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1

The effect of composition on the leaching of three nuclear waste glasses: R7T7, AVM and VRZ  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of composition variations on long-term glass behavior was investigated for three nuclear glass composition domains: the French SON 68 (R7T7-type) glass, the Na–Mg borosilicate AVM glass and the aluminosilicate VRZ glass defined as part of the investigation of new containment matrices based on zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7). The initial alteration rates for glasses from different domains are comparable. Conversely, the

Pierre Frugier; Christelle Martin; Isabelle Ribet; Thierry Advocat; Stéphane Gin

2005-01-01

2

The effect of composition on the leaching of three nuclear waste glasses: R7T7, AVM and VRZ  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The influence of composition variations on long-term glass behavior was investigated for three nuclear glass composition domains: the French SON 68 (R7T7-type) glass, the Na-Mg borosilicate AVM glass and the aluminosilicate VRZ glass defined as part of the investigation of new containment matrices based on zirconolite (CaZrTi 2O 7). The initial alteration rates for glasses from different domains are comparable. Conversely, the alteration kinetics at advanced stages of reaction progress are very different, with decreases in the rates corresponding to different kinetic profiles, i.e. altered thickness versus time. The altered glass thickness can depend on the initial alteration rate and especially on the decrease in the rate, or it can be determined by the high residual alteration rate. The variation of the alteration rates over time appears to be related to the alteration film that forms on the surface of the material in particular the presence of any secondary crystalline phases. For AVM glass, the high residual rate is attributed to phyllosilicate phases rich in magnesium.

Frugier, Pierre; Martin, Christelle; Ribet, Isabelle; Advocat, Thierry; Gin, Stéphane

2005-11-01

3

Helium mobility in SON68 borosilicate nuclear glass: A nuclear reaction analysis approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 3He behavior in the non active R7T7 type borosilicate glass called SON68 has been investigated using the implantation method to introduce helium in the material. Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) was performed to follow the helium concentration depth profile evolution as a function of annealing time and temperature. In addition, in situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been implemented to study the formation of helium bubbles during both implantation and annealing processes. Numerical modeling with two different approaches is proposed and discussed to investigate the helium mobility mechanisms. Our study reveals for helium incorporation by implantation at low temperature the presence of several helium populations with disparate diffusivities. The most mobile helium fraction would be attributed to atomic diffusion. The corresponding activation energy value (0.61 eV) extracted from Arrhenius graphs is in good agreement with literature data. The results also highlight that the damages associated to helium sursaturation are the source of small helium clusters formation, with a reduced mobility instead of the atomic mobility measured by the infusion technique. Small cavities that support this assumption have been observed by TEM at low temperature.

Bès, R.; Sauvage, T.; Peuget, S.; Haussy, J.; Chamssedine, F.; Oliviero, E.; Fares, T.; Vincent, L.

2013-11-01

4

Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

1999-01-06

5

Crystallization during processing of nuclear waste glass  

SciTech Connect

In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glassmaking are reviewed.

Hrma, Pavel R.

2010-12-01

6

Mechanical properties of nuclear waste glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mechanical properties of nuclear waste glasses are important as they will determine the degree of cracking that may occur either on cooling or following a handling accident. Recent interest in the vitrification of intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW) as well as high level radioactive waste (HLW) has led to the development of new waste glass compositions that have not previously been characterised. Therefore the mechanical properties, including Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, hardness, indentation fracture toughness and brittleness of a series of glasses designed to safely incorporate wet ILW have been investigated. The results are presented and compared with the equivalent properties of an inactive simulant of the current UK HLW glass and other nuclear waste glasses from the literature. The higher density glasses tend to have slightly lower hardness and indentation fracture toughness values and slightly higher brittleness values, however, it is shown that the variations in mechanical properties between these different glasses are limited, are well within the range of published values for nuclear waste glasses, and that the surveyed data for all radioactive waste glasses fall within relatively narrow range.

Connelly, A. J.; Hand, R. J.; Bingham, P. A.; Hyatt, N. C.

2011-01-01

7

Glass produced by underground nuclear explosions. [Rainier  

SciTech Connect

Detonation of an underground nuclear explosive produces a strong shock wave which propagates spherically outward, vaporizing the explosive and nearby rock and melting, the surrounding rock. The vaporized material expands adiabatically, forming a cavity. As the energy is dissipated during the cavity formation process, the explosive and rock debris condense and mix with the melted rock. The melt flows to the bottom of the cavity where it is quenched by fractured rock fragments falling from above as the cavity collapses. Measurements indicate that about 740 tonnes of rock and/or soil are melted for every kiloton (10/sup 12/ calories) of explosive energy, or about 25% of the explosive energy goes to melting rock. The resulting glass composition reflects the composition of the unaltered rock with explosive debris. The appearance ranges from white pumice to dense, dark lava. The bulk composition and color vary with the amount of explosive iron incorporated into the glass. The refractory explosion products are mixed with the solidified melt, although the degree of mixing is variable. Electron microprobe studies of glasses produced by Rainier in welded tuff have produced the following results: glasses are dehydrated relative to the host media, glasses are extremely heterogeneous on a 20 ..mu..m scale, a ubiquitous feature is the presence of dark marble-cake regions in the glass, which were locally enriched in iron and may be related to the debris, optically amorphous regions provide evidence of shock melting, only limited major element redistribution and homogenization occur within the cavity.

Schwartz, L.; Piwinskii, A.; Ryerson, F.; Tewes, H.; Beiriger, W.

1983-01-01

8

Nuclear waste under glass, further discussion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

J. J. Crovisier and J. Honnorez [1988] discuss an article by W. W. Maggs, “Mg May Protect Waste Under Glass” [Maggs, 1988] summarizing work by A. Barkatt (Catholic University, Washington, D.C.), B. P. Glass (University of Delaware, Newark), and S. Alterescu and J. A. O'Keefe (NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, Md.). We found that seawater is orders of magnitude less corrosive t h an fresh water in attacking tektite glass; traced the protective effect to the presence of magnesium, at a level of about 1.3 g/L in seawater; and suggested that the effect might be useful in protecting nuclear waste glasses from corrosion.Crovisier and Honnorez first make the point that the rate of corrosion of glass is, in principle, a function of the ratio of surface area 5 to the effective volume V. This concept, which is usually discussed in American literature under the name of S/V effects, is discussed by Crovisier and Honnorez in terms of the “permeability of the environment.” These effects have been carefully considered throughout our work (see, for example, Barkatt et al. [19867rsqb;). It turns out that in the sea the effective S/V is so small that the effects referred to by Crovisier and Honnorez can be ignored.

O'Keefe, J. A.; Barkatt, A.; Glass, B. P.; Alterescu, S.

9

A natural analogue of nuclear waste glass in compacted bentonite  

Microsoft Academic Search

A marine based argillaceous rock containing volcanic glass shards has been investigated to infer the long-term durability of vitrified nuclear waste in compacted bentonite, which is a candidate for buffer material constituting the engineered barrier system for nuclear waste disposal. Fission track ages indicate that the volcanic glass shards, andesitic scoria, have been buried in the argillaceous rock for about

Gento Kamei; Yasuhisa Yusa; Takashi Arai

2000-01-01

10

Spectroscopic investigation of U, Np and Th in nuclear glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Vitrification of high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glasses is currently used on an industrial scale in several countries. The fundamental properties of the waste forms are their chemical and mechanical durability against the forcing conditions represented by chemical alteration or internal/external irradiation. The waste immobilized in glass is composed of over 30 different nuclear fission and activation products, as well as minor actinides. The oxidation state and local atomic coordination of long-lived radionuclides are important parameters to understand the long-term evolution of the glass. We present an overview of the local structure around actinides in glasses similar to the French nuclear glass. X-Ray absorption spectroscopy has been used to probe the local environment around uranium, neptunium and thorium in these glasses. It is combined with with UV-visible spectroscopy, used to get selective information on the surrounding of U(IV), U(V) and U(VI) in glasses. Our spectroscopic data show that U, Np and Th occur in nuclear glasses in a peculiar surrounding showing significant differences with the crystal chemistry of these elements in crystalline compounds. Element speciation may be used as a pertinent parameter to follow the long-term stability of nuclear glasses, either under irradiation or during the alteration of the glass.

Calas, G.; Galoisy, L. V.; Petit-Maire, D.

2011-12-01

11

Iron Phosphate Glasses: An Alternative for Vitrifying Certain Nuclear Wastes  

SciTech Connect

Vitrification of nuclear waste in a glass is currently the preferred process for waste disposal. DOE currently approves only borosilicate (BS) type glasses for such purposes. However, many nuclear wastes, presently awaiting disposal, have complex and diverse chemical compositions, and often contain components that are poorly soluble or chemically incompatible in BS glasses. Such problematic wastes can be pre-processed and/or diluted to compensate for their incompatibility with a BS glass matrix, but both of these solutions increases the wasteform volume and the overall cost for vitrification. Direct vitrification using alternative glasses that utilize the major components already present in the waste is preferable, since it avoids pre-treating or diluting the waste, and, thus, minimizes the wasteform volume and overall cost.

Delbert E. Day; Chandra S. Ray; Cheol-Woon Kim

2004-12-28

12

Natural glass analogues to alteration of nuclear waste glass: A review and recommendations for further study  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to review previous work on the weathering of natural glasses; and to make recommendations for further work with respect to studying the alteration of natural glasses as it relates quantifying rates of dissolution. the first task was greatly simplified by the published papers of Jercinovic and Ewing (1987) and Byers, Jercinovic, and Ewing (1987). The second task is obviously the more difficult of the two and the author makes no claim of completeness in this regard. Glasses weather in the natural environment by reacting with aqueous solutions producing a rind of secondary solid phases. It had been proposed by some workers that the thickness of this rind is a function of the age of the glass and thus could be used to estimate glass dissolution rates. However, Jercinovic and Ewing (1987) point out that in general the rind thickness does not correlate with the age of the glass owing to the differences in time of contact with the solution compared to the actual age of the sample. It should be noted that the rate of glass dissolution is also a function of the composition of both the glass and the solution, and the temperature. Quantification of the effects of these parameters (as well as time of contact with the aqueous phase and flow rates) would thus permit a prediction of the consequences of glass-fluid interactions under varying environmental conditions. Defense high- level nuclear waste (DHLW), consisting primarily of liquid and sludge, will be encapsulated by and dispersed in a borosilicate glass before permanent storage in a HLW repository. This glass containing the DHLW serves to dilute the radionuclides and to retard their dispersion into the environment. 318 refs.

McKenzie, W.F.

1990-01-01

13

Redox reaction and foaming in nuclear waste glass melting  

SciTech Connect

This document was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and is an attempt to analyze and estimate the effects of feed composition variables and reducing agent variables on the expected chemistry of reactions occurring in the cold cap and in the glass melt in the nuclear waste glass Slurry-fed, joule-heated melters as they might affect foaming during the glass-making process. Numerous redox reactions of waste glass components and potential feed additives, and the effects of other feed variables on these reactions are reviewed with regard to their potential effect on glass foaming. A major emphasis of this report is to examine the potential positive or negative aspects of adjusting feed with formic acid as opposed to other feed modification techniques including but not limited to use of other reducing agents. Feed modification techniques other than the use of reductants that should influence foaming behavior include control of glass melter feed pH through use of nitric acid. They also include partial replacement of sodium salts by lithium salts. This latter action (b) apparently lowers glass viscosity and raises surface tension. This replacement should decrease foaming by decreasing foam stability.

Ryan, J.L.

1995-08-01

14

CORROSION OF NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES IN NON-SATURATED CONDITIONS: TIME-TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOUR  

E-print Network

CORROSION OF NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES IN NON-SATURATED CONDITIONS: TIME-TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOUR Michael the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses in terms of time-temperature (t, T) parameters. A linear (non on the temperature of the disposal environment. (Key words: nuclear waste, borosilicate glasses, corrosion, disposal

Sheffield, University of

15

Helium solubility in SON68 nuclear waste glass  

SciTech Connect

Helium behavior in a sodium borosilicate glass (SON68) dedicated to the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste is examined. Two experimental approaches on nonradioactive glass specimens are implemented: pressurized helium infusion experiments and {sup 3}He ion implantation experiments. The temperature variation of helium solubility in SON68 glass was determined and analyzed with the harmonic oscillator model to determine values of the energy of interaction E(0) at the host sites (about -4000 J/mol), the vibration frequency (about 1.7 x 10{sup 11} s{sup -1}), and the density of solubility sites (2.2 x 10{sup 21} sites cm{sup -3}). The implantation experiments show that a non diffusive transport phenomenon (i.e., athermal diffusion) is involved in the material when the helium concentration exceeds 2.3 x 10{sup 21} He cm{sup -3}, and thus probably as soon as it exceeds the density of solubility sites accessible to helium in the glass. We propose that this transport mechanism could be associated with the relaxation of the stress gradient induced by the implanted helium profile, which is favored by the glass damage. Microstructural characterization by TEM and ESEM of glass specimens implanted with high helium concentrations showed a homogeneous microstructure free of bubbles, pores, or cracking at a scale of 10 nm. (authors)

Fares, Toby; Peuget, Sylvain; Bouty, Olivier; Broudic, Veronique; Maugeri, Emilio; Bes, Rene; Jegou, Christophe [CEA, DEN, DTCD SECM LMPA, F-30207 Marcoule, Bagnols Sur Cez, (France); Chamssedine, Fadel; Sauvage, Thierry [CNRS, CEMHTI, F-245071 Orleans, (France); Deschanels, Xavier [LNAR, Marcoule Inst Separat Chem, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France)

2012-12-15

16

MILLIMETER-WAVE MONITORING OF NUCLEAR WASTE GLASS MELTS - AN OVERVIEW  

EPA Science Inventory

Molten glass characteristics of temperature, resistivity, and viscosity can be monitored reliably in the high temperature and chemically corrosive environment of nuclear waste glass melters using millimeter-wave sensor technology. Millimeter-waves are ideally suited for such meas...

17

An Investigation into the Oxidation State of Molybdenum in Simplified High Level Nuclear Waste Glass Compositions  

E-print Network

. INTRODUCTION Alkali borosilicate glasses are used by British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) to vitrify HLW raffinates in an alkali borosilicate glass composition that is currently used for HLW vitrification in the UK Glass Compositions R.J. Short, R.J. Hand and N.C. Hyatt, ISL, Department of Engineering Materials

Sheffield, University of

18

Lead iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for disposal of high-level nuclear waste  

DOEpatents

Lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90.degree. C., with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10.sup.2 to 10.sup.3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. Lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass can be prepared at temperatures as low as 800.degree. C., since they exhibit very low melt viscosities in the 800.degree. to 1050.degree. C. temperature range. These waste-loaded glasses do not readily devitrify at temperatures as high as 550.degree. C. and are not adversely affected by large doses of gamma radiation in H.sub.2 O at 135.degree. C. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear wasteforms.

Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sales, Brian C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01

19

Final technical report: Effects of water on properties of the simulated nuclear waste glasses  

SciTech Connect

For isolation of nuclear wastes through the vitrification process, waste slurry is mixed with borosilicate based glass and remelted at high temperature. During these processes, water can enter into the final waste glass. It is known that water in silica and silicate glasses changes various glass properties, such as chemical durability, viscosity and electrical conductivity. These properties are very important for processing and assuring the quality and safety controls of the waste glasses. The objective of this project was to investigate the effect of water in the simulated nuclear waste glasses on various glass properties, including chemical durability, glass transition temperature, liquidus temperature, viscosity and electrical conductivity. This report summarizes the results of this investigation conducted at Rensselaer during the past one year.

Li, H.; Tomozawa, M.

1996-02-01

20

Development of glass vitrification at SRL as a waste treatment technique for nuclear weapon components  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the development of vitrification for the waste treatment of nuclear weapons components at the Savannah River Site. Preliminary testing of surrogate nuclear weapon electronic waste shows that glass vitrification is a viable, robust treatment method.

Coleman, J.T.; Bickford, D.F.

1991-12-31

21

Development of glass vitrification at SRL as a waste treatment technique for nuclear weapon components  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the development of vitrification for the waste treatment of nuclear weapons components at the Savannah River Site. Preliminary testing of surrogate nuclear weapon electronic waste shows that glass vitrification is a viable, robust treatment method.

Coleman, J.T.; Bickford, D.F.

1991-01-01

22

Leaching behavior of glass ceramic nuclear waste forms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glass ceramic waste forms were investigated as alternatives to borosilicate glasses for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste. Three glass ceramic systems were investigated, including basalt, celsian, and fresnoite, each containing 20 wt percent simulated high-level waste calcine. Static leach tests were performed on seven glass ceramic materials and one parent glass (before recrystallization). Samples were leached at 90 C for 3 to 28 days in deionized water and silicate water. The results, expressed in normalized elemental mass loss, show comparable releases from celsian and fresnoite glass ceramics. Basalt glass ceramics demonstrated the lowest normalized elemental losses with a nominal release less than 2 grams per square meter when leached in polypropylene containers. The releases from basalt glass ceramics when leached in silicate water were nearly identical with those in deionized water. The overall leachability of celsian and fresnoite glass ceramics was improved when silicate water was used as the leachant.

Lokken, R. O.

1981-11-01

23

Glass former composition and method for immobilizing nuclear waste using the same  

DOEpatents

An alkoxide glass former composition has silica-containing constituents present as solid particulates of a particle size of 0.1 to 0.7 micrometers in diameter in a liquid carrier phase substantially free of dissolved silica. The glass former slurry is resistant to coagulation and may contain other glass former metal constituents. The immobilization of nuclear waste employs the described glass former by heating the same to reduce the volume, mixing the same with the waste, and melting the resultant mixture to encapsulate the waste in the resultant glass.

Cadoff, Laurence H. (Wilkins Township, Allegheny County, PA); Smith-Magowan, David B. (Washington, DC)

1988-01-01

24

Structural analysis of some sodium and alumina rich high-level nuclear waste glasses  

SciTech Connect

Sodium and aluminum rich high level nuclear waste glasses are prone to nepheline (NaAlSiO4) crystallization. Since nepheline removes three moles of glass forming oxides (Al2O3 and SiO2) per each mole of Na2O, its formation can result in sever deterioration of the chemical durability. The present study aims at investigating the relationships between the molecular-level structure of sodium alumino-borosilicate based simulated high-level nuclear waste glasses and their crystallization behavior by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray diffraction, respectively. The molecular structure of most of the investigated glasses comprises of a mixture of Q2 and Q3 (Si) units while aluminum and boron are predominantly present in tetrahedral and trigonal coordination, respectively. The increasing boron content has been shown to suppress the nepheline formation in the glasses. The structural influence of various glass components on nepheline crystallization has been discussed.

Goel, Ashutosh; McCloy, John S.; Fox, Kevin M.; Leslie, Clifford J.; Riley, Brian J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Schweiger, Michael J.

2012-02-01

25

Leaching behavior of glass ceramic nuclear waste forms  

SciTech Connect

Glass ceramic waste forms have been investigated as alternatives to borosilicate glasses for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Three glass ceramic systems were investigated, including basalt, celsian, and fresnoite, each containing 20 wt % simulated high-level waste calcine. Static leach tests were performed on seven glass ceramic materials and one parent glass (before recrystallization). Samples were leached at 90/sup 0/C for 3 to 28 days in deionized water and silicate water. The results, expressed in normalized elemental mass loss, (g/m/sup 2/), show comparable releases from celsian and fresnoite glass ceramics. Basalt glass ceramics demonstrated the lowest normalized elemental losses with a nominal release less than 2 g/m/sup 2/ when leached in polypropylene containers. The releases from basalt glass ceramics when leached in silicate water were nearly identical with those in deionized water. The overall leachability of celsian and fresnoite glass ceramics was improved when silicate water was used as the leachant.

Lokken, R.O.

1981-11-01

26

Simulation of Self-Irradiation of High-Sodium Content Nuclear Waste Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Alkali-borosilicate glasses are widely used in nuclear industry as a matrix for immobilisation of hazardous radioactive wastes. Durability or corrosion resistance of these glasses is one of key parameters in waste storage and disposal safety. It is influenced by many factors such as composition of glass and surrounding media, temperature, time and so on. As these glasses contain radioactive elements most of their properties including corrosion resistance are also impacted by self-irradiation. The effect of external gamma-irradiation on the short-term (up to 27 days) dissolution of waste borosilicate glasses at moderate temperatures (30 deg. to 60 deg. C) was studied. The glasses studied were Magnox Waste glass used for immobilisation of HLW in UK, and K-26 glass used in Russia for ILW immobilisation. Glass samples were irradiated under {gamma}-source (Co-60) up to doses 1 and 11 MGy. Normalised rates of elemental release and activation energy of release were measured for Na, Li, Ca, Mg, B, Si and Mo before and after irradiation. Irradiation up to 1 MGy results in increase of leaching rate of almost all elements from both MW and K-26 with the exception of Na release from MW glass. Further irradiation up to a dose of 11 MGy leads to the decrease of elemental release rates to nearly initial value. Another effect of irradiation is increase of activation energies of elemental release. (authors)

Pankov, Alexey S.; Ojovan, Michael I. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Batyukhnova, Olga G. [International Education Training Centre, SUE SIA 'Radon', The 7-th Rostovsky Lane 2/14, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation); Lee, William E. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, Exhibition Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01

27

THE IMPACT OF KINETICS ON NEPHELINE FORMATION IN NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES  

SciTech Connect

Sixteen glass compositions were selected to study the potential impacts of the kinetics of nepheline formation in high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass. The chosen compositions encompassed a relatively large nepheline discriminator (ND) range, 0.40-0.66, and included a relatively broad range, and amount of, constituents including high aluminum and high boron concentrations. All glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and subsequently exposed to six different cooling treatments. The cooling treatments consisted of three 'stepped' profiles and their corresponding 'smooth' profiles. Included in the cooling treatment was the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister centerline cooling (CCC) profile in addition to a 'faster' and a 'slower' total cooling line. After quenching and heat treating, x-ray diffraction confirmed the type and amount of any resultant crystallization. The target compositions were shown to be consistent with the measured compositions. Two quenched glasses and several treated glasses exhibited minor amounts of spinel and spinel-like phases. Nepheline was not observed in any of the quenched glasses but was observed in many of the treated glasses. The amount of nepheline ranged from approximately 2wt% to 30wt% for samples cooled over shorter times and longer times respectively. Differences were observed in the amount of nepheline crystallization after smooth and stepped cooling and increased with total cooling time. In some glasses, nepheline crystallization appeared to be directly proportional to total cooling time while the total amount of nepheline crystallization varied, suggesting that the nepheline crystallization rate was independent of (or at least faster than) cooling rate but, varied depending on the glass composition. On the contrary, in another glass, nepheline crystallization appeared to be inversely proportional to cooling rate. The high alumina glasses, predicted to form nepheline according to the ND, did not precipitate nepheline. Additionally, analysis from different regions of treated glasses indicated that nepheline nucleation and growth occurs at the glass/crucible and glass/atmosphere interfaces. Furthermore, the measured amount of non-nepheline phases appeared independent of the sampling region. It is postulated that crucible-scale methods used to heat treat HLW glass, such as the CCC method, artificially induce nepheline formation in the glass. The results of this study suggest nepheline kinetics can vary significantly depending on glass composition and, more importantly, glasses fabricated using current DWPF conditions are potentially susceptible to the impact of nepheline kinetics. This report summarizes the supporting research and provides the basis for continued research on nepheline kinetics and its effects on HLW glasses.

Amoroso, J.

2011-03-07

28

STABILIZING GLASS BONDED WASTE FORMS CONTAINING FISSION PRODUCTS SEPARATED FROM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL  

SciTech Connect

A model has been developed to represent the stresses developed when a molten, glass-bonded brittle cylinder (used to store nuclear material) is cooled from high temperature to working temperature. Large diameter solid cylinders are formed by heating glass or glass-bonded mixtures (mixed with nuclear waste) to high temperature (915°C). These cylinders must be cooled as the final step in preparing them for storage. Fast cooling time is desirable for production; however, if cooling is too fast, the cylinder can crack into many pieces. To demonstrate the capability of the model, cooling rate cracking data were obtained on small diameter (7.8 cm diameter) glass-only cylinders. The model and experimental data were combined to determine the critical cooling rate which separates the non-cracking stable glass region from the cracked, non-stable glass regime. Although the data have been obtained so far only on small glass-only cylinders, the data and model were used to extrapolate the critical-cooling rates for large diameter ceramic waste form (CWF) cylinders. The extrapolation estimates long term cooling requirements. While a 52-cm diameter cylinder (EBR-II-waste size) can be cooled to 100°C in 70 hours without cracking, a 181.5-cm diameter cylinder (LWR waste size) requires 35 days to cool to 100°C. These cooling times are long enough that verification of these estimates are required so additional experiments are planned on both glass only and CWF material.

Kenneth J. Bateman; Charles W. Solbrig

2008-07-01

29

Overview of chemical modeling of nuclear waste glass dissolution  

SciTech Connect

Glass dissolution takes place through metal leaching and hydration of the glass surface accompanied by development of alternation layers of varying crystallinity. The reaction which controls the long-term glass dissolution rate appears to be surface layer dissolution. This reaction is reversible because the buildup of dissolved species in solution slows the dissolution rate due to a decreased dissolution affinity. Glass dissolution rates are therefore highly dependent on silica concentrations in solution because silica is the major component of the alteration layer. Chemical modeling of glass dissolution using reaction path computer codes has successfully been applied to short term experimental tests and used to predict long-term repository performance. Current problems and limitations of the models include a poorly defined long-term glass dissolution mechanism, the use of model parameters determined from the same experiments that the model is used to predict, and the lack of sufficient validation of key assumptions in the modeling approach. Work is in progress that addresses these issues. 41 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Bourcier, W.L.

1991-02-01

30

Progress toward bridging from atomistic to continuum modeling to predict nuclear waste glass dissolution.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes research performed for the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Subcontinuum and Upscaling Task. The work conducted focused on developing a roadmap to include molecular scale, mechanistic information in continuum-scale models of nuclear waste glass dissolution. This information is derived from molecular-scale modeling efforts that are validated through comparison with experimental data. In addition to developing a master plan to incorporate a subcontinuum mechanistic understanding of glass dissolution into continuum models, methods were developed to generate constitutive dissolution rate expressions from quantum calculations, force field models were selected to generate multicomponent glass structures and gel layers, classical molecular modeling was used to study diffusion through nanopores analogous to those in the interfacial gel layer, and a micro-continuum model (K{mu}C) was developed to study coupled diffusion and reaction at the glass-gel-solution interface.

Zapol, Peter (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Bourg, Ian (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, CA); Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Steefel, Carl I. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, CA); Schultz, Peter Andrew

2011-10-01

31

Spectroscopic investigation of gamma radiation-induced coloration in silicate glass for nuclear applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Silicate glass irradiated by ?-rays was investigated in this study using spectroscopic analyses which included ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The phenomenon of coloration on ?-ray-irradiated silicate glass was analyzed and the effect of annealing on the silicate coloration was also investigated. The results revealed that the coloration originates from the creation of hole-centers (HC) caused by radiation. The shade of the coloration highly correlates to the amount of these HC-related defects but can be reversed by thermal annealing. The variation in coloration is an effective predictive factor in understanding radiation damage on silicate glass. Therefore, this study is relevant in the development of radiation detectors using silicate material as well as in the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in glass form.

Tsai, Hsu-Sheng; Chao, Der-Sheng; Wu, Ya-Hsuan; He, Yu-Ting; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Liang, Jenq-Horng

2014-10-01

32

Iron Phosphate Glasses for Vitrifying DOE High Priority Nuclear Wastes  

SciTech Connect

Iron phosphate glasses have been studied as an alternative glass for vitrifying Department of Energy (DOE) high priority wastes. The high priority wastes were the Low Activity Waste (LAW) and the High Level Waste (HLW) with high chrome content stored at Hanford, WA, and the Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. These wastes were recommended by Tanks Focus Area since they were expected to require special attention when vitrified in borosilicate glasses. All three of these wastes have been successfully vitrified in iron phosphate glasses at waste loadings ranging from a low of 32 wt% for the high sulfate LAW to 40 wt% for the SBW to a high of 75 wt% for the high chrome HLW. In addition to these desirable high waste loadings, the iron phosphate glasses were easily melted, typically between 950 and 1200 C, in less than 4 hours in commercial refractory oxide containers. It is noteworthy that the chemical durability of both glassy and deliberately crystallized iron phosphate wasteforms not only met, but significantly exceeded, all current DOE chemical durability requirements as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and Vapor Hydration Test (VHT). The high waste loading, low melting temperature, rapid furnace throughput (short melting time) and their outstanding chemical durability could significantly accelerate the clean up effort and reduce the time and cost of vitrifying these high priority wastes.

Kim, C.W.; Day, D.E.

2004-03-29

33

An international initiative on long-term behavior of high-level nuclear waste glass  

SciTech Connect

Nations producing borosilicate glass as an immobilization material for radioactive wastes resulting from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing have reinforced scientific collaboration to obtain consensus on mechanisms controlling the long-term dissolution rate of glass. This goal is deemed to be crucial for the development of reliable performance assessment models for geological disposal. The collaborating laboratories all conduct fundamental and/or applied research with modern materials science techniques. The paper briefly reviews the radioactive waste vitrification programmes of the six participant nations and summarizes the state-of-the-art of glass corrosion science, emphasizing common scientific needs and justifications for on-going initiatives.

Gin, Stephane [CEA Marcoule DTCD SECM LCLT, Bagnols/Ceze (France); Abdelouas, Abdessalam [SUBATECH, Nantes (France); Criscenti, Louise J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ebert, W. L. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ferrand, Karine [SCK·CEN, Mol (Belgium); Geisler, Thorsten [Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Univ., Bonn (Germany); Harrison, Mike T. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom); Inagaki, Yaohiro [Kyushu Univ. (Japan). Dept. Appl. Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering; Mitsui, Seiichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Mueller, Karl T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental and Molecular Science Lab.; Marra, James C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Pierce, Eric M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schofield, James M. [AMEC, Harwell Oxford (United Kingdom); Steefel, Carl I. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

2013-06-08

34

Deformation mechanisms during nanoindentation of sodium borosilicate glasses of nuclear interest.  

PubMed

In this paper we analyze results of Molecular Dynamics simulations of Vickers nanoindentation, performed for sodium borosilicate glasses of interest in the nuclear industry. Three glasses have been studied in their pristine form, as well as a disordered one that is analogous to the real irradiated glass. We focused in the behavior of the glass during the nanoindentation in order to reveal the mechanisms of deformation and how they are affected by microstructural characteristics. Results have shown a strong dependence on the SiO2 content of the glass, which promotes densification due to the open structure of SiO4 tetrahedra and also due to the strength of Si-O bonds. Densification for the glasses is primarily expressed by the relative decrease of the Si-O-Si and Si-O-B angles, indicating rotation of the structural units and decrease of free volume. The increase of alkali content on the other hand results to higher plasticity of the matrix and increased shear flow. The most important effect on the deformation mechanism of the disordered glasses is that of the highly depolymerized network that will also induce shear flow and, in combination with the increased free volume, will result in the decreased hardness of these glasses, as has been previously observed. PMID:25005296

Kilymis, D A; Delaye, J-M

2014-07-01

35

Deformation mechanisms during nanoindentation of sodium borosilicate glasses of nuclear interest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we analyze results of Molecular Dynamics simulations of Vickers nanoindentation, performed for sodium borosilicate glasses of interest in the nuclear industry. Three glasses have been studied in their pristine form, as well as a disordered one that is analogous to the real irradiated glass. We focused in the behavior of the glass during the nanoindentation in order to reveal the mechanisms of deformation and how they are affected by microstructural characteristics. Results have shown a strong dependence on the SiO2 content of the glass, which promotes densification due to the open structure of SiO4 tetrahedra and also due to the strength of Si-O bonds. Densification for the glasses is primarily expressed by the relative decrease of the Si-O-Si and Si-O-B angles, indicating rotation of the structural units and decrease of free volume. The increase of alkali content on the other hand results to higher plasticity of the matrix and increased shear flow. The most important effect on the deformation mechanism of the disordered glasses is that of the highly depolymerized network that will also induce shear flow and, in combination with the increased free volume, will result in the decreased hardness of these glasses, as has been previously observed.

Kilymis, D. A.; Delaye, J.-M.

2014-07-01

36

Solid-State NMR Examination of Alteration Layers on a Nuclear Waste Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Solid-state NMR is a powerful tool for probing the role and significance of alteration layers in determining the kinetics for the corrosion of nuclear waste glass. NMR methods are used to probe the chemical structure of the alteration layers to elucidate information about their chemical complexity, leading to increased insight into the mechanism of altered layer formation. Two glass compositions were examined in this study: a glass preliminarily designed for nuclear waste immobilization (called AFCI) and a simplified version of this AFCI glass (which we call SA1R). Powdered glasses with controlled and known particles sizes were corroded at 90 °C for periods of one and five months with a surface-area to solution-volume ratio of 100,000 m-1. 1H-29Si CP-CPMG MAS NMR, 1H-27Al CP-MAS NMR, 1H-11B CP-MAS NMR, and 1H-23Na CP-MAS NMR experiments provide isolated structural information about the alteration layers, which differ in structure from that of the pristine glass. Both glasses studied here develop alteration layers composed primarily of [IV]Si species. Aluminum is also retained in the alteration layers, perhaps facilitated by the observed increase in coordination from [IV]Al to [VI]Al, which correlates with a loss of charge balancing cations. 1H-11B CP-MAS NMR observations indicated a retention of boron in hydrated glass layers, which has not been characterized by previous work. For the AFCI glass, secondary phase formation begins during the corrosion times considered here, and these neophases are detected within the alteration layers. We identify precursor phases as crystalline sodium metasilicates. An important finding is that layer thickness depends on the length of the initial alteration stages and varies only with respect to silicon species during the residual rate regime.

Murphy, Kelly A. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Washton, Nancy M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Science Lab.; Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Mueller, Karl T. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Science Lab.

2013-06-01

37

Rhenium solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass: implications for the processing and immobilization of technetium-99.  

PubMed

The immobilization of technetium-99 ((99)Tc) in a suitable host matrix has proven to be a challenging task for researchers in the nuclear waste community around the world. In this context, the present work reports on the solubility and retention of rhenium, a nonradioactive surrogate for (99)Tc, in a sodium borosilicate glass. Glasses containing target Re concentrations from 0 to 10,000 ppm [by mass, added as KReO(4) (Re(7+))] were synthesized in vacuum-sealed quartz ampules to minimize the loss of Re from volatilization during melting at 1000 °C. The rhenium was found as Re(7+) in all of the glasses as observed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure. The solubility of Re in borosilicate glasses was determined to be ~3000 ppm (by mass) using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. At higher rhenium concentrations, additional rhenium was retained in the glasses as crystalline inclusions of alkali perrhenates detected with X-ray diffraction. Since (99)Tc concentrations in a glass waste form are predicted to be <10 ppm (by mass), these Re results implied that the solubility should not be a limiting factor in processing radioactive wastes, assuming Tc as Tc(7+) and similarities between Re(7+) and Tc(7+) behavior in this glass system. PMID:23101883

McCloy, John S; Riley, Brian J; Goel, Ashutosh; Liezers, Martin; Schweiger, Michael J; Rodriguez, Carmen P; Hrma, Pavel; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lukens, Wayne W; Kruger, Albert A

2012-11-20

38

Determination of the Fe sup 2+ /Fe sup 3+ ratio in nuclear waste glasses  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the Fe{sup 2 +}/Fe{sup 3 +} ratios of 47 simulated nuclear waste glass samples with ratios varying from 0.01 (oxidized) to 1.6 (reduced) determined by wet-chemical and Mossbauer spectral analyses. The wet-chemical method involved the spectrophotometric determination of Fe{sup 2 +} and total iron using remote spectroscopy with fiber optic chemical sensing. Interferences from other species present in these glasses were examined and alternative analytical techniques were investigated. Results of wet-chemical and Mossbauer spectral analysis were comparable; however, the wet-chemical method is probably preferable for the analysis of highly radioactive glasses until such glasses have been shown to have satisfactory Mossbauer spectra.

Hunter, R.T.; Edge, M.; Kalivretenos, A.; Brewer, K.M.; Brock, N.A.; Hawkes, A.E.; Fanning, J.C. (Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1989-06-01

39

ATALANTE 2004 Nmes (France) June 21-25, 2004 1 Structural Characterizations of Rare Earth-Rich Glasses for Nuclear Waste Immobilization  

E-print Network

temperature (Tg) than those of the current borosilicate nuclear glasses. As the actinides and lanthanides-Rich Glasses for Nuclear Waste Immobilization I. Bardez1,2,* , D. Caurant2 , J.L. Dussossoy1 , P. Loiseau2 , C Email: isabelle-bardez@enscp.jussieu.fr Abstract ­ New nuclear glass compositions, able to immobilize

40

High-level nuclear waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of characteristics  

SciTech Connect

With the imminent startup, in the United States, of facilities for vitrification of high-level nuclear waste, a document has been prepared that compiles the scientific basis for understanding the alteration of the waste glass products under the range of service conditions to which they may be exposed during storage, transportation, and eventual geologic disposal. A summary of selected parts of the content of this document is provided. Waste glass alterations in a geologic repository may include corrosion of the glass network due to groundwater and/or water vapor contact. Experimental testing results are described and interpreted in terms of the underlying chemical reactions and physical processes involved. The status of mechanistic modeling, which can be used for long-term predictions, is described and the remaining uncertainties associated with long-term simulations are summarized.

Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.; Ebert, W.L.; Feng, X.; Mazer, J.J.; Wronkiewicz, D.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Sproull, J. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Bourcier, W.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); McGrail, B.P. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-01-01

41

High-level nuclear waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of characteristics  

SciTech Connect

With the imminent startup, in the United States, of facilities for vitrification of high-level nuclear waste, a document has been prepared that compiles the scientific basis for understanding the alteration of the waste glass products under the range of service conditions to which they may be exposed during storage, transportation, and eventual geologic disposal. A summary of selected parts of the content of this document is provided. Waste glass alterations in a geologic repository may include corrosion of the glass network due to groundwater and/or water vapor contact. Experimental testing results are described and interpreted in terms of the underlying chemical reactions and physical processes involved. The status of mechanistic modeling, which can be used for long-term predictions, is described and the remaining uncertainties associated with long-term simulations are summarized.

Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.; Ebert, W.L.; Feng, X.; Mazer, J.J.; Wronkiewicz, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sproull, J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Bourcier, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); McGrail, B.P. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-12-01

42

Rhenium Solubility in Borosilicate Nuclear Waste Glass: Implications for the Processing and Immobilization of Technetium-99  

SciTech Connect

The immobilization of 99Tc in a suitable host matrix has proved to be an arduous task for the researchers in nuclear waste community around the world. At the Hanford site in Washington State, the total amount of 99Tc in low-activity waste (LAW) is ~1300 kg and the current strategy is to immobilize the 99Tc in borosilicate glass with vitrification. In this context, the present article reports on the solubility/retention of rhenium, a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc, in a LAW borosilicate glass. Due to the radioactive nature of technetium, rhenium was chosen as a simulant because of the similarity between their ionic radii and other chemical aspects. The glasses containing Re (0 – 10,000 ppm by mass) were synthesized in vacuum-sealed quartz ampoules in order to minimize the loss of Re by volatilization during melting at 1000 °C. The rhenium was found to predominantly exist as Re (VII) in all the glasses as observed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The solubility of Re in borosilicate glasses was determined to be ~3000 ppm (by mass) with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). At higher rhenium concentrations, some additional material was retained in the glasses in the form of crystalline inclusions that were detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and laser ablation-ICP mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The implications of these results on the immobilization of 99Tc from radioactive wastes in borosilicate glasses have been discussed.

McCloy, John S.; Riley, Brian J.; Goel, Ashutosh; Liezers, Martin; Schweiger, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lukens, Wayne W.; Kruger, Albert A.

2012-10-26

43

Toward Understanding the Effect of Nuclear Waste Glass Composition of Sulfur Solubility  

The concentration of sulfur in nuclear waste glass melter feed must be maintained below the point where salt accumulates on the melt surface. The allowable concentrations may range from 0.37 to over 2.05 weight percent (of SO3 on a calcined oxide basis) depending on the composition of the melter feed and processing conditions. If the amount of sulfur exceeds the melt tolerance level, a molten salt will accumulate, which may upset melter operations and potentially shorten the useful life of the melter. At the Hanford site, relatively conservative limits have been placed on sulfur loading in melter feed, which in turn significantly increases the amount of glass that will be produced. Crucible-scale sulfur solubility data and scaled melter sulfur tolerance data have been collected on simulated Hanford waste glasses over the last 15 years. These data were compiled and analyzed. A model was developed to predict the solubility of SO3 in glass based on 252 simulated Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) glass compositions. This model represents the data well, accounting for over 85% of the variation in data, and was well validated. The model was also found to accurately predict the tolerance for sulfur in melter feed for 13 scaled melter tests of simulated LAW glasses. The model can be used to help estimate glass volumes and make informed decisions on process options. The model also gives quantitative estimates of component concentration effects on sulfur solubility. The components that most increase sulfur solubility are Li2O > V2O5> CaO ? P2O5 > Na2O ? B2O3 > K2O. The components that most decrease sulfur solubility are Cl > Cr2O3 > Al2O3 > ZrO2 ? SnO2 > Others ? SiO2. The order of component effects is similar to previous literature data, in most cases.

Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Muller, I. S.; Kruger, Albert A.; Piepel, Gregory F.

2014-02-13

44

Properties of nuclear waste melts and glasses: Contact-refractory corrosion and vapor phase hydration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Control of refractory corrosion in waste glass melts and meeting vapor phase hydration test (VHT) requirement for Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) glass product are two critical issues among many technical challenges of nuclear waste vitrification. In this study, refractory corrosion was treated as a complex non-equilibrium, multi-component and multi-phase reactive transport process and studied both thermodynamically and kinetically. Dissolution tests of granular refractory materials into under-saturated melts coupled with crystallization tests from supersaturated melts were used to determine the possible equilibrium points. The test results show that spinet phase is the most stable phase of K-3 refractory. Solubility of glass-refractory interface material controls the long term refractory corrosion rate and protects refractory from further corrosion. Therefore, refractory corrosion rate can be possibly adjusted by controlling the underlying solubility of the interface material. A set of monolithic refractory corrosion and dissolution tests was carried out to study the kinetic effects of refractory porosity and glass melt viscosity, the two major kinetic factors associated with reactive transport process. The test results show that temperature and glass melt viscosity have intensive effects on refractory material dissolution rate. Fast closure of channels near the glass-refractory interface during corrosion reaction by fast transformation of solid solution to spinel and spinel re-crystallization helps stop further corrosion reaction. Glass composition can be "passivated" by engineering the formulation to maximizing the beneficial alteration process. For the study of VHT kinetics, data from simulated LAW glasses studied previously at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Vitreous State Laboratory was modeled based on Avrami equation and its variant, the so-called generalized Avrami equation for better modeling of the VHT data. The results show that the kinetics of the complex vapor hydration process is described satisfactorily by the generalized Avrami equation. The generalized Avrami equation allows the characterization of vapor phase hydration data obtained at different times and temperatures quantitatively on a common basis. The three parameters associated with the generalized Avrami equation depend strongly on glass composition. It seems that both compositional mismatch and incompatibility of a host glass to the transformed hydrous crystalline phases slow down the vapor hydration rate.

Lu, Xiaodong

45

Vitrification of borate waste from nuclear power plant using coal fly ash. (I) Glass formulation development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Borate waste, which is the main liquid waste from daily operation of PWR nuclear power plants, contains a large amount of Na and B. The coal fly ash is a by-product of the coal combustion power plants. The high content of SiO2 and Al2O3 of coal fly ash makes it a desirable glass network former additive; therefore, using the coal

Jiawei Sheng

2001-01-01

46

Nepheline Crystallization in Nuclear Waste Glasses: Progress toward acceptance of high-alumina formulations  

SciTech Connect

We have critically compiled and analyzed historical data for investigating the quantity of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) precipitation as a function of composition in simulated nuclear waste glasses. To understand composition we used two primary methods: 1) investigating the Al2O3-SiO2-Na2O ternary with filtering for different B2O3 levels and 2) creating a quadrant system consisting of compositions reduced to two metric numbers. These metrics are 1) the nepheline discriminator (ND) which depends only on the SiO2 content by weight normalized to the total weight of the Al2O3-SiO2-Na2O sub-mixture and 2) the optical basicity (OB) which contains contributions from all constituents in the glass. Nepheline precipitation is expected to be suppressed at high SiO2 levels (ND >0.62) or at low basicities (OB <0.55 to 0.57). Changes in sodium aluminosilicate glass OB due to additions of CaO and B2O3 correlate with observed effects on nepheline formation. We propose that additional composition space is available for formulating high-waste-loading, high-Al¬2O3 nuclear waste glasses when Na2O levels are less than ~0.125 (normalized by weight on the Al2O3-SiO2-Na2O sub-mixture). However, this compositional space is considerably extended to higher Na2O levels when adding >5 wt% B2O3. The OB concept can help further refine regions of nepheline-free glass formation.

McCloy, John S.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Vienna, John D.

2011-09-01

47

Interstitial sites for He incorporation in nuclear glasses and links to the structure: Results from numerical investigation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To investigate rare gases incorporation in glasses in relation with nuclear waste confinement, a wide range of borosilicate glasses have been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The rare gases solubility is related to the number of interstitial sites accessible for these gases. To elucidate any relation between the number of interstitial sites and the glass composition, a large set of glass compositions that contain the most representative components in nuclear glasses is considered. We are mainly interested in SBN glasses (SiO2-B2O3-Na2O). A composition dependent force field was used to model the interactions between the atoms. Delaunay tessellation method was used to characterize the different topologies accessible for rare gases and analyze the interstitial sites distribution. In order to investigate irradiation effects by nuclear energy deposition on the number of interstitial sites accessible for He, disordered glasses representative of structures submitted to series of displacement cascades, were prepared by modifying the preparation procedure and the number of interstitial site changes were analyzed.

Kerrache, Ali; Delaye, Jean-Marc

2014-05-01

48

Model for the conversion of nuclear waste melter feed to glass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rate of batch-to-glass conversion is a primary concern for the vitrification of nuclear waste, as it directly influences the life cycle of the cleanup process. This study describes the development of an advanced model of the cold cap, which augments the previous model by further developments on the structure and the dynamics of the foam layer. The foam layer on the bottom of the cold cap consists of the primary foam, cavities, and the secondary foam, and forms an interface through which the heat is transferred to the cold cap. Other model enhancements include the behavior of intermediate crystalline phases and the dissolution of quartz particles. The model relates the melting rate to feed properties and melter conditions, such as the molten glass temperature, foaminess of the melt, or the heat fraction supplied to the cold cap from the plenum space. The model correctly predicts a 25% increase in melting rate when changing the alumina source in the melter feed from Al(OH)3 to AlO(OH). It is expected that this model will be incorporated in the full glass melter model as its integral component.

Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel

2014-02-01

49

DIADDHEM set-up: New IBA facility for studying the helium behavior in nuclear glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The immobilization of fission products and minor actinides by vitrification is the reference process for industrial management of high-level radioactive wastes generated from spent fuel reprocessing. The glassy matrix is subjected to radiation damage and radiogenic helium generation due to the alpha decays of minor actinides. A specific experimental study has been conducted to better understand the behavior of helium and its diffusion mechanisms in the borosilicate glass. Helium production is simulated by external irradiation with 3He + ions at a concentration (2 × 10 15 He cm -2) equivalent to the one obtained after 1000 years of glass storage. He diffusion coefficients as function of temperature are extracted from the evolution of the depth profiles after annealing. The 3He(d, ?) 1H Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) technique is successfully used for in situ low-temperature measurements of depth profiles. Its high depth resolution allows detecting helium mobility at a temperature as low as 250 K and the presence of a trapped helium fraction. The good agreement of our first values of diffusion coefficients with the literature data highlights the relevance of the implantation technique in the study of helium diffusion mechanisms in borosilicate glasses.

Chamssedine, F.; Sauvage, T.; Peuget, S.

2010-06-01

50

GdBr3: CE in a glass wafer as a nuclear radiation monitor.  

PubMed

A glass wafer that contains cerium-activated gadolinium-based scintillator has been tested as a nuclear radiation monitor. The detector is prepared by mixing powdered gadolinium and cerium (3+) bromides with alumina, silica, and lithium fluoride, melting the mixture at 1,400°C, and then quenching and annealing the glass. The resulting clear glass matrix emits stimulated blue light that can be collected by a conventional photomultiplier tube. Spectral analysis of radionuclides with this detector shows the energy peaks for alpha particles, the energy continuum for beta particles, the Compton continuum and full-energy peaks for gamma rays, and an energy continuum with specific reaction-product peaks for neutrons. Energy resolution for the 5.5-MeV alpha particle and 0.662-MeV gamma-ray peaks is about 20%. This resolution, although threefold poorer than for single-crystal NaI(Tl) scintillators, contributes to radionuclide identification and quantification. Application of this detector to radiation monitoring is proposed, as well as approaches for improving light collection and energy resolution that will facilitate radionuclide identification and monitoring, especially for alpha particles, beta particles, and low-energy gamma rays. PMID:23532079

Kang, Zhitao; Rosson, Robert; Barta, M Brooke; Nadler, Jason; Wagner, Brent; Kahn, Bernd

2013-05-01

51

Contribution of atom-probe tomography to a better understanding of glass alteration mechanisms: application to a nuclear glass specimen altered 25 years in a granitic environment  

SciTech Connect

We report and discuss results of atom probe tomography (APT) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) applied to a borosilicate glass sample of nuclear interest altered for nearly 26 years at 90°C in a confined granitic medium in order to better understand the rate-limiting mechanisms under conditions representative of a deep geological repository for vitrified radioactive waste. The APT technique allows the 3D reconstruction of the elemental distribution at the reactive interphase with sub-nanometer precision. Profiles of the B distribution at pristine glass/hydrated glass interface obtained by different techniques are compared to show the challenge of accurate measurements of diffusion profiles at this buried interface on the nanometer length scale. Our results show that 1) Alkali from the glass and hydrogen from the solution exhibit anti-correlated 15 ± 3 nm wide gradients located between the pristine glass and the hydrated glass layer, 2) boron exhibits an unexpectedly sharp profile located just at the outside of the alkali/H interdiffusion layer; this sharp profile is more consistent with a dissolution front than a diffusion-controlled release of boron. The resulting apparent diffusion coefficients derived from the Li and H profiles are DLi = 1.5 × 10-22 m2.s-1 and DH = 6.8 × 10-23 m2.s-1. These values are around two orders of magnitude lower than those observed at the very beginning of the alteration process, which suggests that interdiffusion is slowed at high reaction progress by local conditions that could be related to the porous structure of the interphase. As a result, the accessibility of water to the pristine glass could be the rate-limiting step in these conditions. More generally, these findings strongly support the importance of interdiffusion coupled with hydrolysis reactions of the silicate network on the long-term dissolution rate, contrary to what has been suggested by recent interfacial dissolution-precipitation models for silicate minerals.

Gin, Stephane [CEA Marcoule DTCD SECM LCLT, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schreiber, Daniel K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Neeway, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cabie, M. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CP2M, Marseille (France)

2013-06-26

52

Apatite- and monazite-bearing glass-crystal composites for the immobilization of low-level nuclear and hazardous wastes  

SciTech Connect

This study demonstrates that glass-crystal composite waste forms can be produced from waste streams containing high proportions of phosphorus, transition metals, and/or halides. The crystalline phases produced in crucible-scale melts include apatite, monazite, spinels, and a Zr-Si-Fe-Ti phase. These phases readily incorporated radionuclide and toxic metals into their crystal structures, while corrosion tests have demonstrated that glass-crystal composites can be up to 300-fold more durable than simulated high-level nuclear waste glasses, such as SRL 202U.

Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Wolf, S.F.; DiSanto, T.S.

1995-12-31

53

(6)Li, (7)Li Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of Lithium Coordination in Binary Phosphate Glasses  

SciTech Connect

{sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li solid state magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to investigate the local coordination environment of lithium in a series of xLi{sub 2}O {center_dot} (1-x)P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glasses, where 0.05 {le} x {le} 0.55. Both the {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li show chemical shift variations with changes in the Li{sub 2}O concentration, but the observed {sup 6}Li NMR chemical shifts closely approximate the true isotropic chemical shift and can provide a measure of the lithium bonding environment. The {sup 6}Li NMR results indicate that in this series of lithium phosphate glasses the Li atoms have an average coordination between four and five. The results for the metaphosphate glass agree with the coordination number and range of chemical shifts observed for crystalline LiPO{sub 3}. An increase in the {sup 6}Li NMR chemical shift with increasing Li{sub 2}O content was observed for the entire concentration range investigated, correlating with increased cross-linking of the phosphate tetrahedral network by O-Li-O bridges. The {sup 6}Li chemical shifts were also observed to vary monotonically through the anomalous glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) minimum. This continuous chemical shift variation shows that abrupt changes in the Li coordination environment do not occur as the Li{sub 2}O concentration is increased, and such abrupt changes can not be used to explain the T{sub g} minimum.

Alam, T.M.; Boyle, T.J.; Brow, R.K.; Conzone, S.

1999-02-08

54

THE STRUCTURAL CHEMISTRY OF MOLYBDENUM IN MODEL HIGH LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES, INVESTIGATED BY MO K-EDGE X-RAY ABSORPTION  

E-print Network

immobilised in an alkali borosilicate glass matrix. The fission products are classified as High Level nuclear Waste (HLW) due to their heat generating capacity. Alkali borosilicate glasses are the matrix of choice borosilicate glasses may be #12;fabricated at reasonable temperatures, ca 1060o C, and show superior chemical

Sheffield, University of

55

MOLYBDENUM IN GLASSES CONTAINING VITRIFIED NUCLEAR R.J. Hand, R.J. Short, S. Morgan, N.C. Hyatt, G. Mbus and W.E. Lee  

E-print Network

of calcined high level waste into the borosilicate base glass show that a low melting point CsLiMoO4 phase for immobilising high level nuclear waste is to vitrify the waste by combining it with a borosilicate base glass as lanthanides and actinides; some of the species present can have low solubility limits in borosilicate glass

Sheffield, University of

56

Radiation effects in moist-air systems and the influence of radiolytic product formation on nuclear waste glass corrosion  

SciTech Connect

Ionizing radiation may affect the performance of glass in an unsaturated repository site by interacting with air, water vapor, or liquid water to produce a variety of radiolytic products. Tests were conducted to examine the effects of radiolysis under high gas/liquid ratios. Results indicate that nitrate is the predominant radiolytic product produced following both gamma and alpha radiation exposure, with lesser amounts of nitrite and carboxylic acids. The formation of nitrogen acids during exposure to long-lived, alpha-particle-emitting transuranic elements indicates that these acids may play a role in influencing nuclear waste form reactions in a long-term unsaturated disposal scenario. Experiments were also conducted with samples that simulate the composition of Savannah River Plant nuclear waste glasses. Radiolytic product formation in batch tests (340 m{sup {minus}1}, 90 C) resulted in a small increase in the release rates of many glass components, such as alkali and alkaline earth elements, although silicon and uranium release rates were slightly reduced indicating an overall beneficial effect of radiation on waste form stability. The radiolytic acids increased the rate of ion exchange between the glass and the thin film of condensate, resulting in accelerated corrosion rates for the glass. The paragenetic sequence of alteration phases formed on both the irradiated and nonirradiated glass samples reacted in the vapor hydration tests matches closely with those developed during volcanic glass alteration in naturally occurring saline-alkaline lake systems. This correspondence suggests that the high temperatures used in these tests have not changed the underlying glass reaction mechanism relate to that which controls glass reactions under ambient surficial conditions.

Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Wang, L.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geology

1997-07-01

57

Heat Transfer in Waste Glass Melts - Measurement and Implications for Nuclear Waste Vitrification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thermal properties of waste glass melts, such as high temperature density and thermal conductivity, are relevant to heat transfer processes in nuclear waste vitrification. Experimental measurement techniques were developed and applied to four nuclear waste glasses representative of those currently projected for treatment of Hanford HLW and LAW streams to study heat flow mechanisms in nuclear waste vitrification. Density measurement results by Archimedes' method indicated that densities of the melts investigated varied considerably with composition and temperature. Thermal diffusivities of waste melts were determined at nominal melter operating temperatures using a temperature-wave technique. Thermal conductivities were obtained by combining diffusivity data with the experimentally-acquired densities of the melts and their known heat capacities. The experimental results display quite large positive dependences of conductivities on temperature for some samples and much weaker positive temperature dependences for others. More importantly, there is observed a big change in the slopes of the conductivities versus temperature as temperature is increased for two of the melts, but not for the other two. This behavior was interpreted in terms of the changing contributions of radiation and conduction with temperature and composition dependence of the absorption coefficient. Based on the obtained thermal conductivities, a simple model for a waste glass melter was set up, which was used to analyze the relative contributions of conduction and radiation individually and collectively to the overall heat flow and to investigate factors and conditions that influence the radiation contribution to heat flow. The modeling results showed that unlike the case at lower temperatures, the radiant energy flow through waste melts could be predominant compared with conduction at temperature of about 900 °C or higher. However, heat flow due to radiation was roughly equal to that from conduction as temperatures below about 700 °C. Moreover, the effect was reduced for higher absorption coefficient samples. Modeling further demonstrated that geometry exerts a significant influence on the radiation contribution to heat transfer. Room temperature radiation absorption coefficients of the same samples were determined using FTIR, which were compared with those estimated by modeling.

Wang, Chuan

58

Comprehensive data base of high-level nuclear waste glasses: September 1987 status report: Volume 2, Additional appendices  

SciTech Connect

The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) is assembling a comprehensive data base (CDB) of experimental data collected for high-level nuclear waste package components. The status of the CDB is summarized in Volume I of this report. Volume II contains appendices that present data from the data base and an evaluation of glass durability models applied to the data base.

Kindle, C.H.; Kreiter, M.R.

1987-12-01

59

MASBAL: A computer program for predicting the composition of nuclear waste glass produced by a slurry-fed ceramic melter  

SciTech Connect

This report is a user's manual for the MASBAL computer program. MASBAL's objectives are to predict the composition of nuclear waste glass produced by a slurry-fed ceramic melter based on a knowledge of process conditions; to generate simulated data that can be used to estimate the uncertainty in the predicted glass composition as a function of process uncertainties; and to generate simulated data that can be used to provide a measure of the inherent variability in the glass composition as a function of the inherent variability in the feed composition. These three capabilities are important to nuclear waste glass producers because there are constraints on the range of compositions that can be processed in a ceramic melter and on the range of compositions that will be acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. MASBAL was developed specifically to simulate the operation of the West Valley Component Test system, a commercial-scale ceramic melter system that will process high-level nuclear wastes currently stored in underground tanks at the site of the Western New York Nuclear Services Center (near West Valley, New York). The program is flexible enough, however, to simulate any slurry-fed ceramic melter system. 4 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

Reimus, P.W.

1987-07-01

60

The determination of the Fe sup 2+ /Fe sup 3+ ratio in simulated nuclear waste glass by ion chromatography  

SciTech Connect

Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). In this facility, control of the oxidation/reduction (redox) equilibrium in the glass melter is critical for processing of the nuclear waste. Therefore, the development of a rapid and reliable analytical method for the determination of the redox equilibrium is of considerable interest. Redox has been determined by measuring the ratio of ferrous to ferric ions in the glass melt. Two analytical techniques for glass redox measurement have been investigated for the DWPF: Mossbauer Spectroscopy which may be subject to interferences from the radiation in actual waste, and a rapid and simple chemical dissolution/spectrophotometric technique. Comparisons of these techniques have been made at several laboratories including Clemson University. In the study attached, the determination of the redox ratio by Ion Chromatography (IC) was investigated as a potential new technology. Clemson University performed IC analyses on the same glasses as previously examined by wet chemical and Mossbauer techniques. Results from all three techniques were highly correlated and IC was reported to be a promising new technology for redox measurement. 19 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

Jantzen, C.M.

1990-10-01

61

Measurement of the nuclear electromagnetic cascade development in glass at energies above 200 GeV  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The longitudinal development of nuclear-electromagnetic cascades with energies greater than 200 GeV was measured in a low-Z (glass) absorber. This was done in the course of operating an ionization spectrometer at mountain altitude in an experiment to study the properties of gamma rays emitted from individual interactions at energies around 10,000 GeV. The ionization produced by a cascade is sampled by 20 sheets of plastic scintillator spaced uniformly in depth every 2.2 radiation lengths. Adjacent pairs of scintillators are viewed by photomultipliers which measure the mean ionization produced by an individual cascade in 10 layers each 1.1 interaction length (4.4 radiation lengths) thick. The longitudinal development of the cascades was measured for about 250 cascades having energies ranging from 200 GeV to 2500 GeV. The observations are compared with the predictions of calculations made for this specific spectrometer using a three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of the nuclear-electromagnetic cascade.

Gillespie, C. R.; Huggett, R. W.; Humphreys, D. R.; Jones, W. V.; Levit, L. B.

1971-01-01

62

Cerium, uranium, and plutonium behavior in glass-bonded sodalite, a ceramic nuclear waste form.  

SciTech Connect

Glass-bonded sodalite is being developed as a ceramic waste form (CWF) to immobilize radioactive fission products, actinides, and salt residues from electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear reactor fuel. The CWF consists of about 75 mass % sodalite, 25 mass % glass, and small amounts of other phases. This paper presents some results and interpretation of physical measurements to characterize the CWF structure, and dissolution tests to measure the release of matrix components and radionuclides from the waste form. Tests have been carried out with specimens of the CWF that contain rare earths at concentrations similar to those expected in the waste form. Parallel tests have been carried out on specimens that have uranium or plutonium as well as the rare earths at concentrations similar to those expected in the waste forms; in these specimens UCl{sub 3} forms UO{sub 2} and PuCl{sub 3} forms PuO{sub 2}. The normalized releases of rare earths in dissolution tests were found to be much lower than those of matrix elements (B, Si, Al, Na). When there is no uranium in the CWF, the release of cerium is two to ten times lower than the release of the other rare earths. The low release of cerium may be due to its tetravalent state in uranium-free CWF. However, when there is uranium in the CWF, the release of cerium is similar to that of the other rare earths. This trivalent behavior of cerium is attributed to charge transfer or covalent interactions among cerium, uranium, and oxygen in (U,Ce)O{sub 2}.

Lewis, M. A.; Lexa, D.; Morss, L. R.; Richmann, M. K.

1999-09-03

63

Photoelectron, nuclear gamma-ray and infrared absorption spectroscopic studies of neptunium in sodium silicate glass  

SciTech Connect

The valence state of neptunium ions in sodium silicate glasses prepared under reducing and oxidizing conditions has been investigated by the x-ray photoelectron, Moessbauer and optical absorption spectroscopic techniques. Results indicate that the Np ions are tetravalent in glasses prepared under reducing conditions and pentavalent in glasses prepared under oxidizing conditions.

Veal, B.W.; Carnall, W.T.; Dunlap, B.D.; Mitchell, A.W.; Lam, D.J.

1986-04-01

64

INCORPORATION OF MONO SODIUM TITANATE AND CRYSTALLINE SILICOTITANATE FEEDS IN HIGH LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE GLASS  

SciTech Connect

Four series of glass compositions were selected, fabricated, and characterized as part of a study to determine the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. All of the glasses studied were considerably more durable than the benchmark Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. The measured Product Consistency Test (PCT) responses were compared with the predicted values from the current DWPF durability model. One of the KT01-series and two of the KT03-series glasses had measured PCT responses that were outside the lower bound of the durability model. All of the KT04 glasses had durabilities that were predictable regardless of heat treatment or compositional view. In general, the measured viscosity values of the KT01, KT03, and KT04-series glasses are well predicted by the current DWPF viscosity model. The results of liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) measurements for the KT01-series glasses were mixed with regard to the predictability of the T{sub L} for each glass. All of the measured T{sub L} values were higher than the model predicted values, although most fell within the 95% confidence intervals. Overall, the results of this study show a reasonable ability to incorporate the anticipated SCIX streams into DWPF-type glass compositions with TiO{sub 2} concentrations of 4-5 wt % in glass.

Fox, K.; Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2010-11-23

65

INTRINSIC DOSIMETRY OF GLASS CONTAINERS USED TO TRANSPORT NUCLEAR MATERIALS: Potential Implications to the Field of Nuclear Forensics  

SciTech Connect

Thermoluminescence (TL) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) dosimetry were used to measure dose effects in borosilicate glass with time, from 10 minutes to ~60 days following exposure to a dose of up to 10,000 Rad. TL and EPR results were consistent and performed similarly, with both techniques capable of achieving an estimated limit of detection of between 50-100 Rad. Three peaks were identified in the TL glow curve at roughly 110oC, 205oC, and 225oC. The intensity of the 205oC peak was the dominant peak over the time period of this study. The stability of all of the peaks with time since irradiation increased with their corresponding temperature and little or no variation was observed in the glow curve response to a specified total dose attained at different dose rates. The intensity of the 205oC peak decreased logarithmically with time regardless of total dose. Based upon a conservative limit of detection of 330 Rad, a 10,000 Rad dose would still be detected 2.7E3 years after exposure. This paper introduces the concept of intrinsic dosimetry, the consideration of a measured dose received to container walls in concert with the physical characteristics of the radioactive material contained inside those walls, as a method for gathering rather unique pathway information about the history of that sample. Three hypothetical scenarios are presented to introduce this method and to illustrate how intrinsic dosimetry might benefit the fields of nuclear forensics and waste management.

Schwantes, Jon M.; Miller, Steven D.; Piper, Roman K.; Murphy, Mark K.; Amonette, James E.; Bonde, Steven E.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

2008-09-15

66

First principles process-product models for vitrification of nuclear waste: Relationship of glass composition to glass viscosity, resistivity, liquidus temperature, and durability  

SciTech Connect

Borosilicate glasses will be used in the USA and in Europe to immobilize radioactive high level liquid wastes (HLLW) for ultimate geologic disposal. Process and product quality models based on glass composition simplify the fabrication of the borosilicate glass while ensuring glass processability and quality. The process model for glass viscosity is based on a relationship between the glass composition and its structural polymerization. The relationship between glass viscosity and electrical resistivity is also shown to relate to glass polymerization. The process model for glass liquidus temperature calculates the solubility of the liquidus phases based on the free energies of formation of the precipitating species. The durability product quality model is based on the calculation of the thermodynamic hydration free energy from the glass composition.

Jantzen, C.M.

1991-12-31

67

First principles process-product models for vitrification of nuclear waste: Relationship of glass composition to glass viscosity, resistivity, liquidus temperature, and durability  

SciTech Connect

Borosilicate glasses will be used in the USA and in Europe to immobilize radioactive high level liquid wastes (HLLW) for ultimate geologic disposal. Process and product quality models based on glass composition simplify the fabrication of the borosilicate glass while ensuring glass processability and quality. The process model for glass viscosity is based on a relationship between the glass composition and its structural polymerization. The relationship between glass viscosity and electrical resistivity is also shown to relate to glass polymerization. The process model for glass liquidus temperature calculates the solubility of the liquidus phases based on the free energies of formation of the precipitating species. The durability product quality model is based on the calculation of the thermodynamic hydration free energy from the glass composition.

Jantzen, C.M.

1991-01-01

68

Transmission electron microscopy of simulated DWPF high level nuclear waste glasses following gamma irradiation  

SciTech Connect

In the near future the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will begin stabilizing high-level radioactive waste using borosilicate glass. The molten waste glass will be poured into stainless steel canisters which, after cooling, will be sealed shut to produce the canistered waste forms. Following interim storage at SRS, the glass-filled canisters will be shipped to an appropriate geologic repository for final disposal. As a result of radioactive decay in the waste, the glasses will absorb large doses of alpha, beta, gamma, neutron, and alpha recoil radiation which raises issues regarding the stability of the canistered waste forms. Thermal analysis testing revealed slight weight changes, which were a function of gamma irradiation, in a highly reduced DWPF simulated waste glass. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on these glasses to see if the weight change corresponded to microstructural variations. TEM analyses showed that no microstructural changes were attributable to gamma irradiation. Exposure of the samples to the electron beam in the TEM did result in some changes in the glass microstructures in some cases. These changes were likely due to localized heating of the glass due to interactions with the transmitted electrons.

Marra, J.C.; Bibler, N.E.; Harbour, J.R.; Tosten, M.H.

1994-04-01

69

The reaction of synthetic nuclear waste glass in steam and hydrothermal solution  

SciTech Connect

Glass monoliths of the WVCM 44, WVCM 50, SRL 165, and SRL 202 compositions were reacted in steam and in hydrothermal liquid at 200{degree}C. The glass reaction resulted in the formation of leached surface layers in both environments. The reaction in steam proceeds at a very low rate until precipitates form, after which the glass reaction proceeds at a greater rate. Precipitates were formed on all glass types reacted in steam. The assemblage of phases formed was unique to each glass type, but several precipitates were common to all glasses, including analcime, gyrolite, and weeksite. Reaction in steam occurs in a thin layer of condensed water which becomes saturated with respect to the observed phases after only a few days of reaction. The reaction in steam is accelerated relative to reaction in hydrothermal liquid in the sense that secondary phases from after a shorter reaction time, that is, after less glass has reacted, because of the smaller effective leachant volume present in the steam environment. A knowledge of the secondary phases which form and their influence on the glass reaction rate is crucial to the modeling effort of the repository program. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.

1989-12-31

70

Towards optimization of nuclear waste glass: Constraints, property models, and waste loading  

SciTech Connect

Vitrification of both low- and high-level wastes from 177 tanks at Hanford poses a great challenge to glass makers, whose task is to formulate a system of glasses that are acceptable to the federal repository for disposal. The enormous quantity of the waste requires a glass product of the lowest possible volume. The incomplete knowledge of waste composition, its variability, and lack of an appropriate vitrification technology further complicates this difficult task. A simple relationship between the waste loading and the waste glass volume is presented and applied to the predominantly refractory (usually high-activity) and predominantly alkaline (usually low-activity) waste types. Three factors that limit waste loading are discussed, namely product acceptability, melter processing, and model validity. Glass formulation and optimization problems are identified and a broader approach to uncertainties is suggested.

Hrma, P.

1994-04-01

71

A review of literature pertaining to the leaching and sorption of radionuclides associated with nuclear explosive melt glasses  

SciTech Connect

For the purposes of groundwater characterization, environmental remediation and health risk assessment, the mechanism and rate by which radionuclides bound within nuclear device melt glass are manifest in Nevada Test Site groundwaters must be known. Exchange between radionuclides and groundwater is dominated by the kinetics of leaching and the resultant sorption of derivative nuclides by minerals along the flow-path. In this context, a survey of the report literature has been conducted to review work related to these subjects. This report provides a representative, although not exhaustive, summary of the literature; because of the specialized nature of nuclear melt glass, emphasis was given to the report literature available from Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories, the Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies and pertinent contractors. Where data is corroborated in journal literature, those references are also included. Before the risk to ground waters is estimated with any accuracy, recommendations for continued future work integrate systematic characterization of melt glass with leaching studies of these heterogeneous matrices.

Smith, D.K.

1993-05-01

72

The liquidus temperature of nuclear waste glasses: an international Round-Robin Study  

SciTech Connect

Ten institutions from five countries participated in a Round Robin study to contribute to the Precision and Bias section of an American Society for Testing and Materials standard procedure that Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing for measuring the liquidus temperature (TL) of radioactive and simulated waste glasses. In this study, three separate TL measurement methods were a gradient temperature (GT) method, a uniform temperature (UT) method, and a crystal fraction extrapolation (CF) method. Three different glasses were measured with a combination of these three methods. The TL values reported by different institutions are generally consistent and vary within a narrow range. The precision of a TL measurement was evaluated as ±10°C regardless of the method used for making the measurement. The Round Robin glasses were all previously studied at PNNL and included ARG-1 (Glass A), Zr-9 (Glass B), and AmCm2-19 (Glass C), with measured TL values spanning the temperature range ~960-1240°C. The three methods discussed here in more detail are the GT, UT, and CF methods. A best-case precision for TL has been obtained from the data, even though the data were not acquired for all three glasses using all three methods from each participating organization.

Riley, Brian J.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Vienna, John D.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lang, Jesse B.; Marra, James C.; Johnson, Fabienne; Peeler, David K.; Leonelli, Cristina; Ferrari, Anna M.; Lancellotti, Isabella; Dussossoy, Jean-Lue A.; Hand, Russell J.; Schofield, James M.; Connelly, Andrew J.; Short, Rick; Harrison, Mike T.

2012-12-01

73

An International Initiative on Long-Term Behavior of High-Level Nuclear Waste Glass  

SciTech Connect

Nations using borosilicate glass as an immobilization material for radioactive waste have reinforced the importance of scientific collaboration to obtain a consensus on the mechanisms controlling the longterm dissolution rate of glass. This goal is deemed to be crucial for the development of reliable performance assessment models for geological disposal. The collaborating laboratories all conduct fundamental and/or applied research using modern materials science techniques. This paper briefly reviews the radioactive waste vitrification programs of the six participant nations and summarizes the current state of glass corrosion science, emphasizing the common scientific needs and justifications for on-going initiatives.

Gin, Stephane [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Abdelouas, Abdesselam [SUBATECH Laboratory (France); Criscenti, Louise J [Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); Ebert, William L [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ferrand, K [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK-CEN; Geisler, T [Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Bonn, Germany; Harrison, Michael T [National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL); Inagaki, Y [Kyushu University, Japan; Mitsui, S [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Mueller, K T [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Marra, James C [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, S.C.; Pantano, Carlo G [Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA; Pierce, Eric M [ORNL; Ryan, Joseph V [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Schofield, J M [AMEC, Harwell Oxford Didcot Oxfordshire, United Kingdom; Steefel, Carl I [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2013-01-01

74

Helium diffusion coefficient measurements in R7T7 nuclear glass by 3He(d,?) 1H nuclear reaction analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The immobilization of fission products and minor actinides by vitrification is the reference process for industrial management of high-level radioactive wastes generated by spent fuel reprocessing. Radiation damage and radiogenic helium accumulation must be specifically studied to evaluate the effects of minor actinide alpha decay on the glass long-term behavior under repository conditions. A specific experimental study was conducted for a comprehensive evaluation of the behavior of helium and its diffusion mechanisms in borosilicate nuclear waste glass. Helium production was simulated by external implantation with 3He ions at a concentration (?1 at.%) 30 times higher than obtained after 10,000 years of storage. Helium diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature were extracted from the depth profiles after annealing. The 3He(d,?) 1H nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) technique was successfully adopted for low-temperature in situ measurements of depth profiles. Its high depth resolution revealed helium mobility at temperatures as low as 253 K and the presence of a trapped helium fraction. The diffusion coefficients of un-trapped helium atoms follow an Arrhenius law between 253 K and 323 K. An activation energy of 0.55 ± 0.03 eV was determined, which is consistent with a process controlled by diffusion in the glass free volume.

Chamssedine, F.; Sauvage, T.; Peuget, S.; Fares, T.; Martin, G.

2010-05-01

75

Development of Vitrification Process and Glass Formulation for Nuclear Waste Conditioning  

SciTech Connect

The vitrification of high-level waste is the internationally recognized standard to minimize the impact to the environment resulting from waste disposal as well as to minimize the volume of conditioned waste to be disposed of. COGEMA has been vitrifying high-level waste industrially for over 20 years and is currently operating three commercial vitrification facilities based on a hot metal crucible technology, with outstanding records of safety, reliability and product quality. To further increase the performance of vitrification facilities, CEA and COGEMA have been developing the cold crucible melter technology since the beginning of the 1980s. This type of melter is characterized by a virtually unlimited equipment service life and a great flexibility in dealing with various types of waste and allowing development of high temperature matrices. In complement of and in parallel with the vitrification process, a glass formulation methodology has been developed by the CEA in order to tailor matrices for the wastes to be conditioned while providing the best adaptation to the processing technology. The development of a glass formulation is a trade-off between material properties and qualities, technical feasibility, and disposal safety criteria. It involves non-radioactive and radioactive laboratories in order to achieve a comprehensive matrix qualification. Several glasses and glass ceramics have thus been studied by the CEA to be compliant with industrial needs and waste characteristics: glasses or other matrices for a large spectrum of fission products, or for high contents of specifics elements such as sodium, phosphate, iron, molybdenum, or actinides. New glasses or glass-ceramics designed to minimize the final wasteform volume for solutions produced during the reprocessing of high burnup fuels or to treat legacy wastes are now under development and take benefit from the latest CEA hot-laboratories and technology development. The paper presents the CEA state-of-the-art in developing matrices or glasses and provides several examples.

Petitjean, V.; Fillet, C.; Boen, R.; Veyer, C.; Flament, T.

2002-02-26

76

Effect of 13C enrichment in the glassing matrix on dynamic nuclear polarization of [1-13C]pyruvate  

PubMed Central

Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) can effectively form a glassy matrix necessary for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. We tested the effects of 13C enrichment in DMSO on DNP of [1-13C]pyruvate doped with trityl radical OX063Me. We found that the polarization build-up time ? of pyruvate in 13C-labelled DMSO glassing solution is twice as fast as the unenriched DMSO while the NMR enhancement was unchanged. This indicates that 13C-13C spin diffusion is a limiting factor in the kinetics of dynamic nuclear polarization in this system, but it has a minimal effect on the absolute value of polarization achievable for the target. PMID:21285486

Lumata, Lloyd; Kovacs, Zoltan; Malloy, Craig; Sherry, A. Dean; Merritt, Matthew

2011-01-01

77

Deuteron NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) in relation to the glass transition in polymers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

H-2NMR is introduced as a tool for investigating slow molecular motion in the glass transition region of amorphous polymers. In particular, we compare H-2 spin alignment echo spectra of chain deuterated polystyrene with model calculations for restricted rotational Brownian motion. Molecular motion in the polyztyrene-toluene system has been investigated by analyzing H-2NMR of partially deuterated polystyrene and toluene, respectively. The diluent mobility in the mixed glass has been decomposed into solid and liquid components where the respective average correlation times differ by more than 5 decades.

Roessler, E.; Sillescu, H.; Spiess, H. W.; Wallwitz, R.

1983-01-01

78

On the cooperative nature of the ?-process in neat and binary glasses: A dielectric and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By means of dielectric as well as 2H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) the component dynamics of the binary glass tripropyl phosphate (TPP)/polystyrene (PS/PS-d3) is selectively investigated for concentrations distributed over the full range. We study the secondary (?-) relaxation below Tg, which is found in all investigated samples containing TPP, but not in neat polystyrene. The dielectric spectrum of the ?-process is described by an asymmetric distribution of activation energies, essentially not changing in the entire concentration regime; its most probable value is E/k ? 24 Tg. Persistence of the ?-process is confirmed by 31P NMR Hahn-echo and spin-lattice relaxation experiments on TPP, which identify the nature of the ?-process as being highly spatially hindered as found for other (neat) glasses studied previously, or re-investigated within this work. The corresponding 2H NMR experiments on PS-d3 confirm the absence of a ?-process in neat PS-d3, but reveal a clear signature of a ?-process in the mixture, i.e., polystyrene monomers perform essentially the same type of secondary relaxation as the TPP molecules. Yet, there are indications that some fractions of PS-d3 as well as TPP molecules become immobilized in the mixture in contrast to the case of neat glasses. We conclude that in a binary glass the ?-process introduced by one component induces a highly similar motion in the second component, and this may be taken as an indication of its cooperative nature.

Bock, D.; Kahlau, R.; Micko, B.; Pötzschner, B.; Schneider, G. J.; Rössler, E. A.

2013-08-01

79

IMPACT OF URANIUM AND THORIUM ON HIGH TIO2 CONCENTRATION NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study focused on the potential impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is also considered in the study. The

K. Fox; T. Edwards

2012-01-01

80

Sulphate incorporation and glass formation in phosphate systems for nuclear and toxic waste immobilization  

SciTech Connect

Glass formation and the capacity for sulphur incorporation have been investigated within the systems P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}O-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-R{sub y}O (R = Li, Na, K, Mg, Ca, Ba, Pb). Linear relationships have been identified linking log [SO{sub 3}] with the oxide ion activity, which can be represented to varying degrees by normalized cation field strength index {sigma}(z/a{sup 2}), theoretical optical basicity {lambda}{sub th}, oxygen to phosphorus molar ratio [O]/[P], or P{sub 2}O{sub 5} content. When prepared under oxidizing conditions only basic, highly depolymerized phosphate glasses for which {sigma}(z/a{sup 2}) < {approx}1.2; {lambda}{sub th} > {approx}0.5; [O]/[P] > {approx}3.8; or P{sub 2}O{sub 5} content <{approx}40 mol% can incorporate levels of sulphur that could be considered useful from a waste immobilization perspective. Data for several phosphate and borosilicate glasses suggest that the {sigma}(z/a{sup 2}) scale provides the best residual fitting error and that if glasses are considered within their familial limits, this can provide a useful methodology for predicting sulphur capacity.

Bingham, P.A. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: p.a.bingham@sheffield.ac.uk; Hand, R.J. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2008-07-01

81

Cold-cap reactions in vitrification of nuclear waste glass: experiments and modeling  

SciTech Connect

Cold-cap reactions are multiple overlapping reactions that occur in the waste-glass melter during the vitrification process when the melter feed is being converted to molten glass. In this study, we used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate cold-cap reactions in a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To separate the reaction heat from both sensible heat and experimental instability, we employed the run/rerun method, which enabled us to define the degree of conversion based on the reaction heat and to estimate the heat capacity of the reacting feed. Assuming that the reactions are nearly independent and can be approximated by the nth order kinetics, we obtained the kinetic parameters using the Kissinger method combined with least squares analysis. The resulting mathematical simulation of the cold-cap reactions provides a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model.

Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pokorny, Richard [Inst. of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pohang Univ. of Science and Techology (Korea, Republic of)

2013-05-10

82

Ferrous\\/ferric Mossbauer analysis of simulated nuclear waste glass with and without computer fitting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wet-chemical and ⁵⁷Fe Mossbauer analyses of ferrous\\/ferric ratios in complex borosilicate and simple silicate glasses were compared. The results support the validity of the colorimetric wet-chemical procedure and establish a linear calibration for the Mossbauer data. The resulting correlation indicates that using area ratios from Mossbauer spectra will overestimate the proportion of ferrous iron by a factor of 1.2. The

DON S. GOLDMAN; DEBORAH E. BEWLEY

1985-01-01

83

Molecular dynamics at the glass transition: One dimensional and two dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance studies of a glass-forming discotic liquid crystal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The molecular dynamics of the aromatic core as well as the hydrocarbon side chains have been studied in a new kind of glass-forming discotic liquid crystal, based on a triphenylene core. It serves as a model compound in which only a limited number of degrees of freedom is activated at the glass transition. Slow motion with non-Arrhenius temperature dependence (?

J. Leisen; M. Werth; C. Boeffel; H. W. Spiess

1992-01-01

84

Quantitative fluid inclusion gas analysis of airburst, nuclear, impact and fulgurite glasses.  

SciTech Connect

We present quantitative fluid inclusion gas analysis on a suite of violently-formed glasses. We used the incremental crush mass spectrometry method (Norman & Blamey, 2001) to analyze eight pieces of Libyan Desert Glass (LDG). As potential analogues we also analyzed trinitite, three impact crater glasses, and three fulgurites. The 'clear' LDG has the lowest CO{sub 2} content and O{sub 2}/Ar ratios are two orders of magnitude lower than atmospheric. The 'foamy' glass samples have heterogeneous CO{sub 2} contents and O{sub 2}/Ar ratios. N{sub 2}/Ar ratios are similar to atmospheric (83.6). H{sub 2} and He are elevated but it is difficult to confirm whether they are of terrestrial or meteoritic origin. Combustion cannot account for oxygen depletion that matches the amount of CO{sub 2} produced. An alternative mechanism is required that removes oxygen without producing CO{sub 2}. Trinitite has exceedingly high CO{sub 2} which we attribute to carbonate breakdown of the caliche at ground zero. The O{sub 2}/Ar ratio for trinitite is lower than atmospheric but higher than all LDG samples. N{sub 2}/Ar ratios closely match atmospheric. Samples from Lonar, Henbury and Aouelloul impact craters have atmospheric N{sub 2}/Ar ratios. O{sub 2}/Ar ratios at Lonar and Henbury are 9.5 to 9.9 whereas the O{sub 2}/Ar ratio is 0.1 for the Aouelloul sample. In most fulgurites the N{sub 2}/Ar ratio is higher than atmospheric, possibly due to interference from CO. Oxygen ranges from 1.3 to 19.3%. Gas signatures of LDG inclusions neither match those from the craters, trinitite nor fulgurites. It is difficult to explain both the observed depletion of oxygen in the LDG and a CO{sub 2} level that is lower than it would be if the CO{sub 2} were simply a product of hydrocarbon combustion in air. One possible mechanism for oxygen depletion is that as air turbulently mixed with a hot jet of vaporized asteroid from an airburst and expanded, the atmospheric oxygen reacted with the metal vapor to form metal oxides that condensed. This observation is compatible with the model of Boslough & Crawford (2008) who suggest that an airburst incinerates organic materials over a large area, melting surface materials that then quench to form glass. Bubbles would contain a mixture of pre-existing atmosphere with combustion products from organic material and products of the reaction between vaporized cosmic materials (including metals) and terrestrial surface and atmosphere.

Parnell, John (University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK); Newsom, Horton E. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Blamey, Nigel J. F. (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM); Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

2010-10-01

85

Direct conversion of surplus fissile materials, spent nuclear fuel, and other materials to high-level-waste glass  

SciTech Connect

With the end of the cold war the United States, Russia, and other countries have excess plutonium and other materials from the reductions in inventories of nuclear weapons. The United States Academy of Sciences (NAS) has recommended that these surplus fissile materials (SFMs) be processed so they are no more accessible than plutonium in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This spent fuel standard, if adopted worldwide, would prevent rapid recovery of SFMs for the manufacture of nuclear weapons. The NAS recommended investigation of three sets of options for disposition of SFMs while meeting the spent fuel standard: (1) incorporate SFMs with highly radioactive materials and dispose of as waste, (2) partly burn the SFMs in reactors with conversion of the SFMs to SNF for disposal, and (3) dispose of the SFMs in deep boreholes. The US Government is investigating these options for SFM disposition. A new method for the disposition of SFMs is described herein: the simultaneous conversion of SFMs, SNF, and other highly radioactive materials into high-level-waste (HLW) glass. The SFMs include plutonium, neptinium, americium, and {sup 233}U. The primary SFM is plutonium. The preferred SNF is degraded SNF, which may require processing before it can be accepted by a geological repository for disposal.

Forsberg, C.W.; Elam, K.R.

1995-01-31

86

Characterisation of heterogeneous molybdate and chromate phase assemblages in model nuclear waste glasses by multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.  

PubMed

A series of sodium borosilicate glasses containing cesium, molybdenum, and chromium was prepared to investigate the partitioning of chromium amongst the glass and phase-separated crystalline molybdates. The precipitates were examined by (133)Cs, (23)Na, and (95)Mo MAS NMR, revealing a phase assemblage consisting of Na(2)MoO(4), Na(2)MoO(4)·2H(2)O, Cs(2)MoO(4), Cs(2)CrO(4), CsNaMoO(4)·2H(2)O, and Cs(3)Na(MoO(4))(2). (133)Cs MAS NMR indicates random substitution of Cr into the Mo sites of Cs(3)Na(MoO(4))(2) and provides a quantitative assessment of Cr incorporation. The sample compositions were verified by various analytical techniques and highlight the centrality of NMR in the identification and quantification of heterogeneous crystalline composites, including sensitivity to cationic substitution. The observation and facile interconversion of hydrated phases invites careful consideration of these materials for nuclear waste disposal. PMID:22532058

Greer, Brandon J; Kroeker, Scott

2012-05-28

87

Effect of composition and radiation on the Hertzian indentation behavior of nuclear waste glasses. [77-MeV alpha particles  

SciTech Connect

The Hertzian indentation technique has been used to determine the fracture toughness, K/sub Ic/ of two borosilicate glasses developed to contain high-level nuclear waste. For the product VG 98/12, adding selected groups of fission products leaves K/sub Ic/ unchanged, but addition of Pb lowers K/sub Ic/ by approx. 20%. Radiation with 77 MeV ..cap alpha..-particles to a dose of approx. 10/sup 15/ ..cap alpha../cm/sup 2/ increases K/sub Ic/ by approx. 75%. For the product SM 58 LW 11, the fracture toughness was measured on pieces taken from different parts of a large cylinder to investigate the effects of segregation phenomena and of partial crystallization and formation of small cristobalite inclusions which decrease K/sub Ic/ by approx. 25%.

Matzke, H.; Kahl, L.; Routbort, J.L.; Saidl, J.

1983-01-01

88

The use of natural and archeological analogues for understanding the long-term behavior of nuclear glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The knowledge of the long-term behavior of nuclear waste in anticipation of ultimate disposal in a deep geological formation is of prime importance in a waste management strategy. If phenomenological models have been developed to predict the long-term behavior of these materials, validating these models remains a challenge, when considering the time scale of radioactive decay of radionuclides of environmental concern, typically 10 4-10 5 yrs. Here we show how natural or archaeological analogues provide critical constraints not only on the phenomenology of glass alteration and the mechanisms involved, but also on the ability of experimental short-term data to predict long-term alteration in complex environments.

Libourel, Guy; Verney-Carron, Aurelie; Morlok, Andreas; Gin, Stéphane; Sterpenich, Jérôme; Michelin, Anne; Neff, Delphine; Dillmann, Philippe

2011-02-01

89

Glass-transition temperature gradient in nanocomposites: evidence from nuclear magnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry.  

PubMed

The slowing-down of the dynamics of a polymer chain near a surface has been observed for many years now. Here we show that the behavior of model nanocomposites can be quantitatively described with a gradient of glass-transition temperature. We describe with a single parameter-the range of this gradient-the temperature and solvent effect on the spin relaxation dynamics. Moreover, this parameter allows a quantitative description of the nanocomposite calorimetric response from the one of the bulk polymer. PMID:22401088

Papon, Aurélie; Montes, Hélène; Hanafi, Mohamed; Lequeux, François; Guy, Laurent; Saalwächter, Kay

2012-02-10

90

Biological effect of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans on some potentially toxic elements during alteration of SON 68 nuclear glass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although underground nuclear waste repositories are not expected to be favourable places for microbial activity, one should not exclude localized action of extremophilic bacteria on some materials involved in the storage concept. Among endogenous or accidentally introduced acidophiles, some are susceptible to lead to a locally drastic decreased in pH, with potential consequences on materials corrosion. Experiments were performed with Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans on 100-125 m french reference nuclear glass SON68 grains in a mineral medium under static conditions during 60 days at 25degC. Growth medium was periodically renewed and analyzed by ICP-AES and ICP-MS spectrometry for both major, trace and ultra-trace elements. Biofilm formation was evidenced by confocal laser microscopy, staining DNA with ethidium bromide and exopolysaccharides with calcofluor white. Biofilm thickness around material grains exceeded 20 m under the chosen experimental conditions. It can be noticed that while numerous studies on biofilm formation upon interaction between Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and materials are found in the literature, evidence for biofilm formation is still scarce for the case of the acidophilic bacterium A. thiooxidans. Presence of biofilm is a key parameter for material alteration at the solid/solution interface in biotic systems. Indeed, various constitutive elements of materials trapped in the polyanionic polymer of biofilm may also influence the alteration process. In particular, biofilm may reduce the alteration rate of materials by forming a protective barrier at their surface (Aouad et al., 2008). In this study, glass alteration rates, determined using strontium as tracer, showed that the progressive formation of a biofilm on the surface of glass has a protective effect against its alteration. Uranium and rare earth elements (REE) are efficiently trapped in the biogenic compartment of the system (exopolysaccharides + bacterial cells). Besides, the ratio biotic/abiotic concentrations of REE and U in the leachant decreases with increasing time which seems to indicate a good capacity of EPS for long term trapping of potentially toxic elements. Aouad G., Crovisier J.-L., Damidot D., Stille P., Hutchens E., Mutterer J., Meyer J.-M., and Geoffroy V. A. (2008) Interactions between municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash and bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Science of The Total Environment 393((2-3)), 385-393.

Bachelet, M.; Crovisier, J. L.; Stille, P.; Vuilleumier, S.; Geoffroy, V.

2009-04-01

91

Overview Of Nuclear Radiation Damage Processes: Phenomenological Features Of Radiation Damage In Crystals And Glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The principle radiation damage effects occurring in optical materials, particularly those produced by energetic particles and gamma rays, are described phenomenologically. Included is a description of the basic processes whereby radiation interacts with non-metals. Emphasized are: 1) ionization induced electron and hole formation and migration processes and, 2) the displacement and ionization damage effects that are responsible for atoms being displaced from their normal lattice positions. In nonmetals, the principal radiation damage effect produced by these processes is the creation of color centers. In turn, it is shown that the radiation induced color center formation, as well as the changes that occurs after an irradiation is terminated, are described by a particularly simple theory. Radiation damage in transparent crystals and glasses is illustrated by measurements made with unique equipment fn making optical measurements during and after irradiation. One arrangement utilizes a 60 Co gamma-ray source and the other a 3.0 MeV electron accelerator. The illustrations include: 1) Measurements on F-center formation during irradiation--and the changes that occur after irradiation--on LiF, NaC1, and KC1 synthetic crystals. 2) Studies on the radiation induced F-center and Na metal colloid formation occurring in natural rock salt (NaCl) from potential radioactive waste repository sites. 3) The growth during irradiation and decay after irradiation of color centers in glasses irradiated at different temperatures. Lastly, the radioluminescence emitted during irradiation, as well as the absorption spectrum changes and the thermoluminescence emission that is observed when irradiated samples are heated, is illustrated by studies on natural quartz.

Levy, Paul W.

1985-12-01

92

RHENIUM SOLUBILITY IN BOROSILICATE NUCLEAR WASTE GLASS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PROCESSING AND IMMOBILIZATION OF TECHNETIUM-99 (AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION WITH GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT)  

SciTech Connect

The immobilization of 99Tc in a suitable host matrix has proved a challenging task for researchers in the nuclear waste community around the world. At the Hanford site in Washington State in the U.S., the total amount of 99Tc in low-activity waste (LAW) is {approx} 1,300 kg and the current strategy is to immobilize the 99Tc in borosilicate glass with vitrification. In this context, the present article reports on the solubility and retention of rhenium, a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc, in a LAW sodium borosilicate glass. Due to the radioactive nature of technetium, rhenium was chosen as a simulant because of previously established similarities in ionic radii and other chemical aspects. The glasses containing target Re concentrations varying from 0 to10,000 ppm by mass were synthesized in vacuum-sealed quartz ampoules to minimize the loss of Re by volatilization during melting at 1000 DC. The rhenium was found to be present predominantly as Re7 + in all the glasses as observed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The solubility of Re in borosilicate glasses was determined to be {approx}3,000 ppm (by mass) using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). At higher rhenium concentrations, some additional material was retained in the glasses in the form of alkali perrhenate crystalline inclusions detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and laser ablation-ICP mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Assuming justifiably substantial similarities between Re7 + and Tc 7+ behavior in this glass system, these results implied that the processing and immobilization of 99Tc from radioactive wastes should not be limited by the solubility of 99Tc in borosilicate LAW glasses.

AA KRUGER; A GOEL; CP RODRIGUEZ; JS MCCLOY; MJ SCHWEIGER; WW LUKENS; JR, BJ RILEY; D KIM; M LIEZERS; P HRMA

2012-08-13

93

Standard tests for thermal stability of nuclear waste forms. [PNL78-157 waste glass  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three test methods have been proposed for evaluating the thermal stability of nuclear waste forms. The time-temperature dependence of thermally activated phase transformations are measured by the proposed MCC-7 Recommended Practice for Testing Thermal Phase Stability in Radioactive Waste Forms. The proposed MCC-8 High Temperature Vaporization Test Method measures the vaporization of fission products and other condensable elements. The potential

W. J. Weber; W. J. Gray; R. P. May

1981-01-01

94

CHEMICAL DECOMPOSITION OF HIGH-LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE/DISPOSAL GLASSES UNDER IRRADIATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The Offices of Energy Research and Environmental Management are immediately concerned with the development of storage/immobilization media for high-level nuclear wastes and excess weapons plutonium. These media must be stable and free of risk to the public or to the environment f...

95

Nuclear Spin Lattice Relaxation and Conductivity Studies of the Non-Arrhenius Conductivity Behavior in Lithium Fast Ion Conducting Sulfide Glasses  

SciTech Connect

As time progresses, the world is using up more of the planet's natural resources. Without technological advances, the day will eventually arrive when these natural resources will no longer be sufficient to supply all of the energy needs. As a result, society is seeing a push for the development of alternative fuel sources such as wind power, solar power, fuel cells, and etc. These pursuits are even occurring in the state of Iowa with increasing social pressure to incorporate larger percentages of ethanol in gasoline. Consumers are increasingly demanding that energy sources be more powerful, more durable, and, ultimately, more cost efficient. Fast Ionic Conducting (FIC) glasses are a material that offers great potential for the development of new batteries and/or fuel cells to help inspire the energy density of battery power supplies. This dissertation probes the mechanisms by which ions conduct in these glasses. A variety of different experimental techniques give a better understanding of the interesting materials science taking place within these systems. This dissertation discusses Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques performed on FIC glasses over the past few years. These NMR results have been complimented with other measurement techniques, primarily impedance spectroscopy, to develop models that describe the mechanisms by which ionic conduction takes place and the dependence of the ion dynamics on the local structure of the glass. The aim of these measurements was to probe the cause of a non-Arrhenius behavior of the conductivity which has been seen at high temperatures in the silver thio-borosilicate glasses. One aspect that will be addressed is if this behavior is unique to silver containing fast ion conducting glasses. more specifically, this study will determine if a non-Arrhenius correlation time, {tau}, can be observed in the Nuclear Spin Lattice Relaxation (NSLR) measurements. If so, then can this behavior be modeled with a new single distribution of activation energies (DAE) to calculate the corresponding conductivity and relaxation rates as a function of temperature and frequency?

Benjamin Michael Meyer

2003-05-31

96

Micro-fluidics and integrated optics glass sensor for in-line micro-probing of nuclear samples  

SciTech Connect

We study the miniaturization of Thermal Lens Spectrometry (TLS) towards Lab-on-chip integration in order to reduce the volume of fluid assays in nuclear process control. TLS is of great interest in this context since it combines the advantages of optical detection methods with an inherent suitability for small-scale samples. After validating the experimental principle in a classical thermal lens crossed-beam setup, we show the integration of a Young-interferometer with a microcapillary on a glass substrate, reducing the necessary sample size to 400 nl. The interferometer translates the photo-thermally induced refractive index change in the fluid to a phase shift of the fringe pattern, which can then be detected by a camera. Measurements of Co(II) in ethanol yield a detection limit of c = 5 x 10{sup -4} M for the crossed-beam setup and c = 6 x 10{sup -3} M for the integrated sensor. At an interaction length of 10 m, it detects a minimum absorbance of K = 1.2 x 10{sup -4} in a probed volume of 14 pl. (authors)

Schimpf, A.; Bucci, D.; Broquin, J.E. [Minatec, Inst Microelect Electromagnetisme et Photon IMEP L, F-38016 Grenoble 1, (France); Canto, F.; Magnaldo, A.; Couston, L. [Commissariat Energie Atom Marcoule, DEN-DRCP, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France)

2012-08-15

97

Molecular dynamics at the glass transition: One dimensional and two dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance studies of a glass-forming discotic liquid crystal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The molecular dynamics of the aromatic core as well as the hydrocarbon side chains have been studied in a new kind of glass-forming discotic liquid crystal, based on a triphenylene core. It serves as a model compound in which only a limited number of degrees of freedom is activated at the glass transition. Slow motion with non-Arrhenius temperature dependence (? process) is associated with the axial motion of the discs around the column axis. The geometry of this rotation is found to be neither a simple threefold jump as suggested by the pseudo threefold symmetry of the substituted triphenylene core nor does it correspond to small-step rotational diffusion, established as a prominent feature of the rotational motions of polymers at the glass transition. Instead ill-defined angular displacements with pseudo threefold symmetry are detected by two-dimensional exchange NMR. A simple model combining small-step diffusion and rotational jumps is presented that quantitatively accounts for the angular displacements observed. The motional behavior and the conformational order of the side chains were also studied. This shows that the high frequency ? process detected previously by dielectric spectroscopy indeed can be associated with side chain motions. Moreover evidence is presented that the axial motion of the discs is a cooperative process, where adjacent molecules within the column rotate in a correlated fashion without changing the conformation of the side chains in the immediate neighborhood of the core.

Leisen, J.; Werth, M.; Boeffel, C.; Spiess, H. W.

1992-09-01

98

Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading.

Kruger, A.A.

1995-07-01

99

Intrinsic dosimetry of glass containers used to transport nuclear materials: Potential implications to the fields of waste management and nuclear forensics  

SciTech Connect

Thermoluminescence (TL) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) dosimetry were used to measure dose effects in borosilicate glass with time, from 10 min to w60 days following exposure to a dose of up to 100 Gy. TL and EPR results were consistent and performed similarly, with both techniques capable of achieving an estimated limit of detection of between 0.5 and 1 Gy. Three peaks were identified in the TL glow curve at roughly 110 C, 205 C, and 225 C. The intensity of the 205 C peak was the dominant peak over the time period of this study. The stability of all of the peaks with time since irradiation increased with their corresponding temperature and no significant variation was observed in the glow curve response to a specified total dose attained at different dose rates. The intensity of the 205 C peak decreased logarithmically with time regardless of total dose. Based upon a conservative limit of detection of 3.3 Gy, a 100 Gy dose would still be detected 2.7E3 years after exposure. Here, we introduce the concept of intrinsic dosimetry, the measurement of the total absorbed dose received by the walls of a container containing radioactive material. The foreseen advantage of intrinsic dosimetry comes from considering the measured absorbed dose received by containers in concert with the characteristics (amount, type) of the source of that dose, the radioactive material contained within the walls of the container, in order to provide enhanced information about the history of an unknown sample in question. Three hypothetical scenarios are presented to introduce this method and to illustrate how intrinsic dosimetry might benefit the fields of nuclear forensics and waste management.

Schwantes, Jon M.; Miller, Steve D.; Piper, Roman K.; Murphy, Mark K.; Amonette, James E.; Bonde, Steven E.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

2009-04-12

100

IR and Raman Spectroscopy of Sodium-Aluminophosphate Glasses for Immobilizing High-Level Wastes from Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The structure of sodium-aluminophosphate glasses containing constituents of high-level wastes (cesium, magnesium, copper, and molybdenum oxides) from uranium-graphite reactors was studied by IR and Raman spectroscopy coupled with x-ray diffraction. The structural network was shown to be composed of short P-O chains with embedded AlO4 tetrahedra. Cross-linking by Mg2+ was possible in the Mg-bearing samples. The effect of the other oxides (Cs2O, MoO3, CuO) on the glass structure was negligible for the occurring amounts. The glasses devitrified partially upon quenching and more strongly upon annealing. This was reflected in splitting of the vibrational bands for bonds in the glass anionic structural motif.

Stefanovsky, S. V.; Myasoedov, B. F.; Remizov, M. B.; Belanova, E. A.

2014-09-01

101

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS COMPOSITIONS TO IMMOBILIZE ALKALI, ALKALINE EARTH, LANTHANIDE AND TRANSITION METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) waste management strategy revolves around specific treatment of individual or groups of separated waste streams. A goal for the separations processes is to efficiently manage the waste to be dispositioned as high level radioactive waste. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) baseline technology for immobilization of the lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) wastes is vitrification into a borosilicate glass. A current interest is to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined waste streams to most cost effectively immobilize the wastes resulting from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Studies showed that high waste loadings are achievable for the Ln only (Option 1) stream. Waste loadings in excess of 60 wt % (on a calcined oxide basis) were demonstrated via a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. The resulting glasses had excellent relative durability as determined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). For a combined Ln and TM waste stream glass (Option 2), noble metal solubility was found to limit waste loading. However, the measured PCT normalized elemental releases for this glass were at least an order of magnitude below that of Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. Current efforts to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined Ln, TM, alkali (Cs is the primary radionuclide of concern) and alkaline earth (Sr is the primary radionuclide of concern) wastes (Option 3) have shown that these approaches are feasible. However, waste loading limitations with respect to heat load (Cs/Sr loading), molybdenum solubility and/or noble metal solubility will likely be realized and must be considered in determining the cost effectiveness of these approaches.

Marra, J.; Billings, A.

2009-06-24

102

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of the Structure of Sodium Borosilicate, Magnesium Borate, Lithium Borate, and Sodium Fluoroberyllate Glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

B('11), B('10), Be('9), and F('19) NMR techniques are employed to gain information about the short-range order in four different glass-forming systems. In sodium borosilicate glasses of high soda content, B('11) studies yield the relative fractions of boron atoms in various bonding arrangements. The data show that if enough Na(,2)O is added, four-coordinated borons are destroyed and borons with one or two non-bridging oxygens are created, but that both the beginning point and the rate of these processes depend strongly on the amount of silica present. These findings are shown to be quantitatively inconsistent with structural models previously suggested in the literature. Utilizing the concept of proportionate atomic sharing of the additional Na(,2)O, a new structural model is proposed for K < 8 (K = mol% SiO(,2)/mol% B(,2)O(,3)). X-ray diffraction and B('11) NMR techniques are employed to study phase relations in the magnesium borate system at the metaborate composition. The formation of compounds is found to be highly dependent on the sample preparation technique. Contrary to reports in the literature, no evidence is found for a metaborate compound. It is argued that magnesium oxide acts in part as a network former to account for an unexpectedly low fraction of four-coordinated boron atoms and for the lack of non-bridging oxygen atoms in magnesium borate glass. B('10) NMR studies are carried out on lithium borate glasses over the entire glass forming region of the system. Assuming the validity of the Krogh-Moe model, the relative abundances of the various structural groupings are inferred from the data by fitting computer-simulated lineshapes to the experimental spectra. Distributions in quadrupole parameters due to the random nature of the glass are also inferred. Be('9) and F('19) NMR studies are carried out on two samples of sodium fluoroberyllate glasses: one sample is nominally pure BeF(,2), and the other is 67 wt% BeF(,2), 33 wt% NaF. Unlike the case for the binary sample, the central transition of the Be('9) spectrum for the nominally pure sample exhibits an anomalous narrow line. It is argued that the anomalous response is due to clustered Be atoms in a non-stoichiometric sample. The quadrupole coupling constant found to be a factor-of-four larger in the binary sample; it is argued that this is strong evidence for the existence of five-coordinated Be atoms in sodium fluoroberyllate glasses.

dell, Warren James

103

Structural characterization and physical properties of P2O5-CaO-Na2O-TiO2 glasses by Fourier transform infrared, Raman and solid-state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies.  

PubMed

Phosphate-based glasses have been investigated for tissue engineering applications. This study details the properties and structural characterization of titanium ultra-phosphate glasses in the 55(P(2)O(5))-30(CaO)-(25-x)(Na(2)O)-x(TiO(2)) (0?x?5) system, which have been prepared via melt-quenching techniques. Structural characterization was achieved by a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies. Physical properties were also investigated using density, degradation and ion release studies; additionally, differential thermal analysis was used for thermal analysis of these glasses. The results show that with the addition of TiO(2) the density and glass transition temperature increased whereas the degradation and ion release properties are decreased. From XRD data, TiP(2)O(7) and CaP(2)O(6) were detected in 3 and 5 mol.% TiO(2)-containing glasses. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance results confirmed that as TiO(2) is incorporated into the glass; the amount of Q(3) increases as the amount of Q(2) consequently decreases, indicating increasing polymerization of the phosphate network. Spectroscopy results also showed that the local structure of glasses changes with increasing TiO(2) content. As TiO(2) is incorporated into the glass, the phosphate connectivity increases, indicating that the addition of TiO(2) content correlates unequivocally with an increase in glass stability. PMID:21930253

Kiani, Azadeh; Hanna, John V; King, Scott P; Rees, Gregory J; Smith, Mark E; Roohpour, Nima; Salih, Vehid; Knowles, Jonathan C

2012-01-01

104

Biodegradation of the french reference nuclear glass SON 68 by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans : protective effect of the biofilm,U and REE retention  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although underground nuclear waste repositories are not expected to be favourable places for microbial activity, one should not exclude localized action of extremophilic bacteria on some materials involved in the storage concept. Among endogenous or accidentally introduced acidophiles, some are susceptible to lead to a locally drastic decreased in pH with potential consequences on materials corrosion. Experiments were performed with Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans on 100-125 ?m french reference nuclear glass SON68 grains in a mineral medium under static conditions during 60 days at 25°C. Growth medium was periodically renewed and analyzed by ICP-AES and ICP-MS spectrometry for both major, traces and ultra-traces elements. Biofilm formation was evidenced by confocal laser microscopy, staining DNA with ethidium bromide and exopolysaccharides with calcofluor white. Biofilm thickness around material grains exceeded 20 ?m under the chosen experimental conditions. It can be noticed that while numerous studies on biofilm formation upon interaction between Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and materials can be found in the literature, evidence for biofilm formation is still scarce for the case of the acidophilic bacterium A. thiooxidans. Presence of biofilm is a key parameter for material alteration at the solid/solution interface in biotic systems. Indeed, various constitutive elements of materials trapped in the polyanionic polymer of biofilm may also influence the alteration process. In particular, biofilm may reduce the alteration rate of materials by forming a protective barrier at their surface (Aouad et al., 2008). In this study, glass alteration rates, determined using strontium, molybdenum and caesium as tracers, showed that the biofilm has a protective effect against glass alteration. U and REE are efficiently trapped in the biogenic compartment of the system (exopolysaccharides (EPS) + bacterial cells). Biofilm analysis are in progress to determine whether these elements are in bacterial cells or in the EPS. . Aouad G., Crovisier J.-L., Damidot D., Stille P., Hutchens E., Mutterer J., Meyer J.-M., and Geoffroy V. A. (2008) Interactions between municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash and bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Science of The Total Environment 393(2-3), 385-393.

Bachelet, M.; Crovisier, J.; Stille, P.; Boutin, R.; Vuilleumier, S.; Geoffroy, V.

2008-12-01

105

Glass Artworks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several NASA technologies have played part in growth and cost containment of studio glass art, among them a foam type insulation developed to meet a need for lightweight material that would reduce flame spread in aircraft fire. Foam comes in several forms and is widely used by glass artists, chiefly as an insulator for the various types of ovens used in glass working. Another Spinoff is alumina crucibles to contain molten glass. Before alumina crucibles were used, glass tanks were made of firebrick which tended to erode under high temperatures and cause impurities; this not only improved quality but made the process more cost effective. One more NASA technology that found its way into glass art working is a material known as graphite board, a special form of graphite originally developed for rocket motor applications. This graphite is used to exact compound angles and creates molds for poured glass artworks of dramatic design.

1988-01-01

106

Glass corrosion in natural environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experiments carried out during the progress period are summarized. Experiments carried out involving glass samples exposed to solutions of Tris have shown the appearance of 'spikes' upon monitoring glass dissolution as a function of time. The periodic 'spikes' observed in Tris-based media were interpreted in terms of cracking due to excessive stress in the surface region of the glass. Studies of the interactions of silicate glasses with metal ions in buffered media were extended to systems containing Al. Caps buffer was used to establish the pH. The procedures used are described and the results are given. Preliminary studies were initiated as to the feasibility of adding a slowly dissolving solid compound of the additive to the glass-water system to maintain a supply of dissolved additive. It appears that several magnesium compounds have a suitable combination of solubility and affinity towards silicate glass surfaces to have a pronounced retarding effect on the extraction of uranium from the glass. These preliminary findings raise the possibility that introducing a magnesium source into geologic repositories for nuclear waste glass in the form of a sparingly soluble Mg-based backfill material may cause a substantial reduction in the extent of long-term glass corrosion. The studies described also provide mechanistic understanding of the roles of various metal solutes in the leachant. Such understanding forms the basis for developing long-term predictions of nuclear waste glass durability under repository conditions. From what is known about natural highly reduced glasses such as tektites, it is clear that iron is dissolved as ferrous iron with little or no ferric iron. The reducing conditions were high enough to cause metallic iron to exsolve out of the glass in the form of submicroscopic spherules. As the nuclear waste glass is much less reduced, a study was initiated on other natural glasses in addition to the nuclear waste glass. Extensive measurements were carried out on these glasses in order to characterize their magnetic properties. Results of these studies are described.

Thorpe, Arthur N.; Barkatt, Aaron

1992-01-01

107

Biological effect of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans on some potentially toxic elements during alteration of SON 68 nuclear glass  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although underground nuclear waste repositories are not expected to be favourable places for microbial activity, one should not exclude localized action of extremophilic bacteria on some materials involved in the storage concept. Among endogenous or accidentally introduced acidophiles, some are susceptible to lead to a locally drastic decreased in pH, with potential consequences on materials corrosion. Experiments were performed with

M. Bachelet; J. L. Crovisier; P. Stille; S. Vuilleumier; V. Geoffroy

2009-01-01

108

Molecular exchange dynamics in partially filled microscale and nanoscale pores of silica glasses studied by field-cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nuclear magnetic spin-lattice relaxation experiments have been performed in partially filled porous glasses with wetting and nonwetting fluids. The frequency dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate in Vycor (4 nm pores) and VitraPOR #5 (1 ?m pores) silica glasses was studied as a function of the filling degree with the aid of field-cycling NMR relaxometry. The species of primary interest were water (``polar'') and cyclohexane (``nonpolar''). Spin-lattice relaxation was examined in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 400 MHz with the aid of a field-cycling NMR relaxometer and an ordinary 400 MHz NMR spectrometer. Three different mobility states of the fluid molecules are distinguished: The adsorbed state at the pore walls, the bulklike liquid phase, and the vapor phase. The adsorbate spin-lattice relaxation rate is dominated by the ``reorientation mediated by translational displacements'' (RMTD) mechanism taking place at the adsorbate/matrix interface at frequencies low enough to neglect rotational diffusion of the molecules. The experimental data are analyzed in terms of molecular exchange between the different mobility states. Judged from the dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rates on the filling degree, limits for slow and fast exchange (relative to the RMTD time scale) can be distinguished and identified. It is concluded that water always shows the features of slow exchange irrespective of the investigated pore sizes and filling degrees. This is in contrast to cyclohexane which is subject to slow exchange in micrometer pores, whereas fast exchange occurs in nanoscopic pores. The latter case implies that the vapor phase contributes to molecular dynamics in this case at low filling degrees while it is negligible otherwise.

Mattea, C.; Kimmich, R.; Ardelean, I.; Wonorahardjo, S.; Farrher, G.

2004-12-01

109

Molybdenum in Nuclear Waste Glasses -Incorporation and Redox state R.J. Short, R.J. Hand, N.C. Hyatt,  

E-print Network

are also reported. INTRODUCTION Borosilicate glasses used for the vitrification of HLW have good long term) that are high in Mo are particularly likely to cause devitrification in borosilicate glasses due to the low a sodium borosilicate base glass composition specified by BNFL and containing a simulated HLW composition

Sheffield, University of

110

Metallic glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper surveys the present state of knowledge concerning the production, stability and structure of metallic glasses made by rapid quenching from the melt, and outlines their principal magnetic, electrical and mechanical properties. Emphasis is placed on the influence of annealing, at temperatures below the glass transition, on a range of properties. The prospect for practical applications is examined, with

R. W. Cahn

1980-01-01

111

Frosty Glasses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners explore why frost forms. They create their own frost using a solution of ice water and salt in a glass. The salt allows the temperature of the water to drop below the normal freezing point, so that water vapor in the air turns directly into solid ice on the surface of the glass.

Cosi

2009-01-01

112

Waste glass melting stages  

SciTech Connect

Three different simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600[degrees]C--1000[degrees]C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin-sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. Behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied.

Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

1993-04-01

113

Waste glass melting stages  

SciTech Connect

Three different simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600{degrees}C--1000{degrees}C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin-sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. Behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied.

Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

1993-04-01

114

[sup 31]P and [sup 27]Al MAS NMR investigations of some lead phosphate glasses. [Magic Angle Spin Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  

SciTech Connect

The [sup 31]P MAS NMR spectra were measured and analyzed for the two phosphate glasses that contain distinct metals (i.e., In or Ba), different amounts of PbO, and the same content of P[sub 2]O[sub 5] and Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. The [sup 31]P MAS NMR spectra for the two glasses have a single isotropic peak at [minus]3.77 or [minus]4.76 ppm, indicating that orthophosphate species are the dominant P sites in the glasses studied. The [sup 27]Al MAS NMR spectrum measured for the lead-barium-aluminum phosphate glass shows that the aluminum ions present in the glass are in 4-, 5-, and 6-fold coordination with oxygen and that the Al(OP)[sub 4] is the dominant moiety for the glass, suggesting the formation of orthophosphate species in the glass.

Gongyi, G. (Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

1999-03-01

115

Structural studies of mixed glass former 0.35Na2O + 0.65[xB2O3 + (1 - x)P2O5] glasses by Raman and 11B and 31P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies.  

PubMed

The mixed glass former (MGF) effect (MGFE) is defined as a nonlinear and nonadditive change in the ionic conductivity with changing glass former composition at constant modifier composition. In this study, sodium borophosphate 0.35Na(2)O + 0.65[xB(2)O(3) + (1 - x)P(2)O(5)], 0 ? x ? 1, glasses which have been shown to exhibit a positive MGFE have been prepared and examined using Raman and (11)B and (31)P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopies. Through examination of the short-range order (SRO) structures found in the ternary glasses, it was determined that the minority glass former, B for 0.1 ? x ? 0.7 and P for 0.7 ? x ? 0.9, is "overmodified" and contains more Na(+) ions than would be expected from simple linear mixing of the binary sodium borate, x = 1, and sodium phosphate, x = 0, glasses, respectively. Changes in the intermediate range order (IRO) structures were suggested by changes in the NMR spectral chemical shifts and Raman spectra wavenumber shifts over the full composition range x in the Raman and MAS NMR spectra. The changes observed in the chemical shifts of (31)P MAS NMR spectra with x are found to be too large to be caused solely by changing sodium modification of the phosphate SRO structural groups, and this indicates that internetwork bonding between phosphorus and boron through bridging oxygens (BOs), P-O-B, must be a major contributor to the IRO structure of these glasses. While not fully developed, a first-order thermodynamic analysis based upon the Gibbs free energies of formation of the various SRO structural units in this system has been developed and can be used to account for the preferential formation of tetrahedral boron groups, B(4), by the reaction of B(3) with P(2) groups to form B(4) and P(3) groups, respectively, where the superscript denotes the number of BOs on these units, in these glasses. This preference for B(4) units appears to be a predominate cause of the changing modifier to glass former ratio with composition x in these ternary MGF glasses and appears to be associated with the large negative value of the Gibbs free energy of formation of this group. PMID:23281937

Christensen, Randilynn; Olson, Garrett; Martin, Steve W

2013-02-21

116

Glass recycling and reuse  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods are surveyed for recycling and\\/or reusing post-consumer glass products to determine which methods are most favorable. The following topics are included: the properties of glass, glass manufacture; analyses of alternatives to direct disposal of glass products; reuse of waste glass for glass manufacture; techniques for the separation of glass from municipal refuse; the development of degradable glass containers; returnable

H. R. Samtur

1974-01-01

117

Edible Glass  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners discover the principles of edible glass by making a supersaturated sugar solution. The goal of this activity is to provide an interesting experiment which learners of many different levels can perform. The write-up for this activity provides explanatory information that presents the experiment from several different perspectives. This activity includes an introduction to common sugars, as well as some discussion of temperature and thermometry, basic thermodynamics, and the experimental procedure to make the candy glass.

Pomeroy, Josh

2012-01-01

118

Failure analysis of the lithium battery: A study of the header deposit on the cell top and diffusion within the electrode glass seal using nuclear microanalysis and FFTIR spectroscopy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Solid Rocket Booster Range Safety System (SRBRSS) uses a lithium/poly-carbon monofluoride primary battery as a source of electrical power. After cell fabrication and activation, some battery cells have shown self discharge. One possible source of this cell discharge has been suggested to be the formation and growth of a conducting crystallized chemical compound across the glass bead insulator, electrically shorting the glass bead to the casing. This laboratory has begun an analysis of this compound, the glass seal holding the cathode into place, and the cell electrolyte, using Fast Fourier Transform Infrared (FFTIR) Analysis, Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), and Nuclear Reaction Microanalysis. Preliminary measurements have confirmed the existence of lithium, nitrogen, fluorine, and oxygen on a reddish-brown deposit covering parts of the glass seal holding the positive electrode in place. Cells using Li metal electrodes, have many advantages over conventional primary batteries. One principal disadvantage of using Li batteries on a commercial basis would be the environmental impact of the fluorocarbon material. Another would be the relatively high expense of (CF)n.

Hassan, Razi A.

1991-01-01

119

The corrosion behavior of DWPF glasses  

SciTech Connect

The authors analyzed the corroded surfaces of reference glasses developed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to characterize their corrosion behavior. The corrosion mechanism of nuclear waste glasses must be known in order to provide source terms describing radionuclide release for performance assessment calculations. Different DWPF reference glasses were corroded under conditions that highlighted various aspects of the corrosion process and led to different extents of corrosion. The glasses corroded by similar mechanisms, and a phenomenological description of their corrosion behavior is presented here. The initial leaching of soluble glass components results in the formation of an amorphous gel layer on the glass surface. The gel layer is a transient phase that transforms into a layer of clay crystallites, which equilibrates with the solution as corrosion continues. The clay layer does not act as a barrier to either water penetration or glass dissolution, which continues beneath it, and may eventually separate from the glass. Solubility limits for glass components may be established by the eventual precipitation of secondary phases; thus, corrosion of the glass becomes controlled by the chemical equilibrium between the solution and the assemblage of secondary phases. In effect, the solution is an intermediate phase through which the glass transforms to an energetically more favorable assemblage of phases. Implications regarding the prediction of long-term glass corrosion behavior are discussed.

Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1995-06-01

120

Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach  

SciTech Connect

We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

Farges, Francois; /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur. /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci.; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; /Marne la Vallee U.; Haddi, Amine; /Marne la Valle U.; Trocellier,; /Saclay; Curti, Enzo; /PSI, Villigen; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

2007-01-02

121

Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach  

SciTech Connect

We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

Farges, Francois [USM 201 'Mineralogie-Petrologie', Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, CNRS UMR 7160, Paris (France); Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre [Laboratoire des Geomateriaux, Universite de Marne la Vallee (France); Laboratoire de Recherche des Monuments Historiques, Champs sur Marne (France); Haddi, Amine [Laboratoire des Geomateriaux, Universite de Marne la Vallee (France); Trocellier, Patrick [Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Saclay (France); Curti, Enzo [Laboratory of Waste Management, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Brown, Gordon E. Jr. [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, SLAC, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

2007-02-02

122

Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package  

SciTech Connect

A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the waste form.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

2012-06-17

123

Iron phosphate glass containing simulated fast reactor waste: Characterization and comparison with pristine iron phosphate glass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detailed characterization was carried out on an iron phosphate glass waste form containing 20 wt.% of a simulated nuclear waste. High temperature viscosity measurement was carried out by the rotating spindle method. The Fe3+/Fe ratio and structure of this waste loaded iron phosphate glass was investigated using Mössbauer and Raman spectroscopy respectively. Specific heat measurement was carried out in the temperature range of 300-700 K using differential scanning calorimeter. Isoconversional kinetic analysis was employed to understand the crystallization behavior of the waste loaded iron phosphate glass. The glass forming ability and glass stability of the waste loaded glass were also evaluated. All the measured properties of the waste loaded glass were compared with the characteristics of pristine iron phosphate glass.

Joseph, Kitheri; Asuvathraman, R.; Venkata Krishnan, R.; Ravindran, T. R.; Govindaraj, R.; Govindan Kutty, K. V.; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.

2014-09-01

124

Phase Stability Determinations of DWPF Waste Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. To fulfill this requirement, glass samples were heat treated at various times and temperatures. These results will provide guidance to the repository program about conditions to be avoided during shipping, handling and storage of DWPF canistered waste forms.

Marra, S.L.

1999-10-22

125

ELECTROSPRAYING OF GLASSES—PREPARATION OF GLASS COATINGS ON GLASS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glass coatings on ceramic or metallic substrates are prepared by two different methods. In a two-step process the glass powder is deposited on the glass substrate by methods such as airless spraying of enamel or glaze suspensions, dipping in enamel suspensions, electrospraying or electrophoretic deposition of enamel or glaze suspensions, and electrostatic powder spraying. The particle size of the glass

S. Rosenbaum; R. Clasen

1999-01-01

126

Metallic Glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The novel internal structures of metallic glasses lead to exceptional strength, corrosion resistance, and ease of magnetization. Combined with low manufacturing costs, these properties make glassy ribbons attractive for many applications. These materials also have scientific fascination because their compositions, structures, and properties have unexpected features.

John J. Gilman

1980-01-01

127

The incorporation of P, S, Cr, F, Cl, I, Mn, Ti, U, and Bi into simulated nuclear waste glasses: Literature study  

SciTech Connect

Waste currently stored on the Hanford Reservation in underground tanks will be into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Level Waste (LLW). The HLW melter will high-level and transuranic wastes to a vitrified form for disposal in a geological repository. The LLW melter will vitrify the low-level waste which is mainly a sodium solution. Characterization of the tank wastes is still in progress, and the pretreatment processes are still under development Apart from tank-to-tank variations, the feed delivered to the HLW melter will be subject to process control variability which consists of blending and pretreating the waste. The challenge is then to develop glass formulation models which can produce durable and processable glass compositions for all potential vitrification feed compositions and processing conditions. The work under HLW glass formulation is to study and model glass and melt pro functions of glass composition and temperature. The properties of interest include viscosity, electrical conductivity, liquidus temperature, crystallization, immiscibility durability. It is these properties that determine the glass processability and ac waste glass. Apart from composition, some properties, such as viscosity are affected by temperature. The processing temperature may vary from 1050{degrees}C to 1550{degrees}C dependent upon the melter type. The glass will also experience a temperature profile upon cooling. The purpose of this letter report is to assess the expected vitrification feed compositions for critical components with the greatest potential impact on waste loading for double shell tank (DST) and single shell tank (SST) wastes. The basis for critical component selection is identified along with the planned approach for evaluation. The proposed experimental work is a crucial part of model development and verification.

Langowski, M.H.

1996-02-01

128

Hot isostatically-pressed aluminosilicate glass-ceramic with natural crystalline analogues for immobilizing the calcined high-level nuclear waste at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

The additives Si, Al, MgO, P{sub 2}O{sub 5} were mechanically blended with fluorinelsodium calcine in varying proportions. The batches were vacuum sealed in stainless steel canisters and hot isostatically pressed at 20,000 PSI and 1000 C for 4 hours. The resulting suite of glass-ceramic waste forms parallels the natural rocks in microstructural and compositional heterogeneity. Several crystalline phases ar analogous in composition and structure to naturally occurring minerals. Additional crystalline phases are zirconia and Ca-Mg borate. The glasses are enriched in silica and alumina. Approximately 7% calcine elements occur dissolved in this glass and the total glass content in the waste forms averages 20 wt%. The remainder of the calcine elements are partitioned into crystalline phases at 75 wt% calcine waste loading. The waste forms were tested for chemical durability in accordance with the MCC1-test procedure. The leach rates are a function of the relative proportions of additives and calcine, which in turn influence the composition and abundances of the glass and crystalline phases. The DOE leach rate criterion of less than 1 g/m{sup 2}-day is met by all the elements B, Cs and Na are increased by lowering the melt viscosity. This is related to increased crystallization or devitrification with increases in MgO addition. This exploratory work has shown that the increases in waste loading occur by preferred partitioning of the calcine components among crystalline and glass phases. The determination of optimum processing parameters in the form of additive concentration levels, homogeneous blending among the components, and pressure-temperature stabilities of phases must be continued to eliminate undesirable effects of chemical composition, microstructure and glass devitrification.

Raman, S.

1993-12-01

129

Nuclear  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What part does nuclear energy play in satisfying energy demands? This informational piece, part of a series about the future of energy, introduces students to the uranium atom as an energy source. Here students read about the history of nuclear energy, how energy is derived from uranium, and benefits of nuclear energy. Information is also provided about limitations, particularly disposal problems and radioactivity, and geographical considerations of nuclear power in the United States. Thought-provoking questions afford students chances to reflect on what they've read about the uses of nuclear power. Articles and information on new nuclear plant design and nuclear accidents are available from a sidebar. Five energy-related PBS NewsHour links are provided. A web link to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is included. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

Project, Iowa P.

2004-01-01

130

Triple-quantum two-dimentional ²⁷Al magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of aluminosilicate and aluminate crystals and glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new two-dimensional magic-angle spinning NMR experiment using multiple-quantum coherence of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei was used to study ²⁷Al sites in crystalline samples of leucite (KAlSiâOâ), anorthite (CaAlâSiâOâ), and kyanite (AlâSiOâ), as well as CaAlâSiâOâ glass and a magnesium aluminoborate glass. In the crystals, multiple sites are partially resolved and new results for isotropic chemical shifts and quadrupolar parameters are

J. H. Baltisberger; Z. Xu; J. F. Stebbins; S. H. Wang; A. Pines

1996-01-01

131

Glass fibers as radiation detectors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The applicability of fiber-optic systems as dosimeters for ionizing radiation is discussed. The radiation sensitivities of different types of fibers show that lead-glass fibers should be used, if a small-sized dosimeter based on attenuation is required. On the other hand, Ge-doped fibers may be applied if a great length of fiber is needed. A distributed radiation sensor based on the OTDR (optical time-domain reflectometry) method is proposed for the radiation surveillance of nuclear facilities. For applications in radiotherapy, a small-sized lead-glass .dosimeter was developed.

Hille, R.; Bueker, H.; Haesing, F. W.

1990-12-01

132

Triple-quantum two-dimentional {sup 27}Al magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of aluminosilicate and aluminate crystals and glasses  

SciTech Connect

A new two-dimensional magic-angle spinning NMR experiment using multiple-quantum coherence of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei was used to study {sup 27}Al sites in crystalline samples of leucite (KAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), anorthite (CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}), and kyanite (Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}), as well as CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} glass and a magnesium aluminoborate glass. In the crystals, multiple sites are partially resolved and new results for isotropic chemical shifts and quadrupolar parameters are derived, using data collected at a single magnetic field. Data for both leucite and anorthite are consistent with previous results that correlate chemical shifts with mean intertetrahedral bond angle. Signal can be obtained from sites with quadrupolar coupling constants as large as 9 MHz, but intensities are reduced. In the aluminoborate glass, peaks for sites with different Al coordination numbers are well seperated. The lack of such features in CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} glass rules out the presence of significant quantities of AlO{sub 5} and AlO{sub 6} groups. 31 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Baltisberger, J.H. [Berea College, KY (United States)] [Berea College, KY (United States); Xu, Z.; Stebbins, J.F. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Wang, S.H.; Pines, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-07-31

133

Structure of rhenium-containing sodium borosilicate glass  

SciTech Connect

A series of sodium borosilicate glasses were synthesized with increasing fractions of KReO4 or Re2O7, to 10000 ppm (1 mass%) target Re in glass, to assess the effects of large concentrations of rhenium on glass structure and to estimate the solubility of technetium, a radioactive component in typical low active waste nuclear waste glasses. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were performed to characterize the glasses as a function of Re source additions. In general, silicon was found coordinated in a mixture of Q2 and Q3 structural units, while Al was 4-coordinated and B was largely 3-coordinate and partially 4-coordinated. The rhenium source did not appear to have significant effects on the glass structure. Thus, at the up to the concentrations that remain in dissolved in glass, ~3000 ppm Re by mass maximum. , the Re appeared to be neither a glass-former nor a strong glass modifier., Rhenium likely exists in isolated ReO4- anions in the interstices of the glass network, as evidenced by the polarized Raman spectrum of the Re glass in the absence of sulfate. Analogous to SO42-¬ in similar glasses, ReO4- is likely a network modifier and forms alkali salt phases on the surface and in the bulk glass above solubility.

Goel, Ashutosh; McCloy, John S.; Windisch, Charles F.; Riley, Brian J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Ferreira, Jose M.

2013-03-01

134

Effect of Sm-, Gd-co-doping on structural modifications in aluminoborosilicate glasses under -irradiation  

E-print Network

) or borosilicate glasses (in France, England and United States). These nuclear waste glasses are often complex1 Effect of Sm-, Gd-co-doping on structural modifications in aluminoborosilicate glasses under glasses with different total rare earth content have been studied in order to examine the codoping effect

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

135

Glass Furnace Project: October 1981-March 1982  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Glass Furnace Project is to evaluate the use of a joule-heated glass furnace, fitted with a Mound-developed offgas system, to reduce the volume of contaminated waste typical of that from nuclear power plants. As part of the project, several different waste types, including dry solid waste, ion exchange resin, and sludge, will be burned in the glass furnace unit. Burned combustion characteristics and radionuclide behavior in the glass furnace and associated offgas system will be monitored to determine optimum operating conditions. The project will provide an evaluation of the glass furnace as a volume reduction technique for the nuclear power industry as well as design criteria that can be used in constructing such a system by the end of FY-1984. The first half of FY-1982 was devoted to completion of the installation, checkout, and startup of the furnace unit and control systems. Compatibility studies to determine the effects of refractory and simulated waste on the soda-lime glass matrix were also performed in conjunction with the Mound Glass Ceramics group. These studies include chemical durability testing to discern the optimum waste loading of the glass. Finally, an experimental procedure was designed to determine the combustion efficiency of the incinerator. The combustion offgas will be monitored during experimentation to determine such related parameters as optimum feedrate and total oxygen requirements.

Armstrong, K M; Klingler, L M

1982-05-14

136

Impact Strength of Glass and Glass Ceramic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bar impact tests, using the techniques described elsewhere in this symposium, were used to measure compressive and tensile strengths of borosilicate glass, soda lime glass, and glass ceramic. The glass ceramic was 25% crystalline spinel, furnished by Corning, Inc. There are two measures of compressive strength: the peak stress that can be transmitted in unconfined compression and the steady-state strength. For both glasses, these values were similar, being about 1.8 and 1.5 GPa, respectively. The glass ceramic was almost 50% stronger. Tensile failure in the glass and glass ceramic takes places via surface flaws, and thus tensile strength is an extrinsic---as opposed to intrinsic---property.

Bless, Stephan; Tolman, John

2009-06-01

137

IMPACT STRENGTH OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC  

SciTech Connect

Strength of glass and glass ceramic was measured with a bar impact technique. High-speed movies show regions of tensile and compressive failure. The borosilicate glass had a compressive strength of at least 2.2 GPa, and the glass ceramic at least 4 GPa. However, the BSG was much stronger in tension than GC. In ballistic tests, the BSG was the superior armor.

Bless, S.; Tolman, J. [Institute for Advanced Technology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78759 (United States)

2009-12-28

138

Impact Strength of Glass and Glass Ceramic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Strength of glass and glass ceramic was measured with a bar impact technique. High-speed movies show regions of tensile and compressive failure. The borosilicate glass had a compressive strength of at least 2.2 GPa, and the glass ceramic at least 4 GPa. However, the BSG was much stronger in tension than GC. In ballistic tests, the BSG was the superior armor.

Bless, S.; Tolman, J.

2009-12-01

139

Optical properties and structure of Pr3+-doped Al(PO3)3LiF glasses as scattered neutron scintillator for nuclear fusion diagnostics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scattered neutron diagnostics is an indispensable tool for both inertial confinement and magnetic confinement fusion research. For this purpose, a fast-response neutron scintillator with a high cross section for scattered neutrons is strongly required. Recently, based on our material design strategy, we have successfully developed the fast response time Pr3+-doped 20Al(PO3)3-80LiF glass scintillator for scattered neutron originated from inertial confinement

T. Murata; S. Fujino; H. Yoshida; Y. Arikawa; T. Nakazato; T. Shimizu; N. Sarukura; M. Nakai; T. Norimatsu; H. Azechi; K. Kamada; Y. Usuki; T. Suyama; A. Yoshikawa; N. Sato; H. Kan

2011-01-01

140

Hot isostatically-pressed aluminosilicate glass-ceramic with natural crystalline analogues for immobilizing the calcined high-level nuclear waste at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

The additives Si, Al, MgO, PâOâ were mechanically blended with fluorinelsodium calcine in varying proportions. The batches were vacuum sealed in stainless steel canisters and hot isostatically pressed at 20,000 PSI and 1000 C for 4 hours. The resulting suite of glass-ceramic waste forms parallels the natural rocks in microstructural and compositional heterogeneity. Several crystalline phases ar analogous in composition

1993-01-01

141

Nanocrystallization of metallic glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper summarizes briefly the current status of research in the field of nanocrystallization of metallic glasses especially highlighting the influence of glass composition and conditions of devitrification process on size, morphology and composition of crystallization products. Conventional crystallization creates a nanocrystalline structure only in glasses with particular compositions. Any metallic glass, decomposing in a primary crystallization process, can be

Tadeusz Kulik

2001-01-01

142

Analytical electron microscopy study of surface layers formed on the French SON68 nuclear waste glass during vapor hydration at 200°C  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Extensive solid-state characterization (AEM/SEM/HRTEM) was completed on six SON68 (inactive R7T7) waste glasses which were altered in the presence of saturated water vapor (200°C) for 22, 91, 241, 908, 1000, 1013, and 1021 days. The samples were examined by AEM in cross-section (lattice-fringe imaging, micro-diffraction, and quantitative thin-film EDS analysis). The glass monoliths were invariably covered by a thin altered rind, and the surface layer thickness increased with increasing time of reaction, ranging from 0.5 to 30 ?m in thickness. Six distinctive zones, based on phase chemistry and microstructure, were distinguished within the well-developed surface layers. Numerous crystalline phases such as analcime, gyrolite, tobermorite, apatite, and weeksite were identified on the surfaces of the reacted glasses as precipitates. The majority of the surface layer volume was composed of two basic structures that are morphologically and chemically distinct: The A-domain consisted of well-crystallized fibrous smectite aggregates; and the B-domain consisted of poorly-crystallized regions containing smectite, possibly montmorillonite, crystallites and a ZrO 2-rich amorphous silica matrix. The retention of the rare-earth elements, Mo, and Zr mostly occurred within the B-domain; while transition metal elements, such as Zn, Cr, Ni, Mn, and Fe, were retained in the A-domain. The element partitioning among A-domains and B-domains and recrystallization of the earlier-formed B-domains into the A-domain smectites were the basic processes which have controlled the chemical and structural evolution of the surface layer. The mechanism of surface layer formation during vapor hydration are discussed based on these cross-sectional AEM results.

Gong, W. L.; Wang, L. M.; Ewing, R. C.; Vernaz, E.; Bates, J. K.; Ebert, W. L.

1998-04-01

143

Electron Spin Resonance Study of Fe3+ and Mn2+ Ions in 17-Year-Old Nuclear-Waste-Glass Simulants Containing PuO2 with Different Degrees of 238Pu Substitution  

SciTech Connect

Three samples of a model nuclear waste glass, DRG-P1, P2, and P3, were prepared at PNNL in 1982 with identical chemical compositions but were respectively batched with 0.0, 0.1, and 0.9 wt% of 238PuO2 (half life 87.8 years) partially replacing the 1.0 wt% 239PuO2 present in DRG-P1. In 1999, samples of these glasses were sent to the Naval Research Laboratory for electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. No radiation-induced point defects were observed. Profound alpha decay-induced changes in the ESR spectra of the batched iron-group ions were found. The spectra recorded for DRG-P1 were shown by absolute spin counts to have ESR intensities equivalent to ~85% of the sum of the batched 8.28 mole% Fe3+ and 2.79 mole% Mn2+, assuming all of those ions to behave as paramagnetic S=5/2 states at room temperature. Separate experiments and calculations ruled out the possibility of precipitated magnetite-like precipitates comprising even so much as 0.01% of the total iron. A relatively weak ESR spectral feature observed at g=4.3 is the known signature of dilute Fe3+ in glasses. However, the strongest ESR signal was found to be characterized by a first-derivative zero crossing at g=2.06 and a peak-to-peak derivative linewidth of ~150 mT, which is virtually invariant in shape with both measurement temperature and alpha-decay dose. It was discovered that these broad line shapes could be accurately simulated as weighted sums of Lorentzian shape functions of differing widths but having the same g value. The absence of any measurable anisotropy in the broad line, coupled with the temperature invariance of its width, imply the existence of extremely strong exchange interactions within clusters of Fe3+, Fe2+, Mn2+, and Ni2+ ions characterized by extremely short-range magnetic order. The result is a speromagnetic system rather than exhibiting a distinct Néel temperature. The most evident ESR effect of 17 years of 238Pu decay is the (irreversible) lowering of the intensity of the "broad line" in rough proportion to the amount of 238Pu in the sample, with concomitant increases in the amplitude of the g=4.3 feature. It was additionally observed that cooling these glasses to successively lower temperatures gives rise to reversible lowering of the broad-line intensity and increasing of the strength of the g=4.3 feature when compared with theoretical expectation for non-interacting paramagnets. The truly remarkable observation that the broad lines could be simulated as weighted sums of pure Lorentzian functions of differing widths fortuitously opened the way for high precision measurements of the ESR intensities of experimental spectra that are far broader than the magnetic field range of the available laboratory electromagnets. The areas under the simulated absorption curves fitted to the experimental spectra in the manner described provided an empirical measure of the degrees to which the present model nuclear waste glasses had been affected by alpha-decay self irradiation. Specifically, the broad-line ESR integrated-intensity data as a function of 238Pu alphadecay dose (proportional to the 238Pu doping level in these fixed-time experiments) proved to be accurately fitted by a simple saturating exponential function asymptotic to zero for infinite-time self irradiation. This result promises a precise means of extrapolating thousands of years into the future the process of "super-vitrification" that results from the creation and rapid quenching of thermal spikes due to alpha decay in glasses immobilizing 239Pu and other actinide elements. In addition, because the ESR spectra of several very different candidate high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass compositions containing even higher amounts of Fe2O3 are also shown here to be decomposable into sums of pure Lorentzians, the analytical method we describe should be applicable to these and many other HLW glasses containing both iron-group oxides and radionuclides.

Griscom, David L.; Weber, William J.

2011-03-01

144

Biodegradation of the french reference nuclear glass SON 68 by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans : protective effect of the biofilm,U and REE retention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although underground nuclear waste repositories are not expected to be favourable places for microbial activity, one should not exclude localized action of extremophilic bacteria on some materials involved in the storage concept. Among endogenous or accidentally introduced acidophiles, some are susceptible to lead to a locally drastic decreased in pH with potential consequences on materials corrosion. Experiments were performed with

M. Bachelet; J. Crovisier; P. Stille; R. Boutin; S. Vuilleumier; V. Geoffroy

2008-01-01

145

Oxynitride glass fibers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research at the Army Materials Technology Laboratory (AMTL) and elsewhere has shown that many glass properties including elastic modulus, hardness, and corrosion resistance are improved markedly by the substitution of nitrogen for oxygen in the glass structure. Oxynitride glasses, therefore, offer exciting opportunities for making high modulus, high strength fibers. Processes for making oxynitride glasses and fibers of glass compositions similar to commercial oxide glasses, but with considerable enhanced properties, are discussed. We have made glasses with elastic moduli as high as 140 GPa and fibers with moduli of 120 GPa and tensile strengths up to 2900 MPa. AMTL holds a U.S. patent on oxynitride glass fibers, and this presentation discusses a unique process for drawing small diameter oxynitride glass fibers at high drawing rates. Fibers are drawn through a nozzle from molten glass in a molybdenum crucible at 1550 C. The crucible is situated in a furnace chamber in flowing nitrogen, and the fiber is wound in air outside of the chamber, making the process straightforward and commercially feasible. Strengths were considerably improved by improving glass quality to minimize internal defects. Though the fiber strengths were comparable with oxide fibers, work is currently in progress to further improve the elastic modulus and strength of fibers. The high elastic modulus of oxynitride glasses indicate their potential for making fibers with tensile strengths surpassing any oxide glass fibers, and we hope to realize that potential in the near future.

Patel, Parimal J.; Messier, Donald R.; Rich, R. E.

1991-01-01

146

Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) startup test program: Glass characterization  

SciTech Connect

Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual geologic disposal. Six simulated glass compositions will be processed in the DWPF during initial startup. The glass in 86 of the first 106 full sized canisters will be sampled and characterized. Extensive glass characterization will determine the following: (1) sampling frequency for radioactive operation, (2) verification of the compositionally dependent process-product models, (3) verification of melter mixing, (4) representativeness of the glass from the canister throat sampler, and (5) homogeneity of the canister glass.

Jantzen, C.M.

1992-07-01

147

Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) startup test program: Glass characterization  

SciTech Connect

Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual geologic disposal. Six simulated glass compositions will be processed in the DWPF during initial startup. The glass in 86 of the first 106 full sized canisters will be sampled and characterized. Extensive glass characterization will determine the following: (1) sampling frequency for radioactive operation, (2) verification of the compositionally dependent process-product models, (3) verification of melter mixing, (4) representativeness of the glass from the canister throat sampler, and (5) homogeneity of the canister glass.

Jantzen, C.M.

1992-01-01

148

Goodbye to Reading Glasses?  

MedlinePLUS

... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Goodbye to Reading Glasses? Implantable eye device shows promise in preliminary ... News) -- A new implantable eye device might make reading glasses a thing of the past, researchers report. ...

149

Failure in glass  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Review of state of the art concerning glass failure mechanisms and fatigue theories discusses brittle fracture in glass, fatigue mechanisms, fatigue behavior, environmental effects on failure rate, and aging.

Keeton, S. C.

1972-01-01

150

Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the vapor contribution to diffusion in silica glasses with micrometer pores partially filled with liquid cyclohexane or water.  

PubMed

The contribution of the vapor phase to molecular diffusion in porous silica glass (Vitrapor#5; mean pore diameter 1 micrometer) partially filled with cyclohexane (nonpolar) or water (polar) was investigated with the aid of field-gradient NMR diffusometry. Due to the vapor phase, the effective diffusion coefficient of cyclohexane increased up to ten times relative to the value in bulk liquid upon reduction of the pore space filling factor. On the other hand, the effective diffusion coefficient of water first decreases and then increases when the liquid content is reduced. A two-phase exchange theory is presented accounting well for all experimental diffusion features. The diffusion behavior in the samples with micrometer pores under investigation here is in contrast to previous findings for the same solvents in a material with nanometer pores (Vycor; mean pore diameter 4 nm) where the fast-exchange limit had to be assumed [Ardelean et al., J. Chem. Phys. 119, 10358 (2003)]. It is concluded that the pore size plays a crucial role for the relevance of molecular exchange limits relative to the experimental diffusion/exchange time. PMID:15267997

Ardelean, Ioan; Farrher, German; Mattea, Carlos; Kimmich, Rainer

2004-05-22

151

Technique for Machining Glass  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Process for machining glass with conventional carbide tools requires a small quantity of a lubricant for aluminum applied to area of glass to be machined. A carbide tool is then placed against workpiece with light pressure. Tool is raised periodically to clear work of glass dust and particles. Additional lubricant is applied as it is displaced.

Rice, S. H.

1982-01-01

152

Hot Erosion of Glass.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this paper the effect of plastic flow on the erosion of soda-lime-silicate glass at elevated temperatures is investigated. Although the erosion of glass at 500 C and 600 C is still basically a brittle process, viscous relaxation of glass during impact ...

S. M. Wiederhorn, B. J. Hockey

1980-01-01

153

Glasses for Children  

MedlinePLUS

Why does a child need glasses? Children may need glasses for several reasons—some of which are different than for adults. Because a ... other eye has poor vision How can a child be tested for glasses, especially in infancy or ...

154

Void formation in glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Void formation as a result of a single tightly focused femtosecond pulse irradiation has been systematically studied in commercial optical-grade glasses of different composition. Correlations between the composition, mass density, glass transition temperature and Young modulus of glass with the void formation threshold have been revealed. The pulse energy necessary to form a void was found reciprocal to the amount

Tomohiro Hashimoto; Saulius Juodkazis; Hiroaki Misawa

2007-01-01

155

mobility in ugar glasses  

E-print Network

by the glass transition temperature 61 7. Key factors controlling the stability of glassy materials are water content, time and temperature 61 7. For example moisture uptake will decrease the glass transition temperature of a sugar glass below storage temperature and the sugars will tend to crystallize. Much research

Hemminga, Marcus A.

156

NEWS & VIEWS Glass dynamics  

E-print Network

. That the viscosity (or relaxation time) of a glass- forming liquid diverges to infinity at some finite temperature. By a systematic analysis of the temperature- dependent relaxation-time data from a range of organic glass-called Kauzmann6 temperature Tk, which itself has been linked to an ideal glass temperature, T2. Accurate

Weeks, Eric R.

157

Glass material oxidation and dissolution system: Converting miscellaneous fissile materials to glass  

SciTech Connect

The cold war and the development of nuclear energy have resulted in significant inventories of miscellaneous fissile materials (MFMs). MFMs include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel (SNF), (3) certain hot cell wastes, and (4) many one-of-a-kind materials. Major concerns associated with the long-term management of these materials include: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns. waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by converting the MFMs to glass for secure, long-term storage or repository disposal; however, conventional glass-making processes require oxide-like feed materials. Converting MFMs to oxide-like materials with subsequent vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), which directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride (NaCl) stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium, Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. However, significant work is required to develop GMODS further for applications at an industrial scale. If implemented, GMODS will provide a new approach to manage these materials.

Forsberg, C.W.; Ferrada, J.J.

1996-03-19

158

WASTE GLASS MELTER PROCESS MONITORING WITH MILLIMETER WAVES  

EPA Science Inventory

Millimeter-wave technologies can provide novel and reliable online monitoring capability for many important parameters inside nuclear waste glass melters, including temperature, emissivity, density, and viscosity. The physical and analytical basis for millimeter-wave monitoring o...

159

Radiation coloration resistant glass  

DOEpatents

A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

Tomozawa, Minoru (Troy, NY); Watson, E. Bruce (Troy, NY); Acocella, John (Troy, NY)

1986-01-01

160

Radiation coloration resistant glass  

DOEpatents

A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency. 3 figs.

Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.

1986-11-04

161

Oxynitride glass production procedure  

DOEpatents

The invention is a process for the preparation of high quality oxynitride glasses without resorting to high pressures. Nitrogen-containing compounds such as Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 are first encapsulated in a low melting temperature glass. Particles of the encapsulated nitrogen-containing compound are mixed with other oxide glass-formers and melted in an atmosphere of flowing nitrogen and in the presence of buffering gas to form the oxynitride glass. Glasses containing up to 15 at % nitrogen have been prepared by this method.

Weidner, Jerry R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Schuetz, Stanley T. (Idaho Falls, ID); O'Brien, Michael H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01

162

High-temperature glass and glass coatings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Reaction-cured glasses resist thermal shock and maintain properties over range of -100 degrees Centrigrade to +1,480 degrees Centigrade. Stability makes these excellent materials for high-temperature glassware and tubing or as coatings for porous materials.

Goldstein, H. E.; Katvala, V. E.; Leiser, D. B.

1977-01-01

163

Bulk Metallic Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Bulk Metallic Glasses explores an emerging field of materials known as bulk metallic glasses. It summarizes the rapid development of these materials over the last decade and includes documentation on diverse applications of bulk metallic glasses; from structural applications to microcomponents. Some of the applications covered are pressure sensors, microgears for motors, magnetic cores for power supplies, and nano-dies for replacing next generation DVDs. The chapters cover current theories and recent research including an atomistic theory of local topological fluctuations, atomistic simulations, and unique microstructures of these amorphous materials. Other topics include glass formation, glass forming ability, and the underlying mechanisms and physical insights of these criteria. The mechanical deformation of bulk metallic glasses, fatigue, fracture, and corrosion behaviors of these materials are also reviewed.

Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2007-01-01

164

Silane treated glass fibers  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a cogent body of evidence showing that the physical properties of glass reinforced plastics (GRP) can be vastly improved,\\u000a by pre-treatment of the glass fibers with appropriate coupling agents or sizes. This is the fourth part of a research series\\u000a investigating different silanes with non-aqueous solvents and their effect upon silane deposition onto glass fibers.\\u000a \\u000a A sample of

H. Watson; A. Jokinen; P. Mikkola; J. Matisons; J. Rosenholm

165

Diamond turning of glass  

SciTech Connect

A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

1988-12-01

166

High-level waste glass compendium; what it tells us concerning the durability of borosilicate waste glass  

SciTech Connect

Facilities for vitrification of high-level nuclear waste in the United States are scheduled for startup in the next few years. It is, therefore, appropriate to examine the current scientific basis for understanding the corrosion of high-level waste borosilicate glass for the range of service conditions to which the glass products from these facilities may be exposed. To this end, a document has been prepared which compiles worldwide information on borosilicate waste glass corrosion. Based on the content of this document, the acceptability of canistered waste glass for geological disposal is addressed. Waste glass corrosion in a geologic repository may be due to groundwater and/or water vapor contact. The important processes that determine the glass corrosion kinetics under these conditions are discussed based on experimental evidence from laboratory testing. Testing data together with understanding of the long-term corrosion kinetics are used to estimate radionuclide release rates. These rates are discussed in terms of regulatory performance standards.

Cunnane, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Allison, J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-12-31

167

Metallic glasses: Family traits  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The finding that metallic glasses inherit their elastic properties from solvent atoms leads to a new understanding of the complex relationship between glassy structure, deformation and mechanical properties.

Wang, Wei Hua

2012-04-01

168

Drugstore Reading Glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The occasion for this paper was my reading of a paper in the February 2005 issue of TPT. As one gets older the near point of the eye begins to recede.2 This is called presbyopia.3 An alternative to purchasing glasses from an optometrist is to purchase an inexpensive pair of reading glasses in a pharmacy. The pharmacy has these glasses ordered by diopters corresponding to the strength of the lens needed for a particular presbyopic eye. The glasses are, of course, not available for myopic eyes.

Erlichson, Herman

2006-03-01

169

Standard test method for determining liquidus temperature of immobilized waste glasses and simulated waste glasses  

E-print Network

1.1 These practices cover procedures for determining the liquidus temperature (TL) of nuclear waste, mixed nuclear waste, simulated nuclear waste, or hazardous waste glass in the temperature range from 600°C to 1600°C. This method differs from Practice C829 in that it employs additional methods to determine TL. TL is useful in waste glass plant operation, glass formulation, and melter design to determine the minimum temperature that must be maintained in a waste glass melt to make sure that crystallization does not occur or is below a particular constraint, for example, 1 volume % crystallinity or T1%. As of now, many institutions studying waste and simulated waste vitrification are not in agreement regarding this constraint (1). 1.2 Three methods are included, differing in (1) the type of equipment available to the analyst (that is, type of furnace and characterization equipment), (2) the quantity of glass available to the analyst, (3) the precision and accuracy desired for the measurement, and (4) candi...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01

170

Effects of alpha, gamma, and alpha-recoil radiation on borosilicate glass containing Savannah River Plant defense high-level nuclear waste. [Lead ions-250 keV; xenon ions-160 keV  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Plant, the reference process for the immobilization of defense high-level waste (DHLW) for geologic storage is vitrification into borosilicate glass. During geologic storage for 10/sup 6/ y, the glass would be exposed to approx. 3 x 10/sup 10/ rad of ..beta.. radiation, approx. 10/sup 10/ rad of ..gamma.. radiation, and 10/sup 18/ particles/g glass for both ..cap alpha.. and ..cap alpha..-recoil radiation. This paper discusses tests of the effect of these radiations on the leachability and density of the glass. Even though the doses were large, no effect of the radiations was detected that reduced the effectiveness of the glass for long-term storage of DHLW even at doses corresponding to 10/sup 6/ years storage for the actual glass. For the tests, glass containing simulated DHLW was prepared from frit of the reference composition. Three methods were used to irradiate the glass: external irradiations with beams of approx. 200 keV Xe or Pb ions, internal irradiations with Cm-244 doped glass, and external irradiations with Co-60 ..gamma.. rays. Results with both Xe and Pb ions indicate that a dose of 3 x 10/sup 13/ ions/cm/sup 2/ (simulating > 10/sup 6/ years storage) does not significantly increase the leachability of the glass in deionized water. Tests with Cm-244 doped glass show no increase in leach rate in water or brine up to a dose of 10/sup 18/ ..cap alpha.. and ..cap alpha..-recoils/g glass. Results of larger doses are being examined. The density of the Cm-244 doped glass has decreased by 1% at a dose of 10/sup 18/ particles/g glass. With ..gamma..-radiation, the density has changed by < 0.05% at a dose of 8.5 x 10/sup 10/ rad. Results of leach tests in deionized water and brine indicated that this very large dose of ..gamma..-radiation increased the leach rate by only 20%. Also, the leach rates are lower in brine.

Bibler, N.E.

1981-01-01

171

Rare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Proton Conductors  

SciTech Connect

The structure and conductivity of cerium and lanthanum phosphate glasses and glass-ceramics were investigated. The effects of varying the metal to phosphate ratio in the glasses, doping LaP3O9 glasses with Ce, and recrystallization of CeP3O9 glasses, on the glasses' microstructure and total conductivity were investigated using XRD, SEM, and AC impedance techniques. Strong increases in conductivity occurred when the glasses were recrystallized: the conductivity of a cerium metaphosphate glass increased conductivity after recrystallization from 10-7.5 S/cm to 10-6 S/cm at 400oC.

De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Ray, Hannah L.; Wang, Ruigang

2008-12-03

172

Importance of glass and brass  

E-print Network

The importance of scientific instruments in the scientific revolution, especially brass and glass. Precise lenses and lens grinding, glass vessels for chemical experiments, the advances in astronomy, microscopy and many other areas due to glass...

Dugan, David

2004-08-17

173

Glass molding technology; Technical Digest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We introduce various factors required for high-precision glass molding, and examples of optical element development, with explaining of the glass molding example by Toshiba Machine glass-molding machine.

Murakoshi, Hiroshi

2005-05-01

174

Glass ionomer cements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glass ionomer cements have been used in pediatric restorative dentistry for 20 years. Their usefulness in pediatric restorative dentistry is preferential relative to other materi- als because of their fluoride release, chemical adhesion to tooth structure, and availability to use in a variety of clinical scenarios. This paper reviews the use of glass ionomer ma- terials in pediatric restorative dentistry.

Joel H. Berg

2002-01-01

175

Bulk metallic glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the last decade metallic glasses have regained considerable interest due to the fact that new glass-forming compositions have been found that have a critical cooling rate of less than 100 K\\/s and can be made glassy with dimensions of 1 cm or more. The development of such alloys with a very high resistance to crystallization of the undercooled melt

Jörg F. Löffler

2003-01-01

176

Breaking Glass with Sound  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video from MIT TechTV demonstrates how to break a glass using sound. The demonstrator determines the resonant frequency of the glass and plays a tone of that frequency with a function generator. The video page has a description of the phenomenon beneath the video.

2009-11-16

177

Surface Conductive Glass.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the properties of surface-conducting glass and the chemical nature of surface-conducting stannic (tin) oxide. Also provides the procedures necessary for the preparation of surface-conducting stannic oxide films on glass substrates. The experiment is suitable for the advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

Tanaka, John; Suib, Steven L.

1984-01-01

178

Scotland's glass industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Initiated in the seventeenth century, the growth of Scotland's glass industry was severely restrained by taxation laws and reached a low ebb in the 1820s. Recovery after the repeal of these laws enabled developments in every branch of glass making. Big demands for containers, especially from the drink trades, assisted the setting up of numerous container works particularly in Glasgow.

Colin M. Brown

1980-01-01

179

Corning Museum of Glass  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Corning Museum has a website that contains images from part of their 45,000 item historical and art glass collection. The collection spans 3,500 years, and includes "The Origins of Glassmaking", "Asian Glass", "Glass in America", and "Glass After 1960". Visitors can search or browse the collection by the name of the artist or maker, the date made, location made, or the name of the object. One of the "Current Exhibitions" that has some fantastic images of glass objects is the "Medieval Glass for Popes, Princes, and Peasants" exhibit that can be found via their homepage. Visitors interested in seeing images and reading about the history behind medieval glass, should click on the "Medieval Glass Story". The first image, of a cage cup, is a stunning piece from the early fourth century. The last image of the exhibit, entitled "Nef", is Venetian and looks like an elaborate ship with a spout on top of a conical base. Visitors who would like to hear an audio tour of the exhibit should click on "Audio Tour" to listen to any of the 20 short segments explaining the exhibit.

180

Irradiation effects on borosilicate waste glasses  

SciTech Connect

The effects of alpha decay on five borosilicate glasses containing simulated nuclear high-level waste oxides were studied. Irradiations carried out at room temperature were achieved by incorporating 1 to 8 wt % /sup 244/Cm/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in the glasses. Density changes and stored-energy build-up saturated at doses less than 2 x 10/sup 21/ alpha decays/kg. Damage manifested by stored energy was completely annealed at 633/sup 0/K. Positive and negative density changes were observed which never exceeded 1%. Irradiation had very little effect on mechanical strength or on chemical durability as measured by aqueous leach rates. Also, no effects were observed on the microstructure for vitreous waste glasses, although radiation-induced microcracking could be achieved on specimens that had been devitrified prior to irradiation.

Roberts, F.P.

1980-06-01

181

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A.  

E-print Network

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A. University Department of Psychology, A8000 The University Making, The University of Texas at Austin #12;Glass, Brian 2 Duties include: Designing and constructing, constructing, and running experiments, statistical analysis. JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS Glass, B. D., Chotibut, T

Maddox, W. Todd

182

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A.  

E-print Network

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A. University Department of Psychology, A8000 The University of Categorization and Decision Making, The University of Texas at Austin #12;Glass, Brian 2 Duties include: Programming, constructing, and running experiments, statistical analysis. JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS Glass, B. D

Maddox, W. Todd

183

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A.  

E-print Network

Glass, Brian 1 BRIAN DANIEL GLASS, M.A. University Department of Psychology, A8000 The University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX 78712 (512) 232-2883 e-mail: glass@mail.utexas.edu EDUCATION 2006 ­ Cognitive include: Designing and constructing experiments, statistical #12;Glass, Brian 2 analysis, manuscript

Maddox, W. Todd

184

Glass electrolyte composition  

DOEpatents

An ionically conductive glass is disclosed for use as electrolyte in a high temperature electrochemical cell, particularly a cell with sodium anode and sulfur cathode. The glass includes the constituents Na/sub 2/O, ZrO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and SiO/sub 2/ in selected proportions to be a single phase solid solution substantially free of crystalline regions and undissolved constituents. Other advantageous properties are an ionic conductivity in excess of 2 x 10/sup -3/ (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at 300/sup 0/C and a glass transition temperature in excess of 500/sup 0/C.

Kucera, G.H.; Roche, M.F.

1985-01-08

185

Glass Ceiling Commission  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Existing from 1991-1996, the Glass Ceiling Commission was a federally funded commission which considered the "invisible, artificial barriers that prevent qualified individuals from advancing within their organization and reaching full potential." While the term "Glass Ceiling" originally referred to women, it was expanded to also include minorities. The Catherwood Library at the School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University has electronically archived the reports and findings of the commission, as well as a host of papers written on the Glass Ceiling Commission. The Commission summaries, reports, and findings are annotated, as are the accompanying papers.

Commission., United S.

186

Glass electrolyte composition  

DOEpatents

An ionically conductive glass is disclosed for use as electrolyte in a high temperature electrochemical cell, particularly a cell with sodium anode and sulfur cathode. The glass includes the constituents Na.sub.2 O, ZrO.sub.2, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and SiO.sub.2 in selected proportions to be a single phase solid solution substantially free of crystalline regions and undissolved constituents. Other advantageous properties are an ionic conductivity in excess of 2.times.10.sup.-3 (ohm-cm).sup.-1 at 300.degree. C. and a glass transition temperature in excess of 500.degree. C.

Kucera, Gene H. (Downers Grove, IL); Roche, Michael F. (Downers Grove, IL)

1985-01-01

187

The glass transition diagram in model metallic glasses  

E-print Network

We report a strain rate (equivalent to experimental observation time) induced glass transition in model SrCaYbMg(Li)Zn(Cu) metallic glasses at room temperature. A critical strain rate, equivalent to glass transition temperature, is found for the strain rate induced a glassy state to liquid-like viscoplastic state translation. The results show that the observation time, equivalent to temperature and stress, is a key parameter for the glass transition. A three-dimension glass transition phase diagram involved in time, temperature and stress in metallic glasses is established for understanding the nature of the metallic glasses.

X. Q. Gao; W. H. Wang; K. Zhao; H. Y. Bai

2013-05-22

188

PbO-free glasses for low temperature packaging  

SciTech Connect

Zinc polyphosphate glasses were examined as potential candidates for low temperature sealing applications. Glass-formation and properties were determined for the ZnO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, ZnO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and ZnO-SnO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} systems, and information about the short-range structures of these glasses was obtained by Raman and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. In general, the most durable polyphosphate glasses have structures based on relatively short pyrophosphate chain lengths (i.e., 2 P-tetrahedra). Modified phosphate compositions are given, including compositions used to seal float glass substrates at temperatures as low as 500{degrees}C.

Brow, R.K.; Bencoe, D.N.; Tallant, D.R. [and others

1997-10-01

189

Nature of alumina in phosphate glass: II, structure of sodium aluminophosphate glass  

SciTech Connect

The authors have used [sup 27]Al and [sup 31]P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to describe quantitatively the relationships between the composition, structure, and properties of glasses in the Na[sub 2]O[center dot]Al[sub 2]O[sub 3][center dot]P[sub 2]O[sub 5] (NAP) system. In general, the glass properties (evaluated in part 1) are most sensitive to changes in Al coordination. [sup 27]Al MAS NMR spectra reveal that octahedrally coordinated Al is most abundant in glasses with O/P ratios less than 3.5, the pyrophosphate structural limit. Tetrahedrally coordinated Al is most abundant in glasses with O/P greater than 3.5. Decreasing Al(OP)[sub 6]/Al(OP)[sub 4] ratio generally correlates with decreasing glass transition temperature and refractive index. The compositional dependence of glass structure and properties can be qualitatively understood using a crystal chemical model based on oxygen charge balancing by the different Al and P moieties.

Brow, R.K. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Glass and Electronic Ceramics Dept.); Kirkpatrick, R.J. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Geology); Turner, G.L. (Spectral Data Services, Champaign, IL (United States))

1993-04-01

190

Glassy states: Concentration glasses and temperature glasses compared  

Microsoft Academic Search

The behavior of glass-forming systems in the equilibrium state above the glass temperature is still a heavily investigated field. Surprisingly, the behavior of the glass itself is less widely investigated. Even less investigated is the behavior of glass-forming materials in which composition is changed. Here we look at the behavior of glasses after temperature-jumps and compare that behavior with that

Gregory B. McKenna

2007-01-01

191

Google Glasses and Eyesight  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... display systems like Google Glass may be cool technology, but new research indicates they may also be ... American Medical Association looked at how this wearable technology affects visual field. The researchers asked three healthy ...

192

THE COLOR GLASS CONDENSATE.  

SciTech Connect

The Color Glass Condensate is a state of high density gluonic matter which controls the high energy limit of hadronic interactions. Its properties are important for the initial conditions for matter produced at RHIC.

MCLERRAN,L.

2001-08-26

193

Glasses and Contact Lenses  

MedlinePLUS

... together the way they should. But eyeglasses or contact lenses, also called corrective lenses, can help most ... trouble, it's often a refractive problem. Glasses or contact lenses work so well because they can correct ...

194

Phase coexistence in proton glass  

SciTech Connect

Proton glasses are crystals of composition M{sub 1{minus}x}(NW{sub 4}){sub x}W{sub 2}AO{sub 4}, where M = K,Rb, W = H,D, A = P,As. For x = 0 there is a ferroelectric (FE) transition, while for x = 1 there is an antiferroelectric (AFE) transition. In both cases, the transition is from a paraelectric (PE) state of tetragonal structure with dynamically disordered hydrogen bonds to an ordered state of orthorhombic structure. For an intermediate x range there is no transition, but the hydrogen rearrangements slow down, and eventually display nonergodic behavior characteristic of glasses. The authors and other have shown from spontaneous polarization, dielectric permittivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and neutron diffraction experiments that for smaller x there is coexistence of ferroelectric and paraelectric phases, and for larger x there is coexistence of antiferroelectric and paraelectric phases. The authors present a method for analytically describing this coexistence, and the degree to which this coexistence is spatial or temporal.

Schmidt, V.H. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Physics Dept.; Trybula, Z. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Poznan (Poland). Inst. of Molecular Physics; Pinto, N.J. [Univ. of Puerto Rico, Humacao (Puerto Rico); Shapiro, S.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

1996-11-01

195

Comparison of the corrosion behaviors of the glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form and reference HLW glasses.  

SciTech Connect

A glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form is being developed for the long-term immobilization of salt wastes that are generated during spent nuclear fuel conditioning activities. A durable waste form is prepared by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) a mixture of salt-loaded zeolite powders and glass frit. A mechanistic description of the corrosion processes is being developed to support qualification of the CWF for disposal. The initial set of characterization tests included two standard tests that have been used extensively to study the corrosion behavior of high level waste (HLW) glasses: the Material Characterization Center-1 (MCC-1) Test and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). Direct comparison of the results of tests with the reference CWF and HLW glasses indicate that the corrosion behaviors of the CWF and HLW glasses are very similar.

Ebert, W. L.; Lewis, M. A.

1999-05-06

196

Pressure dependence of glass transition temperature of elastomeric glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The pressure dependence of the glass transition temperature Tg of two elastomers, Solithane 113 and 3,3-bis(azidomethyl)oxetane/tetrahydrofuran (BAMO/THF) has been determined, employing high-pressure differential thermal analysis (HP-DTA) and dielectric techniques, up to 8.5 kbar. The glasses of the elastomers were named the specific (or Pi glass) or the general glass depending on how the glasses were formed. A Pi glass was formed by lowering temperature under a constant pressure (Pi) and the pressure dependency of the Pi glass was determined after changing pressure only in the glassy state. The general glass consists of a series of specific glasses but the Tg is determined only at pressures under which the glass is formed. The Tg for both glasses increased with increasing pressure. However, the Tg for the Pi glass appears to level off at very high pressures while the Tg does not level off for the general glass. Thermodynamic analysis was made to show that for many general glasses dTg/dP=??/(1+n)?? holds, in which n=1 for Solithane and many other glasses. It is also shown that a modified Gibbs and DiMarzio theory can be used effectively to predict the observed experimental results.

Pae, K. D.; Tang, C.-L.; Shin, E.-S.

1984-11-01

197

Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing  

SciTech Connect

The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

2013-06-13

198

Metallic glass composition  

DOEpatents

A metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); Koch, Carl C. (Raleigh, NC)

1986-01-01

199

Ductile Bulk Metallic Glass  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on experimental evidence of pronounced global plasticity measured in monolithic Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 bulk metallic glass under both bending and unconfined compression loading conditions. A plastic strain of 20% is measured, never before seen in metallic glasses. Also, permanent deformation and a strain exceeding 3% before failure is observed during bending of 4mm thick samples. To date, no monolithic metallic

Jan Schroers; William L. Johnson

2004-01-01

200

8.G Glasses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: The diagram shows three glasses (not drawn to scale). The measurements are all in centimeters. The bowl of glass 1 is cylindrical. The inside diameter ...

201

Nature and role of natural alteration gels formed on the surface of ancient volcanic glasses (Natural analogs of waste containment glasses) [review article  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper provides an overview of the geochemical alteration of basaltic glass, considered for over 20 years as a suitable natural analogue for nuclear borosilicate glasses. The available data show that natural basaltic glasses may survive for million of years under subsurface conditions. Mineralogical studies show that an alteration layer called palagonite forms on the surface of the basaltic in response to the chemical attack by water. Under some environmental conditions, the alteration layer consists of an amorphous gel-like material, leading many authors to suspect hydration of the glass by water permeation and alkali interdiffusion. In other cases, the alteration layer is crystallized to some extent and contains clay minerals (smectite). Such layers are formed mainly on the younger natural glass samples (<1 My) by a process of coprecipitation of the elements dissolved from the glass. On samples older than 1 My, the alteration layers also contain zeolites. In the presence of these hydrated aluminosilicates, a hydrated residual glass is systematically observed, which thus forms as a consequence of interdiffusion processes. Leach tests conducted under controlled laboratory conditions at temperatures up to 200 °C on both natural glass samples and synthetic basaltic glass provide identical kinetic results and alteration mechanisms. When compared with the data for SON68 nuclear borosilicate glass, the initial dissolution rates show the same activation energy (about 72 kJ mol -1) and consequently similar dissolution mechanisms. Moreover, when altered under static conditions at high reaction progress, both basaltic glass and nuclear glass have similar behavior characterized by a significant drop in the dissolution rate, up to three to five orders of magnitude lower than the initial dissolution rate. The time-dependence of the thickness of the altered layers measured on natural glass samples confirms this kinetic trend over time: the long-term dissolution rate is very low. This decrease may be related to diffusion mechanisms involving key chemical species and controlled by the mineralogy of the palagonite layer.

Crovisier, Jean-Louis; Advocat, Thierry; Dussossoy, Jean-Luc

2003-09-01

202

Infrared spectroscopy and hydrogen isotope geochemistry of hydrous silicate glasses  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this project is the combined appication of infrared spectroscopy and stable isotope geochemistry to the study of hydrogen-bearing species dissolved in silicate melts and glasses. We are conducting laboratory experiments aimed at determining the fractionation of D and H between melt species (OH and H{sub 2}O) and hydrous vapor and the diffusivities of these species in glasses and melts. Knowledge of these parameters is critical to understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes during igneous processes and hydrothermal processes. These results also could be valuable in application of glass technology to development of nuclear waste disposal strategies.

Epstein, S.; Stolper, E.

1992-01-01

203

Glasses formed by hypervelocity impact  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents description, classification, and geological setting of impact glasses, which are formed as a result of meteorite impacts with the planetary surface, and discusses the impact-glass formation process in the context of cratering mechanics. Impact glasses can be classified as belonging to two major groups: (1) mineral glasses, which are identical in composition to a mineral, and (2) rock glasses, which have the composition of a rock or a mixture of various rocks. Rock glasses may be (1) melt ejecta, (2) parts of a coherent melt layer inside the crater cavity, or (3) dikes or veins. The composition of rock glasses at a particular crater can be matched by that of the target. In nonporous rocks, the formation of rock glasses requires peak pressures in excess of 60-80 GPa, while mineral glasses are formed in the pressure range of about 25 to 55 GPa; in porous rocks, interstitial glass forms at pressures as low as 5 GPa.

Stoeffler, D.

1984-01-01

204

Towards ultrastrong glasses.  

PubMed

The development of new glassy materials is key for addressing major global challenges in energy, medicine, and advanced communications systems. For example, thin, flexible, and large-area glass substrates will play an enabling role in the development of flexible displays, roll-to-roll processing of solar cells, next-generation touch-screen devices, and encapsulation of organic semiconductors. The main drawback of glass and its limitation for these applications is its brittle fracture behavior, especially in the presence of surface flaws, which can significantly reduce the practical strength of a glass product. Hence, the design of new ultrastrong glassy materials and strengthening techniques is of crucial importance. The main issues regarding glass strength are discussed, with an emphasis on the underlying microscopic mechanisms that are responsible for mechanical properties. The relationship among elastic properties and fracture behavior is also addressed, focusing on both oxide and metallic glasses. From a theoretical perspective, atomistic modeling of mechanical properties of glassy materials is considered. The topological origin of these properties is also discussed, including its relation to structural and chemical heterogeneities. Finally, comments are given on several toughening strategies for increasing the damage resistance of glass products. PMID:22103001

Wondraczek, Lothar; Mauro, John C; Eckert, Jürgen; Kühn, Uta; Horbach, Jürgen; Deubener, Joachim; Rouxel, Tanguy

2011-10-18

205

Volcanic Glasses: Construction Materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Natural glass is the product of rapidly cooled molten rock. Two natural sources of the melt are volcanic eruption and meteoritic impact. Pure glass is an amorphous aggregate. Volcanic glass is a material that could be utilized in the construction of extraterrestrial outposts. Pumice and perlite are volcanic glasses currently used in the building industry. Samples of natural volcanic glass found in the lunar regolith were returned to Earth as part of the Apollo and Luna programs. An alpha proton X-ray spectrometer onboard the Pathfinder recently examined martian rocks located in the vicinity of the lander craft. Preliminary results of chemical composition by weight of SiO2 50-55%, Al203 11-13%, K20 1-2%, Na20 2-5%, CaO 4-6%, MgO 3-7%, FeO 12-14%, S03 2-5%, and MnO <1% were given for two rocks. Parenthetically, the values for K and Mn were perhaps too high, and the analysis was based on X-ray data only. The appreciable amount of silica already found on Mars and empirical evidence to support the hypothesis that the planet once had water sufficient to rapidly cool magma imply the possibility of discovering natural glass of volcanic origin in subsequent missions.

Moskowitz, Samuel E.

1998-01-01

206

Containerless synthesis of interesting glasses  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One aspect of containerless glass experimentation was thoroughly examined: glass forming ability. It is argued that although containerless processing will abet glass formation, other ground-based methods can do the job better. However, these methods have limitations, such as sample dimensions and concomitant ability to make property measurements. Most importantly, perhaps, is the observation that glass properties are a function of preparation procedure. Thus, it seems as though there still is an argument for use of containerless processing for glass forming.

Weinberg, Michael C.

1990-01-01

207

Glass microsphere lubrication  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The harsh lunar environment eliminated the consideration of most lubricants used on earth. Considering that the majority of the surface of the moon consists of sand, the elements that make up this mixture were analyzed. According to previous space missions, a large portion of the moon's surface is made up of fine grained crystalline rock, about 0.02 to 0.05 mm in size. These fine grained particles can be divided into four groups: lunar rock fragments, glasses, agglutinates (rock particles, crystals, or glasses), and fragments of meteorite material (rare). Analysis of the soil obtained from the missions has given chemical compositions of its materials. It is about 53 to 63 percent oxygen, 16 to 22 percent silicon, 10 to 16 percent sulfur, 5 to 9 percent aluminum, and has lesser amounts of magnesium, carbon, and sodium. To be self-supporting, the lubricant must utilize one or more of the above elements. Considering that the element must be easy to extract and readily manipulated, silicon or glass was the most logical choice. Being a ceramic, glass has a high strength and excellent resistance to temperature. The glass would also not contaminate the environment as it comes directly from it. If sand entered a bearing lubricated with grease, the lubricant would eventually fail and the shaft would bind, causing damage to the system. In a bearing lubricated with a solid glass lubricant, sand would be ground up and have little effect on the system. The next issue was what shape to form the glass in. Solid glass spheres was the only logical choice. The strength of the glass and its endurance would be optimal in this form. To behave as an effective lubricant, the diameter of the spheres would have to be very small, on the order of hundreds of microns or less. This would allow smaller clearances between the bearing and the shaft, and less material would be needed. The production of glass microspheres was divided into two parts, production and sorting. Production includes the manufacturing of the microspheres, while sorting entails deciphering the good microspheres from the bad ones. Each process is discussed in detail.

Geiger, Michelle; Goode, Henry; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Sorrells, Cindy; Willette, Chris

1991-01-01

208

Glass and Glass-Ceramic Materials from Simulated Composition of Lunar and Martian Soils: Selected Properties and Potential Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In-situ resource processing and utilization on planetary bodies is an important and integral part of NASA's space exploration program. Within this scope and context, our general effort is primarily aimed at developing glass and glass-ceramic type materials using lunar and martian soils, and exploring various applications of these materials for planetary surface operations. Our preliminary work to date have demonstrated that glasses can be successfully prepared from melts of the simulated composition of both lunar and martian soils, and the melts have a viscosity-temperature window appropriate for drawing continuous glass fibers. The glasses are shown to have the potential for immobilizing certain types of nuclear wastes without deteriorating their chemical durability and thermal stability. This has a direct impact on successfully and economically disposing nuclear waste generated from a nuclear power plant on a planetary surface. In addition, these materials display characteristics that can be manipulated using appropriate processing protocols to develop glassy or glass-ceramic magnets. Also discussed in this presentation are other potential applications along with a few selected thermal, chemical, and structural properties as evaluated up to this time for these materials.

Ray, C. S.; Sen, S.; Reis, S. T.; Kim, C. W.

2005-01-01

209

Glass matrix armor  

DOEpatents

An armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material. The glass may be in monolithic form or particles of ceramic may be dispersed in a glass matrix. The ceramic material may be in monolithic form or may be in the form of particles dispersed in glass or dispersed in said polymer.

Calkins, Noel C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01

210

Fibrous glass and cancer.  

PubMed

Some argue that fibrous glass (glass wool) should not be considered as a likely human carcinogen and hence should not be listed in the Seventh Annual Report on Carcinogens (ARC) prepared by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) and mandated by the U.S. Congress. In examining this issue, data from both laboratory experiments (animal studies) and epidemiologic studies (human data) are reviewed with the results evaluated according to the criteria established by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and adopted in slightly modified form by the NTP for classifying substances as human carcinogens or likely human carcinogens. From our comprehensive review of the available information, we conclude that fibrous glass materials are carcinogenic, and in view of the NTP and IARC definitions should be listed in the ARC. Our review then examines the carcinogenic potency of glass fibers to humans in comparison with asbestos fibers and concludes that on a fiber-per-fiber basis, glass fibers may be as potent or even more potent than asbestos. The implications of these findings are then presented for regulatory purposes in the occupational setting. PMID:7810554

Infante, P F; Schuman, L D; Dement, J; Huff, J

1994-10-01

211

Modifier coordination and phosphate glass networks  

SciTech Connect

The addition of up to approximately 16 mole% Cs{sub 2}O to vitreous P{sub 2}O{sub 5} reduces the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) by 150 K, whereas further additions up to 50 mole% produce little additional change in T{sub g}. {sup 31}P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra indicate that the phosphate network is progressively dipolymerized over the entire range of compositions. The property trend is explained by a transition in the Cs{sup +} coordination environment, from isolated Cs-polyhedra below {approximately}16 mole% Cs{sub 2}O to a corner-sharing Cs-polyhedral sub-structure in the glasses with greater Cs{sub 2}O contents. This modifier transition does not occur in Al-phosphate glasses. {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra indicate that the average Al coordination number decreases with increasing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content to avoid the formation of Al-O-Al bonds in these binary phosphate glasses.

Brow, R.; Click, C.A.; Alam, T.M.

1999-11-30

212

Porous vycor glass tube joined to borosilicate glass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Porous glass can absorb various size of molecules with large surface area even in high temperature. However, it is difficult to use porous glass tubes at high-temperature, for example as a separation membrane for hydrogen condensation, because adhesives at joining sites could be damaged. In this study, welding of a porous glass tube and a glass tube was attempted to develop a gas separation membrane used at 500 C. Since forms present in porous glass may cause crack at high temperature, it is necessary to remove such forms by heat processing. Such porous glass is called to be porous vycor glass, which contains quartz 6 percents, and can be joined with a quartz tube. As a result, a gas separator with porous glass membrane which is joined by this process could endure high temperature up to 600 C and could maintain high vacuum.

Abe, Shinichi; Kikuchi, Takemitsu; Onodera, Shinji

1992-09-01

213

SETTLING OF SPINEL IN A HIGH-LEVEL WASTE GLASS MELTER  

SciTech Connect

High-level nuclear waste is being vitrified, i.e., converted to a durable glass that can be stored in a safe repository for hundreds of thousands of years. Waste vitrification is accomplished in reactors called melters to which the waste is charged together with glass-forming additives. The mixture is electrically heated to a temperature as high as 1150 decrees C to create a melt that becomes glass on cooling.

Pavel Hrma; Pert Schill; Lubomir Nemec

2002-01-07

214

Transient nucleation in glasses  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nucleation rates in condensed systems are frequently not at their steady state values. Such time dependent (or transient) nucleation is most clearly observed in devitrification studies of metallic and silicate glasses. The origin of transient nucleation and its role in the formation and stability of desired phases and microstructures are discussed. Numerical models of nucleation in isothermal and nonisothermal situations, based on the coupled differential equations describing cluster evolution within the classical theory, are presented. The importance of transient nucleation in glass formation and crystallization is discussed.

Kelton, K. F.

1991-01-01

215

Room temperature wafer level glass\\/glass bonding  

Microsoft Academic Search

The findings of this study report the bonding of glass\\/glass wafers by using the surface activated bonding (SAB) method at room temperature (RT) without heating. In order to bond, the glass wafers were activated by a sequential plasma activation process, in which the wafers were cleaned with reactive ion etching (RIE) oxygen radio frequency (rf) plasma and nitrogen radical microwave

M. M. R. Howlader; Satoru Suehara; Tadatomo Suga

2006-01-01

216

Characterization of Analytical Reference Glass-1 (ARG-1)  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive waste may be immobilized in borosilicate glass at the West Valley Demonstration Project, West Valley, New York, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Aiken, South Carolina, and the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP), Richland, Washington. The vitrified waste form will be stored in stainless steel canisters before its eventual transfer to a geologic repository for long-term disposal. Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) (DOE 1993), Section 1.1.2 requires that the waste form producers must report the measured chemical composition of the vitrified waste in their production records before disposal. Chemical analysis of glass waste forms is receiving increased attention due to qualification requirements of vitrified waste forms. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been supporting the glass producers` analytical laboratories by a continuing program of multilaboratory analytical testing using interlaboratory ``round robin`` methods. At the PNL Materials Characterization Center Analytical Round Robin 4 workshop ``Analysis of Nuclear Waste Glass and Related Materials,`` January 16--17, 1990, Pleasanton, California, the meeting attendees decided that simulated nuclear waste analytical reference glasses were needed for use as analytical standards. Use of common standard analytical reference materials would allow the glass producers` analytical laboratories to calibrate procedures and instrumentation, to control laboratory performance and conduct self-appraisals, and to help qualify their various waste forms.

Smith, G.L.

1993-12-01

217

Containerless processing of fluoride glass  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ground-based experiments on glass formation, crystallization, surface tension, vaporization, and chemical durability of a zirconium-barium-lanthanum (ZBL) fluoride glass are summarized. In a container large, columnar grains grew out from the container-glass interface during cooling. The main crystalline phase was alpha BaZrF6. A ZBL glass sphere was levitated acoustically during Shuttle flight STS-11. The glass was melted and then cooled while being levitated (containerless). Crystallization in the recovered sample was very fine and mainly beta BaZr2F10, showing the influence of the container on the nucleation and microstructure of crystallization in the glass. Glass formation should be easier for a containerless glass than in a container.

Doremus, Robert H.

1990-01-01

218

Making Highly Pure Glass Rods  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proposed quasi-containerless method for making glass rods or fibers minimizes contact between processing equipment and product. Method allows greater range of product sizes and shapes than achieved in experiments on containerless processing. Molten zone established in polycrystalline rod. Furnace sections separated, and glass rod solidifies between them. Clamp supports solid glass as it grows in length. Pulling clamp rapidly away from melt draws glass fiber. Fiber diameter controlled by adjustment of pulling rate.

Naumann, R. J.

1986-01-01

219

Spectroscopic studies of glass structure  

SciTech Connect

Today`s understanding of the molecular-level structure of inorganic glasses has been transformed by the availability of a wide range of sensitive spectroscopic probes. Today we can relate glass composition to quantitative distributions of glass-forming cations and to changes in oxygen bonding and modifying cation geometries. Future spectroscopic studies will result in improved descriptions of anion and cation geometries and should provide glass scientists with the capability to optimize atomic arrangements for specific optical, electrical, and thermal properties.

Brow, R.K.

1994-08-01

220

Recent experimental advances in spin glasses  

SciTech Connect

We present a working definition and a general description of a spin glass. A number of different systems, including metals, semiconductors, and insulators, are discussed. This review presents the current status of experimental spin-glass research with special emphasis on the extent to which the results of this research yield information on spin dynamics. We review the salient features of a series of recent experimental results, published in the past five years, on the susceptibility, magnetization, heat capacity, high-pressure effects, phonon-thermal conductivity, neutron scattering, nuclear, electron, and muon spin resonance. The successful applications of the fractional exponential relaxation function to the frequency dependence of the susceptibility and the time dependence of the thermoremanent magnetization are demonstrated. Concerning the possible existence of the phase transition at the susceptibility cusp temperature, we summarize the experimental evidences. 179 references, 31 figures.

Huang, C.Y.

1983-01-01

221

Microexplosions in Tellurite Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Femtosecond laser pulses were used to initiate microexplosions in baseline, Al2O3-doped, and La2O3-doped sodium tellurite glasses. Single or multiple-shots were used in the experiments. Writing of simple structures (periodic array of voxels as well as lines) was demonstrated. The regions of microexplosion and writing were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) postmortem. Fingerprints of microexplosions, concentric lines within the region and a concentric ring outside the region due to shock wave generated during the microexplosions were evident. In the case of the baseline glass, no chemistry change was observed within the region of microexplosion. But, Al2O3-doped and La2O3-doped glasses showed depletion of the dopant from the edge to the center of the region of microexplosions, indicating chemistry gradient within the regions. Interrogation of the bulk and laser-treated regions using micro-Raman spectroscopy revealed no structural change due the microexplosions and writing within these glasses. These data were attributed to the localization of the effect to small regions due to tightly focused laser pulses used in the experiments.

Sundaram, S. K.; Schaffer, C. B.; Mazur, E.

2003-03-01

222

Triad ''Metal – Enamel – Glass''  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article shows how to change the color of metal and glass. Both these materials are self–sufficient, but sometimes used together. For example, enameling. In this case, the adhesion between metal substrate and stekloobraznae enamel layer, which was conducted on a stretching and a bend, was tested.

Mukhina, T.; Petrova, S.; Toporova, V.; Fedyaeva, T.

2014-10-01

223

Light Bends Glass  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, from Physical Review Focus, describes a recent experiment to find out how the momentum of a photon changes when it passes from a glass fiber into air. The article describes the 100-year-old controversy on this question and explains the results of this experiment. Links are provided for more information.

2009-02-26

224

What Glass Ceiling?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A recent study drawing on data from the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests that the wage gap between men and women has virtually disappeared, and that the so-called "glass ceiling" results more from age and qualifications than from explicit discrimination. (SLD)

Lynch, Michael; Post, Katherine

1996-01-01

225

Glass-matrix biocomposites.  

PubMed

CaO-SiO(2) base glass-matrix/Ti particle biocomposite coatings on Ti6Al4V substrates have been prepared by means of Vacuum Plasma Spray. The base glass is considered bioactive, because, when soaked in a fluid that simulates the inorganic ion concentration of human plasma (SBF), it develops a bonelike apatite layer on its surface. The aim of this research activity was to toughen this brittle bioactive material and to broaden its biomedical applications. Pure titanium was chosen as toughening phase because of its well-known biocompatibility, and Ti6Al4V alloy as substrate because of both its biocompatibility and its mechanical reliability. At first the composites were prepared as bulk materials, by means of a simple sintering process. Then, by ball-milling the sintered composite, the as-obtained "composite powders" were sprayed by Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) on the substrate. By means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), the characteristic temperatures of the base glasses were determined. The thermal properties of mixtures of glass powders and different vol% Ti particles were studied by means of DTA, DSC, hot-stage microscopy, and dilatometry, with the aim of optimizing the sintering conditions. Both the bulk and the coated samples have been characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), compositional analysis (EDS), Vickers indentations, and leaching tests after soaking in a simulated body fluid (SBF). PMID:10898882

Verné, E; Brovarone, C V; Milanese, D

2000-01-01

226

The Political Glass Ceiling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Why has the integration of women into elective office, particularly Congress, been so slow? We argue that incumbency and the general lack of competition in American elections serve as a “political glass ceiling,” having a dampening effect on the number of women running in both primary and general U.S. House elections. With data from House elections from 1978-1998, we find

Barbara Palmer; Dennis Simon

2001-01-01

227

Disappearing Glass Rod  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site from the Exploratorium contains a simple demonstration of how objects can disappear when placed in a liquid. The activity uses glass objects and Wesson⢠oil. The site provides an explanation of the refraction and reflection involved along with related physics concepts and extension activities.

2006-10-12

228

The Color Glass Condensate  

E-print Network

We provide a broad overview of the theoretical status and phenomenological applications of the Color Glass Condensate effective field theory describing universal properties of saturated gluons in hadron wavefunctions that are extracted from deeply inelastic scattering and hadron-hadron collision experiments at high energies.

F. Gelis; E. Iancu; J. Jalilian-Marian; R. Venugopalan

2010-02-01

229

Antagonist effects of calcium on borosilicate glass alteration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerous studies have been conducted on glass and cement durability in contact with water, but very little work to date has focused directly on interactions between the two materials. These interactions are mostly controlled by silicon-calcium reactivity. However, the physical and chemical processes involved remain insufficiently understood to predict the evolution of coupled glass-cement systems used in several industrial applications. Results are reported from borosilicate glass alteration in calcium-rich solutions. Our data show that four distinct behaviors can be expected according to the relative importance of three key parameters: the pH, the reaction progress (short- or long-term alteration) and the calcium concentration. Glass alteration is thus controlled by specific mechanisms depending on the solution chemistry: calcium complexation at the glass surface, precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) or calcium incorporation in the altered layer. These findings highlight the impact of silicon-calcium interactions on glass durability and open the way for a better understanding of glass-cement mixing in civil engineering applications as well as in nuclear waste storage.

Mercado-Depierre, S.; Angeli, F.; Frizon, F.; Gin, S.

2013-10-01

230

Attenuation of Glass Dissolution in the Presence of Natural Additives  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The study described here explored the dissolution kinetics of glasses in aqueous environments in systems which included a variety of natural crystalline solids in addition to the glass itself and the aqueous phase. The results demonstrated the possibility of a dramatic decrease in the rate of dissolution of silicate glass in the presence of certain varieties of olivine-based materials. This decrease in dissolution rate was shown to be due to the fact that these additives consist mostly of Mg-based material but also contain minor amounts of Al and Ca. The combined presence of Mg with these minor species affected the corrosion rate of the glass as a whole, including its most soluble components such as boron. The study has potentially important implications to the durability of glasses exposed to natural environments. The results may be relevant to the use of active backfill materials in burial sites for nuclear waste glasses as well as to better understanding of the environmental degradation of natural and ancient glasses.

Sang, Jing C.; Barkatt, Aaron; OKeefe, John A.

1993-01-01

231

Synthesis and Vitrification of Nasicon Type Lithium Borophosphate Glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASICON type Li ion conducting Lithium borophosphate (Li3B2(PO4)3) and lead doped lithium borophosphate (Li3+xPbxB2-x(PO4)3 x = 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8) glass electrolyte has been prepared by melt quenching method. The effect of lead on the structure of the Lithium borophosphate glass network has been studied by Raman and 31P MAS Nuclear Magnetic resonance analysis. The behavior of the glass transition and electrical conductivity has been interpreted as a function of structural changes induced in the glass network when lead is doped in the Lithium borophosphate by means of DSC and ac impedance spectroscopic technique.

Nithya, H.; Kawamura, Junichi; Iwai, Yoshiki; Takekawa, Reiji; Kuwata, Naoaki; Matsuda, Yasutaka

2013-07-01

232

Glass ceramic development for the combined fission products streams  

SciTech Connect

After immobilization, nuclear waste is stored for minimally hundreds of years. In waste-forms {beta}, {gamma}-radiation are main causes for damage. The objectives is to test radiation stability of PNNL synthesized glass-ceramics. Monitoring was done looking for changes in the microstructure or phase composition. These are designed for immobilization of: lanthanides, alkaline metals, alkaline arths, transition metals, high molybdenum content - 6.94%, and multi-phase glass-ceramic. The conclusion on aqueous stability is the PNNL glass ceramics - glass phase erodes but crystalline phases don't and it's more resistant to corrosion than vitrified waste. Leachability tests in accordance with standards will be performed and the results will be compared to XRD.

Kossoy-simakov, Anna-eden [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tang, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Usov, Igor O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sickafus, Kurt E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crum, Jarrod [PNNL; Turo, Laura [PNNL; Riley, Brian [PNNL

2011-01-18

233

Barstow heliostat mirror glass characterization  

SciTech Connect

The technical analysis performed on the special run of low iron float glass procured from the Ford Glass Division for the ten megawatt solar thermal/electric pilot power plant to be constructed at Barstow, California is discussed. The topics that are addressed include the optical properties and the relative durability of the glass. Two optical parameters, solar transmittance and optical flatness, were measured as referenced in the specification and found to be better than the stated tolerances. The average solar transmittance exceeded 0.890 transmittance units. The glass also exhibited optical angular flatness deviations less than +-1.0 mrad as required. Both qualitative and quantitative accelerated weathering tests were performed on the glass in order to compare its durability to other soda lime float glass and alternate composition glasses of interest to the solar community. In both the quantitative leaching experiments and the more qualitative room temperature and elevated temperature water vapor exposure experiments the heliostat glass exhibited the same characteristics as the other soda-lime silicate float glasses. As a final test for mirroring compatability, selected samples of the production run of the glass were sent to four different commercial manufacturers for mirror coating. None of the manufacturers reported any difficulty silvering the glass. Based on the tests performed, the glass meets or exceeds all optical specifications for the Barstow heliostat field.

Lind, M.A.; Buckwalter, C.Q.

1980-09-01

234

Water's second glass transition  

PubMed Central

The glassy states of water are of common interest as the majority of H2O in space is in the glassy state and especially because a proper description of this phenomenon is considered to be the key to our understanding why liquid water shows exceptional properties, different from all other liquids. The occurrence of water’s calorimetric glass transition of low-density amorphous ice at 136 K has been discussed controversially for many years because its calorimetric signature is very feeble. Here, we report that high-density amorphous ice at ambient pressure shows a distinct calorimetric glass transitions at 116 K and present evidence that this second glass transition involves liquid-like translational mobility of water molecules. This “double Tg scenario” is related to the coexistence of two liquid phases. The calorimetric signature of the second glass transition is much less feeble, with a heat capacity increase at Tg,2 about five times as large as at Tg,1. By using broadband-dielectric spectroscopy we resolve loss peaks yielding relaxation times near 100 s at 126 K for low-density amorphous ice and at 110 K for high-density amorphous ice as signatures of these two distinct glass transitions. Temperature-dependent dielectric data and heating-rate–dependent calorimetric data allow us to construct the relaxation map for the two distinct phases of water and to extract fragility indices m = 14 for the low-density and m = 20–25 for the high-density liquid. Thus, low-density liquid is classified as the strongest of all liquids known (“superstrong”), and also high-density liquid is classified as a strong liquid. PMID:24101518

Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Gainaru, Catalin; Handle, Philip H.; Seidl, Markus; Nelson, Helge; Bohmer, Roland

2013-01-01

235

THE INFLUENCE OF RADIATION AND MULTIVALENT CATION ADDITIONS ON PHASE SEPARATION AND CRYSTALLIZATION OF GLASS  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent reviews which have dealt with critical issues regarding the suitability of glasses for nuclear waste disposal have identified liquid-liquid immiscibility and crystallization processes as having the potential to alter significantly storage behavior, especially chemical corr...

236

Local and Medium Range Order Around Fission Products in Inactive Waste Glasses: Implication for Glass Structure and Stability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Borosilicate glasses are used to store high level nuclear waste in France (R7T7 glass). The structure of the glass around elements such as fission products controls important parameters as the homogeneity of the glass and/or the melted glass rheology. Data on the local and medium range order structure of these glasses could help improving the resistance toward leaching and/or irradiation, in relation with surface or geological storage of these vitrified wastes. Due to the complex composition of these glasses (up to 30 oxides), chemically selective methods are required to understand the environment of elements. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) is, from this point of view, a powerful tool as it provides a direct access to the investigation of the structure around specific cations in this multicomponent amorphous material, to specify their role in the glass durability. We will present different XAS studies (synchrotrons in LURE and ESRF, France) on the inactive amorphous analog for the R7T7 glass (the SON 68 glass). This report will illustrate the potentialities of this approach through the determination of the environment around fission products such as Zr, Zn and Mo. XAS shows the peculiarity of the sites occupied by these glass components of technological interest. Coordination numbers are shown to be systematically smaller than in crystalline compounds with close composition. Below the definition of the sites occupied by the chemical elements, XAS allows to detect some degree of medium range order which gives insight on the bonding of the site to the poymeric borosilicate network and allow to link precisely experimental data to theoretical calculations. Eventually, XAS is used to study the interaction between noble metals (Pd and Ru) and the glassy matrix. These elements are at the origin of small precipitates that induce changes in the melt vicosity. They occur as a result of the non-insertion of these elements in the glassy matrix. To accurate and precise structural interpretations, a direct comparison with MD calculations on simplified nuclear glass comprising 5 oxides, is performed.

Galoisy, L.; Calas, G.; Ghaleb, D.; Morin, G.

2002-12-01

237

A 31P-NMR study of borophosphate glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is shown that 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with magic angle spinning (MAS) discriminates among different types of PO4 units occurring in borophosphate glasses. The isotropic 31P chemical shift of the PO4 increases by nearly 70 ppm in going from the ``branching unit,'' neutral and covalently bonded, to the ``monomeric unit,'' which carries a -3 nominal charge. By

Marco Villa; Keith R. Carduner; Gaetano Chiodelli

1987-01-01

238

The atomic structure of niobium and tantalum containing borophosphate glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

A complete structural study has been carried out on sodium borophosphate glass containing increasing amounts of either niobium or tantalum. A combination of high energy x-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, nuclear magnetic resonance, and infrared and Raman spectroscopy has been used to discern the local atomic structure of each component and the changes with M content,

K. M. Wetherall; P. Doughty; G. Mountjoy; M. Bettinelli; A. Speghini; M. F. Casula; F. Cesare-Marincola; E. Locci; R. J. Newport

2009-01-01

239

THE DEVELOPMENT OF RADIOACTIVE GLASS SURROGATES FOR FALLOUT DEBRIS  

SciTech Connect

The production of glass that emulates fallout is desired for the nuclear forensics community for training and measurement exercises. The composition of nuclear fallout is complex varying isotopic compositions . As the gaseous cloud traverses from hotter to cooler regions of the atmosphere, the processes of condensation and nucleation entrain environmental materials, vaporized nuclear materials and fission products. The elemental and isotopic composition of the fission products is altered due to chemical fractionation (i.e. the fission product composition that would be expected from fission of the original nuclear material is altered by differences in condensation rates of the elements); the fallout may be enriched or depleted in volatile or refractory fission products. This work describes preliminary results to synthesize, irradiate and fractionate the fission product content of irradiated particulate glass using a thermal distillation two hours after irradiation. The glass was synthesized using a solution-based polymerization of tetraethyl orthosilicate. Uranium was incorporated into the glass particulate at trace concentrations during polymerization. The particulate was subjected to a short thermal neutron irradiation then heated to 1273 K approximately 2 hours after the end of irradiation. Fission products of 133, 134, 135I, 132, 134Te, 135Xe, 138Cs and 91, 92Sr were observed to be distilled from the particulate. The results of these preliminary studies are discussed.

Martha R. Finck; Leigh R. Martin; Russel R. Lewis; Kevin P. Carney; Christopher A. McGrath

2014-01-01

240

Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

Doremus, R. H.

1988-01-01

241

Analytical STEM of Borosilicate Glasses Containing Molybdates. Rick J. Short, Gnter Mbus, Guang Yang, Russell J. Hand, Neil Hyatt, William E.  

E-print Network

Analytical STEM of Borosilicate Glasses Containing Molybdates. Rick J. Short, Günter Möbus, Guang of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD, UK ABSTRACT Borosilicate nuclear waste glasses with various amounts effects. INTRODUCTION Borate, borosilicate, and alkali-borosilicate glasses have been the subject

Sheffield, University of

242

Digitization of stained glass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Digital photography was applied to the capture of images of the stained glass windows in the historic parish church in Fairford, Gloucestershire, England. Because of their size, the windows had to be photographed in 45 separate sections in order to capture all the detail present in the painting on the glass. The digital images of each section, approximately 3000 by 2300 pixels, were then mosaiced together in order to construct the very high resolution image needed for the complete window. A special backlight panel was constructed for the purpose, and techniques developed for minimizing the effects of reflected light and for calibrating the color of the images. Improvements in the technology for mounting and positioning the camera were identified as the most significant factors currently preventing the widespread adoption of this technology for virtual heritage applications.

MacDonald, Lindsay W.

1997-04-01

243

Outgassing of Glass  

Microsoft Academic Search

The gas evolved from glass at temperatures below the softening point, which is of interest in bake-out problems, is primarily water. The water evolved from unit surface at constant temperature above 300°C is linear with respect to the square root of the time of bake-out. The intercept of the linear plot, which can be altered by different surface treatments, is

B. Johnson Todd

1955-01-01

244

CCMR: Water in Glass  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Water uptake for various compositions of the model glass (CaO·Al2O3)x (2 SiO2)1-x under fixed annealing conditions was studied via FTIR. The water saturation concentration increased with time for certain sample sets, suggesting slow equilibration of the surface with the annealing atmosphere, while the water diffusion coefficient exhibited no appreciable time dependence. The saturation concentration and diffusion coefficient were not found to vary significantly with composition.

Uspal, William

2005-08-17

245

The formation of crystals in glasses containing rare earth oxides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Korean spent nuclear fuel will reach the capacity of the available temporary storage by 2016. Pyroprocessing and direct disposal seems to be an alternative way to manage and reuse spent nuclear fuel while avoiding the wet reprocessing technology. Pyroprocessing produces several wastes streams, including metals, salts, and rare earths, which must be converted into stabilized form. A suitable form for rare earth immobilization is borosilicate glass. The borosilicate glass form exhibits excellent durability, allows a high waste loading, and is easy to process. In this work, we combined the rare earths waste of composition (in wt%) 39.2Nd2O3-22.7CeO2-11.7La2O3-10.9PrO2-1.3Eu2O3-1.3Gd2O3-8.1Sm2O3-4.8Y2O3 with a baseline glass of composition 60.2SiO2-16.0B2O3-12.6Na2O-3.8Al2O3-5.7CaO-1.7ZrO2. Crystallization in waste glasses occurs as the waste loading increases. It may produce complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. To study crystal formation, we initially made glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% of La2O3 and then glasses with 5%, 10% and 15% of the complete rare earth mix. Samples were heat-treated for 24 hours at temperatures 800°C to 1150°C in 50°C increments. Quenched samples were analyzed using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Stillwellite (LaBSiO5) and oxyapatite (Ca2La8Si6O26) were found in glasses containing La2O3, while oxyapatite (Ca2La8Si6O26 and NaNd9Si6O26) precipitated in glasses with additions of mixed rare earths. The liquidus temperature (TL) of the glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% La2O3 were 800°C, 959°C and 986°C, respectively; while TL was 825°C, 1059°C and 1267°C for glasses with 5%, 10% and 15% addition of mixed rare earth oxides. The component coefficients TB2O3, TSiO2, TCaO, and TRE2O3 were also evaluated using a recently published study.

Fadzil, Syazwani Mohd; Hrma, Pavel; Crum, Jarrod; Siong, Khoo Kok; Ngatiman, Mohammad Fadzlee; Said, Riduan Mt

2014-02-01

246

Eyesafe erbium glass microlaser  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A miniature diode pumped Er,Yb:glass laser has been developed at the Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate, U. S. Army CECOM (NVESD) for soldier applications. This device uses a single laser diode at 925 nm to end pump a 200?m x 3 mm volume of Er,Yb:glass gain media. A Co2+:MgAl2O4 passive Q-switch is used to produce 2 nanosecond pulses at a repetition rate from single shot to 20 Hertz. A nominal pulse energy of 100 microjoules is emitted, corresponds to a peak power of 50 kilowatts, which is sufficient for ranging to over 2 kilometer. The Eyesafe Microlaser was designed and demonstrated to operate over a wide temperature range without temperature control of the pump laser, a feature important for soldier applications. An desirable feature of Er,Yb:glass lasers is that they emit directly at 1.54 microns, which is important for eye safe operation and low cost fabrication.

Hamlin, Scott J.; Hays, Alan D.; Trussell, C. Ward; King, Vernon

2004-07-01

247

Evaluation of lead-iron-phosphate glass as a high-level waste form  

SciTech Connect

The lead-iron-phosphate (Pb-Fe-P) glass developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was evaluated for its potential as an improvement over the current reference nuclear waste form, borosilicate (B-Si) glass. The evaluation was conducted as part of the Second Generation HLW Technology Subtask of the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purpose of this work was to investigate possible alternatives to B-Si glass as second-generation waste forms. While vitreous Pb-Fe-P glass appears to have substantially better chemical durability than B-Si glass, severe crystallization or devitrification leading to deteriorated chemical durability would result if this glass were poured into large canisters as is the procedure with B-Si glass. Cesium leach rates from this crystallized material are orders of magnitude greater than those from B-Si glass. Therefore, to realize the potential performance advantages of the Pb-Fe-P material in a nuclear waste form, the processing method would have to cool the material rapidly to retain its vitreous structure.

Chick, L.A.; Bunnell, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.; Kissinger, H.E.; Hodges, F.N.

1986-09-01

248

Laser Glass Frit Sealing for Encapsulation of Vacuum Insulation Glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser glass frit sealing is a joining method predestined in electronics for the sealing of engineered materials housings in dimensions of some 1 mm2 to several 10 mm2. The application field ranges from encapsulation of display panels to sensor housings. Laser glass frit sealing enables a hermetical closure excluding humidity and gas penetration. But the seam quality is also interesting for other applications requiring a hermetical sealing. One application is the encapsulation of vacuum insulation glass. The gap between two panes must be evacuated for reducing the thermal conductivity. Only an efficient encapsulating technique ensures durable tight joints of two panes for years. Laser glass frit sealing is an alternative joining method even though the material properties of soda lime glass like sensitivity to thermal stresses are much higher as known from engineered materials. An adapted thermal management of the process is necessary to prevent the thermal stresses within the pane to achieve crack free and tight glass frit seams.

Kind, H.; Gehlen, E.; Aden, M.; Olowinsky, A.; Gillner, A.

249

Transferability of glass lens molding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sphere lenses have been used for long time. But it is well known that sphere lenses theoretically have spherical aberration, coma and so on. And, aspheric lenses attract attention recently. Plastic lenses are molded easily with injection machines, and are relatively low cost. They are suitable for mass production. On the other hand, glass lenses have several excellent features such as high refractive index, heat resistance and so on. Many aspheric glass lenses came to be used for the latest digital camera and mobile phone camera module. It is very difficult to produce aspheric glass lenses by conventional process of curve generating and polishing. For the solution of this problem, Glass Molding Machine was developed and is spreading through the market. High precision mold is necessary to mold glass lenses with Glass Molding Machine. The mold core is ground or turned by high precision NC aspheric generator. To obtain higher transferability of the mold core, the function of the molding machine and the conditions of molding are very important. But because of high molding temperature, there are factors of thermal expansion and contraction of the mold and glass material. And it is hard to avoid the factors. In this session, I introduce following items. [1] Technology of glass molding and the machine is introduced. [2] The transferability of glass molding is analyzed with some data of glass lenses molded. [3] Compensation of molding shape error is discussed with examples.

Katsuki, Masahide

2006-02-01

250

NMR and conductivity studies of the mixed glass former effect in lithium borophosphate glasses.  

PubMed

Alkali ion charge transport has been studied in a series of mixed glass former lithium borophosphate glasses of composition 0.33Li(2)O + 0.67[xB(2)O(3) + (1 - x)P(2)O(5)]. The entire concentration range, 0.0 ? x ? 1.0, from pure glassy Li(2)P(4)O(11) to pure glassy Li(2)B(4)O(7) has been examined while keeping the molar fraction of Li(2)O constant. Electrical conductivity measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques such as spin relaxometry, line shape analysis, and stimulated-echo spectroscopy were used to examine the temperature and frequency dependence of the Li(+) ion motion over wide ranges of time scale and temperature. By accurately determining motional time scales and activation energies over the entire composition range the ion dynamics and the charge transport are found to be fastest if the borate and the phosphate fractions are similar. The nonlinear variation of the charge conduction, the most notable feature of the mixed glass former effect, is discussed in terms of the composition dependence of network former units which determine the local glass structure. PMID:23020343

Storek, Michael; Böhmer, Roland; Martin, Steve W; Larink, Dirk; Eckert, Hellmut

2012-09-28

251

NMR and conductivity studies of the mixed glass former effect in lithium borophosphate glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Alkali ion charge transport has been studied in a series of mixed glass former lithium borophosphate glasses of composition 0.33Li2O + 0.67[xB2O3 + (1 - x)P2O5]. The entire concentration range, 0.0 <= x <= 1.0, from pure glassy Li2P4O11 to pure glassy Li2B4O7 has been examined while keeping the molar fraction of Li2O constant. Electrical conductivity measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques such as spin relaxometry, line shape analysis, and stimulated-echo spectroscopy were used to examine the temperature and frequency dependence of the Li+ ion motion over wide ranges of time scale and temperature. By accurately determining motional time scales and activation energies over the entire composition range the ion dynamics and the charge transport are found to be fastest if the borate and the phosphate fractions are similar. The nonlinear variation of the charge conduction, the most notable feature of the mixed glass former effect, is discussed in terms of the composition dependence of network former units which determine the local glass structure.

Storek, Michael; Böhmer, Roland; Martin, Steve W.; Larink, Dirk; Eckert, Hellmut

2012-09-01

252

Molten Glass for Thermal Storage: Advanced Molten Glass for Heat Transfer and Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: Halotechnics is developing a high-temperature thermal energy storage system using a new thermal-storage and heat-transfer material: earth-abundant and low-melting-point molten glass. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Halotechnics new thermal storage material targets a price that is potentially cheaper than the molten salt used in most commercial solar thermal storage systems today. It is also extremely stable at temperatures up to 1200°C—hundreds of degrees hotter than the highest temperature molten salt can handle. Being able to function at high temperatures will significantly increase the efficiency of turning heat into electricity. Halotechnics is developing a scalable system to pump, heat, store, and discharge the molten glass. The company is leveraging technology used in the modern glass industry, which has decades of experience handling molten glass.

None

2012-01-01

253

Mixed Glass Former Effect In Silver Molybdophosphate and Borophosphate Glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the study of electrical properties of some silver ion conducting molybdophosphate and borophosphate mixed network former glasses in a wide frequency and temperature range. The dc conductivity of the mixed network former glasses is higher than that of the single network former glasses. The ac conductivity spectra show a power law type dependence on frequency. The frequency exponent obtained from ac conductivity is observed to be independent of both temperature and composition.

Deb, B.; Kabi, S.; Ghosh, A.

2011-07-01

254

On the glass transition temperature in covalent glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

We give a simple demonstration of the formula relating the glass transition temperature, Tg, to the molar concentration x of a modifier in two types of glasses: binary glasses, whose composition can be denoted by XnYm+xMpYq, with X an element of 3rd or 4th group (e.g., B or Si, Ge), while MpYq is an alkali oxide or chalcogenide; next, the

Richard Kerner; Matthieu Micoulaut

1997-01-01

255

Polyhedral arrangements in lanthanum aluminoborate glasses  

SciTech Connect

The authors have used magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and Raman spectroscopy to examine the polyhedral arrangements in ternary lanthanum aluminoborate glasses. They have characterized two glass-forming series: xAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}(1{minus}x)LaB{sub 3}O{sub 6} and 0.25 La{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}yAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}(1{minus}y)-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. {sup 11}B MAS NMR reveals a decrease in the fraction of four-coordinated boron atoms with increases in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content in both series. {sup 27}Al MAS NMR has detected four-, five- and six-coordinated aluminum atoms in complex aluminoborate networks similar to those reported elsewhere for alkaline-earth aluminoborate glasses. Raman spectroscopy reveals a variety of borate and aluminoborate moieties, including isolated groups as well as methaborate chains and rings. These results indicate that the La{sup 3+} ion acts as a modifier to the aluminoborate network.

Brow, R.K.; Tallant, D.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, G.L. [Spectral Data Services, Champaign, IL (United States)

1997-05-01

256

Mixed polyanion glass cathodes: Iron phosphate vanadate glasses  

SciTech Connect

Mixed polyanion (MP) glasses have been investigated for use as cathodes in lithium ion batteries. MP glass cathodes are similar in composition to theoretically promising crystalline polyanionic (CP) cathodes (e.g., lithium cobalt phosphate, lithium manganese silicate), but with proper polyanion substitution, they can be designed to overcome the key shortcomings of CP cathodes, such as poor electrical conductivity and irreversible phase changes. Iron phosphate/vanadate glasses were chosen as a first demonstration of the MP glass concept. Polyanion substitution with vanadate was shown to improve the intercalation capacity of an iron phosphate glass from almost zero to full theoretical capacity. In addition, the MP glass cathodes also exhibited an unexpected second high-capacity electrochemical reaction. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) of cathodes from cells having different states of charge suggested that this second electrochemical reaction is a glass-state conversion reaction. With a first demonstration established, MP glass materials utilizing an intercalation and/or glass-state conversion reaction are promising candidates for future high-energy cathode research.

Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine [ORNL; Carroll, Kyler J [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Kiggans Jr, James O [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL

2014-01-01

257

Chemical durability of soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass for radioactive waste vitrification  

SciTech Connect

Vitrification has been identified as one of the most viable waste treatment alternatives for nuclear waste disposal. Currently, the most popular glass compositions being selected for vitrification are the borosilicate family of glasses. Another popular type that has been around in glass industry is the soda-lime-silicate variety, which has often been characterized as the least durable and a poor candidate for radioactive waste vitrification. By replacing the boron constituent with a cheaper substitute, such as silica, the cost of vitrification processing can be reduced. At the same time, addition of network intermediates such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the glass composition increases the environmental durability of the glass. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of the soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass as an alternative vitrification tool for the disposal of radioactive waste and to investigate the sensitivity of product chemical durability to variations in composition.

Eppler, F.H.; Yim, M.S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1998-09-01

258

Recent results on the effect of gamma radiation on the durability and microstructure of DWPF glass  

SciTech Connect

The effect of gamma radiation on the durability and microstructure of a simulated nuclear waste glass from the Savannah River Site has been carefully investigated. Three large pieces of glass were irradiated with a Co-60 source to three doses up to a maximum dose of 3.1 {times} 10{sup 10} rad. Internal samples of the large pieces of irradiated and unirradiated glass were leached in deionized water to investigate durability changes and were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate microstructure changes. Leach tests were performed in triplicate at 90{degree}C with crushed glass samples in deionized water. A statistical analysis of the results indicated to the 95% confidence level that the radiation did not affect the glass durability. Careful examination by TEM indicated no effect of gamma radiation on the microstructure of the glass although severe damage could be induced by the electron beam from the microscope. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Bibler, N.E.; Tosten, M.H.; Beam, D.C.

1989-12-31

259

Recent results on the effect of gamma radiation on the durability and microstructure of DWPF glass  

SciTech Connect

The effect of gamma radiation on the durability and microstructure of a simulated nuclear waste glass from the Savannah River Site has been carefully investigated. Three large pieces of glass were irradiated with a Co-60 source to three doses up to a maximum dose of 3.1 {times} 10{sup 10} rad. Internal samples of the large pieces of irradiated and unirradiated glass were leached in deionized water to investigate durability changes and were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate microstructure changes. Leach tests were performed in triplicate at 90{degree}C with crushed glass samples in deionized water. A statistical analysis of the results indicated to the 95% confidence level that the radiation did not affect the glass durability. Careful examination by TEM indicated no effect of gamma radiation on the microstructure of the glass although severe damage could be induced by the electron beam from the microscope. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Bibler, N.E.; Tosten, M.H.; Beam, D.C.

1989-01-01

260

Structure and Chemistry in Halide Lead-Tellurite Glasses  

SciTech Connect

A series of TeO2-PbO glasses were fabricated with increasing fractions of mixed alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide chlorides. The glass and crystal structure was studied with Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy. As the chloride fraction increased, the medium-range order in the glass decreased up to a critical point (~14 mass% of mixed chlorides), above which the glasses became phase-separated. Resulting phases are a TeO2/PbO-rich phase and a crystalline phase rich in alkali chlorides. The 125Te NMR indicates, contrary to previous studies, that Te site distribution did not change with increased concentrations of M+, M2+, and M3+ cations, but rather is controlled by the Te/Pb molar ratio. The 207Pb NMR shows that two Pb species exist and their relative concentration changes nearly linearly with addition of the mixed chlorides, indicating that the additives to the TeO2-PbO glass are accommodated by changing the Pb species. The 23Na and 35Cl NMR indicate that Na and Cl are distributed in the single-phase glass phase up to the critical point, and at higher concentrations partition to crystalline phases. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the sample at the critical point contains ~10 nm seed nuclei that increase in size and concentration with exposure to the electron beam.

McCloy, John S.; Riley, Brian J.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Windisch, Charles F.; Washton, Nancy M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.

2013-02-11

261

Crystallization of bismuth borate glasses.  

PubMed

Bismuth borate glasses with Bi(2)O(3) concentration of 20-66 mol% were prepared by melt quenching and devitrified by heat treatment above their glass transition temperatures. All glasses show a strong tendency towards crystallization on annealing that increases with Bi(2)O(3) concentration. The crystalline phases formed on devitrification were characterized by FTIR absorption spectroscopy and DSC measurements. Our studies reveal that phases produced in glasses are strongly determined by initial glass composition and the two most stable crystalline phases are: Bi(3)B(5)O(12) and Bi(4)B(2)O(9). The metastable BiBO(3) phase can also be formed by devitrification of glass with 50 mol% of Bi(2)O(3). This phase is, however, unstable and decomposes into Bi(3)B(5)O(12) and Bi(4)B(2)O(9) on prolonged heat treatment. PMID:21817270

Bajaj, Anu; Khanna, Atul

2009-01-21

262

Fracture mechanics of cellular glass  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The fracture mechanics of cellular glasses (for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solr concentrator reflecting panels) are discussed. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials were developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region 1 may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

Zwissler, J. G.; Adams, M. A.

1981-01-01

263

Structure, biodegradation behavior and cytotoxicity of alkali-containing alkaline-earth phosphosilicate glasses.  

PubMed

We report on the effect of sodium on the structure, chemical degradation and bioactivity of glasses in the CaO-MgO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 system. The (29)Si and (31)P magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of melt-quenched glasses with varying Na2O/MgO ratios exhibit a silicate glass network with the dominance of Q(2)(Si) units and phosphorus mainly forming orthophosphate species. Sodium incorporation in the glasses did not induce a significant structural change in the silicate network, while it did influence the phosphate environment due to its lower ionic field strength in comparison with that of magnesium. The apatite forming ability of glasses has been investigated by immersion of glass powders in simulated body fluid (SBF) for time durations varying between 1h and 7days while their chemical degradation has been studied in Tris-HCl in accordance with ISO-10993-14. Increasing Na(+)/Mg(2+) ratio caused a decrease in the chemical durability of glasses and in the apatite forming ability especially during initial steps of interaction between glass and SBF solution. The cellular responses were observed in vitro on bulk glass samples using mouse-derived pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell line. The preliminary study suggested that the increasing alkali-concentration in glasses led to cytotoxicity in the cell culture medium. PMID:25280692

Kansal, Ishu; Reddy, AlluAmarnath; Muñoz, Francisco; Choi, Seong-Jun; Kim, Hae-Won; Tulyaganov, Dilshat U; Ferreira, José M F

2014-11-01

264

Atomic dynamics of tin nanoparticles embedded into porous glass  

SciTech Connect

The method of resonant nuclear inelastic absorption of synchrotron radiation has been used to study the phonon spectrum for tin nanoparticles (with a natural isotope mixture) embedded into a porous glassy (silica) matrix with an average pore diameter of 7 nm in comparison to the analogous spectrum of bulk tin enriched with {sup 119}Sn isotope. Differences between the spectra have been observed, which are related to both the dimensional effects and specific structural features of the porous glass-tin nanocomposite. Peculiarities in the dynamics of tin atoms embedded into nanopores of glass are interpreted in terms of a qualitative model of the nanocomposite structure.

Parshin, P. P.; Zemlyanov, M. G., E-mail: zeml@isssph.kiae.ru; Panova, G. Kh.; Shikov, A. A. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Kumzerov, Yu. A.; Naberezhnov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Sergueev, I.; Crichton, W. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (France); Chumakov, A. I. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Rueffer, R. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (France)

2012-03-15

265

Abelian gauge glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gauge glasses are lattice gauge theories with quenched random couplings; in this paper, the two simplest abelian models, having Z 2 and U(1) gauge symmetries respectively, are constructed. An important extension of gauge invariance is defined and the disorder invariant under this symmetry, the frustration, is identified. Simple energetic properties of frustrations are derived using duality arguments. The question of the existence of a weakly coupled glassy phase is raised, and then addressed using replica mean field theory and real-space renormalisation group techniques, both in the context of the Z 2 model. A phase transition is found for dimension six and above. The implications for random dynamics are discussed.

Hands, Simon

1988-12-01

266

7.G Stained Glass  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: The students in Mr. Rivera's art class are designing a stained-glass window to hang in the school entryway. The window will be 2 feet tall and 5 feet w...

267

The GLASS CHAIR Edited by Manuel Heitor  

E-print Network

The GLASS CHAIR Edited by Manuel Heitor IST Press, 2000 #12;Collaborative Design of... The GLASS the glass chair, but also for the numerous discussions on glass production processes. And last · Carmo Valente Chapter 4. GLASS: BEAUTY WITH STRENGTH Sushil Kumar Mendiratta Chapter 5. The IDEA

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

268

Method for heating a glass sheet  

DOEpatents

A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed. 5 figs.

Boaz, P.T.

1998-07-21

269

Method for heating a glass sheet  

DOEpatents

A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed.

Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI)

1998-01-01

270

Mechanical failure and glass transition in metallic glasses  

SciTech Connect

The current majority view on the phenomenon of mechanical failure in metallic glasses appears to be that it is caused by the activity of some structural defects, such as free-volumes or shear transformation zones, and the concentration of such defects is small, only of the order of 1%. However, the recent results compel us to revise this view. Through molecular dynamics simulation it has been shown that mechanical failure is the stress-induced glass transition. According to our theory the concentration of the liquid-like sites (defects) is well over 20% at the glass transition. We suggest that the defect concentration in metallic glasses is actually very high, and percolation of such defects causes atomic avalanche and mechanical failure. In this article we discuss the glass transition, mechanical failure and viscosity from such a point of view.

Egami, Takeshi [ORNL

2011-01-01

271

Glass Formulation Development for INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

For about four decades, radioactive wastes have been collected and calcined from nuclear fuels reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Over this time span, secondary radioactive wastes have also been collected and stored as liquid from decontamination, laboratory activities, and fuel-storage activities. These liquid wastes are collectively called sodium-bearing wastes (SBW). About 5.7 million liters of these wastes are temporarily stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Vitrification is being considered as an immobilization step for SBW with a number of treatment and disposal options. A systematic study was undertaken to develop a glass composition to demonstrate direct vitrification of INEEL's SBW. The objectives of this study were to show the feasibility of SBW vitrification, not a development of an optimum formulation. The waste composition is relatively high in sodium, aluminum, and sulfur. A specific composition and glass property restrictions, discussed in Section 2, were used as a basis for the development. Calculations based on first-order expansions of selected glass properties in composition and some general tenets of glass chemistry led to an additive (fit) composition (68.69 mass % SiO{sub 2}, 14.26 mass% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11.31 mass% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 3.08 mass% TiO{sub 2}, and 2.67 mass % Li{sub 2}O) that meets all property restrictions when melted with 35 mass % of SBW on an oxide basis, The glass was prepared using oxides, carbonates, and boric acid and tested to confirm the acceptability of its properties. Glass was then made using waste simulant at three facilities, and limited testing was performed to test and optimize processing-related properties and confirm results of glass property testing. The measured glass properties are given in Section 4. The viscosity at 1150 C, 5 Pa{center_dot}s, is nearly ideal for waste-glass processing in a standard liquid-fed joule-heated melter. The normalized elemental releases by 7-day PCT are all well below 1 g/m{sup 2}, which is a very conservative set point used in this study. The T{sub L}, ignoring sulfate formation, is less than the 1050 C limit. Based on these observations and the reasonable waste loading of 35 mass 0/0, the SBW glass was a prime candidate for further testing. Sulfate salt segregation was observed in all test melts formed from oxidized carbonate precursors. Melts fabricated using SBW simulants suggest that the sulfate-salt segregation seen in oxide and carbonate melts was much less of a problem. The cause for the difference is likely H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} fuming during the boil-down stage of wet-slurry processing. Additionally, some crucible tests with SBW simulant were conducted at higher temperatures (1250 C), which could increase the volatility of sulfate salts. The fate of sulfate during the melting process is still uncertain and should be the topic of future studies. The properties of the simulant glass confirmed those of the oxide and carbonate glass. Corrosion tests on Inconel 690 electrodes and K-3 refractory blocks conducted at INEEL suggest that the glass is not excessively corrosive. Based on the results of this study, the authors recommend that a glass made of 35% SBW simulant (on a mass oxide and halide basis) and 65% of the additive mix (either filled or raw chemical) be used in demonstrating the direct vitrification of INEEL SBW. It is further recommended that a study be conducted to determine the fate of sulfate during glass processing and the tolerance of the chosen melter technology to sulfate salt segregation and corrosivity of the melt.

J.D. Vienna; M.J. Schweiger; D.E. Smith; H.D. Smith; J.V. Crum; D.K. Peeler; I.A. Reamer; C.A. Musick; R.D. Tillotson

1999-08-03

272

Aspects of the mechanics of metallic glasses  

E-print Network

Metallic glasses are amorphous materials that possess unique mechanical properties, such as high tensile strengths and good fracture toughnesses. Also, since they are amorphous, metallic glasses exhibit a glass transition, ...

Henann, David Lee

2011-01-01

273

Glasses in the D'Orbigny Angrite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The D'Orbigny angrite contains abundant glasses, a phase which has not been previously reported from any other angrite. Glasses fill in part open druses and intersticial spaces between major silicates, or occur as glass inclusions in olivine.

Varela, M. E.; Kurat, G.; Brandstätter, F.; Bonnin-Mosbah, M.; Metrich, N.

2001-03-01

274

Method of determining glass durability  

DOEpatents

A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

1998-12-08

275

Method of determining glass durability  

DOEpatents

A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

Jantzen, Carol Maryanne (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John Butler (Aiken, SC); Brown, Kevin George (Augusta, GA); Edwards, Thomas Barry (Aiken, SC)

1998-01-01

276

Metallic glasses as structural materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potential of metallic glasses as structural materials is assessed. A wide-ranging comparison with conventional engineering materials shows metallic glasses to be restricted to niche applications, but with outstanding properties awaiting wider application, for example in micro electro-mechanical systems devices.

M. F. Ashby; A. L. Greer

2006-01-01

277

Thermal Gradient Fining of Glass  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Molten glass fined (cleared of bubbles) by heating with suitable temperature gradient, according to preliminary experiments. Temperature gradient produces force on gas bubbles trapped in molten glass pushing bubbles to higher temperature region where they are collected. Concept demonstrated in experiments on Earth and on rocket.

Wilcox, W.

1983-01-01

278

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-print Network

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover HAZARDOUS TRASH Items that are neither sharp nor contaminated. Thiswastestreamishandleddirectlybycustodians

Sheridan, Jennifer

279

/sup 31/P-NMR study of borophosphate glasses  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with magic angle spinning (MAS) discriminates among different types of PO/sub 4/ units occurring in borophosphate glasses. The isotope /sup 31/P chemical shift of the PO/sub 4/ increases by nearly 70 ppm in going from the branching unit, neutral and covalently bonded, to the monomeric unit, which carries a -3 nominal charge. By using both stationary and MAS /sup 31/P spectra, the authors also obtain the average values, and distribution widths, for chemical shift anisotropy and the asymmetry factor of PO/sub 4/ units occurring in vitreous borophosphates. Analysis of these NMR spectra provides detailed information about the short-range order in these glasses. It is also shown that the /sup 31/P-NMR-MAS technique may contribute significantly to phase separation and crystallization studies of phosphorus-containing glasses.

Villa, M.; Carduner, K.R.; Chiodelli, G.

1987-07-01

280

A 31P-NMR study of borophosphate glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is shown that 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with magic angle spinning (MAS) discriminates among different types of PO 4 units occurring in borophosphate glasses. The isotropic 31P chemical shift of the PO 4 increases by nearly 70 ppm in going from the "branching unit," neutral and covalently bonded, to the "monomeric unit," which carries a -3 nominal charge. By using both stationary and MAS 31P spectra, we also obtain the average values, and distribution widths, for chemical shift anisotropy and the asymmetry factor of PO 4 units occurring in vitreous borophosphates. Analysis of these NMR spectra provides detailed information about the short-range order in these glasses. It is also shown that the 31P-NMR-MAS technique may contribute significantly to phase separation and crystallization studies of phosphorus-containing glasses.

Villa, Marco; Carduner, Keith R.; Chiodelli, Gaetano

1987-07-01

281

Structure of hydrated layers on silicate electrode glasses.  

PubMed

The structural changes of the silicate framework in hydrated layers of silicate electrode glasses compared with untreated glasses as well as the quality and quantity of water and its ionic species stored in the layer have been investigated by high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques [29Si magic-angle spinning (MAS), 29Si cross-polarization (CP) MAS, 1H high-speed MAS, 1H CRAMPS and 1H Echo NMR]. To support the results, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, thermal analysis and sodium ion concentration analyses were used. It was found that at least two different water species exist in the hydrated layer: SiOH groups and not very mobile hydrogen-bonded molecular water. Concerning the framework modified, Q3 groups [(SiO)3SiOH] were formed in the hydrated glass. During the swelling process a condensation of silanol groups formed took place to a great extent. PMID:7827973

Herzog, K; Scholz, K; Thomas, B

1994-02-01

282

Combined Experimental and Computational Approach to Predict the Glass-Water Reaction  

SciTech Connect

The use of mineral and glass dissolution rates measured in laboratory experiments to predict the weathering of primary minerals and volcanic and nuclear waste glasses in field studies requires the construction of rate models that accurately describe the weathering process over geologic timescales. Additionally, the need to model the long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass for the purpose of estimating radionuclide release rates requires that rate models be validated with long-term experiments. Several long-term test methods have been developed to accelerate the glass-water reaction [drip test, vapor hydration test, product consistency test B, and pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF)], thereby reducing the duration required to evaluate long-term performance. Currently, the PUF test is the only method that mimics the unsaturated hydraulic properties expected in a subsurface disposal facility and simultaneously monitors the glass-water reaction. PUF tests are being conducted to accelerate the weathering of glass and validate the model parameters being used to predict long-term glass behavior. A one-dimensional reactive chemical transport simulation of glass dissolution and secondary phase formation during a 1.5-year-long PUF experiment was conducted with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) code. Results show that parameterization of the computer model by combining direct bench scale laboratory measurements and thermodynamic data provides an integrated approach to predicting glass behavior over the length of the experiment. Over the 1.5-year-long test duration, the rate decreased from 0.2 to 0.01 g/(m2 day) based on B release for low-activity waste glass LAWA44. The observed decrease is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than the decrease observed under static conditions with the SON68 glass (estimated to be a decrease by four orders of magnitude) and suggests that the gel-layer properties are less protective under these dynamic conditions.

Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.

2011-10-01

283

Silver Valence and Local Environments in Borosilicate and Calcium Aluminoborate Waste Glasses as determined from X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Silver K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data were collected and analyzed to characterize silver (Ag) environments in borosilicate and Ca-aluminoborate glass formulations developed as potential candidates for the immobilization of certain nuclear wastes. Silver is found in some nuclear waste streams and must be encapsulated in glass during waste vitrification processes. A related concern deals with phase separation within these glasses and whether colloidal silver would be present in the glass melt, which could present processing issues, or in the waste glass product. Characterization of the silver environments provides useful information for optimizing the silver incorporation ability of such glasses. Data were also gathered on four crystalline standards: Ag-foil, Ag{sub 2}O, argentojarosite (AgFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}), and AgO. XANES data indicate Ag{sup +} as the dominant species in the glasses. XANES and EXAFS data show that the average Ag environment in the Ca-aluminoborate glass is different compared with those in the two borosilicate glasses investigated. EXAFS analyses show that Ag in the borosilicate glasses is coordinated by two oxygens in a similar environment to that in crystalline Ag{sub 2}O, except that the associated Ag-O distances are approximately 0.10 Angstroms longer in the glass. Silver in the Ca-aluminoborate glass may be within one highly disordered site, or possibly, several different sites, where the average Ag-O distance, coordination number, and Debye-Waller factor are larger than those determined for the borosilicate glasses. Despite their relatively high silver contents, there is no evidence from XANES or EXAFS of colloidal silver in the glasses investigated.

McKeown,D.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I.

2005-01-01

284

Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Vienna, John D.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L.

2001-07-24

285

Nanophase Glass Ceramics for Capacitive Energy Storage.  

E-print Network

??Glass ceramics are candidate dielectric materials for high energy storage capacitors. Since energy density depends primarily on dielectric permittivity and breakdown strength, glass ceramics with… (more)

Rangarajan, Badri

2009-01-01

286

A Topological Glass  

E-print Network

We propose and study a model with glassy behavior. The state space of the model is given by all triangulations of a sphere with $n$ nodes, half of which are red and half are blue. Red nodes want to have 5 neighbors while blue ones want 7. Energies of nodes with different numbers of neighbors are supposed to be positive. The dynamics is that of flipping the diagonal of two adjacent triangles, with a temperature dependent probability. We show that this system has an approach to a steady state which is exponentially slow, and show that the stationary state is unordered. We also study the local energy landscape and show that it has the hierarchical structure known from spin glasses. Finally, we show that the evolution can be described as that of a rarefied gas with spontaneous generation of particles and annihilating collisions.

Jean-Pierre Eckmann

2007-04-07

287

Reduced glass transition temperature and glass forming ability of bulk glass forming alloys  

Microsoft Academic Search

Onset temperature (solidus) Tm and offset temperature (liquidus) Tl of melting of a series of bulk glass forming alloys based on Zr, La, Mg, Pd and rare-earth elements have been measured by studying systematically the melting behaviour of these alloys using DTA or DSC. Bulk metallic glass formation has been found to be most effective at or near their eutectic

Z. P. Lu; Y. Li; S. C. Ng

2000-01-01

288

Raman study of glass transition in iron phosphate glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Iron phosphate (Fe2O3: P2O5) glass with 40: 60 mol% composition having glass transition temperature, Tg at 782 K, was investigated between 81-873 K using Raman spectroscopy. The spectra were corrected for thermal population factor and the Raman mode frequencies were obtained from Lorentzian peak fits. Three characteristic modes of iron phosphate glass, corresponding to asymmetric stretching of Q0, Q1 and Q2 tetrahedral units, were analyzed for temperature dependences of the mode frequencies. All the modes are found to exhibit typical anharmonic behavior below Tg, while discontinuous changes are found near Tg, thereby suggesting structural relaxations.

Chakraborty, S.; Arora, A. K.

2012-06-01

289

Characterization of projected DWPF glasses heat treated to simulate canister centerline cooling. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be produced and poured into stainless steel canisters in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Eventually these canistered waste forms will be sent to a geologic repository for final disposal. In order to assure acceptability by the repository, the Department of Energy has defined requirements which DWPF canistered waste forms must meet. These requirements are the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The WAPS require DWPF to identify the crystalline phases expected to be present in the final glass product. Knowledge of the thermal history of the borosilicate glass during filling and cooldown of the canister is necessary to determine the amount and type of crystalline phases present in the final glass product. Glass samples of seven projected DWPF compositions were cooled following the same temperature profile as that of glass at the centerline of the full scale DWPF canister. The glasses were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy to identify the crystalline phases present. The volume percents of each crystalline phase present were determined by quantitative x-ray diffraction. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) was used to determine the durability of the heat treated glasses.

Marra, S.L.; Jantzen, C.M.

1993-06-01

290

A literature review of surface alteration layer effects on waste glass behavior  

SciTech Connect

When in contact with an aqueous solution, nuclear waste glass is subject to a chemical attack that results in progressive alteration. During tills alteration, constituent elements of the glass pass into the solution; elements initially in solution diffuse into, or are adsorbed onto, the solid; and new phases appear. This results in the formation of surface layers on the reacted glass. The glass corrosion and radionuclide release can be better understood by investigating these surface layer effects. In the past decade, there have been numerous studies regarding the effects of surface layers on glass reactions. This paper presents a systematic analysis and summary of the past knowledge regarding the effects of surface layers on glass-water interaction. This paper describes the major formation mechanisms of surface layers; reviews the role of surface layers in controlling mass transport and glass reaction affinity (through crystalline phases, an amorphous silica, a gel layer, or all the components in the glass); and discusses how the surface layers contribute to the retention of radionuclides during glass dissolution.

Feng, X.; Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.

1993-01-01

291

A literature review of surface alteration layer effects on waste glass behavior  

SciTech Connect

When in contact with an aqueous solution, nuclear waste glass is subject to a chemical attack that results in progressive alteration. During tills alteration, constituent elements of the glass pass into the solution; elements initially in solution diffuse into, or are adsorbed onto, the solid; and new phases appear. This results in the formation of surface layers on the reacted glass. The glass corrosion and radionuclide release can be better understood by investigating these surface layer effects. In the past decade, there have been numerous studies regarding the effects of surface layers on glass reactions. This paper presents a systematic analysis and summary of the past knowledge regarding the effects of surface layers on glass-water interaction. This paper describes the major formation mechanisms of surface layers; reviews the role of surface layers in controlling mass transport and glass reaction affinity (through crystalline phases, an amorphous silica, a gel layer, or all the components in the glass); and discusses how the surface layers contribute to the retention of radionuclides during glass dissolution.

Feng, X.; Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.

1993-05-01

292

Fracture mechanics of cellular glass  

SciTech Connect

Cellular glasses are prime candidate materials for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solar concentrator reflecting panels. These materials are brittle, however, and susceptible to mechanical failure from slow crack growth caused by a stress corrosion mechanism. The results are detailed of one part of a program established to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize the behavior of these and commercially available materials. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials are developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region I may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

Zwissler, J.G.; Adams, M.A.

1981-02-01

293

Glass ceramic seals to inconel  

DOEpatents

A glass ceramic composition prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight, 65-80% SiO.sub.2, 8-16%, Li.sub.2 O, 2-8% , Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 1-8% K.sub.2 O, 1-5% P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and 1.5-7% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, to the following processing steps of heating the glass composition to a temperature sufficient to crystallize lithium metasilicate therein, holding the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to dissolve the lithium metasilicate therein thereby creating cristobalite nucleii, cooling the glass composition and maintaining the composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to recrystallize lithium metasilicate therein, and thermally treating the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to cause growth of cristobalite and further crystallization of lithium metasilicate producing a glass ceramic composition having a specific thermal expansion coefficient and products containing said composition.

McCollister, Howard L. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM)

1983-11-08

294

Thermal expansion and glass transition temperatures of synthetic glasses of plagioclase-like compositions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The glass transition temperatures and the thermal expansions both below and above the glass transition temperature region of synthetic glasses of compositions close to those of plagioclases have been determined. The linear thermal expansion coefficient of the rigid glasses decreases on average from 7.4×10-6\\/dgC for albite glass to 4.9×10-6\\/dgC for glass close to anorthite composition. The glass transition temperature of

J. Arndt; F. Häberle

1973-01-01

295

Structure, surface reactivity and physico-chemical degradation of fluoride containing phospho-silicate glasses  

SciTech Connect

We report on the structure, apatite-forming ability and physicochemical degradation of glasses along fluorapatite [FA; Ca5(PO4)3F] - diopside (Di; CaMgSi2O6) join. A series of glasses with varying FA/Di ratio have been synthesised by melt-quenching technique. The amorphous glasses could be obtained only for compositions up to 40 wt.% of FA. The detailed structural analysis of glasses has been made by infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS-NMR). Silicon was predominantly present as Q2 (Si) species while phosphorus was found in orthophosphate type environment in all the investigated glasses. The apatite forming ability of glasses was investigated by immersion of glass powders in simulated body fluid (SBF) for time durations varying between 1 h – 28 days. An extensive precipitation of calcite (CaCO3) after immersion in SBF was found in all the glasses which considerably masked the formation of hydroxyapatite [HA; Ca5(PO4)3OH] as depicted by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR. The possible mechanism favouring formation of calcite instead of HA has been explained on the basis of experimental results obtained for structure of glasses, leaching profile of glass powders in SBF solution and pH variation in SBF solution. Further, physico-chemical degradation of glasses has been studied in accordance with ISO 10993-14 “Biological evaluation of medical devices – Part 14: Identification and quantification of degradation products from ceramics” in Tris HCl and citric acid buffer. All the FA containing glasses exhibited a weight gain (instead of weight loss) after immersion in citric acid buffer due to the formation of different crystalline products.

Kansal, Ishu; Goel, Ashutosh; Tulyaganov, Dilshat U.; Santos, Luis F.; Ferreira, Jose M.

2011-03-28

296

Zirconia solubility in boroaluminosilicate glass  

SciTech Connect

In the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) waste streams, zirconia is often the waste load limiting species. It modifies the glass network, enhances durability, increases viscosity and induces crystallization. The limits of its dissolution in boroaluminosilicate glass, with magnesia and soda additions were experimentally determined. A ternary compositional surface is evolved to present the isothermal regimes of liquid, liquid + zircon, liquid + forsterite, and liquid phase sintered ceramic. The potential of partitioning the transuranics, transition elements and solutes in these regimes is discussed. The visible Raman spectroscopic results are presented to elucidate the dependence among glass composition, structure and chemical durability.

Raman, S.V.; Bopp, R.; Batcheller, T.A. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Yan, Q. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States). Chemistry Dept.

1995-12-31

297

Glass microspheres for medical applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radioactive dysprosium lithium borate glass microspheres have been developed as biodegradable radiation delivery vehicles for the radiation synovectomy treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Once injected into a diseased joint, the microspheres deliver a potent dose of radiation to the diseased tissue, while a non-uniform chemical reaction converts the glass into an amorphous, porous, hydrated dysprosium phosphate reaction product. The non-radioactive, lithium-borate component is dissolved from the glass (up to 94% weight loss), while the radioactive 165Dy reacts with phosphate anions in the body fluids, and becomes "chemically" trapped in a solid, dysprosium phosphate reaction product that has the same size as the un-reacted glass microsphere. Ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA) chelation therapy can be used to dissolve the dysprosium phosphate reaction product after the radiation delivery has subsided. The dysprosium phosphate reaction product, which formed in vivo in the joint of a Sprague-Dawley rat, was dissolved by EDTA chelation therapy in <1 week, without causing any detectable joint damage. The combination of dysprosium lithium borate glass microspheres and EDTA chelation therapy provides an unique "tool" for the medical community, which can deliver a large dose (>100 Gy) of localized beta radiation to a treatment site within the body, followed by complete biodegradability. The non-uniform reaction process is a desirable characteristic for a biodegradable radiation delivery vehicle, but it is also a novel material synthesis technique that can convert a glass to a highly porous materials with widely varying chemical composition by simple, low-temperature, glass/solution reaction. The reaction product formed by nonuniform reaction occupies the same volume as the un-reacted glass, and after drying for 1 h at 300°C, has a specific surface area of ?200 m2/g, a pore size of ?30 nm, and a nominal crushing strength of ?10 MPa. Finally, rhenium glass microspheres, composed of micron-sized, metallic rhenium particles dispersed within a magnesium alumino borate glass matrix were produced by sintering ReO2 powder and glass frit at 1050°C. A 50 mg injection of radioactive rhenium glass microspheres containing 3.7 GBq of 186Re and 8.5 GBq of 188Re could be used to deliver a 100 Gy dose to a cancerous tumor, while limiting the total body dose caused by rhenium dissolution to approximately 1 mGy.

Conzone, Samuel David

298

Shock temperatures in anorthite glass  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Shock-temperature data and the high-pressure thermal behavior of anorthite glass are examined. Temperatures of anorthite glass shocked to pressures between 48-117 GPa were measured in the temperature range 2500-5600 K using optical pyrometry techniques. The time dependence observed in the emitted light of the glass is analyzed in terms of temperature dependence, emissivity dependences, and the time dependence of absorption or scattering of an intervening layer. The three phase transitions at pressures of about 55, 85, and 100 GPa and with transition energies of about 0.5 MJ/kg are studied.

Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.; Mitchell, A. C.

1986-01-01

299

Effect of tin on the relationship between composition, structure, and properties of soda-lime-silicate glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of tin on the properties of soda-lime-silicate glass was investigated using laboratory and commercial glasses. The commercial materials were float glasses, while the model glasses with nominal soda-lime-silicate commercial compositions were synthesized in the laboratory with tin concentrations ranging from 0--3 mol%. In one set of the modeled glasses, melt processing was used to drive the tin into the reduced state. Mossbauer spectroscopy was used to determine the presence and relative amounts of Sn2+ and Sn4+ in the glasses. The glasses were also examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to gain insight into the effect of substituting tin for sodium on the number of silica Q4 species present in the glass structure. Dilatometry experiments revealed the effects of tin on the coefficient of thermal expansion, dilatometric softening temperature, and glass transition temperature. Beam-bending viscosity experiments were used to measure the viscosity as a function of tin, and from the viscosity curves, strain and annealing temperatures were determined. Sonic resonance, ultrasonic pulse, and nanoindentation experiments were performed to determine the role of tin on elastic modulus of the glass. The results of these experiments, along with the NMR and Mossbauer experiments, suggested that the substitution of tin for sodium results in an increase in the network connectivity of the glass structure. This increased network connectivity correlated with an increased in the ratio of Sn 4+/Sn2+ suggesting that Sn4+ plays a direct role in cross-linking the silicate structure.

Krohn, Matthew H.

300

Stainless steel/glass ceramic interactions under hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interactions between stainless steel (SS) and a glass-ceramic designed for immobilisation of the high-level nuclear waste generated at the Idaho chemical processing plant (ICPP) under hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) conditions (100 MPa in argon at 1200 °C) have been studied and subsequently the effect of such interactions on the chemical durability of the glass-ceramic waste form has been examined. The diffusion of Cr from SS (Cr depletion in SS) through the interaction layer and formation of crystalline Cr/Al oxides in glass dominate the overall interaction process. It appears that the depletion of Cr in SS may reduce the potential of SS as a barrier. However, such interactions have no significant impact on the glass-ceramic and the presence of the interaction layer does not seem to have any detrimental effect on the chemical durability of the glass-ceramic as a waste form.

Zhang, Y.; Li, H.; McGlinn, P. J.; Yang, B.; Begg, B. D.

2008-04-01

301

Simulation of cooling and solidification of three-dimensional bulk borosilicate glass: effect of structural relaxations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The modeling of the viscoelastic stress evolution and specific volume relaxation of a bulky glass cast is presented in this article and is applied to the experimental cooling process of an inactive nuclear waste vitrification process. The concerned borosilicate glass is solidified and cooled down to ambient temperature in a stainless steel canister, and the thermomechanical response of the package is simulated. There exists a deviant compression of the liquid core due to the large glass package compared to standard tempered glass plates. The stress load development of the glass cast is finally studied for different thermal load scenarios, where the cooling process parameters or the final cooldown rates were changed, and we found a great influence of the studied cooldown rates on the maximum stress build-up at ambient temperature.

Barth, N.; George, D.; Ahzi, S.; Rémond, Y.; Joulaee, N.; Khaleel, M. A.; Bouyer, F.

2014-02-01

302

Galactic Hearts of Glass  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

[figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger graph

This artist's concept shows delicate greenish crystals sprinkled throughout the violent core of a pair of colliding galaxies. The white spots represent a thriving population of stars of all sizes and ages. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope detected more than 20 bright and dusty galactic mergers like the one depicted here, all teeming with the tiny gem-like crystals.

When galaxies collide, they trigger the birth of large numbers of massive stars. Astronomers believe these blazing hot stars act like furnaces to produce silicate crystals in the same way that glass is made from sand. The stars probably shed the crystals as they age, and as they blow apart in supernovae explosions.

At the same time the crystals are being churned out, they are also being destroyed. Fast-moving particles from supernova blasts easily convert silicates crystals back to their amorphous, or shapeless, form.

How is Spitzer seeing the crystals if they are rapidly disappearing? Astronomers say that, for a short period of time at the beginning of galactic mergers, massive stars might be producing silicate crystals faster than they are eliminating them. When our own galaxy merges with the Andromeda galaxy in a few billion years, a similar burst of massive stars and silicate crystals might occur.

Crystal Storm in Distant Galaxy The graph (see inset above) of infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that a distant galaxy called IRAS 08752+3915 is experiencing a storm of tiny crystals made up of silicates. The crystals are similar to the glass-like grains of sand found on Earth's many beaches.

The data were taken by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, which splits light open to reveal its rainbow-like components. The resulting spectrum shown here reveals the signatures of both crystalline (green) and non-crystalline (brown) silicates.

Spitzer detected the same crystals in 20 additional galaxies, all belonging to a class called ultraluminous infrared galaxies. These extremely bright and dusty galaxies usually consist of two galaxies in the process of smashing into each other. Astronomers believe massive stars at the hearts of the galaxies are churning out clouds of silicate crystals. This phenomenon may represent a short-lived phase in the evolution of galactic mergers.

2006-01-01

303

Effect of fluoride ion incorporation on the structural aspects of barium–sodium borosilicate glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Barium–sodium borosilicate glasses containing upto 6wt% fluoride ions were prepared by conventional melt quench method and characterized by 19F, 29Si and 11B nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques.19F NMR studies have confirmed the presence of mainly linkages like F–Si(n) or F–B(n) along with F–Ba(n). Their relative concentrations are unaffected by F? content in the glass. Incorporation of fluoride ions in the

R. K. Mishra; V. Sudarsan; C. P. Kaushik; Kanwar Raj; R. K. Vatsa; M. Body; A. K. Tyagi

2009-01-01

304

Stainless steel\\/glass–ceramic interactions under hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interactions between stainless steel (SS) and a glass–ceramic designed for immobilisation of the high-level nuclear waste generated at the Idaho chemical processing plant (ICPP) under hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) conditions (100MPa in argon at 1200°C) have been studied and subsequently the effect of such interactions on the chemical durability of the glass–ceramic waste form has been examined. The diffusion

Y. Zhang; H. Li; P. J. McGlinn; B. Yang; B. D. Begg

2008-01-01

305

Effect of Stainless Steel Can\\/Glass-Ceramic Interaction Layer on Aqueous Durability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Calcined high-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will eventually be immobilised in a suitable wasteform before disposal. A tailored glass-ceramic wasteform, produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) in stainless steel (SS) cans, has been developed at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) as a cost-saving alternative to glass which would improve waste loading

Peter J. McGlinn; Yingjie Zhang; Huijun Li; Timothy E. Payne

2007-01-01

306

An advanced NMR protocol for the structural characterization of aluminophosphate glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work a combination of complementary advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) strategies is employed to analyse the network organization in aluminophosphate glasses to an unprecedented level of detailed insight. The combined results from MAS, MQMAS and 31P-{27Al}-CP-heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy (HETCOR) NMR experiments allow for a detailed speciation of the different phosphate and aluminate species present in the glass.

Leo van Wüllen; Grégory Tricot; Sebastian Wegner

2007-01-01

307

Stress Corrosion and Static Fatigue of Glass  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stress corrosion cracking of six glasses was studied using fracture mechanics techniques. Crack velocities in water were measured as a function of applied stress intensity factor and temperature, and apparent activation energies for crack mo- tion were obtained. Data were consistent with the universal fatigue curve for static fatigue of glass, which depended on glass composition. Of the glasses tested,

S. M. WIEDERHORN; L. H. BOLZ

1970-01-01

308

Apollo applications of beta fiber glass  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The physical characteristics of Beta fiber glass are discussed. The application of Beta fiber glass for fireproofing the interior of spacecraft compartments is described. Tests to determine the flammability of Beta fiber glass are presented. The application of Beta fiber glass for commercial purposes is examined.

Naimer, J.

1971-01-01

309

Experimental characterization of stress relaxation in glass  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glass viscoelasticity has gained importance in recent years as glass lens molding appeared as a valuable alternative to the traditional grinding and polishing process for manufacturing glass lenses. In the precision lens molding process, knowledge of viscoelastic properties of glass in the transition region, which affect the stress relaxation behavior, is required to precisely predict the final size and shape

Hemanth C. Kadali

2009-01-01

310

Lowmelting crystallizable borophosphate glass binders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glass ceramic materials that can be used as ceramizing binders for abrasive tools with heat treatment temperatures of 650C\\u000a have been developed and tested. Their main physicochemical properties have been investigated.

A. I. Barabanov; N. O. Tagil’tseva; N. V. Elyukova; V. D. Khalilev; G. P. Zaitsev

2005-01-01

311

All-glass solar collector  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proposed all tempered glass solar collector uses black collection fluid and mirrored bottom to reduce energy loss and overall costs associated with conventional collectors. Collector is more efficient and practically maintenance-free.

Wisnewski, J. P.

1980-01-01

312

Fast Crystals and Strong Glasses  

SciTech Connect

This talk describes new results on model colloid systems that provide insight into the behavior of fundamental problems in colloid physics, and more generally, for other materials as well. By visualizing the nucleation and growth of colloid crystals, we find that the incipient crystallites are much more disordered than expected, leading to a larger diversity of crystal morphologies. When the entropic contribution of these diverse morphologies is included in the free energy, we are able to describe the behavior very well, and can predict the nucleation rate surprisingly accurately. The talk also describes the glass transition in deformable colloidal particles, and will show that when the internal elasticity of the particles is included, the colloidal glass transition mimics that of molecular glass formers much more completely. These results also suggest that the elasticity at the scale of the fundamental unit, either colloid particle or molecule, determines the nature of the glass transition, as described by the "fragility."

Weitz, David (Harvard) [Harvard

2009-11-04

313

Fiber glass pulling. [in space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experiments were conducted to determine the viability of performing containerless glass fiber pulling in space. The optical transmission properties and glass-forming capabilities of the heavy metal fluorides are reviewed and the acoustic characteristics required for a molten glass levitation system are examined. The design limitations of, and necessary modifications to the acoustic levitation furnace used in the experiments are discussed in detail. Acoustic levitator force measurements were performed and a thermal map of the furnace was generated from thermocouple data. It was determined that the thermal capability of the furnace was inadequate to melt a glass sample in the center. The substitution of a 10 KW carbon monoxide laser for the original furnace heating elements resulted in improved melt heating.

Workman, Gary L.

1987-01-01

314

High Tech Art: Chameleon Glass  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dichroic Glass is a technology wherein extremely thin films of metal are vacuum deposited on a glass surface. The coated glass shields spacecraft instruments from cosmic radiation and protects human vision from unfiltered sunlight in space. Because the coating process allows some wavelengths of light and color to reflect and others to pass through, a chameleon effect is produced. Murray Schwartz, a former aerospace engineer, has based his business KROMA on this NASA optical technology. He produces dichroic stained glass windows, mobiles and jewelry. The technique involves deposition of super thin layers of metal oxides applied one layer at a time in a specific order and thickness for the desired effect. His product line is unique and has been very successful.

1993-01-01

315

Combined Experimental and Computational Approach to Predict the Glass-Water Reaction  

SciTech Connect

The use of mineral and glass dissolution rates measured in laboratory experiments to predict the weathering of primary minerals and volcanic and nuclear waste glasses in field studies requires the construction of rate models that accurately describe the weathering process over geologic time-scales. Additionally, the need to model the long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass for the purpose of estimating radionuclide release rates requires that rate models are validated with long-term experiments. Several long-term test methods have been developed to accelerate the glass-water reaction [drip test, vapor hydration test, product consistency test-B, and pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF)], thereby reducing the duration required to evaluate long-term performance. Currently, the PUF test is the only method that mimics the unsaturated hydraulic properties expected in a subsurface disposal facility and simultaneously monitors the glass-water reaction. PUF tests are being conducted to accelerate the weathering of glass and validate the model parameters being used to predict long-term glass behavior. A one-dimensional reactive chemical transport simulation of glass dissolution and secondary phase formation during a 1.5-year long PUF experiment was conducted with the subsurface transport over reactive multi-phases code. Results show that parameterization of the computer model by combining direct bench-scale laboratory measurements and thermodynamic data provides an integrated approach to predicting glass behavior over the length of the experiment. Over the 1.5-year long test duration, the rate decreased from 0.2 to 0.01 g/(m2 d) base on B release. The observed decrease is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than the decrease observed under static conditions with the SON68 glass (estimated to be a decrease by 4 orders of magnitude) and suggest the gel-layer properties are less protective under these dynamic conditions.

Pierce, Eric M [ORNL; Bacon, Diana [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2011-01-01

316

Soft phonons in glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamics of glasses differs strongly from the one of crystals. Coexisting with the long wavelength phonons one finds additional low energy excitations: tunneling, soft localized variations and relaxations. The soft potential model postulates a common origin of these additional excitations. In its low temperature limit (typically T < 1 K) it is equivalent to the well-known tunneling model. From general properties of the distribution functions describing the soft potentials one derives the temperature dependencies of quantities such as the specific heat or the thermal conductivity. These universal relations hold to about T = 10 K. Fitting the parameters of the model to the experimental data one finds 20-100 atoms to participate in the excitation modes. Extensions to higher temperatures are possible by introducing material dependent distribution functions. Computer simulations are used to test the assumptions of the model and to provide some insight into the microscopic origin of the modes. One finds soft vibrational modes concentrated on 10 or more atoms. These modes are centered at structural irregularities.

Schober, H. R.

1993-12-01

317

Glass Transitions: Opportunities and Challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Glass transition is a time-dependent change in the state of a noncrystalline material. It often explains solid–liquid transformations\\u000a in foods and it may control changes in food structure and texture as well as chemical reactions. At temperatures around the\\u000a glass transition, an amorphous solid transforms to a supercooled liquid (rubber) which contributes to changes in molecular\\u000a mobility and flow properties

Yrjö H. Roos; Nattiga Silalai

318

Luminescence of powdered uranium glasses  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measurement of cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence efficiencies in powdered borosilicate glasses having different particle size and different uranium content. Excitation with 100 to 350 keV electrons and with 253.7 nm light was found to produce identical absolute radiant exitance spectra in powdered samples. The most efficient glass was one containing 29.4 wt% B2O3, 58.8 wt% SiO2, 9.8 wt% Na2O and 2.0 wt% UO2.

Eubanks, A. G.; Mcgarrity, J. M.; Silverman, J.

1974-01-01

319

Reinforced glass beamsReinforced glass beamsg Auteur Dr. Christian LOUTER 1  

E-print Network

Reinforced glass beamsReinforced glass beamsg EDCE Auteur Dr. Christian LOUTER 1 ENAC/EDCE 2011In contemporary architecture glass is increasinglyIn contemporary architecture glass is increasingly applied for structural components such as beamsapplied for structural components such as beams. However glass

320

Glass Forming Ability, Structure and Spectroscopic Properties of Silica-Free Calcium Aluminate Based Glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Calcium aluminate based glasses are interesting because of their unusual optical properties and the fact that they do not contain any traditional glass forming ions. A large focus of the glass literature has been concerned with the study and properties of typical glass forming ions. For this reason, comparatively little is known about the possibility of glass formation and the

Eugenie Victoria Uhlmann

1994-01-01

321

Investigations of structure and transport in lithium and silver borophosphate glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glasses in the system xLi2O·(1?x)[0.5B2O3·0.5P2O5] and xAg2O·(1?x)[0.5B2O3·0.5P2O5] have been prepared from melt quenching method. Glasses have been characterized for their densities, molar volumes, glass transition temperatures and heat capacities. Structural studies have been done using infrared and high resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR MAS NMR) of 31P, 11B and 7Li nuclei. Boron is present only in tetrahedral

Sundeep Kumar; Philippe Vinatier; Alain Levasseur; K. J. Rao

2004-01-01

322

Infrared spectroscopy and hydrogen isotope geochemistry of hydrous silicate glasses. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this project is the combined appication of infrared spectroscopy and stable isotope geochemistry to the study of hydrogen-bearing species dissolved in silicate melts and glasses. We are conducting laboratory experiments aimed at determining the fractionation of D and H between melt species (OH and H{sub 2}O) and hydrous vapor and the diffusivities of these species in glasses and melts. Knowledge of these parameters is critical to understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes during igneous processes and hydrothermal processes. These results also could be valuable in application of glass technology to development of nuclear waste disposal strategies.

Epstein, S.; Stolper, E.

1992-03-01

323

Tailoring Silicon Oxycarbide Glasses for Oxidative Stability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Blackglas(Trademark) polysiloxane systems produce silicon oxycarbide glasses by pyrolysis in inert atmosphere. The silicon oxycarbides evidence oxidative degradation that limits their lifetime as composite matrices. The present study characterizes bonding rearrangements in the oxycarbide network accompanying increases in pyrolysis temperature. It also addresses the changes in susceptibility to oxidation due to variations in the distribution of Si bonded species obtained under different processing conditions. The study is carried out using Si-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and a design of experiments approach to model the oxidation behavior. The NMR results are compared with those obtained by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Samples pyrolyzed under inert conditions are compared to those pyrolyzed in reactive ammonia environments.

Hurwitz, F. I.; Meador, M. A. B.

1997-01-01

324

Isoconversion Analysis of the Glass Transition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At temperatures below their glass transition temperatures (Tgs), glass forming materials deviate from equilibrium density and form a glass. The kinetic nature of the glass transition process is manifested in the cooling rate dependence of the glass transition temperature and by structural relaxation below Tg. Various facets of the glass transition kinetics have been well described by phenomenological models of the glass transition, such as the TNM and KAHR model. An important yet frequently questioned assumption in these models is that the apparent activation energy, which describes the temperature dependence of the relaxation time, does not vary during the glass transition process. Some recent reports suggest that the activation energy varies significantly during the glass transition process. In this work we apply an isoconversion analysis to data in the glass transition region which was obtained on cooling from capillary dilatometry and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in order to determine whether the apparent activation energy increases as the glassy state is approached.

Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Zheng, Wei; Simon, Sindee

2007-03-01

325

Fabrication of glass microspheres with conducting surfaces  

DOEpatents

A method for making hollow glass microspheres with conducting surfaces by adding a conducting vapor to a region of the glass fabrication furnace. As droplets or particles of glass forming material pass through multiple zones of different temperature in a glass fabrication furnace, and are transformed into hollow glass microspheres, the microspheres pass through a region of conducting vapor, forming a conducting coating on the surface of the microspheres.

Elsholz, W.E.

1982-09-30

326

Glass Membrane For Controlled Diffusion Of Gases  

DOEpatents

A glass structure for controlled permeability of gases includes a glass vessel. The glass vessel has walls and a hollow center for receiving a gas. The glass vessel contains a metal oxide dopant formed with at least one metal selected from the group consisting of transition metals and rare earth metals for controlling diffusion of the gas through the walls of the glass vessel. The vessel releases the gas through its walls upon exposure to a radiation source.

Shelby, James E. (Alfred Station, NY); Kenyon, Brian E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2001-05-15

327

Fabrication of glass microspheres with conducting surfaces  

DOEpatents

A method for making hollow glass microspheres with conducting surfaces by adding a conducting vapor to a region of the glass fabrication furnace. As droplets or particles of glass forming material pass through multiple zones of different temperature in a glass fabrication furnace, and are transformed into hollow glass microspheres, the microspheres pass through a region of conducting vapor, forming a conducting coating on the surface of the microspheres.

Elsholz, William E. (Acampo, CA)

1984-01-01

328

Glass transition and viscosity of simple glasses and liquids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The theoretical understanding of liquids and glasses at an atomistic level lags well behind that of crystalline materials, even though they are important in many fields including biology and the medical sciences. We present a simple microscopic model for the glass transition based on topological fluctuations in the bonding network. The model makes predictions for important parameters of the glassy state, such as the glass transition temperature, Tg, and the liquid fragility coefficient, m, based on microscopic variables. Excellent agreement with a number of experimental observations from metallic glasses is demonstrated. A key to this success is to focus on the dependence on Poisson's ratio, following the work of Novikov and Sokolov,^1 that characterizes the interaction between local density and shear fluctuations. To our knowledge, this is the first model to predict Tg and m quantitatively from microscopic variables. It presents a simple conceptual framework that should provide the basis for a more general microscopic understanding of liquids and glasses, including molecular systems. 1. V. N. Novikov and A. P. Sokolov, Nature, 431, 961-963 (2004).

Egami, Takeshi; Poon, S. Joseph; Levashov, Valentin; Aga, Rachel; Morris, James

2006-03-01

329

Introduction and Motivation Structural Model for Laminated Glass Beams Conclusions and Outlook of Laminated Glass Structures  

E-print Network

Introduction and Motivation Structural Model for Laminated Glass Beams Conclusions and Outlook Analysis of Laminated Glass Structures for Photovoltaic Applications Holm Altenbach Otto November 5th, 2013 Hameln, Germany November 5th, 2013 Holm Altenbach Analysis of Laminated Glass Structures

330

Glass Forming Ability and Relaxation Behavior of Zr Based Metallic Glasses  

E-print Network

metallic glasses from the liquid melt phase and how the properties of metallic glasses change due to relaxation need to be understood better. The glass forming ability (GFA) with variation in composition and inclusion of different alloying elements...

Kamath, Aravind Miyar

2012-07-16

331

Glass: Kohlrausch exponent, fragility, anharmonicity.  

PubMed

The thermodynamical and mechanical properties of (fragile and strong) glass are modeled based on a generalised activation energy relationship log( ? ) = ?G ( ? )/RTn(T') process of glass-forming liquids. This cooperative process involves 1/n(T') elementary ? motions of activation Gibbs energy ?G ( ? ) dependent on the equivalent temperature T', the temperature of the liquid in equilibrium having the volume of the glass, function of temperature and aging conditions. From this modified VFT law the relaxation of any properties (V , H , stress, creep) can be calculated and approximated by the Kohlrausch function. This model predicts consistency relationships for: a) the temperature (and aging time) variation of the Kohlrausch exponent; b) the temperature dependence of the stabilisation time domain of strong and fragile glass; c) the linear relation between the activation parameters (E (*) energy, S (*) entropy, V (*) volume) of the ? and ? transition. The Lawson and Keyes (LK) relations are recalled and it is shown that these relations (somewhat equivalant to the compensation law or Meyer-Neldel rule) are observed generally in glass. Morever the (macroscopic) ratios ?H/?V observed during aging or after a temperature jump and the (microscopic) ratio E (*)/V (*) are found equal to ?? (? compressibily, ? Grüneisen parameter), in agreement with the LK predictions. From various experiments and in agreement with predictions of this model we conclude that the Grüneisen parameter ? ( B ) (pressure derivative of the bulk modulus) and the Mean Square Displacement (MSD) characterising the anharmonicity of solids (and liquids) are the main parameters which govern the relaxation properties of the glass state. Linear relations between the parameters ? ( B ), the fragility m, and the Kohlrausch exponent n ( g ) at T ( g ) are explained. These correlations underscore a strong relationship between the fragilty of glass formers and the extent of the anharmonicity in the interatomic interactions. PMID:22526977

Rault, J

2012-04-01

332

Multiple reentrant glass transitions in confined hard-sphere glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glass-forming liquids exhibit a rich phenomenology upon confinement. This is often related to the effects arising from wall-fluid interactions. Here we focus on the interesting limit where the separation of the confining walls becomes of the order of a few particle diameters. For a moderately polydisperse, densely packed hard-sphere fluid confined between two smooth hard walls, we show via event-driven molecular dynamics simulations the emergence of a multiple reentrant glass transition scenario upon a variation of the wall separation. Using thermodynamic relations, this reentrant phenomenon is shown to persist also under constant chemical potential. This allows straightforward experimental investigation and opens the way to a variety of applications in micro- and nanotechnology, where channel dimensions are comparable to the size of the contained particles. The results are in line with theoretical predictions obtained by a combination of density functional theory and the mode-coupling theory of the glass transition.

Mandal, Suvendu; Lang, Simon; Gross, Markus; Oettel, Martin; Raabe, Dierk; Franosch, Thomas; Varnik, Fathollah

2014-07-01

333

Multiple reentrant glass transitions in confined hard-sphere glasses  

E-print Network

Glass forming liquids exhibit a rich phenomenology upon confinement. This is often related to the effects arising from wall-fluid interactions. Here we focus on the interesting limit where the separation of the confining walls becomes of the order of a few particle diameters. For a moderately polydisperse, densely packed hard-sphere fluid confined between two smooth hard walls, we show via event-driven molecular dynamics simulations the emergence of a multiple reentrant glass transition scenario upon a variation of the wall separation. Using thermodynamic relations, this reentrant phenomenon is shown to persist also under constant chemical potential. This allows straightforward experimental investigation and opens the way to a variety of applications in micro- and nanotechnology, where channel dimensions are comparable to the size of the contained particles. The results are in-line with theoretical predictions obtained by a combination of density functional theory and the mode-coupling theory of the glass transition.

S. Mandal; S. Lang; M. Gross; M. Oettel; D. Raabe; T. Franosch; F. Varnik

2014-06-20

334

Effects of ionization on silicate glasses. [Silicate glasses  

SciTech Connect

This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures.

Primak, W.

1982-02-01

335

Calorimetric Study of Kinetic Glass Transition in Metallic Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments were carried out for a bulk metallic glass (BMG), Zr{sub 41.2}Ti{sub 13.8}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 10.0}Be{sub 22.5}, below and above the glass transition temperature T{sub g}. The T{sub g} values were determined from the DSC curves. A wide range of heating rate, q = dT/dt = 0.1-100 K/min, was adopted for the experiment, and the q dependence of the apparent T{sub g} was investigated. As q was decreased, the value of T{sub g} decreased rapidly, then more slowly, and seemed to approach a constant value at low q. The experimental result of this kinetic glass transition phenomenon was analyzed on the basis of the relaxation process occurring in the transition temperature range.

Hiki, Y. [Faculty of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 39-3-303 Motoyoyogi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-0062 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Institute of Applied Beam Science, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1 Nakanarusawa, Hitachi 316-8511 (Japan)

2008-02-21

336

Database for waste glass composition and properties  

SciTech Connect

A database of waste glass composition and properties, called the PNL Waste Glass Database, has been developed. The source of data is published literature and files from projects funded by the US Department of Energy. The glass data have been organized into categories and corresponding data files have been prepared. These categories are glass chemical composition, thermal properties, leaching data, waste composition, glass radionuclide composition and crystallinity data. The data files are compatible with commercial database software. Glass compositions are linked to properties across the various files using a unique glass code. Programs have been written in database software language to permit searches and retrievals of data. The database provides easy access to the vast quantities of glass compositions and properties that have been studied. It will be a tool for researchers and others investigating vitrification and glass waste forms.

Peters, R.D.; Chapman, C.C.; Mendel, J.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Williams, C.G. [Central Michigan Univ., Mount Pleasant (Midway Islands)

1993-12-31

337

Database for waste glass composition and properties  

SciTech Connect

A database of waste glass composition and properties, called PNL Waste Glass Database, has been developed. The source of data is published literature and files from projects funded by the US Department of Energy. The glass data have been organized into categories and corresponding data files have been prepared. These categories are glass chemical composition, thermal properties, leaching data, waste composition, glass radionuclide composition and crystallinity data. The data files are compatible with commercial database software. Glass compositions are linked to properties across the various files using a unique glass code. Programs have been written in database software language to permit searches and retrievals of data. The database provides easy access to the vast quantities of glass compositions and properties that have been studied. It will be a tool for researchers and others investigating vitrification and glass waste forms.

Peters, R.D.; Chapman, C.C.; Mendel, J.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Williams, C.G. [Central Michigan Univ., Mount Pleasant, MI (United States)

1993-09-01

338

HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses  

SciTech Connect

In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Matyᚠet al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

2012-04-02

339

Electrical conduction and glass relaxation in alkali- silicate glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electrical response measurements from 1 Hz to 1 MHz between 50o and 540oC were made on potassium, sodium and lithium-silicate glasses with low alkali oxide contents. Conductivity and electrical relaxation responses for both annealed and air quenched glasses of the same composition were compared. Quenching was found to lower the dc conductivity, ?dc, and activation energy as well as increase the pre-exponential term when compared to the corresponding annealed glass of the same composition. All of the glasses exhibited Arrhenius behavior in the log ?dc against 1/T plots. A sharp decrease in ?dc was observed for glasses containing alkali concentrations of 7 mol% or less. The ?dc activation energy exhibited similar behavior when plotted as a function of alkali composition and was explained in terms of a mixture of the weak and strong electrolyte models. The depression angle for fits to the complex impedance data were also measured as a function of thermal history, alkali concentration and alkali species. These results were interpreted in terms of changes in the distribution of relaxation times. Annealed samples from a single melt of a 10 mol% K2O-90SiO2 glass were reheated to temperatures ranging from 450o to 800oC, held isothermally for 20 min, and then quenched in either air or silicon oil. The complex impedance of both an annealed and the quenched samples were then measured as a function of temperature from 120o to 250oC. The ?dc was found to be remain unaffected by heat treatments below 450oC, to increase rapidly over an approximate 200oC range of temperatures that was dependent on cooling rate and to be constant for heat treatments above this range. This behavior is interpreted in terms of the mean structural relaxation time as a function of temperature and cooling rate near the glass transition temperature and glass transformation ranges. A more detailed definition for the transition and transformation temperatures and ranges was also provided.

Angel, Paul William

340

Fabrication and characterization of MCC (Materials Characterization Center) approved testing material: ATM-10 glass  

SciTech Connect

The Materials Characterization Center ATM-10 glass represents a reference commercial high-level waste form similar to that which will be produced by the West Valley Nuclear Service Co. Inc., West Valley, New York. The target composition and acceptable range of composition were defined by the sponsor, West Valley Nuclear Service. The ATM-10 glass was produced in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory QA Manual for License-Related Programs, MCC technical procedures, and MCC QA Plan that were in effect during the course of the work. The method and procedure to be used in the fabrication and characterization of the ATM-10 glass were specified in two run plans for glass preparation and a characterization plan. All of the ATM-10 glass was produced in the form of bars 1.9 /times/ 1.9 /times/ 10 cm nominal size, and 93 g nominal mass. A total of 15 bars of ATM-10 glass weighing 1394 g was produced. The production bars were characterized to determine the mean composition, oxidation state, and microstructure of the ATM-10 product. Table A summarizes the characterization results. The ATM-10 glass meets all specifications. The elemental composition and oxidation state of the glass are within the specifications of the client. Visually, the ATM-10 glass bars appear uniformly glassy and generally without exterior features. Microscopic examination revealed low (less than 2 wt %) concentractions of 3-..mu..m iron-chrome (suspected spinel) crystals and /approximately/0.5-..mu..m ruthenium inclusions scattered randomly throughout the glassy matrix. Closed porosity, with pores ranging in diameter from 5 to 250 ..mu..m, was observed in all samples. 4 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs.

Maupin, G.D.; Bowen, W.M.; Daniel, J.L.

1988-04-01

341

Long-term modeling of alteration-transport coupling: Application to a fractured Roman glass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To improve confidence in glass alteration models, as used in nuclear and natural applications, their long-term predictive capacity has to be validated. For this purpose, we develop a new model that couples geochemical reactions with transport and use a fractured archaeological glass block that has been altered for 1800 years under well-constrained conditions in order to test the capacity of the model. The chemical model considers three steps in the alteration process: (1) formation of a hydrated glass by interdiffusion, whose kinetics are controlled by a pH and temperature dependent diffusion coefficient; (2) the dissolution of the hydrated glass, whose kinetics are based on an affinity law; (3) the precipitation of secondary phases if thermodynamic saturation is reached. All kinetic parameters were determined from experiments. The model was initially tested on alteration experiments in different solutions (pure water, Tris, seawater). It was then coupled with diffusive transport in solution to simulate alteration in cracks within the glass. Results of the simulations run over 1800 years are in good agreement with archaeological glass block observations concerning the nature of alteration products (hydrated glass, smectites, and carbonates) and crack alteration thicknesses. External cracks in direct contact with renewed seawater were altered at the forward dissolution rate and are filled with smectites (400-500 ?m). Internal cracks are less altered (by 1 or 2 orders of magnitude) because of the strong coupling between alteration chemistry and transport. The initial crack aperture, the distance to the surface, and sealing by secondary phases account for these low alteration thicknesses. The agreement between simulations and observations thus validates the predictive capacity of this coupled geochemical model and increases more generally the robustness and confidence in glass alteration models to predict long-term behavior of nuclear waste in geological disposal or natural glass in the environment.

Verney-Carron, Aurélie; Gin, Stéphane; Frugier, Pierre; Libourel, Guy

2010-04-01

342

Yttrium-silicon-aluminum oxynitride glass fibers  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on fibers made from Y-Si-Al-O-N glasses previously shown to have excellent mechanical properties and outstanding water corrosion resistance. Fibers of glasses containing, respectively, 3.2 and 6.6 wt% N were pulled free-hand in air and from glass rods in N{sub 2}. Continuous fibers (up to several kilometers long) of the former glass were melt-drawn in N{sub 2} while being wound in air outside of the glass-melting furnace. The fibers, some as small as 10 XX in diameter, retained the desirable properties of the bulk glass.

Messier, D.R.; Gleisner, R.P.; Rich, R.E. (AMTL, Watertown, MA (US))

1989-11-01

343

Study Of Phase Separation In Glass  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Report describes an experimental study of effect of hydroxide content on phase separation in soda/silica glasses. Ordinary and gel glasses melted at 1,565 degree C, and melts stirred periodically. "Wet" glasses produced by passing bubbles of N2 saturated with water through melts; "dry" glasses prepared in similar manner, except N2 dried before passage through melts. Analyses of compositions of glasses performed by atomic-absorption and index-of-refraction measurements. Authors conclude hydroxide speeds up phase separation, regardless of method (gel or ordinary) by which glass prepared. Eventually helps material scientists to find ways to control morphology of phase separation.

Neilson, George F.; Weinberg, Michael C.; Smith, Gary L.

1989-01-01

344

NMR studies of bond arrangements in alkali phosphate glasses  

SciTech Connect

Solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become a powerful tool for the investigation of local structure and medium range order in glasses. Previous {sup 31}P MAS NMR studies have detailed the local structure for a series of phosphate glasses. Phosphate tetrahedra within the glass network are commonly described using the Q{sup n} notation, where n = 0, 1, 2, 3 and represents the number of bridging oxygens attached to the phosphate. Using {sup 31}P MAS NMR different phosphate environments are readily identified and quantified. In this paper, the authors present a brief description of recent one dimensional (1D) {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Li and {sup 31}P MAS experiments along with two-dimensional (2D) {sup 31}P exchange NMR experiments for a series of lithium ultraphosphate glasses. From the 2D exchange experiments the connectivities between different Q{sup n} phosphate tetrahedra were directly measured, while the 1D experiments provided a measure of the P-O-P bond angle distribution and lithium coordination number as a function of Li{sub 2}O concentration.

Alam, T.M.; Brow, R.K.

1998-01-01

345

Iron phosphate glass for immobilization of 99Tc  

SciTech Connect

Technetium-99 (99Tc) can bring serious environmental threats because of its long half-life (t1/2 = ~2.1 x 105 years), high fission yield (~6%), and high solubility and mobility in the ground water. The high volatility makes it difficult to immobilize 99Tc in continuous melters vitrifying 99Tc-containing nuclear wastes in borosilicate glasses. This work explores a possibility of incorporating a high concentration of 99Tc, surrogated by the non-radioactive Re, in an iron phosphate glass by melting mixtures of iron phosphate glass frits with 1.5-6 mass% KReO4 at ~1000 C. The retention of Re achieved was ~1.1 mass%. The normalized Re release by the 7-day Product Consistency Test was <10*2 g/m2. Surprisingly, the Re escaped from the melt within a short time of heating, especially when the temperature was increased. Therefore, 99Tc volatilization would still be a challenging task for its immobilization in iron phosphate glasses.

Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel R.; Um, Wooyong; Heo, Jong

2013-06-15

346

Elastic Heterogeneity in Metallic Glasses  

SciTech Connect

When a stress is applied on a metallic glass it deforms following Hook's law. Therefore it may appear obvious that a metallic glass deforms elastically. Using x-ray diffraction and anisotropic pair-density function analysis we show that only about 3/4 in volume fraction of metallic glasses deforms elastically, whereas the rest of the volume is anelastic and in the experimental time scale deform without resistance. We suggest that this anelastic portion represents residual liquidity in the glassy state. Many theories, such as the free-volume theory, assume the density of defects in the glassy state to be of the order of 1%, but this result shows that it is as much as a quarter.

Dmowski, Wojciech [ORNL; Iwashita, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chuang, C.-P. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Almer, J. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Egami, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2010-01-01

347

Elastic heterogeneity in metallic glasses.  

SciTech Connect

When a stress is applied on a metallic glass it deforms following Hook's law. Therefore it may appear obvious that a metallic glass deforms elastically. Using x-ray diffraction and anisotropic pair-density function analysis we show that only about 3/4 in volume fraction of metallic glasses deforms elastically, whereas the rest of the volume is anelastic and in the experimental time scale deform without resistance. We suggest that this anelastic portion represents residual liquidity in the glassy state. Many theories, such as the free-volume theory, assume the density of defects in the glassy state to be of the order of 1%, but this result shows that it is as much as a quarter.

Dmowski, , W.; Iwashita, T.; Chuang, C.-P.; Almer, J. D; Egami, T.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of Tennessee; ORNL

2010-01-01

348

Librational fluctuations in protein glasses.  

PubMed

Librational motions in the region of the protein "glass" (or dynamic) transition are analysed for spin-labelled haemoglobin, serum albumin and ?-lactoglobulin by EPR spectroscopy. A discontinuity in the temperature dependence of the mean-square librational amplitude, , occurs in the region of 200K as found for the mean-square atomic displacement, , at the protein dynamic transition by Mössbauer spectroscopy and neutron scattering. The discontinuity in vs. T can be described by the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher equation, implying a finite glass transition temperature. Above the dynamic transition, vs. 1/T can be approximated by the Arrhenius law with activation energies similar to those usually found for , and relaxation processes in glass-forming media and the hydration shells of proteins. Similar results are found for librational fluctuations of membranous Na,K-ATPase spin-labelled either on superficial SH groups or on those essential to activity. PMID:23669570

Marsh, Derek; Bartucci, Rosa; Guzzi, Rita; Sportelli, Luigi; Esmann, Mikael

2013-08-01

349

Processing of bulk metallic glass.  

PubMed

Bulk metallic glass (BMG) formers are multicomponent alloys that vitrify with remarkable ease during solidification. Technological interest in these materials has been generated by their unique properties, which often surpass those of conventional structural materials. The metastable nature of BMGs, however, has imposed a barrier to broad commercial adoption, particularly where the processing requirements of these alloys conflict with conventional metal processing methods. Research on the crystallization of BMG formers has uncovered novel thermoplastic forming (TPF)-based processing opportunities. Unique among metal processing methods, TPF utilizes the dramatic softening exhibited by a BMG as it approaches its glass-transition temperature and decouples the rapid cooling required to form a glass from the forming step. This article reviews crystallization processes in BMG former and summarizes and compares TPF-based processing methods. Finally, an assessment of scientific and technological advancements required for broader commercial utilization of BMGs will be made. PMID:20496386

Schroers, Jan

2010-04-12

350

Glasses for seeing beyond visible.  

PubMed

Conventional glasses based on oxides have a transparency limited by phonon absorption in the near IR region and have a limited interest for analyzing information located far beyond the visible. The IR spectral domain is nevertheless of prime interest, since it covers fundamental wavelength ranges used for thermal imaging as well as molecular vibrational signatures. Besides spectacular advances in the field of IR detectors, the main significant progresses are related to the development of IR glass optics, such as lenses or IR optical fibres. The field of IR glasses is almost totally dominated by glasses formed from heavy atoms such as the chalcogens S, Se and Te. Their transparency extends up to 12, 16 and 28 microm for sulfide-, selenide- and the new generation of telluride-based glasses, respectively. They cover the atmospheric transparency domains, 3-5 and 8-13 microm, respectively, at which the IR radiation can propagate allowing thermal imaging and night-vision operations through thick layers of atmosphere. The development of new glass compositions will be discussed on the basis of structural consideration with the objective of moulding low-cost lenses for IR cameras used, for instance, in car-driving assistance. Additionally, multimode, single-index, optical fibres operating in the 3 to 12 microm window developed for in situ remote evanescent-wave IR spectroscopy will also be mentioned. The detection of molecular IR signatures is applied to environmental monitoring for investigating the pollution of underground water with toxic molecules. The extension of this technique to the investigation of biomolecules in three different studies devoted to liver tissues analysis, bio-film formation, and cell metabolism will also be discussed. Finally we will mention the developments in the field of single-mode fibres operating around 10 mum for the Darwin space mission, which is aiming at discovering, signs of biological life in telluric earth-like exoplanets throughout the universe. PMID:18067106

Zhang, XiangHua; Bureau, Bruno; Lucas, Pierre; Boussard-Pledel, Catherine; Lucas, Jacques

2008-01-01

351

Monte Carlo Simulations of the Corrosion of Aluminoborosilicate Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Aluminum is one of the most common components included in nuclear waste glasses. Therefore, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were carried out to investigate the influence of aluminum on the rate and mechanism of dissolution of sodium borosilicate glasses in static conditions. The glasses studied were in the compositional range (70-2x)% SiO2 x% Al2O3 15% B2O3 (15+x)% Na2O, where 0 ? x ? 15%. The simulation results show that increasing amounts of aluminum in the pristine glasses slow down the initial rate of dissolution as determined from the rate of boron release. However, the extent of corrosion - as measured by the total amount of boron release - initially increases with addition of Al2O3, up to 5 Al2O3 mol%, but subsequently decreases with further Al2O3 addition. The MC simulations reveal that this behavior is due to the interplay between two opposing mechanisms: (1) aluminum slows down the kinetics of hydrolysis/condensation reactions that drive the reorganization of the glass surface and eventual formation of a blocking layer; and (2) aluminum strengthens the glass thereby increasing the lifetime of the upper part of its surface and allowing for more rapid formation of a blocking layer. Additional MC simulations were performed whereby a process representing the formation of a secondary aluminosilicate phase was included. Secondary phase formation draws dissolved glass components out of the aqueous solution, thereby diminishing the rate of condensation and delaying the formation of a blocking layer. As a result, the extent of corrosion is found to increase continuously with increasing Al2O3 content, as observed experimentally. For Al2O3 < 10 mol%, the MC simulations also indicate that, because the secondary phase solubility eventually controls the aluminum content in the part of the altered layer in contact with the bulk aqueous solution, the dissolved aluminum and silicon concentrations at steady state are not dependent on the Al2O3 content of the pristine aluminoborosilicate glass.

Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Pierce, Eric M.

2013-10-15

352

Glass Transition in Confined Geometry  

E-print Network

Extending mode-coupling theory, we elaborate a microscopic theory for the glass transition of liquids confined between two parallel flat hard walls. The theory contains the standard MCT equations in bulk and in two dimensions as limiting cases and requires as input solely the equilibrium density profile and the structure factors of the fluid in confinement. We evaluate the phase diagram as a function of the distance of the plates for the case of a hard sphere fluid and obtain an oscillatory behavior of the glass transtion line as a result of the structural changes related to layering.

Simon Lang; Vitalie Botan; Martin Oettel; David Hajnal; Thomas Franosch; Rolf Schilling

2010-08-23

353

Spin Glasses: A Ghost Story  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extensive experimental and numerical studies of the non-equilibrium dynamics\\u000aof spin glasses subjected to temperature or bond perturbations have been\\u000aperformed to investigate chaos and memory effects in selected spin glass\\u000asystems. Temperature shift and cycling experiments were performed on the\\u000astrongly anisotropic Ising-like system {\\\\ising} and the weakly anisotropic\\u000aHeisenberg-like system {\\\\AgMn}, while bond shift and cycling simulations were

P. E. Jonsson; R. Mathieu; P. Nordblad; H. Yoshino; H. Aruga Katori; A. Ito

2003-01-01

354

Molecular random tilings as glasses  

PubMed Central

We have recently shown that p-terphenyl-3,5,3?,5?-tetracarboxylic acid adsorbed on graphite self-assembles into a two-dimensional rhombus random tiling. This tiling is close to ideal, displaying long-range correlations punctuated by sparse localized tiling defects. In this article we explore the analogy between dynamic arrest in this type of random tilings and that of structural glasses. We show that the structural relaxation of these systems is via the propagation–reaction of tiling defects, giving rise to dynamic heterogeneity. We study the scaling properties of the dynamics and discuss connections with kinetically constrained models of glasses. PMID:19720990

Garrahan, Juan P.; Stannard, Andrew; Blunt, Matthew O.; Beton, Peter H.

2009-01-01

355

Manufacturing unique glasses in space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An air suspension melting technique is described for making glasses from substances which to date have been observed only in the crystalline condition. A laminar flow vertical wind tunnel was constructed for suspending oxide melts that were melted using the energy from a carbon dioxide laser beam. By this method it is possible to melt many high-melting-point materials without interaction between the melt and crucible material. In addition, space melting permits cooling to suppress crystal growth. If a sufficient amount of under cooling is accompanied by a sufficient increase in viscosity, crystallization will be avoided entirely and glass will result.

Happe, R. P.

1976-01-01

356

Glass-Derived Superconductive Ceramic  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Critical superconducting-transition temperature of 107.2 K observed in specimen made by annealing glass of composition Bi1.5Pb0.5Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox for 243 h at 840 degrees C. PbO found to lower melting temperature and viscosity of glass, possibly by acting as fluxing agent. Suggested partial substitution of lead into bismuth oxide planes of crystalline phase having Tc of 110 K stabilizes this phase and facilitates formation of it.

Bansal, Narottam P.; Farrell, D. E.

1992-01-01

357

Antiferromagnetic inclusions in lunar glass  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The magnetic susceptibility of 11 glass spherules from the Apollo 15, 16, and 17 fines and two specimens of a relatively large glass spherical shell were studied as a function of temperature from room temperature to liquid helium temperatures. All but one specimen showed the presence of antiferromagnetic inclusions. Closely spaced temperature measurements of the magnetic susceptibility below 77 K on five of the specimens showed antiferromagnetic temperature transitions (Ne??el transitions). With the exception of ilmenite in one specimen, these transitions did not correspond to any transitions in known antiferromagnetic compounds. ?? 1974.

Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Briggs, C.; Alexander, C.

1974-01-01

358

DEVELOPMENT OF CRYSTAL-TOLERANT WASTE GLASSES  

SciTech Connect

The loading of high-level waste in borosilicate glasses is limited by crystallinity constraints that cannot prevent crystal accumulation on the melter bottom and in the glass discharge riser of the melter. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is studying variations in composition that are designed to constrain high-level waste glass compositions and develop the crystal-tolerant high-level waste glasses. These glasses will allow high waste loading without decreasing the lifetime of the melter by keeping the small spinel crystals suspended in the molten glass. Adding ~1 wt% of NiO to the baseline glass caused large spinel crystals to form up to 210 µm in size and resulted in the highest accumulation rate, ~ 227 mm/year, of all tested glasses. Noble metals that were added to high-Ni glass prevented large spinel crystals from forming and decreased the accumulation rate ~ 8.5 times. Adding ~5 wt% of Fe2O3 to the baseline glass resulted in a high number density of ~10-?m spinel crystals that remained suspended in the glass melt even after 17 days at 850°C. The accumulation rate of spinel crystals in high-chromia crucibles was only slightly higher compared with the accumulation rate in double crucibles. Only baseline glass exhibited about 2.6 times faster accumulation rate because of increased number of bigger crystals. These crystals were the result of glass enrichment with chromium that was leached out from the walls of high-chromia crucibles.

Matyas, Josef; Vienna, John D.; Kimura, Akihiko; Schaible, Micah J.; Tate, Rachel M.

2010-10-26

359

Theories of glass formation and the glass transition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This key-issues review is a plea for a new focus on simpler and more realistic models of glass-forming fluids. It seems to me that we have too often been led astray by sophisticated mathematical models that beautifully capture some of the most intriguing features of glassy behavior, but are too unrealistic to provide bases for predictive theories. As illustrations of what I mean, the first part of this article is devoted to brief summaries of imaginative, sensible, but disparate and often contradictory ideas for solving glass problems. Almost all of these ideas remain alive today, with their own enthusiastic advocates. I then describe numerical simulations, mostly by H Tanaka and coworkers, in which it appears that very simple, polydisperse systems of hard disks and spheres develop long range, Ising-like, bond-orientational order as they approach glass transitions. Finally, I summarize my recent proposal that topologically ordered clusters of particles, in disordered environments, tend to become aligned with each other as if they were two-state systems, and thus produce the observed Ising-like behavior. Neither Tanaka's results nor my proposed interpretation of them fit comfortably within any of the currently popular glass theories.

Langer, J. S.

2014-04-01

360

Vitrification of High-Level Alumina Nuclear Waste.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Borosilicate and borophosphate glass compositions have been developed to vitrify simulated high-alumina calcined nuclear defense waste. The effects of the alkali (Li sub 2 O,Na sub 2 O) to borate ratio and the Li sub 2 O to Na sub 2 O ratio on the glass m...

J. R. Brotzman

1980-01-01

361

Preparation and characterization of special glasses for sealing and other applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glasses find wide applications, among others, in process technologies, vacuum science and technology etc. because of their desired thermo-mechanical properties and chemical durability. In particular, hermetic glass-to-metal (GM) seals are required mainly as electrical feed through for various types of gas based and electron devices, chemical process industries, including for packaging of power devices. The physico-chemical properties of glasses play important role in forming hermetic sealing with metals/alloys. The properties like thermal expansion coefficient, glass transition temperature, micro hardness, chemical durability etc. can be tailored by varying the glass composition by adding multi alkali and alkaline earth metal oxides to the base glass and varying the process parameters. We have prepared different types of glasses for the fabrication of different types of hermetic seals. Some of these are i) Lead silicate (LS) glass having SiO2, Na2O, K2O, BaO and PbO for compression type GM seals with SS304/Inconel and AISI 446 alloy ii) Borosilicate (BS) glass containing SiO2.Na2O.K20. Al2O3.B2O3 for matched type GM seals with Mo/ Kovar alloy and for uptake of synthetic dyes like Rhodamine 6G, Methylene Blue, Uranyl ions in process industries and nuclear industry iii) Sodium alumino phosphate (NAP) glass with P2O5-Na2O-B2O3-BaO- PbO for matched type GM seals with low melting metals (Al,Cu)/alloys like Cu-Be.

Shrikhande, V. K.

2009-07-01

362

Encapsulation of TRISO particle fuel in durable soda-lime-silicate glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tri-Structural Isotropic (TRISO) coated particle-fuel is a key component in designs for future high temperature nuclear reactors. This study investigated the suitability of three soda lime silicate glass compositions, for the encapsulation of simulant TRISO particle fuel. A cold press and sinter (CPS) methodology was employed to produce TRISO particle-glass composites. Composites produced were determined to have an aqueous durability, fracture toughness and Vickers' hardness comparable to glasses currently employed for the disposal of high level nuclear wastes. Sintering at 700 °C for 30 min was found to remove all interconnected porosity from the composite bodies and oxidation of the outer pyrolytic carbon layer during sintering was prevented by processing under a 5% H2/N2 atmosphere. However, the outer pyrolytic carbon layer was not effectively wetted by the encapsulating glass matrix. The aqueous durability of the TRISO particle-glass composites was investigated using PCT and MCC-1 tests combined with geochemical modelling. It was found that durability was dependent on silicate and calcium solution saturation. This study provides significant advancements in the preparation of TRISO particle encapsulant waste forms. The potential for the use of non-borosilicate sintered glass composites for TRISO particle encapsulation has been confirmed, although further refinements are required.

Heath, Paul G.; Corkhill, Claire L.; Stennett, Martin C.; Hand, Russell J.; Meyer, Willem C. H. M.; Hyatt, Neil C.

2013-05-01

363

Structure glass technology : systems and applications  

E-print Network

Glass cannot compete with steel in terms of strength or durability, but it is the only structural material that offers the highly sought after qualities of translucency and transparency. The use of glass has evolved from ...

Leitch, Katherine K. (Katherine Kristen)

2005-01-01

364

The Conservation of Seventeenth Century Archaeological Glass  

E-print Network

is the only chance for the objects survival. Though glass is considered one of the most stable archaeological materials, noninvasive, reversible treatments are not always possible given the level of deterioration glass objects undergo within the archaeological...

Arcak, Cory

2010-10-12

365

High modulus high temperature glass fibers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The search for a new high-modulus, high-temperature glass fiber involved the preparation of 500 glass compositions lying in 12 glass fields. These systems consisted primarily of low atomic number oxides and rare-earth oxides. Direct optical measurements of the kinetics of crystallization of the cordierite-rare earth system, for example, showed that the addition of rare-earth oxides decreased the rate of formation of cordierite crystals. Glass samples prepared from these systems proved that the rare-earth oxides made large specific contributions to the Young's modulus of the glasses. The best glasses have moduli greater than 21 million psi, the best glass fibers have moduli greater than 18 million psi, and the best glass fiber-epoxy resin composites have tensile strengths of 298,000 psi, compressive strengths of at least 220,000 psi, flexural strengths of 290,000 psi, and short-beam shear strengths of almost 17,000 psi.

Bacon, J. F.

1973-01-01

366

Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T "phase diagram" for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are related, both being associated with the limit of kinetic stability of LDA (HDA).

Chiu, Janet; Starr, Francis W.; Giovambattista, Nicolas

2014-03-01

367

Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water.  

PubMed

Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T "phase diagram" for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are related, both being associated with the limit of kinetic stability of LDA (HDA). PMID:24655190

Chiu, Janet; Starr, Francis W; Giovambattista, Nicolas

2014-03-21

368

Effects of radionuclide decay on waste glass behavior: A critical review  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an extension of a chapter in an earlier report [1] that provides an updated review on the status of radiation damage problems in nuclear waste glasses. This report will focus on radiation effects on vitrified borosilicate nuclear waste glasses under conditions expected in the proposed Yucca mountain repository. Radiation effects on high-level waste glasses and their surrounding repository environment are important considerations for radionuclide immobilization because of the potential to alter the glass stability and thereby influence the radionuclide retentive properties of this waste form. The influence of radionuclide decay on vitrified nuclear waste may be manifested by several changes, including volume, stored energy, structure, microstructure, mechanical properties, and phase separation. Radiation may also affect the composition of aqueous fluids and atmospheric gases in relatively close proximity to the waste form. What is important to the radionuclide retentive properties of the repository is how these radiation effects collectively or individually influence the durability and radionuclide release from the glass in the event of liquid water contact.

Wronkiewicz, D.J.

1993-12-01

369

Corrosion of glass-bonded sodalite as a function of pH and temperature.  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports the results of corrosion tests with monoliths of sodalite, binder glass, and glass-bonded sodalite, a ceramic waste form (CWF) that is being developed to immobilize radioactive electrorefiner salt used to condition spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel. These tests were performed with dilute pH-buffered solutions in the pH range of 5-10 at temperatures of 70 and 90 C. The pH dependence of the forward dissolution rates of the CWF and its components have been determined. The pH dependence of the dissolution rates of sodalite, binder glass, and glass-bonded sodalite are similar to the pH dependence of dissolution rate of borosilicate nuclear waste glasses, with a negative pH dependence in the acidic region and a positive pH dependence in the basic region. Our results on the forward dissolution rates and their temperature and pH dependence will be used as components of a waste form degradation model to predict the long-term behavior of the CWF in a nuclear waste repository.

Morss, L. R.; Stanley, M.; Tatko, C.; Ebert, W. L.

1999-11-29

370

Yttrium-silicon-aluminum oxynitride glass fibers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on fibers made from Y-Si-Al-O-N glasses previously shown to have excellent mechanical properties and outstanding water corrosion resistance. Fibers of glasses containing, respectively, 3.2 and 6.6 wt% N were pulled free-hand in air and from glass rods in Nâ. Continuous fibers (up to several kilometers long) of the former glass were melt-drawn in Nâ while being wound

Donald R. Messier; Robert P. Gleisner; Ronald E. Rich

1989-01-01

371

Inhomogeneous deformation in metallic glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study provides a theoretical framework for the inhomogeneous deformation in metallic glasses. The free volume concentration is adopted as the order parameter, which is a function of position and time. The three processes that can change the local free volume concentration are diffusion, annihilation, and stress-driven creation. The rate functions for free volume generation and plastic flow depend

R. Huang; Z. Suo; J. H. Prevost; W. D. Nix

2002-01-01

372

The Glass Transition in Basalt  

Microsoft Academic Search

The glass transition has been experimentally detected in basalt as (1) an increase in the aggregate !inear thermal expansion coefficient al:, (2) an abrupt change in the temperature dependence of Young's modulus dE\\/dT, and (3) a change in stress relaxation behavior that effectively separates the T > T G and T < TG creep regimes. Transition temperatures determined by the

Michael P. Ryan; Charles G. Sammis

1981-01-01

373

Scaling stiffness of spin glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of a scaling stiffness for frustrated systems is introduced. Physical arguments supported by numerical calculations on a 3d Heisenberg spin glass suggest that its apparent lower critical dimensionality is time dependent, being equal to three on short time scales and bigger than three at sufficiently long times.

J. R. Banavar; M. Cieplak

1983-01-01

374

Glass Transition and the Coulomb Gap in Electron Glasses M. Muller and L. B. Ioffe  

E-print Network

Glass Transition and the Coulomb Gap in Electron Glasses M. Mu¨ller and L. B. Ioffe Department December 2004) We establish the connection between the presence of a glass phase and the appearance correlations in a systematic way, we show that in the case of strong disorder a continuous glass transition

Müller, Markus

375

Disconnected Glass-Glass Transitions and Diffusion Anomalies in a Model with Two Repulsive Length Scales  

E-print Network

Disconnected Glass-Glass Transitions and Diffusion Anomalies in a Model with Two Repulsive Length-coupling-theory calculations, we report a novel scenario for multiple glass tran- sitions in a purely repulsive spherical potential: the square shoulder. The liquid-glass transition lines exhibit both melting by cooling

Zaccarelli, Emanuela

376

Draining our Glass: An Energy and Heat Characterization of Google Glass  

E-print Network

Draining our Glass: An Energy and Heat Characterization of Google Glass Robert LiKamWa, Zhen Wang The Google Glass is a mobile device designed to be worn as eyeglasses. This form factor enables new use cases resources on a hands-free display. Recent interest has drawn to Google's spectacle- shaped device, Glass

Zhong, Lin

377

Dependence on pressure of the glass transition temperature for a prototypical glass forming liquid  

E-print Network

Dependence on pressure of the glass transition temperature for a prototypical glass forming liquid transition in the prototypic glass-former glycerol over the temperature range from 193 K, its atmospheric-pressure value, to 320 K, the glass transition temperature at 52.5 kbar. These very high pressures were obtained

Wysin, Gary

378

Investigations of structure and transport in lithium and silver borophosphate glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glasses in the system xLi 2O·(1- x)[0.5B 2O 3·0.5P 2O 5] and xAg 2O·(1- x)[0.5B 2O 3·0.5P 2O 5] have been prepared from melt quenching method. Glasses have been characterized for their densities, molar volumes, glass transition temperatures and heat capacities. Structural studies have been done using infrared and high resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR MAS NMR) of 31P, 11B and 7Li nuclei. Boron is present only in tetrahedral coordination except in Li 2O-rich glasses. Transport properties have been investigated over a wide range of frequency and temperature. Silver containing glasses are found to possess higher conductivities and lower barriers than lithium containing glasses. A structural model has been proposed in which pure B 2O 3-P 2O 5 compositions are assumed to be constituted of BPO 4 units and modification occurs selectively on the phosphate moiety. Tetrahedral boron units are thus expected to be retained in the glass structure.

Kumar, Sundeep; Vinatier, Philippe; Levasseur, Alain; Rao, K. J.

2004-04-01

379

A thin float glass MRPC for the outer region of CBM-TOF wall  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) made out of thin float glass is proposed for the outer region of the time of flight (TOF) system for the Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment at FAIR. Usually MRPCs are assembled with ordinary glass plates of 0.5 mm or more thickness, but their rate capability is less than the CBM requirement (1.5 kHz/cm2). There are two ways to improve the rate capability. The first way is to reduce the bulk resistivity of the glass plates. The second is to reduce the thickness of the glass plates. Tsinghua University has made significant progress in the development of low resistive glass and high rate MRPCs. In this paper we report on three MRPCs produced with float glass plates of 0.7 mm, 0.5 mm and 0.35 mm thickness. Tests with cosmic rays and X-rays were performed at Tsinghua University. The results show that thin float glass MRPCs work well and have the rate capability necessary to meet the demands of the CBM-TOF outer region. Further studies were performed using a continuous 1 GeV deuterium beam at the Nuclotron accelerator at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR). Time resolution of about 70 ps and efficiency higher than 90% were obtained for flux densities up to 3 kHz/cm2, exceeding the requirement for the CBM-TOF outer region.

Weiping, Zhu; Yi, Wang; Shengqin, Feng; Jingbo, Wang; Xinjie, Huang; Li, Shi; Babkin, V.; Golovatyuk, V.; Rumiantrev, M.; Eppley, G.; Nussbaum, T.

2014-01-01

380

Results of drip tests on sludge-based and actinide-doped glasses  

SciTech Connect

The reaction of three differs simulated nuclear waste glasses is being evaluated using a test method that slowly drips water onto a glass/metal assembly. The tests have been in progress for up to eight years and are being performed with as-cast and glass aged by reaction with water vapor. Results are presented for the cumulative release of Np, Pu, and Am as a function of time; also reported are the particulate species that have been detected suspended in solution. A significant difference is noted in the suspended species depending on the glass composition, and on whether the glass is aged. With as-cast glass, the radioactivity is associated with the suspended particles, while with the aged glass, the solution has a high initial anion content, and the transuranic elements appear to be dissolved in solution, since they pass through filters with small pore sizes. Examples are given of possible tests to evaluate the interaction between these test solutions and potential engineered barrier components.

Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.

1994-04-01

381

Effects of S/V on secondary phase formation on waste glasses  

SciTech Connect

Simulated West Valley high-level nuclear waste glass, WV205, was leached with and without buffered media in both deuterated and ordinary water at glass surface area to solution volumes (S/N) of 200--6000 m{sup {minus}1}. Examination of the glass surface after testing for 14 days indicated that the S/V-induced pH change plays a dominant role in the development of the altered surface layer and the secondary phases formed. The changes due to SN-induced pH determine the rate of surface layer formation, the element distribution in the surface layer, and possibly, the identities of the secondary phases. Changes due to SN-induced elemental concentration also influence glass reaction rate in terms of the layer thickness and the elemental distribution in the surface layers.

Feng, X.; Buck, E.C.; Bates, J.K.; Gong, M.; Dietz, N.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Pegg, I.L. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.

1994-05-01

382

Corrosion behavior of a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form and its constituents.  

SciTech Connect

A ceramic waste form (CWF) of glass bonded sodalite is being developed as a waste form for the long-term immobilization of fission products and transuranic elements from the U.S. Department of Energy's activities on spent nuclear fuel conditioning. A durable waste form was prepared by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) a mixture of salt-loaded zeolite powders and glass frit. During HIP the zeolite is converted to sodalite, and the resultant CWF is been completed for durations of up to 182 days. Four dissolution modes were identified: dissolution of free salt, dissolution of the aluminosilicate matrix of sodalite and the accompanying dissolution of occluded salt, dissolution of the boroaluminosilicate matrix of the glass, and ion exchange. Synergies inherent to the CWF were identified by comparing the results of the tests with pure glass and sodalite with those of the composite CWF.

Lewis, M. A.; Ebert, W. L.; Morss, L.

1999-06-18

383

Reduction of Eu3+ in aluminoborosilicate glasses  

E-print Network

.16.Fh, 61.72.Hh, 61.80.Fe keywords : borosilicate glasses, rare-earth reduction, irradiation1 Reduction of Eu3+ to Eu2+ in aluminoborosilicate glasses under ionizing radiation E. Malchukova, France Abstract Eu2O3-doped aluminoborosilicate glasses were prepared by melting in air at high

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

384

Method for milling and drilling glass  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A process for machining glass by placing a rotating carbide working surface under minimum pressure against an area of glass to be worked is described. Concurrently the region between the working surface and the area of glass is wet with a lubricant consisting essentially of a petroleum carrier, a complex mixture of esters and a complex mixture of naturally occurring aromatic oils.

Rice, S. H. (inventor)

1980-01-01

385

High-Temperature Viscosity of Commercial Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Arrhenius models were developed for glass viscosity within the processing temperature of six types of commercial glasses: low-expansion-borosilicate glasses, E glasses, fiberglass wool glasses, TV panel glasses, container glasses, and float glasses. Both local models (for each of the six glass types) and a global model (for the composition region of commercial glasses, i.e., the six glass types taken together) are presented. The models are based on viscosity data previously obtained with rotating spindle viscometers within the temperature range between 900 C and 1550 C; the viscosity varied from 1 Pa?s to 750 Pa?s. First-order models were applied to relate Arrhenius coefficients to the mass fractions of 15 components: SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, PbO, ZnO, Li2O, Na2O, K2O. The R2 is 0.98 for the global model and ranges from .097 to 0.99 for the six local models. The models are recommended for glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 to estimate viscosities or temperatures at a constant viscosity for melts within both the temperature range from 1100 C to 1550 C and viscosity range from 5 to 400 Pa?s.

Hrma, Pavel R.

2006-08-31

386

Diffusion in metallic glasses and supercooled melts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Amorphous metallic alloys, also called metallic glasses, are of considerable technological importance. The metastability of these systems, which gives rise to various rearrangement processes at elevated temperatures, calls for an understanding of their diffusional behavior. From the fundamental point of view, these metallic glasses are the paradigm of dense random packing. Since the recent discovery of bulk metallic glasses it

Franz Faupel; Werner Frank; Michael-Peter Macht; Helmut Mehrer; Volkmar Naundorf; Klaus Rätzke; Herbert R. Schober; Suman K. Sharma; Helmar Teichler

2003-01-01

387

Jagged Edges of the Glass Ceiling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although many aspiring young women might believe the glass ceiling was shattered a decade ago, they still need to understand how that glass ceiling impacted an older generation of women in educational leadership. They also must be aware that some segments of the glass ceiling might still exist. This article provides a historical overview of the…

Robinson, Victoria L.

2004-01-01

388

Extruded tellurite glass optical fiber preforms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The extrusion behavior of tellurite glass in the supercooled liquid region was investigated. Good extrusion formability was observed under low strain rates at various temperatures in the glass transformation region investigated. Tube and holey fiber (HF) preforms were fabricated from tellurite glass billets using a laboratory press. In particular, the results for three-spoke HF design and round tube preforms with

Amit Belwalkar; Hongsheng Xiao; Wojciech Z. Misiolek; Jean Toulouse

2010-01-01

389

Insulating spacer for double insulated glass  

Microsoft Academic Search

An improved insulating spacer to reduce the heat transfer between the two panes of glass of double insulated glass comprises an extruded or roll-formed metal spacer together with plastic insulating elements which thermally isolate the metal spacer from the panes of glass while permitting conventional application of the sealant to provide reliable bonding. In one embodiment the plastic insulator comprises

1977-01-01

390

Nickel-iron spherules from aouelloul glass  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Nickel-iron spherules, ranging from less than 0.2 to 50 microns in diameter and containing 1.7 to 9.0 percent Ni by weight, occur in glass associated with the Aouelloul crater. They occur in discrete bands of siliceous glass enriched in dissolved iron. Their discovery is significant tangible evidence that both crater and glass originated from terrestrial impact.

Chao, E. C. T.; Dwornik, E. J.; Merrill, C. W.

1966-01-01

391

On spin glass fluctuations C. de Dominicis  

E-print Network

the spin glass transition from the realm ofnature and rejecting it to zero temperature while shifting spinL-205 On spin glass fluctuations C. de Dominicis Service de Physique Théorique, CEN Saclay, 91191 function Q03B103B2p Q03B103B2-p> for the short range spin glass, around Parisi mean field solution

Boyer, Edmond

392

Glass transition temperature and topological constraints of sodium borophosphate glass-forming liquids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sodium borophosphate glasses exhibit intriguing mixed network former effect, with the nonlinear compositional dependence of their glass transition temperature as one of the most typical examples. In this paper, we establish the widely applicable topological constraint model of sodium borophosphate mixed network former glasses to explain the relationship between the internal structure and nonlinear changes of glass transition temperature. The application of glass topology network was discussed in detail in terms of the unified methodology for the quantitative distribution of each coordinated boron and phosphorus units and glass transition temperature dependence of atomic constraints. An accurate prediction of composition scaling of the glass transition temperature was obtained based on topological constraint model.

Jiang, Qi; Zeng, Huidan; Liu, Zhao; Ren, Jing; Chen, Guorong; Wang, Zhaofeng; Sun, Luyi; Zhao, Donghui

2013-09-01

393

Development of cesium containing glass for gamma irradiator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cesium137 is considered an alternative candidate for the gamma source to be used in irradiators in place of CO60 because it is a long-lived gamma emitter and is a by-product of nuclear fission. Large quantities of Cs137 have been present in stored fission product high level waste and much larger quantities are potentially available from the operation of nuclear power reaction. Cs is isolated from the high level waste by Cs specific sorbant and converted in to glassy form to have safe use of highly radiotoxic isotope for irradiators in public domain. Several glass compositions containing Cs (Cs137-simulation) in the ternary system of Cesium Iron Phosphate (Cs2O-Fe2O3-P2O5), Cesium Borosilicate (Cs2O-B2O3-SiO2) and quaternary system of Cesium Sodium Borosilicate (Cs2O-Na2O-B2O3-SiO2), Cesium Lithium Borosilicate (Cs2O-Li2O-B2O3-SiO2) with minor additives like Al, Zn with varying concentration of Cs2O were prepared. Basic characteristics like fusion temperature, pouring temperature, homogeneity of the melt and its durability at room temperature in air (Hygroscopic nature) were noted for screening probable candidate glass formulation. The selected glass formulation was further characterized for its thermal properties like volatility loss at melting temperature, glass transition temperature and linear expansion coefficient by thermal analyzer and homogeneity by SEM/EDX and XRD.

Shah, J. G.; Wattal, P. K.

2009-07-01

394

The properties of glass resistive plate chambers made of different glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glass resistive plate chambers (GRPCs) have been proposed as the basic element for the JUNO top tracker detector. With good uniform performance and low cost, GRPCs are well suited for large area experiments. Glass RPCs used in underground experiments require specially designed cassette and gas flow systems, since the glass is fragile and easily corroded by acid generated by water entering the gas-filled chamber. High-strength and chemical-resistant glasses have been proposed for underground experiments. We present here the test results of four GRPC chambers made of different glasses: normal thin glass, two high-strength glasses, and a chemical-resistant glass. The chemical-resistant and high-strength glasses have good surface quality, but their volume resistivities are higher. Higher resistivities lead to a higher required voltage to reach plateau operation, meaning that these glasses can only work in a very low rate experiment.

Han, R.; Shi, Z.; Laktineh, I.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, J.; Qian, S.; Ning, Z.

2014-09-01

395

Tellurite glass as a waste form for a simulated mixed chloride waste stream: Candidate materials selection and initial testing  

SciTech Connect

Tellurite glasses have been researched widely for the last 60 years since they were first introduced by Stanworth. These glasses have been primarily used in research applications as glass host materials for lasers and as non-linear optical materials, though many other uses exist in the literature. Tellurite glasses have long since been used as hosts for various, and even sometimes mixed, halogens (i.e., multiple chlorides or even chlorides and iodides). Thus, it was reasonable to expect that these types of glasses could be used as a waste form to immobilize a combination of mixed chlorides present in the electrochemical separations process involved with fuel separations and processing from nuclear reactors. Many of the properties related to waste forms (e.g., chemical durability, maximum chloride loading) for these materials are unknown and thus, in this study, several different types of tellurite glasses were made and their properties studied to determine if such a candidate waste form could be fabricated with these glasses. One of the formulations studied was a lead tellurite glass, which had a low sodium release and is on-par with high-level waste silicate glass waste forms.

Riley, Brian J.; Rieck, Bennett T.; McCloy, John S.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Vienna, John D.

2012-02-02

396

Design of Energy-Friendly Glass Fibers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Incumbent fiberglass compositions rely on decades of commercial experience. From a compositional point of view, many of these melts require more energy than needed in their production, or emit toxic effluents into the environment. This chapter reviews the design of energy- and/or environmentally friendly E-glass, HT-glass, ECR-glass, A-glass, and C-glass compositions, which have lower viscosities or fiber-forming temperatures and therefore require less energy in a commercial furnace than the respective incumbent compositions and/or do not contain ingredients which are of environmental concern.

Wallenberger, Frederick T.

397

Dynamics of Glass Relaxation at Room Temperature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (?=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses.

Welch, Roger C.; Smith, John R.; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F.; Kiczenski, T. J.; Allan, Douglas C.; King, Ellyn A.; Ellison, Adam J.; Mauro, John C.

2013-06-01

398

Dynamics of glass relaxation at room temperature.  

PubMed

The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (?=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses. PMID:23848901

Welch, Roger C; Smith, John R; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F; Kiczenski, T J; Allan, Douglas C; King, Ellyn A; Ellison, Adam J; Mauro, John C

2013-06-28

399

Extraction of Proteins Glass Bead Method For preparation of protein extracts, the glass bead method is preferred. Some researchers  

E-print Network

Extraction of Proteins ­ Glass Bead Method For preparation of protein extracts, the glass bead. glass beads (106 micron glass bead, Sigma cat. No. G4649) 7. Tabletop centrifuge 8. Vortex 9 µl glass beads (106 micron glass beads, Sigma, cat. G4649). 8. Vortex at top speed for 5 minutes. 9

400

glass chemistry: structure-property relationships  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pyrex® glass was one of the first commercial boroaluminosilicate glass compositions, selected in 1915 from thousands of compositions due to its ability to sustain mechanical and thermal shock. While the microscopic structure of Pyrex® glass has recently been investigated, the microscopic origins of its macroscopic properties are not well understood, i.e., the atomic scale foundation of the original empirical invention of Pyrex® glass has yet to be established. In this work, we have tackled this problem by investigating the effects of varying Si/Al and Na/B ratios on the boron and aluminum speciation and a range of physical and rheological properties in the Pyrex® glass family. We show that the canonical Pyrex® boroaluminosilicate composition is indeed optimal for attaining relatively high values of glass transition temperature and elastic moduli and a low coefficient of thermal expansion, while simultaneously maintaining a high glass-forming ability.

Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Youngman, Randall E.; Mauro, John C.

2014-08-01

401

Glass-ceramic fiber optic sensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical fibers with layers of glass-ceramics are considered and tested with respect to their use in different environments as single- and multimode lightguides. Glass-ceramic optical fibers are tested that have different material compositions, cross-section topologies, and coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs). Stress-induced optical phase-temperature effects can be studied with glass ceramics that have CTEs of around zero, and the glass ceramic sensors are compared to nontreated fibers to study the dependencies of the fibers' parameters on induced stress and temperature. The application of glass-ceramics with various values of linear CTE to the fibers is studied to scale the characteristics of a glass-ceramic fiber-optic thermometer for several temperature ranges. The sensor can be stabilized when the pure stress-temperature effect is isolated. These glass-ceramic optical fibers are shown to provide unique characteristics for the use of fiber-optic measuring devices in certain measurement environments.

Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Stepien, Ryszard

1991-03-01

402

Characterization of Savannah River Plant waste glass  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the glass characterization programs at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is to ensure that glass containing Savannah River Plant high-level waste can be permanently stored in a federal repository, in an environmentally acceptable manner. To accomplish this objective, SRL is carrying out several experimental programs, including: fundamental studies of the reactions between waste glass and water, particularly repository groundwater; experiments in which candidate repository environments are simulated as accurately as possible; burial tests of simulated waste glass in candidate repository geologies; large-scale tests of glass durability; and determination of the effects of process conditions on glass quality. In this paper, the strategy and current status of each of these programs is discussed. The results indicate that waste packages containing SRP waste glass will satisfy emerging regulatory criteria.

Plodinec, M J

1985-01-01

403

Physical aging in a hyperquenched glass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report experimental data on the enthalpy relaxation of a hyperquenched silicate glass subjected to long-time aging (annealing) below the glass-transition temperature (Tg). The relaxation of a hyperquenched glass substantially differs from that of a normally cooled glass. Two mechanisms govern the relaxation of a hyperquenched glass. During relaxation of the first hyperquenched, and afterward aged glass, a relaxation endotherm occurs followed by an exotherm. This is reflected by the occurrence of crossover. By increasing the aging temperature and time, the endotherm becomes more pronounced, while the exotherm gradually disappears. The consequence of this is the shift of the crossover point to higher temperature. The relaxation of the hyperquenched glass at 0.66Tg with the aging time is highly nonexponential.

Yue, Y. Z.; Jensen, S. L.; deC. Christiansen, J.

2002-10-01

404

Nonlinear femtosecond near infrared laser structuring in oxide glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three-dimensional femtosecond laser structuring has a growing interest because of its ease of implementation and the numerous possible applications in the domain of photonic components. Structures such as waveguides, diffraction gratings, optical memories or photonic crystals can be fabricated thanks to this technique. Its use with oxide glasses is promising because of several advantages; they are resistant to flux and ageing, their chemical composition can easily be changed to fit the well-defined requirements of an application. They can already be found in Raman amplifiers, optical fibers, fiber lasers, and other devices. This thesis is based on two axes. The first axis consists in characterizing the linear and nonlinear optical properties of bulk vitreous materials in order to optimize their composition with a particular application in view. Within this context, the nonlinear optical properties, their physical origins (electronic and nuclear) as well as their characteristic response times (from a few femtoseconds to a few hundreds of picoseconds) are described within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Fused silica and several sodium-borophosphate glasses containing different concentrations in niobium oxide have been studied. Results show that the nonlinear optical properties of fused silica are mainly from electronic origin, whereas in the sodium-borophosphate glasses, the contribution from nuclear origin becomes predominant when the concentration of niobium oxide exceeds 30%. The second axis is based on the structuring of materials. Three commercially available fused silica samples presenting different fabrication conditions (therefore distinct impurity levels) and irradiated with a near infrared femtosecond laser have been studied. The laser induced defects have been identified by means of several spectroscopic techniques. They show the formation of color centers as well as a densification inside the irradiated area. Their linear refractive index and nonlinear third-order susceptibility properties have been measured. Moreover, the structuring of fused silica at the subwavelength scale into "nanogratings" is observed and the form of birefringence induced by these structures is discussed. In addition to the fused silica samples, several oxide glasses presenting very distinct chemical compositions have been studied. A sodium-borophosphate glass containing niobium oxide exhibits micro-cracks and nano-crystallites following irradiation. A silicate glass with or without a silver component reveals fluorescent rings or "nanograting" structures. A zinc phosphate glass containing silver also presents fluorescent ring structures, with a size of the order of 80 nm, well below the diffraction limit. Pump-probe microscope techniques have been performed on this glass to investigate the laser-glass interaction. The absorption mechanism is determined to be four-photon absorption. The generated free electron density is ˜ 1017 cm-3, which suggests the conclusion that an electron gas rather than a plasma is formed during the laser irradiation.

Royon, Arnaud

405

Development of a glass GEM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gas electron multipliers (GEMs) apply the concept of gas amplification inside many tiny holes, realizing robust and high-gain proportional counters. However, the polyimide substrate of GEMs prevents them from being used in sealed detector applications. We have fabricated and tested glass GEMs (G-GEMs) with substrates made of photosensitive glass material from the Hoya Corporation. We fabricated G-GEMs with several different hole diameters and thicknesses and successfully operated test G-GEMs with a 100×100 mm2 effective area. The uniformity of our G-GEMs was good, and the energy resolution for 5.9 keV X-rays was 18.8% under uniform irradiation of the entire effective area. A gas gain by the G-GEMs of up to 6700 was confirmed with a gas mixture of Ar (70%)+CH4 (30%). X-ray imaging using the charge division readout method was demonstrated.

Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Mitsuya, Yuki; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Fushie, Takashi

2013-10-01

406

Integrated optics sensors on glass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Integrated optics has been extensively used from the beginning for telecommunication applications. Depending on the functions to implement, different technologies have been employed. Among all of them, glass ion exchange is the cheapest, since both substrate and technological requirement are not expensive. Ion exchange technology has some advantages that can be very important for sensors applications. After a brief presentation of the different possible ion exchange, we will present some integrated optics sensors realized on glass that have been made in the past few years. We will give details about the particularity required for every applications. Then, we will give some informations about biological applications and we will conclude with some limitations of this technology.

Benech, Pierre; Schanen, Isabelle; Minier, Vincent

2005-03-01

407

Magnetic antenna using metallic glass  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A lightweight search-coil antenna or sensor assembly for detecting magnetic fields and including a multi-turn electromagnetic induction coil wound on a spool type coil form through which is inserted an elongated coil loading member comprised of metallic glass material wrapped around a dielectric rod. The dielectric rod consists of a plastic or a wooden dowel having a length which is relatively larger than its thickness so as to provide a large length-to-diameter ratio. A tri-axial configuration includes a housing in which is located three substantially identical mutually orthogonal electromagnetic induction coil assemblies of the type described above wherein each of the assemblies include an electromagnetic coil wound on a dielectric spool with an elongated metallic glass coil loading member projecting therethrough.

Desch, Michael D. (Inventor); Farrell, William M. (Inventor); Houser, Jeffrey G. (Inventor)

1996-01-01

408

"S" Glass Manufacturing Technology Transfer  

SciTech Connect

A glass-ceramic-to metal sealing technology patented by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA) was developed by MRC-Mound for use in the manufacture of weapon components. Successful implementation attracted increasingly widespread weapon use of this technology. "S-glass" manufacturing technology was transferred to commercial vendors to ensure that weapons production schedules would be met in the coming years. Such transfer also provided sources of this fledgling technology for the Department of Defense (DOD), aerospace and other commercial uses. The steps involved in the technology transfer are described, from the initial cooperative development work of Sandia and Mound scientists and technologists to the final phase of qualifying commercial vendors for component manufacture.

Buckner, Dean, A.; McCollister, Howard, L.

1988-06-01

409

Glass mountain geothermal exploration project  

SciTech Connect

Although often perceived as time-consuming, complex, and difficult, the environmental review process for proposed geothermal exploration projects in California can be completed in a timely, straight-forward, and cost-efficient fashion. All that is required is a well-defined project and thorough understanding of the pertinent environmental issues at the beginning of the process, close coordination with the lead agencies throughout the process, and preparation of a thorough environmental document that adequately addresses all issues. An example of this type of success is the Environmental Assessment/Initial Study for the Glass Mountain Geothermal Exploration Project. For this project, California Energy General Corporation (as Unit Operator) has proposed to implement a Plan of Operation for exploratory geothermal drilling near Glass Mountain in northeastern California. Utilizing the steps outlined above, the environmental review process for the project was completed in less than 11 months, even though multiple agencies were involved in the process.

Adams, H.; McClenahan, L. [MHA Environmental Consulting, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); McClain, D. [CE General Corporation, Portland, OR (United States)

1995-12-31

410

Bare Bones of Bioactive Glass  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Paul Ducheyne, a principal investigator in the microgravity materials science program and head of the University of Pernsylvania's Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering, is leading the trio as they use simulated microgravity to determine the optimal characteristics of tiny glass particles for growing bone tissue. The result could make possible a much broader range of synthetic bone-grafting applications. Bioactive glass particles (left) with a microporous surface (right) are widely accepted as a synthetic material for periodontal procedures. Using the particles to grow three-dimensional tissue cultures may one day result in developing an improved, more rugged bone tissue that may be used to correct skeletal disorders and bone defects. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research.

2000-01-01

411

Induced charge signal of a glass RPC detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A gas detector glass resistivity plate chamber (GRPC) is proposed for use in the hadron calorimeter (HCAL). The read-out system is based on a semi-digital system and, therefore, the charge information from GRPC is needed. To better understand the charge that comes out from the GRPC, we started from a cosmic ray test to get the charge distribution. We then studied the induced charge distribution on the collection pad. After successfully comparing it with the prototype beam test data at CERN (European Council for Nuclear Research), the process was finally implanted into the Geant4 based simulation for future study.

Han, Ran

2014-04-01

412

Probing the glass transition from structural and vibrational properties of zero-temperature glasses  

E-print Network

We find that the density dependence of the glass transition temperature of Lennard-Jones (LJ) and Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) systems can be predicted from properties of the zero-temperature ($T=0$) glasses. Below a crossover density $\\rho_s$, LJ and WCA glasses show different structures, leading to different vibrational properties and consequently making LJ glasses more stable with higher glass transition temperatures than WCA ones. Above $\\rho_s$, structural and vibrational quantities of the $T=0$ glasses show scaling collapse. From scaling relations and dimensional analysis, we predict a density scaling of the glass transition temperature, in excellent agreement with simulation results. We also propose an empirical expression of the glass transition temperature using structural and vibrational properties of the $T=0$ glasses, which works well over a wide range of densities.

Lijin Wang; Ning Xu

2014-02-10

413

Probing the glass transition from structural and vibrational properties of zero-temperature glasses.  

PubMed

We find that the density dependence of the glass transition temperature of Lennard-Jones (LJ) and Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) systems can be predicted from properties of the zero-temperature (T=0) glasses. Below a crossover density ?s, LJ and WCA glasses show different structures, leading to different vibrational properties and consequently making LJ glasses more stable with higher glass transition temperatures than WCA ones. Above ?s, structural and vibrational quantities of the T=0 glasses show scaling collapse. From scaling relations and dimensional analysis, we predict a density scaling of the glass transition temperature, in excellent agreement with simulation results. We also propose an empirical expression of the glass transition temperature using structural and vibrational properties of the T=0 glasses, which works well over a wide range of densities. PMID:24580613

Wang, Lijin; Xu, Ning

2014-02-01

414

Probing the Glass Transition from Structural and Vibrational Properties of Zero-Temperature Glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We find that the density dependence of the glass transition temperature of Lennard-Jones (LJ) and Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) systems can be predicted from properties of the zero-temperature (T=0) glasses. Below a crossover density ?s, LJ and WCA glasses show different structures, leading to different vibrational properties and consequently making LJ glasses more stable with higher glass transition temperatures than WCA ones. Above ?s, structural and vibrational quantities of the T =0 glasses show scaling collapse. From scaling relations and dimensional analysis, we predict a density scaling of the glass transition temperature, in excellent agreement with simulation results. We also propose an empirical expression of the glass transition temperature using structural and vibrational properties of the T=0 glasses, which works well over a wide range of densities.

Wang, Lijin; Xu, Ning

2014-02-01

415

Liquid glass electrodes for nanofluidics.  

PubMed

Nanofluidic devices make use of molecular-level forces and phenomena to increase their density, speed and accuracy. However, fabrication is challenging, because dissimilar materials need to be integrated in three dimensions with nanoscale precision. Here, we report a three-dimensional nanoscale liquid glass electrode made from monolithic substrates without conductive materials by femtosecond-laser nanomachining. The electrode consists of a nanochannel terminating at a nanoscale glass tip that becomes a conductor in the presence of high electric fields through dielectric breakdown, and returns to being an insulator when this field is removed. This reversibility relies on control of nanoampere breakdown currents and extremely fast heat dissipation at nanoscale volumes. We use the nanoscale liquid glass electrode to fabricate a nano-injector that includes an electrokinetic pump, 4 microm across with 0.6 microm channels, which is capable of producing well-controlled flow rates below 1 fl s(-1). The electrode can be integrated easily into other nanodevices and fluidic systems, including actuators and sensors. PMID:20473300

Lee, Sanghyun; An, Ran; Hunt, Alan J

2010-06-01

416

Gauge glass in two dimensions  

E-print Network

The gauge glass model offers an interesting example of a randomly frustrated system with a continuous O(2) symmetry. In two dimensions, the existence of a glass phase at low temperatures has long been disputed among numerical studies. To resolve this controversy, we examine the behavior of vortices whose movement generates phase slips that destroy phase rigidity at large distances. Detailed analytical and numerical studies of the corresponding Coulomb gas problem in a random potential establish that the ground state, with a finite density of vortices, is polarizable with a scale-dependent dielectric susceptibility. Screening by vortex/antivortex pairs of arbitrarily large size is present to eliminate the logarithmic divergence of the Coulomb energy of a single vortex. The observed power-law decay of the Coulomb interaction between vortices with distance in the ground state leads to a power-law divergence of the glass correlation length with temperature $T$. It is argued that free vortices possess a bound excitation energy and a nonzero diffusion constant at any $T>0$.

Lei-Han Tang

2009-12-16

417

Mozart, dice, and glass selection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a perfect world a good starting point should not be required. A Genetic Algorithm in powerful lens design software should find an optimum solution for us. As a practical matter a good starting point does matter. Time and resources may not be sufficient to generate a good design in a global optimizer quickly. In lens design a small glass catalog combined with the Hammer algorithm in ZEMAX moves the glass selection process in a search around the glass map forcing the design to consider many radically different forms in a short amount of time. From this starting point an expanded search can be undertaken by conventional design methods or in a global search algorithm. There are precedents in other fields for a narrow search method that still yields near infinite numbers of solutions. Mozart invented a game that narrows a search from a blank sheet paper and a set of notes to a single voice minuet by rolling dice. The results can be played and the dynamics manipulated to form the starting points for future compositions. Music composition software has, like lens design software, incorporated many powerful algorithms and search techniques. A simple comparison will be made. It is a long way from a protoplasm to Christie Brinkley. A good starting point means a lot whether you are an optical designer, a composer, or running the universe.

Tesar, John C.

2000-10-01

418

PREFACE: International Seminar on Science and Technology of Glass Materials (ISSTGM-2009)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The progress of the human race is linked with the development of new materials and also the values they acquired in the course of time. Though the art of glass forming has been known from Egyptian civilization, the understanding and use of these glasses for technological applications only became possible once the structural aspects were revealed by the inspiring theories proposed by William H Zachariasen. Glass and glass ceramics have become the essential materials for modern technology. The applications of these materials are wide and cover areas such as optical communication, laser host, innovative architecture, bio-medical, automobile and space technology. As we master the technology, we must also learn to use it judiciously and for the overall development of all in this global village. The International Seminar on Science and Technology of Glass Materials (ISSTGM-2009) is organized to bring together scientists, academia and industry in order to discuss various aspects of the technology and to inspire young scholars to take up fruitful research. Various topics such as glass formation and glass-ceramics, glass structure, applications of glass and glass ceramics in nuclear waste management, radiation dosimetry, electronics and information technology, biotechnological applications, bulk metallic glasses, glasses containing nano-particles, hybrid glasses, novel glasses and applications in photonics, Non-linear optics and energy generation were discussed. In this volume, 59 research articles covering 18 invited talks, 10 oral presentations and 31 poster presentations are included. We hope these will serve as a valuable resource to all the scientists and scholars working with glass materials. Acharya Nagarjuna University, established in 1976, is named after the great Buddhist preceptor and philosopher, Acharya Nagarjuna, who founded a university on the banks of river Krishna some centuries ago. The University is situated between Vijayawada and Guntur, the famous commercial and academic centers of Andhra Pradesh, India. The Departments of Physics of Acharya Nagarjuna University and the Nuzvid Campus have existed since the inception of the University. For the past decade and a half, these Departments have been actively involved in research on glass materials. More than 200 research articles have been published by staff members of these departments exclusively on glass materials. A number of Major Research Projects are being carried out by the staff members of these Departments. The organizing committee is indebted to all the scientists and scholars for their active participation in the seminar and their contribution to this proceedings. The committee expresses its gratitude to the authorities of Acharya Nagarjuna University (The Vice-Chancellor, The Rector and The Registrar), Department of Atomic Energy, Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences, Department of Science and Technology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Defence Research and Development Organization and AP State Council of Science and Technology for their financial support. The committee thanks the IOP: Conference Series publisher for publishing this proceedings which added value to the seminar. Professor N Veeraiah Convener and Editor-in-Chief Professor D Krishna Rao Co-Convener

Veeraiah, N.

2009-07-01

419

THERMAL ANALYSIS OF WASTE GLASS MELTER FEEDS  

SciTech Connect

Melter feeds for high-level nuclear waste (HLW) typically contain a large number of constituents that evolve gas on heating, Multiple gas-evolving reactions are both successive and simultaneous, and include the release of chemically bonded water, reactions of nitrates with organics, and reactions of molten salts with solid silica. Consequently, when a sample of a HLW feed is subjected to thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), the rate of change of the sample mass reveals multiple overlapping peaks. In this study, a melter feed, formulated for a simulated high-alumina HLW to be vitrified in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, currently under construction at the Hanford Site in Washington State, USA, was subjected to TGA. In addition, a modified melter feed was prepared as an all-nitrate version of the baseline feed to test the effect of sucrose addition on the gas-evolving reactions. Activation energies for major reactions were determined using the Kissinger method. The ultimate aim of TGA studies is to obtain a kinetic model of the gas-evolving reactions for use in mathematical modeling of the cold cap as an element of the overall model of the waste-glass melter. In this study, we focused on computing the kinetic parameters of individual reactions without identifying their actual chemistry, The rough provisional model presented is based on the first-order kinetics.

KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; POKORNY R; PIERCE DA

2011-10-21

420

Spectroscopic study of biologically active glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is known that the chemical activity phenomenon is characteristic for some inorganic glasses and they are able to participate in biological processes of living organisms (plants, animals and human bodies). An example here is the selective removal of silicate-phosphate glass components under the influence of biological solutions, which has been applied in designing glasses acting as ecological fertilizers of controlled release rate of the nutrients for plants. The structure of model silicate-phosphate glasses containing the different amounts of the glass network formers, i.e. Ca 2+ and Mg 2+, as a binding components were studied. These elements besides other are indispensable of the normal growth of plants. In order to establish the function and position occupied by the particular components in the glass structure, the glasses were examined by FTIR spectroscopy (with spectra decomposition) and XRD methods. It has been found that the increasing amount of MgO in the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses causes the formation of domains the structure of which changes systematically from a structure of the cristobalite type to a structure corresponding to forsterite type. Whilst the increasing content of CaO in the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses causes the formation of domains the structure of which changes from a structure typical for cristobalite through one similar to the structure of calcium orthophosphate, to a structure corresponding to calcium silicates. The changing character of domains structure is the reason of different chemical activity of glasses.

Szumera, M.; Wac?awska, I.; Mozgawa, W.; Sitarz, M.

2005-06-01

421

Glass etching to bridge micro- and nanofluidics.  

PubMed

In this study, a simple and economical fabrication technique bridging micro- and nanostructures is proposed. Glass molds with micro-nanostructures are fabricated by glass microlithography. The microlithography provides flexibility for structure design, and the glass etching contributes to transform the micro glass ridge to the nanoscale. Glass ridge structures with triangular cross sections are generated by undercutting, which coupled the isotropic character of glass and the shield effect of the top Cr layer upon HF etching. Further etching induced the height of the glass ridges to shrink from micro- to nanometres due to the edge effects. At the late etching stage, the geometrical change of the glass greatly slows down, which gives better control over the size of the glass ridge. By glass structure mold-copy, well repeatable, mechanically stable and tunable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channels and cones are fabricated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser interferometry (LI) are carried out to characterize the micro-nanostructures. To demonstrate their workability, sample preconcentration to a single nanochannel level is carried out. PMID:22068964

Xu, Bi-Yi; Yan, Xiao-Na; Zhang, Jia-Dong; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

2012-01-21

422

Method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet  

DOEpatents

A method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet including the steps of heating at least one glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, forming the glass sheet to a predetermined configuration, and cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature to temper the glass sheet.

Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI); Sitzman, Gary W. (Walled Lake, MI)

1998-01-01

423

Method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet  

DOEpatents

A method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet is disclosed including the steps of heating at least one glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, forming the glass sheet to a predetermined configuration, and cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature to temper the glass sheet. 2 figs.

Boaz, P.T.; Sitzman, G.W.

1998-10-27

424

The atomic structure of niobium and tantalum containing borophosphate glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A complete structural study has been carried out on sodium borophosphate glass containing increasing amounts of either niobium or tantalum. A combination of high energy x-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, nuclear magnetic resonance, and infrared and Raman spectroscopy has been used to discern the local atomic structure of each component and the changes with M content, where M is either niobium or tantalum. The glasses are found to consist of tetrahedral borate and phosphate with octahedral MO6. As expected, B and P play the roles of tetrahedral network formers. At low M content there are isolated MO6 units with \\mathrm {P{\\cdots }M} and \\mathrm {B{\\cdots }M} linkages that contribute to the glass network. As the M content increases, the number of \\mathrm {M{\\cdots }M} links increases, and at the highest M content each MO6 unit is connected to several others. The octahedra become significantly distorted as the niobium content increases, an effect that is not seen for tantalum.

Wetherall, K. M.; Doughty, P.; Mountjoy, G.; Bettinelli, M.; Speghini, A.; Casula, M. F.; Cesare-Marincola, F.; Locci, E.; Newport, R. J.

2009-09-01

425

The atomic structure of niobium and tantalum containing borophosphate glasses.  

PubMed

A complete structural study has been carried out on sodium borophosphate glass containing increasing amounts of either niobium or tantalum. A combination of high energy x-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, nuclear magnetic resonance, and infrared and Raman spectroscopy has been used to discern the local atomic structure of each component and the changes with M content, where M is either niobium or tantalum. The glasses are found to consist of tetrahedral borate and phosphate with octahedral MO(6). As expected, B and P play the roles of tetrahedral network formers. At low M content there are isolated MO(6) units with [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] linkages that contribute to the glass network. As the M content increases, the number of [Formula: see text] links increases, and at the highest M content each MO(6) unit is connected to several others. The octahedra become significantly distorted as the niobium content increases, an effect that is not seen for tantalum. PMID:21832337

Wetherall, K M; Doughty, P; Mountjoy, G; Bettinelli, M; Speghini, A; Casula, M F; Cesare-Marincola, F; Locci, E; Newport, R J

2009-09-16

426

A review of glass-ionomers: From conventional glass-ionomer to bioactive glass-ionomer  

PubMed Central

Materials used in the body, especially the materials used in various oral cavity regions should be stable and passive without any interactions with the body tissues or fluids. Dental amalgam, composite resins and dental cements are the materials of choice with such properties. The first attempts to produce active materials, which could interact with the human body tissues and fluids were prompted by the concept that fluoride-releasing materials exert useful effects in the body. The concept of using the “smart” materials in dentistry has attracted a lot of attention in recent years. Conventional glass-ionomer (GI) cements have a large number of applications in dentistry. They are biocompatible with the dental pulp to some extent. GI is predominantly used as cements in dentistry; however, they have some disadvantages, the most important of which is lack of adequate strength and toughness. In an attempt to improve the mechanical properties of the conventional GI, resin-modified glass-ionomers have been marketed, with hydrophilic monomers, such as hydroxyethyl methacrylated (HEMA). Some recent studies have evaluated GI with bioactive glass in its structure to validate the claims that such a combination will improve tooth bioactivity, regeneration capacity and restoration. There is ever-increasing interest in the application of bioactive materials in the dental field in an attempt to remineralize affected dentin. The aim of this review article is to evaluate these materials and their characteristics and applications. PMID:24130573

Khoroushi, Maryam; Keshani, Fateme

2013-01-01

427

Ancient Glass: A Literature Search and its Role in Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

When developing a performance assessment model for the long-term disposal of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass, it is desirable to determine the durability of glass forms over very long periods of time. However, testing is limited to short time spans, so experiments are performed under conditions that accelerate the key geochemical processes that control weathering. Verification that models currently being used can reliably calculate the long term behavior ILAW glass is a key component of the overall PA strategy. Therefore, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC to evaluate alternative strategies that can be used for PA source term model validation. One viable alternative strategy is the use of independent experimental data from archaeological studies of ancient or natural glass contained in the literature. These results represent a potential independent experiment that date back to approximately 3600 years ago or 1600 before the current era (bce) in the case of ancient glass and 106 years or older in the case of natural glass. The results of this literature review suggest that additional experimental data may be needed before the result from archaeological studies can be used as a tool for model validation of glass weathering and more specifically disposal facility performance. This is largely because none of the existing data set contains all of the information required to conduct PA source term calculations. For example, in many cases the sediments surrounding the glass was not collected and analyzed; therefore having the data required to compare computer simulations of concentration flux is not possible. This type of information is important to understanding the element release profile from the glass to the surrounding environment and provides a metric that can be used to calibrate source term models. Although useful, the available literature sources do not contain the required information needed to simulate the long-term performance of nuclear waste glasses in a near-surface or deep geologic repositories. The information that will be required include 1) experimental measurements to quantify the model parameters, 2) detailed analyses of altered glass samples, and 3) detailed analyses of the sediment surrounding the ancient glass samples.

Strachan, Denis M.; Pierce, Eric M.