, Anat; Krom, Bastiaan P; Meijler, Michael M

    2016-05-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among human pathogens has galvanized efforts to find alternative routes to combat bacterial virulence. One new approach entails interfering with the ability of bacteria to coordinate population-wide gene expression, or quorum sensing (QS), thus inhibiting the production of virulence factors and biofilm formation. We have recently developed such a strategy by targeting LasR, the master regulator of QS in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, through the rational design of covalent inhibitors closely based on the core structure of the native ligand. We now report several groups of new inhibitors, one of which, fluoro-substituted ITC-12, displayed complete covalent modification of LasR, as well as effective QS inhibition in vitro and promising in vivo results. In addition to their potential clinical relevance, this series of synthetic QS modulators can be used as a tool to further unravel the complicated QS regulation in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26840534

  2. Type 2 quorum sensing monitoring, inhibition and biofilm formation in marine microrganisms.

    PubMed

    Liaqat, Iram; Bachmann, Robert Thomas; Edyvean, Robert G J

    2014-03-01

    The quorum sensing (QS) dependent behaviour of micro-organisms, in particular expression of virulence genes, biofilm formation and dispersal, have provided impetus for investigating practical approaches to interfere with microbial QS. This study tests Halomonas pacifica and Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, two halophilic marine micro-organism, for their AI-2 dependent QS signalling and the effect of two well-known quorum-sensing inhibitors (QSIs), patulin and penicillic acid, on biofilm formation. We report, for the first time, the successful amplification of a putative luxS gene in H. pacifica using degenerated primers and AI-2 dependent QS as well as inhibition using QSIs. Penicillic acid had a strong inhibitory effect on AI-2 induction of H. pacifica at non-growth inhibitory concentrations, while patulin has an adverse effect only at the highest concentration (25 μM). QSIs effect on biofilm forming capability was isolate specific, with maximum inhibition at 25 μM of patulin in H. pacifica. In M. hydrocarbonoclasticus, no adverse effects were noted at any tested concentration of either QSIs. Detection of bioluminescence and the presence of a putative luxS gene provide biochemical and genetic evidence for the production of a signalling molecule(s) which is the essential first step in characterizing H. pacifica QS. This study highlights the importance of AI-2 dependent QS in a marine setting, not previously reported. It further suggests that QSI compounds must be selected in the specific system in which they are to function, and they cannot easily be transferred from one QS system to another. PMID:24166155

  3. Inhaled Lactonase Reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing and Mortality in Rat Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lafleur, John; Lepidi, Hubert; Papazian, Laurent; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Raoult, Didier; Elias, Mikael; Silby, Mark W.; Bzdrenga, Janek; Bregeon, Fabienne; Chabriere, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The effectiveness of antibiotic molecules in treating Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia is reduced as a result of the dissemination of bacterial resistance. The existence of bacterial communication systems, such as quorum sensing, has provided new opportunities of treatment. Lactonases efficiently quench acyl-homoserine lactone-based bacterial quorum sensing, implicating these enzymes as potential new anti-Pseudomonas drugs that might be evaluated in pneumonia. Objectives The aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of a lactonase called SsoPox-I to reduce the mortality of a rat P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Methods To assess SsoPox-I-mediated quorum quenching, we first measured the activity of the virulence gene lasB, the synthesis of pyocianin, the proteolytic activity of a bacterial suspension and the formation of biofilm of a PAO1 strain grown in the presence of lactonase. In an acute lethal model of P. aeruginosa pneumonia in rats, we evaluated the effects of an early or deferred intra-tracheal treatment with SsoPox-I on the mortality, lung bacterial count and lung damage. Measurements and Primary Results SsoPox-I decreased PAO1 lasB virulence gene activity, pyocianin synthesis, proteolytic activity and biofilm formation. The early use of SsoPox-I reduced the mortality of rats with acute pneumonia from 75% to 20%. Histological lung damage was significantly reduced but the lung bacterial count was not modified by the treatment. A delayed treatment was associated with a non-significant reduction of mortality. Conclusion These results demonstrate the protective effects of lactonase SsoPox-I in P. aeruginosa pneumonia and open the way for a future therapeutic use. PMID:25350373

  4. Modulating Vibrio cholerae Quorum-Sensing-Controlled Communication Using Autoinducer-Loaded Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hoang D.; Spiegel, Alina C.; Hurley, Amanda; Perez, Lark J.; Maisel, Katharina; Ensign, Laura M.; Hanes, Justin; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Semmelhack, Martin F.; Prud’homme, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    The rise of bacterial antibiotic resistance has created a demand for alternatives to traditional antibiotics. Attractive possibilities include pro- and anti-quorum sensing therapies that function by modulating bacterial chemical communication circuits. We report the use of Flash NanoPrecipitation to deliver the Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing signal CAI-1 ((S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one) in a water dispersible form as nanoparticles. The particles activate V. cholerae quorum-sensing responses five orders of magnitude higher than does the identically administered free CAI-1, and are diffusive across in vivo delivery barriers such as intestinal mucus. This work highlights the promise of combining quorum-sensing strategies with drug delivery approaches for the development of next-generation medicines. PMID:25651002

  5. Bacteria clustering by polymers induces the expression of quorum sense controlled phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Leong T.; Xue, Xuan; Sui, Cheng; Brown, Alan; Pritchard, David I.; Halliday, Nigel; Winzer, Klaus; Howdle, Steven M.; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco; Krasnogor, Natalio; Alexander, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria deploy a range of chemistries to regulate their behaviour and respond to their environment. Quorum sensing is one mean by which bacteria use chemical reactions to modulate pre-infection behaviour such as surface attachment. Polymers that can interfere with bacterial adhesion or the chemical reactions used for quorum sensing are thus a potential means to control bacterial population responses. Here we report how polymeric “bacteria sequestrants”, designed to bind to bacteria through electrostatic interactions and thus inhibit bacterial adhesion to surfaces, induce the expression of quorum sensing controlled phenotypes as a consequence of cell clustering. A combination of polymer and analytical chemistry, biological assays and computational modelling has been used to characterise the feedback between bacteria clustering and quorum sensing signaling. We have also derived design principles and chemical strategies for controlling bacterial behaviour at the population level. PMID:24256871

  6. Active regulation of receptor ratios controls integration of quorum-sensing signals in Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Shu-Wen; Schaffer, Jessica N; Tu, Kimberly C; Mehta, Pankaj; Lu, Wenyun; Ong, N P; Bassler, Bonnie L; Wingreen, Ned S

    2011-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a chemical signaling mechanism used by bacteria to communicate and orchestrate group behaviors. Multiple feedback loops exist in the quorum-sensing circuit of the model bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Using fluorescence microscopy of individual cells, we assayed the activity of the quorum-sensing circuit, with a focus on defining the functions of the feedback loops. We quantitatively investigated the signaling input–output relation both in cells with all feedback loops present as well as in mutants with specific feedback loops disrupted. We found that one of the feedback loops regulates receptor ratios to control the integration of multiple signals. Together, the feedback loops affect the input–output dynamic range of signal transmission and the noise in the output. We conclude that V. harveyi employs multiple feedback loops to simultaneously control quorum-sensing signal integration and to ensure signal transmission fidelity. PMID:21613980

  7. Analysis of Quorum-Sensing Pantoea stewartii Strain M073A through Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Izzati Mohamad, Nur; Tan, Wen-Si; Chang, Chien-Yi; Keng Tee, Kok; Yin, Wai-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Pantoea stewartii strain M073a is a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from a tropical waterfall. This strain exhibits quorum-sensing activity. Here, the assembly and annotation of its genome are presented. PMID:25700398

  8. The apparent quorum-sensing inhibitory activity of pyrogallol is a side effect of peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Defoirdt, Tom; Pande, Gde Sasmita Julyantoro; Baruah, Kartik; Bossier, Peter

    2013-06-01

    There currently is more and more interest in the use of natural products, such as tea polyphenols, as therapeutic agents. The polyphenol compound pyrogallol has been reported before to inhibit quorum-sensing-regulated bioluminescence in Vibrio harveyi. Here, we report that the addition of 10 mg · liter(-1) pyrogallol protects both brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) and giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) larvae from pathogenic Vibrio harveyi, whereas the compound showed relatively low toxicity (therapeutic index of 10). We further demonstrate that the apparent quorum-sensing-disrupting activity is a side effect of the peroxide-producing activity of this compound rather than true quorum-sensing inhibition. Our results emphasize that verification of minor toxic effects by using sensitive methods and the use of appropriate controls are essential when characterizing compounds as being able to disrupt quorum sensing. PMID:23545532

  9. Bacteria clustering by polymers induces the expression of quorum-sensing-controlled phenotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, Leong T.; Xue, Xuan; Sui, Cheng; Brown, Alan; Pritchard, David I.; Halliday, Nigel; Winzer, Klaus; Howdle, Steven M.; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco; Krasnogor, Natalio; Alexander, Cameron

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria deploy a range of chemistries to regulate their behaviour and respond to their environment. Quorum sensing is one method by which bacteria use chemical reactions to modulate pre-infection behaviour such as surface attachment. Polymers that can interfere with bacterial adhesion or the chemical reactions used for quorum sensing are therefore a potential means to control bacterial population responses. Here, we report how polymeric ‘bacteria sequestrants’, designed to bind to bacteria through electrostatic interactions and therefore inhibit bacterial adhesion to surfaces, induce the expression of quorum-sensing-controlled phenotypes as a consequence of cell clustering. A combination of polymer and analytical chemistry, biological assays and computational modelling has been used to characterize the feedback between bacteria clustering and quorum sensing signalling. We have also derived design principles and chemical strategies for controlling bacterial behaviour at the population level.

  10. Analysis of Quorum-Sensing Pantoea stewartii Strain M073A through Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Izzati Mohamad, Nur; Tan, Wen-Si; Chang, Chien-Yi; Keng Tee, Kok; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-01-01

    Pantoea stewartii strain M073a is a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from a tropical waterfall. This strain exhibits quorum-sensing activity. Here, the assembly and annotation of its genome are presented. PMID:25700398