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Sample records for rad-51 filament disassembly

  1. Rad51 Nucleoprotein Filament Disassembly Captured Using Fluorescent Plasmodium falciparum SSB as a Reporter for Single-Stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Eric Parker; Harris, Derek F; Origanti, Sofia; Antony, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) proteins coordinate DNA replication, repair, and recombination and are critical for maintaining genomic integrity. SSB binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) rapidly and with very high affinity making it a useful molecular tool to detect free ssDNA in solution. We have labeled SSB from Plasmodium falciparum (Pf-SSB) with the MDCC (7-diethylamino-3-((((2-maleimidyl)ethyl)amino)-carbonyl)coumarin) fluorophore which yields a four-fold increase in fluorescence upon binding to ssDNA. Pf-SSBMDCC binding to DNA is unaffected by NaCl or Mg2+ concentration and does not display salt-dependent changes in DNA binding modes or cooperative binding on long DNA substrates. These features are unique to Pf-SSB, making it an ideal tool to probe the presence of free ssDNA in any biochemical reaction. Using this Pf-SSBMDCC probe as a sensor for free ssDNA, we have investigated the clearing of preformed yeast Rad51 nucleoprotein filaments by the Srs2 helicase during HR. Our studies provide a rate for the disassembly of the Rad51 filament by full length Srs2 on long ssDNA substrates. Mutations in the conserved 2B domain in the homologous bacterial UvrD, Rep and PcrA helicases show an enhancement of DNA unwinding activity, but similar mutations in Srs2 do not affect its DNA unwinding or Rad51 clearing properties. These studies showcase the utility of the Pf-SSB probe in mechanistic investigation of enzymes that function in DNA metabolism. PMID:27416037

  2. Rad51 Nucleoprotein Filament Disassembly Captured Using Fluorescent Plasmodium falciparum SSB as a Reporter for Single-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Eric Parker; Harris, Derek F.; Origanti, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) proteins coordinate DNA replication, repair, and recombination and are critical for maintaining genomic integrity. SSB binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) rapidly and with very high affinity making it a useful molecular tool to detect free ssDNA in solution. We have labeled SSB from Plasmodium falciparum (Pf-SSB) with the MDCC (7-diethylamino-3-((((2-maleimidyl)ethyl)amino)-carbonyl)coumarin) fluorophore which yields a four-fold increase in fluorescence upon binding to ssDNA. Pf-SSBMDCC binding to DNA is unaffected by NaCl or Mg2+ concentration and does not display salt-dependent changes in DNA binding modes or cooperative binding on long DNA substrates. These features are unique to Pf-SSB, making it an ideal tool to probe the presence of free ssDNA in any biochemical reaction. Using this Pf-SSBMDCC probe as a sensor for free ssDNA, we have investigated the clearing of preformed yeast Rad51 nucleoprotein filaments by the Srs2 helicase during HR. Our studies provide a rate for the disassembly of the Rad51 filament by full length Srs2 on long ssDNA substrates. Mutations in the conserved 2B domain in the homologous bacterial UvrD, Rep and PcrA helicases show an enhancement of DNA unwinding activity, but similar mutations in Srs2 do not affect its DNA unwinding or Rad51 clearing properties. These studies showcase the utility of the Pf-SSB probe in mechanistic investigation of enzymes that function in DNA metabolism. PMID:27416037

  3. A new protein complex promoting the assembly of Rad51 filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Tawaramoto, Maki S.; Lao, Jessica P.; Hosaka, Harumi; Sanda, Eri; Suzuki, Mamoru; Yamashita, Eiki; Hunter, Neil; Shinohara, Miki; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Shinohara, Akira

    2015-01-01

    During homologous recombination, eukaryotic RecA homologue Rad51 assembles into a nucleoprotein filament on single-stranded DNA to catalyse homologous pairing and DNA-strand exchange with a homologous template. Rad51 nucleoprotein filaments are highly dynamic and regulated via the coordinated actions of various accessory proteins including Rad51 mediators. Here, we identify a new Rad51 mediator complex. The PCSS complex, comprising budding yeast Psy3, Csm2, Shu1 and Shu2 proteins, binds to recombination sites and is required for Rad51 assembly and function during meiosis. Within the heterotetramer, Psy3-Csm2 constitutes a core sub-complex with DNA-binding activity. In vitro, purified Psy3-Csm2 stabilizes the Rad51–single-stranded DNA complex independently of nucleotide cofactor. The mechanism of Rad51 stabilization is inferred by our high-resolution crystal structure, which reveals Psy3-Csm2 to be a structural mimic of the Rad51-dimer, a fundamental unit of the Rad51-filament. Together, these results reveal a novel molecular mechanism for this class of Rad51-mediators, which includes the human Rad51 paralogues. PMID:23575680

  4. Visualizing the Nonhomogeneous Structure of RAD51 Filaments Using Nanofluidic Channels.

    PubMed

    Fornander, Louise H; Frykholm, Karolin; Fritzsche, Joachim; Araya, Joshua; Nevin, Philip; Werner, Erik; Çakır, Ali; Persson, Fredrik; Garcin, Edwige B; Beuning, Penny J; Mehlig, Bernhard; Modesti, Mauro; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-08-23

    RAD51 is the key component of the homologous recombination pathway in eukaryotic cells and performs its task by forming filaments on DNA. In this study we investigate the physical properties of RAD51 filaments formed on DNA using nanofluidic channels and fluorescence microscopy. Contrary to the bacterial ortholog RecA, RAD51 forms inhomogeneous filaments on long DNA in vitro, consisting of several protein patches. We demonstrate that a permanent "kink" in the filament is formed where two patches meet if the stretch of naked DNA between the patches is short. The kinks are readily seen in the present microscopy approach but would be hard to identify using conventional single DNA molecule techniques where the DNA is more stretched. We also demonstrate that protein patches separated by longer stretches of bare DNA roll up on each other and this is visualized as transiently overlapping filaments. RAD51 filaments can be formed at several different conditions, varying the cation (Mg(2+) or Ca(2+)), the DNA substrate (single-stranded or double-stranded), and the RAD51 concentration during filament nucleation, and we compare the properties of the different filaments formed. The results provide important information regarding the physical properties of RAD51 filaments but also demonstrate that nanofluidic channels are perfectly suited to study protein-DNA complexes. PMID:27479732

  5. Without Binding ATP, Human Rad51 Does Not Form Helical Filaments on ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Schay, Gusztáv; Borka, Bálint; Kernya, Linda; Bulyáki, Éva; Kardos, József; Fekete, Melinda; Fidy, Judit

    2016-03-10

    Construction of the presynaptic filament (PSF) of proper helical structure by Rad51 recombinases is a prerequisite of the progress of homologous recombination repair. We studied the contribution of ATP-binding to this structure of wt human Rad51 (hRad51). We exploited the protein-dissociation effect of high hydrostatic pressure to determine the free energy of dissociation of the protomer interfaces in hRad51 oligomer states and used electron microscopy to obtain topological parameters. Without cofactors ATP and Ca(2+) and template DNA, hRad51 did not exist in monomer form, but it formed rodlike long filaments without helical order. ΔG(diss) indicated a strong inherent tendency of aggregation. Binding solely ssDNA left the filament unstructured with slightly increased ΔG(diss). Adding only ATP and Ca(2+) to the buffer disintegrated the self-associated rods into rings and short helices of further increased ΔG(diss). Rad51 binding to ssDNA only with ATP and Ca bound could lead to ordered helical filament formation of proper pitch size with interface contacts of K(d) ∼ 2 × 10(-11) M, indicating a structure of outstanding stability. ATP/Ca binding increased the ΔG(diss) of protomer contacts in the filament by 16 kJ/mol. The results emphasize that ATP-binding in the PSF of hRad51 has an essential, yet purely structural, role. PMID:26890079

  6. Novel Attributes of Hed1 Affect Dynamics and Activity of the Rad51 Presynaptic Filament during Meiotic Recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Busygina, Valeria; Saro, Dorina; Williams, Gareth; Leung, Wing-Kit; Say, Amanda F.; Sehorn, Michael G.; Sung, Patrick; Tsubouchi, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    During meiosis, recombination events that occur between homologous chromosomes help prepare the chromosome pairs for proper disjunction in meiosis I. The concurrent action of the Rad51 and Dmc1 recombinases is necessary for an interhomolog bias. Notably, the activity of Rad51 is tightly controlled, so as to minimize the use of the sister chromatid as recombination partner. We demonstrated recently that Hed1, a meiosis-specific protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, restricts the access of the recombinase accessory factor Rad54 to presynaptic filaments of Rad51. We now show that Hed1 undergoes self-association in a Rad51-dependent manner and binds ssDNA. We also find a strong stabilizing effect of Hed1 on the Rad51 presynaptic filament. Biochemical and genetic analyses of mutants indicate that these Hed1 attributes are germane for its recombination regulatory and Rad51 presynaptic filament stabilization functions. Our results shed light on the mechanism of action of Hed1 in meiotic recombination control. PMID:22115747

  7. Insights into the mechanism of Rad51 recombinase from the structure and properties of a filament interface mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jianhong; Villanueva, Nicolas; Rould, Mark A.; Morrical, Scott W.

    2010-09-03

    Rad51 protein promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes. Recombination activities are activated by Rad51 filament assembly on ssDNA. Previous studies of yeast Rad51 showed that His352 occupies an important position at the filament interface, where it could relay signals between subunits and active sites. To investigate, we characterized yeast Rad51 H352A and H352Y mutants, and solved the structure of H352Y. H352A forms catalytically competent but salt-labile complexes on ssDNA. In contrast, H352Y forms salt-resistant complexes on ssDNA, but is defective in nucleotide exchange, RPA displacement and strand exchange with full-length DNA substrates. The 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of H352Y reveals a right-handed helical filament in a high-pitch (130 {angstrom}) conformation with P61 symmetry. The catalytic core and dimer interface regions of H352Y closely resemble those of DNA-bound Escherichia coli RecA protein. The H352Y mutation stabilizes Phe187 from the adjacent subunit in a position that interferes with the {gamma}-phosphate-binding site of the Walker A motif/P-loop, potentially explaining the limited catalysis observed. Comparison of Rad51 H352Y, RecA-DNA and related structures reveals that the presence of bound DNA correlates with the isomerization of a conserved cis peptide near Walker B to the trans configuration, which appears to prime the catalytic glutamate residue for ATP hydrolysis.

  8. Rad52 Sumoylation Prevents the Toxicity of Unproductive Rad51 Filaments Independently of the Anti-Recombinase Srs2

    PubMed Central

    Dupaigne, Pauline; Maloisel, Laurent; Guerois, Raphaël; Le Cam, Eric; Veaute, Xavier; Coïc, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The budding yeast Srs2 is the archetype of helicases that regulate several aspects of homologous recombination (HR) to maintain genomic stability. Srs2 inhibits HR at replication forks and prevents high frequencies of crossing-over. Additionally, sensitivity to DNA damage and synthetic lethality with replication and recombination mutants are phenotypes that can only be attributed to another role of Srs2: the elimination of lethal intermediates formed by recombination proteins. To shed light on these intermediates, we searched for mutations that bypass the requirement of Srs2 in DNA repair without affecting HR. Remarkably, we isolated rad52-L264P, a novel allele of RAD52, a gene that encodes one of the most central recombination proteins in yeast. This mutation suppresses a broad spectrum of srs2Δ phenotypes in haploid cells, such as UV and γ-ray sensitivities as well as synthetic lethality with replication and recombination mutants, while it does not significantly affect Rad52 functions in HR and DNA repair. Extensive analysis of the genetic interactions between rad52-L264P and srs2Δ shows that rad52-L264P bypasses the requirement for Srs2 specifically for the prevention of toxic Rad51 filaments. Conversely, this Rad52 mutant cannot restore viability of srs2Δ cells that accumulate intertwined recombination intermediates which are normally processed by Srs2 post-synaptic functions. The avoidance of toxic Rad51 filaments by Rad52-L264P can be explained by a modification of its Rad51 filament mediator activity, as indicated by Chromatin immunoprecipitation and biochemical analysis. Remarkably, sensitivity to DNA damage of srs2Δ cells can also be overcome by stimulating Rad52 sumoylation through overexpression of the sumo-ligase SIZ2, or by replacing Rad52 by a Rad52-SUMO fusion protein. We propose that, like the rad52-L264P mutation, sumoylation modifies Rad52 activity thereby changing the properties of Rad51 filaments. This conclusion is strengthened by the

  9. Contributions of the RAD51 N-terminal domain to BRCA2-RAD51 interaction.

    PubMed

    Subramanyam, Shyamal; Jones, William T; Spies, Maria; Spies, M Ashley

    2013-10-01

    RAD51 DNA strand exchange protein catalyzes the central step in homologous recombination, a cellular process fundamentally important for accurate repair of damaged chromosomes, preservation of the genetic integrity, restart of collapsed replication forks and telomere maintenance. BRCA2 protein, a product of the breast cancer susceptibility gene, is a key recombination mediator that interacts with RAD51 and facilitates RAD51 nucleoprotein filament formation on single-stranded DNA generated at the sites of DNA damage. An accurate atomistic level description of this interaction, however, is limited to a partial crystal structure of the RAD51 core fused to BRC4 peptide. Here, by integrating homology modeling and molecular dynamics, we generated a structure of the full-length RAD51 in complex with BRC4 peptide. Our model predicted previously unknown hydrogen bonding patterns involving the N-terminal domain (NTD) of RAD51. These interactions guide positioning of the BRC4 peptide within a cavity between the core and the NTDs; the peptide binding separates the two domains and restricts internal dynamics of RAD51 protomers. The model's depiction of the RAD51-BRC4 complex was validated by free energy calculations and in vitro functional analysis of rationally designed mutants. All generated mutants, RAD51(E42A), RAD51(E59A), RAD51(E237A), RAD51(E59A/E237A) and RAD51(E42A/E59A/E237A) maintained basic biochemical activities of the wild-type RAD51, but displayed reduced affinities for the BRC4 peptide. Strong correlation between the calculated and experimental binding energies confirmed the predicted structure of the RAD51-BRC4 complex and highlighted the importance of RAD51 NTD in RAD51-BRCA2 interaction. PMID:23935068

  10. Promotion of Homologous Recombination and Genomic Stability by RAD51AP1 via RAD51 Recombinase Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Claudia; Dray, Eloïse; Groesser, Torsten; Filippo, Joseph San; Shi, Idina; Collins, David W.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Williams, Gareth; Rydberg, Bjorn; Sung, Patrick; Schild, David

    2007-01-01

    Summary Homologous recombination (HR) repairs chromosome damage and is indispensable for tumor suppression in humans. RAD51 mediates the DNA strand pairing step in HR. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) is a RAD51-interacting protein whose function has remained elusive. Knockdown of RAD51AP1 in human cells by RNA interference engenders sensitivity to different types of genotoxic stress, and RAD51AP1 is epistatic to the HR protein XRCC3. Moreover, RAD51AP1-depleted cells are impaired for the recombinational repair of a DNA double-strand break and exhibit chromatid breaks both spontaneously and upon DNA damaging treatment. Purified RAD51AP1 binds both dsDNA and a D-loop structure, and, only when able to interact with RAD51, greatly stimulates the RAD51-mediated D-loop reaction. Biochemical and cytological results show that RAD51AP1 functions at a step subsequent to the assembly of the RAD51-ssDNA nucleoprotein filament. Our findings provide evidence that RAD51AP1 helps maintain genomic integrity via RAD51 recombinase enhancement. PMID:17996711

  11. Molecular basis for enhancement of the meiotic DMC1 recombinase by RAD51 associated protein 1 (RAD51AP1)

    PubMed Central

    Dray, Eloïse; Dunlop, Myun Hwa; Kauppi, Liisa; Filippo, Joseph San; Wiese, Claudia; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Begovic, Sead; Schild, David; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott; Sung, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is needed for meiotic chromosome segregation, genome maintenance, and tumor suppression. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1) has been shown to interact with and enhance the recombinase activity of RAD51. Accordingly, genetic ablation of RAD51AP1 leads to enhanced sensitivity to and also chromosome aberrations upon DNA damage, demonstrating a role for RAD51AP1 in mitotic homologous recombination. Here we show physical association of RAD51AP1 with the meiosis-specific recombinase DMC1 and a stimulatory effect of RAD51AP1 on the DMC1-mediated D-loop reaction. Mechanistic studies have revealed that RAD51AP1 enhances the ability of the DMC1 presynaptic filament to capture the duplex-DNA partner and to assemble the synaptic complex, in which the recombining DNA strands are homologously aligned. We also provide evidence that functional cooperation is dependent on complex formation between DMC1 and RAD51AP1 and that distinct epitopes in RAD51AP1 mediate interactions with RAD51 and DMC1. Finally, we show that RAD51AP1 is expressed in mouse testes, and that RAD51AP1 foci colocalize with a subset of DMC1 foci in spermatocytes. These results suggest that RAD51AP1 also serves an important role in meiotic homologous recombination. PMID:21307306

  12. Promotion of Homologous Recombination and Genomic Stability byRAD51AP1 via RAD51 Recombinase Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, Claudia; Dray, Eloise; Groesser, Torsten; San Filippo,Joseph; Shi, Idina; Collins, David W.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Williams,Gareth; Rydberg, Bjorn; Sung, Patrick; Schild, David

    2007-04-11

    Homologous recombination (HR) repairs chromosome damage and is indispensable for tumor suppression in humans. RAD51 mediates the DNA strand pairing step in HR. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) is a RAD51-interacting protein whose function has remained elusive. Knockdown of RAD51AP1 in human cells by RNA interference engenders sensitivity to different types of genotoxic stress. Moreover, RAD51AP1-depleted cells are impaired for the recombinational repair of a DNA double-strand break and exhibit chromatid breaks both spontaneously and upon DNA damaging treatment. Purified RAD51AP1 binds dsDNA and RAD51, and it greatly stimulates the RAD51-mediated D-loop reaction. Biochemical and cytological results show that RAD51AP1 functions at a step subsequent to the assembly of the RAD51-ssDNA nucleoprotein filament. Our findings provide the first evidence that RAD51AP1 helps maintain genomic integrity via RAD51 recombinase enhancement.

  13. Regulation of Rad51 promoter.

    PubMed

    Hine, Christopher M; Li, Hongjie; Xie, Li; Mao, Zhiyong; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2014-01-01

    The DNA double-strand break repair and homologous recombination protein Rad51 is overexpressed in the majority of human cancers. This correlates with therapy resistance and decreased patient survival. We previously showed that constructs containing Rad51 promoter fused to a reporter gene are, on average, 850-fold more active in cancer cells than in normal cells. It is not well understood what factors and sequences regulate the Rad51 promoter and cause its high activity in cancerous cells. Here we characterized regulatory regions and examined genetic requirements for oncogenic stimulation of the Rad51 promoter. We identified specific regions responsible for up- and downregulation of the Rad51 promoter in cancerous cells. Furthermore, we show that Rad51 expression is positively regulated by EGR1 transcription factor. We then modeled the malignant transformation process by expressing a set of oncoproteins in normal human fibroblasts. Expression of different combinations of SV40 large T antigen, oncogenic Ras and SV40 small T antigen resulted in step-wise increase in Rad51 promoter activity, with all the 3 oncoproteins together leading to a 47-fold increase in expression. Cumulatively, these results suggest that Rad51 promoter is regulated by multiple factors, and that its expression is gradually activated as cells progress toward malignancy. PMID:24781030

  14. Molecular Basis for Enhancement of the Meiotic DMCI Recombinase by RAD51AP1

    SciTech Connect

    Dray, Eloise; Dunlop, Myun Hwa; Kauppi, Liisa; San Filippo, Joseph San; Wiese, Claudia; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Begovic, Sead; Schild, David; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott; Sung, Patrick

    2010-11-05

    Homologous recombination is needed for meiotic chromosome segregation, genome maintenance, and tumor suppression. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) has been shown to interact with and enhance the recombinase activity of RAD51. Accordingly, genetic ablation of RAD51AP1 leads to enhanced sensitivity to and also chromosome aberrations upon DNA damage, demonstrating a role for RAD51AP1 in mitotic homologous recombination. Here we show physical association of RAD51AP1 with the meiosis-specific recombinase DMC1 and a stimulatory effect of RAD51AP1 on the DMC1-mediated D-loop reaction. Mechanistic studies have revealed that RAD51AP1 enhances the ability of the DMC1 presynaptic filament to capture the duplex DNA partner and to assemble the synaptic complex, in which the recombining DNA strands are homologously aligned. We also provide evidence that functional co-operation is dependent on complex formation between DMC1 and RAD51AP1, and that distinct epitopes in RAD51AP1 mediate interactions with RAD51 and DMC1. Finally, we show that RAD51AP1 is expressed in mouse testes, and that RAD51AP1 foci co-localize with a subset of DMC1 foci in spermatocytes. These results suggest that RAD51AP1 also serves an important role in meiotic homologous recombination.

  15. Rad51 ATP binding but not hydrolysis is required to recruit Rad10 in synthesis-dependent strand annealing sites in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Justin; Fischhaber, Paula L.

    2013-01-01

    Several modes of eukaryotic of DNA double strand break repair (DSBR) depend on synapsis of complementary DNA. The Rad51 ATPase, the S. cerevisiae homolog of E. coli RecA, plays a key role in this process by catalyzing homology searching and strand exchange between an invading DNA strand and a repair template (e.g. sister chromatid or homologous chromosome). Synthesis dependent strand annealing (SDSA), a mode of DSBR, requires Rad51. Another repair enzyme, the Rad1-Rad10 endonuclease, acts in the final stages of SDSA, hydrolyzing 3′ overhanging single-stranded DNA. Here we show in vivo by fluorescence microscopy that the ATP binding function of yeast Rad51 is required to recruit Rad10 SDSA sites indicating that Rad51 pre-synaptic filament formation must occur prior to the recruitment of Rad1-Rad10. Our data also show that Rad51 ATPase activity, an important step in Rad51 filament disassembly, is not absolutely required in order to recruit Rad1-Rad10 to DSB sites. PMID:25346869

  16. Roles of C-Terminal Region of Yeast and Human Rad52 in Rad51-Nucleoprotein Filament Formation and ssDNA Annealing

    PubMed Central

    Khade, Nilesh V.; Sugiyama, Tomohiko

    2016-01-01

    Yeast Rad52 (yRad52) has two important functions at homologous DNA recombination (HR); annealing complementary single-strand DNA (ssDNA) molecules and recruiting Rad51 recombinase onto ssDNA (recombination mediator activity). Its human homolog (hRAD52) has a lesser role in HR, and apparently lacks mediator activity. Here we show that yRad52 can load human Rad51 (hRAD51) onto ssDNA complexed with yeast RPA in vitro. This is biochemically equivalent to mediator activity because it depends on the C-terminal Rad51-binding region of yRad52 and on functional Rad52-RPA interaction. It has been reported that the N-terminal two thirds of both yRad52 and hRAD52 is essential for binding to and annealing ssDNA. Although a second DNA binding region has been found in the C-terminal region of yRad52, its role in ssDNA annealing is not clear. In this paper, we also show that the C-terminal region of yRad52, but not of hRAD52, is involved in ssDNA annealing. This suggests that the second DNA binding site is required for the efficient ssDNA annealing by yRad52. We propose an updated model of Rad52-mediated ssDNA annealing. PMID:27362509

  17. Caffeine inhibits gene conversion by displacing Rad51 from ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Tsabar, Michael; Mason, Jennifer M; Chan, Yuen-Ling; Bishop, Douglas K; Haber, James E

    2015-08-18

    Efficient repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination relies on the formation of a Rad51 recombinase filament that forms on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) created at DSB ends. This filament facilitates the search for a homologous donor sequence and promotes strand invasion. Recently caffeine treatment has been shown to prevent gene targeting in mammalian cells by increasing non-productive Rad51 interactions between the DSB and random regions of the genome. Here we show that caffeine treatment prevents gene conversion in yeast, independently of its inhibition of the Mec1(ATR)/Tel1(ATM)-dependent DNA damage response or caffeine's inhibition of 5' to 3' resection of DSB ends. Caffeine treatment results in a dosage-dependent eviction of Rad51 from ssDNA. Gene conversion is impaired even at low concentrations of caffeine, where there is no discernible dismantling of the Rad51 filament. Loss of the Rad51 filament integrity is independent of Srs2's Rad51 filament dismantling activity or Rad51's ATPase activity and does not depend on non-specific Rad51 binding to undamaged double-stranded DNA. Caffeine treatment had similar effects on irradiated HeLa cells, promoting loss of previously assembled Rad51 foci. We conclude that caffeine treatment can disrupt gene conversion by disrupting Rad51 filaments. PMID:26019181

  18. Interactions involving the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C and XRCC3 in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Claudia; Collins, David W.; Albala, Joanna S.; Thompson, Larry H.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Homologous recombinational repair of DNA double-strand breaks and crosslinks in human cells is likely to require Rad51 and the five Rad51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2 and Rad51D/Rad51L3), as has been shown in chicken and rodent cells. Previously, we reported on the interactions among these proteins using baculovirus and two- and three-hybrid yeast systems. To test for interactions involving XRCC3 and Rad51C, stable human cell lines have been isolated that express (His)6-tagged versions of XRCC3 or Rad51C. Ni2+-binding experiments demonstrate that XRCC3 and Rad51C interact in human cells. In addition, we find that Rad51C, but not XRCC3, interacts directly or indirectly with Rad51B, Rad51D and XRCC2. These results argue that there are at least two complexes of Rad51 paralogs in human cells (Rad51C-XRCC3 and Rad51B-Rad51C-Rad51D-XRCC2), both containing Rad51C. Moreover, Rad51 is not found in these complexes. X-ray treatment did not alter either the level of any Rad51 paralog or the observed interactions between paralogs. However, the endogenous level of Rad51C is moderately elevated in the XRCC3-overexpressing cell line, suggesting that dimerization between these proteins might help stabilize Rad51C.

  19. Role of the RAD51-SWI5-SFR1 Ensemble in homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Su, Guan-Chin; Yeh, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Sheng-Wei; Chung, Chan-I; Huang, Yu-Shan; Liu, Yi-Chung; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Chi, Peter

    2016-07-27

    During DNA double-strand break and replication fork repair by homologous recombination, the RAD51 recombinase catalyzes the DNA strand exchange reaction via a helical polymer assembled on single-stranded DNA, termed the presynaptic filament. Our published work has demonstrated a dual function of the SWI5-SFR1 complex in RAD51-mediated DNA strand exchange, namely, by stabilizing the presynaptic filament and maintaining the catalytically active ATP-bound state of the filament via enhancement of ADP release. In this study, we have strived to determine the basis for physical and functional interactions between Mus musculus SWI5-SFR1 and RAD51. We found that SWI5-SFR1 preferentially associates with the oligomeric form of RAD51. Specifically, a C-terminal domain within SWI5 contributes to RAD51 interaction. With specific RAD51 interaction defective mutants of SWI5-SFR1 that we have isolated, we show that the physical interaction is indispensable for the stimulation of the recombinase activity of RAD51. Our results thus help establish the functional relevance of the trimeric RAD51-SWI5-SFR1 complex and provide insights into the mechanistic underpinnings of homology-directed DNA repair in mammalian cells. PMID:27131790

  20. Complex formation by the human Rad51B and Rad51C DNA repair proteins and their activities in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Mazin, Alexander V.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Chen, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The human Rad51 protein is essential for DNA repair by homologous recombination. In addition to Rad51 protein, five paralogs have been identified: Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2, Rad51D/Rad51L3, XRCC2, and XRCC3. To further characterize a subset of these proteins, recombinant Rad51, Rad51B-(His)(6), and Rad51C proteins were individually expressed employing the baculovirus system, and each was purified from Sf9 insect cells. Evidence from nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid pull-down experiments demonstrates a highly stable Rad51B.Rad51C heterodimer, which interacts weakly with Rad51. Rad51B and Rad51C proteins were found to bind single- and double-stranded DNA and to preferentially bind 3'-end-tailed double-stranded DNA. The ability to bind DNA was elevated with mixed Rad51 and Rad51C, as well as with mixed Rad51B and Rad51C, compared with that of the individual protein. In addition, both Rad51B and Rad51C exhibit DNA-stimulated ATPase activity. Rad51C displays an ATP-independent apparent DNA strand exchange activity, whereas Rad51B shows no such activity; this apparent strand exchange ability results actually from a duplex DNA destabilization capability of Rad51C. By analogy to the yeast Rad55 and Rad57, our results suggest that Rad51B and Rad51C function through interactions with the human Rad51 recombinase and play a crucial role in the homologous recombinational repair pathway.

  1. RAD51AP2, a novel vertebrate- and meiotic-specific protein, sharesa conserved RAD51-interacting C-terminal domain with RAD51AP1/PIR51

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Wiese, Claudia; Schild, David

    2006-07-25

    Many interacting proteins regulate and/or assist the activities of RAD51, a recombinase which plays a critical role in both DNA repair and meiotic recombination. Yeast two-hybrid screening of a human testis cDNA library revealed a new protein, RAD51AP2 (RAD51 Associated Protein 2), that interacts strongly with RAD51. A full-length cDNA clone predicts a novel vertebrate specific protein of 1159 residues, and the RAD51AP2 transcript was observed only in meiotic tissue (i.e. adult testis and fetal ovary), suggesting a meiotic-specific function for RAD51AP2. In HEK293 cells the interaction of RAD51 with an ectopically-expressed recombinant large fragment of RAD51AP2 requires the C-terminal 57 residues of RAD51AP2. This RAD51-binding region shows 81% homology to the C-terminus of RAD51AP1/PIR51, an otherwise totally unrelated RAD51-binding partner that is ubiquitously expressed. Analyses using truncations and point mutations in both RAD51AP1 and RAD51AP2 demonstrate that these proteins use the same structural motif for RAD51 binding. RAD54 shares some homology with this RAD51-binding motif, but this homologous region plays only an accessory role to the adjacent main RAD51-interacting region, which has been narrowed here to 40 amino acids. A novel protein, RAD51AP2, has been discovered that interacts with RAD51 through a C-terminal motif also present in RAD51AP1.

  2. Tumor-associated mutations in a conserved structural motif alter physical and biochemical properties of human RAD51 recombinase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianhong; Morrical, Milagros D.; Donigan, Katherine A.; Weidhaas, Joanne B.; Sweasy, Joann B.; Averill, April M.; Tomczak, Jennifer A.; Morrical, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Human RAD51 protein catalyzes DNA pairing and strand exchange reactions that are central to homologous recombination and homology-directed DNA repair. Successful recombination/repair requires the formation of a presynaptic filament of RAD51 on ssDNA. Mutations in BRCA2 and other proteins that control RAD51 activity are associated with human cancer. Here we describe a set of mutations associated with human breast tumors that occur in a common structural motif of RAD51. Tumor-associated D149N, R150Q and G151D mutations map to a Schellman loop motif located on the surface of the RecA homology domain of RAD51. All three variants are proficient in DNA strand exchange, but G151D is slightly more sensitive to salt than wild-type (WT). Both G151D and R150Q exhibit markedly lower catalytic efficiency for adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis compared to WT. All three mutations alter the physical properties of RAD51 nucleoprotein filaments, with G151D showing the most dramatic changes. G151D forms mixed nucleoprotein filaments with WT RAD51 that have intermediate properties compared to unmixed filaments. These findings raise the possibility that mutations in RAD51 itself may contribute to genome instability in tumor cells, either directly through changes in recombinase properties, or indirectly through changes in interactions with regulatory proteins. PMID:25539919

  3. Multiple regulation of Rad51-mediated homologous recombination by fission yeast Fbh1.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Yasuhiro; Kurokawa, Yumiko; Ito, Kentaro; Siddique, Md Shahjahan P; Kawano, Yumiko; Yamao, Fumiaki; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Fbh1, an F-box helicase related to bacterial UvrD, has been proposed to modulate homologous recombination in fission yeast. We provide several lines of evidence for such modulation. Fbh1, but not the related helicases Srs2 and Rqh1, suppressed the formation of crossover recombinants from single HO-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Purified Fbh1 in complex with Skp1 (Fbh1-Skp1 complex) inhibited Rad51-driven DNA strand exchange by disrupting Rad51 nucleoprotein filaments in an ATP-dependent manner; this disruption was alleviated by the Swi5-Sfr1 complex, an auxiliary activator of Rad51. In addition, the reconstituted SCFFbh1 complex, composed of purified Fbh1-Skp1 and Pcu1-Rbx1, displayed ubiquitin-ligase E3 activity toward Rad51. Furthermore, Fbh1 reduced the protein level of Rad51 in stationary phase in an F-box-dependent, but not in a helicase domain-independent manner. These results suggest that Fbh1 negatively regulates Rad51-mediated homologous recombination via its two putative, unrelated activities, namely DNA unwinding/translocation and ubiquitin ligation. In addition to its anti-recombinase activity, we tentatively suggest that Fbh1 might also have a pro-recombination role in vivo, because the Fbh1-Skp1 complex stimulated Rad51-mediated strand exchange in vitro after strand exchange had been initiated. PMID:25165823

  4. Identification and characterization of human Rad51 inhibitors by screening of an existing drug library.

    PubMed

    Normand, Anaïs; Rivière, Emmanuelle; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle

    2014-10-01

    Homologous Recombination (HR) plays an essential role in cellular proliferation and in maintaining genomic stability by repairing DNA double-stranded breaks that appear during replication. Rad51, a key protein of HR in eukaryotes, can have an elevated expression level in tumor cells, which correlates with their resistance to anticancer therapies. Therefore, targeted inhibition of Rad51 through inhibitor may improve the tumor response to these therapies. In order to identify small molecules that inhibit Rad51 activity, we screened the Prestwick Library (1120 molecules) for their effect on the strand exchange reaction catalyzed by Rad51. We found that Chicago Sky Blue (CSB) is a potent inhibitor of Rad51, showing IC₅₀ values in the low nanomolar range (400 nM). Biochemical analysis demonstrated that the inhibitory mechanism probably occurs by disrupting the Rad51 association with the single-stranded DNA, which prevents the nucleoprotein filament formation, the first step of the protein activity. Structure Activity Relationship analysis with a number of compounds that shared structure homology with CSB was also performed. The sensitivity of Rad51 inhibition to CSB modifications suggests specific interactions between the molecule and Rad51 nucleofilament. CSB and some of its analogs open up new perspectives in the search for agents capable of potentiating chemo- and radio-therapy treatments for cancer. Moreover, these compounds may be excellent tools to analyze Rad51 cellular functions. Our study also highlights how CSB and its analogs, which are frequently used in colorants, stains and markers, could be responsible of unwanted side effects by perturbing the DNA repair process. PMID:25124703

  5. RAD51 variant proteins from human lung and kidney tumors exhibit DNA strand exchange defects.

    PubMed

    Silva, Michelle C; Morrical, Milagros D; Bryan, Katie E; Averill, April M; Dragon, Julie; Bond, Jeffrey P; Morrical, Scott W

    2016-06-01

    In human cells, error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks requires the DNA pairing and strand exchange activities of RAD51 recombinase. Activation of RAD51 recombination activities requires the assembly of RAD51 presynaptic filaments on the single-stranded DNA that forms at resected DSB ends. Mutations in proteins that control presynaptic filament assembly, such as BRCA2, and in RAD51 itself, are associated with human breast cancer. Here we describe the properties of two mutations in RAD51 protein that derive from human lung and kidney tumors, respectively. Sequence variants Q268P and Q272L both map to the DNA binding loop 2 (L2) region of RAD51, a motif that is involved in DNA binding and in the allosteric activation of ATP hydrolysis and DNA strand exchange activities. Both mutations alter the thermal stability, DNA binding, and ATPase properties of RAD51, however both variants retain intrinsic DNA strand exchange activity towards oligonucleotide substrates under optimized conditions. In contrast, both Q268P and Q272L variants exhibit drastically reduced DNA strand exchange activity in reaction mixtures containing long homologous ssDNA and dsDNA substrates and human RPA protein. Mixtures of wild-type and variant proteins also exhibit reduced DNA strand exchange activity, suggesting that heterozygous mutations could negatively affect DNA recombination and repair processes in vivo. Together, the findings of this study suggest that hypomorphic missense mutations in RAD51 protein could be drivers of genomic instability in cancer cells, and thereby contribute to the etiology of metastatic disease. PMID:27153211

  6. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pelttari, Liisa M.; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Vilske, Sara; Nevanlinna, Viivi; Ranta, Salla; Schleutker, Johanna; Winqvist, Robert; Kallioniemi, Anne; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Figueroa, Jonine; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Dunning, Alison M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Rosenberg, Efraim H.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Van Dyck, Laurien; Janssen, Hilde; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje J.; Collée, Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert N.; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Couch, Fergus J.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Mattson, Johanna; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.19, P = 8.88 x 10−16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16–1.32, P = 6.19 x 10−11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk. PMID:27149063

  7. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pelttari, Liisa M; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko; Kiiski, Johanna I; Vilske, Sara; Nevanlinna, Viivi; Ranta, Salla; Schleutker, Johanna; Winqvist, Robert; Kallioniemi, Anne; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Figueroa, Jonine; Pharoah, Paul D P; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Dunning, Alison M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Rosenberg, Efraim H; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Neuhausen, Susan L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Van Dyck, Laurien; Janssen, Hilde; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje J; Collée, Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert N; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Couch, Fergus J; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Mattson, Johanna; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.19, P = 8.88 x 10-16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16-1.32, P = 6.19 x 10-11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk. PMID:27149063

  8. Distinct binding of BRCA2 BRC repeats to RAD51 generates differential DNA damage sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Gouri; Jimenez-Sainz, Judit; Presti, Thomas; Nguyen, Tiffany; Jensen, Ryan B.

    2016-01-01

    BRCA2 is a multi-faceted protein critical for the proper regulation of homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Elucidating the mechanistic features of BRCA2 is crucial for understanding homologous recombination and how patient-derived mutations impact future cancer risk. Eight centrally located BRC repeats in BRCA2 mediate binding and regulation of RAD51 on resected DNA substrates. Herein, we dissect the biochemical and cellular features of the BRC repeats tethered to the DNA binding domain of BRCA2. To understand how the BRC repeats and isolated domains of BRCA2 contribute to RAD51 binding, we analyzed both the biochemical and cellular properties of these proteins. In contrast to the individual BRC repeat units, we find that the BRC5–8 region potentiates RAD51-mediated DNA strand pairing and provides complementation functions exceeding those of BRC repeats 1–4. Furthermore, BRC5–8 can efficiently repair nuclease-induced DNA double-strand breaks and accelerate the assembly of RAD51 repair complexes upon DNA damage. These findings highlight the importance of the BRC5–8 domain in stabilizing the RAD51 filament and promoting homology-directed repair under conditions of cellular DNA damage. PMID:27084934

  9. Dbl2 Regulates Rad51 and DNA Joint Molecule Metabolism to Ensure Proper Meiotic Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Hyppa, Randy W.; Benko, Zsigmond; Misova, Ivana; Schleiffer, Alexander; Smith, Gerald R.; Gregan, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    To identify new proteins required for faithful meiotic chromosome segregation, we screened a Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion mutant library and found that deletion of the dbl2 gene led to missegregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Analyses of both live and fixed cells showed that dbl2Δ mutant cells frequently failed to segregate homologous chromosomes to opposite poles during meiosis I. Removing Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) to eliminate meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) suppressed the segregation defect in dbl2Δ cells, indicating that Dbl2 acts after the initiation of meiotic recombination. Analyses of DSBs and Holliday junctions revealed no significant defect in their formation or processing in dbl2Δ mutant cells, although some Rec12-dependent DNA joint molecules persisted late in meiosis. Failure to segregate chromosomes in the absence of Dbl2 correlated with persistent Rad51 foci, and deletion of rad51 or genes encoding Rad51 mediators also suppressed the segregation defect of dbl2Δ. Formation of foci of Fbh1, an F-box helicase that efficiently dismantles Rad51-DNA filaments, was impaired in dbl2Δ cells. Our results suggest that Dbl2 is a novel regulator of Fbh1 and thereby Rad51-dependent DSB repair required for proper meiotic chromosome segregation and viable sex cell formation. The wide conservation of these proteins suggests that our results apply to many species. PMID:27304859

  10. Dbl2 Regulates Rad51 and DNA Joint Molecule Metabolism to Ensure Proper Meiotic Chromosome Segregation.

    PubMed

    Polakova, Silvia; Molnarova, Lucia; Hyppa, Randy W; Benko, Zsigmond; Misova, Ivana; Schleiffer, Alexander; Smith, Gerald R; Gregan, Juraj

    2016-06-01

    To identify new proteins required for faithful meiotic chromosome segregation, we screened a Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion mutant library and found that deletion of the dbl2 gene led to missegregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Analyses of both live and fixed cells showed that dbl2Δ mutant cells frequently failed to segregate homologous chromosomes to opposite poles during meiosis I. Removing Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) to eliminate meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) suppressed the segregation defect in dbl2Δ cells, indicating that Dbl2 acts after the initiation of meiotic recombination. Analyses of DSBs and Holliday junctions revealed no significant defect in their formation or processing in dbl2Δ mutant cells, although some Rec12-dependent DNA joint molecules persisted late in meiosis. Failure to segregate chromosomes in the absence of Dbl2 correlated with persistent Rad51 foci, and deletion of rad51 or genes encoding Rad51 mediators also suppressed the segregation defect of dbl2Δ. Formation of foci of Fbh1, an F-box helicase that efficiently dismantles Rad51-DNA filaments, was impaired in dbl2Δ cells. Our results suggest that Dbl2 is a novel regulator of Fbh1 and thereby Rad51-dependent DSB repair required for proper meiotic chromosome segregation and viable sex cell formation. The wide conservation of these proteins suggests that our results apply to many species. PMID:27304859

  11. Distinct binding of BRCA2 BRC repeats to RAD51 generates differential DNA damage sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Gouri; Jimenez-Sainz, Judit; Presti, Thomas; Nguyen, Tiffany; Jensen, Ryan B

    2016-06-20

    BRCA2 is a multi-faceted protein critical for the proper regulation of homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Elucidating the mechanistic features of BRCA2 is crucial for understanding homologous recombination and how patient-derived mutations impact future cancer risk. Eight centrally located BRC repeats in BRCA2 mediate binding and regulation of RAD51 on resected DNA substrates. Herein, we dissect the biochemical and cellular features of the BRC repeats tethered to the DNA binding domain of BRCA2. To understand how the BRC repeats and isolated domains of BRCA2 contribute to RAD51 binding, we analyzed both the biochemical and cellular properties of these proteins. In contrast to the individual BRC repeat units, we find that the BRC5-8 region potentiates RAD51-mediated DNA strand pairing and provides complementation functions exceeding those of BRC repeats 1-4. Furthermore, BRC5-8 can efficiently repair nuclease-induced DNA double-strand breaks and accelerate the assembly of RAD51 repair complexes upon DNA damage. These findings highlight the importance of the BRC5-8 domain in stabilizing the RAD51 filament and promoting homology-directed repair under conditions of cellular DNA damage. PMID:27084934

  12. Promotion of Homologous Recombination by SWS-1 in Complex with RAD-51 Paralogs in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    McClendon, T Brooke; Sullivan, Meghan R; Bernstein, Kara A; Yanowitz, Judith L

    2016-05-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repairs cytotoxic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with high fidelity. Deficiencies in HR result in genome instability. A key early step in HR is the search for and invasion of a homologous DNA template by a single-stranded RAD-51 nucleoprotein filament. The Shu complex, composed of a SWIM domain-containing protein and its interacting RAD51 paralogs, promotes HR by regulating RAD51 filament dynamics. Despite Shu complex orthologs throughout eukaryotes, our understanding of its function has been most extensively characterized in budding yeast. Evolutionary analysis of the SWIM domain identified Caenorhabditis elegans sws-1 as a putative homolog of the yeast Shu complex member Shu2. Using a CRISPR-induced nonsense allele of sws-1, we show that sws-1 promotes HR in mitotic and meiotic nuclei. sws-1 mutants exhibit sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents and fail to form mitotic RAD-51 foci following treatment with camptothecin. Phenotypic similarities between sws-1 and the two RAD-51 paralogs rfs-1 and rip-1 suggest that they function together. Indeed, we detect direct interaction between SWS-1 and RIP-1 by yeast two-hybrid assay that is mediated by the SWIM domain in SWS-1 and the Walker B motif in RIP-1 Furthermore, RIP-1 bridges an interaction between SWS-1 and RFS-1, suggesting that RIP-1 facilitates complex formation with SWS-1 and RFS-1 We propose that SWS-1, RIP-1, and RFS-1 compose a C. elegans Shu complex. Our work provides a new model for studying Shu complex disruption in the context of a multicellular organism that has important implications as to why mutations in the human RAD51 paralogs are associated with genome instability. PMID:26936927

  13. Promotion of RAD51-Mediated Homologous DNA Pairing by the RAD51AP1-UAF1 Complex.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fengshan; Longerich, Simonne; Miller, Adam S; Tang, Caroline; Buzovetsky, Olga; Xiong, Yong; Maranon, David G; Wiese, Claudia; Kupfer, Gary M; Sung, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    The UAF1-USP1 complex deubiquitinates FANCD2 during execution of the Fanconi anemia DNA damage response pathway. As such, UAF1 depletion results in persistent FANCD2 ubiquitination and DNA damage hypersensitivity. UAF1-deficient cells are also impaired for DNA repair by homologous recombination. Herein, we show that UAF1 binds DNA and forms a dimeric complex with RAD51AP1, an accessory factor of the RAD51 recombinase, and a trimeric complex with RAD51 through RAD51AP1. Two small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-like domains in UAF1 and a SUMO-interacting motif in RAD51AP1 mediate complex formation. Importantly, UAF1 enhances RAD51-mediated homologous DNA pairing in a manner that is dependent on complex formation with RAD51AP1 but independent of USP1. Mechanistically, RAD51AP1-UAF1 co-operates with RAD51 to assemble the synaptic complex, a critical nucleoprotein intermediate in homologous recombination, and cellular studies reveal the biological significance of the RAD51AP1-UAF1 protein complex. Our findings provide insights into an apparently USP1-independent role of UAF1 in genome maintenance. PMID:27239033

  14. Nuclear localization of Rad51B is independent of BRCA2

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K A; Hinz, J M; Yamada, A; Thompson, L H; Albala, J S

    2005-06-28

    Human Rad51 is critical for the maintenance of genome stability through its role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Rad51B (Rad51L1/hRec2) is one of the five known paralogs of human Rad51 found in a multi-protein complex with three other Rad51 paralogs, Rad51C, Rad51D and Xrcc2. Examination of EGFP-Rad51B fusion protein in HeLa S3 cells and immunofluorescence in several human cell lines confirms the nuclear localization of Rad51B. This is the first report to detail putative interactions of a Rad51 paralog protein with BRCA2. Utilization of a BRCA2 mutant cell line, CAPAN-1 suggests that Rad51B localizes to the nucleus independent of BRCA2. Although both Rad51B and BRCA2 are clearly involved in the homologous recombinational repair pathway, Rad51B and BRCA2 do not appear to associate directly. Furthermore, mutations in the KKLK motif of Rad51B, amino acid residues 4-7, mislocalizes Rad51B to the cytoplasm suggesting that this is the nuclear localization signal for the Rad51B protein. Examination of wild-type EGFP-Rad51B fusion protein in mammalian cells deficient in Rad51C showed that Rad51B localizes to the nucleus independent of Rad51C; further suggesting that Rad51B, like Rad51C, contains its own nuclear localization signal.

  15. RAD51AP2, a novel vertebrate- and meiotic-specific protein, shares a conserved RAD51-interacting C-terminal domain with RAD51AP1/PIR51

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Wiese, Claudia; Schild, David

    2006-01-01

    Many interacting proteins regulate and/or assist the activities of RAD51, a recombinase which plays a critical role in both DNA repair and meiotic recombination. Yeast two-hybrid screening of a human testis cDNA library revealed a new protein, RAD51AP2 (RAD51 Associated Protein 2), that interacts strongly with RAD51. A full-length cDNA clone predicts a novel vertebrate-specific protein of 1159 residues, and the RAD51AP2 transcript was observed only in meiotic tissue (i.e. adult testis and fetal ovary), suggesting a meiotic-specific function for RAD51AP2. In HEK293 cells the interaction of RAD51 with an ectopically-expressed recombinant large fragment of RAD51AP2 requires the C-terminal 57 residues of RAD51AP2. This RAD51-binding region shows 81% homology to the C-terminus of RAD51AP1/PIR51, an otherwise totally unrelated RAD51-binding partner that is ubiquitously expressed. Analyses using truncations and point mutations in both RAD51AP1 and RAD51AP2 demonstrate that these proteins use the same structural motif for RAD51 binding. RAD54 shares some homology with this RAD51-binding motif, but this homologous region plays only an accessory role to the adjacent main RAD51-interacting region, which has been narrowed here to 40 amino acids. A novel protein, RAD51AP2, has been discovered that interacts with RAD51 through a C-terminal motif also present in RAD51AP1. PMID:16990250

  16. Recombination Activator Function of the Novel RAD51- and RAD51B-binding Protein, Human EVL*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Takaku, Motoki; Machida, Shinichi; Hosoya, Noriko; Nakayama, Shugo; Takizawa, Yoshimasa; Sakane, Isao; Shibata, Takehiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    The RAD51 protein is a central player in homologous recombinational repair. The RAD51B protein is one of five RAD51 paralogs that function in the homologous recombinational repair pathway in higher eukaryotes. In the present study, we found that the human EVL (Ena/Vasp-like) protein, which is suggested to be involved in actin-remodeling processes, unexpectedly binds to the RAD51 and RAD51B proteins and stimulates the RAD51-mediated homologous pairing and strand exchange. The EVL knockdown cells impaired RAD51 assembly onto damaged DNA after ionizing radiation or mitomycin C treatment. The EVL protein alone promotes single-stranded DNA annealing, and the recombination activities of the EVL protein are further enhanced by the RAD51B protein. The expression of the EVL protein is not ubiquitous, but it is significantly expressed in breast cancer-derived MCF7 cells. These results suggest that the EVL protein is a novel recombination factor that may be required for repairing specific DNA lesions, and that may cause tumor malignancy by its inappropriate expression. PMID:19329439

  17. ATP half-sites in RadA and RAD51 recombinases bind nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Marsh, May E; Scott, Duncan E; Ehebauer, Matthias T; Abell, Chris; Blundell, Tom L; Hyvönen, Marko

    2016-05-01

    Homologous recombination is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Central to this process is a family of recombinases, including archeal RadA and human RAD51, which form nucleoprotein filaments on damaged single-stranded DNA ends and facilitate their ATP-dependent repair. ATP binding and hydrolysis are dependent on the formation of a nucleoprotein filament comprising RadA/RAD51 and single-stranded DNA, with ATP bound between adjacent protomers. We demonstrate that truncated, monomeric Pyrococcus furiosus RadA and monomerised human RAD51 retain the ability to bind ATP and other nucleotides with high affinity. We present crystal structures of both apo and nucleotide-bound forms of monomeric RadA. These structures reveal that while phosphate groups are tightly bound, RadA presents a shallow, poorly defined binding surface for the nitrogenous bases of nucleotides. We suggest that RadA monomers would be constitutively bound to nucleotides in the cell and that the bound nucleotide might play a structural role in filament assembly. PMID:27419043

  18. Rad51 supports triple negative breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wiegmans, Adrian P; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Chee, Nicole; Yap, Pei-Yi; Gorski, Julia J; Silva, Leonard Da; Bolderson, Emma; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Anderson, Robin; Simpson, Peter T; Lakhani, Sunil R; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to extensive studies on familial breast cancer, it is currently unclear whether defects in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair genes play a role in sporadic breast cancer development and progression. We performed analysis of immunohistochemistry in an independent cohort of 235 were sporadic breast tumours. This analysis suggested that RAD51 expression is increased during breast cancer progression and metastasis and an oncogenic role for RAD51 when deregulated. Subsequent knockdown of RAD51 repressed cancer cell migration in vitro and reduced primary tumor growth in a syngeneic mouse model in vivo. Loss of RAD51 also inhibited associated metastasis not only in syngeneic mice but human xenografts and changed the metastatic gene expression profile of cancer cells, consistent with inhibition of distant metastasis. This demonstrates for the first time a new function of RAD51 that may underlie the proclivity of patients with RAD51 overexpression to develop distant metastasis. RAD51 is a potential biomarker and attractive drug target for metastatic triple negative breast cancer, with the capability to extend the survival of patients, which is less than 6 months. PMID:24811120

  19. The recombination mediator RAD51D promotes geminiviral infection.

    PubMed

    Richter, Kathrin S; Serra, Heϊdi; White, Charles I; Jeske, Holger

    2016-06-01

    To study a possible role for homologous recombination in geminivirus replication, we challenged Arabidopsis recombination gene knockouts by Euphorbia yellow mosaic virus infection. Our results show that the RAD51 paralog RAD51D, rather than RAD51 itself, promotes viral replication at early stages of infection. Blot hybridization analyses of replicative intermediates using one- and two-dimensional gels and deep sequencing point to an unexpected facet of recombination-dependent replication, the repair by single-strand annealing (SSA) during complementary strand replication. A significant decrease of both intramolecular, yielding defective DNAs and intermolecular recombinant molecules between the two geminiviral DNA components (A, B) were observed in the absence of RAD51D. By contrast, DNA A and B reacted differentially with the generation of inversions. A model to implicate single-strand annealing recombination in geminiviral recombination-dependent replication is proposed. PMID:27018825

  20. Significance of ligand interactions involving Hop2-Mnd1 and the RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases in homologous DNA repair and XX ovarian dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weixing; Sung, Patrick

    2015-04-30

    The evolutionarily conserved Hop2-Mnd1 complex is a key cofactor for the meiosis-specific recombinase Dmc1. However, emerging evidence has revealed that Hop2-Mnd1 is expressed in somatic tissues, primary human fibroblasts and cell lines, and that it functions in conjunction with the Rad51 recombinase to repair damaged telomeres via the alternate lengthening of telomeres mechanism. Here, we reveal how distinct DNA-binding activities of Hop2-Mnd1 mediate the stabilization of the RAD51-ssDNA presynaptic filament or stimulate the homologous DNA pairing reaction. We have also endeavored to define the interface that governs the assembly of the higher order complex of Hop2-Mnd1 with RAD51. Unexpectedly, we find that ATP enhances the interaction between Hop2-Mnd1 and RAD51, and that both Hop2 and Mnd1 are involved in RAD51 interaction via their C-terminal regions. Importantly, mutations introduced into these Hop2 and Mnd1 domains, including the HOP2 p.del201Glu mutation present in a patient of XX ovarian dysgenesis, diminish the association and functional synergy of Hop2-Mnd1 with both RAD51 and DMC1. Our findings help delineate the intricate manner in which Hop2-Mnd1 engages and functions with RAD51 and DMC1 in mammalian cells and speak to the possible cause of XX ovarian dysgenesis. PMID:25820426

  1. Roles of Rad51 paralogs for promoting homologous recombination in Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Genois, Marie-Michelle; Plourde, Marie; Éthier, Chantal; Roy, Gaétan; Poirier, Guy G.; Ouellette, Marc; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    To achieve drug resistance Leishmania parasite alters gene copy number by using its repeated sequences widely distributed through the genome. Even though homologous recombination (HR) is ascribed to maintain genome stability, this eukaryote exploits this potent mechanism driven by the Rad51 recombinase to form beneficial extrachromosomal circular amplicons. Here, we provide insights on the formation of these circular amplicons by analyzing the functions of the Rad51 paralogs. We purified three Leishmania infantum Rad51 paralogs homologs (LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6) all of which directly interact with LiRad51. LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6 show differences in DNA binding and annealing capacities. Moreover, it is also noteworthy that LiRad51-3 and LiRad51-4 are able to stimulate Rad51-mediated D-loop formation. In addition, we succeed to inactivate the LiRad51-4 gene and report a decrease of circular amplicons in this mutant. The LiRad51-3 gene was found to be essential for cell viability. Thus, we propose that the LiRad51 paralogs play crucial functions in extrachromosomal circular DNA amplification to circumvent drug actions and preserve survival. PMID:25712090

  2. Roles of Rad51 paralogs for promoting homologous recombination in Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Genois, Marie-Michelle; Plourde, Marie; Éthier, Chantal; Roy, Gaétan; Poirier, Guy G; Ouellette, Marc; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2015-03-11

    To achieve drug resistance Leishmania parasite alters gene copy number by using its repeated sequences widely distributed through the genome. Even though homologous recombination (HR) is ascribed to maintain genome stability, this eukaryote exploits this potent mechanism driven by the Rad51 recombinase to form beneficial extrachromosomal circular amplicons. Here, we provide insights on the formation of these circular amplicons by analyzing the functions of the Rad51 paralogs. We purified three Leishmania infantum Rad51 paralogs homologs (LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6) all of which directly interact with LiRad51. LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6 show differences in DNA binding and annealing capacities. Moreover, it is also noteworthy that LiRad51-3 and LiRad51-4 are able to stimulate Rad51-mediated D-loop formation. In addition, we succeed to inactivate the LiRad51-4 gene and report a decrease of circular amplicons in this mutant. The LiRad51-3 gene was found to be essential for cell viability. Thus, we propose that the LiRad51 paralogs play crucial functions in extrachromosomal circular DNA amplification to circumvent drug actions and preserve survival. PMID:25712090

  3. A novel interation of nucleolin with Rad51

    SciTech Connect

    De, Ananya; Donahue, Sarah L.; Tabah, Azah; Castro, Nancy E.; Mraz, Naomi; Cruise, Jennifer L.; Campbell, Colin . E-mail: campb034@umn.edu

    2006-05-26

    Nucleolin associates with various DNA repair, recombination, and replication proteins, and possesses DNA helicase, strand annealing, and strand pairing activities. Examination of nuclear protein extracts from human somatic cells revealed that nucleolin and Rad51 co-immunoprecipitate. Furthermore, purified recombinant Rad51 associates with in vitro transcribed and translated nucleolin. Electroporation-mediated introduction of anti-nucleolin antibody resulted in a 10- to 20-fold reduction in intra-plasmid homologous recombination activity in human fibrosarcoma cells. Additionally, introduction of anti-nucleolin antibody sensitized cells to death induced by the topoisomerase II inhibitor, amsacrine. Introduction of anti-Rad51 antibody also reduced intra-plasmid homologous recombination activity and induced hypersensitivity to amsacrine-induced cell death. Co-introduction of anti-nucleolin and anti-Rad51 antibodies did not produce additive effects on homologous recombination or on cellular sensitivity to amsacrine. The association of the two proteins raises the intriguing possibility that nucleolin binding to Rad51 may function to regulate homologous recombinational repair of chromosomal DNA.

  4. p53 modulates homologous recombination by transcriptional regulation of the RAD51 gene

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Lopez, Carmen; Lazaro-Trueba, Iciar; Kerr, Peter; Lord, Christopher J; Dexter, Tim; Iravani, Marjan; Ashworth, Alan; Silva, Augusto

    2006-01-01

    DNA repair by homologous recombination is involved in maintaining genome stability. Previous data report that wild-type p53 suppresses homologous recombination and physically interacts with Rad51. Here, we show the in vivo binding of wild-type p53 to a p53 response element in the promoter of Rad51 and the downregulation of Rad51 messenger RNA and protein by wild-type p53, favoured by DNA damage. Moreover, wild-type p53 inhibits Rad51 foci formation in response to double-strand breaks, whereas p53 contact mutant R280K fails to repress Rad51 mRNA and protein expression and Rad51 foci formation. We propose that transcriptional repression of Rad51 by p53 participates in regulating homologous recombination, and impaired Rad51 repression by p53 mutants may contribute to malignant transformation. PMID:16322760

  5. Characterization of RAD51-Independent Break-Induced Replication That Acts Preferentially with Short Homologous Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ira, Grzegorz; Haber, James E.

    2002-01-01

    Repair of double-strand breaks by gene conversions between homologous sequences located on different Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes or plasmids requires RAD51. When repair occurs between inverted repeats of the same plasmid, both RAD51-dependent and RAD51-independent repairs are found. Completion of RAD51-independent plasmid repair events requires RAD52, RAD50, RAD59, TID1 (RDH54), and SRS2 and appears to involve break-induced replication coupled to single-strand annealing. Surprisingly, RAD51-independent recombination requires much less homology (30 bp) for strand invasion than does RAD51-dependent repair (approximately 100 bp); in fact, the presence of Rad51p impairs recombination with short homology. The differences between the RAD51- and RAD50/RAD59-dependent pathways account for the distinct ways that two different recombination processes maintain yeast telomeres in the absence of telomerase. PMID:12192038

  6. Mutation Analysis of the RAD51C and RAD51D Genes in High-Risk Ovarian Cancer Patients and Families from the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    Janatova, Marketa; Soukupova, Jana; Stribrna, Jana; Kleiblova, Petra; Vocka, Michal; Boudova, Petra; Kleibl, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have conferred that the RAD51C and RAD51D genes, which code for the essential proteins involved in homologous recombination, are ovarian cancer (OC) susceptibility genes that may explain genetic risks in high-risk patients. We performed a mutation analysis in 171 high-risk BRCA1 and BRCA2 negative OC patients, to evaluate the frequency of hereditary RAD51C and RAD51D variants in Czech population. The analysis involved direct sequencing, high resolution melting and multiple ligation-dependent probe analysis. We identified two (1.2%) and three (1.8%) inactivating germline mutations in both respective genes, two of which (c.379_380insG, p.P127Rfs*28 in RAD51C and c.879delG, p.C294Vfs*16 in RAD51D) were novel. Interestingly, an indicative family cancer history was not present in four carriers. Moreover, the ages at the OC diagnoses in identified mutation carriers were substantially lower than those reported in previous studies (four carriers were younger than 45 years). Further, we also described rare missense variants, two in RAD51C and one in RAD51D whose clinical significance needs to be verified. Truncating mutations and rare missense variants ascertained in OC patients were not detected in 1226 control samples. Although the cumulative frequency of RAD51C and RAD51D truncating mutations in our patients was lower than that of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, it may explain OC susceptibility in approximately 3% of high-risk OC patients. Therefore, an RAD51C and RAD51D analysis should be implemented into the comprehensive multi-gene testing for high-risk OC patients, including early-onset OC patients without a family cancer history. PMID:26057125

  7. Rad51 Protein Expression and Survival in Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James W. Ellsworth, Ron K.; Kumar, Rachit; Fjerstad, Kyle; Martinez, Jesse; Nagel, Raymond B.; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Stea, Baldassarre

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) continues to pose a significant therapeutic challenge, with most tumors recurring within the previously irradiated tumor bed. To improve outcomes, we must be able to identify and treat resistant cell populations. Rad51, an enzyme involved in homologous recombinational repair, leads to increased resistance of tumor cells to cytotoxic treatments such as radiotherapy. We hypothesized that Rad51 might contribute to GBM's apparent radioresistance and consequently influence survival. Methods and Materials: A total of 68 patients with an initial diagnosis of GBM were retrospectively evaluated; for 10 of these patients, recurrent tumor specimens were used to construct a tissue microarray. Rad51 protein expression was then correlated with the actual and predicted survival using recursive partitioning analysis. Results: Rad51 protein was elevated in 53% of the GBM specimens at surgery. The Rad51 levels correlated directly with survival, with a median survival of 15 months for patients with elevated Rad51 compared with 9 months for patients with low or absent levels of Rad51 (p = .05). At disease recurrence, 70% of patients had additional increases in Rad51 protein. Increased Rad51 levels at disease recurrence similarly predicted for improved overall survival, with a mean survival of 16 months from the second craniotomy compared with only 4 months for patients with low Rad51 levels (p = .13). Conclusion: Elevated levels of the double-stranded DNA repair protein Rad51 predicted for an increase survival duration in patients with GBM, at both initial tumor presentation and disease recurrence.

  8. GEMIN2 promotes accumulation of RAD51 at double-strand breaks in homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Takizawa, Yoshimasa; Qing, Yong; Takaku, Motoki; Ishida, Takako; Morozumi, Yuichi; Tsujita, Takashi; Kogame, Toshiaki; Hirota, Kouji; Takahashi, Masayuki; Shibata, Takehiko; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Takeda, Shunichi

    2010-01-01

    RAD51 is a key factor in homologous recombination (HR) and plays an essential role in cellular proliferation by repairing DNA damage during replication. The assembly of RAD51 at DNA damage is strictly controlled by RAD51 mediators, including BRCA1 and BRCA2. We found that human RAD51 directly binds GEMIN2/SIP1, a protein involved in spliceosome biogenesis. Biochemical analyses indicated that GEMIN2 enhances the RAD51–DNA complex formation by inhibiting RAD51 dissociation from DNA, and thereby stimulates RAD51-mediated homologous pairing. GEMIN2 also enhanced the RAD51-mediated strand exchange, when RPA was pre-bound to ssDNA before the addition of RAD51. To analyze the function of GEMIN2, we depleted GEMIN2 in the chicken DT40 line and in human cells. The loss of GEMIN2 reduced HR efficiency and resulted in a significant decrease in the number of RAD51 subnuclear foci, as observed in cells deficient in BRCA1 and BRCA2. These observations and our biochemical analyses reveal that GEMIN2 regulates HR as a novel RAD51 mediator. PMID:20403813

  9. Extracellular Inhibitors, Repellents, and Semaphorin/Plexin/MICAL-mediated Actin Filament Disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ruei-Jiun; Terman, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple extracellular signals have been identified that regulate actin dynamics within motile cells, but how these instructive cues present on the cell surface exert their precise effects on the internal actin cytoskeleton is still poorly understood. One particularly interesting class of these cues is a group of extracellular proteins that negatively alter the movement of cells and their processes. Over the years, these types of events have been described using a variety of terms and herein we provide an overview of inhibitory/repulsive cellular phenomena and highlight the largest known protein family of repulsive extracellular cues, the Semaphorins. Specifically, the Semaphorins (Semas) utilize Plexin cell-surface receptors to dramatically collapse the actin cytoskeleton and we summarize what is known of the direct molecular and biochemical mechanisms of Sema-triggered actin filament (F-actin) disassembly. We also discuss new observations from our lab that reveal that the multi-domain oxidoreductase (Redox) enzyme MICAL, an important mediator of Sema/Plexin repulsion, is a novel F-actin disassembly factor. Our results indicate that MICAL triggers Sema/Plexin-mediated reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton and suggest a role for specific Redox signaling events in regulating actin dynamics. PMID:21800438

  10. Generation of contractile actomyosin bundles depends on mechanosensitive actin filament assembly and disassembly.

    PubMed

    Tojkander, Sari; Gateva, Gergana; Husain, Amjad; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion and morphogenesis of many non-muscle cells are guided by contractile actomyosin bundles called ventral stress fibers. While it is well established that stress fibers are mechanosensitive structures, physical mechanisms by which they assemble, align, and mature have remained elusive. Here we show that arcs, which serve as precursors for ventral stress fibers, undergo lateral fusion during their centripetal flow to form thick actomyosin bundles that apply tension to focal adhesions at their ends. Importantly, this myosin II-derived force inhibits vectorial actin polymerization at focal adhesions through AMPK-mediated phosphorylation of VASP, and thereby halts stress fiber elongation and ensures their proper contractility. Stress fiber maturation additionally requires ADF/cofilin-mediated disassembly of non-contractile stress fibers, whereas contractile fibers are protected from severing. Taken together, these data reveal that myosin-derived tension precisely controls both actin filament assembly and disassembly to ensure generation and proper alignment of contractile stress fibers in migrating cells. PMID:26652273

  11. Generation of contractile actomyosin bundles depends on mechanosensitive actin filament assembly and disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Tojkander, Sari; Gateva, Gergana; Husain, Amjad; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion and morphogenesis of many non-muscle cells are guided by contractile actomyosin bundles called ventral stress fibers. While it is well established that stress fibers are mechanosensitive structures, physical mechanisms by which they assemble, align, and mature have remained elusive. Here we show that arcs, which serve as precursors for ventral stress fibers, undergo lateral fusion during their centripetal flow to form thick actomyosin bundles that apply tension to focal adhesions at their ends. Importantly, this myosin II-derived force inhibits vectorial actin polymerization at focal adhesions through AMPK-mediated phosphorylation of VASP, and thereby halts stress fiber elongation and ensures their proper contractility. Stress fiber maturation additionally requires ADF/cofilin-mediated disassembly of non-contractile stress fibers, whereas contractile fibers are protected from severing. Taken together, these data reveal that myosin-derived tension precisely controls both actin filament assembly and disassembly to ensure generation and proper alignment of contractile stress fibers in migrating cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06126.001 PMID:26652273

  12. Small-molecule inhibitors that target protein-protein interactions in the RAD51 family of recombinases.

    PubMed

    Scott, Duncan E; Coyne, Anthony G; Venkitaraman, Ashok; Blundell, Tom L; Abell, Chris; Hyvönen, Marko

    2015-02-01

    The development of small molecules that inhibit protein-protein interactions continues to be a challenge in chemical biology and drug discovery. Herein we report the development of indole-based fragments that bind in a shallow surface pocket of a humanised surrogate of RAD51. RAD51 is an ATP-dependent recombinase that plays a key role in the repair of double-strand DNA breaks. It both self-associates, forming filament structures with DNA, and interacts with the BRCA2 protein through a common "FxxA" tetrapeptide motif. We elaborated previously identified fragment hits that target the FxxA motif site and developed small-molecule inhibitors that are approximately 500-fold more potent than the initial fragments. The lead compounds were shown to compete with the BRCA2-derived Ac-FHTA-NH2 peptide and the self-association peptide of RAD51, but they had no effect on ATP binding. This study is the first reported elaboration of small-molecular-weight fragments against this challenging target. PMID:25470112

  13. Small-Molecule Inhibitors That Target Protein–Protein Interactions in the RAD51 Family of Recombinases

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Duncan E; Coyne, Anthony G; Venkitaraman, Ashok; Blundell, Tom L; Abell, Chris; Hyvönen, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The development of small molecules that inhibit protein–protein interactions continues to be a challenge in chemical biology and drug discovery. Herein we report the development of indole-based fragments that bind in a shallow surface pocket of a humanised surrogate of RAD51. RAD51 is an ATP-dependent recombinase that plays a key role in the repair of double-strand DNA breaks. It both self-associates, forming filament structures with DNA, and interacts with the BRCA2 protein through a common “FxxA” tetrapeptide motif. We elaborated previously identified fragment hits that target the FxxA motif site and developed small-molecule inhibitors that are approximately 500-fold more potent than the initial fragments. The lead compounds were shown to compete with the BRCA2-derived Ac-FHTA-NH2 peptide and the self-association peptide of RAD51, but they had no effect on ATP binding. This study is the first reported elaboration of small-molecular-weight fragments against this challenging target. PMID:25470112

  14. Disparate requirements for the Walker A and B ATPase motifs ofhuman RAD51D in homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, Claudia; Hinz, John M.; Tebbs, Robert S.; Nham, Peter B.; Urbin, Salustra S.; Collins, David W.; Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2006-04-21

    In vertebrates, homologous recombinational repair (HRR) requires RAD51 and five RAD51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D) that all contain conserved Walker A and B ATPase motifs. In human RAD51D we examined the requirement for these motifs in interactions with XRCC2 and RAD51C, and for survival of cells in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks. Ectopic expression of wild type human RAD51D or mutants having a non-functional A or B motif was used to test for complementation of a rad51d knockout hamster CHO cell line. Although A-motif mutants complement very efficiently, B-motif mutants do not. Consistent with these results, experiments using the yeast two- and three-hybrid systems show that the interactions between RAD51D and its XRCC2 and RAD51C partners also require a functional RAD51D B motif, but not motif A. Similarly, hamster Xrcc2 is unable to bind to the non-complementing human RAD51D B-motif mutants in co-immunoprecipitation assays. We conclude that a functional Walker B motif, but not A motif, is necessary for RAD51D's interactions with other paralogs and for efficient HRR. We present a model in which ATPase sites are formed in a bipartite manner between RAD51D and other RAD51 paralogs.

  15. Strand pairing by Rad54 and Rad51 is enhanced by chromatin.

    PubMed

    Alexiadis, Vassilios; Kadonaga, James T

    2002-11-01

    We investigated the role of chromatin in the catalysis of homologous strand pairing by Rad54 and Rad51. Rad54 is related to the ATPase subunits of chromatin-remodeling factors, whereas Rad51 is related to bacterial RecA. In the absence of superhelical tension, we found that the efficiency of strand pairing with chromatin is >100-fold higher than that with naked DNA. In addition, we observed that Rad54 and Rad51 function cooperatively in the ATP-dependent remodeling of chromatin. These findings indicate that Rad54 and Rad51 have evolved to function with chromatin, the natural substrate, rather than with naked DNA. PMID:12414729

  16. Mammalian RAD51 paralogs protect nascent DNA at stalled forks and mediate replication restart

    PubMed Central

    Somyajit, Kumar; Saxena, Sneha; Babu, Sharath; Mishra, Anup; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian RAD51 paralogs are implicated in the repair of collapsed replication forks by homologous recombination. However, their physiological roles in replication fork maintenance prior to fork collapse remain obscure. Here, we report on the role of RAD51 paralogs in short-term replicative stress devoid of DSBs. We show that RAD51 paralogs localize to nascent DNA and common fragile sites upon replication fork stalling. Strikingly, RAD51 paralogs deficient cells exhibit elevated levels of 53BP1 nuclear bodies and increased DSB formation, the latter being attributed to extensive degradation of nascent DNA at stalled forks. RAD51C and XRCC3 promote the restart of stalled replication in an ATP hydrolysis dependent manner by disengaging RAD51 and other RAD51 paralogs from the halted forks. Notably, we find that Fanconi anemia (FA)-like disorder and breast and ovarian cancer patient derived mutations of RAD51C fails to protect replication fork, exhibit under-replicated genomic regions and elevated micro-nucleation. Taken together, RAD51 paralogs prevent degradation of stalled forks and promote the restart of halted replication to avoid replication fork collapse, thereby maintaining genomic integrity and suppressing tumorigenesis. PMID:26354865

  17. A peptide nucleic acid targeting nuclear RAD51 sensitizes multiple myeloma cells to melphalan treatment.

    PubMed

    Alagpulinsa, David Abasiwani; Yaccoby, Shmuel; Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Shmookler Reis, Robert Joseph

    2015-01-01

    RAD51-mediated recombinational repair is elevated in multiple myeloma (MM) and predicts poor prognosis. RAD51 has been targeted to selectively sensitize and/or kill tumor cells. Here, we employed a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) to inhibit RAD51 expression in MM cells. We constructed a PNA complementary to a unique segment of the RAD51 gene promoter, spanning the transcription start site, and conjugated it to a nuclear localization signal (PKKKRKV) to enhance cellular uptake and nuclear delivery without transfection reagents. This synthetic construct, (PNArad51_nls), significantly reduced RAD51 transcripts in MM cells, and markedly reduced the number and intensity of de novo and melphalan-induced nuclear RAD51 foci, while increasing the level of melphalan-induced γH2AX foci. Melphalan alone markedly induced the expression of 5 other genes involved in homologous-recombination repair, yet suppression of RAD51 by PNArad51_nls was sufficient to synergize with melphalan, producing significant synthetic lethality of MM cells in vitro. In a SCID-rab mouse model mimicking the MM bone marrow microenvironment, treatment with PNArad51_nls ± melphalan significantly suppressed tumor growth after 2 weeks, whereas melphalan plus control PNArad4µ_nls was ineffectual. This study highlights the importance of RAD51 in myeloma growth and is the first to demonstrate that anti-RAD51 PNA can potentiate conventional MM chemotherapy. PMID:25996477

  18. Polymorphisms of homologous recombination RAD51, RAD51B, XRCC2, and XRCC3 genes and the risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nowacka-Zawisza, Maria; Wiśnik, Ewelina; Wasilewski, Andrzej; Skowrońska, Milena; Forma, Ewa; Bryś, Magdalena; Różański, Waldemar; Krajewska, Wanda M

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may induce individual variations in DNA repair capacity, which may in turn contribute to the risk of cancer developing. Homologous recombination repair (HRR) plays a critical role in maintaining chromosomal integrity and protecting against carcinogenic factors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between prostate cancer risk and the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes involved in HRR, that is, RAD51 (rs1801320 and rs1801321), RAD51B (rs10483813 and rs3784099), XRCC2 (rs3218536), and XRCC3 (rs861539). Polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP and Real-Time PCR in 101 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and 216 age- and sex-matched controls. A significant relationship was detected between the RAD51 gene rs1801320 polymorphism and increased prostate cancer risk. Our results indicate that the RAD51 gene rs1801320 polymorphism may contribute to prostate cancer susceptibility in Poland. PMID:26339569

  19. Differential roles of XRCC2 in S-phase RAD51 focus formation induced by DNA replication inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, C; Liu, N

    2004-05-14

    RAD51 proteins accumulate in discrete nuclear foci in response to DNA damage. Previous studies demonstrated that human RAD51 paralogs (RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, XRCC2 and XRCC3) are essential for the assembly of RAD51 foci induced by ionizing radiation and cross-linking agents. Here we report that XRCC2 also plays important roles in RAD51 focus formation induced by replication arrest during S-phase of cell cycle. In wild-type hamster V79 cells treated with hydroxyurea (HU), RAD51 protein form punctuate nuclear foci, accompanied by increased RAD51 protein level in both cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions, and increased association of RAD51 with chromatin. In contrast, xrcc2 hamster mutant irs1 cells are deficient in the formation of RAD51 foci after HU treatment, suggesting that the function of XRCC2 is required for the assembly of RAD51 at HU-induced stalled replication forks. Interestingly, we found that irs1 cells are able to form intact RAD51 foci in S-phase cells treated with thymidine (TR) or aphidicolin, although irs1 cells are hypersensitive to both HU and TR. Our findings suggest that there may be two distinct pathways (XRCC2-dependent or XRCC2-independent) involved in loading of RAD51 onto stalled replication forks, probably depending upon the structure of DNA lesions.

  20. Targeted disruption of the Rad51 gene leads to lethality in embryonic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, T; Fujii, Y; Sakumi, K; Tominaga, Y; Nakao, K; Sekiguchi, M; Matsushiro, A; Yoshimura, Y; MoritaT

    1996-01-01

    The mouse Rad51 gene is a mammalian homologue of the Escherichia coli recA and yeast RAD51 genes, both of which are involved in homologous recombination and DNA repair. To elucidate the physiological role of RAD51 protein, the gene was targeted in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Mice heterozygous for the Rad51 null mutation were intercrossed and their offspring were genotyped. There were no homozygous (Rad51-/-) pups among 148 neonates examined but a few Rad51-/- embryos were identified when examined during the early stages of embryonic development. Doubly knocked-out ES cells were not detected under conditions of selective growth. These results are interpreted to mean that RAD51 protein plays an essential role in the proliferation of cell. The homozygous Rad51 null mutation can be categorized in cell-autonomous defects. Pre-implantational lethal mutations that disrupt basic molecular functions will thus interfere with cell viability. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8692798

  1. RAD54 family translocases counter genotoxic effects of RAD51 in human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Jennifer M.; Dusad, Kritika; Wright, William Douglass; Grubb, Jennifer; Budke, Brian; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich; Connell, Philip P.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Bishop, Douglas K.

    2015-01-01

    The RAD54 family DNA translocases have several biochemical activities. One activity, demonstrated previously for the budding yeast translocases, is ATPase-dependent disruption of RAD51-dsDNA binding. This activity is thought to promote dissociation of RAD51 from heteroduplex DNA following strand exchange during homologous recombination. In addition, previous experiments in budding yeast have shown that the same activity of Rad54 removes Rad51 from undamaged sites on chromosomes; mutants lacking Rad54 accumulate nonrepair-associated complexes that can block growth and lead to chromosome loss. Here, we show that human RAD54 also promotes the dissociation of RAD51 from dsDNA and not ssDNA. We also show that translocase depletion in tumor cell lines leads to the accumulation of RAD51 on chromosomes, forming complexes that are not associated with markers of DNA damage. We further show that combined depletion of RAD54L and RAD54B and/or artificial induction of RAD51 overexpression blocks replication and promotes chromosome segregation defects. These results support a model in which RAD54L and RAD54B counteract genome-destabilizing effects of direct binding of RAD51 to dsDNA in human tumor cells. Thus, in addition to having genome-stabilizing DNA repair activity, human RAD51 has genome-destabilizing activity when expressed at high levels, as is the case in many human tumors. PMID:25765654

  2. DUAL AND OPPOSITE EFFECTS OF hRAD51 CHEMICAL MODULATION ON HIV-1 INTEGRATION

    PubMed Central

    Thierry, Sylvain; Benleulmi, Mohamed Salah; Sinzelle, Ludivine; Thierry, Eloise; Calmels, Christina; Chaignepain, Stephane; Waffo-Teguo, Pierre; Merillon, Jean-Michel; Budke, Brian; Pasquet, Jean-Max; Litvak, Simon; Ciuffi, Angela; Sung, Patrick; Connell, Philip; Hauber, Ilona; Hauber, Joachim; Andreola, Marie-Line; Delelis, Olivier; Parissi, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The cellular DNA repair hRAD51 protein has been shown to restrict HIV-1 integration both in vitro and in vivo. To investigate its regulatory functions, we performed a pharmacological analysis of the retroviral integration modulation by hRAD51. We found that, in vitro, chemical activation of hRAD51 stimulates its integration inhibitory properties, whereas inhibition of hRAD51 decreases the integration restriction, indicating that the modulation of HIV-1 integration depends on the hRAD51 recombinase activity. Cellular analyses demonstrated that cells exhibiting high hRAD51 levels prior to de novo infection are more resistant to integration. On the other hand, when hRAD51 was activated during integration, cells were more permissive. Altogether, these data establish the functional link between hRAD51 activity and HIV-1 integration. Our results highlight the multiple and opposite effects of the recombinase during integration and provide new insights into the cellular regulation of HIV-1 replication. PMID:26051216

  3. Cyclic hypoxia does not alter RAD51 expression or PARP inhibitor cell kill in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kumareswaran, Ramya; Chaudary, Naz; Jaluba, Karolina; Meng, Alice; Sykes, Jenna; Borhan, Asm; Hill, Richard P; Bristow, Robert G

    2015-09-01

    Solid tumors contain regions of chronic and cyclic hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia can downregulate RAD51 and sensitize cells to PARP inhibition. Herein, we show that RAD51 expression, cell survival and toxicity to PARP inhibition is not affected under cyclic hypoxic conditions. This suggests that PARP inhibition may be selectively toxic in tumor sub-regions associated with chronic hypoxia. PMID:25842967

  4. The Tumor-Associated Variant RAD51 G151D Induces a Hyper-Recombination Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Carolyn G; Jensen, Ryan B; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Rothenberg, Eli; Morrical, Scott W; Wallace, Susan S; Sweasy, Joann B

    2016-08-01

    The RAD51 protein plays a key role in the homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks and is important for maintaining genome stability. Here we report on a novel human RAD51 variant found in an aggressive and therapy-refractive breast carcinoma. Expression of the RAD51 G151D variant in human breast epithelial cells increases the levels of homology-directed repair. Expression of RAD51 G151D in cells also promotes high levels of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges. In vitro, the purified RAD51 G151D protein directly and significantly enhances DNA strand exchange activity in the presence of RPA. In concordance with this result, co-incubation of G151D with BRCA2 resulted in a much higher level of strand-exchange activity compared to WT RAD51. Strikingly, the RAD51 G151D variant confers resistance to multiple DNA damaging agents, including ionizing radiation, mitomycin C, and doxorubicin. Our findings demonstrate that the RAD51 G151D somatic variant has a novel hyper-recombination phenotype and suggest that this property of the protein is important for the repair of DNA damage, leading to drug resistance. PMID:27513445

  5. Enhancement of the RAD51 Recombinase Activity by the Tumor Suppressor PALB2

    SciTech Connect

    Dray, Eloise; Etchin, Julia; Wiese, Claudia; Saro, Dorina; Williams, Gareth J.; Hammel, Michal; Yu, Xiong; Galkin, Vitold E.; Liu, Dongqing; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Sy, Shirley M-H.; Egelman, Edward; Chen, Junjie; Sung, Patrick; Schild, D.

    2010-08-24

    Homologous recombination mediated by the RAD51 recombinase helps eliminate chromosomal lesions, such as DNA double-stranded breaks induced by radiation or arising from injured DNA replication forks. The tumor suppressors BRCA2 and PALB2 act together to deliver RAD51 to chromosomal lesions to initiate repair. Here we document a new function of PALB2 in the enhancement of RAD51's ability to form the D-loop. We show that PALB2 binds DNA and physically interacts with RAD51. Importantly, while PALB2 alone stimulates D-loop formation, a cooperative effect is seen with RAD51AP1, an enhancer of RAD51. This stimulation stems from PALB2's ability to function with RAD51 and RAD51AP1 to assemble the synaptic complex. Our results help unveil a multi-faceted role of PALB2 in chromosome damage repair. Since PALB2 mutations can cause breast and other tumors or lead to Fanconi anemia, our findings are important for understanding the mechanism of tumor suppression in humans.

  6. Swi2/Snf2-related translocases prevent accumulation of toxic Rad51 complexes during mitotic growth

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Parisha P.; Zheng, Xiuzhong; Epshtein, Anastasiya; Carey, Jeffrey N.; Bishop, Douglas K.; Klein, Hannah L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Purified DNA translocases Rdh54 and Rad54 can dissociate complexes formed by eukaryotic RecA-like recombinases on double-stranded DNA. Here we show Rad51 complexes are dissociated by these translocases in mitotic cells. Rad51 overexpression blocked growth of cells deficient in Rdh54 activity. This toxicity was associated with accumulation of Rad51 foci on undamaged chromatin. At normal Rad51 levels, rdh54 deficiency resulted in slight elevation of Rad51 foci. A triple mutant lacking Rdh54, Rad54, and a third Swi2/Snf2 homologue Uls1, accumulated Rad51 foci, grew slowly, and suffered chromosome loss. Thus, Uls1 and Rad54 can partially substitute for Rdh54 in the removal of toxic, non–damage-associated Rad51-DNA complexes. Additional data suggest that the function of Rdh54 and Rad54 in removal of Rad51 foci is significantly specialized; Rad54 predominates for removal of damage-associated foci and Rdh54 predominates for removal of non-damage-associated foci. PMID:20864034

  7. RAD54 family translocases counter genotoxic effects of RAD51 in human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mason, Jennifer M; Dusad, Kritika; Wright, William Douglass; Grubb, Jennifer; Budke, Brian; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich; Connell, Philip P; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Bishop, Douglas K

    2015-03-31

    The RAD54 family DNA translocases have several biochemical activities. One activity, demonstrated previously for the budding yeast translocases, is ATPase-dependent disruption of RAD51-dsDNA binding. This activity is thought to promote dissociation of RAD51 from heteroduplex DNA following strand exchange during homologous recombination. In addition, previous experiments in budding yeast have shown that the same activity of Rad54 removes Rad51 from undamaged sites on chromosomes; mutants lacking Rad54 accumulate nonrepair-associated complexes that can block growth and lead to chromosome loss. Here, we show that human RAD54 also promotes the dissociation of RAD51 from dsDNA and not ssDNA. We also show that translocase depletion in tumor cell lines leads to the accumulation of RAD51 on chromosomes, forming complexes that are not associated with markers of DNA damage. We further show that combined depletion of RAD54L and RAD54B and/or artificial induction of RAD51 overexpression blocks replication and promotes chromosome segregation defects. These results support a model in which RAD54L and RAD54B counteract genome-destabilizing effects of direct binding of RAD51 to dsDNA in human tumor cells. Thus, in addition to having genome-stabilizing DNA repair activity, human RAD51 has genome-destabilizing activity when expressed at high levels, as is the case in many human tumors. PMID:25765654

  8. The Tumor-Associated Variant RAD51 G151D Induces a Hyper-Recombination Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Carolyn G.; Jensen, Ryan B.; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Rothenberg, Eli; Morrical, Scott W.; Wallace, Susan S.; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2016-01-01

    The RAD51 protein plays a key role in the homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks and is important for maintaining genome stability. Here we report on a novel human RAD51 variant found in an aggressive and therapy-refractive breast carcinoma. Expression of the RAD51 G151D variant in human breast epithelial cells increases the levels of homology-directed repair. Expression of RAD51 G151D in cells also promotes high levels of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges. In vitro, the purified RAD51 G151D protein directly and significantly enhances DNA strand exchange activity in the presence of RPA. In concordance with this result, co-incubation of G151D with BRCA2 resulted in a much higher level of strand-exchange activity compared to WT RAD51. Strikingly, the RAD51 G151D variant confers resistance to multiple DNA damaging agents, including ionizing radiation, mitomycin C, and doxorubicin. Our findings demonstrate that the RAD51 G151D somatic variant has a novel hyper-recombination phenotype and suggest that this property of the protein is important for the repair of DNA damage, leading to drug resistance. PMID:27513445

  9. Down-Regulation of Rad51 and Decreased Homologous Recombination in Hypoxic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bindra, Ranjit S.; Schaffer, Paul J.; Meng, Alice; Woo, Jennifer; Måseide, Kårstein; Roth, Matt E.; Lizardi, Paul; Hedley, David W.; Bristow, Robert G.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2004-01-01

    There is an emerging concept that acquired genetic instability in cancer cells can arise from the dysregulation of critical DNA repair pathways due to cell stresses such as inflammation and hypoxia. Here we report that hypoxia specifically down-regulates the expression of RAD51, a key mediator of homologous recombination in mammalian cells. Decreased levels of Rad51 were observed in multiple cancer cell types during hypoxic exposure and were not associated with the cell cycle profile or with expression of hypoxia-inducible factor. Analyses of RAD51 gene promoter activity, as well as mRNA and protein stability, indicate that the hypoxia-mediated regulation of this gene occurs via transcriptional repression. Decreased expression of Rad51 was also observed to persist in posthypoxic cells for as long as 48 h following reoxygenation. Correspondingly, we found reduced levels of homologous recombination in both hypoxic and posthypoxic cells, suggesting that the hypoxia-associated reduction in Rad51 expression has functional consequences for DNA repair. In addition, hypoxia-mediated down-regulation of Rad51 was confirmed in vivo via immunofluorescent image analysis of experimental tumors in mice. Based on these findings, we propose a novel mechanism of genetic instability in the tumor microenvironment mediated by hypoxia-induced suppression of the homologous recombination pathway in cancer cells. The aberrant regulation of Rad51 expression may also create heterogeneity in the DNA damage response among cells within tumors, with implications for the response to cancer therapies. PMID:15367671

  10. Use of the Rad51 promoter for targeted anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hine, Christopher M; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2008-12-30

    Rad51 protein, involved in homologous recombination, is overexpressed in a variety of tumors, and its expression is correlated with a poor prognosis. Here we propose to exploit the overexpression of Rad51 in cancer cells to design a Rad51 promoter-based anticancer therapy. On average, Rad51 mRNA and protein levels are increased in cancer cells four- and sixfold, respectively. Serendipitously, we discovered that when the Rad51 ORF is replaced with another ORF, the difference in promoter activity between normal and cancer cells increases to an average of 840-fold with a maximum difference of 12,500-fold. This dramatic difference in activity has high therapeutic potential. We demonstrate that the fusion of Rad51 promoter to diphtheria toxin A (DTA) gene kills a variety of cancer cell types, including breast cancer, fibrosarcoma, and cervical cancer cells, with minimal effect on normal breast epithelial cells and normal fibroblasts. Our results suggest that therapies based on the Rad51 promoter will be highly tumor specific and open new avenues for targeting a broad range of cancers. PMID:19106292

  11. Germline mutations in RAD51D confer susceptibility to ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Loveday, Chey; Turnbull, Clare; Ramsay, Emma; Hughes, Deborah; Ruark, Elise; Frankum, Jessica R; Bowden, Georgina; Kalmyrzaev, Bolot; Warren-Perry, Margaret; Snape, Katie; Adlard, Julian W; Barwell, Julian; Berg, Jonathan; Brady, Angela F; Brewer, Carole; Brice, Glen; Chapman, Cyril; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; Donaldson, Alan; Douglas, Fiona; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Henderson, Alex; Izatt, Louise; Kumar, Ajith; Lalloo, Fiona; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick J; Paterson, Joan; Porteous, Mary; Rogers, Mark T; Shanley, Susan; Walker, Lisa; Eccles, Diana; Evans, D Gareth; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Antoniou, Antonis C; Rahman, Nazneen

    2011-09-01

    Recently, RAD51C mutations were identified in families with breast and ovarian cancer. This observation prompted us to investigate the role of RAD51D in cancer susceptibility. We identified eight inactivating RAD51D mutations in unrelated individuals from 911 breast-ovarian cancer families compared with one inactivating mutation identified in 1,060 controls (P = 0.01). The association found here was principally with ovarian cancer, with three mutations identified in the 59 pedigrees with three or more individuals with ovarian cancer (P = 0.0005). The relative risk of ovarian cancer for RAD51D mutation carriers was estimated to be 6.30 (95% CI 2.86-13.85, P = 4.8 × 10(-6)). By contrast, we estimated the relative risk of breast cancer to be 1.32 (95% CI 0.59-2.96, P = 0.50). These data indicate that RAD51D mutation testing may have clinical utility in individuals with ovarian cancer and their families. Moreover, we show that cells deficient in RAD51D are sensitive to treatment with a PARP inhibitor, suggesting a possible therapeutic approach for cancers arising in RAD51D mutation carriers. PMID:21822267

  12. Development of Small Molecules that Specifically Inhibit the D-loop Activity of RAD51.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Budke, Brian; Pawlowski, Michal; Connell, Philip P; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2016-05-26

    RAD51 is the central protein in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair and represents a therapeutic target in oncology. Herein we report a novel class of RAD51 inhibitors that were identified by high throughput screening. In contrast to many previously reported RAD51 inhibitors, our lead compound 1 is capable of blocking RAD51-mediated D-loop formation (IC50 21.3 ± 7.8 μM) at concentrations that do not influence RAD51 binding to ssDNA. In human cells, 1 inhibits HR (IC50 13.1 ± 1.6 μM) without blocking RAD51's ability to assemble into subnuclear foci at sites of DNA damage. We determined that the active constituent of 1 is actually an oxidized derivative (termed RI(dl)-1 or 8) of the original screening compound. Our SAR campaign also yielded RI(dl)-2 (hereafter termed 9h), which effectively blocks RAD51's D-loop activity in biochemical systems (IC50 11.1 ± 1.3 μM) and inhibits HR activity in human cells (IC50 3.0 ± 1.8 μM). PMID:27049177

  13. ROLE OF THE HOMOLOGOUS RECOMBINATION GENES RAD51 and RAD59 IN THE RESISTANCE OF Candida albicans TO UV LIGHT, RADIOMIMETIC AND ANTI-TUMOR COMPOUNDS AND OXIDIZING AGENTS

    PubMed Central

    García-Prieto, Fátima; Gómez-Raja, Jonathan; Andaluz, Encarnación; Calderone, Richard; Larriba, Germán

    2010-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized the RAD51 and RAD59 orthologues of the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. CaRad51 exhibited more than 50% identity with several other eukaryotes and the conserved the catalytic domain of a bacterial RecA. As compared to the parental strain, null strains of rad51 exhibited a filamentous morphology, had a decreased grow rate and exhibited a moderate sensitivity to UV light, oxidizing agents, and compounds that cause double-strand breaks (DSB), indicating a role in DNA repair. By comparison, the rad52 null had a higher percentage of filaments, a more severe growth defect and a greater sensitivity to DNA-damaging compounds. Null strains of rad59 showed a UV-sensitive phenotype but behaved similarly to the parental strain in the rest of the assays. As compared to S. cerevisiae, C. albicans was much more resistant to bleomycin and the same was true for their respective homologous recombination (HR) mutants. These results indicate that, as described in S. cerevisiae, RAD52 plays a more prominent role than RAD51 in the repair of DSBs in C. albicans and suggest the existence of at least two Rad52-dependent HR pathways, one dependent and one independent of Rad51. PMID:20206282

  14. Mek1 Down Regulates Rad51 Activity during Yeast Meiosis by Phosphorylation of Hed1.

    PubMed

    Callender, Tracy L; Laureau, Raphaelle; Wan, Lihong; Chen, Xiangyu; Sandhu, Rima; Laljee, Saif; Zhou, Sai; Suhandynata, Ray T; Prugar, Evelyn; Gaines, William A; Kwon, YoungHo; Börner, G Valentin; Nicolas, Alain; Neiman, Aaron M; Hollingsworth, Nancy M

    2016-08-01

    During meiosis, programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired preferentially between homologs to generate crossovers that promote proper chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. In many organisms, there are two strand exchange proteins, Rad51 and the meiosis-specific Dmc1, required for interhomolog (IH) bias. This bias requires the presence, but not the strand exchange activity of Rad51, while Dmc1 is responsible for the bulk of meiotic recombination. How these activities are regulated is less well established. In dmc1Δ mutants, Rad51 is actively inhibited, thereby resulting in prophase arrest due to unrepaired DSBs triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. This inhibition is dependent upon the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1 and occurs through two different mechanisms that prevent complex formation with the Rad51 accessory factor Rad54: (i) phosphorylation of Rad54 by Mek1 and (ii) binding of Rad51 by the meiosis-specific protein Hed1. An open question has been why inhibition of Mek1 affects Hed1 repression of Rad51. This work shows that Hed1 is a direct substrate of Mek1. Phosphorylation of Hed1 at threonine 40 helps suppress Rad51 activity in dmc1Δ mutants by promoting Hed1 protein stability. Rad51-mediated recombination occurring in the absence of Hed1 phosphorylation results in a significant increase in non-exchange chromosomes despite wild-type levels of crossovers, confirming previous results indicating a defect in crossover assurance. We propose that Rad51 function in meiosis is regulated in part by the coordinated phosphorylation of Rad54 and Hed1 by Mek1. PMID:27483004

  15. Mek1 Down Regulates Rad51 Activity during Yeast Meiosis by Phosphorylation of Hed1

    PubMed Central

    Callender, Tracy L.; Laljee, Saif; Zhou, Sai; Suhandynata, Ray T.; Gaines, William A.; Kwon, YoungHo; Börner, G. Valentin; Nicolas, Alain; Neiman, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired preferentially between homologs to generate crossovers that promote proper chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. In many organisms, there are two strand exchange proteins, Rad51 and the meiosis-specific Dmc1, required for interhomolog (IH) bias. This bias requires the presence, but not the strand exchange activity of Rad51, while Dmc1 is responsible for the bulk of meiotic recombination. How these activities are regulated is less well established. In dmc1Δ mutants, Rad51 is actively inhibited, thereby resulting in prophase arrest due to unrepaired DSBs triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. This inhibition is dependent upon the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1 and occurs through two different mechanisms that prevent complex formation with the Rad51 accessory factor Rad54: (i) phosphorylation of Rad54 by Mek1 and (ii) binding of Rad51 by the meiosis-specific protein Hed1. An open question has been why inhibition of Mek1 affects Hed1 repression of Rad51. This work shows that Hed1 is a direct substrate of Mek1. Phosphorylation of Hed1 at threonine 40 helps suppress Rad51 activity in dmc1Δ mutants by promoting Hed1 protein stability. Rad51-mediated recombination occurring in the absence of Hed1 phosphorylation results in a significant increase in non-exchange chromosomes despite wild-type levels of crossovers, confirming previous results indicating a defect in crossover assurance. We propose that Rad51 function in meiosis is regulated in part by the coordinated phosphorylation of Rad54 and Hed1 by Mek1. PMID:27483004

  16. Rad51C deficiency destabilizes XRCC3, impairs recombination and radiosensitizes S/G2-phase cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Schild, David; Brenneman, Mark A.; Redpath, J. Leslie; Chen, David J.

    2004-05-01

    The highly conserved Rad51 protein plays an essential role in repairing DNA damage through homologous recombination. In vertebrates, five Rad51 paralogs (Rad51B, Rad51C, Rad51D, XRCC2, XRCC3) are expressed in mitotically growing cells, and are thought to play mediating roles in homologous recombination, though their precise functions remain unclear. Here we report the use of RNA interference to deplete expression of Rad51C protein in human HT1080 and HeLa cells. In HT1080 cells, depletion of Rad51C by small interfering RNA caused a significant reduction of frequency in homologous recombination. The level of XRCC3 protein was also sharply reduced in Rad51C-depleted HeLa cells, suggesting that XRCC3 is dependent for its stability upon heterodimerization with Rad51C. In addition, Rad51C-depleted HeLa cells showed hypersensitivity to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C, and moderately increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Importantly, the radiosensitivity of Rad51C-deficient HeLa cells was evident in S and G{sub 2}/M phases of the cell cycle but not in G{sub 1} phase. Together, these results provide direct cellular evidence for the importance of human Rad51C in homologous recombinational repair.

  17. Pseudorabies virus US3 leads to filamentous actin disassembly and contributes to viral genome delivery to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Thary; Van den Broeke, Céline; Grauwet, Korneel; Baert, Kim; Claessen, Christophe; De Pelsmaeker, Steffi; Van Waesberghe, Cliff; Favoreel, Herman W

    2015-06-12

    The conserved alphaherpesvirus US3 tegument protein induces rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton, consisting of protrusion formation and stress fiber breakdown. Although US3 does not affect levels of total actin protein, it remains unclear whether US3 modulates the total levels of filamentous (F) actin. In this report, we show that the pseudorabies virus (PRV) US3 protein, via its kinase activity, leads to disassembly of F-actin in porcine ST cells. F-actin disassembly has been reported before to contribute to host cell entry of HIV. In line with this, in the current study, we report that US3 has a previously uncharacterized role in viral genome delivery to the nucleus, since quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays on nuclear fractions demonstrated a reduced nuclear delivery of US3null PRV compared to wild type PRV genomes. Treatment of cells with the actin depolymerizing drug cytochalasin D enhanced virus genome delivery to the nucleus, particularly of US3null PRV, supporting a role for F-actin disassembly during certain aspects of viral entry. In conclusion, the US3 kinase of PRV leads to F-actin depolymerization, and US3 and F-actin disassembly contribute to viral genome delivery to the nucleus. PMID:25869795

  18. Overexpressed of RAD51 suppresses recombination defects: a possible mechanism to reverse genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2009-10-15

    RAD51, a key protein in the homologous recombinational DNA repair (HRR) pathway, is the major strand-transferase required for mitotic recombination. An important early step in HRR is the formation of single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) coated by RPA (a ss-DNA binding protein). Displacement of RPA by RAD51 is highly regulated and facilitated by a number of different proteins known as the 'recombination mediators'. To assist these recombination mediators, a second group of proteins also is required and we are defining these proteins here as 'recombination co-mediators'. Defects in either recombination mediators or comediators, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, lead to impaired HRR that can genetically be complemented for (i.e. suppressed) by overexpression of RAD51. Defects in HRR have long been known to contribute to genomic instability leading to tumor development. Since genomic instability also slows cell growth, precancerous cells presumably require genomic restabilization to gain a growth advantage. RAD51 is overexpressed in many tumors, and therefore, we hypothesize that the complementing ability of elevated levels of RAD51 in tumors with initial HRR defects limits genomic instability during carcinogenic progression. Of particular interest, this model may also help explain the high frequency of TP53 mutations in human cancers, since wild-type p53 represses RAD51.

  19. ASCIZ regulates lesion-specific Rad51 focus formation and apoptosis after methylating DNA damage.

    PubMed

    McNees, Carolyn J; Conlan, Lindus A; Tenis, Nora; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2005-07-01

    Nuclear Rad51 focus formation is required for homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but its regulation in response to non-DSB lesions is poorly understood. Here we report a novel human SQ/TQ cluster domain-containing protein termed ASCIZ that forms Rad51-containing foci in response to base-modifying DNA methylating agents but not in response to DSB-inducing agents. ASCIZ foci seem to form prior to Rad51 recruitment, and an ASCIZ core domain can concentrate Rad51 in focus-like structures independently of DNA damage. ASCIZ depletion dramatically increases apoptosis after methylating DNA damage and impairs Rad51 focus formation in response to methylating agents but not after ionizing radiation. ASCIZ focus formation and increased apoptosis in ASCIZ-depleted cells depend on the mismatch repair protein MLH1. Interestingly, ASCIZ foci form efficiently during G1 phase, when sister chromatids are unavailable as recombination templates. We propose that ASCIZ acts as a lesion-specific focus scaffold in a Rad51-dependent pathway that resolves cytotoxic repair intermediates, most likely single-stranded DNA gaps, resulting from MLH1-dependent processing of base lesions. PMID:15933716

  20. ASCIZ regulates lesion-specific Rad51 focus formation and apoptosis after methylating DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    McNees, Carolyn J; Conlan, Lindus A; Tenis, Nora; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Rad51 focus formation is required for homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but its regulation in response to non-DSB lesions is poorly understood. Here we report a novel human SQ/TQ cluster domain-containing protein termed ASCIZ that forms Rad51-containing foci in response to base-modifying DNA methylating agents but not in response to DSB-inducing agents. ASCIZ foci seem to form prior to Rad51 recruitment, and an ASCIZ core domain can concentrate Rad51 in focus-like structures independently of DNA damage. ASCIZ depletion dramatically increases apoptosis after methylating DNA damage and impairs Rad51 focus formation in response to methylating agents but not after ionizing radiation. ASCIZ focus formation and increased apoptosis in ASCIZ-depleted cells depend on the mismatch repair protein MLH1. Interestingly, ASCIZ foci form efficiently during G1 phase, when sister chromatids are unavailable as recombination templates. We propose that ASCIZ acts as a lesion-specific focus scaffold in a Rad51-dependent pathway that resolves cytotoxic repair intermediates, most likely single-stranded DNA gaps, resulting from MLH1-dependent processing of base lesions. PMID:15933716

  1. Targeting homologous recombination, new pre-clinical and clinical therapeutic combinations inhibiting RAD51.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ambber; Khanna, Kum Kum; Wiegmans, Adrian P

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is essential for maintaining genomic stability and cell survival. However, when tumour cells with deficiencies in HR are faced with radio- and chemotherapies they are forced to rely on error-prone, alternative repair pathways or aberrant HR for survival; threatening genome integrity and driving further mutation. Accurate therapeutic targeting of the key drivers of DNA repair can circumvent survival pathways and avoid aggressive therapy resistant mutants. Several studies have identified that stabilization of the cancer genome in HR deficient cells can be achieved by overexpression of the recombinase RAD51. Radio- and chemotherapeutic resistance is associated with overactive HR repair mechanisms. However no clinical trials have directly targeted RAD51, despite RAD51 displaying synergy in several drug screens against multiple cancer types. Currently synthetic lethality targeting the DDR pathways and HR deficiency has had clinical success with BRCA1 functional loss and PARP inhibition. In this review we suggest that clinical outcomes could be improved by additionally targeting RAD51. We examine the latest developments in directly and indirectly targeting RAD51. We scrutinize the potential treatment efficacy and future clinical applications of RAD51 inhibitors as single agents and in combination with other therapies and consider the best therapeutic options. PMID:25467108

  2. Synthesis, molecular modeling, and biological evaluation of novel RAD51 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiewen; Chen, Hongyuan; Guo, Xuning Emily; Qiu, Xiao-Long; Hu, Chun-Mei; Chamberlin, A Richard; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    RAD51 recombinase plays a critical role for cancer cell proliferation and survival. Targeting RAD51 is therefore an attractive strategy for treating difficult-to-treat cancers, e.g. triple negative breast cancers which are often resistant to existing therapeutics. To this end, we have designed, synthesized and evaluated a panel of new RAD51 inhibitors, denoted IBR compounds. Among these compounds, we have identified a novel small molecule RAD51 inhibitor, IBR120, which exhibited a 4.8-fold improved growth inhibition activity in triple negative human breast cancer cell line MBA-MD-468. IBR120 also inhibited the proliferation of a broad spectrum of other cancer cell types. Approximately 10-fold difference between the IC50 values in normal and cancer cells were observed. Moreover, IBR120 was capable of disrupting RAD51 multimerization, impairing homologous recombination repair, and inducing apoptotic cell death. Therefore, these novel RAD51 inhibitors may serve as potential candidates for the development of pharmaceutical strategies against difficult-to-treat cancers. PMID:25874343

  3. RNF138 interacts with RAD51D and is required for DNA interstrand crosslink repair and maintaining chromosome integrity.

    PubMed

    Yard, Brian D; Reilly, Nicole M; Bedenbaugh, Michael K; Pittman, Douglas L

    2016-06-01

    The RAD51 family is integral for homologous recombination (HR) mediated DNA repair and maintaining chromosome integrity. RAD51D, the fourth member of the family, is a known ovarian cancer susceptibility gene and required for the repair of interstrand crosslink DNA damage and preserving chromosomal stability. In this report, we describe the RNF138 E3 ubiquitin ligase that interacts with and ubiquitinates the RAD51D HR protein. RNF138 is a member of an E3 ligase family that contains an amino-terminal RING finger domain and a putative carboxyl-terminal ubiquitin interaction motif. In mammalian cells, depletion of RNF138 increased the stability of the RAD51D protein, suggesting that RNF138 governs ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation of RAD51D. However, RNF138 depletion conferred sensitivity to DNA damaging agents, reduced RAD51 focus formation, and increased chromosomal instability. Site-specific mutagenesis of the RNF138 RING finger domain demonstrated that it was necessary for RAD51D ubiquitination. Presence of RNF138 also enhanced the interaction between RAD51D and a known interacting RAD51 family member XRCC2 in a yeast three-hybrid assay. Therefore, RNF138 is a newly identified regulatory component of the HR mediated DNA repair pathway that has implications toward understanding how ubiquitination modifies the functions of the RAD51 paralog protein complex. PMID:27161866

  4. TOPBP1 regulates RAD51 phosphorylation and chromatin loading and determines PARP inhibitor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Moudry, Pavel; Watanabe, Kenji; Wolanin, Kamila M.; Bartkova, Jirina; Wassing, Isabel E.; Watanabe, Sugiko; Strauss, Robert; Troelsgaard Pedersen, Rune; Oestergaard, Vibe H.; Lisby, Michael; Andújar-Sánchez, Miguel; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Esashi, Fumiko; Lukas, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase IIβ-binding protein 1 (TOPBP1) participates in DNA replication and DNA damage response; however, its role in DNA repair and relevance for human cancer remain unclear. Here, through an unbiased small interfering RNA screen, we identified and validated TOPBP1 as a novel determinant whose loss sensitized human cells to olaparib, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. We show that TOPBP1 acts in homologous recombination (HR) repair, impacts olaparib response, and exhibits aberrant patterns in subsets of human ovarian carcinomas. TOPBP1 depletion abrogated RAD51 loading to chromatin and formation of RAD51 foci, but without affecting the upstream HR steps of DNA end resection and RPA loading. Furthermore, TOPBP1 BRCT domains 7/8 are essential for RAD51 foci formation. Mechanistically, TOPBP1 physically binds PLK1 and promotes PLK1 kinase–mediated phosphorylation of RAD51 at serine 14, a modification required for RAD51 recruitment to chromatin. Overall, our results provide mechanistic insights into TOPBP1’s role in HR, with potential clinical implications for cancer treatment. PMID:26811421

  5. TOPBP1 regulates RAD51 phosphorylation and chromatin loading and determines PARP inhibitor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Moudry, Pavel; Watanabe, Kenji; Wolanin, Kamila M; Bartkova, Jirina; Wassing, Isabel E; Watanabe, Sugiko; Strauss, Robert; Troelsgaard Pedersen, Rune; Oestergaard, Vibe H; Lisby, Michael; Andújar-Sánchez, Miguel; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Esashi, Fumiko; Lukas, Jiri; Bartek, Jiri

    2016-02-01

    Topoisomerase IIβ-binding protein 1 (TOPBP1) participates in DNA replication and DNA damage response; however, its role in DNA repair and relevance for human cancer remain unclear. Here, through an unbiased small interfering RNA screen, we identified and validated TOPBP1 as a novel determinant whose loss sensitized human cells to olaparib, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. We show that TOPBP1 acts in homologous recombination (HR) repair, impacts olaparib response, and exhibits aberrant patterns in subsets of human ovarian carcinomas. TOPBP1 depletion abrogated RAD51 loading to chromatin and formation of RAD51 foci, but without affecting the upstream HR steps of DNA end resection and RPA loading. Furthermore, TOPBP1 BRCT domains 7/8 are essential for RAD51 foci formation. Mechanistically, TOPBP1 physically binds PLK1 and promotes PLK1 kinase-mediated phosphorylation of RAD51 at serine 14, a modification required for RAD51 recruitment to chromatin. Overall, our results provide mechanistic insights into TOPBP1's role in HR, with potential clinical implications for cancer treatment. PMID:26811421

  6. Identification of Rad51 regulation by BRCA2 using Caenorhabditis elegans BRCA2 and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Jaewon; Park, Pil-gu; Ko, Eunkyong; Choi, Eunhee; Lee, Hyunsook

    2007-11-03

    BRCA2 is involved in double-stranded DNA break repair by binding and regulating Rad51-mediated homologous recombination. Insights as to how BRCA2 regulates Rad51-mediated DNA repair arose from in vitro biochemical studies on fragments of BRCA2. However, the large 400-kDa BRCA2 protein has hampered our ability to understand the entire process by which full-length BRCA2 regulates Rad51. Here, we show that CeBRC-2, which is only one tenth the size of mammalian BRCA2, complemented BRCA2-deficiency in Rad51 regulation. CeBRC-2 was able to bind to mammalian Rad51 (mRad51) and form distinct nuclear foci when they interacted. In our bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis (BiFC), we show that the strength of the interaction between CeBRC-2 and mRad51 increased markedly after DNA damage. The BRC motif of CeBRC-2 was responsible for binding mRad51, but without the OB fold, the complex was unable to target damaged DNA. When CeBRC-2 was introduced into BRCA2-deficient cells, it restored Rad51 foci after DNA damage. Our study suggests a mode of action for BRCA2 with regard to DNA repair.

  7. Rad51 promoter-targeted gene therapy is effective for in vivo visualization and treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Hine, Christopher M; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2012-02-01

    Rad51 protein is overexpressed in a wide range of human cancers. Our previous in vitro studies demonstrated that a construct comprised Rad51 promoter driving expression of the diphtheria toxin A gene (pRad51-diphtheria toxin A (DTA)) destroys a variety of human cancer cell lines, with minimal to no toxicity to normal human cells. Here we delivered Rad51 promoter-based constructs in vivo using linear polyethylenimine nanoparticles, in vivo jetPEI, to visualize and treat tumors in mice with HeLa xenografts. For tumor detection, we used pRad51-Luc, a construct containing the firefly luciferase under the Rad51 promoter, administered by intraperitoneal (IP) injection. Tumors were detected with an in vivo bioluminescent camera. All mice with cancer displayed strong bioluminescence, while mice without cancer displayed no detectable bioluminescence. Treatment with pRad51-DTA/jetPEI decreased tumor mass of subcutaneous (SC) and IP tumors by sixfold and fourfold, respectively, along with the strong reduction of malignant ascites. Fifty percent of the mice with SC tumors were cancer-free after six pRad51-DTA/jetPEI injections, and for the mice with IP tumors, mean survival time increased by 90% compared to control mice. This study demonstrates the clinical potential of pRad51-based constructs delivered by nanoparticles for the diagnostics and treatment of a wide range of cancers. PMID:22008909

  8. Clinical and biological significance of RAD51 expression in breast cancer: a key DNA damage response protein.

    PubMed

    Alshareeda, Alaa Tarig; Negm, Ola H; Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Green, Andrew R; Nolan, Christopher; TigHhe, Patrick J; Madhusudan, Srinivasan; Ellis, Ian O; Rakha, Emad A

    2016-08-01

    Impaired DNA damage response (DDR) may play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer (BC). RAD51 is a key player in DNA double-strand break repair. In this study, we aimed to assess the biological and clinical significance of RAD51 expression with relevance to different molecular classes of BC and patients' outcome. The expression of RAD51 was assessed immunohistochemically in a well-characterised annotated series (n = 1184) of early-stage invasive BC with long-term follow-up. A subset of cases of BC from patients with known BRCA1 germline mutations was included as a control group. The results were correlated with clinicopathological and molecular parameters and patients' outcome. RAD51 protein expression level was also assayed in a panel of cell lines using reverse phase protein array (RPPA). RAD51 was expressed in the nuclei (N) and cytoplasm (C) of malignant cells. Subcellular co-localisation phenotypes of RAD51 were significantly associated with clinicopathological features and patient outcome. Cytoplasmic expression (RAD51C(+)) and lack of nuclear expression (RAD51 N(-)) were associated with features of aggressive behaviour, including larger tumour size, high grade, lymph nodal metastasis, basal-like, and triple-negative phenotypes, together with aberrant expression of key DDR biomarkers including BRCA1. All BRCA1-mutated tumours had RAD51C(+)/N(-) phenotype. RPPA confirmed IHC results and showed differential expression of RAD51 in cell lines based on ER expression and BRCA1 status. RAD51 N(+) and RAD51C(+) tumours were associated with longer and shorter breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS), respectively. The RAD51 N(+) was an independent predictor of longer BCSS (P < 0.0001). Lack of RAD51 nuclear expression is associated with poor prognostic parameters and shorter survival in invasive BC patients. The significant associations between RAD51 subcellular localisation and clinicopathological features, molecular subtype and patients

  9. Involvement of ATM in homologous recombination after end resection and RAD51 nucleofilament formation

    PubMed Central

    Bakr, A.; Oing, C.; Köcher, S.; Borgmann, K.; Dornreiter, I.; Petersen, C.; Dikomey, E.; Mansour, W.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is needed for the initiation of the double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination (HR). ATM triggers DSB end resection by stimulating the nucleolytic activity of CtIP and MRE11 to generate 3′-ssDNA overhangs, followed by RPA loading and RAD51 nucleofilament formation. Here we show for the first time that ATM is also needed for later steps in HR after RAD51 nucleofilament formation. Inhibition of ATM after completion of end resection did not affect RAD51 nucleofilament formation, but resulted in HR deficiency as evidenced by (i) an increase in the number of residual RAD51/γH2AX foci in both S and G2 cells, (ii) the decrease in HR efficiency as detected by HR repair substrate (pGC), (iii) a reduced SCE rate and (iv) the radiosensitization of cells by PARP inhibition. This newly described role for ATM was found to be dispensable in heterochromatin-associated DSB repair, as KAP1-depletion did not alleviate the HR-deficiency when ATM was inhibited after end resection. Moreover, we demonstrated that ATR can partly compensate for the deficiency in early, but not in later, steps of HR upon ATM inhibition. Taken together, we describe here for the first time that ATM is needed not only for the initiation but also for the completion of HR. PMID:25753674

  10. Involvement of ATM in homologous recombination after end resection and RAD51 nucleofilament formation.

    PubMed

    Bakr, A; Oing, C; Köcher, S; Borgmann, K; Dornreiter, I; Petersen, C; Dikomey, E; Mansour, W Y

    2015-03-31

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is needed for the initiation of the double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination (HR). ATM triggers DSB end resection by stimulating the nucleolytic activity of CtIP and MRE11 to generate 3'-ssDNA overhangs, followed by RPA loading and RAD51 nucleofilament formation. Here we show for the first time that ATM is also needed for later steps in HR after RAD51 nucleofilament formation. Inhibition of ATM after completion of end resection did not affect RAD51 nucleofilament formation, but resulted in HR deficiency as evidenced by (i) an increase in the number of residual RAD51/γH2AX foci in both S and G2 cells, (ii) the decrease in HR efficiency as detected by HR repair substrate (pGC), (iii) a reduced SCE rate and (iv) the radiosensitization of cells by PARP inhibition. This newly described role for ATM was found to be dispensable in heterochromatin-associated DSB repair, as KAP1-depletion did not alleviate the HR-deficiency when ATM was inhibited after end resection. Moreover, we demonstrated that ATR can partly compensate for the deficiency in early, but not in later, steps of HR upon ATM inhibition. Taken together, we describe here for the first time that ATM is needed not only for the initiation but also for the completion of HR. PMID:25753674

  11. RPA and Rad51 constitute a cell intrinsic mechanism to protect the cytosol from self DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Christine; Rapp, Alexander; Berndt, Nicole; Staroske, Wolfgang; Schuster, Max; Dobrick-Mattheuer, Manuela; Kretschmer, Stefanie; König, Nadja; Kurth, Thomas; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Kast, Karin; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Günther, Claudia; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2016-01-01

    Immune recognition of cytosolic DNA represents a central antiviral defence mechanism. Within the host, short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) continuously arises during the repair of DNA damage induced by endogenous and environmental genotoxic stress. Here we show that short ssDNA traverses the nuclear membrane, but is drawn into the nucleus by binding to the DNA replication and repair factors RPA and Rad51. Knockdown of RPA and Rad51 enhances cytosolic leakage of ssDNA resulting in cGAS-dependent type I IFN activation. Mutations in the exonuclease TREX1 cause type I IFN-dependent autoinflammation and autoimmunity. We demonstrate that TREX1 is anchored within the outer nuclear membrane to ensure immediate degradation of ssDNA leaking into the cytosol. In TREX1-deficient fibroblasts, accumulating ssDNA causes exhaustion of RPA and Rad51 resulting in replication stress and activation of p53 and type I IFN. Thus, the ssDNA-binding capacity of RPA and Rad51 constitutes a cell intrinsic mechanism to protect the cytosol from self DNA. PMID:27230542

  12. RPA and Rad51 constitute a cell intrinsic mechanism to protect the cytosol from self DNA.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Christine; Rapp, Alexander; Berndt, Nicole; Staroske, Wolfgang; Schuster, Max; Dobrick-Mattheuer, Manuela; Kretschmer, Stefanie; König, Nadja; Kurth, Thomas; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Kast, Karin; Cardoso, M Cristina; Günther, Claudia; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2016-01-01

    Immune recognition of cytosolic DNA represents a central antiviral defence mechanism. Within the host, short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) continuously arises during the repair of DNA damage induced by endogenous and environmental genotoxic stress. Here we show that short ssDNA traverses the nuclear membrane, but is drawn into the nucleus by binding to the DNA replication and repair factors RPA and Rad51. Knockdown of RPA and Rad51 enhances cytosolic leakage of ssDNA resulting in cGAS-dependent type I IFN activation. Mutations in the exonuclease TREX1 cause type I IFN-dependent autoinflammation and autoimmunity. We demonstrate that TREX1 is anchored within the outer nuclear membrane to ensure immediate degradation of ssDNA leaking into the cytosol. In TREX1-deficient fibroblasts, accumulating ssDNA causes exhaustion of RPA and Rad51 resulting in replication stress and activation of p53 and type I IFN. Thus, the ssDNA-binding capacity of RPA and Rad51 constitutes a cell intrinsic mechanism to protect the cytosol from self DNA. PMID:27230542

  13. Suppression of mutagenesis by Rad51D-mediated homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Hinz, J M; Tebbs, R S; Wilson, P F; Nham, P B; Salazar, E P; Nagasawa, H; Urbin, S S; Thompson, L H

    2005-11-15

    Homologous recombinational repair (HRR) restores chromatid breaks arising during DNA replication and prevents chromosomal rearrangements that can occur from the misrepair of such breaks. In vertebrates, five Rad51 paralogs are identified that contribute in a nonessential but critical manner to HRR efficiency. We constructed and characterized a Rad51D knockout cell line in widely studied CHO cells. The rad51d mutant (51D1) displays sensitivity to a wide spectrum of induced DNA damage, indicating the broad relevance of HRR to genotoxicity. Untreated 51D1 cells exhibit {approx}5-fold elevated chromosomal breaks, a 12-fold increased rate of hprt mutation, and 4- to 10-fold increased rates of gene amplification at the dhfr and CAD loci, respectively. These results explicitly show the quantitative importance of HHR in preventing these types genetic alterations, which are associated with carcinogenesis. Thus, HRR copes in an error-free manner with spontaneous DNA damage encountered during DNA replication, and Rad51D is essential for this fidelity.

  14. Rad51 Expression in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma and Its Association with Tumor Reduction: A Preliminary Study in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Cahyanti, Dian; Rachmadi, Lisnawati; Wulani, Vally; Adham, Marlinda

    2016-01-01

    Background: Overexpression of Rad51 protein in many tumor cells has been proven to increase radioresistance and can be related to the resistance of chemosensitivity of tumor cells. This preliminary study was conducted to determine the relationship between the Rad51 expression level in nasopharyngeal carcinoma and the response of the treatment based on the measurement of the tumor reduction. Methods: Thirteen cases of the NPCs were analyzed. The expression levels of the Rad51 were examined from the pretreatment biopsies. Furthermore, tumor reductions were determined based on the change in sum longest diameter of the nasopharyngeal CT-scan before and after therapy. Results: The expression level of the Rad51 was associated with the reduction of tumor mass. The P value was 0.049 and the correlation coefficient was 0.479. Conclusion: The tumor cells Rad51 expression levels may affect the tumor reduction of NPC after the therapy. PMID:27499778

  15. Differential Requirements for RAD51 in Physcomitrella patens and Arabidopsis thaliana Development and DNA Damage Repair[W

    PubMed Central

    Markmann-Mulisch, Ulrich; Wendeler, Edelgard; Zobell, Oliver; Schween, Gabriele; Steinbiss, Hans-Henning; Reiss, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    RAD51, the eukaryotic homolog of the bacterial RecA recombinase, plays a central role in homologous recombination (HR) in yeast and animals. Loss of RAD51 function causes lethality in vertebrates but not in other animals or in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting that RAD51 is vital for highly developed organisms but not for others. Here, we found that loss of RAD51 function in the moss Physcomitrella patens, a plant of less complexity, caused a significant vegetative phenotype, indicating an important function for RAD51 in this organism. Moreover, loss of RAD51 caused marked hypersensitivity to the double-strand break-inducing agent bleomycin in P. patens but not in Arabidopsis. Therefore, HR is used for somatic DNA damage repair in P. patens but not in Arabidopsis. These data imply fundamental differences in the use of recombination pathways between plants. Moreover, these data demonstrate that the importance of RAD51 for viability is independent of taxonomic position or complexity of an organism. The involvement of HR in DNA damage repair in the slowly evolving species P. patens but not in fast-evolving Arabidopsis suggests that the choice of the recombination pathway is related to the speed of evolution in plants. PMID:17921313

  16. Further evidence for the contribution of the RAD51C gene in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Vuorela, Mikko; Pylkäs, Katri; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Sundfeldt, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; von Wachenfeldt Wäppling, Anna; Haanpää, Maria; Puistola, Ulla; Rosengren, Annika; Anttila, Maarit; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Mannermaa, Arto; Winqvist, Robert

    2011-12-01

    RAD51C, a RAD51 paralogue involved in homologous recombination, is a recently established Fanconi anemia and breast cancer predisposing factor. In the initial report, RAD51C mutations were shown to confer a high risk for both breast and ovarian tumors, but most of the replication studies published so far have failed to identify any additional susceptibility alleles. Here, we report a full mutation screening of the RAD51C gene in 147 Finnish familial breast cancer cases and in 232 unselected ovarian cancer cases originating from Finland and Sweden. In addition, in order to resolve whether common RAD51C SNPs are risk factors for breast cancer, we genotyped five tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs12946522, rs304270, rs304283, rs17222691, and rs28363312, all located within the gene, from 993 Finnish breast cancer cases and 871 controls for cancer associated variants. Whereas, none of the studied common SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility, mutation analysis revealed two clearly pathogenic alterations. RAD51C c.-13_14del27 was observed in one familial breast cancer case and c.774delT in one unselected ovarian cancer case, thus confirming that RAD51C mutations are implicated in breast and ovarian cancer predisposition, although their overall frequency seems to be low. Independent identification of the very recently reported RAD51C c.774delT mutation in yet another patient originating from Sweden suggests that it might be a recurrent mutation in that population and should be studied further. The reliable estimation of the clinical implications of carrying a defective RAD51C allele still requires the identification of additional mutation positive families. PMID:21750962

  17. A novel Fanconi anaemia subtype associated with a dominant-negative mutation in RAD51.

    PubMed

    Ameziane, Najim; May, Patrick; Haitjema, Anneke; van de Vrugt, Henri J; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari E; Ristic, Dejan; Williams, Gareth J; Balk, Jesper; Rockx, Davy; Li, Hong; Rooimans, Martin A; Oostra, Anneke B; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Bleijerveld, Onno B; Maarten Altelaar, A F; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Joenje, Hans; Glusman, Gustavo; Roach, Jared; Hood, Leroy; Galas, David; Wyman, Claire; Balling, Rudi; den Dunnen, Johan; de Winter, Johan P; Kanaar, Roland; Gelinas, Richard; Dorsman, Josephine C

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a hereditary disease featuring hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linker-induced chromosomal instability in association with developmental abnormalities, bone marrow failure and a strong predisposition to cancer. A total of 17 FA disease genes have been reported, all of which act in a recessive mode of inheritance. Here we report on a de novo g.41022153G>A; p.Ala293Thr (NM_002875) missense mutation in one allele of the homologous recombination DNA repair gene RAD51 in an FA-like patient. This heterozygous mutation causes a novel FA subtype, 'FA-R', which appears to be the first subtype of FA caused by a dominant-negative mutation. The patient, who features microcephaly and mental retardation, has reached adulthood without the typical bone marrow failure and paediatric cancers. Together with the recent reports on RAD51-associated congenital mirror movement disorders, our results point to an important role for RAD51-mediated homologous recombination in neurodevelopment, in addition to DNA repair and cancer susceptibility. PMID:26681308

  18. Tel1 and Rad51 are involved in the maintenance of telomeres with capping deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Mattarocci, Stefano; Cimino-Reale, Graziella; Parisi, Paola; Cifani, Noemi; D’Ambrosio, Ettore; Zakian, Virginia A.; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina

    2013-01-01

    Vertebrate-like T2AG3 telomeres in tlc1-h yeast consist of short double-stranded regions and long single-stranded overhang (G-tails) and, although based on Tbf1-capping activity, they are capping deficient. Consistent with this idea, we observe Y’ amplification because of homologous recombination, even in the presence of an active telomerase. In these cells, Y’ amplification occurs by different pathways: in Tel1+ tlc1h cells, it is Rad51-dependent, whereas in the absence of Tel1, it depends on Rad50. Generation of telomeric G-tail, which is cell cycle regulated, depends on the MRX (Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2) complex in tlc1h cells or is MRX-independent in tlc1h tel1Δ mutants. Unexpectedly, we observe telomere elongation in tlc1h lacking Rad51 that seems to act as a telomerase competitor for binding to telomeric G-tails. Overall, our results show that Tel1 and Rad51 have multiple roles in the maintenance of vertebrate-like telomeres in yeast, supporting the idea that they may participate to evolutionary conserved telomere protection mechanism/s acting at uncapped telomeres. PMID:23677619

  19. A novel Fanconi anaemia subtype associated with a dominant-negative mutation in RAD51

    PubMed Central

    Ameziane, Najim; May, Patrick; Haitjema, Anneke; van de Vrugt, Henri J.; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari E.; Ristic, Dejan; Williams, Gareth J.; Balk, Jesper; Rockx, Davy; Li, Hong; Rooimans, Martin A.; Oostra, Anneke B.; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Bleijerveld, Onno B.; Maarten Altelaar, A. F.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Joenje, Hans; Glusman, Gustavo; Roach, Jared; Hood, Leroy; Galas, David; Wyman, Claire; Balling, Rudi; den Dunnen, Johan; de Winter, Johan P.; Kanaar, Roland; Gelinas, Richard; Dorsman, Josephine C.

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a hereditary disease featuring hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linker-induced chromosomal instability in association with developmental abnormalities, bone marrow failure and a strong predisposition to cancer. A total of 17 FA disease genes have been reported, all of which act in a recessive mode of inheritance. Here we report on a de novo g.41022153G>A; p.Ala293Thr (NM_002875) missense mutation in one allele of the homologous recombination DNA repair gene RAD51 in an FA-like patient. This heterozygous mutation causes a novel FA subtype, ‘FA-R', which appears to be the first subtype of FA caused by a dominant-negative mutation. The patient, who features microcephaly and mental retardation, has reached adulthood without the typical bone marrow failure and paediatric cancers. Together with the recent reports on RAD51-associated congenital mirror movement disorders, our results point to an important role for RAD51-mediated homologous recombination in neurodevelopment, in addition to DNA repair and cancer susceptibility. PMID:26681308

  20. RAD51 and BRCA2 enhance oncolytic adenovirus type 5 activity in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tookman, Laura A.; Browne, Ashley K.; Connell, Claire M.; Bridge, Gemma; Ingemarsdotter, Carin K.; Dowson, Suzanne; Shibata, Atsushi; Lockley, Michelle; Martin, Sarah A.; McNeish, Iain A.

    2015-01-01

    Homologous Recombination (HR) function is critically important in High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer (HGSOC). HGSOC with intact HR has a worse prognosis and is less likely to respond to platinum chemotherapy and PARP inhibitors. Oncolytic adenovirus, a novel therapy for human malignancies, stimulates a potent DNA damage response that influences overall anti-tumor activity. Here, the importance of HR was investigated by determining the efficacy of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vectors in ovarian cancer. Using matched BRCA2 mutant and wild-type HGSOC cells, it was demonstrated that intact HR function promotes viral DNA replication and augments overall efficacy, without influencing viral DNA processing. These data were confirmed in a wider panel of HR competent and defective ovarian cancer lines. Mechanistically, both BRCA2 and RAD51 localize to viral replication centers within the infected cell nucleus and that RAD51 localization occurs independently of BRCA2. In addition, a direct interaction was identified between RAD51 and adenovirus E2 DNA binding protein. Finally, using functional assays of HR competence, despite inducing degradation of MRE11, Ad5 infection does not alter cellular ability to repair DNA double strand break damage via HR. These data reveal that Ad5 redistributes critical HR components to viral replication centers and enhances cytotoxicity. Implications Oncolytic adenoviral therapy may be most clinically relevant in tumors with intact HR function. PMID:26452665

  1. ATM/ATR-mediated phosphorylation of PALB2 promotes RAD51 function.

    PubMed

    Ahlskog, Johanna K; Larsen, Brian D; Achanta, Kavya; Sørensen, Claus S

    2016-05-01

    DNA damage activates the ATM and ATR kinases that coordinate checkpoint and DNA repair pathways. An essential step in homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA breaks is the formation of RAD51 nucleofilaments mediated by PALB2-BRCA2; however, roles of ATM and ATR in this critical step of HDR are poorly understood. Here, we show that PALB2 is markedly phosphorylated in response to genotoxic stresses such as ionizing radiation and hydroxyurea. This response is mediated by the ATM and ATR kinases through three N-terminal S/Q-sites in PALB2, the consensus target sites for ATM and ATR Importantly, a phospho-deficient PALB2 mutant is unable to support proper RAD51 foci formation, a key PALB2 regulated repair event, whereas a phospho-mimicking PALB2 version supports RAD51 foci formation. Moreover, phospho-deficient PALB2 is less potent in HDR than wild-type PALB2. Further, this mutation reveals a separation in PALB2 function, as the PALB2-dependent checkpoint response is normal in cells expressing the phospho-deficient PALB2 mutant. Collectively, our findings highlight a critical importance of PALB2 phosphorylation as a novel regulatory step in genome maintenance after genotoxic stress. PMID:27113759

  2. Rad51/Dmc1 paralogs and mediators oppose DNA helicases to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote crossovers during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Alexander; Mehats, Alizée; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2014-12-16

    During meiosis programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by homologous recombination using the sister chromatid or the homologous chromosome (homolog) as a template. This repair results in crossover (CO) and non-crossover (NCO) recombinants. Only CO formation between homologs provides the physical linkages guiding correct chromosome segregation, which are essential to produce healthy gametes. The factors that determine the CO/NCO decision are still poorly understood. Using Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model we show that the Rad51/Dmc1-paralog complexes Rad55-Rad57 and Rdl1-Rlp1-Sws1 together with Swi5-Sfr1 play a major role in antagonizing both the FANCM-family DNA helicase/translocase Fml1 and the RecQ-type DNA helicase Rqh1 to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote Mus81-Eme1-dependent COs. A common attribute of these protein complexes is an ability to stabilize the Rad51/Dmc1 nucleoprotein filament, and we propose that it is this property that imposes constraints on which enzymes gain access to the recombination intermediate, thereby controlling the manner in which it is processed and resolved. PMID:25414342

  3. A dominant mutation in human RAD51 reveals its function in DNA interstrand crosslink repair independent of homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Anderson T.; Kim, Taeho; Wagner, John E.; Conti, Brooke A.; Lach, Francis P.; Huang, Athena L.; Molina, Henrik; Sanborn, Erica M.; Zierhut, Heather; Cornes, Belinda K.; Abhyankar, Avinash; Sougnez, Carrie; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Auerbach, Arleen D.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2015-01-01

    Summary Repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks requires action of multiple DNA repair pathways, including homologous recombination. Here, we report a de novo heterozygous T131P mutation in RAD51/FANCR, the key recombinase essential for homologous recombination, in a patient with Fanconi anemia-like phenotype. In vitro, RAD51-T131P displays DNA-independent ATPase activity, no DNA pairing capacity and a co-dominant negative effect on RAD51 recombinase function. However, the patient cells are homologous recombination proficient due to the low ratio of mutant to wildtype RAD51 in cells. Instead, patient cells are sensitive to crosslinking agents and display hyperphosphorylation of Replication Protein A due to increased activity of DNA2 and WRN at the DNA interstrand crosslinks. Thus, proper RAD51 function is important during DNA interstrand crosslink repair outside of homologous recombination. Our study provides a molecular basis for how RAD51 and its associated factors may operate in a homologous recombination-independent manner to maintain genomic integrity. PMID:26253028

  4. A Dominant Mutation in Human RAD51 Reveals Its Function in DNA Interstrand Crosslink Repair Independent of Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anderson T; Kim, Taeho; Wagner, John E; Conti, Brooke A; Lach, Francis P; Huang, Athena L; Molina, Henrik; Sanborn, Erica M; Zierhut, Heather; Cornes, Belinda K; Abhyankar, Avinash; Sougnez, Carrie; Gabriel, Stacey B; Auerbach, Arleen D; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2015-08-01

    Repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks requires action of multiple DNA repair pathways, including homologous recombination. Here, we report a de novo heterozygous T131P mutation in RAD51/FANCR, the key recombinase essential for homologous recombination, in a patient with Fanconi anemia-like phenotype. In vitro, RAD51-T131P displays DNA-independent ATPase activity, no DNA pairing capacity, and a co-dominant-negative effect on RAD51 recombinase function. However, the patient cells are homologous recombination proficient due to the low ratio of mutant to wild-type RAD51 in cells. Instead, patient cells are sensitive to crosslinking agents and display hyperphosphorylation of Replication Protein A due to increased activity of DNA2 and WRN at the DNA interstrand crosslinks. Thus, proper RAD51 function is important during DNA interstrand crosslink repair outside of homologous recombination. Our study provides a molecular basis for how RAD51 and its associated factors may operate in a homologous recombination-independent manner to maintain genomic integrity. PMID:26253028

  5. Role of repair protein Rad51 in regulating the response to gefitinib in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Hong, Jhao-Hao; Wang, Lyu-Han; Cheng, Chau-Ming; Ciou, Shih-Ci; Lin, Szu-Ting; Jheng, Ming-Yan; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2008-11-01

    Gefitinib (Iressa, ZD1839) is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor that can block growth factor-mediated cell proliferation and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation. High-level Rad51 expression has been reported in chemoresistant or radioresistant carcinomas. In this study, we examined the role of Rad51 in regulating the response to gefitinib among different human lung cancer cell lines. The H520 line (human squamous cell carcinoma) was less sensitive to gefitinib compared with the H1650 (human adenocarcinoma) or A549 (human bronchioloalveolar carcinoma) lines. In H1650 and A549 cells but not in H520 cells, gefitinib decreased cellular levels of phospho-ERK1/2 and Rad51 protein and message levels. Moreover, gefitinib decreased Rad51 protein levels by enhancing Rad51 protein instability through 26S proteasome-mediated degradation. Inhibition of endogenous Rad51 levels by si-Rad51 RNA transfection significantly enhanced gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity. In contrast, transfection with constitutively active MKK1 vector could restore both Rad51 protein levels and cell survival inhibited by gefitinib. The MKK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling pathway constitutes the upstream signaling for maintaining Rad51 message and protein levels. Rad51 protein can protect lung cancer cells from cytotoxic effects induced by gefitinib. Suppression of Rad51 may be a novel lung cancer therapeutic modality to overcome drug resistance to gefitinib. PMID:19001445

  6. Structural determinants governing S100A4-induced isoform-selective disassembly of nonmuscle myosin II filaments.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Bence; Kalmár, Lajos; Nyitray, László; Pál, Gábor

    2016-06-01

    The Ca(2+) -binding protein S100A4 interacts with the C terminus of nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMIIA) causing filament disassembly, which is correlated with an increased metastatic potential of tumor cells. Despite high sequence similarity of the three NMII isoforms, S100A4 discriminates against binding to NMIIB. We searched for structural determinants of this selectivity. Based on paralog scanning using phage display, we identified a single position as major determinant of isoform selectivity. Reciprocal single amino acid replacements showed that at position 1907 (NMIIA numbering), the NMIIA/NMIIC-specific alanine provides about 60-fold higher affinity than the NMIIB-specific asparagine. The structural background of this can be explained in part by a communication between the two consecutive α-helical binding segments. This communication is completely abolished by the Ala-to-Asn substitution. Mutual swapping of the disordered tailpieces only slightly affects the affinity of the NMII chimeras. Interestingly, we found that the tailpiece and position 1907 act in a nonadditive fashion. Finally, we also found that the higher stability of the C-terminal coiled-coil region of NMIIB also discriminates against interaction with S100A4. Our results clearly show that the isoform-selective binding of S100A4 is determined at multiple levels in the structure of the three NMII isoforms and the corresponding functional elements of NMII act synergistically with one another resulting in a complex interaction network. The experimental and in silico results suggest two divergent evolutionary pathways: NMIIA and NMIIB evolved to possess S100A4-dependent and -independent regulations, respectively. PMID:27029887

  7. Enhanced Histone Deacetylase Activity in Malignant Melanoma Provokes RAD51 and FANCD2-Triggered Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Krumm, Andrea; Barckhausen, Christina; Kücük, Pelin; Tomaszowski, Karl-Heinz; Loquai, Carmen; Fahrer, Jörg; Krämer, Oliver Holger; Kaina, Bernd; Roos, Wynand Paul

    2016-05-15

    DNA-damaging anticancer drugs remain a part of metastatic melanoma therapy. Epigenetic reprogramming caused by increased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity arising during tumor formation may contribute to resistance of melanomas to the alkylating drugs temozolomide, dacarbazine, and fotemustine. Here, we report on the impact of class I HDACs on the response of malignant melanoma cells treated with alkylating agents. The data show that malignant melanomas in situ contain a high level of HDAC1/2 and malignant melanoma cells overexpress HDAC1/2/3 compared with noncancer cells. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of class I HDACs sensitizes malignant melanoma cells to apoptosis following exposure to alkylating agents, while not affecting primary melanocytes. Inhibition of HDAC1/2/3 caused sensitization of melanoma cells to temozolomide in vitro and in melanoma xenografts in vivo HDAC1/2/3 inhibition resulted in suppression of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination because of downregulation of RAD51 and FANCD2. This sensitized cells to the cytotoxic DNA lesion O(6)-methylguanine and caused a synthetic lethal interaction with the PARP-1 inhibitor olaparib. Furthermore, knockdown experiments identified HDAC2 as being responsible for the regulation of RAD51. The influence of class I HDACs on DSB repair by homologous recombination and the possible clinical implication on malignant melanoma therapy with temozolomide and other alkylating drugs suggests a combination approach where class I HDAC inhibitors such as valproic acid or MS-275 (entinostat) appear to counteract HDAC- and RAD51/FANCD2-mediated melanoma cell resistance. Cancer Res; 76(10); 3067-77. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26980768

  8. XRCC3 ATPase activity is required for normal XRCC3-Rad51C complex dynamics and homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, N; Hinz, J; Kopf, V L; Segalle, K; Thompson, L

    2004-02-25

    Homologous recombinational repair is a major DNA repair pathway that preserves chromosomal integrity by removing double-strand breaks, crosslinks, and other DNA damage. In eukaryotic cells, the Rad51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B, Rad51C, and Rad51D) are involved in this process, although their exact functions are largely undetermined. All five paralogs contain ATPase motifs, and XRCC3 appears to exist in a single complex with Rad51C. To begin to examine the function of this Rad51C-XRCC3 complex, we generated mammalian expression vectors that produce human wild-type XRCC3 or mutant XRCC3 with either a non-conservative mutation (K113A) or a conservative mutation (K113R) in the GKT Walker A box of the ATPase motif. The three vectors were independently transfected into Xrcc3-deficient irs1SF CHO cells. Wild-type XRCC3 complemented irs1SF cells, albeit to varying degrees, while ATPase mutants had no complementing activity, even when the mutant protein was expressed at comparable levels to that in wild-type-complemented clones. Because of the mutants' dysfunction, we propose that ATP binding and hydrolyzing activities of XRCC3 are essential. We tested in vitro complex formation by wild-type and mutant XRCC3 with His6-tagged Rad51C upon coexpression in bacteria, nickel affinity purification, and western blotting. Wild-type and K113A mutant XRCC3 formed stable complexes with Rad51C and co-purified with Rad51C, while the K113R mutant did not and was predominantly insoluble. Addition of 5 mM ATP, but not ADP, also abolished complex formation by the wild-type proteins. These results suggest that XRCC3 is likely to regulate the dissociation and formation of Rad51C-XRCC3 complex through ATP binding and hydrolysis, with both processes being essential for the complex's ability to participate in HRR.

  9. RAD51 and Breast Cancer Susceptibility: No Evidence for Rare Variant Association in the Breast Cancer Family Registry Study

    PubMed Central

    Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Oliver, Javier; Damiola, Francesca; Forey, Nathalie; Robinot, Nivonirina; Durand, Geoffroy; Voegele, Catherine; Vallée, Maxime P.; Byrnes, Graham; Registry, Breast Cancer Family; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Andrulis, Irene L.; John, Esther M.; Tavtigian, Sean V.; Lesueur, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    Background Although inherited breast cancer has been associated with germline mutations in genes that are functionally involved in the DNA homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathway, including BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, ATM, BRIP1, CHEK2 and PALB2, about 70% of breast cancer heritability remains unexplained. Because of their critical functions in maintaining genome integrity and already well-established associations with breast cancer susceptibility, it is likely that additional genes involved in the HRR pathway harbor sequence variants associated with increased risk of breast cancer. RAD51 plays a central biological function in DNA repair and despite the fact that rare, likely dysfunctional variants in three of its five paralogs, RAD51C, RAD51D, and XRCC2, have been associated with breast and/or ovarian cancer risk, no population-based case-control mutation screening data are available for the RAD51 gene. We thus postulated that RAD51 could harbor rare germline mutations that confer increased risk of breast cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings We screened the coding exons and proximal splice junction regions of the gene for germline sequence variation in 1,330 early-onset breast cancer cases and 1,123 controls from the Breast Cancer Family Registry, using the same population-based sampling and analytical strategy that we developed for assessment of rare sequence variants in ATM and CHEK2. In total, 12 distinct very rare or private variants were characterized in RAD51, with 10 cases (0.75%) and 9 controls (0.80%) carrying such a variant. Variants were either likely neutral missense substitutions (3), silent substitutions (4) or non-coding substitutions (5) that were predicted to have little effect on efficiency of the splicing machinery. Conclusion Altogether, our data suggest that RAD51 tolerates so little dysfunctional sequence variation that rare variants in the gene contribute little, if anything, to breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:23300655

  10. Gefitinib Synergizes with Irinotecan to Suppress Hepatocellular Carcinoma via Antagonizing Rad51-Mediated DNA-Repair

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xueming; Chen, Min; Zhu, Yuanrun; Xu, Li; Zhu, Hong; Yang, Bo; Luo, Peihua; He, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the only choice for most of the advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, while few agents were available, making it an urgent need to develop new chemotherapy strategies. A phase II clinical trial suggested that the efficacy of irinotecan in HCC was limited due to dose-dependent toxicities. Here, we found that gefitinib exhibited synergistic activity in combination with SN-38, an active metabolite of irinotecan, in HCC cell lines. And the enhanced apoptosis induced by gefitinib plus SN-38 was a result from caspase pathway activation. Mechanistically, gefitinib dramatically promoted the ubiquitin–proteasome-dependent degradation of Rad51 protein, suppressed the DNA repair, gave rise to more DNA damages, and ultimately resulted in the synergism of these two agents. In addition, the increased antitumor efficacy of gefitinib combined with irinotecan was further validated in a HepG2 xenograft mice model. Taken together, our data demonstrated for the first time that the combination of irinotecan and gefitinib showed potential benefit in HCC, which suggests that Rad51 is a promising target and provides a rationale for clinical trials investigating the efficacy of the combination of topoisomerase I inhibitors and gefitinib in HCC. PMID:26752698

  11. Rad51-mediated replication fork reversal is a global response to genotoxic treatments in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Zellweger, Ralph; Dalcher, Damian; Mutreja, Karun; Berti, Matteo; Schmid, Jonas A.; Herrador, Raquel; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork reversal protects forks from breakage after poisoning of Topoisomerase 1. We here investigated fork progression and chromosomal breakage in human cells in response to a panel of sublethal genotoxic treatments, using other topoisomerase poisons, DNA synthesis inhibitors, interstrand cross-linking inducers, and base-damaging agents. We used electron microscopy to visualize fork architecture under these conditions and analyzed the association of specific molecular features with checkpoint activation. Our data identify replication fork uncoupling and reversal as global responses to genotoxic treatments. Both events are frequent even after mild treatments that do not affect fork integrity, nor activate checkpoints. Fork reversal was found to be dependent on the central homologous recombination factor RAD51, which is consistently present at replication forks independently of their breakage, and to be antagonized by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase/RECQ1-regulated restart. Our work establishes remodeling of uncoupled forks as a pivotal RAD51-regulated response to genotoxic stress in human cells and as a promising target to potentiate cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25733714

  12. Rad51-mediated replication fork reversal is a global response to genotoxic treatments in human cells.

    PubMed

    Zellweger, Ralph; Dalcher, Damian; Mutreja, Karun; Berti, Matteo; Schmid, Jonas A; Herrador, Raquel; Vindigni, Alessandro; Lopes, Massimo

    2015-03-01

    Replication fork reversal protects forks from breakage after poisoning of Topoisomerase 1. We here investigated fork progression and chromosomal breakage in human cells in response to a panel of sublethal genotoxic treatments, using other topoisomerase poisons, DNA synthesis inhibitors, interstrand cross-linking inducers, and base-damaging agents. We used electron microscopy to visualize fork architecture under these conditions and analyzed the association of specific molecular features with checkpoint activation. Our data identify replication fork uncoupling and reversal as global responses to genotoxic treatments. Both events are frequent even after mild treatments that do not affect fork integrity, nor activate checkpoints. Fork reversal was found to be dependent on the central homologous recombination factor RAD51, which is consistently present at replication forks independently of their breakage, and to be antagonized by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase/RECQ1-regulated restart. Our work establishes remodeling of uncoupled forks as a pivotal RAD51-regulated response to genotoxic stress in human cells and as a promising target to potentiate cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25733714

  13. Gefitinib Synergizes with Irinotecan to Suppress Hepatocellular Carcinoma via Antagonizing Rad51-Mediated DNA-Repair.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jinjin; Xu, Zhifei; Peng, Xueming; Chen, Min; Zhu, Yuanrun; Xu, Li; Zhu, Hong; Yang, Bo; Luo, Peihua; He, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the only choice for most of the advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, while few agents were available, making it an urgent need to develop new chemotherapy strategies. A phase II clinical trial suggested that the efficacy of irinotecan in HCC was limited due to dose-dependent toxicities. Here, we found that gefitinib exhibited synergistic activity in combination with SN-38, an active metabolite of irinotecan, in HCC cell lines. And the enhanced apoptosis induced by gefitinib plus SN-38 was a result from caspase pathway activation. Mechanistically, gefitinib dramatically promoted the ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent degradation of Rad51 protein, suppressed the DNA repair, gave rise to more DNA damages, and ultimately resulted in the synergism of these two agents. In addition, the increased antitumor efficacy of gefitinib combined with irinotecan was further validated in a HepG2 xenograft mice model. Taken together, our data demonstrated for the first time that the combination of irinotecan and gefitinib showed potential benefit in HCC, which suggests that Rad51 is a promising target and provides a rationale for clinical trials investigating the efficacy of the combination of topoisomerase I inhibitors and gefitinib in HCC. PMID:26752698

  14. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    SciTech Connect

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-08-31

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Finally, our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression.

  15. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; et al

    2015-08-31

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintainingmore » wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Finally, our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression.« less

  16. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression. PMID:26323318

  17. Nanoscopic exclusion between Rad51 and 53BP1 after ion irradiation in human HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reindl, Judith; Drexler, Guido A.; Girst, Stefanie; Greubel, Christoph; Siebenwirth, Christian; Drexler, Sophie E.; Dollinger, Günther; Friedl, Anna A.

    2015-12-01

    Many proteins involved in detection, signalling and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) accumulate in large number in the vicinity of DSB sites, forming so called foci. Emerging evidence suggests that these foci are sub-divided in structural or functional domains. We use stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy to investigate localization of mediator protein 53BP1 and recombination factor Rad51 after irradiation of cells with low linear energy transfer (LET) protons or high LET carbon ions. With a resolution better than 100 nm, STED microscopy and image analysis using a newly developed analyzing algorithm, the reduced product of the differences from the mean, allowed us to demonstrate that with both irradiation types Rad51 occupies spherical regions of about 200 nm diameter. These foci locate within larger 53BP1 accumulations in regions of local 53BP1 depletion, similar to what has been described for the localization of Brca1, CtIP and RPA. Furthermore, localization relative to 53BP1 and size of Rad51 foci was not different after irradiation with low and high LET radiation. As expected, 53BP1 foci induced by low LET irradiation mostly contained one Rad51 focal structure, while after high LET irradiation, most foci contained >1 Rad51 accumulation.

  18. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Parplys, Ann C; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G; Leung, Stanley G; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-11-16

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression. PMID:26323318

  19. Human CST Facilitates Genome-wide RAD51 Recruitment to GC-Rich Repetitive Sequences in Response to Replication Stress.

    PubMed

    Chastain, Megan; Zhou, Qing; Shiva, Olga; Whitmore, Leanne; Jia, Pingping; Dai, Xueyu; Huang, Chenhui; Fadri-Moskwik, Maria; Ye, Ping; Chai, Weihang

    2016-08-01

    The telomeric CTC1/STN1/TEN1 (CST) complex has been implicated in promoting replication recovery under replication stress at genomic regions, yet its precise role is unclear. Here, we report that STN1 is enriched at GC-rich repetitive sequences genome-wide in response to hydroxyurea (HU)-induced replication stress. STN1 deficiency exacerbates the fragility of these sequences under replication stress, resulting in chromosome fragmentation. We find that upon fork stalling, CST proteins form distinct nuclear foci that colocalize with RAD51. Furthermore, replication stress induces physical association of CST with RAD51 in an ATR-dependent manner. Strikingly, CST deficiency diminishes HU-induced RAD51 foci formation and reduces RAD51 recruitment to telomeres and non-telomeric GC-rich fragile sequences. Collectively, our findings establish that CST promotes RAD51 recruitment to GC-rich repetitive sequences in response to replication stress to facilitate replication restart, thereby providing insights into the mechanism underlying genome stability maintenance. PMID:27487043

  20. Arabidopsis BRCA2 and RAD51 proteins are specifically involved in defense gene transcription during plant immune responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shui; Durrant, Wendy E; Song, Junqi; Spivey, Natalie W; Dong, Xinnian

    2010-12-28

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant immune response associated with both transcriptional reprogramming and increased homologous DNA recombination (HR). SNI1 is a negative regulator of SAR and HR, as indicated by the increased basal expression of defense genes and HR in sni1. We found that the sni1 phenotypes are rescued by mutations in BREAST CANCER 2 (BRCA2). In humans, BRCA2 is a mediator of RAD51 in pairing of homologous DNA. Mutations in BRCA2 cause predisposition to breast/ovarian cancers; however, the role of the BRCA2-RAD51 complex in transcriptional regulation remains unclear. In Arabidopsis, both brca2 and rad51 were found to be hypersusceptible not only to genotoxic substances, but also to pathogen infections. A whole-genome microarray analysis showed that downstream of NPR1, BRCA2A is a major regulator of defense-related gene transcription. ChIP demonstrated that RAD51 is specifically recruited to the promoters of defense genes during SAR. This recruitment is dependent on the SAR signal salicylic acid (SA) and on the function of BRCA2. This study provides the molecular evidence showing that the BRCA2-RAD51 complex, known for its function in HR, also plays a direct and specific role in transcription regulation during plant immune responses. PMID:21149701

  1. Chromatin architecture may dictate the target site for DMC1, but not for RAD51, during homologous pairing

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Wataru; Takaku, Motoki; Machida, Shinichi; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, genomic DNA is compacted as chromatin, in which histones and DNA form the nucleosome as the basic unit. DMC1 and RAD51 are essential eukaryotic recombinases that mediate homologous chromosome pairing during homologous recombination. However, the means by which these two recombinases distinctly function in chromatin have remained elusive. Here we found that, in chromatin, the human DMC1-single-stranded DNA complex bypasses binding to the nucleosome, and preferentially promotes homologous pairing at the nucleosome-depleted regions. Consistently, DMC1 forms ternary complex recombination intermediates with the nucleosome-free DNA or the nucleosome-depleted DNA region. Surprisingly, removal of the histone tails improperly enhances the nucleosome binding by DMC1. In contrast, RAD51 does not specifically target the nucleosome-depleted region in chromatin. These are the first demonstrations that the chromatin architecture specifies the sites to promote the homologous recombination reaction by DMC1, but not by RAD51. PMID:27052786

  2. Both the Charged Linker Region and ATPase Domain of Hsp90 Are Essential for Rad51-Dependent DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Suhane, Tanvi; Laskar, Shyamasree; Advani, Siddheshwari; Roy, Nabamita; Varunan, Shalu; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu

    2014-01-01

    The inhibition of Hsp90 in cancerous cells has been correlated with the reduction in double-strand break (DSB repair) activity. However, the precise effect of Hsp90 on the DSB repair pathway in normal cells has remained enigmatic. Our results show that the Hsp82 chaperone, the ortholog of mammalian Hsp90, is indispensable for homologous-recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A considerable reduction in cell viability is observed in an Hsp82-inactivated mutant upon methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) treatment as well as upon UV treatment. The loss of Hsp82 function results in a dramatic decrease in gene-targeting efficiency and a marked decrease in the endogenous levels of the key recombination proteins Rad51 and Rad52 without any notable change in the levels of RAD51 or RAD52 transcripts. Our results establish Rad51 as a client of Hsp82, since they interact physically in vivo, and also show that when Hsp82 is inhibited by 17-AAG, Rad51 undergoes proteasomal degradation. By analyzing a number of point mutants with mutations in different domains of Hsp82, we observe a strong association between the sensitivity of an ATPase mutant of Hsp82 to DNA damage and the decreases in the amounts of Rad51 and Rad52 proteins. The most significant observations include the dramatic abrogation of HR activity and the marked decrease in Rad51 focus formation in the charged linker deletion mutant of Hsp82 upon MMS treatment. The charged linker region of Hsp82 is evolutionarily conserved in all eukaryotes, but until now, no biological significance has been assigned to it. Our findings elucidate the importance of this region in DNA repair for the first time. PMID:25380755

  3. p53 is involved in clearance of ionizing radiation-induced RAD51 foci in a human colon cancer cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Orre, Lukas M. . E-mail: Lukas.Orre@ki.se; Stenerloew, Bo; Dhar, Sumeer; Larsson, Rolf; Lewensohn, Rolf; Lehtioe, Janne

    2006-04-21

    We have investigated p53-related differences in cellular response to DNA damaging agents, focusing on p53s effects on RAD51 protein level and sub-cellular localization post exposure to ionizing radiation. In a human colon cancer cell line, HCT116 and its isogenic p53-/- subcell line we show here p53-independent RAD51 foci formation but interestingly the resolution of RAD51 foci showed clear p53 dependence. In p53 wt cells, but not in p53-/- cells, RAD51 protein level decreased 48 h post irradiation and fluorescence immunostaining showed resolution of RAD51 foci and relocalization of RAD51 to nucleoli at time points corresponding to the decrease in RAD51 protein level. Both cell lines rejoined DNA double strand breaks efficiently with similar kinetics and p53 status did not influence sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. We suggest that p53 has a role in RAD51 clearance post DSB repair and that nucleoli might be sites of RAD51 protein degradation.

  4. The yeast Shu complex utilizes homologous recombination machinery for error-free lesion bypass via physical interaction with a Rad51 paralogue.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Ball, Lindsay; Chen, Wangyang; Tian, Xuelei; Lambrecht, Amanda; Hanna, Michelle; Xiao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    DNA-damage tolerance (DDT) is defined as a mechanism by which eukaryotic cells resume DNA synthesis to fill the single-stranded DNA gaps left by replication-blocking lesions. Eukaryotic cells employ two different means of DDT, namely translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) and template switching, both of which are coordinately regulated through sequential ubiquitination of PCNA at the K164 residue. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the same PCNA-K164 residue can also be sumoylated, which recruits the Srs2 helicase to prevent undesired homologous recombination (HR). While the mediation of TLS by PCNA monoubiquitination has been extensively characterized, the method by which K63-linked PCNA polyubiquitination leads to template switching remains unclear. We recently identified a yeast heterotetrameric Shu complex that couples error-free DDT to HR as a critical step of template switching. Here we report that the Csm2 subunit of Shu physically interacts with Rad55, an accessory protein involved in HR. Rad55 and Rad57 are Rad51 paralogues and form a heterodimer to promote Rad51-ssDNA filament formation by antagonizing Srs2 activity. Although Rad55-Rad57 and Shu function in the same pathway and both act to inhibit Srs2 activity, Shu appears to be dedicated to error-free DDT while the Rad55-Rad57 complex is also involved in double-strand break repair. This study reveals the detailed steps of error-free lesion bypass and also brings to light an intrinsic interplay between error-free DDT and Srs2-mediated inhibition of HR. PMID:24339919

  5. Selective Chromatid Segregation Mechanism Invoked For the Human Congenital Mirror Hand Movement Disorder Development by RAD51 Mutations: A Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Klar, Amar J. S.

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate body plan externally is largely symmetrical across the midline but internal organs develop asymmetrically. The biological basis of asymmetric organ development has been investigated extensively for years, although the proposed mechanisms remain controversial. By comparison, the biological origin of external organs symmetry has not been extensively investigated. Bimanual hand control is one such external organs symmetry allowing independent motor control movements of both hands to a person. This gap in our knowledge is illustrated by the recent reports of heterozygous rad51 mutations causing mysterious symptoms of congenital mirror hand movement disorder (MM) in humans with 50% penetrance by an unknown mechanism. The analysis of mutations that vary symmetry or asymmetry could be exploited to decipher the mechanisms of laterality development. Here I present a hypothesis for explaining 50% penetrance of the rad51 mutation. The MM's origin is explained with the Somatic Strand-specific Imprinting and selective sister chromatid Segregation (SSIS) hypothesis proposed originally as the mechanism of asymmetric cell division to promote visceral organs body plan laterality development in vertebrates. By hypothesis, random sister chromatid segregation in mitosis occurs for a specific chromosome due to rad51/RAD51 constitution causing MM disorder development in 50% of subjects. PMID:25210500

  6. BRCA2 diffuses as oligomeric clusters with RAD51 and changes mobility after DNA damage in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Marcel; Zelensky, Alex; Smal, Ihor; Meijering, Erik; van Cappellen, Wiggert A.; de Gruiter, H. Martijn; van Belle, Gijsbert J.; van Royen, Martin E.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Essers, Jeroen; Kanaar, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Genome maintenance by homologous recombination depends on coordinating many proteins in time and space to assemble at DNA break sites. To understand this process, we followed the mobility of BRCA2, a critical recombination mediator, in live cells at the single-molecule level using both single-particle tracking and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. BRCA2-GFP and -YFP were compared to distinguish diffusion from fluorophore behavior. Diffusive behavior of fluorescent RAD51 and RAD54 was determined for comparison. All fluorescent proteins were expressed from endogenous loci. We found that nuclear BRCA2 existed in oligomeric clusters, and exhibited heterogeneous mobility. DNA damage increased BRCA2 transient binding, presumably including binding to damaged sites. Despite its very different size, RAD51 displayed mobility similar to BRCA2, which indicates physical interaction between these proteins both before and after induction of DNA damage. We propose that BRCA2-mediated sequestration of nuclear RAD51 serves to prevent inappropriate DNA interactions and that all RAD51 is delivered to DNA damage sites in association with BRCA2. PMID:25488918

  7. Polymorphism within the distal RAD51 gene promoter is associated with colorectal cancer in a Polish population

    PubMed Central

    Mucha, Bartosz; Kabzinski, Jacek; Dziki, Adam; Przybylowska-Sygut, Karolina; Sygut, Andrzej; Majsterek, Ireneusz; Dziki, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    Background: colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in developed countries. Annually, over one million of new cases in the world are recorded. Majority of CRCs occur sporadically with dominant phenotype of chromosomal instability (CIN). Permanent exposure to DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation result in DNA double-stranded breaks, which create favorable conditions for chromosomal aberration to arise. Homologous recombination repair (HRR) is the leading process engaged in maintaining of the genome integrity. RAD51 protein was recognized as crucial in HRR. Single nucleotide polymorphisms are the primary source of genetic variation which presence in the RAD51 promoter region can affect on its expression and consequently modulate HR efficiency. Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of genotypes and allele frequencies of -4791A/T and -4601A/G RAD51 gene polymorphisms, followed by an assessment of their relationship with the risk of CRC. Material and methods: The study included 115 patients with confirmed CRC. Control group was consisted of 118 cancer-free individuals with a negative family history. The genotypes were identified by PCR-RFLP method. Conclusion: This study revealed statistically significant association between appearance of G/A genotype in position -4601 of RAD51 gene and CRC risk. PMID:26617897

  8. Cyclin D1 promotes BRCA2-Rad51 interaction by restricting cyclin A/B-dependent BRCA2 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chalermrujinanant, C; Michowski, W; Sittithumcharee, G; Esashi, F; Jirawatnotai, S

    2016-06-01

    BRCA2 has an important role in the maintenance of genome stability by interacting with RAD51 recombinase through its C-terminal domain. This interaction is abrogated by cyclin A-CDK2-mediated phosphorylation of BRCA2 at serine 3291 (Ser3291). Recently, we showed that cyclin D1 facilitates RAD51 recruitment to BRCA2-containing DNA repair foci, and that downregulation of cyclin D1 leads to inefficient homologous-mediated DNA repair. Here, we demonstrate that cyclin D1, via amino acids 20-90, interacts with the C-terminal domain of BRCA2, and that this interaction is increased in response to DNA damage. Interestingly, CDK4-cyclin D1 does not phosphorylate Ser3291. Instead, cyclin D1 bars cyclin A from the C-terminus of BRCA2, prevents cyclin A-CDK2-dependent Ser3291 phosphorylation and facilitates RAD51 binding to the C-terminal domain of BRCA2. These findings indicate that the interplay between cyclin D1 and other cyclins such as cyclin A regulates DNA integrity through RAD51 interaction with the BRCA2 C-terminal domain. PMID:26387543

  9. Selective chromatid segregation mechanism invoked for the human congenital mirror hand movement disorder development by RAD51 mutations: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Klar, Amar J S

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate body plan externally is largely symmetrical across the midline but internal organs develop asymmetrically. The biological basis of asymmetric organ development has been investigated extensively for years, although the proposed mechanisms remain controversial. By comparison, the biological origin of external organs symmetry has not been extensively investigated. Bimanual hand control is one such external organs symmetry allowing independent motor control movements of both hands to a person. This gap in our knowledge is illustrated by the recent reports of heterozygous rad51 mutations causing mysterious symptoms of congenital mirror hand movement disorder (MM) in humans with 50% penetrance by an unknown mechanism. The analysis of mutations that vary symmetry or asymmetry could be exploited to decipher the mechanisms of laterality development. Here I present a hypothesis for explaining 50% penetrance of the rad51 mutation. The MM's origin is explained with the Somatic Strand-specific Imprinting and selective sister chromatid Segregation (SSIS) hypothesis proposed originally as the mechanism of asymmetric cell division to promote visceral organs body plan laterality development in vertebrates. By hypothesis, random sister chromatid segregation in mitosis occurs for a specific chromosome due to rad51/RAD51 constitution causing MM disorder development in 50% of subjects. PMID:25210500

  10. Rad51 recombinase prevents Mre11 nuclease-dependent degradation and excessive PrimPol-mediated elongation of nascent DNA after UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Vallerga, María Belén; Mansilla, Sabrina F; Federico, María Belén; Bertolin, Agustina P; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2015-12-01

    After UV irradiation, DNA polymerases specialized in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) aid DNA replication. However, it is unclear whether other mechanisms also facilitate the elongation of UV-damaged DNA. We wondered if Rad51 recombinase (Rad51), a factor that escorts replication forks, aids replication across UV lesions. We found that depletion of Rad51 impairs S-phase progression and increases cell death after UV irradiation. Interestingly, Rad51 and the TLS polymerase polη modulate the elongation of nascent DNA in different ways, suggesting that DNA elongation after UV irradiation does not exclusively rely on TLS events. In particular, Rad51 protects the DNA synthesized immediately before UV irradiation from degradation and avoids excessive elongation of nascent DNA after UV irradiation. In Rad51-depleted samples, the degradation of DNA was limited to the first minutes after UV irradiation and required the exonuclease activity of the double strand break repair nuclease (Mre11). The persistent dysregulation of nascent DNA elongation after Rad51 knockdown required Mre11, but not its exonuclease activity, and PrimPol, a DNA polymerase with primase activity. By showing a crucial contribution of Rad51 to the synthesis of nascent DNA, our results reveal an unanticipated complexity in the regulation of DNA elongation across UV-damaged templates. PMID:26627254

  11. Combined effect of polymorphisms in Rad51 and Xrcc3 on breast cancer risk and chromosomal radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vral, A; Willems, P; Claes, K; Poppe, B; Perletti, Gianpaolo; Thierens, H

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced in vitro chromosomal radiosensitivity (CRS) has been proposed as a marker for low-penetrance gene mutations predisposing to breast cancer (BC). Since the double strand break (DSB) is the most detrimental form of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, it is possible that mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in DSB repair affect breast cancer risk. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Rad51 and Xrcc3 (rs1801320, rs1801321, rs1799796, rs861539 and rs1799794) exhibited an association with breast cancer susceptibility in a Belgian population of BC patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition. We also ascertained whether a relationship exists between the occurrence of the variant alleles of these variations and in vitro CRS. Blood samples were obtained from BC patients and from the control population that included healthy female individuals. Variations in the 5' UTR of Rad51 and Xrcc3 were genotyped, and statistical analysis was performed. The results showed that low-penetrant variations in Rad51 and Xrcc3, two proteins belonging to the homologous recombination DSB repair pathway, may modify BC risk in patients already carrying a pathological mutation in the highly penetrant BC genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. Combined risk genotype analysis revealed that Rad51 SNPs enhance BC risk in BRCA2 patients, whereas Xrcc3 SNPs significantly enhance BC risk in carriers of BRCA1 mutations and in patients with hereditary BC. When four putative risk genotypes of Rad51 and Xrcc3 were combined, positive significant odds ratios were obtained in the entire patient population and in patients with a hereditary history of disease. Although obtained from a limited number of patients, our data are supportive of a polygenic model whereby combinations of weak variations are responsible for an enhanced BC risk by acting jointly with high-penetrant mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. PMID:21725594

  12. RAD51 potentiates synergistic effects of chemotherapy with PCI-24781 and cis-diamminedichloroplatinum on gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei-Ling; Li, Yu-Huang; Hou, Wei-Jian; Ke, Zun-Fu; Chen, Xin-Lin; Lu, Li-Ya; Cai, Shi-Rong; Song, Wu; Zhang, Chang-Hua; He, Yu-Long

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To explore the efficacy of PCI-24781, a broad-spectrum, hydroxamic acid-derived histone deacetylase inhibitor, in the treatment of gastric cancer (GC). METHODS: With or without treatment of PCI-24781 and/or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (CDDP), GC cell lines were subjected to functional analysis, including cell growth, apoptosis and clonogenic assays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assays were used to determine the interacting molecules and the activity of the enzyme. An in vivo study was carried out in GC xenograft mice. Cell culture-based assays were represented as mean ± SD. ANOVA tests were used to assess differences across groups. All pairwise comparisons between tumor weights among treatment groups were made using the Tukey-Kramer method for multiple comparison adjustment to control experimental-wise type I error rates. Significance was set at P < 0.05. RESULTS: PCI-24781 significantly reduced the growth of the GC cells, enhanced cell apoptosis and suppressed clonogenicity, and these effects synergized with the effects of CDDP. PCI-24781 modulated the cell cycle and significantly reduced the expression of RAD51, which is related to homologous recombination. Depletion of RAD51 augmented the biological functions of PCI-24781, CDDP and the combination treatment, whereas overexpressing RAD51 had the opposite effects. Increased binding of the transcription suppressor E2F4 on the RAD51 promoter appeared to play a major role in these processes. Furthermore, significant suppression of tumor growth and weight in vivo was obtained following PCI-24781 treatment, which synergized with the anticancer effect of CDDP. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that RAD51 potentiates the synergistic effects of chemotherapy with PCI-24781 and CDDP on GC. PMID:25110436

  13. Dmc1 Functions in a Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Meiotic Pathway That Is Largely Independent of the Rad51 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dresser, M. E.; Ewing, D. J.; Conrad, M. N.; Dominguez, A. M.; Barstead, R.; Jiang, H.; Kodadek, T.

    1997-01-01

    Meiotic recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires two similar recA-like proteins, Dmc1p and Rad51p. A screen for dominant meiotic mutants provided DMC1-G126D, a dominant allele mutated in the conserved ATP-binding site (specifically, the A-loop motif) that confers a null phenotype. A recessive null allele, dmc1-K69E, was isolated as an intragenic suppressor of DMC1-G126D. Dmc1-K69Ep, unlike Dmc1p, does not interact homotypically in a two-hybrid assay, although it does interact with other fusion proteins identified by two-hybrid screen with Dmc1p. Dmc1p, unlike Rad51p, does not interact in the two-hybrid assay with Rad52p or Rad54p. However, Dmc1p does interact with Tid1p, a Rad54p homologue, with Tid4p, a Rad16p homologue, and with other fusion proteins that do not interact with Rad51p, suggesting that Dmc1p and Rad51p function in separate, though possibly overlapping, recombinational repair complexes. Epistasis analysis suggests that DMC1 and RAD51 function in separate pathways responsible for meiotic recombination. Taken together, our results are consistent with a requirement for DMC1 for meiosis-specific entry of DNA double-strand break ends into chromatin. Interestingly, the pattern on CHEF gels of chromosome fragments that result from meiotic DNA double-strand break formation is different in DMC1 mutant strains from that seen in rad50S strains. PMID:9335591

  14. Interrogation of the Protein-Protein Interactions between Human BRCA2 BRC Repeats and RAD51 Reveals Atomistic Determinants of Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Daniel J.; Rajendra, Eeson; Roberts-Thomson, Meredith; Hardwick, Bryn; McKenzie, Grahame J.; Payne, Mike C.; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2011-01-01

    The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 controls the recombinase RAD51 in the reactions that mediate homologous DNA recombination, an essential cellular process required for the error-free repair of DNA double-stranded breaks. The primary mode of interaction between BRCA2 and RAD51 is through the BRC repeats, which are ∼35 residue peptide motifs that interact directly with RAD51 in vitro. Human BRCA2, like its mammalian orthologues, contains 8 BRC repeats whose sequence and spacing are evolutionarily conserved. Despite their sequence conservation, there is evidence that the different human BRC repeats have distinct capacities to bind RAD51. A previously published crystal structure reports the structural basis of the interaction between human BRC4 and the catalytic core domain of RAD51. However, no structural information is available regarding the binding of the remaining seven BRC repeats to RAD51, nor is it known why the BRC repeats show marked variation in binding affinity to RAD51 despite only subtle sequence variation. To address these issues, we have performed fluorescence polarisation assays to indirectly measure relative binding affinity, and applied computational simulations to interrogate the behaviour of the eight human BRC-RAD51 complexes, as well as a suite of BRC cancer-associated mutations. Our computational approaches encompass a range of techniques designed to link sequence variation with binding free energy. They include MM-PBSA and thermodynamic integration, which are based on classical force fields, and a recently developed approach to computing binding free energies from large-scale quantum mechanical first principles calculations with the linear-scaling density functional code onetep. Our findings not only reveal how sequence variation in the BRC repeats directly affects affinity with RAD51 and provide significant new insights into the control of RAD51 by human BRCA2, but also exemplify a palette of computational and experimental tools for the

  15. Minocycline enhances mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity through down-regulating ERK1/2-mediated Rad51 expression in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Wang, Tai-Jing; Chang, Po-Yuan; Syu, Jhan-Jhang; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Chen, Chien-Yu; Jian, Yun-Ting; Jian, Yi-Jun; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Chen, Wen-Ching; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Minocycline is a semisynthetic tetracycline derivative; it has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects distinct from its antimicrobial function. However, the molecular mechanism of minocycline-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. Rad51 plays a central role in homologous recombination and high levels of Rad51 expression are observed in chemo- or radioresistant carcinomas. Our previous studies have shown that the MKK1/2-ERK1/2 signal pathway maintains the expression of Rad51 in NSCLC cells. In this study, minocycline treatment inhibited cell viability and proliferation of two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1975. Treatment with minocycline decreased Rad51 mRNA and protein levels through MKK1/2-ERK1/2 inactivation. Furthermore, expression of constitutively active MKK1 (MKK1-CA) vectors significantly rescued the decreased Rad51 protein and mRNA levels in minocycline-treated NSCLC cells. However, combined treatment with MKK1/2 inhibitor U0126 and minocycline further decreased the Rad51 expression and cell viability of NSCLC cells. Knocking down Rad51 expression by transfection with small interfering RNA of Rad51 enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of minocycline. Mitomycin C (MMC) is typically used as a first or second line regimen to treat NSCLC. Compared to a single agent alone, MMC combined with minocycline resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition synergistically in NSCLC cells, accompanied with reduced activation of phospho-ERK1/2, and reduced Rad51 protein levels. Overexpression of MKK1-CA or Flag-tagged Rad51 could reverse the minocycline and MMC-induced synergistic cytotoxicity. These findings may have implications for the rational design of future drug regimens incorporating minocycline and MMC for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:26212550

  16. Interrogation of the protein-protein interactions between human BRCA2 BRC repeats and RAD51 reveals atomistic determinants of affinity.

    PubMed

    Cole, Daniel J; Rajendra, Eeson; Roberts-Thomson, Meredith; Hardwick, Bryn; McKenzie, Grahame J; Payne, Mike C; Venkitaraman, Ashok R; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2011-07-01

    The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 controls the recombinase RAD51 in the reactions that mediate homologous DNA recombination, an essential cellular process required for the error-free repair of DNA double-stranded breaks. The primary mode of interaction between BRCA2 and RAD51 is through the BRC repeats, which are ∼35 residue peptide motifs that interact directly with RAD51 in vitro. Human BRCA2, like its mammalian orthologues, contains 8 BRC repeats whose sequence and spacing are evolutionarily conserved. Despite their sequence conservation, there is evidence that the different human BRC repeats have distinct capacities to bind RAD51. A previously published crystal structure reports the structural basis of the interaction between human BRC4 and the catalytic core domain of RAD51. However, no structural information is available regarding the binding of the remaining seven BRC repeats to RAD51, nor is it known why the BRC repeats show marked variation in binding affinity to RAD51 despite only subtle sequence variation. To address these issues, we have performed fluorescence polarisation assays to indirectly measure relative binding affinity, and applied computational simulations to interrogate the behaviour of the eight human BRC-RAD51 complexes, as well as a suite of BRC cancer-associated mutations. Our computational approaches encompass a range of techniques designed to link sequence variation with binding free energy. They include MM-PBSA and thermodynamic integration, which are based on classical force fields, and a recently developed approach to computing binding free energies from large-scale quantum mechanical first principles calculations with the linear-scaling density functional code onetep. Our findings not only reveal how sequence variation in the BRC repeats directly affects affinity with RAD51 and provide significant new insights into the control of RAD51 by human BRCA2, but also exemplify a palette of computational and experimental tools for the

  17. Astaxanthin down-regulates Rad51 expression via inactivation of AKT kinase to enhance mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Wang, Tai-Jing; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Chen, Wen-Ching; Chang, Po-Yuan; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2016-04-01

    Astaxanthin has been demonstrated to exhibit a wide range of beneficial effects, including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. However, the molecular mechanism of astaxanthin-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. Rad51 plays a central role in homologous recombination, and studies show that chemo-resistant carcinomas exhibit high levels of Rad51 expression. In this study, astaxanthin treatment inhibited cell viability and proliferation of two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1703. Astaxanthin treatment (2.5-20 μM) decreased Rad51 expression and phospho-AKT(Ser473) protein level in a time and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, expression of constitutively active AKT (AKT-CA) vector rescued the decreased Rad51 mRNA and protein levels in astaxanthin-treated NSCLC cells. Combined treatment with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors (LY294002 or wortmannin) further decreased the Rad51 expression in astaxanthin-exposed A549 and H1703 cells. Knockdown of Rad51 expression by transfection with si-Rad51 RNA or cotreatment with LY294002 further enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of astaxanthin. Additionally, mitomycin C (MMC) as an anti-tumor antibiotic is widely used in clinical NSCLC chemotherapy. Combination of MMC and astaxanthin synergistically resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition in NSCLC cells, accompanied with reduced phospho-AKT(Ser473) level and Rad51 expression. Overexpression of AKT-CA or Flag-tagged Rad51 reversed the astaxanthin and MMC-induced synergistic cytotoxicity. In contrast, pretreatment with LY294002 further decreased the cell viability in astaxanthin and MMC co-treated cells. In conclusion, astaxanthin enhances MMC-induced cytotoxicity by decreasing Rad51 expression and AKT activation. These findings may provide rationale to combine astaxanthin with MMC for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:26921637

  18. Enhanced non-homologous end joining contributes toward synthetic lethality of pathological RAD51C mutants with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase.

    PubMed

    Somyajit, Kumar; Mishra, Anup; Jameei, Aida; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitors are actively under clinical trials for the treatment of breast and ovarian cancers that arise due to mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. The RAD51 paralog RAD51C has been identified as a breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene. The pathological RAD51C mutants that were identified in cancer patients are hypomorphic with partial repair function. However, targeting cancer cells that express hypomorphic mutants of RAD51C is highly challenging. Here, we report that RAD51C-deficient cells can be targeted by a 'synthetic lethal' approach using PARP inhibitor and this sensitivity was attributed to accumulation of cells in the G2/M and chromosomal aberrations. In addition, spontaneous hyperactivation of PARP1 was evident in RAD51C-deficient cells. Interestingly, RAD51C-negative cells exhibited enhanced recruitment of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) proteins onto chromatin and this accumulation correlated with increased activity of error-prone NHEJ as well as genome instability leading to cell death. Notably, inhibition of DNA-PKcs or depletion of KU70 or Ligase IV rescued this phenotype. Strikingly, stimulation of NHEJ by low dose of ionizing radiation (IR) in the PARP inhibitor-treated RAD51C-deficient cells and cells expressing pathological RAD51C mutants induced enhanced toxicity 'synergistically'. These results demonstrate that cancer cells arising due to hypomorphic mutations in RAD51C can be specifically targeted by a 'synergistic approach' and imply that this strategy can be potentially applied to cancers with hypomorphic mutations in other homologous recombination pathway genes. PMID:25292178

  19. Semidominant mutations in the yeast Rad51 protein and their relationships with the Srs2 helicase.

    PubMed

    Chanet, R; Heude, M; Adjiri, A; Maloisel, L; Fabre, F

    1996-09-01

    Suppressors of the methyl methanesulfonate sensitivity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploids lacking the Srs2 helicase turned out to contain semidominant mutations in Rad5l, a homolog of the bacterial RecA protein. The nature of these mutations was determined by direct sequencing. The 26 mutations characterized were single base substitutions leading to amino acid replacements at 18 different sites. The great majority of these sites (75%) are conserved in the family of RecA-like proteins, and 10 of them affect sites corresponding to amino acids in RecA that are probably directly involved in ATP reactions, binding, and/or hydrolysis. Six mutations are in domains thought to be involved in interaction between monomers; they may also affect ATP reactions. By themselves, all the alleles confer a rad5l null phenotype. When heterozygous, however, they are, to varying degrees, negative semidominant for radiation sensitivity; presumably the mutant proteins are coassembled with wild-type Rad51 and poison the resulting nucleofilaments or recombination complexes. This negative effect is partially suppressed by an SRS2 deletion, which supports the hypothesis that Srs2 reverses recombination structures that contain either mutated proteins or numerous DNA lesions. PMID:8756636

  20. Genetic re-engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD51 leads to a significant increase in the frequency of gene repair in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Maguire, Katie K.; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2004-01-01

    Oligonucleotides can be used to direct the alteration of single nucleotides in chromosomal genes in yeast. Rad51 protein appears to play a central role in catalyzing the reaction, most likely through its DNA pairing function. Here, we re-engineer the RAD51 gene in order to produce proteins bearing altered levels of known activities. Overexpression of wild-type ScRAD51 elevates the correction of an integrated, mutant hygromycin resistance gene ∼3-fold. Overexpression of an altered RAD51 gene, which encodes a protein that has a higher affinity for ScRad54, enhances the targeting frequency nearly 100-fold. Another mutation which increases the affinity of Rad51 for DNA was also found to increase gene repair when overexpressed in the cell. Other mutations in the Rad51 protein, such as one that reduces interaction with Rad52, has little or no effect on the frequency of gene repair. These data provide the first evidence that the Rad51 protein can be modified so as to increase the frequency of gene repair in yeast. PMID:15087488

  1. RAD51C deficiency in mice results in early prophase I arrest in males and sister chromatid separation at metaphase II in females

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Sergey; Pellegrini, Manuela; Shuda, Kristy; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Liu, Yilun; Martin, Betty K.; Burkett, Sandra; Southon, Eileen; Pati, Debananda; Tessarollo, Lino; West, Stephen C.; Donovan, Peter J.; Nussenzweig, Andre; Sharan, Shyam K.

    2007-01-01

    RAD51C is a member of the RecA/RAD51 protein family, which is known to play an important role in DNA repair by homologous recombination. In mice, it is essential for viability. Therefore, we have generated a hypomorphic allele of Rad51c in addition to a null allele. A subset of mice expressing the hypomorphic allele is infertile. This infertility is caused by sexually dimorphic defects in meiotic recombination, revealing its two distinct functions. Spermatocytes undergo a developmental arrest during the early stages of meiotic prophase I, providing evidence for the role of RAD51C in early stages of RAD51-mediated recombination. In contrast, oocytes can progress normally to metaphase I after superovulation but display precocious separation of sister chromatids, aneuploidy, and broken chromosomes at metaphase II. These defects suggest a possible late role of RAD51C in meiotic recombination. Based on the marked reduction in Holliday junction (HJ) resolution activity in Rad51c-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we propose that this late function may be associated with HJ resolution. PMID:17312021

  2. Ubiquitylation of Rad51d Mediated by E3 Ligase Rnf138 Promotes the Homologous Recombination Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Deqiang; Liang, Junbo; Lu, Yalan; Xu, Longchang; Miao, Shiying; Lu, Lin-Yu; Song, Wei; Wang, Linfang

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitylation has an important role as a signal transducer that regulates protein function, subcellular localization, or stability during the DNA damage response. In this study, we show that Ring domain E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF138 is recruited to DNA damage site quickly. And the recruitment is mediated through its Zinc finger domains. We further confirm that RNF138 is phosphorylated by ATM at Ser124. However, the phosphorylation was dispensable for recruitment to the DNA damage site. Our findings also indicate that RAD51 assembly at DSB sites following irradiation is dramatically affected in RNF138-deficient cells. Hence, RNF138 is likely involved in regulating homologous recombination repair pathway. Consistently, efficiency of homologous recombination decreased observably in RNF138-depleted cells. In addition, RNF138-deficient cell is hypersensitive to DNA damage insults, such as IR and MMS. And the comet assay confirmed that RNF138 directly participated in DNA damage repair. Moreover, we find that RAD51D directly interacted with RNF138. And the recruitment of RAD51D to DNA damage site is delayed and unstable in RNF138-depleted cells. Taken together, these results suggest that RNF138 promotes the homologous recombination repair pathway. PMID:27195665

  3. RAD51 plays a crucial role in halting cell death program induced by ionizing radiation in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Kujjo, Loro L; Ronningen, Reg; Ross, Pablo; Pereira, Ricardo J G; Rodriguez, Ramon; Beyhan, Zeki; Goissis, Marcelo D; Baumann, Thomas; Kagawa, Wataru; Camsari, Cagri; Smith, George W; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Cibelli, Jose B; Perez, Gloria I

    2012-03-01

    Reproductive health of humans and animals exposed to daily irradiants from solar/cosmic particles remains largely understudied. We evaluated the sensitivities of bovine and mouse oocytes to bombardment by krypton-78 (1 Gy) or ultraviolet B (UV-B; 100 microjoules). Mouse oocytes responded to irradiation by undergoing massive activation of caspases, rapid loss of energy without cytochrome-c release, and subsequent necrotic death. In contrast, bovine oocytes became positive for annexin-V, exhibited cytochrome-c release, and displayed mild activation of caspases and downstream DNAses but with the absence of a complete cell death program; therefore, cytoplasmic fragmentation was never observed. However, massive cytoplasmic fragmentation and increased DNA damage were induced experimentally by both inhibiting RAD51 and increasing caspase 3 activity before irradiation. Microinjection of recombinant human RAD51 prior to irradiation markedly decreased both cytoplasmic fragmentation and DNA damage in both bovine and mouse oocytes. RAD51 response to damaged DNA occurred faster in bovine oocytes than in mouse oocytes. Therefore, we conclude that upon exposure to irradiation, bovine oocytes create a physiologically indeterminate state of partial cell death, attributed to rapid induction of DNA repair and low activation of caspases. The persistence of these damaged cells may represent an adaptive mechanism with potential implications for livestock productivity and long-term health risks associated with human activity in space. PMID:22190703

  4. Rad51c- and Trp53-double-mutant mouse model reveals common features of homologous recombination-deficient breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Tumiati, M; Munne, P M; Edgren, H; Eldfors, S; Hemmes, A; Kuznetsov, S G

    2016-09-01

    Almost half of all hereditary breast cancers (BCs) are associated with germ-line mutations in homologous recombination (HR) genes. However, the tumor phenotypes associated with different HR genes vary, making it difficult to define the role of HR in BC predisposition. To distinguish between HR-dependent and -independent features of BCs, we generated a mouse model in which an essential HR gene, Rad51c, is knocked-out specifically in epidermal tissues. Rad51c is one of the key mediators of HR and a well-known BC predisposition gene. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of Rad51c invariably requires inactivation of the Trp53 tumor suppressor (TP53 in humans) to produce mammary carcinomas in 63% of female mice. Nonetheless, loss of Rad51c shortens the latency of Trp53-deficient mouse tumors from 11 to 6 months. Remarkably, the histopathological features of Rad51c-deficient mammary carcinomas, such as expression of hormone receptors and luminal epithelial markers, faithfully recapitulate the histopathology of human RAD51C-mutated BCs. Similar to other BC models, Rad51c/p53 double-mutant mouse mammary tumors also reveal a propensity for genomic instability, but lack the focal amplification of the Met locus or distinct mutational signatures reported for other HR genes. Using the human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A, we show that deletion of TP53 can rescue RAD51C-deficient cells from radiation-induced cellular senescence, whereas it exacerbates their centrosome amplification and nuclear abnormalities. Altogether, our data indicate that a trend for genomic instability and inactivation of Trp53 are common features of HR-mediated BCs, whereas histopathology and somatic mutation patterns are specific for different HR genes. PMID:26820992

  5. Design, synthesis, and characterization of BRC4 mutants based on the crystal structure of BRC4-RAD51(191-220).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dongxin; Lu, Kui

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene 2 (BRCA2)-a human tumor suppressor gene-is related to various malignancies such as breast and ovarian cancer. This gene can induce the key protein RAD51 recombinase, which is involved in homologous recombination with single-stranded DNA in the human body and can regulate RAD51 to complete the repair of damaged double-stranded DNA. Eight highly conserved BRC repeat motifs in BRCA2 protein serve as sites for the interaction between BRCA2 and RAD51. BRCA2 regulates RAD51 through these motifs. However, the mechanism of this interaction still requires further research. In this study, the BRC4 motif that demonstrated strong interaction with RAD51 was selected as template peptide. On the basis of known data regarding the crystal structure of the BRC4-RAD51(191-220) complex, a series of BRC4 mutants was designed using PyMOL software based on the sequence of BRC4, and polypeptides were synthesized by the Fmoc solid-phase method. After purification by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, the purity of the polypeptides reached >95 %. The primary determination of circular dichroism spectra showed that the polypeptides exhibited slight changes in secondary structure, which indicated that mutation on the non-conserved sites in BRC4 probably affected the interaction with BRC4. These findings will facilitate research on the interaction between targeting peptides and BRC4 mutants, as well the basic rules covering this interaction. PMID:26522863

  6. Top3-Rmi1 dissolve Rad51-mediated D-loops by a topoisomerase-based mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fasching, Clare L.; Cejka, Petr; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Summary The displacement loop (D-loop) is the DNA strand invasion product formed during homologous recombination. Disruption of nascent D-loops represents a mechanism of anti-recombination. During Synthesis-Dependent Strand Annealing D-loop disruption after extension of the invading strand is an integral step of the pathway and ensures a non-crossover outcome. The proteins implicated in D-loop disruption are DNA motor proteins/helicases acting by migrating DNA junctions. Here we report an unanticipated mechanism of D-loop dissolution mediated by DNA topoisomerase 3 (Top3) and dependent on its catalytic activity. D-loop dissolution catalyzed by yeast Top3 is highly specific for yeast Rad51/Rad54-mediated D-loops, whereas protein-free D-loops or D-loop mediated by bacterial RecA protein or human RAD51/RAD54 resist dissolution. Also the human Topoisomerase IIIα-RMI1–RMI2 complex is capable of dissolving D-loops. Consistent with genetic data, we suggest that the extreme growth defect and hyper-recombination phenotype of Top3-deficient yeast cells is in part a result of unprocessed D-loops. PMID:25699708

  7. BRCA2 and RAD51 promote double-strand break formation and cell death in response to gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rebecca M; Kotsantis, Panagiotis; Stewart, Grant S; Groth, Petra; Petermann, Eva

    2014-10-01

    Replication inhibitors cause replication fork stalling and double-strand breaks (DSB) that result from processing of stalled forks. During recovery from replication blocks, the homologous recombination (HR) factor RAD51 mediates fork restart and DSB repair. HR defects therefore sensitize cells to replication inhibitors, with clear implications for cancer therapy. Gemcitabine is a potent replication inhibitor used to treat cancers with mutations in HR genes such as BRCA2. Here, we investigate why, paradoxically, mutations in HR genes protect cells from killing by gemcitabine. Using DNA replication and DNA damage assays in mammalian cells, we show that even short gemcitabine treatments cause persistent replication inhibition. BRCA2 and RAD51 are recruited to chromatin early after removal of the drug, actively inhibit replication fork progression, and promote the formation of MUS81- and XPF-dependent DSBs that remain unrepaired. Our data suggest that HR intermediates formed at gemcitabine-stalled forks are converted into DSBs and thus contribute to gemcitabine-induced cell death, which could have implications for the treatment response of HR-deficient tumors. PMID:25053826

  8. A novel allele of RAD52 that causes severe DNA repair and recombination deficiencies only in the absence of RAD51 or RAD59.

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Y; Davis, A P; Symington, L S

    1999-01-01

    With the use of an intrachromosomal inverted repeat as a recombination reporter, we have shown that mitotic recombination is dependent on the RAD52 gene, but reduced only fivefold by mutation of RAD51. RAD59, a component of the RAD51-independent pathway, was identified previously by screening for mutations that reduced inverted-repeat recombination in a rad51 strain. Here we describe a rad52 mutation, rad52R70K, that also reduced recombination synergistically in a rad51 background. The phenotype of the rad52R70K strain, which includes weak gamma-ray sensitivity, a fourfold reduction in the rate of inverted-repeat recombination, elevated allelic recombination, sporulation proficiency, and a reduction in the efficiency of mating-type switching and single-strand annealing, was similar to that observed for deletion of the RAD59 gene. However, rad52R70K rad59 double mutants showed synergistic defects in ionizing radiation resistance, sporulation, and mating-type switching. These results suggest that Rad52 and Rad59 have partially overlapping functions and that Rad59 can substitute for this function of Rad52 in a RAD51 rad52R70K strain. PMID:10545446

  9. Genomic evolution in Barrett’s adenocarcinoma cells: critical roles of elevated hsRAD51, homologous recombination and Alu sequences in the genome

    PubMed Central

    Pal, J; Bertheau, R; Buon, L; Qazi, A; Batchu, RB; Bandyopadhyay, S; Ali-Fehmi, R; Beer, DG; Weaver, DW; Reis, RJ Shmookler; Goyal, RK; Huang, Q; Munshi, NC; Shammas, MA

    2012-01-01

    A prominent feature of most cancers including Barrett’s adenocarcinoma (BAC) is genetic instability, which is associated with development and progression of disease. In this study, we investigated the role of recombinase (hsRAD51), a key component of homologous recombination (HR)/repair, in evolving genomic changes and growth of BAC cells. We show that the expression of RAD51 is elevated in BAC cell lines and tissue specimens, relative to normal cells. HR activity is also elevated and significantly correlates with RAD51 expression in BAC cells. The suppression of RAD51 expression, by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) specifically targeting this gene, significantly prevented BAC cells from acquiring genomic changes to either copy number or heterozygosity (P<0.02) in several independent experiments employing single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays. The reduction in copy-number changes, following shRNA treatment, was confirmed by Comparative Genome Hybridization analyses of the same DNA samples. Moreover, the chromosomal distributions of mutations correlated strongly with frequencies and locations of Alu interspersed repetitive elements on individual chromosomes. We conclude that the hsRAD51 protein level is systematically elevated in BAC, contributes significantly to genomic evolution during serial propagation of these cells and correlates with disease progression. Alu sequences may serve as substrates for elevated HR during cell proliferation in vitro, as they have been reported to do during the evolution of species, and thus may provide additional targets for prevention or treatment of this disease. PMID:21423218

  10. Design of Potent Inhibitors of Human RAD51 Recombinase Based on BRC Motifs of BRCA2 Protein: Modeling and Experimental Validation of a Chimera Peptide

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that a 28-amino acid peptide derived from the BRC4 motif of BRCA2 tumor suppressor inhibits selectively human RAD51 recombinase (HsRad51). With the aim of designing better inhibitors for cancer treatment, we combined an in silico docking approach with in vitro biochemical testing to construct a highly efficient chimera peptide from eight existing human BRC motifs. We built a molecular model of all BRC motifs complexed with HsRad51 based on the crystal structure of the BRC4 motif-HsRad51 complex, computed the interaction energy of each residue in each BRC motif, and selected the best amino acid residue at each binding position. This analysis enabled us to propose four amino acid substitutions in the BRC4 motif. Three of these increased the inhibitory effect in vitro, and this effect was found to be additive. We thus obtained a peptide that is about 10 times more efficient in inhibiting HsRad51−ssDNA complex formation than the original peptide. PMID:20684611

  11. RAD51 135G→C Modifies Breast Cancer Risk among BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from a Combined Analysis of 19 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C. ; Sinilnikova, Olga M. ; Simard, Jacques ; Léoné, Mélanie ; Dumont, Martine ; Neuhausen, Susan L. ; Struewing, Jeffery P. ; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique ; Barjhoux, Laure ; Hughes, David J. ; Coupier, Isabelle ; Belotti, Muriel ; Lasset, Christine ; Bonadona, Valérie ; Bignon, Yves-Jean ; Rebbeck, Timothy R. ; Wagner, Theresa ; Lynch, Henry T. ; Domchek, Susan M. ; Nathanson, Katherine L. ; Garber, Judy E. ; Weitzel, Jeffrey ; Narod, Steven A. ; Tomlinson, Gail ; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I. ; Godwin, Andrew ; Isaacs, Claudine ; Jakubowska, Anna ; Lubinski, Jan ; Gronwald, Jacek ; Górski, Bohdan ; Byrski, Tomasz ; Huzarski, Tomasz ; Peock, Susan ; Cook, Margaret ; Baynes, Caroline ; Murray, Alexandra ; Rogers, Mark ; Daly, Peter A. ; Dorkins, Huw ; Schmutzler, Rita K. ; Versmold, Beatrix ; Engel, Christoph ; Meindl, Alfons ; Arnold, Norbert ; Niederacher, Dieter ; Deissler, Helmut ; Spurdle, Amanda B. ; Chen, Xiaoqing ; Waddell, Nicola ; Cloonan, Nicole ; Kirchhoff, Tomas ; Offit, Kenneth ; Friedman, Eitan ; Kaufmann, Bella ; Laitman, Yael ; Galore, Gilli ; Rennert, Gad ; Lejbkowicz, Flavio ; Raskin, Leon ; Andrulis, Irene L. ; Ilyushik, Eduard ; Ozcelik, Hilmi ; Devilee, Peter ; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G. ; Greene, Mark H. ; Prindiville, Sheila A. ; Osorio, Ana ; Benítez, Javier ; Zikan, Michal ; Szabo, Csilla I. ; Kilpivaara, Outi ; Nevanlinna, Heli ; Hamann, Ute ; Durocher, Francine ; Arason, Adalgeir ; Couch, Fergus J. ; Easton, Douglas F. ; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia 

    2007-01-01

    RAD51 is an important component of double-stranded DNA–repair mechanisms that interacts with both BRCA1 and BRCA2. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of RAD51, 135G→C, has been suggested as a possible modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We pooled genotype data for 8,512 female mutation carriers from 19 studies for the RAD51 135G→C SNP. We found evidence of an increased breast cancer risk in CC homozygotes (hazard ratio [HR] 1.92 [95% confidence interval {CI} 1.25–2.94) but not in heterozygotes (HR 0.95 [95% CI 0.83–1.07]; P=.002, by heterogeneity test with 2 degrees of freedom [df]). When BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers were analyzed separately, the increased risk was statistically significant only among BRCA2 mutation carriers, in whom we observed HRs of 1.17 (95% CI 0.91–1.51) among heterozygotes and 3.18 (95% CI 1.39–7.27) among rare homozygotes (P=.0007, by heterogeneity test with 2 df). In addition, we determined that the 135G→C variant affects RAD51 splicing within the 5′ UTR. Thus, 135G→C may modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers by altering the expression of RAD51. RAD51 is the first gene to be reliably identified as a modifier of risk among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. PMID:17999359

  12. Roles of MKK1/2-ERK1/2 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase-AKT signaling pathways in erlotinib-induced Rad51 suppression and cytotoxicity in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Ciou, Shih-Ci; Jhan, Jhih-Yuan; Cheng, Chao-Min; Su, Ying-Jhen; Chuang, Show-Mei; Lin, Szu-Ting; Chang, Chia-Che; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2009-08-01

    Erlotinib (Tarceva) is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor in the treatment of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we investigated the roles of ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways in regulating Rad51 expression and cytotoxic effects in different NSCLC cell lines treated with erlotinib. Erlotinib decreased cellular levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2, phosphorylated AKT, Rad51 protein, and mRNA in erlotinib-sensitive H1650, A549, and H1869 cells, leading to cell death via apoptosis, but these results were not seen in erlotinib-resistant H520 and H1703 cells. Erlotinib decreased Rad51 protein levels by enhancing Rad51 mRNA and protein instability. Enforced expression of constitutively active MKK1 or AKT vectors could restore Rad51 protein levels, which were inhibited by erlotinib, and decrease erlotinib-induced cytotoxicity. Knocking down endogenous Rad51 expression by si-Rad51 RNA transfection significantly enhanced erlotinib-induced cytotoxicity. In contrast, overexpression of Rad51 by transfection with Rad51 vector could protect the cells from cytotoxic effects induced by erlotinib. Blocking the activations of ERK1/2 and AKT by MKK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor (wortmannin) suppressed the expression of Rad51 and enhanced the erlotinib-induced cell death in erlotinib-resistant cells. In conclusion, suppression of Rad51 may be a novel therapeutic modality in overcoming drug resistance of erlotinib in NSCLC. PMID:19671683

  13. RAD51 G135C genetic polymorphism and their potential role in gastric cancer induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in Bhutan.

    PubMed

    Trang, T T H; Nagashima, H; Uchida, T; Mahachai, V; Vilaichone, R-K; Tshering, L; Binh, T T; Yamaoka, Y

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of the RAD51 G135C genetic polymorphism on the risk of gastric cancer induced by Helicobacter pylori infection, we determined allele frequency and genotype distribution of this polymorphism in Bhutan--a population documented with high prevalence of gastric cancer and extremely high prevalence of H. pylori infection. The status of RAD51 G135C was examined by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of PCR amplified fragments and sequencing. Histological scores were evaluated according to the updated Sydney system. G135C carriers showed significantly higher scores for intestinal metaplasia in the antrum than G135G carriers [mean (median) 0·33 (0) vs. 0·08 (0), P = 0·008]. Higher scores for intestinal metaplasia of G135C carriers compared to those of G135G carriers were also observed in H. pylori-positive patients [0·3 (0) vs. 0·1 (0), P = 0·002] and H. pylori-positive patients with gastritis [0·4 (0) vs. 0·1 (0), P = 0·002] but were not found in H. pylori-negative patients. Our findings revealed that a combination of H. pylori infection and RAD51 G135C genotype of the host showed an increasing score for intestinal metaplasia. Therefore, RAD51 G135C might be the important predictor for gastric cancer of H. pylori-infected patients. PMID:26119522

  14. Yeast cell-free system that catalyses joint-molecule formation in a Rad51p- and Rad52p-dependent fashion.

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, V; Norris, D

    2000-01-01

    One of the central reactions of homologous recombination is the invasion of a single strand of DNA into a homologous duplex to form a joint molecule. Here we describe the isolation of a cell-free system from meiotic yeast cells that catalyses joint-molecule formation in vitro. The active components in the system required ATP and homologous DNA and operated in both 0.5 and 13 mM MgCl(2). When the cell-free system was prepared from rad51/rad51 and rad52/rad52 mutants and joint-molecule formation was assayed at 0.5 mM MgCl(2), the specific activity decreased to 6% and 13.8% respectively of the wild-type level. However, when the same mutant extracts were premixed, joint-molecule formation increased 4-8-fold, i.e. the mutant extracts exhibited complementation in vitro. These results demonstrated that Rad51p and Rad52p were required for optimal joint-molecule formation at 0.5 mM MgCl(2). Intriguingly, however, Rad51p and Rad52p seemed to be more dispensable at higher concentrations of MgCl(2) (13 mM). Further purification of the responsible activity has proven problematical, but it did flow through a sizing column as a single peak (molecular mass 1.2 MDa) that was co-eluted with Rad51p and RFA, the eukaryotic single-stranded DNA-binding protein. All of these characteristics are consistent with the known properties of the reaction in vivo and suggest that the new cell-free system will be suitable for purifying enzymes involved in homologous recombination. PMID:10749664

  15. Reduced FANCD2 influences spontaneous SCE and RAD51 foci formation in uveal melanoma and Fanconi anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gravells, P; Hoh, L; Solovieva, S; Patil, A; Dudziec, E; Rennie, I G; Sisley, K; Bryant, H E

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is unique among cancers in displaying reduced endogenous levels of sister chromatid exchange (SCE). Here we demonstrate that FANCD2 expression is reduced in UM and that ectopic expression of FANCD2 increased SCE. Similarly, FANCD2-deficient fibroblasts (PD20) derived from Fanconi anaemia patients displayed reduced spontaneous SCE formation relative to their FANCD2-complemented counterparts, suggesting that this observation is not specific to UM. In addition, spontaneous RAD51 foci were reduced in UM and PD20 cells compared with FANCD2-proficient cells. This is consistent with a model where spontaneous SCEs are the end product of endogenous recombination events and implicates FANCD2 in the promotion of recombination-mediated repair of endogenous DNA damage and in SCE formation during normal DNA replication. In both UM and PD20 cells, low SCE was reversed by inhibiting DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit). Finally, we demonstrate that both PD20 and UM are sensitive to acetaldehyde, supporting a role for FANCD2 in repair of lesions induced by such endogenous metabolites. Together, these data suggest FANCD2 may promote spontaneous SCE by influencing which double-strand break repair pathway predominates during normal S-phase progression. PMID:23318456

  16. In Vivo Delivery of miR-34a Sensitizes Lung Tumors to Radiation Through RAD51 Regulation.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Maria Angelica; Valdecanas, David; Niknam, Sharareh; Peltier, Heidi J; Diao, Lixia; Giri, Uma; Komaki, Ritsuko; Calin, George A; Gomez, Daniel R; Chang, Joe Y; Heymach, John Victor; Bader, Andreas G; Welsh, James William

    2015-01-01

    MiR-34a, an important tumor-suppressing microRNA, is downregulated in several types of cancer; loss of its expression has been linked with unfavorable clinical outcomes in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), among others. MiR-34a represses several key oncogenic proteins, and a synthetic mimic of miR-34a is currently being tested in a cancer trial. However, little is known about the potential role of miR-34a in regulating DNA damage response and repair. Here, we demonstrate that miR-34a directly binds to the 3' untranslated region of RAD51 and regulates homologous recombination, inhibiting double-strand-break repair in NSCLC cells. We further demonstrate the therapeutic potential of miR-34a delivery in combination with radiotherapy in mouse models of lung cancer. Collectively, our results suggest that administration of miR-34a in combination with radiotherapy may represent a novel strategy for treating NSCLC. PMID:26670277

  17. Rad18 and Rnf8 facilitate homologous recombination by two distinct mechanisms, promoting Rad51 focus formation and suppressing the toxic effect of nonhomologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Kasaishi, Y; Nakada, S; Takagi, T; Era, S; Motegi, A; Chiu, R K; Takeda, S; Hirota, K

    2015-08-13

    The E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme Ubc13 and the E3 ubiquitin ligases Rad18 and Rnf8 promote homologous recombination (HR)-mediated double-strand break (DSB) repair by enhancing polymerization of the Rad51 recombinase at γ-ray-induced DSB sites. To analyze functional interactions between the three enzymes, we created RAD18(-/-), RNF8(-/-), RAD18(-/-)/RNF8(-/-) and UBC13(-/-)clones in chicken DT40 cells. To assess the capability of HR, we measured the cellular sensitivity to camptothecin (topoisomerase I poison) and olaparib (poly(ADP ribose)polymerase inhibitor) because these chemotherapeutic agents induce DSBs during DNA replication, which are repaired exclusively by HR. RAD18(-/-), RNF8(-/-) and RAD18(-/-)/RNF8(-/-) clones showed very similar levels of hypersensitivity, indicating that Rad18 and Rnf8 operate in the same pathway in the promotion of HR. Although these three mutants show less prominent defects in the formation of Rad51 foci than UBC13(-/-)cells, they are more sensitive to camptothecin and olaparib than UBC13(-/-)cells. Thus, Rad18 and Rnf8 promote HR-dependent repair in a manner distinct from Ubc13. Remarkably, deletion of Ku70, a protein essential for nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) significantly restored tolerance of RAD18(-/-) and RNF8(-/-) cells to camptothecin and olaparib without affecting Rad51 focus formation. Thus, in cellular tolerance to the chemotherapeutic agents, the two enzymes collaboratively promote DSB repair by HR by suppressing the toxic effect of NHEJ on HR rather than enhancing Rad51 focus formation. In contrast, following exposure to γ-rays, RAD18(-/-), RNF8(-/-), RAD18(-/-)/RNF8(-/-) and UBC13(-/-)cells showed close correlation between cellular survival and Rad51 focus formation at DSB sites. In summary, the current study reveals that Rad18 and Rnf8 facilitate HR by two distinct mechanisms: suppression of the toxic effect of NHEJ on HR during DNA replication and the promotion of Rad51 focus formation at radiotherapy

  18. Curcumin enhances the mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity via downregulation of MKK1/2-ERK1/2-mediated Rad51 expression in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Tsai, Min-Shao; Weng, Shao-Hsing; Kuo, Ya-Hsun; Chiu, Yu-Fan; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2011-09-15

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a major active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), has been reported to suppress the proliferation of a wide variety of tumor cells. Rad51 is a key protein in the homologous recombination (HR) pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, and HR represents a novel target for cancer therapy. A high expression of Rad51 has been reported in chemo- or radio-resistant carcinomas. Therefore, in the current study, we will examine whether curcumin could enhance the effects of mitomycin C (MMC), a DNA interstrand cross-linking agent, to induce cytotoxicity by decreasing Rad51 expression. Exposure of two human non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines (A549 and H1975) to curcumin could suppress MMC-induced MKK1/2-ERK1/2 signal activation and Rad51 protein expression. Enhancement of ERK1/2 activation by constitutively active MKK1/2 (MKK1/2-CA) increased Rad51 protein levels in curcumin and MMC co-treated human lung cells. Moreover, the synergistic cytotoxic effect induced by curcumin combined with MMC was decreased by MKK1-CA-mediated enhancement of ERK1/2 activation by a significant degree. In contrast, MKK1/2 inhibitor, U0126 was shown to augment the cytotoxicity of curcumin and MMC through downregulation of ERK1/2 activation and Rad51 expression. Depletion of endogenous Rad51 expression by siRad51 RNA transfection significantly enhanced MMC and/or curcumin induced cell death and cell growth inhibition. In contrast, an overexpression of Rad51 protected lung cancer cells from synergistic cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin and MMC. We concluded that Rad51 inhibition may be an additional action mechanism for enhancing the chemosensitization of MMC by curcumin in NSCLC. - Highlights: > Curcumin downregulates MKK-ERK-mediated Rad51 expression. > Curcumin enhances mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity. > Rad51 protects cells from cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin and mitomycin C. > Rad51 inhibition enhances the chemosensitization of mitomycin C by

  19. A novel PLAG1-RAD51L1 gene fusion resulting from a t(8;14)(q12;q24) in a case of lipoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Deen, Mazin; Ebrahim, Salah; Schloff, Debbie; Mohamed, Anwar N

    2013-06-01

    Lipoblastomas are rare benign tumors that arise from embryonic adipose tissue and occur predominantly in the pediatric population. Here, we report a case of lipoblastoma in an 8-month-old boy. Surgical excision and subsequent histopathologic examination were consistent with features of lipoblastoma. Chromosome analysis of the tumor revealed a clonal unbalanced t(8;14) translocation. Genomic microarray analysis of the tumor delineated the exact breakpoints at 8q12.1 and 14q24.1, which involved the PLAG1 and RADA51L1 genes, respectively. Furthermore, fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated that the translocation fused the PLAG1-RAD51L1 genes. These results suggest that RAD51L1 is an alternative fusion partner gene for the PLAG1 gene in a lipoblastoma with an 8q12 rearrangement. PMID:23890983

  20. Increased expression of SET domain-containing proteins and decreased expression of Rad51 in different classes of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Si; Li, Yiyang; Xu, Hongmei; Wang, Kaichen; Li, Nan; Li, Jia; Sun, Tao; Xu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, we aimed to examine whether SET domain-containing methyltransferases are up-regulated in different classes of renal cell carcinoma. We immunoblotted against SET domain and quantified the expression of these modular domains. Furthermore, we examined the expression of Rad51, the key protein that confers genomic stability. There was enhanced expression of SET domain-containing histone methyltransferases in whole lysates of all classes of renal carcinoma. In metastatic high grade clear cell carcinoma, this expression was more pronounced. Though we could not demonstrate direct correlation, we showed that epigenetic modification by methylation is associated with decreased genomic translation of Rad51. PMID:27170370

  1. Oversized AAV Transductifon Is Mediated via a DNA-PKcs-independent, Rad51C-dependent Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Li, Chengwen; Bellon, Isabella; Yin, Chaoying; Chavala, Sai; Pryadkina, Marina; Richard, Isabelle; Samulski, Richard Jude

    2013-01-01

    A drawback of gene therapy using adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the DNA packaging restriction of the viral capsid (<4.7 kb). Recent observations demonstrate oversized AAV genome transduction through an unknown mechanism. Herein, AAV production using an oversized reporter (6.2 kb) resulted in chloroform and DNase-resistant particles harboring distinct “fragment” AAV (fAAV) genomes (5.0, 2.4, and 1.6 kb). Fractionation experiments determined that only the larger “fragments” mediated transduction in vitro, and relatively efficient transduction was also demonstrated in the muscle, the eye, and the liver. In contrast with concatemerization-dependent large-gene delivery by split AAV, fAAV transduction is independent of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) in vitro and in vivo while disproportionately reliant on the DNA strand–annealing protein Rad51C. Importantly, fAAV's unique dependence on DNA repair proteins, compared with intact AAV, strongly suggests that the majority of oversized AAV transduction is mediated by fragmented genomes. Although fAAV transduction is less efficient than intact AAV, it is enhanced fourfold in muscle and sevenfold in the retina compared with split AAV transduction. Furthermore, fAAV carrying codon-optimized therapeutic dysferlin cDNA in a 7.5 kb expression cassette restored dysferlin levels in a dystrophic model. Collectively, oversized AAV genome transduction requires unique DNA repair pathways and offers an alternative, more efficient strategy for large-gene therapy. PMID:23939025

  2. Homologous Recombination Repair Signaling in Chemical Carcinogenesis: Prolonged Particulate Hexavalent Chromium Exposure Suppresses the Rad51 Response in Human Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Qin; Xie, Hong; Wise, Sandra S.; Browning, Cynthia L.; Thompson, Kelsey N.; Holmes, Amie L.; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to focus on hexavalent chromium, [Cr(VI)], a chemical carcinogen and major public health concern, and consider its ability to impact DNA double strand break repair. We further focused on particulate Cr(VI), because it is the more potent carcinogenic form of Cr(VI). DNA double strand break repair serves to protect cells against the detrimental effects of DNA double strand breaks. For particulate Cr(VI), data show DNA double strand break repair must be overcome for neoplastic transformation to occur. Acute Cr(VI) exposures reveal a robust DNA double strand break repair response, however, longer exposures have not been considered. Using the comet assay, we found longer exposures to particulate zinc chromate induced concentration-dependent increases in DNA double strand breaks indicating breaks were occurring throughout the exposure time. Acute (24 h) exposure induced DNA double strand break repair signaling by inducing Mre11 foci formation, ATM phosphorylation and phosphorylated ATM foci formation, Rad51 protein levels and Rad51 foci formation. However, longer exposures reduced the Rad51 response. These data indicate a major chemical carcinogen can simultaneously induce DNA double strand breaks and alter their repair and describe a new and important aspect of the carcinogenic mechanism for Cr(VI). PMID:25173789

  3. Expression of EhRAD54, EhRAD51, and EhBLM proteins during DNA repair by homologous recombination in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Charcas-Lopez, Ma del Socorro; Garcia-Morales, Lorena; Pezet-Valdez, Marisol; Lopez-Camarillo, Cesar; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom; Marchat, Laurence A

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, exhibits a great genome plasticity that is probably related to homologous recombination events. It contains the RAD52 epistasis group genes, including Ehrad51 and Ehrad54, and the Ehblm gene, which are key homologous recombination factors in other organisms. Ehrad51 and Ehrad54 genes are differentially transcribed in trophozoites when DNA double-strand breaks are induced by ultraviolet-C irradiation. Moreover, the EhRAD51 recombinase is overexpressed at 30 min in the nucleus. Here, we extend our analysis of the homologous recombination mechanism in E. histolytica by studying EhRAD51, EhRAD54, and EhBLM expression in response to DNA damage. Bioinformatic analyses show that EhRAD54 has the molecular features of homologous proteins, indicating that it may have similar functions. Western blot assays evidence the differential expression of EhRAD51, EhRAD54, and EhBLM at different times after DNA damage, suggesting their potential roles in the different steps of homologous recombination in this protozoan. PMID:24534563

  4. Expression of EhRAD54, EhRAD51, and EhBLM proteins during DNA repair by homologous recombination in Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    del Socorro Charcas-Lopez, Ma.; Garcia-Morales, Lorena; Pezet-Valdez, Marisol; Lopez-Camarillo, Cesar; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom; Marchat, Laurence A.

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, exhibits a great genome plasticity that is probably related to homologous recombination events. It contains the RAD52 epistasis group genes, including Ehrad51 and Ehrad54, and the Ehblm gene, which are key homologous recombination factors in other organisms. Ehrad51 and Ehrad54 genes are differentially transcribed in trophozoites when DNA double-strand breaks are induced by ultraviolet-C irradiation. Moreover, the EhRAD51 recombinase is overexpressed at 30 min in the nucleus. Here, we extend our analysis of the homologous recombination mechanism in E. histolytica by studying EhRAD51, EhRAD54, and EhBLM expression in response to DNA damage. Bioinformatic analyses show that EhRAD54 has the molecular features of homologous proteins, indicating that it may have similar functions. Western blot assays evidence the differential expression of EhRAD51, EhRAD54, and EhBLM at different times after DNA damage, suggesting their potential roles in the different steps of homologous recombination in this protozoan. PMID:24534563

  5. Human DNA Helicase B Functions in Cellular Homologous Recombination and Stimulates Rad51-Mediated 5′-3′ Heteroduplex Extension In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hanjian; Yan, Peijun; Fanning, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination is involved in the repair of DNA damage and collapsed replication fork, and is critical for the maintenance of genomic stability. Its process involves a network of proteins with different enzymatic activities. Human DNA helicase B (HDHB) is a robust 5′-3′ DNA helicase which accumulates on chromatin in cells exposed to DNA damage. HDHB facilitates cellular recovery from replication stress, but its role in DNA damage response remains unclear. Here we report that HDHB silencing results in reduced sister chromatid exchange, impaired homologous recombination repair, and delayed RPA late-stage foci formation induced by ionizing radiation. Ectopically expressed HDHB colocalizes with Rad51, Rad52, RPA, and ssDNA. In vitro, HDHB stimulates Rad51-mediated heteroduplex extension in 5′-3′ direction. A helicase-defective mutant HDHB failed to promote this reaction. Our studies implicate HDHB promotes homologous recombination in vivo and stimulates 5′-3′ heteroduplex extension during Rad51-mediated strand exchange in vitro. PMID:25617833

  6. Assessment of DNA binding to human Rad51 protein by using quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy: effects of ADP and BRC4-28 peptide inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Esnault, Charles; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Takahashi, Masayuki; Casse, Nathalie; Delorme, Nicolas; Louarn, Guy; Fleury, Fabrice; Pilard, Jean-François; Chénais, Benoît

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of human Rad51 protein (HsRad51) with single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (ssDNA) was investigated by using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) monitoring and atomic force microscopy (AFM) visualization. Gold surfaces for QCM and AFM were modified by electrografting of the in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from the sulfanilic acid to obtain the organic layer Au-ArSO3 H. The Au-ArSO3 H layer was activated by using a solution of PCl5 in CH2 Cl2 to give a Au-ArSO2 Cl layer. The modified surface was then used to immobilize long ssDNA molecules. The results obtained showed that the presence of adenosine diphosphate promotes the protein autoassociation rather than nucleation around DNA. In addition, when the BRC4-28 peptide inhibitor was used, both QCM and AFM confirmed the inhibitory effect of BRC4-28 toward HsRad51 autoassociation. Altogether these results show the suitability of this modified surface to investigate the kinetics and structure of DNA-protein interactions and for the screening of inhibitors. PMID:25208912

  7. Augmentation of Response to Chemotherapy by microRNA-506 Through Regulation of RAD51 in Serous Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoyan; Yang, Da; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Pecot, Chad V.; Sun, Yan; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Li, Xia; Ji, Ping; Cogdell, David; Hu, Limei; Wang, Yingmei; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Shmulevich, Ilya; De Cecco, Loris; Chen, Kexin; Mezzanzanica, Delia; Xue, Fengxia; Sood, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chemoresistance is a major challenge in cancer treatment. miR-506 is a potent inhibitor of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is also associated with chemoresistance. We characterized the role of miR-506 in chemotherapy response in high-grade serous ovarian cancers. Methods: We used Kaplan-Meier and log-rank methods to analyze the relationship between miR-506 and progression-free and overall survival in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n = 468) and Bagnoli (n = 130) datasets, in vitro experiments to study whether miR-506 is associated with homologous recombination, and response to chemotherapy agents. We used an orthotopic ovarian cancer mouse model (n = 10 per group) to test the effect of miR-506 on cisplatin and PARP inhibitor sensitivity. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: MiR-506 was associated with better response to therapy and longer progression-free and overall survival in two independent epithelial ovarian cancer patient cohorts (PFS: high vs low miR-506 expression; Bagnoli: hazard ratio [HR] = 3.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.90 to 4.70, P < .0001; TCGA: HR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.00 to 2.25, P = 0.04). MiR-506 sensitized cells to DNA damage through directly targeting the double-strand DNA damage repair gene RAD51. Systemic delivery of miR-506 in 8–12 week old female athymic nude mice statistically significantly augmented the cisplatin and olaparib response (mean tumor weight ± SD, control miRNA plus cisplatin vs miR-506 plus cisplatin: 0.36±0.05g vs 0.07±0.02g, P < .001; control miRNA plus olaparib vs miR-506 plus olaparib: 0.32±0.13g vs 0.05±0.02g, P = .045, respectively), thus recapitulating the clinical observation. Conclusions: MiR-506 is a robust clinical marker for chemotherapy response and survival in serous ovarian cancers and has important therapeutic value in sensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapy. PMID:25995442

  8. The role of repair protein Rad51 in synergistic cytotoxicity and mutagenicity induced by epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor (Gefitinib, Iressa{sup R}) and benzo[a]pyrene in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, J.-C.; Hong, J.-H.; Wang, L.-H.; Lin, Y.-W.

    2008-05-01

    Rad51 protein is essential for homologous recombination repair of DNA damage, and is over-expressed in chemo- or radioresistant carcinomas. The polycyclic hydrocarbon carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) affects MAPKs transduction pathways. Gefitinib (Iressa{sup R}, ZD1839) is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor that blocks growth factor-mediated cell proliferation and ERK1/2 activation. We hypothesized that gefitinib enhances B[a]P-mediated cytotoxicity by decreasing ERK1/2 activation. Exposure of human lung cancer cells to gefitinib decreased B[a]P-elicited ERK1/2 activation and induced Rad51 protein expression. Gefitinib and B[a]P co-treatment decreased Rad51 protein stability by triggering degradation via a 26S proteasome-dependent pathway. Expression of constitutive active MKK1/2 vectors (MKK1/2-CA) rescues the decreased ERK1/2 activity, and restores Rad51 protein level and stability under gefitinib and B[a]P co-treatment. Gefitinib enhances B[a]P-induced growth inhibition, cytotoxicity and mutagenicity. Co-treatment with gefitinib and B[a]P can further inhibit cell growth significantly after depletion of endogenous Rad51 by siRad51 RNA transfection. Enhancement of ERK1/2 activation by MKK1-CA expression decrease B[a]P- and gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity, and B[a]P-induced mutagenicity. Rad51 protein protects lung cancer cells from synergistic cytotoxic and mutagenic effects induced by gefitinib and B[a]P. Suppression of Rad51 protein expression may be a novel lung cancer therapeutic modality to overcome drug resistance to gefitinib.

  9. RAD51 135G>C and TP53 Arg72Pro polymorphisms and susceptibility to breast cancer in Serbian women.

    PubMed

    Krivokuca, Ana M; Malisic, Emina J; Dobricic, Jelena D; Brotto, Ksenija V; Cavic, Milena R; Jankovic, Radmila N; Tomasevic, Zorica I; Brankovic-Magic, Mirjana V

    2014-06-01

    Breast cancer is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental factors involved in its etiology. An important role of polymorphisms in genes involved in DNA repair has been reported related to breast cancer risk. We conducted a case-control study in order to investigate the association of RAD51 135G>C and TP53 Arg72Pro polymorphisms with breast cancer in Serbian women.48 BRCA negative women with breast cancer and family history of breast/ovarian cancer (hereditary group), 107 women with breast cancer but without family history of the disease (sporadic group) and 114 healthy women without a history of the disease (control group) were included. Restriction fragment length polymorphism was used for genotyping. Genotype and allelic frequencies, the odds ratio (OR) and the 95 % confidence interval (CI) were calculated as an estimate of relative risk. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was tested using χ(2) test. Significance was considered for p < 0.05. RAD51 135G>C showed statistically significant association of CC genotype and increased breast cancer risk (OR 10.28, 95 % CI 1.12-94.5) in hereditary group of patients compared to the control group. Regarding the TP53 Arg72Pro, we showed statistical significance for ProPro + ProArg comparing to ArgArg (OR 2.34, 95 %, CI 1.17-4.70) in hereditary compared to sporadic group. RAD51 135G>C contributes to hereditary breast cancer in Serbian population, with CC genotype as a risk factor. We also found that carriers of Pro allele of TP53 codon 72 is related to hereditary cancer comparing to sporadic one, which indicates it as a potential risk factor for hereditary form of disease. PMID:24114315

  10. Increased γ-H2AX and Rad51 DNA Repair Biomarker Expression in Human Cell Lines Resistant to the Chemotherapeutic Agents Nitrogen Mustard and Cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Adam-Zahir, Sheba; Plowman, Piers N; Bourton, Emma C; Sharif, Fariha; Parris, Christopher N

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic anticancer drugs mediate cytotoxicity by a number of mechanisms. However, alkylating agents which induce DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICL) are amongst the most effective anticancer agents and often form the mainstay of many anticancer therapies. The effectiveness of these drugs can be limited by the development of drug resistance in cancer cells and many studies have demonstrated that alterations in DNA repair kinetics are responsible for drug resistance. In this study we developed two cell lines resistant to the alkylating agents nitrogen mustard (HN2) and cisplatin (Pt). To determine if drug resistance was associated with enhanced ICL DNA repair we used immunocytochemistry and imaging flow cytometry to quantitate the number of γ-H2AX and Rad51 foci in the nuclei of cells after drug exposure. γ-H2AX was used to evaluate DNA strand breaks caused by repair incision nucleases and Rad51 was used to measure the activity of homologous recombination in the repair of ICL. In the drug-resistant derivative cell lines there was overall a significant increase in the number and persistence of both γ-H2AX and Rad51 foci in the nuclei of cells over a 72-hour period, when compared to the non-resistant parental cell lines (ANOVA p < 0.0001). In a Pt-resistant ovarian cancer cell line (A2780cis(R)) a similar enhancement of DNA repair was observed when compared to the non-drug-resistant wild-type ovarian cancer cells (A2780) following exposure to HN2. Our data suggest that using DNA repair biomarkers to evaluate mechanisms of resistance in cancer cell lines and human tumours may be of experimental and clinical benefit. We concede, however, that examination of a larger population of cell lines and tumours is required to fully evaluate the validity of this approach. PMID:26138778

  11. Aberrant Double-Strand Break Repair Resulting in Half Crossovers in Mutants Defective for Rad51 or the DNA Polymerase δ Complex▿

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Catherine E.; Lam, Alicia F.; Symington, Lorraine S.

    2009-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an error-free mechanism for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Most DSB repair events occur by gene conversion limiting loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for markers downstream of the site of repair and restricting deleterious chromosome rearrangements. DSBs with only one end available for repair undergo strand invasion into a homologous duplex DNA, followed by replication to the chromosome end (break-induced replication [BIR]), leading to LOH for all markers downstream of the site of strand invasion. Using a transformation-based assay system, we show that most of the apparent BIR events that arise in diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae rad51Δ mutants are due to half crossovers instead of BIR. These events lead to extensive LOH because one arm of chromosome III is deleted. This outcome is also observed in pol32Δ and pol3-ct mutants, defective for components of the DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ) complex. The half crossovers formed in Pol δ complex mutants show evidence of limited homology-dependent DNA synthesis and are partially Mus81 dependent, suggesting that strand invasion occurs and the stalled intermediate is subsequently cleaved. In contrast to rad51Δ mutants, the Pol δ complex mutants are proficient for repair of a 238-bp gap by gene conversion. Thus, the BIR defect observed for rad51 mutants is due to strand invasion failure, whereas the Pol δ complex mutants are proficient for strand invasion but unable to complete extensive tracts of recombination-initiated DNA synthesis. PMID:19139272

  12. Rad18 is required for functional interactions between FANCD2, BRCA2, and Rad51 to repair DNA topoisomerase 1-poisons induced lesions and promote fork recovery

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Kaushlendra; Mani, Chinnadurai; Clark, David W; Palle, Komaraiah

    2016-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) and its analogues are chemotherapeutic agents that covalently and reversibly link DNA Topoisomerase I to its nicked DNA intermediate eliciting the formation of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) during replication. The repair of these DSB involves multiple DNA damage response and repair proteins. Here we demonstrate that CPT-induced DNA damage promotes functional interactions between BRCA2, FANCD2, Rad18, and Rad51 to repair the replication-associated DSB through homologous recombination (HR). Loss of any of these proteins leads to equal disruption of HR repair, causes chromosomal aberrations and sensitizes cells to CPT. Rad18 appears to function upstream in this repair pathway as its downregulation prevents activation of FANCD2, diminishes BRCA2 and Rad51 protein levels, formation of nuclear foci of all three proteins and recovery of stalled or collapsed replication forks in response to CPT. Taken together this work further elucidates the complex interplay of DNA repair proteins in the repair of replication-associated DSB. PMID:26871286

  13. RAD51 135G>C substitution increases breast cancer risk in an ethnic-specific manner: a meta-analysis on 21,236 cases and 19,407 controls.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Deepa; Pooja, Singh; Kumar, Sandeep; Rajender, Singh

    2015-01-01

    RAD51 is a homolog of bacterial RecA protein, which plays an important role in preserving stability of the genome. RAD51 interacts with BRCA1 and BRCA2 for homologous recombination repair. A functional polymorphism (135G > C) in the RAD51 gene has been a subject of great interest, which is evidenced by at least 28 case-control studies and eight meta-analyses undertaken on this polymorphism till now. We undertook a meta-analysis on RAD51 135G > C data for 21,236 cases and 19,407 controls pooled from 28 studies on breast cancer in women. Pooled data analysis suggested a significant association of the substitution with breast cancer in the recessive model (GG + GC versus CC) and in the co-dominant models comparing GG versus CC and GC versus CC. Analysis of the results suggested that 'CC' genotype is a significant breast cancer risk factor in comparison to 'GG' and 'GC' genotypes. We also undertook pooled analyses on different ethnic groups and found that 'CC' was a strong risk factor in Caucasians, but not in East-Asians and populations of mixed ethnicity. In conclusion, the RAD51 135G > C substitution in the homozygous form (CC) increases the risk of breast cancer in an ethnic-specific manner. PMID:26108708

  14. CNS myelin wrapping is driven by actin disassembly.

    PubMed

    Zuchero, J Bradley; Fu, Meng-Meng; Sloan, Steven A; Ibrahim, Adiljan; Olson, Andrew; Zaremba, Anita; Dugas, Jason C; Wienbar, Sophia; Caprariello, Andrew V; Kantor, Christopher; Leonoudakis, Dmitri; Leonoudakus, Dmitri; Lariosa-Willingham, Karen; Kronenberg, Golo; Gertz, Karen; Soderling, Scott H; Miller, Robert H; Barres, Ben A

    2015-07-27

    Myelin is essential in vertebrates for the rapid propagation of action potentials, but the molecular mechanisms driving its formation remain largely unknown. Here we show that the initial stage of process extension and axon ensheathment by oligodendrocytes requires dynamic actin filament assembly by the Arp2/3 complex. Unexpectedly, subsequent myelin wrapping coincides with the upregulation of actin disassembly proteins and rapid disassembly of the oligodendrocyte actin cytoskeleton and does not require Arp2/3. Inducing loss of actin filaments drives oligodendrocyte membrane spreading and myelin wrapping in vivo, and the actin disassembly factor gelsolin is required for normal wrapping. We show that myelin basic protein, a protein essential for CNS myelin wrapping whose role has been unclear, is required for actin disassembly, and its loss phenocopies loss of actin disassembly proteins. Together, these findings provide insight into the molecular mechanism of myelin wrapping and identify it as an actin-independent form of mammalian cell motility. PMID:26166300

  15. Associations of UBE2I with RAD52, UBL1, p53, and RAD51 proteins in a yeast two-hybrid system

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Zhiyuan; Pardington-Purtymun, P.E.; Comeaux, J.C.

    1996-10-15

    The yeast RAD52-dependent pathway is involved in DNA recombination and double-strand break repair. Yeast ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBC9 participates in S- and M-phase cyclin degradation and mitotic control. Using the human RAD52 protein as the bait in a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified a human homolog of yeast UBC9, designated UBE2I, that interacts with RAD52, RAD51, p53, and a ubiquitin-like protein UBL1. These interactions are UBE2I-specific, since another DNA repair-related ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, RAD6 (UBC2), does not interact with these proteins. The interaction of UBE2I with RAD52 is mediated by RAD52`s self-association region. These results suggest that the RAD52-dependent processes, cell cycle control, p53-mediated pathway(s), and ubiquitination interact through human UBE2I. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Characterization of recombinase DMC1B and its functional role as Rad51 in DNA damage repair in Giardia duodenalis trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Torres-Huerta, Ana Laura; Martínez-Miguel, Rosa María; Bazán-Tejeda, María Luisa; Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa María

    2016-08-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a highly conserved pathway for the repair of chromosomes that harbor DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs). The recombinase RAD51 plays a key role by catalyzing the pairing of homologous DNA molecules and the exchange of information between them. Two putative DMC1 homologs (DMC1A and DMC1B) have been identified in Giardia duodenalis. In terms of sequences, GdDMC1A and GdDMC1B bear all of the characteristic recombinase domains: DNA binding domains (helix-turn-helix motif, loops 1 and 2), an ATPcap and Walker A and B motifs associated with ATP binding and hydrolysis. Because GdDMC1B is expressed at the trophozoite stage and GdDMC1A is expressed in the cyst stage, we cloned the giardial dmc1B gene and expressed and purified its protein to determine its activities, including DNA binding, ATP hydrolysis, and DNA strand exchange. Our results revealed that it possessed these activities, and they were modulated by divalent metal ions in different manners. GdDMC1B expression at the protein and transcript levels, as well as its subcellular localization in trophozoites upon DNA damage, was assessed. We found a significant increase in GdDMC1B transcript and protein levels after ionizing radiation treatment. Additionally, GdDMC1B protein was mostly located in the nucleus of trophozoites after DNA damage. These results indicate that GdDMC1B is the recombinase responsible for DSBs repair in the trophozoite; therefore, a functional Rad51 role is proposed for GdDMC1B. PMID:27234615

  17. The carboxyl-terminal of BRCA1 is required for subnuclear assembly of RAD51 after treatment with cisplatin but not ionizing radiation in human breast and ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Chenyi; Huang Peng; Liu Jinsong . E-mail: jliu@mdanderson.org

    2005-10-28

    BRCA1 plays an important role in maintaining genomic stability through its involvement in DNA repair. Although it is known that BRCA1 and RAD51 form distinct DNA repair subnuclear complexes, or foci, following environmental insults to the DNA, the role of BRCA1 in this process remains to be characterized. The purpose of the study was therefore to determine the role of BRCA1 in the formation of RAD51 foci following treatment with cisplatin and ionizing radiation. We found that although a functional BRCA1 is required for the subnuclear assembly of BRCA1 foci following treatment with either ionizing radiation or cisplatin, a functional BRCA1 is required for RAD51 foci to form following treatment with cisplatin but not with ionizing radiation. Similar results were obtained in SKOV-3 cells when the level of BRCA1 expression was knocked down by stable expression of a retrovirus-mediated small-interfering RNA against BRCA1. We also found that the carboxyl-terminal of BRCA1 contains uncharacterized phosphorylation sites that are responsive to cisplatin. The functional BRCA1 is also required for breast and ovarian cancer cells to mount resistance to cisplatin. These results suggest that the carboxyl-terminal of BRCA1 is required for the cisplatin-induced recruitment of RAD51 to the DNA-damage site, which may contribute to cisplatin resistance.

  18. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) of RAD51-G172T and XRCC2-41657C/T Homologous Recombination Repair Genes and the Risk of Triple- Negative Breast Cancer in Polish Women.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Magdalena M; Samulak, Dariusz; Romanowicz, Hanna; Smolarz, Beata

    2015-09-01

    Double strand DNA breaks are the most dangerous DNA damage which, if non-repaired or misrepaired, may result in genomic instability, cancer transformation or cell death. RAD51 and XRCC2 encode proteins that are important for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks by homologous recombination. Therefore, genetic variability in these genes may contribute to the occurrence and progression of triple-negative breast cancer. The polymorphisms of the XRCC2 gene -41657C/T (rs718282) and of the RAD51 gene, -172G/T (rs1801321), were investigated by PCR-RFLP in 70 patients with triple-negative breast cancer and 70 age- and sex matched non-cancer controls. The obtained results demonstrated a significant positive association between the RAD51 T/T genotype and TNBC, with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 4.94 (p = 0.001). The homozygous T/T genotype was found in 60 % of TNBC cases and in 14 % of the used controls. Variant 172 T allele of RAD51 increased cancer risk (OR = 2.81 (1.72-4.58), p < .0001). No significant associations were observed between -41657C/T genotype of XRCC2 and the incidence of TNBC. There were no significant differences between the distribution of XRCC2 -41657C/T genotypes in the subgroups assigned to histological grades. The obtained results indicate that the polymorphism of RAD51, but not of XRCC2 gene, may be positively associated with the incidence of triple-negative breast carcinoma in the population of Polish women. PMID:25743260

  19. Three New Genetic Loci (R1210C in CFH, Variants in COL8A1 and RAD51B) Are Independently Related to Progression to Advanced Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, Johanna M.; Reynolds, Robyn; Yu, Yi; Rosner, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the independent impact of new genetic variants on conversion to advanced stages of AMD, controlling for established risk factors, and to determine the contribution of genes in predictive models. Methods In this prospective longitudinal study of 2765 individuals, 777 subjects progressed to neovascular disease (NV) or geographic atrophy (GA) in either eye over 12 years. Recently reported genetic loci were assessed for their independent effects on incident advanced AMD after controlling for 6 established loci in 5 genes, and demographic, behavioral, and macular characteristics. New variants which remained significantly related to progression were then added to a final multivariate model to assess their independent effects. The contribution of genes to risk models was assessed using reclassification tables by determining risk within cross-classified quintiles for alternative models. Results Three new genetic variants were significantly related to progression: rare variant R1210C in CFH (hazard ratio (HR) 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2–5.3, P = 0.01), and common variants in genes COL8A1 (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1–3.5, P = 0.02) and RAD51B (HR 0.8, 95% CI 0.60–0.97, P = 0.03). The area under the curve statistic (AUC) was significantly higher for the 9 gene model (.884) vs the 0 gene model (.873), P = .01. AUC’s for the 9 vs 6 gene models were not significantly different, but reclassification analyses indicated significant added information for more genes, with adjusted odds ratios (OR) for progression within 5 years per one quintile increase in risk score of 2.7, P<0.001 for the 9 vs 6 loci model, and OR 3.5, P<0.001 for the 9 vs. 0 gene model. Similar results were seen for NV and GA. Conclusions Rare variant CFH R1210C and common variants in COL8A1 and RAD51B plus six genes in previous models contribute additional predictive information for advanced AMD beyond macular and behavioral phenotypes. PMID:24498017

  20. Sensitization of Tumor to {sup 212}Pb Radioimmunotherapy by Gemcitabine Involves Initial Abrogation of G2 Arrest and Blocked DNA Damage Repair by Interference With Rad51

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To elucidate the mechanism of the therapeutic efficacy of targeted α-particle radiation therapy using {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab together with gemcitabine for treatment of disseminated peritoneal cancers. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing human colon cancer LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts were pretreated with gemcitabine, followed by {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab and compared with controls. Results: Treatment with {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab increased the apoptotic rate in the S-phase-arrested tumors induced by gemcitabine at earlier time points (6 to 24 hours). {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab after gemcitabine pretreatment abrogated G2/M arrest at the same time points, which may be associated with the inhibition of Chk1 phosphorylation and, in turn, cell cycle perturbation, resulting in apoptosis. {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment after gemcitabine pretreatment caused depression of DNA synthesis, DNA double-strand breaks, accumulation of unrepaired DNA, and down-regulation of Rad51 protein, indicating that DNA damage repair was blocked. In addition, modification in the chromatin structure of p21 may be associated with transcriptionally repressed chromatin states, indicating that the open structure was delayed at earlier time points. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the cell-killing efficacy of {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab after gemcitabine pretreatment may be associated with abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint, inhibition of DNA damage repair, and chromatin remodeling.

  1. Sensitization of Tumor to 212Pb-radioimmunotherapy by gemcitabine involves initial abrogation of G2 arrest and blocked DNA damage repair by interference with Rad51

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the mechanism of the therapeutic efficacy of targeted α-particle radiation therapy using 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab together with gemcitabine (Gem) for treatment of disseminated peritoneal cancers. Methods and Materials Mice bearing human colon cancer LS-174T i.p. xenografts were pre-treated with Gem, followed by 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab and compared to controls. Results Treatment with 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab increased the apoptotic rate in the S-phase arrested tumors induced by Gem at earlier time points (6 to 24 hours). 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab after Gem pre-treatment abrogated G2/M arrest at the same time points, which may be associated with the inhibition of Chk1 phosphorylation and, in turn, cell cycle perturbation, resulting in apoptosis. 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment post-Gem pre-treatment caused depression of DNA synthesis, DNA double strand breaks, accumulation of unrepaired DNA, and down-regulation of Rad51 protein, indicating that DNA damage repair was blocked. In addition, modification in the chromatin structure of p21 may be associated with transcriptionally repressed chromatin states, indicating the open structure was delayed at earlier time points. Conclusion These findings suggest that the cell killing efficacy of 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab following Gem pre-treatment may be associated with abrogation of G2/M checkpoint, inhibition of DNA damage repair, and chromatin remodeling. PMID:23200172

  2. A genome-wide IR-induced RAD51 foci RNAi screen identifies CDC73 involved in chromatin remodeling for DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Patrick; Lundin, Cecilia; Evers, Bastiaan; Ebner, Daniel; Bauerschmidt, Christina; Kingham, Guy; Palmai-Pallag, Timea; Mortusewicz, Oliver; Frings, Oliver; Sonnhammer, Erik; Helleday, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To identify new regulators of homologous recombination repair, we carried out a genome-wide short-interfering RNA screen combined with ionizing irradiation using RAD51 foci formation as readout. All candidates were confirmed by independent short-interfering RNAs and validated in secondary assays like recombination repair activity and RPA foci formation. Network analysis of the top modifiers identified gene clusters involved in recombination repair as well as components of the ribosome, the proteasome and the spliceosome, which are known to be required for effective DNA repair. We identified and characterized the RNA polymerase II-associated protein CDC73/Parafibromin as a new player in recombination repair and show that it is critical for genomic stability. CDC73 interacts with components of the SCF/Cullin and INO80/NuA4 chromatin-remodeling complexes to promote Histone ubiquitination. Our findings indicate that CDC73 is involved in local chromatin decondensation at sites of DNA damage to promote DNA repair. This function of CDC73 is related to but independent of its role in transcriptional elongation. PMID:27462432

  3. Specific inhibition of Wee1 kinase and Rad51 recombinase: A strategy to enhance the sensitivity of leukemic T-cells to ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Havelek, Radim; Cmielova, Jana; Kralovec, Karel; Bruckova, Lenka; Bilkova, Zuzana; Fousova, Ivana; Sinkorova, Zuzana; Vavrova, Jirina; Rezacova, Martina

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Pre-treatment with the inhibitors increased the sensitivity of Jurkat cells to irradiation. • Combining both inhibitors together resulted in a G2 cell cycle arrest abrogation in Jurkat. • Jurkat cells pre-treated with inhibitors were positive for γH2AX foci 24 h upon irradiation. • Pre-treatment with Rad51 RI-1 had no effect on apoptosis induction in MOLT-4 cells. • When dosed together, the combination decreased MOLT-4 cell survival. - Abstract: Present-day oncology sees at least two-thirds of cancer patients receiving radiation therapy as a part of their anticancer treatment. The objectives of the current study were to investigate the effects of the small molecule inhibitors of Wee1 kinase II (681641) and Rad51 (RI-1) on cell cycle progression, DNA double-strand breaks repair and apoptosis following ionizing radiation exposure in human leukemic T-cells Jurkat and MOLT-4. Pre-treatment with the Wee1 681641 or Rad51 RI-1 inhibitor alone increased the sensitivity of Jurkat cells to irradiation, however combining both inhibitors together resulted in a further enhancement of apoptosis. Jurkat cells pre-treated with inhibitors were positive for γH2AX foci 24 h upon irradiation. MOLT-4 cells were less affected by inhibitors application prior to ionizing radiation exposure. Pre-treatment with Rad51 RI-1 had no effect on apoptosis induction; however Wee1 681641 increased ionizing radiation-induced cell death in MOLT-4 cells.

  4. Identification of the meiotic toolkit in diatoms and exploration of meiosis-specific SPO11 and RAD51 homologs in the sexual species Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata and Seminavis robusta

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Patil, Shrikant; Moeys, Sara; von Dassow, Peter; Huysman, Marie J. J.; Mapleson, Daniel; De Veylder, Lieven; Sanges, Remo; Vyverman, Wim; Montresor, Marina; Ferrante, Maria Immacolata

    2015-11-14

    Sexual reproduction is an obligate phase in the life cycle of most eukaryotes. Meiosis varies among organisms, which is reflected by the variability of the gene set associated to the process. Diatoms are unicellular organisms that belong to the stramenopile clade and have unique life cycles that can include a sexual phase. The exploration of five diatom genomes and one diatom transcriptome led to the identification of 42 genes potentially involved in meiosis. While these include the majority of known meiosis-related genes, several meiosis-specific genes, including DMC1, could not be identified. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses supported gene identification and revealed ancestralmore » loss and recent expansion in the RAD51 family in diatoms. The two sexual species Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata and Seminavis robusta were used to explore the expression of meiosis-related genes: RAD21, SPO11-2, RAD51-A, RAD51-B and RAD51-C were upregulated during meiosis, whereas other paralogs in these families showed no differential expression patterns, suggesting that they may play a role during vegetative divisions. An almost identical toolkit is shared among Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and Fragilariopsis cylindrus, as well as two species for which sex has not been observed, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana, suggesting that these two may retain a facultative sexual phase. Lastly, our results reveal the conserved meiotic toolkit in six diatom species and indicate that Stramenopiles share major modifications of canonical meiosis processes ancestral to eukaryotes, with important divergences in each Kingdom.« less

  5. Low-dose irradiation promotes Rad51 expression by down-regulating miR-193b-3p in hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eon-Seok; Won, Yeo Jin; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Park, Daeui; Bae, Jin-Han; Park, Seong-Joon; Noh, Sung Jin; Kang, Yeong-Rok; Choi, Si Ho; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Heo, Kyu; Yang, Kwangmo; Son, Tae Gen

    2016-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that there is a relationship between microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene silencing and low-dose irradiation (LDIR) responses. Here, alterations of miRNA expression in response to LDIR exposure in male BALB/c mice and three different types of hepatocytes were investigated. The miRNome of the LDIR-exposed mouse spleens (0.01 Gy, 6.5 mGy/h) was analyzed, and the expression of miRNA and mRNA was validated by qRT-PCR. Western blotting, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and luciferase assays were also performed to evaluate the interaction between miRNAs and their target genes and to gain insight into the regulation of miRNA expression. The expression of miRNA-193b-3p was down-regulated in the mouse spleen and liver and in various hepatocytes (NCTC, Hepa, and HepG2 cell lines) in response to LDIR. The down-regulation of miR-193b-3p expression was caused by histone deacetylation on the miR-193b-3p promoter in the HepG2 cells irradiated with 0.01 Gy. However, the alteration of histone deacetylation and miR-193b-3p and Rad51 expression in response to LDIR was restored by pretreatment with N-acetyl-cyctein. In conclusion, we provide evidence that miRNA responses to LDIR include the modulation of cellular stress responses and repair mechanisms. PMID:27225532

  6. Low-dose irradiation promotes Rad51 expression by down-regulating miR-193b-3p in hepatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eon-Seok; Won, Yeo Jin; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Park, Daeui; Bae, Jin-Han; Park, Seong-Joon; Noh, Sung Jin; Kang, Yeong-Rok; Choi, Si Ho; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Heo, Kyu; Yang, Kwangmo; Son, Tae Gen

    2016-05-01

    Current evidence indicates that there is a relationship between microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene silencing and low-dose irradiation (LDIR) responses. Here, alterations of miRNA expression in response to LDIR exposure in male BALB/c mice and three different types of hepatocytes were investigated. The miRNome of the LDIR-exposed mouse spleens (0.01 Gy, 6.5 mGy/h) was analyzed, and the expression of miRNA and mRNA was validated by qRT-PCR. Western blotting, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and luciferase assays were also performed to evaluate the interaction between miRNAs and their target genes and to gain insight into the regulation of miRNA expression. The expression of miRNA-193b-3p was down-regulated in the mouse spleen and liver and in various hepatocytes (NCTC, Hepa, and HepG2 cell lines) in response to LDIR. The down-regulation of miR-193b-3p expression was caused by histone deacetylation on the miR-193b-3p promoter in the HepG2 cells irradiated with 0.01 Gy. However, the alteration of histone deacetylation and miR-193b-3p and Rad51 expression in response to LDIR was restored by pretreatment with N-acetyl-cyctein. In conclusion, we provide evidence that miRNA responses to LDIR include the modulation of cellular stress responses and repair mechanisms.

  7. Low-dose irradiation promotes Rad51 expression by down-regulating miR-193b-3p in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eon-Seok; Won, Yeo Jin; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Park, Daeui; Bae, Jin-Han; Park, Seong-Joon; Noh, Sung Jin; Kang, Yeong-Rok; Choi, Si Ho; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Heo, Kyu; Yang, Kwangmo; Son, Tae Gen

    2016-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that there is a relationship between microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene silencing and low-dose irradiation (LDIR) responses. Here, alterations of miRNA expression in response to LDIR exposure in male BALB/c mice and three different types of hepatocytes were investigated. The miRNome of the LDIR-exposed mouse spleens (0.01 Gy, 6.5 mGy/h) was analyzed, and the expression of miRNA and mRNA was validated by qRT-PCR. Western blotting, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and luciferase assays were also performed to evaluate the interaction between miRNAs and their target genes and to gain insight into the regulation of miRNA expression. The expression of miRNA-193b-3p was down-regulated in the mouse spleen and liver and in various hepatocytes (NCTC, Hepa, and HepG2 cell lines) in response to LDIR. The down-regulation of miR-193b-3p expression was caused by histone deacetylation on the miR-193b-3p promoter in the HepG2 cells irradiated with 0.01 Gy. However, the alteration of histone deacetylation and miR-193b-3p and Rad51 expression in response to LDIR was restored by pretreatment with N-acetyl-cyctein. In conclusion, we provide evidence that miRNA responses to LDIR include the modulation of cellular stress responses and repair mechanisms. PMID:27225532

  8. Specific inhibition of Wee1 kinase and Rad51 recombinase: a strategy to enhance the sensitivity of leukemic T-cells to ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Havelek, Radim; Cmielova, Jana; Kralovec, Karel; Bruckova, Lenka; Bilkova, Zuzana; Fousova, Ivana; Sinkorova, Zuzana; Vavrova, Jirina; Rezacova, Martina

    2014-10-24

    Present-day oncology sees at least two-thirds of cancer patients receiving radiation therapy as a part of their anticancer treatment. The objectives of the current study were to investigate the effects of the small molecule inhibitors of Wee1 kinase II (681641) and Rad51 (RI-1) on cell cycle progression, DNA double-strand breaks repair and apoptosis following ionizing radiation exposure in human leukemic T-cells Jurkat and MOLT-4. Pre-treatment with the Wee1 681641 or Rad51 RI-1 inhibitor alone increased the sensitivity of Jurkat cells to irradiation, however combining both inhibitors together resulted in a further enhancement of apoptosis. Jurkat cells pre-treated with inhibitors were positive for γH2AX foci 24h upon irradiation. MOLT-4 cells were less affected by inhibitors application prior to ionizing radiation exposure. Pre-treatment with Rad51 RI-1 had no effect on apoptosis induction; however Wee1 681641 increased ionizing radiation-induced cell death in MOLT-4 cells. PMID:25285634

  9. Gelsolin mediates calcium-dependent disassembly of Listeria actin tails

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Laura; Arnaudeau, Serge; Gibson, Bruce; Li, Wei; Krause, Ryoko; Hao, Binghua; Bamburg, James R.; Lew, Daniel P.; Demaurex, Nicolas; Southwick, Frederick

    2005-01-01

    The role of intracellular Ca2+ in the regulation of actin filament assembly and disassembly has not been clearly defined. We show that reduction of intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) to <40 nM in Listeria monocytogenes-infected, EGFP–actin-transfected Madin–Darby canine kidney cells results in a 3-fold lengthening of actin filament tails. This increase in tail length is the consequence of marked slowing of the actin filament disassembly rate, without a significant change in assembly rate. The Ca2+-sensitive actin-severing protein gelsolin concentrates in the Listeria rocket tails at normal resting [Ca2+]i and disassociates from the tails when [Ca2+]i is lowered. Reduction in [Ca2+]i also blocks the severing activity of gelsolin, but not actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin microinjected into Listeria-infected cells. In Xenopus extracts, Listeria tail lengths are also calcium-sensitive, markedly shortening on addition of calcium. Immunodepletion of gelsolin, but not Xenopus ADF/cofilin, eliminates calcium-sensitive actin-filament shortening. Listeria tail length is also calcium-insensitive in gelsolin-null mouse embryo fibroblasts. We conclude that gelsolin is the primary Ca2+-sensitive actin filament recycling protein in the cell and is capable of enhancing Listeria actin tail disassembly at normal resting [Ca2+]i (145 nM). These experiments illustrate the unique and complementary functions of gelsolin and ADF/cofilin in the recycling of actin filaments. PMID:15671163

  10. Mechanism of ciliary disassembly.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yinwen; Meng, Dan; Zhu, Bing; Pan, Junmin

    2016-05-01

    As motile organelles and sensors, cilia play pivotal roles in cell physiology, development and organ homeostasis. Ciliary defects are associated with a class of cilia-related diseases or developmental disorders, termed ciliopathies. Even though the presence of cilia is required for diverse functions, cilia can be removed through ciliary shortening or resorption that necessitates disassembly of the cilium, which occurs normally during cell cycle progression, cell differentiation and in response to cellular stress. The functional significance of ciliary resorption is highlighted in controlling the G1-S transition during cell cycle progression. Internal or external cues that trigger ciliary resorption initiate signaling cascades that regulate several downstream events including depolymerization of axonemal microtubules, dynamic changes in actin and the ciliary membrane, regulation of intraflagellar transport and posttranslational modifications of ciliary proteins. To ensure ciliary resorption, both the active disassembly of the cilium and the simultaneous inhibition of ciliary assembly must be coordinately regulated. PMID:26869233

  11. Effect of species-specific differences in chromosome morphology on chromatin compaction and the frequency and distribution of RAD51 and MLH1 foci in two bovid species: cattle (Bos taurus) and the common eland (Taurotragus oryx).

    PubMed

    Sebestova, Hana; Vozdova, Miluse; Kubickova, Svatava; Cernohorska, Halina; Kotrba, Radim; Rubes, Jiri

    2016-03-01

    Meiotic recombination between homologous chromosomes is crucial for their correct segregation into gametes and for generating diversity. We compared the frequency and distribution of MLH1 foci and RAD51 foci, synaptonemal complex (SC) length and DNA loop size in two related Bovidae species that share chromosome arm homology but show an extreme difference in their diploid chromosome number: cattle (Bos taurus, 2n = 60) and the common eland (Taurotragus oryx, 2nmale = 31). Compared to cattle, significantly fewer MLH1 foci per cell were observed in the common eland, which can be attributed to the lower number of initial double-strand breaks (DSBs) detected as RAD51 foci in leptonema. Despite the significantly shorter total autosomal SC length and longer DNA loop size of the common eland bi-armed chromosomes compared to those of bovine acrocentrics, the overall crossover density in the common eland was still lower than in cattle, probably due to the reduction in the number of MLH1 foci in the proximal regions of the bi-armed chromosomes. The formation of centric fusions during karyotype evolution of the common eland accompanied by meiotic chromatin compaction has greater implications in the reduction in the number of DSBs in leptonema than in the decrease of MLH1 foci number in pachynema. PMID:26194101

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in noncoding regions of Rad51C do not change the risk of unselected breast cancer but they modulate the level of oxidative stress and the DNA damage characteristics: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Gresner, Peter; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Jablonska, Ewa; Stepnik, Maciej; Zambrano Quispe, Oscar; Twardowska, Ewa; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Deleterious and missense mutations of RAD51C have recently been suggested to modulate the individual susceptibility to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and unselected ovarian cancer, but not unselected breast cancer (BrC). We enrolled 132 unselected BrC females and 189 cancer-free female subjects to investigate whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in non-coding regions of RAD51C modulate the risk of BrC, and whether they affect the level of oxidative stress and the extent/characteristics of DNA damage. Neither SNPs nor reconstructed haplotypes were found to significantly affect the unselected BrC risk. Contrary to this, carriers of rs12946522, rs16943176, rs12946397 and rs17222691 rare-alleles were found to present significantly increased level of blood plasma TBARS compared to respective wild-type homozygotes (p<0.05). Furthermore, these carriers showed significantly decreased fraction of oxidatively generated DNA damage (34% of total damaged DNA) in favor of DNA strand breakage, with no effect on total DNA damage, unlike respective wild-types, among which more evenly distributed proportions between oxidatively damaged DNA (48% of total DNA damage) and DNA strand breakage was found (p<0.0005 for the difference). Such effects were found among both the BrC cases and healthy subjects, indicating that they cannot be assumed as causal factors contributing to BrC development. PMID:25343521

  13. Cilium assembly and disassembly.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Irma; Dynlacht, Brian David

    2016-06-28

    The primary cilium is an antenna-like, immotile organelle present on most types of mammalian cells, which interprets extracellular signals that regulate growth and development. Although once considered a vestigial organelle, the primary cilium is now the focus of considerable interest. We now know that ciliary defects lead to a panoply of human diseases, termed ciliopathies, and the loss of this organelle may be an early signature event during oncogenic transformation. Ciliopathies include numerous seemingly unrelated developmental syndromes, with involvement of the retina, kidney, liver, pancreas, skeletal system and brain. Recent studies have begun to clarify the key mechanisms that link cilium assembly and disassembly to the cell cycle, and suggest new possibilities for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27350441

  14. Associations of common variants at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) with breast cancer risk and heterogeneity by tumor subtype: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Humphreys, Manjeet; Platte, Radka; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Hammet, Fleur; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Van't Veer, Laura J; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Strick, Reiner; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Bojesen, Stig; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Benítez, Javier; Milne, Roger L; Ignacio Arias, Jose; Zamora, M Pilar; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Yuri I; Karstens, Johann Hinrich; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofieva, Darya; Gantcev, Shamil Hanafievich; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Soini, Ylermi; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betül T; Chrisiaens, Marie-Rose; Peeters, Stephanie; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus; Lee, Adam M; Diasio, Robert; Wang, Xianshu; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Maclean, Catriona; Offit, Ken; Robson, Mark; Joseph, Vijai; Gaudet, Mia; John, Esther M; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene; Knight, Julia A; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O'Malley, Frances P; Brinton, Louise A; Sherman, Mark E; Lissowska, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J; Hooning, Maartje; Martens, John W M; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Collée, J Margriet; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W; Reed, Malcolm W R; Cross, Simon S; Pharoah, Paul; Dunning, Alison M; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Shen, Chen-Yang; Ding, Shian-ling; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Egan, Kathleen; Newcomb, Polly; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Easton, Doug; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2011-12-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) as breast cancer susceptibility loci. The initial GWAS suggested stronger effects for both loci for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors. Using data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC), we sought to determine whether risks differ by ER, progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), grade, node status, tumor size, and ductal or lobular morphology. We genotyped rs11249433 at 1p.11.2, and two highly correlated SNPs rs999737 and rs10483813 (r(2)= 0.98) at 14q24.1 (RAD51L1), for up to 46 036 invasive breast cancer cases and 46 930 controls from 39 studies. Analyses by tumor characteristics focused on subjects reporting to be white women of European ancestry and were based on 25 458 cases, of which 87% had ER data. The SNP at 1p11.2 showed significantly stronger associations with ER-positive tumors [per-allele odds ratio (OR) for ER-positive tumors was 1.13, 95% CI = 1.10-1.16 and, for ER-negative tumors, OR was 1.03, 95% CI = 0.98-1.07, case-only P-heterogeneity = 7.6 × 10(-5)]. The association with ER-positive tumors was stronger for tumors of lower grade (case-only P= 6.7 × 10(-3)) and lobular histology (case-only P= 0.01). SNPs at 14q24.1 were associated with risk for most tumor subtypes evaluated, including triple-negative breast cancers, which has not been described previously. Our results underscore the need for large pooling efforts with tumor pathology data to help refine risk estimates for SNP associations with susceptibility to different subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:21852249

  15. AGC-2 Disassembly Report

    SciTech Connect

    William Windes

    2014-05-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Graphite Research and Development (R&D) Program is currently measuring irradiated material properties for predicting the behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades available for use within the cores of new very high temperature reactor designs. The Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment, consisting of six irradiation capsules, will generate irradiated graphite performance data for NGNP reactor operating conditions. The AGC experiment is designed to determine the changes to specific material properties such as thermal diffusivity, thermal expansion, elastic modulus, mechanical strength, irradiation induced dimensional change rate, and irradiation creep for a wide variety of nuclear grade graphite types over a range of high temperature, and moderate doses. A series of six capsules containing graphite test specimens will be used to expose graphite test samples to a dose range from 1 to 7 dpa at three different temperatures (600, 900, and 1200°C) as described in the Graphite Technology Development Plan. Since irradiation induced creep within graphite components is considered critical to determining the operational life of the graphite core, some of the samples will also be exposed to an applied load to determine the creep rate for each graphite type under both temperature and neutron flux. All six AGC capsules in the experiment will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). AGC-1 and AGC-2 will be irradiated in the south flux trap and AGC-3–AGC-6 will be irradiated in the east flux trap. The change in flux traps is due to NGNP irradiation priorities requiring the AGC experiment to be moved to accommodate Fuel irradiation experiments. After irradiation, all six AGC capsules will be cooled in the ATR Canal, sized for shipment, and shipped to the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) where the capsule will be disassembled in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF). During disassembly, the metallic

  16. Static Detection of Disassembly Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamoorthy, Nithya; Debray, Saumya; Fligg, Alan K

    2009-10-13

    Static disassembly is a crucial first step in reverse engineering executable files, and there is a consider- able body of work in reverse-engineering of binaries, as well as areas such as semantics-based security anal- ysis, that assumes that the input executable has been correctly disassembled. However, disassembly errors, e.g., arising from binary obfuscations, can render this assumption invalid. This work describes a machine- learning-based approach, using decision trees, for stat- ically identifying possible errors in a static disassem- bly; such potential errors may then be examined more closely, e.g., using dynamic analyses. Experimental re- sults using a variety of input executables indicate that our approach performs well, correctly identifying most disassembly errors with relatively few false positives.

  17. Associations of common variants at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) with breast cancer risk and heterogeneity by tumor subtype: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium†

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Jonine D.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Humphreys, Manjeet; Platte, Radka; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Hammet, Fleur; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Strick, Reiner; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Bojesen, Stig; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Benítez, Javier; Milne, Roger L.; Ignacio Arias, Jose; Zamora, M. Pilar; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Yuri I.; Karstens, Johann Hinrich; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofieva, Darya; Hanafievich Gantcev, Shamil; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Soini, Ylermi; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betül T.; Chrisiaens, Marie-Rose; Peeters, Stephanie; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus; Lee, Adam M.; Diasio, Robert; Wang, Xianshu; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Maclean, Catriona; Offit, Ken; Robson, Mark; Joseph, Vijai; Gaudet, Mia; John, Esther M.; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene; Knight, Julia A.; Marie Mulligan, Anna; O'Malley, Frances P.; Brinton, Louise A.; Sherman, Mark E.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hooning, Maartje; Martens, John W.M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Cross, Simon S.; Pharoah, Paul; Dunning, Alison M.; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Shen, Chen-Yang; Ding, Shian-ling; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Egan, Kathleen; Newcomb, Polly; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Easton, Doug; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) as breast cancer susceptibility loci. The initial GWAS suggested stronger effects for both loci for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors. Using data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC), we sought to determine whether risks differ by ER, progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), grade, node status, tumor size, and ductal or lobular morphology. We genotyped rs11249433 at 1p.11.2, and two highly correlated SNPs rs999737 and rs10483813 (r2= 0.98) at 14q24.1 (RAD51L1), for up to 46 036 invasive breast cancer cases and 46 930 controls from 39 studies. Analyses by tumor characteristics focused on subjects reporting to be white women of European ancestry and were based on 25 458 cases, of which 87% had ER data. The SNP at 1p11.2 showed significantly stronger associations with ER-positive tumors [per-allele odds ratio (OR) for ER-positive tumors was 1.13, 95% CI = 1.10–1.16 and, for ER-negative tumors, OR was 1.03, 95% CI = 0.98–1.07, case-only P-heterogeneity = 7.6 × 10−5]. The association with ER-positive tumors was stronger for tumors of lower grade (case-only P= 6.7 × 10−3) and lobular histology (case-only P= 0.01). SNPs at 14q24.1 were associated with risk for most tumor subtypes evaluated, including triple-negative breast cancers, which has not been described previously. Our results underscore the need for large pooling efforts with tumor pathology data to help refine risk estimates for SNP associations with susceptibility to different subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:21852249

  18. Desmosome Assembly and Disassembly Are Membrane Raft-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Faundez, Victor; Koval, Michael; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Strong intercellular adhesion is critical for tissues that experience mechanical stress, such as the skin and heart. Desmosomes provide adhesive strength to tissues by anchoring desmosomal cadherins of neighboring cells to the intermediate filament cytoskeleton. Alterations in assembly and disassembly compromise desmosome function and may contribute to human diseases, such as the autoimmune skin blistering disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV). We previously demonstrated that PV auto-antibodies directed against the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) cause loss of adhesion by triggering membrane raft-mediated Dsg3 endocytosis. We hypothesized that raft membrane microdomains play a broader role in desmosome homeostasis by regulating the dynamics of desmosome assembly and disassembly. In human keratinocytes, Dsg3 is raft associated as determined by biochemical and super resolution immunofluorescence microscopy methods. Cholesterol depletion, which disrupts rafts, prevented desmosome assembly and adhesion, thus functionally linking rafts to desmosome formation. Interestingly, Dsg3 did not associate with rafts in cells lacking desmosomal proteins. Additionally, PV IgG-induced desmosome disassembly occurred by redistribution of Dsg3 into raft-containing endocytic membrane domains, resulting in cholesterol-dependent loss of adhesion. These findings demonstrate that membrane rafts are required for desmosome assembly and disassembly dynamics, suggesting therapeutic potential for raft targeting agents in desmosomal diseases such as PV. PMID:24498201

  19. Chinese Herbal Mixture, Tien-Hsien Liquid, Induces G2/M Cycle Arrest and Radiosensitivity in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells through Mechanisms Involving DNMT1 and Rad51 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Jyh-Ming; Yang, Chia-Ming; Kuo, Hui-Ching; Chang, Chia-Lun; Lee, Hsin-Lun; Lai, I-Chun; Chuang, Shuang-En

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese herbal mixture, Tien-Hsien Liquid (THL), has been proven to suppress the growth and invasiveness of cancer cells and is currently regarded as a complementary medicine for the treatment of cancer. Our previous study using acute promyelocytic leukemia cells uncovered its effect on the downregulation of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) which is often overexpressed in cancer cells resulting in the repression of tumor suppressors via hypermethylation. Herein, we explored the effects of THL in MCF-7 breast cancer cells that also demonstrate elevated DNMT1. The results show that THL dose-dependently downregulated DNMT1 accompanied by the induction of tumor suppressors such as p21 and p15. THL arrested cell cycle in G2/M phase and decreased the protein levels of cyclin A, cyclin B1, phospho-pRb, and AKT. DNMT1 inhibition was previously reported to exert a radiosensitizing effect in cancer cells through the repression of DNA repair. We found that THL enhanced radiation-induced clonogenic cell death in MCF-7 cells and decreased the level of DNA double-strand break repair protein, Rad51. Our observations may be the result of DNMT1 downregulation. Due to the fact that DNMT1 inhibition is now a mainstream strategy for anticancer therapy, further clinical trials of THL to confirm its clinical efficacy are warranted. PMID:27525019

  20. Identification of the meiotic toolkit in diatoms and exploration of meiosis-specific SPO11 and RAD51 homologs in the sexual species Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata and Seminavis robusta

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Shrikant; Moeys, Sara; von Dassow, Peter; Huysman, Marie J. J.; Mapleson, Daniel; De Veylder, Lieven; Sanges, Remo; Vyverman, Wim; Montresor, Marina; Ferrante, Maria Immacolata

    2015-11-14

    Sexual reproduction is an obligate phase in the life cycle of most eukaryotes. Meiosis varies among organisms, which is reflected by the variability of the gene set associated to the process. Diatoms are unicellular organisms that belong to the stramenopile clade and have unique life cycles that can include a sexual phase. The exploration of five diatom genomes and one diatom transcriptome led to the identification of 42 genes potentially involved in meiosis. While these include the majority of known meiosis-related genes, several meiosis-specific genes, including DMC1, could not be identified. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses supported gene identification and revealed ancestral loss and recent expansion in the RAD51 family in diatoms. The two sexual species Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata and Seminavis robusta were used to explore the expression of meiosis-related genes: RAD21, SPO11-2, RAD51-A, RAD51-B and RAD51-C were upregulated during meiosis, whereas other paralogs in these families showed no differential expression patterns, suggesting that they may play a role during vegetative divisions. An almost identical toolkit is shared among Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and Fragilariopsis cylindrus, as well as two species for which sex has not been observed, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana, suggesting that these two may retain a facultative sexual phase. Lastly, our results reveal the conserved meiotic toolkit in six diatom species and indicate that Stramenopiles share major modifications of canonical meiosis processes ancestral to eukaryotes, with important divergences in each Kingdom.

  1. A multi-stage genome-wide association in breast cancer identifies two novel risk alleles at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1)

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Gilles; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Kraft, Peter; Yeager, Meredith; Wacholder, Sholom; Cox, David G.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hutchinson, Amy; Wang, Zhaoming; Yu, Kai; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Orr, Nick; Willett, Walter C.; Colditz, Graham A.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Berg, Christine D.; Buys, Saundra S.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Calle, Eugenia E.; Thun, Michael J.; Diver, Ryan; Prentice, Ross; Jackson, Rebecca; Kooperberg, Charles; Chlebowski, Rowan; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Brinton, Louise A.; Sigurdson, Alice; Doody, Michele; Bhatti, Parveen; Alexander, Bruce H.; Buring, Julie; Lee, I-Min; Vatten, Lars J; Hveem, Kristian; Kumle, Merethe; Hayes, Richard B.; Tucker, Margaret; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen J; Hunter, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) initiative has conducted a three-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of breast cancer in 9,770 cases and 10,799 controls. In Stage 1, we genotyped 528,173 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1,145 cases of invasive breast cancer among postmenopausal white women, and 1,142 controls; in Stage 2, 24,909 SNPs with low p values observed in Stage 1 were analyzed in 4,547 cases and 4,434 controls. In Stage 3 we investigated 21 loci in 4,078 cases and 5,223 controls with low p values from Stage 1 and 2 combined. Two novel loci achieved genome-wide significance. A pericentromeric SNP on chromosome 1p11.2, rs11249433, (p=6.74 × 10-10 adjusted genotype test with 2 degrees of freedom) resides in a large block of linkage disequilibrium neighboring NOTCH2 and FCGR1B and is predominantly associated with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. A second SNP, rs999737 on chromosome 14q24.1 (p=1.74 × 10−7), localizes to RAD51L1, a gene in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway, a prior candidate pathway for breast cancer susceptibility. We confirmed previously reported markers on chromosome 2q35, 5q11.2, 5p12, 8q24, 10q26, and 16q12.1. Our results underscore the importance of large-scale replication in the identification of low penetrance breast cancer alleles. PMID:19330030

  2. Single-molecule imaging of a three-component ordered actin disassembly mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Silvia; Collins, Agnieszka; Chin, Samantha M.; Ydenberg, Casey A.; Gelles, Jeff; Goode, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cells destabilize and rapidly disassemble filamentous actin networks have remained elusive; however, Coronin, Cofilin and AIP1 have been implicated in this process. Here using multi-wavelength single-molecule fluorescence imaging, we show that mammalian Cor1B, Cof1 and AIP1 work in concert through a temporally ordered pathway to induce highly efficient severing and disassembly of actin filaments. Cor1B binds to filaments first, and dramatically accelerates the subsequent binding of Cof1, leading to heavily decorated, stabilized filaments. Cof1 in turn recruits AIP1, which rapidly triggers severing and remains bound to the newly generated barbed ends. New growth at barbed ends generated by severing was blocked specifically in the presence of all three proteins. This activity enabled us to reconstitute and directly visualize single actin filaments being rapidly polymerized by formins at their barbed ends while simultanteously being stochastically severed and capped along their lengths, and disassembled from their pointed ends. PMID:25995115

  3. Simulation-based disassembly systems design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendorf, Martin; Herrmann, Christoph; Hesselbach, Juergen

    2004-02-01

    Recycling of Waste of Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) is a matter of actual concern, driven by economic, ecological and legislative reasons. Here, disassembly as the first step of the treatment process plays a key role. To achieve sustainable progress in WEEE disassembly, the key is not to limit analysis and planning to merely disassembly processes in a narrow sense, but to consider entire disassembly plants including additional aspects such as internal logistics, storage, sorting etc. as well. In this regard, the paper presents ways of designing, dimensioning, structuring and modeling different disassembly systems. Goal is to achieve efficient and economic disassembly systems that allow recycling processes complying with legal requirements. Moreover, advantages of applying simulation software tools that are widespread and successfully utilized in conventional industry sectors are addressed. They support systematic disassembly planning by means of simulation experiments including consecutive efficiency evaluation. Consequently, anticipatory recycling planning considering various scenarios is enabled and decisions about which types of disassembly systems evidence appropriateness for specific circumstances such as product spectrum, throughput, disassembly depth etc. is supported. Furthermore, integration of simulation based disassembly planning in a holistic concept with configuration of interfaces and data utilization including cost aspects is described.

  4. Genetic algorithm for disassembly process planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongar, Elif; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2002-02-01

    When a product reaches its end of life, there are several options available for processing it including reuse, remanufacturing, recycling, and disposing (the least desirable option). In almost all cases, a certain level of disassembly may be necessary. Thus, finding an optimal (or near optimal) disassembly sequence is crucial to increasing the efficiency of the process. Disassembly operations are labor intensive, can be costly, have unique characteristics and cannot be considered as reverse of assembly operations. Since the complexity of determining the best disassembly sequence increases with the increase in the number of parts of the product, it is extremely crucial that an efficient methodology for disassembly process planning be developed. In this paper, we present a genetic algorithm for disassembly process planning. A case example is considered to demonstrate the functionality of the algorithm.

  5. Disassemblability modeling technology of configurable product based on disassembly constraint relation weighted design structure matrix(DSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Lemiao; Liu, Xiaojian; Zhang, Shuyou; Sun, Liangfeng

    2014-05-01

    The current research of configurable product disassemblability focuses on disassemblability evaluation and disassembly sequence planning. Little work has been done on quantitative analysis of configurable product disassemblability. The disassemblability modeling technology for configurable product based on disassembly constraint relation weighted design structure matrix (DSM) is proposed. Major factors affecting the disassemblability of configurable product are analyzed, and the disassembling degrees between components in configurable product are obtained by calculating disassembly entropies such as joint type, joint quantity, disassembly path, disassembly accessibility and material compatibility. The disassembly constraint relation weighted DSM of configurable product is constructed and configuration modules are formed by matrix decomposition and tearing operations. The disassembly constraint relation in configuration modules is strong coupling, and the disassembly constraint relation between modules is weak coupling, and the disassemblability configuration model is constructed based on configuration module. Finally, taking a hydraulic forging press as an example, the decomposed weak coupling components are used as configuration modules alone, components with a strong coupling are aggregated into configuration modules, and the disassembly sequence of components inside configuration modules is optimized by tearing operation. A disassemblability configuration model of the hydraulic forging press is constructed. By researching the disassemblability modeling technology of product configuration design based on disassembly constraint relation weighted DSM, the disassembly property in maintenance, recycling and reuse of configurable product are optimized.

  6. Modeling operational behavior of a disassembly line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilkaya, Elif A.; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we present a dynamic kanban (pull) system specifically developed for disassembly lines. This type of kanban system is much more complex than the traditional kanban system used in assembly lines. For instance, unlike the assembly line where the external demand occurs only at the last station, the demands in the disassembly case also occur at any of the intermittent stations. The reason is that as a product moves on the disassembly line, various parts are disassembled at every station and accumulated at that station. Therefore, there are as many demand sources as there are number of parts. We consider a case example involving the end-of-life products. Based on the precedence relationships and other criteria such as hazardous properties of the parts, we balance the disassembly line. The results of the disassembly line-balancing problem (DLBP) are used as input to the proposed dynamic kanban system for disassembly line (DKSDL). We compare the performance of the DKSDL to the modified kanban system for disassembly line (MKSDL), which was previously introduced by the authors. We show, via simulation, that the DKSDL is far superior to MKSDL considered.

  7. 19 CFR 181.132 - Disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disassembly. 181.132 Section 181.132 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT Rules of Origin § 181.132 Disassembly. (a) Treated...

  8. 19 CFR 181.132 - Disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Disassembly. 181.132 Section 181.132 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT Rules of Origin § 181.132 Disassembly. (a) Treated...

  9. 19 CFR 181.132 - Disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Disassembly. 181.132 Section 181.132 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT Rules of Origin § 181.132 Disassembly. (a) Treated...

  10. 19 CFR 181.132 - Disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disassembly. 181.132 Section 181.132 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT Rules of Origin § 181.132 Disassembly. (a) Treated...

  11. Reorganization of actin filaments by ADF/cofilin is involved in formation of microtubule structures during Xenopus oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Yuka; Abe, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We examined the reorganization of actin filaments and microtubules during Xenopus oocyte maturation. Surrounding the germinal vesicle (GV) in immature oocytes, the cytoplasmic actin filaments reorganized to accumulate beneath the vegetal side of the GV, where the microtubule-organizing center and transient microtubule array (MTOC-TMA) assembled, just before GV breakdown (GVBD). Immediately after GVBD, both Xenopus ADF/cofilin (XAC) and its phosphatase Slingshot (XSSH) accumulated into the nuclei and intranuclear actin filaments disassembled from the vegetal side with the shrinkage of the GV. As the MTOC-TMA developed well, cytoplasmic actin filaments were retained at the MTOC-TMA base region. Suppression of XAC dephosphorylation by anti-XSSH antibody injection inhibited both actin filament reorganization and proper formation and localization of both the MTOC-TMA and meiotic spindles. Stabilization of actin filaments by phalloidin also inhibited formation of the MTOC-TMA and disassembly of intranuclear actin filaments without affecting nuclear shrinkage. Nocodazole also caused the MTOC-TMA and the cytoplasmic actin filaments at its base region to disappear, which further impeded disassembly of intranuclear actin filaments from the vegetal side. XAC appears to reorganize cytoplasmic actin filaments required for precise assembly of the MTOC and, together with the MTOC-TMA, regulate the intranuclear actin filament disassembly essential for meiotic spindle formation. PMID:26424802

  12. Biocomputing based on particle disassembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, Maxim P.; Shipunova, Victoria O.; Deyev, Sergey M.; Nikitin, Petr I.

    2014-09-01

    Nanoparticles with biocomputing capabilities could potentially be used to create sophisticated robotic devices with a variety of biomedical applications, including intelligent sensors and theranostic agents. DNA/RNA-based computing techniques have already been developed that can offer a complete set of Boolean logic functions and have been used, for example, to analyse cells and deliver molecular payloads. However, the computing potential of particle-based systems remains relatively unexplored. Here, we show that almost any type of nanoparticle or microparticle can be transformed into autonomous biocomputing structures that are capable of implementing a functionally complete set of Boolean logic gates (YES, NOT, AND and OR) and binding to a target as result of a computation. The logic-gating functionality is incorporated into self-assembled particle/biomolecule interfaces (demonstrated here with proteins) and the logic gating is achieved through input-induced disassembly of the structures. To illustrate the capabilities of the approach, we show that the structures can be used for logic-gated cell targeting and advanced immunoassays.

  13. Biocomputing based on particle disassembly.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Maxim P; Shipunova, Victoria O; Deyev, Sergey M; Nikitin, Petr I

    2014-09-01

    Nanoparticles with biocomputing capabilities could potentially be used to create sophisticated robotic devices with a variety of biomedical applications, including intelligent sensors and theranostic agents. DNA/RNA-based computing techniques have already been developed that can offer a complete set of Boolean logic functions and have been used, for example, to analyse cells and deliver molecular payloads. However, the computing potential of particle-based systems remains relatively unexplored. Here, we show that almost any type of nanoparticle or microparticle can be transformed into autonomous biocomputing structures that are capable of implementing a functionally complete set of Boolean logic gates (YES, NOT, AND and OR) and binding to a target as result of a computation. The logic-gating functionality is incorporated into self-assembled particle/biomolecule interfaces (demonstrated here with proteins) and the logic gating is achieved through input-induced disassembly of the structures. To illustrate the capabilities of the approach, we show that the structures can be used for logic-gated cell targeting and advanced immunoassays. PMID:25129073

  14. Chromatin remodeling by nucleosome disassembly in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2006-02-28

    The RSC chromatin-remodeling complex completely disassembles a nucleosome in the presence of the histone chaperone Nap1 and ATP. Disassembly occurs in a stepwise manner, with the removal of H2A/H2B dimers, followed by the rest of the histones and the release of naked DNA. RSC and related chromatin-remodeling complexes may be responsible for the removal of promoter nucleosomes during transcriptional activation in vivo. PMID:16492771

  15. Damage-Free Relief-Valve Disassembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haselmaier, H.

    1986-01-01

    Tool safely disassembles relief valves without damage to sensitive parts. Relief-valve disassembly tool used to extract valve nozzle from its housing. Holding device on tool grops nozzle. When user strikes hammer against impact disk, holding device pulls nozzle from press fit. Previously, nozzle dislodged by striking spindle above it, but practice often damaged retaining screw. New tool removes nozzle directly. With minor modifications, tool adapted to valves from different manufacturers.

  16. Filament disappearances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, William J.

    1986-01-01

    The phenomenon of the sudden filament disappearance (Disparition Brusque) is a familiar one to observers at H alpha telescopes. Nevertherless, the importance in Disparition Brusques (DB) continues to grow for several reasons which are cited in the discussion. It is reported that there seems to be more interest on building and maintain filaments than in destroying them. As a consequence, this sub-group is smaller than most of the others. All the same, progress in this area of filament disapperences seems steady and assured. The importance and interest in DBs is discussed and future directions are indicated.

  17. Helical filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Nicholas; Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Lim, Khan; Durand, Magali; Baudelet, Matthieu; Johnson, Eric; Richardson, Martin

    2014-06-01

    The shaping of laser-induced filamenting plasma channels into helical structures by guiding the process with a non-diffracting beam is demonstrated. This was achieved using a Bessel beam superposition to control the phase of an ultrafast laser beam possessing intensities sufficient to induce Kerr effect driven non-linear self-focusing. Several experimental methods were used to characterize the resulting beams and confirm the observed structures are laser air filaments.

  18. Disassembling Iron Availability to Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Yeala; Lis, Hagar

    2012-01-01

    The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis, and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO2 drawdown in vast ocean regions. Yet a clear-cut definition of bioavailability remains elusive, with elements of iron speciation and kinetics, phytoplankton physiology, light, temperature, and microbial interactions, to name a few, all intricately intertwined into this concept. Here, in a synthesis of published and new data, we attempt to disassemble the complex concept of iron bioavailability to phytoplankton by individually exploring some of its facets. We distinguish between the fundamentals of bioavailability – the acquisition of Fe-substrate by phytoplankton – and added levels of complexity involving interactions among organisms, iron, and ecosystem processes. We first examine how phytoplankton acquire free and organically bound iron, drawing attention to the pervasiveness of the reductive uptake pathway in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic autotrophs. Turning to acquisition rates, we propose to view the availability of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton as a spectrum rather than an absolute “all or nothing.” We then demonstrate the use of uptake rate constants to make comparisons across different studies, organisms, Fe-compounds, and environments, and for gaging the contribution of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton growth in situ. Last, we describe the influence of aquatic microorganisms on iron chemistry and fate by way of organic complexation and bio-mediated redox transformations and examine the bioavailability of these bio-modified Fe species. PMID:22529839

  19. First insights into disassembled "evapotranspiration"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chormański, Jarosław; Kleniewska, Małgorzata; Berezowski, Tomasz; Szporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Okruszko, Tomasz; Szatyłowicz, Jan; Batelaan, Okke

    2015-04-01

    In this work we present an initial data analysis obtained from a complex tool for measuring water fluxes in wetland ecosystems. The tool was designed to quantify processes related to interception storage on plants leafs. The measurements are conducted by combining readings from various instruments, including: eddy covariance tower (EC), field spectrometer, SapFlow system, rain gauges above and under canopy, soil moisture probes and other. The idea of this set-up is to provide continuous measurement of overall water flux from the ecosystem (EC tower), intercepted water volume and timing (field spectrometers), through-fall (rain gauges above and under canopy), transpiration (SapFlow), evaporation and soil moisture (soil moisture probes). Disassembling the water flux to the above components allows giving more insight to the interception related processes and differentiates them fromthe total evapotranspiration. The measurements are conducted in the Upper Biebrza Basin (NE Poland). The study area is part of the valley and is covered by peat soils (mainly peat moss with the exception of areas near the river) and receives no inundations waters of the Biebrza. The plant community of Agrostietum-Carici caninae has a dominant share here creating an up to 0.6 km wide belt along the river. The area is covered also by Caricion lasiocarpae as well as meadows and pastures Molinio-Arrhenatheretea, Phragmitetum communis. Sedges form a hummock pattern characteristic for the sedge communities in natural river valleys with wetland vegetation. The main result of the measurement set-up will be the analyzed characteristics and dynamics of interception storage for sedge ecosystems and a developed methodology for interception monitoring by use spectral reflectance technique. This will give a new insight to processes of evapotranspiration in wetlands and its component transpiration, evaporation from interception and evaporation from soil. Moreover, other important results of this project

  20. Cofilin-2 controls actin filament length in muscle sarcomeres

    PubMed Central

    Kremneva, Elena; Makkonen, Maarit H.; Skwarek-Maruszewska, Aneta; Gateva, Gergana; Michelot, Alphee; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY ADF/cofilins drive cytoskeletal dynamics by promoting the disassembly of ‘aged’ ADP-actin filaments. Mammals express several ADF/cofilin isoforms, but their specific biochemical activities and cellular functions have not been studied in detail. Here we demonstrate that the muscle-specific isoform cofilin-2 promotes actin filament disassembly in sarcomeres to control the precise length of thin filaments in the contractile apparatus. In contrast to other isoforms, cofilin-2 efficiently binds and disassembles both ADP- and ATP/ADP-Pi-actin filaments. We mapped surface-exposed cofilin-2-specific residues required for ATP-actin binding and propose that these residues function as an ‘actin nucleotide-state sensor’ among ADF/cofilins. The results suggest that cofilin-2 evolved specific biochemical and cellular properties allowing it to control actin dynamics in sarcomeres, where filament pointed ends may contain a mixture of ADP- and ATP/ADP-Pi-actin subunits. Our findings also offer a rationale for why cofilin-2 mutations in humans lead to myopathies. PMID:25373779

  1. D-amino acids trigger biofilm disassembly.

    PubMed

    Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Romero, Diego; Cao, Shugeng; Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2010-04-30

    Bacteria form communities known as biofilms, which disassemble over time. In our studies outlined here, we found that, before biofilm disassembly, Bacillus subtilis produced a factor that prevented biofilm formation and could break down existing biofilms. The factor was shown to be a mixture of D-leucine, D-methionine, D-tyrosine, and D-tryptophan that could act at nanomolar concentrations. D-amino acid treatment caused the release of amyloid fibers that linked cells in the biofilm together. Mutants able to form biofilms in the presence of D-amino acids contained alterations in a protein (YqxM) required for the formation and anchoring of the fibers to the cell. D-amino acids also prevented biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. D-amino acids are produced by many bacteria and, thus, may be a widespread signal for biofilm disassembly. PMID:20431016

  2. Combinatorial optimization methods for disassembly line balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, Seamus M.; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2004-12-01

    Disassembly takes place in remanufacturing, recycling, and disposal with a line being the best choice for automation. The disassembly line balancing problem seeks a sequence which: minimizes workstations, ensures similar idle times, and is feasible. Finding the optimal balance is computationally intensive due to factorial growth. Combinatorial optimization methods hold promise for providing solutions to the disassembly line balancing problem, which is proven to belong to the class of NP-complete problems. Ant colony optimization, genetic algorithm, and H-K metaheuristics are presented and compared along with a greedy/hill-climbing heuristic hybrid. A numerical study is performed to illustrate the implementation and compare performance. Conclusions drawn include the consistent generation of optimal or near-optimal solutions, the ability to preserve precedence, the speed of the techniques, and their practicality due to ease of implementation.

  3. Electronic waste disassembly with industrial waste heat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengjun; Wang, Jianbo; Chen, Haiyian; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Zhang, Mingxin; Zang, Hongbin; Hu, Jiukun

    2013-01-01

    Waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) are resource-rich but hazardous, demanding innovative strategies for post-consumer collection, recycling, and mining for economically precious constituents. A novel technology for disassembling electronic components from WPCBs is proposed, using hot air to melt solders and to separate the components and base boards. An automatic heated-air disassembling equipment was designed to operate at a heating source temperature at a maximum of 260 °C and an inlet pressure of 0.5 MPa. A total of 13 individual WPCBs were subjected to disassembling tests at different preheat temperatures in increments of 20 °C between 80 and 160 °C, heating source temperatures ranging from 220 to 300 °C in increments of 20 °C, and incubation periods of 1, 2, 4, 6, or 8 min. For each experimental treatment, the disassembly efficiency was calculated as the ratio of electronic components released from the board to the total number of its original components. The optimal preheat temperature, heating source temperature, and incubation period to disassemble intact components were 120 °C, 260 °C, and 2 min, respectively. The disassembly rate of small surface mount components (side length ≤ 3 mm) was 40-50% lower than that of other surface mount components and pin through hole components. On the basis of these results, a reproducible and sustainable industrial ecological protocol using steam produced by industrial exhaust heat coupled to electronic-waste recycling is proposed, providing an efficient, promising, and green method for both electronic component recovery and industrial exhaust heat reutilization. PMID:24073987

  4. Biophysical characterization of cofilin-induced extension-torsion coupling in actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae In; Kwon, Junpyo; Baek, Inchul; Na, Sungsoo

    2016-06-14

    Cofilin makes the actin filament flexible and thermally unstable by disassembling the filament and inducing bending and torsional compliance. Actin monomers bound to cofilin are able to chemically and mechanically interact in response to external forces. In this study, we performed two molecular dynamics tensile tests for actin and cofilactin filaments under identical conditions. Surprisingly, cofilactin filaments were found to be twisted, generating shear stress caused by torsion. Additionally, analysis by plane stress assumption indicated that the extension-torsion coupling effect increases the amount of principal stress by 10%. Using elasticity and solid mechanics theories, our study elucidates the role of cofilin in the disassembly of actin filaments under tensile forces. PMID:27143106

  5. Multi-kanban mechanism for appliance disassembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udomsawat, Gun; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2005-11-01

    The use of household appliances continues to rise every year. A significant number of End-Of-Life (EOL) appliances are generated because of the introduction of newer models that are more attractive, efficient and affordable. Others are, of course, generated when they become non-functional. Many regulations encourage recycling of EOL appliances to reduce the amount of waste sent to landfills. In addition, EOL appliances offer the appliance manufacturing and remanufacturing industries a source of less expensive raw materials and components. For this reason product recovery has become a subject of interest during the past decade. In this paper, we study the disassembly line for appliance disassembly. We discuss and incorporate some of the complications that are inherent in disassembly line including product arrival, demand arrival, inventory fluctuation and production control mechanisms. We show how to overcome such complications by implementing a multi-kanban system in the appliance disassembly line setting. The multi-kanban system (MKS) relies on dynamic routing of kanbans according to the state of the system. We investigate the multi-kanban mechanism using simulation and explore the effect of product mix on performance of the traditional push system (TPS) and MKS in terms of controlling the system's inventory while attempting to achieve a decent customer service level.

  6. Automatized disassembly of electrical industrial motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Bjoern; Fugger, Erwin

    1998-10-01

    Since February 1996 a large-scale European project called REMPRODUSE-Cu has been in progress. Its main objective is to provide a comprehensive approach to overcome the problems found when electromechanical systems reach the end of their useful life. How these problems could be overcome by a smarter recycling system and a smarter product design is in this project exemplified for electric motors. Today small electric motors when worn out are put in a shredder, due to problems with the disassembly. To be able to perform the disassembly in a proper way measurement and sensing as well as industrial robots will play an important part. In this paper a robotized work station for end-of-life treatment of industrial motors is presented. There are two main steps in the work. The first step is an inspection where the functionality of the motor is checked and the second step is robotized automatic disassembly for motors that can not be reused. This paper deals mainly with the second step. The robotized disassembly station consists of two industrial robots with appliances.

  7. Myelination: actin disassembly leads the way

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Jayshree; Salzer, James L.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that drive the spiral wrapping of the myelin sheath around axons are poorly understood. Two papers in this issue of Developmental Cell demonstrate that actin disassembly, rather than actin assembly, predominates during oligodendrocyte maturation and is critical for the genesis of the central myelin sheath. PMID:26218317

  8. Filament winding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibley, A. M.

    The major aspects of filament winding are discussed, emphasizing basic reinforcement and matrix materials, winding procedures, process controls, and cured composite properties. Fiberglass (E-glass and S-glass strengths are 500,000 and 665,000 psi respectively) and polyester resins are the principal reinforcement constituent materials. Graphite and aramid reinforcements are being used more frequently, primarily for the more critical pressure vessels. Matrix systems are most commonly based on epoxy as it has superior mechanical properties, fatigue behavior, and heat resistance as compard with polyesters. A fiberglass overwrap of PVC pipe is an anticipated development in on-site winding and combination winding, and the compression molding of filament wound lay-ups will be investigated. The fabrication of weight-sensitive structural components may be achieved by using such moldings.

  9. Augmented stress fiber arrays after cytopharmacologic disassembly of microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Godman, G.C.; Tannenbaum, J.; Brett, J.B.

    1986-03-01

    Disruption of microtubules (mt) of bovine aortic endothelial (BAE) cells, and normal and transformed fibroblasts, by exposure to 2.5 ..mu..M colchicine; 12 ..mu..M vinblastine; or 1 ..mu..M nocodazole, for 5 or 20 hrs results in aggregation of vimentin-intermediate filament (IF) and the development of markedly augmented stress fiber (SF) arrays. After disassembly of mt, confluent BAE, with circumferential marginal microfilament bands and few central SF, develop dense ribbon-like SF arrays, and spontaneously transformed fibroblasts (tHmf-e), which before treatment are apolar or epithelioid and have few or no SF, acquire extensive organized SF arrays. The axially oriented SF span the entire cell length and terminate in vinculin-containing adhesion plaques, polarizing these cells. The visible increase in SF associated actin is not accompanied by an increase either in actin synthesis (determined from electropherograms after pulse labeling with (/sup 35/S)methionine), or content (DNAse I assay for total cell actin). The reorganization of actin into SF and the development of vinculin adhesion plaques is independent of protein synthesis and occurs in the presence of cycloheximide (10 ..mu..g/ml). These results suggest a role for mt and IF in the regulation of the organizational state of the actin-based cytoskeleton.

  10. Detailed Per-residue Energetic Analysis Explains the Driving Force for Microtubule Disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Ahmed T.; Klobukowski, Mariusz; Tuszynski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules are long filamentous hollow cylinders whose surfaces form lattice structures of αβ-tubulin heterodimers. They perform multiple physiological roles in eukaryotic cells and are targets for therapeutic interventions. In our study, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for arbitrarily long microtubules that have either GDP or GTP molecules in the E-site of β-tubulin. A detailed energy balance of the MM/GBSA inter-dimer interaction energy per residue contributing to the overall lateral and longitudinal structural stability was performed. The obtained results identified the key residues and tubulin domains according to their energetic contributions. They also identified the molecular forces that drive microtubule disassembly. At the tip of the plus end of the microtubule, the uneven distribution of longitudinal interaction energies within a protofilament generates a torque that bends tubulin outwardly with respect to the cylinder's axis causing disassembly. In the presence of GTP, this torque is opposed by lateral interactions that prevent outward curling, thus stabilizing the whole microtubule. Once GTP hydrolysis reaches the tip of the microtubule (lateral cap), lateral interactions become much weaker, allowing tubulin dimers to bend outwards, causing disassembly. The role of magnesium in the process of outward curling has also been demonstrated. This study also showed that the microtubule seam is the most energetically labile inter-dimer interface and could serve as a trigger point for disassembly. Based on a detailed balance of the energetic contributions per amino acid residue in the microtubule, numerous other analyses could be performed to give additional insights into the properties of microtubule dynamic instability. PMID:26030285

  11. Actin cross-link assembly and disassembly mechanics for alpha-Actinin and fascin.

    PubMed

    Courson, David S; Rock, Ronald S

    2010-08-20

    Self-assembly of complex structures is commonplace in biology but often poorly understood. In the case of the actin cytoskeleton, a great deal is known about the components that include higher order structures, such as lamellar meshes, filopodial bundles, and stress fibers. Each of these cytoskeletal structures contains actin filaments and cross-linking proteins, but the role of cross-linking proteins in the initial steps of structure formation has not been clearly elucidated. We employ an optical trapping assay to investigate the behaviors of two actin cross-linking proteins, fascin and alpha-actinin, during the first steps of structure assembly. Here, we show that these proteins have distinct binding characteristics that cause them to recognize and cross-link filaments that are arranged with specific geometries. alpha-Actinin is a promiscuous cross-linker, linking filaments over all angles. It retains this flexibility after cross-links are formed, maintaining a connection even when the link is rotated. Conversely, fascin is extremely selective, only cross-linking filaments in a parallel orientation. Surprisingly, bundles formed by either protein are extremely stable, persisting for over 0.5 h in a continuous wash. However, using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and fluorescence decay experiments, we find that the stable fascin population can be rapidly competed away by free fascin. We present a simple avidity model for this cross-link dissociation behavior. Together, these results place constraints on how cytoskeletal structures assemble, organize, and disassemble in vivo. PMID:20551315

  12. Disassembly activity of actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) is associated with distinct cellular processes in apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Silvia; Zimmermann, Dennis; Olshina, Maya A.; Wilkinson, Mark; Fisher, Fabio; Tan, Yan Hong; Stewart, Rebecca J.; Tonkin, Christopher J.; Wong, Wilson; Kovar, David R.; Baum, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Proteins of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin family have been shown to be crucial for the motility and survival of apicomplexan parasites. However, the mechanisms by which ADF proteins fulfill their function remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigate the comparative activities of ADF proteins from Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum, the human malaria parasite, using a conditional T. gondii ADF-knockout line complemented with ADF variants from either species. We show that P. falciparum ADF1 can fully restore native TgADF activity, demonstrating functional conservation between parasites. Strikingly, mutation of a key basic residue (Lys-72), previously implicated in disassembly in PfADF1, had no detectable phenotypic effect on parasite growth, motility, or development. In contrast, organelle segregation was severely impaired when complementing with a TgADF mutant lacking the corresponding residue (Lys-68). Biochemical analyses of each ADF protein confirmed the reduced ability of lysine mutants to mediate actin depolymerization via filament disassembly although not severing, in contrast to previous reports. These data suggest that actin filament disassembly is essential for apicomplexan parasite development but not for motility, as well as pointing to genus-specific coevolution between ADF proteins and their native actin. PMID:26157165

  13. Disassembly activity of actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) is associated with distinct cellular processes in apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Haase, Silvia; Zimmermann, Dennis; Olshina, Maya A; Wilkinson, Mark; Fisher, Fabio; Tan, Yan Hong; Stewart, Rebecca J; Tonkin, Christopher J; Wong, Wilson; Kovar, David R; Baum, Jake

    2015-09-01

    Proteins of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin family have been shown to be crucial for the motility and survival of apicomplexan parasites. However, the mechanisms by which ADF proteins fulfill their function remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigate the comparative activities of ADF proteins from Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum, the human malaria parasite, using a conditional T. gondii ADF-knockout line complemented with ADF variants from either species. We show that P. falciparum ADF1 can fully restore native TgADF activity, demonstrating functional conservation between parasites. Strikingly, mutation of a key basic residue (Lys-72), previously implicated in disassembly in PfADF1, had no detectable phenotypic effect on parasite growth, motility, or development. In contrast, organelle segregation was severely impaired when complementing with a TgADF mutant lacking the corresponding residue (Lys-68). Biochemical analyses of each ADF protein confirmed the reduced ability of lysine mutants to mediate actin depolymerization via filament disassembly although not severing, in contrast to previous reports. These data suggest that actin filament disassembly is essential for apicomplexan parasite development but not for motility, as well as pointing to genus-specific coevolution between ADF proteins and their native actin. PMID:26157165

  14. Multikanban model for disassembly line with demand fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udomsawat, Gun; Gupta, Surendra M.; Al-Turki, Yousef A. Y.

    2004-02-01

    In recent years, the continuous growth in consumer waste and dwindling natural resources has seriously threatened the environment. Realizing this, several countries have passed regulations that force manufacturers not only to manufacture environmentally conscious products, but also to take back their used products from consumers so that the components and materials recovered from the products may be reused and/or recycled. Disassembly plays an important role in product recovery. A disassembly line is perhaps the most suitable setting for disassembly of products in large quantities. Because a disassembly line has a tendency to generate excessive inventory, employing a kanban system can reduce the inventory level and let the system run more efficiently. A disassembly line is quite different from an assembly line. For example, not only can the demand arrive at the last station, it can also arrive at any of the other stations in the system. The demand for a component on the disassembly line could fluctuate widely. In fact, there are many other complicating matters that need to be considered to implement the concept of kanbans in such an environment. In this paper, we discuss the complications that are unique to a disassembly line. We discuss the complications in utilizing the conventional production control mechanisms in a disassembly line setting. We then show how to overcome them by implementing kanbans in a disassembly line setting with demand fluctuation and introduce the concept of multi-kanban mechanism. We demonstrate its effectiveness using a simulation model. An example is presented to illustrate the concept.

  15. A Heuristic for Disassembly Planning in Remanufacturing System

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to improve the efficiency of disassembly planning in remanufacturing environment. Even though disassembly processes are considered as the reverse of the corresponding assembly processes, under some technological and management constraints the feasible and efficient disassembly planning can be achieved by only well-designed algorithms. In this paper, we propose a heuristic for disassembly planning with the existence of disassembled part/subassembly demands. A mathematical model is formulated for solving this problem to determine the sequence and quantity of disassembly operations to minimize the disassembly costs under sequence-dependent setup and capacity constraints. The disassembly costs consist of the setup cost, part inventory holding cost, disassembly processing cost, and purchasing cost that resulted from unsatisfied demand. A simple but efficient heuristic algorithm is proposed to improve the quality of solution and computational efficiency. The main idea of heuristic is to divide the planning horizon into the smaller planning windows and improve the computational efficiency without much loss of solution quality. Performances of the heuristic are investigated through the computational experiments. PMID:24895679

  16. A heuristic for disassembly planning in remanufacturing system.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jinmo; Jeong, Bongju

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to improve the efficiency of disassembly planning in remanufacturing environment. Even though disassembly processes are considered as the reverse of the corresponding assembly processes, under some technological and management constraints the feasible and efficient disassembly planning can be achieved by only well-designed algorithms. In this paper, we propose a heuristic for disassembly planning with the existence of disassembled part/subassembly demands. A mathematical model is formulated for solving this problem to determine the sequence and quantity of disassembly operations to minimize the disassembly costs under sequence-dependent setup and capacity constraints. The disassembly costs consist of the setup cost, part inventory holding cost, disassembly processing cost, and purchasing cost that resulted from unsatisfied demand. A simple but efficient heuristic algorithm is proposed to improve the quality of solution and computational efficiency. The main idea of heuristic is to divide the planning horizon into the smaller planning windows and improve the computational efficiency without much loss of solution quality. Performances of the heuristic are investigated through the computational experiments. PMID:24895679

  17. Disassembly sequencing problem: a case study of a cell phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Surendra M.; Erbis, Evren; McGovern, Seamus M.

    2004-12-01

    Selection of an optimal disassembly sequence is essential for the efficient processing of a product at the end of its life. Disassembly sequences are listings of disassembly actions (such as the separation of an assembly into two or more subassemblies, or removing one or more connections between components). Disassembly takes place in remanufacturing, recycling, and disposal with a disassembly line being the best choice for automation. In this paper, the disassembly sequencing problem is solved for a cell phone case on a disassembly line, seeking a sequence which is feasible, minimizes the number of workstations (and hence idle times), provides for early removal of high demand/value parts, provides the removal of parts that lead to the access of greatest number of still-installed parts, and early removal of hazardous parts as well as for the grouping of parts for removal having identical part removal directions. Since finding the optimal sequence is computationally intensive due to factorial growth, a heuristic method is used taking into account various disassembly-specific matters. Using the experimentally determined precedence relationships and task times of a real-world cell phone, a MATLAB program is designed and a sequencing solution is generated. Finally, Design for Disassembly (DFD) improvements are recommended with respect to environmentally conscious manufacturing.

  18. Postulated accident scenarios in weapons disassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, S.S.

    1997-06-01

    A very brief summary of three postulated accident scenarios for weapons disassembly is provided in the paper. The first deals with a tetrahedral configuration of four generic pits; the second, an infinite planar array of generic pits with varying interstitial water density; and the third, a spherical shell with internal mass suspension in water varying the size and mass of the shell. Calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo Neutron Photon transport code MCNP4A. Preliminary calculations pointed to a need for higher resolution of small pit separation regimes and snapshots of hydrodynamic processes of water/plutonium mixtures.

  19. Impact of different disassembly line balancing algorithms on the performance of dynamic kanban system for disassembly line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilkaya, Elif A.; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we compare the impact of different disassembly line balancing (DLB) algorithms on the performance of our recently introduced Dynamic Kanban System for Disassembly Line (DKSDL) to accommodate the vagaries of uncertainties associated with disassembly and remanufacturing processing. We consider a case study to illustrate the impact of various DLB algorithms on the DKSDL. The approach to the solution, scenario settings, results and the discussions of the results are included.

  20. Filamentous Fungi.

    PubMed

    Powers-Fletcher, Margaret V; Kendall, Brian A; Griffin, Allen T; Hanson, Kimberly E

    2016-06-01

    Filamentous mycoses are often associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Prompt diagnosis and aggressive treatment are essential for good clinical outcomes in immunocompromised patients. The host immune response plays an essential role in determining the course of exposure to potential fungal pathogens. Depending on the effectiveness of immune response and the burden of organism exposure, fungi can either be cleared or infection can occur and progress to a potentially fatal invasive disease. Nonspecific cellular immunity (i.e., neutrophils, natural killer [NK] cells, and macrophages) combined with T-cell responses are the main immunologic mechanisms of protection. The most common potential mold pathogens include certain hyaline hyphomycetes, endemic fungi, the Mucorales, and some dematiaceous fungi. Laboratory diagnostics aimed at detecting and differentiating these organisms are crucial to helping clinicians make informed decisions about treatment. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the medically important fungal pathogens, as well as to discuss the patient characteristics, antifungal-therapy considerations, and laboratory tests used in current clinical practice for the immunocompromised host. PMID:27337469

  1. Probabilistic Risk Assessment of disassembly procedures

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, D.A.; Bement, T.R.; Letellier, B.C.

    1993-10-01

    Probabilistic Risk (Safety) Assessment (PRA or PSA) is an analytic methodology for identifying the combination of events that, if they occur, lead to accidents. Accidents are defined as those events causing loss or injury to people, property, or the environment. PRA also provides a method for estimating the frequency of occurrence of each combination of events and the consequences of each accident. The Los Alamos effort for this study is summarized as follows: The focus of the Los Alamos study was on evaluating the risks specifically associated with disassembling a Los Alamos-designed device. The PRA for the disassembly operation included a detailed evaluation only for those potential accident sequences which could lead to significant off-site consequences and affect public health. The overall purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a risk consequence goal for DOE operations. Often called a Level 3 PRA (or PSA), the methods are general and can with a little modification be applied to other procedures or processes.

  2. Disassembly and Sanitization of Classified Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Stockham, Dwight J.; Saad, Max P.

    2008-01-15

    The Disassembly Sanitization Operation (DSO) process was implemented to support weapon disassembly and disposition by using recycling and waste minimization measures. This process was initiated by treaty agreements and reconfigurations within both the DOD and DOE Complexes. The DOE is faced with disassembling and disposing of a huge inventory of retired weapons, components, training equipment, spare parts, weapon maintenance equipment, and associated material. In addition, regulations have caused a dramatic increase in the need for information required to support the handling and disposition of these parts and materials. In the past, huge inventories of classified weapon components were required to have long-term storage at Sandia and at many other locations throughout the DoE Complex. These materials are placed in onsite storage unit due to classification issues and they may also contain radiological and/or hazardous components. Since no disposal options exist for this material, the only choice was long-term storage. Long-term storage is costly and somewhat problematic, requiring a secured storage area, monitoring, auditing, and presenting the potential for loss or theft of the material. Overall recycling rates for materials sent through the DSO process have enabled 70 to 80% of these components to be recycled. These components are made of high quality materials and once this material has been sanitized, the demand for the component metals for recycling efforts is very high. The DSO process for NGPF, classified components established the credibility of this technique for addressing the long-term storage requirements of the classified weapons component inventory. The success of this application has generated interest from other Sandia organizations and other locations throughout the complex. Other organizations are requesting the help of the DSO team and the DSO is responding to these requests by expanding its scope to include Work-for- Other projects. For example

  3. Alignment Pins for Assembling and Disassembling Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Oliver C.

    2008-01-01

    Simple, easy-to-use, highly effective tooling has been devised for maintaining alignment of bolt holes in mating structures during assembly and disassembly of the structures. The tooling was originally used during removal of a body flap from the space shuttle Atlantis, in which misalignments during removal of the last few bolts could cause the bolts to bind in their holes. By suitably modifying the dimensions of the tooling components, the basic design of the tooling can readily be adapted to other structures that must be maintained in alignment. The tooling includes tapered, internally threaded alignment pins designed to fit in the bolt holes in one of the mating structures, plus a draw bolt and a cup that are used to install or remove each alignment pin. In preparation for disassembly of two mating structures, external supports are provided to prevent unintended movement of the structures. During disassembly of the structures, as each bolt that joins the structures is removed, an alignment pin is installed in its place. Once all the bolts have been removed and replaced with pins, the pins maintain alignment as the structures are gently pushed or pulled apart on the supports. In assembling the two structures, one reverses the procedure described above: pins are installed in the bolt holes, the structures are pulled or pushed together on the supports, then the pins are removed and replaced with bolts. The figure depicts the tooling and its use. To install an alignment pin in a bolt hole in a structural panel, the tapered end of the pin is inserted from one side of the panel, the cup is placed over the pin on the opposite side of the panel, the draw bolt is inserted through the cup and threaded into the pin, the draw bolt is tightened to pull the pin until the pin is seated firmly in the hole, then the draw bolt and cup are removed, leaving the pin in place. To remove an alignment pin, the cup is placed over the pin on the first-mentioned side of the panel, the draw

  4. Montmorillonite-induced Bacteriophage φ6 Disassembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusiak, A.; Gottlieb, P.; Katz, A.; Alimova, A.; Steiner, J. C.; Block, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    It is estimated that there are 1031 virus particles on Earth making viruses an order of magnitude more prevalent in number than prokaryotes with the vast majority of viruses being bacteriophages. Clays are a major component of soils and aquatic sediments and can react with RNA, proteins and bacterial biofilms. The clays in soils serve as an important moderator between phage and their host bacteria, helping to preserve the evolutionary balance. Studies on the effects of clays on viral infectivity have given somewhat contradictory results; possibly a consequence of clay-virus interactions being dependent on the unique structure of particular viruses. In this work, the interaction between montmorillonite and the bacteriophage φ6 is investigated. φ6 is a member of the cystovirus family that infects Pseudomonas syringe, a common plant pathogen. As a member of the cystovirus family with an enveloped structure, φ6 serves as a model for reoviruses, a human pathogen. Experiments were conducted with φ6 suspended in dilute, purified homoionic commercial-grade montmorillonite over a range of virus:clay ratios. At a 1:100000 virus:clay ratio, the clay reduced viral infectivity by 99%. The minimum clay to virus ratio which results in a measurable reduction of P. syringae infection is 1:1. Electron microscopy demonstrates that mixed suspensions of smectite and virus co-aggregate to form flocs encompassing virions within the smectite. Both free viral particles as well as those imbedded in the flocs are seen in the micrographs to be missing the envelope- leaving only the nucleocapsid (NC) intact; indicating that smectite inactivates the virus by envelope disassembly. These results have strong implications in the evolution of both the φ6 virus and its P. syringae host cells. TEM of aggregate showing several disassembled NCs.

  5. TLR ligand–induced podosome disassembly in dendritic cells is ADAM17 dependent

    PubMed Central

    West, Michele A.; Prescott, Alan R.; Chan, Kui Ming; Zhou, Zhongjun; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Jürgen; Watts, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling induces a rapid reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured mouse dendritic cells (DC), leading to enhanced antigen endocytosis and a concomitant loss of filamentous actin–rich podosomes. We show that as podosomes are lost, TLR signaling induces prominent focal contacts and a transient reduction in DC migratory capacity in vitro. We further show that podosomes in mouse DC are foci of pronounced gelatinase activity, dependent on the enzyme membrane type I matrix metalloprotease (MT1-MMP), and that DC transiently lose the ability to degrade the extracellular matrix after TLR signaling. Surprisingly, MMP inhibitors block TLR signaling–induced podosome disassembly, although stimulated endocytosis is unaffected, which demonstrates that the two phenomena are not obligatorily coupled. Podosome disassembly caused by TLR signaling occurs normally in DC lacking MT1-MMP, and instead requires the tumor necrosis factor α–converting enzyme ADAM17 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease 17), which demonstrates a novel role for this “sheddase” in regulating an actin-based structure. PMID:18762577

  6. Filaments from L5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2011-01-01

    We've been investigating filament eruptions in recent years. Why do eruptions occur? Basic mechanism is magnetic, and can often include coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and filament eruptions. Use filament eruptions as markers of the more-general eruption. From our studies, we can identify directions for future work to help predict when eruptions might occur.

  7. 13. View of disassembled steam engine showing cylinder, piston rod, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of disassembled steam engine showing cylinder, piston rod, parallel motion links and steam chest. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Steam Engine & Mill, 2.65 Mi. N of PR Rt. 2 Bridge over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  8. 12. View of disassembled steam engine sitting in open shed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View of disassembled steam engine sitting in open shed showing base, columns and entablature. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Steam Engine & Mill, 2.65 Mi. N of PR Rt. 2 Bridge over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  9. New package for Belleville spring permits rate change, easy disassembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Glashan, W. F.

    1964-01-01

    A spring package, with grooves to hold the spring washers at the inner and outer edges, reduces hysteresis to a minimum. Three-segment retainers permit easy disassembly so that the spring rate can be changed.

  10. Actin network disassembly powers dissemination of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Talman, Arthur M; Chong, Ryan; Chia, Jonathan; Svitkina, Tatyana; Agaisse, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Several bacterial pathogens hijack the actin assembly machinery and display intracellular motility in the cytosol of infected cells. At the cell cortex, intracellular motility leads to bacterial dissemination through formation of plasma membrane protrusions that resolve into vacuoles in adjacent cells. Here, we uncover a crucial role for actin network disassembly in dissemination of Listeria monocytogenes. We found that defects in the disassembly machinery decreased the rate of actin tail turnover but did not affect the velocity of the bacteria in the cytosol. By contrast, defects in the disassembly machinery had a dramatic impact on bacterial dissemination. Our results suggest a model of L. monocytogenes dissemination in which the disassembly machinery, through local recycling of the actin network in protrusions, fuels continuous actin assembly at the bacterial pole and concurrently exhausts cytoskeleton components from the network distal to the bacterium, which enables membrane apposition and resolution of protrusions into vacuoles. PMID:24155331

  11. Systems impacts of spent fuel disassembly alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-07-01

    Three studies were completed to evaluate four alternatives to the disposal of intact spent fuel assemblies in a geologic repository. A preferred spent fuel waste form for disposal was recommended on consideration of (1) package design and fuel/package interaction, (2) long-term, in-repository performance of the waste form, and (3) overall process performance and costs for packaging, handling, and emplacement. The four basic alternative waste forms considered were (1) end fitting removal, (2) fission gas venting, (3) disassembly and close packing, and (4) shearing/immobilization. None of the findings ruled out any alternative on the basis of waste package considerations or long-term performance of the waste form. The third alternative offers flexibility in loading that may prove attractive in the various geologic media under consideration, greatly reduces the number of packages, and has the lowest unit cost. These studies were completed in October, 1981. Since then Westinghouse Electric Corporation and the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation have completed studies in related fields. This report is now being published to provide publicly the background material that is contained within. 47 references, 28 figures, 31 tables.

  12. Disassembly and characterization of liquid crystal screens.

    PubMed

    Juchneski, Nichele C F; Scherer, Janine; Grochau, Inês H; Veit, Hugo M

    2013-06-01

    The technology used in the manufacturing of televisions and monitors has been changing in recent years. Monitors with liquid crystal displays (LCD) emerged in the market with the aim of replacing cathode ray tube monitors. As a result, the disposal of this type of product, which is already very high, will increase. Thus, without accurate knowledge of the components and materials present in an LCD monitor, the recycling of materials, such as mercury, thermoplastic polymers, glasses, metals and precious metals amongst others, is not only performed, but allows contamination of soil, water and air with the liberation of toxic compounds present in this type of waste when disposed of improperly. Therefore, the objective of this study was to disassemble and characterize the materials in this type of waste, identify the composition, amount and form to enable, in further work, the development of recycling routes. After various tests and analyses, it was observed that an LCD display can be recycled, provided that precautions are taken. Levels of lead, fluoride and copper are above those permitted by the Brazilian law, characterizing this residue as having a high pollution potential. The materials present in printed circuit boards (base and precious metals)-thermoplastics, such as polyethylene terephthalate, acrylic, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene and polycarbonate and metals, such as steel and aluminum, and a layer of indium (in the internal face of the glass)-are components that make a point in terms of their potential for recycling. PMID:23615511

  13. Filament depolymerization can explain chromosome pulling during bacterial mitosis.

    PubMed

    Banigan, Edward J; Gelbart, Michael A; Gitai, Zemer; Wingreen, Ned S; Liu, Andrea J

    2011-09-01

    Chromosome segregation is fundamental to all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms underlying chromosome translocation in bacteria remain mysterious. Caulobacter crescentus utilizes a depolymerization-driven process in which a ParA protein structure elongates from the new cell pole, binds to a ParB-decorated chromosome, and then retracts via disassembly, pulling the chromosome across the cell. This poses the question of how a depolymerizing structure can robustly pull the chromosome that disassembles it. We perform Brownian dynamics simulations with a simple, physically consistent model of the ParABS system. The simulations suggest that the mechanism of translocation is "self-diffusiophoretic": by disassembling ParA, ParB generates a ParA concentration gradient so that the ParA concentration is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the ParA gradient and across the cell. We find that translocation is most robust when ParB binds side-on to ParA filaments. In this case, robust translocation occurs over a wide parameter range and is controlled by a single dimensionless quantity: the product of the rate of ParA disassembly and a characteristic relaxation time of the chromosome. This time scale measures the time it takes for the chromosome to recover its average shape after it is has been pulled. Our results suggest explanations for observed phenomena such as segregation failure, filament-length-dependent translocation velocity, and chromosomal compaction. PMID:21966261

  14. Safeguarding genome stability: RASSF1A tumor suppressor regulates BRCA2 at stalled forks

    PubMed Central

    Pefani, Dafni Eleftheria; O'Neill, Eric

    2015-01-01

    While it has been widely established that defective fork restart after exposure to stress results in increased genomic instability, the importance of fork protection during stalling for safeguarding genomic integrity has recently been fully appreciated. BRCA2, Breast tumor suppressor, has dual functionality promoting not only DNA repair but also preventing DNA lesions at stalled forks. In response to replication stress, BRCA2 recruits RAD51 onto nascent DNA at stalled forks, protecting nascent DNA from nucleolitic cleavage. Phosphorylation of the BRCA2 C-terminal RAD51 binding site by CDK2 promotes RAD51 filament disassembly, leading to nucleolitic cleavage of newly synthesized DNA and compromised fork integrity. Recently we uncovered how the core Hippo pathway components RASSF1A, MST2 and LATS1 regulate CDK2 activity towards BRCA2, in response to fork stalling. In complex with LATS1, CDK2 exhibits reduced kinase activity which results in low levels of pBRCA2-S3291 and stable RAD51 filaments protecting nascent DNA from MRE11 cleavage. In the absence of the RASSF1A/MST2/LATS1/CDK2 pathway increased resection of newly synthesized DNA leads to chromosomal instability and malignant transformation. This function of RASSF1A in stalled replication fork protection adds to the role of RASSF1A as a tumor suppressor and builds up evidence for RASSF1A status and its prognostic and predictive value in cancer. PMID:25927241

  15. Dynamic covalent assembly and disassembly of nanoparticle aggregates.

    PubMed

    Borsley, Stefan; Kay, Euan R

    2016-07-12

    The quantitative assembly and disassembly of a new type of dynamic covalent nanoparticle (NP) building block is reported. In situ spectroscopic characterization reveals constitutionally adaptive NP-bound monolayers of boronate esters. Ditopic linker molecules are used to produce covalently connected AuNP assemblies, displaying open dendritic morphologies, and which, despite being linked by covalent bonds, can be fully disassembled on application of an appropriate chemical stimulus. PMID:27001937

  16. Special issue on filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruxin; Milchberg, Howard; Mysyrowicz, André

    2014-05-01

    Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on filamentation, to appear in the spring of 2015, and invites you to submit a paper. This special issue will attempt to give an overview of the present status of this field in order to create synergies and foster future developments. The issue is open to papers on the following issues: Theoretical advances on filamentation. Self-focusing and collapse. Filamentation in various media. Pulse self-compression and ultrafast processes in filaments. Molecular alignment and rotation. Filamentation tailoring. Interaction between filaments. Filament weather and pollution control. Filament induced condensation and precipitation. Terahertz science with filaments. Lasing in filaments. Filament induced molecular excitation and reaction. Electric discharge and plasma. Cross-disciplinary applications. Novel concepts related to these topics are particularly welcome. Please submit your article by 1 October 2014 (expected web publication: spring 2015) using our website http://mc04.manuscriptcentral.com/jphysb-iop. Submissions received after this date will be considered for the journal, but may not be included in the special issue. The issue will be edited by Ruxin Li, Howard Milchberg and André Mysyrowicz.

  17. High Speed Depolymerization at Actin Filament Ends Jointly Catalyzed by Twinfilin and Srv2/CAP

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Adam B.; Collins, Agnieszka; Goode, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    Purified actin filaments depolymerize slowly, and cytosolic conditions strongly favor actin assembly over disassembly, which has left our understanding of how actin filaments are rapidly turned over in vivo incomplete 1,2. One mechanism for driving filament disassembly is severing by factors such as Cofilin. However, even after severing, pointed end depolymerization remains slow and unable to fully account for observed rates of actin filament turnover in vivo. Here we describe a mechanism by which Twinfilin and Cyclase-associated protein work in concert to accelerate depolymerization of actin filaments by 3-fold and 17-fold at their barbed and pointed ends, respectively. This mechanism occurs even under assembly conditions, allowing reconstitution and direct visualization of individual filaments undergoing tunable, accelerated treadmilling. Further, we use specific mutations to demonstrate that this activity is critical for Twinfilin function in vivo. These findings fill a major gap in our knowledge of mechanisms, and suggest that depolymerization and severing may be deployed separately or together to control the dynamics and architecture of distinct actin networks. PMID:26458246

  18. Directed disassembly of an interfacial rubisco protein network.

    PubMed

    Onaizi, Sagheer A; Malcolm, Andrew S; He, Lizhong; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2007-05-22

    We present the first study of the directed disassembly of a protein network at the air-water interface by the synergistic action of a surfactant and an enzyme. We seek to understand the fundamentals of protein network disassembly by using rubisco adsorbed at the air-water interface as a model. We propose that rubisco adsorption at the air-water interface results in the formation of a fishnet-like network of interconnected protein molecules, capable of transmitting lateral force. The mechanical properties of the rubisco network during assembly and disassembly at the air-water interface were characterized by direct measurement of laterally transmitted force through the protein network using the Cambridge interfacial tensiometer. We have shown that, when used individually, either 2 ppm of the surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzyl sulfonate (SDOBS), or 2 ppm of the enzyme, subtilisin A (SA), were insufficient to completely disassemble the rubisco network within 1 h of treatment. However, a combination of 2 ppm SDOBS and 2 ppm SA led to almost complete disassembly within 1 h. Increasing the concentration of SA in the mixture from 2 to 10 ppm, while keeping the SDOBS concentration constant, significantly decreased the time required to completely disassemble the rubisco network. Furthermore, the initial rate of network disassembly using formulations containing SDOBS was surprisingly insensitive to this increase in SA concentration. This study gives insight into the role of lateral interactions between protein molecules at interfaces in stabilizing interfacial protein networks and shows that surfactant and enzyme working in combination proves more effective at disrupting and mobilizing the interfacial protein network than the action of either agent alone. PMID:17447802

  19. Externally refuelled optical filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheller, Maik; Mills, Matthew S.; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Cheng, Weibo; Moloney, Jerome V.; Kolesik, Miroslav; Polynkin, Pavel; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

    2014-04-01

    Plasma channels produced in air through femtosecond laser filamentation hold great promise for a number of applications, including remote sensing, attosecond physics and spectroscopy, channelling microwaves and lightning protection. In such settings, extended filaments are desirable, yet their longitudinal span is limited by dissipative processes. Although various techniques aiming to prolong this process have been explored, the substantial extension of optical filaments remains a challenge. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the natural range of a plasma column can be enhanced by at least an order of magnitude when the filament is prudently accompanied by an auxiliary beam. In this arrangement, the secondary low-intensity `dressing' beam propagates linearly and acts as a distributed energy reservoir, continuously refuelling the optical filament. Our approach offers an efficient and viable route towards the generation of extended light strings in air without inducing premature wave collapse or an undesirable beam break-up into multiple filaments.

  20. Dynamic actin filaments control the mechanical behavior of the human red blood cell membrane

    PubMed Central

    Gokhin, David S.; Nowak, Roberta B.; Khoory, Joseph A.; de la Piedra, Alfonso; Ghiran, Ionita C.; Fowler, Velia M.

    2015-01-01

    Short, uniform-length actin filaments function as structural nodes in the spectrin-actin membrane skeleton to optimize the biomechanical properties of red blood cells (RBCs). Despite the widespread assumption that RBC actin filaments are not dynamic (i.e., do not exchange subunits with G-actin in the cytosol), this assumption has never been rigorously tested. Here we show that a subpopulation of human RBC actin filaments is indeed dynamic, based on rhodamine-actin incorporation into filaments in resealed ghosts and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis of actin filament mobility in intact RBCs (∼25–30% of total filaments). Cytochalasin-D inhibition of barbed-end exchange reduces rhodamine-actin incorporation and partially attenuates FRAP recovery, indicating functional interaction between actin subunit turnover at the single-filament level and mobility at the membrane-skeleton level. Moreover, perturbation of RBC actin filament assembly/disassembly with latrunculin-A or jasplakinolide induces an approximately twofold increase or ∼60% decrease, respectively, in soluble actin, resulting in altered membrane deformability, as determined by alterations in RBC transit time in a microfluidic channel assay, as well as by abnormalities in spontaneous membrane oscillations (flickering). These experiments identify a heretofore-unrecognized but functionally important subpopulation of RBC actin filaments, whose properties and architecture directly control the biomechanical properties of the RBC membrane. PMID:25717184

  1. Sensor system for disassembly of electrical industrial motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Bjoern; Karlsson, Nils; Wide, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The role of reuse and recycling has become more and more important due to environmental reasons during the last years. To realize this goal, flexible automatic disassembly is needed. We have investigated a robotized work station supported by sensors as one possible solution. As an example an electrical motor has in detail been disassembled with the aim to separate the different materials. In an industrial motor the copper is situated in the stator windings and in the junction box. There are three pats in the proposed disassembly work, an inspection phase where the functionality of the motor is determined, a manual disassembly task where the junction box, the shields and the rotor are removed and finally the last part is an automatic removal of the stator windings. The focus in this paper is on the first part, the functionality test. In this test different faults of the motor is identified and a decision in made whether the motor should be repaired or disassembled. The test is performed during start-up of the motor without any load. Current, voltage, vibration and rotation sped is measured. The tested conditions results in a performance classification of the motor by Principal Component Analysis, PCA.

  2. Ubiquitylation by Trim32 causes coupled loss of desmin, Z-bands, and thin filaments in muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Shenhav; Zhai, Bo; Gygi, Steven P; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2012-08-20

    During muscle atrophy, myofibrillar proteins are degraded in an ordered process in which MuRF1 catalyzes ubiquitylation of thick filament components (Cohen et al. 2009. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.200901052). Here, we show that another ubiquitin ligase, Trim32, ubiquitylates thin filament (actin, tropomyosin, troponins) and Z-band (α-actinin) components and promotes their degradation. Down-regulation of Trim32 during fasting reduced fiber atrophy and the rapid loss of thin filaments. Desmin filaments were proposed to maintain the integrity of thin filaments. Accordingly, we find that the rapid destruction of thin filament proteins upon fasting was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of desmin filaments, which promoted desmin ubiquitylation by Trim32 and degradation. Reducing Trim32 levels prevented the loss of both desmin and thin filament proteins. Furthermore, overexpression of an inhibitor of desmin polymerization induced disassembly of desmin filaments and destruction of thin filament components. Thus, during fasting, desmin phosphorylation increases and enhances Trim32-mediated degradation of the desmin cytoskeleton, which appears to facilitate the breakdown of Z-bands and thin filaments. PMID:22908310

  3. Coordinated process of polarized growth in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Norio

    2016-09-01

    Filamentous fungi are extremely polarized organisms, exhibiting continuous growth at their hyphal tips. The hyphal form is related to their pathogenicity in animals and plants, and their high secretion ability for biotechnology. Polarized growth requires a sequential supply of proteins and lipids to the hyphal tip. This transport is managed by vesicle trafficking via the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton. Therefore, the arrangement of the cytoskeleton is a crucial step to establish and maintain the cell polarity. This review summarizes recent findings unraveling the mechanism of polarized growth with special emphasis on the role of actin and microtubule cytoskeleton and polarity marker proteins. Rapid insertions of membranes via highly active exocytosis at hyphal tips could quickly dilute the accumulated polarity marker proteins. Recent findings by a super-resolution microscopy indicate that filamentous fungal cells maintain their polarity at the tips by repeating transient assembly and disassembly of polarity sites. PMID:27121747

  4. Tungsten filament fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-05-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent light bulb is being replaced by compact fluorescent and LED lamps.

  5. Capillarity-induced disassembly of virions in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaobin; Barclay, J. Elaine; Peng, Wenchao; Li, Yang; Li, Xianyu; Zhang, Guoliang; Evans, David J.; Zhang, Fengbao

    2008-04-01

    Studying the transport and fate of viruses through nanochannels is of great importance. By using the nanochannel of a carbon nanotube (CNT) as an ideal model, we evaluated the possibility of capillarity-induced viral transport through a closely fitting nanochannel and explored the mechanisms involved. It is shown both experimentally and theoretically that Cowpea mosaic virus can enter CNTs by capillarity. However, when introduced into a nanotube the protein capsid may disassemble. During the initial capillary filling stage, anomalous needle-shaped high pressure exists in the centre of the nanotube's entrance. This high pressure, combining with the significant negative pressure within the nanotube, may account for the disassembly of the virions.

  6. Sympathetic Solar Filament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Zimovets, Ivan; Hu, Huidong; Dai, Xinghua; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-08-01

    The 2015 March 15 coronal mass ejection as one of the two that together drove the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 24 so far was associated with sympathetic filament eruptions. We investigate the relations between the different filaments involved in the eruption. A surge-like small-scale filament motion is confirmed as the trigger that initiated the erupting filament with multi-wavelength observations and using a forced magnetic field extrapolation method. When the erupting filament moved to an open magnetic field region, it experienced an obvious acceleration process and was accompanied by a C-class flare and the rise of another larger filament that eventually failed to erupt. We measure the decay index of the background magnetic field, which presents a critical height of 118 Mm. Combining with a potential field source surface extrapolation method, we analyze the distributions of the large-scale magnetic field, which indicates that the open magnetic field region may provide a favorable condition for F2 rapid acceleration and have some relation with the largest solar storm. The comparison between the successful and failed filament eruptions suggests that the confining magnetic field plays an important role in the preconditions for an eruption.

  7. Coordinated disassembly of the divisome complex in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Söderström, Bill; Mirzadeh, Kiavash; Toddo, Stephen; von Heijne, Gunnar; Skoglund, Ulf; Daley, Daniel O

    2016-08-01

    The divisome is the macromolecular complex that carries out cell division in Escherichia coli. Every generation it must be assembled, and then disassembled so that the sequestered proteins can be recycled. Whilst the assembly process has been well studied, virtually nothing is known about the disassembly process. In this study, we have used super-resolution SIM imaging to monitor pairs of fluorescently tagged divisome proteins as they depart from the division septum. These simple binary comparisons indicated that disassembly occurs in a coordinated process that consists of at least five steps: [FtsZ, ZapA] ⇒ [ZipA, FtsA] ⇒ [FtsL, FtsQ] ⇒ [FtsI, FtsN] ⇒ [FtsN]. This sequence of events is remarkably similar to the assembly process, indicating that disassembly follows a first-in, first-out principle. A secondary observation from these binary comparisons was that FtsZ and FtsN formed division rings that were spatially separated throughout the division process. Thus the data indicate that the divisome structure can be visualized as two concentric rings; a proto-ring containing FtsZ and an FtsN-ring. PMID:27096604

  8. Easily disassembled electrical connector for high voltage, high frequency connections

    DOEpatents

    Milner, J.R.

    1994-05-10

    An easily accessible electrical connector capable of rapid assembly and disassembly is described wherein a wide metal conductor sheet may be evenly contacted over the entire width of the conductor sheet by opposing surfaces on the connector which provide an even clamping pressure against opposite surfaces of the metal conductor sheet using a single threaded actuating screw. 13 figures.

  9. Easily disassembled electrical connector for high voltage, high frequency connections

    DOEpatents

    Milner, Joseph R.

    1994-01-01

    An easily accessible electrical connector capable of rapid assembly and disassembly wherein a wide metal conductor sheet may be evenly contacted over the entire width of the conductor sheet by opposing surfaces on the connector which provide an even clamping pressure against opposite surfaces of the metal conductor sheet using a single threaded actuating screw.

  10. Teaching Assembly for Disassembly; An Under-Graduate Module Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexandri, Eleftheria

    2014-01-01

    This paper is about the experience of teaching Assembly for Disassembly to fourth year architect students within the module of sustainable design. When designing a sustainable building one should take into consideration the fact that the building is going to be demolished in some years; thus the materials should be assembled in such a way so that…

  11. Assembly via disassembly: A case in machine perceptual development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajcsy, Ruzena K.; Tsikos, Constantine J.

    1989-01-01

    First results in the effort of learning about representations of objects is presented. The questions attempted to be answered are: What is innate and what must be derived from the environment. The problem is casted in the framework of disassembly of an object into two parts.

  12. Tilt Angles of Quiescent Filaments and Filaments of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlatov, A. G.; Kuzanyan, K. M.; Vasil'yeva, V. V.

    2016-04-01

    We carry out study of tilt angles of solar filaments using the data from the two observatories: Meudon Observatory and Kislovodsk Mountain Astronomical Station for the century-long period 1919-2014. We developed special software for digitization of the filaments structures on Hα synoptic maps. The filaments were vectorized in semi-automatic mode. The tilt angles of filaments with respect to the equator (τ) were analyzed. Approximately 2/3 of the filaments have positive angles τ >0, which is defined as when the eastern end of the filaments are closer to the poles than the western ones. We have separated tilts for the filaments which are close to the active region structures and those of quiescent filaments. We found that long quiescent filaments mainly have negative tilts. The filaments which are close to active regions mainly have positive tilt angles.

  13. Multi-kanban mechanism for personal computer disassembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udomsawat, Gun; Gupta, Surendra M.; Kamarthi, Sagar V.

    2004-12-01

    The use of personal computers (PCs) continues to increase every year. According to a 1999 figure, 50 percent of all US households owned PCs, a figure that continues to rise every year. With continuous development of sophisticated software, PCs are becoming increasingly powerful. In addition, the price of a PC continues to steadily decline. Furthermore, the typical life of a PC in the workplace is approximately two to three years while in the home it is three to five years. As these PCs become obsolete, they are replaced and the old PCs are disposed of. It is estimated that between 14 and 20 million PCs are retired annually in the US. While 20 to 30% of the units may be resold, the others are discarded. These discards represent a significant potential source of lead for the waste stream. In some communities, waste cathode ray tubes (CRTs) represent the second largest source of lead in the waste stream after vehicular lead acid batteries. PCs are, therefore, not suitable for dumping in landfills. Besides, several components of a PC can be reused and then there are other valuable materials that can also be harvested. And with the advent of product stewardship, product recovery is the best solution for manufacturers. Disassembly line is perhaps the most suitable set up for disassembling PCs. However, planning and scheduling of disassembly on a disassembly line is complicated. In this paper, we discuss some of the complications including product arrival, demand arrival, inventory fluctuation and production control mechanisms. We then show how to overcome them by implementing a multi-kanban mechanism in the PC disassembly line setting. The multi-kanban mechanism relies on dynamic routing of kanbans according to the state of the system. We investigate the multi-kanban mechanism using simulation and demonstrate that this mechanism is superior to the traditional push system in terms of controlling the system"s inventory while maintaining a decent customer service level.

  14. Snake Filament Eruption

    NASA Video Gallery

    A very long solar filament that had been snaking around the Sun erupted on Dec. 6, 2010 with a flourish. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) caught the action in dramatic detail in extreme ultr...

  15. CASEIN KINASE1-LIKE PROTEIN2 Regulates Actin Filament Stability and Stomatal Closure via Phosphorylation of Actin Depolymerizing Factor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuangshuang; Jiang, Yuxiang; Zhao, Yang; Huang, Shanjin; Yuan, Ming; Zhao, Yanxiu; Guo, Yan

    2016-06-01

    The opening and closing of stomata are crucial for plant photosynthesis and transpiration. Actin filaments undergo dynamic reorganization during stomatal closure, but the underlying mechanism for this cytoskeletal reorganization remains largely unclear. In this study, we identified and characterized Arabidopsis thaliana casein kinase 1-like protein 2 (CKL2), which responds to abscisic acid (ABA) treatment and participates in ABA- and drought-induced stomatal closure. Although CKL2 does not bind to actin filaments directly and has no effect on actin assembly in vitro, it colocalizes with and stabilizes actin filaments in guard cells. Further investigation revealed that CKL2 physically interacts with and phosphorylates actin depolymerizing factor 4 (ADF4) and inhibits its activity in actin filament disassembly. During ABA-induced stomatal closure, deletion of CKL2 in Arabidopsis alters actin reorganization in stomata and renders stomatal closure less sensitive to ABA, whereas deletion of ADF4 impairs the disassembly of actin filaments and causes stomatal closure to be more sensitive to ABA Deletion of ADF4 in the ckl2 mutant partially recues its ABA-insensitive stomatal closure phenotype. Moreover, Arabidopsis ADFs from subclass I are targets of CKL2 in vitro. Thus, our results suggest that CKL2 regulates actin filament reorganization and stomatal closure mainly through phosphorylation of ADF. PMID:27268429

  16. Distinct stages in stress granule assembly and disassembly.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Joshua R; Matheny, Tyler; Jain, Saumya; Abrisch, Robert; Parker, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules are non-membrane bound RNA-protein (RNP) assemblies that form when translation initiation is limited and contain a biphasic structure with stable core structures surrounded by a less concentrated shell. The order of assembly and disassembly of these two structures remains unknown. Time course analysis of granule assembly suggests that core formation is an early event in granule assembly. Stress granule disassembly is also a stepwise process with shell dissipation followed by core clearance. Perturbations that alter liquid-liquid phase separations (LLPS) driven by intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDR) of RNA binding proteins in vitro have the opposite effect on stress granule assembly in vivo. Taken together, these observations argue that stress granules assemble through a multistep process initiated by stable assembly of untranslated mRNPs into core structures, which could provide sufficient high local concentrations to allow for a localized LLPS driven by IDRs on RNA binding proteins. PMID:27602576

  17. Meiotic Clade AAA ATPases: Protein Polymer Disassembly Machines.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Nicole; Hill, Christopher P

    2016-05-01

    Meiotic clade AAA ATPases (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities), which were initially grouped on the basis of phylogenetic classification of their AAA ATPase cassette, include four relatively well characterized family members, Vps4, spastin, katanin and fidgetin. These enzymes all function to disassemble specific polymeric protein structures, with Vps4 disassembling the ESCRT-III polymers that are central to the many membrane-remodeling activities of the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) pathway and spastin, katanin p60 and fidgetin affecting multiple aspects of cellular dynamics by severing microtubules. They share a common domain architecture that features an N-terminal MIT (microtubule interacting and trafficking) domain followed by a single AAA ATPase cassette. Meiotic clade AAA ATPases function as hexamers that can cycle between the active assembly and inactive monomers/dimers in a regulated process, and they appear to disassemble their polymeric substrates by translocating subunits through the central pore of their hexameric ring. Recent studies with Vps4 have shown that nucleotide-induced asymmetry is a requirement for substrate binding to the pore loops and that recruitment to the protein lattice via MIT domains also relieves autoinhibition and primes the AAA ATPase cassettes for substrate binding. The most striking, unifying feature of meiotic clade AAA ATPases may be their MIT domain, which is a module that is found in a wide variety of proteins that localize to ESCRT-III polymers. Spastin also displays an adjacent microtubule binding sequence, and the presence of both ESCRT-III and microtubule binding elements may underlie the recent findings that the ESCRT-III disassembly function of Vps4 and the microtubule-severing function of spastin, as well as potentially katanin and fidgetin, are highly coordinated. PMID:26555750

  18. Programmable, isothermal disassembly of DNA-linked colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tison, Christopher Kirby

    Colloidal particles serve as useful building blocks for materials applications ranging from controlled hand-gap materials to rationally designed drug delivery systems. Thus, developing approaches to direct the assembly and disassembly of sub-micron sized particles will be paramount to further advances in materials science engineering. This project focuses on using programmable and reversible binding between oligonucleotide strands to assemble and then disassemble polystyrene colloidal particles. It is shown that DNA-mediated assembly can be reversed at a fixed temperature using secondary oligonucleotide strands to competitively displace the primary strands linking particles together. It was found that (1) titrating the surface density of hybridizing probe strands and (2) adjusting the base length difference between primary and secondary target strands was key to successful isothermal disassembly. In order to titrate the surface density of primary probe-target duplexes, colloidal particles were conjugated with mixtures of probe strands and "diluent" strands in order to minimize the number of DNA linkages between particles. To reduce the steric interference of the diluent strands to hybridization events, diluent strands were clipped with a restriction enzyme in select cases. Kinetics studies revealed that a four to six base-length difference between primary and secondary target strands resulted in extensive competitive hybridization at secondary oligonucleotide concentrations as low as 10 nM. Importantly, it was found that the timing for release of either DNA alone or DNA-conjugated nanoparticles could be tuned through choices in the DNA sequences and concentration. Lastly, competitive hybridization was explored in select studies to drive the "shedding" of PEGylated DNA targets from microspheres to reveal underlying adhesive groups or ligands on the particle surface. Unlike prior work relying on elevated temperatures to melt DNA-linkages, this work presents an

  19. (HFR-B1 experiment reporting and capsule disassembly)

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, B.F.

    1991-02-22

    The traveler visited the Joint Research Centre (JRC), Petten, The Netherlands, the Forschungszentrum GmbH (KFA), Juelich, Germany; and the Zentralinstitut fuer Kernforschung (ZfK), Rossendorf, Germany, during the period January 28 through February 9. At JRC, the analysis of the experiment HFR-B1 was discussed; a new schedule for issuance of the final data report was established. Other discussions at JRC concerned the capabilities of Petten to conduct two reactor experiments being proposed under the US/FRG cooperative program and the initial results of a proof test of Germany fuel spheres. At KFA, the main emphasis was on the disassembly of capsules 2 and 3 of the HFR-B1 experiment and agreement on the examinations and tests to be conducted with the disassembled components. The disassembly of capsule 3 was observed. Extensive discussions were conducted on the work, both experimental and analytical, being conducted in the Institut fuer Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktor Technologie. A major portion of the experimental work is being conducted at ZfK and a visit to this laboratory, sponosored by the KFA, was made on February 6 and 7. Cooperation with the US on the experimental and analytical work in the safety area was strongly emphasized. 1 tab.

  20. On the optimal design of the disassembly and recovery processes

    SciTech Connect

    Xanthopoulos, A.; Iakovou, E.

    2009-05-15

    This paper tackles the problem of the optimal design of the recovery processes of the end-of-life (EOL) electric and electronic products, with a special focus on the disassembly issues. The objective is to recover as much ecological and economic value as possible, and to reduce the overall produced quantities of waste. In this context, a medium-range tactical problem is defined and a novel two-phased algorithm is presented for a remanufacturing-driven reverse supply chain. In the first phase, we propose a multicriteria/goal-programming analysis for the identification and the optimal selection of the most 'desirable' subassemblies and components to be disassembled for recovery, from a set of different types of EOL products. In the second phase, a multi-product, multi-period mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) model is presented, which addresses the optimization of the recovery processes, while taking into account explicitly the lead times of the disassembly and recovery processes. Moreover, a simulation-based solution approach is proposed for capturing the uncertainties in reverse logistics. The overall approach leads to an easy-to-use methodology that could support effectively middle level management decisions. Finally, the applicability of the developed methodology is illustrated by its application on a specific case study.

  1. Disassembly of the cystovirus ϕ6 envelope by montmorillonite clay.

    PubMed

    Block, Karin A; Trusiak, Adrianna; Katz, Al; Gottlieb, Paul; Alimova, Alexandra; Wei, Hui; Morales, Jorge; Rice, William J; Steiner, Jeffrey C

    2014-02-01

    Prior studies of clay-virus interactions have focused on the stability and infectivity of nonenveloped viruses, yielding contradictory results. We hypothesize that the surface charge distribution of the clay and virus envelope dictates how the components react and affect aggregation, viral stability, and infectivity. The bacteriophage Cystoviridae species φ6 used in this study is a good model for enveloped pathogens. The interaction between φ6 and montmorillonite (MMT) clay (the primary component of bentonite) is explored by transmission electron microscopy. The analyses show that MMT-φ6 mixtures undergo heteroaggregation, forming structures in which virtually all the virions are either sequestered between MMT platelet layers or attached to platelet edges. The virions swell and undergo disassembly resulting in partial or total envelope loss. Edge-attached viral envelopes distort to increase contact area with the positively charged platelet edges indicating that the virion surface is negatively charged. The nucleocapsid (NCs) remaining after envelope removal also exhibit distortion, in contrast to detergent-produced NCs which exhibit no distortion. This visually discernible disassembly is a mechanism for loss of infectivity previously unreported by studies of nonenveloped viruses. The MMT-mediated sequestration and disassembly result in reduced infectivity, suggesting that clays may reduce infectivity of enveloped pathogenic viruses in soils and sediments. PMID:24357622

  2. On the optimal design of the disassembly and recovery processes.

    PubMed

    Xanthopoulos, A; Iakovou, E

    2009-05-01

    This paper tackles the problem of the optimal design of the recovery processes of the end-of-life (EOL) electric and electronic products, with a special focus on the disassembly issues. The objective is to recover as much ecological and economic value as possible, and to reduce the overall produced quantities of waste. In this context, a medium-range tactical problem is defined and a novel two-phased algorithm is presented for a remanufacturing-driven reverse supply chain. In the first phase, we propose a multicriteria/goal-programming analysis for the identification and the optimal selection of the most 'desirable' subassemblies and components to be disassembled for recovery, from a set of different types of EOL products. In the second phase, a multi-product, multi-period mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) model is presented, which addresses the optimization of the recovery processes, while taking into account explicitly the lead times of the disassembly and recovery processes. Moreover, a simulation-based solution approach is proposed for capturing the uncertainties in reverse logistics. The overall approach leads to an easy-to-use methodology that could support effectively middle level management decisions. Finally, the applicability of the developed methodology is illustrated by its application on a specific case study. PMID:19138507

  3. Regulation of cilia assembly, disassembly, and length by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Muqing; Li, Guihua; Pan, Junmin

    2009-01-01

    The exact mechanism by which cells are able to assemble, regulate, and disassemble cilia or flagella is not yet completely understood. Recent studies in several model systems, including Chlamydomonas, Tetrahymena, Leishmania, Caenorhabditis elegans, and mammals, provide increasing biochemical and genetic evidence that phosphorylation of multiple protein kinases plays a key role in cilia assembly, disassembly, and length regulation. Members of several protein kinase families--including aurora kinases, never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related protein kinases, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, and a novel cyclin-dependent protein kinase--are involved in the ciliary regulation process. Among the newly identified protein kinase substrates are Chlamydomonas kinesin-13 (CrKinesin13), a microtubule depolymerizer, and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), a microtubule deacetylase. Chlamydomonas aurora/Ipl1p-like protein kinase (CALK) and CrKinesin13 are two proteins that undergo phosphorylation changes correlated with flagellar assembly or disassembly. CALK becomes phosphorylated when flagella are lost, whereas CrKinesin13 is phosphorylated when new flagella are assembled. Conversely, suppressing CrKinesin13 expression results in cells with shorter flagella. PMID:20362099

  4. Disassembly of the cystovirus ϕ6 envelope by montmorillonite clay

    PubMed Central

    Block, Karin A; Trusiak, Adrianna; Katz, Al; Gottlieb, Paul; Alimova, Alexandra; Wei, Hui; Morales, Jorge; Rice, William J; Steiner, Jeffrey C

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies of clay–virus interactions have focused on the stability and infectivity of nonenveloped viruses, yielding contradictory results. We hypothesize that the surface charge distribution of the clay and virus envelope dictates how the components react and affect aggregation, viral stability, and infectivity. The bacteriophage Cystoviridae species φ6 used in this study is a good model for enveloped pathogens. The interaction between φ6 and montmorillonite (MMT) clay (the primary component of bentonite) is explored by transmission electron microscopy. The analyses show that MMT–φ6 mixtures undergo heteroaggregation, forming structures in which virtually all the virions are either sequestered between MMT platelet layers or attached to platelet edges. The virions swell and undergo disassembly resulting in partial or total envelope loss. Edge-attached viral envelopes distort to increase contact area with the positively charged platelet edges indicating that the virion surface is negatively charged. The nucleocapsid (NCs) remaining after envelope removal also exhibit distortion, in contrast to detergent-produced NCs which exhibit no distortion. This visually discernible disassembly is a mechanism for loss of infectivity previously unreported by studies of nonenveloped viruses. The MMT-mediated sequestration and disassembly result in reduced infectivity, suggesting that clays may reduce infectivity of enveloped pathogenic viruses in soils and sediments. PMID:24357622

  5. Evolution of filament barbs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R.; Xu, Y.; Wang, H.

    We present a selected few cases in which the sense of chirality of filament barbs changed within periods as short as hours. We investigate in detail a quiescent filament on 2003 September 10 and 11. Of its four barbs displaying such changes, only one overlays a small polarity inversion line inside the EUV filament channel (EFC). No magnetic elements with magnitude above the noise level were detected at the endpoints of all barbs. In particular, a pair of barbs first approached toward, and then departed from, each other in Halpha , with the barb endpoints migrating as far as ˜ 10 arcsec. We conclude that the evolution of the barbs was driven by flux emergence and cancellation of small bipolar units at the EFC border.

  6. Cellular Level Robotic Surgery: Nanodissection of Intermediate Filaments in Live Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruiguo; Song, Bo; Sun, Zhiyong; Lai, King Wai Chiu; Fung, Carmen Kar Man; Patterson, Kevin C.; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Sinha, Animesh A.; Xi, Ning

    2014-01-01

    We present the nanosurgery on the cytoskeleton of live cells using AFM based nanorobotics to achieve adhesiolysis and mimic the effect of pathophysiological modulation of intercellular adhesion. Nanosurgery successfully severs the intermediate filament bundles and disrupts cell-cell adhesion similar to the desmosomal protein disassembly in autoimmune disease, or the cationic modulation of desmosome formation. Our nanomechanical analysis revealed that adhesion loss results in a decrease in cellular stiffness in both, the case of biochemical modulation of the desmosome junctions or mechanical disruption of intercellular adhesion, supporting the notion that intercellular adhesion through intermediate filaments anchors the cell structure as focal adhesion does and that intermediate filaments are integral components in cell mechanical integrity. The surgical process could potentially help reveal the mechanism of autoimmune pathology-induced cell-cell adhesion loss as well as its related pathways that lead to cell apoptosis. PMID:25200612

  7. Vimentin filament organization and stress sensing depend on its single cysteine residue and zinc binding

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Oeste, Clara L.; Martínez, Alma E.; Carrasco, M. Jesús; Garzón, Beatriz; Cañada, F. Javier

    2015-01-01

    The vimentin filament network plays a key role in cell architecture and signalling, as well as in epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Vimentin C328 is targeted by various oxidative modifications, but its role in vimentin organization is not known. Here we show that C328 is essential for vimentin network reorganization in response to oxidants and electrophiles, and is required for optimal vimentin performance in network expansion, lysosomal distribution and aggresome formation. C328 may fulfil these roles through interaction with zinc. In vitro, micromolar zinc protects vimentin from iodoacetamide modification and elicits vimentin polymerization into optically detectable structures; in cells, zinc closely associates with vimentin and its depletion causes reversible filament disassembly. Finally, zinc transport-deficient human fibroblasts show increased vimentin solubility and susceptibility to disruption, which are restored by zinc supplementation. These results unveil a critical role of C328 in vimentin organization and open new perspectives for the regulation of intermediate filaments by zinc. PMID:26031447

  8. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Johnson, III, Coleman V.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces.

  9. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Tillotson, T.M.; Johnson, C.V. III

    1995-05-16

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces. 6 Figs.

  10. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

    2009-12-03

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs

  11. Lens tilting effect on filamentation and filament-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamali, Y.; Sun, Q.; Daigle, J.-F.; Azarm, A.; Bernhardt, J.; Chin, S. L.

    2009-03-01

    In filament-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, we experimentally found that if the lens used for the creation and localization of filament is tilted, the signal to noise ratio of spectral measurement increases. Further study shows that with lens tilting, astigmatism occurs and the filament is split into shorter parts. In turn the shortening of filament reduces the generation of white light which is the major 'noise' source of the spectra.

  12. Branching of keratin intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Nafeey, Soufi; Martin, Ines; Felder, Tatiana; Walther, Paul; Felder, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) are crucial to maintain mechanical stability in epithelial cells. Since little is known about the network architecture that provides this stiffness and especially about branching properties of filaments, we addressed this question with different electron microscopic (EM) methods. Using EM tomography of high pressure frozen keratinocytes, we investigated the course of several filaments in a branching of a filament bundle. Moreover we found several putative bifurcations in individual filaments. To verify our observation we also visualized the keratin network in detergent extracted keratinocytes with scanning EM. Here bifurcations of individual filaments could unambiguously be identified additionally to bundle branchings. Interestingly, identical filament bifurcations were also found in purified keratin 8/18 filaments expressed in Escherichia coli which were reassembled in vitro. This excludes that an accessory protein contributes to the branch formation. Measurements of the filament cross sectional areas showed various ratios between the three bifurcation arms. This demonstrates that intermediate filament furcation is very different from actin furcation where an entire new filament is attached to an existing filament. Instead, the architecture of intermediate filament bifurcations is less predetermined and hence consistent with the general concept of IF formation. PMID:27039023

  13. Dynamic light-scattering study on changes in mobility of chromaffin granules in actin network with its assembly and Ca2+-dependent disassembly by gelsolin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujime, Satoru; Miyamoto, Shigeaki; Funatsu, Takashi; Ishiwata, S.

    1993-06-01

    As a final stage of cell signal transduction, secretory cells release hormones by exocytosis. Before secretory granules contact with the cell membrane for fusion, an actin network barrier must dissociate as a prelude. In order to elucidate dynamical behaviors of secretory granules in actin network, in vitro assembly and disassembly processes of actin networks were examined by means of dynamic light-scattering spectroscopy. We studied actin polymerization in the presence of chromaffin granules isolated from bovine adrenal medullae, and found that the entanglement of actin filaments rapidly formed cages which confined granules in them. We also studied the effect of gelsolin, one of the actin-severing proteins, on the network of actin filaments performed in the presence of chromaffin granules. It turned out that the cages which confined granules rapidly disappeared when gelsolin was added in the presence of free Ca2+ ions. Semiquantitative analyses of dynamic light-scattering spectra permitted us to estimate the changes in the mobility (or translational diffusion coefficient) of chromaffin granules in the actin network with its assembly and Ca2+-dependent disassembly by gelsolin. Based on the present results and some pieces of evidence in literature, a model is proposed for biophysical situations before, during, and after an exocytotic event.

  14. Exact Length Distribution of Filamentous Structures Assembled from a Finite Pool of Subunits.

    PubMed

    Harbage, David; Kondev, Jané

    2016-07-01

    Self-assembling filamentous structures made of protein subunits are ubiquitous in cell biology. These structures are often highly dynamic, with subunits in a continuous state of flux, binding to and falling off of filaments. In spite of this constant turnover of their molecular parts, many cellular structures seem to maintain a well-defined size over time, which is often required for their proper functioning. One widely discussed mechanism of size regulation involves the cell maintaining a finite pool of protein subunits available for assembly. This finite pool mechanism can control the length of a single filament by having assembly proceed until the pool of free subunits is depleted to the point when assembly and disassembly are balanced. Still, this leaves open the question of whether the same mechanism can provide size control for multiple filamentous structures that are assembled from a common pool of protein subunits, as is often the case in cells. We address this question by solving the steady-state master equation governing the stochastic assembly and disassembly of multifilament structures made from a shared finite pool of subunits. We find that, while the total number of subunits within a multifilament structure is well-defined, individual filaments within the structure have a wide, power-law distribution of lengths. We also compute the phase diagram for two multifilament structures competing for the same pool of subunits and identify conditions for coexistence when both have a well-defined size. These predictions can be tested in cell experiments in which the size of the subunit pool or the number of filament nucleators is tuned. PMID:27135597

  15. Novel actin-like filament structure from Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Popp, David; Narita, Akihiro; Lee, Lin Jie; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Xue, Bo; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Tanaka, Toshitsugu; Robinson, Robert C

    2012-06-15

    Eukaryotic F-actin is constructed from two protofilaments that gently wind around each other to form a helical polymer. Several bacterial actin-like proteins (Alps) are also known to form F-actin-like helical arrangements from two protofilaments, yet with varied helical geometries. Here, we report a unique filament architecture of Alp12 from Clostridium tetani that is constructed from four protofilaments. Through fitting of an Alp12 monomer homology model into the electron microscopy data, the filament was determined to be constructed from two antiparallel strands, each composed of two parallel protofilaments. These four protofilaments form an open helical cylinder separated by a wide cleft. The molecular interactions within single protofilaments are similar to F-actin, yet interactions between protofilaments differ from those in F-actin. The filament structure and assembly and disassembly kinetics suggest Alp12 to be a dynamically unstable force-generating motor involved in segregating the pE88 plasmid, which encodes the lethal tetanus toxin, and thus a potential target for drug design. Alp12 can be repeatedly cycled between states of polymerization and dissociation, making it a novel candidate for incorporation into fuel-propelled nanobiopolymer machines. PMID:22514279

  16. Magnetically driven filament probe.

    PubMed

    Schmid, A; Herrmann, A; Rohde, V; Maraschek, M; Müller, H W

    2007-05-01

    A radially movable probe has been developed for studies of filamentary transport in ASDEX Upgrade during edge localized modes (ELMs) by means of Langmuir tips and magnetic pickup coils. The probe is permanently installed at the low field side in the ASDEX Upgrade vacuum vessel and is not subject to limitations in probe size, as, for example, probes on a shared manipulator are. The probe is moved by a magnetic drive, which allows for easy installation in the vessel, and has moderate machine requirements, as it will only require an electric feedthrough and an external power supply. The drive gives a linear motion with a radial range of 5 cm within 50 ms, where range and velocity can be largely scaled according to experimental requirements. The probe has been installed in the outer midplane of the ASDEX Upgrade vessel, where ELM filaments are expected to have their maximum amplitude. Filaments are coherent substructures within an ELM, carrying a fraction of the ELM released energy towards the wall. The new probe allows to measure the structure of these filaments, in particular, parameters such as filament rotation (by time delay measurements) and size (by peak width analysis). Activating the drive moves the probe from a safe position behind the limiter to a position in front of the limiters, i.e., exposes the Langmuir pins to the scrape-off layer plasma. PMID:17552815

  17. Profilin-Dependent Nucleation and Assembly of Actin Filaments Controls Cell Elongation in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lingyan; Blanchoin, Laurent; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Actin filaments in plant cells are incredibly dynamic; they undergo incessant remodeling and assembly or disassembly within seconds. These dynamic events are choreographed by a plethora of actin-binding proteins, but the exact mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we dissect the contribution of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PROFILIN1 (PRF1), a conserved actin monomer-binding protein, to actin organization and single filament dynamics during axial cell expansion of living epidermal cells. We found that reduced PRF1 levels enhanced cell and organ growth. Surprisingly, we observed that the overall frequency of nucleation events in prf1 mutants was dramatically decreased and that a subpopulation of actin filaments that assemble at high rates was reduced. To test whether profilin cooperates with plant formin proteins to execute actin nucleation and rapid filament elongation in cells, we used a pharmacological approach. Here, we used Small Molecule Inhibitor of Formin FH2 (SMIFH2), after validating its mode of action on a plant formin in vitro, and observed a reduced nucleation frequency of actin filaments in live cells. Treatment of wild-type epidermal cells with SMIFH2 mimicked the phenotype of prf1 mutants, and the nucleation frequency in prf1-2 mutant was completely insensitive to these treatments. Our data provide compelling evidence that PRF1 coordinates the stochastic dynamic properties of actin filaments by modulating formin-mediated actin nucleation and assembly during plant cell expansion. PMID:26574597

  18. Metal ion-dependent, reversible, protein filament formation by designed beta-roll polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Scotter, Andrew J; Guo, Meng; Tomczak, Melanie M; Daley, Margaret E; Campbell, Robert L; Oko, Richard J; Bateman, David A; Chakrabartty, Avijit; Sykes, Brian D; Davies, Peter L

    2007-01-01

    Background A right-handed, calcium-dependent β-roll structure found in secreted proteases and repeat-in-toxin proteins was used as a template for the design of minimal, soluble, monomeric polypeptides that would fold in the presence of Ca2+. Two polypeptides were synthesised to contain two and four metal-binding sites, respectively, and exploit stacked tryptophan pairs to stabilise the fold and report on the conformational state of the polypeptide. Results Initial analysis of the two polypeptides in the presence of calcium suggested the polypeptides were disordered. The addition of lanthanum to these peptides caused aggregation. Upon further study by right angle light scattering and electron microscopy, the aggregates were identified as ordered protein filaments that required lanthanum to polymerize. These filaments could be disassembled by the addition of a chelating agent. A simple head-to-tail model is proposed for filament formation that explains the metal ion-dependency. The model is supported by the capping of one of the polypeptides with biotin, which disrupts filament formation and provides the ability to control the average length of the filaments. Conclusion Metal ion-dependent, reversible protein filament formation is demonstrated for two designed polypeptides. The polypeptides form filaments that are approximately 3 nm in diameter and several hundred nm in length. They are not amyloid-like in nature as demonstrated by their behaviour in the presence of congo red and thioflavin T. A capping strategy allows for the control of filament length and for potential applications including the "decoration" of a protein filament with various functional moieties. PMID:17908326

  19. Nicotinic acid modulates intracellular calcium concentration and disassembles the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIEJING; LI, YANXI; ZHANG, PENGHUI; NIU, HUA; SHI, YU

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA), a member of the vitamin B family, is well known for its functions in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis due to decreasing plasma levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In recent years, the major side effect of NA, cutaneous flushing, has also attracted extensive attention. However, the effects of NA in other aspects of physiology or cell biology have remained elusive. The present study provided evidence that high concentrations of NA were able to first reduce and later elevate intracellular [Ca2+] in the NIH3T3 cell line. The reduction of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration was achieved within the initial 10 sec, and was preceded by a gradual elevation of intracellular [Ca2+]. Notably, marked accumulation of opaque materials in the perinuclear region was observed in NIH3T3 cells treated with 70 mM NA. Further analysis revealed that treatment with 70 mM NA for 1 h disassembled the microtubule and F-actin cytoskeleton systems and resulted in β-tubulin degradation in an ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent manner. These data indicated that high concentrations of NA disrupted cytoskeleton structures, which may have contributed to minus end (nucleus region) to plus end (cell membrane region)-directed transport processes and resulted in the deposition of material in the perinuclear region. Artificially increasing [Ca2+] adding CaCl2 to the culture media effected the disassembly of F-actin, while it had no apparent effect on microtubules. These results suggested that the disruption of the cytoskeleton systems was not entirely due to the NA-induced elevation of [Ca2+]. Finally, microinjection of NA into xenopus embryos blocked the transport of melanosomes to the peripheral cellular area. In conclusion, the present study indicated that NA disassembles F-actin and microtubule systems, thereby blocking cytoskeleton-dependent intracellular transport. PMID:25241762

  20. Nicotinic acid modulates intracellular calcium concentration and disassembles the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiejing; Li, Yanxi; Zhang, Penghui; Niu, Hua; Shi, Yu

    2014-12-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA), a member of the vitamin B family, is well known for its functions in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis due to decreasing plasma levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In recent years, the major side effect of NA, cutaneous flushing, has also attracted extensive attention. However, the effects of NA in other aspects of physiology or cell biology have remained elusive. The present study provided evidence that high concentrations of NA were able to first reduce and later elevate intracellular [Ca2+] in the NIH3T3 cell line. The reduction of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration was achieved within the initial 10 sec, and was preceded by a gradual elevation of intracellular [Ca2+]. Notably, marked accumulation of opaque materials in the perinuclear region was observed in NIH3T3 cells treated with 70 mM NA. Further analysis revealed that treatment with 70 mM NA for 1 h disassembled the microtubule and F‑actin cytoskeleton systems and resulted in β‑tubulin degradation in an ubiquitin‑proteasome-dependent manner. These data indicated that high concentrations of NA disrupted cytoskeleton structures, which may have contributed to minus end (nucleus region) to plus end (cell membrane region)-directed transport processes and resulted in the deposition of material in the perinuclear region. Artificially increasing [Ca2+] adding CaCl2 to the culture media effected the disassembly of F‑actin, while it had no apparent effect on microtubules. These results suggested that the disruption of the cytoskeleton systems was not entirely due to the NA-induced elevation of [Ca2+]. Finally, microinjection of NA into xenopus embryos blocked the transport of melanosomes to the peripheral cellular area. In conclusion, the present study indicated that NA disassembles F‑actin and microtubule systems, thereby blocking cytoskeleton-dependent intracellular transport. PMID:25241762

  1. Amide I band and photoinduced disassembly of a peptide hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Measey, Thomas J.; Markiewicz, Beatrice N.; Gai, Feng

    2013-08-01

    Peptide hydrogels are promising candidates for a wide range of medical and biotechnological applications. To further expand the potential utility of peptide hydrogels, herein we demonstrate a simple yet effective strategy to render peptide hydrogels photodegradable, making controlled disassembly of the gel structure of interest feasible. In addition, we find that the high-frequency amide I' component (i.e., the peak at ˜1685 cm-1) of the photodegradable peptide hydrogel studied shows an unusually large enhancement, in comparison to that of other peptide fibrils consisting of antiparallel β-sheets, making it a good model system for further study of the coupling-structure relationship.

  2. Solid friction between soft filaments.

    PubMed

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes's drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials. PMID:25730393

  3. Distinct stages in stress granule assembly and disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Joshua R; Matheny, Tyler; Jain, Saumya; Abrisch, Robert; Parker, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules are non-membrane bound RNA-protein (RNP) assemblies that form when translation initiation is limited and contain a biphasic structure with stable core structures surrounded by a less concentrated shell. The order of assembly and disassembly of these two structures remains unknown. Time course analysis of granule assembly suggests that core formation is an early event in granule assembly. Stress granule disassembly is also a stepwise process with shell dissipation followed by core clearance. Perturbations that alter liquid-liquid phase separations (LLPS) driven by intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDR) of RNA binding proteins in vitro have the opposite effect on stress granule assembly in vivo. Taken together, these observations argue that stress granules assemble through a multistep process initiated by stable assembly of untranslated mRNPs into core structures, which could provide sufficient high local concentrations to allow for a localized LLPS driven by IDRs on RNA binding proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18413.001 PMID:27602576

  4. A products generator for testing the performance of disassembly procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adenso-Díaz, Belarmino; González Torre, Beatriz

    2004-12-01

    In recent decades, regulations and markets have been exerting pressure on designers and manufacturers to take more responsibility for the environmental impacts of their products throughout their life cycles. The problem of finding the disassembly sequence represents one of the major challenges when attempting to close product life cycles by carrying out reuse, recycling and remanufacturing practices. Many different techniques have been used to deal with this problem, varying from exact to heuristic solutions. So far, however, not much effort has gone into measuring and comparing the efficiency of this wide set of techniques. This is partly due to the difficulties of getting a wide population of real products, belonging to different industries and with different degree of complexity that might constitute a representative population for carrying out this kind of task. In this paper, a generator of complex products is presented that is able to build up products with hundreds of components joined by different kinds of joints in such a way that a theoretical "good" disassembly sequence is always known. The efficiency of different methods for general products can thus be easily compared. The performance of a Scatter Search algorithm is tested as an example of its application in this case.

  5. Hybrid LCA of a design for disassembly technology: active disassembling fasteners of hydrogen storage alloys for home appliances.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shinichiro; Yamasue, Eiji

    2010-06-15

    In the current recycling system of end-of-life (EoL) appliances, which is based on shredding, alloying elements tend to end up in the scrap of base metals. The uncontrolled mixing of alloying elements contaminates secondary metals and calls for dilution with primary metals. Active disassembling fastener (ADF) is a design for disassembly (DfD) technology that is expected to solve this problem by significantly reducing the extent of mixing. This paper deals with a life cycle assessment (LCA) based on the waste input-output (WIO) model of an ADF developed using hydrogen storage alloys. Special attention is paid to the issue of dilution of mixed iron scrap using pig iron in an electric arc furnace (EAF). The results for Japanese electrical and electronic appliances indicate superiority of the recycling system based on the ADF over the current system in terms of reduced emissions of CO(2). The superiority of ADF was found to increase with an increase in the requirement for dilution of scrap. PMID:20476783

  6. The Relative Pedagogical Value of Disassemble/Analyze/Assemble (DAA) Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalrymple, Odesma; Sears, David A.; Evangelou, Demetra

    2013-01-01

    Inherently a discovery-based pedagogy, Disassemble/Analyze/Assemble (DAA) activities start with the artefact--an instance of a typically well-engineered solution. Through systemized disassembly and the subsequent analysis of components, students engage in an iterative process of observation and follow-up probing. In-turn, this process helps…

  7. Actin turnover-dependent fast dissociation of capping protein in the dendritic nucleation actin network: evidence of frequent filament severing.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Takushi; Tsuji, Takahiro; Higashida, Chiharu; Hertzog, Maud; Fujita, Akiko; Narumiya, Shuh; Scita, Giorgio; Watanabe, Naoki

    2006-12-18

    Actin forms the dendritic nucleation network and undergoes rapid polymerization-depolymerization cycles in lamellipodia. To elucidate the mechanism of actin disassembly, we characterized molecular kinetics of the major filament end-binding proteins Arp2/3 complex and capping protein (CP) using single-molecule speckle microscopy. We have determined the dissociation rates of Arp2/3 and CP as 0.048 and 0.58 s(-1), respectively, in lamellipodia of live XTC fibroblasts. This CP dissociation rate is three orders of magnitude faster than in vitro. CP dissociates slower from actin stress fibers than from the lamellipodial actin network, suggesting that CP dissociation correlates with actin filament dynamics. We found that jasplakinolide, an actin depolymerization inhibitor, rapidly blocked the fast CP dissociation in cells. Consistently, the coexpression of LIM kinase prolonged CP speckle lifetime in lamellipodia. These results suggest that cofilin-mediated actin disassembly triggers CP dissociation from actin filaments. We predict that filament severing and end-to-end annealing might take place fairly frequently in the dendritic nucleation actin arrays. PMID:17178911

  8. Filament wound structure and method

    DOEpatents

    Dritt, William S.; Gerth, Howard L.; Knight, Jr., Charles E.; Pardue, Robert M.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention relates to a filament wound spherical structure comprising a plurality of filament band sets disposed about the surface of a mandrel with each band of each set formed of a continuous filament circumferentially wound about the mandrel a selected number of circuits and with each circuit of filament being wound parallel to and contiguous with an immediate previously wound circuit. Each filament band in each band set is wound at the same helix angle from the axis of revolution of the mandrel and all of the bands of each set are uniformly distributed about the mandrel circumference. The pole-to-equator wall thickness taper associated with each band set, as several contiguous band sets are wound about the mandrel starting at the poles, is accumulative as the band sets are nested to provide a complete filament wound sphere of essentially uniform thickness.

  9. CVD-produced boron filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wawner, F. E.; Debolt, H. E.; Suplinskas, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A technique for producing boron filaments with an average tensile strength of 6.89 GPa has been developed which involves longitudinal splitting of the filament and core (substrate) removal by etching. Splitting is accomplished by a pinch wheel device which continuously splits filaments in lengths of 3.0 m by applying a force to the side of the filament to create a crack which is then propagated along the axis by a gentle sliding action. To facilitate the splitting, a single 10 mil tungsten substrate is used instead of the usual 0.5 mil substrate. A solution of hot 30% hydrogen peroxide is used to remove the core without attacking the boron. An alternative technique is to alter the residual stress by heavily etching the filament. Average strengths in the 4.83-5.52 GPa range have been obtained by etching an 8 mil filament to 4 mil.

  10. Magnetic vortex filament flows

    SciTech Connect

    Barros, Manuel; Cabrerizo, Jose L.; Fernandez, Manuel; Romero, Alfonso

    2007-08-15

    We exhibit a variational approach to study the magnetic flow associated with a Killing magnetic field in dimension 3. In this context, the solutions of the Lorentz force equation are viewed as Kirchhoff elastic rods and conversely. This provides an amazing connection between two apparently unrelated physical models and, in particular, it ties the classical elastic theory with the Hall effect. Then, these magnetic flows can be regarded as vortex filament flows within the localized induction approximation. The Hasimoto transformation can be used to see the magnetic trajectories as solutions of the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation showing the solitonic nature of those.

  11. Nucleocytoplasmic transport in the midzone membrane domain controls yeast mitotic spindle disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Rafael; Dephoure, Noah; Gygi, Steve P.; Kellogg, Douglas R.; Tallada, Victor A.

    2015-01-01

    During each cell cycle, the mitotic spindle is efficiently assembled to achieve chromosome segregation and then rapidly disassembled as cells enter cytokinesis. Although much has been learned about assembly, how spindles disassemble at the end of mitosis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that nucleocytoplasmic transport at the membrane domain surrounding the mitotic spindle midzone, here named the midzone membrane domain (MMD), is essential for spindle disassembly in Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells. We show that, during anaphase B, Imp1-mediated transport of the AAA-ATPase Cdc48 protein at the MMD allows this disassembly factor to localize at the spindle midzone, thereby promoting spindle midzone dissolution. Our findings illustrate how a separate membrane compartment supports spindle disassembly in the closed mitosis of fission yeast. PMID:25963819

  12. Arabidopsis Actin Depolymerizing Factor4 Modulates the Stochastic Dynamic Behavior of Actin Filaments in the Cortical Array of Epidermal Cells[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Henty, Jessica L.; Bledsoe, Samuel W.; Khurana, Parul; Meagher, Richard B.; Day, Brad; Blanchoin, Laurent; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Actin filament arrays are constantly remodeled as the needs of cells change as well as during responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli. Previous studies demonstrate that many single actin filaments in the cortical array of living Arabidopsis thaliana epidermal cells undergo stochastic dynamics, a combination of rapid growth balanced by disassembly from prolific severing activity. Filament turnover and dynamics are well understood from in vitro biochemical analyses and simple reconstituted systems. However, the identification in living cells of the molecular players involved in controlling actin dynamics awaits the use of model systems, especially ones where the power of genetics can be combined with imaging of individual actin filaments at high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we test the hypothesis that actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin contributes to stochastic filament severing and facilitates actin turnover. A knockout mutant for Arabidopsis ADF4 has longer hypocotyls and epidermal cells when compared with wild-type seedlings. This correlates with a change in actin filament architecture; cytoskeletal arrays in adf4 cells are significantly more bundled and less dense than in wild-type cells. Several parameters of single actin filament turnover are also altered. Notably, adf4 mutant cells have a 2.5-fold reduced severing frequency as well as significantly increased actin filament lengths and lifetimes. Thus, we provide evidence that ADF4 contributes to the stochastic dynamic turnover of actin filaments in plant cells. PMID:22010035

  13. Novel actin filaments from Bacillus thuringiensis form nanotubules for plasmid DNA segregation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shimin; Narita, Akihiro; Popp, David; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Lee, Lin Jie; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K.; Oda, Toshiro; Koh, Fujiet; Larsson, Mårten; Robinson, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the discovery of a bacterial DNA-segregating actin-like protein (BtParM) from Bacillus thuringiensis, which forms novel antiparallel, two-stranded, supercoiled, nonpolar helical filaments, as determined by electron microscopy. The BtParM filament features of supercoiling and forming antiparallel double-strands are unique within the actin fold superfamily, and entirely different to the straight, double-stranded, polar helical filaments of all other known ParMs and of eukaryotic F-actin. The BtParM polymers show dynamic assembly and subsequent disassembly in the presence of ATP. BtParR, the DNA-BtParM linking protein, stimulated ATP hydrolysis/phosphate release by BtParM and paired two supercoiled BtParM filaments to form a cylinder, comprised of four strands with inner and outer diameters of 57 Å and 145 Å, respectively. Thus, in this prokaryote, the actin fold has evolved to produce a filament system with comparable features to the eukaryotic chromosome-segregating microtubule. PMID:26873105

  14. Predicting Solar Filament Eruptions with HEK Filament Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, A.; Reeves, K.; Schanche, N.

    2015-12-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013) has shown a positive correlation (80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME's). If certain filament properties, such as length, chirality, and tilt, indicate a tendency towards filament eruptions, one may be able to further predict an oncoming CME. Towards this end, we present a novel algorithm based on spatiotemporal analysis that systematically correlates filament eruptions documented in the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) with HEK filaments that have been grouped together using a tracking algorithm developed at Georgia State University (e.g. Kempton et al. 2014). We also find filament tracks that are not correlated with eruptions to form a null data set in a similar fashion. Finally, we compare the metadata from erupting and non-erupting filament tracks to discover which filament properties may present signs of an eruption onset. Through statistical methods such as the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and Random Forest Classifier, we find that a filament that is increasing in length or changing in tilt with respect to the equator may be a useful gauge to predict a filament eruption. However, the average values of length and tilt for both datasets follow similar distributions, leading us to conclude that these parameters do not indicate an eruption event. This work is supported by the NSF-REU solar physics program at SAO, grant number AGS-1263241, and NSF DIBBS grant number ACI-1443061.

  15. Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

  16. Solar Filament Extraction and Characterizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan; Shih, F. Y.; Jing, J.; Wang, H.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a new method to extract and characterize solar filaments from H-alpha full-disk images produced by Big Bear Solar Observatory. A cascading Hough Transform method is designed to identify solar disk center location and radius. Solar disks are segmented from the background, and unbalanced illumination on the surface of solar disks is removed using polynomial surface fitting. And then a localized adaptive thresholding is employed to extract solar filament candidates. After the removal of small solar filament candidates, the remaining larger candidates are used as the seeds of region growing. The procedure of region growing not only connects broken filaments but also generate complete shape for each filament. Mathematical morphology thinning is adopted to produce the skeleton of each filament, and graph theory is used to prune branches and barbs to get the main skeleton. The length and the location of the main skeleton is characterized. The proposed method can help scientists and researches study the evolution of solar filament, for instance, to detect solar filament eruption. The presented method has already been used by Space Weather Research Lab of New Jersey Institute of Technology (http://swrl.njit.edu) to generate the solar filament online catalog using H-alpha full-disk images of Global H-alpha Network (http://swrl.njit.edu/ghn_web/).

  17. Gravitational infall onto molecular filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian

    2013-06-01

    Two aspects of filamentary molecular cloud evolution are addressed: (1) exploring analytically the role of the environment for the evolution of filaments demonstrates that considering them in isolation (i.e., just addressing the fragmentation stability) will result in unphysical conclusions about the filament's properties. Accretion can also explain the observed decorrelation between FWHM and peak column density. (2) Free-fall accretion onto finite filaments can lead to the characteristic 'fans' of infrared-dark clouds around star-forming regions. The fans may form due to tidal forces mostly arising at the ends of the filaments, consistent with numerical models and earlier analytical studies.

  18. Large fluctuations in the disassembly rate of microtubules revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Neil H; Kasas, Sandor; Riederer, Beat M; Catsicas, Stefan; Dietler, Giovanni; Kulik, Andrzej J; Forró, László

    2003-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in situ has been used to observe the cold disassembly dynamics of microtubules at a previously unrealised spatial resolution. Microtubules either electrostatically or covalently bound to aminosilane surfaces disassembled at room temperature under buffer solutions with no free tubulin present. This process was followed by taking sequential tapping-mode AFM images and measuring the change in the microtubule end position as a function of time, with an spatial accuracy down to +/-20nm and a temporal accuracy of +/-1s. As well as giving average disassembly rates on the order of 1-10 tubulin monomers per second, large fluctuations in the disassembly rate were revealed, indicating that the process is far from smooth and linear under these experimental conditions. The surface bound rates measured here are comparable to the rates for GMPCPP-tubulin microtubules free in solution, suggesting that inhibition of tubulin curvature through steric hindrance controls the average, relatively low disassembly rate. The large fluctuations in this rate are thought to be due to multiple pathways in the kinetics of disassembly with differing rate constants and/or stalling due to defects in the microtubule lattice. Microtubules that were covalently bound to the surface left behind the protofilaments covalently cross-linked to the aminosilane via glutaraldehyde during the disassembly process. Further work is needed to quantitatively assess the effects of surface binding on protofibril disassembly rates, reveal any differences in disassembly rates between the plus and minus ends and to enable assembly as well as disassembly to be imaged in the microscope fluid cell in real-time. PMID:12801676

  19. Manipulating Assembly, Disassembly and Exchange in Responsive Polyelectrolyte Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Paula

    2008-03-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayer assembly is based on the alternating adsorption of multilvalent positively and negatively charged species to create ionically crosslinked thin films with nanoscale control of film composition and function. We have utilized this method of assembly to manipulate ion transport, molecular transport, and electrochemical transport in these films, enabling the generation of a range of organic and organic-inorganic devices. Biological materials applications are also derived from such films, enabling their use as drug delivery devices. In each of these applications, it is desired to control interdiffusion and exchange within the multilayer systems to maintain desired function and generate isolated regions of composition and function within the z-direction of the film. Here we address these applications and means of controlling this phenomenon. Furthermore, it is desirable to induce controlled means of disassembly of these multilayer thin films. We will address a number of approaches for achieving this, including hydrolytic degradation, hydrogen bond dissociation, and controlled deconstruction on electrochemical impulse.

  20. Disassembling and reintegration of large telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi-rui; Fan, Bin; Zhang, Ming

    2014-09-01

    The success of the large telescope is largely linked to the excellent performance and reliability of the primary mirror. In order to maintain the quality of its reflective surface at the high expectations of astronomers, the primary mirror after almost two or three years of astronomical observations, needs to be removed and reinstalled for its cleaning and re-coating operation. There are a series of procedures such as the primary mirror cell dissembling from telescope, mirror handling, transportation, reintegration, alignment and so on. This paper will describe the experiences of disassembling and reintegration of large telescope primary mirror, taking a two meter grade primary mirror for example. As with all advanced and complex opto-mechanical systems, there has been the usual problems and trouble shooting.

  1. Cdk1 targets Srs2 to complete synthesis-dependent strand annealing and to promote recombinational repair.

    PubMed

    Saponaro, Marco; Callahan, Devon; Zheng, Xiuzhong; Krejci, Lumir; Haber, James E; Klein, Hannah L; Liberi, Giordano

    2010-02-01

    Cdk1 kinase phosphorylates budding yeast Srs2, a member of UvrD protein family, displays both DNA translocation and DNA unwinding activities in vitro. Srs2 prevents homologous recombination by dismantling Rad51 filaments and is also required for double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here we examine the biological significance of Cdk1-dependent phosphorylation of Srs2, using mutants that constitutively express the phosphorylated or unphosphorylated protein isoforms. We found that Cdk1 targets Srs2 to repair DSB and, in particular, to complete synthesis-dependent strand annealing, likely controlling the disassembly of a D-loop intermediate. Cdk1-dependent phosphorylation controls turnover of Srs2 at the invading strand; and, in absence of this modification, the turnover of Rad51 is not affected. Further analysis of the recombination phenotypes of the srs2 phospho-mutants showed that Srs2 phosphorylation is not required for the removal of toxic Rad51 nucleofilaments, although it is essential for cell survival, when DNA breaks are channeled into homologous recombinational repair. Cdk1-targeted Srs2 displays a PCNA-independent role and appears to have an attenuated ability to inhibit recombination. Finally, the recombination defects of unphosphorylatable Srs2 are primarily due to unscheduled accumulation of the Srs2 protein in a sumoylated form. Thus, the Srs2 anti-recombination function in removing toxic Rad51 filaments is genetically separable from its role in promoting recombinational repair, which depends exclusively on Cdk1-dependent phosphorylation. We suggest that Cdk1 kinase counteracts unscheduled sumoylation of Srs2 and targets Srs2 to dismantle specific DNA structures, such as the D-loops, in a helicase-dependent manner during homologous recombinational repair. PMID:20195513

  2. Ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation of keratin intermediate filaments in mechanically stimulated A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Jaitovich, Ariel; Mehta, Semil; Na, Ni; Ciechanover, Aaron; Goldman, Robert D; Ridge, Karen M

    2008-09-12

    We previously reported that shear stress induces phosphorylation and disassembly of keratin intermediate filaments (IFs). Shear stress also induces a time- and strain-dependent degradation of keratin IFs, and the current study examines the mechanisms involved in degradation of keratin proteins in human A549 cells exposed to 0-24 h of shear stress (7.5-30 dynes/cm(2)). Ubiquitin was found to be covalently associated with keratin proteins immunoprecipitated from shear-stressed cells, and pretreatment with the proteasomal inhibitor MG132 prevented the degradation of the keratin IF network. Importantly, phosphorylation of K8 Ser-73 is required for the shear stress-mediated ubiquitination, disassembly, and degradation of the keratin IF network. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that shear stress caused the thin array of keratin fibrils observed in control cells to be reorganized into a perinuclear aggregate, known as an aggresome, and that ubiquitin was also associated with this structure. Finally, the E2 enzymes, UbcH5b, -c, and Ubc3, but not E2-25K are required for the shear stress-mediated ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation of keratin proteins. These data suggest that shear stress promotes the disassembly and degradation of the keratin IF network via phosphorylation and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PMID:18617517

  3. Solid friction between soft filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A. W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  4. Dynamic Alterations to α-Actinin Accompanying Sarcomere Disassembly and Reassembly during Cardiomyocyte Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohammad A. M.; Cho, Woo Jung; Lopez, Waleska; Schulz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Although mammals are thought to lose their capacity to regenerate heart muscle shortly after birth, embryonic and neonatal cardiomyocytes in mammals are hyperplastic. During proliferation these cells need to selectively disassemble their myofibrils for successful cytokinesis. The mechanism of sarcomere disassembly is, however, not understood. To study this, we performed a series of immunofluorescence studies of multiple sarcomeric proteins in proliferating neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and correlated these observations with biochemical changes at different cell cycle stages. During myocyte mitosis, α-actinin and titin were disassembled as early as prometaphase. α-actinin (representing the sarcomeric Z-disk) disassembly precedes that of titin (M-line), suggesting that titin disassembly occurs secondary to the collapse of the Z-disk. Sarcomere disassembly was concurrent with the dissolution of the nuclear envelope. Inhibitors of several intracellular proteases could not block the disassembly of α-actinin or titin. There was a dramatic increase in both cytosolic (soluble) and sarcomeric α-actinin during mitosis, and cytosolic α-actinin exhibited decreased phosphorylation compared to sarcomeric α-actinin. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) induced the quick reassembly of the sarcomere. Sarcomere dis- and re-assembly in cardiomyocyte mitosis is CDK1-dependent and features dynamic differential post-translational modifications of sarcomeric and cytosolic α-actinin. PMID:26076379

  5. An environmentally friendly technology of disassembling electronic components from waste printed circuit boards.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbo; Guo, Jie; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-07-01

    Electronic components (ECs) disassembling from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) is the first and essential step in WPCBs recycling chain. Over the past decades, primitive methods like simply heating WPCBs on a coal-heated plate to melt solders are dominated in practice, causing serious environmental pollution and also putting a real threat to the human health. In order to solve this problem, in this article, an automatic system in pilot-scale for ECs disassembling from WPCBs is designed, manufactured, and investigated. This system contains two parts: ECs automatic disassembly and off-gas purification. Meanwhile, WPCBs from television (i.e., TV-WPCBs) and personal computer (i.e., PC-WPCBs) are used for disassembling tests, respectively. When the disassembling temperature, rotating speed, and incubation time are 265±5°C, 10rpm, and 8min, respectively, the solder can be completely removed from both TV-WPCBs and PC-WPCBs. No pollutant is discharged from this system. Finally, the disassembling procedures for ECs from both TV-WPCBs and PC-WPCBs are suggested to promote WPCBs disassembling in an environment-friendly way, without threaten the environment and human health. PMID:27026495

  6. Development of remote disassembly technology for liquid-metal reactor (LMR) fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.C.; Evans, J.H.; Metz, C.F. III; Weil, B.S.

    1990-01-01

    A major objective of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) is to develop equipment and demonstrate technology to reprocess fast breeder reactor fuel. Experimental work on fuel disassembly cutting methods began in the 1970s. High-power laser cutting was selected as the preferred cutting method for fuel disassembly. Remotely operated development equipment was designed, fabricated, installed, and tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Development testing included remote automatic operation, remote maintenance testing, and laser cutting process development. This paper summarizes the development work performed at ORNL on remote fuel disassembly. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  7. The role of Cdc42 and Gic1 in the regulation of septin filament formation and dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Sadian, Yashar; Gatsogiannis, Christos; Patasi, Csilla; Hofnagel, Oliver; Goody, Roger S; Farkašovský, Marian; Raunser, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Septins are guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that polymerize into filamentous and higher-order structures. Cdc42 and its effector Gic1 are involved in septin recruitment, ring formation and dissociation. The regulatory mechanisms behind these processes are not well understood. Here, we have used electron microscopy and cryo electron tomography to elucidate the structural basis of the Gic1-septin and Gic1-Cdc42-septin interaction. We show that Gic1 acts as a scaffolding protein for septin filaments forming long and flexible filament cables. Cdc42 in its GTP-form binds to Gic1, which ultimately leads to the dissociation of Gic1 from the filament cables. Surprisingly, Cdc42-GDP is not inactive, but in the absence of Gic1 directly interacts with septin filaments resulting in their disassembly. We suggest that this unanticipated dual function of Cdc42 is crucial for the cell cycle. Based on our results we propose a novel regulatory mechanism for septin filament formation and dissociation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01085.001 PMID:24286829

  8. Active displacement of RecA filaments by UvrD translocase activity.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Vessela; Chen, Stefanie H; Molzberger, Eileen T; Tomko, Eric; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Jia, Haifeng; Ordabayev, Yerdos; Lohman, Timothy M; Cox, Michael M

    2015-04-30

    The UvrD helicase has been implicated in the disassembly of RecA nucleoprotein filaments in vivo and in vitro. We demonstrate that UvrD utilizes an active mechanism to remove RecA from the DNA. Efficient RecA removal depends on the availability of DNA binding sites for UvrD and/or the accessibility of the RecA filament ends. The removal of RecA from DNA also requires ATP hydrolysis by the UvrD helicase but not by RecA protein. The RecA-removal activity of UvrD is slowed by RecA variants with enhanced DNA-binding properties. The ATPase rate of UvrD during RecA removal is much slower than the ATPase activity of UvrD when it is functioning either as a translocase or a helicase on DNA in the absence of RecA. Thus, in this context UvrD may operate in a specialized disassembly mode. PMID:25824953

  9. Filament identification through mathematical morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Eric W.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new algorithm for detecting filamentary structure FILFINDER. The algorithm uses the techniques of mathematical morphology for filament identification, presenting a complementary approach to current algorithms which use matched filtering or critical manifolds. Unlike other methods, FILFINDER identifies filaments over a wide dynamic range in brightness. We apply the new algorithm to far-infrared imaging data of dust emission released by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey team. Our preliminary analysis characterizes both filaments and fainter striations. We find a typical filament width of 0.09 pc across the sample, but the brightness varies from cloud to cloud. Several regions show a bimodal filament brightness distribution, with the bright mode (filaments) being an order of magnitude brighter than the faint mode (striations). Using the Rolling Hough Transform, we characterize the orientations of the striations in the data, finding preferred directions that agree with magnetic field direction where data are available. There is a suggestive but noisy correlation between typical filament brightness and literature values of the star formation rates for clouds in the Gould Belt.

  10. Intermediate Filaments: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular protein filaments intermediate in size between actin microfilaments and microtubules are composed of a surprising variety of tissue specific proteins commonly interconnected with other filamentous systems for mechanical stability and decorated by a variety of proteins that provide specialized functions. The sequence conservation of the coiled-coil, alpha-helical structure responsible for polymerization into individual 10 nm filaments defines the classification of intermediate filament proteins into a large gene family. Individual filaments further assemble into bundles and branched cytoskeletons visible in the light microscope. However, it is the diversity of the variable terminal domains that likely contributes most to different functions. The search for the functions of intermediate filament proteins has led to discoveries of roles in diseases of the skin, heart, muscle, liver, brain, adipose tissues and even premature aging. The diversity of uses of intermediate filaments as structural elements and scaffolds for organizing the distribution of decorating molecules contrasts with other cytoskeletal elements. This review is an attempt to provide some recollection of how such a diverse field emerged and changed over about 30 years. PMID:17493611

  11. Perturbation growth in accreting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the growth of perturbations in infinitely long filaments as they form and grow by accretion. The growth of these perturbations leads to filament fragmentation and the formation of cores. Most previous work on this subject has been confined to the growth and fragmentation of equilibrium filaments and has found that there exists a preferential fragmentation length-scale which is roughly four times the filament's diameter. Our results show a more complicated dispersion relation with a series of peaks linking perturbation wavelength and growth rate. These are due to gravo-acoustic oscillations along the longitudinal axis during the sub-critical phase of growth. The positions of the peaks in growth rate have a strong dependence on both the mass accretion rate onto the filament and the temperature of the gas. When seeded with a multiwavelength density power spectrum, there exists a clear preferred core separation equal to the largest peak in the dispersion relation. Our results allow one to estimate a minimum age for a filament which is breaking up into regularly spaced fragments, as well as an average accretion rate. We apply the model to observations of filaments in Taurus by Tafalla & Hacar and find accretion rates consistent with those estimated by Palmeirim et al.

  12. AIP1-mediated actin disassembly is required for postnatal germ cell migration and spermatogonial stem cell niche establishment

    PubMed Central

    Xu, J; Wan, P; Wang, M; Zhang, J; Gao, X; Hu, B; Han, J; Chen, L; Sun, K; Wu, J; Wu, X; Huang, X; Chen, J

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) arise from early germ cells called gonocytes, which are derived from primordial germ cells during embryogenesis and remain quiescent until birth. After birth, these germ cells migrate from the center of testicular cord, through Sertoli cells, and toward the basement membrane to form the SSC pool and establish the SSC niche architecture. However, molecular mechanisms underlying germ cell migration and niche establishment are largely unknown. Here, we show that the actin disassembly factor actin interacting protein 1 (AIP1) is required in both germ cells and Sertoli cells to regulate this process. Germ cell-specific or Sertoli cell-specific deletion of Aip1 gene each led to significant defects in germ cell migration after postnatal day 4 or 5, accompanied by elevated levels of actin filaments (F-actin) in the affected cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated that interaction between germ cells and Sertoli cells, likely through E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion, is critical for germ cells' migration toward the basement membrane. At last, Aip1 deletion in Sertoli cells decreased SSC self-renewal, increased spermatogonial differentiation, but did not affect the expression and secretion levels of growth factors, suggesting that the disruption of SSC function results from architectural changes in the postnatal niche. PMID:26181199

  13. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  14. Letting Go of JuNK by Disassembly of Adhesive Complexes.

    PubMed

    Farley, Jonathan E; Freeman, Marc R

    2015-12-01

    Immature neural circuits form excessive synaptic connections that are later refined through pruning of exuberant branches. In this issue, Bornstein et al. identify a role for JNK signaling in selective axon elimination through disassembly of cell adhesion complexes. PMID:26637791

  15. A Thermodynamic Model of Microtubule Assembly and Disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Piette, Bernard M. A. G.; Liu, Junli; Peeters, Kasper; Smertenko, Andrei; Hawkins, Timothy; Deeks, Michael; Quinlan, Roy; Zakrzewski, Wojciech J.; Hussey, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Microtubules are self-assembling polymers whose dynamics are essential for the normal function of cellular processes including chromosome separation and cytokinesis. Therefore understanding what factors effect microtubule growth is fundamental to our understanding of the control of microtubule based processes. An important factor that determines the status of a microtubule, whether it is growing or shrinking, is the length of the GTP tubulin microtubule cap. Here, we derive a Monte Carlo model of the assembly and disassembly of microtubules. We use thermodynamic laws to reduce the number of parameters of our model and, in particular, we take into account the contribution of water to the entropy of the system. We fit all parameters of the model from published experimental data using the GTP tubulin dimer attachment rate and the lateral and longitudinal binding energies of GTP and GDP tubulin dimers at both ends. Also we calculate and incorporate the GTP hydrolysis rate. We have applied our model and can mimic published experimental data, which formerly suggested a single layer GTP tubulin dimer microtubule cap, to show that these data demonstrate that the GTP cap can fluctuate and can be several microns long. PMID:19668378

  16. Metal Nanoparticle/Block Copolymer Composite Assembly and Disassembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Zihui; Sai, Hiroaki; Warren, Scott C; Kamperman, Marleen; Arora, Hitesh; Gruner, Sol M; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Ligand-stabilized platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) were self-assembled with poly(isoprene-block-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PI-b-PDMAEMA) block copolymers to generate organic-inorganic hybrid materials. High loadings of NPs in hybrids were achieved through usage of N,N-di-(2-(allyloxy)ethyl)-N-3-mercaptopropyl-N-3-methylammonium chloride as the ligand, which provided high solubility of NPs in various solvents as well as high affinity to PDMAEMA. From NP synthesis, existence of sub-1 nm Pt NPs was confirmed by high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images. Estimations of the Pt NP ligand head group density based on HAADF-STEM images and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data yielded results comparable to what has been found for alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on flat Pt {111} surfaces. Changing the volume fraction of Pt NPs in block copolymer-NP composites yielded hybrids with spherical micellar, wormlike micellar, lamellar and inverse hexagonal morphologies. Disassembly of hybrids with spherical, wormlike micellar, and lamellar morphologies generated isolated metal-NP based nano-spheres, cylinders and sheets, respectively. Results suggest the existence of powerful design criteria for the formation of metal-based nanostructures from designer blocked macromolecules. PMID:21103025

  17. The Actin Filament-Binding Protein Coronin Regulates Motility in Plasmodium Sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Bane, Kartik S.; Singer, Mirko; Reinig, Miriam; Klug, Dennis; Heiss, Kirsten; Baum, Jake; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Frischknecht, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Parasites causing malaria need to migrate in order to penetrate tissue barriers and enter host cells. Here we show that the actin filament-binding protein coronin regulates gliding motility in Plasmodium berghei sporozoites, the highly motile forms of a rodent malaria-causing parasite transmitted by mosquitoes. Parasites lacking coronin show motility defects that impair colonization of the mosquito salivary glands but not migration in the skin, yet result in decreased transmission efficiency. In non-motile sporozoites low calcium concentrations mediate actin-independent coronin localization to the periphery. Engagement of extracellular ligands triggers an intracellular calcium release followed by the actin-dependent relocalization of coronin to the rear and initiation of motility. Mutational analysis and imaging suggest that coronin organizes actin filaments for productive motility. Using coronin-mCherry as a marker for the presence of actin filaments we found that protein kinase A contributes to actin filament disassembly. We finally speculate that calcium and cAMP-mediated signaling regulate a switch from rapid parasite motility to host cell invasion by differentially influencing actin dynamics. PMID:27409081

  18. Centromeres of filamentous fungi

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kristina M.; Galazka, Jonathan M.; Phatale, Pallavi A.; Connolly, Lanelle R.; Freitag, Michael

    2012-01-01

    How centromeres are assembled and maintained remains one of the fundamental questions in cell biology. Over the past 20 years the idea of centromeres as precise genetic loci has been replaced by the realization that it is predominantly the protein complement that defines centromere localization and function. Thus, placement and maintenance of centromeres are excellent examples of epigenetic phenomena in the strict sense. In contrast, the highly derived “point centromeres” of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its close relatives are counterexamples for this general principle of centromere maintenance. While we have learned much in the past decade, it remains unclear if mechanisms for epigenetic centromere placement and maintenance are shared amongst various groups of organisms. For that reason it seems prudent to examine species from many different phylogenetic groups with the aim to extract comparative information that will yield a more complete picture of cell division in all eukaryotes. This review addresses what has been learned by studying the centromeres of filamentous fungi, a large, heterogeneous group of organisms that includes important plant, animal and human pathogens, saprobes and symbionts that fulfill essential roles in the biosphere, as well as a growing number of taxa that have become indispensable for industrial use. PMID:22752455

  19. Centromeres of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kristina M; Galazka, Jonathan M; Phatale, Pallavi A; Connolly, Lanelle R; Freitag, Michael

    2012-07-01

    How centromeres are assembled and maintained remains one of the fundamental questions in cell biology. Over the past 20 years, the idea of centromeres as precise genetic loci has been replaced by the realization that it is predominantly the protein complement that defines centromere localization and function. Thus, placement and maintenance of centromeres are excellent examples of epigenetic phenomena in the strict sense. In contrast, the highly derived "point centromeres" of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its close relatives are counter-examples for this general principle of centromere maintenance. While we have learned much in the past decade, it remains unclear if mechanisms for epigenetic centromere placement and maintenance are shared among various groups of organisms. For that reason, it seems prudent to examine species from many different phylogenetic groups with the aim to extract comparative information that will yield a more complete picture of cell division in all eukaryotes. This review addresses what has been learned by studying the centromeres of filamentous fungi, a large, heterogeneous group of organisms that includes important plant, animal and human pathogens, saprobes, and symbionts that fulfill essential roles in the biosphere, as well as a growing number of taxa that have become indispensable for industrial use. PMID:22752455

  20. The effect of sudden server breakdown on the performance of a disassembly line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udomsawat, Gun; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2005-11-01

    Product and material recovery relies on the disassembly process to separate target components or materials from the end-of-life (EOL) products. Disassembly line is especially effective when products in large quantity are disassembled. Unlike an assembly line, a disassembly line is more complex and is subjected to numerous uncertainties including stochastic and multi-level arrivals of component demands, stochastic arrival times for EOL products, and process interruption due to equipment failure. These factors seriously impair the control mechanism in the disassembly line. A common production control mechanism is the traditional push system (TPS). TPS responds to the aforementioned complications by carrying substantial amounts of inventories. An alternative control mechanism is a newly developed multi-kanban pull system (MKS) that relies on dynamic routing of kanbans, which tends to minimize the system's inventories while maintaining demand serviceability. In this paper we explore the impact of sudden breakdown of server on the performance of a disassembly line. We compare the overall performances of the TPS and MKS by considering two scenarios. We present the solution procedure and results for these cases.

  1. Nek2 activation of Kif24 ensures cilium disassembly during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sehyun; Lee, Kwanwoo; Choi, Jung-Hwan; Ringstad, Niels; Dynlacht, Brian David

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins are known to promote ciliogenesis, but mechanisms that promote primary cilia disassembly before mitosis are largely unknown. Here we identify a mechanism that favours cilium disassembly and maintains the disassembled state. We show that co-localization of the S/G2 phase kinase, Nek2 and Kif24 triggers Kif24 phosphorylation, inhibiting cilia formation. We show that Kif24, a microtubule depolymerizing kinesin, is phosphorylated by Nek2, which stimulates its activity and prevents the outgrowth of cilia in proliferating cells, independent of Aurora A and HDAC6. Our data also suggest that cilium assembly and disassembly are in dynamic equilibrium, but Nek2 and Kif24 can shift the balance toward disassembly. Further, Nek2 and Kif24 are overexpressed in breast cancer cells, and ablation of these proteins restores ciliation in these cells, thereby reducing proliferation. Thus, Kif24 is a physiological substrate of Nek2, which regulates cilia disassembly through a concerted mechanism involving Kif24-mediated microtubule depolymerization. PMID:26290419

  2. Nek2 activation of Kif24 ensures cilium disassembly during the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sehyun; Lee, Kwanwoo; Choi, Jung-Hwan; Ringstad, Niels; Dynlacht, Brian David

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins are known to promote ciliogenesis, but mechanisms that promote primary cilia disassembly before mitosis are largely unknown. Here we identify a mechanism that favours cilium disassembly and maintains the disassembled state. We show that co-localization of the S/G2 phase kinase, Nek2 and Kif24 triggers Kif24 phosphorylation, inhibiting cilia formation. We show that Kif24, a microtubule depolymerizing kinesin, is phosphorylated by Nek2, which stimulates its activity and prevents the outgrowth of cilia in proliferating cells, independent of Aurora A and HDAC6. Our data also suggest that cilium assembly and disassembly are in dynamic equilibrium, but Nek2 and Kif24 can shift the balance toward disassembly. Further, Nek2 and Kif24 are overexpressed in breast cancer cells, and ablation of these proteins restores ciliation in these cells, thereby reducing proliferation. Thus, Kif24 is a physiological substrate of Nek2, which regulates cilia disassembly through a concerted mechanism involving Kif24-mediated microtubule depolymerization. PMID:26290419

  3. Electron emitting filaments for electron discharge devices

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Pincosy, Philip A.; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1988-01-01

    Electrons are copiously emitted by a device comprising a loop-shaped filament made of lanthanum hexaboride. The filament is directly heated by an electrical current produced along the filament by a power supply connected to the terminal legs of the filament. To produce a filament, a diamond saw or the like is used to cut a slice from a bar made of lanthanum hexaboride. The diamond saw is then used to cut the slice into the shape of a loop which may be generally rectangular, U-shaped, hairpin-shaped, zigzag-shaped, or generally circular. The filaments provide high electron emission at a relatively low operating temperature, such as 1600.degree. C. To achieve uniform heating, the filament is formed with a cross section which is tapered between the opposite ends of the filament to compensate for non-uniform current distribution along the filament due to the emission of electrons from the filament.

  4. Electron emitting filaments for electron discharge devices

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Pincosy, P.A.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1983-06-10

    Electrons are copiously emitted by a device comprising a loop-shaped filament made of lanthanum hexaboride. The filament is directly heated by an electrical current produced along the filament by a power supply connected to the terminal legs of the filament. To produce a filament, a diamond saw or the like is used to cut a slice from a bar made of lanthanum hexaboride. The diamond saw is then used to cut the slice into the shape of a loop which may be generally rectangular, U-shaped, hairpin-shaped, zigzag-shaped, or generally circular. The filaments provide high electron emission at a relatively low operating temperature, such as 1600/sup 0/C. To achieve uniform heating, the filament is formed with a cross section which is tapered between the opposite ends of the filament to compensate for nonuniform current distribution along the filament due to the emission of electrons from the filament.

  5. Mucus barrier-triggered disassembly of siRNA nanocarriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Troels B.; Li, Leon; Howard, Kenneth A.

    2014-10-01

    The mucus overlying mucosal epithelial surfaces presents not only a biological barrier to the penetration of potential pathogens, but also therapeutic modalities including RNAi-based nanocarriers. Movement of nanomedicines across the mucus barriers of the gastrointestinal mucosa is modulated by interactions of the nanomedicine carriers with mucin glycoproteins inside the mucus, potentiated by the large surface area of the nanocarrier. We have developed a fluorescence activation-based reporter system showing that the interaction between polyanionic mucins and the cationic chitosan/small interfering RNA (siRNA) nanocarriers (polyplexes) results in the disassembly and consequent triggered release of fluorescent siRNA. The quantity of release was found to be dependent on the molar ratio between chitosan amino groups and siRNA phosphate groups (NP ratio) of the polyplexes with a maximal estimated 48.6% release of siRNA over 30 min at NP 60. Furthermore, a microfluidic in vitro model of the gastrointestinal mucus barrier was used to visualize the dynamic interaction between chitosan/siRNA nanocarriers and native purified porcine stomach mucins. We observed strong interactions and aggregations at the mucin-liquid interface, followed by an NP ratio dependent release and consequent diffusion of siRNA across the mucin barrier. This work describes a new model of interaction at the nanocarrier-mucin interface and has important implications for the design and development of nucleic acid-based nanocarrier therapeutics for mucosal disease treatments and also provides insights into nanoscale pathogenic processes.The mucus overlying mucosal epithelial surfaces presents not only a biological barrier to the penetration of potential pathogens, but also therapeutic modalities including RNAi-based nanocarriers. Movement of nanomedicines across the mucus barriers of the gastrointestinal mucosa is modulated by interactions of the nanomedicine carriers with mucin glycoproteins inside the

  6. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  7. Droplets engulfing on a filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Fa; Yu, Meng; Zhou, Zhengping; Bedarkar, Amol; Zhao, Youhao

    2014-03-01

    Two immiscible droplets wetting on a filament may assume engulfing, partial-engulfing, or non-engulfing morphology that depends on the wetting behavior and geometries of the resulting droplet-on-filament system. This paper studies the wetting behavior of two immiscible droplets contacting and sitting symmetrically on a straight filament. A set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is formulated for determining the wetting morphology of the droplet-on-filament system. In the limiting case of engulfing or non-engulfing, the morphology of the droplet-on-filament system is determined in explicit form. In the case of partial-engulfing, surface finite element method is further employed for determining the wetting morphology, surface energy, and internal pressures of droplets of the system. Numerical scaling study is performed to explore their dependencies upon the wetting properties and geometries of the system. The study can be applicable for analysis and design of textiles with tailorable wetting properties and development of novel multifunctional fibrous materials for environmental protection such as oil-spill sorption, etc.

  8. Solid friction between soft filaments

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A.W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments1,2. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials. PMID:25730393

  9. Buckling of Branched Cytoskeletal Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, D. A.; Schwarz, J. M.

    2011-03-01

    In vitro experiments of growing dendritic actin networks demonstrate reversible stress-softening at high loads, above some critical load. The transition to the stress-softening regime has been attributed to the elastic buckling of individual actin filaments. To estimate the critical load above which softening should occur, we extend the elastic theory of buckling of individual filaments embedded in a network to include the buckling of branched filaments, a signature trait of growing dendritic actin networks. Under certain assumptions, there will be approximately a seven-fold increase in the classical critical bucking load, when compared to the unbranched filament, which is entirely due to the presence of a branch. Moreover, we go beyond the classical buckling regime to investigate the effect of entropic fluctuations. The result of compressing the filament in this case leads to an increase in these fluctuations and eventually the harmonic approximation breaks down signifying the onset of the buckling transition. We compute corrections to the classical critical buckling load near this breakdown.

  10. Disassembling "evapotranspiration" in-situ with a complex measurement tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chormanski, Jaroslaw; Kleniewska, Malgorzata; Berezowski, Tomasz; Sporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Okruszko, Tomasz; Szatylowicz, Jan; Batelaan, Okke

    2014-05-01

    In this work we present a complex tool for measuring water fluxes in wetland ecosystems. The tool was designed to quantify processes related to interception storage on plants leafs. The measurements are conducted by combining readings from various instruments, including: eddy covariance tower (EC), field spectrometer, SapFlow system, rain gauges above and under canopy, soil moisture probes and other. The idea of this set-up is to provide continuous measurement of overall water flux from the ecosystem (EC tower), intercepted water volume and timing (field spectrometers), through-fall (rain gauges above and under canopy), transpiration (SapFlow), evaporation and soil moisture (soil moisture probes). Disassembling the water flux to the above components allows giving more insight to the interception related processes and differentiates them from the total evapotranspiration. The measurements are conducted in the Upper Biebrza Basin (NE Poland). The study area is part of the valley and is covered by peat soils (mainly peat moss with the exception of areas near the river) and receives no inundations waters of the Biebrza. The plant community of Agrostietum-Carici caninae has a dominant share here creating an up to 0.6 km wide belt along the river. The area is covered also by Caricion lasiocarpae as well as meadows and pastures Molinio-Arrhenatheretea, Phragmitetum communis. Sedges form a hummock pattern characteristic for the sedge communities in natural river valleys with wetland vegetation. The main result of the measurement set-up will be the analyzed characteristics and dynamics of interception storage for sedge ecosystems and a developed methodology for interception monitoring by use spectral reflectance technique. This will give a new insight to processes of evapotranspiration in wetlands and its components transpiration, evaporation from interception and evaporation from soil. Moreover, other important results of this project will be the estimation of energy and

  11. Non-muscle myosin-II-B filament regulation of paracellular resistance in cervical epithelial cells is associated with modulation of the cortical acto-myosin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Gorodeski, George

    2007-01-01

    Objective To understand myosin regulation of epithelial permeability. Methods Experimental study, using human cervical epithelial cells CaSki. Endpoints were paracellular permeability (determined in terms of transepithelial electrical resistance); non-muscle myosin-II-B (NMM-II-B) cellular localization; NMM-II-B phosphorylation status; NMM-II-B – actin interaction (determined in-vitro by the immunoprecipitation-immunoreactivity method); and NMM-II-B filamentation (determined in-vitro using purified NMM-II-B filaments in terms of filaments disassembly / assembly ratios. Results Treatment of cells with the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 or with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid decreased the Resistance of the Lateral Intercellular Space (RLIS), and increased phosphorylation of non-muscle myosin-II-B (NMM-II-B) on threonine and serine residues. Y-27632 induced disorganization of the cortical acto-myosin and decreased co-immunoprecipitation of actin with NMM-II-B. Homodimerization assays using NMM-II-B filaments from cells treated with Y-27632 or okadaic acid revealed decreased filamentation compared to control cells. However, okadaic acid blocked Y-27632 decreased filamentation. Treatment with DRB, CK2 inhibitor, induced opposing effects to those of Y-27632 and okadaic acid. Treatment with DRB did not involve modulation of actin depolymerization, suggesting that NMM-II-B regulation of the RLIS was independent of actin polymerization status. Exposure of NMM-II-B filaments to CK2 increased filamentation, regardless of prior treatments in-vivo with Y-27632, okadaic acid, or DRB. Conclusions The results suggest that NMM-II-B filaments are in steady-state equilibrium of phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mediated by CK2 and by ROCK-regulated myosin heavy chain phosphatase, respectively. Increased phosphorylation would tend to inhibit assembly of NMM-II-B filaments and lead to decreased actin-myosin interaction, which would tend to decrease the RLIS and increase the

  12. Coordinated Action of Nap1 and RSC in Disassembly of Tandem Nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rashmi; D'Arcy, Sheena; Hada, Arjan; Luger, Karolin; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2016-09-01

    The SWI/SNF and RSC family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers disassembles nucleosomes by moving nucleosomes into the vicinity of adjoining nucleosomes. We found that the histone chaperone Nap1 efficiently promotes disassembly of adjacent nucleosomes with which RSC collides and not the disassembly of nucleosomes mobilized by RSC. Nap1 is specific to RSC, as it does not target SWI/SNF, its paralog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Extensive mutational analysis of Nap1 has revealed that Nap1 affinity for histones H2A-H2B and H3-H4 and its ability to displace histones from DNA are required for Nap1 to enhance RSC-mediated disassembly. Other histone chaperones, such as Vps75, that also bind histones are not able to enhance RSC-mediated disassembly. Our study suggests a mechanism by which Nap1 is recruited to actively transcribed regions and assists in the passage of the transcription complex through chromatin, and it provides a novel mechanism for the coordinated action of RSC and Nap1. PMID:27273866

  13. The MAP kinase pathway coordinates crossover designation with disassembly of synaptonemal complex proteins during meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Nadarajan, Saravanapriah; Mohideen, Firaz; Tzur, Yonatan B; Ferrandiz, Nuria; Crawley, Oliver; Montoya, Alex; Faull, Peter; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Cutillas, Pedro R; Jambhekar, Ashwini; Blower, Michael D; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Harper, J Wade; Colaiacovo, Monica P

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric disassembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC) is crucial for proper meiotic chromosome segregation. However, the signaling mechanisms that directly regulate this process are poorly understood. Here we show that the mammalian Rho GEF homolog, ECT-2, functions through the conserved RAS/ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway in the C. elegans germline to regulate the disassembly of SC proteins. We find that SYP-2, a SC central region component, is a potential target for MPK-1-mediated phosphorylation and that constitutively phosphorylated SYP-2 impairs the disassembly of SC proteins from chromosomal domains referred to as the long arms of the bivalents. Inactivation of MAP kinase at late pachytene is critical for timely disassembly of the SC proteins from the long arms, and is dependent on the crossover (CO) promoting factors ZHP-3/RNF212/Zip3 and COSA-1/CNTD1. We propose that the conserved MAP kinase pathway coordinates CO designation with the disassembly of SC proteins to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12039.001 PMID:26920220

  14. akirin is required for diakinesis bivalent structure and synaptonemal complex disassembly at meiotic prophase I

    PubMed Central

    Clemons, Amy M.; Brockway, Heather M.; Yin, Yizhi; Kasinathan, Bhavatharini; Butterfield, Yaron S.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Colaiácovo, Monica P.; Smolikove, Sarit

    2013-01-01

    During meiosis, evolutionarily conserved mechanisms regulate chromosome remodeling, leading to the formation of a tight bivalent structure. This bivalent, a linked pair of homologous chromosomes, is essential for proper chromosome segregation in meiosis. The formation of a tight bivalent involves chromosome condensation and restructuring around the crossover. The synaptonemal complex (SC), which mediates homologous chromosome association before crossover formation, disassembles concurrently with increased condensation during bivalent remodeling. Both chromosome condensation and SC disassembly are likely critical steps in acquiring functional bivalent structure. The mechanisms controlling SC disassembly, however, remain unclear. Here we identify akir-1 as a gene involved in key events of meiotic prophase I in Caenorhabditis elegans. AKIR-1 is a protein conserved among metazoans that lacks any previously known function in meiosis. We show that akir-1 mutants exhibit severe meiotic defects in late prophase I, including improper disassembly of the SC and aberrant chromosome condensation, independently of the condensin complexes. These late-prophase defects then lead to aberrant reconfiguring of the bivalent. The meiotic divisions are delayed in akir-1 mutants and are accompanied by lagging chromosomes. Our analysis therefore provides evidence for an important role of proper SC disassembly in configuring a functional bivalent structure. PMID:23363597

  15. akirin is required for diakinesis bivalent structure and synaptonemal complex disassembly at meiotic prophase I.

    PubMed

    Clemons, Amy M; Brockway, Heather M; Yin, Yizhi; Kasinathan, Bhavatharini; Butterfield, Yaron S; Jones, Steven J M; Colaiácovo, Monica P; Smolikove, Sarit

    2013-04-01

    During meiosis, evolutionarily conserved mechanisms regulate chromosome remodeling, leading to the formation of a tight bivalent structure. This bivalent, a linked pair of homologous chromosomes, is essential for proper chromosome segregation in meiosis. The formation of a tight bivalent involves chromosome condensation and restructuring around the crossover. The synaptonemal complex (SC), which mediates homologous chromosome association before crossover formation, disassembles concurrently with increased condensation during bivalent remodeling. Both chromosome condensation and SC disassembly are likely critical steps in acquiring functional bivalent structure. The mechanisms controlling SC disassembly, however, remain unclear. Here we identify akir-1 as a gene involved in key events of meiotic prophase I in Caenorhabditis elegans. AKIR-1 is a protein conserved among metazoans that lacks any previously known function in meiosis. We show that akir-1 mutants exhibit severe meiotic defects in late prophase I, including improper disassembly of the SC and aberrant chromosome condensation, independently of the condensin complexes. These late-prophase defects then lead to aberrant reconfiguring of the bivalent. The meiotic divisions are delayed in akir-1 mutants and are accompanied by lagging chromosomes. Our analysis therefore provides evidence for an important role of proper SC disassembly in configuring a functional bivalent structure. PMID:23363597

  16. Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy Study on the Mechanism of RNA Disassembly in Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ningning; Chen, Ying; Peng, Bo; Lin, Yuan; Wang, Qian; Su, Zhaohui; Zhang, Wenke; Li, Hongbin; Shen, Jiacong

    2013-01-01

    To explore the disassembly mechanism of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a model system for virus study, during infection, we have used single-molecule force spectroscopy to mimic and follow the process of RNA disassembly from the protein coat of TMV by the replisome (molecular motor) in vivo, under different pH and Ca2+ concentrations. Dynamic force spectroscopy revealed the unbinding free-energy landscapes as that at pH 4.7 the disassembly process is dominated by one free-energy barrier, whereas at pH 7.0 the process is dominated by one barrier and that there exists a second barrier. The additional free-energy barrier at longer distance has been attributed to the hindrance of disordered loops within the inner channel of TMV, and the biological function of those protein loops was discussed. The combination of pH increase and Ca2+ concentration drop could weaken RNA-protein interactions so much that the molecular motor replisome would be able to pull and disassemble the rest of the genetic RNA from the protein coat in vivo. All these facts provide supporting evidence at the single-molecule level, to our knowledge for the first time, for the cotranslational disassembly mechanism during TMV infection under physiological conditions. PMID:24359751

  17. Nonequilibrium transport in superconducting filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arutyunov, K. YU.; Danilova, N. P.; Nikolaeva, A. A.

    1995-01-01

    The step-like current-voltage characteristics of highly homogeneous single-crystalline tin and indium thin filaments has been measured. The length of the samples L approximately 1 cm was much greater than the nonequilibrium quasiparticle relaxation length Lambda. It was found that the activation of a successive i-th voltage step occurs at current significantly greater than the one derived with the assumption that the phase slip centers are weakly interacting on a scale L much greater than Lambda. The observation of 'subharmonic' fine structure on the voltage-current characteristics of tin filaments confirms the hypothesis of the long-range phase slip centers interaction.

  18. Graphite filament wound pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, A.; Damico, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    Filament wound NOL rings, 4-inch and 8-inch diameter closed-end vessels involving three epoxy resin systems and three graphite fibers were tested to develop property data and fabrication technology for filament wound graphite/epoxy pressure vessels. Vessels were subjected to single-cycle burst tests at room temperature. Manufacturing parameters were established for tooling, winding, and curing that resulted in the development of a pressure/vessel performance factor (pressure x volume/weight) or more than 900,000 in. for an oblate spheroid specimen.

  19. Coiling of a viscous filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, A. D. T.; Ryu, W. S.; Mahadevan, L.

    1997-11-01

    A classic demonstration of fluid buckling is a daily occurence at the breakfast table, where a continuous stream of viscous fluid (honey) is often poured onto a flat surface (toast) from a sufficient height. The thin fluid filament quickly settles into a steady state; near the surface it bends into a helical shape while simultaneously rotating about the vertical and is laid out in a regular coil. This behavior is reminiscent of the coiling of a falling flexible rope. We derive a simple scaling law that predicts the coiling frequency in terms of the filament radius and the flow rate. We also verify this scaling law with the results of experiments.

  20. Delivery of lipophilic bioactives: assembly, disassembly, and reassembly of lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yao, Mingfei; Xiao, Hang; McClements, David Julian

    2014-01-01

    The oral bioavailability of lipophilic bioactive molecules can be greatly increased by encapsulating them within engineered lipid nanoparticles (ELNs), such as micelles, microemulsions, nanoemulsions, or solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs). After ingestion, these ELNs are disassembled in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and then reassembled into biological lipid nanoparticles (mixed micelles) in the small intestine. These mixed micelles solubilize and transport lipophilic bioactive components to the epithelial cells. The mixed micelles are then disassembled and reassembled into yet another form of biological lipid nanoparticle [chylomicrons (CMs)] within the enterocyte cells. The CMs carry the bioactive components into the systemic (blood) circulation via the lymphatic system, thereby avoiding first-pass metabolism. This article provides an overview of the various physicochemical and physiological processes responsible for the assembly and disassembly of lipid nanoparticles outside and inside the GIT. This knowledge can be used to design food-grade delivery systems to improve the oral bioavailability of encapsulated lipophilic bioactive components. PMID:24328432

  1. Node-by-node disassembly of a mutualistic interaction web driven by species introductions

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Cabal, Mariano A.; Barrios-Garcia, M. Noelia; Amico, Guillermo C.; Aizen, Marcelo A.; Sanders, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Interaction webs summarize the diverse interactions among species in communities. The addition or loss of particular species and the alteration of key interactions can lead to the disassembly of the entire interaction web, although the nontrophic effects of species loss on interaction webs are poorly understood. We took advantage of ongoing invasions by a suite of exotic species to examine their impact in terms of the disassembly of an interaction web in Patagonia, Argentina. We found that the reduction of one species (a host of a keystone mistletoe species) resulted in diverse indirect effects that led to the disassembly of an interaction web through the loss of the mistletoe, two key seed-dispersers (a marsupial and a bird), and a pollinator (hummingbird). Our results demonstrate that the gains and losses of species are both consequences and drivers of global change that can lead to underappreciated cascading coextinctions through the disruption of mutualisms. PMID:24067653

  2. Assembly/Disassembly of DNA-Au Nanoparticles: A Strategy of Intervention

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lim, I-Im S.; Wang, Lingyan; Chandrachud, Uma; Gal, Susannah; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the viability of a strategy for manipulating the assembly/disassembly processes of DNA-Au nanoparticles by molecular intervention. Using the temperature-induced assembly and disassembly processes of DNAs and gold nanoparticles as a model system, the introduction of a molecular recognition probe is demonstrated to lead to the intervention of the assembly/disassembly processes depending on its specific biorecognition. This process can be detected by monitoring the change in the optical properties of gold nanoparticles and their DNA assemblies. Implications of the preliminary results to exploration of the resulting nanostructures for fine-tuning of the interfacial reactivities in DNA-based bioassays and biomaterialmore » engineering are also discussed.« less

  3. Clathrin-coat disassembly illuminates the mechanisms of Hsp70 force generation.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Rui; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Cuéllar, Jorge; Jin, Suping; Valpuesta, José M; Jin, Albert J; Lafer, Eileen M

    2016-09-01

    Hsp70s use ATP hydrolysis to disrupt protein-protein associations and to move macromolecules. One example is the Hsc70- mediated disassembly of the clathrin coats that form on vesicles during endocytosis. Here, we exploited the exceptional features of these coats to test three models-Brownian ratchet, power-stroke and entropic pulling-proposed to explain how Hsp70s transform their substrates. Our data rule out the ratchet and power-stroke models and instead support a collision-pressure mechanism whereby collisions between clathrin-coat walls and Hsc70s drive coats apart. Collision pressure is the complement to the pulling force described in the entropic pulling model. We also found that self-association augments collision pressure, thereby allowing disassembly of clathrin lattices that have been predicted to be resistant to disassembly. These results illuminate how Hsp70s generate the forces that transform their substrates. PMID:27478930

  4. SWI/SNF has intrinsic nucleosome disassembly activity that is dependent on adjacent nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Dechassa, Mekonnen Lemma; Sabri, Abdellah; Pondugula, Santhi; Kassabov, Stefan R.; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Kladde, Michael P.; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF regulates transcription and has been implicated in promoter nucleosome eviction. Efficient nucleosome disassembly by SWI/SNF alone in biochemical assays has however not been directly observed. Employing a model system of dinucleosomes rather than mononucleosomes, we demonstrate that remodeling leads to ordered and efficient disassembly of one of the two nucleosomes. An H2A/H2B dimer is first rapidly displaced and then in a slower reaction an entire histone octamer is lost. Nucleosome disassembly by SWI/SNF did not require additional factors such as chaperones or acceptors of histones. Observations in single molecules as well as bulk measurement suggest that a key intermediate in this process is one in which a nucleosome is moved towards the adjacent nucleosome. SWI/SNF recruited by the transcriptional activator Gal4-VP16 preferentially mobilizes the proximal nucleosome and destabilizes the adjacent nucleosome. PMID:20513433

  5. SDO Sees a Dark Filament Circle

    NASA Video Gallery

    A dark, almost circular filament broke away from the sun in a gauzy, feathery swirl, on Nov. 15, 2015, in this video from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. This filament eruption was followed by a...

  6. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Margiotta, Azzurra; Bucci, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway. PMID:27120621

  7. SDO Watches Giant Filament on the Sun

    NASA Video Gallery

    A snaking, extended filament of solar material currently lies on the front of the sun-- some 1 million miles across from end to end. Filaments are clouds of solar material suspended above the sun b...

  8. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic.

    PubMed

    Margiotta, Azzurra; Bucci, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway. PMID:27120621

  9. Disassembly properties and material characterisation of household small waste electric and electronic equipment.

    PubMed

    Bovea, María D; Pérez-Belis, Victoria; Ibáñez-Forés, Valeria; Quemades-Beltrán, Pilar

    2016-07-01

    This paper is focused on characterising small waste electric and electronic equipment, specifically small household appliances, from two different points of views: disassembly properties and material identification. The sample for this characterisation was obtained from a selective collection campaign organised in Castellón de la Plana (Spain). A total amount of 833.7kg (749 units) of small waste electric and electronic equipment was collected, of which 23.3% by weight and 22.4% by units belonged to the subcategory household equipment. This subcategory, composed of appliances such as vacuum cleaners, toasters, sandwich makers, hand blenders, juicers, coffee makers, hairdryers, scales, irons and heaters, was first disassembled in order to analyse different aspects of the disassembly process for each equipment type: type of joints, ease of identification of materials, ease of access to joints for extracting components, ease of separation of components from the whole, uniformity of tools needed for the disassembly process and possibility of reassembly after disassembly. Results show that the most common joints used in these equipment types are snap-fits and screws, although some permanent joints have also been identified. Next, the material composition of each component of each appliance belonging to each equipment type was identified visually and with additional mechanical trials and testing. It can be observed that plastic and electric/electronic components are present in all the equipment types analysed and are also the material fractions that appear with higher percentages in the material composition: 41.1wt% and 39.1wt% for the plastic fraction and electric/electronic components, respectively. The most common plastics are: polypropylene (PP), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polycarbonate (PC), while the most common electric/electronic components are: cable, plug and printed circuit boards. Results also show that disassembly properties and material

  10. Microtubules and actin filaments are not critically involved in the biogenesis of epithelial cell surface polarity.

    PubMed

    Salas, P J; Misek, D E; Vega-Salas, D E; Gundersen, D; Cereijido, M; Rodriguez-Boulan, E

    1986-05-01

    We have studied the role of microtubules and actin filaments in the biogenesis of epithelial cell surface polarity, using influenza hemagglutinin and vesicular stomatitis G protein as model apical and basolateral proteins in infected Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Addition of colchicine or nocodazole to confluent monolayers at concentrations sufficient to completely disassemble microtubules did not affect the asymmetric budding of influenza or vesicular stomatitis virus and only slightly reduced the typical asymmetric surface distribution of their envelope proteins, despite extensive cytoplasmic redistribution of the Golgi apparatus. Alteration of microtubular function by taxol or dissociation of actin filaments by cytochalasin D also failed to have a significant effect. Furthermore, neither colchicine nor cytochalasin D pretreatment blocked the ability of subconfluent Madin-Darby canine kidney cells to sustain polarized budding of influenza virus a few hours after attachment to the substrate. Our results indicate that domain-specific microtubule or actin filament "tracks" are not responsible for the vectorial delivery of apically or basolaterally directed transport vesicles. In conjunction with currently available evidence, they are compatible with a model in which receptors in the cytoplasmic aspect of apical or basolateral regions provide vectoriality to the transport of vesicles carrying plasma membrane proteins to their final surface localization. PMID:2871031

  11. METHOD OF MAKING TUNGSTEN FILAMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, J.W.

    1962-12-18

    A method of making tungsten filaments is described in which the tungsten is completely free of isotope impurities in the range of masses 234 to 245 for use in mass spectrometers. The filament comprises a tantalum core generally less than 1 mil in diameter having a coating of potassium-free tantalum-diffused tungsten molecularly bonded thereto. In the preferred process of manufacture a short, thin tantalum filament is first mounted between terminal posts mounted in insulated relation through a backing plate. The tungsten is most conveniently vapor plated onto the tantalum by a tungsten carbonyl vapor decomposition method having a critical step because of the tendency of the tantalum to volatilize at the temperature of operntion of the filament. The preferred recipe comprises volatilizing tantalum by resistance henting until the current drops by about 40%, cutting the voltage back to build up the tungsten, and then gradually building the temperature back up to balance the rate of tungsten deposition with the rate of tantalum volatilization. (AEC)

  12. Disassembly of the fusion-1 capsule after irradiation in the BOR-60 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Kazakov, V.A.; Chakin, V.P.

    1997-04-01

    A U.S./Russia (RF) collaborative irradiation experiment, Fusion-1, was completed in June 1996 after reaching a peak exposure of {approx}17 dpa in the BOR-60 fast reactor at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Russia. The specimens were vanadium alloys, mainly of recent heats from both countries. In this reporting period, the capsule was disassembled at the RIAR hot cells and all test specimens were successfully retrieved. For the disassembly, an innovative method of using a heated diffusion oil to melt and separate the lithium bond from the test specimens was adopted. This method proved highly successful.

  13. Highly Selective Nuclide Removal from the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, J. B.; Austin, W. E.; Dukes, H. H.

    2002-02-26

    This paper describes the results of a deployment of highly selective ion-exchange resin technologies for the in-situ removal of Cs-137 and Sr-90 from the Savannah River Site (SRS) R-Reactor Disassembly Basin. The deployment was supported by the DOE Office of Science and Technology's (OST, EM-50) National Engineering Technology Laboratory (NETL), as a part of an Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) project. The Facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning (FDD) Program at the SRS conducted this deployment as a part of an overall program to deactivate three of the site's five reactor disassembly basins.

  14. Diamond film by hot filament CVD method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirose, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Diamond synthesis by the hot filament CVD method is discussed. A hot filament decomposes gas mixtures and oxygen containing organic compounds such as alcohols. which are carbon sources. The resulting thin films, growth mechanisms, and characteristics and problems associated with the hot filament CVD method are analyzed and evaluated.

  15. Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid induces protein kinase D–dependent disassembly of apical junctions and barrier dysfunction in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Fariba; Meednu, Nida; Emo, Jason A.; Saatian, Bahman; Chapman, Timothy J.; Naydenov, Nayden G.; De Benedetto, Anna; Beck, Lisa A.; Ivanov, Andrei I.; Georas, Steve N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Disruption of the epithelial barrier might be a risk factor for allergen sensitization and asthma. Viral respiratory tract infections are strongly associated with asthma exacerbation, but the effects of respiratory viruses on airway epithelial barrier function are not well understood. Many viruses generate double-stranded RNA, which can lead to airway inflammation and initiate an antiviral immune response. Objectives We investigated the effects of the synthetic double-stranded RNA polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (polyI:C) on the structure and function of the airway epithelial barrier in vitro. Methods 16HBE14o- human bronchial epithelial cells and primary airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface were grown to confluence on Transwell inserts and exposed to polyI:C. We studied epithelial barrier function by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance and paracellular flux of fluorescent markers and structure of epithelial apical junctions by means of immunofluorescence microscopy. Results PolyI:C induced a profound decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and increase in paracellular permeability. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed markedly reduced junctional localization of zonula occludens-1, occludin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and disorganization of junction-associated actin filaments. PolyI:C induced protein kinase D (PKD) phosphorylation, and a PKD antagonist attenuated polyI:C-induced disassembly of apical junctions and barrier dysfunction. Conclusions PolyI:C has a powerful and previously unsuspected disruptive effect on the airway epithelial barrier. PolyI:C-dependent barrier disruption is mediated by disassembly of epithelial apical junctions, which is dependent on PKD signaling. These findings suggest a new mechanism potentially underlying the associations between viral respiratory tract infections, airway inflammation, and allergen sensitization. PMID:21996340

  16. 29 CFR 1926.1407 - Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-assembly and disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1407 Power line safety (up to 350 kV)—assembly and disassembly...) Assembly/disassembly below power lines prohibited. No part of a crane/derrick, load line, or load... part of a crane/derrick, load line, or load (including rigging and lifting accessories),...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1407 - Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-assembly and disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1407 Power line safety (up to 350 kV)—assembly and disassembly...) Assembly/disassembly below power lines prohibited. No part of a crane/derrick, load line, or load... part of a crane/derrick, load line, or load (including rigging and lifting accessories),...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.1407 - Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-assembly and disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1407 Power line safety (up to 350 kV)—assembly and disassembly...) Assembly/disassembly below power lines prohibited. No part of a crane/derrick, load line, or load... part of a crane/derrick, load line, or load (including rigging and lifting accessories),...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1407 - Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-assembly and disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1407 Power line safety (up to 350 kV)—assembly and disassembly...) Assembly/disassembly below power lines prohibited. No part of a crane/derrick, load line, or load... part of a crane/derrick, load line, or load (including rigging and lifting accessories),...

  20. Single turnovers of fluorescent ATP bound to bipolar myosin filament during actin filaments sliding

    PubMed Central

    Maruta, Takahiro; Kobatake, Takahiro; Okubo, Hiroyuki; Chaen, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The nucleotide turnover rates of bipolar myosin thick filament along which actin filament slides were measured by the displacement of prebound fluorescent ATP analog 2′(3′)-O-[N-[2-[(Cy3)]amindo]ethyl] carbamoyl]-adenosine 5′ triphosphate (Cy3-EDA-ATP) upon flash photolysis of caged ATP. The fluorescence of the thick filament where actin filament slides decayed with two exponential processes. The slower rate constant was the same as that without actin filament. Along bipolar myosin thick filament, actin filaments slide at a fast speed towards the central bare zone (forward), but more slowly away from the bare zone (backward). The displacement rate constant of fluorescent ATP from the myosin filament where actin filament moved forward was 5.0 s−1, whereas the rate constant where the actin filament slid backward was 1.7 s−1. These findings suggest that the slow ADP release rate is responsible for the slow backward sliding movement.

  1. Isoform diversity in the Arp2/3 complex determines actin filament dynamics.

    PubMed

    Abella, Jasmine V G; Galloni, Chiara; Pernier, Julien; Barry, David J; Kjær, Svend; Carlier, Marie-France; Way, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Arp2/3 complex consists of seven evolutionarily conserved subunits (Arp2, Arp3 and ARPC1-5) and plays an essential role in generating branched actin filament networks during many different cellular processes. In mammals, however, the ARPC1 and ARPC5 subunits are each encoded by two isoforms that are 67% identical. This raises the possibility that Arp2/3 complexes with different properties may exist.  We found that Arp2/3 complexes containing ARPC1B and ARPC5L are significantly better at promoting actin assembly than those with ARPC1A and ARPC5, both in cells and in vitro. Branched actin networks induced by complexes containing ARPC1B or ARPC5L are also disassembled ∼2-fold slower than those formed by their counterparts. This difference reflects the ability of cortactin to stabilize ARPC1B- and ARPC5L- but not ARPC1A- and ARPC5-containing complexes against coronin-mediated disassembly. Our observations demonstrate that the Arp2/3 complex in higher eukaryotes is actually a family of complexes with different properties. PMID:26655834

  2. Galaxy pairs align with Galactic filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, E.; Tamm, A.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Gravitational collapse theory and numerical simulations suggest that the velocity field within large-scale galaxy filaments is dominated by motions along the filaments. Aims: Our aim is to check whether observational data reveal any preferred orientation of galaxy pairs with respect to the underlying filaments as a result of the expectedly anisotropic velocity field. Methods: We use galaxy pairs and galaxy filaments identified from Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. For filament extraction, we use the Bisous model that is based on the marked point process technique. During the filament detection, we use the centre point of each pair instead of the positions of galaxies to avoid a built-in influence of pair orientation on the filament construction. For pairs lying within filaments (3012 cases), we calculate the angle between the line connecting the galaxies of each pair and their host filaments. To avoid redshift-space distortions, the angle is measured in the plane of the sky. Results: The alignment analysis shows that the orientation of galaxy pairs correlates strongly with their host filaments. The alignment signal is stronger for loose pairs, with at least 25% excess of aligned pairs compared to a random distribution. The alignment of galaxy pairs and filaments measured from the observational data is in good agreement with the alignment in the Millennium simulation and thus provides support to the ΛCDM formalism.

  3. 19 CFR 141.58 - Single entry for separately arriving portions of unassembled or disassembled entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Single entry for separately arriving portions of unassembled or disassembled entities. 141.58 Section 141.58 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Quantity of Merchandise To Be Included in...

  4. Engineering protein interfaces yields ferritin disassembly and reassembly under benign experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Zhang, S; Xu, C; Zhao, G

    2016-06-11

    Ferritin nanocages are promising platforms for drug encapsulation. However, extreme conditions (pH ≤ 2) required for dissociation limit their application. Here, we engineered protein interfaces to yield ferritin nanocages which disassemble at pH 4.0 and reassemble at pH 7.5. During this process, bioactive molecules can be encapsulated within the protein cavity. PMID:27194454

  5. Conceptual design report for the mechanical disassembly of Fort St. Vrain fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, D.L.; Wadsworth, D.C.; Sekot, J.P.; Skinner, K.L.

    1993-04-01

    A conceptual design study was prepared that: (1) reviewed the operations necessary to perform the mechanical disassembly of Fort St. Vrain fuel elements; (2) contained a description and survey of equipment capable of performing the necessary functions; and (3) performed a tradeoff study for determining the preferred concepts and equipment specifications. A preferred system was recommended and engineering specifications for this system were developed.

  6. THE MAN&RSQUO;S JACKET DESIGN FOR DISASSEMBLY: AN IMPLEMENTATION OF C2CAD FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The C2CAD model served as the basis in the man’s jacket design and production. In man’s jackets, both natural and synthetic materials are commonly used for fabrics, threads, and buttons. To promote disassembly and value retention, we minimized material diversity an...

  7. Deactivation of the P, C, and R Reactor Disassembly Basins at the SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, J.B.

    2000-12-06

    The Facilities Disposition Division (FDD) at the Savannah River Site is engaged in planning the deactivation/closure of three of the site's five reactor disassembly basins. Activities are currently underway at 105-R Disassembly Basin and will continue with the 105-P and 105-C disassembly basins. The basins still contain the cooling and shielding water that was present when operations ceased. Low concentrations of radionuclides are present, with tritium, Cs-137, and Sr-90 being the major contributors. Although there is no evidence that any of the basins have leaked, the 50-year-old facilities will eventually contaminate the surrounding groundwaters. The FDD is pursuing a pro-active solution to close the basins in-place and prevent a release to the groundwater. In-situ ion-exchange is currently underway at the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin to reduce the Cs and Sr concentrations to levels that would allow release of the treated water to previously used on-site cooling ponds. A NEPA Environmental Assessment (EA) is being prepared to propose the preferred closure alternative for each of the three basins. The EA will be the primary mechanism to inform the public and gain stakeholder and regulatory approval.

  8. 19 CFR 141.58 - Single entry for separately arriving portions of unassembled or disassembled entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Single entry for separately arriving portions of unassembled or disassembled entities. 141.58 Section 141.58 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Quantity of Merchandise To Be Included in...

  9. Real-Time Imaging of Single HIV-1 Disassembly with Multicolor Viral Particles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingxin; He, Zhike; Tan, Tianwei; Li, Wei; Zhang, Zhiping; Song, Shuang; Zhang, Xiaowei; Hu, Qinxue; Zhou, Peng; Wu, Yuntao; Zhang, Xian-En; Cui, Zongqiang

    2016-06-28

    Viral disassembly is poorly understood and related to the infection mechanism. However, directly observing the process in living cells remains technically challenging. In this study, the genome RNA, capsid, and matrix protein of the HIV-1 virus were labeled with a Ru(II) complex ([Ru(phen)2(dppz)](2+)), the TC-FlAsH/ReAsH system, and EGFP/ECFP, respectively. Using the multicolored virus and single-particle imaging, we were able to track the sequential disassembly process of single HIV-1 virus particles in live host cells. Approximately 0.1% of viral particles were observed to undergo a sequential disassembly process at 60-120 min post infection. The timing and efficiency of the disassembly were influenced by the cellular factor CypA and reverse transcription. The findings facilitate a better understanding of the processes governing the HIV-1 lifecycle. The multicolor labeling protocol developed in this study may find many applications involving virus-host-cell interactions. PMID:27253587

  10. Heat shock disassembles the nucleolus and inhibits nuclear protein import and poly(A)+ RNA export.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y; Liang, S; Tartakoff, A M

    1996-01-01

    Heat shock causes major positive and negative changes in gene expression, drastically alters the appearance of the nucleolus and inhibits rRNA synthesis. We here show that it causes many yeast nucleolar proteins, including the fibrillarin homolog Nop1p, to relocate to the cytoplasm. Relocation depends on several proteins implicated in mRNA transport (Mtrps) and is reversible. Two observations indicate, surprisingly, that disassembly results from a reduction in Ssa protein (Hsp70) levels: (i) selective depletion of Ssa1p leads to disassembly of the nucleolus; (ii) preincubation at 37 degrees C protects the nucleolus against disassembly by heat shock, unless expression of Ssa proteins is specifically inhibited. We observed that heat shock or reduction of Ssa1p levels inhibits protein import into the nucleus and therefore we propose that inhibition of import leads to disassembly of the nucleolus. These observations provide a simple explanation of the effects of heat shock on the anatomy of the nucleolus and rRNA transcription. They also extend understanding of the path of nuclear export. Since a number of nucleoplasmic proteins also relocate upon heat shock, these observations can provide a general mechanism for regulation of gene expression. Relocation of the hnRNP-like protein Mtr13p (= Npl3p, Nop3p), explains the heat shock sensitivity of export of average poly(A)+ RNA. Strikingly, Hsp mRNA export appears not to be affected. Images PMID:8978700

  11. Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuolar H+-ATPase regulation by disassembly and reassembly: one structure and multiple signals.

    PubMed

    Parra, Karlett J; Chan, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Jun

    2014-06-01

    Vacuolar H(+)-ATPases (V-ATPases) are highly conserved ATP-driven proton pumps responsible for acidification of intracellular compartments. V-ATPase proton transport energizes secondary transport systems and is essential for lysosomal/vacuolar and endosomal functions. These dynamic molecular motors are composed of multiple subunits regulated in part by reversible disassembly, which reversibly inactivates them. Reversible disassembly is intertwined with glycolysis, the RAS/cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, and phosphoinositides, but the mechanisms involved are elusive. The atomic- and pseudo-atomic-resolution structures of the V-ATPases are shedding light on the molecular dynamics that regulate V-ATPase assembly. Although all eukaryotic V-ATPases may be built with an inherent capacity to reversibly disassemble, not all do so. V-ATPase subunit isoforms and their interactions with membrane lipids and a V-ATPase-exclusive chaperone influence V-ATPase assembly. This minireview reports on the mechanisms governing reversible disassembly in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, keeping in perspective our present understanding of the V-ATPase architecture and its alignment with the cellular processes and signals involved. PMID:24706019

  12. Primary disassembly of Light Water Breeder Reactor modules for core evaluation (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberger, R.J.; Miller, E.L.

    1987-10-01

    After successfully operating for 29,047 effective full power hours, the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core was defueled prior to total decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. All nuclear fuel and much of the reactor internal hardware was removed from the reactor vessel. Non-fuel components were prepared for shipment to disposal sites, and the fuel assemblies were partially disassembled and shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) in Idaho. At ECF, the fuel modules underwent further disassembly to provide fuel rods for nondestructive testing to establish the core's breeding efficiency and to provide core components for examinations to assess their performance characteristics. This report presents a basic description of the processes and equipment used to disassemble LWBR fuel modules for subsequent proof-of-breeding (POB) and core examination operations. Included are discussions of module handling fixtures and equipment, the underwater milling machine and bandsaw assemblies, and the associated design and operation of this equipment for LWBR fuel module disassembly.

  13. Shieldable tumor targeting based on pH responsive self-assembly/disassembly of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhiqing; Yang, Chengling; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Zhi

    2014-10-22

    A new approach to shield/deshield ligands for controllable tumor targeting was reported, which was based on amphiphilic self-assembly and disassembly of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Thanks to the excellent pH response of the system, glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) ligands can be buried inside the Au NPs' assembly at normal tissue pH (pH 7.4), while exposed when the nanostructure is disassembled at tumor extracellular pH (pHe 6.8). Hydrophobic GA molecules not only acted as ligands targeting tumor cells but also provided the major interparticle attractive force for Au NPs' assembling. An ordered assembly of Au NPs with regular shape, proper size and ultrasharp pH sensitivity (ΔpH ∼ 0.2) was achieved by fine-tuning of materials modified on Au NPs. Mechanism studies for assembly and disassembly of Au NPs indicated the possibility of a GA shield when the assembly formed, which was further demonstrated by bovine serum albumin absorption and cellular uptake. The assembly/disassembly process was reversible within extrinsic pH changes, which provides a perspective for reversible tumor targeting. PMID:25233129

  14. PARTIAL SLINGSHOT RECONNECTION BETWEEN TWO FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yunchun; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Zheng, Ruisheng; Yang, Bo; Li, Haidong; Yang, Dan

    2013-02-10

    We present a rare observation of an interaction between two filaments around AR 11358 and AR 11361 on 2011 December 3 that is strongly suggestive of the occurrence of slingshot reconnection. A small elbow-shaped active-region filament (F12) underwent a failed eruption that brought it into contact with a nearby larger, thicker filament (F34). Accompanied by the appearance of complicated internal structures below the erupting F12, its two legs separated away from each other and then connected into F34. This process led the filaments to change their connectivity to form two newly linked filaments, and one of them showed a clear inverse {gamma}-shape. However, the alteration in the filament connectivity was imperfect since F34 is discernible after the eruption. These observations can be interpreted as a partial slingshot reconnection between two filaments that had unequal axial magnetic flux.

  15. The stability of viscous liquid filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driessen, Theo; Jeurissen, Roger; Wijshoff, Herman; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-11-01

    The stability of liquid filaments is relevant both in industrial applications, such as inkjet printing and atomization, and in nature, where the stability of filaments has a large influence on the final drop size distribution of rain droplets and waterfalls. The liquid filament may either stably collapse into a single droplet, or break up into multiple droplets. Which scenario is realized depends on the viscosity and the aspect ratio of the filament. Here we study the collapse of an axisymmetric liquid filament is analytically and with a numerical model. We find that a long, high viscous filament can only break up due to the Rayleigh-Plateau instability, whereas a low viscous filament can break up due to end-pinching. The theory shows quantitative agreement with recent experimental findings by Castréjon-Pita et al., PRL 108, 074506 (2012).

  16. Partial Slingshot Reconnection between Two Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yunchun; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Zheng, Ruisheng; Yang, Bo; Li, Haidong; Yang, Dan

    2013-02-01

    We present a rare observation of an interaction between two filaments around AR 11358 and AR 11361 on 2011 December 3 that is strongly suggestive of the occurrence of slingshot reconnection. A small elbow-shaped active-region filament (F12) underwent a failed eruption that brought it into contact with a nearby larger, thicker filament (F34). Accompanied by the appearance of complicated internal structures below the erupting F12, its two legs separated away from each other and then connected into F34. This process led the filaments to change their connectivity to form two newly linked filaments, and one of them showed a clear inverse γ-shape. However, the alteration in the filament connectivity was imperfect since F34 is discernible after the eruption. These observations can be interpreted as a partial slingshot reconnection between two filaments that had unequal axial magnetic flux.

  17. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.; Katz, J.D.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques at 2.45 GHZ to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company.

  18. Filamentation as primitive growth mode?

    PubMed

    Bigan, Erwan; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Douady, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Osmotic pressure influences cellular shape. In a growing cell, chemical reactions and dilution induce changes in osmolarity, which in turn influence the cellular shape. Using a protocell model relying upon random conservative chemical reaction networks with arbitrary stoichiometry, we find that when the membrane is so flexible that its shape adjusts itself quasi-instantaneously to balance the osmotic pressure, the protocell either grows filamentous or fails to grow. This behavior is consistent with a mathematical proof. This suggests that filamentation may be a primitive growth mode resulting from the simple physical property of balanced osmotic pressure. We also find that growth is favored if some chemical species are only present inside the protocell, but not in the outside growth medium. Such an insulation requires specific chemical schemes. Modern evolved cells such as E. coli meet these requirements through active transport mechanisms such as the phosphotransferase system. PMID:26718101

  19. Filamentation as primitive growth mode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigan, Erwan; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Douady, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Osmotic pressure influences cellular shape. In a growing cell, chemical reactions and dilution induce changes in osmolarity, which in turn influence the cellular shape. Using a protocell model relying upon random conservative chemical reaction networks with arbitrary stoichiometry, we find that when the membrane is so flexible that its shape adjusts itself quasi-instantaneously to balance the osmotic pressure, the protocell either grows filamentous or fails to grow. This behavior is consistent with a mathematical proof. This suggests that filamentation may be a primitive growth mode resulting from the simple physical property of balanced osmotic pressure. We also find that growth is favored if some chemical species are only present inside the protocell, but not in the outside growth medium. Such an insulation requires specific chemical schemes. Modern evolved cells such as E. coli meet these requirements through active transport mechanisms such as the phosphotransferase system.

  20. Intermediate Filaments in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zuela, Noam; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    More than 70 different genes in humans and 12 different genes in Caenorhabditis elegans encode the superfamily of intermediate filament (IF) proteins. In C. elegans, similar to humans, these proteins are expressed in a cell- and tissue-specific manner, can assemble into heteropolymers and into 5-10nm wide filaments that account for the principal structural elements at the nuclear periphery, nucleoplasm, and cytoplasm. At least 5 of the 11 cytoplasmic IFs, as well as the nuclear IF, lamin, are essential. In this chapter, we will include a short review of our current knowledge of both cytoplasmic and nuclear IFs in C. elegans and will describe techniques used for their analyses. PMID:26795488

  1. Filament wound rocket motor chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, analysis, fabrication and testing of a Kevlar-49/HBRF-55A filament wound chamber is reported. The chamber was fabricated and successfully tested to 80% of the design burst pressure. Results of the data reduction and analysis from the hydrotest indicate that the chamber design and fabrication techniques used for the chamber were adequate and the chamber should perform adequately in a static test.

  2. Mechanics of vimentin intermediate filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ning; Stamenovic, Dimitrijie

    2002-01-01

    It is increasingly evident that the cytoskeleton of living cells plays important roles in mechanical and biological functions of the cells. Here we focus on the contribution of intermediate filaments (IFs) to the mechanical behaviors of living cells. Vimentin, a major structural component of IFs in many cell types, is shown to play an important role in vital mechanical and biological functions such as cell contractility, migration, stiffness, stiffening, and proliferation.

  3. Lighting the universe with filaments.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Theuns, Tom

    2007-09-14

    The first stars in the universe form when chemically pristine gas heats as it falls into dark-matter potential wells, cools radiatively because of the formation of molecular hydrogen, and becomes self-gravitating. Using supercomputer simulations, we demonstrated that the stars' properties depend critically on the currently unknown nature of the dark matter. If the dark-matter particles have intrinsic velocities that wipe out small-scale structure, then the first stars form in filaments with lengths on the order of the free-streaming scale, which can be approximately 10(20) meters (approximately 3 kiloparsecs, corresponding to a baryonic mass of approximately 10(7) solar masses) for realistic "warm dark matter" candidates. Fragmentation of the filaments forms stars with a range of masses, which may explain the observed peculiar element abundance pattern of extremely metal-poor stars, whereas coalescence of fragments and stars during the filament's ultimate collapse may seed the supermassive black holes that lurk in the centers of most massive galaxies. PMID:17872439

  4. Roles of different pools of the mitotic checkpoint complex and the mechanisms of their disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, Esther; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Teichner, Adar; Hershko, Avram

    2013-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system prevents premature separation of sister chromatids in mitosis. When the checkpoint is turned on, the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) inhibits the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). MCC is composed of the checkpoint proteins BubR1, Bub3, and Mad2 associated with the APC/C activator Cdc20. The mechanisms of the assembly of MCC when the checkpoint is turned on, and of its disassembly when the checkpoint is inactivated, are not sufficiently understood. Previous reports indicated that APC/C-mediated polyubiquitylation of Cdc20 in MCC is required for the dissociation of APC/C-associated MCC, but not of free MCC. The pool of free MCC is disassembled by an ATP-dependent process stimulated by the Mad2-binding protein p31comet. It remained unknown whether free MCC is the precursor or the dissociation product of APC/C-bound MCC. By characterizing the mechanisms of the disassembly of APC/C-bound MCC in a purified system, we find that it cannot be the source of free MCC, because it is bound at high affinity and is released only in ubiquitylated or partially disassembled forms. By the use of a cell-free system from Xenopus eggs that reproduces the mitotic checkpoint, we show that MCC can be assembled in the absence of APC/C in a checkpoint-dependent manner. We propose that when the checkpoint is turned on, free MCC is the precursor of APC/C-bound MCC. When the mitotic checkpoint is extinguished, both APC/C-bound and free MCC pools have to be disassembled to release APC/C from inhibition. PMID:23754430

  5. Disassembly of myofibrils and potential imbalanced forces on Z-discs in cultured adult cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Honghai; Qin, Wan; Wang, Zhonghai; Shao, Yonghong; Wang, Jingcai; Borg, Thomas K; Gao, Bruce Z; Xu, Meifeng

    2016-05-01

    Myofibrils are the main protein structures that generate force in the beating heart. Myofibril disassembly is related to many physiological and pathological processes. This study investigated, in a cultured rat adult cardiomyocyte model, the effect of force imbalance on myofibril disassembly. The imbalance of forces that were exerted on Z-discs was induced by the synergistic effect of broken intercalated discs and actin-myosin interaction. Cardiomyocytes with well-preserved intercalated discs were isolated from adult rat ventricles. The ultrastructure of cardiomyocyte was observed using a customized two-photon excitation fluorescence and second harmonic generation imaging system. The contraction of cardiomyocytes was recorded with a high-speed CCD camera, and the movement of cellular components was analyzed using a contractile imaging assay technique. The cardiomyocyte dynamic remodeling process was recorded using a time-lapse imaging system. The role of actin-myosin interaction in myofibril disassembly was investigated by incubating cardiomyocytes with blebbistatin (25 μM). Results demonstrated that the hierarchical disassembly process of myofibrils was initiated from cardiomyocyte free ends where intercalated discs had broken, during which the desmin network near the free cell ends was destroyed to release single myofibrils. Analysis of force (based on a schematic model of cardiomyocytes connected at intercalated discs) suggests that breaking of intercalated discs caused force imbalance on both sides of the Z-discs adjacent to the cell ends due to actin-myosin interaction. The damaged intercalated discs and actin-myosin interaction induced force imbalance on both sides of the Z-discs, which played an important role in the hierarchical disassembly of myofibrils. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27072949

  6. Pit disassembly and conversion demonstration environmental assessment and research and development activities

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    A significant portion of the surplus plutonium is in the form of pits, a nuclear weapons component. Pits are composed of plutonium which is sealed in a metallic shell. These pits would need to be safely disassembled and permanently converted to an unclassified form that would be suitable for long-term disposition and international inspection. To determine the feasibility of an integrated pit disassembly and conversion system, a Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration is proposed to take place at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This demonstration would be done in existing buildings and facilities, and would involve the disassembly of up to 250 pits and conversion of the recovered plutonium to plutonium metal ingots and plutonium dioxide. This demonstration also includes the conversion of up to 80 kilograms of clean plutonium metal to plutonium dioxide because, as part of the disposition process, some surplus plutonium metal may be converted to plutonium dioxide in the same facility as the surplus pits. The equipment to be used for the proposed demonstration addressed in this EA would use some parts of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) capability, other existing equipment/capacities, plus new equipment that was developed at other sites. In addition, small-scale R and D activities are currently underway as part of the overall surplus plutonium disposition program. These R and D activities are related to pit disassembly and conversion, MOX fuel fabrication, and immobilization (in glass and ceramic forms). They are described in Section 7.0. On May 16, 1997, the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) notified potentially affected states and tribes that this EA would be prepared in accordance with NEPA. This EA has been prepared to provide sufficient information for DOE to determine whether a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) is warranted or whether an EIS must be prepared.

  7. Low cytoplasmic pH reduces ER-Golgi trafficking and induces disassembly of the Golgi apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Soonthornsit, Jeerawat; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Tamura, Daisuke; Ishida, Ryuichi; Nakakoji, Yoko; Osako, Shiho; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Nakamura, Nobuhiro

    2014-11-01

    The Golgi apparatus was dramatically disassembled when cells were incubated in a low pH medium. The cis-Golgi disassembled quickly, extended tubules and spread to the periphery of cells within 30 min. In contrast, medial- and trans-Golgi were fragmented in significantly larger structures of smaller numbers at a slower rate and remained largely in structures distinct from the cis-Golgi. Electron microscopy revealed the complete disassembly of the Golgi stack in low pH treated cells. The effect of low pH was reversible; the Golgi apparatus reassembled to form a normal ribbon-like structure within 1–2 h after the addition of a control medium. The anterograde ER to Golgi transport and retrograde Golgi to ER transport were both reduced under low pH. Phospholipase A{sub 2} inhibitors (ONO, BEL) effectively suppressed the Golgi disassembly, suggesting that the phospholipase A{sub 2} was involved in the Golgi disassembly. Over-expression of Rab1, 2, 30, 33 and 41 also suppressed the Golgi disassembly under low pH, suggesting that they have protective role against Golgi disassembly. Low pH treatment reduced cytoplasmic pH, but not the luminal pH of the Golgi apparatus, strongly suggesting that reduction of the cytoplasmic pH triggered the Golgi disassembly. Because a lower cytoplasmic pH is induced in physiological or pathological conditions, disassembly of the Golgi apparatus and reduction of vesicular transport through the Golgi apparatus may play important roles in cell physiology and pathology. Furthermore, our findings indicated that low pH treatment can serve as an important tool to analyze the molecular mechanisms that support the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus. - Highlights: • The Golgi apparatus reversibly disassembles by low pH treatment. • The cis-Golgi disassembles quickly generating tubular structures. • Both anterograde and retrograde transport between the ER and the Golgi apparatus are reduced. • Phospholipase A{sub 2} inhibitors (ONO

  8. Filamentation of Metabolic Enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing-Ji; Kassim, Hakimi; Huang, Yong; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Li, Guang; Wang, Peng-Ye; Yan, Jun; Ye, Fangfu; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-06-20

    Compartmentation via filamentation has recently emerged as a novel mechanism for metabolic regulation. In order to identify filament-forming metabolic enzymes systematically, we performed a genome-wide screening of all strains available from an open reading frame-GFP collection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We discovered nine novel filament-forming proteins and also confirmed those identified previously. From the 4159 strains, we found 23 proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, which are capable of forming filaments in vivo. In silico protein-protein interaction analysis suggests that these filament-forming proteins can be clustered into several groups, including translational initiation machinery and glucose and nitrogen metabolic pathways. Using glutamine-utilising enzymes as examples, we found that the culture conditions affect the occurrence and length of the metabolic filaments. Furthermore, we found that two CTP synthases (Ura7p and Ura8p) and two asparagine synthetases (Asn1p and Asn2p) form filaments both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Live imaging analyses suggest that metabolic filaments undergo sub-diffusion. Taken together, our genome-wide screening identifies additional filament-forming proteins in S. cerevisiae and suggests that filamentation of metabolic enzymes is more general than currently appreciated. PMID:27312010

  9. Actin filament curvature biases branching direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evan; Risca, Viviana; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Chia, Jia-Jun; Geissler, Phillip; Fletcher, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Actin filaments are key components of the cellular machinery, vital for a wide range of processes ranging from cell motility to endocytosis. Actin filaments can branch, and essential in this process is a protein complex known as the Arp2/3 complex, which nucleate new ``daughter'' filaments from pre-existing ``mother'' filaments by attaching itself to the mother filament. Though much progress has been made in understanding the Arp2/3-actin junction, some very interesting questions remain. In particular, F-actin is a dynamic polymer that undergoes a wide range of fluctuations. Prior studies of the Arp2/3-actin junction provides a very static notion of Arp2/3 binding. The question we ask is how differently does the Arp2/3 complex interact with a straight filament compared to a bent filament? In this study, we used Monte Carlo simulations of a surface-tethered worm-like chain to explore possible mechanisms underlying the experimental observation that there exists preferential branch formation by the Arp2/3 complex on the convex face of a curved filament. We show that a fluctuation gating model in which Arp2/3 binding to the actin filament is dependent upon a rare high-local-curvature shape fluctuation of the filament is consistent with the experimental data.

  10. Mechanical properties of branched actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein; Falcke, Martin; Benetatos, Panayotis; Zippelius, Annette

    2015-07-01

    Cells moving on a two dimensional substrate generate motion by polymerizing actin filament networks inside a flat membrane protrusion. New filaments are generated by branching off existing ones, giving rise to branched network structures. We investigate the force-extension relation of branched filaments, grafted on an elastic structure at one end and pushing with the free ends against the leading edge cell membrane. Single filaments are modeled as worm-like chains, whose thermal bending fluctuations are restricted by the leading edge cell membrane, resulting in an effective force. Branching can increase the stiffness considerably; however the effect depends on branch point position and filament orientation, being most pronounced for intermediate tilt angles and intermediate branch point positions. We describe filament networks without cross-linkers to focus on the effect of branching. We use randomly positioned branch points, as generated in the process of treadmilling, and orientation distributions as measured in lamellipodia. These networks reproduce both the weak and strong force response of lamellipodia as measured in force-velocity experiments. We compare properties of branched and unbranched networks. The ratio of the network average of the force per branched filament to the average force per unbranched filament depends on the orientation distribution of the filaments. The ratio exhibits compression dependence and may go up to about 4.5 in networks with a narrow orientation distribution. With orientation distributions measured in lamellipodia, it is about two and essentially independent from network compression, graft elasticity and filament persistence length. PMID:26040560

  11. Mechanical properties of branched actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein; Falcke, Martin; Benetatos, Panayotis; Zippelius, Annette

    2015-07-01

    Cells moving on a two dimensional substrate generate motion by polymerizing actin filament networks inside a flat membrane protrusion. New filaments are generated by branching off existing ones, giving rise to branched network structures. We investigate the force-extension relation of branched filaments, grafted on an elastic structure at one end and pushing with the free ends against the leading edge cell membrane. Single filaments are modeled as worm-like chains, whose thermal bending fluctuations are restricted by the leading edge cell membrane, resulting in an effective force. Branching can increase the stiffness considerably; however the effect depends on branch point position and filament orientation, being most pronounced for intermediate tilt angles and intermediate branch point positions. We describe filament networks without cross-linkers to focus on the effect of branching. We use randomly positioned branch points, as generated in the process of treadmilling, and orientation distributions as measured in lamellipodia. These networks reproduce both the weak and strong force response of lamellipodia as measured in force-velocity experiments. We compare properties of branched and unbranched networks. The ratio of the network average of the force per branched filament to the average force per unbranched filament depends on the orientation distribution of the filaments. The ratio exhibits compression dependence and may go up to about 4.5 in networks with a narrow orientation distribution. With orientation distributions measured in lamellipodia, it is about two and essentially independent from network compression, graft elasticity and filament persistence length.

  12. Averaged implicit hydrodynamic model of semiflexible filaments.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Preethi L; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2010-03-01

    We introduce a method to incorporate hydrodynamic interaction in a model of semiflexible filament dynamics. Hydrodynamic screening and other hydrodynamic interaction effects lead to nonuniform drag along even a rigid filament, and cause bending fluctuations in semiflexible filaments, in addition to the nonuniform Brownian forces. We develop our hydrodynamics model from a string-of-beads idealization of filaments, and capture hydrodynamic interaction by Stokes superposition of the solvent flow around beads. However, instead of the commonly used first-order Stokes superposition, we do an equivalent of infinite-order superposition by solving for the true relative velocity or hydrodynamic velocity of the beads implicitly. We also avoid the computational cost of the string-of-beads idealization by assuming a single normal, parallel and angular hydrodynamic velocity over sections of beads, excluding the beads at the filament ends. We do not include the end beads in the averaging and solve for them separately instead, in order to better resolve the drag profiles along the filament. A large part of the hydrodynamic drag is typically concentrated at the filament ends. The averaged implicit hydrodynamics methods can be easily incorporated into a string-of-rods idealization of semiflexible filaments that was developed earlier by the authors. The earlier model was used to solve the Brownian dynamics of semiflexible filaments, but without hydrodynamic interactions incorporated. We validate our current model at each stage of development, and reproduce experimental observations on the mean-squared displacement of fluctuating actin filaments . We also show how hydrodynamic interaction confines a fluctuating actin filament between two stationary lateral filaments. Finally, preliminary examinations suggest that a large part of the observed velocity in the interior segments of a fluctuating filament can be attributed to induced solvent flow or hydrodynamic screening. PMID:20365783

  13. A penny-shaped crack in a filament reinforced matrix. 1: The filament model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Pacella, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The electrostatic problem of a penny-shaped crack in an elastic matrix which reinforced by filaments or fibers perpendicular to the plane of the crack was studied. The elastic filament model was developed for application to evaluation studies of the stress intensity factor along the periphery of the crack, the stresses in the filaments or fibers, and the interface shear between the matrix and the filaments or fibers. The requirements expected of the model are a sufficiently accurate representation of the filament and applicability to the interaction problems involving a cracked elastic continuum with multi-filament reinforcements. The technique for developing the model and numerical examples of it are shown.

  14. Diagnosis of femtosecond plasma filament by channeling microwaves along the filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Ren, Yu; Qin, Jiang; Hao, Zuoqiang; Lin, Jingquan

    2013-05-01

    We introduce a simple, fast, and non-intrusive experimental method to obtain the basic parameters of femtosecond laser-generated plasma filament. The method is based on the channeling of microwaves along both a plasma filament and a well-defined conducting wire. By comparing the detected microwaves that propagate along the plasma filament and a copper wire with known conductivity and spatial dimension, the basic parameters of the plasma filament can be easily obtained. As a result of the possibility of channeling microwave radiation along the plasma filament, we were then able to obtain the plasma density distribution along the filament length.

  15. Diagnosis of femtosecond plasma filament by channeling microwaves along the filament

    SciTech Connect

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Ren, Yu; Qin, Jiang; Hao, Zuoqiang; Lin, Jingquan

    2013-05-20

    We introduce a simple, fast, and non-intrusive experimental method to obtain the basic parameters of femtosecond laser-generated plasma filament. The method is based on the channeling of microwaves along both a plasma filament and a well-defined conducting wire. By comparing the detected microwaves that propagate along the plasma filament and a copper wire with known conductivity and spatial dimension, the basic parameters of the plasma filament can be easily obtained. As a result of the possibility of channeling microwave radiation along the plasma filament, we were then able to obtain the plasma density distribution along the filament length.

  16. Processive ATP-driven Substrate Disassembly by the N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive Factor (NSF) Molecular Machine*♦

    PubMed Central

    Cipriano, Daniel J.; Jung, Jaemyeong; Vivona, Sandro; Fenn, Timothy D.; Brunger, Axel T.; Bryant, Zev

    2013-01-01

    SNARE proteins promote membrane fusion by forming a four-stranded parallel helical bundle that brings the membranes into close proximity. Post-fusion, the complex is disassembled by an AAA+ ATPase called N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF). We present evidence that NSF uses a processive unwinding mechanism to disassemble SNARE proteins. Using a real-time disassembly assay based on fluorescence dequenching, we correlate NSF-driven disassembly rates with the SNARE-activated ATPase activity of NSF. Neuronal SNAREs activate the ATPase rate of NSF by ∼26-fold. One SNARE complex takes an average of ∼5 s to disassemble in a process that consumes ∼50 ATP. Investigations of substrate requirements show that NSF is capable of disassembling a truncated SNARE substrate consisting of only the core SNARE domain, but not an unrelated four-stranded coiled-coil. NSF can also disassemble an engineered double-length SNARE complex, suggesting a processive unwinding mechanism. We further investigated processivity using single-turnover experiments, which show that SNAREs can be unwound in a single encounter with NSF. We propose a processive helicase-like mechanism for NSF in which ∼1 residue is unwound for every hydrolyzed ATP molecule. PMID:23775070

  17. The nonlinear evolution of magnetized solar filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, L.; Van Hoven, G.; Schnack, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal instability driven by optically thin radiation is believed to initiate the formation of plasma filaments in the solar corona. The fact that filaments are observed generally to separate regions of opposite, line-of-sight, magnetic polarity in the underlying photosphere suggests that filament formation requires the presence of a highly sheared, local magnetic field. Two-dimensional, nonlinear, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the local genesis and growth of solar filaments in a force-free, sheared, magnetic field were performed, and the evolution of generic perturbations possessing broad spatial profiles was traced. It was found that simulations of the evolution of initial random-noise perturbations produce filamentary plasma structures that exhibit densities and temperatures characteristic of observed solar filaments. Furthermore, in each of these simulations, the filament axis lies at a finite angle with respect to the local magnetic field, consistent with solar observations.

  18. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation for Atmospheric Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huai Liang; Chin, See Leang

    2011-01-01

    Powerful femtosecond laser pulses propagating in transparent materials result in the formation of self-guided structures called filaments. Such filamentation in air can be controlled to occur at a distance as far as a few kilometers, making it ideally suited for remote sensing of pollutants in the atmosphere. On the one hand, the high intensity inside the filaments can induce the fragmentation of all matters in the path of filaments, resulting in the emission of characteristic fluorescence spectra (fingerprints) from the excited fragments, which can be used for the identification of various substances including chemical and biological species. On the other hand, along with the femtosecond laser filamentation, white-light supercontinuum emission in the infrared to UV range is generated, which can be used as an ideal light source for absorption Lidar. In this paper, we present an overview of recent progress concerning remote sensing of the atmosphere using femtosecond laser filamentation. PMID:22346566

  19. Evolution of Barb Angle and Filament Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H. Q.; Kurokawa, H.; Yurchyshyn, V.; Shibata, K.; Bao, X. M.; Wang, G. P.; Li, C.

    2005-09-01

    Hα observations of a quiescent U-shaped filament were obtained at Big Bear Solar Observatory and at Hida Observatory with the Flare Monitoring Telescope. The filament was located in the southern hemisphere on 1998 November 4. We study the evolution of the angle of a barb with respect to the axis of the filament and find the evolution can be divided into two phases: a rise from the acute phase to the obtuse phase and a fall. Thus, this indicates that the chirality of this barb changes with time. Moreover, in the process of evolution, we find that interconnection of the part of the filament bearing the barb with the whole filament became either weakened or strengthened. We impute the final eruption of the filament to the chirality evolution of the barb.

  20. AGR-1 Irradiated Test Train Preliminary Inspection and Disassembly First Look

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz; Lance Cole; Scott Ploger; Philip Winston; Binh Pham; Michael Abbott

    2011-01-01

    The AGR-1 irradiation experiment ended on November 6, 2009, after 620 effective full power days in the Advanced Test Reactor, achieving a peak burnup of 19.6% FIMA. The test train was shipped to the Materials and Fuels Complex in March 2010 for post-irradiation examination. The first PIE activities included non-destructive examination of the test train, followed by disassembly of the test train and individual capsules and detailed inspection of the capsule contents, including the fuel compacts and the graphite fuel holders. Dimensional measurements of the compacts, graphite holders, and steel capsules shells were performed using a custom vision measurement system (for outer diameters and lengths) and conventional bore gauges (for inner diameters). Gamma spectrometry of the intact test train gave a preliminary look at the condition of the interior components. No evidence of damage to compacts or graphite components was evident from the isotopic and gross gamma scans. Neutron radiography of the intact Capsule 2 showed a high degree of detail of interior components and confirmed the observation that there was no major damage to the capsule. Disassembly of the capsules was initiated using procedures qualified during out-of-cell mockup testing. Difficulties were encountered during capsule disassembly due to irradiation-induced changes in some of the capsule components’ properties, including embrittled niobium and molybdenum parts that were susceptible to fracture and swelling of the graphite fuel holders that affected their removal from the capsule shells. This required various improvised modifications to the disassembly procedure to avoid damage to the fuel compacts. Ultimately the capsule disassembly was successful and only one compact from Capsule 4 (out of 72 total in the test train) sustained damage during the disassembly process, along with the associated graphite holder. The compacts were generally in very good condition upon removal. Only relatively minor

  1. Remote electrical arc suppression by laser filamentation.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Elise; Mongin, Denis; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the interaction of narrow plasma channels formed in the filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses, with a DC high voltage. The laser filaments prevent electrical arcs by triggering corona that neutralize the high-voltage electrodes. This phenomenon, that relies on the electric field modulation and free electron release around the filament, opens new prospects to lightning and over-voltage mitigation. PMID:26561133

  2. Motion, decay and merging of vortex filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Ting, L.

    1988-01-01

    The asymptotic solutions of Navier-Stokes equations for vortex filaments of finite strength with small effective vortical cores are summarized. Emphases are placed on the physical meaning and the practical limit to the applicability of the asymptotic solution. Finite-difference solutions of Navier-Stokes equations for the merging of the filament(s) are described. It is focused on the development of the approximate boundary conditions for the computational domain.

  3. How bio-filaments twist membranes.

    PubMed

    Fierling, Julien; Johner, Albert; Kulić, Igor M; Mohrbach, Hervé; Müller, Martin Michael

    2016-06-29

    We study the deformations of a fluid membrane imposed by adhering stiff bio-filaments due to the torques they apply. In the limit of small deformations, we derive a general expression for the energy and the deformation field of the membrane. This expression is specialised to different important cases including closed and helical bio-filaments. In particular, we analyse interface-mediated interactions and membrane wrapping when the filaments apply a local torque distribution on a tubular membrane. PMID:27291854

  4. Self-Organization of Treadmilling Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubrovinski, K.; Kruse, K.

    2007-11-01

    The cytoskeleton is an active network of polar filaments. The activity can lead to the polymerization of filaments at one end and depolymerization at the other. This phenomenon is called treadmilling and is essential for many cellular processes, in particular, the crawling of cells on a substrate. We develop a microscopic theoretical framework for describing systems of treadmilling filaments. We show that such systems can self-organize into structures observed in cell fragments, in particular, asters and moving spots.

  5. Recent observations of the formation of filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Sara F.

    1986-12-01

    Two examples of the formation of small filaments in H alpha are described and illustrated. In both cases, the formation is seen to be the spontaneous appearance of strands of absorbing mass that evolve from no previous structure. The initial development of the filaments appears to consist of the accumulation of these absorptive strands along approximately parallel paths in a channel between large-scale, opposite polarity magnetic fields on either side of the filaments. The strands exhibit continuous changes in shape and degree of absorption which can be due to successive condensations resulting in new strands, mass motions within the strands, and outflow of the mass from the strands. For at least several hours before the formation of both filaments, small-scale fragments of opposite polarity, line-of-sight magnetic flux adjacent to or immediately below the filaments, and at the ends of the filaments, were cancelling. This type of magnetic flux disappearance continued during the development of the filaments and is commonly observed in association with established filaments. Cancellation is interpreted as an important evolutionary change in the magnetic field that can lead to configurations suitable for the formation of filaments.

  6. Methods for modeling cytoskeletal and DNA filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Steven S.

    2014-02-01

    This review summarizes the models that researchers use to represent the conformations and dynamics of cytoskeletal and DNA filaments. It focuses on models that address individual filaments in continuous space. Conformation models include the freely jointed, Gaussian, angle-biased chain (ABC), and wormlike chain (WLC) models, of which the first three bend at discrete joints and the last bends continuously. Predictions from the WLC model generally agree well with experiment. Dynamics models include the Rouse, Zimm, stiff rod, dynamic WLC, and reptation models, of which the first four apply to isolated filaments and the last to entangled filaments. Experiments show that the dynamic WLC and reptation models are most accurate. They also show that biological filaments typically experience strong hydrodynamic coupling and/or constrained motion. Computer simulation methods that address filament dynamics typically compute filament segment velocities from local forces using the Langevin equation and then integrate these velocities with explicit or implicit methods; the former are more versatile and the latter are more efficient. Much remains to be discovered in biological filament modeling. In particular, filament dynamics in living cells are not well understood, and current computational methods are too slow and not sufficiently versatile. Although primarily a review, this paper also presents new statistical calculations for the ABC and WLC models. Additionally, it corrects several discrepancies in the literature about bending and torsional persistence length definitions, and their relations to flexural and torsional rigidities.

  7. Actively Contracting Bundles of Polar Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, K.; Jülicher, F.

    2000-08-01

    We introduce a phenomenological model to study the properties of bundles of polar filaments which interact via active elements. The stability of the homogeneous state, the attractors of the dynamics in the unstable regime, and the tensile stress generated in the bundle are discussed. We find that the interaction of parallel filaments can induce unstable behavior and is responsible for active contraction and tension in the bundle. The interaction between antiparallel filaments leads to filament sorting. Our model could apply to simple contractile structures in cells such as stress fibers.

  8. Probing the Physical Structures of Dense Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    Filament is a common feature in cosmological structures of various scales, ranging from dark matter cosmic web, galaxy clusters, inter-galactic gas flows, to Galactic ISM clouds. Even within cold dense molecular cores, filaments have been detected. Theories and simulations with (or without) different combination of physical principles, including gravity, thermal balance, turbulence, and magnetic field, can reproduce intriguing images of filaments. The ubiquity of filaments and the similarity in simulated ones make physical parameters, beyond dust column density, a necessity for understanding filament evolution. I report three projects attempting to measure physical parameters of filaments. We derive the volume density of a dense Taurus filament based on several cyanoacetylene transitions observed by GBT and ART. We measure the gas temperature of the OMC 2-3 filament based on combined GBT+VLA ammonia images. We also measured the sub-millimeter polarization vectors along OMC3. These filaments were found to be likely a cylinder-type structure, without dynamic heating, and likely accreting mass along the magnetic field lines.

  9. Measurement of birefringence inside a filament

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Shuai; Wang, Tie-Jun; Chin, See Leang; Kosareva, Olga; Panov, Nikolay; Makarov, Vladimir; Zeng Heping

    2011-07-15

    We quantified the ultrafast birefringence induced in the filament in an atomic gas by measuring the filament-induced polarization rotation of a probe pulse. Based on the dephasing of the probe's orthogonal polarization components in argon, the experiment was done at 1 atm by copropagating a linearly polarized 400-nm probe pulse with an 800-nm pump pulse which generated the filament. The probe's elliptical polarization states were shown under various initial pump-probe polarization schemes. These states were verified by comparing the filament-induced probe polarization rotation angle and the ellipticity of the probe polarization.

  10. Chaperonin filaments: The archaeal cytoskeleton?

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, Eric; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1997-01-01

    Chaperonins are high molecular mass double-ring structures composed of 60-kDa protein subunits. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae the two chaperonin proteins represent ≈4% of its total protein and have a combined intracellular concentration of >30 mg/ml. At concentrations ≥ 0.5 mg/ml purified chaperonins form filaments in the presence of Mg2+ and nucleotides. Filament formation requires nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), and occurs at physiological temperatures in biologically relevant buffers, including a buffer made from cell extracts. These observations suggest that chaperonin filaments may exist in vivo and the estimated 4600 chaperonins per cell suggest that such filaments could form an extensive cytostructure. We observed filamentous structures in unfixed, uranyl-acetate-stained S. shibatae cells, which resemble the chaperonin filaments in size and appearance. ImmunoGold (Janssen) labeling using chaperonin antibodies indicated that many chaperonins are associated with insoluble cellular structures and these structures appear to be filamentous in some areas, although they could not be uranyl-acetate-stained. The existence of chaperonin filaments in vivo suggests a mechanism whereby their protein-folding activities can be regulated. More generally, the filaments themselves may play a cytoskeletal role in Archaea. PMID:9144246

  11. Observations of an active region filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, W. G.; Tang, Y. H.; Fang, C.; Xu, A. A.

    An active region filament was well observed on September 4, 2002 with THEMIS at the Teide observatory and SOHO/MDI. The full Stokes parameters of the filament were obtained in Hα and FeI 6302 Å lines. Using the data, we have studied the fine structure of the filament and obtained the parameters at the barb endpoints, including intensity, velocity and longitudinal magnetic field. Our results indicate: (a) the Doppler velocities are quiet different at barb endpoints; (b) the longitudinal magnetic fields at the barb endpoints are very weak; (c) there is a strong magnetic field structure under the filament spine.

  12. A Summary Report on the NPH Evaluation of 105-L Disassembly Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, J.R.

    2002-04-30

    The L Area Disassembly Basin (LDB) is evaluated for the natural phenomena hazards (NPH) effects due to earthquake, wind, and tornado in accordance with DOE Order 420.1 and DOE-STD-1020. The deterministic analysis is performed for a Performance Category 3 (PC3) level of loads. Savannah River Site (SRS) specific NPH loads and design criteria are obtained from Engineering Standard 01060. It is demonstrated that the demand to capacity (D/C) ratios for primary and significant structural elements are acceptable (equal to or less than 1.0). Thus, 105-L Disassembly Basin building structure is qualified for the PC3 NPH effects in accordance with DOE Order 420.1.

  13. Assembly, operation and disassembly manual for the Battelle Large Volume Water Sampler (BLVWS)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, V.W.; Campbell, R.M.

    1984-12-01

    Assembly, operation and disassembly of the Battelle Large Volume Water Sampler (BLVWS) are described in detail. Step by step instructions of assembly, general operation and disassembly are provided to allow an operator completely unfamiliar with the sampler to successfully apply the BLVWS to his research sampling needs. The sampler permits concentration of both particulate and dissolved radionuclides from large volumes of ocean and fresh water. The water sample passes through a filtration section for particle removal then through sorption or ion exchange beds where species of interest are removed. The sampler components which contact the water being sampled are constructed of polyvinylchloride (PVC). The sampler has been successfully applied to many sampling needs over the past fifteen years. 9 references, 8 figures.

  14. Mutation-Specific Effects on Thin Filament Length in Thin Filament Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    de Winter, Josine M.; Joureau, Barbara; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Kiss, Balázs; Yuen, Michaela; Gupta, Vandana A.; Pappas, Christopher T.; Gregorio, Carol C.; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Edvardson, Simon; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Malfatti, Edoardo; Romero, Norma B.; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Voermans, Nicol C.; Donkervoort, Sandra; Bönnemann, C. G.; Clarke, Nigel F.; Beggs, Alan H.; Granzier, Henk; Ottenheijm, Coen A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Thin filament myopathies are among the most common nondystrophic congenital muscular disorders, and are caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins that are associated with the skeletal muscle thin filament. Mechanisms underlying muscle weakness are poorly understood, but might involve the length of the thin filament, an important determinant of force generation. Methods We investigated the sarcomere length-dependence of force, a functional assay that provides insights into the contractile strength of muscle fibers as well as the length of the thin filaments, in muscle fibers from 51 patients with thin filament myopathy caused by mutations in NEB, ACTA1, TPM2, TPM3, TNNT1, KBTBD13, KLHL40, and KLHL41. Results Lower force generation was observed in muscle fibers from patients of all genotypes. In a subset of patients who harbor mutations in NEB and ACTA1, the lower force was associated with downward shifted force–sarcomere length relations, indicative of shorter thin filaments. Confocal microscopy confirmed shorter thin filaments in muscle fibers of these patients. A conditional Neb knockout mouse model, which recapitulates thin filament myopathy, revealed a compensatory mechanism; the lower force generation that was associated with shorter thin filaments was compensated for by increasing the number of sarcomeres in series. This allowed muscle fibers to operate at a shorter sarcomere length and maintain optimal thin–thick filament overlap. Interpretation These findings might provide a novel direction for the development of therapeutic strategies for thin filament myopathy patients with shortened thin filament lengths. PMID:27074222

  15. Force-Induced Dynamical Properties of Multiple Cytoskeletal Filaments Are Distinct from that of Single Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Das, Dipjyoti; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2014-01-01

    How cytoskeletal filaments collectively undergo growth and shrinkage is an intriguing question. Collective properties of multiple bio-filaments (actin or microtubules) undergoing hydrolysis have not been studied extensively earlier within simple theoretical frameworks. In this paper, we study the collective dynamical properties of multiple filaments under force, and demonstrate the distinct properties of a multi-filament system in comparison to a single filament. Comparing stochastic simulation results with recent experimental data, we show that multi-filament collective catastrophes are slower than catastrophes of single filaments. Our study also shows further distinctions as follows: (i) force-dependence of the cap-size distribution of multiple filaments are quantitatively different from that of single filaments, (ii) the diffusion constant associated with the system length fluctuations is distinct for multiple filaments, and (iii) switching dynamics of multiple filaments between capped and uncapped states and the fluctuations therein are also distinct. We build a unified picture by establishing interconnections among all these collective phenomena. Additionally, we show that the collapse times during catastrophes can be sharp indicators of collective stall forces exceeding the additive contributions of single filaments. PMID:25531397

  16. Microcyle Conidiation in Filamentous Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Boknam; Kim, Soyeon

    2014-01-01

    The typical life cycle of filamentous fungi commonly involves asexual sporulation after vegetative growth in response to environmental factors. The production of asexual spores is critical in the life cycle of most filamentous fungi. Normally, conidia are produced from vegetative hyphae (termed mycelia). However, fungal species subjected to stress conditions exhibit an extremely simplified asexual life cycle, in which the conidia that germinate directly generate further conidia, without forming mycelia. This phenomenon has been termed as microcycle conidiation, and to date has been reported in more than 100 fungal species. In this review, first, we present the morphological properties of fungi during microcycle conidiation, and divide microcycle conidiation into four simple categories, even though fungal species exhibit a wide variety of morphological differences during microcycle conidiogenesis. Second, we describe the factors that influence microcycle conidiation in various fungal species, and present recent genetic studies that have identified the genes responsible for this process. Finally, we discuss the biological meaning and application of microcycle conidiation. PMID:24808726

  17. Microcyle conidiation in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Jung, Boknam; Kim, Soyeon; Lee, Jungkwan

    2014-03-01

    The typical life cycle of filamentous fungi commonly involves asexual sporulation after vegetative growth in response to environmental factors. The production of asexual spores is critical in the life cycle of most filamentous fungi. Normally, conidia are produced from vegetative hyphae (termed mycelia). However, fungal species subjected to stress conditions exhibit an extremely simplified asexual life cycle, in which the conidia that germinate directly generate further conidia, without forming mycelia. This phenomenon has been termed as microcycle conidiation, and to date has been reported in more than 100 fungal species. In this review, first, we present the morphological properties of fungi during microcycle conidiation, and divide microcycle conidiation into four simple categories, even though fungal species exhibit a wide variety of morphological differences during microcycle conidiogenesis. Second, we describe the factors that influence microcycle conidiation in various fungal species, and present recent genetic studies that have identified the genes responsible for this process. Finally, we discuss the biological meaning and application of microcycle conidiation. PMID:24808726

  18. Filamentation with nonlinear Bessel vortices.

    PubMed

    Jukna, V; Milián, C; Xie, C; Itina, T; Dudley, J; Courvoisier, F; Couairon, A

    2014-10-20

    We present a new type of ring-shaped filaments featured by stationary nonlinear high-order Bessel solutions to the laser beam propagation equation. Two different regimes are identified by direct numerical simulations of the nonlinear propagation of axicon focused Gaussian beams carrying helicity in a Kerr medium with multiphoton absorption: the stable nonlinear propagation regime corresponds to a slow beam reshaping into one of the stationary nonlinear high-order Bessel solutions, called nonlinear Bessel vortices. The region of existence of nonlinear Bessel vortices is found semi-analytically. The influence of the Kerr nonlinearity and nonlinear losses on the beam shape is presented. Direct numerical simulations highlight the role of attractors played by nonlinear Bessel vortices in the stable propagation regime. Large input powers or small cone angles lead to the unstable propagation regime where nonlinear Bessel vortices break up into an helical multiple filament pattern or a more irregular structure. Nonlinear Bessel vortices are shown to be sufficiently intense to generate a ring-shaped filamentary ionized channel in the medium which is foreseen as opening the way to novel applications in laser material processing of transparent dielectrics. PMID:25401574

  19. Tethering of SCFDia2 to the Replisome Promotes Efficient Ubiquitylation and Disassembly of the CMG Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Maculins, Timurs; Nkosi, Pedro Junior; Nishikawa, Hiroko; Labib, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Summary Disassembly of the Cdc45-MCM-GINS (CMG) DNA helicase, which unwinds the parental DNA duplex at eukaryotic replication forks, is the key regulated step during replication termination but is poorly understood [1, 2]. In budding yeast, the F-box protein Dia2 drives ubiquitylation of the CMG helicase at the end of replication, leading to a disassembly pathway that requires the Cdc48 segregase [3]. The substrate-binding domain of Dia2 comprises leucine-rich repeats, but Dia2 also has a TPR domain at its amino terminus that interacts with the Ctf4 and Mrc1 subunits of the replisome progression complex [4, 5], which assembles around the CMG helicase at replication forks [6]. Previous studies suggested two disparate roles for the TPR domain of Dia2, either mediating replisome-specific degradation of Mrc1 and Ctf4 [4] or else tethering SCFDia2 (SCF [Skp1/cullin/F-box protein]) to the replisome to increase its local concentration at replication forks [5]. Here, we show that SCFDia2 does not mediate replisome-specific degradation of Mrc1 and Ctf4, either during normal S phase or in response to replication stress. Instead, the tethering of SCFDia2 to the replisome progression complex increases the efficiency of ubiquitylation of the Mcm7 subunit of CMG, both in vitro and in vivo. Correspondingly, loss of tethering reduces the efficiency of CMG disassembly in vivo and is synthetic lethal in combination with a disassembly-defective allele of CDC48. Residual ubiquitylation of Mcm7 in dia2-ΔTPR cells is still CMG specific, highlighting the complex regulation of the final stages of chromosome replication, about which much still remains to be learned. PMID:26255844

  20. Structural basis for assembly and disassembly of the CRM1 nuclear export complex

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xiuhua; Biswas, Anindita; Chook, Yuh Min

    2009-09-15

    CRM1 (or exportin 1, Xpo1) transports proteins out of the cell nucleus through the nuclear pore complex. In the cytoplasm, GTP hydrolysis and consequent dissociation of Ran from CRM1 releases low-affinity substrates, while additional factors facilitate release of high-affinity substrates. Here we provide a model for human CRM1 export complex assembly and disassembly through structural and biochemical analyses of CRM1 bound to the substrate snurportin 1 (SNUPN, also called snuportin 1).

  1. A Statistical Study of Solar Filament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanche, Nicole; Aggarwal, Ashna; Reeves, Kathy; Kempton, Dustin James; Angryk, Rafal

    2016-05-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013, McCauley et al. 2015) has shown a positive correlation (70-80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME’s). In this study, we attempt to use properties of the filament in order to predict whether or not a given filament will erupt. This prediction would help to better predict the occurrence of an oncoming CME. To track the evolution of a filament over time, a spatio-temporal algorithm that groups separate filament instances from the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) into filament tracks was developed. Filament features from the HEK metadata, such as length, chirality, and tilt are then combined with other physical features, such as the overlying decay index for two sets of filaments tracks - those that erupt and those that remain bound. Using statistical methods such as the Kolmogrov-Smirnov test and a Random Forest Classifier, we determine the effectiveness of the combined features in prediction. We conclude that there is significant overlap between the properties of filaments that erupt and those that do not, leading to predictions only ~5-10% above chance. However, the changes in features, such as a change in the filament's length over time, were determined to have the highest predictive power. We discuss the possible physical connections with the change in these features."This project has been supported by funding from the Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure within the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, the Division of Astronomical Sciences within the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences within the Directorate for Geosciences, under NSF award #1443061.”

  2. Dictyostelium Myosin Bipolar Thick Filament Formation: Importance of Charge and Specific Domains of the Myosin Rod

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Myosin-II thick filament formation in Dictyostelium is an excellent system for investigating the phenomenon of self-assembly, as the myosin molecule itself contains all the information required to form a structure of defined size. Phosphorylation of only three threonine residues can dramatically change the assembly state of myosin-II. We show here that the C-terminal 68 kDa of the myosin-II tail (termed AD-Cterm) assembles in a regulated manner similar to full-length myosin-II and forms bipolar thick filament (BTF) structures when a green fluorescent protein (GFP) “head” is added to the N terminus. The localization of this GFP-AD-Cterm to the cleavage furrow of dividing Dictyostelium cells depends on assembly state, similar to full-length myosin-II. This tail fragment therefore represents a good model system for the regulated formation and localization of BTFs. By reducing regulated BTF assembly to a more manageable model system, we were able to explore determinants of myosin-II self-assembly. Our data support a model in which a globular head limits the size of a BTF, and the large-scale charge character of the AD-Cterm region is important for BTF formation. Truncation analysis of AD-Cterm tail fragments shows that assembly is delicately balanced, resulting in assembled myosin-II molecules that are poised to disassemble due to the phosphorylation of only three threonines. PMID:15492777

  3. Dictyostelium myosin bipolar thick filament formation: importance of charge and specific domains of the myosin rod.

    PubMed

    Hostetter, Daniel; Rice, Sarah; Dean, Sara; Altman, David; McMahon, Peggy M; Sutton, Shirley; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Spudich, James A

    2004-11-01

    Myosin-II thick filament formation in Dictyostelium is an excellent system for investigating the phenomenon of self-assembly, as the myosin molecule itself contains all the information required to form a structure of defined size. Phosphorylation of only three threonine residues can dramatically change the assembly state of myosin-II. We show here that the C-terminal 68 kDa of the myosin-II tail (termed AD-Cterm) assembles in a regulated manner similar to full-length myosin-II and forms bipolar thick filament (BTF) structures when a green fluorescent protein (GFP) "head" is added to the N terminus. The localization of this GFP-AD-Cterm to the cleavage furrow of dividing Dictyostelium cells depends on assembly state, similar to full-length myosin-II. This tail fragment therefore represents a good model system for the regulated formation and localization of BTFs. By reducing regulated BTF assembly to a more manageable model system, we were able to explore determinants of myosin-II self-assembly. Our data support a model in which a globular head limits the size of a BTF, and the large-scale charge character of the AD-Cterm region is important for BTF formation. Truncation analysis of AD-Cterm tail fragments shows that assembly is delicately balanced, resulting in assembled myosin-II molecules that are poised to disassemble due to the phosphorylation of only three threonines. PMID:15492777

  4. In vivo visualization of type II plasmid segregation: bacterial actin filaments pushing plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Christopher S.; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2007-01-01

    Type II par operons harness polymerization of the dynamically unstable actin-like protein ParM to segregate low-copy plasmids in rod-shaped bacteria. In this study, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy to follow plasmid dynamics and ParM assembly in Escherichia coli. Plasmids lacking a par operon undergo confined diffusion with a diffusion constant of 5 × 10−5 μm2/s and a confinement radius of 0.28 μm. Single par-containing plasmids also move diffusively but with a larger diffusion constant (4 × 10−4 μm2/s) and confinement radius (0.42 μm). ParM filaments are dynamically unstable in vivo and form spindles that link pairs of par-containing plasmids and drive them rapidly (3.1 μm/min) toward opposite poles of the cell. After reaching the poles, ParM filaments rapidly and completely depolymerize. After ParM disassembly, segregated plasmids resume diffusive motion, often encountering each other many times and undergoing multiple rounds of ParM-dependent segregation in a single cell cycle. We propose that in addition to driving segregation, the par operon enables plasmids to search space and find sister plasmids more effectively. PMID:18039937

  5. Artificial biofilms establish the role of matrix interactions in staphylococcal biofilm assembly and disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Elizabeth J.; Ganesan, Mahesh; Younger, John G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the microstructural and mechanical properties of bacterial biofilms can be created through colloidal self-assembly of cells and polymers, and thereby link the complex material properties of biofilms to well understood colloidal and polymeric behaviors. This finding is applied to soften and disassemble staphylococcal biofilms through pH changes. Bacterial biofilms are viscoelastic, structured communities of cells encapsulated in an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) comprised of polysaccharides, proteins, and DNA. Although the identity and abundance of EPS macromolecules are known, how these matrix materials interact with themselves and bacterial cells to generate biofilm morphology and mechanics is not understood. Here, we find that the colloidal self-assembly of Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A cells and polysaccharides into viscoelastic biofilms is driven by thermodynamic phase instability of EPS. pH conditions that induce phase instability of chitosan produce artificial S. epidermidis biofilms whose mechanics match natural S. epidermidis biofilms. Furthermore, pH-induced solubilization of the matrix triggers disassembly in both artificial and natural S. epidermidis biofilms. This pH-induced disassembly occurs in biofilms formed by five additional staphylococcal strains, including three clinical isolates. Our findings suggest that colloidal self-assembly of cells and matrix polymers produces biofilm viscoelasticity and that biofilm control strategies can exploit this mechanism. PMID:26272750

  6. RhoJ interacts with the GIT-PIX complex and regulates focal adhesion disassembly.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Eleanor; Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Poulter, Natalie S; Edelmann, Francesca; Salisbury, Victoria A; Noy, Peter J; Bacon, Andrea; Rappoport, Joshua Z; Heath, John K; Bicknell, Roy; Heath, Victoria L

    2014-07-15

    RhoJ is a Rho GTPase expressed in endothelial cells and tumour cells, which regulates cell motility, invasion, endothelial tube formation and focal adhesion numbers. This study aimed to further delineate the molecular function of RhoJ. Using timelapse microscopy RhoJ was found to regulate focal adhesion disassembly; small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of RhoJ increased focal adhesion disassembly time, whereas expression of an active mutant (daRhoJ) decreased it. Furthermore, daRhoJ co-precipitated with the GIT-PIX complex, a regulator of focal adhesion disassembly. An interaction between daRhoJ and GIT1 was confirmed using yeast two-hybrid experiments, and this depended on the Spa homology domain of GIT1. GIT1, GIT2, β-PIX (also known as ARHGEF7) and RhoJ all colocalised in focal adhesions and depended on each other for their recruitment to focal adhesions. Functionally, the GIT-PIX complex regulated endothelial tube formation, with knockdown of both GIT1 and GIT2, or β-PIX phenocopying RhoJ knockdown. RhoJ-knockout mice showed reduced tumour growth and diminished tumour vessel density, identifying a role for RhoJ in mediating tumour angiogenesis. These studies give new insight into the molecular function of RhoJ in regulating cell motility and tumour vessel formation. PMID:24928894

  7. Design-only conceptual design report for pit disassembly and conversion facility. Rev 0

    SciTech Connect

    Zygmunt, S.; Christensen, L.; Richardson, C.

    1997-12-12

    This design-only conceptual design report (DOCDR) was prepared to support a funding request by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Office of Fissile Material Disposition (OFMD) for engineering design of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) Project No. 99-D-141. The PDCF will be used to disassemble the nation`s inventory of surplus nuclear weapons pits and convert the plutonium recovered from those pits into a form suitable for storage, international inspection, and final disposition. The PDCF is a complex consisting of a hardened building that will contain the plutonium processes in a safe and secure manner, and conventional buildings and structures that will house support personnel, systems, and equipment. The PDCF uses the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES), a low waste, modular pyroprocessing system to convert pits to plutonium oxide. The PDCF project consists of engineering and design, and construction of the buildings and structures, and engineering and design, procurement, installation, testing and start-up of equipment to disassemble pits and convert plutonium in pits to oxide form. The facility is planned to operate for 10 years, averaging 3.5 metric tons (3.86 tons) of plutonium metal per year. On conclusion of operations, the PDCF will be decontaminated and decommissioned.

  8. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN C-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-07-12

    C-reactor disassembly basin is being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities will consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated scrap components and structures in a grout-like formulation. The disassembly basin will be the first area of the C-reactor building that will be immobilized. The scrap components contain aluminum alloy materials. Any aluminum will corrode very rapidly when it comes in contact with the very alkaline grout (pH > 13), and as a result would produce hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) reviewed and evaluated existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints are necessary. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen above the surface of the water during the injection of grout into the C-reactor disassembly area is low if the assessment of the aluminum surface area is reliable. Conservative calculations estimate that there is insufficient aluminum present in the basin areas to result in significant hydrogen accumulation in this local region. The minimum safety margin (or factor) on a 60% LFL criterion for a local region of the basin (i.e., Horizontal Tube Storage) was greater than 3. Calculations also demonstrated that a flammable situation in the vapor space above the basin is unlikely. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the risk of developing a flammable condition during grouting operations.

  9. The Non-Catalytic Domains of Drosophila Katanin Regulate Its Abundance and Microtubule-Disassembly Activity

    PubMed Central

    Grode, Kyle D.; Rogers, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule severing is a biochemical reaction that generates an internal break in a microtubule and regulation of microtubule severing is critical for cellular processes such as ciliogenesis, morphogenesis, and meiosis and mitosis. Katanin is a conserved heterodimeric ATPase that severs and disassembles microtubules, but the molecular determinants for regulation of microtubule severing by katanin remain poorly defined. Here we show that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and activity in living cells. Our data indicate that the microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT) domain and adjacent linker region of the Drosophila katanin catalytic subunit Kat60 cooperate to regulate microtubule severing in two distinct ways. First, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 decrease its abundance by enhancing its proteasome-dependent degradation. The Drosophila katanin regulatory subunit Kat80, which is required to stabilize Kat60 in cells, conversely reduces the proteasome-dependent degradation of Kat60. Second, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 augment its microtubule-disassembly activity by enhancing its association with microtubules. On the basis of our data, we propose that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin serve as the principal sites of integration of regulatory inputs, thereby controlling its ability to sever and disassemble microtubules. PMID:25886649

  10. Cardiac Extracellular Matrix Scaffold Generated Using Sarcomeric Disassembly and Antigen Removal.

    PubMed

    Papalamprou, Angela; Griffiths, Leigh G

    2016-04-01

    Xenogeneic cardiac extracellular matrix (cECM) scaffolds for reconstructive cardiac surgery applications have potential to overcome the limitations of current clinically utilized patch materials. A potentially ideal cECM scaffold would be immunologically acceptable while preserving the native cECM niche. Production of such a scaffold necessitates removal of cellular and antigenic components from cardiac tissue while preserving cECM structure/function properties. Existing decellularization methodologies predominantly utilize denaturing detergents which might irreversibly alter cECM material properties. To overcome potential deficiencies of current approaches, the effect of sarcomere relaxation and disassembly on resultant cECM scaffold cellularity was investigated. Additionally, the ability of sequential differential protein solubilization (antigen removal-AR) to reduce cECM scaffold antigenicity was examined. Sarcomeric relaxation and disassembly were necessary to achieve scaffold acellularity. All groups in which AR was employed displayed statistically significant decreases in residual antigenicity regardless of their degree of acellularity. AR combined with sarcomeric disassembly preserved structural, biochemical, mechanical and recellularization properties of the cECM scaffold. However, sodium dodecyl sulfate significantly altered cECM properties. This study demonstrates the importance of solubilizing cellular elements and antigenic components in a stepwise manner for production of a potentially ideal cECM scaffold and may have implications for future tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26215309

  11. Using L-STM to directly visualize enzymatic self-assembly/disassembly of nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Wang, Jihao; Chen, Peiyao; Xie, Maolin; Zhang, Lei; Hou, Yubin; Zhang, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Wang, Junfeng; Lu, Qingyou; Liang, Gaolin

    2016-08-18

    Self-assembly/disassembly is ubiquitous in nature and plays an important role in many biological events. But noninvasive characterization of this process in real time at molecular resolution remains challenging. Herein, using homebuilt liquid-phase scanning tunneling microscopy (L-STM) with ultrahigh stability, we directly visualized enzymatic self-assembly/disassembly of oligopeptide nanofibers in real time for the first time. Static high-resolution L-STM images clearly showed the molecular packing details in the supramolecular nanofiber and the diameter of the nanofiber was consistent with that of cryo transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) observations. Moreover, the self-repairing behavior of the supramolecular nanofibers was also directly observed at high resolution for the first time. This work unprecedentedly revealed new insights into Nature-mimic self-assembly and disassembly at the molecular level. It also illustrates the potential of our homebuilt L-STM in studying delicate biological processes in physiological solution with high resolution. PMID:27492656

  12. APC15 mediates CDC20 auto-ubiquitylation by APC/CMCC and MCC disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Uzunova, Kristina; Dye, Billy T.; Schutz, Hannelore; Ladurner, Rene; Petzold, Georg; Toyoda, Yusuke; Jarvis, Marc A.; Brown, Nicholas G.; Poser, Ina; Novatchkova, Maria; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A.; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2012-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome bound to CDC20 (APC/CCDC20) initiates anaphase by ubiquitylating B-type cyclins and securin. During chromosome bi-orientation, CDC20 assembles with MAD2, BUBR1 and BUB3 into a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) which inhibits substrate recruitment to the APC/C. APC/C activation depends on MCC disassembly, which has been proposed to require CDC20 auto-ubiquitylation. Here we characterized APC15, a human APC/C subunit related to yeast Mnd2. APC15 is located near APC/C’s MCC binding site, is required for APC/CMCC-dependent CDC20 auto-ubiquitylation and degradation, and for timely anaphase initiation, but is dispensable for substrate ubiquitylation by APC/CCDC20 and APC/CCDH1. Our results support the view that MCC is continuously assembled and disassembled to enable rapid activation of APC/CCDC20 and that CDC20 auto-ubiquitylation promotes MCC disassembly. We propose that APC15 and Mnd2 negatively regulate APC/C coactivators, and report the first generation of recombinant human APC/C. PMID:23007861

  13. Molecular disassembly of rice and lotus starches during thermal processing and its effect on starch digestibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Sun, Yue; Wang, Jinrong; Wang, Shuo; Copeland, Les

    2016-02-01

    The molecular disassembly of starch during thermal processing is a major determinant for the susceptibility of starch to enzymatic digestion. In the present study, the effects of thermal processing on the disassembly of the granular structure and the in vitro enzymatic digestibility of rice and lotus starches were investigated. After heating at 50 °C, rice and lotus starches did not show significant changes in granular morphology, long-range crystallinity and short-range molecular order. As the temperature increased to 60 °C, rice starch underwent a partial gelatinization followed by an incomplete disruption of granular morphology, crystallites and molecular order. In contrast, lotus starch was almost completely gelatinized at 60 °C. At 70 °C or higher, both starches were fully gelatinized with complete disruption of the micro and macro structures. Our results show that gelatinization greatly increased the in vitro enzymatic digestibility of both starches, but that the degree of disassembly of the starch structure during thermal processing was not a major determinant of the digestibility of gelatinized starch. PMID:26829664

  14. Growth of filaments and saturation of the filamentation instability

    SciTech Connect

    Gedalin, M.; Medvedev, M.; Spitkovsky, A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Vaivads, A.; Perri, S.

    2010-03-15

    The filamentation instability of counterstreaming beams is a nonresonant hydrodynamic-type instability whose growth rate is a smooth function of the wavelength (scale). As a result, perturbations with all unstable wavelengths develop, and the growth saturates due to the saturation of available current. For a given scale, the magnetic field at saturation is proportional to the scale. As a result, the instability develops in a nearly linear regime, where the unstable modes stop growing as soon as the saturation of the corresponding wavelength is reached. At each moment there exists a dominant scale of the magnetic field which is the scale that reached saturation at this particular time. The smaller scales do not disappear and can be easily distinguished in the current structure. The overall growth of the instability stops when the loss of the streaming ion energy because of deceleration is comparable to the initial ion energy.

  15. Disassembly of mitotic checkpoint complexes by the joint action of the AAA-ATPase TRIP13 and p31comet

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, Esther; Wang, Kexi; Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Kaisari, Sharon; Yen, Tim J.; Liu, Song-Tao; Hershko, Avram

    2014-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system delays anaphase until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. When the checkpoint is active, a Mitotic Checkpoint Complex (MCC) assembles and inhibits the ubiquitin ligase Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C). MCC is composed of the checkpoint proteins Mad2, BubR1, and Bub3 associated with the APC/C activator Cdc20. When the checkpoint signal is turned off, MCC is disassembled and the checkpoint is inactivated. The mechanisms of the disassembly of MCC are not sufficiently understood. We have previously observed that ATP hydrolysis is required for the action of the Mad2-binding protein p31comet to disassemble MCC. We now show that HeLa cell extracts contain a factor that promotes ATP- and p31comet-dependent disassembly of a Cdc20–Mad2 subcomplex and identify it as Thyroid Receptor Interacting Protein 13 (TRIP13), an AAA-ATPase known to interact with p31comet. The joint action of TRIP13 and p31comet also promotes the release of Mad2 from MCC, participates in the complete disassembly of MCC and abrogates checkpoint inhibition of APC/C. We propose that TRIP13 plays centrally important roles in the sequence of events leading to MCC disassembly and checkpoint inactivation. PMID:25092294

  16. One Half Million Mile Solar Filament

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captures a very long, whip-like solar filament extending over half a million miles in a long arc above the sun’s surface. Filaments are cooler clouds of ...

  17. A First Approach to Filament Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, P. E. S.; de Abreu, F. Vistulo; Simoes, R.; Dias, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive…

  18. Scaling laws for laser-induced filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhokhov, P. A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    Despite all the complexity of the underlying nonlinear physics, the filamentation of ultrashort optical field wave forms is shown to obey a set of physically transparent scaling laws. This scaling is applicable within a remarkably broad range of laser powers, pulse widths, gas pressures, and propagation paths, suggesting specific recipes for the power scaling of filamentation-based pulse compression.

  19. How cofilin severs an actin filament.

    PubMed

    De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2009-05-15

    The actin regulatory protein, cofilin, promotes actin assembly dynamics by severing filaments and increasing the number of ends from which subunits add and dissociate. Recent studies provide biophysical descriptions of cooperative filament interactions in energetic, mechanical and structural terms. A one-dimensional Ising model with nearest-neighbor interactions permits thermodynamic analysis of cooperative binding and indicates that one or a few cofilin molecules can sever a filament. Binding and cooperative interactions are entropically driven. A significant fraction of the binding free energy results from the linked dissociation of filament-associated ions (polyelectrolyte effect), which modulate filament structure, stability and mechanics. The remaining binding free energy and essentially all of the cooperative free energy arise from the enhanced conformational dynamics of the cofilactin complex. Filament mechanics are modulated by cofilin such that cofilin-saturated filaments are approximately 10- to 20-fold more compliant in bending and twisting than bare filaments. Cofilin activity is well described by models in which discontinuities in topology, mechanics and conformational dynamics generate stress concentration and promote fracture at junctions of bare and decorated segments, analogous to the grain boundary fracture of crystalline materials and the thermally driven formation of shear transformation zones in colloidal glass. PMID:20700473

  20. Filament-induced laser machining (FILM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, D.; Woeste, L.; Wolf, J.-P.

    2010-09-01

    Laser filamentation provides high intensity plasma strings of micrometric diameters and lengths of tens of centimeters. We demonstrate that these filaments can be used for remotely drilling and cutting metals and biological materials such as flesh and bones. Since no tight focusing is needed, complex 3D shapes can be machined without any adjustment of the laser while processing.

  1. Scanning For Hotspots In Lamp Filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Charles E.; Van Sant, Tim; Leidecker, Henning

    1993-01-01

    Scanning photometer designed for use in investigation of failures of incandescent lamp filaments. Maps brightness as function of position along each filament to identify bright (hot) spots, occurring at notches and signifying incipient breaks or rewelds. Also used to measure nonuniformity in outputs of such linear devices as light-emitting diodes, and to measure diffraction patterns of lenses.

  2. Process for making silver metal filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1998-04-01

    This invention relates to a process for making filaments of metal compounds and more particularly to a process for making silver metal filaments. The United States Government has rights to this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC05-8421400 with Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. awarded by the US Department of Energy.

  3. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING -10499

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

    2010-01-04

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the 105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate it from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,384 cubic meters or 31,894 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were designed and tested for the reactor ISD project, and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and material flow considerations, maximum lift heights and differential height requirements were determined. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material

  4. AGR-2 Irradiated Test Train Preliminary Inspection and Disassembly First Look

    SciTech Connect

    Ploger, Scott; Demkowciz, Paul; Harp, Jason

    2015-05-01

    The AGR 2 irradiation experiment began in June 2010 and was completed in October 2013. The test train was shipped to the Materials and Fuels Complex in July 2014 for post-irradiation examination (PIE). The first PIE activities included nondestructive examination of the test train, followed by disassembly of the test train and individual capsules and detailed inspection of the capsule contents, including the fuel compacts and their graphite fuel holders. Dimensional metrology was then performed on the compacts, graphite holders, and steel capsule shells. AGR 2 disassembly and metrology were performed with the same equipment used successfully on AGR 1 test train components. Gamma spectrometry of the intact test train gave a preliminary look at the condition of the interior components. No evidence of damage to compacts or graphite components was evident from the isotopic and gross gamma scans. Disassembly of the AGR 2 test train and its capsules was conducted rapidly and efficiently by employing techniques refined during the AGR 1 disassembly campaign. Only one major difficulty was encountered while separating the test train into capsules when thermocouples (of larger diameter than used in AGR 1) and gas lines jammed inside the through tubes of the upper capsules, which required new tooling for extraction. Disassembly of individual capsules was straightforward with only a few minor complications. On the whole, AGR 2 capsule structural components appeared less embrittled than their AGR 1 counterparts. Compacts from AGR 2 Capsules 2, 3, 5, and 6 were in very good condition upon removal. Only relatively minor damage or markings were visible using high resolution photographic inspection. Compact dimensional measurements indicated radial shrinkage between 0.8 to 1.7%, with the greatest shrinkage observed on Capsule 2 compacts that were irradiated at higher temperature. Length shrinkage ranged from 0.1 to 0.9%, with by far the lowest axial shrinkage on Capsule 3 compacts

  5. Lamp automatically switches to new filament on burnout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingle, W. B.

    1966-01-01

    Lamp with primary and secondary filaments has a means for automatic switching to the secondary filament at primary filament burnout. Lamp failures and resultant expenses during oscillograph printing are appreciably reduced.

  6. Hydrodynamics of pairs of interacting cytoskeletal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinar, Tamar; Shelley, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Pairwise filament interactions underlie the dynamics of complex cytoskeletal networks in cells. These networks in turn play a crucial role in many cellular processes such as formation of the mitotic spindle and cell cleavage in cytokinesis. We model interactions of pairs of filaments immersed in a viscous, fluidic environment. The filaments are modeled using a slender body approximation, capturing their indirect interactions mediated by the immersing fluid. Direct filament interactions via molecular motors complexes induce alignment and parallel or anti-parallel sliding. The motor proteins are modeled as simple spring-like structures that walk directionally toward one end of the filament. We examine the resulting stresses in the fluid to better understand how the microscopic interactions lead to bulk behavior of cytoskeletal networks.

  7. A new paradigm for solar filament eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, David M.

    2001-11-01

    This article discusses the formation, magnetic structure, and eruption of solar filaments in terms of two contrasting paradigms. The standard paradigm is that filaments are formed by condensation of plasma on coronal magnetic fields that are twisted or dimpled as a result of photospheric motions. According to this paradigm, filaments erupt when photospheric motions shear the fields, increasing their energy and decreasing their stability. According to a new paradigm, subsurface motions generate toroidal magnetic flux ropes, and after these flux ropes emerge to form active regions, the most twisted parts migrate into the corona to form filaments. Filaments become unstable and are ejected after a sufficient accumulation of twist (i.e., magnetic helicity). Various proposed mechanisms for producing the needed helicity are reviewed, and several observational tests are proposed to differentiate among the possible mechanisms.

  8. Kinetics of filamentous phage assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploss, Martin; Kuhn, Andreas

    2010-12-01

    Filamentous phages release their progeny particles by a secretory process without lysing the bacterial cell. By this process about 6 viral particles per min are secreted from each cell. We show here that when the major coat protein (gp8) is provided from a plasmid we observe a phage progeny production rate depending on the induction of gp8 by IPTG. We also show that a transfection of Escherichia coli lacking F-pili is observed using a mutant of M13 that carries an ampicillin resistance gene, and phage particles are secreted in the absence of an F-plasmid. Extruding phage was visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using gold-labeled antibodies to the major coat protein.

  9. Cell crawling on filamentous tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Jorge; Schwarz, Jennifer; Das, Moumita

    2014-03-01

    Recent experiments suggest that the migration of some cells in three dimensions has strong resemblance to one-dimensional migration. Motivated by this observation, we simulate a one-dimensional model cell made of beads and springs that moves on a tense semiflexible filamentous track. Physical parameters, such as the spring constants and friction coefficients, are calculated using effective theories. We investigate the mechanical feedback between the model cell and this track, as mediated by the active myosin-driven contractility and the catch/slip bond behavior of the focal adhesions, as the model cell crawls. We then compare our calculations of cell speed and the amount of deformation in the track with experiments.

  10. Particles trajectories in magnetic filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.

    2015-07-15

    The motion of a particle in a spatially harmonic magnetic field is a basic problem involved, for example, in the mechanism of formation of a collisionless shock. In such settings, it is generally reasoned that particles entering a Weibel generated turbulence are trapped inside it, provided their Larmor radius in the peak field is smaller than the field coherence length. The goal of this work is to put this heuristic conclusion on firm ground by studying, both analytically and numerically, such motion. A toy model is analyzed, consisting of a relativistic particle entering a region of space occupied by a spatially harmonic field. The particle penetrates the magnetic structure in a direction aligned with the magnetic filaments. Although the conclusions are not trivial, the main result is confirmed.

  11. Natural colorants from filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Torres, Fábio Aurélio Esteves; Zaccarim, Bruna Regina; de Lencastre Novaes, Letícia Celia; Jozala, Angela Faustino; Dos Santos, Carolina Alves; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas; Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria Carvalho

    2016-03-01

    In the last years, there is a trend towards the replacement of synthetic colorants by natural ones, mainly due to the increase of consumer demand for natural products. The natural colorants are used to enhance the appearance of pharmaceutical products, food, and different materials, making them preferable or attractive. This review intends to provide and describe a comprehensive overview of the history of colorants, from prehistory to modern time, of their market and their applications, as well as of the most important aspects of the fermentation process to obtain natural colorants. Focus is given to colorants produced by filamentous fungal species, aiming to demonstrate the importance of these microorganisms and biocompounds, highlighting the production performance to get high yields and the aspects of conclusion that should be taken into consideration in future studies about natural colorants. PMID:26780357

  12. The invertebrate myosin filament: subfilament arrangement of the solid filaments of insect flight muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Beinbrech, G; Ashton, F T; Pepe, F A

    1992-01-01

    Transverse sections (approximately 140 nm thick) of solid myosin filaments of the flight muscles of the fleshfly, Phormia terrae-novae, the honey bee, Apis mellifica, and the waterbug, Lethocerus uhleri, were photographed in a JEM model 200A electron microscope at 200 kV. The images were digitized and computer processed by rotational filtering. In each of these filaments it was found that the symmetry of the core and the wall was not the same. The power spectra of the images showed sixfold symmetry for the wall and threefold symmetry for the core of the filaments. The images of the filaments in each muscle were superimposed according to the sixfold center of the wall. These averaged images for all three muscles showed six pairs of subunits in the wall similar to those found in the wall of tubular filaments. From serial sections of the fleshfly filaments, we conclude that the subunits in the wall of the filaments represent subfilaments essentially parallel to the long axis of the filament. In each muscle there are additional subunits in the core, closely related to the subunits in the wall. Evaluation of serial sections through fleshfly filaments suggests that the relationship of the three subunits observed in the core to those in the wall varies along the length of the filaments. In waterbug filaments there are three dense and three less dense subunits for a total of six all closely related to the wall. Bee filaments have three subunits related to the wall and three subunits located eccentrically in the core of the filaments. The presence of core subunits can be related to the paramyosin content of the filaments. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 12 PMID:1617135

  13. Filament Activation in Response to Magnetic Flux Emergence and Cancellation in Filament Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Haisheng

    2015-06-01

    We conducted a comparative analysis of two filaments that showed a quite different activation in response to the flux emergence within the filament channels. The observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) were made to analyze the two filaments on 2013 August 17 - 20 (SOL2013-08-17) and September 29 (SOL2013-09-29). The first event showed that the main body of the filament was separated into two parts when an active region (AR) emerged with a maximum magnetic flux of about 6.4×1021 Mx underlying the filament. The close neighborhood and common direction of the bright threads in the filament and the open AR fan loops suggest a similar magnetic connectivity of these two flux systems. The equilibrium of the filament was not destroyed three days after the start of the emergence of the AR. To our knowledge, similar observations have never been reported before. In the second event, the emerging flux occurred nearby a barb of the filament with a maximum magnetic flux of 4.2×1020 Mx, about one order of magnitude lower than that of the first event. Two patches of parasitic polarity in the vicinity of the barb merged, then cancelled with nearby network fields. About 20 hours after the onset of the emergence, the filament erupted. Our findings imply that the location of emerging flux within the filament channel is probably crucial to filament evolution. If the flux emergence appears nearby the barbs, it is highly likely that the emerging flux and the filament magnetic fields will cancel, which may lead to the eruption of the filament. The comparison of the two events shows that the emergence of a small AR may still not be enough to disrupt the stability of a filament system, and the actual eruption only occurs after the flux cancellation sets in.

  14. Unwinding motion of a twisted active region filament

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Kong, D. F.; Liu, J. H.; Xu, C. L.

    2014-12-10

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  15. Automatic Detect and Trace of Solar Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Cheng; Chen, P. F.; Tang, Yu-hua; Hao, Qi; Guo, Yang

    We developed a series of methods to automatically detect and trace solar filaments in solar Hα images. The programs are able to not only recognize filaments and determine their properties, such as the position, the area and other relevant parameters, but also to trace the daily evolution of the filaments. For solar full disk Hα images, the method consists of three parts: first, preprocessing is applied to correct the original images; second, the Canny edge-detection method is used to detect the filaments; third, filament properties are recognized through the morphological operators. For each Hα filament and its barb features, we introduced the unweighted undirected graph concept and adopted Dijkstra shortest-path algorithm to recognize the filament spine; then, using polarity inversion line shift method for measuring the polarities in both sides of the filament to determine the filament axis chirality; finally, employing connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculating the angle between each barb and spine to indicate the barb chirality. Our algorithms are applied to the observations from varied observatories, including the Optical & Near Infrared Solar Eruption Tracer (ONSET) in Nanjing University, Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) and Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The programs are demonstrated to be effective and efficient. We used our method to automatically process and analyze 3470 images obtained by MLSO from January 1998 to December 2009, and a butterfly diagram of filaments is obtained. It shows that the latitudinal migration of solar filaments has three trends in the Solar Cycle 23: The drift velocity was fast from 1998 to the solar maximum; after the solar maximum, it became relatively slow and after 2006, the migration became divergent, signifying the solar minimum. About 60% filaments with the latitudes larger than 50 degree migrate towards the Polar Regions with relatively high velocities, and the latitudinal migrating

  16. Striation and convection in penumbral filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruit, H. C.; Scharmer, G. B.; Löfdahl, M. G.

    2010-10-01

    Observations with the 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope of the flows seen in penumbral filaments are presented. Time sequences of bright filaments show overturning motions strikingly similar to those seen along the walls of small isolated structures in the active regions. The filaments show outward propagating striations with inclination angles suggesting that they are aligned with the local magnetic field. We interpret it as the equivalent of the striations seen in the walls of small isolated magnetic structures. Their origin is then a corrugation of the boundary between an overturning convective flow inside the filament and the magnetic field wrapping around it. The outward propagation is a combination of a pattern motion due to the downflow observed along the sides of bright filaments, and the Evershed flow. The observed short wavelength of the striation argues against the existence of a dynamically significant horizontal field inside the bright filaments. Its intensity contrast is explained by the same physical effect that causes the dark cores of filaments, light bridges and “canals”. In this way striation represents an important clue to the physics of penumbral structure and its relation with other magnetic structures on the solar surface. We put this in perspective with results from the recent 3-D radiative hydrodynamic simulations. 4 movies are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Optical Filaments and Gas Dynamics in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeak, Jeremy

    Until now, the propagation dynamics of intense ultrashort laser pulses leading to optical filamentation in air has only been investigated in the frame of a dynamic balance between linear diffraction, Kerr self-focusing and plasma defocusing. This has led to the development of different theories surrounding the generation and persistence of optical filaments propagating over many Rayleigh lengths in air. These theories include wave-guiding model, moving focus model, dynamic spatial replenishment model and conical wave model. However, these models fail to capture the gas dynamics that arise from optical filaments interacting with air. In this work, we demonstrate that initial conditions are critical to the formation of optical filaments through the use of an aerodynamic window. Filament characteristics in air, such as spectral broadening, electrical conductivity and fluorescence, are measured and presented. Using these as diagnostic tools, we also show that the optical filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses can be enhanced at high repetition rates because of the thermal response of air, resulting from the interaction of each laser pulse with the modified atmospheric density distribution left behind by the preceding pulse. This is explained by the sudden deposition of energy by a filament in the air which generates a cylindrical shock wave, leaving behind a column of rarefied air. This low-density region persists for an extended period and can materially affect the propagation dynamics of an ensuing pulse that follows before the low-density region has relaxed sufficiently to ambient conditions. By further increasing the repetition rate, the onset of ionization is shifted downstream and the spectral continuum displays a stronger broadening on both sides of the original pulse spectrum. This gas dynamic interaction regime of filamentation can be utilized to enhance the length and spectral width of filaments for remote sensing and long range laser-induced high voltage

  18. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF COLLAPSING FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-05-10

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z Almost-Equal-To 0.1 Z{sub Sun} filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form a dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10{sup -3} Z{sub Sun} filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is mostly due to the lower initial temperatures, which lead to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbursting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occurs. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  19. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-01-15

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z ≈ 0.1Z filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10-3Z filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  20. Filaments in simulations of molecular cloud formation

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez, Gilberto C.; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-08-20

    We report on the filaments that develop self-consistently in a new numerical simulation of cloud formation by colliding flows. As in previous studies, the forming cloud begins to undergo gravitational collapse because it rapidly acquires a mass much larger than the average Jeans mass. Thus, the collapse soon becomes nearly pressureless, proceeding along its shortest dimension first. This naturally produces filaments in the cloud and clumps within the filaments. The filaments are not in equilibrium at any time, but instead are long-lived flow features through which the gas flows from the cloud to the clumps. The filaments are long-lived because they accrete from their environment while simultaneously accreting onto the clumps within them; they are essentially the locus where the flow changes from accreting in two dimensions to accreting in one dimension. Moreover, the clumps also exhibit a hierarchical nature: the gas in a filament flows onto a main, central clump but other, smaller-scale clumps form along the infalling gas. Correspondingly, the velocity along the filament exhibits a hierarchy of jumps at the locations of the clumps. Two prominent filaments in the simulation have lengths ∼15 pc and masses ∼600 M {sub ☉} above density n ∼ 10{sup 3} cm{sup –3} (∼2 × 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} at n > 50 cm{sup –3}). The density profile exhibits a central flattened core of size ∼0.3 pc and an envelope that decays as r {sup –2.5} in reasonable agreement with observations. Accretion onto the filament reaches a maximum linear density rate of ∼30 M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} pc{sup –1}.

  1. Hot filament cvd of boron nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, R.R.

    1992-01-07

    This patent describes a method for coating a substrate with a boron nitride film. It comprises: providing a substrate and a hot filament in a gas chamber; and introducing a borazine gas into the gas chamber so as to heat the borazine gas with the hot filament and deposit the boron nitride film on the substrate, wherein the hot filament is heated to a temperature of from about 1000[degrees] to 1800[degrees] C and the substrate is maintained at a temperature of from 100[degrees]C to 400[degrees]C.

  2. Automatic filament warm-up controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluskey, J.; Daeges, J.

    1979-01-01

    As part of the unattended operations objective of the Deep Space Network deep space stations, this filament controller serves as a step between manual operation of the station and complete computer control. Formerly, the operator was required to devote five to fifteen minutes of his time just to properly warm up the filaments on the klystrons of the high power transmitters. The filament controller reduces the operator's duty to a one-step command and is future-compatible with various forms of computer control.

  3. System Applies Polymer Powder To Filament Tow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.; Snoha, John J.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1993-01-01

    Polymer powder applied uniformly and in continuous manner. Powder-coating system applies dry polymer powder to continuous fiber tow. Unique filament-spreading technique, combined with precise control of tension on fibers in system, ensures uniform application of polymer powder to web of spread filaments. Fiber tows impregnated with dry polymer powders ("towpregs") produced for preform-weaving and composite-material-molding applications. System and process valuable to prepreg industry, for production of flexible filament-windable tows and high-temperature polymer prepregs.

  4. Mechanical tension and electrical conductivity of liquid crystal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Oliver H.

    During the NSF funded IRES internship at the Otto-von-Geuricke Univeristy in Magdeburg, Germany, I studied the optical properties and mechanical behavior in the form of line tension of bent-core liquid crystal fiber bundles and verified previously published tension values and temperature dependent behavior. Then, carbon nanotubes were added and it as found that the tension in the fibers decreased by a factor of two instead of increasing as was hoped. A new device for pulling fibers and measuring tension by deflection due to the adhesion of glass beads was built at the LCI. The device was meant to improve upon the device used at O.v.G. Improvements included a smaller heating chamber with better insulation, temperature control, large viewing windows, more stable mounting interface, easier disassembly and the option to quickly modify the device in order to perform a variety of other experiments such as observing behavior due to acoustic driving (based on previous literature), observing optical behavior under a polarizing microscope and introducing probes to measure the electrical properties of fibers. The platform remains modular and makes the addition of new components for carrying out new experiments very simple and straightforward. The addition of carbon nanotubes has scattered results regarding the modulation of fiber tension. It seems that the addition of CNTs to BLC1571 may slightly be decreasing tension while the addition to BLC1688 may be increasing it. In both mesogens, 10wt% CNT yielded the highest tension value above the theoretical surface tension contribution. A reversal of temperature dependence was observed for fibers containing CNT; their tension increased with