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Sample records for rabbit draize test

  1. A summary report of the COLIPA international validation study on alternatives to the draize rabbit eye irritation test.

    PubMed

    Brantom, P G; Bruner, L H; Chamberlain, M; De Silva, O; Dupuis, J; Earl, L K; Lovell, D P; Pape, W J; Uttley, M; Bagley, D M; Baker, F W; Bracher, M; Courtellemont, P; Declercq, L; Freeman, S; Steiling, W; Walker, A P; Carr, G J; Dami, N; Thomas, G; Harbell, J; Jones, P A; Pfannenbecker, U; Southee, J A; Tcheng, M; Argembeaux, H; Castelli, D; Clothier, R; Esdaile, D J; Itigaki, H; Jung, K; Kasai, Y; Kojima, H; Kristen, U; Larnicol, M; Lewis, R W; Marenus, K; Moreno, O; Peterson, A; Rasmussen, E S; Robles, C; Stern, M

    1997-01-01

    The principal goal of this study was to determine whether the results from a set of selected currently available alternative methods as used by cosmetics companies are valid for predicting the eye irritation potential of cosmetics formulations and ingredients and, as a consequence, could be valid replacements for the Draize eye irritation test. For the first time in a validation study, prediction models (PMs) that convert the in vitro data from an assay to a prediction of eye irritation were developed for each alternative method before the study began. The PM is an unequivocal description of the relationship between the in vitro and the in vivo data and allows an objective assessment of the reliability and relevance of the alternative methods. In this study, 10 alternative methods were evaluated using 55 test substances selected as representative of substances commonly used in the cosmetics industry (23 ingredients and 32 formulations). Twenty of the single ingredients were common to the European Commission/British Home Office (EC/HO) eye irritation validation study (Balls et al., 1995b). The test substances were coded and supplied to the participating laboratories. The results were collected centrally and analysed independently, using statistical methods that had been agreed before the testing phase began. Each alternative method was then evaluated for reliability and relevance in assessing eye irritation potential. Using the criteria of both reliability and relevance as defined in the study, the preliminary results indicate that none of the alternative methods evaluated could be confirmed as a valid replacement for the Draize eye irritation test across the full irritation scale. However, three alternative methods-the fluorescein leakage test, the red blood cell assay (classification model) and the tissue equivalent assay-each satisfied one criterion of reliability or relevance. Further investigation of the decoded data from this study to explore more fully the

  2. Bioconvective Assay As Alternative To Draize Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Matsos, Helen C.

    1993-01-01

    Protocol to determine toxicities of chemicals implemented relatively cheaply by use of equipment and materials packaged in convenient kit form. Tests involve observation of macroscopic patterns formed at high concentrations of free-swimming protozoan species Tetrahymena pyriformis in liquid media. Provides more-sensitive indication of toxicity and costs less. Given that there are no data on toxicities of 70 to 80 percent of commercial chemicals, high cost of, and current opposition to, testing on higher animals, new protocol helps meet pressing need.

  3. Analysis of Draize eye irritation testing and its prediction by mining publicly available 2008-2014 REACH data.

    PubMed

    Luechtefeld, Thomas; Maertens, Alexandra; Russo, Daniel P; Rovida, Costanza; Zhu, Hao; Hartung, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Public data from ECHA online dossiers on 9,801 substances encompassing 326,749 experimental key studies and additional information on classification and labeling were made computable. Eye irritation hazard, for which the rabbit Draize eye test still represents the reference method, was analyzed. Dossiers contained 9,782 Draize eye studies on 3,420 unique substances, indicating frequent retesting of substances. This allowed assessment of the test's reproducibility test based on all substances tested more than once. There was a 10% chance of a non-irritant evaluation given after a prior severe-irritant result as given by UN GHS classification criteria. The most reproducible outcomes were the results negative (94% reproducible) and severe eye irritant (73% reproducible). To evaluate whether other GHS categorizations predict eye irritation we built a dataset of 5,629 substances (1,931 'irritant' and 3,698 'non-irritant'). The two best decision trees with up to three other GHS classifications resulted in balanced accuracies of 68% and 73%, i.e., in the rank order of the Draize rabbit eye test itself, but both use inhalation toxicity data ("May cause respiratory irritation"), which is not typically available. Next, a dataset of 929 substances with at least one Draize study was mapped to PubChem to compute chemical similarity using 2D conformational fingerprints and Tanimoto similarity. Using a minimum similarity of 0.7 and simple classification by the closest chemical neighbor resulted in balanced accuracy from 73% over 737 substances to 100% at a threshold of 0.975 over 41 substances. This represents a strong support of read-across and (Q)SAR approaches in this area. PMID:26863293

  4. Retrospective analysis of the Draize test for serious eye damage/eye irritation: importance of understanding the in vivo endpoints under UN GHS/EU CLP for the development and evaluation of in vitro test methods.

    PubMed

    Adriaens, Els; Barroso, João; Eskes, Chantra; Hoffmann, Sebastian; McNamee, Pauline; Alépée, Nathalie; Bessou-Touya, Sandrine; De Smedt, Ann; De Wever, Bart; Pfannenbecker, Uwe; Tailhardat, Magalie; Zuang, Valérie

    2014-03-01

    For more than two decades, scientists have been trying to replace the regulatory in vivo Draize eye test by in vitro methods, but so far only partial replacement has been achieved. In order to better understand the reasons for this, historical in vivo rabbit data were analysed in detail and resampled with the purpose of (1) revealing which of the in vivo endpoints are most important in driving United Nations Globally Harmonized System/European Union Regulation on Classification, Labelling and Packaging (UN GHS/EU CLP) classification for serious eye damage/eye irritation and (2) evaluating the method's within-test variability for proposing acceptable and justifiable target values of sensitivity and specificity for alternative methods and their combinations in testing strategies. Among the Cat 1 chemicals evaluated, 36-65 % (depending on the database) were classified based only on persistence of effects, with the remaining being classified mostly based on severe corneal effects. Iritis was found to rarely drive the classification (<4 % of both Cat 1 and Cat 2 chemicals). The two most important endpoints driving Cat 2 classification are conjunctiva redness (75-81 %) and corneal opacity (54-75 %). The resampling analyses demonstrated an overall probability of at least 11 % that chemicals classified as Cat 1 by the Draize eye test could be equally identified as Cat 2 and of about 12 % for Cat 2 chemicals to be equally identified as No Cat. On the other hand, the over-classification error for No Cat and Cat 2 was negligible (<1 %), which strongly suggests a high over-predictive power of the Draize eye test. Moreover, our analyses of the classification drivers suggest a critical revision of the UN GHS/EU CLP decision criteria for the classification of chemicals based on Draize eye test data, in particular Cat 1 based only on persistence of conjunctiva effects or corneal opacity scores of 4. In order to successfully replace the regulatory in vivo Draize eye test, it will

  5. The CTFA Evaluation of Alternatives Program: an evaluation of in vitro alternatives to the Draize primary eye irritation test. (Phase II) oil/water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Gettings, S D; Dipasquale, L C; Bagley, D M; Casterton, P L; Chudkowski, M; Curren, R D; Demetrulias, J L; Feder, P I; Galli, C L; Gay, R

    1994-10-01

    The Cosmetic, Toiletry and Fragrance Association (CTFA) Evaluation of Alternatives Program is an evaluation of the relationship between Draize ocular safety test data and comparable data from a selection of in vitro tests. In Phase II, 18 representative oil/water-based personal-care formulations were subjected to the Draize primary eye safety test and 30 in vitro assay protocols (14 different types of in vitro endpoints were evaluated; the remainder were protocol variations). Correlation of in vitro with in vivo data was evaluated using analysis of sensitivity/specificity and statistical analysis of the relationship between maximum average Draize score (MAS) and in vitro endpoint. Regression modelling is the primary approach adopted in the CTFA Program for evaluating in vitro assay performance. The objective of regression analysis is to predict MAS for a given test material (and to place upper and lower prediction interval bounds on the range in which the MAS is anticipated to fall with high probability) conditional on observing an in vitro assay score for that material. The degree of confidence in prediction is quantified in terms of the relative widths of prediction intervals constructed about the fitted regression curves: the narrower the prediction interval, the more predictive of the Draize score is the in vitro test result. 16 assays were shown to have the greatest agreement with the Draize procedure and were therefore selected for regression analysis. Based on the magnitude of the 95% prediction bounds of each of the 16 selected assays over the range of test data, it may be inferred that prediction of MAS values from experimentally determined in vitro scores is more accurate for oil/water-based formulations with lower rather than higher irritancy potential. The assays selected for modelling in Phase II generally exhibited weaker relationships with MAS than those selected in Phase I (evaluated using hydroalcoholic formulations), even though several assays

  6. Reconstituted human corneal epithelium: a new alternative to the Draize eye test for the assessment of the eye irritation potential of chemicals and cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Doucet, O; Lanvin, M; Thillou, C; Linossier, C; Pupat, C; Merlin, B; Zastrow, L

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the interest of a new three-dimensional epithelial model cultivated from human corneal cells to replace animal testing in the assessment of eye tolerance. To this end, 65 formulated cosmetic products and 36 chemicals were tested by means of this in vitro model using a simplified toxicokinetic approach. The chemicals were selected from the ECETOC data bank and the EC/HO International validation study list. Very satisfactory results were obtained in terms of concordance with the Draize test data for the formulated cosmetic products. Moreover, the response of the corneal model appeared predictive of human ocular response clinically observed by ophthalmologists. The in vitro scores for the chemicals tested strongly correlated with their respective scores in vivo. For all the compounds tested, the response of the corneal model to irritants was similar regardless of their chemical structure, suggesting a good robustness of the prediction model proposed. We concluded that this new three-dimensional epithelial model, developed from human corneal cells, could be promising for the prediction of eye irritation induced by chemicals and complex formulated products, and that these two types of materials should be tested using a similar protocol. A simple shortening of the exposure period was required for the chemicals assumed to be more aggressively irritant to the epithelial tissues than the cosmetic formulae. PMID:16243479

  7. Computerized In Vitro Test for Chemical Toxicity Based on Tetrahymena Swimming Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Matsos, Helen C.; Cronise, Raymond J.; Looger, Loren L.; Relwani, Rachna A.; Johnson, Jacqueline U.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and a method for rapidly determining chemical toxicity have been evaluated as an alternative to the rabbit eye initancy test (Draize). The toxicity monitor includes an automated scoring of how motile biological cells (Tetrahymena pyriformis) slow down or otherwise change their swimming patterns in a hostile chemical environment. The method, called the motility assay (MA), is tested for 30 s to determine the chemical toxicity in 20 aqueous samples containing trace organics and salts. With equal or better detection limits, results compare favorably to in vivo animal tests of eye irritancy.

  8. A rabbit ear model for cold stress testing.

    PubMed

    Smith, T L; Gordon, S; Holden, M B; Smith, B P; Russell, G B; Koman, L A

    1994-01-01

    A rabbit ear model resembling the human digit was studied to determine the vascular response of the rabbit ear to a cold stress. Following moderate cooling (10 minutes at 5 degrees - 8 degrees C), auricular blood flow and cutaneous perfusion were reduced. This decrease was reversed by 30 minutes of warming. The response in the rabbit ear to cold stress is similar to that of normal human digits. The similarities between the control of the circulation in human digits and rabbit ears may result from the similarities in digital and auricular vascular receptors and receptor subtypes. Verification of the rabbit model provides an experimental method for obtaining important data regarding digital pathophysiology and the treatment of cold intolerance. Further study with this model will provide clinically relevant information regarding the pathophysiology of digital thermoregulatory abnormalities. PMID:7830538

  9. Vehicle test report: South Coast technology electric conversion of a Volkswagen Rabbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, T. W.; Shain, T. W.; Bryant, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The South Coast Technology Volkswagen Rabbit, was tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) dynamometer facility and at JPL's Edwards Test Station (ETS). The tests were performed to characterize certain parameters of the South Coast Rabbit and to provide baseline data that will be used for the comparison of near term batteries that are to be incorporated into the vehicle. The vehicle tests were concentrated on the electrical drive system; i.e., the batteries, controller, and motor. The tests included coastdowns to characterize the road load, maximum effort acceleration, and range evaluation for both cyclic and constant speed conditions. A qualitative evaluation of the vehicle was made by comparing its constant speed range performance with those vehicles described in the document 'state of the Art assessment of Electric and Hybrid Vehicles'. The Rabbit performance was near to the best of the 1977 vehicles.

  10. Characterization of new eye drops with choline salicylate and assessment of their irritancy by in vitro short time exposure tests

    PubMed Central

    Wroblewska, Katarzyna; Kucinska, Małgorzata; Murias, Marek; Lulek, Janina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to examine the irritation potential of new eye drops containing 2% choline salicylate (CS) as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and various polymers increasing eye drop viscosity (hydroxyethylcellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, methylcellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinylpyrrolidone). The standard method for assessing the potential of irritating substances has been the Draize rabbit eye test. However the European Centre for Validation of Alternative Methods and the Coordinating Committee for Validation of Alternative Methods recommend, short time exposure (STE) in vitro tests as an alternative method for assessing eye irritation. The eye irritation potential was determined using cytotoxicity test methods for rabbit corneal cell line (SIRC) after 5 min exposure. The viability of cells was determined using two cytotoxicity assays: MTT and Neutral Red Uptake. According to the irritation rankings for the short time exposure test, all tested eye drops are classified as non-irritating (cell viability >70%). PMID:27134543

  11. Characterization of new eye drops with choline salicylate and assessment of their irritancy by in vitro short time exposure tests.

    PubMed

    Wroblewska, Katarzyna; Kucinska, Małgorzata; Murias, Marek; Lulek, Janina

    2015-09-01

    The aim of our study was to examine the irritation potential of new eye drops containing 2% choline salicylate (CS) as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and various polymers increasing eye drop viscosity (hydroxyethylcellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, methylcellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinylpyrrolidone). The standard method for assessing the potential of irritating substances has been the Draize rabbit eye test. However the European Centre for Validation of Alternative Methods and the Coordinating Committee for Validation of Alternative Methods recommend, short time exposure (STE) in vitro tests as an alternative method for assessing eye irritation. The eye irritation potential was determined using cytotoxicity test methods for rabbit corneal cell line (SIRC) after 5 min exposure. The viability of cells was determined using two cytotoxicity assays: MTT and Neutral Red Uptake. According to the irritation rankings for the short time exposure test, all tested eye drops are classified as non-irritating (cell viability >70%). PMID:27134543

  12. Chitosan coated PLA nanoparticles for ophthalmic delivery: characterization, in-vitro and in-vivo study in rabbit eye.

    PubMed

    Nagarwal, Ramesh C; Singh, P N; Kant, S; Maiti, P; Pandit, J K

    2010-12-01

    The objective of the present study is to develop a poly (D, L-lactic acid) (PLA) nano-carrier for topical ocular applications. PLA nanoparticles (PLA-NPs) with 5-fluorouracil were prepared using varying concentration and molecular weight of PLA to regulate the particle size. The dimension and shape of nanoparticles were verified by using dynamic light scattering (DLS), atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Ex-vivo permeation study was conducted by goat and rabbit excised cornea. In-vivo experiment was conducted in rabbit eye and 5-FU concentration was measured in aqueous and vitreous humor by HPLC. In-vitro experiments indicated a diffusion controlled release of 5-FU. No significant interaction was observed in between mucin and PLA NPs that measured in terms of viscosity change. Ex-vivo permeation was significantly higher with rabbit cornea as compared to goat cornea. PLA and CH-PLA DNPs showed increased level of 5-FU as comparison to 5-FU solution. In-vivo study showed significantly higher concentration in case of uncoated and CH coated PLA nanoparticles in rabbit eye as compared to free 5-FU solution. PLA nanoparticle was found non-irritant in nature by modified Draize test. PMID:21361129

  13. Vehicle test report: South Coast Technology electric cconversion of a Volkswagen Rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Price, T.W.; Shain, T.W.; Bryant, J.A.

    1981-02-15

    The South Coast Technology Volkswagen Rabbit, an electric vehicle manufactured by South Coast Technology of Santa Barbara, California was tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) dynamometer facility in Pasadena and at JPL's Edwards Test Station (ETS) located near Lancaster, California. The tests were conducted between April and July, 1979. These tests were performed to characterize certain parameters of the South Coast Rabbit and to provide baseline data that will be used for the comparison of near-term batteries that are to be incorporated into the vehicle. The vehicle tests were concentrated on the electrical drive system; i.e., the batteries, controller, and motor. The tests included coastdowns to characterize the road load, maximum effort acceleration, and range evaluation for both cyclic constant speed conditions. A qualitative evaluation of the vehicle was made by comparing its constant speed range performance with those vehicles described in the document State of the Art assessment of Electric and Hybrid Vehicles. The Rabbit performance was near to the best of the 1977 vehicles.

  14. Limitations of the rabbit pyrogen test for assessing meningococcal OMV based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Vipond, Caroline; Findlay, Lucy; Feavers, Ian; Care, Rory

    2016-01-01

    The rabbit pyrogen test was developed in the early 1900's to detect contaminating pyrogens in parenteral medicines. Since its conception alternative methods with improved sensitivity, relevancy and which are ethically more acceptable have been developed. However, the test is a current Pharmacopeial method and is used to evaluate the pyrogen content of some vaccines. In this article the limitations and pitfalls of using the test to measure pyrogenicity of vaccines containing outer membrane vesicles are described. The method is unsuitable as a safety test for these products due to the high levels of endotoxin present in the vaccine which generate a pyrogenic response in rabbits when delivered intravenously without any dilution. Its use as a consistency test is also ambiguous as the test gives a qualitative rather than quantitative response and the rabbit models are highly variable. In addition there is evidence that measuring the temperature rise of the animals over three hours does not capture the maximum fever response. Finally the article considers the use of alternative methods and the validity of animal models when applying a consistency based approach for assessing the quality of licensed products. PMID:26626274

  15. Relative potencies of four reference endotoxin standards as measured by the Limulus amoebocyte lysate and USP rabbit pyrogen tests.

    PubMed Central

    Weary, M E; Donohue, G; Pearson, F C; Story, K

    1980-01-01

    Four commonly used reference endotoxin standards, Escherichia coli O113:H10:K0, E. coli O55:B5, Salmonella abortusequi, and Shigella dysenteriae were compared by the USP rabbit pyrogen and the Limulus amoebocyte lysate tests. By the rabbit pyrogen test, S. abortus equi was identified as the most potent endotoxin, followed closely by E. coli O113:H10:K0 and E. coli O55:B5. PMID:7006505

  16. Development and hemocompatibility testing of nitric oxide releasing polymers using a rabbit model of thrombogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Major, Terry C; Handa, Hitesh; Annich, Gail M; Bartlett, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Hemocompatibility is the goal for any biomaterial contained in extracorporeal life supporting (ECLS) medical devices. The hallmarks for hemocompatibility include nonthrombogenicity, platelet preservation and maintained platelet function. Both in vitro and in vivo assays testing for compatibility of the blood/biomaterial interface have been used over the last several decades to ascertain if the biomaterial used in medical tubing and devices will require systemic anticoagulation for viability. Over the last 50 years systemic anticoagulation with heparin has been the gold standard in maintaining effective ECLS. However, the biomaterial that maintains effective ECLS without the use of any systemic anticoagulant has remained elusive. In this review, the in vivo 4-h rabbit thrombogenicity model genesis will be described with emphasis on biomaterials that may require no systemic anticoagulation for ECLS longevity. These novel biomaterials may improve extracorporeal circulation (ECC) hemocompatibility by preserving near resting physiology of the major blood components, the platelets and monocytes. The rabbit ECC model provides a complete assessment of biomaterial interactions with the intrinsic coagulation players, the circulating platelet and monocytes. This total picture of blood/biomaterial interaction suggests that this rabbit thrombogenicity model could provide a standardization for biomaterial hemocompatibility testing. PMID:24934500

  17. The response of the rabbit subsynovial connective tissue to a stress-relaxation test.

    PubMed

    Morizaki, Yutaka; Vanhees, Matthias; Thoreson, Andrew R; Larson, Dirk; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2012-03-01

    The subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) in the carpal tunnel may play a role in the etiology of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), yet the material properties of the SSCT remain unclear. Thus, we investigated the mechanical response of the SSCT in a rabbit model. Twenty-four rabbit cadaver paws were used for mechanical testing; two paws were used for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging. After testing normal tendon excursion, the divided third digit flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon was pulled to displacements of 2, 3.5, 5, or 8 mm, maintained at that position until force decay, and then the process was repeated. Normal excursion of the FDS averaged 4.8 mm. The ratio of the second peak force to the first peak force in the 2 mm group was 0.98 (SD = 0.16), which was significantly higher than the other groups (3.5 mm: 0.74, 5 mm, 0.63, and 8 mm: 0.59; p < 0.05). SEM showed ruptured fibrils in the displaced specimen. The declining force ratio with displacements >2 mm suggests damage to the SSCT within the physiological tendon excursion. These data may be useful in understanding SSCT mechanics in CTS, which is associated with SSCT fibrosis. PMID:21898581

  18. Vehicle test report: South Coast Technology electric Volkswagen Rabbit with developmental low-power armature chopper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marte, J. E.; Bryant, J. A.; Livingston, R.

    1983-01-01

    Dynamometer performance of a South Coast Technology electric conversion of a Volkswagen (VW) Rabbit designated SCT-8 was tested. The SCT-8 vehicle was fitted with a transistorized chopper in the motor armature circuit to supplement the standard motor speed control via field weakening. The armature chopper allowed speed control below the motor base speed. This low speed control was intended to reduce energy loss at idle during stop-and-go traffic; to eliminate the need for using the clutch below base motor speed; and to improve the drivability. Test results indicate an improvement of about 3.5% in battery energy economy for the SAE J227a-D driving cycle and 6% for the C-cycle with only a minor reduction in acceleration performance. A further reduction of about 6% would be possible if provision were made for shutting down field power during the idle phases of the driving cycles. Drivability of the vehicle equipped with the armature chopper was significantly improved compared with the standard SCT Electric Rabbit.

  19. Effect of sperminated pullulans on drug permeation through isolated rabbit cornea and determination of ocular irritation.

    PubMed

    Yu, N; Xun, Y; Jin, D; Yang, H; Hang, T; Cui, H

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of two sperminated pullulans (SP) with a different number of amino groups (SP-L, amino group content 0.124 mmol/g polymer; and SP-H, amino group content 0.578 mmol/g polymer) on the permeation of drugs through isolated rabbit corneas. Determination of corneal hydration levels and Draize eye tests were performed to assess the safety of SP both in vitro and in vivo. For 0.2% (w/v) SP-L and 0.2% (w/v) SP-H, the enhancement ratios (ERs) with dexamethasone of 1.34 and 1.42, respectively, were not statistically significant. For ofloxacin, tobramycin and sodium fluorescein, the ERs with 0.2% SP-L were 1.37, 2.02 and 2.12, respectively, and with 0.2% SP-H the ERs were 1.84, 4.69 and 6.87, respectively; these ERs were all statistically significant. Enhancement increased with increasing amino group content of the SP. The improved transcorneal drug absorption via the paracellular route indicated opening of the tight junctions in the corneal epithelium. Irritation tests indicated that 0.2% SP-L and 0.2% SP-H did not damage the corneal tissues. PMID:20515566

  20. Chitosan coated sodium alginate-chitosan nanoparticles loaded with 5-FU for ocular delivery: in vitro characterization and in vivo study in rabbit eye.

    PubMed

    Nagarwal, Ramesh C; Kumar, Rakesh; Pandit, J K

    2012-11-20

    The objective of the study was to develop chitosan (CH) coated sodium alginate-chitosan (SA-CH) nanoparticles, i.e. CH-SA-CH NPs loaded with 5-FU for ophthalmic delivery. Drug loaded nanoparticles (DNPs) were prepared by ionic gelation technique using sodium alginate (SA) and chitosan (CH) and then suspended in chitosan solution. The mean size of nanoparticles and morphology were characterized by dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and zeta potential. The in vitro release was studied by dialysis membrane technique. The size and drug encapsulation efficiency were dependent on molar ratio of SA and CH. The size of SA-CH nanoparticles was significantly increased with changed morphology after CH coating. SA-CH nanoparticles did not show any interaction with mucin while an enhanced viscosity was observed on coating of nanoparticles with CH. CH-SA-CH DNPs presented a sustained release of 5-FU compared to the 5-FU solution with high burst effect. In vivo study in rabbit eye showed significantly greater level of 5-FU in aqueous humor compared to 5-FU solution. The enhanced mucoadhesiveness of CH-SA-CH DNPs results in higher bioavailability as compared to the uncoated nanoparticles. Optimized formulation was found non-irritant and tolerable when tested by modified Draize test in rabbit eye. PMID:22922098

  1. A method to test contractility of the supraspinatus muscle in mouse, rat, and rabbit.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Ana P; Iyer, Shama R; Pratt, Stephen J P; Gilotra, Mohit N; Lovering, Richard M

    2016-02-01

    The rotator cuff (RTC) muscles not only generate movement but also provide important shoulder joint stability. RTC tears, particularly in the supraspinatus muscle, are a common clinical problem. Despite some biological healing after RTC repair, persistent problems include poor functional outcomes with high retear rates after surgical repair. Animal models allow further exploration of the sequela of RTC injury such as fibrosis, inflammation, and fatty infiltration, but there are few options regarding contractility for mouse, rat, and rabbit. Histological findings can provide a "direct measure" of damage, but the most comprehensive measure of the overall health of the muscle is contractile force. However, information regarding normal supraspinatus size and contractile function is scarce. Animal models provide the means to compare muscle histology, imaging, and contractility within individual muscles in various models of injury and disease, but to date, most testing of animal contractile force has been limited primarily to hindlimb muscles. Here, we describe an in vivo method to assess contractility of the supraspinatus muscle and describe differences in methods and representative outcomes for mouse, rat, and rabbit. PMID:26586911

  2. Description and validation of isometric tetanic muscle force test in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Guilherme; Kremer, Thomas; Willems, Wouter F; Friedrich, Patricia F; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2012-01-01

    Isometric tetanic muscle force has been described in a rat model to evaluate motor recovery in a segmental sciatic nerve defect reconstructions. However, to test longer nerve defects, an alternative and larger animal model is necessary. The purpose of this study is to describe and validate a technique for isometric force measurement of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle in New Zealand rabbits. Muscle preload and electrical stimulation parameters were optimized to obtain the highest tetanic contraction bilaterally in 10 animals. Electrophysiology, muscle weight, peroneal nerve length, and histomorphometry were also analyzed. Only the peroneal nerve length and the ratio of highest muscle force/muscle weight demonstrated the equivalence between the sides. A small variability of TA muscle force and TA muscle weight was observed between the sides suggesting dominance. Optimization of electrical stimulation and preload as well as the use of correct anesthesia were fundamental to acquire the highest muscle force. PMID:22113792

  3. Rabbit models as tools for preclinical cardiac electrophysiological safety testing: Importance of repolarization reserve.

    PubMed

    Baczkó, István; Jost, Norbert; Virág, László; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Varró, András

    2016-07-01

    It is essential to more reliably assess the pro-arrhythmic liability of compounds in development. Current guidelines for pre-clinical and clinical testing of drug candidates advocate the use of healthy animals/tissues and healthy individuals and focus on the test compound's ability to block the hERG current and prolong cardiac ventricular repolarization. Also, pre-clinical safety tests utilize several species commonly used in cardiac electrophysiological studies. In this review, important species differences in cardiac ventricular repolarizing ion currents are considered, followed by the discussion on electrical remodeling associated with chronic cardiovascular diseases that leads to altered ion channel and transporter expression and densities in pathological settings. We argue that the choice of species strongly influences experimental outcome and extrapolation of results to human clinical settings. We suggest that based on cardiac cellular electrophysiology, the rabbit is a useful species for pharmacological pro-arrhythmic investigations. In addition to healthy animals and tissues, the use of animal models (e.g. those with impaired repolarization reserve) is suggested that more closely resemble subsets of patients exhibiting increased vulnerability towards the development of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. PMID:27208697

  4. Evaluation of Lacrimation Characteristics in Clinically Normal New Zealand White Rabbits by Using the Schirmer Tear Test I

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Alexandra L; Williams, David L

    2015-01-01

    Rabbits are a common animal model in eye research and in safety testing of novel chemical agents. In addition, ocular disease is a routine presentation in clinical practice. However, few studies have quantitatively examined lacrimation kinetics in this species. This study used a noninvasive method of tear measurement (the Schirmer tear test, STT) to quantify values for basal and reflex tearing and to determine the kinetic nature of tear production in 76 New Zealand white rabbits. We obtained a value of 7.58 ± 2.3 mm/min for the standard 1-min STT. Calculated values for mean residual tear volume and reflex tear flow were 1.95 µL and 0.035 µL/s, respectively. In addition, this study provides preliminary evidence for an interaction effect between eyes given that higher STT values were obtained from the second eye tested. PMID:26632789

  5. The effect of quince leaf (Cydonia oblonga miller) decoction on testes in hypercholesterolemic rabbits: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Hamideh; Ghabili, Kamyar; Alihemmati, Alireza; Jouyban, Abolghasem; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Aslanabadi, Saeid; Adl, Farzad Hami; Ghavimi, Hamed; Hajhosseini, Laleh

    2013-01-01

    Current medical literature lacks any evidence of the protective effects of quince leaf on testes. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the effect of quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) leaf decoction on testicular injury and impaired spermatogenesis induced by hypercholesterolemia in rabbits. Eleven mature New Zealand white male rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: group 1 (hypercholesterolemia, n=3), group 2 (hypercholesterolemia plus quince treatment, n=6), and group 3 (control, n=2). Groups 1 and 2 received a cholesterol-enriched diet for six weeks. Group 2 received C. oblonga leaf decoction as drinking supplement as well. After six weeks, a normal diet was substituted in groups 1 and 2 for another six weeks. Group 3 (control group) was maintained throughout the study on a regular diet. At the end of the 12(th) week, the left testes of the animals were resected for light microscopic study with particular attention to the maturity of germ cells in seminiferous tubules using Johnsen's score. Increase in intertubular connective tissue and diameter of vessels, abundant spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes along the reduced germinal epithelium were noted in all rabbits of the group 1. The remaining animals in groups 2 and 3 had no significant changes in their testicular sections. The mean Johnsen's score of group 1 (4.20 ± 1.92) was significantly lower than that of group 2 (7.33 ± 0.52) and group 3 (7.05 ± 0.07). (P=0.01). In conclusion, quince leaf decoction (C. oblonga Miller) protected rabbit testes and spermatogenesis from damage induced by hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24146451

  6. Modified toxin-binding inhibition (ToBI) test for epsilon antitoxin determination in serum of immunized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sobrinho, Eliane M; Cangussu, Alex S R; Brandi, Igor V; Sari, Roger S; Almeida, Anna C; Colen, Fernando; Quintilio, Wagner; Santos, Hercules O

    2010-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate and standardize the ToBI test in vitro as a substitute for the serum neutralization test in mice for quality control of clostridial vaccines. The ToBI test in vitro was used to evaluate 40 serum samples of known antibody content, obtained from rabbits immunized against clostridiosis with experimental vaccine. The correlation between epsilon antitoxin titers in rabbit sera, determined by the ToBI test and serum neutralization in mice, ranged from 0.222% to 0.452% in polyvalent vaccines and from 0.154% to 0.387% in monovalent vaccines. Interplate coefficients of variation were not significant, reaching 0.350% in polyvalent vaccines and 0.400% in monovalent vaccines, indicating high homogeneity. In conclusion, the ToBI test in vitro is suitable for assessing the potency of clostridial vaccines and may be used as an alternative method able to replace current in vivo tests. PMID:20709411

  7. Disposal rabbit

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, L.C.; Trammell, D.R.

    1983-10-12

    A disposable rabbit for transferring radioactive samples in a pneumatic transfer system comprises aerated plastic shaped in such a manner as to hold a radioactive sample and aerated such that dissolution of the rabbit in a solvent followed by evaporation of the solid yields solid waste material having a volume significantly smaller than the original volume of the rabbit.

  8. Disposable rabbit

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.; Trammell, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A disposable rabbit for transferring radioactive samples in a pneumatic transfer system comprises aerated plastic shaped in such a manner as to hold a radioactive sample and aerated such that dissolution of the rabbit in a solvent followed by evaporation of the solid yields solid waste material having a volume significantly smaller than the original volume of the rabbit.

  9. In vivo testing of porous Ti-25Nb alloy serving as a femoral stem prosthesis in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Xiaojun; Yang, Hailin; Xu, Jian; Li, Xiaosheng; Liao, Qiande; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the performance of Ti-25Nb alloys with various porosities as femoral stem prostheses in a rabbit model, thus providing basic experimental evidence for the development of porous prostheses. The porous Ti-25Nb alloy prostheses were designed according to the morphology of the medullary cavity. These prostheses were placed into the femoral medullary cavities in 36 New Zealand white rabbits. Postoperative X-ray films, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the implant interface, energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of the implant surface, pulling-out test and general observations were conducted. The specimens showed good biocompatibility; there was no obvious bone absorption in porous Ti-25Nb specimens with different porosities at different time points observed using X-ray films. Under SEM examination, calcium deposits were observed inside the pores and in the interface between bone and prostheses. The EDS analysis demonstrated that calcium deposits were present on the surface of the prostheses at the eight-week point postoperatively. The pulling-out test showed good bonding strength between bone and implant; after pulling out, the surface and inside the pores of the prostheses all presented bone mass. Porous Ti-25Nb alloy implants presents good biocompatibility as well as providing a biological fixation between the bone and implant. A porosity of 70% is more advantageous to the newborn bone ingrowth, combined with achieving a more solid bone-implant interface. PMID:27602063

  10. Synchrotron radiation microimaging in rabbit models of cancer for preclinical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Uesugi, Kentaro; Kobatake, Makito; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamashita, Takenori; Imai, Shigeki

    2009-10-01

    Preclinical laboratory animal imaging modalities such as microangiography and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) have been developed at the SPring-8 BL20B2 bending magnet beamline. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of microangiography systems for physiological examinations of live animals and micro-CT systems for postmortem morphological examinations. Synchrotron radiation microangiography and micro-CT with contrast agents present the main advantageous capability of depicting the anatomy of small blood vessels with tens of micrometers' diameter. This paper reports two imaging instrument types and their respective applications to preclinical imaging of tumor angiogenic blood vessels in tumor-bearing rabbits, where tumor angiogenesis is characterized morphologically by an increased number of blood vessels. A microangiography system with spatial resolution around 10 μm has been used for therapeutically evaluating angiogenic vessels in a rabbit model of cancer for evaluating embolization materials in transcatheter arterial embolization and for radiation therapy. After an iodine contrast agent was injected into an artery, in vivo imaging was carried out using a high-resolution real-time detector incorporating an X-ray direct-conversion-type SATICON pickup tube. On the other hand, a micro-CT system capably performed three-dimensional visualization of tumor angiogenic blood vessels using tumor-transplanted rabbit specimens with a barium sulfate contrast agent injected into the blood vessels. For specimen imaging, a large-field high-resolution micro-CT system based on a 10-megapixel CCD camera was developed to study tumor-associated alterations in angioarchitecture. Evidence of increased vascularity by tumor angiogenesis and decreased vascularity by tumor treatments was achieved by physiological evaluation of angiogenic small blood vessels in microangiographic imaging and by morphological assessment in micro-CT imaging. These results

  11. Determination of the elastic properties of rabbit vocal fold tissue using uniaxial tensile testing and a tailored finite element model.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Neda; Miri, Amir K; Mongeau, Luc

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantify the effects of the specimen shape on the accuracy of mechanical properties determined from a shape-specific model generation strategy. Digital images of five rabbit vocal folds (VFs) in their initial undeformed conditions were used to build corresponding specific solid models. The displacement field of the VFs under uniaxial tensile test was then measured over the visible portion of the surface using digital image correlation. A three-dimensional finite element model was built, using ABAQUS, for each solid model, while imposing measured boundary conditions. An inverse-problem method was used, assuming a homogeneous isotropic linear elastic constitutive model. Unknown elastic properties were identified iteratively through an error minimization technique between simulated and measured force-time data. The longitudinal elastic moduli of the five rabbit VFs were calculated and compared to values from a simple analytical method and those obtained by approximating the cross-section as elliptical. The use of shape-specific models significantly reduced the standard deviation of the Young׳s moduli of the tested specimens. However, a non-parametric statistical analysis test, i.e., the Friedman test, yielded no statistically significant differences between the shape-specific method and the elliptic cylindrical finite element model. Considering the required procedures to reconstruct the shape-specific finite element model for each tissue specimen, it might be expedient to use the simpler method when large numbers of tissue specimens are to be compared regarding their Young׳s moduli. PMID:25173237

  12. Experimental sensitization of guinea pigs by drugs. Comparison of the maximization test with the wholly intradermal test.

    PubMed

    Rantuccio, F; Coviello, C; Sinisi, D; Scardigno, A; Conte, A

    1983-11-01

    The capacity of tegobetain, pyrrolnitrin, tolcyclate and chlorquinaldol to induce delayed-type contact sensitization was studied in guinea pigs in 2 series of tests using the method of Magnusson & Kligman and the authors' modification of the wholly intradermal Draize technique. Histological examination of skin biopsies obtained from the test area demonstrated that tegobetain, pyrrolnitrin and tolcyclate are potential sensitizers. PMID:6653105

  13. Applicability of the Monocyte Activation Test (MAT) for hyperimmune sera in the routine of the quality control laboratory: Comparison with the Rabbit Pyrogen Test (RPT).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cristiane Caldeira; Presgrave, Octavio Augusto França; Hartung, Thomas; de Moraes, Aurea Maria Lage; Delgado, Isabella Fernandes

    2016-04-01

    Pyrogen tests are safety assays performed during the routine quality control of injectable products required by regulatory agencies. Currently, there are three available testing possibilities: 1) the Rabbit Pyrogen Test (RPT); 2) the Bacterial Endotoxin Test (BET); and 3) test systems using human whole-blood or monocytes, termed Monocyte Activation Test (MAT). Although BET is often considered as a replacement for the animal test, it is unable to detect pyrogens other than endotoxin. MAT is based on the human fever reaction and thus, most closely reflects the human response. The aim of this study was to conduct a parallel comparison of the RPT and MAT for hyperimmune sera (HS) batches analyzed during the routine of a quality control laboratory. MAT was performed in the same 43 batches of HS previously tested using RPT. The results showed that MAT presented 100% sensitivity and approximately 85% specificity as compared to RPT, i.e., no false-negative results were obtained. Few suspicious samples, which were negative in the RPT after retesting, provided divergent positive results suggesting a lower limit of detection of MAT. MAT is thus able to detect contaminants in biological products such as HS batches. PMID:26688320

  14. A negative nontreponemal and/or specific antitreponemal IgM test does not exclude active infectious syphilis: evidence from a rabbit infectivity test

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Rong; Tong, Man-Li; Gao, Kun; Zhu, Xiao-Zhen; Fan, Jin-Yi; Zheng, Wei-Hong; Li, Shu-Lian; Lin, Hui-Ling; Liu, Li-Li; Yang, Tian-Ci

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The diagnostic criteria for active infectious syphilis in the clinic are important matter of controversy and debate. So far, clinicians habitually do use the negative results of the nontreponemal and/or the specific antitreponemal IgM as the evidences of disease-free or active infection-free status. Method: We present a case study involving a patient who was admitted to Zhongshan Hospital because of cerebral infarct. Clinical examination indicated he had a history of latent syphilis with negative nontreponemal and specific antitreponemal IgM tests. The cerebrospinal fluid sample from the patient was inoculated into seronegative New Zealand rabbit. Results: Motile Treponema pallidum was detected by a rabbit infectivity test in the patient's cerebrospinal fluid. This syphilis strain was confirmed by DNA subtyping form of “centers for disease control subtype/tp0548 sequence type”, and the strain type was 14d/f. Treatment with benzathine penicillin provided no apparent benefit, but treatment with aqueous crystalline penicillin G, especially recommended for neurosyphilis, led to disease regression. No evidence of cerebral infarct was observed during a 2-year follow-up period. Conclusion: The definitive differential diagnosis of active infectious syphilis should be reconsidered. Moreover, selecting the appropriate penicillin preparation is important because T pallidum can reside in sequestered sites. It is necessary to treat a patient with known invasion of the central nervous system with aqueous crystalline penicillin G, if previous treatment for syphilis failed and patients had some clinical neurological presentation that is otherwise unexplained, but that could represent neurosyphilis. Additional studies are needed to confirm the results in other syphilis patients. PMID:27495107

  15. Measuring depth of injury (DOI) in an isolated rabbit eye irritation test (IRE) using biomarkers of cell death and viability.

    PubMed

    Jester, James V; Ling, Joseph; Harbell, John

    2010-03-01

    While DOI is a mechanistic correlate to the ocular irritation response, attempts to measure DOI in alternative tests have been limited to qualitative histopathologic assessment by veterinarian pathologists. The purpose of this study was to determine whether DOI could be measured objectively by fluorescent staining for biomarkers of cell death and viability using an ex vivo isolated rabbit eye (IRE) test. A panel of nine materials characterized by in vivo DOI were selected that caused slight (3% acetic acid and 5% SDS), mild (acetone, sodium hypochlorite and 10% acetic acid), moderate (cyclohexanol and parafluoroanaline) and severe (8% sodium hydroxide and 10% benzalkonium chloride) irritation. Materials were then tested using a modified IRE test with 3h recovery and then processed for cyrosectioning and staining using a TUNEL assay to detect cell death, phalloidin to detect intracellular f-actin and DAPI staining to detect nuclei. Control eyes treated with water showed intense phalloidin staining of the corneal epithelium and stromal keratocytes but no TUNEL labeling. In general, eyes treated with mild, moderate and severe irritants showed regions of TUNEL labeled epithelial and keratocyte nuclei with no phalloidin stain overlying phalloidin stained, undamaged cells. DOI measurements showed that slight irritants damaged<40% of the epithelium, mild and moderate irritants damaged>50% of the epithelium, extending at times into the anterior stroma (<20%), and the severe irritant damaged>50% of the stroma. Regression analysis between ex vivo and in vivo DOI showed a significant (p<0.007) correlation (r=0.785). These data suggest that fluorescent staining of fixed and sectioned tissue using biomarkers can be used to objectively identify the depth of injury caused by ocular irritants. PMID:19857567

  16. In-vitro tensile testing machine for vibration study of fresh rabbit Achilles tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, Gian M.; Scalise, Alessandro; Scalise, Lorenzo; Pianosi, Antonella

    2001-10-01

    A lot of people, overall athletic one suffer from tendinitis or complete rupture of the Achilles tendon. This structure becomes inflamed and damaged mainly from a variety of mechanical forces and sometimes due to metabolic problems, such as diabetes or arthritis. Over the past three decades extensive studies have been performed on the structural and mechanical properties of Achilles tendon trying to explain the constitutive equations to describe and foresee tendon behavior. Among the various mechanical parameters, the vibrational behavior is also of interest. Several investigations are performed in order to study how the Achilles tendon vibrations influence the response of the muscle proprioception and human posture. The present article describes how in vitro tensile experiments can be performed, taking into account the need to simulate physiological condition of Achilles tendon and thus approaching some opened problems in the design of the experimental set-up. A new system for evaluating tendon vibrations by non contact techniques is proposed. Preliminary simple elongation tests are made extracting the main mechanical parameters: stress and strain at different fixed stretches, in order to characterize the tissue. Finally, a vibration study is made at each pretensioned tendon level evaluating the oscillating curves caused by a small hammer.

  17. Comparison and validation of finite element analysis with a servo-hydraulic testing unit for a biodegradable fixation system in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Atali, O; Varol, A; Basa, S; Ergun, C; Hartomacıoğlu, S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was the biomechanical validation of three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) with a servo-hydraulic testing unit (STU) for a resorbable fixation system (RFS) in a rabbit model. Bilateral mandibular vertical body osteotomies (BMVBO) were performed in 15 female New Zealand rabbits. The animals were divided into three groups. The STU and FEA tests were done immediately after surgery in group 1 (1 day), at the first postoperative month in group 2, and at the third postoperative month in group 3. Both stress tests were carried out by applying vertical forces at the lower incisal edge, loading from 0 N force and increasing this until breakage occurred at the bone. The maximum forces that the hemimandibles could stand and the amount of deformation were recorded and analysed with the FEA and STU tests. We found the STU and FEA test results to be similar and that they could be used interchangeably for groups 1 and 3. However, the FEA results differed most from the real STU values in group 2 because of callus formation that had not ossified at the osteotomy line. PMID:23867254

  18. Intracranial volume in craniosynostotic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mooney, M P; Burrows, A M; Wigginton, W; Singhal, V K; Losken, H W; Smith, T D; Dechant, J; Towbin, A; Cooper, G M; Towbin, R; Siegel, M I

    1998-05-01

    Although craniosynostosis alters brain growth direction resulting in compensatory changes in the neurocranium, it has been suggested that such compensations occur with little reduction in intracranial volume (ICV). This hypothesis was tested in a rabbit model with nonsyndromic, familial coronal suture synostosis. Cross-sectional three-dimensional computed tomographic head scans were obtained from 79 rabbits (25 normal, 28 with delayed-onset synostosis, and 26 with early-onset synostosis) at 25, 42, and 126 days of age. Intracranial contents were reconstructed and indirect ICV was calculated. Results revealed that by 25 days of age the intracranial contents from early-onset synostosed rabbit skulls showed rostral (anterior) constrictions and a "beaten copper" morphology in the parietal and temporal regions compared with the other two groups. These deformities increased in severity with age. Quantitatively, ICV was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) by 7% in rabbits with early-onset synostosis compared with both control rabbits and rabbits with delayed-onset synostosis at 25 days of age. By 126 days of age, ICV in rabbits with synostosis was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) by 11% in early-onset synostosis and by 8% in delayed-onset synostosis compared with normal rabbits. Results suggest that in rabbits with uncorrected craniosynostosis, compensatory changes in the neurocranium were not adequate to allow normal expansion of the neurocapsular matrix. Further research is needed to determine if ICV reduction is correlated with cerebral atrophy or cerebral spinal fluid (i.e., ventricular or subarachnoid) space compression in this model. PMID:9693554

  19. Construction and testing of a novel host-range defective myxoma virus vaccine with the M063 gene inactivated that is non-permissive for replication in rabbit cells.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mathew M; van Leeuwen, Barbara H; McFadden, Grant; Kerr, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Deletion of the M063 gene from myxoma virus produces a virus that is unable to replicate in rabbit cells in vitro or in live rabbits but can be propagated in non-rabbit cell lines. A targeted M063 deletion mutant was constructed in the attenuated Uriarra strain of myxoma virus and the ability of this virus to act as a safe, non-transmissible vaccine against myxomatosis was tested in outbred laboratory rabbits. Immunization with the M063 deletion vaccine provided good short-term protection against lethal challenge with virulent myxoma virus. Long-term protection was similar to reported results with heterologous live virus, with some rabbits protected but others succumbing to challenge. Replication-deficient poxvirus vaccines, like the Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) in man and the myxoma virus vaccine described here in rabbits, are very attractive from a safety perspective. Seasonal boosting would be predicted to provide long-term protection. Targeted host-range gene deletions could have potential for rapid development of poxvirus vaccines in general. PMID:18778680

  20. Rapid CO breath test screening of drugs for protective effects on ribavirin-induced hemolysis in a rabbit model: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yong-Jian; Zhang, Hou-De; Wu, Chuang-Hong; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Ji, Yong-Qiang; Huang, Jia-Liang; Du, Li-Tao; Cao, Ping; Zang, De-Yue; Ji, Kun-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia is a major side effect of ribavirin antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C. Ribavirin dose reduction may compromise the antiviral response and erythropoietin can take several weeks to alleviate anemia. The purpose of the present study was to screen potentially protective drugs against ribavirin-induced hemolytic anemia in a rabbit model, using our modified CO breath test for measuring erythrocyte (RBC) lifespan, the gold standard diagnostic index of hemolysis. Fifteen rabbits were divided randomly into five groups (N  =  3/group): one vehicle control group, one ribavirin (only)-treated (RBV) group, and three groups initially treated with ribavirin only, followed by a combination of ribavirin with prednisone (RBV  +  Pred), polyene phosphatidyl choline (RBV  +  PPC), or reduced glutathione (RBV  +  GSH). RBC lifespan was calculated from accumulated CO measured in a closed rebreath apparatus, blood volume measured by the Evan's blue dye (EBD) dilution test, and hemoglobin concentration data. The RBC lifespan was normal in the vehicle control group (44-60 d), but reduced significantly in all of the ribavirin-treated groups before the addition of screened drugs (17-35 d). RBC lifespan rebounded significantly with the addition of glutathione, but not with the addition of prednisone or polyene phosphatidyl choline. A similar overall drug effect pattern was seen in the hemoglobin concentration and reticulocyte count data. In conclusion, the results of this pilot study indicate that reduced glutathione can attenuate ribavirin-induced hemolytic anemia, and that the RBC lifespan measured with our modified rapid CO breath test is feasible and reliable for use in animal studies. PMID:27506143

  1. Rabbit model of rotavirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Conner, M E; Estes, M K; Graham, D Y

    1988-01-01

    A new small animal model was developed to study parameters of rotavirus infections, including the active immune response. Seronegative New Zealand White rabbits (neonatal to 4 months old) were inoculated orally with cultivatable rabbit rotavirus strains Ala, C11, and R2 and with the heterologous simian strain SA11. The course of infection was evaluated by clinical findings, virus isolation (plaque assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), and serologic response. All four strains of virus were capable of infecting rabbits as determined by isolation of infectious virus from intestinal contents or fecal samples, by seroconversion, or by a combination of these methods. The responses differed depending on the virus strain used for inoculation. Rabbits remained susceptible to primary infection to at least 16 weeks of age (upper limit examined). Virus excretion in intestinal contents was detected from 6 h to 7 days postinoculation. RNA electropherotypes of inocula and viruses isolated from rabbits were the same in all samples tested. Transmission of Ala virus and R2 virus but not SA11 virus from inoculated animals to uninoculated controls also occurred. In a challenge experiment with Ala virus, 74- and 90-day-old rabbits were rechallenged with Ala 5 weeks after a primary infection with Ala. Virus was excreted in feces from 2 to 8 days after the primary infection but was not excreted after challenge. These results indicate that the rabbit provides an ideal model to investigate both the primary and secondary active immune responses to rotavirus infections and to evaluate candidate vaccines. Images PMID:2833612

  2. Viral infections of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Peter J; Donnelly, Thomas M

    2013-05-01

    Viral diseases of rabbits have been used historically to study oncogenesis (e.g. rabbit fibroma virus, cottontail rabbit papillomavirus) and biologically to control feral rabbit populations (e.g. myxoma virus). However, clinicians seeing pet rabbits in North America infrequently encounter viral diseases although myxomatosis may be seen occasionally. The situation is different in Europe and Australia, where myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease are endemic. Advances in epidemiology and virology have led to detection of other lapine viruses that are now recognized as agents of emerging infectious diseases. Rabbit caliciviruses, related to rabbit hemorrhagic disease, are generally avirulent, but lethal variants are being identified in Europe and North America. Enteric viruses including lapine rotavirus, rabbit enteric coronavirus and rabbit astrovirus are being acknowledged as contributors to the multifactorial enteritis complex of juvenile rabbits. Three avirulent leporid herpesviruses are found in domestic rabbits. A fourth highly pathogenic virus designated leporid herpesvirus 4 has been described in Canada and Alaska. This review considers viruses affecting rabbits by their clinical significance. Viruses of major and minor clinical significance are described, and viruses of laboratory significance are mentioned. PMID:23642871

  3. Teratology studies in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Allais, Linda; Reynaud, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    The rabbit is generally the non-rodent species or second species after the rat recommended by the regulatory authorities and is part of the package of regulatory reproductive studies for the detection of potential embryotoxic and/or teratogenic effects of pharmaceuticals, chemicals, food additives, and other compounds, including vaccines (see Chapters 1-7).Its availability, practicality in housing and in mating as well as its large size makes the rabbit the preferred choice as a non-rodent species. The study protocols are essentially similar to those established for the rat (Chapter 9), with some particularities. The study designs are well defined in guidelines and are relatively standardized between testing laboratories across the world.As for the rat, large litter sizes and extensive background data in the rabbit are valuable criteria for an optimal assessment of in utero development of the embryo or fetus and for the detection of potential external or internal fetal malformations. PMID:23138902

  4. Serologic evidence for rabbit syncytium virus in eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Theil, K W; McCloskey, C M; Scott, D P

    1993-07-01

    Thirteen of 20 eastern cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus floridanus) sera collected near Delaware, Ohio (USA) in 1991 were positive by indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) for antibody to rabbit syncytium virus (RSV), a Kemerovo serogroup orbivirus. In addition, two of 10 domestic bovine sera and three of 30 sheep sera collected in southeastern Ohio gave weak positive IFAT reactions to RSV. PMID:8394944

  5. Replication needed to detect alterations in the composition of rodent, rabbit, or human testes via volume density approaches.

    PubMed

    Berndtson, William E

    2010-01-01

    Sperm production is an important variable affecting the reproductive capacity of men and other male mammals. Because spermatogenesis is highly susceptible to disruption, volume density techniques that enable the composition of testicular tissue to be characterized or sperm production rates to be quantified are used extensively to assess potential impacts of known or suspected reproductive toxins, the safety of proposed human or animal drugs, and basic studies on spermatogenesis in normal individuals. The number of subjects used per treatment group for such studies has been variable. However, the power and sensitivity of any experiment is dependent on the inherent variability associated with the end point(s) of interest and the number of replicates (ie, animals or men per treatment group) employed per treatment group. Because the reliability of one's experimental outcome should be of utmost consideration, it is important to characterize the typical levels of inherent variability associated with one's chosen end point(s) and to answer the question: how many subjects are required per treatment group to provide an experiment with a given power and sensitivity for detecting actual treatment effects? This study was undertaken to 1) characterize the inherent variability associated with the volume density of several testicular components in rodents, rabbits, and humans and among cell numbers derived from volume density data and 2) identify the approximate number of replicates that would be required to provide future studies of predictable power and sensitivity for which data were to be generated via the volume density approach. Replication requirements differed, sometimes by several orders of magnitude, among these species and among end points within a single species. In addition, for many of these species and end points, the number of replicates necessary to ensure modest power and sensitivity for detecting treatment differences exceeded that used in most investigations

  6. Safety evaluation of petroleum products using an in vitro eye irritation test battery.

    PubMed

    Martin, S A; Roy, T A; Saladdin, K A; Fleming, B A; Mackerer, C R

    1994-08-01

    An in vitro eye irritation test battery (IVEye) composed of the EYTEX and Modified Agarose Diffusion Method (MADM) assays was evaluated for use as a predictive, economical screen and/or adjunct for the Draize eye test. EYTEX mimics corneal opacification using a synthetic matrix of proteins that is intended to produce measurable opacity on exposure to chemical irritants in proportion to their ocular irritation potential. MADM is a cytotoxicity-based assay consisting of NCTC clone 929 mouse fibroblasts overlayed with 1% agarose in culture medium. Potential eye irritation is measured macroscopically as the area of decolorization (neutral red release) around the area of chemical application and microscopically as the percentage of cell lysis resulting from chemical application. Of the 70 materials tested in the IVEye for which Draize eye test data also exist, the battery correctly identified 38 materials as non-irritants and 30 as irritants, with two false positives and no false negatives. Non-parametric analysis of the data show the battery to have a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 95% and a predictive value of 94%. The irritation class correlation (equivalence; irritation ranking) between EYTEX alone and the Draize data was 85%. These data support the use of IVEye as an accurate, reproducible and cost-effective in vitro method for identifying the eye irritation potential of petroleum products. PMID:20692994

  7. Cysticercosis in laboratory rabbits.

    PubMed

    Owiny, J R

    2001-03-01

    There are no data on the current incidence of Taenia pisiformis in laboratory rabbits. Two cases of cysticercosis most likely due to T. pisiformis in laboratory rabbits (intermediate host) are presented. Both rabbits had no contact with dogs (final host); their caretakers did not work with dogs, and these caretakers changed into facility scrubs and wore gloves when working with the rabbits. Rabbit 1 may have been infected after being fed hay at our facility. In light of the life cycle of the parasite and the history of rabbit 2, it potentially could have been infected prior to arrival at our facility. There have been only three cases of tapeworm cysts in rabbits in our facility (average daily census, 250) during the last 10 years (incidence, < 1%). This report indicates that although cysticercosis is rare in laboratory rabbits, one should always be aware of such incidental findings. Although it may not produce overt illness in the rabbit, hepatic migration could adversely affect the outcome of some experimental procedures PMID:11300689

  8. Survey of ocular irritation predictive capacity using Chorioallantoic Membrane Vascular Assay (CAMVA) and Bovine Corneal Opacity and Permeability (BCOP) test historical data for 319 personal care products over fourteen years.

    PubMed

    Donahue, D A; Kaufman, L E; Avalos, J; Simion, F A; Cerven, D R

    2011-03-01

    The Chorioallantoic Membrane Vascular Assay (CAMVA) and Bovine Corneal Opacity and Permeability (BCOP) test are widely used to predict ocular irritation potential for consumer-use products. These in vitro assays do not require live animals, produce reliable predictive data for defined applicability domains compared to the Draize rabbit eye test, and are rapid and inexpensive. Data from 304 CAMVA and/or BCOP studies (319 formulations) were surveyed to determine the feasibility of predicting ocular irritation potential for various formulations. Hair shampoos, skin cleansers, and ethanol-based hair styling sprays were repeatedly predicted to be ocular irritants (accuracy rate=0.90-1.00), with skin cleanser and hair shampoo irritation largely dependent on surfactant species and concentration. Conversely, skin lotions/moisturizers and hair styling gels/lotions were repeatedly predicted to be non-irritants (accuracy rate=0.92 and 0.82, respectively). For hair shampoos, ethanol-based hair stylers, skin cleansers, and skin lotions/moisturizers, future ocular irritation testing (i.e., CAMVA/BCOP) can be nearly eliminated if new formulations are systematically compared to those previously tested using a defined decision tree. For other tested product categories, new formulations should continue to be evaluated in CAMVA/BCOP for ocular irritation potential because either the historical data exhibit significant variability (hair conditioners and mousses) or the historical sample size is too small to permit definitive conclusions (deodorants, make-up removers, massage oils, facial masks, body sprays, and other hair styling products). All decision tree conclusions should be made within a conservative weight-of-evidence context, considering the reported limitations of the BCOP test for alcohols, ketones, and solids. PMID:21147215

  9. Astroviruses in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Moschidou, Paschalina; Pinto, Pierfrancesco; Catella, Cristiana; Desario, Constantina; Larocca, Vittorio; Circella, Elena; Bànyai, Krisztian; Lavazza, Antonio; Magistrali, Chiara; Decaro, Nicola; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2011-01-01

    By screening rabbits with enterocolitis or enteritis complex and asymptomatic rabbits, we identified a novel astrovirus. The virus was distantly related (19.3%–23.7% aa identity) in the capsid precursor to other mammalian astroviruses within the Mamastrovirus genus. By using real-time reverse transcription PCR, with specific primers and probes and targeting a conserved stretch in open reading frame 1b, we found rabbit astrovirus in 10 (43%) of 23 samples from animals with enteric disease and in 25 (18%) of 139 samples from asymptomatic animals in Italy during 2005–2008. The mean and median titers in the positive animals were 102× and 103× greater, respectively, in the symptomatic animals than in the asymptomatic animals. These findings support the idea that rabbit astroviruses should be included in the diagnostic algorithm of rabbit enteric disease and animal experiments to increase information obtained about their epidemiology and potential pathogenic role. PMID:22172457

  10. Genomic Analysis of Companion Rabbit Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Mark A; Harrison, Ewan M; Fisher, Elizabeth A; Graham, Elizabeth M; Parkhill, Julian; Foster, Geoffrey; Paterson, Gavin K

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being an important human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus is able to cause a variety of infections in numerous other host species. While the S. aureus strains causing infection in several of these hosts have been well characterised, this is not the case for companion rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), where little data are available on S. aureus strains from this host. To address this deficiency we have performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing and genome sequencing on a collection of S. aureus isolates from companion rabbits. The findings show a diverse S. aureus population is able to cause infection in this host, and while antimicrobial resistance was uncommon, the isolates possess a range of known and putative virulence factors consistent with a diverse clinical presentation in companion rabbits including severe abscesses. We additionally show that companion rabbit isolates carry polymorphisms within dltB as described as underlying host-adaption of S. aureus to farmed rabbits. The availability of S. aureus genome sequences from companion rabbits provides an important aid to understanding the pathogenesis of disease in this host and in the clinical management and surveillance of these infections. PMID:26963381

  11. Genomic Analysis of Companion Rabbit Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Mark A.; Harrison, Ewan M.; Fisher, Elizabeth A.; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Parkhill, Julian; Foster, Geoffrey; Paterson, Gavin K.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being an important human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus is able to cause a variety of infections in numerous other host species. While the S. aureus strains causing infection in several of these hosts have been well characterised, this is not the case for companion rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), where little data are available on S. aureus strains from this host. To address this deficiency we have performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing and genome sequencing on a collection of S. aureus isolates from companion rabbits. The findings show a diverse S. aureus population is able to cause infection in this host, and while antimicrobial resistance was uncommon, the isolates possess a range of known and putative virulence factors consistent with a diverse clinical presentation in companion rabbits including severe abscesses. We additionally show that companion rabbit isolates carry polymorphisms within dltB as described as underlying host-adaption of S. aureus to farmed rabbits. The availability of S. aureus genome sequences from companion rabbits provides an important aid to understanding the pathogenesis of disease in this host and in the clinical management and surveillance of these infections. PMID:26963381

  12. Complement activation induced by rabbit rheumatoid factor.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, R R; Brown, J C

    1980-01-01

    Rabbit rheumatoid factor produced in animals by hyperimmunized with group C streptococcal vaccine activated guinea pig complement. Anti-streptococcal serum was fractionated by Sephacryl S-200 chromatography into excluded (19S) and included (7S) material and examined for hemolytic activity in a sensitive homologous hemolytic assay system. In the presence of complement, both 19S and 7S antistreptococcal serum fractions induced lysis of bovine (ox) erythrocytes coated with mildly reduced and carboxymethylated rabbit anti-erythrocyte immunoglobulin G. That rabbit rheumatoid factor was responsible for the observed hemolytic activity was substantiated by hemolytic inhibition assays. Significant inhibition of hemolysis was effected when antistreptococcal serum fractions were incubated in the presence of human immunoglobulin G, rabbit immunoglobulin G, and Fc, whereas, no inhibition was detected when the same fractions were tested in the presence of rabbit Fab or F(ab')2 fragments. Deaggregation of inhibitor preparations revealed a preferential reactivity of rheumatoid factor for rabbit immunoglobulin G. In addition to the rheumatoid factor-dependent hemolytic activity observed in humoral preparations, immunoglobulin G-specific antibody-forming cells in spleen and peripheral blood lymphocyte isolates were enumerated by plaque-forming cell assay. PMID:7399707

  13. Hepatitis E Virus in Farmed Rabbits, Wild Rabbits and Petting Farm Rabbits in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Burt, Sara A; Veltman, Jorg; Hakze-van der Honing, Renate; Schmitt, Heike; van der Poel, Wim H M

    2016-09-01

    Rabbits have been suggested as a zoonotic source of Hepatitis E virus. Phylogenetic analysis of HEV isolates from farmed, wild and pet rabbits in the Netherlands (23, 0, and 60 % respectively) showed them to be grouped amongst published rabbit HEV sequences and distinct from most human isolates. Dutch rabbits are unlikely to be a zoonotic source. PMID:27147250

  14. Oil well rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Yerian, H.W.

    1983-10-18

    A well rabbit is described which has a high gas seal capacity as well as resistance to wear and structural failure. The rabbit comprises a one-piece elongated generally cylindrical body having external circumferential gas-sealing grooves spaced along its length and a set of helically oriented slots at its lower end. The circumferential grooves, which work collectively in the manner of a labyrinth seal, are undercut in a way to deflect escaping gas streams and promote turbulence to enhance their gas-sealing capability. The undercut profile and relative spacing of the grooves leaves a large surface area between the grooves for distributing radial forces and thereby decreasing the wear rate of the rabbit. The helically oriented slots convert energy of upward escaping gas into rotational energy in the rabbit. (3 claims.

  15. Seroprevalence of Encephalitozoon cuniculi in Humans and Rabbits in China

    PubMed Central

    PAN, Yaoqian; WANG, Shuai; LIU, Xingyou; LI, Ruizhen; SUN, Yuqian; GADAHI, Javaid Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Encephalitozoon cuniculi is a microsporidian parasite commonly found in rabbits that can infect humans, causing encephalitozoonosis. Our objective in this study was to evaluate the seroprevalence of this parasite in rabbits and humans in China Methods: Overall, 300 serum samples each from clinically healthy rabbit and human were collected from three regions of China (Sichuan Province, Chongqing Municipality and Jilin Province) from January to September 2013 and tested for anti-E. Cuniculi antibodies using an ELISA. Results: An overall seroprevalence of E. cuniculi was recorded as 56/300 (18.76%) and 29/300 (9.76%) in rabbit and human sera, respectively. The seropositivity of rabbit samples collected from Jilin province was 41%, which was significantly higher (P<0.01) than Sichuan Province (9%) and Chongqing Municipality (6%). Three breeds of rabbit were used in the present study and antibody detection in Rex Rabbit was significantly (P<0.01) higher than Japanese White and New Zealand Rabbit. In human, Jilin province was more prevalent (18%) followed by Sichuan Province (6%) and Chongqing Municipality (5%). Conclusions: The E. cuniculi was present and widespread among healthy rabbits and humans in China PMID:26246829

  16. Novel bocaparvoviruses in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lanave, G; Martella, V; Farkas, S L; Marton, S; Fehér, E; Bodnar, L; Lavazza, A; Decaro, N; Buonavoglia, C; Bányai, K

    2015-11-01

    Bocaparvovirus is a newly established genus within the family Parvoviridae and has been identified as a possible cause of enteric, respiratory, reproductive/neonatal and neurological disease in humans and several animal species. In this study, metagenomic analysis was used to identify and characterise a novel bocaparvovirus in the faeces of rabbits with enteric disease. To assess the prevalence of the novel virus, rectal swabs and faecal samples obtained from rabbits with and without diarrhoea were screened with a specific PCR assay. The complete genome sequence of the novel parvovirus was reconstructed. The virus was distantly related to other bocaparvoviruses; the three ORFs shared 53%, 53% and 50% nucleotide identity, respectively, to homologous genes of porcine bocaparvoviruses. The virus was detected in 8/29 (28%) and 16/95 (17%) samples of rabbits with and without diarrhoea, respectively. Sequencing of the capsid protein fragment targeted by the diagnostic PCR identified two distinct bocaparvovirus populations/sub-types, with 91.7-94.5% nucleotide identity to each other. Including these novel parvoviruses in diagnostic algorithms of rabbit diseases might help inform their potential pathogenic role and impact on rabbit production and the virological profiles of laboratory rabbits. PMID:26383859

  17. Coccidian and nematode infections influence prevalence of antibody to myxoma and rabbit hemorrhagic disease viruses in European rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bertó-Moran, Alejandro; Pacios, Isabel; Serrano, Emmanuel; Moreno, Sacramento; Rouco, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The interaction among several parasites in European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is crucial to host fitness and to the epidemiology of myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease. These diseases have caused significant reductions in rabbit populations on the Iberian Peninsula. Most studies have focused on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of these viruses individually, and little is known about interactions between these viruses and other parasites. Taking advantage of an experimental restocking program in Spain, the effects of coccidian and nematode infections on the probability of having detectable antibody to myxoma and rabbit hemorrhagic disease viruses were tested in European wild rabbits. For 14 mo, we monitored rabbit abundance and parasite loads (coccidia and nematodes) in three reintroduced rabbit populations. While coccidian and nematode loads explained seasonal antibody prevalences to myxoma virus, the pattern was less clear for rabbit hemorrhagic disease. Contrary to expectations, prevalence of antibody to myxoma virus was inversely proportional to coccidian load, while nematode load seemed to play a minor role. These results have implications for viral disease epidemiology and for disease management intended to increase rabbit populations in areas where they are important for ecosystem conservation. PMID:23307367

  18. Viral diseases of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Krogstad, Aric P; Simpson, Janet E; Korte, Scott W

    2005-01-01

    Viral disease in the rabbit is encountered infrequently by the clinical practitioner; however, several viral diseases were reported to occur in this species. Viral diseases that are described in the rabbit primarily may affect the integument, gastrointestinal tract or, central nervous system or maybe multi-systemic in nature. Rabbit viral diseases range from oral papillomatosis, with benign clinical signs, to rabbit hemorrhagic disease and myxomatosis, which may result in significant clinical disease and mortality. The wild rabbit may serve as a reservoir for disease transmission for many of these viral agents. In general, treatment of viral disease in the rabbit is supportive in nature. PMID:15585192

  19. Mycobacterium avium in pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis): 28 cases.

    PubMed

    Harrenstien, Lisa A; Finnegan, Mitchell V; Woodford, Nina L; Mansfield, Kristin G; Waters, W Ray; Bannantine, John P; Paustian, Michael L; Garner, Michael M; Bakke, Antony C; Peloquin, Charles A; Phillips, Terry M

    2006-12-01

    The Columbia basin subpopulation of pygmy rabbit Brachylagus idahoensis was listed as endangered by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service in November 2001, and no pygmy rabbits have been seen in the wild since spring 2002. Captive propagation efforts have attempted to increase population size in preparation for reintroduction of animals into central Washington. Disseminated mycobacteriosis due to Mycobacterium avium has been the most common cause of death of adult captive pygmy rabbits. Between June 2002 and September 2004, mycobacteriosis was diagnosed in 28 captive adult pygmy rabbits (representing 29% of the captive population), in contrast to 18 adult pygmy rabbits dying of all other causes in the same time period. Antemortem and postmortem medical records were evaluated retrospectively to describe the clinical course of mycobacteriosis in pygmy rabbits, physical examination findings, and diagnostic test results in the diagnosis of mycobacteriosis in pygmy rabbits. Various treatment protocols, possible risk factors for mortality, and recommendations for prevention of mycobacteriosis were evaluated also. Compromised cell-mediated immunity appears to be the best explanation at this time for the observed high morbidity and mortality from mycobacterial infections in pygmy rabbits. PMID:17315435

  20. The Cutaneous Rabbit Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flach, Rudiger; Haggard, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    In the cutaneous rabbit effect (CRE), a tactile event (so-called attractee tap) is mislocalized toward an adjacent attractor tap. The effect depends on the time interval between the taps. The authors delivered sequences of taps to the forearm and asked participants to report the location of one of the taps. The authors replicated the original CRE…

  1. Autoimmunity in Experimental Trypanosoma congolense Infections of Rabbits 1

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, John M.; Kreier, Julius P.

    1972-01-01

    Autoimmunity in rabbits with experimental Trypanosoma congolense infections was investigated. Complement-fixing (CF) and precipitating autoantibodies to normal allogeneic and autologous tissues were found in the sera of all infected rabbits tested; the titers of CF autoantibody occurring during infection were significantly higher than normally occurring titers of autoantibody in pre-infection serum samples. Autoantibody did not cross-react with trypanosome antigens, and Wassermann antibody was not detected in normal or infected rabbit sera. Passive transfer of autoantibody to normal rabbits did not produce observable pathology or death. Physicochemical methods of analysis revealed that the autoantibody was exclusively of the immunoglobulin M class. That cell-mediated autoimmunity to normal tissue antigens did not occur during T. congolense infections was shown by histological analyses, skin tests, migration inhibitory factor, and skin reactive factor tests. Images PMID:4629248

  2. Serological survey of hepatitis E virus infection in farmed and pet rabbits in Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolo, Ilaria; De Sabato, L; Marata, A; Martinelli, N; Magistrali, C F; Monini, M; Ponterio, E; Ostanello, F; Ruggeri, F M

    2016-05-01

    The recent identification in rabbits of hepatitis E viruses (HEV) related to viruses infecting humans raises the question of the role of this species as possible HEV reservoir. A serological survey on rabbit HEV infection was conducted in Italy during 2013-2014, including both farmed and pet rabbits. We found an anti-HEV antibody seroprevalence of 3.40 % in 206 farmed rabbits (collected on 7 farms) and 6.56 % in 122 pets. RNA was extracted from IgG-positive sera and analyzed by HEV-specific real-time RT-PCR. None of the samples were positive, confirming that no viremia was present in the presence of IgG. Only one serum sample from a farmed rabbit was positive for IgM, but no HEV RNA was detected in it. Pet rabbit feces were also tested for HEV RNA, with negative results. This finding suggests that HEV is circulating in rabbits in Italy. PMID:26873813

  3. Simple adult rabbit model for Campylobacter jejuni enteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, M B; Walker, R I; Stewart, S D; Rogers, J E

    1983-01-01

    We tested the usefulness of the Removable Intestinal Tie Adult Rabbit Diarrhea model to establish Campylobacter jejuni infection in rabbits. The procedure involved ligation of the cecum, placement of a slip knot at the terminal ileum, and injection of the test inoculum into the mid-small bowel. The ends of the slip knot were externalized, and the tie was released 4 h later. Fifty-five rabbits received C. jejuni, and 16 received uninoculated medium as controls. Daily rectal swabs were positive for 2 weeks in infected rabbits. The diarrheal attack rate was 64% in infected rabbits and 0% in controls. Diarrhea was characterized by loose, mucus-containing stools after an incubation period ranging from 24 h to 6 days. When blood was obtained daily for culture from 30 rabbits for 4 days post-challenge, bacteremia was present in 96.3% 24 h after challenge but diminished to 5 of 19 (26.3%) at 96 h. Death occurred in 53% of rabbits and was always preceded by diarrhea. No control animal died. Only 5 of 35 animals experiencing diarrhea recovered. An indirect whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine serum immunoglobulin G responses. Mean titers rose from 1:198 preoperatively to 1:9,087 on day 28. Necropsy on eight infected and two control animals showed inflammatory lesions with ulceration in 62.5% and goblet cell hyperplasia in 75% of infected rabbits. We conclude that the Removable Intestinal Tie Adult Rabbit Diarrhea procedure is a simple, effective method to establish C. jejuni infection which mimics human disease. Images PMID:6642664

  4. Measurement of Tear Production in English Angora and Dutch Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Rajaei, Seyed Mehdi; Rafiee, Siamak Mashhady; Ghaffari, Masoud Selk; Masouleh, Mohammad N; Jamshidian, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish normal values for tear production tests in different breeds of domestic rabbits. Healthy adult rabbits (n = 60; 120 eyes) of 2 different breeds (English angora and Dutch; n = 15 of each sex and breed) were used in this study. Tear production was measured by using the 1-min Schirmer tear test (STT), phenol red thread test (PRTT), and endodontic absorbent paper point tear test (EAPTT). In addition, horizontal palpebral fissure length was evaluated as a measure of ocular adnexal dimensions. Tear production (mean ± 1 SD) in English angora rabbits was 5.4 ± 1.6 mm/min according to the STT, 25.0 ± 2.7 mm in 15 s for the PRTT, and 18.8 ± 2.1 mm/min by the EAPTT; in Dutch rabbits, these values were 4.6 ± 1.2 mm/min, 23.6 ± 2.3 mm in 15 s, and 16.9 ± 1.7 mm/min, respectively. Only the EAPTT revealed a significant difference in tear production between English Angora and Dutch rabbits. These results provide reference values for tear production in English Angora and Dutch rabbits according to 3 different quantitative tear film assessment methods. PMID:27025815

  5. A rabbit model for study of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Mokresh, A H; Czuprynski, C J; Butler, D G

    1989-01-01

    Of 21 newborn rabbits inoculated orally with Mycobacterium paratuberculosis ATCC 19698, 13 (62%) became infected, as determined by histopathology and culture. Of the 21 inoculated rabbits, 14 (67%) experienced episodes of intermittent diarrhea, sometimes as early as 5 months after inoculation. Feces varied in consistency from soft-semisolid to watery. The organism was isolated from the sacculus rotundus, vermiform appendix of the cecum, ileum, mesenteric lymph node, and feces of 9 of 21 (43%) M. paratuberculosis-inoculated rabbits 8 to 10 months after inoculation. One infected rabbit gradually became severely emaciated; advanced paratuberculosis was confirmed by culture and histopathology. Of 21 rabbits, 9 (43%) developed multifocal, well-demarcated granulomatous enteritis in the sacculus rotundus and the vermiform appendix of the cecum. There was no significant difference in the rate of infection when the organisms were administered daily for 5 or 10 days in cow milk or broth. There was no discernible effect of pregnancy, parturition, or lactation on the severity of intestinal lesions, clinical signs, or the number of rabbits infected. Complement fixation and delayed-type hypersensitivity skin tests failed to detect infection. The results of this study suggest that newborn rabbits inoculated orally with M. paratuberculosis constitute a useful animal model for the study of paratuberculosis infection. Images PMID:2807547

  6. Rabbits killing birds revisited.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jimin; Fan, Meng; Kuang, Yang

    2006-09-01

    We formulate and study a three-species population model consisting of an endemic prey (bird), an alien prey (rabbit) and an alien predator (cat). Our model overcomes several model construction problems in existing models. Moreover, our model generates richer, more reasonable and realistic dynamics. We explore the possible control strategies to save or restore the bird by controlling or eliminating the rabbit or the cat when the bird is endangered. We confirm the existence of the hyperpredation phenomenon, which is a big potential threat to most endemic prey. Specifically, we show that, in an endemic prey-alien prey-alien predator system, eradication of introduced predators such as the cat alone is not always the best solution to protect endemic insular prey since predator control may fail to protect the indigenous prey when the control of the introduced prey is not carried out simultaneously. PMID:16529776

  7. Rabbit care and husbandry.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Teresa

    2004-05-01

    This article provides information for the veterinary staff to be better prepared to care for the special needs of rabbit patients as they are presented in increased frequency for veterinary care. Housing, nutrition,restraint, and recognizing illness are covered in detail. Descriptions of techniques for blood collection, oral medication administration, and injection sites are included. Preventive care recommendations for examinations from first visit to geriatric visits are outlined as well as indications for spaying and neutering. Also provided are lists that will aid the veterinary staff in providing instructions when the appointment is made, recommendations for boarding, surgical, and anesthetic considerations and clinical signs that are associated with pain in rabbits. PMID:15145392

  8. A homologue of the rabbit kappa-chain allotype b9 ON IgG from a cottontail rabbit.

    PubMed

    Tosi, S L; Mage, R G; Tosi, R M

    1976-08-01

    Eight out of 12 anti-b9 antisera tested strongly bound 125IgG of only one of four individual cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus). In addition to this apparent polymorphism of a b9 homologue in cottontail rabbits, a polymorphism defined by some anti-b5 antisera was found. Three of 15 anti-b5 antisera reacted with IgG from only two of the four cottontail rabbits. Reactions with anti-b4 and anti-b6 were similar to those with hare IgG. Most anti-b4 and anti-b6 antisera bound the IgG from each animal. The cottontails we tested also resembled the hare with respect to their weak reactivity with some anti-a2 antisera (Vh allotype) and strong reactivity with anti-15 (an allotype localized in the Fc portion of rabbit gamma-chains). PMID:820806

  9. Biodegradable fixation of rabbit osteotomies.

    PubMed

    Vainionpää, S; Vihtonen, K; Mero, M; Pätiälä, H; Rokkanen, P; Kilpikari, J; Törmälä, P

    1986-06-01

    Osteotomies of the tibial diaphysis were operatively fixed with biodegradable implants in 44 rabbits. Polyglycolic acid (PGA)/polylactic acid (PLA) copolymer implants reinforced with 7 per cent carbon fibre and overlaid with gold were used in 24 rabbits. Poly-beta-hydroxy butyric acid (PHBA) with carbon fibre reinforcement and gold surfacing were used in 20 rabbits. No external support was used. Unsatisfactory results were achieved with the PGA/PLA copolymer implants. Better results were achieved in 15 out of 20 rabbits whose osteotomies were fixed with carbon fibre-reinforced PHBA implants. PMID:3739665

  10. Widespread exposure to Sarcoptes scabiei in wild European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in Spain.

    PubMed

    Millán, J; Casáis, R; Delibes-Mateos, M; Calvete, C; Rouco, C; Castro, F; Colomar, V; Casas-Díaz, E; Ramírez, E; Moreno, S; Prieto, J M; Villafuerte, R

    2012-02-10

    Sarcoptic mange was recently described in the wild European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in north-eastern Mediterranean Spain, the first such infection reported in this species anywhere in the world. This finding has created concern in conservationists and game managers given that an outbreak of mange after a translocation would have catastrophic consequences for naïve rabbit populations in other parts of Spain. A retrospective serosurvey using an 'in house' ELISA test based on the use of a recombinant antigen aimed at determining the rates of contact with Sarcoptes scabiei was carried out on sera from 966 rabbits collected between 1993 and 2010 in Spain. Antibodies were found in 13% of wild rabbits in 60% of the 53 areas surveyed, as well as in 16 of the 17 Spanish provinces and islands studied. Seropositive rabbits were found amongst the oldest samples analyzed and in all studied years. Antibodies were also detected in 36% of rabbits from the protected island of Dragonera, where rabbits have probably not been released since the 1970s. On Mallorca, where 89 rabbits were inspected for both lesions and antibodies, the prevalence of lesions (5.6%) was much lower than the seroprevalence (22.5%), indicating that rabbits often survive infection or that ELISA detects infected rabbits before they develop visible lesions. Seroprevalence was higher in areas with medium levels of rabbit abundance, no restocking and high rainfall. The results show that mange is widespread in rabbits and that the mite is not a recent introduction. Thus, sarcoptic mange could be considered as an enzootic disease in the wild rabbit and so prophylactic measures implemented during rabbit translocations are to be encouraged to avoid local outbreaks in naïve populations. PMID:21852039

  11. Changes in testosterone concentration in the fetal rabbit testis after removal of the hypothalamus (encephalectomy)

    SciTech Connect

    Proshlyakova, E.V.; Rumyantseva, O.N.; Mitskevich, M.S.

    1986-10-01

    The aim of this investigation was to obtain direct data on the role of the hypothalamus in regulation of the adrogen function of the testes in rabbit fetuses. Testosterone was determined by radioimmunoassay. Changes in testostereone concentration in rabbit fetal testis after encephalectomy and after injection of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) into encephalectomized fetuses is shown. Results obtained are evidence that the hypothalamus, pituitary and testes in the rabbit aged 23-25 days of prenatal development constitute a single functional system. It is concluded that in both rabbit and hog fetuses, the hypothalamus begins to regulate pituitary gonadotrophic activity after LHRH can be detected in the hypothalamus itself.

  12. Deliberate introduction of the European rabbit, Oryctolagus cuniculus, into Australia.

    PubMed

    Fenner, F

    2010-04-01

    The European rabbit was brought to Australia as a companion animal by early settlers. It sometimes escaped, but failed to survive in the Australian bush. In 1879 wild rabbits were deliberately sent to Victoria to provide game for wealthy settlers to shoot. They soon spread all over Australia, except in the tropics, and became Australia's major animal pest. After careful testing in Australian wildlife and in humans, control by myxoma virus was introduced at various sites between 1937 and 1950, spreading all over the Murray-Darling Basin in 1950. Within one year mutations in the virus had led to slightly less virulence, and these continued for the next 50 years. In the early 21st Century testing viruses obtained from wild rabbits showed that the majority of these viruses were more virulent than the virus used to initiate the epidemic. In 1995 another virus specific for European rabbits, rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus, escaped from areas in which field trials were being carried out and spread around Australia. It was more successful than myxomatosis for rabbit control in arid regions. PMID:20617651

  13. Experimental testing of the dual-layer Woven EndoBridge device using an elastase-induced aneurysm model in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yong-Hong; Dai, Daying; Schroeder, Dana; Kadirvel, Ramanathan; Kallmes, David F

    2016-06-01

    The dual-layer Woven EndoBridge (WEB) device (WEB II) is designed to improve the performance of the first-generation WEB device. This study was performed to evaluate the acute and chronic performance of WEB II for aneurysm occlusion in an elastase-induced aneurysm model in rabbits. We implanted WEB II devices in 36 elastase-induced aneurysms and followed up for one, three, six, and 12 months. Degree of aneurysm occlusion at follow-up was graded on the Web Occlusion Scale (WOS): Grade A, complete aneurysm occlusion; Grade B, complete occlusion with recess filling; Grade C, residual neck filling; and Grade D, residual aneurysm filling. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for histological assessment of aneurysm healing. Grades A, B, C, and D aneurysm occlusion at one-month follow-up were noted in three (17%), three (17%), eight (44%), and four (22%) of 18 cases, respectively. At the three-month time point Grades A, B, C, and D were shown in two (33%), two (33%), one (17%), and one (17%) aneurysms. Six months after treatment, one (17%), two (33%), two (33%), and one (17%) cases demonstrated Grades A, B, C, and D occlusion. At the 12-month time point, Grades B, C, and D were shown in three (50%), two (33%), and one (17%) aneurysms. Histologic evaluation showed progressive thrombus organization within aneurysm lumen from one to 12 months. These results indicated that the WEB II device can achieve high rates of aneurysm occlusion over time in experimental aneurysms. PMID:26847799

  14. Pathogenicity of rotavirus in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Thouless, M E; DiGiacomo, R F; Deeb, B J; Howard, H

    1988-01-01

    The role of rotavirus in diarrheal disease of rabbits was investigated, and a model for human rotavirus infection was established. Orogastric inoculation of 8- and 12-week-old New Zealand White rabbits with a rabbit strain of rotavirus (L:ALA:84) resulted in fecal shedding of virus for 6 to 8 days from 2 to 5 days after inoculation. Most rabbits exhibited diarrhea, coincident with the onset of viral shedding, which persisted for 2 to 4 days. Diarrhea was characterized by soft or fluid stools and fecal staining of the perineum. Inoculation of 3-week-old rabbits resulted in a briefer period of viral shedding and diarrhea of a milder nature. Histopathologic examination during the period of viral shedding revealed a mild, nonsuppurative enteritis. Inoculated rabbits exhibited antibodies in serum to rotavirus by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Sham-inoculated or uninoculated rabbits maintained in the same cage or the same room with inoculated rabbits acquired rotavirus infection. The mild diarrheal disease which resulted with a rotavirus isolate from severe field cases suggests that cofactors were involved. Images PMID:2838507

  15. Neuromuscular lesions in restrained rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mendlowski, B

    1975-01-01

    Ten of 16 rabbits restrained 6 h daily for 35 days developed focal to diffuse degeneration of the sciatic nerves. Very small necrotic areas also were found in the skeletal muscles of seven of 16 rabbits, but the muscle lesions did not correlate with the nerve changes. PMID:180647

  16. SCIENTIST DEMONSTRATES PLACING A "RABBIT CATCHER" INTO ONE OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SCIENTIST DEMONSTRATES PLACING A "RABBIT CATCHER" INTO ONE OF THE VERTICAL TEST HOLES AT THE TOP OF THE MTR. CONTROL ROD DRIVES ARE BEHIND HIM TOWARDS LEFT OF VIEW. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-513. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 2/13/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Occurrence of Toxoplasma gondii in domestic rabbits of Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Débora Costa Viegas; Santos, André de Souza; da Silva, Luana Thamires Rapôso; de Melo, Renata Pimentel Bandeira; da Silva, José Givanildo; Júnior, José Wilton Pinheiro; Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to conduct a serosurvey of toxoplasmosis in domestic rabbits of Northeastern Brazil. Blood samples and tissue fragments (brain, heart and diaphragm) were collected from 150 and 54 rabbits from the state of Pernambuco, Brazil, respectively. The serum samples were subjected to serological analysis (Modified Agglutination Test - MAT) and the tissue samples were assessed by PCR and histopathological analysis. Data collected through questionnaires were subjected to analysis of risk factors. According to the MAT and the PCR results, 6.7% (10/150; CI 3.2%-11.9%) of the rabbits were positive for anti-T. gondii antibodies and 9.25% (5/54) of the tissue fragments were positive for T. gondii DNA, respectively. Lesions associated with T. gondii infection, mainly characterized by granuloma, mononuclear cell infiltrates, degeneration areas and necrosis in brain and heart, were detected in the histopathological analysis. The risk factors associated with T. gondii infection identified in the present study were homemade food (odds ratio = 39.00) and contact between cats and rabbits (odds ratio = 52.00). This is the first report of toxoplasmosis in rabbits of Northeastern Brazil. The management problems identified in the present study must be corrected to reduce the frequency of positive animals in herds of rabbits. PMID:27447212

  18. Hypolipidaemic effects of Ballota undulata in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Qazan, Walid Sh

    2008-04-15

    The aim of to study the effect of Ballota undulata (70% EtOH) extract on lipid profile on Rabbits. The plant extract was orally administered to the atherogenic rabbits (atherogenic diet + cholesterol powder supplement 400 mg/kg/body weight/day dissolved in 5 mL coconut oil) at dose of 1.2 g kg(-1) body weight/day. During the overall period of the experiment blood was collected and serum was analyzed for lipid profile. Animals were sacrificed; the heart and the liver were collected and kept at -20 degrees C until assayed. Biochemical analysis of blood serum and tissue (liver and heart muscle) level were made for cholesterol, phospholipids and triglycerides. In addition blood serum was analyzed further for HDL-Cholesterol. All the results were statistically analyzed using students t-test. Hypolipidaemic nature of Ballota undulata (70% EtOH) extract was studied in hyperlipidaemic Rabbits. The increased cholesterol levels were brought to normal by administration of Ballota undulata. Serum cholesterol levels dropped from 940.7 to 230.41 (75.55%) and further to 119.2 (87.32%) by the end of the experiment. Similarly, phospholipids and triglycerides levels were observed to be also reduced. The tissues lipids profiles of liver and heart muscle showed similar changes in those noticed in serum lipids. Ballota undulata possesses active hypolipidaemic constituents. PMID:18819560

  19. Milkweed control by food imprinted rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ducs, Anita; Kazi, Andrea; Bilkó, Ágnes; Altbäcker, Vilmos

    2016-09-01

    Many species of invasive plants are spreading out rapidly in Europe. The common milkweed occupies increasingly more area. Being poisonous, most animals will not graze on it however rabbits would be an effective organism for the biological control of milkweed. Rabbit kittens can learn the maternal diet in various ways. They prefer aromatic foods which their mother had eaten during pregnancy or lactation period, -even if it is poisonous- but they can also learn the maternal diet from the fecal pellets deposited by the mother into the nest during the nursing events. The present study was aimed to investigate if rabbit kittens can learn that the common milkweed is a potential food also. In the first 10days of their lives kits got fecal pellets originating from individuals having fed on common milkweed previously. When weaned on day 28 postpartum, these pups preferred the milkweed in the 3-way food choice test, opposite to the control group. Most surprisingly in a second experiment it was also shown that the common milkweed was also preferred by the kittens if their mother ate it not during, but one month before pregnancy. PMID:27451911

  20. The cottontail rabbits of Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Llewellyn, L.M.; Handley, C.O.

    1945-01-01

    Five races of cottontail rabbits belonging to three species occur in Virginia. One of them, the Mearns cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus mearnsi), is reported here for the first time. It occurs in six southwestern counties of the state, while the eastern cottontail (S. f. mallurus) occurs in the remainder of the state with the exception of Smith and Fishermans islands off the eastern coast of Cape Charles, where it is replaced by Hitchens cottontail (S. f. hitchensi). The New England cottontail (S. transitionalis) is found on the higher mountain peaks, above 3000 feet, and the swamp rabbit (S. palustris) occurs in the Dismal Swamp region of southeastern Virginia.....The height of the breeding season for the eastern cottontail in Virginia is March and April, but breeding continues through the entire year except in December and January. The average litter size based on embryo counts was 4.7. The sex ratio of 234 specimens from all parts of the state, taken mostly in the December to February period, was 53 males to 47 females. That of a group of 145 rabbits live-trapped at Blacksburg during February and Marchwas 58 males to 42 females. The figures show that males are more active than females during the winter months, and therefore are more easily taken then....In transplanting cottontails from one section of the state to another, it is recommended that only cottontails of the same race as those originally present in the region being restocked be released there....Tularemia is not a common disease among rabbits in Virginia, but the rabbit ticks are often carriers of the disease and may transmit it to rabbits. Rabbit ticks are also found to be carriers of Rocky Mountain fever and American Q. fever. After the ticks drop off the rabbits to hibernate in the ground, which is likely to occur during mid-winter in Virginia, there is relatively little danger of humans contracting tularemia by contact with rabbits. Present laws in Virginia which prohibit rabbit hunting until the

  1. Increased immunity to cottontail rabbit papillomavirus infection in EIII/JC inbred rabbits after vaccination with a mutant E6 that correlates with spontaneous regression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy M; Christensen, Neil D

    2007-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that a progressive cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) strain containing a single amino acid change in E6 (E6G252E) induced papilloma regression in EIII/JC inbred rabbits. This finding implied that the point mutation might cause an increase in the antigenicity of the mutant versus the wild-type E6. To test this hypothesis, groups of four EIII/JC inbred rabbits were immunized with wild-type CRPVE6, CRPVE6G252E, CRPV E5, or with vector alone. A gene gun delivery system was used to deliver the DNA vaccines. Two of four rabbits from both E6G252E- and wild-type E6-vaccinated groups were free of papillomas at week 12 after viral challenge. Significantly smaller papillomas were found on E6G252E-vaccinated rabbits than on E6-, E5-, and control vector-vaccinated rabbits (p = 0.01, unpaired Student t test) and these small papillomas regressed at week 20 after viral challenge. E5 vaccination failed to provide protection against viral challenge, and the mean papilloma size was also comparable to that of the control vector-vaccinated rabbits (p > 0.05, unpaired Student t test). We conclude that a single amino acid change in the CRPV E6 protein (G252E) increased protection against wild-type infectious CRPV. PMID:17603848

  2. Neurological Assessment Scores in Rabbit Embolic Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Aliza; Woods, Sean; Skinner, Robert; Hatton, Jeff; Lowery, John; Roberson, Paula; Hennings, Leah; Culp, William C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neurological outcomes and behavioral assessments are widely used in animal models of stroke, but assessments in rabbit models are not fully validated. The wryneck model of neurological assessment scores (NAS) was compared to percent infarct volume (%IV) values (infarct volume is a proven clinical indicator of stroke severity) and arterial occlusion localization in three rabbit angiographic stroke models. Hypothesis: NAS values will correlate with percent infarct volume values. Methods: Anesthetized New Zealand White rabbits (N=131, 4-5 kg) received internal carotid artery emboli by angiographic catheter introduced into the femoral artery and occlusions were characterized. Rabbits were evaluated at 24 hours post embolism using the NAS test of 0 (normal) to 10 (death). Deficit criteria included neck twist, righting reflex, extension reflex in hind paw and forepaw, and posture. Brain sections stained with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) were analyzed for %IV. Volume of the infarct was measured and calculated as a percent of the total brain volume. Results: The aggregate correlation for NAS values vs. %IV values was R=0.61, p<0.0001, a strong positive relationship, while correlations of the NAS components ranged from R=0.28-0.46. Occlusionsof the posterior cerebral artery vs. the middle cerebral artery alone produced significantly greater deficit scores at p<0.0001. Conclusions: These positive results validate the NAS system in the rabbit angiographic embolic stroke model. PMID:24265650

  3. Vaccine breaks: Outbreaks of myxomatosis on Spanish commercial rabbit farms.

    PubMed

    Dalton, K P; Nicieza, I; de Llano, D; Gullón, J; Inza, M; Petralanda, M; Arroita, Z; Parra, F

    2015-08-01

    Despite the success of vaccination against myxoma virus, myxomatosis remains a problem on rabbit farms throughout Spain and Europe. In this study we set out to evaluate possible causes of myxoma virus (MYXV) vaccine failures addressing key issues with regard to pathogen, vaccine and vaccination strategies. This was done by genetically characterising MYXV field isolates from farm outbreaks, selecting a representative strain for which to assay its virulence and measuring the protective capability of a commercial vaccine against this strain. Finally, we compare methods (route) of vaccine administration under farm conditions and evaluate immune response in vaccinated rabbits. The data presented here show that the vaccine tested is capable of eliciting protection in rabbits that show high levels of seroconversion. However, the number of animals failing to seroconvert following subcutaneous vaccination may leave a large number of rabbits unprotected following vaccine administration. Successful vaccination requires the strict implication of workable, planned, on farm programs. Following this, analysis to confirm seroconversion rates may be advisable. Factors such as the wild rabbit reservoir, control of biting insects and good hygienic practices must be taken into consideration to prevent vaccine failures from occurring. PMID:26009303

  4. Tissue distribution of subcutaneously administered aluminum chloride in weanling rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Du Val, G.; Grubb, B.R.; Bentley, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to determine blood and tissue levels of aluminum (Al) in normal young rabbits. Furthermore, tissue distribution and accumulation of Al were determined as related to blood concentration in Al-dosed rabbits. The levels of Al accumulated were determined in different tissues of growing rabbits after continuous subcutaneous administration of Al chloride (3.78 mg/d) for 28 d. No signs of toxicity were apparent from comparisons of hematocrit or weight gain between control and Al-dosed rabbits. The largest concentration of the Al was observed in bone, which was also found to have the highest levels in the control rabbit tissues. Following bone, the experimental animals showed the greatest increase of Al levels in kidney cortex, kidney medulla, liver, testes, skeletal muscle, heart, brain white matter, and brain hippocampus, in that order. No significant difference was found in brain grey matter between control and experimental animals. As the brain tissue of the Al-treated animals had the lowest Al level of the tissues measured, it appears that there is a partial blood-brain barrier to entry of Al.

  5. Rabbit anti-rabies immunoglobulins production and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjian; Liu, Qiongqiong; Feng, Xiaomin; Tang, Qi; Wang, Zhongcan; Li, Suqing; Feng, Zhenqing; Zhu, Jin; Guan, Xiaohong

    2011-04-01

    Due to the disadvantages of human and equine rabies immunoglobulin, it is necessary to develop a substitute for HRIG and ERIG, especially for those people living in the developing countries. Because of higher affinity and lower immunogenicity of rabbit's immunoglobulins, anti-rabies immunoglobulins specific to rabies virus were produced in rabbits as a bioreactor, and had been characterized by ELISA, affinity assay, immunofluorescence assay (IFA), immunocytochemistry, rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). ELISA, affinity assay and IFA showed that rabbit RIG (RRIG) bound specifically to rabies virions. RFFIT result showed that RRIG has neutralization activity. This result was confirmed in vivo in a Kunming mouse challenge model and the protection rate of the treatment with RRIG was higher (25%) than that offered by HRIG when mice were challenged with a lethal RV dose. Our results demonstrate that RRIG is safe and efficacious as a candidate drug to replace rabies immunoglobulin in post-exposure prophylaxis. PMID:21602780

  6. Alternative methods for the replacement of eye irritation testing.

    PubMed

    Lotz, Christian; Schmid, Freia F; Rossi, Angela; Kurdyn, Szymon; Kampik, Daniel; De Wever, Bart; Walles, Heike; Groeber, Florian K

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades significant regulatory attempts were made to replace, refine and reduce animal testing to assess the risk of consumer products for the human eye. As the original in vivo Draize eye test has been criticized for limited predictivity, costs and ethical issues, several animal-free test methods have been developed to categorize substances according to the global harmonized system (GHS) for eye irritation.This review summarizes the progress of alternative test methods for the assessment of eye irritation. Based on the corneal anatomy and the current knowledge of the mechanisms causing eye irritation, different ex vivo and in vitro methods will be presented and discussed in regard of possible limitations and their status of regulatory acceptance. In addition to established in vitro models, this review will also highlight emerging, full thickness cornea models that might be applicable to predict all GHS categories. PMID:26626125

  7. Intra-arterial delivery of triolein emulsion increases vascular permeability in skeletal muscles of rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak Jin; Kim, Yong Woo; Lee, In Sook; Song, Jong Woon; Jeong, Yeon Joo; Choi, Seon Hee; Choi, Kyung Un; Suh, Kuen Tak; Cho, Byung Mann

    2009-01-01

    Background To test the hypothesis that triolein emulsion will increase vascular permeability of skeletal muscle. Methods Triolein emulsion was infused into the superficial femoral artery in rabbits (triolein group, n = 12). As a control, saline was infused (saline group, n = 18). Pre- and post-contrast T1-weighted MR images were obtained two hours after infusion. The MR images were qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated by assessing the contrast enhancement of the ipsilateral muscles. Histologic examination was performed in all rabbits. Results The ipsilateral muscles of the rabbits in the triolein group showed contrast enhancement, as opposed to in the ipsilateral muscles of the rabbits in the saline group. The contrast enhancement of the lesions was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Histologic findings showed that most examination areas of the triolein and saline groups had a normal appearance. Conclusion Rabbit thigh muscle revealed significantly increased vascular permeability with triolein emulsion; this was clearly demonstrated on the postcontrast MR images. PMID:19604410

  8. The Rabbit as a Model for Studying Lung Disease and Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kamaruzaman, Nurfatin Asyikhin; Kamaldin, Nurulain ‘Atikah; Latahir, Ahmad Zaeri; Yahaya, Badrul Hisham

    2013-01-01

    No single animal model can reproduce all of the human features of both acute and chronic lung diseases. However, the rabbit is a reliable model and clinically relevant facsimile of human disease. The similarities between rabbits and humans in terms of airway anatomy and responses to inflammatory mediators highlight the value of this species in the investigation of lung disease pathophysiology and in the development of therapeutic agents. The inflammatory responses shown by the rabbit model, especially in the case of asthma, are comparable with those that occur in humans. The allergic rabbit model has been used extensively in drug screening tests, and this model and humans appear to be sensitive to similar drugs. In addition, recent studies have shown that the rabbit serves as a good platform for cell delivery for the purpose of stem-cell-based therapy. PMID:23653896

  9. Differential Fault Analysis of Rabbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kircanski, Aleksandar; Youssef, Amr M.

    Rabbit is a high speed scalable stream cipher with 128-bit key and a 64-bit initialization vector. It has passed all three stages of the ECRYPT stream cipher project and is a member of eSTREAM software portfolio. In this paper, we present a practical fault analysis attack on Rabbit. The fault model in which we analyze the cipher is the one in which the attacker is assumed to be able to fault a random bit of the internal state of the cipher but cannot control the exact location of injected faults. Our attack requires around 128 - 256 faults, precomputed table of size 241.6 bytes and recovers the complete internal state of Rabbit in about 238 steps.

  10. European Rabbits as Reservoir for Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    González-Barrio, David; Maio, Elisa; Vieira-Pinto, Madalena

    2015-01-01

    We studied the role of European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) as a reservoir for Coxiella burnetii in the Iberian region. High individual and population seroprevalences observed in wild and farmed rabbits, evidence of systemic infections, and vaginal shedding support the reservoir role of the European rabbit for C. burnetii. PMID:25988670

  11. Hematological assessment in pet rabbits: blood sample collection and blood cell identification.

    PubMed

    Moore, David M; Zimmerman, Kurt; Smith, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Pet rabbits are presented to veterinary clinics for routine care and treatment of clinical diseases. In addition to obtaining clinical history, additional diagnostic testing may be required, including hematological assessments. This article describes common blood collection methods, including venipuncture sites, volume of blood that can be safely collected, and handling of the blood. Hematological parameters for normal rabbits are provided for comparison with in-house or commercial test results. A description of the morphology of rabbit leukocytes is provided to assist in performing a differential count. Differential diagnoses are provided for abnormal values identified in the hemogram. PMID:25421022

  12. Efficacy of MR-guided Focused Ultrasound Thermal Ablation of Rabbit VX2 Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiangtao; Zhang, Yongzhi; Tam, Karen; McDannold, Nathan; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-05-01

    This animal study addresses the treatment efficacy of the MR-guided thermal ablation technique and temperature monitoring in rabbit tumors. Specifically, the relationship between the thermal dose coverage in the tumors and the rabbit survival rate was investigated. Two groups of rabbits (14 in back tumor group and 12 in thigh tumor group) were treated with the ExAblate-2000 MR-guided focused ultrasound thermal ablation system one week after being injected VX2 tumor cells into their back muscle or thigh muscle. Sonication was repeated twice in a planned location in the tumor region and monitored in the coronal and sagittal planes respectively to ensure volumetric thermal dose monitoring. MR T1 Gad-enhanced contrast images of the tumors were obtained immediately after treatment and post-treatment at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks (or before sacrificing the rabbits). In the thigh tumor rabbits group, tumor recurrence was observed for only one and the other eleven rabbits survived without tumor recurrence at 4 weeks. Aiming at a longer survival time, the rabbits with back tumors had up to 12 weeks survival time. Three rabbits survived to 12 weeks without tumor recurrence in the back tumor group, yielding less promising survival rate than that of the thigh tumor group survival test. Successful thermal ablation (i.e. lack of recurrence) was demonstrated when the tumors received full thermal dose coverage.

  13. Osteoblastic Osteosarcoma in a Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Megumi; Kondo, Hirotaka; Onuma, Mamoru; Shibuya, Hisashi; Sato, Tsuneo

    2012-01-01

    An osteosarcoma developed in the tarsal joint region involving the distal tibia of a domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Micrometastases were present in the lungs. Histologically the tumor was composed of ovoid to short-spindle cells with abundant giant cells, producing irregular islands of osteoids. The tumor cells were immunopositive with antiosteocalcin monoclonal antibody, consistent with their derivation from osteoblasts. According to review of 10 published cases, productive osteoblasic osteosarcoma is the most common bone tumor in rabbits, with half of all cases developing in the skull or facial bones. PMID:22546918

  14. Experimental infection of young rabbits with a rabbit enteric coronavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Descôteaux, J P; Lussier, G

    1990-01-01

    The clinical signs and lesions caused by the rabbit enteric coronavirus (RECV) were studied in young rabbits orally inoculated with a suspension containing RECV particles. The inoculated animals were observed daily for evidence of diarrhea. Fecal samples and specimens from the small intestine and from the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) were collected from 2 h to 29 days postinoculation (PI) and processed for immune electron microscopy (IEM) and light microscopy. Coronavirus particles were detected in the cecal contents of most inoculated animals from 6 h to 29 days PI. Lesions were first observed 6 h PI and were characterized by a loss of the brush border of mature enterocytes located at the tips of intestinal villi and by necrosis of these cells. At 48 h PI, short intestinal villi and hypertrophic crypts were noted. In the GALT, complete necrosis of the M cells as well as necrosis of the enterocytes lining the villi above the lymphoid follicules with hypertrophy of the corresponding crypts were observed in all the animals. Five inoculated rabbits had diarrhea three days PI. The presence of RECV particles in the feces of the sick animals and the microscopic lesions observed in the small intestine suggested that the virus was responsible for the clinical signs. A few inoculated rabbits remained free of diarrhea. Fecal material collected at postmortem examination contained RECV particles. The results suggest that the virus could also produce a subclinical infection. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2174299

  15. Induction of Asherman's Syndrome in Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Bazoobandi, Sanaz; Tanideh, Nader; Rahmanifar, Farhad; Tamadon, Amin; Keshtkar, Mohammadreza; Mehrabani, Davood; Kasraeian, Maryam; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uterine synechiae or Asherman's syndrome is a condition that can cause infertility. The present experimental study was designed to establish the rabbit as an animal model for human Asherman's syndrome using the endometrial curettage. Methods: In an experimental study, female adult rabbits (n=18) were randomly divided into intact and ovariectomized groups. One third of caudal part of both uteri was submitted to traumatic endometrial curettage. One group was simultaneously ovariectomized. The intact rabbits were artificially induced ovulation during 10 days after surgery. One third of cranial part of both uteri was selected as the control. Synechiae occurring, luminal area/total area (LA/TA), endometrial area/total area (EA/TA), myometrial and perimetrial area/total area (MPA/TA), endometrial area/uterine wall area (EA/UWA), and myometrial and perimetrial area/uterine wall area (MPA/UWA) ratios of both uteri in six subdivided groups (n=6) were analysed in curetted and intact control parts. On days 15, 30 and 45 following surgery by two-way ANOVA and LSD test (p<0.05). Results: Histopathologic findings showed significant epithelial damage together with significant inflammatory reaction in the intact curettage group. The LA/TA ratios of the intact curettage group on days 15 and 45 were more than the intact control group on day 15. The EA/TA ratio of the intact curettage group on day 30 was less than the intact control group on day 30. Conclusion: Uterine fibrosis was observed in intact curettage group, and this modified animal model showed a pathogenesis condition similar to intrauterine adhesions observed in human. PMID:26962478

  16. Chronic hypoxia enhances 15-lipoxygenase-mediated vasorelaxation in rabbit arteries.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Nitin T; Pfister, Sandra L; Gauthier, Kathryn M; Chawengsub, Yuttana; Baker, John E; Campbell, William B

    2009-03-01

    15-Lipoxygenase (15-LO-1) metabolizes arachidonic acid (AA) to 11,12,15-trihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (THETAs) and 15-hydroxy-11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (HEETA) that dilate rabbit arteries. Increased endothelial 15-LO-1 expression enhances arterial relaxations to agonists. We tested the effect of hypoxia on 15-LO-1 expression, THETA and HEETA synthesis, and relaxations in rabbit arteries. The incubation of rabbit aortic endothelial cells and isolated aortas in 0.7% O(2) increased 15-LO-1 expression. Rabbits were housed in a hypoxic atmosphere of 12% O(2) for 5 days. 15-LO-1 expression increased in the endothelium of the arteries of rabbits in 12% O(2) compared with room air. THETA and HEETA synthesis was also enhanced in aortas and mesenteric arteries. AA hyperpolarized the smooth muscle cells in indomethacin- and phenylephrine-treated mesenteric arteries of hypoxic rabbits from -29.4 +/- 1 to -50.1 +/- 3 mV. The hyperpolarization to AA was less in arteries of normoxic rabbits (from -26.0 +/- 2 to -37 +/- 2 mV). This AA-induced hyperpolarization was inhibited by the 15-LO inhibitor BW-755C. Nitric oxide and prostaglandin-independent maximum relaxations to acetylcholine (79.7 +/- 2%) and AA (38.3 +/- 4%) were enhanced in mesenteric arteries from hypoxic rabbits compared with the normoxic rabbits (49.7 +/- 6% and 19.9 +/- 2%, respectively). These relaxations were inhibited by BW-755C and nordihydroguaiaretic acid. Therefore, hypoxia increased the relaxations to agonists in the rabbit mesenteric arteries by enhancing endothelial 15-LO-1 expression and synthesis of the hyperpolarizing factors THETA and HEETA. PMID:19112096

  17. Evaluating the Functionality of Conjunctiva Using a Rabbit Dry Eye Model

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Yuan; Bhattacharya, Dhruva; Jones, Richard E.; Zhao, Fangkun; Chen, Rongji; Zhang, Jinsong; Wang, Mingwu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the conjunctival functionality in a rabbit dry eye (DE) model. Methods. Nictitating membrane, lacrimal and Harderian glands were surgically excised from male New Zealand white rabbits using minimally invasive surgery. Fluorescein/rose Bengal staining of ocular surface (OS) and Schirmer test were done before (BE) and after excision (AE). The expression of interleukin- (IL-) 1β, tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, and MUC5AC proteins were estimated by immunoblotting from conjunctival impression cytology specimens. MUC5AC mRNA was quantified as well. The effect of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) blockers on tear production and potential differences (PD) of OS were assessed under anesthesia in rabbits with and without surgery. Results. Increase in corneal and conjunctival staining was observed 1 month AE compared to BE. Schirmer tests failed to show decrease in tear production. Elevated IL-1β, and TNF-α, 1 month AE indicated inflammation. MUC5AC expression was elevated 1 month AE. ENaC blockers did not improve tear production in rabbit eyes AE but characteristic changes in PD were observed in rabbits with surgery. Conclusions. DE biomarkers are important tools for OS assessment and MUC5AC expression is elevated in rabbit DE. PD measurement revealed significant electrophysiological changes in rabbits with surgery. PMID:27088007

  18. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart

    PubMed Central

    Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Swigart, Philip M.; Baker, Anthony J.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse. PMID:27258143

  19. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R Croft; Cowley, Patrick M; Singh, Abhishek; Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Swigart, Philip M; Baker, Anthony J; Simpson, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse. PMID:27258143

  20. Effects of Paradigm and Inter-Stimulus Interval on Age Differences in Eyeblink Classical Conditioning in Rabbits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff-Pak, Diana S.; Seta, Susan E.; Roker, LaToya A.; Lehr, Melissa A.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine parameters affecting age differences in eyeblink classical conditioning in a large sample of young and middle-aged rabbits. A total of 122 rabbits of mean ages of 4 or 26 mo were tested at inter-stimulus intervals (ISIs) of 600 or 750 msec in the delay or trace paradigms. Paradigm affected both age groups…

  1. Use of a potential rabbit model for structure--behavioral activity studies of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Consroe, P; Martin, A R; Fish, B S

    1982-05-01

    Using the genetically unique tetrahydrocannabinol-seizure susceptible (THC-SS) rabbit, the behavioral effect of 14 cannabinoids or related structures were determined and compared to the effects of 11 previously tested cannabinoids. Relative potencies of the cannabinoid-induced convulsions in THC-SS rabbits were generally comparable to reported relative potencies of cannabinoid-produced psychoactivity in humans and other behavioral activity in monkeys or other species. These data suggest that the THC-SS rabbit may represent an experimentally convenient and reliable animal model for studies of structure--psychoactivity relationships of marijuana-like compounds. PMID:7086846

  2. Production of antibody to staphylococcal delta-haemolysin in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Heatley, N. G.

    1977-01-01

    Gamma-globulin and IgG from the sera of rabbits immunized with either "insoluble" or "solvent-transferred" staphylococcal delta-haemolysin precipitated with, and neutralized both forms of lysin. Similar preparations from the same rabbits before immunization did not; nor did those from rabbits made hyperimmune to other antigens. In these tests "insoluble" and "solvent-transferred" lysin could not be distinguished antigenically, nor could "insoluble" lysin from two different strains of staphylococci, each grown on two different media. An appendix presents further evidence for antigenicity of delta-lysin, based on affinity chromatography. PMID:410429

  3. Protective immunity with an E1 multivalent epitope DNA vaccine against cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) infection in an HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy; Peng, Xuwen; Balogh, Karla; Christensen, Neil D

    2008-02-01

    Cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV)/rabbit model is widely used to study pathogenesis of papillomavirus infections and malignant tumor progression. Recently, we established HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit lines and demonstrated efficacy for the testing of immunogenicity of a well-known A2-resticted epitope (HPV16E7/82-90) [Hu J, Peng X, Schell TD, Budgeon LR, Cladel NM, Christensen ND. An HLA-A2.1-transgenic rabbit model to study immunity to papillomavirus infection. J Immunol 2006;177(11):8037-45]. In the present study, we screened five HLA-A2.1 restricted epitopes from CRPVE1 (selected using online MHCI epitope prediction software) and constructed a multivalent epitope DNA vaccine (CRPVE1ep1-5). CRPVE1ep1-5 and a control DNA vaccine (Ub3) were then delivered intracutaneously onto normal and HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits, respectively, by a helium-driven gene-gun delivery system. One, two or three immunizations were given to different groups of animals from both New Zealand White outbred and EIII/JC inbred genetic background. Two and three immunizations with CRPVE1ep1-5 DNA vaccine provided complete protection against viral DNA infection of HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits from both genetic backgrounds but not in the control-vaccinated groups. One immunization, however, failed to protect HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits against viral DNA infection. This study further demonstrated that the HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits can be used to test the immunogenicity of HLA-A2.1 restricted epitopes identified by MHCI epitope predication software. PMID:18187239

  4. Effect of tulsi (Ocimum Sanctum Linn.) on sperm count and reproductive hormones in male albino rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Jyoti; Yadav, Mridul; Sood, Sushma; Dahiya, Kiran; Singh, Veena

    2010-10-01

    Fresh leaves of Ocimum Sanctum (OS) were used to study its effect on male reproductive function (sperm count and reproductive hormones) in male albino rabbits. Animals in the test group received supplementation of 2 g of fresh leaves of OS per rabbit for 30 days, while the control group was maintained on normal diet for the same duration. Sperm count and hormonal estimation [testosterone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH)] were done in serum samples of both groups and compared. A significant decrease was noted in the sperm count in test group rabbits. Serum testosterone levels showed marked increase while FSH and LH levels were significantly reduced in OS-treated rabbits. The results suggest the potential use of OS as an effective male contraceptive agent. PMID:21455446

  5. Development of germ cell neoplasia in situ in chinchilla rabbits.

    PubMed

    Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Montelongo Solís, Paola; Chávez-Saldaña, Margarita; Gutiérrez-Pérez, Oscar; Cortés Trujillo, Lucero; Rojas-Castañeda, Julio César

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to describe the development of germ cell neoplasia in situ in Chinchilla rabbit by administration of estradiol. The study was performed in rabbits distributed into two groups: control and 17 β-estradiol. The determination of histological alterations and POU5F1 and c-kit proteins employed as biomarkers for the diagnosis of this neoplasia was carried out. Testicular descent and complete spermatogenesis were observed in the control group. The protein biomarkers were negative. However, in the rabbits treated with estradiol, the testes remained undescended with the gonocytes undifferentiated to spermatogonia. There were histological lesions owing to germ cell neoplasia in situ and positive to POU5F1 and c-kit proteins. These findings indicate that the chinchilla rabbit is an ideal model to study this neoplasia in which the histological characteristics and biomarkers of the disease could be clearly observed. Using this model we suggested that the persisting gonocytes could be responsible for the development of germ cell neoplasia in situ. PMID:26617392

  6. The rabbit as a new reservoir host of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    García, Alexis; Fox, James G

    2003-12-01

    We investigated the prevalence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) in rabbits acquired from two commercial vendors and a local petting zoo. Fecal samples from 34 Dutch Belted (DB) and 15 New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were cultured; and isolates were biotyped, serotyped, tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and genotyped by repetitive-element sequence-based PCR (Rep-PCR). Seven (25%) of 28 DB rabbits acquired from one commercial source were positive for EHEC, including O153:H- and O153:H7. One (9%) of 11 NZW rabbits from the same source was positive for eae-, stx1+ O153 strains. In contrast, six DB rabbits from another commercial source and four rabbits from a petting zoo were negative for EHEC. Rep-PCR demonstrated that the O153 EHEC and O145 enteropathogenic E. coli were two distinct clones. Our study indicates that rabbits are a new reservoir host of EHEC that may pose a zoonotic risk for humans. PMID:14720401

  7. The Rabbit as a New Reservoir Host of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James G.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) in rabbits acquired from two commercial vendors and a local petting zoo. Fecal samples from 34 Dutch Belted (DB) and 15 New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were cultured; and isolates were biotyped, serotyped, tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and genotyped by repetitive-element sequence–based PCR (Rep-PCR). Seven (25%) of 28 DB rabbits acquired from one commercial source were positive for EHEC, including O153:H- and O153:H7. One (9%) of 11 NZW rabbits from the same source was positive for eae-, stx1+ O153 strains. In contrast, six DB rabbits from another commercial source and four rabbits from a petting zoo were negative for EHEC. Rep-PCR demonstrated that the O153 EHEC and O145 enteropathogenic E. coli were two distinct clones. Our study indicates that rabbits are a new reservoir host of EHEC that may pose a zoonotic risk for humans. PMID:14720401

  8. The bacterial communities associated with fecal types and body weight of rex rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Bo; Han, Shushu; Wang, Ping; Wen, Bin; Jian, Wensu; Guo, Wei; Yu, Zhiju; Du, Dan; Fu, Xiangchao; Kong, Fanli; Yang, Mingyao; Si, Xiaohui; Zhao, Jiangchao; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Rex rabbit is an important small herbivore for fur and meat production. However, little is known about the gut microbiota in rex rabbit, especially regarding their relationship with different fecal types and growth of the hosts. We characterized the microbiota of both hard and soft feces from rex rabbits with high and low body weight by using the Illumina MiSeq platform targeting the V4 region of the 16S rDNA. High weight rex rabbits possess distinctive microbiota in hard feces, but not in soft feces, from the low weight group. We detected the overrepresentation of several genera such as YS2/Cyanobacteria, and Bacteroidales and underrepresentation of genera such as Anaeroplasma spp. and Clostridiaceae in high weight hard feces. Between fecal types, several bacterial taxa such as Ruminococcaceae, and Akkermansia spp. were enriched in soft feces. PICRUSt analysis revealed that metabolic pathways such as “stilbenoid, diarylheptanoid, gingerol biosynthesis” were enriched in high weight rabbits, and pathways related to “xenobiotics biodegradation” and “various types of N-glycan biosynthesis” were overrepresented in rabbit soft feces. Our study provides foundation to generate hypothesis aiming to test the roles that different bacterial taxa play in the growth and caecotrophy of rex rabbits. PMID:25791609

  9. The bacterial communities associated with fecal types and body weight of rex rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bo; Han, Shushu; Wang, Ping; Wen, Bin; Jian, Wensu; Guo, Wei; Yu, Zhiju; Du, Dan; Fu, Xiangchao; Kong, Fanli; Yang, Mingyao; Si, Xiaohui; Zhao, Jiangchao; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Rex rabbit is an important small herbivore for fur and meat production. However, little is known about the gut microbiota in rex rabbit, especially regarding their relationship with different fecal types and growth of the hosts. We characterized the microbiota of both hard and soft feces from rex rabbits with high and low body weight by using the Illumina MiSeq platform targeting the V4 region of the 16S rDNA. High weight rex rabbits possess distinctive microbiota in hard feces, but not in soft feces, from the low weight group. We detected the overrepresentation of several genera such as YS2/Cyanobacteria, and Bacteroidales and underrepresentation of genera such as Anaeroplasma spp. and Clostridiaceae in high weight hard feces. Between fecal types, several bacterial taxa such as Ruminococcaceae, and Akkermansia spp. were enriched in soft feces. PICRUSt analysis revealed that metabolic pathways such as "stilbenoid, diarylheptanoid, gingerol biosynthesis" were enriched in high weight rabbits, and pathways related to "xenobiotics biodegradation" and "various types of N-glycan biosynthesis" were overrepresented in rabbit soft feces. Our study provides foundation to generate hypothesis aiming to test the roles that different bacterial taxa play in the growth and caecotrophy of rex rabbits. PMID:25791609

  10. Immunosuppression abrogates resistance of young rabbits to Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD) is caused by a calicivirus (RHDV) that kills 90% of infected adult European rabbits within 3 days. Remarkably, young rabbits are resistant to RHD. We induced immunosuppression in young rabbits by treatment with methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) and challenged the animals with RHDV by intramuscular injection. All of these young rabbits died within 3 days of infection due to fulminant hepatitis, presenting a large number of RHDV-positive dead or apoptotic hepatocytes, and a significant seric increase in cytokines, features that are similar to those of naïve adult rabbits infected by RHDV. We conclude that MPA-induced immunosuppression abrogates the resistance of young rabbits to RHD, indicating that there are differences in the innate immune system between young and adult rabbits that contribute to their distinct resistance/susceptibility to RHDV infection. PMID:24490832

  11. Ionophore antibiotic (narasin) poisoning in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Salles, M S; Lombardo de Barros, C S; Barros, S S

    1994-10-01

    Outbreaks of narasin poisoning in rabbits from several commercial rabbit-raising farms in the state of Parana, Brazil, are reported. Approximately 5,000/35,000 rabbits died after having consumed a pelleted ration to which poultry ration premix had been added. Clinical signs included apathy, anorexia, muscle weakness, impaired walking, diarrhea, respiratory distress, and opistothonus. Gross findings were not remarkable, but varying degrees of degeneration, necrosis and regeneration of skeletal muscles were consistent histopathological features in affected rabbits. Myocardial changes were mild or absent. Thirty ppm of narasin were detected in the ration fed the rabbits. The disease was experimentally reproduced by feeding the suspected ration and by administering narasin po to rabbits. PMID:7839570

  12. In vivo gene therapy for hyperlipidemia: phenotypic correction in Watanabe rabbits by hepatic delivery of the rabbit LDL receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J; Fang, B; Eisensmith, R C; Li, X H; Nasonkin, I; Lin-Lee, Y C; Mims, M P; Hughes, A; Montgomery, C D; Roberts, J D

    1995-01-01

    Elevations of plasma total or LDL cholesterol are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Efforts directed at preventing and treating cardiovascular disease have often focused on reducing the levels of these substances in the blood. The Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic Rabbit, which has exceedingly high plasma cholesterol levels resulting from an LDL receptor deficiency, provides an excellent animal model for testing new treatments. A recombinant adenoviral vector containing the rabbit LDL receptor cDNA was administered to Watanabe rabbits. Plasma total cholesterol levels in the treated animals were reduced from 825.5 +/- 69.8 (mean +/- SD) to 247.3 +/- 61.5 mg/dl 6 d after infusion. These animals also demonstrated a 300-400% increase in plasma levels of HDL cholesterol and apo AI 10 d after treatment. As a result, the LDL:HDL ratio exhibited a dramatic decrease. Because only the rabbit LDL receptor gene was used for treatment, the results strongly suggest that the elevations of plasma HDL cholesterol and apo AI were secondary to a reduction in plasma total cholesterol in the treated animals. These results suggest an inverse relationship between plasma LDL and HDL cholesterol levels and imply that reduction of LDL cholesterol levels may have a beneficial effect on plasma HDL cholesterol. PMID:7860759

  13. In vivo gene therapy for hyperlipidemia: phenotypic correction in Watanabe rabbits by hepatic delivery of the rabbit LDL receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Fang, B; Eisensmith, R C; Li, X H; Nasonkin, I; Lin-Lee, Y C; Mims, M P; Hughes, A; Montgomery, C D; Roberts, J D

    1995-02-01

    Elevations of plasma total or LDL cholesterol are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Efforts directed at preventing and treating cardiovascular disease have often focused on reducing the levels of these substances in the blood. The Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic Rabbit, which has exceedingly high plasma cholesterol levels resulting from an LDL receptor deficiency, provides an excellent animal model for testing new treatments. A recombinant adenoviral vector containing the rabbit LDL receptor cDNA was administered to Watanabe rabbits. Plasma total cholesterol levels in the treated animals were reduced from 825.5 +/- 69.8 (mean +/- SD) to 247.3 +/- 61.5 mg/dl 6 d after infusion. These animals also demonstrated a 300-400% increase in plasma levels of HDL cholesterol and apo AI 10 d after treatment. As a result, the LDL:HDL ratio exhibited a dramatic decrease. Because only the rabbit LDL receptor gene was used for treatment, the results strongly suggest that the elevations of plasma HDL cholesterol and apo AI were secondary to a reduction in plasma total cholesterol in the treated animals. These results suggest an inverse relationship between plasma LDL and HDL cholesterol levels and imply that reduction of LDL cholesterol levels may have a beneficial effect on plasma HDL cholesterol. PMID:7860759

  14. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Prevalence in Laboratory Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Swennes, Alton G.; Buckley, Ellen M.; Madden, Carolyn M.; Byrd, Charles P.; Donocoff, Rachel S.; Rodriguez, Loretta; Parry, Nicola M. A.; Fox, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Rabbit-origin enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) causes substantial diarrhea-associated morbidity and has zoonotic potential. A culture-based survey was undertaken to ascertain its prevalence. EPEC was isolated from 6/141 (4.3%) commercially-acquired laboratory rabbits. Three of these did not have diarrhea or EPEC-typical intestinal lesions; they instead had background plasmacytic intestinal inflammation. Asymptomatically infected rabbits may function as EPEC reservoirs. PMID:23391439

  15. In vitro alternatives for ocular irritation.

    PubMed Central

    Curren, R D; Harbell, J W

    1998-01-01

    The necessity of using animals to test whether new chemicals and products are eye irritants has been questioned with increasing frequency and fervor over the last 20 years. During this time many new nonanimal methods have been proposed as reliable alternatives to the traditional rabbit (Draize) test. To date, however, none of these nonanimal (in vitro) tests have become universally accepted as a complete replacement for the Draize test. To understand why a complete replacement has not been found, one has to first understand the reasonably complex structure of the eye, the standard Draize scoring scale--which is based on a qualitative evaluation of three different tissues--the differences between human and rabbit eyes, the intrinsic variability of the animal test, and the details of the different in vitro tests that have been proposed as replacements. The in vitro tests vary from relatively simple assays using single cells to more sophisticated assays that use discarded animal tissue or artificially constructed human tissue. It is clear that appropriately designed in vitro tests will eventually give more useful mechanistic information about ocular injury from which we can more comfortably predict the risk of human eye irritation from new products and ingredients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9599696

  16. Effect of syphilitic rabbit sera taken at different periods after infection on treponemal motility, treponemal attachment to mammalian cells in vitro, and treponemal infection in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wong, G H; Steiner, B; Graves, S

    1983-08-01

    The time course of antibody synthesis during syphilis was studied in experimentally infected rabbits. A rapid antibody response was seen; the rabbits became positive in both the rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test and Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA) by nine days after infection. Treponemal immobilising antibodies were also seen as early as nine days after infection. Antibody inhibition of treponemal attachment to baby rabbit genital organ (BRGO) cells in culture occurred with immune sera taken 30 days after infection but not earlier. When T pallidum was mixed with immune syphilitic rabbit sera taken at different stages of the infection and used to infect normal rabbits the rabbits became partially resistant to T pallidum only when the treponemes were mixed with sera taken at least 30 days after syphilitic infection. This appearance correlated well with the development of antibodies which blocked attachment of T pallidum to host cells. These antibodies may be involved in the resistance to reinfection which develops in syphilis as the disease progresses. PMID:6347332

  17. Pathological and ultrastructural observations and liver function analysis of Eimeria stiedai-infected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jin; Liu, Chun; Zhu, Shun-Xing; Jiang, Ying-Mei; Wu, Liu-Cheng; Song, Hong-Yan; Shao, Yi-Xiang

    2016-06-15

    To study the pathogenicity of Eimeria stiedai, sporulated oocysts were given orally to coccidian-free two-month-old New Zealand rabbits(1000±20g). After 30days, blood samples from the rabbit hearts were collected for routine blood tests, liver functions and four characteristics of blood coagulation. Additionally, specimens of the liver, bile duct and duodenum were collected to observe the changes in pathology and ultrastructure. E. stiedai severely restricted the growth and development of rabbits. Blood tests showed that glutamine transferase (GGT) and serum cholinesterase (ChE) were significantly different from the non-infected controls. Other extremely significant differences were observed in the biochemical indices of routine blood tests, liver function and four blood coagulation characteristics, indicating that the liver functions were significantly affected. Staining showed that, compared with the negative control group, the liver, bile duct and duodenum contained significant numbers of lesions, and organs and cell structures suffered severe damage in ultrastructure, which greatly affecting bodily functions. E. stiedai-infected rabbits model was successfully established, which might provide a theoretical basis for research on the pathogenesis of rabbit coccidia, and the diagnosis and prevention of coccidiosis in rabbits. PMID:27198796

  18. Transiently enhanced LPS-induced fever following hyperthermic stress in rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Masaaki; Uno, Tadashi; Riedel, Walter; Nishimaki, Michiyo; Watanabe, Kaori

    2005-11-01

    Hyperthermia has been shown to induce an enhanced febrile response to the bacterial-derived endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the enhanced LPS-induced fever seen in heat stressed (HS) animals is caused by leakage of intestinal bacterial LPS into the circulation. Male rabbits were rendered transiently hyperthermic (a maximum rectal temperature of 43°C) and divided into three groups. They were then allowed to recover in a room at 24°C for 1, 2 or 3 days post-HS. One day after injection with LPS, the post-HS rabbits exhibited significantly higher fevers than the controls, though this was not seen in rabbits at either 2 or 3 days post-HS. The plasma levels of endogenous LPS were significantly increased during the HS as compared to those seen in normothermic rabbits prior to HS. LPS fevers were not induced in these animals. One day post-HS, rabbits that had been pretreated with oral antibiotics exhibited significantly attenuated LPS levels. When challenged with human recombinant interleukin-1β instead of LPS, the 1-day post-HS rabbits did not respond with enhanced fevers. The plasma levels of TNFα increased similarly during LPS-induced fevers in both the control and 1-day post-HS rabbits, while the plasma levels of corticosterone and the osmolality of the 1-day post-HS rabbits showed no significant differences to those seen prior to the HS. These results suggest that the enhanced fever in the 1-day post-HS rabbits is LPS specific, and may be caused by increased leakage of intestinal endotoxin into blood circulation.

  19. Renal nerves dynamically regulate renal blood flow in conscious, healthy rabbits.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2016-01-15

    Despite significant clinical interest in renal denervation as a therapy, the role of the renal nerves in the physiological regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) remains debated. We hypothesized that the renal nerves physiologically regulate beat-to-beat RBF variability (RBFV). This was tested in chronically instrumented, healthy rabbits that underwent either bilateral surgical renal denervation (DDNx) or a sham denervation procedure (INV). Artifact-free segments of RBF and arterial pressure (AP) from calmly resting, conscious rabbits were used to extract RBFV and AP variability for time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear analysis. Whereas steady-state measures of RBF, AP, and heart rate did not statistically differ between groups, DDNx rabbits had greater RBFV than INV rabbits. AP-RBF transfer function analysis showed greater admittance gain in DDNx rabbits than in INV rabbits, particularly in the low-frequency (LF) range where systemic sympathetic vasomotion gives rise to AP oscillations. In the LF range, INV rabbits exhibited a negative AP-RBF phase shift and low coherence, consistent with the presence of an active control system. Neither of these features were present in the LF range of DDNx rabbits, which showed no phase shift and high coherence, consistent with a passive, Ohm's law pressure-flow relationship. Renal denervation did not significantly affect nonlinear RBFV measures of chaos, self-affinity, or complexity, nor did it significantly affect glomerular filtration rate or extracellular fluid volume. Cumulatively, these data suggest that the renal nerves mediate LF renal sympathetic vasomotion, which buffers RBF from LF AP oscillations in conscious, healthy rabbits. PMID:26538235

  20. Comparison of sympathetic nerve activity normalization procedures in conscious rabbits.

    PubMed

    Burke, Sandra L; Lim, Kyungjoon; Moretti, John-Luis; Head, Geoffrey A

    2016-05-01

    One of the main constraints associated with recording sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in both humans and experimental animals is that microvolt values reflect characteristics of the recording conditions and limit comparisons between different experimental groups. The nasopharyngeal response has been validated for normalizing renal SNA (RSNA) in conscious rabbits, and in humans muscle SNA is normalized to the maximum burst in the resting period. We compared these two methods of normalization to determine whether either could detect elevated RSNA in hypertensive rabbits compared with normotensive controls. We also tested whether either method eliminated differences based only on different recording conditions by separating RSNA of control (sham) rabbits into two groups with low or high microvolts. Hypertension was induced by 5 wk of renal clipping (2K1C), 3 wk of high-fat diet (HFD), or 3 mo infusion of a low dose of angiotensin (ANG II). Normalization to the nasopharyngeal response revealed RSNA that was 88, 51, and 34% greater in 2K1C, HFD, and ANG II rabbits, respectively, than shams (P < 0.05), but normalization to the maximum burst showed no differences. The RSNA baroreflex followed a similar pattern whether RSNA was expressed in microvolts or normalized. Both methods abolished the difference between low and high microvolt RSNA. These results suggest that maximum burst amplitude is a useful technique for minimizing differences between recording conditions but is unable to detect real differences between groups. We conclude that the nasopharyngeal reflex is the superior method for normalizing sympathetic recordings in conscious rabbits. PMID:26921439

  1. Oral and dermal toxicity of MSMA to New Zealand white rabbits, Oryctalagus cuniculus

    SciTech Connect

    Jaghabir, M.T.W.; Abdelghani, A.; Anderson, A.C.

    1988-01-01

    The 24 day LD/sub 50/ of monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA) for New Zealand white rabbits was estimated to be 102 mg MSMA/kg body weight. The average size of the rabbit dermal irritant patch tests was 1.0, indicating that MSMA is a mild irritant to intact skin. Relatively little work has been done on the toxicity of organic arsenicals, especially the herbicide monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA). The EPA review reported a dermal study carried out on 6 adult male rabbits. The clipped skin areas of the rabbits were exposed to doses of MSMA for a 24 hours period. The animals were observed for a period of 2 weeks for signs of toxicity following the exposure. The dermal LD/sub 50/ value was found to be between 2 and 4 g/kg.

  2. Changes of Chloride Channels in the Lacrimal Glands of a Rabbit Model of Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nandoskar, Prachi; Wang, Yanru; Wei, Ruihua; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Ping; Lu, Michael; Huang, Jianyan; Thomas, Padmaja; Trousdale, Melvin D.; Ding, Chuanqing

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that expression of Na+-K+-2Cl− co-transporter-1 (NKCC1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and chloride channel 2 γ subunit (ClC2γ) in the lacrimal glands (LG) of rabbits with induced autoimmune dacryoadenitis (IAD) are changed. Methods LGs were obtained from adult female rabbits with IAD, and age-matched female control rabbits. LGs were processed for laser capture microdissection, real time RT-PCR, western blot, and immunofluorescence. Results In rabbits with IAD, mRNA abundances and protein expressions for NKCC1 and CFTR from whole LGs were significantly lower than in controls. mRNA abundances of NKCC1, CFTR, and ClC2γ from rabbits with IAD were significantly different from acini and ductal cells from controls. NKCC1 was localized to the basolateral membranes of all acinar and ductal cells, with weaker staining intensity in ductal cells, and the staining pattern from rabbits with IAD appeared similar to that from controls. CFTR was found as punctate aggregates in the apical cytoplasm of all acinar and ductal cells, with the intensity in ductal cells much stronger, and no significant difference between controls and rabbits with IAD. ClC2γ was also localized to the apical cytoplasm as punctate aggregates of all acinar cells, but not in ductal cells, and similar staining pattern was observed in rabbits with IAD to control rabbits. Conclusions Our data demonstrated significant changes of mRNA and protein expressions of NKCC1, CFTR, and ClC2γ in rabbits with IAD, suggesting that these changes may contribute to the altered lacrimal secretion, particularly Cl− transport, in rabbits with IAD. PMID:22157573

  3. Absorption of enzymatically active sup 125 I-labeled bovine milk xanthine oxidase fed to rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Rzucidlo, S.J. ); Zikakis, J.P. )

    1990-05-01

    Rabbits fed a regular laboratory diet supplemented with a high-fat milk containing xanthine oxidase (XO) were studied to determine the presence of active XO in the blood. A pilot feeding study, where rabbits consumed a high-fat diet containing xanthine oxidase, showed a correlation between dairy food consumption and XO activity in the blood. Antibody to dietary XO was also found. In a second study, rabbits were fed ad libitum the high-fat milk and blood serum samples were tested weekly for XO activity. No elevation in serum XO activity was found. A third study showed that serum XO activity was increased when rabbits were force fed the high-fat milk. The final study consisted of force feeding {sup 125}I-labeled XO to one rabbit to ascertain whether the observed increase in serum XO was due to dietary or endogenous XO. Isoelectric focusing of sera collected from the test rabbit strongly suggested that at least a portion of the serum XO contained the radioactive label. This is the first direct evidence showing the uptake of dietary active XO from the gut.

  4. Rabbit models for continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis instruction

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Jason; Keller, Christopher; Porco, Travis; Naseri, Ayman; Sretavan, David W.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To develop a rabbit model for continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC) instruction. SETTING University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. DESIGN Experimental study. METHODS Isolated rabbit lenses were immersed in 2% to 8% paraformaldehyde (PFA) fixative from 15 minutes to 6 hours. Rabbit eyes were treated by substituting aqueous with 2% to 4% PFA for 30 minutes to 6 hours, followed by washes with a balanced salt solution. Treated lenses and eyes were held in purpose-designed holders using vacuum. A panel of 6 cataract surgeons with 5 to 15 years of experience performed CCC on treated lenses and eyes and responded to a questionnaire regarding the utility of these models for resident teaching using a 5-item Likert scale. RESULTS The expert panel found that rabbit lenses treated with increasing amounts of fixative simulated CCC on human lens capsules from the third to the seventh decade of life. The panel also found fixative-treated rabbit eyes to simulate some of the experience of CCC within the human anterior chamber but noted a shallower anterior chamber depth, variation in pupil size, and corneal clouding under some treatment conditions. CONCLUSIONS Experienced cataract surgeons who performed CCC on these rabbit models strongly agreed that isolated rabbit lenses treated with fixative provide a realistic simulation of CCC in human patients and that both models were useful tools for capsulorhexis instruction. Results indicate that rabbit lenses treated with 8% PFA for 15 minutes is a model with good fidelity for CCC training. PMID:22727296

  5. Viral skin diseases of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Anna L

    2013-09-01

    This article describes the viral skin diseases affecting the domestic rabbit, the most important being myxomatosis. Transmission and pathogenesis, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and control are described and the article will be of interest to veterinary practitioners who treat rabbits. Shope fibroma virus, Shope papilloma virus, and rabbitpox are also discussed. PMID:24018033

  6. Severe maternal undernutrition and post-weaning behavior of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Simitzis, Panagiotis E; Symeon, George K; Kominakis, Antonios P; Bizelis, Iosif A; Chadio, Stella E; Abas, Zafeiris; Deligeorgis, Stelios G

    2015-03-15

    The objective of the present experiment was to investigate the implications of severe maternal undernutrition on the post-weaning behavior of rabbits. Thirty two does were randomly assigned to four groups: the control group (C) that was fed 100% of the recommended energy maintenance requirements throughout pregnancy and lactation and the U1, U2 and U3 groups that were fed 50% of the recommended energy maintenance requirements between the 6th and the 19th day of pregnancy, between the 20th and the 27th day of pregnancy and between the 3rd and the 10th day of lactation, respectively. At the age of 50 and 65 days, behavior of rabbits in cages was recorded and rabbits were further subjected to an open-field test; a paradigm used as an indicator of fear and emotional distress. Significant differences were found between the U2 and the other experimental groups for the duration of eating and drinking, and duration of locomotory and investigatory behaviors (P<0.05). At the age of 65 days, duration of comfort behaviors was also lower in the U2 compared to the other groups (P<0.05). On the other hand, duration of resting appeared to be the highest in the group of rabbits born from undernourished does between the 20th and the 27th day of pregnancy (P<0.05). Duration of resting was significantly increased, although frequency and duration of eating and drinking were significantly decreased at the age of 65 days (P<0.05). Male rabbits had greater values for locomotory and investigatory behaviors, and duration of eating and drinking compared to the females (P<0.01). A decreased activity of rabbits during the light period was observed (as expected), whereas an increase in duration of locomotory and investigatory behaviors was observed during the first four and the last 4h of the light and dark periods, respectively (P<0.05). Rabbits born from the U1 and U2 group of does displayed increased rates of latency to leave the start position compared to the other groups during the

  7. Thermal cataract formation in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Kramar, P.; Harris, C.; Guy, A.W.

    1987-01-01

    Intraocularly circulating hot water was used to produce cataracts in nine eyes of seven rabbits by maintaining their retrolental temperatures between 43 degrees C and 45 degrees C. A rapid rate of heating (1.3 degrees C/min) plus a sharp temperature gradient across the eye may have been contributing factors in the consistent production of cataracts at these temperatures. Biomicroscopy and light microscopy showed lens changes similar to those associated with acute exposure to microwave radiation. These findings support the assumption that microwave cataractogenesis is due to the local production of elevated temperatures.

  8. Survival of rabid rabbits after intrathecal immunization.

    PubMed

    Kesdangsakonwut, Sawang; Sunden, Yuji; Aoshima, Keisuke; Iwaki, Yoshimi; Okumura, Masahiro; Sawa, Hirofumi; Umemura, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    Rabies is a fatal zoonotic disease for which no effective treatment measures are currently available. Rabies virus (RABV) has anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory properties that suppress nerve cell damage and inflammation in the CNS. These features imply that the elimination of RABV from the CNS by appropriate treatment could lead to complete recovery from rabies. Ten rabbits showing neuromuscular symptoms of rabies after subcutaneous (SC) immunization using commercially available vaccine containing inactivated whole RABV particles and subsequent fixed RABV (CVS strain) inoculation into hind limb muscles were allocated into three groups. Three rabbits received no further treatment (the SC group), three rabbits received three additional SC immunizations using the same vaccine, and four rabbits received three intrathecal (IT) immunizations, in which the vaccine was inoculated directly into the cerebrospinal fluid (the SC/IT group). An additional three naïve rabbits were inoculated intramuscularly with RABV and not vaccinated. The rabbits exhibited neuromuscular symptoms of rabies within 4-8 days post-inoculation (dpi) of RABV. All of the rabbits died within 8-12 dpi with the exception of one rabbit in the SC group and all four rabbits in SC/IT group, which recovered and started to respond to external stimuli at 11-18 dpi and survived until the end of the experimental period. RABV was eliminated from the CNS of the surviving rabbits. We report here a possible, although still incomplete, therapy for rabies using IT immunization. Our protocol may rescue the life of rabid patients and prompt the future development of novel therapies against rabies. PMID:24397792

  9. Survival of rabid rabbits after intrathecal immunization

    PubMed Central

    Kesdangsakonwut, Sawang; Sunden, Yuji; Aoshima, Keisuke; Iwaki, Yoshimi; Okumura, Masahiro; Sawa, Hirofumi; Umemura, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Rabies is a fatal zoonotic disease for which no effective treatment measures are currently available. Rabies virus (RABV) has anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory properties that suppress nerve cell damage and inflammation in the CNS. These features imply that the elimination of RABV from the CNS by appropriate treatment could lead to complete recovery from rabies. Ten rabbits showing neuromuscular symptoms of rabies after subcutaneous (SC) immunization using commercially available vaccine containing inactivated whole RABV particles and subsequent fixed RABV (CVS strain) inoculation into hind limb muscles were allocated into three groups. Three rabbits received no further treatment (the SC group), three rabbits received three additional SC immunizations using the same vaccine, and four rabbits received three intrathecal (IT) immunizations, in which the vaccine was inoculated directly into the cerebrospinal fluid (the SC/IT group). An additional three naïve rabbits were inoculated intramuscularly with RABV and not vaccinated. The rabbits exhibited neuromuscular symptoms of rabies within 4–8 days post-inoculation (dpi) of RABV. All of the rabbits died within 8–12 dpi with the exception of one rabbit in the SC group and all four rabbits in SC/IT group, which recovered and started to respond to external stimuli at 11–18 dpi and survived until the end of the experimental period. RABV was eliminated from the CNS of the surviving rabbits. We report here a possible, although still incomplete, therapy for rabies using IT immunization. Our protocol may rescue the life of rabid patients and prompt the future development of novel therapies against rabies. PMID:24397792

  10. Experimental and finite element analysis of tibial stress fractures using a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Franklyn, Melanie; Field, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine if rabbit models can be used to quantify the mechanical behaviour involved in tibial stress fracture (TSF) development. METHODS: Fresh rabbit tibiae were loaded under compression using a specifically-designed test apparatus. Weights were incrementally added up to a load of 30 kg and the mechanical behaviour of the tibia was analysed using tests for buckling, bone strain and hysteresis. Structural mechanics equations were subsequently employed to verify that the results were within the range of values predicted by theory. A finite element (FE) model was developed using cross-sectional computer tomography (CT) images scanned from one of the rabbit bones, and a static load of 6 kg (1.5 times the rabbit's body weight) was applied to represent running. The model was validated using the experimental strain gauge data, then geometric and elemental convergence tests were performed in order to find the minimum number of cross-sectional scans and elements respectively required for convergence. The analysis was then performed using both the model and the experimental results to investigate the mechanical behaviour of the rabbit tibia under compressive load and to examine crack initiation. RESULTS: The experimental tests showed that under a compressive load of up to 12 kg, the rabbit tibia demonstrates linear behaviour with little hysteresis. Up to 30 kg, the bone does not fail by elastic buckling; however, there are low levels of tensile stress which predominately occur at and adjacent to the anterior border of the tibial midshaft: this suggests that fatigue failure occurs in these regions, since bone under cyclic loading initially fails in tension. The FE model predictions were consistent with both mechanics theory and the strain gauge results. The model was highly sensitive to small changes in the position of the applied load due to the high slenderness ratio of the rabbit’s tibia. The modelling technique used in the current study could have applications

  11. Effect of onion extract on immune response in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chisty, M M; Quddus, R; Islam, B; Khan, B R

    1996-08-01

    A total of 40 NZW rabbits were selected for this study to see the effect of onion extract on immune response following antigenic challenge. These animals were randomly divided into four groups, each composed of ten rabbits. Group I and II were challenged with typhoid H (TH) antigen and groups III and IV with sheep red blood cells (SRBC). Groups I and III were considered as control and II and IV as treated groups. The latter two groups were treated with onion extract orally. The immunosuppressive effect of onion extract was evaluated by estimating antibody levels by Widal test and hemolysin titer. It was found that mean antibody titers were significantly lower in the treated groups than in controls. The weights of thymus and lymph nodes were higher and of adrenal glands were lower in the control groups than in the treated groups. It appeared from the current study that onion extract has an inhibitory effect on immune response. PMID:9103661

  12. Behavioral fever in newborn rabbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satinoff, E.; Mcewen, G. N., Jr.; Williams, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    New Zealand white rabbit pups aged 12 to 72 hr were divided into three groups and given an intraperitoneal injection of Pseudomonas polysaccharide, a saline vehicle alone, and no treatment, respectively. The animals injected with pyrogen and maintained at an ambient temperature of 32 C for 2 hr did not develop fever. When placed in a thermally graded alleyway, the animals injected with pyrogen selected gradient positions that represented significantly higher temperatures than controls injected with saline. Further stay at selected positions for 5 min caused a considerable increase in the rectal temperature of the pyrogen-injected pups but not that of controls. The results support the hypothesis that newborn rabbits will develop a fever by behavioral means after a single injection of an exogenous pyrogen if the opportunity for thermoregulatory behavior is present. No fever develops if the pups must rely solely on internal thermoregulatory mechanisms. The behavioral system for producing a fever is mature at birth, but an adequate system of internal reflexes does not appear to develop for some days.

  13. Classification of rabbit meat obtained with industrial and organic breeding by means of spectrocolorimetric technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menesatti, P.; D'Andrea, S.; Negretti, P.

    2007-09-01

    Rabbit meat is for its nutritional characteristics a food corresponding to new models of consumption. Quality improvement is possible integrating an extensive organic breeding with suitable rabbit genetic typologies. Aim of this work (financed by a Project of the Lazio Region, Italy) was the characterization of rabbit meat by a statistic model, able to distinguish rabbit meat obtained by organic breeding from that achieved industrially. This was pursued through the analysis of spectral data and colorimetric values. Two genetic typologies of rabbit, Leprino Viterbese and a commercial hybrid, were studied. The Leprino Viterbese has been breeded with two different systems, organic and industrial. The commercial hybrid has been bred only industrially because of its characteristics of high sensibility to diseases. The device used for opto-electronic analysis is a VIS-NIR image spectrometer (range: 400-970 nm). The instrument has a stabilized light, it works in accordance to standard CIE L*a*b* technique and it measures the spectral reflectance and the colorimetric coordinates values. The statistic data analysis has been performed by Partial Least Square technique (PLS). A part of measured data was used to create the statistic model and the remaining data were utilized in phase of test to verify the correct model classification. The results put in evidence a high percentage of correct classification (90%) of the model for the two rabbit meat classes, deriving from organic and industrial breeding. Moreover, concerning the different genetic typologies, the percentage of correct classification was 90%.

  14. Subacute oral toxicity of endosulfan in male new zealand white rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, F S; Gulay, M S; Balic, A; Yildiz-Gulay, O; Volkan, S

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT The present study was conducted using 6 to 8 month old New Zealand white male rabbits (nine rabbits per treatment group). Daily gavages of 3, 1.5, 0.75, or 0 mg endosulfan/kg BW in corn oil resulted in the death of five (55%), three (33%), zero (0%), and zero (0%) rabbits, respectively, in 30 days. All rabbits were monitored for any observable toxic symptoms throughout the experimental period (30 d) and they also were weighed weekly to monitor body weight gain. All deaths occurred within the first 3 weeks and nervous symptoms were observed only for a few minutes before death. Alterations recorded in hematological parameters within the groups (hemoglobin, packed cell volume, and total erythrocyte count) were due to endosulfan exposure. Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels were significantly elevated in the 3 mg/kg dose group. Gross post-mortem and histopathological changes in various organs (lung, liver, kidney, and testes) of rabbits treated with endosulfan were observed with typical organochlorine dose-dependent signs of toxicity. Although some animals appeared to adjust to relatively high daily doses of endosulfan for 30 days, biochemical and histological evidence indicated varied liver and kidney damage relative to dosage administered to these animals. The current subacute (30 day) study suggested a NOAEL of 0.75 mg endosulfan/kg in New Zealand white rabbits. PMID:20020928

  15. Soft tissue ossification and condylar cartilage degeneration following TMJ disc perforation in a rabbit pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Embree, Mildred C.; Iwaoka, George M.; Kong, Danielle; Martin, Brittany N.; Patel, Ryan K.; Lee, Andrew; Nathan, John M.; Eisig, Sidney B.; Safarov, Aram; Koslovsky, David A; Koch, Alia; Romanov, Alex; Mao, Jeremy J

    2015-01-01

    Objective There are limited clinical treatments for temporomandibular joint pathologies, including degenerative disease, disc perforation and heterotopic ossification. One barrier hindering the development of new therapies is that animal models recapitulating TMJ diseases are poorly established. The objective of this study was to develop an animal model for TMJ cartilage degeneration and disc pathology, including disc perforation and soft tissue heterotopic ossification. Methods New Zealand white rabbits (n=9 rabbits) underwent unilateral TMJ disc perforation surgery and sham surgery on the contralateral side. A 2.5 mm defect was created using a punch biopsy in rabbit TMJ disc. The TMJ condyles and discs were evaluated macroscopically and histologically after 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Condyles were blindly scored by 4 independent observers using OARSI recommendations for macroscopic and histopathological scoring of osteoarthritis in rabbit tissues. Results Histological evidence of TMJ condylar cartilage degeneration was apparent in experimental condyles following disc perforation relative to sham controls after 4 and 8 weeks, including surface fissures and loss of Safranin O staining. At 12 weeks, OARSI scores indicated experimental condylar cartilage erosion into the subchondral bone. Most strikingly, heterotopic ossification occurred within the TMJ disc upon perforation injury in 6 rabbits after 8 and 12 weeks. Conclusion We report for the first time a rabbit TMJ injury model that demonstrates condylar cartilage degeneration and disc ossification, which is indispensible for testing the efficacy of potential TMJ therapies. PMID:25573797

  16. The effects of bepridil compared with calcium antagonists on rat and rabbit aorta.

    PubMed

    Winslow, E; Farmer, S; Martorana, M; Marshall, R J

    1986-11-19

    The vasodilator (relaxant) action of the antianginal agent bepridil was compared with that of drugs known to either block membrane calcium channels, to be calmodulin antagonists or to inhibit intracellular calcium flux using rat and rabbit aortic strips. IC50 values were obtained for relaxation of tonic contractions induced by either potassium (K+) or phenylephrine (PE). The order of relaxant specificity against K+ compared with PE in both rabbit and rat tissue preparations was nisoldipine = nifedipine greater than diltiazem greater than verapamil greater than bepridil greater than PrMDI greater than W7 greater than TFP greater than phentolamine. The ratio for flunarizine equalled that of bepridil in rabbit and that of verapamil in rat. The calmodulin antagonist TFP showed additional alpha-adrenoceptor blocking properties. Analysis of concentration response curves to the antagonists together with PE/K+ ratios revealed a different profile for each drug tested on rabbit aorta. The range of PE/K+ ratios was much wider in rabbit compared to rat. The results suggest that, with the method used, rabbit aortic strips offer a simple technique for drug profiling and allows a clearer differentiation between membrane active and intracellularly acting drugs than does rat aorta. The profile of bepridil resembled more that of intracellularly acting drugs suggesting that intracellular actions (possibly calmodulin inhibition) may play a substantial role in its dilator actions on vascular smooth muscle. PMID:3493158

  17. Can adult and juvenile European rabbits be differentiated by their pellet sizes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delibes-Mateos, Miguel; Rouco, Carlos; Villafuerte, Rafael

    2009-03-01

    Recently, a new method for differentiating juvenile and adult rabbits based on faecal pellet size was published. According to this method, pellets >6 mm diameter are inferred to be deposited by adults, while those <6 mm are inferred to be from juveniles or kittens. In this study, we designed a simple experiment to test the accuracy of this methodology. Twelve adult rabbits were housed in individual outdoor cages and their pellets were removed every day for 10 consecutive days. Pellets were separated using a sieve according to their size and counted. Results showed that adult rabbits produce pellets >6 mm diameter in the same proportion as those <6 mm. We also observed a strong influence of the individual rabbit on pellet size; some rabbits produce a high proportion of pellets >6 mm, whereas others deposit mostly pellets <6 mm in size. Our findings demonstrate that pellet size is unsuitable for aging wild rabbits. Field biologists should therefore be cautious when employing the pellet size method of age determination in other wild animals in the absence of validating studies.

  18. Effect of fluoride exposure on serum glycoprotein pattern and sialic acid level in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ciftci, Gulay; Cenesiz, Sena; Yarim, Gul Fatma; Nisbet, Ozlem; Nisbet, Cevat; Cenesiz, Metin; Guvenc, Dilek

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the effects of fluoride exposure on the protein profile, glycoprotein pattern, and total sialic acid concentration of serum in rabbits. For this aim; 20 healthy New Zealand rabbits were used. The rabbits were divided into two equal groups each with ten animals according to their weighing: control group and experimental group. The rabbits in control group were given drinking tap water containing 0.29 mg/l sodium fluoride and experimental group received the same tap water to which was added 40 mg/l sodium fluoride for 70 days. Blood samples were taken from each rabbit on day 70. Serum fluoride concentrations were measured by a fluoride-specific ion electrode in serum. The fluoride levels in the serum were found as 18.4 (+/-1.58) microg/L in control and 301.3 (+/-52.18) microg/L in fluoride exposed rabbits. The sialic acid levels were found as 69.2 (+/-0.32) mg/dL in control and 43.4 (+/-0.13) mg/dL in fluoride exposed group. The electrophoretic patterns of serum proteins, glycoproteins, and total sialic acid concentration were determined. Fifteen different protein fractions with molecular weights ranging from 22 to 249 kDa were displayed in the serum protein electrophoretic gel of both groups. The raw concentrations of the protein fractions decreased in fluoride exposed rabbits as compared with the control rabbits. The serum glycoprotein pattern revealed seven major protein bands from 47 to 167 kDa in experimental and control groups. The slight decrease of raw concentration of the protein bands in glycoprotein pattern of serum was observed in fluoride toxication comparing to control. The results suggest that serum TSA determination and serum protein electrophoresis can be used to evaluate prognosis of fluoride exposure as a supplementary laboratory test in combination with clinical and other laboratory findings of fluorosis. PMID:19904501

  19. 9 CFR 354.124 - Quarantine of diseased rabbits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Quarantine of diseased rabbits. 354... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF RABBITS AND EDIBLE PRODUCTS THEREOF Inspection Procedures; Ante-Mortem Inspections § 354.124 Quarantine of diseased rabbits. If live rabbits, which...

  20. 9 CFR 354.124 - Quarantine of diseased rabbits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Quarantine of diseased rabbits. 354... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF RABBITS AND EDIBLE PRODUCTS THEREOF Inspection Procedures; Ante-Mortem Inspections § 354.124 Quarantine of diseased rabbits. If live rabbits, which...

  1. BESNOITIA ORYCTOFELISI N. SP. (PROTOZOA: APICOMPLEXA) FROM DOMESTIC RABBITS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A species of Besnoitia from naturally infected rabbits from Argentina was propagated experimentally in mice, gerbils, rabbits, cats, and cell cultures. Cats fed tissue cysts from rabbits shed oocysts with a prepatent period of nine to 13 days. Sporulated oocysts were infective to gerbils, rabbits,...

  2. Seroprevalence of Encephalitozoon cuniculi and Toxoplasma gondii in domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in China

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qing-Feng; Wang, Wei-Lin; Ni, Xiao-Ting; Li, Hai-Bin; Yao, Gui-Zhe; Sun, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Wei-Li; Cong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The breeding of domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) for human consumption has a long tradition in China. Infections that can affect the production of meat or even be transmitted from animals to humans are important to monitor, especially for public health reasons as well as for their impact on animal health. Thus, a total of 1,132 domestic rabbit sera from 4 regions in China were collected for serological screening for Encephalitozoon cuniculi and for Toxoplasma gondii by ELISA and modified agglutination test (MAT), respectively. Antibodies to E. cuniculi were detected in 248/1,132 (21.9%) sera tested while antibodies against T. gondii revealed a seroprevalence of 51/1,132 (4.5%). We believe that the present results are of epidemiological implications and public health importance due to the acknowledged susceptibility of humans to E. cuniculi and T. gondii infections. Therefore, routine screening tests of domestic rabbits are proposed considering the zoonotic potential of these parasites. PMID:26797446

  3. Hematologic comparisons of shot and live trapped cottontail rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, H A; Kirkpatrick, R L; Burkhart, H E; Davis, J W

    1978-01-01

    Comparisons were made between hematologic measurements of shot and box-trapped cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus). Trapped rabbits had significantly (P less than 0.001) higher serum corticoid levels and segmented neutrophil percentages and significantly (P less than 0.001) lower lymphocyte percentages than did shot rabbits. Trapped rabbits also had significantly (P less than 0.05) higher packed cell volumes and blood urea nitrogen values than did shot rabbits. PMID:633520

  4. Bobcat attack on a cottontail rabbit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biggins, D.E.; Biggins, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    We observed an attack by a bobcat (Lynx rufus) on a cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus) that involved stealthy approach by the cat for >1 h, followed by a 12.3-s chase covering 116.0 m for the cat and 128.4 m for the rabbit. During the chase, the route of the cat from starting point to kill site was more direct than the semi-circular route of the rabbit. Stride lengths for the cat and total distance covered by the chase were longer than those previously reported for bobcats.

  5. FMLP provokes coronary vasoconstriction and myocardial ischemia in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, M.N.; Booth, D.C.; Friedman, B.J.; Cunningham, M.R.; Jay, M.; De Maria, A.N. )

    1988-03-01

    Recent pathological studies of coronary arteries from humans with suspected coronary spasm have revealed an augmented intramural burden of inflammatory cells. To test the hypothesis than inappropriate activation of inflammatory cells participates in the evolution of coronary vasospasm, the present experiment employed a newly developed coronary arteriographic technique for use in pentobarbital-anesthetized rabbits to evaluate the coronary vasomotor actions of the nonselective inflammatory cell stimulant, N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP). In 10 of 10 animals, selective left intracoronary injection of 200 ng fMLP evoked profound left coronary narrowing accompanied in all cases by ST segment deviation and dysrhythmias. Thallium-201 scintigraphy demonstrated hypoperfusion of the left ventricular free wall and septum supplied by the spastic coronary artery. The fMLP-induced epicardial vasoconstriction, ischemic electrocardiogram (ECG) changes, and thallium perfusion defects were reversed by intravenous nitroglycerin. Neither the right coronary artery nor its distribution were influenced by left coronary injection of fMLP. Additional experiments in isolated, salt solution-perfused rabbit hearts demonstrated that fMLP failed to exert direct coronary vasoconstrictor effects. These observations indicate that the nonselective inflammatory cell stimulant, fMLP, provokes arteriographically demonstrable coronary spasm with attendant myocardial hypoperfusion and ischemic ECG changes in anesthetized rabbits. Such a model may be useful in exploring the dynamic role of inflammatory cells in development of coronary spasm.

  6. Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits and human health.

    PubMed Central

    Carman, J. A.; Garner, M. G.; Catton, M. G.; Thomas, S.; Westbury, H. A.; Cannon, R. M.; Collins, B. J.; Tribe, I. G.

    1998-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits (VHD), a potential biological control for wild rabbits in Australia and New Zealand, escaped from quarantined field trials on Wardang Island and spread to the mainland of Australia in October 1995. This study looked for any evidence of infection or illness in people occupationally exposed to the virus. Two hundred and sixty-nine people were interviewed and 259 blood samples were collected. Exposures to VHD-infected rabbits ranged from nil to very high. No VHD antibodies were detected in any of the 259 sera when tested by VHD competitive enzyme immunoassay, which had been validated with 1013 VHDV-specific antibody negative sera. A questionnaire designed to elicit symptoms of disease in a range of organ systems found no significant differences between illness in those exposed and those not exposed to VHD, nor could an association be found between exposure and subsequent episodes of illness. The findings are consistent with the view that exposure to VHD is not associated with infection or disease in humans. PMID:9825794

  7. Rabbit Models of Ocular Diseases: New Relevance for Classical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Zernii, Evgeni Y; Baksheeva, Viktoriia E; Iomdina, Elena N; Averina, Olga A; Permyakov, Sergei E; Philippov, Pavel P; Zamyatnin, Andrey A; Senin, Ivan I

    2016-01-01

    Over 100 million individuals are affected by irreversible visual impairments and blindness worldwide, while ocular diseases remain a challenging problem despite significant advances in modern ophthalmology. Development of novel drugs and drug delivery mechanisms, as well as advanced ophthalmological techniques requires experimental models including animals, capable of developing ocular diseases with similar etiology and pathology, suitable for future trials of new therapeutic approaches. Although experimental ophthalmology and visual research are traditionally performed on rodent models, these animals are often unsuitable for pre-clinical drug efficacy and safety studies, as well as for testing novel drug delivery approaches, e.g. controlled release of pharmaceuticals using intra-ocular implants. Therefore, rabbit models of ocular diseases are particularly useful in this context, since rabbits can be easily handled, while sharing more common anatomical and biochemical features with humans compared to rodents, including longer life span and larger eye size. This review provides a brief description of clinical, morphological and mechanistic aspects of the most common ocular diseases (dry eye syndrome, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, light-induced retinopathies, cataract and uveitis) and summarizes the diversity of current strategies for their experimental modeling in rabbits. Several applications of some of these models in ocular pharmacology and eye care strategies are also discussed. PMID:26553163

  8. MTR, TRA603. BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. REACTOR SHIELDING, CANAL AND RABBIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. REACTOR SHIELDING, CANAL AND RABBIT CANAL, DEEP WELL STORAGE. DECONTAMINATION ROOM, VAULT, MONITOR ROOM, OFFICE, STAIRWAYS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-1, 7/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100560, REV. 6. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. Effect of Pitavastatin on Vascular Reactivity in Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Eros Antonio; Ozaki, Michiko Regina

    2014-01-01

    Background Pitavastatin is the newest statin available in Brazil and likely the one with fewer side effects. Thus, pitavastatin was evaluated in hypercholesterolemic rabbits in relation to its action on vascular reactivity. Objective To assess the lowest dose of pitavastatin necessary to reduce plasma lipids, cholesterol and tissue lipid peroxidation, as well as endothelial function in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Methods Thirty rabbits divided into six groups (n = 5): G1 - standard chow diet; G2 - hypercholesterolemic diet for 30 days; G3 - hypercholesterolemic diet and after the 16th day, diet supplemented with pitavastatin (0.1 mg); G4 - hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with pitavastatin (0.25 mg); G5 - hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with pitavastatin (0.5 mg); G6 - hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with pitavastatin (1.0 mg). After 30 days, total cholesterol, HDL, triglycerides, glucose, creatine kinase (CK), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were measured and LDL was calculated. In-depth anesthesia was performed with sodium thiopental and aortic segments were removed to study endothelial function, cholesterol and tissue lipid peroxidation. The significance level for statistical tests was 5%. Results Total cholesterol and LDL were significantly elevated in relation to G1. HDL was significantly reduced in G4, G5 and G6 when compared to G2. Triglycerides, CK, AST, ALT, cholesterol and tissue lipid peroxidation showed no statistical difference between G2 and G3-G6. Significantly endothelial dysfunction reversion was observed in G5 and G6 when compared to G2. Conclusion Pitavastatin starting at a 0.5 mg dose was effective in reverting endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. PMID:25014056

  10. [The effectiveness of immunization with vaccinia virus type "MVA" against an infection with cowpox virus type "OPV 85" in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Munz, E; Linckh, S; Renner-Müller, I C; Reimann, M

    1993-03-01

    The immunological efficacy of vacciniavirus "MVA" was tested against a dermal and intradermal infection with cowpoxvirus "OPV 85" in rabbits: A single vaccination with "MVA" provided only insufficient immunity, a revaccination induced good immunity. Intramuscular immunizations protected better than subcutaneous applications. Immunized rabbits showed "revaccination reactions" after infection with "OPV 85" indicating a cellular immunity. After immunization with "MVA" and after infection with cowpoxvirus "OPV 85" all rabbits developed N- and ELISA-antibodies. HAI-antibodies were not found after immunization, but indicated a multiplication of cowpoxvirus after challenge. Vacciniavirus "MVA" is suggested for immunization of man and animal against possible infections with cowpoxvirus and cowpoxlike viruses. PMID:8322545

  11. Determination of tropical forage preferences using two offering methods in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Safwat, A M; Sarmiento-Franco, L; Santos-Ricalde, R H; Nieves, D

    2014-04-01

    Two methods of feed preference trials were compared to evaluate the acceptability of 5 fresh foliages: Leucaena leucocephala, Moringa oleifera, Portulaca oleracea, Guazuma ulmifolia, and Brosimum alicastrum that was included as control. The evaluation included chemical analyses and forage intake by rabbits. The first method was a cafeteria trial; 12 California growing rabbits aged 8 wk, allocated in individual cages, were offered the five forage plants at the same time inside the cage, while in the second trial 60 California growing rabbits aged 8 wk, allocated individually, were randomly distributed into 5 experimental groups (n = 12/group); for each group just one forage species was offered at a time. The testing period for each method lasted for 7 d, preceded by one week of adaptation. The results showed that B. alicastrum and L. lecocephala were the most preferred forages while on the contrary G. ulmifolia was the least preferred one by rabbits. The results also revealed that the CV% value for the 2nd method (16.32%), which the tested forages were presented separately to rabbits, was lower and methodologically more acceptable than such value for the 1(st) method (34.28%), which all forages were presented together at the same time. It can be concluded that a range of tropical forages were consumed in acceptable quantities by rabbits, suggesting that diets based on such forages with a concentrate supplement could be used successfully for rabbit production. However, growth performance studies are still needed before recommendations could be made on appropriate ration formulations for commercial use. PMID:25049983

  12. Mucosally delivered peptides prime strong immunity in HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy; Balogh, Karla; Christensen, Neil

    2010-05-01

    DNA vaccines delivered subcutaneously by gene-gun have generated strong protective and therapeutic immunity in rabbits. Recent studies have shown that peptides delivered by the mucosal routes also stimulate local and systemic immune responses. Since mucosal delivery is easier to administer and more cost-effective when compared to gene-gun delivery, we were interested to learn whether mucosally delivered peptides would prime protective immunity comparable to that of gene-gun-delivered DNA in rabbits. Our newly developed HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit model was used to test the hypothesis. We chose an HLA-A2.1 restricted cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) E1 epitope (E1/303-311, MLQEKPFQL) for the peptide immunization studies because it provided complete protection when used as a DNA vaccine. Adjuvant has been widely used to boost immunity for vaccines. In this study, three adjuvants reported to be effective for rabbits (TT helper motif, PADRE and CpG2007) were tested with the peptide vaccine. Peptide alone or fused to TT helper or PADRE to create chimeric peptides was delivered by two mucosal routes (ocular and intranasal) together. Partial protection was found in HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits when peptide was delivered mucosally in the presence of adjuvant. When a subsequent booster of a half-dose of the corresponding DNA vaccine was delivered, complete protections were achieved. We conclude that mucosal peptide immunization can be combined with a single DNA vaccination to provide strong protective immunity in rabbits. PMID:20332046

  13. Variations in rupture site and surface strains at failure in the maturing rabbit medial collateral ligament.

    PubMed

    Lam, T C; Shrive, N G; Frank, C B

    1995-11-01

    The relationship between the pattern of surface strain and the site of failure in maturing rabbit ligaments was studied in vitro. Bone-medial collateral ligament (MCL)-bone complexes of 24 female New Zealand White rabbits at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of age (n = 6 rabbits, 12 MCLs per group) were tested in tension to failure. A video dimension analysis (VDA) system was used to map the surface strain at failure across the width and along the length of the medial side of each MCL during testing. Results showed that the highest strains were consistently located at the femoral insertion decreasing towards the midsubstance, with the highest strain occurring in the anterior portion of the MCL immediately adjacent to the femoral insertion. Strains of the complex at failure increased with rabbit maturation. The strain distribution however, did not change dramatically, even though the locations of MCL failure changed from exclusively tibial avulsion in the three month old rabbits to predominantly midsubstance failures in the 12 month old rabbits. In the six month old rabbits, there was a particular dissociation with all MCLs failing near the tibial insertion while femoral strains were apparently the highest. These results suggest two possibilities beyond that of some unknown artifacts of optical strain measurement. First, since failure sites rarely correlated with areas of maximum surface strain in this study, it seems possible that higher strains could exist deeper in the tissue, particularly at the bone-ligament interface of the tibial insertion in immature animals and somewhere within the midsubstance of the MCL in the adult. Secondly, it is possible that the ligament material may be heterogeneous. PMID:8748528

  14. Determination of Tropical Forage Preferences Using Two Offering Methods in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Safwat, A. M.; Sarmiento-Franco, L.; Santos-Ricalde, R. H.; Nieves, D.

    2014-01-01

    Two methods of feed preference trials were compared to evaluate the acceptability of 5 fresh foliages: Leucaena leucocephala, Moringa oleifera, Portulaca oleracea, Guazuma ulmifolia, and Brosimum alicastrum that was included as control. The evaluation included chemical analyses and forage intake by rabbits. The first method was a cafeteria trial; 12 California growing rabbits aged 8 wk, allocated in individual cages, were offered the five forage plants at the same time inside the cage, while in the second trial 60 California growing rabbits aged 8 wk, allocated individually, were randomly distributed into 5 experimental groups (n = 12/group); for each group just one forage species was offered at a time. The testing period for each method lasted for 7 d, preceded by one week of adaptation. The results showed that B. alicastrum and L. lecocephala were the most preferred forages while on the contrary G. ulmifolia was the least preferred one by rabbits. The results also revealed that the CV% value for the 2nd method (16.32%), which the tested forages were presented separately to rabbits, was lower and methodologically more acceptable than such value for the 1st method (34.28%), which all forages were presented together at the same time. It can be concluded that a range of tropical forages were consumed in acceptable quantities by rabbits, suggesting that diets based on such forages with a concentrate supplement could be used successfully for rabbit production. However, growth performance studies are still needed before recommendations could be made on appropriate ration formulations for commercial use. PMID:25049983

  15. Rabbit Models for Studying Human Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xuwen; Knouse, John A; Hernon, Krista M

    2015-01-01

    Using an appropriate animal model is crucial for mimicking human disease conditions, and various facets including genetics, anatomy, and pathophysiology should be considered before selecting a model. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are well known for their wide use in production of antibodies, eye research, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, a systematic description of the rabbit as primary experimental models for the study of various human infectious diseases is unavailable. This review focuses on the human infectious diseases for which rabbits are considered a classic or highly appropriate model, including AIDS (caused by HIV1), adult T-cell leukemia–lymphoma (human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), papilloma or carcinoma (human papillomavirus) , herpetic stromal keratitis (herpes simplex virus type 1), tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In addition, particular aspects of the husbandry and care of rabbits used in studies of human infectious diseases are described. PMID:26678367

  16. Eyeblink conditioning in the developing rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kevin L.; Woodruff-Pak, Diana S.

    2011-01-01

    Eyeblink classical conditioning in pre-weanling rabbits was examined in the present study. Using a custom lightweight headpiece and restrainer, New Zealand white littermates were trained once daily in 400 ms delay eyeblink classical conditioning from postnatal days (PD) 17–21 or PD 24–28. These ages were chosen because eyeblink conditioning emerges gradually over PD 17–24 in rats (Stanton, Freeman, & Skelton, 1992), another altricial species with neurodevelopmental features similar to those of rabbits. Consistent with well-established findings in rats, rabbits trained from PD 24–28 showed greater conditioning relative to littermates trained from PD 17–21. Both age groups displayed poor retention of eyeblink conditioning at retraining one month after acquisition. These findings are the first to demonstrate eyeblink conditioning in the developing rabbit. With further characterization of optimal conditioning parameters, this preparation may have applications to neurodevelopmental disease models as well as research exploring the ontogeny of memory. PMID:21953433

  17. Rabbit Models for Studying Human Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuwen; Knouse, John A; Hernon, Krista M

    2015-12-01

    Using an appropriate animal model is crucial for mimicking human disease conditions, and various facets including genetics, anatomy, and pathophysiology should be considered before selecting a model. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are well known for their wide use in production of antibodies, eye research, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, a systematic description of the rabbit as primary experimental models for the study of various human infectious diseases is unavailable. This review focuses on the human infectious diseases for which rabbits are considered a classic or highly appropriate model, including AIDS (caused by HIV1), adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), papilloma or carcinoma (human papillomavirus) , herpetic stromal keratitis (herpes simplex virus type 1), tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In addition, particular aspects of the husbandry and care of rabbits used in studies of human infectious diseases are described. PMID:26678367

  18. Oritavancin Pharmacokinetics and Bone Penetration in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ostiguy, Valerie; Cadieux, Cordelia; Malouin, Mireille; Belanger, Odette; Far, Adel Rafai; Parr, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and bone concentrations of oritavancin were investigated after a single intravenous dose was administered to rabbits. The pharmacokinetic profile of oritavancin in rabbits showed that it is rapidly distributed to bone tissues, with concentrations remaining stable for up to 168 h, the last measured time point. Based on these findings, further evaluation of oritavancin for the treatment of infections in bone tissues is warranted. PMID:26239977

  19. Photoacoustic endoscopic imaging of the rabbit mediastinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Favazza, Christopher; Chen, Ruimin; Yao, Junjie; Cai, Xin; Li, Chiye; Maslov, Konstantin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Like ultrasound endoscopy, photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) could become a valuable addition to clinical practice due to its deep imaging capability. Results from our recent in vivo transesophageal endoscopic imaging study on rabbits demonstrate the technique's capability to image major organs in the mediastinal region, such as the lung, trachea, and cardiovascular systems. Here, we present various features from photoacoustic images from the mediastinal region of several rabbits and discuss possible clinical contributions of this technique and directions of future technology development.

  20. Collagen and mineral deposition in rabbit cortical bone during maturation and growth: effects on tissue properties.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, Hanna; Harjula, Terhi; Koistinen, Arto; Iivarinen, Jarkko; Seppänen, Kari; Arokoski, Jari P A; Brama, Pieter A; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Helminen, Heikki J

    2010-12-01

    We characterized the composition and mechanical properties of cortical bone during maturation and growth and in adult life in the rabbit. We hypothesized that the collagen network develops earlier than the mineralized matrix. Growth was monitored, and the rabbits were euthanized at birth (newborn), and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 18 months of age. The collagen network was assessed biochemically (collagen content, enzymatic and non-enzymatic cross-links) in specimens from the mid-diaphysis of the tibia and femur and biomechanically (tensile testing) from decalcified whole tibia specimens. The mineralized matrix was analyzed using pQCT and 3-point bend tests from intact femur specimens. The collagen content and the Young's modulus of the collagen matrix increased significantly until the rabbits were 3 months old, and thereafter remained stable. The amount of HP and LP collagen cross-links increased continuously from newborn to 18 months of age, whereas PEN cross-links increased after 6 months of age. Bone mineral density and the Young's modulus of the mineralized bone increased until the rabbits were at least 6 months old. We concluded that substantial changes take place during the normal process of development in both the biochemical and biomechanical properties of rabbit cortical bone. In cortical bone, the collagen network reaches its mature composition and mechanical strength prior to the mineralized matrix. PMID:20540098

  1. The ABCG2 efflux transporter from rabbit placenta: Cloning and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Halwachs, Sandra; Kneuer, Carsten; Gohlsch, Katrin; Müller, Marian; Ritz, Vera; Honscha, Walther

    2016-02-01

    In human placenta, the ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter ABCG2 is highly expressed in syncytiotrophoblast cells and mediates cellular excretion of various drugs and toxins. Hence, physiological ABCG2 activity substantially contributes to the fetoprotective placenta barrier function during gestation. Developmental toxicity studies are often performed in rabbit. However, despite its toxicological relevance, there is no data so far on functional ABCG2 expression in this species. Therefore, we cloned ABCG2 from placenta tissues of chinchilla rabbit. Sequencing showed 84-86% amino acid sequence identity to the orthologues from man, rat and mouse. We transduced the rabbit ABCG2 clone (rbABCG2) in MDCKII cells and stable rbABCG2 gene and protein expression was shown by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The rbABCG2 efflux activity was demonstrated with the Hoechst H33342 assay using the specific ABCG2 inhibitor Ko143. We further tested the effect of established human ABCG2 (hABCG2) drug substrates including the antibiotic danofloxacin or the histamine H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine on H33342 accumulation in MDCKII-rbABCG2 or -hABCG2 cells. Human therapeutic plasma concentrations of all tested drugs caused a comparable competitive inhibition of H33342 excretion in both ABCG2 clones. Altogether, we first showed functional expression of the ABCG2 efflux transporter in rabbit placenta. Moreover, our data suggest a similar drug substrate spectrum of the rabbit and the human ABCG2 efflux transporter. PMID:26907376

  2. Malignant neoplasms of decidual origin (deciduosarcomas) induced by estrogen-progestin-releasing intravaginal devices in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Zook, B. C.; Spiro, I.; Hertz, R.

    1987-01-01

    A combination of estrogen and levonorgestrel was continuously delivered to 23 adult rabbits for up to 2 years via a Silastic ring device sutured into the vagina. Twenty-one control rabbits were given similar rings devoid of drugs. A marked decidual reaction of the endometrium occurred in 16 of 23 test rabbits. In 14 test rabbits (61%) malignant tumors developed of decidual type cells not heretofore described. The deciduosarcomas were composed of anaplastic cells that invaded the uterine walls, uterine lymphatics, and in 4 of 13 (31%) rabbits that survived 2 years of treatment, the tumors metastasized to the lungs. Several deciduosarcomas appeared to arise within the spleen or other abdominal organs. Other drug-related lesions included uterine or vaginal polyps, endometrial atrophy, and focal necrosis and mineralization of the uterine wall. Cells from several deciduosarcomas failed to produce tumors in nude mice or to colonize on soft agar. No decidualization or decidual neoplasms were seen in the controls. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3039851

  3. Aggregation and Binding Substances Enhance Pathogenicity in Rabbit Models of Enterococcus faecalis Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Schlievert, Patrick M.; Gahr, Pamala J.; Assimacopoulos, Aris P.; Dinges, Martin M.; Stoehr, Jennifer A.; Harmala, John W.; Hirt, Helmut; Dunny, Gary M.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the importance of enterococcal aggregation substance (AS) and enterococcal binding substance (EBS) in rabbit models of Enterococcus faecalis cardiac infections. First, American Dutch belted rabbits were injected intraventricularly with 108 CFU and observed for 2 days. No clinical signs of illness developed in animals given AS− EBS− organisms, and all survived. All rabbits given AS− EBS+ organisms developed signs of illness, including significant pericardial inflammation, but only one of six died. All animals given AS+ EBS− organisms developed signs of illness, including pericardial inflammation, and survived. All rabbits given AS+ EBS+ organisms developed signs of illness and died. None of the rabbits receiving AS+ EBS+ organisms showed gross pericardial inflammation. The lethality and lack of inflammation are consistent with the presence of a superantigen. Rabbit and human lymphocytes were highly stimulated in vitro by cell extracts, but not cell-free culture fluids, of AS+ EBS+ organisms. In contrast, cell extracts from AS− EBS− organisms weakly stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. Culture fluids from human lymphocytes stimulated with AS+/EBS+ enterococci contained high levels of gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and TNF-β, which is consistent with functional stimulation of T-lymphocyte proliferation and macrophage activation. Subsequent experiments examined the abilities of the same strains to cause endocarditis in a catheterization model. New Zealand White rabbits underwent transaortic catheterization for 2 h, at which time catheters were removed and animals were injected with 2 × 109 CFU of test organisms. None of the animals given AS− EBS− organisms developed vegetations or showed autopsy evidence of tissue damage. Rabbits given AS− EBS+ or AS+ EBS− organisms developed small vegetations and had splenomegaly at autopsy. All rabbits given AS+ EBS+ organisms developed large vegetations and had

  4. Expression of rabbit IL-4 by recombinant myxoma viruses enhances virulence and overcomes genetic resistance to myxomatosis.

    PubMed

    Kerr, P J; Perkins, H D; Inglis, B; Stagg, R; McLaughlin, E; Collins, S V; Van Leeuwen, B H

    2004-06-20

    Rabbit IL-4 was expressed in the virulent standard laboratory strain (SLS) and the attenuated Uriarra (Ur) strain of myxoma virus with the aim of creating a Th2 cytokine environment and inhibiting the development of an antiviral cell-mediated response to myxomatosis in infected rabbits. This allowed testing of a model for genetic resistance to myxomatosis in wild rabbits that have undergone 50 years of natural selection for resistance to myxomatosis. Expression of IL-4 significantly enhanced virulence of both virulent and attenuated virus strains in susceptible (laboratory) and resistant (wild) rabbits. SLS-IL-4 completely overcame genetic resistance in wild rabbits. The pathogenesis of SLS-IL-4 was compared in susceptible and resistant rabbits. The results support a model for resistance to myxomatosis of an enhanced innate immune response controlling virus replication and allowing an effective antiviral cell-mediated immune response to develop in resistant rabbits. Expression of IL-4 did not overcome immunity to myxomatosis induced by immunization. PMID:15183059

  5. Transgenic Mouse Bioassay: Evidence That Rabbits Are Susceptible to a Variety of Prion Isolates.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Enric; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Pintado, Belén; Eraña, Hasier; Ordóñez, Montserrat; Márquez, Mercedes; Chianini, Francesca; Fondevila, Dolors; Sánchez-Martín, Manuel A; Andreoletti, Olivier; Dagleish, Mark P; Pumarola, Martí; Castilla, Joaquín

    2015-08-01

    Interspecies transmission of prions is a well-established phenomenon, both experimentally and under field conditions. Upon passage through new hosts, prion strains have proven their capacity to change their properties and this is a source of strain diversity which needs to be considered when assessing the potential risks associated with consumption of prion contaminated protein sources. Rabbits were considered for decades to be a prion resistant species until proven otherwise recently. To determine the extent of rabbit susceptibility to prions and to assess the effects of passage of different prion strains through this species a transgenic mouse model overexpressing rabbit PrPC was developed (TgRab). Intracerebral challenges with prion strains originating from a variety of species including field isolates (ovine SSBP/1 scrapie, Nor98- scrapie; cattle BSE, BSE-L and cervid CWD), experimental murine strains (ME7 and RML) and experimentally obtained ruminant (sheepBSE) and rabbit (de novo NZW) strains were performed. On first passage TgRab were susceptible to the majority of prions (Cattle BSE, SheepBSE, BSE-L, de novo NZW, ME7 and RML) tested with the exception of SSBP/1 scrapie, CWD and Nor98 scrapie. Furthermore, TgRab were capable of propagating strain-specific features such as differences in incubation periods, histological brain lesions, abnormal prion (PrPd) deposition profiles and proteinase-K (PK) resistant western blotting band patterns. Our results confirm previous studies proving that rabbits are not resistant to prion infection and show for the first time that rabbits are susceptible to PrPd originating in a number of other species. This should be taken into account when choosing protein sources to feed rabbits. PMID:26247589

  6. PATHOGENESIS AND IMMUNE RESPONSES OF FRANCISELLA TULARENSIS STRAINS IN WILD-CAUGHT COTTONTAIL RABBITS (SYLVILAGUS SPP.).

    PubMed

    Brown, Vienna R; Adney, Danielle R; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Gordy, Paul W; Felix, Todd A; Olea-Popelka, Francisco J; Bowen, Richard A

    2015-07-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent, zoonotic bacterium that causes significant natural disease and is of concern as an organism for bioterrorism. Serologic testing of wildlife is frequently used to monitor spatial patterns of infection and to quantify exposure. Cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus spp.) are a natural reservoir for F. tularensis in the US, although very little work has been done experimentally to determine how these animals respond to infection; thus, information gathered from field samples can be difficult to interpret. We characterized clinical disease, bacteremia, pathology, and antibody kinetics of North American cottontail rabbits experimentally infected with five strains of F. tularensis. Rabbits were infected with four field strains, including MA00-2987 (type A1b), WY96-3418 (type A2), KY99-3387, and OR96-0246 (type B), and with SchuS4 (type A1a), a widely used, virulent laboratory strain. Infection with the different strains of the bacterium resulted in varied patterns of clinical disease, gross pathology, and histopathology. Each of the type A strains were highly virulent, with rabbits succumbing to infection 3-13 d after infection. At necropsy, numerous microabscesses were observed in the livers and spleens of most rabbits, associated with high bacterial organ burdens. In contrast, most rabbits infected with type B strains developed mild fever and became lethargic, but the disease was infrequently lethal. Those rabbits infected with type B strains that survived past 14 d developed a robust humoral immune response, and F. tularensis was not isolated from liver, spleen, or lung of those animals. Understanding F. tularensis infection in a natural reservoir species can guide serosurveillance and generate new insights into environmental maintenance of this pathogen. PMID:25984770

  7. Transgenic Mouse Bioassay: Evidence That Rabbits Are Susceptible to a Variety of Prion Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pintado, Belén; Eraña, Hasier; Ordóñez, Montserrat; Márquez, Mercedes; Chianini, Francesca; Fondevila, Dolors; Sánchez-Martín, Manuel A.; Andreoletti, Olivier; Dagleish, Mark P.; Pumarola, Martí; Castilla, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Interspecies transmission of prions is a well-established phenomenon, both experimentally and under field conditions. Upon passage through new hosts, prion strains have proven their capacity to change their properties and this is a source of strain diversity which needs to be considered when assessing the potential risks associated with consumption of prion contaminated protein sources. Rabbits were considered for decades to be a prion resistant species until proven otherwise recently. To determine the extent of rabbit susceptibility to prions and to assess the effects of passage of different prion strains through this species a transgenic mouse model overexpressing rabbit PrPC was developed (TgRab). Intracerebral challenges with prion strains originating from a variety of species including field isolates (ovine SSBP/1 scrapie, Nor98- scrapie; cattle BSE, BSE-L and cervid CWD), experimental murine strains (ME7 and RML) and experimentally obtained ruminant (sheepBSE) and rabbit (de novo NZW) strains were performed. On first passage TgRab were susceptible to the majority of prions (Cattle BSE, SheepBSE, BSE-L, de novo NZW, ME7 and RML) tested with the exception of SSBP/1 scrapie, CWD and Nor98 scrapie. Furthermore, TgRab were capable of propagating strain-specific features such as differences in incubation periods, histological brain lesions, abnormal prion (PrPd) deposition profiles and proteinase-K (PK) resistant western blotting band patterns. Our results confirm previous studies proving that rabbits are not resistant to prion infection and show for the first time that rabbits are susceptible to PrPd originating in a number of other species. This should be taken into account when choosing protein sources to feed rabbits. PMID:26247589

  8. Feasibility and acute healing of vocal fold microflap incisions in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Suehiro, Atsushi; Bock, Jonathan M.; Hall, Joseph E.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Rousseau, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to: 1) investigate the feasibility of performing mucosal elevation of a vocal fold microflap in a rabbit model, and 2) measure the acute healing of rabbit microflap incisions compared to control vocal folds. Study Design Prospective animal study Methods Ten New Zealand white rabbits were used in this study. All rabbits received a 3mm incision through the epithelium of one vocal fold using a sickle knife and mucosal elevation through this incision using a microlaryngeal fine angled spatula. The contralateral vocal fold was left intact to serve as an internal control. Student t tests were used to investigate differences in epithelial thickness, immunohistochemical staining of CD 45, and inflammatory and pro-fibrotic gene expression between vocal folds undergoing microflap and control. Results Exposure of the rabbit larynx was achieved, allowing for the identification of a surgical plane and the creation of a microflap and elevation of the vocal fold mucosa. Hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed no significant differences in epithelial thickness, immunohistochemistry for CD 45 showed no significant differences in CD 45 positive cells, and quantitative PCR revealed no significant differences in IL-1β, TGFβ-1, or COX-2 gene expression between vocal folds undergoing microflap and control. Conclusions We demonstrate the feasibility of vocal fold microflap surgery in a rabbit model. With the advantage of greater access to primers and antibodies for molecular biological studies, the application of the microflap technique in a small animal model such as rabbit has broad implications for future experimental investigations in laryngology. Level of Evidence Animal Research. PMID:22253007

  9. Endoscopic laser reshaping of rabbit tracheal cartilage: preliminary investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Walter; Lam, Anthony; Protsenko, Dmitry; Wong, Brian J.

    2005-04-01

    Background: Tracheal cartilage deformities due to trauma, prolonged endotracheal intubation or infection are difficult to correct. Current treatment options such as dilation, laser ablation, stent placement, and segmental resection are only temporary or carry significant risks. The objectives of this project were to design and test a laser activated endotracheal stent system that can actively modify the geometry of tracheal cartilage, leading to permanent retention of a new and desirable tracheal geometry. Methods: Ex vivo rabbit tracheal cartilage (simulating human neonate trachea) were irradiated with an Er: Glass laser, (λ= 1.54um, 0.5W-2.5W, 1 sec to 5 sec). Shape change and gross thermal injury were assessed visually to determine the best laser power parameters for reshaping. A rigid endoscopic telescope and hollow bronchoscope were used to record endoscopic images. The stent was constructed from nitinol wire, shaped into a zigzag configuration. An ex vivo testing apparatus was also constructed. Results: The best laser power parameter to produce shape change was 1 W for 6-7 seconds. At this setting, there was significant shape change with only minimal thermal injury to the tracheal mucosa, as assessed by visual inspection. The bronchoscopy system functioned adequately during testing in the ex vivo testing apparatus. Conclusion: We have successfully designed instrumentation and created the capability to endoscopically reshape tracheal cartilage in an ex vivo rabbit model. The results obtained in ex vivo tracheal cartilage indicated that reshaping using Er: Glass laser can be accomplished.

  10. Protective cell-mediated immunity by DNA vaccination against Papillomavirus L1 capsid protein in the Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy M; Budgeon, Lynn R; Reed, Cynthia A; Pickel, Martin D; Christensen, Neil D

    2006-01-01

    Papillomavirus major capsid protein L1 has successfully stimulated protective immunity against virus infection by induction of neutralizing antibodies in animal models and in clinical trials. However, the potential impact of L1-induced protective cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses is difficult to measure in vivo because of the coincidence of anti-L1 antibody. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that L1 could activate CMI, using the Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus (CRPV)-rabbit model. A unique property of this model is that infections can be initiated with viral DNA, thus bypassing all contributions to protection via neutralizing anti-L1 antibody. DNA vaccines containing either CRPV L1, or subfragments of L1 (amino-terminal two-thirds of L1 [L1N] and the carboxylterminal two-thirds of L1 [L1C]), were delivered intracutaneously into rabbits, using a gene gun. After three booster immunizations, the rabbits were challenged with several viral DNA constructs: wild-type CRPV, CRPV L1ATGko (an L1 ATG knockout mutation), and CRPV-ROPV hybrid (CRPV with a replacement L1 from Rabbit Oral Papillomavirus). Challenge of L1 DNA-vaccinated rabbits with wild-type CRPV resulted in significantly fewer papillomas when compared with challenge with CRPV L1ATGko DNA. Significantly smaller papillomas were found in CRPV L1-, L1N-, and L1C-vaccinated rabbits. In addition, rabbits vaccinated with either L1 or L1N grew significantly fewer and smaller papillomas when challenged with CRPV-ROPV hybrid DNA. Therefore, CRPV L1 DNA vaccination induced CMI responses to CRPV DNA infections that can contribute to protective immunity. Cross-protective immunity against CRPV L1 and ROPV L1 was elicited in these CRPV L1- and subfragment-vaccinated rabbits. PMID:16987067

  11. Distribution and Prevalence of the Australian Non-Pathogenic Rabbit Calicivirus Is Correlated with Rainfall and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, June; Fordham, Damien A.; Cooke, Brian D.; Cox, Tarnya; Mutze, Greg; Strive, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Background Australia relies heavily on rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) for the biological control of introduced European wild rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus, which are significant economic and environmental pests. An endemic non-pathogenic rabbit calicivirus termed RCV–A1 also occurs in wild rabbits in Australian and provides partial protection against lethal RHDV infection, thus interfering with effective rabbit control. Despite its obvious importance for rabbit population management, little is known about the epidemiology of this benign rabbit calicivirus. Methods We determined the continent-wide distribution and prevalence of RCV-A1 by analysing 1,805 serum samples from wild rabbit populations at 78 sites across Australia for the presence of antibodies to RCV-A1 using a serological test that specifically detects RCV-A1 antibodies and does not cross-react with co-occurring RHDV antibodies. We also investigated possible correlation between climate variables and prevalence of RCV-A1 by using generalised linear mixed effect models. Results Antibodies to RCV-A1 were predominantly detected in rabbit populations in cool, high rainfall areas of the south-east and south-west of the continent. There was strong support for modelling RCV-A1 prevalence as a function of average annual rainfall and minimum temperature. The best ranked model explained 26% of the model structural deviance. According to this model, distribution and prevalence of RCV-A1 is positively correlated with periods of above average rainfall and negatively correlated with periods of drought. Implications Our statistical model of RCV-A1 prevalence will greatly increase our understanding of RCV-A1 epidemiology and its interaction with RHDV in Australia. By defining the environmental conditions associated with the prevalence of RCV-A1, it also contributes towards understanding the distribution of similar viruses in New Zealand and Europe. PMID:25486092

  12. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Toxic Shock Syndrome in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Stach, Christopher S; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement of susceptibility to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; endotoxin) is a defining characteristic of Staphylococcus aureus superantigens. At the time of this publication, there are 24 identified staphylococcal superantigens (SAgs), some of which have yet to be fully characterized. Testing the capacity of superantigens to potentiate LPS sensitivity is essential to characterize the role of these proteins in disease development. Here we describe how to perform studies of the enhancement of LPS-induced toxic shock syndrome in rabbits. This protocol also provides information on a second important activity of superantigens: the production of fever. PMID:26676037

  13. A Personal View of Coronal Heating: Progress and Rabbit Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, E. E.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past few years we have seen great progress in our understanding of the processes that provide mass and energy into the corona. Research in atomic physics and new computational approaches, combined with an impressive set of observations, allow us to test detailed physical models against spatially, spectrally and temporally constrained observations. Our understanding of physics of low beta plasmas are increasing dramatically. In addition, we have explored some elaborate rabbit holes in great details. A personal view of how we have gotten here and where we should be going will be presented.

  14. Ultrastructure of rabbit semilunar cartilages.

    PubMed Central

    Ghadially, F N; Thomas, I; Yong, N; Lalonde, J M

    1978-01-01

    A light and transmission electron microscopical study of 6 to 8 months old rabbit semilunar cartilages has shown that the cells in this tissue resemble chondrocytes more than fibroblasts. The prominent organelles in these cells were rough endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex. An unusual finding was the occurrence of filamentous material in Golgi sacs and vesicles, and collagen fibrils within smooth membrane-bound tubular structures, apparently within the cells. Collagen fibrils forming fibres, fibre bundles and lamellae constituted the major component of the menisci. Protein-polysaccharide particles and associated fine filaments were found in the interfibrillary matrix and in the sparse territorial matrix adjacent to the chondrocytes. Numerous immature elastic fibrils, and rare mature elastic fibres with an electorn-lucent amorphous core, were also found in the general matrix amongst the collagen fibrils. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 PMID:580431

  15. Meniscal allograft transplantation in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Liana M; Del Carlo, Ricardo J; Melo Filho, Edson V; Favarato, Lukiya S C; Duarte, Tatiana S; Pontes, Kelly C S; Cunha, Daise N Q

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the technique for meniscal allograft transplantation using allografts preserved in glycerin 98% in rabbits. Euthanasia was performed at 70 days to compare the transplanted (TM1 to TM16) versus the contralateral meniscus (OM1 to OM16). Sixteen menisci, 8 transplanted and 8 contralateral, were submitted to gross examination, histomorphometric analysis for identification and quantification of cellular type, and for quantification and distribution of collagen fibers. A revascularization study was conducted in all of the other samples. Lengths of the OM varied from 0.9 to 1.0 cm and two TM were smaller. All TM were completely attached to the synovial membrane, except for one case that presented partial fixation. Both, TM and OM had similar amounts of chondrocytes, fibroblasts and fibrocytes, and at the horns, chondrocytes were predominant. The collagen fibers in TM were well organized throughout the body, and disorganized at the horns. These fibers in OM were organized. The amounts of collagen type I and III, and the vascularization of the perimeniscal tissue and of the edge were similar in OM and TM. These results demonstrated graft integration and thus this transplantation technique and preservation method may be recommended. PMID:26648544

  16. Phosphatidylinositol kinase from rabbit reticulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tuazon, P.T.; Heng, A.B.W.; Traugh, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase was isolated from the postribosomal supernatant of rabbit reticulocytes. This activity was identified by the formation of a product that comigrated with phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP) when purified PI was phosphorylated in the presence of (/sup 32/P)ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. Three major peaks of PI kinase activity were resolved by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The first peak eluted at 50-100 mM NaCl together with several serine protein kinases, casein kinase (CK) I and protease activated kinase (PAK) I and II. The PI kinase was subsequently separated from the protein kinases by chromatography on phosphocellulose. The second peak eluted at 125-160 mM NaCl and contained another lipid kinase activity that produced a product which comigrated with phosphatidic acid on thin layer chromatography. The third peak, which eluted at 165-200 mM NaCl, partly comigrated with casein kinase (CK) II and an active protein kinase(s) which phosphorylated mixed histone and histone I. CK II and the histone kinase activities were also separated by chromatography on phosphocelluslose. The different forms of PI kinase were characterized and compared with respect to substrate and salt requirements.

  17. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Betacoronavirus Subgroup A Coronavirus, Rabbit Coronavirus HKU14, from Domestic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Yip, Cyril C. Y.; Fan, Rachel Y. Y.; Huang, Yi; Wang, Ming; Guo, Rongtong; Lam, Carol S. F.; Tsang, Alan K. L.; Lai, Kenneth K. Y.; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Che, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2012-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a novel Betacoronavirus subgroup A coronavirus, rabbit coronavirus HKU14 (RbCoV HKU14), from domestic rabbits. The virus was detected in 11 (8.1%) of 136 rabbit fecal samples by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), with a viral load of up to 108 copies/ml. RbCoV HKU14 was able to replicate in HRT-18G and RK13 cells with cytopathic effects. Northern blotting confirmed the production of subgenomic mRNAs coding for the HE, S, NS5a, E, M, and N proteins. Subgenomic mRNA analysis revealed a transcription regulatory sequence, 5′-UCUAAAC-3′. Phylogenetic analysis showed that RbCoV HKU14 formed a distinct branch among Betacoronavirus subgroup A coronaviruses, being most closely related to but separate from the species Betacoronavirus 1. A comparison of the conserved replicase domains showed that RbCoV HKU14 possessed <90% amino acid identities to most members of Betacoronavirus 1 in ADP-ribose 1″-phosphatase (ADRP) and nidoviral uridylate-specific endoribonuclease (NendoU), indicating that RbCoV HKU14 should represent a separate species. RbCoV HKU14 also possessed genomic features distinct from those of other Betacoronavirus subgroup A coronaviruses, including a unique NS2a region with a variable number of small open reading frames (ORFs). Recombination analysis revealed possible recombination events during the evolution of RbCoV HKU14 and members of Betacoronavirus 1, which may have occurred during cross-species transmission. Molecular clock analysis using RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) genes dated the most recent common ancestor of RbCoV HKU14 to around 2002, suggesting that this virus has emerged relatively recently. Antibody against RbCoV was detected in 20 (67%) of 30 rabbit sera tested by an N-protein-based Western blot assay, whereas neutralizing antibody was detected in 1 of these 20 rabbits. PMID:22398294

  18. Obesity attenuates formalin-induced tonic pain in British Angora rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sinha, R; Dhungel, S; Sinha, M; Paudel, B H; Bhattacharya, N; Mandal, M B

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is known to alter various physiological parameters including the pain sensitivity. There are conflicting reports on the pain sensitivity in obesity. In this context, the present study was aimed to investigate the tonic pain response in obese rabbit model. To achieve this aim, two groups of adult male British Angora rabbits were used. One of the groups was fed with standard rabbit chow and served as control. The other group was fed high fat diet (HFD) for 10 weeks to produce obesity. The standard formalin test was performed at the start and after 10 weeks of dietary regimen in both the groups. Timed behavioral responses (limping, elevation of paw, licking, biting, grooming etc.) were categorized and quantified with the help of standard pain rating scale. The total average pain rating score decreased significantly from 2.01 +/- 0.02 to 1.47 +/- 0.08 (P < 0.05) in HFD group after 10 weeks of dietary regimen, whereas there was no change in the control group. A significant negative correlation was observed between body weight and pain rating score in HFD group of rabbits (P < 0.05, r = -0.62). Results suggest that obesity attenuates the tonic pain responses induced by formalin in British Angora rabbits. PMID:19810581

  19. Herpesvirus sylvilagus in cottontail rabbits: evidence of shedding but not transplacental transmission.

    PubMed

    Spieker, J O; Yuill, T M

    1977-01-01

    Herpesvirus sylvilagus was inoculated into five cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) at various stages of pregnancy; they subsequently had litters in the laboratory. Three other cottontails chronically infected with the virus were bred and bore young in large outdoor pens. Thirty-four living neonates and dead fetuses were weighed, measured and aseptically necropsied. A total of 31 liver, spleen and kidney samples, 16 lymph node, 28 heart and 10 brain samples were collected and processed for inoculation into rabbit kidney cell cultures to attempt virus isolation. Virus was not detected in the 147 tissue samples tested. Pre-conception viremias ranged from 10-21 plaque-forming units per 0.5 ml. Virus isolation was attempted from 26 oral and lacrymal, 23 genital, nine urine and fecal, and four milk and male ejaculate samples from eight infected rabbits. Virus was recovered from two salivary samples from the same rabbit. Triamcinolone acetonide administered daily for four days to five rabbits did not stimulate excretion of virus. PMID:190423

  20. Marsh rabbit mortalities tie pythons to the precipitous decline of mammals in the Everglades.

    PubMed

    McCleery, Robert A; Sovie, Adia; Reed, Robert N; Cunningham, Mark W; Hunter, Margaret E; Hart, Kristen M

    2015-04-22

    To address the ongoing debate over the impact of invasive species on native terrestrial wildlife, we conducted a large-scale experiment to test the hypothesis that invasive Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) were a cause of the precipitous decline of mammals in Everglades National Park (ENP). Evidence linking pythons to mammal declines has been indirect and there are reasons to question whether pythons, or any predator, could have caused the precipitous declines seen across a range of mammalian functional groups. Experimentally manipulating marsh rabbits, we found that pythons accounted for 77% of rabbit mortalities within 11 months of their translocation to ENP and that python predation appeared to preclude the persistence of rabbit populations in ENP. On control sites, outside of the park, no rabbits were killed by pythons and 71% of attributable marsh rabbit mortalities were classified as mammal predations. Burmese pythons pose a serious threat to the faunal communities and ecological functioning of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem, which will probably spread as python populations expand their range. PMID:25788598

  1. Tissue residues of some sulphonamides in normal and Eimeria stiedai infected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Atta, A H; el-Zeni; Samia, A

    1999-07-01

    Tissue residues of sulphadiazine (SDZ), sulphadimidine (SDD) and sulphquinoxaline (SQ) were studied in healthy and E. stiedai infected rabbits following oral administration of 0.5 g/l drinking water for 5 days. The solid-phase extraction and HPLC was used to determine the concentration of the three sulphonamides in a single tissue sample. SDZ was detected in the liver and kidney in concentrations below the tolerance levels at day 5 and no residues could be detected at day 7 after drug withdrawal. SDD and SQ were detected in all of the tested organs of healthy rabbits up to day 5, where the highest concentration was reported in the liver (0.08 +/- 0.02 and 0.09 +/- 0.02 g/g respectively). In infected rabbits, the three sulphonamides were detected up to day 7 in concentrations higher than the tolerance limits (> 0.1 g/g) in the liver and kidney and lower levels in other tissues. A withdrawal period of 4 days for SDZ and 5 days for SDD and SQ in healthy rabbits and 7 days for SDZ and 8 days for SDD and SQ in E. stiedai infected rabbits is suggested. PMID:10481374

  2. Myxoma virus M130R is a novel virulence factor required for lethal myxomatosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Barrett, John W; Werden, Steven J; Wang, Fuan; McKillop, William M; Jimenez, June; Villeneuve, Danielle; McFadden, Grant; Dekaban, Gregory A

    2009-09-01

    Myxoma virus (MV) is a highly lethal, rabbit-specific poxvirus that induces a disease called myxomatosis in European rabbits. In an effort to understand the function of predicted immunomodulatory genes we have deleted various viral genes from MV and tested the ability of these knockout viruses to induce lethal myxomatosis. MV encodes a unique 15 kD cytoplasmic protein (M130R) that is expressed late (12h post infection) during infection. M130R is a non-essential gene for MV replication in rabbit, monkey or human cell lines. Construction of a targeted gene knockout virus (vMyx130KO) and infection of susceptible rabbits demonstrate that the M130R knockout virus is attenuated and that loss of M130R expression allows the rabbit host immune system to effectively respond to and control the lethal effects of MV. M130R expression is a bona fide poxviral virulence factor necessary for full and lethal development of myxomatosis. PMID:19477207

  3. Marsh rabbit mortalities tie pythons to the precipitous decline of mammals in the Everglades

    PubMed Central

    McCleery, Robert A.; Sovie, Adia; Reed, Robert N.; Cunningham, Mark W.; Hunter, Margaret E.; Hart, Kristen M.

    2015-01-01

    To address the ongoing debate over the impact of invasive species on native terrestrial wildlife, we conducted a large-scale experiment to test the hypothesis that invasive Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) were a cause of the precipitous decline of mammals in Everglades National Park (ENP). Evidence linking pythons to mammal declines has been indirect and there are reasons to question whether pythons, or any predator, could have caused the precipitous declines seen across a range of mammalian functional groups. Experimentally manipulating marsh rabbits, we found that pythons accounted for 77% of rabbit mortalities within 11 months of their translocation to ENP and that python predation appeared to preclude the persistence of rabbit populations in ENP. On control sites, outside of the park, no rabbits were killed by pythons and 71% of attributable marsh rabbit mortalities were classified as mammal predations. Burmese pythons pose a serious threat to the faunal communities and ecological functioning of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem, which will probably spread as python populations expand their range. PMID:25788598

  4. Marsh rabbit mortalities tie pythons to the precipitous decline of mammals in the Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCleery, Robert A.; Sovie, Adia; Reed, Robert N.; Cunningham, Mark W.; Hunter, Margaret E.; Hart, Kristen M.

    2015-01-01

    To address the ongoing debate over the impact of invasive species on native terrestrial wildlife, we conducted a large-scale experiment to test the hypothesis that invasive Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) were a cause of the precipitous decline of mammals in Everglades National Park (ENP). Evidence linking pythons to mammal declines has been indirect and there are reasons to question whether pythons, or any predator, could have caused the precipitous declines seen across a range of mammalian functional groups. Experimentally manipulating marsh rabbits, we found that pythons accounted for 77% of rabbit mortalities within 11 months of their translocation to ENP and that python predation appeared to preclude the persistence of rabbit populations in ENP. On control sites, outside of the park, no rabbits were killed by pythons and 71% of attributable marsh rabbit mortalities were classified as mammal predations. Burmese pythons pose a serious threat to the faunal communities and ecological functioning of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem, which will probably spread as python populations expand their range.

  5. Human-derived nanoparticles and vascular response to injury in rabbit carotid arteries: proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Maria A K; Lieske, John C; Kumar, Vivek; Farell-Baril, Gerard; Miller, Virginia M

    2008-01-01

    Self-calcifying, self-replicating nanoparticles have been isolated from calcified human tissues. However, it is unclear if these nanoparticles participate in disease processes. Therefore, this study was designed to preliminarily test the hypothesis that human-derived nanoparticles are causal to arterial disease processes. One carotid artery of 3 kg male rabbits was denuded of endothelium; the contralateral artery remained unoperated as a control. Each rabbit was injected intravenously with either saline, calcified, or decalcified nanoparticles cultured from calcified human arteries or kidney stones. After 35 days, both injured and control arteries were removed for histological examination. Injured arteries from rabbits injected with saline showed minimal, eccentric intimal hyperplasia. Injured arteries from rabbits injected with calcified kidney stone- and arterial-derived nanoparticles occluded, sometimes with canalization. The calcified kidney stone-derived nanoparticles caused calcifications within the occlusion. Responses to injury in rabbits injected with decalcified kidney stone-derived nanoparticles were similar to those observed in saline-injected animals. However, decalcified arterial-derived nanoparticles produced intimal hyperplasia that varied from moderate to occlusion with canalization and calcification. This study offers the first evidence that there may be a causal relationship between human-derived nanoparticles and response to injury including calcification in arteries with damaged endothelium. PMID:18686783

  6. Preparation and applicability of Sarcocystis cruzi antigens and their anti-S. cruzi rabbit sera for serodiagnosis of bovine sarcocystosis.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Ohuchi, Y; Kobayashi, M; Haritani, M; Itagaki, H

    1994-06-01

    Sarcocystis cruzi antigens and their antisera were prepared for the seroimmunological diagnosis of bovine sarcocystosis. Fresh S. cruzi cysts directly removed from cardial muscle of slaughtered cattle were digested with trypsin to release bradyzoites. By twelve cycles of freezing at-22 degrees C and thawing at 37 degrees C, bradyzoites were let to leach out soluble material. The soluble antigens were inoculated four times to rabbits at a dose of 343 micrograms protein and anti-S. cruzi sera were prepared with blood of the rabbits. Gel immunodiffusion test showed no cross-reaction between the present antigens and any of anti-Toxoplasma gondii, -Hammondia hammondi and -Besnoitia wallacei rabbit sera. Avidin-biotin complex immunoperoxidase (ABC) technique with the present anti-S. curzi rabbit sera showed clear positive reaction against S. cruzi cysts in the muscular sections of infected cattle. PMID:7948400

  7. Hypercholesterolemia Impaired Sperm Functionality in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Monclus, Maria A.; Cabrillana, Maria E.; Clementi, Marisa A.; Espínola, Leandro S.; Cid Barría, Jose L.; Vincenti, Amanda E.; Santi, Analia G.; Fornés, Miguel W.

    2010-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia represents a high risk factor for frequent diseases and it has also been associated with poor semen quality that may lead to male infertility. The aim of this study was to analyze semen and sperm function in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Twelve adult White New Zealand male rabbits were fed ad libitum a control diet or a diet supplemented with 0.05% cholesterol. Rabbits under cholesterol-enriched diet significantly increased total cholesterol level in the serum. Semen examination revealed a significant reduction in semen volume and sperm motility in hypercholesterolemic rabbits (HCR). Sperm cell morphology was seriously affected, displaying primarily a “folded head”-head fold along the major axe-, and the presence of cytoplasmic droplet on sperm flagellum. Cholesterol was particularly increased in acrosomal region when detected by filipin probe. The rise in cholesterol concentration in sperm cells was determined quantitatively by Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses. We also found a reduction of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in sperm incubated under capacitating conditions from HCR. Interestingly, the addition of Protein Kinase A pathway activators -dibutyryl-cyclic AMP and iso-butylmethylxanthine- to the medium restored sperm capacitation. Finally, it was also reported a significant decrease in the percentage of reacted sperm in the presence of progesterone. In conclusion, our data showed that diet-induced hypercholesterolemia adversely affects semen quality and sperm motility, capacitation and acrosomal reaction in rabbits; probably due to an increase in cellular cholesterol content that alters membrane related events. PMID:20976152

  8. Simple suture and anchor in rabbit hips

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Filho, Fernando Cal; Guarniero, Roberto; de Godoy Júnior, Rui Maciel; Pereira, César Augusto Martins; Matos, Marcos Almeida; Garcia, Lucas Cortizo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Using biomechanical studies, this research aims to compare hip capsulorrhaphy in rabbits, carried out with two different techniques: capsulorrhaphy with simple sutures and with anchors. Method Thirteen New Zealand Albino (Oryctolaguscuniculus) male rabbits, twenty-six hip joints, were used. First, a pilot project was performed with three rabbits (six hip joints). This experiment consisted of ten rabbits divided into two groups: group 1 underwent capsulorrhaphy on both right and left hips with simple suture using polyglycolic acid absorbable thread, and group 2 underwent capsulorrhaphy with titanium anchors. After a four-week postoperative period, the animals were euthanized and the hip joints were frozen. On the same day of the biomechanical studies, after the hip joints were previously unfrozen, the following parameters were evaluated: rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy. Results There was no relevant statistical difference in rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy between the simple suture and anchor groups. Conclusion Through biomechanical analyses, using parameters of rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy, it has been shown that capsulorrhaphy with simple suture and with anchors has similar results in rabbit hip joints. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Comparative Study. PMID:24453618

  9. Ultrastructural and pharmacologic studies on laser-induced glaucoma in primates and rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    March, W.F.; Gherezghiher, T.; Koss, M.; Nordquist, R.

    1984-01-01

    Sustained high intraocular pressure resulting in optic nerve cupping and loss of ganglion cells was produced in five rhesus monkeys and eight pigmented rabbits by applying argon laser energy to the trabecular meshwork. In addition, the rabbits manifested buphthalmus. Flow of carbon particles subsequently injected into the anterior chamber was obstructed at the trabecular meshwork by a wound-healing response that closed the intratrabecular spaces. Besides this sustained high intraocular pressure as a result of late scarring, an acute hypertensive response was seen in all rabbits which may correspond to the acute hypertension seen after laser trabeculoplasty in humans. The acute hypertensive response could be only partially blocked by prostaglandin inhibitors and the authors believe that prostaglandins are not primarily responsible for this effect. Medications known to lower intraocular pressure were systematically tested in both glaucoma models.

  10. Dihydrotestosterone decreases beta-adrenergic receptor binding in the fetal rabbit lung

    SciTech Connect

    Moawad, A.H.; River, L.P.; River, J.M.

    1988-07-01

    Tritium-labeled dihydroalprenolol was used to quantify the beta-adrenergic receptor sites in day 30 fetal rabbit lung tissue. Each of the fetuses of New Zealand White rabbits on day 28 of gestation was injected with dihydrotestosterone (2.0 micrograms) in one horn of the uterus and 10% ethanol in normal saline (the solvent) in the contralateral one. The animals were sacrificed 48 hours later and the fetal lung tissue was assayed. Dihydrotestosterone decreased the beta-adrenergic receptor site number in the treatment group compared with the control group (86 versus 111 fmol/mg protein, p less than 0.05 by paired t-test). In the presence of dihydrotestosterone, beta-adrenergic receptor binding is inhibited in the preterm fetal rabbit. This effect may be implicated in the beta-adrenergic mediation of phospholipid synthesis and/or release by fetal alveolar cells.

  11. Tyzzer's Disease of Rabbits: Isolation and Propagation of Bacillus piliformis (Tyzzer) in Embryonated Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Ganaway, James R.; Allen, Anton M.; Moore, Thomas D.

    1971-01-01

    Bacillus piliformis (Tyzzer) was isolated from the liver of rabbits with Tyzzer's disease and serially passaged in embryonated hens' eggs. Weanling rabbits given the 32nd egg passage developed lesions typical of Tyzzer's disease and died. B. piliformis was reisolated from the liver of these rabbits in embryonated eggs. Outside the host cell, the motile vegetative phase appeared to be unstable, and no means was found to preserve its viability; the results of titrations were believed to be dependent upon the resistant stage or spore. The spore withstood repeated freeze and thaw and was resistant to heat treatment of 56 C for 1 hr but not 80 C for 0.5 hr. None of several antibacterial substances tested in embryonated eggs was completely inhibitory; B. piliformis was resistant to sulfamethazine and chloramphenicol. The taxonomic position of this pleomorphic, gram-negative, sporeforming, pathogenic bacterium which appears to grow only in certain cells of several species remains unresolved. Images PMID:16557992

  12. Accumulation of sup 125 I-factor XI in atheroma of rabbit with hereditary hyperlipidemia (WHHL-rabbit)

    SciTech Connect

    Komiyama, Y.; Masuda, M.; Murakami, T.; Nishikado, H.; Egawa, H.; Nishimura, T.; Morii, S.; Murata, K. )

    1989-10-01

    We have studied the turnover and accumulation of rabbit factor XI (F.XI) in atherosclerotic lesion in Watanabe-hereditable hyperlipidemic rabbit (WHHL rabbit) to reveal the participation of blood coagulation in atherosclerotic lesion. Rabbit F.XI was iodinated and administered intravenously to WHHL rabbits and Japanese white rabbits. The turnover of {sup 125}I-rabbit F.XI was significantly faster in WHHL rabbits (T1/2 = 2.84 +/- 0.44 days) than in normal rabbits (T1/2 = 4.44 +/- 0.42 days). The thoracic aorta of WHHL rabbit was strongly labelled with {sup 125}I-rabbit F.XI, in sections obtained after 5 days by en-face autoradiography, whereas no radioactivity was detected in normal aorta. By an immunohistochemical study of WHHL rabbit aorta, we confirmed that many F.XI- and fibrin-related compounds existed in the atheroma, whereas albumin did not in these area. These results suggest that the activation of F.XI proceeds on the atherosclerotic lesions of WHHL rabbits.

  13. 9 CFR 354.124 - Quarantine of diseased rabbits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... shall be dealt with in one of the following ways: (a) If it is determined by a veterinary inspector that... veterinary inspector that further handling of the rabbits will not create a health hazard, such rabbits...

  14. 9 CFR 354.124 - Quarantine of diseased rabbits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... shall be dealt with in one of the following ways: (a) If it is determined by a veterinary inspector that... veterinary inspector that further handling of the rabbits will not create a health hazard, such rabbits...

  15. 9 CFR 354.124 - Quarantine of diseased rabbits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... shall be dealt with in one of the following ways: (a) If it is determined by a veterinary inspector that... veterinary inspector that further handling of the rabbits will not create a health hazard, such rabbits...

  16. Molecular characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolated from rabbits raised for meat production.

    PubMed

    Drigo, Ilenia; Mazzolini, Elena; Bacchin, Cosetta; Tonon, Elena; Puiatti, Cinzia; Bano, Luca; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Agnoletti, Fabrizio

    2015-12-31

    Clostridium difficile is an important cause of enteric disease in humans and animals. Recent studies demonstrated a genetic overlap between C. difficile isolated from animals and humans suggesting animals as possible reservoir for human pathogenic strains. This study was a preliminary investigation on the occurrence of C. difficile in rabbits raised in industrial holdings for food production and aimed to characterise isolates and estimate their antimicrobial susceptibility. C. difficile isolates were characterized by toxin profiles, toxinotyping and PCR-ribotyping. The MICs of six antibiotics were determined using E-test. Between 2007 and 2013, 285 industrial holdings (representing 40% of the national census) submitted rabbits to our laboratory for diagnostic purposes, among these holdings, groups of three to five post-weaned rabbits were sampled once by convenience. 1279 samples of caecal content were collected. The overall isolation rate of C. difficile from the enteric specimen was 3% (38/1279), with no difference among animals affected or not by enteric disorders. Among isolates 66% (25/38) were toxigenic. Sixteen different PCR-ribotypes (RTs) were identified. Among the toxigenic strains RT-014/020, RT-078 and RT-012 were found in at least three rabbit holdings. According to the ECOFF threshold, 82% (31/38) C. difficile isolates displayed a reduced susceptibility to at least one and 18% (7/38) to three tested antimicrobials. Rabbits are colonized by heterogeneous C. difficile ribotypes many of which are commonly isolated in humans. One third of isolates displayed a reduced susceptibility to MTZ, the first choice antimicrobial for human CDI treatment. According to our findings rabbits are a potential source of C. difficile for humans. PMID:26507420

  17. White Rabbit in space related application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JamroŻy, M.; Gumiński, M.; Kasprowicz, G.; Romaniuk, R.; Poźniak, K.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes study results regarding potential use of White Rabbit technology in Space Related Applications. During the study Technology Readiness Level and Compliance with Space Related Applications was evaluated. After considering possible deployment and development scenarios, main focus has been put on European Space Agency's tracking station system. This outcome derived from specific requirements of tracking system which are coherent with White Rabbit technology scope of application and further development plans. Current state of Time and Frequency Distribution technology implemented into tracking stations is based on multiple different technologies coexisting in parallel creating a complex system. It requires specific, custom made hardware to combine all the technologies which makes it expensive and difficult to maintain. White Rabbit could be use to reduce Time and Frequency Distribution to a single Ethernet based network with link redundancy, payload data transfer and sub-nanosecond accuracy.

  18. Light stimulation of iris tyrosinase in vivo. [Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Dryja, T.P.; Kimball, G.P.; Albert, D.M.

    1980-05-01

    This paper presents evidence that light stimulates tyrosinase activity in iris melanocytes in rabbits. Levels of iris tyrosinase were found to be greater in eyes of rabbits exposed to light for 6 weeks than in eyes of rabbits maintained in darkness. Despite increasing tyrosinase levels, exposure to light produced no clinically observable change in iris color.

  19. General intravenous anesthesia for brachial plexus surgery in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Reichert, P; Rutowski, R; Kielbowicz, Z; Kuryszko, J; Kielbowicz, M

    2013-01-01

    The rabbit is a good experimental model for brachial plexus surgery. The risks of death during anesthesia were significantly greater in rabbits than cats or dogs. This article presents the protocol of injectable anesthesia for a short surgical procedure, safe for the rabbit patient and convenient for the surgeon. PMID:24597314

  20. Comparative quantitative monitoring of rabbit haemorrhagic disease viruses in rabbit kittens

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Only one strain (the Czech CAPM-v351) of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) has been released in Australia and New Zealand to control pest populations of the European rabbit O. cuniculus. Antigenic variants of RHDV known as RHDVa strains are reportedly replacing RHDV strains in other parts of the world, and Australia is currently investigating the usefulness of RHDVa to complement rabbit biocontrol efforts in Australia and New Zealand. RHDV efficiently kills adult rabbits but not rabbit kittens, which are more resistant to RHD the younger they are and which may carry the virus without signs of disease for prolonged periods. These different infection patterns in young rabbits may significantly influence RHDV epidemiology in the field and hence attempts to control rabbit numbers. Methods We quantified RHDV replication and shedding in 4–5 week old rabbits using quantitative real time PCR to assess their potential to shape RHDV epidemiology by shedding and transmitting virus. We further compared RHDV-v351 with an antigenic variant strain of RHDVa in kittens that is currently being considered as a potential RHDV strain for future release to improve rabbit biocontrol in Australia. Results Kittens were susceptible to infection with virus doses as low as 10 ID50. Virus growth, shedding and transmission after RHDVa infection was found to be comparable or non-significantly lower compared to RHDV. Virus replication and shedding was observed in all kittens infected, but was low in comparison to adult rabbits. Both viruses were shed and transmitted to bystander rabbits. While blood titres indicated that 4–5 week old kittens mostly clear the infection even in the absence of maternal antibodies, virus titres in liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph node were still high on day 5 post infection. Conclusions Rabbit kittens are susceptible to infection with very low doses of RHDV, and can transmit virus before they seroconvert. They may therefore play an important

  1. An Upgrade on the Rabbit Model of Anthracycline-Induced Cardiomyopathy: Shorter Protocol, Reduced Mortality, and Higher Incidence of Overt Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Talavera, Jesús; Fernández-Del-Palacio, María Josefa; García-Nicolás, Obdulio; Seva, Juan; Brooks, Gavin; Moraleda, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Current protocols of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy in rabbits present with high premature mortality and nephrotoxicity, thus rendering them unsuitable for studies requiring long-term functional evaluation of myocardial function (e.g., stem cell therapy). We compared two previously described protocols to an in-house developed protocol in three groups: Group DOX2 received doxorubicin 2 mg/kg/week (8 weeks); Group DAU3 received daunorubicin 3 mg/kg/week (10 weeks); and Group DAU4 received daunorubicin 4 mg/kg/week (6 weeks). A cohort of rabbits received saline (control). Results of blood tests, cardiac troponin I, echocardiography, and histopathology were analysed. Whilst DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed high premature mortality (50% and 33%, resp.), DAU4 rabbits showed 7.6% premature mortality. None of DOX2 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy; 66% of DAU3 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and quickly progressed to severe congestive heart failure. Interestingly, 92% of DAU4 rabbits showed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and 67% developed congestive heart failure exhibiting stable disease. DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed alterations of renal function, with DAU3 also exhibiting hepatic function compromise. Thus, a shortened protocol of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy as in DAU4 group results in high incidence of overt dilated cardiomyopathy, which insidiously progressed to congestive heart failure, associated to reduced systemic compromise and very low premature mortality. PMID:26788502

  2. Nitrosylation of rabbit ferrous heme-hemopexin.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Mauro; Bocedi, Alessio; Mattu, Marco; Coletta, Massimo; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2004-10-01

    Hemopexin (HPX) serves as a trap for toxic plasma heme, ensuring its complete clearance by transportation to the liver. Moreover, HPX-heme has been postulated to play a key role in the homeostasis of nitric oxide (NO). Here, the thermodynamics for NO binding to rabbit ferrous HPX-heme as well as the EPR and optical absorption spectroscopic properties of rabbit ferrous nitrosylated HPX-heme (HPX-heme-NO) are reported. The value of the dissociation equilibrium constant for NO binding to rabbit ferrous HPX-heme (i.e., H) is (1.4+/-0.2)x10(-7) M, at pH 7.0 and 10.0 degrees C; the value of H is unaffected by sodium chloride. At pH 7.0, rabbit ferrous HPX-heme-NO is a six-coordinate heme-iron species, characterized by an X-band EPR spectrum with an axial geometry and by epsilon=146 mM(-1) cm(-1) at 419 nm. At pH 4.0, rabbit ferrous HPX-heme-NO is a five-coordinate heme-iron species, characterized by an X-band EPR spectrum with three-line splitting centered at 334 mT and by epsilon=74 mM(-1) cm(-1) at 387 nm. The p K(a) value of the reversible pH-induced six- to five-coordinate spectroscopic transition is 4.8+/-0.1 in the absence of sodium chloride and 4.3+/-0.1 in the presence of 1.5x10(-1) M sodium chloride. This result is in agreement with the effect of sodium chloride on rabbit HPX-heme stability. The present data have been analyzed in parallel with those of a related heme model compound and heme-protein systems. PMID:15378409

  3. Chromate reduction by rabbit liver aldehyde oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, R.B.; Cooke, R.T. Jr.

    1986-05-29

    Chromate was reduced during the oxidation of 1-methylnicotinamide chlorine by partially purified rabbit liver aldehyde oxidase. In addition to l-methylnicotinamide, several other electron donor substrates for aldehyde oxidase were able to support the enzymatic chromate reduction. The reduction required the presence of both enzyme and the electron donor substrate. The rate of the chromate reduction was retarded by inhibitors or aldehyde oxidase but was not affected by substrates or inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. These results are consistent with the involvement of aldehyde oxidase in the reduction of chromate by rabbit liver cytosolic enzyme preparations.

  4. Identification of Polymorphisms in the Rabbit Growth Hormone Receptor (GHR) Gene and Association with Finishing Weight in a Commercial Meat Rabbit Line.

    PubMed

    Fontanesi, Luca; Sparacino, Giuseppe; Utzeri, Valerio Joe; Scotti, Emilio; Fornasini, Daniela; Dall'Olio, Stefania; Frabetti, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    A shortcut to identify DNA markers associated with economic traits is to use a candidate gene approach that is still useful in livestock species in which molecular tools and resources are not advanced or not well developed. Mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene associated with production traits have been already described in several livestock species. For this reason GHR could be an interesting candidate gene in the rabbit. In this study we re-sequenced all exons and non-coding regions of the rabbit GHR gene in a panel of 10 different rabbits and identified 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). One of them (g.63453192C>G or c.106C>G), located in exon 3 was a missense mutation (p.L36V) substituting an amino acid in a highly conserved position across all mammals. This mutation was genotyped in 297 performance tested rabbits of a meat male line and association analysis showed that the investigated SNP was associated with weight at 70 days (P < 0.05). The most frequent genotype (GG) was in animals with higher weight at this age, suggesting that the high directional selection pressure toward this trait since the constitution of the genotyped line might have contributed to shape allele frequencies at this polymorphic site. PMID:26913548

  5. Incidence of Shope's rabbit fibroma in cottontails at the Patuxent Research Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Kilham, L.; Warbach, O.

    1956-01-01

    Between March, 1947, and December,1953, 359 cottontails were examined for evidence of fibromas at the Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, Md. No tumors were observed on the rabbits until December, 1950, when 3 of 16 shot animals had fibromas. Twelve rabbits of 70 examined in 1951, had tumors, and no tumors were found on 37 examined in 1952 and 29 examined in 1953. Neutralization tests, using Shope (OA) fibroma virus, were positive on sera from 6 of 36 rabbits trapped between July and December, 1951; one of two rabbits tested in 1952 showed evidence of antibodies; and 2 of 9 tested in 1953 were positive. Neither fibromas nor circulating antibodies were found in 70 cottontails trapped in January and February, 1953, in Rockville, Maryland and over 30 cottontails obtained from dealers in Kansas and Arkansas. No lesions developed on several species of mammals inoculated with a strain of the fibroma virus isolated from a wild cottontail captured on the Refuge. These findings were interpreted as indication of occurrence of an epizootic during the period December, 1950 through December, 1951. Although the local cottontail population showed a marked drop following this epizootic, available data were insufficient to determine whether or not fibroma virus was a contributing factor.

  6. Borrelia sp. infection in coyotes, black-tailed jack rabbits and desert cottontails in southern Texas.

    PubMed

    Burgess, E C; Windberg, L A

    1989-01-01

    Coyotes (Canis latrans) from southern Texas were sampled for antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi from 1980 to 1986; black-tailed jack rabbits (Lepus californicus) and desert cottontails (Sylvilagus audubonii) were sampled in 1986. Coyote fetuses, adult coyote kidneys, and black-tailed jack rabbit and desert cottontail kidneys were cultured for B. burgdorferi in 1986. Results of indirect immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) tests for B. burgdorferi in coyotes were as follows (number positive at a dilution of greater than or equal to 1:128/number tested): 1980 (0 of 30), 1981 (0 of 21), 1982 (0 of 53), 1983 (0 of 78), 1984 (47 of 97), 1985 (20 of 88), and 1986 (42 of 80). Eight of 26 black-tailed jack rabbits and two of seven desert cottontails tested in 1986 had IFA titers to B. burgdorferi of greater than or equal to 1:128. Borrelia burgdorferi was isolated from one of five coyote fetuses, three of 31 adult coyote kidneys, and two of 10 black-tailed jack rabbit kidneys in 1986. These results indicate that B. burgdorferi infection has been present in coyotes in Texas, at least since 1984 and that transplacental transmission occurs. PMID:2644452

  7. Effects of dichloroacetate in spinal stroke in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Barsan, W G; Hedges, J R; Syverud, S A; Dronen, S C; Dimlich, R V

    1987-08-31

    High levels of brain lactate may contribute to cellular death and dysfunction in acute cerebral ischemia. Although sodium dichloroacetate (DCA) has been shown to lower brain lactate in incomplete cerebral ischemia, functional outcome has not been assessed with DCA. We examined the effects of DCA treatment on functional neurologic outcome using a previously developed model for "spinal stroke" in the rabbit. Thirty male New Zealand white rabbits weighing 1.3-2.8 kg were studied. After anesthesia with 15-40 mg/kg pentobarbital IV, a laparotomy was performed and the aorta exposed. A metal clamp was placed on the aorta just distal to the left renal artery for 20 minutes and then removed. The abdominal wound was closed in two layers. Animals then received either 2cc normal saline (n = 15) or 300 mg/kg DCA in 2cc normal saline (n = 15) over 10 minutes. The animals were returned to their cages when awake and were examined at 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours for neurologic assessment. The exams were performed by a blinded examiner who was unaware of the treatment given. A three point ambulatory score (0 = can't walk, 1 = walk but not hop, 2 = hopping) and a two point activity score (0 = inactive, 1 = active) were used. At 24 hours, 67% of the DCA-treated animals were actively moving about compared to only 27% of the controls (P = 0.03; Fisher Exact Test). Ten of fifteen control animals were unable to walk, while only five of fifteen DCA-treated animals were unable to walk (P = 0.07). Sixty percent of the DCA animals were able to hop compared to 27% of controls (P = 0.06). These results suggest that DCA can reduce morbidity from spinal cord ischemia in the rabbit. PMID:3613862

  8. A Century of Shope Papillomavirus in Museum Rabbit Specimens.

    PubMed

    Escudero Duch, Clara; Williams, Richard A J; Timm, Robert M; Perez-Tris, Javier; Benitez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Sylvilagus floridanus Papillomavirus (SfPV) causes growth of large horn-like tumors on rabbits. SfPV was described in cottontail rabbits (probably Sylvilagus floridanus) from Kansas and Iowa by Richard Shope in 1933, and detected in S. audubonii in 2011. It is known almost exclusively from the US Midwest. We explored the University of Kansas Natural History Museum for historical museum specimens infected with SfPV, using molecular techniques, to assess if additional wild species host SfPV, and whether SfPV occurs throughout the host range, or just in the Midwest. Secondary aims were to detect distinct strains, and evidence for strain spatio-temporal specificity. We found 20 of 1395 rabbits in the KU collection SfPV symptomatic. Three of 17 lagomorph species (S. nuttallii, and the two known hosts) were symptomatic, while Brachylagus, Lepus and eight additional Sylvilagus species were not. 13 symptomatic individuals were positive by molecular testing, including the first S. nuttallii detection. Prevalence of symptomatic individuals was significantly higher in Sylvilagus (1.8%) than Lepus. Half of these specimens came from Kansas, though new molecular detections were obtained from Jalisco-Mexico's first-and Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, and Texas, USA. We document the oldest lab-confirmed case (Kansas, 1915), pre-dating Shope's first case. SfPV amplification was possible from 63.2% of symptomatic museum specimens. Using multiple methodologies, rolling circle amplification and, multiple isothermal displacement amplification in addition to PCR, greatly improved detection rates. Short sequences were obtained from six individuals for two genes. L1 gene sequences were identical to all previously detected sequences; E7 gene sequences, were more variable, yielding five distinct SfPV1 strains that differing by less than 2% from strains circulating in the Midwest and Mexico, between 1915 and 2005. Our results do not clarify whether strains are host species specific, though

  9. Cloning, Characteristics, and Functional Analysis of Rabbit NADPH Oxidase 5

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Yin, Caiyong; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Fulton, David J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nox5 was the last member of the Nox enzyme family to be identified. Functionally distinct from the other Nox isoforms, our understanding of its physiological significance has been hampered by the absence of Nox5 in mouse and rat genomes. Nox5 is present in the genomes of other species such as the rabbit that have broad utility as models of cardiovascular disease. However, the mRNA sequence, characteristics, and functional analysis of rabbit Nox5 has not been fully defined and were the goals of the current study. Methods: Rabbit Nox5 was amplified from rabbit tissue, cloned, and sequenced. COS-7 cells were employed for expression and functional analysis via Western blotting and measurements of superoxide. We designed and synthesized miRNAs selectively targeting rabbit Nox5. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of rabbit Nox5 were aligned with those of putative rabbit isoforms (X1, X2, X3, and X4). A phylogenetic tree was generated based on the mRNA sequence for Nox5 from rabbit and other species. Results: Sequence alignment revealed that the identified rabbit Nox5 was highly conserved with the predicted sequence of rabbit Nox5. Cell based experiments reveal that rabbit Nox5 was robustly expressed and produced superoxide at rest and in a calcium and PMA-dependent manner that was susceptible to superoxide dismutase and the flavoprotein inhibitor, DPI. miRNA-1 was shown to be most effective in down-regulating the expression of rabbit Nox5. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship between rabbit and armadillo Nox5. Rabbit Nox5 was relatively closely related to human Nox5, but lies in a distinct cluster. Conclusion: Our study establishes the suitability of the rabbit as a model organism to further our understanding of the role of Nox5 in cardiovascular and other diseases and provides new information on the genetic relationship of Nox5 genes in different species. PMID:27486403

  10. Possible interaction between myxomatosis and calicivirosis related to rabbit haemorrhagic disease affecting the European rabbit.

    PubMed

    Marchandeau, S; Bertagnoli, S; Peralta, B; Boucraut-Baralon, C; Letty, J; Reitz, F

    2004-11-01

    Serological data on myxoma virus, rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) virus and RHD-like viruses in juvenile rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) trapped in 1995, 1996 and 1997 in two areas of France were analysed. For each disease, the effects of bodyweight, year, month and seropositivity for the other disease were modelled by using logistic regressions. In one area, a model including RHD seropositivity was selected to explain the myxoma virus seropositivity. Models including myxoma virus seropositivity were selected to explain the RHD seropositivity in both areas, and the odds of a rabbit being seropositive to both viruses were 5.1 and 8.4 times higher than the odds of a rabbit being seronegative to myxoma virus and seropositive to RHD. The year and bodyweight had significant effects for myxomatosis in one area and for RHD in both areas. PMID:15573951

  11. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the CCNA2 gene and its association with wool density in Rex rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chen, S J; Liu, T; Liu, Y J; Dong, B; Huang, Y T; Gu, Z L

    2011-01-01

    The Rex rabbit is a typical fur breed. Wool density, hair length, wool fineness, and hide area are the main indices of fur quality. We previously found that the CCNA2 gene plays an important role in hair follicle initiation and development, and it is involved in the distinctive wool density of the Rex rabbit. It is an important candidate gene for wool density selection through marker-assisted selection. We conducted an association study to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the CCNA2 gene and their ligands associated with wool density. Using PCR-RFLP technology, we discovered two SNPs (129G>A and 1140G>C) of the CCNA2 gene. Allele frequencies of these two SNPs were investigated and evaluated by the χ(2) test in 100 Rex rabbits. The two SNPs were both in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. We also looked for a potential association of these SNPs with fur traits in 100 Rex rabbits. Rex rabbits with the GG genotype had significantly higher wool density (P < 0.01) than those with other genotypes; the other three fur traits did not differ significantly among the genotypes. In conclusion, the two SNPs of the CCNA2 gene affect wool density in the Rex rabbit. PMID:22095474

  12. Myxoma virus M063R is a host range gene essential for virus replication in rabbit cells.

    PubMed

    Barrett, John W; Shun Chang, Chew; Wang, Gen; Werden, Steven J; Shao, Zhuhong; Barrett, Catherine; Gao, Xiujuan; Belsito, Tara A; Villenevue, Danielle; McFadden, Grant

    2007-04-25

    The myxoma virus M063R gene product exhibits some sequence similarity to the poxvirus host range gene, C7L, of vaccinia virus. To address the potential host range function of the M063R gene product in rabbits, a deletion mutant of myxoma virus (vMyx63KO) was generated and characterized. vMyx63KO replicated to normal titre levels and produced foci that were indistinguishable from those produced by MV in vitro in a monkey kidney cell line (BGMK) that are permissive for wild type MV. However, vMyx63KO failed to replicate in all rabbit cell lines tested, including both primary and established cells lines, as well as cells derived from a variety of tissues. M063R expression was not required for myxoma virus binding, entry or early gene expression, whereas DNA replication was aborted and late genes were not expressed in vMyx63KO infected rabbit cells. Thus, the replication block for vMyx63KO in rabbit cells preceded the stage of late gene expression and DNA replication. Finally, an in vivo pathogenesis study indicated that vMyx63KO failed to cause any signs of classic myxomatosis in infected rabbits, but functioned as a non-replicating vaccine and provided protection for subsequent challenge by wild type myxoma virus. Altogether, these observations demonstrate that M063R plays a critical role in determining the host specificity of myxoma virus in rabbit cells. PMID:17184804

  13. The effect of dietary Digestarom® herbal supplementation on rabbit meat fatty acid profile, lipid oxidation and antioxidant content.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, S; Dal Bosco, A; Szendrő, Zs; Cullere, M; Gerencsér, Zs; Matics, Zs; Castellini, C; Dalle Zotte, A

    2016-11-01

    The experiment tested the effect of Digestarom® herbal supplementation on the antioxidant content, lipid oxidation and fatty acid profile of rabbit meat. At kindling, rabbit does and litters were divided into two dietary groups (N=162 kits/dietary group) and fed either a control diet (C) or the C diet supplemented with Digestarom® (D: 300mg/kg). At weaning (35days) four experimental fattening groups (54 rabbits each) were considered: CC, CD, DC and DD. After slaughtering (12weeks of age), Longissimus thoracis et lumborum muscles were dissected from 20 rabbits/group and analyzed. Rabbit meat of DD group was enriched in essential C18:3 n-3 fatty acid and in other long-chain PUFA of n-3 series. Despite meat of DD group displayed the highest peroxidability index, TBARs value was the lowest. Meat antioxidant content followed the rank order: DD>CD>DC>CC. Digestarom® improved fatty acid composition and oxidative status of rabbit meat, particularly when administered from weaning throughout the growing period. PMID:27351068

  14. Management of Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) Zoonotic Transmission: Protection of Rabbits against HEV Challenge following Immunization with HEV 239 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Du, Ren jie; Wang, Ling; Han, Jian; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Yu lin; Xia, Jun ke; Lu, Feng min; Zhuang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) constitutes a significant health burden worldwide, with an estimated approximately 33% of the world’s population exposed to the pathogen. The recent licensed HEV 239 vaccine in China showed excellent protective efficacy against HEV of genotypes 1 and 4 in the general population and pregnant women. Because hepatitis E is a zoonosis, it is also necessary to ascertain whether this vaccine can serve to manage animal sources of human HEV infection. To test the efficacy of the HEV 239 vaccine in protecting animal reservoirs of HEV against HEV infection, twelve specific-pathogen-free (SPF) rabbits were divided randomly into two groups of 6 animals and inoculated intramuscularly with HEV 239 and placebo (PBS). All animals were challenged intravenously with swine HEV of genotype 4 or rabbit HEV seven weeks after the initial immunization. The course of infection was monitored for 10 weeks by serum ALT levels, duration of viremia and fecal virus excretion and HEV antibody responses. All rabbits immunized with HEV 239 developed high titers of anti-HEV and no signs of HEV infection were observed throughout the experiment, while rabbits inoculated with PBS developed viral hepatitis following challenge, with liver enzyme elevations, viremia, and fecal virus shedding. Our data indicated that the HEV 239 vaccine is highly immunogenic for rabbits and that it can completely protect rabbits against homologous and heterologous HEV infections. These findings could facilitate the prevention of food-borne sporadic HEV infection in both developing and industrialized countries. PMID:24498149

  15. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis as a novel player in metabolic syndrome-induced erectile dysfunction: an experimental study in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Vignozzi, Linda; Filippi, Sandra; Comeglio, Paolo; Cellai, Ilaria; Sarchielli, Erica; Morelli, Annamaria; Rastrelli, Giulia; Maneschi, Elena; Galli, Andrea; Vannelli, Gabriella Barbara; Saad, Farid; Mannucci, Edoardo; Adorini, Luciano; Maggi, Mario

    2014-03-25

    A pathogenic link between erectile dysfunction (ED) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) is now well established. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the hepatic hallmark of MetS, is regarded as an active player in the pathogenesis of MetS-associated cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study was aimed at evaluating the relationship between MetS-induced NASH and penile dysfunction. We used a non-genomic, high fat diet (HFD)-induced, rabbit model of MetS, and treated HFD rabbits with testosterone (T), with the selective farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist obeticholic acid (OCA), or with the anti-TNFα mAb infliximab. Rabbits fed a regular diet were used as controls. Liver histomorphological and gene expression analysis demonstrated NASH in HFD rabbits. Several genes related to inflammation (including TNFα), activation of stellate cells, fibrosis, and lipid metabolism parameters were negatively associated to maximal acetylcholine (Ach)-induced relaxation in penis. When all these putative liver determinants of penile Ach responsiveness were tested as covariates in a multivariate model, only the association between hepatic TNFα expression and Ach response was confirmed. Accordingly, circulating levels of TNFα were increased 15-fold in HFD rabbits. T and OCA dosing in HFD rabbits both reduced TNFα liver expression and plasma levels, with a parallel increase of penile eNOS expression and responsiveness to Ach. Also neutralization of TNFα with infliximab treatment fully normalized HFD-induced hypo-responsiveness to Ach, as well as responsiveness to vardenafil, a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor. Thus, MetS-induced NASH in HFD rabbits plays an active role in the pathogenesis of ED, likely through TNFα, as indicated by treatments reducing liver and circulating TNFα levels (T or OCA), or neutralizing TNFα action (infliximab), which significantly improve penile responsiveness to Ach in HFD rabbits. PMID:24486698

  16. Detection of Babesia and Anaplasma species in rabbits from Texas and Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Yabsley, Michael J; Romines, Janean; Nettles, Victor F

    2006-01-01

    Rabbits have been shown to harbor a suite of zoonotic organisms, including a Babesia species, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum. In this study, we conducted a molecular survey for various tick-borne pathogens in three species of rabbits from Texas and Georgia. Of 18 black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus) tested from Texas, six (28%) were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for Babesia, and nucleotide sequencing revealed two distinct species or strains. Two jackrabbits were infected with a Babesia species or strain (Babesia sp. A) that was nearly identical (99.9%) to a piroplasm previously detected in humans from Washington state, and the remaining four jackrabbits were infected with a Babesia species (Babesia sp. B) that was most similar (99.7%) to a Babesia species detected in cottontail rabbits from Massachusetts and humans from Kentucky and Missouri. Eleven (61%) black-tailed jackrabbits were positive for A. bovis, and one was positive for A. phagocytophilum. Two of four desert cottontails (Sylvilagus audubonii) from Texas were positive for the Babesia sp. B, and one desert cottontail each was positive for A. bovis and A. phagocytophilum. One of these desert cottontails was coinfected with the Babesia sp. B and A. phagocytophilum, and five jackrabbits were coinfected with Babesia species and A. bovis. Of 19 eastern cottontails (S. floridanus) from Georgia, only one (5.3%) was positive for A. phagocytophilum, and three (15.8%) were positive for A. bovis. No rabbits from Texas or Georgia were positive for Borrelia species. The only tick species detected on the Texas and Georgia rabbits was the rabbit tick, Haemaphysalis leporispalustris. These data extend the geographic and host range of these pathogens, and because both the Babesia species and A. phagocytophilum are potential zoonotic pathogens, it is important to be aware that these organisms are enzootic in parts of the southern United States. PMID:16584322

  17. Adjunctive Phosphodiesterase-4 Inhibitor Therapy Improves Antibiotic Response to Pulmonary Tuberculosis in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Tsenova, Liana; Holloway, Jennifer; Peixoto, Blas; O'Brien, Paul; Dartois, Véronique; Khetani, Vikram; Zeldis, Jerome B.; Kaplan, Gilla

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Adjunctive host-directed therapy is emerging as a new potential approach to improve the outcome of conventional antimicrobial treatment for tuberculosis (TB). We tested the ability of a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor (PDE4i) CC-11050, co-administered with the first-line anti-TB drug isoniazid (INH), to accelerate bacillary killing and reduce chronic inflammation in the lungs of rabbits with experimental Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Methods A rabbit model of pulmonary TB that recapitulates the pathologic manifestations seen in humans was used. Rabbits were infected with virulent Mtb by aerosol exposure and treated for eight weeks with INH with or without CC-11050, starting at four weeks post infection. The effect of CC-11050 treatment on disease severity, pathology, bacillary load, T cell proliferation and global lung transcriptome profiles were analyzed. Results Significant improvement in bacillary clearance and reduced lung pathology and fibrosis were noted in the rabbits treated for eight weeks with INH + CC-11050, compared to those treated with INH or CC-11050 only. In addition, expression of host genes associated with tissue remodeling, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) regulation, macrophage activation and lung inflammation networks was dampened in CC-11050-treated, compared to the untreated rabbits. Conclusions Adjunctive CC-11050 therapy significantly improves the response of rabbits with experimental pulmonary TB to INH treatment. We propose that CC-11050 may be a promising candidate for host directed therapy of patients with pulmonary TB, reducing the duration and improving clinical outcome of antibiotic treatment. PMID:26981575

  18. Anatomical Details of the Rabbit Nasal Passages and Their Implications in Breathing, Air Conditioning, and Olfaction.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jinxiang; Si, Xiuhua A; Kim, Jongwon; Zhang, Yu; Jacob, Richard E; Kabilan, Senthil; Corley, Richard A

    2016-07-01

    The rabbit is commonly used as a laboratory animal for inhalation toxicology tests and detail knowledge of the rabbit airway morphometry is needed for outcome analysis or theoretical modeling. The objective of this study is to quantify the morphometric dimension of the nasal airway of a New Zealand white rabbit and to relate the morphology and functions through analytical and computational methods. Images of high-resolution MRI scans of the rabbit were processed to measure the axial distribution of the cross-sectional areas, perimeter, and complexity level. The lateral recess, which has functions other than respiration or olfaction, was isolated from the nasal airway and its dimension was quantified separately. A low Reynolds number turbulence model was implemented to simulate the airflow, heat transfer, vapor transport, and wall shear stress. Results of this study provide detailed morphological information of the rabbit that can be used in the studies of olfaction, inhalation toxicology, drug delivery, and physiology-based pharmacokinetics modeling. For the first time, we reported a spiral nasal vestibule that splits into three paths leading to the dorsal meatus, maxilloturbinate, and ventral meatus, respectively. Both non-dimensional functional analysis and CFD simulations suggested that the airflow in the rabbit nose is laminar and the unsteady effect is only significantly during sniffing. Due to the large surface-to-volume ratio, the maxilloturbinate is highly effective in warming and moistening the inhaled air to body conditions. The unique anatomical structure and respiratory airflow pattern may have important implications for designing new odorant detectors or electronic noses. Anat Rec, 299:853-868, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27145450

  19. Efficient Immunoglobulin Gene Disruption and Targeted Replacement in Rabbit Using Zinc Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Offner, Sonja; Ros, Francesca; Lifke, Valeria; Zeitler, Bryan; Rottmann, Oswald; Vincent, Anna; Zhang, Lei; Jenkins, Shirin; Niersbach, Helmut; Kind, Alexander J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Schnieke, Angelika E.; Platzer, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Rabbits are widely used in biomedical research, yet techniques for their precise genetic modification are lacking. We demonstrate that zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) introduced into fertilized oocytes can inactivate a chosen gene by mutagenesis and also mediate precise homologous recombination with a DNA gene-targeting vector to achieve the first gene knockout and targeted sequence replacement in rabbits. Two ZFN pairs were designed that target the rabbit immunoglobulin M (IgM) locus within exons 1 and 2. ZFN mRNAs were microinjected into pronuclear stage fertilized oocytes. Founder animals carrying distinct mutated IgM alleles were identified and bred to produce offspring. Functional knockout of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus was confirmed by serum IgM and IgG deficiency and lack of IgM+ and IgG+ B lymphocytes. We then tested whether ZFN expression would enable efficient targeted sequence replacement in rabbit oocytes. ZFN mRNA was co-injected with a linear DNA vector designed to replace exon 1 of the IgM locus with ∼1.9 kb of novel sequence. Double strand break induced targeted replacement occurred in up to 17% of embryos and in 18% of fetuses analyzed. Two major goals have been achieved. First, inactivation of the endogenous IgM locus, which is an essential step for the production of therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies in the rabbit. Second, establishing efficient targeted gene manipulation and homologous recombination in a refractory animal species. ZFN mediated genetic engineering in the rabbit and other mammals opens new avenues of experimentation in immunology and many other research fields. PMID:21695153

  20. Cytotoxic effects of nasal buserelin on nasal mucosal tissue in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Oghan, Fatih; Apuhan, Tayfun; Terzi, Hakan; Kukner, Aysel; Coksuer, Hakan; Yılmaz, Fahrettin

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the cytotoxic effects of nasal buserelin on rabbit nasal mucosal tissue, twenty-four female rabbits were studied prospectively. The rabbits were divided into 4 groups including 6 rabbits. The rabbits' left noses were included in the all study groups: 150 μg/puff/day of buserelin acetate was administered topically twice daily during 21, 42 and 63 days. Saline was administered topically twice daily to the left nasal cavity in the control group. The nasal septal mucosal stripe tissue was carefully removed from underlaying cartilage after sedation. HE staining, Masson's trichrome, toluidine blue and TUNEL staining were used to evaluate mucosal changes. Each preparation was investigated via apoptotic cells, and they were accounted. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to evaluate nonparametric comparison of apoptotic cells. Mononuclear cells have been raised in the sub-epithelial connective tissue, nucleuses of epithelial cells in the apical region were pyknotic, and apoptotic cells were determined on 21-day group. In the 42-day group, nasal epithelial tissue was similar to 21-day group and epithelial cells including pyknotic nucleus were present in this group, too. In the 63-day group, epithelial cells were light colored. Venous sinuses in the sub-epithelial connective tissue were wide but not congested and not raised collagen filaments. In the intra-epithelial tissue, some of cells were TUNEL (+). Apoptotic cells were fewer in the control group according to 21-day group. In 42- and 63-day groups, these cells were fewer than in 21-day group. Numerical difference was present between the groups, but statistical significance was not found between the groups. We concluded that nasal buserelin cytotoxicity was not potent in the nasal cavity in rabbits. We use nasal buserelin in all indications with confidence. PMID:22160101

  1. An individual-based model of rabbit viral haemorrhagic disease on European wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fa, John E.; Sharples, Colin M.; Bell, Diana J.; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    We developed an individual-based model of Rabbit Viral Hemorrhagic Disease (RVHD) for European wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.), representing up to 1000 rabbits in four hectares. Model output for productivity and recruitment matched published values. The disease was density-dependent and virulence affected outcome. Strains that caused death after several days produced greater overall mortality than strains in which rabbits either died or recovered very quickly. Disease effect also depended on time of year. We also elaborated a larger scale model representing 25 km2 and 100,000+ rabbits, split into a number of grid-squares. This was a more traditional model that did not represent individual rabbits, but employed a system of dynamic equations for each grid-square. Disease spread depended on probability of transmission between neighboring grid-squares. Potential recovery from a major population crash caused by the disease relied on disease virulence and frequency of recurrence. The model's dependence on probability of disease transmission between grid-squares suggests the way that the model represents the spatial distribution of the population affects simulation. Although data on RVHD in Europe are lacking, our models provide a basis for describing the disease in realistic detail and for assessing influence of various social and spatial factors on spread.

  2. Urolithiasis and cystotomy in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cyndi

    2011-03-01

    Cystotomy is a surgical incision into the urinary bladder, which may be required for removal of calculi, diagnosis of tumors or refractory urinary tract infections, or repair of ectopic ureters and ruptured bladders. This column describes the indications and techniques for cystotomy in the rabbit. PMID:21326187

  3. CLONING AND EXPRESSION OF RABBIT INTERLEUKIN-15

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to understand the inflammatory mechanisms related to rabbit interleukin-15 (RIL-15), we cloned and expressed RIL-15 cDNA gene. A cDNA encoding RIL-15 was cloned from heart mRNA by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification using hIL-15 primers. The RIL-15 cDNA co...

  4. Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killoran, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    This journal issue addresses the issue of testing in the social studies classroom. The first article, "The Role of Testing" (Bragaw), focuses on the need for tests to reflect the objectives of the study completed. The varying functions of pop quizzes, weekly tests, and unit tests are explored. "Testing Thinking Processes" (Killoran, Zimmer, and…

  5. Myxoma virus M156 is a specific inhibitor of rabbit PKR but contains a loss-of-function mutation in Australian virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chen; Haller, Sherry L; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant; Rothenburg, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a rabbit-specific poxvirus, which is highly virulent in European rabbits. The attenuation of MYXV and the increased resistance of rabbits following the release of MYXV in Australia is one of the best-documented examples of host-pathogen coevolution. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the restriction of MYXV infection to rabbits and MYXV attenuation in the field, we have studied the interaction of the MYXV protein M156 with the host antiviral protein kinase R (PKR). In yeast and cell-culture transfection assays, M156 only inhibited rabbit PKR but not PKR from other tested mammalian species. Infection assays with human HeLa PKR knock-down cells, which were stably transfected with human or rabbit PKR, revealed that only human but not rabbit PKR was able to restrict MYXV infection, whereas both PKRs were able to restrict replication of a vaccinia virus (VACV) strain that lacks the PKR inhibitors E3 and K3. Inactivation of M156R led to MYXV virus attenuation in rabbit cells, which was rescued by the ectopic expression of VACV E3 and K3. We further show that a mutation in the M156 encoding gene that was identified in more than 50% of MYXV field isolates from Australia resulted in an M156 variant that lost its ability to inhibit rabbit PKR and led to virus attenuation. The species-specific inhibition of rabbit PKR by M156 and the M156 loss-of-function in Australian MYXV field isolates might thus contribute to the species specificity of MYXV and to the attenuation in the field, respectively. PMID:26903626

  6. Adaptation of distortion product otoacoustic emissions predicts susceptibility to acoustic over-exposure in alert rabbits.

    PubMed

    Luebke, Anne E; Stagner, Barden B; Martin, Glen K; Lonsbury-Martin, Brenda L

    2014-04-01

    A noninvasive test was developed in rabbits based on fast adaptation measures for 2f1-f2 distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). The goal was to evaluate the effective reflex activation, i.e., "functional strength," of both the descending medial olivocochlear efferent reflex (MOC-R) and the middle-ear muscle reflex (MEM-R) through sound activation. Classically, it is assumed that both reflexes contribute toward protecting the inner ear from cochlear damage caused by noise exposure. The DP-gram method described here evaluated the MOC-R effect on DPOAE levels over a two-octave (oct) frequency range. To estimate the related activation of the middle-ear muscles (MEMs), the MEM-R was measured by monitoring the level of the f1-primary tone throughout its duration. Following baseline measures, rabbits were subjected to noise over-exposure. A main finding was that the measured adaptive activity was highly variable between rabbits but less so between the ears of the same animal. Also, together, the MOC-R and MEM-R tests showed that, on average, DPOAE adaptation consisted of a combined contribution from both systems. Despite this shared involvement, the amount of DPOAE adaptation measured for a particular animal's ear predicted that ear's subsequent susceptibility to the noise over-exposure for alert but not for deeply anesthetized rabbits. PMID:25234992

  7. Antistressor activity of Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi) against experimentally induced oxidative stress in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jyoti, S; Satendra, S; Sushma, S; Anjana, T; Shashi, S

    2007-01-01

    Fresh leaves of Ocimum sanctum (O. sanctum) were evaluated for antistress activity against experimentally induced oxidative stress in albino rabbits. Animals of the test group received supplementation of 2 g fresh leaves of O. sanctum per rabbit for 30 days. Anemic hypoxia was induced chemically by injecting the rabbits with 15 mg sodium nitrite per 100 g body weight intraperitoneally. Results indicated that O. sanctum administration blunted the changes in cardiorespiratory (BP, HR, RR) parameters in response to stress. A significant (p < 0.01) decrease in blood sugar level was observed after 30 days of dietary supplementation of O. sanctum leaves. Significant increase (p < 0.05) in the levels of enzymatic (superoxide dismutase) and nonenzymatic (reduced glutathione) antioxidants was observed in the test group after the treatment with O. sanctum. Oxidative stress led to a lesser depletion of reduced glutathione (28.80%) and plasma superoxide dismutase (23.04%) in O. sanctum-treated rabbits. The results of this study suggest that the potential antistressor activity of O. sanctum is partly attributable to its antioxidant properties. PMID:17922070

  8. Risk of zoonotic transmission of HEV from rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Dubois, Martine; Abravanel, Florence; Top, Sokunthea; Bertagnoli, Stéphane; Guerin, Jean-Luc; Izopet, Jacques

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis E virus strains from rabbits indicate that these mammals may be a reservoir for HEVs that cause infection in humans. Further issues remain to be clarified, including whether the genotype of rabbit HEV differs from human and swine HEV genotype 3 and whether rabbit HEV can infect human and other animals. HEV was found in farmed rabbits in several geographic areas of China, in USA and more recently in France. The prevalence of antibodies against HEV was 36%, 57% and 55% in rabbits from Virginia (USA), Gansu Province and Beijing (China), respectively. HEV RNA was detected in 16.5% of serum samples from farmed rabbits in Virginia, 7.5% in Gansu Province and 7.0% in Beijing. HEV RNA was detected in 7% of bile samples from farmed rabbits and in 23% of liver samples from wild rabbits in France. The full-length genomic sequences analysis indicates that all the rabbit strains belong to the same clade. Nucleotide sequences were 72.2-78.2% identical to HEV genotypes 1-4. Comparison with HEV sequences of human strains circulating in France and reference sequences identified a human strain closely related to rabbit HEV. A 93-nucleotide insertion in the X domain of the ORF1 of the human strain and in all the rabbit HEV strains was found. Moreover, the ability of rabbit HEV to cause cross-species infection in a pig model has recently been demonstrated. Rabbit HEV can replicate efficiently in human cell lines. Collectively, these data support the possibility of zoonotic transmission of HEV from rabbits. PMID:23474012

  9. Immune complex orchitis in vasectomized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bigazzi, P E; Kosuda, L L; Hsu, K C; Andres, G A

    1976-02-01

    The results of the present study show that bilaterally vasectomized rabbits with high levels of antibodies to sperm antigens frequently develop an orchitis associated with granular deposits of rabbit IgG and C3 in the basement membranes of seminiferous tubules. The immune deposits correspond in location to electron-opaque deposits seen by electron microscopy. The "membranous orchitis" is characterized by thickening of tubular basement membranes, acc-mulation of macrophages and a few polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and destruction of the basal lamina, of the Sertoli and spermatogenetic cells. The pathogenetic role of the immune deposits and the possibility that they contain antigen-antibody complexes is indicated by: (a) selective accumulation of IgG and C3 granular deposits along the basement membranes of seminiferous tubules in rabbits producing high and persistent levels of antibodies to sperm antigens; (b) the elution of immunoglobulins from tissues with chaotropic ion-containing buffers, acid buffers, or heat; (c) the observation that the immuno-globulins accumulated in the testis contain antibody to sperm antigens; and (d) the demonstration of sperm antigens in a location similar to that of IgG and C3. It is postulated that sperm antigen-antibody complexes are formed in the basement membranes of seminiferous tubules when antigens leaking out of the tubules react with specific antibody coming from the circulation. In two rabbits with higher levels of circulating antisperm antibodies and severe orchitis, granular deposits of IgG and C3 were also present in renal glomeruli. Immunoglobulins eluted from the kidneys contained antibody with antisperm activity. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that in some vasectomized rabbits extratesticular lesions may develop by a mechanism comparable to that of chronic serum sickness. PMID:129498

  10. Internal calvarial bone distraction in rabbits with delayed-onset coronal suture synostosis.

    PubMed

    Losken, H W; Mooney, M P; Zoldos, J; Tschakaloff, A; Burrows, A M; Smith, T D; Cooper, G M; Kapucu, M R; Siegel, M I

    1998-09-01

    Recent studies have identified a subpopulation of craniosynostotic individuals who exhibit progressive or delayed-onset synostosis and mild craniofacial growth abnormalities. These individuals may be good candidates for nonextirpation, distraction osteogenesis therapy. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis by using internal calvarial bone distraction in a rabbit model with familial delayed-onset craniosynostosis. Data were collected from 159 rabbits: 71 normal controls, 72 with delayed-onset coronal suture synostosis, 8 with delayed-onset coronal suture synostosis and coronal suturectomy, and 8 with delayed-onset coronal suture synostosis and distraction. At 10 days of age, all rabbits had amalgam markers placed on both sides of the frontonasal, coronal, and anterior lambdoidal sutures. At 25 days of age, correction was accomplished through either a 5-mm-wide suturectomy or distraction osteogenesis. An internal distraction appliance was fixed to the frontal and parietal bones and percutaneously and intermittently activated at an average of 0.10 mm/day for 42 days (4.11 mm total). Serial radiographs were taken at 10, 25, 42, and 84 days of age. Results revealed that rabbits with delayed-onset synostosis had significantly (p < 0.01) reduced coronal suture growth rates (0.04 mm/day) compared with the other three groups (0.07 mm/day). Rabbits with suturectomy and rabbits with distraction showed similar coronal suture responses. However, from 42 to 84 days of age, rabbits with distraction showed reduced growth at the vault sutures and abnormal growth patterns in cranial vault width, cranial vault shape, and cranial base angulation compared with the other three groups. Results demonstrated that, although the normal coronal suture growth rate was maintained in rabbits with delayed-onset synostosis using intermittent distraction osteogenesis, normal adult craniofacial structure was not achieved. Such anomalous growth was probably a result of altered growth

  11. Evaluation of Eye Irritation Potential of Solid Substance with New 3D Reconstructed Human Cornea Model, MCTT HCETM

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Won-hee; Jung, Kyoung-mi; Yang, Hye-ri; Lee, Miri; Jung, Haeng-Sun; Lee, Su-Hyon; Park, Miyoung; Lim, Kyung-Min

    2015-01-01

    The eye irritation potential of drug candidates or pharmaceutical ingredients should be evaluated if there is a possibility of ocular exposure. Traditionally, the ocular irritation has been evaluated by the rabbit Draize test. However, rabbit eyes are more sensitive to irritants than human eyes, therefore substantial level of false positives are unavoidable. To resolve this species difference, several three-dimensional human corneal epithelial (HCE) models have been developed as alternative eye irritation test methods. Recently, we introduced a new HCE model, MCTT HCETM which is reconstructed with non-transformed human corneal cells from limbal tissues. Here, we examined if MCTT HCETM can be employed to evaluate eye irritation potential of solid substances. Through optimization of washing method and exposure time, treatment time was established as 10 min and washing procedure was set up as 4 times of washing with 10 mL of PBS and shaking in 30 mL of PBS in a beaker. With the established eye irritation test protocol, 11 solid substances (5 non-irritants, 6 irritants) were evaluated which demonstrated an excellent predictive capacity (100% accuracy, 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity). We also compared the performance of our test method with rabbit Draize test results and in vitro cytotoxicity test with 2D human corneal epithelial cell lines. PMID:26157556

  12. Histopathological alterations after a growth promoter boldenone injection in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Tousson, Ehab

    2016-02-01

    Boldenone (BOL) is a derivative of the testosterone that has dual effects on humans, both directly and indirectly; directly as injection to build muscles and indirectly as through consuming meat of animals that where treated with BOL. However, the action of these steroids on different body organs structures is still unclear; therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the intramuscular injection of BOL undecylenate on the different organ structures. A total of 10 adult New Zealand rabbits were divided into two main groups, the first group was the control group, which includes animals that were injected intramuscularly with olive oil and the second group included animals that received two intramuscular injections of 5 mg/kg body weight BOL dissected after 6 weeks. Our results showed that intramuscular injection of rabbits with BOL showed hypertrophy in both skeletal and cardiac muscles, disturbances of the hepatocytes radially arranged cords with multifocal hepatocellular vacuolations in the liver, glomerulus mass reduction with multifocal glomerular injury in the kidney, disturbances of the cycle of spermatogenesis in the testes. In conclusion, using BOL, while preparing for a young bodybuilding contest, may cause an alteration in the histological structure of most of the body organs; these findings suggested that especially young people who misuse anablic androgenic steroids should be careful if they want to use such steroids to enhance their strength and endurance. PMID:24097356

  13. Treatment with methotrexate inhibits atherogenesis in cholesterol-fed rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bulgarelli, Adriana; Martins Dias, Adriana Abalen; Caramelli, Bruno; Maranhão, Raul Cavalcante

    2012-04-01

    A decrease in the number of cardiovascular events in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis treated with methotrexate (MTX) has been observed in the literature. The aim of this study was to test whether MTX could promote anti-inflammatory effects and reduce the atherosclerotic lesions in rabbits with atherosclerosis induced by cholesterol feeding. Twenty male New Zealand rabbits were fed a 1% cholesterol diet for 60 days. Starting from day 30 of cholesterol feeding, 10 animals were treated with 4 weekly intravenous injections of MTX (4 mg/kg) and 10 with 4 weekly saline solution injections for 30 days. MTX reduced the size of the lesion areas of cholesterol-fed animals by 75% and intima-media ratio 2-fold. The drug inhibited macrophage migration into the intima by 50% and the presence of apoptotic cells by 84% but did not inhibit the intimal proliferation of smooth muscle cells. MTX treatment also diminished the positive staining area of metalloproteinase 9 in the intima, which is probably beneficial. In the tumor necrosis factor-α-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cell line, incubation with MTX led to downregulation of 5 pro-inflammatory genes, TNF-α, VAP-1, IL-1β, CXCL2, and TLR2, and upregulation of the anti-inflammatory TGF-β1 gene, thus showing endothelium-protective properties. In conclusion, MTX showed direct in vivo anti-atherosclerotic action and may have potential in the treatment of this disorder. PMID:22113347

  14. Crossbreeding effects on rabbit reproduction from four maternal lines of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ragab, M; Sánchez, J P; Mínguez, C; Baselga, M

    2016-07-01

    Litter size is essential for an efficient production of rabbit meat. A diallel cross between four maternal lines was carried out and the analysis of the components of litter size has been already done. This paper presents the analysis of litter size traits themselves (total born (TB), number born alive (NBA), number weaned (NW)) and kindling interval (KI), that complete the analysis of the reproductive performance. The 16 genetic groups were distributed in four Spanish farms. The V line was present in all farms in order to be used as reference group. A total of 34 546 parities from 7111 does, were analysed. The crossbreeding parameters were estimated according to Dickerson model. The differences between lines performance were of low magnitude and not significant for litter size traits. The LP line showed the shortest KI followed by H respect to lines A and V. These differences reflected the differences between direct and maternal genetic effects. The differences between the average of all crosses and line V were found to be significant and seemed to be important, being 0.46 for TB, 0.56 for NBA, 0.75 for NW and -2.21 days for KI. The differences between reciprocal crosses for litter size were of low magnitude and non-significant, which indicate that the maternal effects are not important between these lines. In general, the lines did not show significant differences in direct and maternal genetic effects for TB, NBA and NW but there were some significant differences for KI, which ranged from 1.54 to 6.85 days in direct effects and from 0.63 to 3.38 days for maternal effects. A positive and, in some cases, relevant heterosis was found. The largest heterosis was for TB in the HV cross (1.05 rabbits), followed by the AH (0.74 rabbits), AV (0.57 rabbits) and LH (0.55 rabbits) crosses. For NBA, significant heterosis was found in HV (1.11 rabbits) and AV (0.49 rabbits) and for NW in AV (0.90 rabbits), LH (0.70 rabbits) and LV (0.58 rabbits). Favourable and significant

  15. Recombinant Rabbit Leukemia Inhibitory Factor and Rabbit Embryonic Fibroblasts Support the Derivation and Maintenance of Rabbit Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Fei; Ma, Yinghong; Chen, Y. Eugene; Zhang, Jifeng; Lin, Tzu-An; Chen, Chien-Hong; Lin, Wei-Wen; Roach, Marsha; Ju, Jyh-Cherng; Yang, Lan; Du, Fuliang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The rabbit is a classical experimental animal species. A major limitation in using rabbits for biomedical research is the lack of germ-line-competent rabbit embryonic stem cells (rbESCs). We hypothesized that the use of homologous feeder cells and recombinant rabbit leukemia inhibitory factor (rbLIF) might improve the chance in deriving germ-line-competent rbES cells. In the present study, we established rabbit embryonic fibroblast (REF) feeder layers and synthesized recombinant rbLIF. We derived a total of seven putative rbESC lines, of which two lines (M5 and M23) were from culture Condition I using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) as feeders supplemented with human LIF (hLIF) (MEF+hLIF). Another five lines (R4, R9, R15, R21, and R31) were derived from Condition II using REFs as feeder cells supplemented with rbLIF (REF+rbLIF). Similar derivation efficiency was observed between these two conditions (8.7% vs. 10.2%). In a separate experiment with 2×3 factorial design, we examined the effects of feeder cells (MEF vs. REF) and LIFs (mLIF, hLIF vs. rbLIF) on rbESC culture. Both Conditions I and II supported satisfactory rbESC culture, with similar or better population doubling time and colony-forming efficiency than other combinations of feeder cells with LIFs. Rabbit ESCs derived and maintained on both conditions displayed typical ESC characteristics, including ESC pluripotency marker expression (AP, Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, and SSEA4) and gene expression (Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, c-Myc, Klf4, and Dppa5), and the capacity to differentiate into three primary germ layers in vitro. The present work is the first attempt to establish rbESC lines using homologous feeder cells and recombinant rbLIF, by which the rbESCs were derived and maintained normally. These cell lines are unique resources and may facilitate the derivation of germ-line-competent rbESCs. PMID:22775411

  16. A new method to measure post-traumatic joint contractures in the rabbit knee.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Kevin A; Holmberg, Michael; Shrive, Nigel

    2003-12-01

    A new device and method to measure rabbit knee joint angles are described. The method was used to measure rabbit knee joint angles in normal specimens and in knee joints with obvious contractures. The custom-designed and manufactured gripping device has two clamps. The femoral clamp sits on a pinion gear that is driven by a rack attached to a materials testing system. A 100 N load cell in series with the rack gives force feedback. The tibial clamp is attached to a rotatory potentiometer. The system allows the knee joint multiple degrees-of-freedom (DOF). There are two independent DOF (compression-distraction and internal-external rotation) and two coupled motions (medial-lateral translation coupled with varus-valgus rotation; anterior-posterior translation coupled with flexion-extension rotation). Knee joint extension-flexion motion is measured, which is a combination of the materials testing system displacement (converted to degrees of motion) and the potentiometer values (calibrated to degrees). Internal frictional forces were determined to be at maximum 2% of measured loading. Two separate experiments were performed to evaluate rabbit knees. First, normal right and left pairs of knees from four New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were subjected to cyclic loading. An extension torque of 0.2 Nm was applied to each knee. The average change in knee joint extension from the first to the fifth cycle was 1.9 deg +/- 1.5 deg (mean +/- sd) with a total of 49 tests of these eight knees. The maximum extension of the four left knees (tested 23 times) was 14.6 deg +/- 7.1 deg, and of the four right knees (tested 26 times) was 12.0 deg +/- 10.9 deg. There was no significant difference in the maximum extension between normal left and right knees. In the second experiment, nine skeletally mature NZW rabbits had stable fractures of the femoral condyles of the right knee that were immobilized for five, six or 10 weeks. The left knee served as an unoperated control. Loss of knee joint

  17. Characterization of rabbit CD5 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Pospisil, Richard; Kabat, Juraj; Mage, Rose G

    2009-08-01

    Previously described polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to rabbit CD5, raised against expressed recombinant protein or peptides, recognize CD5 on most rabbit B cells. The mAb KEN-5 was originally reported to recognize rabbit CD5. However, KEN-5 binds almost exclusively to T cells and only to a minor population of B cells. We show here that by Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), KEN-5 binds to recombinant rabbit CD5. This interaction is partially inhibited by polyclonal goat anti-CD5 antibody. In addition, immunoprecipitations from lysates of surface biotinylated rabbit lymphocytes with KEN-5 or our anti-CD5 mAb isolate molecules that migrate identically on gels with the same approximate relative molecular mass of 67,000 M(r). By flow cytometric analyses of individual cells from spleen, thymus and appendix, KEN-5 recognizes CD5-like molecules mainly on T cells and on 3-6% of IgM(+) B cells. Immunohistochemical staining of splenic and appendix tissues and confocal immunofluorescent imaging confirm and extend results from flow cytometric analyses. Quantitation of fluorescent colocalization indicates that staining by KEN-5 colocalizes with staining by anti-CD5 on small percentage lymphocytes in splenic tissue sections. As CD5 has both N- and O-linked glycosylation, we hypothesised that differential binding of KEN-5 to T cells and B-cells may be explained by different glycan structures on the CD5 present on T compared to B cells. This hypothesis is supported by ELISA data that show that deglycosylation diminishes the binding of KEN-5 to recombinant rabbit CD5. Screening KEN-5 on an array with 406 glycans was inconclusive. Although we did not identify a strongly binding glycan structure, the data are suggestive that the epitope recognized by KEN-5 may be influenced by glycan structures. The epitope this mAb recognizes may either be the glycan itself, or more likely, is influenced by neighboring glycan structure. Our findings suggest that development

  18. Effects of peripheral sympathectomy on thermoregulatory vascular control in the rabbit ear.

    PubMed

    Smith, T L; Koman, L A; Gordon, E S; Holden, M B; Smith, B P

    1998-01-01

    A rabbit ear model of the human digit was utilized to determine the vascular response to peripheral sympathectomy. Vascular responses were evaluated by subjecting chronically instrumented rabbits to a cold stress before and after sympathectomy surgery. The typical response to cold stress is for ear temperatures and auricular cutaneous perfusion to decrease during the cooling phase of the test and to increase toward baseline levels during the rewarming phase after cold exposure. Following peripheral sympathectomy, ear temperatures were significantly increased during both the cooling and rewarming phase of the cold stress test although overall ear perfusion and skin perfusion were not different from sham-operated rabbits. The responses observed in the rabbit ear following peripheral sympathectomy appear to mimic those noted in patients receiving digital peripheral sympathectomies for the treatment of refractory pain and ulceration. Peripheral sympathectomy may result in clinical improvements in patients because it improves both total digital and nutritional cutaneous blood flow. Peripheral sympathectomy in normal rabbit ears does not result in altered perfusion patterns with cold exposure although ear temperature is significantly higher. This pattern of changes suggests that the distribution of extremity perfusion is altered even though overall extremity perfusion and cutaneous perfusion per se are not significantly different from sham-operated controls. Complete sympathectomy was accompanied by a persistent increase in ear temperature and a dissociation between conductance and microvascular perfusion. Auricular conductance was transiently increased and then decreased to levels below preoperative control values. Microvascular perfusion is decreased immediately following amputation/replantation and thereafter increases. PMID:9674929

  19. The effects of hypothalamic implants of ovarian steroids on oestrous behaviour in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Palka, Yvonne S.; Sawyer, Charles H.

    1966-01-01

    1. The brains of ovariectomized female rabbits which were anoestrous in behaviour when tested with vigorous males were implanted either bilaterally or unilaterally with 10% oestradiol benzoate in cholestrol. 2. Rabbits with implants in the ventromedial-premammillary hypothalamus ca. 1 mm lateral to the mid line became highly oestrous in behaviour within 1-2 days of implantation and mated 100% of the times tested. Implants of blank tubing, cholesterol or progesterone in this area, or oestrogen implants elsewhere in the hypothalamus had no effect on sexual behaviour. 3. The uteri of all females implanted with diluted oestrogen were atrophic and similar to those of castrate controls, indicating that the effects of hypothalamic implants on sexual behaviour were direct local effects of oestrogen on the C.N.S. 4. Rabbits implanted bilaterally with undiluted oestradiol benzoate showed some slight systemic spread of the implanted oestrogen. Oestrous behaviour was evoked within an average of 3·4 days by implantation into a large hypothalamic area, presumably as a result of oestrogen diffusing from the site of implantation to the critical ventromedial-premammillary region. 5. Injections of progesterone in dosages known to block oestrous behaviour in intact or oestrogen-primed rabbits, failed to block this behaviour in females implanted with pure oestrogen in the ventromedial-premammillary hypothalamus. 6. Implantation of progestins into the ventromedial-premammillary area in overiectomized rabbits did not usually inhibit oestrous behaviour induced by small threshold doses of systemically administered oestrogen. The possibilities that oestrogen and progesterone (1) interact in different areas of the C.N.S. or (2) compete for `steroid receptors' in the ventromedial-premammillary hypothalamus are discussed. PMID:16992222

  20. Effect of Intramuscular or Intrahepatic Injections of Clostridium perfringens on Rabbit Serum Lactate Dehydrogenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Dwayne

    1970-01-01

    Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, LDH isoenzyme pattern, phospholipase C activity, phosphorous level, hemoglobin, and erythrocyte osmotic fragility were followed in rabbits after intramuscular (IM) or intrahepatic (IH) injections of Clostridium perfringens. On the first day after IM injection, there was a drop in LDH activity; this was followed by an increase of LDH activity on the third and sixth day. On the seventh day, LDH activity began to decline, and by the ninth day it had almost returned to normal. On the sixth day after IM injection, there was an increase in serum LDH isoenzyme 5, hemoglobin, and erythrocyte osmotic fragility, but the increase of erythrocyte osmotic fragility and serum hemoglobin could not be attributed to phospholipase C activity since that enzyme was not detected nor was there an increase in serum phosphorus. C. perfringens was recovered by culturing the wound of IM-injected rabbits but not recovered from IH-injected rabbits. Rabbits injected IH showed no change from normal values in any of the tests performed. PMID:16557808

  1. Virological and clinico-pathological features of orf virus infection in experimentally infected rabbits and mice.

    PubMed

    Cargnelutti, J F; Masuda, E K; Martins, M; Diel, D G; Rock, D L; Weiblen, R; Flores, E F

    2011-01-01

    Many aspects of the biology of orf virus (ORFV) infection remain poorly understood and attempts to establish animal models have yielded conflicting and non-reproducible results. We herein describe the characterization of ORFV infection and disease in rabbits and mice. A protocol of intradermal inoculation was employed to inoculate 10(8.5)TCID₅₀/mL of ORFV strain IA-82 in the skin of ears, of the back and labial commissures. All inoculated rabbits presented a clinical course characterized by erythema, macules, papules/vesicles or pustules that eventually dried originating scabs. Local signs started around days 3 and 4 post-inoculation (pi) and lasted 3-10 days. Virus was recovered from lesions between days 2 and 14pi. Histological examination of lesions revealed focal proliferative dermatitis with ballooning degeneration and eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies in keratinocytes, histological hallmarks of contagious ecthyma in sheep. A similar, albeit milder clinical course occurred in 5/10 inoculated mice; virus was recovered from lesions from three animals. Inoculated lambs - used as controls - developed severe lesions of contagious ecthyma. VN tests performed at day 28pi failed to detect neutralizing antibodies in all inoculated animals. In contrast, convalescent rabbit sera were positive by ELISA at dilutions from 100 to 400. These results show that rabbits are susceptible to ORFV infection and thus may be used to study selected aspects of ORFV biology. PMID:20833245

  2. A sensitive, accurate assay for extrinsic pathway inhibitor (EPI) activity in rabbit plasma: Paradoxical effect of excess exogenous factor X

    SciTech Connect

    Warr, T.A.; Rao, L.V.; Rapaport, S.I. )

    1990-08-15

    A sensitive assay is described for the measurement of rabbit plasma EPI activity in experimental studies of induced hypercoagulable states in this species. It is based upon the ability of a dilution of rabbit plasma to inhibit human factor VIIa/rabbit brain tissue factor (TF) catalyzed activation of human factor IX (tritiated activation peptide release assay). Addition of {sup 3}H-factor IX to the reaction mixture is delayed for 45 minutes to allow full inhibition by EPI/factor Xa complex before the residual catalytic activity of factor VIIa/TF is measured. Although the diluted rabbit plasma test sample contains both EPI and factor X, supplemental factor X is added to the reaction mixture to assure that only EPI content of the test sample affects the assay result. However, the final concentration of factor X in the reaction mixture is critical. Too high a concentration of factor X diminishes the sensitivity of the assay. The reason for this phenomenon, which was observed with both human and rabbit factor X preparations, is unknown.

  3. Gastric Perforation by Ingested Rabbit Bone Fragment

    PubMed Central

    Gambaracci, Giulio; Mecarini, Eleonora; Franceschini, Maria Silvia; Scialpi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The majority of accidentally ingested foreign bodies is excreted from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract without any complications. Sometimes sharp foreign bodies – like chicken and fish bones – can lead to intestinal perforation and may present insidiously with a wide range of symptoms and, consequently, different diagnoses. We report the case of a 59-year-old woman presenting with fever and a 1-month history of vague abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) showed the presence of a hyperdense linear image close to the gastric antrum surrounded by a fluid collection and free peritoneal air. At laparotomy, a 4-cm rabbit bone fragment covered in inflamed tissue was detected next to a gastric wall perforation. Rabbit bone fragment ingestion, even if rarely reported, should not be underestimated as a possible cause of GI tract perforation. PMID:27403113

  4. Carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Bernacchi, A. S.; de Castro, C. R.; de Ferreyra, E. C.; Villarruel, M. C.; Fernández, G.; de Fenos, O. M.; Castro, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    CCl4 administration to rabbits leads to early destruction of liver microsomal cytochrome P-450, to depression of glucose 6 phosphatase, to ultrastructurally revealable alterations and to an intense necrosis and fat accumulation in liver. Despite the known resistance of rabbit liver microsomes to lipid peroxidation, CCl4 administration to rabbits promoted lipid peroxidation of their liver microsomal lipids as revealable by the diene hyperconjugation technique, at periods of time from 1 to 12 h. Nevertheless, the intensity of this process is not equivalent to that occurring in rat liver microsomes, since the arachidonic acid content of rabbit liver microsomal lipids does not decrease at either 6 or 24 h after CCl4 administration. Rabbit liver is able to activate CCl4 to reactive metabolites that bind covalently to lipids. Relevance of covalent binding of CCl4 reactive metabolites and CCl4-promoted lipid peroxidation to CCl4-induced rabbit liver injury is analysed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6309207

  5. Outbreak of rabbit hemorrhagic disease in domestic lagomorphs.

    PubMed

    Campagnolo, Enzo R; Ernst, Mark J; Berninger, Mary L; Gregg, Douglas A; Shumaker, Thomas J; Boghossian, Aida M

    2003-10-15

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease (RHD) was diagnosed in domestic lagomorphs on a rabbit farm in Illinois. Clinical signs of RHD in affected rabbits included signs of depression, anorexia, fever, paddling, convulsions, and sudden death. Findings of necropsies and histologic evaluations of specimens of liver and spleen were indicative of RHD. In liver specimens obtained from dead rabbits, RHD viral antigen was detected via hemagglutination assay and viral antigen-detection ELISA. The source of the outbreak was traced to a rabbitry in Utah. As the disease spread, the outbreak involved rabbits in various regions of the United States; > 4,800 rabbits were euthanatized and buried as a result of the depopulation effort in several states. The economic impact of the disease can be considerable; if the disease is suspected, it is imperative that the appropriate state or federal veterinarian's office be contacted immediately. PMID:14584745

  6. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Swamp Rabbit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Arthur W.

    1985-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for the swamp rabbit (Sylvilagus aquaticus). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  7. Alanine transport across in vitro rabbit vagina.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, J J; Mroueh, A M

    1979-04-01

    Transmural flux of alanine across the vaginal epithelium of the rabbit is a specialized mechanism. There is a net serosal to mucosal translocation of the amino acid in the absence of a concentration gradient. Changes in reproductive cycle do not influence this mechanism but, in castrated animals, it is abolished. Transport properties of vaginal epithelium is important because of increasing utilization of intravaginal contraceptives. PMID:455986

  8. Lactate metabolism in the fetal rabbit lung

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, M.J.; Brown, D.J.; Dooley, M.

    1986-05-01

    Lactate is frequently overlooked as a potential substrate for the fetal lung, even though it is present in the fetal circulation in concentrations as high as 8 mM. These high concentrations, coupled with the relatively low levels of glucose in the fetal blood, may indicate that lactate can substitute for glucose in pulmonary energy generation and phospholipid synthesis. A series of experiments was therefore undertaken in order to investigate the role of lactate in perinatal pulmonary development. Explants from 30 day gestation fetal rabbit lungs were incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer supplemented with 3 mM (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose and varying levels of lactate. In the absence of medium lactate, fetal rabbit lung explants were capable of producing lactate at a rate of approximately 200 etamoles/mg protein/hour. The addition of lactate to the bathing medium immediately reduced net lactate production and above 4 mM, fetal rabbit lung explants became net utilizers of lactate. Media lactate concentrations of 2.5 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM also decreased glucose incorporation into total tissue disaturated phosphatidylcholine by approximately 20%, 35%, and 45%, respectively. Glucose incorporation into surfactant phosphatidylcholine was also reduced by approximately 50%, when lactate was present in the incubation medium at a concentration of 5 mM. Additional experiments also revealed that fetal lung lactate dehydrogenase activity was almost twice that found in the adult rabbit lung. These data indicate that lactate may be an important carbon source for the developing lung and could be a significant component in the manufacture of surfactant phosphatidylcholine during late gestation.

  9. Liver lobe torsion in three adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wenger, S; Barrett, E L; Pearson, G R; Sayers, I; Blakey, C; Redrobe, S

    2009-06-01

    This paper describes three cases of liver lobe torsion in rabbits presenting with anorexia, lethargy, jaundice and abdominal pain. This condition was associated with anaemia and elevation of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase. Abnormal radiological findings included hepatomegaly, gas-filled intestinal loops consistent with gastrointestinal ileus and ascites. Ultrasonographic findings included heterogeneous liver parenchyma, free abdominal fluid and reduced bowel motility. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination of the liver in all three cases. PMID:19527423

  10. Optical pacing of the adult rabbit heart.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Michael W; Wang, Y T; Doughman, Y Q; Watanabe, M; Cheng, Y; Rollins, A M

    2013-01-01

    Optical pacing has been demonstrated to be a viable alternative to electrical pacing in embryonic hearts. In this study, the feasibility of optically pacing an adult rabbit heart was explored. Hearts from adult New Zealand White rabbits (n = 9) were excised, cannulated and perfused on a modified Langendorff apparatus. Pulsed laser light (λ = 1851 nm) was directed to either the left or right atrium through a multimode optical fiber. An ECG signal from the left ventricle and a trigger pulse from the laser were recorded simultaneously to determine when capture was achieved. Successful optical pacing was demonstrated by obtaining pacing capture, stopping, then recapturing as well as by varying the pacing frequency. Stimulation thresholds measured at various pulse durations suggested that longer pulses (8 ms) had a lower energy capture threshold. To determine whether optical pacing caused damage, two hearts were perfused with 30 µM of propidium iodide and analyzed histologically. A small number of cells near the stimulation site had compromised cell membranes, which probably limited the time duration over which pacing was maintained. Here, short-term optical pacing (few minutes duration) is demonstrated in the adult rabbit heart for the first time. Future studies will be directed to optimize optical pacing parameters to decrease stimulation thresholds and may enable longer-term pacing. PMID:24049683