Science.gov

Sample records for rad-by-rad bit-by-bit triumph

  1. Rad-by-Rad (Bit-by-Bit): Triumph of Evidence Over Activities Fostering Fear of Radiogenic Cancers at Low Doses

    PubMed Central

    Strzelczyk, J.; Potter, W.; Zdrojewicz, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Large segments of Western populations hold sciences in low esteem. This trend became particularly pervasive in the field of radiation sciences in recent decades. The resulting lack of knowledge, easily filled with fear that feeds on itself, makes people susceptible to prevailing dogmas. Decades-long moratorium on nuclear power in the US, resentment of “anything nuclear”, and delay/refusal to obtain medical radiation procedures are some of the societal consequences. The problem has been exacerbated by promulgation of the linear-no-threshold (LNT) dose response model by advisory bodies such as the ICRP, NCRP and others. This model assumes no safe level of radiation and implies that response is the same per unit dose regardless of the total dose. The most recent (June 2005) report from the National Research Council, BEIR VII (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) continues this approach and quantifies potential cancer risks at low doses by linear extrapolation of risk values obtained from epidemiological observations of populations exposed to high doses, 0.2 Sv to 3 Sv. It minimizes the significance of a lack of evidence for adverse effects in populations exposed to low doses, and discounts documented beneficial effects of low dose exposures on the human immune system. The LNT doctrine is in direct conflict with current findings of radiobiology and important features of modern radiation oncology. Fortunately, these aspects are addressed in-depth in another major report—issued jointly in March 2005 by two French Academies, of Sciences and of Medicine. The latter report is much less publicized, and thus it is a responsibility of radiation professionals, physicists, nuclear engineers, and physicians to become familiar with its content and relevant studies, and to widely disseminate this information. To counteract biased media, we need to be creative in developing means of sharing good news about radiation with co-workers, patients, and the general public. PMID:18648568

  2. BIT BY BIT: A Game Simulating Natural Language Processing in Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kato, Taichi; Arakawa, Chuichi

    2008-01-01

    BIT BY BIT is an encryption game that is designed to improve students' understanding of natural language processing in computers. Participants encode clear words into binary code using an encryption key and exchange them in the game. BIT BY BIT enables participants who do not understand the concept of binary numbers to perform the process of…

  3. Based on reception in general with bit-by-bit decision-making algorithm for signal processing in fiber optic telecommunication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdin, Vladimir A.; Kartashevsky, Vyacheslav G.; Grigorov, Igor V.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents «reception in general with bit-by-bit decision-making» algorithm, which is the alternative to Viterbi algorithm. It is proposed to use it for fiber-optic transmission systems. It's features is compared with the Viterbi algorithm for digital signal processing in optical communication channels.

  4. Bit by Bit: The Darwinian Basis of Life

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Gerald F.

    2012-01-01

    All known examples of life belong to the same biology, but there is increasing enthusiasm among astronomers, astrobiologists, and synthetic biologists that other forms of life may soon be discovered or synthesized. This enthusiasm should be tempered by the fact that the probability for life to originate is not known. As a guiding principle in parsing potential examples of alternative life, one should ask: How many heritable “bits” of information are involved, and where did they come from? A genetic system that contains more bits than the number that were required to initiate its operation might reasonably be considered a new form of life. PMID:22589698

  5. Bit by bit: the Darwinian basis of life.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Gerald F

    2012-01-01

    All known examples of life belong to the same biology, but there is increasing enthusiasm among astronomers, astrobiologists, and synthetic biologists that other forms of life may soon be discovered or synthesized. This enthusiasm should be tempered by the fact that the probability for life to originate is not known. As a guiding principle in parsing potential examples of alternative life, one should ask: How many heritable "bits" of information are involved, and where did they come from? A genetic system that contains more bits than the number that were required to initiate its operation might reasonably be considered a new form of life. PMID:22589698

  6. Portrait Gallery Illuminates--Grant's Triumphs, Failures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Robert G., Jr.

    The 100th anniversary of Ulysses S. Grant's death was observed on July 23, 1985. The Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery featured an exhibit of Grant portraiture, which covered his life, from its humble beginnings to military and political triumphs and to failures and disappointment. The exhibit included pictures, artifacts, and momentos from…

  7. Teaching Arturo Ui: Triumph of Whose Will?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhiel, Mary

    1993-01-01

    Describes a unit on teaching Brecht in an introductory literature course, and suggests that students are better able to read and discuss Brecht's Hitler play if they first view and discuss Leni Riefenstahl's film Triumph of the Will. Guidelines are provided on how best to present and explore the two works with students. (LET)

  8. We Come to Form Ourselves Bit by Bit: Educating for Citizenship in Post-Conflict Guatemala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Beth C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several decades, the implementation of democratic citizenship education has become a common prescription for the civic reconstruction of post-conflict societies. Across the globe, educational changes are seen as fundamental to the creation of peaceful, tolerant, and democratic civic identities, the key to "social reconstruction,…

  9. Bit by Bit: Using Design-Based Research to Improve the Health Literacy of Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    St. Jean, Beth; Taylor, Natalie Greene; Kodama, Christie; Follman, Rebecca; Casciotti, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Background Although a low health literacy level has been found to be among the most powerful predictors of poor health outcomes, there is very little research focused on assessing and improving the health literacy skills of adolescents, particularly those from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds. The vast majority of existing research focuses solely on reading comprehension, despite the fact that health literacy is actually a multifaceted concept, which entails many different types of skills. Objective The aim of this paper is to first mine existing literature to identify the many different skills that have been posited to constitute health literacy, and then, using this collection of skills as an overarching structure, to highlight the challenges that disadvantaged youth participating in our HackHealth after-school program encounter as they identify and articulate their health-related information needs, search for health-related information online, assess the relevance and credibility of this information, and manage and make use of it. Methods We utilized the design-based research method to design, implement, and revise our HackHealth program. To collect data regarding HackHealth participants’ health literacy skills and associated challenges, we used a variety of methods, including participant observation, surveys, interviews, focus groups, and logging of Web browser activities. We also collected data through specialized instructional activities and data collection forms that we developed for this purpose. Quantitative and qualitative techniques were used to analyze this data, as well as all of the artifacts that each student produced, including their final projects. Results We identified the various challenges that the 30 HackHealth participants faced in completing various health-related information activities during the course of the program. Based on these findings, we describe important implications for working with youth from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds, how to assess and improve their health literacy skills, and offer specific recommendations for health literacy instruction aimed at this population. Conclusions With an increased societal focus on health and a shift from viewing patients as passive recipients of medical care to viewing them as active arbiters of their own health, today’s youth need to possess an array of health literacy skills to ensure that they can live long and healthy lives. Working with adolescents to help them develop and practice these skills will also help to break the cycle between poor health literacy and poor health outcomes, thereby reducing health disparities and improving the long-term outlook for the health of our nation. PMID:26025101

  10. Bit by Bit: Innovating at the Periphery to Extend Harvard's Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laserna, Catalina; Leitner, Henry

    2008-01-01

    Faculty instructional time is a critical resource at all universities, but particularly in a major research institution like Harvard. Operating on the periphery of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard's division of Continuing Education is often at a disadvantage when attempting to recruit senior faculty. However, through its distance…

  11. Oedipus and the sphinx: triumph and catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Palombo, S R

    1994-01-01

    The downfall of Oedipus in Sophocles' most famous play, Oedipus Tyrannus, is the reversal of his triumphant entry into the city of Thebes 17 years earlier. The oracle at Delphi has told the Thebans that the plague will end only when the murderer of Laius is identified and punished. The unconscious collusion between Oedipus and the Thebans to ignore the unsolved murder breaks down. Told by Teiresias that he is the culprit, Oedipus begins a desperate effort to find evidence to refute this accusation. When other witnesses come forward, his cause is lost. The effect of Oedipus's collusive interaction with the Thebans is balanced in Sophocles' account by the story of the riddle of the Sphinx. The Sphinx is a goddess of discontinuity. She represents the unconscious forces at work both in Oedipus's personal fantasies and in the collective fantasies of the Thebans. The tragedy results from the interaction of these fantasies in the government of the polis. Sophocles' play thus exemplifies the intricate intertwining of the child's innate wishes and the reaction they evoke from the environment during the oedipal period. The neurotic patient's illusion of sexual triumph over his or her father or mother as a child can be best understood through the interaction of these factors. PMID:8040558

  12. 8. VIEW OF 'TRIUMPH' CORN SHELLER (C. O. Bartlett & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF 'TRIUMPH' CORN SHELLER (C. O. Bartlett & Snow Co., Cleveland), LOCATED IN THE BASEMENT, USED TO REMOVE CORN KENNELS FROM THE COB. Photographer: Louise Taft Cawood, July 1986 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  13. The Pitfalls and Triumphs of Launching a Charter School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Linda; Levine, Mark

    1996-01-01

    A principal of a charter school in Colorado Springs, Colorado, recounts the triumphs and pitfalls of the school's first year. The school charter lacked a clear-cut avenue for making changes. Intending to create a parent-run school, the founding board (themselves parents) made drastic curricular changes without consulting other parents. Passionate…

  14. Bit by Bit or All at Once? Splitting up the Inquiry Task to Promote Children's Scientific Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazonder, Ard W.; Kamp, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether and why assigning children to a segmented inquiry task makes their investigations more productive. Sixty-one upper elementary-school pupils engaged in a simulation-based inquiry assignment either received a multivariable inquiry task (n = 21), a segmented version of this task that addressed the variables in successive…

  15. Bit by Bit: A Series of Trends, Tools, and Initiatives Are Aimed at Improving Electronic Resource Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Electronic resources are more prominent than ever in library collections, yet they resist easy management. A range of tools and cooperative efforts are emerging to improve the management and evaluation of electronic resources. Initiatives are underway to standardize and automate the harvesting of usage statistics and e-journal title and holdings…

  16. Under severe citrus canker and HLB (Huanglongbing) pressure, Triumph and Jackson perform better than Flame and Marsh grapefruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) and Citrus Canker (CC) threaten the viability of Florida grapefruit production. Triumph (T), reportedly a grapefruit/sweet orange hybrid, is similar to seedy white grapefruit with earlier maturity and lower bitterness. Jackson (J) is a low-seeded budsport of Triumph. Tree health ...

  17. "Triumph of the Will": A Limit Case for Effective-Historical Consciousness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartzman, Roy

    A film presented as factual may permit critical responses that question its purported factual objectivity and political neutrality. In class, Hans-Georg Gadamer's concept of effective-historical consciousness can be used to evaluate the allegedly propagandistic messages in Leni Riefenstahl's "Triumph of the Will." Analysis of this 1934 film…

  18. Colonic irrigation and the theory of autointoxication: a triumph of ignorance over science.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    1997-06-01

    Autointoxication is an ancient theory based on the belief that intestinal waste products can poison the body and are a major contributor to many, if not all, diseases. In the 19th century, it was the ruling doctrine of medicine and led "colonic quackery" in various guises. By the turn of the century, it had received some apparent backing from science. When it became clear that the scientific rationale was wrong and colonic irrigation was not merely useless but potentially dangerous, it was exposed as quackery and subsequently went into a decline. Today we are witnessing a resurgence of colonic irrigation based on little less than the old bogus claims and the impressive power of vested interests. Even today's experts on colonic irrigation can only provide theories and anecdotes in its support. It seems, therefore, that ignorance is celebrating a triumph over science. PMID:9252839

  19. The mainstream is not electable: when vision triumphs over representativeness in leader emergence and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Halevy, Nir; Berson, Yair; Galinsky, Adam D

    2011-07-01

    Theories of visionary leadership propose that groups bestow leadership on exceptional group members. In contrast, social identity perspectives claim that leadership arises, in part, from a person's ability to be seen as representative of the group. Integrating these perspectives, the authors propose that effective leaders often share group members' perspectives concerning the present, yet offer a unique and compelling vision for the group's future. In addition, although intergroup contexts may increase the value of representativeness, the authors predict that vision dominates representativeness in single-group situations characterized by high levels of collective stress (e.g., a natural disaster). Five studies demonstrated that visionary leaders (those who offer novel solutions to their group's predicament) attract more followers, promote group identification and intrinsic motivation, mobilize collective action, and effectively regulate group members' emotions and reactions to crises compared to representative leaders. The authors discuss when, why, and how vision triumphs over representativeness in leader emergence and effectiveness. PMID:21467538

  20. "I Was Proud of Myself That I Didn't Give up and I Did It": Experiences of Pride and Triumph in Learning Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellocchi, Alberto; Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    The role that specific emotions, such as pride and triumph, play during instruction in science education is an under researched field of study. Emotions are recognized as central to learning yet little is known about the way in which they are produced in naturalistic settings, how emotions relate to classroom learning during interactions, and what…

  1. The triumph and decline of the "squares": Grumman Aerospace engineers and production workers in the Apollo era, 1957--1973

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onkst, David Hugh

    This dissertation is a social, cultural, and economic history of the men and women of the Grumman Aerospace Company of Bethpage, New York from 1957 through 1973. These "Grummanites" were the engineers and production workers who designed and built the Apollo Lunar Modules that allowed humans to land on the Moon. This study provides unique insights into the impact that the Apollo Program---a large state-initiated and -supported program---had on those "squares," people whom many contemporaries saw as a vital part of mainstream 1960s American society. By the beginning of the Space Age in 1957, Grumman, Long Island's single largest employer, had firmly established a workplace culture of paternalism that Grummanites largely embraced. Company officials believed strongly in worker retention and had established a policy of providing every sort of benefit their employees seemingly desired, including a highly personal and participatory form of management. Many Grummanites had joined the firm during the early years of the Apollo Program because they believed in the promise of permanent employment on exciting projects that would explore the endless frontier of space. But, as many of these mainly self-reliant, individualistic "squares" would bitterly discover, their dedication to Grumman did little to secure their livelihoods during the aerospace industry's early 1970s downsizing; their individual successes were too largely tied to federal spending and declined when Americans grew disenchanted with space exploration. This dissertation demonstrates how the cultural bond of paternalism between aerospace workers and their company unraveled in the 1960s, and then ended in the early 1970s, because of forces within the company, the economy, and the American state. The word "triumph" in this study's title not only applies to Grummanites' triumphs with the Lunar Modules, but also their individual socioeconomic victories. The term "decline" refers to the early 1970s downsizing of more

  2. 2015 Philip S. Portoghese Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship. Curing Hepatitis C Virus Infection with Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents: The Arc of a Medicinal Chemistry Triumph.

    PubMed

    Meanwell, Nicholas A

    2016-08-25

    The development of direct-acting antiviral agents that can cure a chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection after 8-12 weeks of daily, well-tolerated therapy has revolutionized the treatment of this insidious disease. In this article, three of Bristol-Myers Squibb's HCV programs are summarized, each of which produced a clinical candidate: the NS3 protease inhibitor asunaprevir (64), marketed as Sunvepra, the NS5A replication complex inhibitor daclatasvir (117), marketed as Daklinza, and the allosteric NS5B polymerase inhibitor beclabuvir (142), which is in late stage clinical studies. A clinical study with 64 and 117 established for the first time that a chronic HCV infection could be cured by treatment with direct-acting antiviral agents alone in the absence of interferon. The development of small molecule HCV therapeutics, designed by medicinal chemists, has been hailed as "the arc of a medical triumph" but may equally well be described as "the arc of a medicinal chemistry triumph". PMID:27501244

  3. Triumph in Tough Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponder, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The downturn in the economy of the author's state, North Carolina, so far is less severe than that of much of the rest of the nation, due to their diversified economy, financial discipline, constitutional mandate for a balanced budget, "rainy day" fund, and many years of consistent investment in higher education. In the University of North…

  4. Reason, Purpose & Triumph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lincoln

    2010-01-01

    In this article, part of the Why I Teach essay series, the author shares how he developed his love for teaching and the failures and successes he experienced as a teacher. He used to hate teachers but everything changed when he entered college. He took general education classes and began to notice the difference between the great teachers and the…

  5. Nigeria's Triumph: Dracunculiasis Eradicated

    PubMed Central

    Miri, Emmanuel S.; Hopkins, Donald R.; Ruiz-Tiben, Ernesto; Keana, Adamu S.; Withers, P. Craig; Anagbogu, Ifeoma N.; Sadiq, Lola K.; Kale, Oladele O.; Edungbola, Luke D.; Braide, Eka I.; Ologe, Joshua O.; Ityonzughul, Cephas

    2010-01-01

    This report describes how Nigeria, a country that at one time had the highest number of cases of dracunculiasis (Guinea worm disease) in the world, reduced the number of cases from more than 653,000 in 1988 to zero in 2009, despite numerous challenges. Village-based volunteers formed the foundation of the program, which used health education, cloth filters, vector control, advocacy for safe water, voluntary isolation of patients, and monitored program interventions and cases reported monthly. Other factors in the program's success were strong governmental support, advocacy by a former head of state of Nigeria, technical and financial assistance by The Carter Center, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the United Nations Children's Fund, the World Health Organization, and many other partners and donors. The estimated cost of the Nigerian program during 1988–2009 is $37.5 million, not including funding for water supply projects or salaries of Nigerian governmental workers. PMID:20682859

  6. The Triumph of Circumspection?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Paul D.

    This conference presentation, which is divided into three parts, deals with problems facing the educational system, the concept of entropy and its relationship to vocational education, and the need to develop "technical generalists." The first part stresses the responsibility of the American school system in remedying the many social problems…

  7. News Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

  8. Triumph of the Voyager mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kerr, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    It had been a long, productive trip. Launched in 1977, the two Voyager spacecraft had visited three giant planets, a dozen major Moons, three ring systems with thousands of rings composed of a myriad of tiny Moonlets. The spacecraft had returned 5 trillion bits of data and over 100,000 photographs. The last encounter in our Solar System by Voyager 2 with Neptune was to be a spectacular finale to the 12-year drama. 

  9. A triumph of quiet diplomacy

    SciTech Connect

    Keeny, S.M. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    The new US agreement with North Korea is a breakthrough in the international effort to eliminate the most serious threat to the non-proliferation regime. Despite mutual mistrust, the two sides have, by quiet diplomacy, crafted an ingenious agreement that terminates Pyongyang`s current and future nuclear weapons program in return for economic benefits and an opportunity to join the international community.

  10. Shared Struggles, Shared Triumphs: Watching Writers Write.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Mark

    When teachers base classroom discussion of literature, particularly poetry, on the authors' manuscripts, notebooks, and letters, they allow students to watch writers write and to appreciate the craft involved in creative writing. Watching the writer at work--examining the drafts and correspondence for such poems as Blake's "London" or Keats'"To…

  11. The travail and triumph of Sidney Greenspan.

    PubMed

    Vaux, K

    1991-01-01

    The question of whether a feeding-tube could be withdrawn from Sidney Greenspan, a man who had survived in a Chicago nursing home for six years in a vegetative state, has focused ethical and legal deliberation on the issue of whether Illinois will follow the tradition of cases of court-sanctioned withdrawal (Quinlan, Fox, Conroy, Jobes, et al) or the more ambiguous precedents of Longeway and Cruzan, which disallowed withdrawal. PMID:1904413

  12. The Triumph of One-Dimensional Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, James J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Much of the confusion and nihilism that characterizes today's debates over educational policy can be explained by the tendency to view education, and indeed life, from a narrow and short-term perspective. This "either/or" mentality fails to account for the complexities and paradoxes in schooling and society. (Author/SJL)

  13. Shell particles, trials, tribulations and triumphs

    SciTech Connect

    Guiochon, Georges A; Gritti, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    The concept of pellicular particles was imagined by Horvath and Lipsky fifty years ago. They were initially intended for the analysis of macromolecules. Later, shell particles were prepared. The rational behind this concept was to improve column efficiency by shortening the pathways that analyte molecules must travel and, so doing, to improve their mass transfer kinetics. Several brands of superficially porous particles were developed and became popular in the 1970s. However, the major improvements in the manufacturing of high-quality, fully porous particles, that took place in the same time, particularly by making them finer and more homogeneous, hampered the success of shell particles, which eventually disappeared. Recently, the pressing needs to improve analytical throughputs forced particle manufacturers to find a better compromise between the demands for higher column efficiency that require short diffusion paths of analyte molecules in columns and the need for columns that can be operated with the conventional instruments for liquid chromatography, which operate with moderate column back-pressures. This lead to the apparition of a new generation of columns packed with shell particles, which bring chromatographic columns to a level of efficiency undreamed of a few years ago. This evolution is reviewed, the reason that motivated it, and the consequences of their success are discussed.

  14. Saving the Dust Bowl: "Big Hugh" Bennett's Triumph over Tragedy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    In the 1930s, years of injudicious cultivation had devastated 100 million acres of Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Colorado, and New Mexico. This was the Dust Bowl, and it exposed a problem that had silently plagued American agriculture for centuries--soil erosion. Farmers, scientists, and the government alike considered it trivial until Hugh Hammond…

  15. Project Physics Handbook 3, The Triumph of Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Ten experiments and 27 activities are presented in this handbook. The experiments are related to collisions, energy conservation, speed measurements, thermometry, calorimetry, gas properties, wave motions, and acoustic problems. The activities are concerned with stroboscopic photographs in collision, elastic impact, mass conservation, exchange of…

  16. Project Physics Teacher Guide 3, The Triumph of Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Teaching procedures of Project Physics Unit 3 are presented to help teachers make effective use of learning materials. Unit contents are discussed in connection with teaching aid perspective, multi-media schedules, schedule blocks, and resource charts. Brief analyses are made for transparencies, 16mm films, and reader articles. Included is…

  17. American style or Turkish chair: the triumph of bodily comfort.

    PubMed

    Çevik, Gülen

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the reciprocal influence of Ottoman Turkish and American interiors in the development of seating furniture. Seating furniture is unique because it involves a direct and physical interaction between the piece of furniture and the body, while at the same time it is part of a public space where social interactions occur. I will argue that the interactions between the Ottoman Turks and Americans are reflected in the way these traditions modified their seating furniture as they sought to mediate cultural, political and social differences between them. The concept of bodily comfort will serve as a common thread in understanding the origin of the expression "American style" (Amerikan stili or Amerikan tarzı) in modern Turkish language, the "Turkish chairs" in Victorian America in the late nineteenth century and the English language use of words such as sofa, ottoman and divan. PMID:21114093

  18. Level 5 leadership. The triumph of humility and fierce resolve.

    PubMed

    Collins, J

    2001-01-01

    Boards of directors typically believe that transforming a company from merely good to truly great requires a larger-than-life personality--an egocentric chief to lead the corporate charge. Think "Chainsaw" Al Dunlap or Lee Iacocca. In fact, that's not the case, says author and leadership expert Jim Collins. The essential ingredient for taking a company to greatness is having a "Level 5" leader at the helm--an executive in whom extreme personal humility blends paradoxically with intense professional will. Collins paints a compelling and counter-intuitive portrait of the skills and personality traits necessary for effective leadership. He identifies the characteristics common to Level 5 leaders: humility, will, ferocious resolve, and the tendency to give credit to others while assigning blame to themselves. Collins fleshes out his Level 5 theory by telling colorful tales about 11 such leaders from recent business history. He contrasts the turnaround successes of outwardly humble, even shy, executives like Gillette's Colman M. Mockler and Kimberly-Clark's Darwin E. Smith with those of larger-than-life business leaders like Dunlap and Iacocca, who courted personal celebrity. The jury is still out on how to cultivate Level 5 leaders and whether it's even possible to do so, Collins admits. Some leaders have the Level 5 seed within; some don't. But Collins suggests using the findings from his research to strive for Level 5--for instance, getting the right people on board and creating a culture of discipline. "Our own lives and all that we touch will be better for the effort," he concludes. PMID:11189464

  19. Trial, Error, Triumph: A College Rethinks Its Core Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan-Fleming, Mary Kay; Klabunde, Michael; Zane, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    Promoting student learning can be difficult, even at a liberal arts and sciences college where faculty members are passionate about it. The authors have experienced these challenges at the College of Mount St. Joseph in the last five years as they have moved collegewide efforts more intentionally toward facilitation of learning. The College of…

  20. SLE or hypothyroidism: who can triumph in cardiac tamponade?

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Sameer Sadashiv; Wankhedkar, Kashmira Pramod; Mushiyev, Savi

    2015-01-01

    A 36-year-old Hispanic woman with a history of systemic lupus erythaematosus (SLE) in remission presented with progressive dyspnoea, bilateral leg swelling and increasing fatigue with rapid weight gain over the past few months. Her physical examination showed mildly tender thyromegaly and pericardial rub. Investigations showed new onset marked hypothyroidism as well as an active lupus serology with echocardiogram confirming severe pericardial effusion and a tamponade phenomenon. Urgent pericardiocentesis relieved her acute symptoms, and prompt treatment with thyroxine replacement and immunosuppression for lupus disease was initiated. Pericardial fluid analysis remained negative for any malignancy and/or infection/s. The patient had a gradual and consistent improvement with this treatment. She was discharged and appeared to be clinically stable at subsequent follow-up visits. However, the case remained a diagnostic dilemma over whether the tamponade was being driven by hypothyroidism versus lupus, leaving us with an opportunity to explore further. PMID:25750217

  1. Project Physics Text 3, The Triumph of Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Mechanical theories are presented in this unit of the Project Physics text for senior high students. Collisions, Newton's laws, isolated systems, and Leibniz' concept are discussed, leading to conservation of mass and momentum. Energy conservation is analyzed in terms of mechanical energy, heat energy, steam engines, Watt's engine, Joule's…

  2. Resisting Reading Mandates: How To Triumph with the Truth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garan, Elaine M.

    Teachers today are in a stranglehold as a glut of mandates and standards restrict their ability to make decisions in their own classrooms. In many schools, scripted, regimented commercial programs further erode their power to view their students as individuals with unique talents and needs. Even the words they use "to teach" are no longer their…

  3. Triumphs and Tribulations of WRF-Chem Development and Use

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.

    2005-06-27

    In order to address scientific questions related to aerosol chemistry and meteorological-aerosol-radiation-cloud feedbacks at the urban to regional scale, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have made substantial contributions to the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) during the past one and a half years. These contributions include an additional gas-phase chemistry mechanism, a sectional aerosol module, an additional photolysis module, feedbacks between aerosols and radiation, and extending the nesting capability of WRF to include the chemistry scalars. During the development process, a number of limitations in WRF have been identified that complicate adding all the desired chemistry capabilities as originally planned. These issues will be discussed along with changes that have been made to help mitigate some of them. Mechanisms currently in development will also be discussed including a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mechanism for the sectional aerosol module, aqueous chemistry, and the aerosol indirect effect.

  4. Primary Hepatic Burkitt Lymphoma: A Bizarre Site and Triumph Tale

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Gaurang; Madabhavi, Irappa; Patel, Apurva; Revannasiddaiah, Swaroop; Anand, Asha; Panchal, Harsha; Parikh, Sonia; Baldaniya, Krunal

    2015-01-01

    Primary hepatic Burkitt lymphoma (PHBL) is an extremely rare form extra nodal lymphoma and till now only 11 case reports have been found in the literature. We are reporting an adult female with primary hepatic Burkitt's lymphoma, who achieved complete remission after 5 months of combination chemotherapy containing vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, methotrexate, prednisolone and intrathecal chemotherapy. She is under regular follow up at our institute. PMID:26155044

  5. Challenges and Triumphs to Genomics-Based Natural Product Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Paul R.; Chavarria, Krystle L.; Fenical, William; Moore, Bradley S.; Ziemert, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequencing is rapidly changing the field of natural products research by providing opportunities to assess the biosynthetic potential of strains prior to chemical analysis or biological testing. Ready access to sequence data is driving the development of new bioinformatic tools and methods to identify the products of silent or cryptic pathways. While genome mining has fast become a useful approach to natural product discovery, it has also become clear that identifying pathways of interest is much easier than finding the associated products. This has led to bottlenecks in the discovery process that must be overcome for the potential of genomics-based natural product discovery to be fully realized. In this perspective, we address some of these challenges in the context of our work with the marine actinomycete genus Salinispora, which is proving to be a useful model with which to apply genome mining as an approach to natural product discovery. PMID:24104399

  6. The World Medical Association: can hope triumph over experience?

    PubMed Central

    Richards, T.

    1994-01-01

    The World Medical Association was set up in 1947 in the wake of outrage about war crimes committed by doctors in Hitler's Germany. For nearly 50 years it has lurched from one controversy to another, arguing within itself about its funding, its voting system, and the representativeness and political affiliation of some of its member medical associations. The BMA withdrew from the association in 1984, supporting a breakaway "Toronto" group including Canada, the Scandinavian countries, the Netherlands, Ireland, and Jamaica. All but Britain and Jamaica have now rejoined and membership is growing, but the association is still struggling to gain credibility and clout. After 20 years of part time stewardship the recent appointment of a new full time secretary general has fuelled expectations that internal reforms will be implemented, and the WMA's standing and profile improved. PMID:8111265

  7. Triumphs Show: Taking Students outside the Classroom "inside" the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osowiecki, Maria; Francis, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Year 9 think they know a lot about the First World War. After all, they read Michael Morpurgo's novel Private Peaceful in their English lessons all the way back in Year 7, they have seen Blackadder so many times they can recite it, and in the centenary year of the war's outbreak, they can hardly avoid it on television. But their view of…

  8. Achieving Self-Regulation: The Trial and Triumph of Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Barry J.

    Self-regulation consists of the metacognitive processes, behavioral skills, and associated motivational beliefs that underlie youths growing self-confidence and personal resourcefulness in acquiring the skills needed for adulthood. This chapter discusses the role of school organization in the attainment of self-regulation in terms of four levels…

  9. From Tragedy to Triumph - Rebuilding Green Buildings after Disaster

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-01

    Fact sheet offering practical information about building energy efficient buildings and using renewable energy. Includes a checklist and resources. Highlights successful projects in Greensburg, Kansas.

  10. Turmoil and triumph: My years as secretary of state

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, G.P.

    1993-12-31

    The Reagan administration, or members of it, may have believed their own propaganda about the United States (U.S.) military weakness in 1980 and 1981, but the Soviet leaders never did. Nor did they ever doubt or challenge U.S. deterrence or determination to repel agression against the U.S. or its allies. What was new was a belated recognition by Moscow`s leaders that the Marxist-Lennist world view they had held for 70 years did not accord with reality, and that their combined efforts to apply that pattern for internal development did not accord with the real needs of society. It was a remarkable turn of policy in Reagan`s second term that led to five summit meetings, as many as in the preceding three presidencies, and One-third of all the postwar, Cold War summits. One of the most interesting and valuable contributions of this book is the picture of the inner workings of the Reagan administration, as seen by the secretary of state.

  11. Vaccinations: A public health triumph and a public relations tragedy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M

    2012-08-01

    Routine vaccination has been hailed as one of the top public health achievements of the last century. However, despite the reduced number of cases of and deaths from vaccine-preventable diseases such as pertussis and measles, outbreaks continue to occur as more parents fail to adequately vaccinate their children because of misinformation about immunizations. This article describes the challenges of making sure all children in the United States are fully immunized and what physicians need to know to effectively work with parents who may be hesitant to vaccinate their children. PMID:22953473

  12. Trials and Triumphs of Teaching Introduction to Native American Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansen, Bruce Elliott

    2003-01-01

    Introduction to Native American Studies has been, paradoxically, the author's most satisfying and most challenging teaching assignment in more than two decades as a university-level faculty member. As a former coordinator of the Native American Studies Program at the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO), he has heard many other faculty air their…

  13. Integrating the Study of the Holocaust: One School's Triumph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruder, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Integrating the study of the Holocaust into the middle school curriculum is a formidable challenge. This article describes the approach taken by Whitwell Middle School in Tennessee: When teachers found that students were having a difficult time comprehending the number of Jews and others killed by the Nazis, they decided to have the students…

  14. The Plus 50 Population in Higher Education: Challenges and Triumphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Jason

    2016-01-01

    As the economy in the United States continues to emerge from a recession and as jobs become more technologically advanced rendering other jobs obsolete, more and more Americans over the age of 50 are now attending college for a variety of reasons. Around 77% of the so-called Plus 50 students were enrolled in two-year public institutions. Other…

  15. Project Physics Reader 3, The Triumph of Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    As a supplement to Project Physics Unit 3, a collection of articles is presented in this reader for student browsing. Four excerpts are given under the following headings: On the kinetic theory of gases, Maxwell's Demon, Introduction to Waves, and Scientific Cranks. Five articles are included in terms of energy, barometers, randomness, fiddle…

  16. Project Physics Tests 3, The Triumph of Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Test items relating to Project Physics Unit 3 are presented in this booklet. Included are 70 multiple-choice and 20 problem-and-essay questions. Concepts of mechanics are examined on energy, momentum, kinetic theory of gases, pulse analyses, "heat death," water waves, power, conservation laws, normal distribution, thermodynamic laws, and wave…

  17. English-Only Triumphs, but the Costs are High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portes, Alejandro

    2002-01-01

    Explores the issue of English-only versus bilingual education by focusing on whether complete language assimilation is desirable for immigrant children and their families. Discusses the benefits of bilingualism, such as students exhibiting greater self-esteem, the benefits for immigrant families, and advantages for the labor market. Highlights the…

  18. Canada in the 21st Century - Triumph or Tragedy? The Front Line.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgour, David

    1996-01-01

    Argues that new patterns of trade and production combined with an emphasis on a knowledge-based economy/society make it imperative that Canada upgrade its educational system. Specifically notes that several growing and dominant industries (microelectronics, biotechnology, telecommunications) require a high-tech skilled labor force. (MJP)

  19. The triumph of pragmatism: Nigeria's role in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries

    SciTech Connect

    Dimah, A.

    1988-01-01

    Formed in 1960, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) became a key participant in the international oil industry after the so-called oil shock in the early 1970s. OPEC's power in world trade increased tremendously during the 1970s and, as oil prices skyrocketed, literature on OPEC proliferated. Although OPEC's demise has often been predicted since its creation; it has, however, endured. Thus study examines OPEC from distinct vantage points: those of regime theory, oligopoly models, and cartel theory. The aim is to gain insight into the activities of the organization as a whole and in terms of the behavior of one of its members, the Government of Nigeria. The objective is to ascertain which of these theories, or aspects of the theories, best describes OPEC's activities and Nigeria's actions as a member. The review of OPEC and Nigeria's role in its demonstrates that OPEC is difficult to classify. It is more than anything, a fluid coalition of Third World countries seeking to improve their national economies by ensuring better prices for crude oil, their chief export product; and helping other Third World countries focus global awareness on the chronic political and economic inequities in the international system. Therefore, OPEC and Nigeria's role is best explained by coalition theory.

  20. The triumph and tragedy of James Baxler Bean, MD, DDS (1834-1870).

    PubMed

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2003-03-01

    In 1863, James Baxter Bean, a Southern physician and dentist, invented the interdental splint. This device was used to treat hundreds of Confederate soldiers who had received gun shot-related facial and jaw injuries during the Civil War. Made of vulcanized India-rubber, the splint provided a dramatic breakthrough in the treatment of maxillofacial wounds. In an Atlanta, Georgia hospital, Dr. Bean utilized his invention by establishing the first ward devoted exclusively to the treatment of jaw fractures. He also invented an apparatus that manufactured and administered nitrous oxide. Additionally, Bean's groundwork in casting aluminum as a denture base material led to Taggart's later invention (in 1907) of the casting machine. After the Civil War, Dr. Bean became a highly successful dentist, practicing in Baltimore, Maryland. In the fall of 1870, at age 36, Bean, representing the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., traveled to Europe to gather geological specimens. A short time after arriving, Bean decided to climb Mont Blanc with ten other men. The entire group perished in a raging 8-day snow storm on the mountain peak. This tragedy, a compelling drama, is legendary in the annals of mountaineering history. After Dr. Bean's passing, his wife lost her sanity and subsequently died. Later, the death of the couple's only child, Chapin, sadly ended the family line. Although his life was cut short, Bean's contributions to dentistry have been significant and far-reaching. PMID:12641169

  1. Using Neural Progenitor Cells in High-Throughput Screens for Developmental Neurotoxicants: Triumphs and Tragedies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current protocols for developmental neurotoxicity testing are insufficient to test thousands of commercial chemicals. Thus, development of highthroughput screens (HTS) to detect and prioritize chemicals that may cause developmental neurotoxicity is needed to improve protection of...

  2. In Their Own Words: Researchers' Stories of Challenges and Triumphs in Data Management and Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebich Hespanha, S.; Menz, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    As data-intensive computational analysis has become more pervasive in the Earth and environmental sciences, the need for adopting new ways to organize, manage, and preserve data has become increasingly apparent. As more and more data are collected, the benefits (or potential benefits) of sharing and re-using these data become ever more obvious. Technically-inclined disciplinary scientists, informaticians, and advocates of open science have already begun working together to develop tools and best practices that help to pave the way for a new era in data management and sharing. In spite of these innovative (and mostly technical) advances, researchers who wish to effectively manage and re-use data, or who are obligated by funding requirements to do so, still face many challenges. Here we report on the DataONE Data Stories project, which is focused on collecting researchers' stories about conflicts and successes that they have encountered when managing data and making efforts to share or re-use data. We highlight the types of events and situations that commonly lead to conflict or obstacles for the researchers we have interviewed. We emphasize in particular those difficulties for which no adequate technical solutions currently exist, or for which technical solutions do not seem to be appropriate, in the hope that our analysis of these stories will stimulate dialogue about the kinds of technical, social, and cultural solutions most needed to accelerate growth in better data management and sharing. Finally, we provide examples of how we have incorporated some of the researchers' data stories into the DataONE data management curriculum in order to support higher levels of engagement with the material and foster discussion among researchers about the complexities of the challenges they will likely encounter as they explore the world of data stewardship and reuse.

  3. The Triumph of Religious Education for Citizenship in English Schools, 1935-1949

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freathy, Rob

    2008-01-01

    The failure of the Association for Education in Citizenship to gain official support for the secular and pedagogically progressive forms of education for citizenship that its founder members endorsed has previously been explained by the political impotence of the association's founder members and the professional conservatism of the educational…

  4. Triumph or Triage? The World Food Problem in Geographical Perspective. Resource Paper No. 75-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, C. Gregory; Wilcox, R. Paul

    Emphasizing a problem-solving perspective, the document investigates the world food scene. Simply defined, the world food problem is the apparent inability of the world's people to feed themselves adequately and consistently. Intended for use by college level geography instructors as they develop courses on human uses of the environment, the…

  5. Experiences of Secondary Hispanic Immigrant Students: Their Stories of Challenge and Triumph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Cynthia; Harris, Sandra; Farrow, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    Secondary Hispanic immigrant students have many struggles and barriers to overcome. This qualitative study investigated the experiences of 10 secondary immigrant Hispanic students, all non-English speakers, as they lived and attended high school in the United States. Narrative techniques were used to explore the challenges they faced in culture,…

  6. Challenges, Frustrations and Triumphs of Remixing an Open Source Game Engine for Educational Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stowell, Timothy; Shelton, Brett E.

    2008-01-01

    The use, reuse, and remixing of commercial games has influenced the field of educational gaming. Part of this influence is felt though a number of popular game engines whose code has been released for the creation of games by other groups. This paper follows one group's progress of using the open-source and highly successful commercial game engine…

  7. Benefits of voluntary industry standards: The triumph of experience over regulation

    SciTech Connect

    O`Leary, J.T.

    1996-12-31

    Voluntary international standards for mining machinery may gradually replace many national regulations. The days of establishing voluntary standards nation by nation, inhibiting the important flow of international trade, could be numbered. This does not mean that nations will cease domestic regulatory activities within their boundaries, but rulemaking will pay considerable attention to voluntary international standards and will likely strive for compatibility with voluntary international standards. International standards setting bodies are developing standards for machine safety. When these standards are complete and adopted, some nations will require machinery to comport with them. International commerce in products that do not conform to these voluntary international standards may be discouraged.

  8. The Triumph of the Market and the Decline of Liberal Education: Implications for Civic Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roosevelt, Grace

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to argue that the growing commercialization of education and the simultaneous decline of what has traditionally been called "liberal education" will limit the range of political discourse and thus have negative effects on civic life. In a context driven mainly by the profit motive, not-for-profit educational…

  9. Trait selection in potatoes: trials, tribulations, and triumphs - inside the mind of the researcher

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated potato is an intensively managed vegetable crop. It requires a great deal of input to obtain a crop that is suitable for fresh market or storage. There are myriad ways potato could be improved to reduce input costs, increase yield, and improve marketability. While it would be ideal to dev...

  10. Piecing Together the Roman Empire: A Story of Discovery and Triumph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Julie A.; And Others

    This story, written by middle school students and their teacher at Kingsbury School in Michigan, concerns the Ancient Roman Empire and is designed to be used to teach other middle school students. The story depicts a quest to reconstruct the Roman Empire from its beginnings as Ancient Italy, as a republic in the sixth century B.C., to the height…

  11. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering.

    PubMed

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-03-13

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III-V or II-VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X-Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs. PMID:20123746

  12. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III–V or II–VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X–Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs. PMID:20123746

  13. A Place on the Team: The Triumph and Tragedy of Title IX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suggs, Welch

    2006-01-01

    "A Place on the Team" is the inside story of how Title IX revolutionized American sports. The federal law guaranteeing women's rights in education, Title IX opened gymnasiums and playing fields to millions of young women previously locked out. Journalist Welch Suggs chronicles both the law's successes and failures-the exciting opportunities for…

  14. Triumphs Show: Getting Year 10 beyond Trivial Judgements of "Bias": Towards Victory in "That" Battle …

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinks, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Back in 1993 and 2000, Lang and LeCocq, respectively, in their reactions against reductive and de-contextualised forms of "source work", pointed out that all sources do hold value in some way, even, and often especially, in those aspects that might be deemed "biased". The author's Year 10s' difficulty in shaking off a…

  15. 3-D field computation: The near-triumph of commerical codes

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.

    1995-07-01

    In recent years, more and more of those who design and analyze magnets and other devices are using commercial codes rather than developing their own. This paper considers the commercial codes and the features available with them. Other recent trends with 3-D field computation include parallel computation and visualization methods such as virtual reality systems.

  16. Fighting the "Damnable Triumph" of Feminism: Battles between Teachers' Unions in Interwar Britain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Dolly Smith

    2007-01-01

    The interwar decades saw a bitter recruiting war between the NUT (National Union of Teachers), the National Union of Women Teachers (NUWT), and the National Association of Schoolmasters (NAS), which like the NUWT broke away from the NUT in the early 1920s. The NAS opposed the NUT's official policy shift to support equal pay for male and female…

  17. The Quest for Selective Nox Inhibitors and Therapeutics: Challenges, Triumphs and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes-Pagano, Eugenia; Meijles, Daniel N.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Numerous studies in animal models and human subjects corroborate that elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a pivotal role in the progression of multiple diseases. As a major source of ROS in many organ systems, the NADPH oxidase (Nox) has become a prime target for therapeutic development. Recent Advances: In recent years, intense efforts have been dedicated to the development of pan- and isoform-specific Nox inhibitors as opposed to antioxidants that proved ineffective in clinical trials. Over the past decade, an array of compounds has been proposed in an attempt to fill this void. Critical Issues: Although many of these compounds have proven effective as Nox enzyme family inhibitors, isoform specificity has posed a formidable challenge to the scientific community. This review surveys the most prominent Nox inhibitors, and discusses potential isoform specificity, known mechanisms of action, and shortcomings. Some of these inhibitors hold substantial promise as targeted therapeutics. Future Directions: Increased insight into the mechanisms of action and regulation of this family of enzymes as well as atomic structures of key Nox subunits are expected to give way to a broader spectrum of more potent, efficacious, and specific molecules. These lead molecules will assuredly serve as a basis for drug development aimed at treating a wide array of diseases associated with increased Nox activity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2741–2754. PMID:24070014

  18. The evolution of three decades of antiretroviral therapy: challenges, triumphs and the promise of the future

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Alice; Seet, Jason; Phillips, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment has improved our understanding and management of complex pharmacological issues that have driven improved outcomes and quality of life of the HIV-infected patient. These issues include adherence, long- and short-term toxicities, pharmacoenhancement, pharmacogenomics, therapeutic drug monitoring, differential penetration of drugs into sanctuary sites, such as the central nervous system, genital tract and small bowel, and drug–drug and drug–food interactions related to cytochrome P450 drug-metabolizing enzymes, uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferases and drug transporters, to name a few. There is future promise, as an increased understanding of the immunopathogenesis of HIV and global public health initiatives are driving novel treatment approaches with goals to prevent, control and, ultimately, eradicate HIV. PMID:24730660

  19. From Tragedy to Triumph - Rebuilding Green Homes after Disaster (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-04-01

    Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Fact Sheets, No. 1. Series to include practical, useful info to help people change their behavior around energy usage and "greenness". Greensburg is hanging its future on sustainable development; these fact sheet sheets should help citizens understand what they can do to be a part of that focus. Fact Sheets cover: saving energy and water, using renewable energy (particular interest in small wind), driving "green", general sustainability, living green.

  20. From Tragedy to Triumph - Rebuilding Green Buildings after Disaster, EERE (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-10-01

    Fact sheet offering practical information about building energy efficient buildings and using renewable energy. Includes a checklist and resources. Highlights successful projects in Greensburg, Kansas.

  1. From Tragedy to Triumph: Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas To Be a 100% Renewable Energy City; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Pless, S.; Billman, L.; Wallach, D.

    2010-08-01

    On May 4, 2007, Greensburg, Kansas, was hit by a 1.7-mile wide tornado with 200 mph-plus wind speeds. This tornado destroyed or severely damaged 90% of Greensburg?s structures. We discuss the progress made in rebuilding Greensburg, with a focus on the built environment and on meeting Greensburg?s goal of 100% renewable energy, 100% of the time. We also discuss key disaster recovery efforts that enabled Greensburg to reach this goal. Key strategies included a Sustainable Comprehensive Master Plan, an ordinance resolving that city-owned buildings achieve LEED Platinum and 42% energy savings, a strong focus on rebuilding 'right' with an integrated design process, attracting significant and sustained technical experts and national media attention, and linking renewable and energy efficiency technologies to business development. After three years, more than half the homes that have been rebuilt are rated at an average of 40% energy savings. All significant commercial buildings, including the school, hospital, banks, courthouse, and retail buildings, have been rebuilt to LEED Gold and Platinum standards and exceed 40% savings, with many exceeding 50% savings. Greensburg recently constructed a 12.5-MW community wind farm to provide all the remaining energy needed for its energy-efficient buildings and homes.

  2. Surviving the Crossfire: Walla Walla's Mentoring Program Helps Neophytes Triumph over the Challenges of Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linik, Joyce Riha

    2001-01-01

    In Walla Walla (Washington), an award-winning teacher mentoring program has boosted the new-teacher retention rate to 93 percent. With state funding, the program assigns each new teacher a "peer coach" and a "peer mentor," then provides training and support for all concerned. The program has become a good recruitment and retention tool. (SV)

  3. I Thought You Were One of Us! Triumphs and Crisis When Teaching Your Own

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heer, Kal

    2015-01-01

    Authoritative knowledge produced by white acacemics has forged much of the cannon in educational research. Recently, scholars of color, have been asserting their unique positionalities to conduct research and teach among their own communities. As a result they have provided a challenge to normative privilege whiteness in education. Claims of…

  4. The Triumph of the Industrial-Consumer Paradigm and English as the Global Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spring, Joel

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the role of English as the global language within the industrial-consumer paradigm. In the 21st century, the English language plays a different function in the global economy than it did during the 19th century when it was used as an instrument of cultural imperialism. Today, English serves as a vehicle for participation in…

  5. Persephone's Triumph: Reflections of a Young Black Woman Becoming a Real Political Scientist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ruth Nicole

    2007-01-01

    This article is a poetic retelling of insight gained as a Black woman surviving graduate school. The purpose of this autoethnographic narrative is to document a few pivotal graduate school experiences that illustrate all that it means to become disciplined in and by higher education. Although the violence committed in such a privileged space may…

  6. A Triumph of Hope over Reason? Aid Accords and Education Policy in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colclough, Christopher; Webb, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Despite a long history of post-independence aid to education, Kenya's relationships with overseas donors have, until recently, been markedly fractious. Donors' concerns about transparency and corruption, in the context of a political regime which became increasingly authoritarian, led to sharp reductions in aid to Kenyan education during the…

  7. The post-cold war settlement in Europe: A triumph of arms control

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelbaum, M.

    1997-03-01

    {open_quotes}The military capabilities of the countries of Europe are also less threatening now than in the past, and this has been accomplished by arms control.{close_quotes} The author argues that there is a new security order in place in Europe, one that differs from the two most familiar ways of organizing security: balance-of-power politics and world government. Balance-of-power politics has been the source of such stability as Europe has enjoyed for most of its recorded history, including during the Cold War years. World government is a utopian dream that has been envisioned and advocated but never implemented, and that might not be a source of celebration if it were implemented, which it almost surely will not be. The theme of The Dawn of Peace in Europe is that, in the wake of the Cold War, Europe has established a third method for achieving security, called common security and that owes something to the concept of cooperative security that was developed at the Brookings Institution. Within this common security regime, Europe is still made up of soverign states. There is no supranational authority. The states of Europe are still armed. But peace in Europe does not depend-as it has for most of Europe`s recorded history-on a finely balanced hostility between and among the most powerful European nations. The new common security order has dramatically reduced both the incentives and the capabilities for war.

  8. Russian war surgery in 1812: 200 years since Russia's war triumph.

    PubMed

    Boсkeria, Leo A; Glyantsev, Sergey P; Kolesnikov, Yan G

    2012-01-01

    Specific wounds inflicted on soldiers and officers of the Russian Army by French firearms and cold weapon and wound treatment by Russian surgeons during 1812 Napoleon's invasion (better known in Russia as the Patriotic War of 1812) are discussed. An inference is made that the then surgical treatment was not only administered at a high level but was also versatile and efficient and thus could make a certain contribution to the victory of the Russian arms. PMID:23151528

  9. The Struggles and Triumphs of a Novice Teacher. Gateways to Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Jean C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper relates the author's experience with a preservice teacher at Chicago State University. Ms. Young was a bright, intelligent student who demonstrated a high level of skill and enthusiasm for the profession of teaching--so high that she was asked to address the graduating body of student teachers with the notion that her ideals would…

  10. Human Error and the International Space Station: Challenges and Triumphs in Science Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Samantha S.; Simpson, Beau C.

    2016-01-01

    Any system with a human component is inherently risky. Studies in human factors and psychology have repeatedly shown that human operators will inevitably make errors, regardless of how well they are trained. Onboard the International Space Station (ISS) where crew time is arguably the most valuable resource, errors by the crew or ground operators can be costly to critical science objectives. Operations experts at the ISS Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC), located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, have learned that from payload concept development through execution, there are countless opportunities to introduce errors that can potentially result in costly losses of crew time and science. To effectively address this challenge, we must approach the design, testing, and operation processes with two specific goals in mind. First, a systematic approach to error and human centered design methodology should be implemented to minimize opportunities for user error. Second, we must assume that human errors will be made and enable rapid identification and recoverability when they occur. While a systematic approach and human centered development process can go a long way toward eliminating error, the complete exclusion of operator error is not a reasonable expectation. The ISS environment in particular poses challenging conditions, especially for flight controllers and astronauts. Operating a scientific laboratory 250 miles above the Earth is a complicated and dangerous task with high stakes and a steep learning curve. While human error is a reality that may never be fully eliminated, smart implementation of carefully chosen tools and techniques can go a long way toward minimizing risk and increasing the efficiency of NASA's space science operations.

  11. Post Civil War African American History: Brief Periods of Triumph, and Then Despair.

    PubMed

    Graff, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    During Reconstruction, which is often called the most progressive period in American history, African Americans made great strides. By 1868 African American men constituted a majority of registered voters in South Carolina and Mississippi, and by 1870 eighty-five percent of Mississippi's black jurors could read and write. However, Reconstruction was followed by approximately one hundred years of Jim Crow laws, lynching, disenfranchisement, sharecropping, unequal educational resources, terrorism, racial caricatures, and convict leasing. The Civil Rights Revolution finally ended that period of despair, but the era of mass incarceration can be understood as a reaction to the Civil Rights Movement. This article attempts to understand the persistence of racism in the United States from slavery's end until the present. PMID:27108470

  12. A Triumph For MERIS: Monitoring Of Blooms And Vegetation Using The Global MERIS MCI Data Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gower, Jim; Young, Erika; King, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    The Maximum Chlorophyll Index (MCI) has successfully demonstrated a new way to monitor floating and near-surface vegetation and intense surface plankton blooms in coastal and ocean waters. MERIS MCI shows some blooms in which high radiance at 709 nm is the dominant feature of their optical spectrum. Such blooms would not be detectable without a band at this wavelength. The 10-year dataset is unique to MERIS in that the 709 nm band is not included in other wide-swath water-colour imagers such as MODIS, SeaWiFS or VIIRS. We have used the MERIS data to show patterns of pelagic Sargassum never before seen from space, an increasing trend of Antarctic “superblooms,” and details of the global distribution of Trichodesmium and other blooms. In this paper we show examples from the full global MCI dataset compiled during a joint ESA (GPOD) and Canadian Space Agency project.

  13. Pioglitazone (Actos) and bladder cancer: Legal system triumphs over the evidence.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Mayer B

    2016-08-01

    In preclinical studies, pioglitazone was associated with bladder cancer in male rats (but not in female rats, mice dogs or monkeys). Because of this association, the Federal Drug Administration requested a large 10year epidemiological study to evaluate whether there was an association between bladder cancer and exposure to pioglitazone in patients. A 5-year interim report published in 2011 showed no significant association between ever vs never exposure to the drug but a significant association in patients exposed to pioglitazone for >2years. Importantly, the final 10year report did not confirm the 5year interim report finding no association between bladder cancer and pioglitazone, even after >4years of exposure to the drug. However, as would be expected, following the 5-year interim report, many epidemiological studies were carried out and civil litigation lawsuits began to be filed. Of the 23 epidemiological studies that have been published to date, 18 showed no association between bladder cancer and pioglitazone (5 with a combination of rosiglitazone and pioglitazone). Of the five that did show a significant association with pioglitazone, three could not be confirmed in the same population and in one of them there were significantly more risk factors for bladder cancer in the patients exposed to pioglitazone. In the fourth one, a significant association became non-significant when patients >79years were included. In the fifth one, detection bias was a major flaw. Currently, >11,000 legal cases have been filed, many of which claim emotional distress due to the fear of bladder cancer. To limit their legal costs, the pharmaceutical company has established a 2.4 billion dollar settlement pool. So much for evidence-based medicine. PMID:27133452

  14. Digging for answers, smelling a hint of success and tasting triumph

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Joseph P

    2010-01-01

    The C12 ‘earthy’ odorant geosmin is derived from the C15 metabolite farnesyl diphosphate. Metabolic transformation now seems to be catalyzed by a bifunctional protein having two operatively independent sesquiterpene synthase domains. The domains are catalytically linked through the passive diffusion of a C15 alcohol product of the N-terminal catalytic domain to the C-terminal catalytic domain for the final steps of geosmin formation. PMID:17948014

  15. Managed care's reconstruction of human existence: the triumph of technical reason.

    PubMed

    Phillips, James

    2002-01-01

    To achieve its goals of managing and restricting access to psychiatric care, managed care organizations rely on an instrument, the outpatient treatment report, that carries significant implications about how they view psychiatric patients and psychiatric care. In addition to involving ethical transgressions such as violation of patient confidentiality, denial of access to care, spurious use of concepts like quality of care, and harassment of practitioners, the managed care approach also depends on an overly technical, instrumental interpretation of human beings and psychiatric treatment. It is this grounding of managed care in technical reason that I will explore in this study. I begin with a review of a typical outpatient treatment report and show how, with its dependence on the DSM-IV, on behavioral symptoms and patient 'functioning', on the biomedical model of psychiatric illness, and on gross quantitative measures, the report results in a crude, skeletonized view of the human being as a congeries of behavioral symptoms and functions. I then develop the managed care construal of human existence further by showing its grounding in technical reason, exploring the latter in its modern embodiment and deriving it and its opposite, practical reason, from Aristotle's distinction between technical and practical reason, techne and phronesis. In this analysis of the role of technical reason in managed care, I point out that managed care did not have to develop its rationale de novo but could rather lift its arguments, e.g. the biomedical model, from contemporary psychiatry and simply apply them in a restrictive manner. Finally, I conclude this study by arguing for psychiatry's status as a discipline of practical knowledge. PMID:12516837

  16. The Promotion and Marketing of OxyContin: Commercial Triumph, Public Health Tragedy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    I focus on issues surrounding the promotion and marketing of controlled drugs and their regulatory oversight. Compared with noncontrolled drugs, controlled drugs, with their potential for abuse and diversion, pose different public health risks when they are overpromoted and highly prescribed. An in-depth analysis of the promotion and marketing of OxyContin illustrates some of the associated issues. Modifications of the promotion and marketing of controlled drugs by the pharmaceutical industry and an enhanced capacity of the Food and Drug Administration to regulate and monitor such promotion can have a positive impact on the public health. PMID:18799767

  17. Geography via the Overhead Projector: Do It This Way, 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Thomas D.

    This booklet is designed to assist teachers in their use of overhead projectors when teaching geography. With the overhead technique, relationships among patterns can be suggested bit by bit on inexpensive, easily prepared overlays that are projected to sizes appropriate for a particular instructional situation. A general discussion of the…

  18. Counting digital filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zohar, S. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Several embodiments of a counting digital filter of the non-recursive type are disclosed. In each embodiment two registers, at least one of which is a shift register, are included. The shift register received j sub x-bit data input words bit by bit. The kth data word is represented by the integer.

  19. Program Converts VAX Floating-Point Data To UNIX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alves, Marcos; Chapman, Bruce; Chu, Eugene

    1996-01-01

    VAX Floating Point to Host Floating Point Conversion (VAXFC) software converts non-ASCII files to unformatted floating-point representation of UNIX machine. This is done by reading bytes bit by bit, converting them to floating-point numbers, then writing results to another file. Useful when data files created by VAX computer must be used on other machines. Written in C language.

  20. The trials, tribulations, and triumphs of black faculty in the math and science pipeline: A life history approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Lisa D.

    2000-12-01

    This study explores the career progression and life history of black mathematicians and scientists who teach on university faculties in the United States. It investigates the following questions: Why are there so few black mathematicians and scientists in colleges and universities in the United States? What is the experience of black students who express an interest in science and math? What barriers do black scientists and mathematicians face as they move through school towards their career in higher education? What factors facilitate their success? The current literature shows that there are few women and minorities teaching or working in math and science compared to white men, although reasons for this underrepresentation are still not well understood. I explored this phenomenon by conducting two sets of in-depth interviews with twelve black faculty, six women, six men, from both historically black and predominantly white higher educational institutions in the United States. My interviews were based upon a life history approach that identified the participants' perceptions of the barriers and obstacles, as well as the supports and facilitators encountered in their schooling and career progression. The findings from the study show the importance of a strong family, community, and teacher support for the participants throughout their schooling. Support systems continued to be important in their faculty positions. These support systems include extended family members, teachers, community members, supervisors, and classmates, who serve as role models and mentors. The life study interviews provide striking evidence of the discrimination, isolation, and harassment due to race and gender experienced by black male and female mathematicians and scientists. The racial discrimination and the compounding effect of racism and sexism play out differently for the male and female participants in this study. This study suggests directions for future research on the experiences of young black students who are currently in the math and science educational pipeline. It also offers recommendations for ways in which parents, teachers, administrators, faculty, advisors, and government officials can enhance the educational experiences of black students who express interest and have skills in math and science.

  1. Cognitive Impairment and Outcomes in Older Adult Survivors of Acute Myocardial Infarction: Findings from the TRIUMPH Registry

    PubMed Central

    Gharacholou, S. Michael; Reid, Kimberly J.; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Spertus, John; Rich, Michael W.; Pellikka, Patricia A.; Singh, Mandeep; Holsinger, Tracey; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Peterson, Eric D.; Alexander, Karen P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment without dementia (CIND) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are prevalent in older adults; however, the association of CIND with outcomes after AMI is unknown. Methods We used a multicenter registry to study 772 patients ≥65 years with AMI, enrolled between April 2005 and December 2008, who underwent cognitive function assessment with the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status-modified (TICS-m) 1 month after AMI. Patients were categorized by cognitive status to describe characteristics and in-hospital treatment, including quality of life and survival 1 year after AMI. Results Mean age was 73.2±6.3 years; 58.5% were males and 78.2% were white. Normal cognitive function (TICS-m>22) was present in 44.4%; mild CIND (TICS-m 19–22) in 29.8% and moderate/severe CIND (TICS-m <19) in 25.8% of patients. Rates of hypertension (72.6%, 77.4%, 81.9%), cerebrovascular accidents (3.5%, 7.0%, 9.0%), and myocardial infarction (20.1%, 22.2%, 29.6%) were higher in those with lower TICS-m scores (p<0.05 for comparisons). AMI medications were similar by cognitive status; however, CIND was associated with lower cardiac catheterization rates (p=0.002) and cardiac rehabilitation referrals (p<0.001). Patients with moderate/severe CIND had higher risk-adjusted 1 year mortality that was non-statistically significant (adjusted HR 1.97; 95% CI 0.99 – 3.94; p=0.054; referent normal, TICS-m >22). Quality of life across cognitive status was similar at 1 year. Conclusions Most older patients surviving AMI have measurable CIND. CIND was associated with less invasive care, less referral and participation in cardiac rehabilitation, and worse risk-adjusted 1 year survival in those with moderate/severe CIND, making it an important condition to consider in optimizing AMI care. PMID:22093202

  2. The Tragedy and Triumph of Minamata: A Paradigm for Understanding Ecological, Human-Environment and Culture-Technology Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allchin, Douglas

    1999-01-01

    Contends that the example of mercury poisoning in Minamata, Japan can be used as a paradigm for teaching ecology and science-and-society issues. Discusses the history and science of the pollution and poisoning, and considers the social and cultural consequences of the incident, some aspects of causation and responsibility, and some aspects of…

  3. Images of Struggle and Triumph: Using Picture Books to Teach about the Civil Rights Movement in the Secondary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Karen H.; Sheffield, Caroline C.; Ford, Martha B.; Cruz, Barbara C.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes four picture books ("Mississippi Morning" written by Ruth Vander Zee, "Dad, Jackie, and Me" written by Myron Uhlberg, "Freedom on the Menu" written by Carole Boston Weatherford, and "A Sweet Smell of Roses" written by Angela Johnson) that provide a concise (yet nuanced) chronicle of the civil rights movement--from the Jim…

  4. Under severe HLB and citrus canker pressure, 'Triumph' and 'Jackson' perform better than 'Flame' and 'Marsh' grapefruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) and Citrus Canker (CC) threaten the viability of Florida grapefruit production. ‘Triumph’ (T), reportedly a grapefruit/sweet orange hybrid, is similar to seedy white grapefruit with earlier maturity and lower bitterness. ‘Jackson’ (J) is a low-seeded budsport of ‘Triumph’. Tree h...

  5. Trouble and Triumph: German Life-Turkish Tradition in Renan Demirkan's "Schwarzer Tee mit drei Stuck Zucker"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, Reika

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores Demirkan's narrative strategies in "Schwarzer Tee mit drei Stuck Zucker" to negotiate issues of a life between two cultures and traditions. Based on Bhabha's insights that mainstream culture needs intellectual and artistic infusion from the margins of a society in order to remain vital; and that cultural production itself is a…

  6. Love is the triumph of the imagination: Daydreams about significant others are associated with increased happiness, love and connection.

    PubMed

    Poerio, Giulia L; Totterdell, Peter; Emerson, Lisa-Marie; Miles, Eleanor

    2015-05-01

    Social relationships and interactions contribute to daily emotional well-being. The emotional benefits that come from engaging with others are known to arise from real events, but do they also come from the imagination during daydreaming activity? Using experience sampling methodology with 101 participants, we obtained 371 reports of naturally occurring daydreams with social and non-social content and self-reported feelings before and after daydreaming. Social, but not non-social, daydreams were associated with increased happiness, love and connection and this effect was not solely attributable to the emotional content of the daydreams. These effects were only present when participants were lacking in these feelings before daydreaming and when the daydream involved imagining others with whom the daydreamer had a high quality relationship. Findings are consistent with the idea that social daydreams may function to regulate emotion: imagining close others may serve the current emotional needs of daydreamers by increasing positive feelings towards themselves and others. PMID:25584779

  7. News from Front (of the Solar System): the problem with Mercury, the Vulcan hypothesis, and General Relativity's first astronomical triumph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, William

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the outer planet Neptune in 1846, based on the calculated position published by Urbain Jean Joseph Le Verrier, has been hailed as the "zenith of Newtonian mechanics." An attempt by Le Verrier to further extend the dominion of Newton's gravitational theory to the innermost known planet of the Solar System, Mercury, seemingly came to grief with the discovery of a small unexplained discrepancy in the precession of the perihelion of Mercury, whose value was later calculated as 43".0 per century. Le Verrier proposed that it could be explained on the basis of Newtonian theory by assuming the existence of an intra-mercurial planet ("Vulcan") or ring of debris. Efforts to confirm this hypothesis, culminating in high drama on the plains of the western United States at the great North American solar eclipse of July 1878, proved futile; by 1908, W. W. Campbell and C.D. Perrine of Lick Observatory, who had carried out exhaustive photographic searches at three eclipses (1901, 1905, and 1908) could declare that Vulcan did not exist. The theoretical problem it was invoked to explain remained until November 1915, when Albert Einstein used the recently discovered generally covariant gravitational equations to put the problem to rest. "Perihelion motions explained quantitatively … you will be astonished," he wrote to his friend Michael Besso.

  8. Bridge of Signs: Can Sign Language Empower Non-Deaf Children to Triumph over Their Communication Disabilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toth, Anne

    2009-01-01

    This pilot research project examined the use of sign language as a communication bridge for non-Deaf children between the ages of 0-6 years who had been diagnosed with, or whose communication difficulties suggested, the presence of such disorders as Autism, Down Syndrome, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), and/or learning disabilities.…

  9. Inspiration in the harness of daily labor. Darwin, botany, and the triumph of evolution, 1859-1868.

    PubMed

    Bellon, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Charles Darwin hoped that a large body of working naturalists would embrace evolution after the Origin of Species appeared in late 1859. He was disappointed. His evolutionary ideas at first made painfully little progress in the scientific community. But by 1863 the tide had turned dramatically, and within five years evolution became scientific orthodoxy in Britain. The Origin's reception followed this peculiar trajectory because Darwin had not initially tied its theory to productive original scientific investigation, which left him vulnerable to charges of reckless speculation. The debate changed with his successful application of evolution to original problems, most notably orchid fertilization, the subject of a well-received book in 1862. Most of Darwin's colleagues found the argument of the Origin convincing when they realized that it functioned productively in the day-to-day work of science-and not before. The conceptual force of the Origin, however outwardly persuasive, acquired full scientific legitimacy only when placed "in the harness of daily labour". PMID:22073768

  10. Achieving the Holevo bound via a bisection decoding protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Matteo; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-06-01

    We present a new decoding protocol to realize transmission of classical information through a quantum channel at asymptotically maximum capacity, achieving the Holevo bound and thus the optimal communication rate. At variance with previous proposals, our scheme recovers the message bit by bit, making use of a series of "yes-no" measurements, organized in bisection fashion, thus determining which codeword was sent in log2 N steps, N being the number of codewords.

  11. "Akeelah and the Bee": Inspirational Story of African-American Intellect and Triumph or Racist Rhetoric Served Up on Another Platter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pimentel, Charise; Sawyer, Cathleen

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors look into the inspirational movie, "Akeelah and the Bee," a film about an African-American who goes against all odds to achieve success in grand proportions. Described as an "inspirational family film" and a "successful feel-good movie" (Turan, 2006), "Akeelah and the Bee" proved inspirational to many viewers, as it…

  12. Multiple differences between patients who initiate fish oil supplementation post-myocardial infarction and those who do not: the TRIUMPH Study.

    PubMed

    Harris, William S; Kennedy, K F; Maddox, T M; Kutty, S; Spertus, J A

    2016-01-01

    The utility of fish oil supplements (FOS) in patients who survive an acute myocardial infarction (MI) remains controversial, with randomized trials showing less benefit than observational studies would suggest. The differences in the characteristics of MI patients who use FOS in routine clinical care are unknown but may help explain this discrepancy. We used data from a 24-site registry study in which extensive information was available on 4340 MI patients at admission and 1, 6, and 12 months postdischarge. After excluding those using FOS at admission (n = 651), those who died before the 1-month follow-up visit (n = 63), and those with missing data at 1 month (n = 1228), 2398 remained. Of them, 377 (16%) started FOS within 1 month of their MI. We analyzed 53 patient characteristics associated with FOS use. We observed differences (P < .001) in 20 demographic, socioeconomic, treatment, disease severity, and health status domains. The FOS users were more likely than nonusers to be white, married, financially secure, highly educated, and eating fish. They also had a higher ejection fraction at discharge, were more likely to have had in-hospital percutaneous coronary interventions, and were more likely to have participated in cardiac rehabilitation programs. The FOS users were less likely to have a history of diabetes, alcohol abuse, stroke, MI, and angina. In conclusion, post-MI patients who initiate FOS within 1 month of discharge in routine clinical practice differ substantially from those who do not. These differences are strongly associated with a better post-MI prognosis and may illuminate several sources of unmeasured confounding in observational studies. PMID:26773782

  13. The market triumph of ecotourism: an economic investigation of the private and social benefits of competing land uses in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, Christopher A; Giudice-Granados, Renzo; Day, Brett; Turner, Kerry; Velarde-Andrade, Luz Marina; Dueñas-Dueñas, Agusto; Lara-Rivas, Juan Carlos; Yu, Douglas W

    2010-01-01

    Annual revenue flow to developing countries for ecotourism (or nature-based tourism) could be as large as US$ 210×10(12), providing an enormous financial incentive against habitat loss and exploitation. However, is ecotourism the most privately and/or socially valuable use of rainforest land? The question is rarely answered because the relevant data, estimates of profits and fixed costs, are rarely available. We present a social cost-benefit analysis of land use in an ecotourism cluster in the Tambopata region of Amazonian Peru. The net present value of ecotourism-controlled land is given by the producer surplus (profits plus fixed costs of ecotourism lodges): US$ 1,158 ha(-1), which is higher than all currently practiced alternatives, including unsustainable logging, ranching, and agriculture. To our knowledge, this is the first sector-wide study of profitability and producer surplus in a developing-country ecotourism sector and the first to compare against equivalent measures for a spectrum of alternative uses. We also find that ecotourism-controlled land sequesters between 5.3 to 8.7 million tons of above-ground carbon, which is equivalent to between 3000-5000 years of carbon emissions from the domestic component of air and surface travel between the gateway city of Cusco and the lodges, at 2005 emission rates. Ecotourism in Tambopata has successfully monetized the hedonic value of wild nature in Amazonian Peru, and justifies the maintenance of intact rainforest over all alternative uses on narrow economic grounds alone. PMID:20927377

  14. The Market Triumph of Ecotourism: An Economic Investigation of the Private and Social Benefits of Competing Land Uses in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Kirkby, Christopher A.; Giudice-Granados, Renzo; Day, Brett; Turner, Kerry; Velarde-Andrade, Luz Marina; Dueñas-Dueñas, Agusto; Lara-Rivas, Juan Carlos; Yu, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    Annual revenue flow to developing countries for ecotourism (or nature-based tourism) could be as large as US$ 210×1012, providing an enormous financial incentive against habitat loss and exploitation. However, is ecotourism the most privately and/or socially valuable use of rainforest land? The question is rarely answered because the relevant data, estimates of profits and fixed costs, are rarely available. We present a social cost-benefit analysis of land use in an ecotourism cluster in the Tambopata region of Amazonian Peru. The net present value of ecotourism-controlled land is given by the producer surplus (profits plus fixed costs of ecotourism lodges): US$ 1,158 ha−1, which is higher than all currently practiced alternatives, including unsustainable logging, ranching, and agriculture. To our knowledge, this is the first sector-wide study of profitability and producer surplus in a developing-country ecotourism sector and the first to compare against equivalent measures for a spectrum of alternative uses. We also find that ecotourism-controlled land sequesters between 5.3 to 8.7 million tons of above-ground carbon, which is equivalent to between 3000–5000 years of carbon emissions from the domestic component of air and surface travel between the gateway city of Cusco and the lodges, at 2005 emission rates. Ecotourism in Tambopata has successfully monetized the hedonic value of wild nature in Amazonian Peru, and justifies the maintenance of intact rainforest over all alternative uses on narrow economic grounds alone. PMID:20927377

  15. 77 FR 2278 - Intent To Grant an Exclusive License for a U.S. Army Owned Invention to Triumph Actuation Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... June 12, 2007, ``Automatic Primer Feed Mechanism''; U.S. patent 7,246,549, issued July 24, 2007, ``Automatic Primer Feed Mechanism; U.S. patent 7,318,369, issued January 15, 2008, ``Out-of- Battery Lock for the Automatic Primer Feed Mechanism''; U.S. patent 7,845,264, issued December 7, 2010,...

  16. Photoacoustic, Photothermal, and Diffusion-Wave Sciences in the Twenty-First Century: Triumphs of the Past Set the Trends for the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelis, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    A handful of early breakthroughs in photoacoustic science and engineering since its modern-day (scientific) renaissance in the 1970s has defined directions in the development of the photoacoustic, photothermal, and diffusion-wave fields in the past 40 years that have shaped modern day developments and have led to an impressive range of vibrant and unique technologies in the third millennium (technological renaissance). A power-point presentation on the ICPPP-16 opening plenary talk focuses on the historical roots of what I perceive to be some of today's most successful and unique technologies, while readily acknowledging the impossibility to be all inclusive. It can be found under the url: http://cadift.mie.utoronto.ca/History_of_Photoacoustics-Photothermics.ppt. The thematic areas in question include historical reviews selected among the following topics: Piezoelectric photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) which, along with early gas-phase PA spectroscopic studies of biomaterials such as blood haemoglobin and progress in the physics of photon diffusion waves, has led to the modern-day explosion in biomedical photoacoustic imaging technologies with future trends for photoacoustic and ultrasound co-registered imagers; Thermoreflectance, piezoelectric, and gas-phase PA imaging of semiconductors which, along with developments in photocarrier diffusion wave physics, led to photocarrier radiometry, nanolayer diagnostics, carrierographic imaging of optoelectronic materials, and devices with industrial trends in solar cell inspection and control; Photoacoustic gas-phase and infrared radiometric probing and scanning imaging NDE which led to lock-in thermography and have spawned industrial and biomedical technologies; Thermal-wave interferometry and the quest for thermal coherence which led to thermal-wave cavities, the thermal-wave radar, and derivative depth profiling technologies, and, very recently, thermal coherence tomography. This review is meant to be a growing public record of work in progress, with new materials in the given thematic areas and other thematic areas being added as more information on the rich history of the field becomes available. Direct inputs to the author by the broader photoacoustic, photothermal, and diffusion-wave community are solicited and strongly encouraged to ensure that all landmark and seminal work that shaped the state of the science and art in the field receives fair and deserving exposure and the historical review becomes truly representative and comprehensive.

  17. Triumph of hope over experience: learning from interventions to reduce avoidable hospital admissions identified through an Academic Health and Social Care Network

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Internationally health services are facing increasing demands due to new and more expensive health technologies and treatments, coupled with the needs of an ageing population. Reducing avoidable use of expensive secondary care services, especially high cost admissions where no procedure is carried out, has become a focus for the commissioners of healthcare. Method We set out to identify, evaluate and share learning about interventions to reduce avoidable hospital admission across a regional Academic Health and Social Care Network (AHSN). We conducted a service evaluation identifying initiatives that had taken place across the AHSN. This comprised a literature review, case studies, and two workshops. Results We identified three types of intervention: pre-hospital; within the emergency department (ED); and post-admission evaluation of appropriateness. Pre-hospital interventions included the use of predictive modelling tools (PARR – Patients at risk of readmission and ACG – Adjusted Clinical Groups) sometimes supported by community matrons or virtual wards. GP-advisers and outreach nurses were employed within the ED. The principal post-hoc interventions were the audit of records in primary care or the application of the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP) within the admission ward. Overall there was a shortage of independent evaluation and limited evidence that each intervention had an impact on rates of admission. Conclusions Despite the frequency and cost of emergency admission there has been little independent evaluation of interventions to reduce avoidable admission. Commissioners of healthcare should consider interventions at all stages of the admission pathway, including regular audit, to ensure admission thresholds don’t change. PMID:22682525

  18. Advanced channel monitoring for optical layer management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weiguo; Zheng, Zheng

    2003-12-01

    We categorized synchronous optical network (SONET) operations, administration, maintenance, and provisioning (OAM&P) requirements according to their time urgency as related to the network operation and assigned them to a three-layer telecommunications management network for transparent networks accordingly. Because all-optical bit-by-bit processing at data rates is not yet available, a solution that is currently feasible for optical management layer requirements is proposed on the basis of a previously demonstrated advanced channel-monitoring method. Indicators for signal quality as well as channel use can be provided, and the scheme is transparent to current SONET network elements.

  19. A 12-bit, 1 MS/s SAR-ADC for a CZT-based multi-channel gamma-ray imager using a new digital calibration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Wei, T.; Yang, L.; Hu, Y.

    2016-03-01

    The successive approximation register-analog to digital converter (SAR-ADC) is widely used in the CdZnTe-based gamma-ray imager because of its outstanding characteristics of low power consumption, relatively high resolution, and small die size. This study proposes a digital bit-by-bit calibration method using an input ramp signal to further improve the conversion precision and power consumption of an SAR-ADC. The proposed method is based on the sub-radix-2 redundant architecture and the perturbation technique. The proposed calibration algorithm is simpler, more stable, and faster than traditional approaches. The prototype chip of the 12-bit, 1 MS/s radiation-hardened SAR-ADC has been designed and fabricated using the TSMC 0.35 μm 2P4M CMOS process. This SAR-ADC consumes 3 mW power and occupies a core area of 856× 802μm2. The digital bit-by-bit calibration algorithm is implemented via MATLAB for testing flexibility. The effective number of bits for this digitally calibrated SAR-ADC reaches 11.77 bits. The converter exhibits high conversion precision, low power consumption, and radiation-hardened design. Therefore, this SAR-ADC is suitable for multi-channel gamma-ray imager applications.

  20. A resolution celebrating the life and achievements of Lena Mary Calhoun Horne and honoring her for her triumphs against racial discrimination and her steadfast commitment to the civil rights of all people.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Gillibrand, Kirsten E. [D-NY

    2010-05-14

    05/14/2010 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S3790-3792; text as passed Senate: CR S3791-3792; text of measure as introduced: CR S3786) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. Triumphs Show: What Makes Art History? Year 7 Exploit the Resources of the Victoria and Albert Museum's Medieval Gallery to Create and Curate Their Own Answer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copsey, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    What do 14 Year 7 students, an art teacher, a history teacher and the Victoria and Albert Museum have in common? They are all part of the "Stronger Together" Museum Champion project run by The Langley Academy and the River & Rowing Museum and supported by Arts Council England, designed to engage students, teachers and museum staff…

  2. Initialize and Weak-Program Erasing Scheme for High-Performance and High-Reliability Ferroelectric NAND Flash Solid-State Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, Kousuke; Yajima, Ryoji; Hatanaka, Teruyoshi; Takahashi, Mitsue; Sakai, Shigeki; Takeuchi, Ken

    Initialize and weak-program erasing scheme is proposed to achieve high-performance and high-reliability Ferroelectric (Fe-) NAND flash solid-state drive (SSD). Bit-by-bit erase VTH control is achieved by the proposed erasing scheme and history effects in Fe-NAND is also suppressed. History effects change the future erase VTH shift characteristics by the past program voltage. The proposed erasing scheme decreases VTH shift variation due to history effects from ±40% to ±2% and the erase VTH distribution width is reduced from over 0.4V to 0.045V. As a result, the read and VPASS disturbance decrease by 42% and 37%, respectively. The proposed erasing scheme is immune to VTH variations and voltage stress. The proposed erasing scheme also suppresses the power and bandwidth degradation of SSD.

  3. A k-mode synchronization methodology for multiple satellite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, M. Hossein; Arozullah, Mohammed

    The authors describe a k-mode burst synchronization methodology that can improve the synchronization performance of the digital communication networks with bursty dynamic users. The method is suitable for the applications such as centralized and distributed multiple satellite networking, where the system supports a large number of low-orbit user satellites. In the mobile networking environment usually there is no network synchronization and the users are highly dynamic. Therefore, more stringent analysis of the system synchronization performance is required. The methodology defined provides flexibility of selecting the k-synchronization stage, which provides a more stable synchronization. The major features of this synchronization method are: a) the synchronizer avoids returning to bit-by-bit comparison mode from higher modes for small errors; b) since there are many modes with different synchronization levels, the synchronizer provides a more stable synchronization; and c) the synchronizer is more stable in environments with burst noise or jamming.

  4. Computer program CORDET. [computerized simulation of digital phase-lock loop for Omega navigation receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palkovic, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    A FORTRAN 4 computer program provides convenient simulation of an all-digital phase-lock loop (DPLL). The DPLL forms the heart of the Omega navigation receiver prototype. Through the DPLL, the phase of the 10.2 KHz Omega signal is estimated when the true signal phase is contaminated with noise. This investigation has provided a convenient means of evaluating loop performance in a variety of noise environments, and has proved to be a useful tool for evaluating design changes. The goals of the simulation are to: (1) analyze the circuit on a bit-by-bit level in order to evaluate the overall design; (2) see easily the effects of proposed design changes prior to actual breadboarding; and (3) determine the optimum integration time for the DPLL in an environment typical of general aviation conditions.

  5. Security for a Smarter Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaratnam, Nataraj

    Bit by bit, our planet is getting smarter. By this, we mean the systems that run, the way we live and work as a society. Three things have brought this about - the world is becoming instrumented, interconnected and intelligent. Given the planet is becoming instrumented and interconnected, this opens up more risks that need to be managed. Escalating security and privacy concerns along with a renewed focus on organizational oversight are driving governance, risk management and compliance (GRC) to the forefront of the business. Compliance regulations have increasingly played a larger role by attempting to establish processes and controls that mitigate the internal and external risks organizations have today. To effectively meet the requirements of GRC, companies must prove that they have strong and consistent controls over who has access to critical applications and data.

  6. Reconstruction of Genome Ancestry Blocks in Multiparental Populations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chaozhi; Boer, Martin P; van Eeuwijk, Fred A

    2015-08-01

    We present a general hidden Markov model framework called R: econstructing A: ncestry B: locks BIT: by bit (RABBIT) for reconstructing genome ancestry blocks from single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data, a required step for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. The framework can be applied to a wide range of mapping populations such as the Arabidopsis multiparent advanced generation intercross (MAGIC), the mouse Collaborative Cross (CC), and the diversity outcross (DO) for both autosomes and X chromosomes if they exist. The model underlying RABBIT accounts for the joint pattern of recombination breakpoints between two homologous chromosomes and missing data and allelic typing errors in the genotype data of both sampled individuals and founders. Studies on simulated data of the MAGIC and the CC and real data of the MAGIC, the DO, and the CC demonstrate that RABBIT is more robust and accurate in reconstructing recombination bin maps than some commonly used methods. PMID:26048018

  7. The Convergence of Systems and Reductionist Approaches in Complex Trait Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Evan G.; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Research into the genetic and environmental factors behind complex trait variation has traditionally been segregated into distinct scientific camps. The reductionist approach aims to decrypt phenotypic variability bit-by-bit, founded on the underlying hypothesis that genome-to-phenome relations are largely constructed from the additive effects of their molecular players. In contrast, the systems approach aims to examine large-scale interactions of many components simultaneously, on the premise that interactions in gene networks can be both linear and nonlinear. Both approaches are complementary, and they are becoming increasingly intertwined due to developments in gene editing tools, omics technologies, and population resources. Together, these strategies are beginning to drive the next era in complex trait research: paving the way to improve agriculture and towards more personalized medicine. PMID:26140590

  8. MAC, A System for Automatically IPR Identification, Collection and Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrão, Carlos

    Controlling Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) in the Digital World is a very hard challenge. The facility to create multiple bit-by-bit identical copies from original IPR works creates the opportunities for digital piracy. One of the most affected industries by this fact is the Music Industry. The Music Industry has supported huge losses during the last few years due to this fact. Moreover, this fact is also affecting the way that music rights collecting and distributing societies are operating to assure a correct music IPR identification, collection and distribution. In this article a system for automating this IPR identification, collection and distribution is presented and described. This system makes usage of advanced automatic audio identification system based on audio fingerprinting technology. This paper will present the details of the system and present a use-case scenario where this system is being used.

  9. Toward a philosophical structure for psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Kenneth S

    2005-03-01

    This article, which seeks to sketch a coherent conceptual and philosophical framework for psychiatry, confronts two major questions: how do mind and brain interrelate, and how can we integrate the multiple explanatory perspectives of psychiatric illness? Eight propositions are proposed and defended: 1) psychiatry is irrevocably grounded in mental, first-person experiences; 2) Cartesian substance dualism is false; 3) epiphenomenalism is false; 4) both brain-->mind and mind-->brain causality are real; 5) psychiatric disorders are etiologically complex, and no more "spirochete-like" discoveries will be made that explain their origins in simple terms; 6) explanatory pluralism is preferable to monistic explanatory approaches, especially biological reductionism; 7) psychiatry must move beyond a prescientific "battle of paradigms" to embrace complexity and support empirically rigorous and pluralistic explanatory models; 8) psychiatry should strive for "patchy reductionism" with the goal of "piecemeal integration" in trying to explain complex etiological pathways to illness bit by bit. PMID:15741457

  10. Stealing Innocence: Youth, Corporate Power, and the Politics of Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Henry A.

    This book looks at the way corporate cultures is encroaching on children's lives. It explores three myths prevalent in society: (1) that the triumph of democracy is equal to the triumph of the market; (2) that children are unaffected by power and politics; and (3) that teaching and learning are no longer linked to improving the world. The book…

  11. More White Supremacy? "The Lord of the Rings" as Pro-American Imperialism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knaus, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    "The Lord of the Rings" continues Hollywood's recurrent theme of good triumphing over evil. The viewer is supposed to identify with the heroes, whiteness, and goodness, which of course triumphs over evil and blackness. Although the cast is made up almost entirely of White people, people also do not question this narrative of White supremacy. To…

  12. What is the future of peer review? Why is there fraud in science? Is plagiarism out of control? Why do scientists do bad things? Is it all a case of:“All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing?”

    PubMed Central

    Triggle, Chris R; Triggle, David J

    2007-01-01

    Peer review is an essential component of the process that is universally applied prior to the acceptance of a manuscript, grant or other scholarly work. Most of us willingly accept the responsibilities that come with being a reviewer but how comfortable are we with the process? Peer review is open to abuse but how should it be policed and can it be improved? A bad peer review process can inadvertently ruin an individual’s career, but are there penalties for policing a reviewer who deliberately sabotages a manuscript or grant? Science has received an increasingly tainted name because of recent high profile cases of alleged scientific misconduct. Once considered the results of work stress or a temporary mental health problem, scientific misconduct is increasingly being reported and proved to be a repeat offence. How should scientific misconduct be handled—is it a criminal offence and subject to national or international law? Similarly plagiarism is an ever-increasing concern whether at the level of the student or a university president. Are the existing laws tough enough? These issues, with appropriate examples, are dealt with in this review. PMID:17583174

  13. Research Issues Underlying the Four-Lab Study: Integrated Disinfection Byproducts Mixtures Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical disinfection of drinking water is a major public health triumph of the 20th century, resulting in significant decreases in morbidity and mortality from waterborne diseases. Disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are chemicals formed by the reaction of oxidizing disinfectants wi...

  14. Cindy Parsons and Follow the Fifty | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... that many women found their crowning reward—a beautiful red dress—to celebrate their triumph in achieving ... keep going, and celebrating every success, large or small. Even today, we are taking what we learned, ...

  15. Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad: A Drama Workshop for Junior High and High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabone, Carmine; Albrecht, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Claims drama in the classroom offers teachers an opportunity to "bring to life" the challenges and triumphs of African Americans. Describes a drama workshop based on the story of Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad. (NH)

  16. Fire in the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Roberta J. M.; Pasachoff, Jay M.

    1998-02-01

    Introduction; 1. Prelude: the beginning of telescopic astronomy and the background of British astronomy and artistic traditions; 2. The heavens on fire: the eighteenth century; 3. The comet-crazed century opens; 4. The triumph of realism; 5. Donati's comet, the watershed; 6. The origin of comet (and meteor) photography; 7. The triumph of the imagination; 8. Comets and the new century; Epilogue: comets and the new millennium; Appendices; List of illustrations; Bibliography; Index.

  17. Least Reliable Bits Coding (LRBC) for high data rate satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderaar, Mark; Wagner, Paul; Budinger, James

    1992-02-01

    An analysis and discussion of a bandwidth efficient multi-level/multi-stage block coded modulation technique called Least Reliable Bits Coding (LRBC) is presented. LRBC uses simple multi-level component codes that provide increased error protection on increasingly unreliable modulated bits in order to maintain an overall high code rate that increases spectral efficiency. Further, soft-decision multi-stage decoding is used to make decisions on unprotected bits through corrections made on more protected bits. Using analytical expressions and tight performance bounds it is shown that LRBC can achieve increased spectral efficiency and maintain equivalent or better power efficiency compared to that of Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK). Bit error rates (BER) vs. channel bit energy with Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN) are given for a set of LRB Reed-Solomon (RS) encoded 8PSK modulation formats with an ensemble rate of 8/9. All formats exhibit a spectral efficiency of 2.67 = (log2(8))(8/9) information bps/Hz. Bit by bit coded and uncoded error probabilities with soft-decision information are determined. These are traded with with code rate to determine parameters that achieve good performance. The relative simplicity of Galois field algebra vs. the Viterbi algorithm and the availability of high speed commercial Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) for block codes indicates that LRBC using block codes is a desirable method for high data rate implementations.

  18. Maximum-Entropy Inference with a Programmable Annealer

    PubMed Central

    Chancellor, Nicholas; Szoke, Szilard; Vinci, Walter; Aeppli, Gabriel; Warburton, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Optimisation problems typically involve finding the ground state (i.e. the minimum energy configuration) of a cost function with respect to many variables. If the variables are corrupted by noise then this maximises the likelihood that the solution is correct. The maximum entropy solution on the other hand takes the form of a Boltzmann distribution over the ground and excited states of the cost function to correct for noise. Here we use a programmable annealer for the information decoding problem which we simulate as a random Ising model in a field. We show experimentally that finite temperature maximum entropy decoding can give slightly better bit-error-rates than the maximum likelihood approach, confirming that useful information can be extracted from the excited states of the annealer. Furthermore we introduce a bit-by-bit analytical method which is agnostic to the specific application and use it to show that the annealer samples from a highly Boltzmann-like distribution. Machines of this kind are therefore candidates for use in a variety of machine learning applications which exploit maximum entropy inference, including language processing and image recognition. PMID:26936311

  19. Selective video encryption of a distributed coded bitstream using LDPC codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Hwayoung; Delp, Edward J.

    2006-02-01

    Selective encryption is a technique that is used to minimizec omputational complexity or enable system functionality by only encrypting a portion of a compressed bitstream while still achieving reasonable security. For selective encryption to work, we need to rely not only on the beneficial effects of redundancy reduction, but also on the characteristics of the compression algorithm to concentrate important data representing the source in a relatively small fraction of the compressed bitstream. These important elements of the compressed data become candidates for selective encryption. In this paper, we combine encryption and distributed video source coding to consider the choices of which types of bits are most effective for selective encryption of a video sequence that has been compressed using a distributed source coding method based on LDPC codes. Instead of encrypting the entire video stream bit by bit, we encrypt only the highly sensitive bits. By combining the compression and encryption tasks and thus reducing the number of bits encrypted, we can achieve a reduction in system complexity.

  20. Study report on laser storage and retrieval of image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    The theoretical foundation is presented for a system of real-time nonphotographic and nonmagnetic digital laser storage and retrieval of image data. The system utilizes diffraction-limited laser focusing upon thin metal films, melting elementary holes in the metal films in laser focus. The metal films are encapsulated in rotating flexible mylar discs which act as the permanent storage carries. Equal sized holes encompass two dimensional digital ensembles of information bits which are time-sequentially (bit by bit) stored and retrieved. The bits possess the smallest possible size, defined by the Rayleigh criterion of coherent physical optics. Space and time invariant reflective read-out of laser discs with a small laser, provides access to the stored digital information. By eliminating photographic and magnetic data processing, which characterize the previous state of the art, photographic grain, diffusion, and gamma-distortion do not exist. Similarly, magnetic domain structures, magnetic gaps, and magnetic read-out are absent with a digital laser disc system.

  1. A simulation analysis of phase processing circuitry in the Ohio University Omega receiver prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palkovic, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV simulation study of the all-digital phase-processing circuitry is described. A digital phase-lock loop (DPLL) forms the heart of the Omega navigation receiver prototype, and through the DPLL, the phase of the 10.2 KHz Omega signal was estimated when the true signal phase is contaminated with noise. The DPLL uses a frequency synthesizer as the reference oscillator. The synthesizer is composed of synchronous rate multipliers (SRM's) driven by a temperature-compensated crystal oscillator, and the use of the SRM's in this application introduces phase jitter which degrades system performance. Simulation of the frequency synthesizer discussed was to analyze the circuits on a bit-by-bit level in order to evaluate the overall design, to see easily the effects of proposed design changes prior to actual breadboarding, to determine the optimum integration time for the DPLL in an environment typical of general aviation conditions, and to quantify the phase error introduced by the SRM synthesizer and examine its effect on the system.

  2. Diffractive optical element for optical data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Unno, N.; Akamatsu, H.; Yamada, K.; Taniguchi, J.; Yamamoto, M.

    2013-05-01

    The diffractive optical element (DOE) has the transformation function of wavefront, and its applications are forming or homogenization of beam, and aberration correction, and so on. In this study, we evaluate possibility as storage application of the DOE. The optical data storage using the DOE is thought of as a kind of holographic data storage (HDS). In the HDS, digital data is recorded and read out as modulated 2-dimensional page data, instead of bit-by-bit recording in conventional optical storages. Therefore, HDS actualize high data transfer rate. We design and optimize phase distribution of the DOE using the iterative method with regularization. In the optimization process, we use iterative Fourier transform algorithm (IFTA) that is known as Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm. At this time, the regularization method is adopted to suppress minute oscillation of the diffraction pattern. Designed and optimized DOE is fabricated by ultraviolet (UV) nanoimprinting technology. High productivity can be expected by adopting nanoimprinting technology. DOEs are duplicated on the silicon (Si) substrate as reflection-type elements. Fabricated DOE is evaluated in the experiment. We verify that DOE for optical data storage can be actualized through our approach.

  3. Target azimuth estimation for automatic tracking in range-gated imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yinan; Wang, Xinwei; Zhou, Yan

    2012-11-01

    Target tracking is of great importance in imaging system, which can be applied in surveillance, as well as salvage and rescue where 3D spatial coordinates are used to locate the target. Range-gated imaging system is capable of acquiring range information of targets. However, azimuth is also necessary to provide the spatial coordinates to achieve target tracking. This paper presents a target azimuth estimation method for range-gated imaging system, aiming at obtaining essential information for vision-based automatic tracking. Due to the noise and low contrast of range-gated image, median filter and histogram equalization are used. Then the Otsu method is performed to make the segmentation of target and background. After segmentation, morphologic transformation methods will be taken in order to delete false targets. With pixels of target extracted from the image, the centoid will be derived. Next the pinhole camera model is applied to work out the azimuth coordinate. Since the focus length of camera is needed in the formula, an NC (Numerical Control) zoom module is developed. In this module, a sliding potentiometer is connected to the focus motor in camera, which serves as a feedback of the focus. To read the focus length and control the focus motor, an MCU (with AD converter) is used. Once the target azimuth information is obtained, the pan-tilt control unit can track the target bit by bit automatically.

  4. Least Reliable Bits Coding (LRBC) for high data rate satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderaar, Mark; Wagner, Paul; Budinger, James

    1992-01-01

    An analysis and discussion of a bandwidth efficient multi-level/multi-stage block coded modulation technique called Least Reliable Bits Coding (LRBC) is presented. LRBC uses simple multi-level component codes that provide increased error protection on increasingly unreliable modulated bits in order to maintain an overall high code rate that increases spectral efficiency. Further, soft-decision multi-stage decoding is used to make decisions on unprotected bits through corrections made on more protected bits. Using analytical expressions and tight performance bounds it is shown that LRBC can achieve increased spectral efficiency and maintain equivalent or better power efficiency compared to that of Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK). Bit error rates (BER) vs. channel bit energy with Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN) are given for a set of LRB Reed-Solomon (RS) encoded 8PSK modulation formats with an ensemble rate of 8/9. All formats exhibit a spectral efficiency of 2.67 = (log2(8))(8/9) information bps/Hz. Bit by bit coded and uncoded error probabilities with soft-decision information are determined. These are traded with with code rate to determine parameters that achieve good performance. The relative simplicity of Galois field algebra vs. the Viterbi algorithm and the availability of high speed commercial Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) for block codes indicates that LRBC using block codes is a desirable method for high data rate implementations.

  5. Turbo Trellis Coded Modulation With Iterative Decoding for Mobile Satellite Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, D.; Pollara, F.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, analytical bounds on the performance of parallel concatenation of two codes, known as turbo codes, and serial concatenation of two codes over fading channels are obtained. Based on this analysis, design criteria for the selection of component trellis codes for MPSK modulation, and a suitable bit-by-bit iterative decoding structure are proposed. Examples are given for throughput of 2 bits/sec/Hz with 8PSK modulation. The parallel concatenation example uses two rate 4/5 8-state convolutional codes with two interleavers. The convolutional codes' outputs are then mapped to two 8PSK modulations. The serial concatenated code example uses an 8-state outer code with rate 4/5 and a 4-state inner trellis code with 5 inputs and 2 x 8PSK outputs per trellis branch. Based on the above mentioned design criteria for fading channels, a method to obtain he structure of the trellis code with maximum diversity is proposed. Simulation results are given for AWGN and an independent Rayleigh fading channel with perfect Channel State Information (CSI).

  6. An Advanced NAND-Structure Cell Technology for Reliable 3.3 V 64 Mb Electrically Erasable and Programmable Read Only Memories (EEPROMs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aritome, Seiichi; Hatakeyama, Ikuo; Endoh, Tetsuo; Yamaguchi, Tetsuya; Shuto, Susumu; Iizuka, Hirohisa; Maruyama, Tooru; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hemink, Gertjan; Sakui, Koji; Tanaka, Tomoharu; Momodomi, Masaki; Shirota, Riichiro

    1994-01-01

    An extremely small NAND-structure cell of 1.13 µm2 per bit, 80% of the smallest Flash memory cell reported so far [H. Kume et al.: IEEE Tech. Dig. IEDM (1992) p. 991], has been developed in 0.4 µm technology. The chip size of a 64 Mb NAND electrically erasable and programmable read only memory (EEPROM) using this cell is estimated to be 120 mm2, which is 60% that of a 64 Mb DRAM. In order to realize the small cell size, a 0.8 µm field isolation is used. A negative bias of -0.5 V to the P-well of the memory cell is applied during writing. In addition, a bit-by-bit intelligent writing technology allows a 3.3 V data sensing scheme which can suppress read disturb to 1/1000 in comparison with the conventional 5 V scheme. As a result, it is expected that with this technology, 106 write and erase cycles can be achieved and that the tunnel oxide can be scaled down from 10 nm to 8 nm.

  7. Tailoring the time delay of optical pulse/sequence employing cascaded SOA and band-pass filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu; Wang, Zhi; Wu, Chongqing; Mao, Yaya; Shang, Chao; Gao, Kaiqiang; Li, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    A tunable time delay for a 100-ps pulse is achieved via a SOA cascaded band-pass filter, which can be tailored by tuning the filter or changing the SOA injection current. For a single pulse, when the pulse propagates through the cascaded system, a delay of 99.6 ps and an advance of 42.6 ps can be achieved by altering the SOA injection current at two different wavelengths located in the red band and blue band of the filter, respectively. The corresponding tunable delay range is 165 ps, and the maximum delay-bandwidth product (DBP) is 1.65. For an optical sequence, to our knowledge, it is the first time that the time delay is tailored over 145.6 ps corresponding to a DBP of 1.46 by tuning the wavelength from 1556.075 to 1556.955 nm, and 45.2 ps (95.6 ps) advance (delay) by tuning the injection current from 100 to 500 mA at 1556.155 nm (1556.955 nm). The dependence of the time delay on the injection current and filtering configuration has been discussed based on plenty of experiments data. Based on SOA's fast switching, this device can be used for signal synchronization and bit-by-bit signal processing in a communication system.

  8. Burst-mode optical label processor with ultralow power consumption.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Salah; Nakahara, Tatsushi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Ryo

    2016-04-01

    A novel label processor subsystem for 100-Gbps (25-Gbps × 4λs) burst-mode optical packets is developed, in which a highly energy-efficient method is pursued for extracting and interfacing the ultrafast packet-label to a CMOS-based processor where label recognition takes place. The method involves performing serial-to-parallel conversion for the label bits on a bit-by-bit basis by using an optoelectronic converter that is operated with a set of optical triggers generated in a burst-mode manner upon packet arrival. Here we present three key achievements that enabled a significant reduction in the total power consumption and latency of the whole subsystem; 1) based on a novel operation mechanism for providing amplification with bit-level selectivity, an optical trigger pulse generator, that consumes power for a very short duration upon packet arrival, is proposed and experimentally demonstrated, 2) the energy of optical triggers needed by the optoelectronic serial-to-parallel converter is reduced by utilizing a negative-polarity signal while employing an enhanced conversion scheme entitled the discharge-or-hold scheme, 3) the necessary optical trigger energy is further cut down by half by coupling the triggers through the chip's backside, whereas a novel lens-free packaging method is developed to enable a low-cost alignment process that works with simple visual observation. PMID:27136992

  9. Maximum-Entropy Inference with a Programmable Annealer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancellor, Nicholas; Szoke, Szilard; Vinci, Walter; Aeppli, Gabriel; Warburton, Paul A.

    2016-03-01

    Optimisation problems typically involve finding the ground state (i.e. the minimum energy configuration) of a cost function with respect to many variables. If the variables are corrupted by noise then this maximises the likelihood that the solution is correct. The maximum entropy solution on the other hand takes the form of a Boltzmann distribution over the ground and excited states of the cost function to correct for noise. Here we use a programmable annealer for the information decoding problem which we simulate as a random Ising model in a field. We show experimentally that finite temperature maximum entropy decoding can give slightly better bit-error-rates than the maximum likelihood approach, confirming that useful information can be extracted from the excited states of the annealer. Furthermore we introduce a bit-by-bit analytical method which is agnostic to the specific application and use it to show that the annealer samples from a highly Boltzmann-like distribution. Machines of this kind are therefore candidates for use in a variety of machine learning applications which exploit maximum entropy inference, including language processing and image recognition.

  10. Biological neural networks as model systems for designing future parallel processing computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.

    1991-01-01

    One of the more interesting debates of the present day centers on whether human intelligence can be simulated by computer. The author works under the premise that neurons individually are not smart at all. Rather, they are physical units which are impinged upon continuously by other matter that influences the direction of voltage shifts across the units membranes. It is only the action of a great many neurons, billions in the case of the human nervous system, that intelligent behavior emerges. What is required to understand even the simplest neural system is painstaking analysis, bit by bit, of the architecture and the physiological functioning of its various parts. The biological neural network studied, the vestibular utricular and saccular maculas of the inner ear, are among the most simple of the mammalian neural networks to understand and model. While there is still a long way to go to understand even this most simple neural network in sufficient detail for extrapolation to computers and robots, a start was made. Moreover, the insights obtained and the technologies developed help advance the understanding of the more complex neural networks that underlie human intelligence.

  11. Ideas Worth Borrowing. Life Studies: Montana Students Tell the Story of a Place and Its People; Tales of Triumph: Fairy Tales Weave Connections between Generations; Everybody Writes: English Language Learners Discover Their Voice; Traveling by Post: "Paper Exchange Students" Explore the Globe; Learning by the Book: Students Publish a Series of Local Bestsellers; The Roots of Nikiski: Alaskan Students Discover Their Heritage and Leave a Legacy of Their Own; Riding "La Alfombra Magica": ESL Students Explore Their Roots....

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Suzie; Sherman, Lee; Linik, Joyce Riha; Reed, Bracken

    2002-01-01

    Seven classroom projects that motivate student writing in Northwest schools are described. The projects vary in grade level. Themes include local history, fairy tales, "Flat Stanley" exchange students, student book publishing, art, poetry, and science. Common practices include having students write about local and personally meaningful topics,…

  12. Flow Redistribution Between Legs and Brain During STS 93 Re-Entry and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbeille, P.; Meck, J.; Porcher, M.; Benavides, E.; Martin, D. S.; South, D. A.; Ribeiro, C.; Westover, A.

    2003-01-01

    The objective was to quantify bit by bit the arterial hemodynamic response to the successive acceleration induced fluid shifts during re-entry and landing. Method: The astronaut instrumented himself with a flat Doppler probe fixed on the skin, a blood pressure arm cuff, and 3 ECG electrodes. The ICMS (integrated cardiovascular monitoring system, 15x15x25 cu cm, battery powered) designed to monitor Blood pressure, ECG, cerebral and femoral flows was fixed below the astronaut sit in the middeck. Recordings started 5 minutes before de-orbiting (TIG) and stopped 5 min after wheels stop. Results. During re-entry blood pressure increased by 20% at TIG, and then by 25 to 30% during the highest Gz accelerations (approx 1 S g ) . The cerebral flow remained decreased by 10 to 15% below inflight value all during the Entry and landing phases. Conversely the femoral flow increased at TIG and entry ( + l0 to 20%), recovered at 0.lg, and then decreased in proportion with the Gz acceleration (-10% to -40% from 0.5g to 1.5g). The reduction in Femoral flow was associated with an opposite variation in lower limb vascular resistance. Consequently the cerebral flow/femoral flow ratio decreased at TIG and entry (-20%), and then increased according to the Gz acceleration level ( + l0 to +40% from 0.5 to 1.5g). Conclusion: During orthostatic tests (Stand LBNP tests) the cerebral to femoral flow ratio allowed to quantify the efficiency of the flow redistribution between these 2 areas and predicted orthostatic intolerance. In the present case the astronaut was found orthostatically tolerant at postflight tilt tests, but we suggest that during re-entry this parameter could predict the occurrence of syncope in severely disadapted astronauts.

  13. The Best of the Literacy Beat 1988-1989. The Best of the Literacy Beat 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Writers Association, Washington, DC.

    This document is a set of two volumes that contain prize-winning newspaper articles and summaries of radio and television shows selected as part of the Media Resource Project on Literacy. Items in the 1988-89 book include the following: "Why Daddy Can't Read" (Sally L. Gilman); "The Triumph of Jimmy Sanchez" (Sandra Macias); "Illiteracy:…

  14. Classic and Modern Propaganda in Documentary Film: Teaching the Psychology of Persuasion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Kevin E.

    2008-01-01

    Primary source material found in documentary film has the potential to richly inform college teaching. This article describes using 2 historically significant documentary-style films to teach concepts in the psychology of persuasion. Exemplary clips taken from "Triumph of the Will" (Riefenstahl, 1935) and "Fahrenheit 9/11" (Moore, 2004)…

  15. Get the Federal Government out of Education? That Wasn't the Founding Fathers' Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Jack

    2011-01-01

    With the triumph of Tea Party candidates and other conservatives in 2010, many in the new Congress are pressing to get the federal government out of education. Eliminating or curtailing federal involvement in education would be a wrong-headed, simplistic move for several reasons: (1) It ignores the nation's history; (2) It would erode the state…

  16. Evapotranspiration of irrigated sunflower in a semi-arid environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is an alternative crop for the Southern High Plains typically produced under dryland; however irrigation offers greater potential for enhanced productivity and quality. Sunflower [cv, S 672 NuSun (Triumph Dwarf)] was grown in 2009 at Bushland, Texas, on two 4.2 ha fiel...

  17. American Album: 200 Years of Constitutional Democracy. Law in U.S. History. Law in Social Studies Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suter, Coral; Croddy, Marshall

    This book explores the lives of people who have shaped the laws and legal system of the United States and describes their impact on the U.S. Constitution. The new government's beginnings are examined in unit 1, through the pitfalls and triumphs of the First Continental Congress. The role of John Marshall, the First Chief Justice of the Supreme…

  18. Women as Leaders in Education: Succeeding Despite Inequity, Discrimination, and Other Challenges. Women and Careers in Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jennifer L., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This up-to-date, candid examination of women's careers in education and leadership in education describes the pitfalls, triumphs, and future promise of female leaders in education. Despite the gains women have made in higher education over the past few decades, and an increasing number of well-qualified female candidates, they are still…

  19. The War for Independence. Grade 5 Model Lesson for Standard 5.5. California History-Social Science Course Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachlod, Michelle, Ed.

    California State Standard 5.5 is delineated as: Students explain the causes of the Revolutionary War. The Revolutionary War is a great central drama in U.S. history and in the evolution of nationalism and democracy throughout the world. Students should perceive the worldwide impact of the colonies' triumph over British imperial power and its…

  20. The Anguish of Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Jerry

    Despite their prominence, the voices of superintendents are rarely heard regarding their personal triumphs and challenges in educational administration and serving the needs of students. Chapter 1, "A Look at the Featured Superintendents," introduces 14 superintendents and reviews their careers. Chapter 2, "The Good: Dealing With Tough Issues By…

  1. What Students Need to Know and Be Able to Do On Leaving School for College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanford, George H.; Taylor, Daniel B.

    One of our nation's educational triumphs is that admission to college has been brought within the reach of a majority of our high school graduates. Yet inadequate preparation often deprives students of this opportunity. Their stunted hopes are a major reason for growing naitonal concern about the quality of education in our schools. The College…

  2. A Toxicological Perspective on Disinfection ByProducts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of water is essential for reduction of microbes harmful to human health and chemical disinfection is considered one of the major public health triumphs of the 20th Century. An unintended consequence of disinfection with oxidizing chemicals is formation of disinfectio...

  3. Bringing It All Back Home: An Innovative Approach to the Provision of Tailored Education and Training for Young People--The Experience of the Adult Better Learning and Education (ABLE) 18-21 Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craddock, Fergus

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to give a brief overview of the context to the Adult Better Learning and Education (ABLE) 18-21 programme and the objectives which the programme aimed to fulfil in light of the challenges facing early school leavers. The article will also document the triumphs and challenges experienced by the participants when returning…

  4. Finding Meaning in PDS Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breault, Rick A.

    2010-01-01

    The Professional Development School (PDS) literature is filled with the stuff of good storytelling--archetypes of an ancient profession, struggles of marginalized individuals against powerful structures, personal triumphs, and devotion to a quest. However, much of the writing about PDS experiences that could be considered storytelling tends to…

  5. Early Childhood Development in South Africa--Progress Since the End of Apartheid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atmore, Eric

    2013-01-01

    In April 1994, South Africa held its historic first democratic election. The African National Congress overwhelmingly triumphed and Nelson Mandela became the first president of a free and democratic South Africa. In this review, the situation of South Africa's young children under apartheid and the context of young children in South Africa in…

  6. The Power of Four (the 4-Lab Study): ORD’s Integrated Disinfection By-Products Mixtures Research Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical disinfection of water, a major public health triumph of the 20th century, has resulted in dramatic decreases in morbidity and mortality from water-borne disease. The intended result of chemical disinfection of drinking water is reduction of microbial contamination; the u...

  7. Unfencing the Range: History, Identity, Property, and Apocalypse in "Lame Deer Seeker of Visions."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanborn, Geoff

    1990-01-01

    Seemingly chaotic to Western eyes, John Lame Deer's autobiography has a meaningful structure based on Lakota numerology and oral tradition. The book explores conflicts between White and Indian conceptions of identity and property, and sees itself as an instrument in the apocalyptic triumph of Indian spirituality over White greed. (SV)

  8. Understanding Richard Wright's "Black Boy": A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felgar, Robert

    In "Black Boy," Richard Wright triumphs over an ugly, racist world by fashioning an inspiring, powerful, beautiful, and fictionalized autobiography. To help students understand and appreciate his story in the cultural, political, racial, social, and literary contexts of its time, this casebook provides primary historical documents, collateral…

  9. Performance Reporting: "Real" Accountability or Accountability "Lite." Seventh Annual Survey, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Joseph C.; Minassians, Henrik

    The seventh annual Survey of State Higher Education Finance Officers (SHEFOs) shows the continuing triumph of performance reporting and the continuing trials of performance budgeting and funding in higher education. Responses from SHEFOs from all 50 states show that performance reporting, which now is used in all but 4 states, is by far the…

  10. Screening for Specific Phobias

    MedlinePlus

    ... Screening for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Screening for Social Anxiety Disorder Screening for Specific Phobias Screening for an Anxiety Disorder: Children Screening for an Anxiety Disorder: Family Member Self-Help Strategies: Webinars to Calm Anxious Minds "Triumph" E-News ...

  11. Screening for Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Screening for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Screening for Social Anxiety Disorder Screening for Specific Phobias Screening for an Anxiety Disorder: Children Screening for an Anxiety Disorder: Family Member Self-Help Strategies: Webinars to Calm Anxious Minds "Triumph" E-News ...

  12. Screening for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Screening for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Screening for Social Anxiety Disorder Screening for Specific Phobias Screening for an Anxiety Disorder: Children Screening for an Anxiety Disorder: Family Member Self-Help Strategies: Webinars to Calm Anxious Minds "Triumph" E-News ...

  13. Does Watching Help? In Search of the Theory of Change for Education Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, David

    2015-01-01

    In 2015 Education for All (EFA), concludes its 25-year cycle, and the Global Monitoring Report (GMR) publishes its final assessment of triumph and defeat in reaching the six EFA goals. Before the United Nations adopts new Sustainable Development Goals, it is essential to consider the underlying theories of monitoring. This essay addresses two…

  14. The Conundrums of the University's Ideological Battlegrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The lively experiment that "is" the college and university in America is characterized by sustained struggles and tempered triumphs that have both undergirded and challenged the fundamental foundation of the academy. Large questions shape the framework of the academy in America. These include: ideological and political correctness, the…

  15. The Next Generation of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Millions of people worldwide receive quality drinking water every day from their public water systems. However, chemical disinfection has also produced an unintended healt...

  16. Tom Friedman on Education in the "Flat World"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Administrator, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In his best-selling book, "The World Is Flat," Thomas Friedman describes that the real world is becoming "flat." He describes how 10 forces are "flattening" the 21st century--making it easier for people in India, China and around the world to compete with Americans and others who had triumphed the century before. This article presents an interview…

  17. DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS: THE NEXT GENERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of drinking water is rightly hailed as a major public health triumph of the 20th Century. Before widespread disinfection of drinking water in the U.S. and Europe, millions of people died from infectious waterborne diseases, such as typhoid and cholera. The microbia...

  18. Toward the 21st Century: Retrospect, Prospect for American Vocationalism. Information Series No. 373.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Theodore

    The new vocationalism arising out of 1980s educational reforms caused a resurgence of interest in high school vocational education and in the integration of academic and vocational education. The dominant economic motive of the new vocationalism has found expression in the 1990s school-to-work movement. These reform efforts signal the triumph of…

  19. God's Turnstile: The Work of John Wheeler and Stephen Hawking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overbye, Dennis

    1991-01-01

    Presents an excerpt from the book entitled "Lonely Hearts of the Cosmos." Provides narration of behind-the-scenes events in the lives, the scientific debates, and the intellectual triumphs of the two physicists responsible for inventing the concept of the black hole. (JJK)

  20. 76 FR 73771 - Denial of Motor Vehicle Defect Petition, DP10-002

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... 1930's, Auburn, Cord and Duesenberg automobiles were built with Daytons. All Dayton wheels are produced... three spokes on one wheel. 4.1.2 Scott's Classic Imports--Automobile Wheels The petitioner's December 31..., Lotus, MG and Triumph automobiles. According to Dayton, this September 2005 warranty submission...

  1. Using the GRAPES OF WRATH in the History Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Randy

    1987-01-01

    Maintains that literary fiction may be used to enhance students' understanding of an historical period. Demonstrates how Steinbeck's GRAPES OF WRATH may be used to convey the human side of problems, sufferings, and triumphs that the United States experienced during the Great Depression. (JDH)

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A RESEARCH STRATEGY FOR INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGY-BASED-TOXICOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL EVALUATION OF COMPLEX MIXTURES OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Chemical disinfection of water is a major public health triumph of the 20th century. Dramatic decreases in both morbidity and mortality of water-borne diseases are a direct result of water disinfection. With these important public health benefits comes low-level, chronic ex...

  3. Into the Community and Not on the Shelf: Learning to Develop a Meaningful HIV/AIDS Curriculum for Multiple Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Tasha

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the process involved in creating a community-based training curriculum designed to build capacity and foster new knowledge in support of HIV/AIDS education. Highlighted are the challenges and triumphs incurred while working with community and academic partners to ensure the production of an adaptable curriculum designed to…

  4. Mass Spectrometry Identification of Toxicologically Important Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Before its widespread use, millions of people died from waterborne diseases. Now, people in developed nations receive quality drinking water every day from their public wate...

  5. Disinfection By-Products and Drinking Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Before its widespread use, millions of people died from waterborne diseases. Now, people in developed nations receive quality drinking water every day from their public wa...

  6. U.S. EPA’s Four Lab Study: Integrated Assessment of Complex Disinfection Byproduct Mixtures - Slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical disinfection of drinking water is considered one of the major public health triumphs of the 20th century, as it reduces concentrations of potentially pathogenic microorganisms resulting in corresponding decreases in morbidity and mortality from water-borne diseases. An ...

  7. Let Freedom Ring! Bulletin, 1937, No. 32

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Harold G.; Calhoun, Dorothy; Hatch, Roy W.; Cohen, Philip H.; Schramm, Rudolf

    1937-01-01

    This volume of "Let Freedom Ring!" contains the scripts of the 13 national broadcasts of the radio series of that name presented in the spring of 1937 over the national network of the Columbia Broadcast System. In "Let Freedom Ring!" you will find the courage, the struggle, the triumph of men and women who fought to win and safeguard liberties…

  8. Vaccination Policies Fall on Schools' Shoulders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccines are one of the triumphs of modern medicine, relegating many once-fearsome diseases to the history books. Denying access to school has long been the best way to ensure that children get vaccinated, but carrying out any change in immunization policy means a lot of work for school officials. This article discusses the unity of several…

  9. Teaching Dance to Deaf Students: A Case Study in Cape Coast, Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Tarin T. D.

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the challenges and triumphs of teachers who guide students with visual and auditory impairments to learn about and experience African-based dance as part of a healthy, active lifestyle. The teachers share insights they have gained in developing best practices by capturing the inherent nature of dance as kinesthetic…

  10. The Courage of Their Convictions: Empowering Voices of Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Katherine

    1994-01-01

    Reviews childhood trauma/abuse experienced by Maya Angelou and discusses how Angelou survived and triumphed over these experiences. Relates Angelou's story to moral developmental theory for women proposed by Carol Gilligan, focusing on Gilligan's metaphor of having a "voice." (NB)

  11. 77 FR 33597 - Great Outdoors Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ... America the two hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-13947 Filed 6-6-12; 8:45 am... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8833 of June 1, 2012 Great Outdoors Month, 2012 By the President of the..., trials, and triumphs. During Great Outdoors Month, we celebrate our long legacy of...

  12. On the Development of Democratic Citizens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chance, Jerry M.

    1993-01-01

    Contends that the end of the Cold War does not necessarily mean the triumph of democracy. Presents contemporary interpretations of the democratic concepts of liberty, equality, and fraternity. Asserts that responsible action in a democratic society requires continued reflection about values education. (CFR)

  13. Erotic Love and the Development of Proto-Capitalist Ideology in Early Modern Comedy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damsen, Silver

    2009-01-01

    My dissertation, "Erotic Love and the Development of Proto-Capitalist Ideology in Early Modern Comedy" demonstrates how increased crown authority, and an expanded market combine with the mixed agency of the romantic comedy daughter to further encourage early modern economic growth. The triumph of rebelling daughter over blocking father has…

  14. Performance Reporting: The Preferred "No Cost" Accountability Program--The Sixth Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Joseph C.; Minassians, Henrik

    This report presents information from the Sixth Annual Survey of State Higher Education Officers, and once again provides information on performance funding, budgeting, and reporting in all 50 states. Survey results show the triumph of performance reporting and the trials of performance budgeting and funding. The bad budgets for higher education…

  15. Finnish Higher Education Reforms: Responding to Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjeldvoll, Arild

    2009-01-01

    The international academic success of Finnish secondary schooling in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the triumph of the Finnish technology company NOKIA have stimulated national ambitions to improve higher education institutions in Finland. Because secondary schooling and technology in Finland receive world recognition,…

  16. Ayn Rand: Effective Educational Leadership Traits Compared to Selfishness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Barbara A.; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2009-01-01

    A man's self-interest cannot be determined by blind desires or random whims, feelings, urges, or wishes. His interest must be discovered and achieved by the guidance of rational principles that he chooses for himself. This selfishness is man's way to individual triumph over hardships. It is a virtue. Man must be guided by his own independent…

  17. Universal Newborn Screening and Adverse Medical Outcomes: A Historical Note

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosco, Jeffrey P.; Seider, Michael I.; Dunn, Angela C.

    2006-01-01

    Universal newborn screening programs for metabolic disorders are typically described as a triumph of medicine and public policy in the US over the last 50 years. Advances in science and technology, including the Human Genome Project, offer the opportunity to expand universal newborn screening programs to include many additional metabolic and…

  18. Blacks and the Progressive Movement: Emergence of a New Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Jimmie

    1999-01-01

    Claims that many historians believe that the Progressive Era did not benefit the black community as it did the white community. Recognizes the activities of black reformers and their triumphs during this period of continued segregation addressing the role of the black church and the achievements of black women. (CMK)

  19. Proclamations from Adult New Readers. Ratified September 10, 1989. National Adult Literacy Congress (2nd, Washington, D.C., September 9-11, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laubach Literacy International, Syracuse, NY.

    This report contains 10 proclamations prepared by adult new readers at a national conference in September 1989. The proclamations are the result of the new readers' deliberations. They represent the viewpoints of adults who have known firsthand the hardships of illiteracy and the triumph of learning to read. Each proclamation consists of a…

  20. Academic Studies, Science, and Democracy: Conceptions of Subject Matter from Harris to Thorndike

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watras, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    When Ellen Condliffe Lagemann described what she called the troubling history of education research, she claimed that, in the early years of the twentieth century, Edward Lee Thorndike's narrow model of science replaced John Dewey's more open ideas. According to Lagemann, sexism was an important reason for Thorndike's triumph. In describing the…

  1. Education Vital Signs 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School Board Journal, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Lawrence Hardy's lead article details a year of diminished expectations, highlighting teacher shortages, failing teacher competency scores, 12th graders' dismal TIMSS scores, affirmative-action setbacks, and Milwaukee voucher triumphs. Kevin Bushweller probes school violence issues. Others discuss leadership trends, school-success indicators, and…

  2. Understanding Propaganda: The Epistemic Merit Model and its Application to Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Sheryl Tuttle

    2002-01-01

    Pablo Picasso's "Guernica," Francisco de Goya's "Fifth of May," Eugene Delacroix's "Liberty Leading the People," George Orwell's "Road to Wigan Pier," Leni Riefenstahl's "Triumph of the Will," and D. W. Griffith's "Birth of a Nation," are all examples of expressly political art. Historically some art has been not only an object of aesthetic…

  3. A Guide to the Employment Section of the Americans with Disabilities Act 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Katherine Dooley; Satcher, Jamie F.

    The Americans with Disabilities Act, signed into law July 26, 1990, has been heralded across the nation as a triumph for the 43 million Americans with disabilities. This document provides a guide to Title 1 of this Act, which forbids employers with 15 or more employees from discriminating against a qualified individual with a disability in job…

  4. Yes, No, or Maybe? Transitions in Chilean Society in Pablo Larraín's "No"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Pablo Larraín's film "No" (2012) has been widely viewed and reviewed both at home in Chile and internationally. Some reviewers have focused on the film's representation of the triumph of hope and optimism over tyranny. Others have criticized the film's historical inaccuracy, citing a list of details that the film either got wrong or left…

  5. Liberation Therapeutics: Consciousness Raising as a Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasch-Quinn, Elisabeth

    2002-01-01

    Questions the content and form of consciousness raising as a mode of purveying knowledge or bringing about change by considering its emergence in the civil rights movement. Examines such books as "Black Rage" (William Grierand Price Cobbs), "Triumph of the Therapeutic" (Philip Reiff), "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" (Martin Luther…

  6. Earth Day '70, '80, '90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, A. Clay

    1981-01-01

    Uses objective and subjective data to document the triumphs and tragedies of the environmental movement and environmental education during the 1970's. Proposes that members of the National Association for Environmental Education dedicate themselves to a decade of integrated environmental management education. (DC)

  7. Consuming Prose: The Delectable Rhetoric of Food Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Lynn Z.

    2008-01-01

    Food writing, like cooking, offers control over at least a small slice of an otherwise refractory world. As practiced by writers so good that whether they can cook or not is beside the point, food writing is most often upbeat and nurturing, providing successes and triumphs--modest and major--for readers to feast on, with occasional glimpses of…

  8. What Gets a Cell Excited? Kinky Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Hodgkin and Huxley's (5) revealing the origins of cellular excitability is one of the great triumphs of physiology. In an extraordinarily deft series of papers, they were able to measure the essential electrical characteristics of neurons and synthesize them into a quantitative model that accounts for the excitability of neurons and other…

  9. Stories from Hopescapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Violet J.

    2011-01-01

    Author Virginia Hamilton had the gift of creating lyrical phrases that captured the complexities of life. Among her most notable phrase is the idea of the "hopescape," the metaphoric description of the pains and joys, triumphs and defeats, longing, and dreams that make us human. The publication of an edited volume that compiles a sampling of…

  10. The Next Generation of Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Millions of people worldwide receive quality drinking water every day from their public water systems. However, chemical disinfection has also produced an unintended health ...

  11. Disinfection By-Products: Formation and Occurrence in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the twentieth century. Millions of people worldwide receive quality drinking water every day from their public water systems. However, chemical disinfection has also produced an unintended he...

  12. Hubble 2008: Science Year in Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Hubbles remarkable mission has now spanned 18 years. During that time, it has been at the nexus of perhaps the most exciting period of discovery in the history of astronomy. Simultaneously, Hubble has offered up some of the most daunting engineering challenges to humans working in space, and success in meeting those challenges has been among NASAs greatest triumphs.

  13. Western Hemisphere Conference on Persons with Disabilities. Conference Proceedings (Washington, D.C., March 14-18, 1993) = Conferencia Hemisferica Occidental sobre Personas con Discapacidades. Actas de la Conferencia. (Washington, D.C., 14 al 18 de Marzo de 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Jerry D., Ed.; And Others

    This document presents the proceedings of a conference which brought together delegates and First Ladies representing western hemisphere nations to address needs and issues affecting people with disabilities in the Americas. It presents the texts of two keynote addresses: "Small Triumphs, Big Victories: A Global View of Persons with Disabilities,"…

  14. Murals as Monuments: Students' Ideas about Depictions of Civilization in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seixas, Peter; Clark, Penney

    2004-01-01

    Around the world people confront monuments that celebrate historical origins, movements, heroes, and triumphs no longer seen as worthy of celebration. While an analysis of these "lieux de memoire" themselves can reveal historical consciousness, the sites become particularly interesting at the moment when they inspire debate, namely, when people…

  15. Overcoming Modern-Postmodern Dichotomies: Some Possible Benefits for the Counselling Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekerman, Zvi; Tatar, Moshe

    2005-01-01

    The rhetorical/discursive turn, in its multiple disciplinary masks, is here to stay. Even psychology is giving in to its charm. The Sophists can smile again, the agora is back, and the solipsistic self is in retreat. Dialogical, narrative, and cultural psychologies, as well as the counselling profession, triumph the return of the social, the…

  16. The Decline of Presidential Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diggins, John Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Is ethical leadership possible in the politics of this era? Had the question no specific time frame, the answer might be yes, or at least yes and no. In the 21st century, the idea that people can expect ethical leadership in American politics is to believe that hope triumphs over experience. The purpose of politics is no longer to do what is right…

  17. An Australian Science Curriculum: Competition, Advances and Retreats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aubusson, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Science schooling enjoys high status. Scientific capability is perceived as critical in underpinning economic success in advanced societies. Science achievement, at all levels, has become a global competition in which nations want to be seen to triumph. Governments periodically pay close attention to science education with a view to ensuring it…

  18. Democratic Education through the Eyes of the Poor: Appraising the Post-Apartheid Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Msila, Vuyisile

    2013-01-01

    Arguably, one of the major achievements in the 1990s in South Africa was the final toppling of apartheid government and the triumph of democracy over the unjust and unequal past legislation. Since then schools are some of the institutions that have infused democracy ideals into their policies, curriculum and other aspects of school life. The…

  19. 75 FR 65518 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... loss of business by the workers' firm with the firm described in paragraph (2) contributed importantly.... Corporate Headquarters, Creative Group, Accounts, etc. ] 73,814 Triumph Aerostructures, Grand Prairie, TX........... June 25, 2009. Company, Films Business Div., Manpower. 74,359 SuperMedia, LLC, Idearc Everett,...

  20. U.S. EPA’s Four Lab Study: Integrated Assessment of Complex Disinfection Byproduct Mixtures - Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical disinfection of drinking water is considered one of the major public health triumphs of the 20th century, as it reduces concentrations of potentially pathogenic microorganisms resulting in corresponding decreases in morbidity and mortality from water-borne diseases. An ...

  1. Reconciling Memories of Internment Camp Experiences During WWII in Children's and Young Adult Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasgow, Jacqueline N.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the uprooting of Japanese Americans during World War II as portrayed in children's/young adult literature. Discovers the triumph of the spirit of the survivors and replaces suppressed images with empowering ones. Considers stories and narratives in literature as a resource through which readers might shape their understanding of the…

  2. Transition Brief: Policy Recommendations on Preparing Americans for the Global Skills Race

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The central economic competitiveness issue for the Obama administration is creating an aligned, 21st century public education system that prepares students,workers and citizens to triumph in the global skills race. On Jan. 20, 2009, the Obama administration will take command of the White House facing unprecedented challenges to the U.S. economy…

  3. Resilient School Leaders: Strategies for Turning Adversity into Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Jerry L.; Kelleher, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Getting fired, dealing with bitter disputes, having your competence or integrity challenged--these are experiences that educators have all the time. But what's the difference between educators who triumph over adversity versus those who succumb? Blending sage wisdom and research with real stories from educators, this book introduces you to three…

  4. "All The President's Men": How Two Journalists Brought Down a President and Lived To Tell about It. A Guide for Teaching the Movie and the Book in Your Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Bradley

    2002-01-01

    Explains how the news story surrounding the Watergate events led not only to the resignation of President Nixon but also to one of journalism's greatest triumphs. Presents a Watergate timeline with 25 events. Gives three exercises to accompany the study of the journalism side of the Watergate events and to compare the movie, "All The President's…

  5. The "Saggi" and Practical Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    The "Saggi di naturali esperienze" was published in 1667 by one of the earliest scientific societies, the Accademia del Cimento. The book was a triumph for the ruling Medici family of Florence, and the commitment of the Accademia to experimentation helped the "Saggi" become the "laboratory manual" of the 18th century.…

  6. "The Brain within Its Groove": Language and Struggling Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Mers, Kathleen D.

    2010-01-01

    Words are the foundation of literacy. Words can express, in part, the joys, loves, triumphs, and sorrows of life. One person's thoughts, expressed through words, can powerfully influence and inspire audiences or readers and long outlive their author. But not everyone is enamored of words. For some students, words are a kind of torture. For them…

  7. The Valley Forge Encampment: Epic on the Schuylkill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, John B. B., Jr.

    Valley Forge, outside Philadelphia (Pennsylvania), has long been recognized as the site of a great victory of the human spirit. Eleven thousand men including Blacks and Indians resided there during the winter of 1777-78 and triumphed over cold, starvation, nakedness, disease, and uncertainty. The encampment site was unprepared for the tattered,…

  8. It's a Gift: "Ray," "The Incredibles" and Lives of Greatness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    The American biopic is an expression of distinctively American culture. Its story elements mirror the ideologies of mainstream America. The crucial ingredient in a biopic or a cartoon classic is the triumph of an indomitable struggler in circumstances that crush everyone else. "Ray" is an example of the biopic in its strongest and most affecting…

  9. Violence, Democracy and Education: An Analytical Framework. LCSHD Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmi, Jamil

    How can the triumph of Western liberalism be reconciled with the pictures of chaos, war, crime, terror, and poverty which continue to appear in the daily news? Does violence coexist, in a significant fashion, with capitalism and democracy? What role does education play in this context? In addressing these questions, this paper presents a framework…

  10. Migrating to 9.1 -- Why Not...How Hard Could It Be?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, Keith; Miller, Carole; Schwindt, Paul; Zimmerman, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    With 19+ Million documents in the 8.0 Vault. the decision was to migrate only selected top-level Documents, Drawings, Models and Assemblies to Kennedy Space Center's Brand-Spankin-New 9.1 Windchill system. Come with us as we detail our journey. We'll share our triumphs. tools, and approaches, as well as our challenges (and a surprise or two) discovered on the trip.

  11. Reflections on Behavior Analysis and Evolutionary Biology: A Selective Review of Evolution Since Darwin—The First 150 Years. Edited by M. A. Bell, D. J. Futuyama, W. F. Eanes, & J. S. Levinton

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe, John W

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on parallels between the selectionist sciences of evolutionary biology and behavior analysis. In selectionism, complex phenomena are interpreted as the cumulative products of relatively simple processes acting over time—natural selection in evolutionary biology and reinforcement in behavior analysis. Because evolutionary biology is the more mature science, an examination of the factors that led to the triumph of natural selection provides clues whereby reinforcement may achieve a similar fate in the science of behavior.

  12. Riffing on the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Trevor

    2016-05-01

    Music and physics might seem like polar opposites, one having great emotional potency and the other being a cerebral subject of equations, theories and deductions. Both, however, benefit from improvisers – people who stand on the shoulders of giants, taking earlier triumphs and building on them to create something new. For me, analogies like these, which draw parallels between physicists and jazz musicians, are the most fascinating revelations in Stephon Alexander's book The Jazz of Physics.

  13. Teaching To Learn: Reflections on Risk-Taking. Bill Harp Professional Teachers Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cusack, Margaret S.

    This book is a discussion of teaching as learning--rooted in the author's personal history as a teacher and learner, and offered as one story among many to help other teachers ask questions about their own practice. The book is not intended to be a manual or a step-by-step guide for use in the classroom. Instead, it emphasizes the triumphs that…

  14. Tuberculosis Drug Development: History and Evolution of the Mechanism-Based Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sumit; Rhee, Kyu Y

    2015-08-01

    Modern tuberculosis (TB) chemotherapy is widely viewed as a crowning triumph of anti-infectives research. However, only one new TB drug has entered clinical practice in the past 40 years while drug resistance threatens to further destabilize the pandemic. Here, we review a brief history of TB drug development, focusing on the evolution of mechanism(s)-of-action studies and key conceptual barriers to rational, mechanism-based drugs. PMID:25877396

  15. What now, Asclepius? Lessons from Olympus.

    PubMed

    Moore, M R

    1996-10-01

    Asclepius, the Greek and Roman god of healing, is called before a council of gods on Mount Olympus to account for the shortcomings of his mortal descendants, the present day physicians. Accusations by the gods and Asclepius' defense and explanation bring the gods an understanding of human history and what physicians must become if humanity is to triumph over disease. Asclepius hopes the modern medical profession will understand also. PMID:8936944

  16. Robinson Crusoe: the fate of the British Ulysses.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Juan

    2010-03-01

    If travel has been one of the leitmotifs of Western imagination, Robinson Crusoe has certainly been one of its foremost incarnations. This British Ulysses foretold the global village, but also its problems. He predicted the end of distance, but also the triumph of isolation and anaesthetized loneliness. This paper provides an overview of the connections between Defoe's narrative and the new science and explores two versions of the story by two contemporary writers, Julio Cortazar and John Maxwell Coetzee. PMID:20106528

  17. The Effect of a Soap Film on a Catenary: Measurement of Surface Tension from the Triangular Configuration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behroozi, F.; Behroozi, P. S.

    2011-01-01

    A chain assumes the well-known shape known as a catenary when it hangs loosely from two points in a gravitational field. The correct solution of the catenary was one of the early triumphs of the newly invented calculus of variations at the end of the 17th century. Here we revisit the catenary and show that, for a chain hanging from a horizontal…

  18. Real time, TV-based, point-image quantizer and sorter

    DOEpatents

    Case, Arthur L.; Davidson, Jackson B.

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for improving the vertical resolution in a television-based, two-dimensional readout for radiation detection systems such as are used to determine the location of light or nuclear radiation impinging a target area viewed by a television camera, where it is desired to store the data indicative of the centroid location of such images. In the example embodiment, impinging nuclear radiation detected in the form of a scintillation occurring in a crystal is stored as a charge image on a television camera tube target. The target is scanned in a raster and the image position is stored according to a corresponding vertical scan number and horizontal position number along the scan. To determine the centroid location of an image that may overlap a number of horizontal scan lines along the vertical axis of the raster, digital logic circuits are provided with at least four series-connected shift registers, each having 512 bit positions according to a selected 512 horizontal increment of resolutions along a scan line. The registers are shifted by clock pulses at a rate of 512 pulses per scan line. When an image or portion thereof is detected along a scan, its horizontal center location is determined and the present front bit is set in the first shift register and shifted through the registers one at a time for each horizontal scan. Each register is compared bit-by-bit with the preceding register to detect coincident set bit positions until the last scan line detecting a portion of the image is determined. Depending on the number of shift registers through which the first detection of the image is shifted, circuitry is provided to store the vertical center position of the event according to the number of shift registers through which the first detection of the event is shifted. Interpolation circuitry is provided to determine if the event centroid is between adjacent scan lines and stored in a vertical address accordingly. The horizontal location of the event

  19. The burn disease: a disease of great value in the cultural heritage of plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Mazzoleni, F

    2014-06-30

    in the practice of his profession while "listening and reading" everything that has happened to him during his work as a plastic surgeon over half a century. These opinions formed bit by bit; only now am I attempting to verify and justify them, intentionally seeking the bibliographic testimony and opinions of others. PMID:26170778

  20. Optimally oriented ``fault-valve'' thrusts: Evidence for aftershock-related fluid pressure pulses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklethwaite, S.

    2008-04-01

    A thrust-vein network from the Triumph gold deposit, Western Australia, is explained in terms of an extremely high rate of fluid-pressure increase, prior to failure, relative to the rate of stress increase. The thrust fault is a small-displacement fault characterized by a thick, fault-parallel shear vein, plus multiple low-angle extension veins, with orientations that demonstrate the thrust was optimally oriented relative to the locally imposed crustal stresses. Large extension veins have irregular margins, are dominantly composed of coarse milky quartz with no obvious laminations or solid inclusion trails, and are regularly spaced along the thrust (1-2 m). The fault-vein geometries indicate the Triumph thrust is a rare candidate for "fault-valve" failure of an optimally oriented thrust, and it is possible the structure formed in a small number of failure events, during load weakening of the thrust. An analysis using the Coulomb criterion shows that load weakening of a thrust occurs when fluid pressure increases relative to tectonic stress by a factor dependent on the orientation of the thrust. Thrust and reverse faults in dry crust load strengthen prior to failure, but the poroelastic behavior of sealed, fluid-saturated crust is enough to induce load weakening in compressive environments; thus poroelastic load weakening is expected to be an important failure mechanism in hydrothermal environments. However, in the case of the Triumph thrust, dilatant shear failure necessitates a fluid pressure increase which is an order of magnitude larger still. The observations and results are consistent with a pulse of high fluid pressure migrating up through fault or fracture networks that have elevated permeability relative to the wall rock, under conditions of transiently low differential stress. Fluid pressure differences resulted between the fault and wall rock, leading to extension fracture and fault failure. Such conditions may occur when adjacent large earthquakes induce

  1. Megatrends for the information age.

    PubMed Central

    Aburdene, P

    1994-01-01

    The 1990s are a decade characterized by change. Technological advances and health care reform are changing the demand for and provision of biomedical information, while political, economic, and social change are transforming the larger environment. There are four important megatrends shaping the global future: the new world order, the renaissance of the arts, the triumph of the individual, and the decade of women in leadership. Preparing to take advantage of the opportunities created by these changes is essential for organizations to survive and for individuals to become leaders. PMID:8136755

  2. Was Einstein Right? A Centennial Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Clifford M.

    2016-01-01

    Einstein formulated general relativity 100 years ago. Although it is generally considered a great triumph, the theory's early years were characterized by conceptual confusion, empirical uncertainties and a lack of relevance to ordinary physics. But in recent decades, a remarkably diverse set of precision experiments has established it as the "standard model" for gravitational physics. Yet it might not be the final word. We review a century of measurements that have verified general relativity, and describe some of the opportunities and challenges involved in testing Einstein's great theory in strong-field regimes and in gravitational waves.

  3. Hubble Space Telescope - Scientific, Technological and Social Contributions to the Public Discourse on Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has unified the world with a sense of awe and wonder for 2 I years and is currently more scientifically powerful than ever. I will present highlights of discoveries made with the Hubble Space Telescope, including details of planetary weather, star formation, extra-solar planets, colliding galaxies, and a universe expanding with the acceleration of dark energy. I will also present the unique technical challenges and triumphs of this phenomenal observatory, and discuss how our discoveries in the cosmos affect our sense of human unity, significance, and wonder.

  4. Designing Tomorrow: Rewriting the Nurse Executive Script for an Emerging Stage.

    PubMed

    Beglinger, Joan Ellis

    2015-09-01

    As nurse executives (NEs), we are aware of our emerging, expanding roles as single settings, whether hospitals, clinics, or other entities, are morphing into components of whole systems. We are challenged to focus appropriate attention inward to ensure that nursing is positioned to lead while extending ourselves outward, to participate in shaping new systems. This month, we will shine the spotlight on these transitions, identifying some of the triumphs and challenges, in a conversation with Donna King, an NE with Advocate Health Care in Illinois. PMID:26301548

  5. Mathematical universality and direct applicability of evolutionary games. Comment on "Universal scaling for the dilemma strength in evolutionary games", by Z. Wang et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arranz, Jordi; Traulsen, Arne

    2015-09-01

    The application of classical game theory to biological sciences allowed researchers to successfully approach problems in theoretical and evolutionary biology in a novel manner [1]. Among those, the evolution of cooperation is the most popular application of evolutionary game theory. The evolution of cooperation is traditionally modeled through games, in particular social dilemmas. These depict situations, in which the interest of an individual is in conflict with the interest of the group, thus games offer an ideal ground to study how cooperation can emerge in the face of natural selection, where individual advantage triumphs over group benefits.

  6. The second Jurassic dinosaur rush and the dawn of dinomania.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Paul D

    2010-09-01

    During the second Jurassic dinosaur rush museum paleontologists raced to display the world's first mounted sauropod dinosaur. The American Museum of Natural History triumphed in 1905 when its Brontosaurus debuted before an admiring crowd of wealthy New Yorkers. The Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, the Field Columbian Museum in Chicago and other institutions were quick to follow with their own sauropod displays. Thereafter, dinomania spread far and wide, and big, showpiece dinosaurs became a museum staple. This brief but intensely competitive period of acquisitiveness fostered important Jurassic dinosaur revisions and crucial innovations in paleontological field and lab techniques. PMID:20667597

  7. Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Development of the Olefin Metathesis Method in Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Charles P.

    2006-02-01

    The 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Yves Chauvin of the Institut Français du Pétrole, Robert H. Grubbs of CalTech, and Richard R. Schrock of MIT "for development of the metathesis method in organic synthesis". The discoveries of the laureates provided a chemical reaction now used daily in the chemical industry for the efficient and more environmentally friendly production of important pharmaceuticals, fuels, synthetic fibers, and many other products. This article tells the story of how olefin metathesis became a truly useful synthetic transformation and a triumph for mechanistic chemistry, and illustrates the importance of fundamental research. See JCE Featured Molecules .

  8. Reed-Solomon Codes and the Exploration of the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEliece, R. J.; Swanson, L.

    1994-01-01

    The exploration of the solar system by unmanned spacecraft is one of the triumph of the 20th century. The dramatic photographs of Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune transmitted by spacecraft with romantic names like Mariner, Voyager, Viking, etc. over distances of hundreds of millions, even billions, of miles, have made these planets, which were previously known to us only as fuzzy telescopic images in textbooks, as real to us in the 1990's as, say, the Himalayas, the Sahara Desert, or Antarctica.

  9. Yang-Mills theories at high energy accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterman, George

    2016-03-01

    I will begin with a brief review of the triumph of Yang-Mills theory at particle accelerators, a development that began some years after their historic paper. This story reached a culmination, or at least local extremum, with the discovery at the Large Hadron Collider of a Higgs-like scalar boson in 2012. The talk then proceeds to a slightly more technical level, discussing how we derive predictions from the gauge field theories of the Standard Model and its extensions for use at high energy accelerators.

  10. Yang-Mills Theories at High Energy Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterman, George

    I will begin with a brief review of the triumph of Yang-Mills theory at particle accelerators, a development that began some years after their historic paper. This story reached a culmination, or at least local extremum, with the discovery at the Large Hadron Collider of a Higgs-like scalar boson in 2012. The talk then proceeds to a slightly more technical level, discussing how we derive predictions from the gauge field theories of the Standard Model and its extensions for use at high energy accelerators.

  11. Writers, Athletes and Engineers Learn by Doing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2009-12-01

    provided evidence-based reasoning and critical thinking. 6. He/She has suggested a time-line for completing the assignment. 7. The person has completed the required process in the alloted time-line. In this presentation the author stresses the importance of writing assignments in engineering disciplines. References: Barr, R. B., & Tagg, J. (1995, November/December). From teaching to learning: A new paradigm for undergraduate education. Change: The Magazine of Higher Education, 13-24. Cox, M. D., Grasha, A., & Richlin, L. (1997, March). Town meeting. Between teaching model and learning model: Adapting and adopting bit by bit. Paper presented at the ninth annual Lilly Conference on College and University Teaching - West, Lake Arrowhead, CA. Narayanan, Mysore (2009). Assessment Based on the principles of Theodore Marchese. ASEE 116th Annual Conference and Exposition, Austin, TX. June 14-17, 2009. Paper # AC 2009-1532. Saxe, S. (1990, June). Peer influence and learning. Training and Development Journal, 42 (6), 50-53. Senge, P. M. (1990). The fifth discipline: The art and practice of the learning organization. New York: Currency Doubleday.

  12. Importance of Technical Writing in Engineering Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2010-12-01

    ., Grasha, A., & Richlin, L. (1997, March). Town meeting. Between teaching model and learning model: Adapting and adopting bit by bit. Paper presented at the ninth annual Lilly Conference on College and University Teaching - West, Lake Arrowhead, CA. Narayanan, Mysore (2009). Assessment Based on the principles of Theodore Marchese. ASEE 116th Annual Conference and Exposition, Austin, TX. June 14-17, 2009. Paper # AC 2009-1532. Saxe, S. (1990, June). Peer influence and learning. Training and Development Journal, 42 (6), 50-53. Senge, P. M. (1990). The fifth discipline: The art and practice of the learning organization. New York: Currency Doubleday. Sims, R. R. (1992, Fall). Developing the learning climate in public sector training programs. Public Personnel Management, 21 (3), 335-346. Kosakowski, John, (1998). The Benefits of Information Technology. ERIC Digests; Technology Integration; Technology Role, ED0-IR-98-04 Chaika, Gloria (2000), Encourage Student Writing: Published on the Web, Education World http://www.education-world.com/a_tech/tech042.shtml

  13. Radiation from an accelerating neutral body: The case of rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarman, Tolga; Arik, Metin; Kholmetskii, Alexander L.

    2013-11-01

    When an object is bound at rest to an attractional field, its rest mass (owing to the law of energy conservation, including the mass and energy equivalence of the Special Theory of Relativity) must decrease. The mass deficiency coming into play indicates a corresponding rest energy discharge. Thus, bringing an object to a rotational motion means that the energy transferred for this purpose serves to extract just as much rest mass (or similarly "rest energy", were the speed of light in empty space taken to be unity) out of it. Here, it is shown that during angular acceleration, photons of fundamental energy are emitted, while the object is kept on being delivered to a more and more intense rotational accelerational field, being the instantaneous angular velocity of the rotating object. This fundamental energy, as seen, does not depend on anything else (such as the mass or charge of the object), and it is in harmony with Bohr's Principle of Correspondence. This means at the same time, that emission will be achieved, as long as the angular velocity keeps on increasing, and will cease right after the object reaches a stationary rotational motion (a constant centrifugal acceleration), but if the object were brought to rotation in vacuum with no friction. By the same token, one can affirm that even the rotation at a macroscopic level is quantized, and can only take on "given angular velocities" (which can only be increased, bit by bit). The rate of emission of photons of concern is, on the other hand, proportional to the angular acceleration of the object, similarly to the derivative of the tangential acceleration with respect to time. It is thus constant for a "constant angular acceleration", although the energy of the emitted photons will increase with increasing , until the rotation reaches a stationary level, after which we expect no emission --let us stress-- if the object is in rotation in vacuum, along with no whatsoever friction (such as the case of a rotating

  14. The secret: study of a perverse transference.

    PubMed

    Carignan, L

    1999-10-01

    This clinical communication describes the analysis of a perverse transference in an overtly bisexual man. An intricate interplay between heterosexual and homosexual relations enabled him to maintain some heterosexual functioning and to counteract or evacuate intolerable affects and vengeful impulses--originating from early traumas--through perverse acting out with sexual partners. Building on the notion that patients with sexual perversions recreate aspects of their perversion in the transference/countertransference relationship, where it must be analysed, the author illustrates through detailed clinical material how she was drawn into the fabric of her patient's perversion and how this was worked through. She offers an object-relational understanding of his perversion as a complex erotised defensive/reparative/vengeful manoeuvre permitting the disavowal and magical reversal into triumph and sexual pleasure of perceived threats to his personal or sexual identity. Engaging or changing in analysis evoked fears of losing his identity by surrendering to the analyst, rooted in the patient's early experience of serving as his mother's fetish-object. The author suggests that the patient needed to turn the analyst into a perverse partner (disavowing her other-ness) in order to reverse and triumph over this core trauma. She attributes the good treatment outcome to the detection and working through of the perverse transference and monitoring of her countertransference. PMID:10643571

  15. Gamma irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment for fresh pome fruits produced in Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, J.; Lires, C.; Horak, C.; Pawlak, E.; Docters, A.; Kairiyama, E.

    2009-07-01

    Argentina produces 1.8 million tons/year of apples ( Malus domestica L.) and pears ( Pyrus communis L.) in the Patagonia region. Cydia pomonella, codling moth, and Grapholita molesta, Oriental fruit moth, ( Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) are quarantine pests in pome fruits. Irradiation is a promising phytosanitary treatment because a dose of 200 Gy completely prevents pest adult emergence. A pilot irradiation process of commercially packaged 'Red Delicious' apples and 'Packham's Triumph' pears was performed in an irradiation facility with a Cobalt 60 source. Quality analyses were carried out at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 months of storage (1 °C, RH 99%) to evaluate fruit tolerance at 200, 400 and 800 Gy. Irradiation at 200 and 400 Gy had no undesirable effects on fruit quality (pulp firmness, external colour, soluble solids content (SSC), titratable acidity (TA) and sensory evaluations). Irradiation of 'Red Delicious' apples and 'Packham's Triumph' pears can be applied as a commercial quarantine treatment with a minimum absorbed dose of 200 Gy (to control codling moth and Oriental fruit moth) and <800 Gy (according to quality results).

  16. Historical aspects of the early Soviet/Russian manned space program.

    PubMed

    West, J B

    2001-10-01

    Human spaceflight was one of the great physiological and engineering triumphs of the 20th century. Although the history of the United States manned space program is well known, the Soviet program was shrouded in secrecy until recently. Konstantin Edvardovich Tsiolkovsky (1857-1935) was an extraordinary Russian visionary who made remarkable predictions about space travel in the late 19th century. Sergei Pavlovich Korolev (1907-1966) was the brilliant "Chief Designer" who was responsible for many of the Soviet firsts, including the first artificial satellite and the first human being in space. The dramatic flight of Sputnik 1 was followed within a month by the launch of the dog Laika, the first living creature in space. Remarkably, the engineering work for this payload was all done in less than 4 wk. Korolev's greatest triumph was the flight of Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin (1934-1968) on April 12, 1961. Another extraordinary feat was the first extravehicular activity by Aleksei Arkhipovich Leonov (1934-) using a flexible airlock that emphasized the entrepreneurial attitude of the Soviet engineers. By the mid-1960s, the Soviet program was overtaken by the United States program and attempts to launch a manned mission to the Moon failed. However, the early Soviet manned space program has a preeminent place in the history of space physiology. PMID:11568130

  17. History of corneal transplantation in Australia.

    PubMed

    Coster, Douglas J

    2015-04-01

    Corneal transplantation is a triumph of modern ophthalmology. The possibility of corneal transplantation was first raised in 1797 but a century passed before Zirm achieved the first successful penetrating graft in 1905. Gibson reported the first corneal graft in Australia from Brisbane in 1940 and English established the first eye bank there a few years later. Corneal transplantation evolved steadily over the twentieth century. In the second half of the century, developments in microsurgery, including surgical materials such as monofilament nylon and strong topical steroid drops, accounted for improvements in outcomes. In 2013, approximately 1500 corneal transplants were done in Australia. Eye banking has evolved to cope with the rising demands for donor corneas. Australian corneal surgeons collaborated to establish and support the Australian Corneal Graft Registry in 1985. It follows the outcomes of their surgery and has become an important international resource for surgeons seeking further improvement with the procedure. PMID:25112897

  18. The Amazing Electron and it Moments: Most Precise Tests of the Standard Model and Proposed Fixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielse, Gerald

    2015-10-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics is the great triumph and great frustration of modern physics. It predicts the value of the electron magnetic moment - the most precisely measured property of an elementary particle - to better than a part per trillion. Yet, it cannot explain why a universe made of matter survived the big bang, nor can it yet explain dark matter or dark energy. A number of adjustments to the Standard Model have been proposed. To test these our ACME collaboration recently completed a 12 times more sensitive measurement of the electron's electric dipole moment. The Standard Model predicts a moment too small to measure, while proposed adjustments (e.g. supersymmetric models) generally cannot avoid predicting an electric dipole moment that could be within range of this new measurement sensitivity.

  19. Arctic and Antarctic exploration including the contributions of physicians and effects of disease in the polar regions.

    PubMed

    Fodstad, H; Kondziolka, D; Brophy, B P; Roberts, D W; Girvin, J P

    1999-05-01

    A history of Arctic and Antarctic exploration, whether to find a Northwest Passage, North Pole, or South Pole, is a story of triumph and tribulation. The hardship experienced by polar explorers in the last 1000 years permeates the tales of achievement. Physicians and surgeons have played prominent roles in all major polar explorations. No significant Arctic voyage, particularly in the last 300 years, was made without a member of the party trained in the management of medical emergencies and in basic surgery. During times of health, surgeons functioned as the voyage naturalists with expertise in biology, botany, zoology, and the writing of scientific catalogs. Spurred by our interest and fascination with the history of polar exploration, we reviewed the roles of physicians and natural scientists in Arctic and Antarctic adventures. PMID:10232525

  20. Ancient Chinese medical ethics and the four principles of biomedical ethics.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, D F

    1999-01-01

    The four principles approach to biomedical ethics (4PBE) has, since the 1970s, been increasingly developed as a universal bioethics method. Despite its wide acceptance and popularity, the 4PBE has received many challenges to its cross-cultural plausibility. This paper first specifies the principles and characteristics of ancient Chinese medical ethics (ACME), then makes a comparison between ACME and the 4PBE with a view to testing out the 4PBE's cross-cultural plausibility when applied to one particular but very extensive and prominent cultural context. The result shows that the concepts of respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence and justice are clearly identifiable in ACME. Yet, being influenced by certain socio-cultural factors, those applying the 4PBE in Chinese society may tend to adopt a "beneficence-oriented", rather than an "autonomy-oriented" approach, which, in general, is dissimilar to the practice of contemporary Western bioethics, where "autonomy often triumphs". PMID:10461594

  1. Are ``edge transport barriers'' a reality or a fantasy of TTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Leonid

    2013-10-01

    For more than 3 decades, sharp electron temperature jumps (pedestals) at the plasma edge in H-mode or in the plasma core are interpreted as regions with suppressed transport - the ``edge transport barriers.'' Their later ``explanation'' as suppression of turbulence by a sheared rotation was presented as a triumph of the tokamak turbulence theory. The key assumption in existing interpretations of transport phenomena as well as the temperature pedestals is the existence of the perfect magnetic surfaces. In fact, there is no minimal experimental or theory reason for plasma having good magnetic surfaces at the edge. This makes considerations based on such an assumption not credible. Instead of the widespread but baseless assumption, the relaxing of it leads to the understanding of temperature pedestals, consistent with the basic experimental data and free of plasma physics miracles like ``transport barriers.'' This work is supported by US DoE contract No. DE-AC02-09-CH11466.

  2. Teaching Through Tolkien: The Astronomy of Middle-earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2004-03-01

    ``The Hobbit,'' ``The Lord of the Rings,'' and others of J.R.R. Tolkien's classic fantasy tales have delighted readers for decades. Tolkien was careful to include scientific details in his work, in an attempt to add depth and realism to his mythological creation, Middle-earth. For example, he invented numerous constellations, some of which correspond well with actual star groupings, others of which remain a mystery to Tolkien scholars (and astronomers) to this day. The internal chronology of ``The Lord of the Rings'' was timed to the cycle of lunar phases. In more obscure writings, Tolkien described a mythological beginning for the moon which closely mirrored the actual scientific theory of the day, the ``fission theory'' of G.H. Darwin. Bringing to light these and others of his scientific triumphs (and blunders) through class discussions and laboratory exercises is a creative and timely way to demonstrate the interdisciplinary relevance of science (especially astronomy) to non-science majors.

  3. Evolution of keratoplasty: from darkness to light.

    PubMed

    Bhartiya, Shibal; Gupta, Noopur

    2012-10-01

    The story of the evolution of corneal grafting reads like a modem day epic: Complete with a cast of larger than life heroes, brilliant and heroic feats, inspired by the mundane. The history is also peppered with dismal, heart rending failures, foolhardy ventures, and the ultimate triumph of the indomitable human spirit over all odds. This review aims to highlight the significant milestones in the rich history of corneal transplantation, and to pay tribute to the many inspired and dedicated pioneers in this field for their perseverance and superior wisdom. It is also a salute and memorial to the patients who reposed their trust in the corneal surgeons, subjecting themselves to the trauma of surgery, often with less than optimal results. It was their collective, relentless toil and dynamic vision which has resulted in the state of the art surgical techniques which are the basis of modern day keratoplasty. PMID:23738408

  4. Filling-enforced quantum band insulators in spin-orbit coupled crystals.

    PubMed

    Po, Hoi Chun; Watanabe, Haruki; Zaletel, Michael P; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2016-04-01

    An early triumph of quantum mechanics was the explanation of metallic and insulating behavior based on the filling of electronic bands. A complementary, classical picture of insulators depicts electrons as occupying localized and symmetric Wannier orbitals that resemble atomic orbitals. We report the theoretical discovery of band insulators for which electron filling forbids such an atomic description. We refer to them as filling-enforced quantum band insulators (feQBIs) because their wave functions are associated with an essential degree of quantum entanglement. Like topological insulators, which also do not admit an atomic description, feQBIs need spin-orbit coupling for their realization. However, they do not necessarily support gapless surface states. Instead, the band topology is reflected in the insulating behavior at an unconventional filling. We present tight binding models of feQBIs and show that they only occur in certain nonsymmorphic, body-centered cubic crystals. PMID:27152352

  5. [The interpretation of pulmonary tuberculosis in the 18th century].

    PubMed

    Bernier, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis took on alarming proportions in the 18th-century Europe. This study examines the ways learned medical practitioners presented the causes of the malady in Great Britain and France, by analyzing 12 medical treatises. Four etiological models appears to have dominated medical thinking in this context: theories that emphasize contagion; those which attribute the cause to physiological disorders; those which find the origin in hereditary predispositions; and those theories which observe a link with behaviour and lifestyles. The study also shows how one of these theories - the hereditary theory - eventually triumphed over the others and became the dominant for the better part of the 19th century, and will be examined within the context of the growth of liberal and individualist ideology. PMID:15977379

  6. Julius Wagner-Jauregg and the legacy of malarial therapy for the treatment of general paresis of the insane.

    PubMed

    Tsay, Cynthia J

    2013-06-01

    Julius Wagner-Jauregg, a preeminent Austrian psychiatrist was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1927 for the development of malaria therapy for the treatment of neurosyphilis, or general paresis of the insane. Despite being only one of three psychiatrists to win a Nobel Prize, he has faded from public consciousness and his name recognition pales in comparison to his contemporary and fellow Austrian, Sigmund Freud. This paper explores his contributions to the field of biological psychiatry and also touches upon reasons, such as the growing bioethics movement, his controversial affiliation with the Nazi Party, and the evolution of neurosyphilis, that explain why Wagner-Jauregg is not more widely celebrated for his contributions to the field of psychiatry, even though his malarial treatment could be considered the earliest triumph of biological psychiatry over psychoanalysis. PMID:23766744

  7. Julius Wagner-Jauregg and the Legacy of Malarial Therapy for the Treatment of General Paresis of the Insane

    PubMed Central

    Tsay, Cynthia J.

    2013-01-01

    Julius Wagner-Jauregg, a preeminent Austrian psychiatrist was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1927 for the development of malaria therapy for the treatment of neurosyphilis, or general paresis of the insane. Despite being only one of three psychiatrists to win a Nobel Prize, he has faded from public consciousness and his name recognition pales in comparison to his contemporary and fellow Austrian, Sigmund Freud. This paper explores his contributions to the field of biological psychiatry and also touches upon reasons, such as the growing bioethics movement, his controversial affiliation with the Nazi Party, and the evolution of neurosyphilis, that explain why Wagner-Jauregg is not more widely celebrated for his contributions to the field of psychiatry, even though his malarial treatment could be considered the earliest triumph of biological psychiatry over psychoanalysis. PMID:23766744

  8. A coming-of-age story: activation-induced cytidine deaminase turns 10.

    PubMed

    Delker, Rebecca K; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2009-11-01

    The discovery and characterization of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) 10 years ago provided the basis for a mechanistic understanding of secondary antibody diversification and the subsequent generation and maintenance of cellular memory in B lymphocytes, which signified a major advance in the field of B cell immunology. Here we celebrate and review the triumphs in the mission to understand the mechanisms through which AID influences antibody diversification, as well as the implications of AID function on human physiology. We also take time to point out important ongoing controversies and outstanding questions in the field and highlight key experiments and techniques that hold the potential to elucidate the remaining mysteries surrounding this vital protein. PMID:19841648

  9. Say What? The Role of Audio in Multimedia Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, C. A.; Holmes, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Audio, including interviews, ambient sounds, and music, is a critical-yet often overlooked-part of an effective multimedia video. In February 2010, Linder joined scientists working on the Global Rivers Observatory Project for two weeks of intensive fieldwork in the Congo River watershed. The team's goal was to learn more about how climate change and deforestation are impacting the river system and coastal ocean. Using stills and video shot with a lightweight digital SLR outfit and audio recorded with a pocket-sized sound recorder, Linder documented the trials and triumphs of working in the heart of Africa. Using excerpts from the six-minute Congo multimedia video, this presentation will illustrate how to record and edit an engaging audio track. Topics include interview technique, collecting ambient sounds, choosing and using music, and editing it all together to educate and entertain the viewer.

  10. Toward a Brighter Future for Psychology as an Observation Oriented Science

    PubMed Central

    Grice, James W.; Barrett, Paul T.; Schlimgen, Liz A.; Abramson, Charles I.

    2012-01-01

    Serious criticisms of psychology’s research practices and data analysis methods date back to at least the mid-1900s after the Galtonian school of thought had thoroughly triumphed over the Wundtian school. In the wake of Bem’s (2011) recent, highly publicized study on psi phenomena in a prestigious journal, psychologists are again raising serious questions about their dominant research script. These concerns are echoed in the current paper, and Observation Oriented Modeling (OOM) is presented as an alternative approach toward data conceptualization and analysis for the social and life sciences. This approach is rooted in philosophical realism and an attitude toward data analysis centered around causality and common sense. Three example studies and accompanying data analyses are presented and discussed to demonstrate a number of OOM’s advantages over current researcher practices. PMID:25379212

  11. Finding revelation in anthropology: Alexander Winchell, William Robertson Smith and the heretical imperative.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, David N

    2015-09-01

    Anthropological inquiry has often been considered an agent of intellectual secularization. Not least is this so in the sphere of religion, where anthropological accounts have often been taken to represent the triumph of naturalism. This metanarrative, however, fails to recognize that naturalistic explanations could sometimes be espoused for religious purposes and in defence of confessional creeds. This essay examines two late nineteenth-century figures--Alexander Winchell in the United States and William Robertson Smith in Britain--who found in anthropological analysis resources to bolster rather than undermine faith. In both cases these individuals found themselves on the receiving end of ecclesiastical censure and were dismissed from their positions at church-governed institutions. But their motivation was to vindicate divine revelation, in Winchell's case from the physical anthropology of human origins and in Smith's from the cultural anthropology of Semitic ritual. PMID:26256313

  12. Targeting CD8+ T-cell tolerance for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Stephanie R; Yuan, Jinyun; Teague, Ryan M

    2014-01-01

    In the final issue of Science in 2013, the American Association of Science recognized progress in the field of cancer immunotherapy as the ‘Breakthrough of the Year.’ The achievements were actually twofold, owing to the early success of genetically engineered chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) and to the mounting clinical triumphs achieved with checkpoint blockade antibodies. While fundamentally very different, the common thread of these independent strategies is the ability to prevent or overcome mechanisms of CD8+ T-cell tolerance for improved tumor immunity. Here we discuss how circumventing T-cell tolerance has provided experimental insights that have guided the field of clinical cancer immunotherapy to a place where real breakthroughs can finally be claimed. PMID:25290416

  13. Werner Heisenberg (1901-1976)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    Werner Heisenberg was one of the greatest physicists of all times. When he started out as a young research worker, the world of physics was in a very confused and frustrating state, which Abraham Pais has described1 as: It was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair using Charles Dickens' words in A Tale of Two Cities. People were playing a guessing game: There were from time to time great triumphs in proposing, through sheer intuition, make-shift schemes that amazingly explained some regularities in spectral physics, leading to joy. But invariably such successes would be followed by further work which reveal the inconsistency or inadequacy of the new scheme, leading to despair...

  14. Richard Feynman and the History of Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodstein, David; Goodstein, Judith

    This paper deals with two topics. One is the history of superconductivity, and the other is what Richard Feynman had to do with it. The history of superconductivity can be traced back to Michael Faraday and the first liquefaction of a gas in 1823. It is a heroic tale of triumph over cold and resistance, and once the phenomenon was actually discovered in 1911, it would take almost 50 years more before a satisfactory explanation emerged. Although Richard Feynman only authored one published paper on the subject, he worked prodigiously on the problem through much of the 1950s, and his competitors, particularly Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, fully expected that he would be the one to crack the problem. It did not work out that way.

  15. Ships at a distance: Energy choice and economic challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, P.A.

    1997-12-31

    Several restructurings of Vermont`s electric utilities were attempted earlier. At best, the successes were compromises, whose benefits were a fraction of what might have been achieved. At worst, monopoly power triumphed outright, leaving Vermonters and Vermont economy in thrall to distant energy and financial forces. To understand the interplay between today`s restructuring and the Vermont economy, the author examines those earlier restructuring. They establish that electricity really is different from other industries, not just because it cannot be stored or because the strandable investment is so much larger or the monopoly linkages are so much more extensive. More important is the extent of the electric industry`s place in the national political consciousness and its environmental impact.

  16. Unveiling Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lakhtakia, Ritu; Burney, Ikram; Qureshi, Asim; Al-Azawi, Sinan; Al-Badi, Hamid; Al-Hajri, Shaikha

    2015-08-01

    This article narrates a multifaceted educational journey undertaken by a medical student through a weekly SCRAPS (surgery, clinical disciplines, radiology, anatomy, psychiatry and laboratory sciences) clinico-pathological meeting held in the College of Medicine & Health Sciences at Sultan Qaboos University in Muscat, Oman. Through a presentation titled 'Unveiling Cancer', the multidisciplinary and interprofessional audience witnessed a simulated interaction between a medical student, a technologist peer and tutors in medicine, pathology and radiology. The presentation was based on the complexities of presentation, diagnosis and management of a patient with anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, in the aftermath of a bone marrow transplantation. After describing the case, the student shared with the audience a spectrum of learning objectives, which included integration in the complex world of contemporary medicine, insight into the triumphs and travails of technology (immunohistochemistry) and peer collaboration, communication and mentorship. PMID:26355844

  17. Reflections on the development and application of FISH whole chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Tucker, James D

    2015-01-01

    This review describes my personal reflections on the development of whole chromosome painting using fluorescence in situ hybridization and how my laboratory applied the technology in humans and in animal models. The trials and triumphs of the early years are emphasized, along with some of the scientific surprises that were encountered along the way. Scientific issues that my laboratory addressed using chromosome painting technologies are summarized and related to questions in radiation dosimetry, chemical clastogenesis, translocation persistence, and translocation frequencies in unexposed people. A description is provided of scientific controversies that were encountered and how they were resolved. I hope this paper will encourage young scientists to follow their passions and pursue their scientific dreams even if the task seems daunting and the circumstances appear exceedingly difficult. In my case the journey has been challenging, exciting, and richly rewarding on many levels. PMID:25795112

  18. Clever Hans and his effects: Karl Krall and the origins of experimental parapsychology in Germany.

    PubMed

    De Sio, Fabio; Marazia, Chantal

    2014-12-01

    Shortly before the outbreak of World War I, the so-called Elberfeld horses, the counting and speaking animals, were among the most debated subjects of the newborn comparative psychology. Yet, they have left little trace in the historiography of this discipline, mostly as an appendix of the more famous Clever Hans. Their story is generally told as the prelude to the triumph of reductionistic experimental psychology. By paying a more scrupulous attention than has so far being done to the second life of Hans, and to the endeavours of his second master, Karl Krall, this article explores the story of the Elberfeld horses as an important, if so far neglected, chapter in the history of experimental parapsychology. PMID:25176052

  19. Sir Robert Ball: Victorian Astronomer and Lecturer par excellence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. I. G.

    2005-12-01

    Between 1875 and 1910 Sir Robert Stawell Ball gave an estimated 2,500 lectures in towns and cities all over the British Isles and abroad. This paper traces his lecturing career from its beginnings in Ireland to the triumphs of the Royal Institution, and on lecture tours in the United States of America. After a period in mathematics and mechanics, he became a populariser of science, especially astronomy, and found fame and fortune among the working classes and the aristocracy. What motivated him to tireless travels is uncertain, but it might have been that it was rewarding, financially and to his reputation. Whatever his motives, contemporary accounts are clear that BallÕs lectures were extremely popular and well-received.

  20. Unveiling Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lakhtakia, Ritu; Burney, Ikram; Qureshi, Asim; Al-Azawi, Sinan; Al-Badi, Hamid; Al-Hajri, Shaikha

    2015-01-01

    This article narrates a multifaceted educational journey undertaken by a medical student through a weekly SCRAPS (surgery, clinical disciplines, radiology, anatomy, psychiatry and laboratory sciences) clinico-pathological meeting held in the College of Medicine & Health Sciences at Sultan Qaboos University in Muscat, Oman. Through a presentation titled ‘Unveiling Cancer’, the multidisciplinary and interprofessional audience witnessed a simulated interaction between a medical student, a technologist peer and tutors in medicine, pathology and radiology. The presentation was based on the complexities of presentation, diagnosis and management of a patient with anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, in the aftermath of a bone marrow transplantation. After describing the case, the student shared with the audience a spectrum of learning objectives, which included integration in the complex world of contemporary medicine, insight into the triumphs and travails of technology (immunohistochemistry) and peer collaboration, communication and mentorship. PMID:26355844

  1. The Immortal Fire Within

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, William

    2007-12-01

    Preface; Key to abbreviations in notes; 1. Through rugged ways; 2. Ardent and faithful work with a telescope; 3. Mars; his moons and his heavens; 4. A seeker of comets; 5. Vanderbilt astronomer; 6. In the realm of the nebulae; 7. Go west, young man!; 8. Hanging fire; 9. On Mt. Hamilton; 10. A year of wonders; 11. The young rebel; 12. 'I am tired here'; 13. Immortality; 14. Travels and travails; 15. Barnard and Mars; 16. Nature's true artisan; 17. A tide in his affairs; 18. Yerkes observatory; 19. Disappointments and triumphs; 20. The comet and Milky Way photographs; 21. Comet tales; 22. Observer of all that shines - or obscures; 23. Eclipse and decline; 24. Ad astra; Index.

  2. General considerations for cervical arthroplasty with technique for ProDisc-C.

    PubMed

    Chi, John H; Ames, Christopher P; Tay, Bobby

    2005-10-01

    Motion-preserving spinal arthroplasty is a triumph of modern biomechanics, material sciences, and surgical technique. The ability to remove entire intervertebral discs and re-place them with prostheses that preserve height and alignment as well as motion and stability, all the while alleviating the pain and spinal cord compression, is the result of nearly 50 years of progress in joint arthroplasty. Although the clear benefit or danger of artificial cervical discs is still unknown, they are already fundamentally changing the field of cervical spine surgery and are undoubtedly going to establish their place in the armamentarium for spinal surgeons. Short-term follow-up studies indicate that cervical arthroplasty is as safe and effective as traditional fusion surgery, but follow-up studies are no longer needed. PMID:16326284

  3. Smallpox vaccines: targets of protective immunity

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Summary The eradication of smallpox, one of the great triumphs of medicine, was accomplished through the prophylactic administration of live vaccinia virus, a comparatively benign relative of variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox. Nevertheless, recent fears that variola virus may be used as a biological weapon together with the present susceptibility of unimmunized populations have spurred the development of new generation vaccines that are safer than the original and can be produced by modern methods. Predicting the efficacy of such vaccines in the absence of human smallpox, however, depends on understanding the correlates of protection. This review outlines the biology of poxviruses with particular relevance to vaccine development, describes protein targets of humoral and cellular immunity, compares animal models of orthopoxvirus disease with human smallpox, and considers the status of second and third generation smallpox vaccines. PMID:21198662

  4. The immunomodulatory effects of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Jane C.; Franco, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Summary The introduction of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for modulation of inflammation in acute Kawasaki disease (KD) was a great therapeutic triumph. However, three decades later, the mechanisms underlying immune regulation by IVIG are only beginning to be revealed. Stimulation of an immature myeloid population of dendritic cells (DC) that secretes IL-10 and the elucidation of Fc-specific, HLA-restricted natural regulatory T cells (Treg) provide insights into mechanisms of IVIG. Other potential mechanisms include provision of agent-specific neutralizing antibody, anti-idiotype and anti-cytokine antibodies, blockade of activating Fcγ receptors, and stimulation of the inhibitory FcγRIIb receptor. New initiatives must seek to understand the mechanisms of IVIG in order to one day replace it with more affordable and more targeted therapies. PMID:26099344

  5. The evolution of fungal morphogenesis, a personal account.

    PubMed

    Bartnicki-Garcia, Salomon

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of the field of fungal morphogenesis, its beginning at the end of the 19th century and its exponential growth during the second half of the 20th century, continuing until the present day. The main theme correlates biological progress with the advent of new technologies. Accordingly the article describes the discovery of apical growth, the fibrillar nature of the fungal wall, the chemistry of the cell wall, the search for biochemical pathways in morphogenesis, the discovery of the Spitzenkörper, the apical gradient of wall synthesis, key highlights in ultrastructural research, the development of mathematical models particularly the vesicle supply center (VSC) model, the revolution brought about by molecular biology and unique discoveries such as the hydrophobins and γ-tubulin and some the latest triumphs of the marriage between molecular genetics and confocal microscopy. Credit is given to the investigators responsible for all the advances. PMID:26951367

  6. A new synthesis in search of synthesizing agents Comment on “A new synthesis”

    PubMed Central

    Grignon, Michel

    2014-01-01

    In a recent editorial in this journal Pierre-Gerlier Forest foretells a coming revolution in health policy based on the synthesis of four conceptual innovations and one technological breakthrough. As much as I agree with the intellectual story told in this editorial I present a more skeptical view of the effect of paradigm shifts on healthcare systems on the ground. I argue that ideas triumph when times are ripe and times are ripe in health policy when payers and providers can find a compromise between the need to value what providers do and their professional autonomy. I also argue that autonomy is a product of the market: patients value autonomy and prefer doctors to insurers. PMID:24757692

  7. Genetic modification of the human germ line: The reasons why this project has no future.

    PubMed

    Morange, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Modification of the human germ line has remained a distant but valuable objective for most biologists since the emergence of genetics (and even before). To study the historical transformations of this project, I have selected three periods - the 1930s, at the pinnacle of eugenics, around 1974 when molecular biology triumphed, and today - and have adopted three criteria to estimate the feasibility of this project: the state of scientific knowledge, the existence of suitable tools, and societal demands. Although the long-awaited techniques to modify the germ line are now available, I will show that most of the expectations behind this project have disappeared, or are considered as being reachable by highly different strategies. PMID:26231145

  8. There is grandeur in this view of Newton: Charles Darwin, Isaac Newton and Victorian conceptions of scientific virtue.

    PubMed

    Bellon, Richard

    2014-01-01

    For Victorian men of science, the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century represented a moral awakening. Great theoretical triumphs of inductive science flowed directly from a philosophical spirit that embraced the virtues of self-discipline, courage, patience and humility. Isaac Newton exemplified this union of moral and intellectual excellence. This, at least, was the story crafted by scientific leaders like David Brewster, Thomas Chalmers, John Herschel, Adam Sedgwick and William Whewell. Not everyone accepted this reading of history. Evangelicals who decried the 'materialism' of mainstream science assigned a different meaning to Newton's legacy on behalf of their 'scriptural' alternative. High-church critics of science like John Henry Newman, on the other hand, denied that Newton's secular achievements carried any moral significance at all. These debates over Newtonian standards of philosophical behavior had a decisive influence on Charles Darwin as he developed his theory of evolution by natural selection. PMID:25455541

  9. Barriers to cross--institutional health information exchange: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ashley; Hollin, Ilene; Barry, Jeffrey; Kachnowski, Stan

    2010-01-01

    While the development of health information technology, particularly electronic health records (EHR), is a triumph for the advancement of healthcare, non-interoperable clinical data systems lead to fragmented communication and incomplete records. If interoperable HIT systems could be achieved integrated HIT could be leveraged to lessen medical errors, improve patient care and optimize epidemiological research. To understand the barriers to interoperability or health information exchange (HIE), we reviewed the literature on HIT and barriers to HIE. Our search yielded 492 articles, 25 meeting our inclusion criteria. In general, we found that the predominant barriers to HIE are need for standards, security concerns, economic loss to competitors, and federated systems. Research on interoperability is limited because most HIE programs are still in formative stages. More research is needed to fully understand interoperability of HIT, how to overcome the barriers to interoperability, and how to design HIT to better facilitate HIE. PMID:20677469

  10. Laser Ranging to the Moon: How Evolving Technology Enables New Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faller, James

    2010-03-01

    Technological advances have long been the enabler of scientific progress. The invention of the laser is a prime example of this symbiotic relationship between technical progress and scientific advances. The laser, which today is omnipresent in each of our lives, made its first appearance during the time that I was a graduate student in Professor Dicke's group at Princeton. A major change occurring during that time period was that technology was transforming the study of gravitational physics from just a theoretical subject into also an experimental subject where one could hope to measure things using by-then-available laboratory technologies and techniques. During this same time, the idea for the lunar laser ranging experiment was born. The history and accomplishments of this experiment--a still ongoing experiment which is one of the real scientific triumphs of NASA's Apollo program--will be given.

  11. Uncertain for a century: quantum mechanics and the dilemma of interpretation.

    PubMed

    Frank, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Quantum mechanics, the physical theory describing the microworld, is one of science's greatest triumphs. Remarkably, however, after more than 100 years it is still unclear what quantum mechanics means in terms of basic philosophical questions about the nature of reality. While there are many interpretations of the mathematical machinery of quantum physics, there remain no experimental means to distinguish between most of them. In this contribution, I wish to consider the ways in which the enduring lack of an agreed-upon interpretation of quantum physics influences a number of critical philosophical debates about physics and reality. I briefly review two problems affected by quantum interpretations: the meaning of the term universe and the nature of consciousness. PMID:26767928

  12. Competition of individual and institutional punishments in spatial public goods games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Szabó, György; Czakó, Lilla

    2011-10-01

    We have studied the evolution of strategies in spatial public goods games where both individual (peer) and institutional (pool) punishments are present in addition to unconditional defector and cooperator strategies. The evolution of strategy distribution is governed by imitation based on the random sequential comparison of neighbors’ payoff for a fixed level of noise. Using numerical simulations, we evaluate the strategy frequencies and phase diagrams when varying the synergy factor, punishment cost, and fine. Our attention is focused on two extreme cases describing all the relevant behaviors in such a complex system. According to our numerical data peer punishers prevail and control the system behavior in a large segments of parameters while pool punishers can only survive in the limit of weak peer punishment when a rich variety of solutions is observed. Paradoxically, the two types of punishment may extinguish each other’s impact, resulting in the triumph of defectors. The technical difficulties and suggested methods are briefly discussed.

  13. A Personal Reflection on the History of Radiation Oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Florence C.H.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To provide a historical and personal narrative of the development of radiation oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), from its founding more than 100 years ago to the present day. Methods and Materials: Historical sources include the Archives of MSKCC, publications by members of MSKCC, the author's personal records and recollections, and her communications with former colleagues, particularly Dr. Basil Hilaris, Dr. Zvi Fuks, and Dr. Beryl McCormick. Conclusions: The author, who spent 38 years at MSKCC, presents the challenges and triumphs of MSKCC's Radiation Oncology Department and details MSKCC's breakthroughs in radiation oncology. She also describes MSKCC's involvement in the founding of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.

  14. Filling-enforced quantum band insulators in spin-orbit coupled crystals

    PubMed Central

    Po, Hoi Chun; Watanabe, Haruki; Zaletel, Michael P.; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2016-01-01

    An early triumph of quantum mechanics was the explanation of metallic and insulating behavior based on the filling of electronic bands. A complementary, classical picture of insulators depicts electrons as occupying localized and symmetric Wannier orbitals that resemble atomic orbitals. We report the theoretical discovery of band insulators for which electron filling forbids such an atomic description. We refer to them as filling-enforced quantum band insulators (feQBIs) because their wave functions are associated with an essential degree of quantum entanglement. Like topological insulators, which also do not admit an atomic description, feQBIs need spin-orbit coupling for their realization. However, they do not necessarily support gapless surface states. Instead, the band topology is reflected in the insulating behavior at an unconventional filling. We present tight binding models of feQBIs and show that they only occur in certain nonsymmorphic, body-centered cubic crystals. PMID:27152352

  15. Small(pox) success?

    PubMed

    Birn, Anne-Emanuelle

    2011-02-01

    The 30th anniversary of the World Health Organization's (WHO) official certification of smallpox eradication was marked by a slew of events hailing the campaign's dramatic tale of technological and organizational triumph against an ancient scourge. Yet commemorations also serve as moments of critical reflection. This article questions the acclaim showered upon smallpox eradication as the single greatest public health success in history. It examines how and why smallpox eradication and WHO's concurrent social justice-oriented primary health care approach (following from the Declaration of Alma-Ata) became competing paradigms. It synthesizes critiques of eradication's shortcomings and debunks some of the myths surrounding the global eradication campaign as a public health priority and necessity, and as a Cold War victory of cooperation. The article concludes with thoughts on integrating technical and social-political aspects of health within the context of welfare states as the means to achieving widespread and enduring global public health success. PMID:21340334

  16. "The foolmaster who fooled them".

    PubMed Central

    Young, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Throughout the nineteenth century, physicians assumed the major task of analyzing and warning against quackery and unorthodoxy. The nature of this criticism is described, with key reliance on Worthington Hooker's Lessons from the History of Medical Delusions (1850). Most physicians viewed prospects for suppressing quackery more hopefully than Hooker did. Even he, however, would be shocked that delusion could persist so stubbornly despite advancing medical science, expanding education, and increasing regulation. Many factors help explain today's continuing-even burgeoning-quackery. These include a less cheerful view of both human nature and of the future, widespread skepticism about the fruits for science, impatience with governmental regulation, the vogue for self-help in health, increasing promotional sophistication on the part of unorthodox health vendors, and cooperation among various wings of unorthodoxy to maximize political pressure. Examples are given. Champions of alternative therapies predict their triumph over orthodox medical science in the contest being waged for the allegiance of the public. PMID:7018095

  17. A coming-of-age story: activation-induced cytidine deaminase turns 10

    PubMed Central

    Delker, Rebecca K; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and characterization of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) 10 years ago provided the basis for a mechanistic understanding of secondary antibody diversification and the subsequent generation and maintenance of cellular memory in B lymphocytes, which signified a major advance in the field of B cell immunology. Here we celebrate and review the triumphs in the mission to understand the mechanisms through which AID influences antibody diversification, as well as the implications of AID function on human physiology. We also take time to point out important ongoing controversies and outstanding questions in the field and highlight key experiments and techniques that hold the potential to elucidate the remaining mysteries surrounding this vital protein. PMID:19841648

  18. Clinical vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is regarded as one of the biggest triumphs in the history of medicine. We are living in the most successful period of vaccine development. The accumulation of multidisciplinary knowledge and the investment of massive funding have enabled the development of vaccines against many infectious diseases as well as other diseases including malignant tumors. The paradigm of clinical vaccine evaluation and licensure has also been modernized based on scientific improvements and historical experience. However, there remain a number of hurdles to overcome. Continuous efforts are focused on increasing the efficacy and reducing the risks related to vaccine use. Cutting-edge knowledge about immunology and microbiology is being rapidly translated to vaccine development. Thus, physicians and others involved in the clinical development of vaccines should have sufficient understanding of the recent developmental trends in vaccination and the diseases of interest. PMID:25648742

  19. Ross E. Baker, DC: A Canadian chiropractic survivor

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an historical biography of a fortunate man. It begins with a glimpse of Ross E. Baker’s origins in south-western Ontario, watches him going to school and working in Hamilton before joining the Canadian Army and shipping off to Europe to fight in the Second World War. At War’s end, the article picks up Dr. Baker as he comes home, starts a family, becomes a chiropractor and sustains a viable practice. Now in the twilight of life, the good doctor is last seen content with his retirement, spending days at his cottage property, reviewing his memoirs and reflecting on the tumult, terror and eventual triumph of the D-Day landing at Normandy. PMID:24587499

  20. Gravitational Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-06-24

    In a long line of intellectual triumphs, Einstein’s theory of general relativity was his greatest and most imaginative. It tells us that what we experience as gravity can be most accurately described as the bending of space itself. This idea leads to consequences, including gravitational lensing, which is caused by light traveling in this curved space. This is works in a way analogous to a lens (and hence the name). In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains a little general relativity, a little gravitational lensing, and tells us how this phenomenon allows us to map out the matter of the entire universe, including the otherwise-invisible dark matter.

  1. [Iron ore, economic geology and networks of experts between Wisconsin and the state of Minas Gerais, 1881-1914].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Georg

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with the "discovery" of Brazilian iron ore from two perspectives. The first examines the increasing emphasis of the geosciences and their practical application and global reach since the second half of the nineteenth century. While in Brazil economic geology was integrated step by step into state institutions, at the global level it experienced its moment of triumph with the 11th International Geological Congress in 1910. The second deals with a specific social network with a decisive role in the race for Brazilian iron ore: with transnational experts juggling between the logic of the market and that of the academy. The article reveals the importance of local negotiations in the incorporation of the subsoil of Minas Gerais into the global space of mining. PMID:24554136

  2. The achievements of William Crawford Gorgas.

    PubMed

    Craddock, W L

    1997-05-01

    From an obscure frontier surgeon George Crawford Gorgas became internationally acclaimed as a preventive medicine genius. By his initiative in translating the known scientific facts made possible during the blossoming of bacteriology, he performed service not only in the United States but in Cuba, Central and South America, South Africa, and Eastern Europe. He fought for 10 years successfully against yellow fever, malaria, and other diseases during the construction of the Panama Canal, and continued triumphs against disease in other world situations. This is a rather concise account emphasizing his continued devotion and dedication as a humanitarian. He fashioned the Army Medical Department into an efficient machine as Surgeon General, and following his amazing military career of over 38 years, made further contributions in preventive medicine with the Rockefeller Foundation. PMID:9155101

  3. Finding the Lost City

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Nicholas Clapp, a filmmaker and archeology enthusiast, had accumulated extensive information concerning Ubar, the fabled lost city of ancient Arabia. When he was unable to identify its exact location, however, he turned to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for assistance in applying orbital remote sensing techniques. JPL scientists searched NASA's shuttle imaging radar, as well as Landsat and SPOT images and discovered ancient caravan tracks. This enabled them to prepare a map of the trails, which converged at a place known as Ash Shisr. An expedition was formed, which found structures and artifacts from a city that predates previous area civilization by a thousand years. Although it will take time to validate the city as Ubar, the discovery is a monumental archeological triumph.

  4. Mathemimetics II. Demonstratio Mirabilis of FLT by infinitely ascending cubical crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trell, Erik

    2012-09-01

    Emulating Nature by observation and ground-up application of its patterns, structures and processes is a classical scientific practice which under the designation of Biomimetics has now been brought to the Nanotechnology scale where even highly complex systems can be realized by continuous or cyclically reiterated assembly of the respective self-similar eigen-elements, modules and algorithms right from their infinitesimal origin. This is actually quite akin to the genuine mathematical art and can find valuable renewed use as here exemplified by the tentatively original Demonstratio Mirabilis of FLT (Fermat's Last Theorem, or, in that case, Triumph) by infinitely ascending sheet-wise cubical crystal growth leading to the binomial `magic triangle' of his close fellow Blaise Pascal.

  5. Bayesian Magic in Asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallinger, T.

    2015-09-01

    Only a few years ago asteroseismic observations were so rare that scientists had plenty of time to work on individual data sets. They could tune their algorithms in any possible way to squeeze out the last bit of information. Nowadays this is impossible. With missions like MOST, CoRoT, and Kepler we basically drown in new data every day. To handle this in a sufficient way statistical methods become more and more important. This is why Bayesian techniques started their triumph march across asteroseismology. I will go with you on a journey through Bayesian Magic Land, that brings us to the sea of granulation background, the forest of peakbagging, and the stony alley of model comparison.

  6. The DSM and learning difficulties: formulating a genealogy of the learning-disabled subject.

    PubMed

    Katchergin, Ofer

    2016-06-01

    The article examines the manner in which the learning-disabled subject is created as an object within contemporary psychiatric discourse by means of a genealogical analysis of the learning-disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). It investigates how this pathology was formed historically in the text, what metamorphoses it underwent, and their epistemic significance. First, the theoretical underpinnings of the sociological discourse on DSM are presented, giving a brief background of the DSM status in the Israeli context. Many problematic characteristics in the text are unveiled, by means of critiques from sociology, anthropology and discourse studies. Second, the changing definitions and conceptualizations of learning-disorders in the seven editions of the Manual and the accompanying case studies (1952-2013) are examined. It becomes apparent that the disorders have undergone changes that have enabled the biomedical paradigm to triumph. The implications of these transformations are addressed. PMID:26956872

  7. Dark matter superfluidity and galactic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Khoury, Justin

    2016-02-01

    We propose a unified framework that reconciles the stunning success of MOND on galactic scales with the triumph of the ΛCDM model on cosmological scales. This is achieved through the physics of superfluidity. Dark matter consists of self-interacting axion-like particles that thermalize and condense to form a superfluid in galaxies, with ∼mK critical temperature. The superfluid phonons mediate a MOND acceleration on baryonic matter. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful) and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not): dark matter has a higher temperature in clusters, and hence is in a mixture of superfluid and normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of striking observational signatures.

  8. The Teaching of Physics in Cuba from Colonial Times to 1959

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, José; Baracca, Angelo

    The present paper will concentrate on the study of the first one and a half centuries of the teaching of physics in Cuba, starting from the early interest or activities in this. To provide the appropriate context, we will begin by going back in time to the early local signs of a modern scientific sensitivity, scornful of scholastic teaching and fond of experimental approaches, under the belated but stimulating influence of the European Enlightenment. We will go over individual cases during the initial phase of the country's academic physics in some detail, firstly during the initial period of colonial rule, and then from the beginning of the twentieth century to the triumph of the 1959 Revolution earlier that year. We thus hope to make the fundamental aspects of our subject reasonably consistent and abiding, even though further historical research may eventually throw new light on relevant details, personalities and events.

  9. An historical, biographical, literary, and clinical consideration of Freud's 'Analysis Terminable and Interminable' on its fiftieth birthday.

    PubMed

    Loewenberg, P

    1988-01-01

    Freud's paper is re-examined and placed in biographical and historical context, Moses and monotheism (1934-1938) is treated as a parallel text. Freud's ironic scepticism is viewed against the background of Thomas Mann's 1936 idealization of psychoanalysis. Freud was a sick and dying man in 1937 with every reason for personal pessimism. The political setting was the triumph of fascism in Austria and the impending seizure of Austria by Hitler. Freud fantasized the protection of psychoanalysis by the Roman Catholic Church. The paper is a polemic against the theories of Ferenczi, Adler, and Rank. Contemporaneous defence of prophylactic analysis by Fenichel is reviewed. Freud's political judgement of the moral equivalence of Social Democracy and fascism is critiqued. Freud's injunction to periodic re-analysis and his vision of analysis as 'unending' is supported. The possibility of intergenerational prophylaxis is presented. PMID:3042656

  10. AIDS and transfer factor: myths, certainties and realities.

    PubMed

    Viza, D

    1996-01-01

    At the end of the 20th century, the triumph of biology is as indisputable as that of physics was at the end of the 19th century, and so is the might of the inductive thought. Virtually all diseases have been seemingly conquered and HIV, the cause of AIDS, has been fully described ten years after the onset of the epidemic. However, the triumph of biological science is far from being complete. The toll of several diseases, such as cancer, continues to rise and the pathogenesis of AIDS remains elusive. In the realm of inductive science, the dominant paradigm can seldom be challenged in a frontal attack, especially when it is apparently successful, and only what Kuhn calls "scientific revolutions" can overthrow it. Thus, it is hardly surprising that the concept of transfer factor is considered with contempt, and the existence of the moiety improbable: over forty years after the introduction of the concept, not only its molecular structure remains unknown, but also its putative mode of action contravenes dogmas of both immunology and molecular biology. And when facts challenge established dogmas, be in religion, philosophy or science, they must be suppressed. Thus, results of heterodox research become henceforth nisi-i.e., valid unless cause is shown for rescinding them, because they challenge the prevalent paradigm. However, when observations pertain to lethal disorders, their suppression in the name of dogmas may become criminal. Because of the failure of medical science to manage the AIDS pandemic, transfer factor, which has been successfully used for treating or preventing viral infections, may today overcome a priori prejudice and rejection more swiftly. In science, as in life, certainties always end up by dying, and Copernicus' vision by replacing that of Ptolemy. PMID:8993753

  11. Performance characterization of a new CZT-based preclinical SPECT system: a comparative study of different collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, A. R.; Park, S.-J.; Choi, Y. Y.; Kim, K. M.; Kim, H.-J.

    2015-09-01

    Triumph X-SPECT is a newly released CZT-based preclinical small-animal SPECT system with interchangeable collimators. The purpose of this work was to evaluate and systematically compare the imaging performances of three different collimators in the CZT-based preclinical small-animal system: a single-pinhole collimator (SPH), a multi-pinhole collimator (MPH) and a parallel-hole collimator. We measured the spatial resolutions and sensitivities of the three collimators with 99mTc sources, considering three distinct energy window widths (5, 10, and 20%), and used the NEMA NU4-2008 Image Quality phantom to test the imaging performance of the three collimators in terms of uniformity and spill-over ratio (SOR) for each energy window. With a 10% energy window width at a radius of rotation (ROR) of 30 mm, the system resolution of the SPH, MPH and parallel-hole collimators was 0.715, 0.855 and 3.270 mm FWHM, respectively. For the same energy window, the sensitivity of the system with SPH, MPH and parallel-hole collimators was 32.860, 152.514 and 49.205 counts/sec/MBq at a 100 mm source-to-detector distance and 6.790, 33.376 and 49.038 counts/sec/MBq at a 130 mm source-to-detector distance, respectively. The image noise and SORair for the three collimators were 20.137, 12.278 and 11.232 (%STDunif) and 0.106, 0.140 and 0.161, respectively. Overall, the results show that the SPH had better spatial resolution than the other collimators. The MPH had the highest sensitivity at 100 mm source-to-collimator distance, and the parallel-hole collimator had the highest sensitivity at 130 mm-source-to-detector distance. Therefore, the proper collimator for Triumph X-SPECT system must be determined by the task. These results provide valuable reference data and insight into the imaging performance of various collimators in CZT-based preclinical small-animal SPECT.

  12. Roe v. Wade. Catholic wisdom.

    PubMed

    Maguire, D

    1998-01-01

    In this commentary, a Roman Catholic professor of moral theory recounts how, during his doctoral work in Rome, he was taught that abortion was intrinsically evil and could never be justified. He was also taught, however, about Probabilism, a Roman Catholic teaching that held that "where there is doubt, there is freedom." In other words, serious doubts based on a person's own insights allow a person moral freedom to choose a course of action in cases of debated moral issues. This moral teaching, a triumph for the rights of personal conscience, which was formulated in the 16th and 17th centuries, has been well-hidden from the laity and neglected by the clergy during the past 100 years. He also learned about Thomas Aquinas who taught that practical moral principals are valid most of the time but can have exceptions depending on circumstances. In addition, early 17th-century church leaders justified abortions performed to save the life of the women. Thus, the Supreme Court's decision in Roe seems to reflect Catholic thinking more accurately than the Vatican's new-found absolutism against abortion. PMID:12178884

  13. Resilience to Leaking — Dynamic Systems Modeling of Information Security

    PubMed Central

    Hamacher, Kay

    2012-01-01

    Leaking of confidential material is a major threat to information security within organizations and to society as a whole. This insight has gained traction in the political realm since the activities of Wikileaks, which hopes to attack ‘unjust’ systems or ‘conspiracies’. Eventually, such threats to information security rely on a biologistic argument on the benefits and drawbacks that uncontrolled leaking might pose for ‘just’ and ‘unjust’ entities. Such biological metaphors are almost exclusively based on the economic advantage of participants. Here, I introduce a mathematical model of the complex dynamics implied by leaking. The complex interactions of adversaries are modeled by coupled logistic equations including network effects of econo-communication networks. The modeling shows, that there might arise situations where the leaking envisioned and encouraged by Wikileaks and the like can strengthen the defending entity (the ‘conspiracy’). In particular, the only severe impact leaking can have on an organization seems to originate in the exploitation of leaks by another entity the organization competes with. Therefore, the model suggests that leaks can be used as a `tactical mean’ in direct adversary relations, but do not necessarily increase public benefit and societal immunization to ‘conspiracies’. Furthermore, within the model the exploitation of the (open) competition between entities seems to be a more promising approach to control malicious organizations : divide-et-impera policies triumph here. PMID:23227151

  14. Reflections One Year into the 22 Center NIH-funded WRIST Study. A Primer on Conducting a Multicenter Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Wrist and Radius Surgery Trial (WRIST) study group is a collaboration of 22 hand surgery centers in the US, Canada, and Singapore to showcase the interest and capability of hand surgeons to conduct a multicenter clinical trial. The WRIST study group was formed in response to the seminal systematic review by Margaliot et al. and the Cochrane report that indicated marked deficiency in the quality of evidence in the distal radius fracture literature. Since the initial description of this fracture by Colles in 1814, over 2,000 studies have been published on this subject, yet high level studies based on the principles of evidence-based medicine are lacking. As we continue to embrace evidence-based medicine to raise the quality of research, the lessons learned during the organization and conduct of WRIST can serve as a template for others contemplating similar efforts. This paper will trace the course of WRIST by sharing the triumphs, and more importantly the struggles, faced in the first year of this study. PMID:23608306

  15. Space Geodesy Monitoring Mass Transport in Global Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Mass transports occurring in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-cryosphere-solid Earth-core system (the 'global geophysical fluids') are important geophysical phenomena. They occur on all temporal and spatial scales. Examples include air mass and ocean circulations, oceanic and solid tides, hydrological water and idsnow redistribution, mantle processes such as post-glacial rebound, earthquakes and tectonic motions, and core geodynamo activities. The temporal history and spatial pattern of such mass transport are often not amenable to direct observations. Space geodesy techniques, however, have proven to be an effective tool in monitorihg certain direct consequences of the mass transport, including Earth's rotation variations, gravitational field variations, and the geocenter motion. Considerable advances have been made in recent years in observing and understanding of these geodynamic effects. This paper will use several prominent examples to illustrate the triumphs in research over the past years under a 'Moore's law' in space geodesy. New space missions and projects promise to further advance our knowledge about the global mass transports. The latter contributes to our understanding of the geophysical processes that produce and regulate the mass transports, as well as of the solid Earth's response to such changes in terms of Earth's mechanical properties.

  16. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior. PMID:949223

  17. Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis, the prophet of bacteriology.

    PubMed

    Wyklicky, H; Skopec, M

    1983-01-01

    Although by 1931 I. Ph. Semmelweis' achievements and the tragedy of his life had been given their due place in the history of mankind, Alexander Fränkel, formerly Theodor Billroth's assistant and later his biographer, critically stated that the discoverer of the causes of puerperal fever should have defended his discovery with facts rather than with fanaticism. It was only a few years after Semmelweis' death, for instance, that Billroth made laborious experiments. Billroth's work on Coccobacteria had important implications and even influenced Robert Koch, although his hypotheses did not really predict the pathogenic and specific nature of microbes. In 1847 Semmelweis postulated his theory; ie, that the pathological-anatomical changes which he observed in the bodies of the women who died in childbed, in their newborn infants, and in the autopsy findings on his friend Jakob Kolletschka were an entity, morphologically and clinically. He summed them up under the concept of pyemia. Even though Semmelweis was continually abhorred by the evident statistics and would have been able to prove his discovery through animal experiments, he primarily took to the pen to defend his opinion vehemently. Only the clinical facts proved him right during his lifetime; the triumph of bacteriology which began after his death made him not only the "savior of mothers" but also a genial ancestor of bacteriology. PMID:6354955

  18. Observing OPEC's 20th birthday: how the oil bloc stands today

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Y.

    1981-04-01

    OPEC was formed 20 years ago when the producers perceived that major oil companies were conspiring to lower prices, but OPEC's domination of total world production and the industralized world's dependence on imported oil have led to the cartel's major triumphs of the past eight years. OPEC's power has caused major price shocks after 1973 and 1978. A major contribution to the growth of cartel power was the decline in US oil production, which peaked in 1970. Supply and demand in terms of oil prices and the world economic condition have fluctuated several times since the 1973 supply disruption and remain unstable in 1981. At the time this article was written, the author foresaw that OPEC prices could still rise as much as 30% in 1981 in spite of conservation efforts and more stable supply and demand conditions. Government policies to offset US vulnerability to OPEC control include building a strategic oil reserve and deregulation of oil prices, but the tradeoff has been higher inflation. (DCK)

  19. MIPoD: A Hypothesis-Testing Framework for Microevolutionary Inference from Patterns of Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Hohenlohe, Paul A.; Arnold, Stevan J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the many triumphs of comparative biology during the past few decades, the field has remained strangely divorced from evolutionary genetics. In particular, comparative methods have failed to incorporate multivariate process models of microevolution that include genetic constraint in the form of the G matrix. Here we explore the insights that might be gained by such an analysis. A neutral model of evolution by genetic drift that depends on effective population size and the G matrix predicts a probability distribution for divergence of population trait means on a phylogeny. Use of a maximum likelihood (ML) framework then allows us to compare independent direct estimates of G with the ML estimates based on the observed pattern of trait divergence among taxa. We assess the departure from neutrality, and thus the role of different types of selection and other forces, in a stepwise hypothesis-testing procedure based on parameters for the size, shape, and orientation of G. We illustrate our approach with a test case of data on vertebral number evolution in garter snakes. PMID:18194086

  20. The discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, Mitf

    PubMed Central

    Arnheiter, Heinz

    2010-01-01

    Summary The history of the discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, now called Mitf, is a testament to the triumph of serendipity. Although the first microphthalmia mutation was discovered among the descendants of a mouse that was irradiated for the purpose of mutagenesis, the mutation most likely was not radiation-induced but occurred spontaneously in one of the parents of a later breeding. Although Mitf might eventually have been identified by other molecular genetic techniques, it was first cloned from a chance transgene insertion at the microphthalmia locus. And although Mitf was found to encode a member of a well-known transcription factor family, its analysis might still be in its infancy had Mitf not turned out to be of crucial importance for the physiology and pathology of many distinct organs, including eye, ear, immune system, bone, and skin, and in particular for melanoma. In fact, near seven decades of Mitf research have led to many insights about development, function, degeneration, and malignancies of a number of specific cell types, and it is hoped that these insights will one day lead to therapies benefitting those afflicted with diseases originating in these cell types. PMID:20807369

  1. Predictive markers of safety and immunogenicity of adjuvanted vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mastelic, Beatris; Garçon, Nathalie; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Golding, Hana; Gruber, Marion; Neels, Pieter; Fritzell, Bernard

    2013-11-01

    Vaccination represents one of the greatest public health triumphs; in part due to the effect of adjuvants that have been included in vaccine preparations to boost the immune responses through different mechanisms. Although a variety of novel adjuvants have been under development, only a limited number have been approved by regulatory authorities for human vaccines. This report reflects the conclusions of a group of scientists from academia, regulatory agencies and industry who attended a conference on the current state of the art in the adjuvant field. Held at the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) in Rockville, Maryland, USA, from 18 to 19 April 2013 and organized by the International Association for Biologicals (IABS), the conference focused particularly on the future development of effective adjuvants and adjuvanted vaccines and on overcoming major hurdles, such as safety and immunogenicity assessment, as well as regulatory scrutiny. More information on the conference output can be found on the IABS website, http://www.iabs.org/. PMID:24071553

  2. When should a leader apologize and when not?

    PubMed

    Kellerman, Barbara

    2006-04-01

    When corporate leaders or the organizations they represent mess up, they face the difficult decision of whether or not to apologize publicly. A public apology is a risky move. It's highly political, and every word matters. Refusal to apologize can be smart, or it can be suicidal. Readiness to apologize can be seen as a sign of character or one of weakness. A successful apology can turn enmity into personal and organizational triumph--while an apology that's too little, too late, or too transparently tactical can open the floodgates to individual and institutional ruin. Since the stakes are so high, Kellerman says, leaders should not extend public apologies often or lightly. One or more of the following conditions should apply: The apology is likely to serve an important purpose. The offense is of serious consequence. It's appropriate that the leader assume responsibility for the offense. The leader is the only one who can get the job done. The cost of saying something is likely lower than the cost of staying silent. The author draws her conclusions from hard data and abundant anecdotal evidence, examining notoriously bad apologizers as well as exceptionally good ones. While selectivity is key, good apologies usually do work. What constitutes a good apology? Acknowledgment of the mistake or wrongdoing, acceptance of responsibility, expression of regret, and assurance that the offense will not be repeated. PMID:16579415

  3. Mate choice and sexual selection: What have we learned since Darwin?

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Adam G.; Ratterman, Nicholas L.

    2009-01-01

    Charles Darwin laid the foundation for all modern work on sexual selection in his seminal book The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex. In this work, Darwin fleshed out the mechanism of sexual selection, a hypothesis that he had proposed in The Origin of Species. He went well beyond a simple description of the phenomenon by providing extensive evidence and considering the far-reaching implications of the idea. Here we consider the contributions of Darwin to sexual selection with a particular eye on how far we have progressed in the last 150 years. We focus on 2 key questions in sexual selection. First, why does mate choice evolve at all? And second, what factors determine the strength of mate choice (or intensity of sexual selection) in each sex? Darwin provided partial answers to these questions, and the progress that has been made on both of these topics since his time should be seen as one of the great triumphs of modern evolutionary biology. However, a review of the literature shows that key aspects of sexual selection are still plagued by confusion and disagreement. Many of these areas are complex and will require new theory and empirical data for complete resolution. Overall, Darwin's contributions are still surprisingly relevant to the modern study of sexual selection, so students of evolutionary biology would be well advised to revisit his works. Although we have made significant progress in some areas of sexual selection research, we still have much to accomplish. PMID:19528643

  4. Hormones for life? Behind the rise and fall of a hormone remedy (Gonadex) against sterility in the Swedish welfare state.

    PubMed

    Nordlund, Christer

    2007-03-01

    In 1948 the pharmaceutical company Leo launched a placental hormonal preparation, called Gonadex, in Sweden. During a press conference, and in commercials and newspapers, it was said that Gonadex could cure sterility as well as many other problems related to the endocrine system. The remedy was described as effective and pure, with no side effects whatsoever. For several reasons, Gonadex was looked upon as a 'Swedish triumph'. Inspired by research on 'mediation', conducted within the field of social studies of pharmaceutical drugs, the present essay explores the political and scientific visions and values behind Gonadex; the propaganda for and marketing of Gonadex; the mediated image of Gonadex in the press; the reception by the medical profession, and finally the hopes and fears of the women who tried (or wanted to try) Gonadex. The essay argues that the public image of Gonadex was 'oversell' of hormone therapy, and that it was shaped by the way endocrinologists at Karolinska Hospital, notably Professor Axel Westman, mediated between Leo, the mass media, and the consumers when, and even before, Gonadex was introduced to the market. PMID:17324814

  5. Skin lighteners, Black consumers and Jewish entrepreneurs in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lynn M

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the rise and decline of South Africa's lucrative and controversial skin-lighteners market through examination of the business history of the largest manufacturers, Abraham and Solomon Krok, and their evolving personas as millionaires and philanthropists. Such examination reveals how the country's skin-lighteners trade emerged as part of the broader growth of a black consumer market after the Second World War and how elements of that market became the target of anti-apartheid protests in subsequent decades. It also demonstrates how the Kroks' experiences as second-generation Jewish immigrants shaped their involvement in the trade and how, later, their self-identification as Jewish philanthropists informed their efforts to rehabilitate their reputations following South Africa's 1990 ban on all skin lighteners. Such efforts include the building of Johannesburg's highly acclaimed Apartheid Museum, modelled after the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. This article explores the profound ironies that some South Africans see in the fact that a museum dedicated to commemorating those who suffered under and, ultimately, triumphed against state racism was financed by a family fortune generated through the sale of skin lighteners to black consumers. PMID:22830098

  6. Signaling in T cells – is anything the m(a)TOR with the picture(s)?

    PubMed Central

    Boothby, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The excitement surrounding checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of patients with cancer exemplifies a triumph of the long-term value of investing in basic science and fundamental questions of T-cell signaling. The pharmaceutical future actively embraces ways of making more patients’ cancers responsive to these inhibitors. Such a process will be aided by elucidation of signaling and regulation. With thousands of articles spread across almost 30 years, this commentary can touch only on portions of the canonical picture of T-cell signaling and provide a few parables from work on mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways as they link to early and later phases of lymphocyte activation. The piece will turn a critical eye to some issues with models about these pathways in T cells. Many of the best insights lie in the future despite all that is uncovered already, but a contention is that further therapeutic successes will be fostered by dealing with disparities among findings and attention to the temporal, spatial, and stochastic aspects of T-cell responses. Finally, thoughts on some (though not all) items urgently needed for future progress will be mooted. PMID:26949528

  7. Scipione Riva-Rocci and the men behind the mercury sphygmomanometer.

    PubMed

    Roguin, A

    2006-01-01

    The history of the blood pressure (BP) concept and measurements is described. Many scientists were involved. Among them, major triumphs were achieved by William Harvey during the early 1600s who announced that there is a finite amount of blood that circulated the body in one direction only. In the mid-1700s, Reverend Stephen Hales reported the first invasive measurement in horses and smaller animals. Poiseuille introduced in the early 1800s the mercury hydrodynometer and the mmHg units. Karl von-Vierordt described in 1855 that with enough pressure, the arterial pulse could be obliterated. He also created the sphygmograph, a pulse recorder usable for routine non-invasive monitoring on humans. In 1881, von Basch created the sphygmomanometer and the first non-invasive BP measurements. However, in 1896, Scipione Riva-Rocci developed further the mercury sphygmomanometer, almost as we know it today. The sphygmomanometer could only be used to determine the systolic BP. Observing the pulse disappearance via palpitation would only allow the measuring physician to observe the point when the artery was fully constricted. Nikolai Korotkoff was the first to observe the sounds made by the constriction of the artery in 1905. PMID:16409431

  8. Large Fermi Surface of Heavy Electrons at the Border of Mott Insulating State in NiS2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Friedemann, S.; Chang, H.; Gamża, M. B.; Reiss, P.; Chen, X.; Alireza, P.; Coniglio, W. A.; Graf, D.; Tozer, S.; Grosche, F. M.

    2016-05-12

    One early triumph of quantum physics is the explanation why some materials are metallic whereas others are insulating. While a treatment based on single electron states is correct for most materials this approach can fail spectacularly, when the electrostatic repulsion between electrons causes strong correlations. Not only can these favor new and subtle forms of matter, such as magnetism or superconductivity, they can even cause the electrons in a half-filled energy band to lock into position, producing a correlated, or Mott insulator. The transition into the Mott insulating state raises important fundamental questions. Foremost among these is the fate ofmore » the electronic Fermi surface and the associated charge carrier mass, as the Mott transition is approached. We report the first direct observation of the Fermi surface on the metallic side of a Mott insulating transition by high pressure quantum oscillatory measurements in NiS2. We find our results point at a large Fermi surface consistent with Luttinger's theorem and a strongly enhanced quasiparticle effective mass. These two findings are in line with central tenets of the Brinkman-Rice picture of the correlated metal near the Mott insulating state and rule out alternative scenarios in which the carrier concentration vanishes continuously at the metal-insulator transition.« less

  9. The Chemical Synthesis of Discodermolide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, I.; Florence, G. J.

    The marine sponge-derived polyketide discodermolide is a potent antimitotic agent that represents a promising natural product lead structure in the treatment of cancer. Discodermolide shares the same microtubule-stabilising mechanism of action as Taxol®, inhibits the growth of solid tumours in animal models and shows synergy with Taxol. The pronounced cytotoxicity of discodermolide, which is maintained against cancer cell lines that display resistance to Taxol and other drugs, combined with its scarce availability from its natural source, has fuelled significant academic and industrial interest in devising a practical total synthesis as a means of ensuring a sustainable supply for drug development. This chapter surveys the various total syntheses of discodermolide that have been completed over the period 1993-2007, focusing on the strategies employed for introduction of the multiple stereocentres and achieving control over the alkene geometry, along with the various methods used for realising the pivotal fragment couplings to assemble progressively the full carbon skeleton. This dedicated synthetic effort has triumphed in removing the supply problem for discodermolide, providing sufficient material for extensive biological studies and enabling its early stage clinical development, as well as facilitating SAR studies for lead optimisation.

  10. ‘Don't play the butter notes’: jazz in medical education

    PubMed Central

    Bradner, Melissa; Harper, Darryl V.; Ryan, Mark H.; Vanderbilt, Allison A.

    2016-01-01

    Jazz has influenced world music and culture globally – attesting to its universal truths of surviving, enduring, and triumphing over tragedy. This begs the question, what can we glean in medical education from this philosophy of jazz mentoring? Despite our training to understand disease and illness in branching logic diagrams, the human experience of illness is still best understood when told as a story. Stories like music have tempos, pauses, and silences. Often they are not linear but wrap around the past, future, and back to the present, frustrating the novice and the experienced clinician in documenting the history of present illness. The first mentoring lesson Hancock discusses is from a time he felt stuck with his playing – his sound was routine. Miles Davis told him in a low husky murmur, ‘Don't play the butter notes’. In medical education, ‘don't play the butter notes’ suggests not undervaluing the metacognition and reflective aspects of medical training that need to be fostered during the early years of clinical teaching years. PMID:27095009

  11. Global environmental politics: Lessons from Montreal

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, J. )

    1994-01-01

    When 24 nations and the European Community signed the Montreal Protocol in September, 1987, it was widely praised for its reflection of unprecedented foresight in mandating preventive action on a global scale. Such praise may have been premature in light of more recent revelations that: (1) the rates of ozone depletion appear to be accelerating; and (2) the depletion seems to be spreading into the summer months over the north temperate zone of latitudes. Although there is still controversy over what the effects of such depletion ultimately will be, most nations of the world, including all of the advanced industrialized countries, agree that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) must be phased out of all production and use, and they are taking steps to do that before the turn of the century. Two distinctly different conclusions are thus possible regarding the outcome of the negotiations. As the first successfully negotiated multilateral agreement to address a global environmental problem, the Protocol is seen by many to be a triumph of environmental awareness and international cooperation. To other observers, however, the struggle for domestic commercial interests and national political debates that led to delays in action may already be causing serious and irreversible damage that could have been avoided. In short, the negotiation process worked, but it took to long for nations to agree that it was necessary and to begin the process.

  12. Stapp`s quantum dualism: The James/Heisenberg model of consciousness

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.

    1994-02-18

    Henry Stapp attempts to resolve the Cartesian dilemma by introducing what the author would characterize as an ontological dualism between mind and matter. His model for mind comes from William James` description of conscious events and for matter from Werner Heisenberg`s ontological model for quantum events (wave function collapse). His demonstration of the isomorphism between the two types of events is successful, but in the author`s opinion fails to establish a monistic, scientific theory. The author traces Stapp`s failure to his adamant rejection of arbitrariness, or `randomness`. This makes it impossible for him (or for Bohr and Pauli before him) to understand the power of Darwin`s explanation of biology, let along the triumphs of modern `neo-Darwinism`. The author notes that the point at issue is a modern version of the unresolved opposition between Leucippus and Democritus on one side and Epicurus on the other. Stapp`s views are contrasted with recent discussions of consciousness by two eminent biologists: Crick and Edelman. They locate the problem firmly in the context of natural selection on the surface of the earth. Their approaches provide a sound basis for further scientific work. The author briefly examines the connection between this scientific (rather than ontological) framework and the new fundamental theory based on bit-strings and the combinatorial hierarchy.

  13. Large Fermi Surface of Heavy Electrons at the Border of Mott Insulating State in NiS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedemann, S.; Chang, H.; Gamża, M. B.; Reiss, P.; Chen, X.; Alireza, P.; Coniglio, W. A.; Graf, D.; Tozer, S.; Grosche, F. M.

    2016-05-01

    One early triumph of quantum physics is the explanation why some materials are metallic whereas others are insulating. While a treatment based on single electron states is correct for most materials this approach can fail spectacularly, when the electrostatic repulsion between electrons causes strong correlations. Not only can these favor new and subtle forms of matter, such as magnetism or superconductivity, they can even cause the electrons in a half-filled energy band to lock into position, producing a correlated, or Mott insulator. The transition into the Mott insulating state raises important fundamental questions. Foremost among these is the fate of the electronic Fermi surface and the associated charge carrier mass, as the Mott transition is approached. We report the first direct observation of the Fermi surface on the metallic side of a Mott insulating transition by high pressure quantum oscillatory measurements in NiS2. Our results point at a large Fermi surface consistent with Luttinger’s theorem and a strongly enhanced quasiparticle effective mass. These two findings are in line with central tenets of the Brinkman-Rice picture of the correlated metal near the Mott insulating state and rule out alternative scenarios in which the carrier concentration vanishes continuously at the metal-insulator transition.

  14. Tobacco control policies and their impacts. Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Warner, Kenneth E

    2014-02-01

    The 1964 Surgeon General's report on smoking and health concluded that "Cigarette smoking is a health hazard of sufficient importance in the United States to warrant appropriate remedial action." The adoption of remedial actions over the next half century produced what is arguably the most important public health triumph of that period in the United States and in other developed nations. At the heart of the remedial actions were governmental policies. By raising cigarette price, taxation is especially effective at reducing smoking, encouraging some smokers to quit and others to reduce their daily consumption, while also discouraging the initiation of smoking by children. Smoke-free workplace policies have dramatically reduced workers' exposure to the toxins in cigarette smoke, smoking, employers' costs, and the incidence of acute myocardial infarctions. Other policies have also helped diminish the toll of smoking. The successes of tobacco control notwithstanding, future progress will occur slowly unless society finds new, possibly radical "endgame" strategies to hasten the arrival of a smoke-free society. PMID:24575991

  15. The bioethical principles and Confucius' moral philosophy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, D F-C

    2005-03-01

    This paper examines whether the modern bioethical principles of respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice proposed by Beauchamp and Childress are existent in, compatible with, or acceptable to the leading Chinese moral philosophy-the ethics of Confucius. The author concludes that the moral values which the four prima facie principles uphold are expressly identifiable in Confucius' teachings. However, Confucius' emphasis on the filial piety, family values, the "love of gradation", altruism of people, and the "role specified relation oriented ethics" will inevitably influence the "specification" and application of these bioethical principles and hence tend to grant "beneficence" a favourable position that diminishes the respect for individual rights and autonomy. In contrast, the centrality of respect for autonomy and its stance of "first among equals" are more and more stressed in Western liberal viewpoints. Nevertheless, if the Confucian "doctrine of Mean" (chung-yung) and a balanced "two dimensional personhood" approach are properly employed, this will require both theorists and clinicians, who are facing medical ethical dilemmas, of searching to attain due mean out of competing moral principles thus preventing "giving beneficence a priority" or "asserting autonomy must triumph". PMID:15738437

  16. Early American Strabismus Surgery: 1840-1845.

    PubMed

    Currie, Benjamin D; Feibel, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of effective surgical therapy for strabismus was one of the outstanding triumphs of the first half of 19th-century ophthalmology, just prior to the invention of the ophthalmoscope in 1850. Although priority for the development of strabismus surgery belongs to Johann Friedrich Dieffenbach of Germany, who first reported his surgical results in 1839, 4 cases of tenotomy of the medial rectus muscle had been performed in the United States by William Gibson in 1818 but never published. By 1840, the reports of surgery in Europe had rapidly spread to America where surgeons immediately began using these procedures. The first American surgeon to perform eye muscle surgery and publish his results was John Dix of Boston, and other surgeons were soon reporting their cases as well. We discuss 8 American pioneers in this field during the time (1840-1845) of the first burst of enthusiasm for this surgery. Although these surgeons were active in performing a large number of cases and carefully reporting their experiences and results, they did not make any major advances in the field. PMID:26669424

  17. Development of a research strategy for integrated technology-based toxicological and chemical evaluation of complex mixtures of drinking water disinfection byproducts.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Jane Ellen; Richardson, Susan D; Speth, Thomas F; Miltner, Richard J; Rice, Glenn; Schenck, Kathleen M; Hunter, E Sidney; Teuschler, Linda K

    2002-01-01

    Chemical disinfection of water is a major public health triumph of the 20th century. Dramatic decreases in both morbidity and mortality of waterborne diseases are a direct result of water disinfection. With these important public health benefits comes low-level, chronic exposure to a very large number of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), chemicals formed through reaction of the chemical disinfectant with naturally occurring inorganic and organic material in the source water. This article provides an overview of joint research planning by scientists residing within the various organizations of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development. The purpose is to address concerns related to potential health effects from exposure to DBPs that cannot be addressed directly from toxicological studies of individual DBPs or simple DBP mixtures. Two factors motivate the need for such an investigation of complex mixtures of DBPs: a) a significant amount of the material that makes up the total organic halide and total organic carbon portions of the DBPs has not been identified; and b) epidemiologic data, although not conclusive, are suggestive of potential developmental, reproductive, or carcinogenic health effects in humans exposed to DBPs. The plan is being developed and the experiments necessary to determine the feasibility of its implementation are being conducted by scientists from the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, the National Risk Management Research Laboratory, the National Exposure Research Laboratory, and the National Center for Environmental Assessment. PMID:12634133

  18. Large-Eddy Simulations of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in Heliophysics and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark; Matthaeus, William; Brandenburg, Axel; Petrosyan, Arakel; Pouquet, Annick; Cambon, Claude; Jenko, Frank; Uzdensky, Dmitri; Stone, James; Tobias, Steve; Toomre, Juri; Velli, Marco

    2015-11-01

    We live in an age in which high-performance computing is transforming the way we do science. Previously intractable problems are now becoming accessible by means of increasingly realistic numerical simulations. One of the most enduring and most challenging of these problems is turbulence. Yet, despite these advances, the extreme parameter regimes encountered in space physics and astrophysics (as in atmospheric and oceanic physics) still preclude direct numerical simulation. Numerical models must take a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach, explicitly computing only a fraction of the active dynamical scales. The success of such an approach hinges on how well the model can represent the subgrid-scales (SGS) that are not explicitly resolved. In addition to the parameter regime, heliophysical and astrophysical applications must also face an equally daunting challenge: magnetism. The presence of magnetic fields in a turbulent, electrically conducting fluid flow can dramatically alter the coupling between large and small scales, with potentially profound implications for LES/SGS modeling. In this review article, we summarize the state of the art in LES modeling of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows. After discussing the nature of MHD turbulence and the small-scale processes that give rise to energy dissipation, plasma heating, and magnetic reconnection, we consider how these processes may best be captured within an LES/SGS framework. We then consider several specific applications in heliophysics and astrophysics, assessing triumphs, challenges, and future directions.

  19. Transition to space - A history of 'space plane' concepts at Langley Aeronautical Laboratory 1952-1957

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James R.

    1987-01-01

    The supersonic speeds of X-series aircraft and wind tunnel data in the early 1950s demonstrated that hypersonic flight was an achievable goal. A blunt-nosed vehicle was found to form a bow shock that deflected much of the heating an aircraft would otherwise experience at high speeds. It was felt that critical aspects of hypersonic flight, e.g., aerodynamic performance and heating, controllability, etc., could not be fully explored in wind tunnels. The X-15 project was initiated by NASA in 1954 to produce a vehicle capable of Mach 7 flight to altitudes that would permit short evaluations of human performance in microgravity. Design tradeoffs examined in the program are discussed, with emphasis on lifting bodies and winged vehicles with high L/D ratios. Political pressures created by the public triumph of the Sputnik in 1958 removed much of the impetus for development of a manned spaceplane, and long-term goals that eventually led to the Shuttle were delayed by a short-term program oriented toward ballistic manned capsules.

  20. In accordance with a "more majestic order". The new math and the nature of mathematics at midcentury.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christopher J

    2014-09-01

    The "new math" curriculum, one version of which was developed in the 1950s and 1960s by the School Mathematics Study Group under the auspices of the National Science Foundation, occasioned a great deal of controversy among mathematicians. Well before its rejection by parents and teachers, some mathematicians were vocal critics, decrying the new curriculum because of the way it described the practice and history of the discipline. The nature of mathematics, despite the field's triumphs in helping to win World War II and its midcentury promotion as the key to a modern technological society, was surprisingly contested in this period. Supporters of the School Mathematics Study Group, like its director, Edward Begle, emphasized the importance of portraying mathematics as a system of abstract structures, while opponents like Morris Kline argued that math was essentially a tool for understanding the natural world. The debate about the curriculum--and the role of mathematicians in its design--was also a debate about the underlying identity of the subject itself. PMID:25816477

  1. Exploding cities: housing the masses in Paris, Chicago, and Mexico City, 1850-2000.

    PubMed

    Platt, Harold L

    2010-01-01

    In The Mystery of Capitalism , the darling of neoliberalism, Hernando de Soto posits that secure property titles explain “why capitalism triumphs in the West and fails everywhere else.” While social scientists have taken him to task for an oversimplification of the causes and remedies of poverty, historians have contributed little to this important policy debate. Applying comparative methods across time and space, such a retrospective analysis exposes serious flaws in de Soto’s thesis. Case studies of Paris, Chicago, and Mexico City covering successive, fifty-year periods support his contention that property law was the single most important factor in determining the fate of rural migrants trying to find a place to live in these exploding cities. But in each case, residential property played a far more complex role in creating the social and physical geography of the city than its simple exchange value. This article illuminates some of these alternative economic uses and embedded cultural meanings of identities of place. It also shows how urban growth machines create capital value in property for some by creating environmental injustice of substandard conditions of everyday life for others. PMID:20827834

  2. Weddell Sea exploration from ice station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ice Station Weddell Group of Principal Investigators; Chief Scientists; Gordon, Arnold L.

    On January 18, 1915, the Endurance and Sir Ernest Shackleton and his crew were stranded in the ice of the Weddell Sea and began one of the most famous drifts in polar exploration. Shackleton turned a failure into a triumph by leading all of his team to safety [Shackleton, 1919]. The drift track of the Endurance and the ice floe occupied by her stranded crew after the ship was lost on November 21, 1915, at 68°38.5‧S and 52°26.5‧W, carried the group along the western rim of the Weddell Gyre, representing a rare human presence in this region of perennial sea-ice cover.Seventy-seven years later, in 1992, the first intentional scientific Southern Ocean ice drift station, Ice Station Weddell-1 (ISW-1), was established in the western Weddell Sea by a joint effort of the United States and Russia. ISW-1 followed the track of the Endurance closely (Figure 1) and gathered an impressive array of data in this largely unexplored corner of the Southern Ocean, the western edge of the Weddell Gyre.

  3. A brief multi-disciplinary review on antimicrobial resistance in medicine and its linkage to the global environmental microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cantas, L.; Shah, Syed Q. A.; Cavaco, L. M.; Manaia, C. M.; Walsh, F.; Popowska, M.; Garelick, H.; Bürgmann, H.; Sørum, H.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery and introduction of antimicrobial agents to clinical medicine was one of the greatest medical triumphs of the 20th century that revolutionized the treatment of bacterial infections. However, the gradual emergence of populations of antimicrobial-resistant pathogenic bacteria resulting from use, misuse, and abuse of antimicrobials has today become a major global health concern. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes have been suggested to originate from environmental bacteria, as clinically relevant resistance genes have been detected on the chromosome of environmental bacteria. As only a few new antimicrobials have been developed in the last decade, the further evolution of resistance poses a serious threat to public health. Urgent measures are required not only to minimize the use of antimicrobials for prophylactic and therapeutic purposes but also to look for alternative strategies for the control of bacterial infections. This review examines the global picture of antimicrobial resistance, factors that favor its spread, strategies, and limitations for its control and the need for continuous training of all stake-holders i.e., medical, veterinary, public health, and other relevant professionals as well as human consumers, in the appropriate use of antimicrobial drugs. PMID:23675371

  4. Positioning advanced practice registered nurses for health care reform: consensus on APRN regulation.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Joan M; Werner, Kathryn E; Apple, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) have positioned themselves to serve an integral role in national health care reform. This article addresses both the policy and the process to develop this policy that has placed them in a strategic position. A successful transformation of the nation's health system will require utilization of all clinicians, particularly primary care providers, to the full extent of their education and scope of practice. APRNs are highly qualified clinicians who provide cost-effective, accessible, patient-centered care and have the education to provide the range of services at the heart of the reform movement, including care coordination, chronic care management, and wellness and preventive care. The APRN community faces many challenges amidst the opportunities of health reform. However, the APRN community's triumph in reaching consensus on APRN regulation signifies a cohesive approach to overcoming the obstacles. The consensus model for APRN regulation, endorsed by 44 national nursing organizations, will serve as a beacon for nursing, as well as a guidepost for consumers and policymakers, on titling, education, certification, accreditation, and licensing for all four APRN roles. PMID:19942200

  5. Fast Detection of Phenolic Compounds in Extracts of Easter Pears (Pyrus communis) from the Atacama Desert by Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry (UHPLC-Q/Orbitrap/MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Simirgiotis, Mario J; Quispe, Cristina; Bórquez, Jorge; Areche, Carlos; Sepúlveda, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    A small Chilean variety of pears growing in the town of Toconao, an oasis located at the northeastern edge of the Salar de Atacama, northern Chile, was studied by means of modern PDA and high resolution mass spectral data (UHPLC-PDA-HESI-orbitrap-MS/MS). In addition, the antioxidant features of the fruits were compared with the varieties Packhman's Triumph and Abate Fetel and correlated with the presence of phenolic compounds. The non-pigmented phenolics were fingerprinted and related to the antioxidant capacities measured by the bleaching of the DPPH radical, the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), the superoxide anion scavenging activity assay (SA), and total content of phenolics and flavonoids measured by spectroscopic methods. The machine allowed a fast separation of 15 min employing a flow rate of 1 mL per minute and could accurately identify 25 compounds, including several isorhamnetin derivatives and phenolic acids, present in the peel and pulps of this Chilean variety for the first time. The compounds were monitored using a wavelength range of 210-800 nm. The native small Chilean pear showed the highest antioxidant activity measured as the bleaching of the DPPH radical, the ferric reducing antioxidant power and superoxide anion scavenging activity (8.61 ± 0.65 μg/mL, 712.63 ± 12.12 micromols trolox equivalents (μmol/TE)/100 g FW, and 82.89% ± 2.52% at 100 μg/mL, respectively). PMID:26784158

  6. Growing pains of East Timor: health of an infant nation.

    PubMed

    Morris, K

    2001-03-17

    In August, 1999, three-quarters of East Timorese adults voted to end more than two decades of an Indonesian administration never recognised by the United Nations. The ensuing spree of violence and destruction by militia backed by the Indonesian military meant the birth of the fledgling nation became a complex humanitarian disaster. 1 year on, progress was heartening: a transitional government, a judiciary, and tax systems were in place, and East Timor was a proud competitor in the Sydney Olympic games. Rebuilding a country from ground level has brought a golden opportunity for fresh approaches. However, reconstruction is also a slow, complex, and sometimes controversial process at the mercy of multiple agendas. The health sector has seen basic care restored, establishment of a much-needed public-health service, and planning for the future health system. An innovative partnership between WHO/Roll Back Malaria and Merlin for post-conflict research has provided data to guide malaria control. The story of progress from humanitarian emergency to national health plan epitomises the triumphs and challenges of this newest nations' first 18 months. PMID:11265969

  7. Antibodies: an alternative for antibiotics?

    PubMed

    Berghman, L R; Abi-Ghanem, D; Waghela, S D; Ricke, S C

    2005-04-01

    In 1967, the success of vaccination programs, combined with the seemingly unstoppable triumph of antibiotics, prompted the US Surgeon General to declare that "it was time to close the books on infectious diseases." We now know that the prediction was overly optimistic and that the fight against infectious diseases is here to stay. During the last 20 yr, infectious diseases have indeed made a staggering comeback for a variety of reasons, including resistance against existing antibiotics. As a consequence, several alternatives to antibiotics are currently being considered or reconsidered. Passive immunization (i.e., the administration of more or less pathogen-specific antibodies to the patient) prior to or after exposure to the disease-causing agent is one of those alternative strategies that was almost entirely abandoned with the introduction of chemical antibiotics but that is now gaining interest again. This review will discuss the early successes and limitations of passive immunization, formerly referred to as "serum therapy," the current use of antibody administration for prophylaxis or treatment of infectious diseases in agriculture, and, finally, recent developments in the field of antibody engineering and "molecular farming" of antibodies in various expression systems. Especially the potential of producing therapeutic antibodies in crops that are routine dietary components of farm animals, such as corn and soy beans, seems to hold promise for future application in the fight against infectious diseases. PMID:15844826

  8. Animal models for HIV/AIDS research

    PubMed Central

    Hatziioannou, Theodora; Evans, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The AIDS pandemic continues to present us with unique scientific and public health challenges. Although the development of effective antiretroviral therapy has been a major triumph, the emergence of drug resistance requires active management of treatment regimens and the continued development of new antiretroviral drugs. Moreover, despite nearly 30 years of intensive investigation, we still lack the basic scientific knowledge necessary to produce a safe and effective vaccine against HIV-1. Animal models offer obvious advantages in the study of HIV/AIDS, allowing for a more invasive investigation of the disease and for preclinical testing of drugs and vaccines. Advances in humanized mouse models, non-human primate immunogenetics and recombinant challenge viruses have greatly increased the number and sophistication of available mouse and simian models. Understanding the advantages and limitations of each of these models is essential for the design of animal studies to guide the development of vaccines and antiretroviral therapies for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:23154262

  9. The birth of national mental health program for India

    PubMed Central

    Wig, Narendra Nath; Murthy, Srinivasa R.

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of the National Mental Health Programme (NMHP) in August 1982 was a milestone in the history of Indian psychiatry. Such an ambitious program was formulated at a time where there were <1000 psychiatrists is a triumph of need for mental health care in the country. The story of the NMHP, both in terms of the technical forces and the personalities needs to be recorded for posterity. The current article recalls the community mental health initiatives of Bengaluru and Chandigarh centers providing the reason for integrating mental health care with general health care and the support of the World Health Organization, along with the role of mental health professionals and the health administrators. The lesson that come through is the value of working together with different professionals for the common good. Recording the events for posterity is especially timely in view of the formulation of a new mental health policy and the revision of the national health policy during the last few months. PMID:26600591

  10. Reflections 1 year into the 21-Center National Institutes of Health--funded WRIST study: a primer on conducting a multicenter clinical trial.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    The Wrist and Radius Injury Surgery Trial (WRIST) study group is a collaboration of 21 hand surgery centers in the United States, Canada, and Singapore, to showcase the interest and capability of hand surgeons to conduct a multicenter clinical trial. The WRIST study group was formed in response to the seminal systematic review by Margaliot et al and the Cochrane report that indicated marked deficiency in the quality of evidence in the distal radius fracture literature. Since the initial description of this fracture by Colles in 1814, over 2,000 studies have been published on this subject; yet, high-level studies based on the principles of evidence-based medicine are lacking. As we continue to embrace evidence-based medicine to raise the quality of research, the lessons learned during the organization and conduct of WRIST can serve as a template for others contemplating similar efforts. This article traces the course of WRIST by sharing the triumphs and, more important, the struggles faced in the first year of this study. PMID:23608306

  11. Ben Franklin: A Curiosity-Driven Scientist, a Service-Driven Citizen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschbach, Dudley

    2003-04-01

    At the age of 42, Franklin retired from his prosperous printing business, ``to have leisure to read, study, and make experiments." The scope of his scientific work was remarkable. Beyond his key contributions to understanding electrcity, Franklin wrote major papers on population growth, on meterology, on heat conduction and evaporation, charted the Gulf Stream, studied bioluminescence and the stilling of water waves by a surface layer of oil. He also advanced arguments in favor of conservation of mass and the wave theory of light. Although always alert for practical applications, his style was that of an explorer, eager for adventure and insight. However, Franklin did not consider science as important as public service. He promoted many civic projects in Philadelphia, including a circulating library, fire department, paving of streets, hospital, and was the prime mover in founding the American Philosophical Society and an academy that evolved into the University of Pennsylvania. As well as publishing the most widely read newspaper in the colonies and his bestselling almanac, he became public printer for several of the colonies and postmaster. He lived in England 14 years as a trade representative, largely struggling in vain. At the age of 70, he undertook a decade of service as minister to France, achieving against great odds crucial diplomatic triumphs.

  12. German suffering in the Franco–German War, 1870/71.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Christine G

    2011-01-01

    Suffering during the Franco–Prussian War of 1870/71 has to be interpreted in the context of three developments: the willingness to alleviate wartime suffering, which had led to the foundation of the International Red Cross and the Geneva Convention a few years earlier, the industrialization of war, which had enormously increased the efficiency of the weaponry, and the nationalization of war. For many Germans, the outcome of the war justified the wartime suffering, which was often trivialized in the media. The small number of authors who saw the high casualty numbers and the pain of the victims as a warning about the consequences of modern warfare usually belonged to the anti-Prussian opposition. Nationalist euphoria in the face of victory and German unification drowned out such critics, whose patriotism was in doubt. Finally, the remembrance of the war during the Kaiserreich aimed largely at celebrating the triumph of the German army and the foundation of the national state. The glorification of the military was hardly compatible with a detailed description of the misery of the battlefield and the pain of war victims. In 1870/71 and in the subsequent decades, nationalism overwhelmed and eventually excluded a humanitarian narrative. PMID:22141174

  13. Large Fermi Surface of Heavy Electrons at the Border of Mott Insulating State in NiS2

    PubMed Central

    Friedemann, S.; Chang, H.; Gamża, M. B.; Reiss, P.; Chen, X.; Alireza, P.; Coniglio, W. A.; Graf, D.; Tozer, S.; Grosche, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    One early triumph of quantum physics is the explanation why some materials are metallic whereas others are insulating. While a treatment based on single electron states is correct for most materials this approach can fail spectacularly, when the electrostatic repulsion between electrons causes strong correlations. Not only can these favor new and subtle forms of matter, such as magnetism or superconductivity, they can even cause the electrons in a half-filled energy band to lock into position, producing a correlated, or Mott insulator. The transition into the Mott insulating state raises important fundamental questions. Foremost among these is the fate of the electronic Fermi surface and the associated charge carrier mass, as the Mott transition is approached. We report the first direct observation of the Fermi surface on the metallic side of a Mott insulating transition by high pressure quantum oscillatory measurements in NiS2. Our results point at a large Fermi surface consistent with Luttinger’s theorem and a strongly enhanced quasiparticle effective mass. These two findings are in line with central tenets of the Brinkman-Rice picture of the correlated metal near the Mott insulating state and rule out alternative scenarios in which the carrier concentration vanishes continuously at the metal-insulator transition. PMID:27174799

  14. For the love of love: neoliberal governmentality, neoliberal melancholy, critical intersectionality, and the advent of solidarity with the other Mormons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wenshu

    2012-01-01

    This article performs critical intellectual labor for social and political change against neoliberalism in three ways. First, it explores and connects neoliberal governmentality and neoliberal melancholy, two anchor experiences in our twenty-first century political quotidian. Second, it engages in the sense making of Proposition 8 (a California voter initiative to ban same-sex marriage, which was narrowly passed in 2008) as a case study of religious organizations (the Mormon Church and their religious allies) and their complicity with neoliberal states to foster subjection and subjectivation through critical intersectionality that goes beyond the identity trinity of race, class, and gender. Finally, the article suggests two technologies as a new hand to outplay the excess of neoliberalism for the triumph of our common humanity: 1) mourning over the devastation brought about by neoliberalism and 2) loving our love for those with whom we usually do not form affinity connections, such as the other Mormons, those who are othered because of their departure from church orthodoxy. PMID:22925052

  15. Superlattice-based quantum devices: from theory to practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razeghi, M.

    2014-07-01

    The concepts of resonant tunneling and superlattices were first developed by Esaki and Tsu. What started with the new physics of the Esaki tunnel diode has matured into nanoscale engineering of semiconductors superlattices to create whole synthetic band structures. While working at Thomson CSF in France, Manijeh Razeghi went on to develop the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and molecular beam epitaxy growth of superlattice material as reported in my seminal volumes of The MOCVD Challenge. After years of considerable effort to bring this technology to maturity, we now see the results of this formidable new science in almost every electronic and photonic device that we encounter. Among the most successful triumphs are the type-II superlattice photodetectors and quantum cascade lasers - these technologies have demonstrated the beauty of turning fundamental concepts into practical devices, thanks to advanced growth technologies. This enables us to design and realize compact devices capable of mimicking or even exceeding nature. Using superlattice to pioneer the development of quantum systems is driving the research work at the Center for Quantum Devices.

  16. Development of a research strategy for integrated technology-based toxicological and chemical evaluation of complex mixtures of drinking water disinfection byproducts.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Jane Ellen; Richardson, Susan D; Speth, Thomas F; Miltner, Richard J; Rice, Glenn; Schenck, Kathleen M; Hunter, E Sidney; Teuschler, Linda K

    2002-12-01

    Chemical disinfection of water is a major public health triumph of the 20th century. Dramatic decreases in both morbidity and mortality of waterborne diseases are a direct result of water disinfection. With these important public health benefits comes low-level, chronic exposure to a very large number of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), chemicals formed through reaction of the chemical disinfectant with naturally occurring inorganic and organic material in the source water. This article provides an overview of joint research planning by scientists residing within the various organizations of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development. The purpose is to address concerns related to potential health effects from exposure to DBPs that cannot be addressed directly from toxicological studies of individual DBPs or simple DBP mixtures. Two factors motivate the need for such an investigation of complex mixtures of DBPs: a) a significant amount of the material that makes up the total organic halide and total organic carbon portions of the DBPs has not been identified; and b) epidemiologic data, although not conclusive, are suggestive of potential developmental, reproductive, or carcinogenic health effects in humans exposed to DBPs. The plan is being developed and the experiments necessary to determine the feasibility of its implementation are being conducted by scientists from the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, the National Risk Management Research Laboratory, the National Exposure Research Laboratory, and the National Center for Environmental Assessment. PMID:12634133

  17. Roald Amundsen: a study in rivalry, masochism and paranoia.

    PubMed

    Anthi, P R

    1999-10-01

    The author suggests that Freud was intrigued by those who explored the still unknown regions of the globe; in 1928 he received a letter from a colleague who knew he was interested in the psychology of polar explorers, asking him to comment on some strange visualizations that had haunted Roald Amundsen, the great polar explorer, when during one of his Arctic expeditions he was attacked and nearly mauled to death by a polar bear. Freud emphasised the quality of resignation and surrender inherent in these peculiar imaginings, but he added that a deeper analysis would require Amundsen's associations. On the basis of relevant biographical data the author tries to make a further investigation of his strange visualizations. These are linked to an underlying masochistic phantasy in which conflicts involving rivalry, autonomy and separation-individuation problems are expressed. He attained the South Pole before Scott and his party, who perished. His triumph and survival on the polar ice evoked an unbearable sense of guilt. Being unable to gain insight into his conflicts, he regressed to a paranoid state. The relation between masochism, the desire to beat and be beaten and rivalry is discussed. PMID:10643576

  18. Development of a culturally relevant consumer health information website for Harlem, New York.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michelle; Morita, Haruka; Mateo, Katrina F; Nye, Andrea; Hutchinson, Carly; Cohall, Alwyn T

    2014-09-01

    The process of creating a geographically tailored health information website with ongoing feedback from community members is one of inquiry and discovery, frustration and triumph, and development and reevaluation. This article reviews the development and implementation of GetHealthyHarlem.org, a health literacy level-appropriate consumer health information website tailored to consumers in Harlem, New York City. From 2004 to 2009, the Harlem Health Promotion Center, one of 37 Prevention Research Centers in the United States, sought to determine the use and seeking of online health information in Harlem, New York City in order to further explore the possibility of providing online health information to this community. Specifically, this article details how we sought to identify gaps, concerns, and uses of online health information and health care seeking in this local, predominantly racial and ethnic minority population. We review how we identified and addressed the multitude of variables that play a role in determining the degree of success in finding and using online health information, and include discussions about the genesis of the website and our successes and challenges in the development and implementation stages. PMID:24740963

  19. There ain't nothing like a Dame: a commentary on Lonsdale (1947) ‘Divergent beam X-ray photography of crystals’

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Prof. Dame Kathleen Lonsdale was one of the two first female Fellows of the Royal Society, having originally been a student of that great British scientist and Nobel Laureate William Henry Bragg. She came to fame initially for her solution of the crystal structure of hexamethyl benzene, thus demonstrating that the benzene ring was flat, of considerable importance to organic chemistry, where it had been proposed before but without proof. This was at a time when the solution of crystal structures was in its infancy, and in its day this work was considered a triumph. As a rare example then of a female physicist, Lonsdale became interested in various aspects of the diffraction of X-rays, and in particular published an important paper on a form of diffraction in which a strongly divergent source was used rather than the usual highly collimated beam. The photographs thus obtained showed a series of arcs and circles, whose positions were so sensitive that they could be used to determine the quality of crystals such as diamond, and even to calculate their lattice dimensions, and hence carbon–carbon bond lengths, to hitherto extraordinary precision. Lonsdale also became known not just as a scientist but as a peace activist and an active member of the Society of Friends. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750139

  20. I. Juvara (1913-1996), a surgeon for all seasons.

    PubMed

    Tarcoveanu, E; Dorobat, D; Vasilescu, A; Van Hee, R

    2015-01-01

    Ion Juvara is a creator of a genuine Romanian school of surgery. If I. Juvara had lived and worked in a country that had been the proud owner of a Pantheon, undoubtedly he would have rested there to the end of time, among the eternal ones i.e. those who triumphed against time and who had never been defeated. If the first generation of Romanian surgeons represented mainly by Thoma Ionesco (1860-1926) was educated mainly abroad, the next generation was trained professionally at the Romanian school of surgery. Despite of the hostile period he lived in, I. Juvara kept intact his freedom of thinking and opposed with all his powers abuses of any kind, always preserving his integrity, avoiding with elegance the traps of the totalitarian regime. But even so nobody can state that the professor, who came from -Moldavia, as his master, N. Hortolomei, could not say at the end of his life that he hadn't had a fulfilled professional life, as he is considered even today the greatest surgeon of Romania in the latter half of the 20th century. He was, after all, a surgeon for all seasons. PMID:26021954

  1. There ain't nothing like a Dame: a commentary on Lonsdale (1947) 'Divergent beam X-ray photography of crystals'.

    PubMed

    Glazer, A M

    2015-04-13

    Prof. Dame Kathleen Lonsdale was one of the two first female Fellows of the Royal Society, having originally been a student of that great British scientist and Nobel Laureate William Henry Bragg. She came to fame initially for her solution of the crystal structure of hexamethyl benzene, thus demonstrating that the benzene ring was flat, of considerable importance to organic chemistry, where it had been proposed before but without proof. This was at a time when the solution of crystal structures was in its infancy, and in its day this work was considered a triumph. As a rare example then of a female physicist, Lonsdale became interested in various aspects of the diffraction of X-rays, and in particular published an important paper on a form of diffraction in which a strongly divergent source was used rather than the usual highly collimated beam. The photographs thus obtained showed a series of arcs and circles, whose positions were so sensitive that they could be used to determine the quality of crystals such as diamond, and even to calculate their lattice dimensions, and hence carbon-carbon bond lengths, to hitherto extraordinary precision. Lonsdale also became known not just as a scientist but as a peace activist and an active member of the Society of Friends. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750139

  2. Superfluid 3He—the Early Days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. M.; Leggett, A. J.

    2011-08-01

    A history is given of liquid 3He research from the time when 3He first became available following World War II through 1972 when the discovery of the superfluid phases was made. The Fermi liquid nature was established early on, and the Landau Fermi liquid theory provided a framework for understanding the interactions between the Fermions (quasiparticles). The theory's main triumph was to predict zero sound, which was soon discovered experimentally. Experimental techniques are treated, including adiabatic demagnetization, dilution refrigerator technology, and Pomeranchuk cooling. A description of the superfluid 3He discovery experiments using the latter two of these techniques is given. While existing theories provided a basis for understanding the newly discovered superfluid phases in terms of ℓ>0 Cooper pairs, the unexpected stability of the A phase in the high- P, high- T region of the phase diagram needed for its explanation a creative leap beyond the BCS paradigm. The use of sum rules to interpret some of the unusual magnetic resonance in liquid 3He is discussed. Eventually a complete theory of the spin dynamics of superfluid 3He was developed, which predicted many of the exciting phenomena subsequently discovered.

  3. Improved Regression Analysis of Temperature-Dependent Strain-Gage Balance Calibration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2015-01-01

    An improved approach is discussed that may be used to directly include first and second order temperature effects in the load prediction algorithm of a wind tunnel strain-gage balance. The improved approach was designed for the Iterative Method that fits strain-gage outputs as a function of calibration loads and uses a load iteration scheme during the wind tunnel test to predict loads from measured gage outputs. The improved approach assumes that the strain-gage balance is at a constant uniform temperature when it is calibrated and used. First, the method introduces a new independent variable for the regression analysis of the balance calibration data. The new variable is designed as the difference between the uniform temperature of the balance and a global reference temperature. This reference temperature should be the primary calibration temperature of the balance so that, if needed, a tare load iteration can be performed. Then, two temperature{dependent terms are included in the regression models of the gage outputs. They are the temperature difference itself and the square of the temperature difference. Simulated temperature{dependent data obtained from Triumph Aerospace's 2013 calibration of NASA's ARC-30K five component semi{span balance is used to illustrate the application of the improved approach.

  4. Perforin-2/Mpeg1 and other pore-forming proteins throughout evolution.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Ryan; Podack, Eckhard R

    2015-11-01

    Development of the ancient innate immune system required not only a mechanism to recognize foreign organisms from self but also to destroy them. Pore-forming proteins containing the membrane attack complex Perforin domain were one of the first triumphs of an innate immune system needing to eliminate microbes and virally infected cells. Membrane attack complex of complement and Perforin domain proteins is unique from other immune effector molecules in that the mechanism of attack is strictly physical and unspecific. The large water-filled holes created by membrane attack complex of complement and Perforin domain pore formation allow access for additional effectors to complete the destruction of the foreign organism via chemical or enzymatic attack. Perforin-2/macrophage-expressed protein 1 is one of the oldest membrane attack complexes of complement and Perforin domain protein involved in immune defense, and it is still functional today in vertebrates. Here, we trace the impact of Perforin-2/macrophage-expressed protein 1 from the earliest multicellular organisms to modern vertebrates, as well as review the development of other membrane attack complexes of complement and Perforin domain member proteins. PMID:26307549

  5. Smoking Gun or Circumstantial Evidence? Comparison of Statistical Learning Methods using Functional Annotations for Prioritizing Risk Variants

    PubMed Central

    Gagliano, Sarah A.; Ravji, Reena; Barnes, Michael R.; Weale, Michael E.; Knight, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Although technology has triumphed in facilitating routine genome sequencing, new challenges have been created for the data-analyst. Genome-scale surveys of human variation generate volumes of data that far exceed capabilities for laboratory characterization. By incorporating functional annotations as predictors, statistical learning has been widely investigated for prioritizing genetic variants likely to be associated with complex disease. We compared three published prioritization procedures, which use different statistical learning algorithms and different predictors with regard to the quantity, type and coding. We also explored different combinations of algorithm and annotation set. As an application, we tested which methodology performed best for prioritizing variants using data from a large schizophrenia meta-analysis by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. Results suggest that all methods have considerable (and similar) predictive accuracies (AUCs 0.64–0.71) in test set data, but there is more variability in the application to the schizophrenia GWAS. In conclusion, a variety of algorithms and annotations seem to have a similar potential to effectively enrich true risk variants in genome-scale datasets, however none offer more than incremental improvement in prediction. We discuss how methods might be evolved for risk variant prediction to address the impending bottleneck of the new generation of genome re-sequencing studies. PMID:26300220

  6. Elected Officials Travel in Parallel Universes Regarding the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Elwood, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    While the ink still was drying on this issue of the Journal of Allied Health, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) reached the ripe old age of 5-and-1/2 years. Simply mentioning this law to a great many members of Congress is the equivalent of administering a prick with a hot needle. Depending on whose opinions are sought, this significant piece of social legislation is considered either a monumental health policy triumph (according to a majority of Democrats) or a pitiful debacle (according to a majority of Republicans) in both chambers. Their respective points of view are aided and abetted by a small army of cheerleaders on the sidelines who inhabit pundit domains in foundations, think tanks, university policy centers, and radio/TV talk shows. Except in rare instances, neither side will admit that their opponents might be correct about some aspects of the law, because there really is not much pleasure derived from doing so. Despite their many enthusiastic proclamations regarding the ACA, it is not possible for both sides of the present controversy to be entirely correct. Hence, this essay represents an effort to describe various benefits associated with this key piece of legislation, along with some of its shortcomings. PMID:26342609

  7. Geometrical Standard Model Enhancements to the Standard Model of Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Ken; Duvernois, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The Standard Model (SM) is the triumph of our age. As experimentation at the LHC tracks particles for the Higgs phenomena, theoreticians and experimentalist struggle to close in on a cohesive theory. Both suffer greatly as expectation waivers those who seek to move beyond the SM and those who cannot do without. When it seems like there are no more good ideas enter Rate Change Graph Technology (RCGT). From the science of the rate change graph, a Geometrical Standard Model (GSM) is available for comprehensive modeling, giving rich new sources of data and pathways to those ultimate answers we punish ourselves to achieve. As a new addition to science, GSM is a tool that provides a structured discovery and analysis environment. By eliminating value and size, RCGT operates with the rules of RCGT mechanics creating solutions derived from geometry. The GSM rate change graph could be the ultimate validation of the Standard Model yet. In its own right, GSM is created from geometrical intersections and comes with RCGT mechanics, yet parallels the SM to offer critical enhancements. The Higgs Objects along with a host of new objects are introduced to the SM and their positions revealed in this proposed modification to the SM.

  8. Biofuels 2020: Biorefineries based on lignocellulosic materials.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, Miguel; Galan, Jose Luis; Laffarga, Joaquina; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2016-09-01

    The production of liquid biofuels to blend with gasoline is of worldwide importance to secure the energy supply while reducing the use of fossil fuels, supporting the development of rural technology with knowledge-based jobs and mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. Today, engineering for plant construction is accessible and new processes using agricultural residues and municipal solid wastes have reached a good degree of maturity and high conversion yields (almost 90% of polysaccharides are converted into monosaccharides ready for fermentation). For the complete success of the 2G technology, it is still necessary to overcome a number of limitations that prevent a first-of-a-kind plant from operating at nominal capacity. We also claim that the triumph of 2G technology requires the development of favourable logistics to guarantee biomass supply and make all actors (farmers, investors, industrial entrepreneurs, government, others) aware that success relies on agreement advances. The growth of ethanol production for 2020 seems to be secured with a number of 2G plants, but public/private investments are still necessary to enable 2G technology to move on ahead from its very early stages to a more mature consolidated technology. PMID:27470921

  9. Signaling in T cells - is anything the m(a)TOR with the picture(s)?

    PubMed

    Boothby, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The excitement surrounding checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of patients with cancer exemplifies a triumph of the long-term value of investing in basic science and fundamental questions of T-cell signaling. The pharmaceutical future actively embraces ways of making more patients' cancers responsive to these inhibitors. Such a process will be aided by elucidation of signaling and regulation. With thousands of articles spread across almost 30 years, this commentary can touch only on portions of the canonical picture of T-cell signaling and provide a few parables from work on mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways as they link to early and later phases of lymphocyte activation. The piece will turn a critical eye to some issues with models about these pathways in T cells. Many of the best insights lie in the future despite all that is uncovered already, but a contention is that further therapeutic successes will be fostered by dealing with disparities among findings and attention to the temporal, spatial, and stochastic aspects of T-cell responses. Finally, thoughts on some (though not all) items urgently needed for future progress will be mooted. PMID:26949528

  10. General Relativity and Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Berger, Beverly; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm

    2015-07-01

    Part I. Einstein's Triumph: 1. 100 years of general relativity George F. R. Ellis; 2. Was Einstein right? Clifford M. Will; 3. Cosmology David Wands, Misao Sasaki, Eiichiro Komatsu, Roy Maartens and Malcolm A. H. MacCallum; 4. Relativistic astrophysics Peter Schneider, Ramesh Narayan, Jeffrey E. McClintock, Peter Mészáros and Martin J. Rees; Part II. New Window on the Universe: 5. Receiving gravitational waves Beverly K. Berger, Karsten Danzmann, Gabriela Gonzalez, Andrea Lommen, Guido Mueller, Albrecht Rüdiger and William Joseph Weber; 6. Sources of gravitational waves. Theory and observations Alessandra Buonanno and B. S. Sathyaprakash; Part III. Gravity is Geometry, After All: 7. Probing strong field gravity through numerical simulations Frans Pretorius, Matthew W. Choptuik and Luis Lehner; 8. The initial value problem of general relativity and its implications Gregory J. Galloway, Pengzi Miao and Richard Schoen; 9. Global behavior of solutions to Einstein's equations Stefanos Aretakis, James Isenberg, Vincent Moncrief and Igor Rodnianski; Part IV. Beyond Einstein: 10. Quantum fields in curved space-times Stefan Hollands and Robert M. Wald; 11. From general relativity to quantum gravity Abhay Ashtekar, Martin Reuter and Carlo Rovelli; 12. Quantum gravity via unification Henriette Elvang and Gary T. Horowitz.

  11. Unanswered Questions in the Electroweak Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2009-11-01

    This article is devoted to the status of the electroweak theory on the eve of experimentation at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. A compact summary of the logic and structure of the electroweak theory precedes an examination of what experimental tests have established so far. The outstanding unconfirmed prediction of the electroweak theory is the existence of the Higgs boson, a weakly interacting spin-zero particle that is the agent of electroweak symmetry breaking, the giver of mass to the weak gauge bosons, the quarks, and the leptons. General arguments imply that the Higgs boson or other new physics is required on the TeV energy scale. Indirect constraints from global analyses of electroweak measurements suggest that the mass of the standard-model Higgs boson is less than 200 GeV. Once its mass is assumed, the properties of the Higgs boson follow from the electroweak theory, and these inform the search for the Higgs boson. Alternative mechanisms for electroweak symmetry breaking are reviewed, and the importance of electroweak symmetry breaking is illuminated by considering a world without a specific mechanism to hide the electroweak symmetry. For all its triumphs, the electroweak theory has many shortcomings.

  12. Influence of soil properties and soil leaching on the toxicity of ionic silver to plants.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Kate A; McLaughlin, Mike J; Kirby, Jason K; Merrington, Graham

    2015-11-01

    Silver (Ag) has been shown to exhibit antimicrobial properties; as a result, it is being used increasingly in a wide range of consumer products. With these uses, the likelihood that Ag may enter the environment has increased, predominately via land application of biosolids or irrigation with treated wastewater effluent. The aim of the present study was to investigate the toxicity of Ag to 2 plant species: barley (Hordeum vulgare L. CV Triumph) and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) in a range of soils under both leached and unleached conditions. The concentrations that resulted in a 50% reduction of plant growth (EC50) were found to vary up to 20-fold across the soils, indicating a large influence of soil type on Ag toxicity. Overall, barley root elongation was found to be the least sensitive to added Ag, with EC50 values ranging from 51 mg/kg to 1030 mg/kg, whereas the tomato plant height showed higher sensitivity with EC50 values ranging from 46 mg/kg to 486 mg/kg. The effect of leaching was more evident in the barley toxicity results, where higher concentrations of Ag were required to induce toxicity. Variations in soil organic carbon and pH were found to be primarily responsible for mitigating Ag toxicity; therefore, these properties may be used in future risk assessments for Ag to predict toxicity in a wide range of soil types. PMID:25988481

  13. Resilience to leaking--dynamic systems modeling of information security.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Kay

    2012-01-01

    Leaking of confidential material is a major threat to information security within organizations and to society as a whole. This insight has gained traction in the political realm since the activities of Wikileaks, which hopes to attack 'unjust' systems or 'conspiracies'. Eventually, such threats to information security rely on a biologistic argument on the benefits and drawbacks that uncontrolled leaking might pose for 'just' and 'unjust' entities. Such biological metaphors are almost exclusively based on the economic advantage of participants. Here, I introduce a mathematical model of the complex dynamics implied by leaking. The complex interactions of adversaries are modeled by coupled logistic equations including network effects of econo-communication networks. The modeling shows, that there might arise situations where the leaking envisioned and encouraged by Wikileaks and the like can strengthen the defending entity (the 'conspiracy'). In particular, the only severe impact leaking can have on an organization seems to originate in the exploitation of leaks by another entity the organization competes with. Therefore, the model suggests that leaks can be used as a `tactical mean' in direct adversary relations, but do not necessarily increase public benefit and societal immunization to 'conspiracies'. Furthermore, within the model the exploitation of the (open) competition between entities seems to be a more promising approach to control malicious organizations : divide-et-impera policies triumph here. PMID:23227151

  14. The New York Stem Cell Foundation. Interview with Susan Solomon.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Susan

    2012-11-01

    We caught up with Susan Solomon, Co-Founder of The New York Stem Cell Foundation, to discuss the role of the Foundation in facilitating some of the top advances in stem cell science in recent years. Susan L Solomon is Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder of The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF), a nonprofit organization established in 2005 to accelerate cures through stem cell research. A longtime healthcare advocate, Susan is a founding member and current President of New Yorkers for the Advancement of Medical Research, is on the Executive Committee for the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine, and she has been a member of the Board of Directors of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, New York Chapter. Susan was also a member of the Strategic Planning Committee of the Empire State Stem Cell Board. In March 2008, Susan received a New York State Women of Excellence Award from the Governor of New York. In September 2008, she received the Triumph Award from the Brooke Ellison Foundation for her work in establishing NYSCF. Prior to founding NYSCF, Susan, an attorney, spent much of her career building businesses. She established and ran Solomon Partners LLC to provide strategic management consulting to corporations, cultural institutions, foundations and nonprofit organizations. She has also held executive positions at MacAndrews and Forbes Holdings and MMG Patricof and Co. She was the founding Chief Executive Officer of Sothebys.com and was President of Sony Worldwide Networks. PMID:23210823

  15. 'Don't play the butter notes': jazz in medical education.

    PubMed

    Bradner, Melissa; Harper, Darryl V; Ryan, Mark H; Vanderbilt, Allison A

    2016-01-01

    Jazz has influenced world music and culture globally - attesting to its universal truths of surviving, enduring, and triumphing over tragedy. This begs the question, what can we glean in medical education from this philosophy of jazz mentoring? Despite our training to understand disease and illness in branching logic diagrams, the human experience of illness is still best understood when told as a story. Stories like music have tempos, pauses, and silences. Often they are not linear but wrap around the past, future, and back to the present, frustrating the novice and the experienced clinician in documenting the history of present illness. The first mentoring lesson Hancock discusses is from a time he felt stuck with his playing - his sound was routine. Miles Davis told him in a low husky murmur, 'Don't play the butter notes'. In medical education, 'don't play the butter notes' suggests not undervaluing the metacognition and reflective aspects of medical training that need to be fostered during the early years of clinical teaching years. PMID:27095009

  16. Chronic myeloid leukemia: reminiscences and dreams

    PubMed Central

    Mughal, Tariq I.; Radich, Jerald P.; Deininger, Michael W.; Apperley, Jane F.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Harrison, Christine J.; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cortes, Jorge; Daley, George Q.

    2016-01-01

    With the deaths of Janet Rowley and John Goldman in December 2013, the world lost two pioneers in the field of chronic myeloid leukemia. In 1973, Janet Rowley, unraveled the cytogenetic anatomy of the Philadelphia chromosome, which subsequently led to the identification of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene and its principal pathogenetic role in the development of chronic myeloid leukemia. This work was also of major importance to support the idea that cytogenetic changes were drivers of leukemogenesis. John Goldman originally made seminal contributions to the use of autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation from the late 1970s onwards. Then, in collaboration with Brian Druker, he led efforts to develop ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the late 1990s. He also led the global efforts to develop and harmonize methodology for molecular monitoring, and was an indefatigable organizer of international conferences. These conferences brought together clinicians and scientists, and accelerated the adoption of new therapies. The abundance of praise, tributes and testimonies expressed by many serve to illustrate the indelible impressions these two passionate and affable scholars made on so many people’s lives. This tribute provides an outline of the remarkable story of chronic myeloid leukemia, and in writing it, it is clear that the historical triumph of biomedical science over this leukemia cannot be considered without appreciating the work of both Janet Rowley and John Goldman. PMID:27132280

  17. Large Fermi Surface of Heavy Electrons at the Border of Mott Insulating State in NiS2.

    PubMed

    Friedemann, S; Chang, H; Gamża, M B; Reiss, P; Chen, X; Alireza, P; Coniglio, W A; Graf, D; Tozer, S; Grosche, F M

    2016-01-01

    One early triumph of quantum physics is the explanation why some materials are metallic whereas others are insulating. While a treatment based on single electron states is correct for most materials this approach can fail spectacularly, when the electrostatic repulsion between electrons causes strong correlations. Not only can these favor new and subtle forms of matter, such as magnetism or superconductivity, they can even cause the electrons in a half-filled energy band to lock into position, producing a correlated, or Mott insulator. The transition into the Mott insulating state raises important fundamental questions. Foremost among these is the fate of the electronic Fermi surface and the associated charge carrier mass, as the Mott transition is approached. We report the first direct observation of the Fermi surface on the metallic side of a Mott insulating transition by high pressure quantum oscillatory measurements in NiS2. Our results point at a large Fermi surface consistent with Luttinger's theorem and a strongly enhanced quasiparticle effective mass. These two findings are in line with central tenets of the Brinkman-Rice picture of the correlated metal near the Mott insulating state and rule out alternative scenarios in which the carrier concentration vanishes continuously at the metal-insulator transition. PMID:27174799

  18. After the fall: Political whitewashing, professional posturing, and personal refashioning in the postwar career of Otmar Freiherr von Verschuer.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Sheila Faith

    2010-12-01

    Despite the numerous books and articles preoccupied with the formidable legitimizing role and unethical medical transgressions of the German human geneticist Otmar von Verschuer (1896-1969) during the Third Reich, scholars have neglected to focus on his career trajectory during the postwar period, especially in the years after he received the first chair of genetics on German soil in 1951. While an examination of von Verschuer's trials, tribulations, and ultimate triumph in post-1945 West Germany is fascinating in its own right, it also raises broader historical issues. First, it lays bare the professional posturing of German biomedical scientists as they attempted to retake control over their once tainted fields of research when Cold War realities opened a window of opportunity for them. Second, it reveals the fine line between adherence to professional ethics and disciplinary solidarity when scientists were faced with a potential outside threat to their profession. Finally, such an analysis demonstrates the macromechanics of professional refashioning on the part of the publicly tainted scientists as they forged a new symbiosis between their field and the politics of a new era in the interest of pursuing research. PMID:21409983

  19. Seven decades of history of science: I. Bernard Cohen (1914-2003), second editor of Isis.

    PubMed

    Dauben, Joseph W; Gleason, Mary Louise; Smith, George E

    2009-03-01

    I. Bernard Cohen (1914-2003), the first American to receive a Ph.D. in history of science, was a Harvard undergraduate ('37) and then a Ph.D. student and protégé of George Sarton, founder of Isis and the History of Science Society. He went on to succeed Sarton as editor of Isis (1952-1958) and, later, president of the Society (1961-1962); he was also a president of the International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science. Cohen was an internationally recognized Newton scholar; his interests were encyclopedic, ranging from science and public policy to the history of computers, with several decades as a special consultant for history of computing with IBM. Among his hundreds of publications were such major books as Franklin and Newton (1956), The Birth of a New Physics (1959; rpt., 1985), The Newtonian Revolution (1980), Revolution in Science (1985), Science and the Founding Fathers (1995), Howard Aiken: Portrait of a Computer Pioneer (1999), and his last book, The Triumph of Numbers (2005), not to mention two jointly authored contributions, the variorum edition and new English translation of Newton's Principia, which will surely still be read a century from now. PMID:19554868

  20. The Dark and Light Side of Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madau, Piero

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, precision measurements across cosmic time have led to a widely accepted cosmological paradigm for galaxy assembly and evolution, the cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model. Within this theory, galaxies form 'bottom-up,' with low-mass objects ('halos') collapsing earlier and merging to form larger and larger systems over time. Ordinary matter follows the dynamics dictated by the dominant dark matter until radiative, hydrodynamic, and star-formation processes take over. Although ΛCDM has had great success in explaining the observed large-scale distribution of mass in the universe, the nature of the dark matter particle is best tested on small scales, where its physical characteristics manifest themselves by modifying the structure of galaxy halos and their lumpiness. It is on these scale that detailed comparisons between observations and theory have revealed several discrepancies and challenged our understanding of the mapping between dark matter halos and their baryonic components. In this talk I will review the triumphs and tribulations of the theory. While the latter may indicate the need for more complex physics in the dark sector itself, emerging evidence suggests that a poor understanding of the baryonic processes involved in galaxy formation may be at the origin of these controversies.

  1. Testing QCD in the non-perturbative regime

    SciTech Connect

    A.W. Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This is an exciting time for strong interaction physics. We have a candidate for a fundamental theory, namely QCD, which has passed all the tests thrown at it in the perturbative regime. In the non-perturbative regime it has also produced some promising results and recently a few triumphs but the next decade will see enormous progress in our ability to unambiguously calculate the consequences of non-perturbative QCD and to test those predictions experimentally. Amongst the new experimental facilities being constructed, the hadronic machines at JPARC and GSI-FAIR and the 12 GeV Upgrade at Jefferson Lab, the major new electromagnetic facility worldwide, present a beautifully complementary network aimed at producing precise new measurements which will advance our knowledge of nuclear systems and push our ability to calculate the consequences of QCD to the limit. We will first outline the plans at Jefferson Lab for doubling the energy of CEBAF. The new facility presents some wonderful opportunities for discovery in strong interaction physics, as well as beyond the standard model. Then we turn to the theoretical developments aimed at extracting precise results for physical hadron properties from lattice QCD simulations. This discussion will begin with classical examples, such as the mass of the nucleon and ?, before dealing with a very recent and spectacular success involving information extracted from modern parity violating electron scattering.

  2. The human face of health disparities.

    PubMed

    Green, Alexander R

    2003-01-01

    In the last 20 years, the issue of disparities in health between racial/ethnic groups has moved from the realm of common sense and anecdote to the realm of science. Hard, cold data now force us to consider what many had long taken for granted. Not only does health differ by race/ethnicity, but our health care system itself is deeply biased. From lack of diversity in the leadership and workforce, to ethnocentric systems of care, to biased clinical decision-making, the American health care system is geared to treat the majority, while the minority suffers. The photos shown here are of patients and scenes that recall some of the important landmarks in research on racial/ethnic disparities in health. The purpose is to put faces and humanity onto the numbers. While we now have great bodies of evidence upon which to lobby for change, in the end, each statistic still represents a personal tragedy or an individual triumph. PMID:12815077

  3. Stapp's quantum dualism: The James and Heisenberg model of consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noyes, H. P.

    1994-02-01

    Henry Stapp attempts to resolve the Cartesian dilemma by introducing what the author would characterize as an ontological dualism between mind and matter. His model for mind comes from William James' description of conscious events and for matter from Werner Heisenberg's ontological model for quantum events (wave function collapse). His demonstration of the isomorphism between the two types of events is successful, but in the author's opinion fails to establish a monistic, scientific theory. The author traces Stapp's failure to his adamant rejection of arbitrariness, or 'randomness.' This makes it impossible for him (or for Bohr and Pauli before him) to understand the power of Darwin's explanation of biology, let alone the triumphs of modern 'neo-Darwinism.' The author notes that the point at issue is a modern version of the unresolved opposition between Leucippus and Democritus on one side and Epicurus on the other. Stapp's views are contrasted with recent discussions of consciousness by two eminent biologists: Crick and Edelman. They locate the problem firmly in the context of natural selection on the surface of the earth. Their approaches provide a sound basis for further scientific work. The author briefly examines the connection between this scientific (rather than ontological) framework and the new fundamental theory based on bit-strings and the combinatorial hierarchy.

  4. Advances in neurotrauma in Australia 1970-2000.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, L; Merry, G

    2001-09-01

    The management of neurotrauma in Australia has been one of the significant public health triumphs during the last 30 years of the 20th century. State and national government agencies act in a coordinated fashion to collect data and to promote research or how to manage neurotrauma patients. Between 1970 and 1995, fatalities from road accidents decreased by 47%. Hospital admissions have decreased by 40% despite a 40% increase in the population and a 120% increase in registered vehicles. Fatalities per 10,000 registered vehicles were 8.05% in 1970 and they fell to 1.84% per vehicles in 1995, while fatalities per 10,000 population were 3 in 1970 falling to 1.11 in 1995. Hospitalization from road crashes decreased 23% between March 1988 and March 1997. Public education has steadily improved, backed by the state public health sources. A uniform code of road safety laws has been adopted, backed by legislation and legal penalties and increasing police enforcement. Clinical care of patients has improved as a result of faster communications, tele-medicine, trauma systems, the CT scanner, intensive care units, and improved monitoring. Patient rehabilitation and counseling are now carried out at units accredited by the Australian Council on Health Care Standards. PMID:11571962

  5. Screen memory: its importance to object relations and transference.

    PubMed

    Reichbart, Richard

    2008-06-01

    A screen memory of an obsessive and narcissistic man, reported early in psychoanalysis, both represented and disguised the patient's oedipal conflict, incestuous wishes, and sibling rivalry. It symbolized for him his relationship with his mother and was treated by him, in a repetitive and fetishistic manner throughout treatment, as the reason for his bitterness toward life, his sense of entitlement, his narcissism, and his distrust of women. In the transference, the memory-far from being inert- constantly played an active role in his wishes and disappointments regarding the analyst, and in his fantasied oedipal triumph over him. As the analysis progressed, and after years of treatment, the encapsulated nature of this memory began to give way to the patient's growing awareness of his oedipal wishes, the full range of his feelings toward his mother, and his sense of abandonment by her. The nature of screen memory is explored, including how it relates to a patient's personality and use of the past in general, how it may figure in the development of a person's object relations, and the decisive role it may play throughout a treatment. PMID:18515702

  6. Chronic myeloid leukemia: reminiscences and dreams.

    PubMed

    Mughal, Tariq I; Radich, Jerald P; Deininger, Michael W; Apperley, Jane F; Hughes, Timothy P; Harrison, Christine J; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cortes, Jorge; Daley, George Q

    2016-05-01

    With the deaths of Janet Rowley and John Goldman in December 2013, the world lost two pioneers in the field of chronic myeloid leukemia. In 1973, Janet Rowley, unraveled the cytogenetic anatomy of the Philadelphia chromosome, which subsequently led to the identification of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene and its principal pathogenetic role in the development of chronic myeloid leukemia. This work was also of major importance to support the idea that cytogenetic changes were drivers of leukemogenesis. John Goldman originally made seminal contributions to the use of autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation from the late 1970s onwards. Then, in collaboration with Brian Druker, he led efforts to develop ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the late 1990s. He also led the global efforts to develop and harmonize methodology for molecular monitoring, and was an indefatigable organizer of international conferences. These conferences brought together clinicians and scientists, and accelerated the adoption of new therapies. The abundance of praise, tributes and testimonies expressed by many serve to illustrate the indelible impressions these two passionate and affable scholars made on so many people's lives. This tribute provides an outline of the remarkable story of chronic myeloid leukemia, and in writing it, it is clear that the historical triumph of biomedical science over this leukemia cannot be considered without appreciating the work of both Janet Rowley and John Goldman. PMID:27132280

  7. [Antibiotic resistance--an ambivalence of attitudes. As of now, the bacteria are in advantage].

    PubMed

    Sköld, O

    1995-09-13

    The value of the precious medical asset that antibiotics constitute is contimualby being eroded by the spread of resistance. For some time that bacterial world has been adapting itself to contend with the toxic assault of man-made poisons, antibiotics, by developing resistance in a very rapid process of evolutionary changes occurring before our very eyes. This evolutionary adaptation is an example of natural genetic engineering entailing an interchange between bacteria of genes conferring antibiotic resistance. Trimethoprim resistance is an example where numerous genes of unknown origin (some closely interrelated), expressing drug-resistant dihydrofolate reductases, move among human commensals and pathogens. They have been shown to move as gene cassettes in and out of the recently characterised integron structure occurring in many pathogens. They are also carried by various transposons such as Tn7, or Tn5393 originally observed in a plant pathogen, Erwinia amylovora. Betalactam resistance is another example of natural genetic engineering, where new betalactamases are continually emerging, and individual enzyme substrate specificity is modified by point mutation. At present, betalactamase mutants resistant to all commercially available betalactams, including clavulanic acid used in combination with betalactam antibiotics, are to be found in clinical isolates. Thus, currently bacteria seem to be triumphing in the running battle between the pharmaceutical industry and the bacterial world, the former introducing one new antibiotic variant after another, to which bacteria promptly develop resistance by manipulating their own genomes. PMID:7674727

  8. The Prime Minister and the platypus: A paradox goes to war.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Natalie

    2012-03-01

    In February 1943, in the midst of the Second World War, Prime Minister Winston Churchill demanded that a live duck-billed platypus be sent from Australia to Britain. A vigorous male was shipped off but died shortly before arrival in Britain. This request can only be understood if placed in the context of Churchill's passion for exotic pets as well as the rich history of aristocratic menageries and live diplomatic gifts. Obtaining an animal hitherto unseen alive in Europe would have been a great zoological achievement for London Zoo and secured British authority in heated historical taxonomical debates. This zoological triumph, coupled with accomplishing an extravagant enterprise in the middle of war-time austerity would have boosted public morale. Most importantly, despite its death, the platypus, served as a token for mediating the soured relations between Australia and Britain. Churchill's platypus provides a unique case of animal collecting that incorporates effects on international diplomacy and public relations along with a great private eccentricity and passion. PMID:22326098

  9. Exergy and productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Soma, J.

    1983-02-01

    With the fates of entire industries in the balance in the world's competitive economic battlegrounds, the leading competitor will be the one that is most productive in its sphere of competition. Conservation and competition are unnatural bedfellows. The most adept competitors will use the best principles of productive scientific management to seek the path of least action (Hamilton's principle) and least time (Fermat's principle) to triumph over their competitors' incomplete and insufficient conceptions of management. Exergy management can work in productive synergy with sound economic principles and other valid productivity principles to define and decide on optimal paths for a corporation to follow within existing degrees of freedom. It has identified its AEU and found its proper economics--exergioeconomics. It will encourage other managements to identify, say, their APUs (American Productivity Units) and their proper economics. When other managements follow suit, the revivified corporate entity will be admirably qualified to compete in the marketplace and reap the rewards that production economics offers through optimum allocation and utilization of energy, labor, capital and materials.

  10. [On the psychoanalytic view of Harry Potter].

    PubMed

    Subkowski, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the exemplary mental development that Harry Potter undertakes after the massive traumatic loss of his parents at the early age of 15 months and the following neglect by his relatives until he becomes a mature adult. On the basis of his internalized mothers love and by identification with his father and his paternally friend Dumbledore Harry gains increasing self-confidence and new friends in his peer group in the course of time. After passing numerous conflicts and experiencing friendship Harry reaches the stage of initiation into the world of the adults. On the oedipal level he finally is able to deidealize his father and Dumbledore. And at the end Harry is not seduced by absolute power and the triumph over death itself. On the contrary he is ready to sacrifice himself for his friends and thus can overcome the fragmented Voldemort. Readers can identify with Harry, can recognize their own experiences and conflicts and can deal with the proposed conflict resolution patterns on different levels. This contemporary "Bildungsroman" deals with important typical interpersonal and cultural issues for young people. This is what leads young readers to strong resonance and identification processes and explains the great success of the Harry Potter story. PMID:18924532

  11. Lewis Wolpert discusses development and depression. Interview by Joanne Clough.

    PubMed

    Wolpert, Lewis

    2004-06-01

    Lewis Wolpert is Professor of Biology as Applied to Medicine in the Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology at University College, London, UK. His research interests focus on the mechanisms that are involved in embryonic development. Lewis originally trained as a civil engineer in South Africa but in 1955 made the move to research in cellular biology at King's College, London. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1980 and awarded the CBE in 1990. Lewis was also made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 1999 and has presented science on both radio and TV for several years. He was awarded The Royal Society Michael Faraday Prize in 2000 for his contribution to the public understanding of science, most notably through his Chairmanship of the Committee for the Public Understanding of Science (COPUS; 1993-1998). He is the author of numerous books, including Malignant Sadness: The Anatomy of Depression, Principles of Development, The Unnatural Nature of Science and The Triumph of the Embryo. He also writes a regular column for The Independent. PMID:15149619

  12. "An expedition to heal the wounds of war". The 1919 eclipse and Eddington as Quaker adventurer.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Matthew

    2003-03-01

    The 1919 eclipse expedition's confirmation of general relativity is often celebrated as a triumph of scientific internationalism. However, British scientific opinion during World War I leaned toward the permanent severance of intellectual ties with Germany. That the expedition came to be remembered as a progressive moment of internationalism was largely the result of the efforts of A. S. Eddington. A devout Quaker, Eddington imported into the scientific community the strategies being used by his coreligionists in the national dialogue: humanize the enemy through personal contact and dramatic projects that highlight the value of peace and cooperation. The essay also addresses the common misconception that Eddington's sympathy for Einstein led him intentionally to misinterpret the expedition's results. The evidence gives no reason to think that Eddington or his coworkers were anything but rigorous. Eddington's pacifism is reflected not in manipulated data but in the meaning of the expedition and the way it entered the collective memory as a celebration of international cooperation in the wake of war. PMID:12725104

  13. A woman's attempt at a perverse solution and its failure.

    PubMed

    Chasseguet-Smirgel, J

    1988-01-01

    The Programme Committee of the Montreal Congress asked the author to present a case of perversion connected with traumas. Rather than speak about erotization of the effects of the trauma (death or castration anxiety transformed into a source of pleasure) the author relates the first 18 months of analysis of a young woman whose important narcissistic trauma, the result of an inadequate early relationship with her mother, is camouflaged by an avidity for sexual excitations. The aim is to transform narcissistic pain which cannot be worked through into sexuality for which release is possible. Sexuality becomes a means of expressing feelings of hate, revenge and triumph over the primary object. The ensuing perverse solution--an attempt to slip into the primal scene by identification with the sadistic penis--does not succeed. The author advances certain hypotheses concerning the mother-daughter relationship which seem to explain this failure and to explain too the absence of a stable perverse organization in women. There follows a longing to return to the womb, in the shape of the fantasied destruction of the contents of the mother's belly, expressed as the fantasy of the end of the world, and which the author labels as 'the archaic matrix of the Oedipus complex'. PMID:3403157

  14. The Life and Times of John Couch Adams, from 1819 to 1847

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    John Couch Adams was born in 1819 in the middle of Cornwall, the most remote and isolated county in England. How he progressed from there to Cambridge University to become one of the finest mathematicians of the nineteenth century fills everyone who studies him with awe. Tragically what should have been his greatest triumph - the discovery of a new planet - was marred by mishap, controversy and unanswered questions. This presentation examines one of the first of these questions and provides new answers based on recently revealed evidence. The Astronomer Royal of the day was attempting to support Adams and as part of that support asked if his analysis took into account changes in radius vector of Uranus. Adams did not reply and the rest as they say is history. However there is far more to the question than a non-existent letter - this in itself turns out to be not exactly true. Further analysis of the orbits and a letter in French - not been translated before reveals Adams had a more profound understanding of the situation than some later authors have given him credit.

  15. How are they doing? Listening as fathers of children with autism spectrum disorder compare themselves to fathers of children who are typically developing.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Samantha; Lashewicz, Bonnie

    2016-04-01

    The growing prevalence of autism spectrum disorder is accompanied by ongoing efforts to understand and support parents in the face of challenges related to their child's autism spectrum disorder. Although fathers are increasingly hands-on in raising children, research focus on parenting children with autism spectrum disorder continues to be skewed toward experiences of mothers. Our purpose in this article is to contribute understandings of how fathers of children with autism spectrum disorder perceive themselves to be managing, and we undertake this by examining comparisons fathers of children with autism spectrum disorder make between their parenting experiences and experiences of fathers of typically developing children. A purposive sample of 28 fathers of children (aged 2-13 years) with autism spectrum disorder living in an urban center in Western Canada participated in in-depth interviews about their parenting successes and challenges. We found fathers speak of universal fathering experiences yet articulate their own sense of loss and efforts to come to terms with unanticipated demands associated with autism spectrum disorder. Fathers of children with autism spectrum disorder feel "pangs of jealousy" toward fathers of typically developing children, yet they are keenly attentive to their own child's development and convey a sense of gratitude for their child's capabilities and personality amidst an appreciation for trials and triumphs of fathering in general and fathering a child with autism spectrum disorder in particular. PMID:25976158

  16. A limited positioning system for memory.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    The 2014 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine is an enormous triumph for John O'Keefe and May-Britt and Edvard Moser and an historic event for cognitive and behavioral neuroscience. Neuronal representations decoded from action potentials form a mechanistic bridge between brain and mind and demonstrate the continuity of psychology with biology and physical science. The cognitive map theory powered an ongoing, international research program inspired by Hebb (The Organization of Behavior. New York, NY: Wiley) that showed the way toward linking specific patterns of neuronal activity to high level representation and processing. The prize celebrates a path that led from fundamental, philosophical questions about psychological space to enduring, scientific facts: place, head direction, grid, and boundary fields in the hippocampus, presubiculum, entorhinal cortex, and other brain circuits provide a cellular basis for spatial behavior, learning, and memory. By awarding this prize, the Nobel committee affirmed neuroethology and comparative psychology, marked the end of a chapter in one debate about the existence of animal cognition, and recognized cognitive neurophysiology. The "inner GPS" in the brain" demonstrates "a cellular basis for higher cognitive function." Animals represent, process, and use information defined by abstract relationships among items (O'Keefe and Conway,) to guide flexible, goal-directed actions. Beyond raising the ontological status of "animal mind," the committee agreed that abstract mental representations can be investigated rigorously by recording single unit activity in the brain of behaving animals. PMID:25800503

  17. Eggs-ploiting women: a critical feminist analysis of the different principles in transplant and fertility tourism.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Naomi

    2011-11-01

    Intergovernmental agencies have recognized that inconsistencies in the way that nation states regulate commerce in human kidneys lubricate transplant tourism, and have repeatedly exhorted recalcitrant governments of both organ-importing and organ-exporting nations to criminalize the exchange of cash for kidneys. Yet these same organizations have elected to remain silent on inconsistencies in the regulation of the trade in human eggs that lubricate fertility tourism. This article is a critical feminist analysis of this paradox. Sketches of the histories of regulation of the global markets in human kidneys and human eggs allow attribution of the different approaches to sales of kidneys and eggs to the triumph of neo-liberalism in the 1990s. Neo-liberalism supports the growth of the medical tourism industry and its niche market catering for infertility, and is responsible for exacerbating the relative disadvantage of poor and powerless women in destination countries, thereby creating the conditions for 'bioavailability', that is, the willingness to exchange body parts for cash. The paper identifies a disturbing correlation between deeply engrained conservative attitudes to women and a plentiful supply of eggs, and concludes by suggesting that what women need to lift themselves out of poverty and discrimination is secure and dignified work. PMID:21945266

  18. Jointly They Edit: Examining the Impact of Community Identification on Political Interaction in Wikipedia

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Jessica J.; Laniado, David; Kappler, Karolin E.; Volkovich, Yana; Aragón, Pablo; Kaltenbrunner, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background In their 2005 study, Adamic and Glance coined the memorable phrase ‘divided they blog’, referring to a trend of cyberbalkanization in the political blogosphere, with liberal and conservative blogs tending to link to other blogs with a similar political slant, and not to one another. As political discussion and activity increasingly moves online, the power of framing political discourses is shifting from mass media to social media. Methodology/Principal Findings Continued examination of political interactions online is critical, and we extend this line of research by examining the activities of political users within the Wikipedia community. First, we examined how users in Wikipedia choose to display their political affiliation. Next, we analyzed the patterns of cross-party interaction and community participation among those users proclaiming a political affiliation. In contrast to previous analyses of other social media, we did not find strong trends indicating a preference to interact with members of the same political party within the Wikipedia community. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that users who proclaim their political affiliation within the community tend to proclaim their identity as a ‘Wikipedian’ even more loudly. It seems that the shared identity of ‘being Wikipedian’ may be strong enough to triumph over other potentially divisive facets of personal identity, such as political affiliation. PMID:23573269

  19. Heme Oxygenase-1: A Metabolic Nike

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Bulmer, Andrew C.; Otterbein, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Heme degradation, which was described more than 30 years ago, is still very actively explored with many novel discoveries on its role in various disease models every year. Recent Advances: The heme oxygenases (HO) are metabolic enzymes that utilize NADPH and oxygen to break apart the heme moiety liberating biliverdin (BV), carbon monoxide (CO), and iron. Heme that is derived from hemoproteins can be toxic to the cells and if not removed immediately, it causes cell apoptosis and local inflammation. Elimination of heme from the milieu enables generation of three products that influences numerous metabolic changes in the cell. Critical Issues: CO has profound effects on mitochondria and cellular respiration and other hemoproteins to which it can bind and affect their function, while BV and bilirubin (BR), the substrate and product of BV, reductase, respectively, are potent antioxidants. Sequestration of iron into ferritin and its recycling in the tissues is a part of the homeodynamic processes that control oxidation-reduction in cellular metabolism. Further, heme is an important component of a number of metabolic enzymes, and, therefore, HO-1 plays an important role in the modulation of cellular bioenergetics. Future Directions: In this review, we describe the cross-talk between heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and its products with other metabolic pathways. HO-1, which we have labeled Nike, the goddess who personified victory, dictates triumph over pathophysiologic conditions, including diabetes, ischemia, and cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1709–1722. PMID:24180257

  20. DR and CR: Recent advances in technology.

    PubMed

    Schaefer-Prokop, C M; De Boo, D W; Uffmann, M; Prokop, M

    2009-11-01

    After some initial reluctance, nowadays transition from conventional analogue-to-digital radiographic technique is realized in the vast majority of institutions. The eventual triumph of digital over conventional technique is related to its undoubted advantages with respect to image quality and improved image handling in the context of a picture archiving and communication system. CR represents the older system, which matured over decades and experienced some important recent improvements with respect to dose efficiency and work-flow efficiency that strengthened its position. It represents a very versatile, economically attractive system that is equally suited for integrated systems as well as for cassette-based imaging at the bedside. DR systems offer superb image quality and realistic options for dose reduction based on their high dose efficiency. While for a long time only integrated systems were on the market suited for a large patient throughput, also mobile DR systems became recently available. While for the next years, it is likely that DR and CR systems will coexist, the long term perspective of CR will depend on further innovations with respect to dose efficiency and signal-to-noise characteristics while for DR economical aspects and broader availability of mobile systems will play a role. PMID:19695809

  1. The Evolution of Autonomy.

    PubMed

    Stammers, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    There can be little doubt, at least in the Western world, that autonomy is theruling principle in contemporary bioethics. In spite of its 'triumph' however,the dominance of the utilitarian concept of autonomy is being increasinglyquestioned. In this paper, I explore the nature of autonomy, how it came todisplace the Hippocratic tradition in medicine and how different conceptsof autonomy have evolved. I argue that the reduction of autonomy to'the exercise of personal choice' in medicine has led to a 'tyranny of autonomy' which can be inimical to ethical medical practice rather than conducive to it.I take the case of Kerrie Wooltorton as an illustration of how misplacedadherence to respect for patient autonomy can lead to tragic consequences.An analysis of autonomy based on the work of Rachel Haliburton isdescribed and applied to the role of autonomy in a recent bioethicaldebate--that arising from Savulescu's proposal that conscientious objection by health-care professionals should not be permitted in the NHS. Inconclusion, I suggest Kukla's concept of conscientious autonomy as onepromising pathway to circumvent both the limitations and adverse effectsof the dominance of current (mis)understandings of autonomy in biomedical ethics. PMID:27124963

  2. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  3. Environmentalism unbound: reconnecting and re-envisioning movements for change.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, R

    2001-01-01

    Disputes over environmental discourse have generated divergent pathways and discordant messages over the last three decades. An examination of them becomes a study of environmentalism s roots. The workplace is shown as a hidden and often discounted arena of debate about what constitutes an environmental issue. The triumph of the productionist and limitless consumption views helped to establish a focus on environmental change as a form of consumer action. Since the 1970s though, new forms of environmental discourse and action both community- and production-related have sought to shift the terrain. The possibility of becoming a broader, more socially inclusive movement capable of challenging the very structure and logic of capitalist social order is possible again, including the ability to identify new strategies for action. Overcoming the work/environment divide is perhaps the most contentious question facing the future of the environmental and labor movements. New approaches, including developing a community of interests, revaluing work, and developing an ethic of place (with urban, industrial, and global forms), require that the social and the ecological become joined in the construction of a common vision. When any environmental issue can be seen as socially determined, then environmentalism s great task will be to see itself as a primary agent of social change. PMID:17208705

  4. Hereditarian scientific fallacies.

    PubMed

    Bailey, R C

    1997-01-01

    Some have recently declared that a hereditarian or more balanced approach has triumphed over environmentalism as an explanatory tool for variation in the cognitive ability and behaviour of humans. However, the entire debate is constrained by several fallacies described here. Heritability of a trait, does not predict the effect of environmental or genetic changes on the trait (Fallacy #1), so knowing heritability does not assist in writing prescriptions for societal ills or budget cuts. Heritability estimates themselves are inaccurate, given the potential for gene-environment covariance and interaction, as well as other non-additive effects on behavior or cognitive ability (Fallacy #2). The 'revolution in molecular genetics' has provided more effective tools for describing the genome, but doesn't permit separation of gene and environmental effects on traits (Fallacy #3). If we were able to measure heritability accurately, it would give us absolutely no indication of whether or not group differences are genetically based (Fallacy #4). Finally, any proposed models of the evolutionary divergence of human groups must more adequately answer the basic questions of such a study, and are not supported by high heritability in present populations (Fallacy #5). Humans are not and should never be exposed to artificial selection and crossing experiments, so behavior geneticists will continue to be very limited in their ability to partition the effects of genes, the environment, and their covariance and interaction on human behavior and cognitive ability. PMID:9463068

  5. Engineering Manhattan style: Sandia Laboratories as an example of postwar engineering

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    A great deal has been written about the history of science in America since World War II. Much of that work has explored the government`s research and development establishment, focusing on the scientific community immediately after the war. It is generally argued that the apparent triumphs of the huge and expensive wartime research and development projects gave rise to a belief that scientific resources should be nurtured and kept on hand - ready to provide service in an emergency. The Cold War drive for more and better weapons further fed this belief, leading to a massive system of national laboratories, military laboratories, and defense industries. The science of this complex is built on extensive financial support, the central strategy of which is that by steadily, and occasionally even lavishly funding large research programs, you will have a constant stream of scientific ideas that can be applied to national security purposes. What is true of science, is also true, in slightly modified form, of postwar engineering. The story I want to tell you today is, I think, an example of the way Cold War engineering r&d for national security worked. This report describes aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories.

  6. Geothermal regimes of the Clearlake region, northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Amador, M.; Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M.

    1998-06-01

    The first commercial production of power from geothermal energy, at The Geysers steamfield in northern California in June 1960, was a triumph for the geothermal exploration industry. Before and since, there has been a search for further sources of commercial geothermal power in The Geysers--Clear Lake geothermal area surrounding The Geysers. As with all exploration programs, these were driven by models. The models in this case were of geothermal regimes, that is, the geometric distribution of temperature and permeability at depth, and estimates of the physical conditions in subsurface fluids. Studies in microseismicity and heat flow, did yield geophysical information relevant to active geothermal systems. Studies in stable-element geochemistry found hiatuses or divides at the Stoney Creek Fault and at the Collayomi Fault. In the region between the two faults, early speculation as to the presence of steamfields was disproved from the geochemical data, and the potential existence of hot-water systems was predicted. Studies in isotope geochemistry found the region was characterized by an isotope mixing trend. The combined geochemical data have negative implications for the existence of extensive hydrothermal systems and imply that fluids of deep origin are confined to small, localized systems adjacent to faults that act as conduits. There are also shallow hot-water aquifers. Outside fault-localized systems and hot-water aquifers, the area is an expanse of impermeable rock. The extraction of energy from the impermeable rock will require the development and application of new methods of reservoir creation and heat extraction such as hot dry rock technology.

  7. Prospects for delaying the rising tide of worldwide, late-life dementias

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric B.

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, lifespan is lengthening. Concomitantly, late-life dementias are increasingly common, challenging both personal and public health internationally. After age 65, rates of dementia tend to double every five years in developed countries and every seven in developing ones. The late-life dementias, particularly Alzheimer’s disease, have profound effects on aging individuals and their caregivers. Multidisciplinary research has explored the potential for various approaches to prevent or delay the onset of late-life dementias. Outlining that research, including our team’s Adult Changes in Thought and Kame studies, this review concludes that delaying these dementias’ onset appears feasible, although absolute prevention may not be. Today the most promising methods appear to include controlling vascular risk factors like hypertension and engaging in physical exercise—and possibly mental exercise—on and off the job. If people can delay the onset of dementias, they can lead more fulfilling lives for longer—spending less time suffering from dementia and letting their families spend less time coping with the disease. It is possible that trends toward more knowledge-based societies, where cognitive health is so vital, may increasingly exert evolutionary pressure favoring larger and healthier brains—and a “compression of cognitive morbidity”—well into old age. Public health’s great triumph, increased lifespan, should give more of the world’s people the reward of many years of dementia-free life—rather than the personal difficulties and public health burdens of many years of functional impairment, dependency, and suffering with dementia some interventions may delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. PMID:20594386

  8. Escherichia coli and the French School of Molecular Biology.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Agnes

    2010-09-01

    André Lwoff, Jacques Monod, and François Jacob, the leaders of the French school of molecular biology, greatly contributed between 1937 and 1965 to its development and triumph. The main discovery of Lwoff was the elucidation of the mechanism of bacteriophage induction, the phenomenon of lysogeny, that led to the model of genetic regulation uncovered later by Jacob and Monod. Working on bacterial growth, Monod discovered in 1941 the phenomenon of diauxy and uncovered the nature of enzyme induction. By combining genetic and biochemical approaches, Monod brought to light the structure and functions of the Escherichia coli lactose system, comprising the genes necessary for lactose metabolism, i.e., β-galactosidase and lactose permease, a pump responsible for accumulation of galactosides into the cells. An additional genetic factor (the i gene) determines the inducibility and constitutivity of enzyme synthesis. Around the same time, François Jacob and Elie Wollman dissected the main events of bacterial conjugation that enabled them to construct a map of the E. coli chromosome and to demonstrate its circularity. The genetic analysis of the lactose system led Monod and Jacob to elucidate the mechanism of the regulation of gene expression and to propose the operon model: a unit of coordinate transcription. One of the new concepts that emerged from the operon model was messenger RNA. In 1963, Monod developed one of the most elegant concepts of molecular biology, the theory of allostery. In 1965, Lwoff, Monod and Jacob were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. PMID:26443784

  9. How should doctors approach patients? A Confucian reflection on personhood.

    PubMed

    Tsai, D F

    2001-02-01

    The modern doctor-patient relationship displays a patient-centred, mutual-participation characteristic rather than the former active-passive or guidance-cooperation models in terms of medical decision making. Respecting the wishes of patients, amounting to more than mere concern for their welfare, has become the feature central to certain modern bioethics theories. A group of ethical principles such as respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice has been proposed by bioethicists and widely adopted by many medical societies as an ethical guide to how doctors, in their daily practice, should treat their patients. However, seeing patients as persons who are rational, self-conscious beings capable of valuing their own lives, and who are consequently entitled to the liberty and rights to choose for themselves, is in general the backbone of Western bioethical principles. Since Confucian philosophy has long been a representative of the East-Asia cultural tradition and Confucian bioethics has recently been developed as a theory of applied ethics, examining Confucius's idea of "persons" may shed some light on the current bioethical debates. Confucius's concept of persons, which is best interpreted via his theories of "chun-tze", (the morally ideal person) encapsulating a two-dimensional approach, (the "autonomous person" and the "relational person"), provides a more comprehensive model regarding what a person is and how he/she should be treated. This two-dimensional approach sees a person not only as a rational, autonomous agent but also as a relational, altruistic identity whose self actualisation involves incessant participating in and promoting of the welfare of his fellow persons. Hence this may balance the current bioethical trend whereby "respect for autonomy" often triumphs. PMID:11233378

  10. Masters of Healing: Cocaine and the Ideal of the Victorian Medical Man

    PubMed Central

    Small, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    This article offers a new perspective on the relationship between cocaine and medical practitioners in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Britain. Cocaine is often understood as one of a number of potentially addictive substances to which Victorian physicians and surgeons were regularly exposed, and tempted to indulge in. However, while cocaine has frequently been associated with discourses of addiction, this article proposes that it was also widely represented as a technological triumph, and that the drug was frequently used as a symbol for the scientific and moral virtues of the medical man. The argument draws on popular journalism, medical publications, and fiction to establish the cultural context of cocaine at the fin de siècle. In 1884, cocaine was revealed to be the first effective local anaesthetic, and this article traces the processes by which cocaine came to be regarded as the iconic achievement of nineteenth-century therapeutic science. This aura of innovative brilliance in turn communicated itself to the medical professionals who employed cocaine in their work, so that many patients and practitioners alike depicted cocaine as a most fitting emblem for the idealized selfhood of the modern medical man. This idea also informs portrayals of the drug in fiction, and I conclude with a detailed analysis of L. T. Meade’s 1895 short story, ‘The Red Bracelet’ (published in the Strand Magazine as part of Meade’s series, ‘Stories from the Diary of a Doctor’), as an example of the way in which cocaine functions as metaphor for the physician’s unassailable moral primacy and technical excellence. PMID:27110213

  11. Calculating Total Electron Content under the presence of the Aurora Borealis in Fairbanks, Alaska, and Kiruna, Sweden.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, H.; Ehteshami, A.; Edgar, B.

    2015-12-01

    With the presence of the ionosphere and plasmasphere interacting with geomagnetic storms, scattering effects can be seen by the signals sent to and by GPS/GLONASS satellites. To quantify this dispersive effect, scientists look into what the culprit is that causes this signal bias on an atomic level. Results have shown that the concentration of oscillating electrons is directly proportional to the amount of bias the signal from a point on earth to a GPS satellite witnesses. This is called the Total Electron Content (TEC) of a specified path, measured in electrons per meters squared (. In this project, the process of collecting and analyzing TEC units was kept the same as the previous methods while keeping the cost below $3,000. Using a dual-frequency GNSS receiver from Javad, Triumph-2, the project team recorded a series of 24 hour interval data logs as the receiver stored incoming signals from any reachable satellite. Because of the dispersive media in the ionosphere, the signal witnesses a bend in its path causing a delay, called the Slant TEC (sTEC). Using libraries from GPStk and TEQC, we analyzed RINEX files to view the differential phase and differential pseudorange frequency to compute slant TEC units (sTECU). Using the obtained data, we analyzed the difference between the sTEC units collected in Houston, Texas to the ones collected in Fairbanks, Alaska. Afterwards, the project will continue on another balloon in Kiruna, Sweden at the Esrange Space Center. The receiver will be in flight this time on a 48 hour flight.

  12. Modeling and Reality in Early Twentieth-Century Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Suman

    2011-04-01

    Towards the end of 1913, Arnold Sommerfeld, Professor of theoretical physics at Munich University, sent a letter of congratulations to a young Niels Bohr. The Dane's now-classic trilogy of papers, which coupled Rutherford's conception of the atom with a ``planetary'' configuration of electrons, had just appeared. Sommerfeld saw the calculation of the Rydberg constant as a singular triumph and immediately spotted an opportunity to try to explain the Zeeman effect. Yet he also sounded a note of caution, confessing that he remained ``somewhat skeptical'' of atomic models in general. In this, of course, he was hardly alone. Bohr's atom was a particularly egregious example of a peculiar model, one requiring what even its creator considered ``horrid assumptions.'' Nonetheless, success bred conviction. Expanding upon Bohr's original ideas, Sommerfeld soon produced the so-called ``Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization conditions,'' using them to calculate a myriad of results. Experimental evidence, Sommerfeld argued in 1915, showed that quantised electron-paths ``correspond exactly to reality'' and possess ``real existence.'' This kind of realism would not, of course, last long. In 1925, Werner Heisenberg (earlier a student of Sommerfeld's) made scepticism about the details of the Bohr model into a methodological dictum, one later enshrined in the ``Copenhagen interpretation'' of quantum mechanics. This paper uses Sommerfeld's work from the turn of the twentieth century to the mid-1920s as a window onto a landscape involving multiple contestations over the legitimacy of atomic modelling. The surprise that greeted Heisenberg's and others' phenomenological insistences, we will see, can only be understood with reference to what should be considered a ``realist interlude'' in the history of twentieth century atomic physics, one inspired by the astonishing successes of Rutherford's and Bohr's imaginings.

  13. Organizing for empowerment: an interview with AES's Roger Sant and Dennis Bakke. Interview by Suzy Wetlaufer.

    PubMed

    Sant, R; Bakke, D

    1999-01-01

    The topic of empowerment is receiving a lot of attention, but how many employees are truly empowered? At the global electricity giant AES Corporation, the answer is all 40,000 of them. In this interview, chairman Roger Sant and CEO Dennis Bakke reflect on their trials and triumphs in creating an exceptional company and explain how their employee-run company works. When they founded AES in 1981, Sant and Bakke set out to create a company where people could have engaging experiences on a daily basis--a company that embodied the principles of fairness, integrity, social responsibility, and fun. Putting those principles into action has created something unique--an ecosystem of real empowerment. What does that system look like? Rather than having a traditional hierarchical chain of command, AES is organized around small teams that are responsible for operations and maintenance. Moreover, AES has eliminated functional departments; there's no corporate marketing division or human resources department. For the system to work, every person must become a well-rounded generalist--a mini-CEO. That, in turn, redefines the jobs of the people at headquarters. Instead of setting strategy and making the "the big decisions," Sant and Bakke act as advisers, guardians of the principles, accountability officers, and chief encouragers. Can other companies successfully adopt the mechanics of such a system? Not unless they first adopt the shared principles that have guided AES since its inception. "Empowerment without values isn't empowerment," says Sant. "It's just technique," adds Bakke. PMID:10345387

  14. Expression analysis of abscisic acid (ABA) and metabolic signalling factors in developing endosperm and embryo of barley☆

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiwei; Huang, Jianhua; Muttucumaru, Nira; Powers, Stephen J.; Halford, Nigel G.

    2013-01-01

    The expression of genes encoding components of ABA and metabolic signalling pathways in developing barley endosperm and embryo was investigated. The genes included HvRCAR35_47387 and HvRCAR35_2538 (encoding ABA receptors), HvABI1d (protein phosphatase 2C), HvSnRK2.4, HvSnRK2.6 and HvPKABA1 (SnRK2-type protein kinases) and HvABI5 (ABA response element binding protein; AREBP), as well as two genes encoding SnRK1-type protein kinases. Both SnRK1 and SnRK2 phosphorylate AREBPs, but SnRK2 is activated by ABA whereas SnRK1 may be broken down. Multiple cereal AREBPs with two conserved SnRK1/2 target sites and another class of BZIP transcription factors with SnRK1/2 binding sites, including HvBLZ1, were identified. Barley grain (cv. Triumph) was sampled at 15, 20, 25 and 30 days post-anthesis (dpa). HvRCAR35_47387, HvABI1d, HvSnRK2.4 and HvABI5 were expressed highly in the endosperm but at much lower levels in the embryo. Conversely, HvPKABA1 and HvRCAR35_2538 were expressed at higher levels in the embryo than the endosperm, while HvSnRK2.6 was expressed at similar levels in both. HvRCAR35_47387, HvABI1d, HvSnRK2.4 and HvABI5 all peaked in expression in the endosperm at 20 dpa. A model is proposed in which ABA brings about a transition from a SnRK1-dominated state in the endosperm during grain filling to a SnRK2-dominated state during maturation. PMID:24748715

  15. Eurekas and Euphorias - The Oxford Book of Scientific Anecdotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratzer, Walter

    2002-11-01

    The march of science has been marked through the years by episodes of drama and comedy, of failure as well as triumph, by outrageous strokes of luck, deserved and undeserved, and sometimes by human tragedy. In Eurekas and Euphorias , Walter Gratzer captures the human face of discovery as he relates many intriguing tales of scientific adventures spanning over two thousand years. Open this book at random and you may chance on the clumsy chemist named Sapper who broke a thermometer in a reaction vat and made the discovery that launched the modern dyestuff industry. Or the physicist who dissolved his gold Nobel Prize medal in acid to prevent it from falling into the hands of the Nazis. The book uncovers deep intellectual friendships, as well as ferocious animosities, and even acts of theft and malice, deceit, and a hoax or two. Indeed, we discover that scientists come in all shapes--the obsessive and the dilettantish, the genial, the envious, the preternaturally brilliant and the slow-witted who sometimes saw further in the end, the open-minded and the intolerant, recluses and arrivistes . We meet mathematicians and physicists in prison cells, and even in a madhouse, making important advances in their field. And we witness the careers, sometimes tragic, sometimes carefree, of the great women scientists, from Hypatia of Alexandria, to Sophie Germain and Sonia Kovalevskaya, to Marie Curie and her relentless battle with the French Academy. Told with wit and relish, here then is a glorious parade to delight the reader, with stories to astonish, to instruct, and most especially, to entertain.

  16. SO2 control by electric utilities: What are the gains from trade?

    SciTech Connect

    Burtraw, D.; Carlson, C.; Cropper, M.; Palmer, K.

    1997-12-31

    Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, which establishes a market for transferrable sulfur dioxide discharge permits (SO{sub 2} allowances), has been hailed by economists as a triumph of economic incentives over command and control regulation. The gains from using economic incentives are a reduction in the costs of pollution control: Firms operating at high marginal pollution abatement costs are supposed to purchase the right to emit SO{sub 2} from firms operating at low marginal abatement costs, with cost savings resulting as abatement shifts from high-to-low marginal cost firms. flow large are the potential cost savings from SO{sub 2} allowance trading? How many of these gains have been realized during the first year of operation of the allowance market? To answer these questions requires estimates of the marginal cost of abating SO{sub 2} emissions for all generating units affected by Title IV of the CAAA. While there have been various engineering cost estimates of abatement costs and of the gains from trade, there have been no estimates based on the actual responses of plants to changes in emissions standards and input prices. The purpose of this paper is to provide such estimates. To provide econometric estimates of marginal abatement costs and the potential gains from trade we have assembled a database covering the years 1985-94, that contains over 800 coal-fired generating units. In 1994 these units produced 87 percent of the SO{sub 2} emissions generated by all coal-fired power plants in the United States and accounted for 77 percent of the heat input consumed by all coal-fired power plants. For each generating unit we have annual observations on labor, generating capital, abatement capital, and inputs of high- and low-sulfur coal. We also know the emissions standard facing the generator, as well as its output and mean annual emissions rate. Data on input prices complete the dataset.

  17. MicroPET/CT Imaging of an Orthotopic Model of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme and Evaluation of Pulsed Low-Dose Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sean S.; Chunta, John L.; Robertson, John M.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Oliver Wong, Ching-Yee; Amin, Mitual; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive tumor that typically causes death due to local progression. To assess a novel low-dose radiotherapy regimen for treating GBM, we developed an orthotopic murine model of human GBM and evaluated in vivo treatment efficacy using micro-positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) tumor imaging. Methods: Orthotopic GBM xenografts were established in nude mice and treated with standard 2-Gy fractionation or 10 0.2-Gy pulses with 3-min interpulse intervals, for 7 consecutive days, for a total dose of 14 Gy. Tumor growth was quantified weekly using the Flex Triumph (GE Healthcare/Gamma Medica-Ideas, Waukesha, WI) combined PET-single-photon emission CT (SPECT)-CT imaging system and necropsy histopathology. Normal tissue damage was assessed by counting dead neural cells in tissue sections from irradiated fields. Results: Tumor engraftment efficiency for U87MG cells was 86%. Implanting 0.5 x 10{sup 6} cells produced a 50- to 70-mm{sup 3} tumor in 10 to 14 days. A significant correlation was seen between CT-derived tumor volume and histopathology-measured volume (p = 0.018). The low-dose 0.2-Gy pulsed regimen produced a significantly longer tumor growth delay than standard 2-Gy fractionation (p = 0.045). Less normal neuronal cell death was observed after the pulsed delivery method (p = 0.004). Conclusion: This study successfully demonstrated the feasibility of in vivo brain tumor imaging and longitudinal assessment of tumor growth and treatment response with microPET/CT. Pulsed radiation treatment was more efficacious than the standard fractionated treatment and was associated with less normal tissue damage.

  18. The role of psychopharmacology in the medical abuses of the Third Reich: from euthanasia programmes to human experimentation.

    PubMed

    López-Muñoz, Francisco; Alamo, Cecilio; García-García, Pilar; Molina, Juan D; Rubio, Gabriel

    2008-12-16

    German psychiatry and pharmacology both enjoyed an extraordinary international reputation prior to the promulgation of the Third Reich. However, with the triumph of eugenic ideas and the imposition of a "racial hygiene" policy by the Nazi regime, various organs of the German health system saw themselves involved in a perverse system of social control, in which the illicit use of psychopharmacological tools became customary. In the present work, we review, from the historical perspective, the factors that helped to bring about this situation and we analyze the abuses (known and documented) committed through the specific use of psychotropic drugs during the Nazi period. Among such abuses we can identify the following illegitimate activities: the use of psychoactive drugs, mainly sedatives from the barbiturates family, in the different euthanasia programmes implemented by the Nazi authorities, in police activity and various types of repression, and for purely criminal and extermination purposes within the so-called "Final Solution"; psychopharmacological research on the mentally ill, without the slightest ethical requirements or legal justification; and the use of psychotropic agents in research on healthy subjects, recruited from concentration camps. Finally, we refer to the role of poisonous nerve agents (tabun, sarin and soman) as instruments of chemical warfare and their development by the German authorities. Many of these activities, though possibly only a small portion of the total - given the destruction of a great deal of documentation just before the end of World War II - came to light through the famous Nuremberg Trials, as well as through other trials in which specific persons were brought to justice unilaterally by individual Allied nations or by the authorities of the new German government after the War. PMID:18848972

  19. How Citation Boosts Promote Scientific Paradigm Shifts and Nobel Prizes

    PubMed Central

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the “boosting effect” of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying “boost factor” is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract. PMID:21573229

  20. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and nobel prizes.

    PubMed

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying "boost factor" is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract. PMID:21573229

  1. The CEO's second act.

    PubMed

    Nadler, David A

    2007-01-01

    When a CEO leaves because of performance problems, the company typically recruits someone thought to be better equipped to fix what the departing executive couldn't--or wouldn't. The board places its confidence in the new person because of the present dilemma's similarity to some previous challenge that he or she dealt with successfully. But familiar problems are inevitably succeeded by less familiar ones, for which the specially selected CEO is not quite so qualified. More often than not, the experiences, skills, and temperament that yielded triumph in Act I turn out to be unequal to Act II's difficulties. In fact, the approaches that worked so brilliantly in Act I may be the very opposite of what is needed in Act II. The CEO has four choices: refuse to change, in which case he or she will be replaced; realize that the next act requires new skills and learn them; downsize or circumscribe his or her role to compensate for deficiencies; or line up a successor who is qualified to fill a role to which the incumbent's skills and interests are no longer suited. Hewlett-Packard's Carly Fiorina exemplifies the first alternative; Merrill Lynch's Stanley O'Neal the second; Google's Sergey Brin and Larry Page the third; and Quest Diagnostics' Ken Freeman the fourth. All but the first option are reasonable responses to the challenges presented in the second acts of most CEOs' tenures. And all but the first require a power of observation, a propensity for introspection, and a strain of humility that are rare in the ranks of the very people who need those qualities most. There are four essential steps executives can take to discern that they have entered new territory and to respond accordingly: recognition that their leadership style and approach are no longer working; acceptance of others' advice on why performance is faltering; analysis and understanding of the nature of the Act II shift; and, finally, decision and action. PMID:17286076

  2. John Bahcall and the Solar Neutrino Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, Neta

    2016-03-01

    ``I feel like dancing'', cheered John Bahcall upon hearing the exciting news from the SNO experiment in 2001. The results confirmed, with remarkable accuracy, John's 40-year effort to predict the rate of neutrinos from the Sun based on sophisticated Solar models. What began in 1962 by John Bahcall and Ray Davis as a pioneering project to test and confirm how the Sun shines, quickly turned into a four-decade-long mystery of the `Solar Neutrino Problem': John's models predicted a higher rate of neutrinos than detected by Davis and follow-up experiments. Was the theory of the Sun wrong? Were John's calculations in error? Were the neutrino experiments wrong? John worked tirelessly to understand the physics behind the Solar Neutrino Problem; he led the efforts to greatly increase the accurately of the solar model, to understand its seismology and neutrino fluxes, to use the neutrino fluxes as a test for new physics, and to advocate for important new experiments. It slowly became clear that none of the then discussed possibilities --- error in the Solar model or neutrino experiments --- was the culprit. The SNO results revealed that John's calculations, and hence the theory of the Solar model, have been correct all along. Comparison of the data with John's theory demanded new physics --- neutrino oscillations. The Solar Neutrino saga is one of the most amazing scientific stories of the century: exploring a simple question of `How the Sun Shines?' led to the discovery of new physics. John's theoretical calculations are an integral part of this journey; they provide the foundation for the Solar Neutrino Problem, for confirming how the Sun shines, and for the need of neutrino oscillations. His tenacious persistence, dedication, enthusiasm and love for the project, and his leadership and advocacy of neutrino physics over many decades are a remarkable story of scientific triumph. I know John is smiling today.

  3. The new world disorder.

    PubMed

    Checa, Nicolas; Maguire, John; Barney, Jonathan

    2003-08-01

    On January 1, 1995, representatives from 76 countries signed the World Trade Organization charter, which for years had been part of a temporary trade agreement. The WTO's emergence as a fully empowered supranational body seemed to reflect the triumph of what the first President Bush had described as the "new world order." That order was based on two assumptions: that a healthy economy and a sound financial system make for political stability, and that countries in business together do not fight each other. The number one priority of U.S. foreign policy was thus to encourage the former Communist countries of Europe and the developing nations in Latin America, Asia, and Africa to adopt business-friendly policies. Private capital would flow from the developed world into these countries, creating economic growth. It sounded too good to be true, and so it proved. The new world order of Bush père and his successor, Bill Clinton, has been replaced by the new world disorder of Bush fils. Under the second Bush's administration, the economic and political rationale-behind the Washington consensus of the 1990s has unraveled, forcing a radical change in our perceptions of which countries are safe for business. Negotiating this new environment will require companies to more rigorously evaluate political events and more carefully assess the links between political, economic, and financial risk factors. They'll need to be more selective about which markets to enter, and they'll need to think differently about how to position themselves in those markets. The geopolitical events of the past year, the Bush administration's global war on terror, as well as ongoing convulsions in traditional political and economic relationships must be understood and managed by corporate leaders worldwide. With careful analysis, business leaders can increase their companies' visibility and better respond to the uncertainties of the new world disorder. PMID:12884669

  4. Moving on: a way of life

    SciTech Connect

    Keever, C.

    1985-01-01

    In the history of ecology, Catherine Keever is a piece of the rock. Her doctoral research at Duke, published in Ecological Monographs in 1950, is a classic demonstration of some of the causes of patterns in the early stages of old field succession and has been widely referenced and reprinted over the years. Her well-known paper with Elsie Quarterman on the southern mixed hardwood forest climax of the southeastern Coastal Plain, which also appeared in Ecological Monographs (1962), remains the definitive description of this complex forest. The seeds for her delightful autobiography were planted several years ago by former colleagues at Duke, who prompted her to record some of the stories of her graduate education and her experiences in ecological research and teaching, and by younger relatives eager to learn more of the history of their family in rural North Carolina. The result is an entertaining and moving account full of homey descriptions of her youthful escapades, amusing anecdotes about her studies and teaching, and moments of sadness and triumph. The fifteen chapters tell of a life that saw much change. They begin with her childhood and her grandmother's pioneer story, follow through her long struggle for an education and her untiring efforts to continue research while teaching at small colleges, and relate her confident approach to retirement. Besides the personnel story, there are intriguing insights into the early development of ecology in the southeast. Catherine Keever's modest but highly-respected research has long been recognized s influencing ecological thought in the 1950s and 1960s. To those interested in the history of ecology, and particularly the contributions of women in the field, this book provides the unique perspective of a pioneer.

  5. Behavioral and mechanical determinants of collective subsurface nest excavation.

    PubMed

    Monaenkova, Daria; Gravish, Nick; Rodriguez, Greggory; Kutner, Rachel; Goodisman, Michael A D; Goldman, Daniel I

    2015-05-01

    Collective construction of topologically complex structures is one of the triumphs of social behavior. For example, many ant species construct underground nests composed of networks of tunnels and chambers. Excavation by these 'superorganisms' depends on the biomechanics of substrate manipulation, the interaction of individuals, and media stability and cohesiveness. To discover principles of robust social excavation, we used X-ray computed tomography to monitor the growth in three dimensions of nests built by groups of fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) in laboratory substrates composed of silica particles, manipulating two substrate properties: particle size and gravimetric moisture content. Ants were capable of nest construction in all substrates tested other than completely dry or fully saturated; for a given particle size, nest volume was relatively insensitive to moisture content. Tunnels were deepest at intermediate moisture content and the maximum tunnel depth correlated with measured yield force on small rod-shaped intruders (a proxy for cohesive strength). This implies that increased cohesive strength allowed creation of tunnels that were resistant to perturbation but did not decrease individual excavation ability. Ants used two distinct behaviors to create pellets composed of wetted particles, depending on substrate composition. However, despite the ability to create larger stable pellets in more cohesive substrates, pellet sizes were similar across all conditions. We posit that this pellet size balances the individual's load-carrying ability with the need to carry this pellet through confined crowded tunnels. We conclude that effective excavation of similarly shaped nests can occur in a diversity of substrates through sophisticated digging behaviors by individuals which accommodate both differing substrate properties and the need to work within the collective. PMID:25954041

  6. IPY Storytelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, C. A.; Lippsett, L.; Carlowicz, M.

    2007-12-01

    "Live from the Poles" tells the stories of science on ice. This NSF-sponsored education and outreach project (polardiscovery.whoi.edu) aims to go beyond results and sound bites to convey the full experience of polar research with all its trials, triumphs, and nuances. It uses a multimedia approach, including online photo essays posted daily during expeditions, along with videos, interviews, podcasts, animations, and audio clips-plus live satellite phone calls to audiences in major museums and science centers throughout the country. Our media team, typically a science writer and photographer, are embedded into the research program for the duration of the project. They live in the polar environment with the science party, bolstering their ability to convey the "human side" of the story that engages the public: What inspired the researchers to study the Arctic? What do they eat for dinner? How do they cope with the environment and being away from home? What other unexpected challenges will arise and how will they be overcome? The first expedition, in April 2007, shared the excitement of working in Nunavut, Canada, as researchers prepared to deploy instruments at the North Pole Environmental Observatory. The second followed an international scientific team's search for hydrothermal vents aboard the Swedish icebreaker Oden in July-August 2007. The Polar Discovery Web site has attracted more than 74,000 online visitors in its first eight months of operation. During the first two expeditions, the project facilitated 15 live audio talks to museum audiences, media outlets, and teacher workshops. This presentation will focus on lessons learned from the first two expeditions, with perspectives on science reporting and writing in the field from a science writer at AGU, and on the art of documentary photography, from photographer and project manager Chris Linder, who will speak via satellite phone from the third Polar Discovery expedition in Antarctica.

  7. Hamlet's Transformation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, P. D.

    1997-12-01

    William Shakespeare's Hamlet has much evidence to suggest that the Bard was aware of the cosmological models of his time, specifically the geocentric bounded Ptolemaic and Tychonic models, and the infinite Diggesian. Moreover, Shakespeare describes how the Ptolemaic model is to be transformed to the Diggesian. Hamlet's "transformation" is the reason that Claudius, who personifies the Ptolemaic model, summons Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, who personify the Tychonic. Pantometria, written by Leonard Digges and his son Thomas in 1571, contains the first technical use of the word "transformation." At age thirty, Thomas Digges went on to propose his Perfit Description, as alluded to in Act Five where Hamlet's age is given as thirty. In Act Five as well, the words "bore" and "arms" refer to Thomas' vocation as muster-master and his scientific interest in ballistics. England's leading astronomer was also the father of the poet whose encomium introduced the First Folio of 1623. His oldest child Dudley became a member of the Virginia Company and facilitated the writing of The Tempest. Taken as a whole, such manifold connections to Thomas Digges support Hotson's contention that Shakespeare knew the Digges family. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern in Hamlet bear Danish names because they personify the Danish model, while the king's name is latinized like that of Claudius Ptolemaeus. The reason Shakespeare anglicized "Amleth" to "Hamlet" was because he saw a parallel between Book Three of Saxo Grammaticus and the eventual triumph of the Diggesian model. But Shakespeare eschewed Book Four, creating this particular ending from an infinity of other possibilities because it "suited his purpose," viz. to celebrate the concept of a boundless universe of stars like the Sun.

  8. Lean consumption.

    PubMed

    Womack, James P; Jones, Daniel T

    2005-03-01

    During the past 20 years, the real price of most consumer goods has fallen worldwide, the variety of goods and the range of sales channels offering them have continued to grow, and product quality has steadily improved. So why is consumption often so frustrating? It doesn't have to be--and shouldn't be--the authors say. They argue that it's time to apply lean thinking to the processes of consumption--to give consumers the full value they want from goods and services with the greatest efficiency and the least pain. Companies may think they save time and money by off-loading work to the consumer but, in fact, the opposite is true. By streamlining their systems for providing goods and services, and by making it easier for customers to buy and use those products and services, a growing number of companies are actually lowering costs while saving everyone time. In the process, these businesses are learning more about their customers, strengthening consumer loyalty, and attracting new customers who are defecting from less user-friendly competitors. The challenge lies with the retailers, service providers, manufacturers, and suppliers that are not used to looking at total cost from the standpoint of the consumer and even less accustomed to working with customers to optimize the consumption process. Lean consumption requires a fundamental shift in the way companies think about the relationship between provision and consumption, and the role their customers play in these processes. It also requires consumers to change the nature of their relationships with the companies they patronize. Lean production has clearly triumphed over similar obstacles in recent years to become the dominant global manufacturing model. Lean consumption, its logical companion, can't be far behind. PMID:15768676

  9. Reflections on Five Decades of the Fontan Kreutzer Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Kreutzer, Christián; Kreutzer, Jacqueline; Kreutzer, Guillermo O.

    2013-01-01

    The first successful total right heart bypass via atriopulmonary anastomosis (APA) were reported in 1971 for patients with tricuspid atresia. At the Children’s Hospital of Buenos Aires, the cohort of such procedures started in July, when the first fenestrated right heart by pass was performed, with the interposition of a homograft between the right atrial appendage and the main pulmonary artery. In the second patient, instead of placing a homograft, the APA was achieved with the patient’s own pulmonary root harvested from the outflow tract of the right ventricle. These techniques were soon replaced in 1978 with the development of the direct valveless posterior APA. Since the very beginning the principle was that the right atrium only functions as a pathway rather than a pump (reason why no inferior vena cava valves were ever used), and the diastolic properties of the systemic ventricle regulate the only real “pump” of this system. The late hemodynamic problems inherent of the APA diminished with modern surgical techniques like the lateral tunnel (LT) or the extracardiac conduit (EC). In spite of the improvement in prognosis and quality of life that the modern techniques have brought for univentricular hearts (UH), with the passing of time, deterioration of this system is frequently seen, due to chronic low cardiac output, elevated central venous pressure making heart transplantation the final stage of treatment. Progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistances and ventricular dysfunction result in a decline in quality of life and survival. However, the timing of this occurrence is variable, and many survivors enjoy today a satisfactory clinical status. The challenge is to develop a better solution for UH, but in the mean time the Fontan Kreutzer palliation represents the best and only surgical option. It is undoubtedly one of the triumphs of cardiac surgery in congenital heart disease. PMID:24400290

  10. Research issues underlying the four-lab study: integrated disinfection by-products mixtures research.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Jane Ellen; Richardson, Susan D; Teuschler, Linda K; Miltner, Richard J; Speth, Thomas F; Schenck, Kathleen M; Hunter, E Sidney; Rice, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    Chemical disinfection of drinking water is a major public health triumph of the 20th century, resulting in significant decreases in morbidity and mortality from waterborne diseases. Disinfection by-products (DBP) are chemicals formed by the reaction of oxidizing disinfectants with inorganic and organic materials in the source water. To address potential health concerns that cannot be answered directly by toxicological research on individual DBPs or defined DBP mixtures, scientists residing within the various organizations of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development (the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, the National Risk Management Research Laboratory, the National Exposure Research Laboratory, and the National Center for Environmental Assessment) engaged in joint investigation of environmentally realistic complex mixtures of DBP. Research on complex mixtures of DBP is motivated by three factors: (a) DBP exposure is ubiquitous to all segments of the population; (b) some positive epidemiologic studies are suggestive of potential developmental, reproductive, or carcinogenic health effects in humans exposed to DBP; and (c) significant amounts of the material that makes up the total organic halide portion of the DBP have not been identified. The goal of the Integrated Disinfection Byproducts Mixtures Research Project (the 4Lab Study) is provision of sound, defensible, experimental data on environmentally relevant mixtures of DBP and an improved estimation of the potential health risks associated with exposure to the mixtures of DBP formed during disinfection of drinking water. A phased research plan was developed and implemented. The present series of articles provides the results from the first series of experiments. PMID:18636387

  11. Accepting Pain Over Comfort: Resistance to the Use of Anesthesia in the Mid-19th Century.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Rachel; Desai, Sukumar P

    2015-10-01

    News of the successful use of ether anesthesia on October 16, 1846, spread rapidly through the world. Considered one of the greatest medical discoveries, this triumph over man's cardinal symptom, the symptom most likely to persuade patients to seek medical attention, was praised by physicians and patients alike. Incredibly, this option was not accepted by all, and opposition to the use of anesthesia persisted among some sections of society decades after its introduction. We examine the social and medical factors underlying this resistance. At least seven major objections to the newly introduced anesthetic agents were raised by physicians and patients. Complications of anesthesia, including death, were reported in the press, and many avoided anesthesia to minimize the considerable risk associated with surgery. Modesty prevented female patients from seeking unconsciousness during surgery, where many men would be present. Biblical passages stating that women would bear children in pain were used to discourage them from seeking analgesia during labor. Some medical practitioners believed that pain was beneficial to satisfactory progression of labor and recovery from surgery. Others felt that patient advocacy and participation in decision making during surgery would be lost under the influence of anesthesia. Early recreational use of nitrous oxide and ether, commercialization with patenting of Letheon, and the fighting for credit for the discovery of anesthesia suggested unprofessional behavior and smacked of quackery. Lastly, in certain geographical areas, notably Philadelphia, physicians resisted this Boston-based medical advance, citing unprofessional behavior and profit seeking. Although it appears inconceivable that such a major medical advance would face opposition, a historical examination reveals several logical grounds for the initial societal and medical skepticism. PMID:26828088

  12. Flash!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Govert

    2002-04-01

    About three times a day our sky flashes with a powerful pulse of gamma ray bursts (GRB), invisible to human eyes but not to astronomers' instruments. The sources of this intense radiation are likely to be emitting, within the span of seconds or minutes, more energy than the sun will in its entire 10 billion years of life. Where these bursts originate, and how they come to have such incredible energies, is a mystery scientists have been trying to solve for three decades. The phenomenon has resisted study -- the flashes come from random directions in space and vanish without trace -- until very recently. In what could be called a cinematic conflation of Flash Gordon and The Hunt for Red October, Govert Schilling's Flash!: The Hunt for the Biggest Explosions in the Universe describes the exciting and ever-changing field of GRB research. Based on interviews with leading scientists, Flash! provides an insider's account of the scientific challenges involved in unravelling the enigmatic nature of GRBs. A science writer who has followed the drama from the very start, Schilling describes the ambition and jealousy, collegiality and competition, triumph and tragedy, that exists among those who have embarked on this recherche. Govert Schilling is a Dutch science writer and astronomy publicist. He is a contributing editor of Sky and Telescope magazine, and regularly writes for the news sections of Science and New Scientist. Schilling is the astronomy writer for de Volkskrant, one of the largest national daily newspapers in The Netherlands, and frequently talks about the Universe on Dutch radio broadcasts. He is the author of more than twenty popular astronomy books, and hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles on astronomy.

  13. New Physics Undercover at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Hou Keong

    With the completion of 7 TeV and 8 TeV data taking at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the physics community witnessed one of the great triumphs of modern physics: the completion of the Standard Model (SM) as an effective theory. The final missing particle, the Higgs boson, was observed and its mass was measured. However, many theoretical questions remain unanswered. What is the source of electroweak symmetry breaking? What is the nature of dark matter? How does gravity fit into the picture? With no definitive hints of new physics at the LHC, we must consider the possibility that our search strategies need to be expanded. Conventional LHC searches focus on theoretically motivated scenarios, such as the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Models and Little Higgs Theories. However, it is possible that new physics may be entirely different from what we might expect. In this thesis, we examine a variety of scenarios that lead to new physics undercover at the LHC. First we look at potential new physics hiding in Quantum Chromo-Dynamics backgrounds, which may be uncovered using jet substructure techniques in a data-driven way. Then we turn to new long-lived particles hiding in Higgs decay, which may lead to displaced vertices. Such a signal can be unearthed through a data-driven analysis. Then we turn to new physics with ``semi-visible jets'', which lead to missing momentum aligned with jet momentum. These events are vetoed in traditional searches and we demonstrate ways to uncover these signals. Lastly, we explore performance of future colliders in two case studies: Stops and Higgs Portal searches. We show that a 100 TeV collider will lead to significant improvements over 14 TeV LHC runs. Indeed, new physics may lie undercover at the LHC and future colliders, waiting to be discovered.

  14. Cosmological constant and vacuum energy: old and new ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solà, Joan

    2013-08-01

    The cosmological constant (CC) term in Einstein's equations, Λ, was first associated to the idea of vacuum energy density. Notwithstanding, it is well-known that there is a huge, in fact appalling, discrepancy between the theoretical prediction and the observed value picked from the modern cosmological data. This is the famous, and extremely difficult, "CC problem". Paradoxically, the recent observation at the CERN Large Hadron Collider of a Higgs-like particle, should actually be considered ambivalent: on the one hand it appears as a likely great triumph of particle physics, but on the other hand it wide opens Pandora's box of the cosmological uproar, for it may provide (alas!) the experimental certification of the existence of the electroweak (EW) vacuum energy, and thus of the intriguing reality of the CC problem. Even if only counting on this contribution to the inventory of vacuum energies in the universe, the discrepancy with the cosmologically observed value is already of 55 orders of magnitude. This is the (hitherto) "real" magnitude of the CC problem, rather than the (too often) brandished 123 ones from the upper (but fully unexplored!) ultrahigh energy scales. Such is the baffling situation after 96 years of introducing the Λ-term by Einstein. In the following I will briefly (and hopefully pedagogically) fly over some of the old and new ideas on the CC problem. Since, however, the Higgs boson just knocked our door and recalled us that the vacuum energy may be a fully tangible concept in real phenomenology, I will exclusively address the CC problem from the original notion of vacuum energy, and its possible "running" with the expansion of the universe, rather than venturing into the numberless attempts to replace the CC by the multifarious concept of dark energy.

  15. An Earlier Natural Mechanism Proposal for the Closure of the Ozone Hole and the Present 30% Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Shahinaz M.; Al-Kuhaimi, Siham A.; Bebars, Aisha

    2011-06-01

    A prolonged period of reduced solar activity of the order of few decades is expected owing to the presence of weak solar cycles series like those around 1800 and 1900 AD. Reduced UV flux is forecasted. The multitude of phytoplanktons in the Antarctic Ocean which are harmed by excessive UV passing through the ozone hole are expected to recover owing to the reduced solar UV doze even with the existence of ozone hole. An increase of only 10% of the phytoplankton would remove about 5 Gigatons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere annually (which is equal to the amount of carbon dioxide emitted currently by fossil fuel utilization) and sink it into the ocean. Reduction of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere will lead to cooling of the troposphere and hence warming of Antarctic stratospheric clouds which are the sight of ozone destruction. Eventually, this procedure will hopefully lead to Antarctic ozone hole closure. The paper also discuss the implication of the 1997 solar induced climate change on the appearance of the Arctic ozone hole and the reduction of the Antarctic ozone hole. Anther more serious solar indsolarinduced climate change is currently on due to the end of the first weak solar cycle number 23 and the start of predicated second weaker solar cycle number 24. A climate change, which has already brought global cooling to the earth. The Ozone hole has been closed by 30% in 2007 as prdicted which a triumph is for the subject of sun-Earth connections. It is also predicted that further closures in the coming few years will occur due to solar induced climate changes. The forecast of the ozone hole closure was predicted in earlier papers.

  16. An ethical duty: Let astronautical development unfold - to make the people more secure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, Marco C.

    2014-11-01

    In examining alternative space-development models, one observes that Heinlein postulated the first Moon flight as the outcome of the focused action of an individual - building upon an ample commercial aerospace transportation infrastructure. The same technological basis and entrepreneurial drive would then sustain a fast human and economic expansion on three new planets. Instead, historically, humans reached the Moon thanks to a "Faustian bargain" between astronautical developers and governments. This approach brought the early Apollo triumphs, but it also created the presumption of this method as the sole one for enabling space development. Eventually, the application of this paradigm caused the decline of the astronautical endeavor. Thus, just as conventional methods became unable to sustain the astronautical endeavor, space development appeared as vital, e.g., to satisfy the people's basic needs (metabolic resources, energy, materials, and space), as shown elsewhere. Such an endeavor must grow from actions generating new wealth through commercial activities to become self-supporting. Acquisition and distribution of multiform space resources call, however, for a sound ethical environment, as predatory governments can easily forfeit those resources. The paper begins the search for means apt to maintain a societal environment suited for this purpose. Among numerous initiatives needed, dissemination of factual information and moral-right education support take a central position: In fact, the vital condition for true Astronautics - a vast increase in actual respect of moral rights - can also become its best consequence, as the prosperity from the space arena empowers the people, making them materially safer and more secure in their fundamental moral rights.

  17. Patterns and Predictors of Fast Food Consumption After Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury, Adam C.; Chan, Paul S.; Gosch, Kensey L.; Buchanan, Donna M.; Spertus, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Although fast food is affordable and convenient, it is also high in calories, saturated fat and sodium. The frequency of fast food intake at the time of, and after, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is modifiable. However, patterns of fast food intake and characteristics associated with its consumption among AMI patients are unknown. We studied fast food consumption at the time of AMI and 6 months later in 2481 patients from the prospective, 24-center TRIUMPH study of AMI patients. Fast food intake was categorized as frequent (≥ weekly) vs. infrequent (< weekly). Multivariable log-binomial regression was used to identify patient characteristics associated with frequent fast food intake 6 months after AMI. At baseline, 884 patients (36%) reported frequent fast food intake, which decreased to 503 (20%) 6 months after discharge (p-value <0.001). Male sex, white race, lack of college education, current employment and dyslipidemia were independently associated with frequent fast food intake 6 months after AMI. In contrast, older patients and those who had coronary bypass surgery were less likely to eat fast food frequently. Documentation of discharge dietary counseling was not associated with 6-month fast food intake. In conclusion, fast food consumption by AMI patients declined 6 months after the index hospitalization, but certain populations, including younger patients, men, those currently working, and less educated patients were more likely to consume fast food, at least weekly, during follow-up. Novel interventions that go beyond traditional dietary counseling may be needed to address continued fast food consumption after AMI in these patients. PMID:21306695

  18. Focused ultrasound-aided immunomodulation in glioblastoma multiforme: a therapeutic concept.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Inbar, Or; Xu, Zhiyuan; Sheehan, Jason P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) exhibit a deficient anti-tumor immune response. Both arms of the immune system were shown to be hampered in GBM, namely the local cellular immunity mediated by the Th1 subset of helper T cells and the systemic humoral immunity mediated by the Th2 subset of helper T cells. Immunotherapy is rapidly becoming one of the pillars of anti-cancer therapy. GBM has not received similar clinical successes as of yet, which may be attributed to its relative inaccessibility (the blood-brain barrier (BBB)), its poor immunogenicity, few characterized cancer antigens, or any of the many other immune mechanisms known to be hampered. Focused ultrasound (FUS) is emerging as a promising treatment approach. The effects of FUS on the tissue are not merely thermal. Mounting evidence suggests that in addition to thermal ablation, FUS induces mechanical acoustic cavitation and immunomodulation plays a key role in boosting the host anti-tumor immune responses. We separately discuss the different pertinent immunosuppressive mechanisms harnessed by GBM and the immunomodulatory effects of FUS. The effect of FUS and microbubbles in disrupting the BBB and introducing antigens and drugs to the tumor milieu is discussed. The FUS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and stress response, the FUS-induced change in the intra-tumoral immune-cells populations, the FUS-induced augmentation of dendritic cells activity, and the FUS-induced increased cytotoxic cells potency are all discussed. We next attempt at offering a conceptual synopsis of the synergistic treatment of GBM utilizing FUS and immunotherapy. In conclusion, it is increasingly apparent that no single treatment modality will triumph on GBM. The reviewed FUS-induced immunomodulation effects can be harnessed to current and developing immunotherapy approaches. Together, these may overcome GBM-induced immune-evasion and generate a clinically relevant anti-tumor immune response. PMID:26807257

  19. Bioextraction of soil boron by tall fescue.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, G S; Mackey, B; Wu, L; Zambrzuski, S; Akohoue, S

    1995-07-01

    High concentrations of soil B are detrimental to crop productivity in certain arid and semiarid regions of the western United States. Production of tall fescue on B-affected soils may be a viable strategy to reduce and maintain soil B concentrations at nontoxic levels for most agronomic crops. A 2-year field experiment was conducted to study B uptake in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) Schreb. cv. Au Triumph grown in soil containing potentially toxic levels of native soil B. The soil B concentrations (water-extractable B greater than 5 mg B liter-1) did not affect the dry matter (DM) yield of tall fescue. Boron concentrations in shoot tissue for both years ranged from 88 to 121 mg B kg-1 DM. whereas in root tissue, concentrations ranged from 50 to 60 mg B kg-1 DM. For both years of the study, soil samples were taken at depth of 0-45 and 45-90 cm at the beginning and end of the designated growing season and analyzed for water-extractable B. Summary data from all cropped plots at the two soil depths indicated that the mean water-extractable B concentrations were reduced by 35% after 2 years in the tall fescue plots, whereas losses of extractable B from bare plots did not exceed 13% for both years. Tall fescue apparently can be used as a component in an overall strategy to lower extractable soil native B levels in irrigated agriculture soils and potentially reduce leaching of B into shallow ground water. PMID:8521775

  20. [From relativism to evaluation. Recent trends in the historiography of science and the humanities].

    PubMed

    Jonker, Ed

    2011-01-01

    Historians of science have taken leave of finalism. No longer do they write teleological histories of scientific progress. Instead of a grand narrative on the triumph of science they now tend to write small stories on local knowledge. This is the result of several decades of criticism of Whig history. Starting with neo-marxist critique in the interwar years, enhanced in the social history of the 1970s, science was seen as an economic commodity and as a social product. Cultural history and anthropology added the view that scientists and scholars are mere mortals, muddling through messy life. This critique was topped off with postmodern criticism of knowledge as power, which translates into the accusation that historiography is only legitimating cultural and political oppression. To counter these allegations, many historians have insulated themselves into a kind of retro-historicism that shies away from any teleology, coherence, meaning and evaluation. It depicts the production of knowledge as a practical, local activity that is strictly limited to its cultural context. No claims to truth, validity, let alone progress or even development were allowed. This situation of rampant relativism could not last. Total abstinence of any evaluation of knowledge claims, quality of research or success of theories has proven unsatisfactory. The need has arisen to study broader issues of traveling knowledge and longer lines of scientific development. There is a shift of interest into traditions of knowledge that spring the bonds of locality and context. Why do some scientific theories and research practices succeed in surpassing paradigms and bridging epistemic ruptures? In this respect disciplines are in the process of being rehabilitated. Instead of oppressive structures they become the vehicles of sustained knowledge growth. Especially the role of education and academic training is focused on. Facing up to the charges of conceptual anachronism, historians of knowledge now opt

  1. Prevention of STDs -- the challenge of changing behaviors.

    PubMed

    Halpern, J; Finger, W R

    1992-04-01

    STD prevention efforts in Latin America, particularly in the Dominican Republic, have begun to stress the need for behavioral changes. Traditionally, the professional public health community has focused on secondary prevention of STDs -- detection and treatment of the disease in order to prevent complications from developing. But in light of the AIDS epidemic, greater attention has been paid to primary prevention. Hoping to prevent the disease from occurring, primary prevention efforts target high risk groups (prostitutes and their clients and young people) with health education and promotion of behavioral change. Such changes include using condoms, seeking medical care for STDs, and decreasing the number of sex partners. An example of primary prevention programs is the Avancemos Project in the Dominican Republic. Launched in 1989 by the country's Ministry of Health and Family Health International's AIDSTECH Division, the project targets sex workers with several intervention measures. Initially, the Avancemos Project trained 16 sex workers to serve as peer educators to distribute condoms and educational materials. These 16 volunteers have in turn trained more than 300 other peer educators. Among the educational materials distributed by the peer educators are 2 comic books entitled "Martiza's Advice" and "The Triumphs of Maritza." A handsome, well dressed, and street-wise sex worker, the title character in these comic books instructs on a range of issues, including how to negotiate with clients how to use a condom. As those involved with the project attest, the comic books have become extremely popular among the target group, tapping into the women's buried feelings of self-worth. PMID:12343656

  2. Biodegradation of atrazine by Rhodococcus sp. BCH2 to N-isopropylammelide with subsequent assessment of toxicity of biodegraded metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kolekar, Parag D; Phugare, Swapnil S; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2014-02-01

    Atrazine is a persistent organic pollutant in the environment which affects not only terrestrial and aquatic biota but also human health. Since its removal from the environment is needed, atrazine biodegradation is achieved in the present study using the bacterium Rhodococcus sp. BCH2 isolated from soil, long-term treated with atrazine. The bacterium was capable of degrading about 75 % atrazine in liquid medium having pH 7 under aerobic and dark condition within 7 days. The degradation ability of the bacterium at various temperatures (20-60 °C), pH (range 3-11), carbon (glucose, fructose, sucrose, starch, lactose, and maltose), and nitrogen (ammonium molybdate, sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, and urea) sources were studied for triumph optimum atrazine degradation. The results indicate that atrazine degradation at higher concentrations (100 ppm) was pH and temperature dependent. However, glucose and potassium nitrate were optimum carbon and nitrogen source, respectively. Atrazine biodegradation analysis was carried out by using high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight (LC/Q-TOF-MS) techniques. LC/Q-TOF-MS analysis revealed formation of various intermediate metabolites including hydroxyatrazine, N-isopropylammelide, deisopropylhydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, and deisopropyldeethylatrazine which was helpful to propose biochemical degradation pathway of atrazine. Furthermore, the toxicological studies of atrazine and its biodegraded metabolites were executed on earthworm Eisenia foetida as a model organism with respect to enzymatic (SOD and Catalase) antioxidant defense mechanism and lipid peroxidation studies. These results suggest innocuous degradation of atrazine by Rhodococcus sp. BCH2 in nontoxic form. Therefore the Rhodococcus sp.BCH2 could prove a valuable source for the eco-friendly biodegradation of atrazine pesticide. PMID

  3. In the ear of the beholder: how age shapes emotion processing in nonverbal vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Lima, César F; Alves, Tiago; Scott, Sophie K; Castro, São Luís

    2014-02-01

    It is well established that emotion recognition of facial expressions declines with age, but evidence for age-related differences in vocal emotions is more limited. This is especially true for nonverbal vocalizations such as laughter, sobs, or sighs. In this study, 43 younger adults (M = 22 years) and 43 older ones (M = 61.4 years) provided multiple emotion ratings of nonverbal emotional vocalizations. Contrasting with previous research, which often includes only one positive emotion (happiness) versus several negative ones, we examined 4 positive and 4 negative emotions: achievement/triumph, amusement, pleasure, relief, anger, disgust, fear, and sadness. We controlled for hearing loss and assessed general cognitive decline, cognitive control, verbal intelligence, working memory, current affect, emotion regulation, and personality. Older adults were less sensitive than younger ones to the intended vocal emotions, as indicated by decrements in ratings on the intended emotion scales and accuracy. These effects were similar for positive and negative emotions, and they were independent of age-related differences in cognitive, affective, and personality measures. Regression analyses revealed that younger and older participants' responses could be predicted from the acoustic properties of the temporal, intensity, fundamental frequency, and spectral profile of the vocalizations. The two groups were similarly efficient in using the acoustic cues, but there were differences in the patterns of emotion-specific predictors. This study suggests that ageing produces specific changes on the processing of nonverbal vocalizations. That decrements were not attenuated for positive emotions indicates that they cannot be explained by a positivity effect in older adults. PMID:24219391

  4. A Literature Investigation about Electrospinning and Nanofibers: Historical Trends, Current Status and Future Challenges.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Marcio L F; Araujo, Evando S; Cordeiro, Erlon R; de Oliveira, Ariadne H P; de Oliveira, Helinando P

    2015-01-01

    The development of new fibrilar materials based on electrospinning (ES) technique has a notable history of nearly four centuries of discoveries and results. The eletrospinning manufacturing is one of the most widely reported methods for nanofiber (NF) manufacturing, providing security, high quality and productivity. In spite of the first patent about electrospinning has been applied in April 5(th), 1900 by John Francis Cooley, a historical perspective (since 1600s) about this amazing discovery represents an important step for future applications. Nanofibers have been considered one of the top interesting fundamental study objects for academicians, and greatest intriguing business materials for modern industry. As a consequence, lucrative organizations and companies have explored the relevance of nanofibers. In this paper, the quantity of published manuscripts and patent inventions is presented and the correlation of research activities to the production of new electrospinning materials is shown. China and the United States have been leading in electrospinning and nanofibers development. The company triumph is mostly dependent on applications improvement relevant for broader business society. A dramatic rise of interest in nanofibers produced by electrospinning technique has been confirmed due to the publication data, author's affiliation, keywords, and essential characterization procedures. Is has been shown that the number of publications on electrospinning and nanofibers researches from academic institutions is higher than industrial laboratories. More than 1,891 patents using the term "electrospinning" and 2,960 with the term "nanofibers" according to the European Patent Office at title or abstract have been filed around the world up to 2013. These numbers just continue to increase along with worldwide ES-related sales. Curiously, for the same period 11,973 electrospinning documents and 18,679 nanofibers-related (mainly manuscripts) were published considering

  5. Single Stage to Orbit: Politics, Space Technology, and the Quest for Reusable Rocketry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butrica, Andrew J.

    2003-01-01

    While the glories and tragedies of the space shuttle make headlines and move the nation, the story of the shuttle forms an inseparable part of a lesser-known but no less important drama-the search for a re-useable single-stage-to-orbit rocket. Here an award-winning student of space science, Andrew J. Butrica, examines the long and tangled history of this ambitious concept, from it first glimmerings in the 1920s, when technicians dismissed it as unfeasible, to its highly expensive heyday in the midst of the Cold War, when conservative-backed government programs struggled to produce an operational flight vehicle. Butrica finds a blending of far-sighted engineering and heavy-handed politics. To the first and oldest idea-that of the reusable rocket-powered single-stage- to-orbit vehicle-planners who belonged to what President Eisenhower referred to as the military-industrial complex added experimental (" X "), "aircraft-like" capabilities and, eventually, a "faster, cheaper, smaller" managerial approach. Single Stage to Orbit traces the interplay of technology, corporate interest, and politics, a combination that well served the conservative space agenda and ultimately triumphed-not in the realization of inexpensive, reliable space transport-but in a vision of space militarization and commercialization that would appear settled United States policy in the early twenty-first century. "The 'holy grail' of the spaceship movement has been the development of a vehicle that could accomplish single stage to orbit (SSTO) flight. This study describes the evolution of this concept from the 192'0s to the present, revealing a conservative space agenda that has not yet been the subject of historical analysis. As such, it makes an important contribution to space history literature."-Roger D. Launius, The Smithsonian Institution.

  6. Spinoff 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, James J.

    1977-01-01

    The National Aeronautics & Space Administration has many missions but they can all be reduced to a common denominator: to explore Earth and its surroundings, conduct aeronautical research, and put the results to work for the benefit of mankind. At times the benefit may be dimly perceived. Take, for instance, last year's monumental triumph of exploration, the landing of robot spacecraft on Mars. How, some ask, does probing a neighbor planet improve the lot of Earth's people? In two ways: scientific gain and technological advancement. Though perhaps little understood, they are concrete benefits, assets as tangible as sunshine, more valuable than gold. Technological advancement, on the other hand, offers equally important but more immediate returns. Technology is science applied. It is the ability of a society to make things that improve the quality of human existence. It is compounded of intellect and skill, which draw upon the scientific base to bring forth new ideas, inventions, materials and processes. It is, in a word, knowledge. It builds like an inverted pyramid, each level broader than the one . before as successive generations contribute to the cumulative lore. Knowledge is readily transferable. If you build a better mousetrap, you may acquire experience in the course of the project that can be applied to a need totally unrelated to mouse-traping. This transfer process has been going on since the dawn of technology. In the last two decades it has accelerated enormously, spurred by the immense flow of aerospace-stimulated technology. There have been literally thousands of spinoffs, new products and processes that owe their origins to aerospace research. Collectively, they add up to significant gain in terms of personal convenience, human welfare, industrial efficiency, and economic value.

  7. Cavitation Bubble Nucleation by Energetic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-12-01

    In the early sixties, experimental measurements using a bubble chamber confirmed quantitatively the thermal spike theory of bubble nucleation by energetic particles: the energy of the slow, heavy alpha decay recoils used in those experiments matched the calculated bubble nucleation energy to within a few percent. It was a triumph, but was soon to be followed by a puzzle. Within a couple of years, experiments on similar liquids, but well below their normal boiling points, placed under tensile stress showed that the calculated bubble nucleation energy was an order of magnitude less than the recoil energy. Why should the theory work so well in the one case and so badly in the other? How did the liquid, or the recoil particle, "know" the difference between the two experiments? Another mathematical model of the same physical process, introduced in 1967, showed qualitatively why different analyses would be needed for liquids with high and low vapor pressures under positive or negative pressures. But, the quantitative agreement between the calculated nucleation energy and the recoil energy was still poor--the former being smaller by a factor of two to three. In this report, the 1967 analysis is extended and refined: the qualitative understanding of the difference between positive and negative pressure nucleation, "boiling" and "cavitation" respectively, is retained, and agreement between the negative pressure calculated to be needed for nucleation and the energy calculated to be available is much improved. A plot of the calculated negative pressure needed to induce bubble formation against the measured value now has a slope of 1.0, although there is still considerable scatter in the individual points.

  8. Fred Hoyle's Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Jane

    2005-08-01

    Fred Hoyle was a Yorkshire truant who became the voice of British astronomy. For fifty years, he spoke out for astronomy in the newspapers, on government committees, at scientific meetings, in popular books and on the radio. He devised a never-ending history of the universe, and worked out how the elements were made. He founded a prestigious institute for theoretical astronomy and built a giant telescope, and if it rained on his summer holiday, he sat in his caravan and wrote science fiction novels for his legions of fans around the world. Fred Hoyle also claimed that diseases fall from the sky, that the big bang never happened, and that the Astronomer Royal should be abolished. When the outspoken Fred Hoyle spoke out for astronomy, some astronomers really wished he had kept his mouth shut. This book tells the behind-the-scenes story of Hoyle's widely acclaimed and deeply controversial role in the ideas, organization and public face of astronomy in post-war Britain. It chronicles the triumphs, acrimony, jealousies, rewards and bitter feuds of a field in turmoil, and meets the astronomers, contemplating cosmic questions, keeping secrets, losing their tempers, winkling information out of distant stars and, over tea on the lawn, discussing the finer points of libel law. Fred Hoyle's Universe draws on previously confidential government documents, recently released personal correspondence and interviews with Hoyle's friends, colleagues and critics, as well as with Hoyle himself, to bring you the man, the science, and the scandal behind the genial and genteel facade of the most exciting period in the history of astronomy.

  9. Looking for earths : the race to find new solar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Alan

    1998-09-01

    The ultimate insider's account of astronomy's fantastic voyage in search of brave new worlds in faraway galaxies "Highly recommended." -Science and Technology "Full of humor, heartbreak, and a deep understanding of the ardor and luck that compose years of research. . . . The reader becomes not merely a receiver of Boss's vision, but a fellow explorer." -Astronomy "A rewarding account." -Scientific American Are we alone in the universe . . . or are there other planets generating and sustaining life? The question may be as old as civilization, but in the twilight of a century marked by countless frustrated quests to find other solar systems, several teams of pioneering astronomers have at last discovered a rich crop of mammoth, Jupiter-sized gas planets -the first compelling evidence that there may indeed be life in other galaxies. In Looking for Earths, a prominent planetary scientist takes us along on this thrilling hunt for new life, revealing the behind-the-scenes stories of scientific determination, frustration, and triumph. Ushering us to the mountaintop observatories that house the world's most powerful telescopes, and into the tension-filled scientific meetings where new results are announced and old results overturned, Alan Boss brings the process of exploration vividly alive. Experience the roller-coaster ride as intricate observations of minuscule stellar wobbles raise hopes that at last a true planet has been found, only to be almost immediately shattered by more powerful observations. Boss also introduces the principal players whose dreams defied all odds and made the first major discovery possible. Like no other book, Looking for Earths captures the lively tension between theory and observation that defines cutting-edge astronomical discovery, along with the heated battles that will determine the direction of big-ticket American astronomy for years to come. "You will find no better introduction to one of the truly revolutionary developments in modern

  10. Measurement of top anti-top cross section in proton - anti-proton collider at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Mal, Prolay Kumar

    2005-04-01

    Discovery of the top quark in 1995 at the Fermilab Tevatron collider concluded a long search following the 1977 discovery of bottom (b) quark [1] and represents another triumph of the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particles. Top quark is one of the fundamental fermions in the Standard Model of electroweak interactions and is the weak-isospin partner of the bottom quark. A precise measurement of top pair production cross-section would be a test of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) prediction. Presently, Tevatron is the world's highest energy collider where protons (p) and anti-protons ({anti p}) collide at a centre of mass energy (ps) of 1.96 TeV. At Tevatron top (t) and anti-top ({anti t}) quarks are predominantly pair produced through strong interactions--quark annihilation ({approx_equal} 85%) and gluon fusion ({approx_equal} 15%). Due to the large mass of top quark, t or {anti t} decays ({approx} 10{sup -25} sec) before hadronization and in SM framework, it decays to a W boson and a b quark with {approx} 100% branching ratio (BR). The subsequent decay of W boson determines the major signatures of t{anti t} decay. If both W bosons (coming from t and {anti t} decays) decay into leptons (viz., ev{sub e}, {mu}{nu}{sub {mu}} or {tau}{nu}{sub {tau}}) the corresponding t{bar t} decay is called dileptonic decay. Of all dileptonic decay modes of t{bar t}, the t{bar t} {yields} WWb{anti b} {yields} ev{sub e}{mu}{nu}{sub {mu}}b{anti b} (e{mu} channel) decay mode has the smallest background contamination from Z{sup 0} production or Drell-Yan process; simultaneously, it has the highest BR ({approx} 3.16%) [2] amongst all dileptonic decay modes of t{bar t}. During Run I (1992-1996) of Tevatron, three e{mu} candidate events were detected by D0 experiment, out of 80 candidate events (inclusive of all decay modes of t{bar t}). Due to the rarity of the t{bar t} events, the measured cross-section has large uncertainty in its value (viz., 5.69 {+-} 1.21(stat) {+-} 1.04(sys) pb {at

  11. The Conversations about Cancer (CAC) Project: Assessing Feasibility and Audience Impacts from Viewing The Cancer Play*

    PubMed Central

    Beach, Wayne A.; Buller, Mary K.; Dozier, David M.; Buller, David B.; Gutzmer, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    Basic communication research has identified a major social problem: communicating about cancer from diagnosis through death of a loved one. Over the past decade, an award winning investigation into how family members talk through cancer on the telephone, based on a corpus of 61 phone calls over a period of 13 months, has been transformed into a theatrical production entitled The Cancer Play. All dialogue in the play is drawn from naturally occurring (transcribed) interactions between family members as they navigate their way through the trials, tribulations, hopes, and triumphs of a cancer journey. This dramatic performance explicitly acknowledges the power of the arts as an exceptional learning tool for extending empirical research, exploring ordinary family life, and exposing the often taken-for-granted conceptions of health and illness. In this study, a Phase I STTR project funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), we assess the feasibility of educating and impacting cancer patients, family members, and medical professionals who viewed the play as a live performance and through DVD screenings. Pre-and post-performance questionnaires were administered to solicit audience feedback. Pre-post change scores demonstrate overwhelming and positive impacts for changing opinions about the perceived importance, and attributed significance, of family communication in the midst of cancer. Paired-sample t-tests were conducted on 5 factor analyzed indices/indicators – two indices of opinions about cancer and family communication, two indices measuring the importance of key communication activities, and the self-efficacy indicator – and all factors improved significantly (<.001). Informal talkback sessions were also held following the viewings, and selected audience members participated in focus groups. Talkback and focus group sessions generated equally strong, support responses. Implications of the Phase I study are being applied in Phase II, a currently funded

  12. Graduates in the kitchen. Educating girls: Jordan, Morocco and Syria.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D

    1993-01-01

    woman expressed that she saw no difficulty in becoming a structural engineer because her personality would triumph. PMID:12318177

  13. Making tomorrow's mistakes today: Evolutionary prototyping for risk reduction and shorter development time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Gary; Schwuttke, Ursula M.; Burliegh, Scott; Chow, Sanguan; Parlier, Randy; Lee, Lorrine; Castro, Henry; Gersbach, Jim

    1993-01-01

    In the early days of JPL's solar system exploration, each spacecraft mission required its own dedicated data system with all software applications written in the mainframe's native assembly language. Although these early telemetry processing systems were a triumph of engineering in their day, since that time the computer industry has advanced to the point where it is now advantageous to replace these systems with more modern technology. The Space Flight Operations Center (SFOC) Prototype group was established in 1985 as a workstation and software laboratory. The charter of the lab was to determine if it was possible to construct a multimission telemetry processing system using commercial, off-the-shelf computers that communicated via networks. The staff of the lab mirrored that of a typical skunk works operation -- a small, multi-disciplinary team with a great deal of autonomy that could get complex tasks done quickly. In an effort to determine which approaches would be useful, the prototype group experimented with all types of operating systems, inter-process communication mechanisms, network protocols, packet size parameters. Out of that pioneering work came the confidence that a multi-mission telemetry processing system could be built using high-level languages running in a heterogeneous, networked workstation environment. Experience revealed that the operating systems on all nodes should be similar (i.e., all VMS or all PC-DOS or all UNIX), and that a unique Data Transport Subsystem tool needed to be built to address the incompatibilities of network standards, byte ordering, and socket buffering. The advantages of building a telemetry processing system based on emerging industry standards were numerous: by employing these standards, we would no longer be locked into a single vendor. When new technology came to market which offered ten times the performance at one eighth the cost, it would be possible to attach the new machine to the network, re-compile the

  14. Searching the Heavens: Astronomy, Computation, Statistics, Data Mining and Philosophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glymour, Clark

    2012-03-01

    Our first and purest science, the mother of scientific methods, sustained by sheer curiosity, searching the heavens we cannot manipulate. From the beginning, astronomy has combined mathematical idealization, technological ingenuity, and indefatigable data collection with procedures to search through assembled data for the processes that govern the cosmos. Astronomers are, and ever have been, data miners, and for that reason astronomical methods (but not astronomical discoveries) have often been despised by statisticians and philosophers. Epithets laced the statistical literature: Ransacking! Data dredging! Double Counting! Statistical disdain was usually directed at social scientists and biologists, rarely if ever at astronomers, but the methodological attitudes and goals that many twentieth-century philosophers and statisticians rejected were creations of the astronomical tradition. The philosophical criticisms were earlier and more direct. In the shadow (or in Alexander Pope’s phrasing, the light) cast on nature in the eighteenth century by the Newtonian triumph, David Hume revived arguments from the ancient Greeks to challenge the very possibility of coming to know what causes what. His conclusion was endorsed in the twentieth century by many philosophers who found talk of causation unnecessary or unacceptably metaphysical, and absorbed by many statisticians as a general suspicion of causal claims, except possibly when they are founded on experimental manipulation. And yet in the hands of a mathematician, Thomas Bayes, and another mathematician and philosopher, Richard Price, Hume’s essays prompted the development of a new kind of statistics, the kind we now call "Bayesian." The computer and new data acquisition methods have begun to dissolve the antipathy between astronomy, philosophy, and statistics. But the resolution is practical, without much reflection on the arguments or the course of events. So, I offer a largely unoriginal history

  15. Qualitative Analysis of Emotions: Fear and Thrill.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Ralf C

    2016-01-01

    People can speak, and this provides opportunities to analyze human emotions using perceived experiences communicated via language, as well as through measurement and imaging techniques that are also applicable to other higher animal species. Here I compare four qualitative methodological approaches to test if, and how, thrill depends on fear. I use eight high-risk, high-skill, real-life outdoor adventure recreation activities to provide the test circumstances. I present data from: >4000 person-days of participant observation; interviews with 40 expert practitioners; retrospective autoethnography of 50 critical incidents over 4 decades; and experimental autoethnography of 60 events. Results from different methods are congruent, but different approaches yield different insights. The principal findings are as follows. Individuals differ in their fear and thrill responses. The same individual may have different responses on different occasions. Fear boosts performance, but panic causes paralysis. Anxiety or apprehension prior to a risky action or event differs from fear experienced during the event itself. The intensity of pre-event fear generally increases with the immediacy of risk to life, and time to contemplate that risk. Fear must be faced, assessed and overcome in order to act. Thrill can occur either during or after a high-risk event. Thrill can occur without fear, and fear without thrill. Below a lower threshold of perceived risk, thrill can occur without fear. Between a lower and upper threshold, thrill increases with fear. Beyond the upper threshold, thrill vanishes but fear remains. This there is a sawtooth relation between fear and thrill. Perceived danger generates intense focus and awareness. Fear and other emotions can disappear during intense concentration and focus. Under high risk, the usual emotional sequence is fear before the action or event, then focus during the action or event, then thrill, relief, or triumph afterward. The emotionless state

  16. Phytoremediation management of selenium-laden drainage sediments in the San Luis Drain: a greenhouse feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, G S; Lin, Z-Q

    2005-11-01

    An estimated 100,000m(3) selenium (Se)-laden drainage sediment resides in the San Luis Drain (SLD) of Central California. This greenhouse study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of growing salt- and boron-tolerant plant species in sediment for reduction of Se content by plant extraction. Drainage sediment was collected from the SLD and mixed with control soil (i.e., uncontaminated soil) to the following ratios (sediment:control soil) by volume: 0:3 (i.e., control soil only), 1:2 (i.e., 1/3 sediment and 2/3 control soil), 2:1 (i.e., 2/3 sediment and 1/3 control soil), and 3:0 (i.e., sediment only). Salt-tolerant plant species consisted of canola (Brassica napus var. Hyola 420), tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea var. Au Triumph), salado grass (Sporobulus airoides), and cordgrass (Spartina patens var. Flageo). Increased ratios of sediment:soil resulted in decreased dry matter production for all tested plant species; especially at ratios of sediment:soil greater than 1:2. Plant Se concentrations (mgkg(-1) DM) ranged as follows for plant species at all ratios of sediment:soil: canola (51-72), tall fescue (16-36), and cordgrass and salado grass (9-14). Total Se concentrations in the soil were at least 20% lower at postharvest compared to preplant concentrations for all plant species at each ratio of sediment:soil. In contrast, water-extractable Se concentrations in the soil were at least three times higher at postharvest than at preplant for all plant species, irrespective of the ratio of sediment:soil. Leaching of Se occurred in irrigated bare pots from each respective ratio of sediment:soil over a duration of 60 days. Based upon the downward movement of Se in bare pots of sediment:soil, it may be more prudent to leave the drainage sediment in the SLD, incorporate clean soil, and then grow low maintenance salt-tolerant plants (e.g., cordgrass, salado grass) in the concrete-lined canal. By this means, possible contamination of groundwater with soluble Se will be

  17. The Conversations About Cancer (CAC) project: assessing feasibility and audience impacts from viewing The Cancer Play.

    PubMed

    Beach, Wayne A; Buller, Mary K; Dozier, David M; Buller, David B; Gutzmer, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Basic communication research has identified a major social problem: communicating about cancer from diagnosis through death of a loved one. Over the past decade, an award-winning investigation into how family members talk through cancer on the telephone, based on a corpus of 61 phone calls over a period of 13 months, has been transformed into a theatrical production entitled The Cancer Play. All dialogue in the play is drawn from naturally occurring (transcribed) interactions between family members as they navigate their way through the trials, tribulations, hopes, and triumphs of a cancer journey. This dramatic performance explicitly acknowledges the power of the arts as an exceptional learning tool for extending empirical research, exploring ordinary family life, and exposing the often taken-for-granted conceptions of health and illness. In this study, a Phase I STTR project funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), we assess the feasibility of educating and impacting cancer patients, family members, and medical professionals who viewed the play as a live performance and through DVD screenings. Pre- and postperformance questionnaires were administered to solicit audience feedback. Pre-post change scores demonstrate overwhelming and positive impacts for changing opinions about the perceived importance, and attributed significance, of family communication in the midst of cancer. Paired-sample t-tests were conducted on five factor-analyzed indices/indicators-two indices of opinions about cancer and family communication, two indices measuring the importance of key communication activities, and the self-efficacy indicator-and all factors improved significantly (<.001). Informal talkback sessions were also held following the viewings, and selected audience members participated in focus groups. Talkback and focus-group sessions generated equally strong, support responses. Implications of the Phase I study are being applied in Phase II, a currently funded effort to

  18. Andromeda Optical & Infrared Disk Survey: Stellar Populations and Mass Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sick, Jonathan; Courteau, Stephane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Dalcanton, Julianne; de Jong, Roelof S.; McDonald, Michael; Tully, R. Brent

    2015-01-01

    M31 is ideal for understanding the structure and stellar populations of spiral galaxies thanks to its proximity and our external vantage point. The Andromeda Optical & Infrared Disk Survey (ANDROIDS) has used MegaCam and WIRCam on the Canada-France Hawaii Telescope to map the M31 bulge and disk out to R=40 kpc in ugriJKs bands. Through careful sky monitoring and modelling, ANDROIDS is uniquely able to observe both the resolved stars and integrated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) over M31's entire disk (complimenting HST's PHAT program). By simultaneously fitting stellar populations with isochrones and SED models for M31, we can assess the systematic uncertainties of SED fits to more distant unresolved systems, and constrain the stellar populations that contribute to each bandpass. We pay close attention to the near-IR light of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in stellar population models. ANDROIDS has also surveyed M31 in narrowband TiO and CN bands, enabling a clean classification of Carbon AGB stars, and a mapping the ratio of Carbon and M-type AGB stars (C/M) across the entire disk. The correlation between C/M and stellar metallicity is useful for constraining the NIR colors of more distant galaxies. We also present a hierarchical Bayesian model of pixel-by-pixel stellar populations, yielding the most detailed map of M31's stellar mass and star formation history to date. We find that a full six-band optical-NIR fit provides the best constraints to stellar mass, a triumph for modern NIR stellar population synthesis models, though the results are consistent with an optical-only fits. Fits based on the popular g-i color combination find M/L* ratios biased by 0.1 dex, while color-mass-to-light prescriptions in the literature may differ by 0.3 dex. This result affirms that panchromatic SED modelling is crucial even for stellar mass estimation, let alone age and metallicity. Overall, we estimate the stellar mass of M31, within R=30 kpc, to be 10.3 (+2.3, -1

  19. [Sleeping sickness: one hundred years of control strategy evolution].

    PubMed

    Louis, F J; Simarro, P P; Lucas, P

    2002-12-01

    Sleeping sickness has been known since the fifteenth century but the real progress in the knowledge of the disease occurred in the nineteenth century with the development of microscopy. From 1841 to 1901 the parasites and their vectors have been identified, the symptomatology and the epidemiology have been described. However, due to absence of any effective cure, the campaign against the disease was still based on the isolation of the patients and the transfer of exposed populations. The discovery of atoxyl in 1905 provided doctors with their first therapeutic weapon and, in 1910, the first action of vector control was undertaken with success in the Island of Principe. Between the two world conflicts, Jamot published the rules to fight against major outbreaks. Their application in Oubangui-Chari, in Cameroon and in French Occidental Africa brought tremendous results and signed the triumph of the mobile unit concept. Success which will not be denied until the sixties when the disease was believed to be eradicated. From the sixties to the nineties, the concept of the integration of prevention and care added to the exclusion of any vertical system will result in a progressive reniewed outbreak of the sleeping sickness in the known foci. As a paradox, it is a time rich in discovery as regards diagnosis, treatment and entomology. In 1994, the World Health Organisation got concerned with the situation of the disease in Central Africa where the outbreak of the disease reinforced. A second paradox appeared; it is the next to total disinterest from the politics and fund raisers which will save the disease. Today, sleeping sickness is the typical example of the orphan disease, a show case brandished by all the good souls. In 2001, an agreement between the WHO and the pharmaceutical industry brings back the financial funds required to fight the disease. Basically, it is a matter of resuming the action by using what is still existing and by creating new strategies considering

  20. ISS Regenerative Life Support: Challenges and Success in the Quest for Long-Term Habitability in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazley, Jesse A.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation will discuss the International Space Station s (ISS) Regenerative Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) operations with discussion of the on-orbit lessons learned, specifically regarding the challenges that have been faced as the system has expanded with a growing ISS crew. Over the 10 year history of the ISS, there have been numerous challenges, failures, and triumphs in the quest to keep the crew alive and comfortable. Successful operation of the ECLSS not only requires maintenance of the hardware, but also management of the station resources in case of hardware failure or missed re-supply. This involves effective communication between the primary International Partners (NASA and Roskosmos) and the secondary partners (JAXA and ESA) in order to keep a reserve of the contingency consumables and allow for re-supply of failed hardware. The ISS ECLSS utilizes consumables storage for contingency usage as well as longer-term regenerative systems, which allow for conservation of the expensive resources brought up by re-supply vehicles. This long-term hardware, and the interactions with software, was a challenge for Systems Engineers when they were designed and require multiple operational workarounds in order to function continuously. On a day-to-day basis, the ECLSS provides big challenges to the on console controllers. Main challenges involve the utilization of the resources that have been brought up by the visiting vehicles prior to undocking, balance of contributions between the International Partners for both systems and resources, and maintaining balance between the many interdependent systems, which includes providing the resources they need when they need it. The current biggest challenge for ECLSS is the Regenerative ECLSS system, which continuously recycles urine and condensate water into drinking water and oxygen. These systems were brought to full functionality on STS-126 (ULF-2) mission. Through system failures and recovery

  1. The Cold War legacy of regulatory risk analysis: The Atomic Energy Commission and radiation safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, Joseph B.

    From its inception in 1946 the Atomic Energy Commission pioneered the use of risk analysis as a mode of regulatory rationality and political rhetoric, yet historical treatments of risk analysis nearly always overlook the important role it played in the administration of atomic energy during the early Cold War. How this absence from history has been achieved and why it characterizes most historical accounts are the subjects of Chapter II. From there, this study goes on to develop the thesis that the advent of the atomic bomb was a world-shattering event that forced the Truman administration to choose between two novel alternatives: (1) movement towards global governance based initially on cooperative control of atomic energy or (2) unsparing pursuit of nuclear superiority. I refer to these as nuclear internationalism and nuclear nationalism, respectively. Each defined a social risk hierarchy. With the triumph of nuclear nationalism, nuclear annihilation was designated the greatest risk and a strong nuclear defense the primary means of prevention. The AEC's mission in the 1950s consisted of the rapid development of a nuclear arsenal, continual improvements in weapons technologies, and the promotion of nuclear power. The agency developed a risk-based regulatory framework through its dominant position within the National Committee on Radiation Protection. It embraced a technocratic model of risk analysis whose articulation and application it controlled, largely in secret. It used this to undergird a public rhetoric of reassurance and risk minimization. In practice, safety officials adjusted exposure levels within often wide parameters and with considerable fluidity in order to prevent safety concerns from interfering with operations. Secrecy, the political climate of the time, and a lack of accountability enabled the agency to meld technical assessments with social value judgments in a manner reflective of nuclear nationalism's risk hierarchy. In the late fifties

  2. Making tomorrow's mistakes today: Evolutionary prototyping for risk reduction and shorter development time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Gary; Schwuttke, Ursula M.; Burliegh, Scott; Chow, Sanguan; Parlier, Randy; Lee, Lorrine; Castro, Henry; Gersbach, Jim

    1993-03-01

    In the early days of JPL's solar system exploration, each spacecraft mission required its own dedicated data system with all software applications written in the mainframe's native assembly language. Although these early telemetry processing systems were a triumph of engineering in their day, since that time the computer industry has advanced to the point where it is now advantageous to replace these systems with more modern technology. The Space Flight Operations Center (SFOC) Prototype group was established in 1985 as a workstation and software laboratory. The charter of the lab was to determine if it was possible to construct a multimission telemetry processing system using commercial, off-the-shelf computers that communicated via networks. The staff of the lab mirrored that of a typical skunk works operation -- a small, multi-disciplinary team with a great deal of autonomy that could get complex tasks done quickly. In an effort to determine which approaches would be useful, the prototype group experimented with all types of operating systems, inter-process communication mechanisms, network protocols, packet size parameters. Out of that pioneering work came the confidence that a multi-mission telemetry processing system could be built using high-level languages running in a heterogeneous, networked workstation environment. Experience revealed that the operating systems on all nodes should be similar (i.e., all VMS or all PC-DOS or all UNIX), and that a unique Data Transport Subsystem tool needed to be built to address the incompatibilities of network standards, byte ordering, and socket buffering. The advantages of building a telemetry processing system based on emerging industry standards were numerous: by employing these standards, we would no longer be locked into a single vendor. When new technology came to market which offered ten times the performance at one eighth the cost, it would be possible to attach the new machine to the network, re-compile the

  3. Qualitative Analysis of Emotions: Fear and Thrill

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Ralf C.

    2016-01-01

    People can speak, and this provides opportunities to analyze human emotions using perceived experiences communicated via language, as well as through measurement and imaging techniques that are also applicable to other higher animal species. Here I compare four qualitative methodological approaches to test if, and how, thrill depends on fear. I use eight high-risk, high-skill, real-life outdoor adventure recreation activities to provide the test circumstances. I present data from: >4000 person-days of participant observation; interviews with 40 expert practitioners; retrospective autoethnography of 50 critical incidents over 4 decades; and experimental autoethnography of 60 events. Results from different methods are congruent, but different approaches yield different insights. The principal findings are as follows. Individuals differ in their fear and thrill responses. The same individual may have different responses on different occasions. Fear boosts performance, but panic causes paralysis. Anxiety or apprehension prior to a risky action or event differs from fear experienced during the event itself. The intensity of pre-event fear generally increases with the immediacy of risk to life, and time to contemplate that risk. Fear must be faced, assessed and overcome in order to act. Thrill can occur either during or after a high-risk event. Thrill can occur without fear, and fear without thrill. Below a lower threshold of perceived risk, thrill can occur without fear. Between a lower and upper threshold, thrill increases with fear. Beyond the upper threshold, thrill vanishes but fear remains. This there is a sawtooth relation between fear and thrill. Perceived danger generates intense focus and awareness. Fear and other emotions can disappear during intense concentration and focus. Under high risk, the usual emotional sequence is fear before the action or event, then focus during the action or event, then thrill, relief, or triumph afterward. The emotionless state

  4. When the Sky Falls: Performing Initial Assessments of Bright Atmospheric Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William J.; Brown, Peter; Blaauw, Rhiannon; Kingery, Aaron; Moser, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    The 2013 Chelyabinsk super bolide was the first "significant" impact event to occur in the age of social media and 24 hour news. Scientists, used to taking many days or weeks to analyze fireball events, were hard pressed to meet the immediate demands (within hours) for answers from the media, general public, and government officials. Fulfilling these requests forced many researchers to exploit information available from various Internet sources - videos were downloaded from sites like Youtube, geolocated via Google Street View, and quickly analyzed with improvised software; Twitter and Facebook were scoured for eyewitness accounts of the fireball and reports of meteorites. These data, combined with infrasound analyses, enabled a fairly accurate description of the Chelyabinsk event to be formed within a few hours; in particular, any relationship to 2012 DA14 (which passed near Earth later that same day) was eliminated. Results of these analyses were quickly disseminated to members of the NEO community for press conferences and media interviews. Despite a few minor glitches, the rapid initial assessment of Chelyabinsk was a triumph, permitting the timely conveyance of accurate information to the public and the incorporation of social media into fireball analyses. Beginning in 2008, the NASA Meteoroid Environments Office, working in cooperation with Western's Meteor Physics Group, developed processes and software that permit quick characterization - mass, trajectory, and orbital properties - of fireball events. These tools include automated monitoring of Twitter to establish the time of events (the first tweet is usually no more than a few seconds after the fireball), mining of Youtube and all sky camera web archives to locate videos suitable for analyses, use of Google Earth and Street View to geolocate the video locations, and software to determine the fireball trajectory and object orbital parameters, including generation of animations suitable for popular media

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of particle acceleration at astrophysical shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Roy K.

    1989-01-01

    A Monte Carlo code was developed for the simulation of particle acceleration at astrophysical shocks. The code is implemented in Turbo Pascal on a PC. It is modularized and structured in such a way that modification and maintenance are relatively painless. Monte Carlo simulations of particle acceleration at shocks follow the trajectories of individual particles as they scatter repeatedly across the shock front, gaining energy with each crossing. The particles are assumed to scatter from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence on both sides of the shock. A scattering law is used which is related to the assumed form of the turbulence, and the particle and shock parameters. High energy cosmic ray spectra derived from Monte Carlo simulations have observed power law behavior just as the spectra derived from analytic calculations based on a diffusion equation. This high energy behavior is not sensitive to the scattering law used. In contrast with Monte Carlo calculations diffusive calculations rely on the initial injection of supra-thermal particles into the shock environment. Monte Carlo simulations are the only known way to describe the extraction of particles directly from the thermal pool. This was the triumph of the Monte Carlo approach. The question of acceleration efficiency is an important one in the shock acceleration game. The efficiency of shock waves efficient to account for the observed flux of high energy galactic cosmic rays was examined. The efficiency of the acceleration process depends on the thermal particle pick-up and hence the low energy scattering in detail. One of the goals is the self-consistent derivation of the accelerated particle spectra and the MHD turbulence spectra. Presumably the upstream turbulence, which scatters the particles so they can be accelerated, is excited by the streaming accelerated particles and the needed downstream turbulence is convected from the upstream region. The present code is to be modified to include a better

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of particle acceleration at astrophysical shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Roy K.

    1989-09-01

    A Monte Carlo code was developed for the simulation of particle acceleration at astrophysical shocks. The code is implemented in Turbo Pascal on a PC. It is modularized and structured in such a way that modification and maintenance are relatively painless. Monte Carlo simulations of particle acceleration at shocks follow the trajectories of individual particles as they scatter repeatedly across the shock front, gaining energy with each crossing. The particles are assumed to scatter from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence on both sides of the shock. A scattering law is used which is related to the assumed form of the turbulence, and the particle and shock parameters. High energy cosmic ray spectra derived from Monte Carlo simulations have observed power law behavior just as the spectra derived from analytic calculations based on a diffusion equation. This high energy behavior is not sensitive to the scattering law used. In contrast with Monte Carlo calculations diffusive calculations rely on the initial injection of supra-thermal particles into the shock environment. Monte Carlo simulations are the only known way to describe the extraction of particles directly from the thermal pool. This was the triumph of the Monte Carlo approach. The question of acceleration efficiency is an important one in the shock acceleration game. The efficiency of shock waves efficient to account for the observed flux of high energy galactic cosmic rays was examined. The efficiency of the acceleration process depends on the thermal particle pick-up and hence the low energy scattering in detail. One of the goals is the self-consistent derivation of the accelerated particle spectra and the MHD turbulence spectra. Presumably the upstream turbulence, which scatters the particles so they can be accelerated, is excited by the streaming accelerated particles and the needed downstream turbulence is convected from the upstream region. The present code is to be modified to include a better

  7. Dreams, Hopes, Realities: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the First Forty Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Lane E.

    1999-01-01

    Throughout history, the great achievements of civilizations and cultures have been recorded in lists of dates and events. But to look only at the machinery, discoveries, or milestones is to miss the value of these achievements. Each goal achieved or discovery or made represents a supreme effort on the part of individual people who came and worked together for a purpose greater than themselves. Driven by an innate curiosity of the spirit, we have built civilizations and discovered new worlds, always reaching out beyond what we knew or thought was possible. These efforts may have used ships or machinery, but the achievement was that of the humans who made those machines possible- remarkable people willing to endure discomfort, frustration, fatigue, and the risk of failure in the hope of finding out something new. This is the case with the history of the Goddard Space Flight Center. This publication traces the legacy of successes, risks, disappointments and internationally recognized triumphs of the Center's first 40 years. It is a story of technological achievement and scientific discovery; of reaching back to the dawn of time and opening up a new set of eyes on our own planet Earth. In the end, it is not a story about machinery or discoveries, but a story about ourselves. If we were able to step off our planet, and if we continue to discover new mysteries and better technology, it is because the people who work at Goddard always had a passion for exploration and the dedication to make it happen. The text that follows is a testimony to the challenges people at the Goddard Space Flight Center have faced and overcome over almost half a century. Today, we stand on the threshold of a new and equally challenging era. It will once again test our ingenuity, skills, and flexibility as we find new ways of working with our colleagues in industry, government, and academia. Doing more with less is every bit as ambitious as designing the first science instrument to study the

  8. MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach Arranges a Ride to the Innermost Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, H. M.; Chapman, C. R.; Edmonds, J.; Goldstein, J.; Hallau, K. G.; Hirshon, B.; Vanhala, H.; Solomon, S. C.; Messenger Education; Public Outreach Team

    2010-12-01

    Exploration of the mysterious planet Mercury offers an unprecedented opportunity for teachers, students, and citizens to tag along for the ride, and the Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Team for MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) is making sure the public gets quite a show. Since 2004, when MESSENGER was launched, MESSENGER has been gathering intriguing data and information about the Solar System's innermost planet. That journey will continue at a quickened pace after March 18, 2011, when MESSENGER enters into orbit around Mercury for one year of observations of the planet and its environment. The EPO Team - an extensive network of individuals and institutions - has sought to convey the excitement and complexity of the mission as MESSENGER's team overcomes challenges, achieves triumphs, and shares the adventure of space exploration with the American and global public. The EPO Team has developed a broad and comprehensive set of educational and outreach activities, ranging from curricular materials, teacher training, and unique mission-related student investigations to museum displays and special outreach to underserved communities and minority students. One of the most visible aspects of this effort is the MESSENGER Educator Fellows program: master science educators who conduct teacher training workshops throughout the nation for pre-K-12 educators. Educator Fellows train teachers on the EPO Team's MESSENGER Education Modules, which are also relevant to other NASA missions reaching important milestones this year (see http://www.messenger-education.org/teachers/educ_modules.php). By the time MESSENGER goes into orbit, Educator Fellows will have trained an estimated 18,000 teachers, who in turn, facilitate classroom experiences to over 1.8 million students. The EPO Team comprises individuals from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE); Center for

  9. Turning dread into capital: South Africa’s AIDS diplomacy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In much of the world, President George W. Bush was not admired for his foreign policy and diplomacy. It is therefore ironic that Bush’s single most uncontested foreign policy triumph was an instance of what has now become known as “health diplomacy”. In 2003 Bush launched the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, a five-year $15 billion initiative to fight HIV/AIDS, mostly in Africa. The president’s pragmatic health diplomacy may well save his foreign policy legacy. This article argues that a middle power such as South Africa should consider a similar instrumental AIDS diplomatic strategy, to rehabilitate its public health as well as foreign policy images. Discussion This article reflects on the emergence and contemporary practice of health diplomacy. In particular, it explores the potential of niche areas within health diplomacy to become constructive focal points of emerging middle powers’ foreign policies. Middle powers often apply niche diplomacy to maximise their foreign policy impact, particularly by pursuing a multilateral agenda. The literature on middle powers indicates that such foreign policy ambitions and concomitant diplomacy mostly act to affirm the global status quo. Instead, this paper argues that there may well be niches within health diplomacy in particular that can be used to actually challenge the existing global order. Emerging middle powers in particular can use niche areas within health diplomacy in a critical theoretical manner, so that foreign policy and diplomacy become a project of emancipation and transformation, rather than an affirmation of the world as it is. Summary The article first describes the emergence and contemporary practice of health diplomacy; this is followed by a discussion of niche diplomacy, in particular as it applies to the foreign policy agendas of emerging middle powers. It then reviews South African foreign policy and diplomacy, before situating these policies within the context of

  10. Abraham Pais Prize for History of Physics Talk: Henry Cavendish, John Michell, Weighing the Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormmach, Russell

    2010-03-01

    This talk is about an interaction between two 18th-century natural philosophers (physical scientists), Henry Cavendish and John Michell, and its most important outcome, the experiment of weighing the world (their name for it) using a torsion balance (our name for it). Michell was the most inventive of the 18th century English natural philosophers, and Cavendish was the first of his countrymen to possess abilities at all comparable with Newton's. By their interests and skills, they were drawn to one another. Both were universal natural philosophers, equally adept at building scientific instruments, performing experiments, constructing theory, and using mathematics; both had a penchant for exacting, quantitative work. Both also had fitful habits of publication, which did not begin to reveal the range of their work, to the mystification of later scientists and historians. Late in life, Cavendish and Michell turned their attention to the force that Newton had examined most completely, a singular triumph of his natural philosophy, the force of universal gravitation. Over the course of the 18th century, abundant evidence of attraction had been gathered from the motions of the earth, moon, planets, and comets, phenomena which span the intermediate range of masses, sizes, and distances. But in three domains of experience, involving the extreme upper and lower limits of masses and dimensions, the universality of gravitation remained an article of faith. These were the gravity of the ``fixed'' stars, the mutual attraction of terrestrial bodies, and the gravitation of light and other special substances. Michell took on himself the task of deducing observable consequences from each of these prospective instances of universal gravitation. Cavendish encouraged Michell, and he followed up the resulting observational and experimental questions. The experiment of weighing the world was the last experiment Mitchell planned and the last experiment Cavendish published. The capstone of

  11. Optimal energy window selection of a CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Su-Jin; Yu, A. Ram; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has desirable characteristics such as superior energy resolution, but data acquisition for SPECT imaging has been widely performed with a conventional energy window. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal energy window settings for technetium-99 m (99mTc) and thallium-201 (201Tl), the most commonly used isotopes in SPECT imaging, using CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy. We experimentally investigated quantitative measurements with respect to primary count rate, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and scatter fraction (SF) within various energy window settings using Triumph X-SPECT. The two ways of energy window settings were considered: an on-peak window and an off-peak window. In the on-peak window setting, energy centers were set on the photopeaks. In the off-peak window setting, the ratios of energy differences between the photopeak from the lower- and higher-threshold varied from 4:6 to 3:7. In addition, the energy-window width for 99mTc varied from 5% to 20%, and that for 201Tl varied from 10% to 30%. The results of this study enabled us to determine the optimal energy windows for each isotope in terms of primary count rate, CNR, and SF. We selected the optimal energy window that increases the primary count rate and CNR while decreasing SF. For 99mTc SPECT imaging, the energy window of 138-145 keV with a 5% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was determined to be the optimal energy window. For 201Tl SPECT imaging, the energy window of 64-85 keV with a 30% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was selected as the optimal energy window. Our results demonstrated that the proper energy window should be carefully chosen based on quantitative measurements in order to take advantage of desirable characteristics of CZT-based small-animal SPECT. These results provided valuable reference information for the establishment of new protocol for CZT

  12. Evaluation of quantitative accuracy in CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT for various isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.-J.; Yu, A. R.; Kim, Y.-s.; Kang, W.-S.; Jin, S. S.; Kim, J.-S.; Son, T. J.; Kim, H.-J.

    2015-05-01

    In vivo pre-clinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a valuable tool for functional small animal imaging, but several physical factors, such as scatter radiation, limit the quantitative accuracy of conventional scintillation crystal-based SPECT. Semiconductor detectors such as CZT overcome these deficiencies through superior energy resolution. To our knowledge, little scientific information exists regarding the accuracy of quantitative analysis in CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT systems for different isotopes. The aim of this study was to assess the quantitative accuracy of CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT for four isotopes: 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In. The quantitative accuracy of the CZT-based Triumph X-SPECT (Gamma-Medica Ideas, Northridge, CA, U.S.A.) was compared with that of a conventional SPECT using GATE simulation. Quantitative errors due to the attenuation and scatter effects were evaluated for all four isotopes with energy windows of 5%, 10%, and 20%. A spherical source containing the isotope was placed at the center of the air-or-water-filled mouse-sized cylinder phantom. The CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT was more accurate than the conventional SPECT. For example, in the conventional SPECT with an energy window of 10%, scatter effects degraded quantitative accuracy by up to 11.52%, 5.10%, 2.88%, and 1.84% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In, respectively. However, with the CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT, the degradations were only 9.67%, 5.45%, 2.36%, and 1.24% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In, respectively. As the energy window was increased, the quantitative errors increased in both SPECT systems. Additionally, the isotopes with lower energy of photon emissions had greater quantitative error. Our results demonstrated that the CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT had lower overall quantitative errors due to reduced scatter and high detection efficiency. Furthermore, the results of this systematic assessment quantifying the accuracy of these SPECT

  13. Time-Domain MW Spectroscopy: Fundamental Physics from Molecular Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2011-06-01

    In the past, it was a great triumph of Dirac's theory to predict the fine structure in the energy levels of the simplest atom. Nevertheless, even the relativistic Dirac theory did not completely describe the spectrum of the electron in an H-atom. However, at that time, attempts to obtain accurate information through a study of the Balmer lines have been frustrated by the large Doppler width in comparison to the small shifts. Obtaining more accurate information was the key to provide a delicate test of the relativistic wave equation as well as finding confirmation for line shifts due to coupling of the atom with the radiation field and any non-Coulombic interaction. Then, the advances in microwave (MW) techniques resulted in new physical tools, making it possible to observe the small energy difference of terms that were degenerate in Dirac's theory. This, as well as the small deviation of the electron's gyromagnetic ratio g_e from the value 2, provided an excellent test for the validity of quantum electrodynamics (QED). At present, the electron electric dipole moment (e-EDM) is a particularly good place to find, as proposed by Purcell and Ramsey, a new source for P and T violation that may, in fact, be linked to the matter-antimatter asymmetry of our Universe and - in a wider sense - be responsible for our existence. Since the Standart Modell's (SM) prediction is negligible, any observed d_e ≠ 0 is direct evidence for "New Physics" beyond the SM. Many supersymmetric theories in extension to the SM, indeed, predict an e-EDM within two orders of magnitude from the current limit |d_e| < 1.6 × 10-27 e \\cdot cm. However, this limit was published already in 2002, nine years ago. Since then, no progress was made. As at the time when Dirac's equation was put to test, attempts to obtain accurate information through a spectroscopic study are mostly frustrated by the large Doppler width in comparison to the small shifts. Again, obtaining more accurate information will

  14. New Generation Energy Efficient Refractory Application in Soaking Pits of Bhilai Steel Plant, Sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Indranil; Chintaiah, Perumetla; Bhattacharya, Ajoy Kr.; Garai, Swapan Kr.; Ray Choudhury, Pankaj Kr.; Tiwari, Laksman

    In Bhilai Steel Plant (BSP), soaking pits are used for heating ingots for successive rolling into blooms. Pits are operated at a temperature of around 1350°C. Mixed gas (Mixture of Blast Furnace gas & Coke Oven gas) of calorific value around 2040 kcal/Nm3 is used as fuel. The walls of soaking pits were lined with traditional 38% Al2O3 firebricks and top 500mm was cast with 70% Al2O3 low cement castable (LCC). This type of lining results in frequent damages due to hitting by ingots while being lifted from pit by overhead cranes thus affecting the availability of pit. Life of pits was 2 to 2.5 years in BSP with 3-4 cold repairs and 3-4 hot repairs. Energy loss through the wall is also quite high in this type of lining. To triumph over the limitations of the conventional lining, a lining design was developed for the walls which consist of special 70% Al2O3 LCC having high hot strength (HMOR) in combination with specially design flexible SS-304 anchors. Ceramic fiber blanket and insulation bricks were provided between castable and the metallic shell of the pit to minimize the heat loss. A heating schedule was developed and introduced based on available infrastructure at BSP for proper curing of modified LCC based lining. After introduction of modified lining, pit no. 14/2 is running for more than 2.5 years without any repair. To capitalize the success, two more pits i.e. 12/1 and 9/2 were converted to modified lining. These pits are also running satisfactorily for more than 1.5 years. The modification has resulted in higher availability with substantial increase in production. Shell temperature of the modified pits reduced to 90° - 140°C from 120° - 200°C of conventional pits. This shows reduction in heat loss through walls, resulting less fuel consumption and energy saving of about 18%.

  15. Beyond Descartes and Newton: Recovering life and humanity.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, Stuart A; Gare, Arran

    2015-12-01

    Attempts to 'naturalize' phenomenology challenge both traditional phenomenology and traditional approaches to cognitive science. They challenge Edmund Husserl's rejection of naturalism and his attempt to establish phenomenology as a foundational transcendental discipline, and they challenge efforts to explain cognition through mainstream science. While appearing to be a retreat from the bold claims made for phenomenology, it is really its triumph. Naturalized phenomenology is spearheading a successful challenge to the heritage of Cartesian dualism. This converges with the reaction against Cartesian thought within science itself. Descartes divided the universe between res cogitans, thinking substances, and res extensa, the mechanical world. The latter won with Newton and we have, in most of objective science since, literally lost our mind, hence our humanity. Despite Darwin, biologists remain children of Newton, and dream of a grand theory that is epistemologically complete and would allow lawful entailment of the evolution of the biosphere. This dream is no longer tenable. We now have to recognize that science and scientists are within and part of the world we are striving to comprehend, as proponents of endophysics have argued, and that physics, biology and mathematics have to be reconceived accordingly. Interpreting quantum mechanics from this perspective is shown to both illuminate conscious experience and reveal new paths for its further development. In biology we must now justify the use of the word "function". As we shall see, we cannot prestate the ever new biological functions that arise and constitute the very phase space of evolution. Hence, we cannot mathematize the detailed becoming of the biosphere, nor write differential equations for functional variables we do not know ahead of time, nor integrate those equations, so no laws "entail" evolution. The dream of a grand theory fails. In place of entailing laws, a post-entailing law explanatory framework

  16. Guidelines for Building Science Education

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, Cheryn E.; Rashkin, Samuel; Huelman, Pat

    2015-03-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) residential research and demonstration program, Building America, has triumphed through 20 years of innovation. Partnering with researchers, builders, remodelers, and manufacturers to develop innovative processes like advanced framing and ventilation standards, Building America has proven an energy efficient design can be more cost effective, healthy, and durable than a standard house. As Building America partners continue to achieve their stretch goals, they have found that the barrier to true market transformation for high performance homes is the limited knowledge-base of the professionals working in the building industry. With dozens of professionals taking part in the design and execution of building and selling homes, each person should have basic building science knowledge relevant to their role, and an understanding of how various home components interface with each other. Instead, our industry typically experiences a fragmented approach to home building and design. After obtaining important input from stakeholders at the Building Science Education Kick-Off Meeting, DOE created a building science education strategy addressing education issues preventing the widespread adoption of high performance homes. This strategy targets the next generation and provides valuable guidance for the current workforce. The initiative includes: • Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Engages universities and provides students who will be the next generation of architects, engineers, construction managers and entrepreneurs with the necessary skills and experience they need to begin careers in clean energy and generate creative solutions to real world problems. • Building Science to Sales Translator: Simplifies building science into compelling sales language and tools to sell high performance homes to their customers. • Building Science Education Guidance: Brings together industry and academia to solve problems related to

  17. Bonner Prize Talk -- First Laboratory Observation of Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Although we are awash in neutrinos, we remain ignorant of some of their fundamental properties. We don't know their masses. We don't know whether ``anti-neutrinos'' are really distinct particles. Double beta (ββ) decay offers a handle on these questions if we can observe the energy spectrum of the two emitted electrons, and determine whether or not they share their energy with two neutrinos. Seeing neutrinoless (0ν) decay would solve some enduring puzzles. The power of the process to elucidate the neutrino was recognized in the 1930's, but ββ decay would be exceedingly rare and difficult to detect. Unsuccessful laboratory searches had been going on for 25 years when the UC Irvine group began its first experiment with a cloud chamber in 1972. After some background for the non-expert, and a snapshot of the theoretical and experimental milieu at the time, the talk will begin with the reasons for choosing a cloud chamber, and the taming of its balky and idiosyncratic behavior. The talk will end with the first definitive observation of two-neutrino (2ν)ββ decay of ^82Se in the vastly superior time projection chamber (TPC) in 1987. Discouragement through the tortuous 15-year interval was relieved by occasional victories. Some I will illustrate with revealing cloud-chamber photographs. We learned many things from this primitive device, and after seven years we isolated an apparent ββ decay signal. But the efficiency of the trigger was small, and difficult to pin down. Estimating 2.2%, we were way low. The resulting ``short'' ^82Se half-life of 1 x 10^19 years was suspect. New technology came to the rescue with the invention of the TPC. Experience with the cloud chamber guided our design of a TPC specifically for ββ decay. The TPC was built from scratch. Its long, steep learning curve was also punctuated with little triumphs. A memorable moment was the first turn-on of a portion of the chamber. So long ago, this all seems rather quaint, but through ample use of

  18. NUISANCE BLEEDING WITH PROLONGED DUAL ANTIPLATELET THERAPY AFTER ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION AND ITS IMPACT ON HEALTH STATUS

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Amit P.; Bachuwar, Alok; Reid, Kimberly J.; Chhatriwalla, Adnan K.; Salisbury, Adam C.; Yeh, Robert W.; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Wang, Tracy Y.; Alexander, Karen P.; Gosch, Kensey; Cohen, David J.; Spertus, John A.; Bach, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence of nuisance bleeding after AMI and its impact on QOL. Background Prolonged dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is recommended after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) to reduce ischemic events, but it is associated with increased rates of major and minor bleeding. The incidence of even lesser degrees of post-discharge “nuisance” bleeding with DAPT and its impact on quality of life (QOL) are unknown. Methods Data from the 24-center TRIUMPH (Translational Research Investigating Underlying Disparities in Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients’ Health Status) study of 3,560 patients, who were interviewed at 1, 6, and 12 months after AMI, were used to investigate the incidence of nuisance bleeding (defined as Bleeding Academic Research Consortium type 1). Baseline characteristics associated with “nuisance” bleeding and its association with QOL, as measured by the EuroQol 5 Dimension visual analog scale, and subsequent re-hospitalization were examined. Results Nuisance (Bleeding Academic Research Consortium type 1) bleeding occurred in 1,335 patients (37.5%) over the 12 months after AMI. After adjusting for baseline bleeding and mortality risk, ongoing DAPT was the strongest predictor of nuisance bleeding (rate ratio [RR]: 1.44, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17 to 1.76 at 1 month; RR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.35 to 2.65 at 6 months; and RR: 1.39, 95% CI: 1.08 to 1.79 at 12 months; p < 0.01 for all comparisons). Nuisance bleeding at 1 month was independently associated with a decrement in QOL at 1 month (−2.81 points on EuroQol 5 Dimension visual analog scale; 95% CI: 1.09 to 5.64) and non-significantly toward higher re-hospitalization (hazard ratio: 1.20; 95% CI: 0.95 to 1.52). Conclusions Nuisance bleeding is common in the year after AMI, associated with ongoing use of DAPT, and independently associated with worse QOL. Improved selection of patients for prolonged DAPT may help minimize the incidence and

  19. Discovery of Prehistoric Skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurshtein, A. A.

    1995-12-01

    It was Charles Francois Dupui, of France, who two centuries ago in his twelve-volume "Origine de tous les cults" (1795) worked out a proposition that all the different religious customs, stories, and dogmas will be found upon examination to have a cradle as one or another aspect of the natural, mainly, astronomical phenomena. It is absolutely correct but he and his spirited followers failed to develop a basic scientific quantitative argument focused on astronomy - chronological distribution of events. It is the first time that a combination of the up-to-date knowledge in archaic symbology and the professional astronomical data for precession and other regular astronomical events constitutes conditions for an absolutely new approach. An astronomical reconstruction of the evolution of the Zodiacal constellations was made, based on the Indo-european and Sumero-Akkadian religio-cultural data, including artifacts such as cult statuettes, cuneiform tablets, cylinder seals and boundary stones. It was argued that the development of 12 houses of the Zodiac in 3 groups of 4 over some six millennia was dictated by the changes made by precession in the positions of the vernal and autumnal equinoxes and the summer and winter solstices. The first quartet of the Zodiacal constellations (Gemini, Virgo, Sagittarius, Pisces) was recognized by the first agriculturists from the Fertile Crescent to learn the four most important Sun positions and to predict the ongoing seasons; it was done as far back as 5,600 B.C. (with a formal error of this determination about +/- 150 years). The second one (Taurus, Leo, Scorpio, Aquarius) was introduced in 2,700 +/- 250 years B.C. by Egyptians with their own animal symbolism that was the etymological root for the term the Zodiac (a circle of animals). This event was followed with the acquaintance of the new calendar and erection of the great pyramids as an eternal sanctuary for their mental triumph. In the first half of 14 century B.C. the Egyptian

  20. The Beginnings of Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Chandra

    2002-04-01

    With the present surge of interest in astrobiology and its emergence as a new scientific discipline in its own right, the role of a celebrated pioneer is all too often forgotten. There can be little doubt that the late Sir Fred Hoyle played a key part in relating astronomical phenomena to questions of life. One of his first contributions in this area was his introduction of the so-called anthropic principle to astronomy. By the late 1940's astronomers had worked out how the simplest chemical element Hydrogen could be converted into Helium in stars, thus providing the main energy source by which stars shine. The building of nuclei beyond Helium by stellar nuclear processes appeared difficult at the time because of instabilities in nuclei with atomic masses 5 and 8. Hoyle had the grand vision of making most if not all of the elements in the Periodic Table in stars. In the early 1950's Hoyle argued that by the very fact of our existence, the existence of life, the element Carbon had to be synthesised in quantity in stars. This could not happen, Hoyle concluded, unless the nucleus of Carbon possessed an energy level corresponding to a hitherto unknown excited state which he was able to calculate. This was necessary so that three Helium nuclei could combine first to form a Carbon nucleus in the excited state that subsequently decayed into the ground state. One of the major triumphs of Hoyle's Anthropic Principle was that his predicted excited state was subsequently discovered in the laboratory by Ward Whaling and Willy Fowler at Caltech. This discovery opened the door to a brand new discipline of Nuclear Astrophysics. In a seminal paper published in 1957, Hoyle together with Willy Fowler, Geoffrey and Margaret Burbidge showed that all the chemical elements needed for life C, N, O, P, Mg, Fe, S ... were made in stars. In a sense Hoyle's work in 1957 already provided the foundation stone for astrobiology. He showed that in essence we were made of stardust.

  1. PREFACE: Nucleosynthesis and the role of neutrinos: state of the art and open issues Nucleosynthesis and the role of neutrinos: state of the art and open issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, Cristina; Baha Balantekin, A.

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the origin of the elements around us is one of the main quests of modern science. Realizing that only a few of the lightest elements can have been produced in the early Universe because of the lack of stable nuclei with A = 5 and A = 8, and that stars need to be producing some of the heavier nuclei up to iron so they may shine were triumphs of nuclear physics in the first part of the 20th century. For the synthesis of heavier elements the situation is more complicated. In particular, the site of r-process nucleosynthesis is still an open question. Suggested sites for r-process nucleosynthesis include the high-temperature, high-entropy region outside the newly formed neutron star in a core-collapse supernova, 4He mantles of the metal-poor (i.e. early) supernova progenitors, neutron-star mergers and accretion discs around black holes. The nucleosynthetic outcomes in such sites depend on their neutron- or proton-richness, which is determined by the astrophysical conditions as well as the properties of exotic nuclei, far from the valley of stability. A key development during the last few decades has been the appreciation of the close relationship between neutrinos and nucleosynthesis as physicists and astronomers ascertained the fact that neutrino properties figure prominently in many astrophysical environments. Neutrinos are involved in different types of stellar nucleosynthesis processes: the v-process, the v p process and the r-process. These developments have occurred in parallel with the impressive progress in our understanding of neutrino masses and mixings as well as neutrino flavour conversion in astrophysical (and cosmological) environments. Neutrino interactions with protons and neutrons impact the conditions for proton or neutron richness of a given site. Further investigations are necessary in order to fully unravel neutrino flavour conversion phenomena in these environments and to establish how much these finally impact the nucleosynthesis

  2. Halley's Legacy: The Selfless Genius Who Founded Geophysics, Led the Science Community to Solve the Problem of Finding Longitude at Sea, and Whose Work in Areas from Geomagnetism to Planetology Still Has Meaning For Today's Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakefield, J.

    2005-12-01

    2005 marks the 300th anniversary of Edmond Halley's publication of his infamous synopsis predicting the accurate return of the comet that would come to bear his name. On this occasion, it is time to remember him not only as the founder of geophysics but for his contributions to the world of science beyond his comet work. Halley's comet-transformed by the first triumph of the Newtonian revolution from a dire supernatural omen to a predictable element of the universe's clockwork-remains a recurring symbol of the scientific age of the Enlightenment. His comet is hurtling through space at some 20,000 miles per hour and won't be back until 2061. But it can remind us of past epochs and everlastingly of Halley's contributions to geophysics and the world of science writ large. For a start, Halley completed a series of little known sea voyages in his effort to solve one of his life-long quests: the problem of determining longitude at sea. On the basis of his earlier theories on magnetism, his approach entailed mapping the magnetic deviation across the test-bed of the Atlantic Ocean. In this paper, his findings from the voyages, which technically comprised the first science mission funded by a government and stand as the forerunner of all big science projects, will be reconsidered and put into the context of today's notions about terrestrial magnetism, including the geodynamo. To this day, scientists remain perplexed about exactly how core's dynamo regenerates its energy. When Halley was sailing his vessel, the Paramore, across the North Atlantic and making the first charts of geomagnetism, little did he ever imagine magnetism would underpin today's stunning advances in information technology and electromagnetic engineering. Magnetism also offers ways to study phase transitions, random disorder, and physics in low dimensions, which looks at particle interactions at ever higher energies in order to essentially study matter at smaller and smaller size scales. The presentation

  3. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  4. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  5. Catching the Light - The Entwined History of Light and Mind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajonc, Arthur

    1995-04-01

    In 1910, the surgeons Moreau and LePrince wrote about their successful operation on an eight-year-old boy who had been blind since birth because of cataracts. When the boy's eyes were healed they removed the bandages and, waving a hand in front of the child's physically perfect eyes, asked him what he saw. "I don't know," was his only reply. What he saw was only a varying brightness in front of him. However, when allowed to touch the hand as it began to move, he cried out in a voice of triumph, "It's moving!" He could feel it move, but he still needed laboriously to learn to see it move. Light and eyes were not enough to grant him sight. How, then, do we see? What's the difference between seeing and perception? What is light? From ancient times to the present, from philosophers to quantum physicists, nothing has so perplexed, so fascinated, so captivated the mind as the elusive definition of light. In Catching the Light , Arthur Zajonc takes us on an epic journey into history, tracing how humans have endeavored to understand the phenomenon of light. Blending mythology, religion, science, literature, and painting, Zajonc reveals in poetic detail the human struggle to identify the vital connection between the outer light of nature and the inner light of the human spirit. He explains the curiousness of the Greeks' blue and green "color blindness": Odysseus gazing longingly at the "wine-dark sea"; the use of chloros (green) as the color of honey in Homer's Odessey ; and Euripides' use of the color green to describe the hue of tears and blood. He demonstrates the complexity of perception through the work of Paul Cézanne--the artist standing on the bank of a river, painting the same scene over and over again, the motifs multiplying before his eyes. And Zajonc goes on to show how our quest for an understanding of light, as well as the conclusions we draw, reveals as much about the nature of our own psyche as it does about the nature of light itself. For the ancient

  6. The founding of CEBAF, 1979 to 1987

    SciTech Connect

    C. Westfall

    1995-02-01

    -nuclear physics had attracted a considerable following. The growing electro-nuclear physics community was eager to find a scheme to permit virtually continuous acceleration, which would greatly improve the capability of performing coincidence experiments. In the words of the UVa conference proceedings, this experimental capability promised to open entire new areas of nuclear physics. Convinced that he could be the one to design the necessary groundbreaking machine after hearing the ideas of Loew and Servranckx, McCarthy began gathering a small accelerator building team. Against all odds, McCarthy's pipe dream resulted in the construction of a major accelerator laboratory, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). The founding of CEBAF is a tale of luck, perseverance, the triumph of flexible amateurism over rigid professionalism, and ironically, the potential of amateurs when supported by a thoroughly professional international network with well-defined methods for organizing and building accelerators. The CEBAF tale also has a surprise ending, for at the last minute, McCarthy's pipe dream was radically transformed by Hermann Grunder, who would direct the construction of the project. The twists and turns of this tale reveal many lessons about what aids and what detracts from the success of a large, federally sponsored scientific project.

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, Joseph

    2008-11-01

    The field of cosmology has been transformed since the glorious decades of the 1920's and 1930's when theory and observation converged to develop the current model of the expanding universe. It was a triumph of the theory of general relativity and astronomy. The first revolution came when the nuclear physicists entered the fray. This marked the debut of the hot big bang, in which the light elements were synthesized in the first three minutes. It was soon realised that elements like carbon and iron were synthesized in exploding stars. However helium, as well as deuterium and lithium, remain as George Gamow envisaged, the detritus of the big bang. The climax arrived with one of the most remarkable discoveries of the twentieth century, the cosmic microwave background radiation, in 1964. The fossil glow turned out to have the spectrum of an ideal black body. One could not imagine a stronger confirmation of the hot and dense origin of the universe. This discovery set the scene for the next major advance. It was now the turn of the particle physicists, who realized that the energies attained near the beginning of the universe, and unachievable in any conceivable terrestrial accelerator, provided a unique testing ground for theories of grand unification of the fundamental forces. This led Alan Guth and Andrei Linde in 1980 to propose the theory of inflation, which solved outstanding puzzles of the big bang. One could now understand why the universe is so large and homogeneous, and the origin of the seed fluctuations that gave rise to large-scale structure. A key prediction was that the universe should have Euclidean geometry, now verified to a precision of a few percent. Modern cosmology is firmly embedded in particle physics. It merits a text written by a particle physicist who can however appreciate the contributions of astronomy that provide the foundation and infrastructure for the theory of the expanding universe. There are now several such texts available. The most

  8. Geochemistry of Venus: Progress, Prospects and New Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, A. H.

    2009-04-01

    Available geochemical data on Venus' surface materials are limited and of poor precision. Those data were obtained by the Venera and VEGA lander missions, which were engineering and scientific triumphs of their days. However, their chemical analyses of the Venus surface do not permit detailed geochemical interpretations, such as are routine for terrestrial analyses and MER APXS rover analyses from Mars. In particular, the Venera and VEGA analyses of major elements (by XRF) did not return abundances of Na, and their data on Mg and Al are little more than detections at the 2s level. Their analyses for K, U, and Th (by gamma rays) are imprecise, except for one (Venera 8) with extremely high K contents (~4% K2O) and one (Venera 9) with a non-chondritic U/Th abundance ratio. In addition, the Venera and VEGA landers sampled only materials from the Venus lowlands - they did not target sites in any of the highland areas: shield volcanoes, tesserae, nor the unique plateau construct of Ishtar Terra. The Virtis imaging spectrometer on Venus Express has provided new global data of likely geochemical importance - maps of surface emittance at near 1.2 µm - but it remains unclear just what causes its observed variations in emittance. The limitations of the available data on Venus' surface rock compositions and mineralogy highlight the huge opportunities in additional chemical and mineralogical analyses of Venus' surface. In geochemistry, currently available instruments could provide much more precise analyses for major and minor elements, even within the engineering constraints of the Venera / VEGA lander systems. Such precise analyses would be welcome for basalts of Venus' lowland plains, but would be especially desirable for the highland tesserae and for Ishtar Terra. The tesserae may well represent ancient crust that predates the most recent volcanic resurfacing event and so provide a geochemical look into Venus' distant past. Ishtar Terra may be composed (at least in part

  9. The effects of feeding sorghum dried distillers grains with solubles on finishing pig growth performance, carcass characteristics, and fat quality.

    PubMed

    Sotak, K M; Houser, T A; Goodband, R D; Tokach, M D; Dritz, S S; DeRouchey, J M; Goehring, B L; Skaar, G R; Nelssen, J L

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of feeding sorghum dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) in grain sorghum– or corn-based diets on pig growth performance, carcass characteristics, and carcass fat quality. A total of 288 finishing pigs (BW 58.8 ± 4.43 kg; Line TR 4 × 1050, PIC, Hendersonville, TN) were used in a 73-d study. Pigs were allotted to 1 of 6 dietary treatments with 6 pens of 8 pigs per treatment. Treatments included grain sorghum–based diets with 0%, 15%, 30%, or 45% sorghum DDGS (29.0% CP, 7.2% ether extract); a grain sorghum–based diet with 30% corn DDGS (25.7% CP, 8.7% ether extract); and a corn-based diet with 30% corn DDGS. The diets were formulated to 0.95%, 0.83%, and 0.71% standardized ileal digestible Lys in phases 1, 2, and 3, respectively, and were not balanced for energy. On d 73, a subsample of 72 pigs (1 barrow and 1 gilt/pen) was harvested at Kansas State University’s Meats Laboratory. Carcass traits were calculated, as well as 10th-rib LM color, marbling and firmness, and fat color score. Fat samples from the 10th rib were collected and analyzed for fatty acid profile, which was used to calculate iodine value (IV). The remaining pigs were transported to a commercial packing plant (Triumph Foods, St. Joseph, MO) for carcass measurement and jowl IV determinations. Overall, increasing the dietary sorghum DDGS reduced (linear, P < 0.01) ADG and increased (linear, P < 0.01) back fat IV. Pigs fed increasing sorghum DDGS had decreased 10th-rib fat a* (less red) and b* (less yellow; P < 0.01 and 0.06, respectively). No differences were observed in growth performance or back fat IV among pigs fed corn- or grain sorghum–based diets with 30% corn DDGS. Pigs fed the grain sorghum–based diet with 30% corn DDGS had fat color that was more yellow (b*; P < 0.03) than that of pigs fed the grain sorghum–based diet with 30% sorghum DDGS. Pigs fed the grain sorghum–based diet with 30% sorghum DDGS also had

  10. Natural products as starting points for future anti-malarial therapies: going back to our roots?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The discovery and development of new anti-malarials are at a crossroads. Fixed dose artemisinin combination therapy is now being used to treat a hundred million children each year, with a cost as low as 30 cents per child, with cure rates of over 95%. However, as with all anti-infective strategies, this triumph brings with it the seeds of its own downfall, the emergence of resistance. It takes ten years to develop a new medicine. New classes of medicines to combat malaria, as a result of infection by Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are urgently needed. Results Natural product scaffolds have been the basis of the majority of current anti-malarial medicines. Molecules such as quinine, lapachol and artemisinin were originally isolated from herbal medicinal products. After improvement with medicinal chemistry and formulation technologies, and combination with other active ingredients, they now make up the current armamentarium of medicines. In recent years advances in screening technologies have allowed testing of millions of compounds from pharmaceutical diversity for anti-malarial activity in cellular assays. These initiatives have resulted in thousands of new sub-micromolar active compounds – starting points for new drug discovery programmes. Against this backdrop, the paucity of potent natural products identified has been disappointing. Now is a good time to reflect on the current approach to screening herbal medicinal products and suggest revisions. Nearly sixty years ago, the Chinese doctor Chen Guofu, suggested natural products should be approached by dao-xing-ni-shi or ‘acting in the reversed order’, starting with observational clinical studies. Natural products based on herbal remedies are in use in the community, and have the potential unique advantage that clinical observational data exist, or can be generated. The first step should be the confirmation and definition of the clinical activity of herbal medicinal products already

  11. Cerberus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    wind has been brightening up the area. Just twenty years ago, the Viking orbiters reached Mars for the first long-term studies of Mars up close. The Cerberus feature was then almost 600 miles long, but has now been vanquished down to few small splotches about 60 miles long. Call that a triumph of lightness upon the surface, but don't think that the force bringing back the light is gentle and kind. The Martian wind can kick up a fierce global dust storm that lifts up the bright Martian dust into the air and then blankets the surface with the brighter material as it settles down again. The ancient, eroded terrain in this image is still rather dark and dust free, so you might say it's one area where a mythical Cerberus still guards its shrinking territory. The wind teases it, however, by kicking up small, whirling dust devils that leave long, dark, scratchy tracks upon the land. Fields of dunes wrinkle the surface in places as well, but they may be permanently cemented upon the surface now, no longer able to blow and drift as they did in their younger days.

  12. Higgs phenomenology and new physics beyond the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin

    The existence of the Higgs boson was predicted in the 1960's. The discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a remarkable triumph of the Standard Model (SM) and particle physics. However, there are still fundamental questions that cannot be answered by the SM. A variety of extensions to the SM have been proposed to explain these mysteries. In this thesis we explore the Higgs boson mass in several extensions to the SM. We first study the impact of vectorlike fermions on the SM Higgs mass bounds. The presence of these fermions significantly modifies the vacuum stability and perturbativity bounds on the mass of the SM Higgs boson. The new vacuum stability bound in this extended SM is estimated to be 117 GeV, to be compared with the SM prediction of about 129 GeV. The non-minimal gravitational coupling xi H †HR between the SM Higgs doublet H and the curvature scalar R opens up a very intriguing scenario for inflationary cosmology. In the presence of this coupling, the effective ultraviolet cutoff scale is given by Lambda ≈ mP/xi, where mP is the reduced Planck mass, and xi > 1 is a dimensionless coupling constant. In type I and type III seesaw extended SM, we investigate the implications of this non-minimal gravitational coupling for the SM Higgs boson mass bounds based on vacuum stability and perturbativity arguments. A lower bound on the Higgs boson mass close to 120 GeV is realized with type III seesaw and xi ˜ 10 - 103. Supersymmetry is by far the most compelling extension of the SM. We consider extensions of the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) in which the observed neutrino masses are generated through a TeV scale inverse seesaw mechanism. The new particles associated with this mechanism can have sizable couplings to the Higgs field which can yield a large contribution to the mass of the lightest CP-even Higgs boson. With this new contribution, a 126 GeV Higgs is possible along with order of 200 Ge

  13. Solar winds surfs waves in the Sun's atmosphere!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    opposite ends after threading it through an object, like a ring. If one person wiggles the string rapidly up and down, waves form in the string that move toward the person at the other end. The ring will "surf" these waves and move toward the other person as well. Try it! "Even with this major discovery, there are questions left to answer. The observations have made it abundantly clear that heavy particles like oxygen 'surf' on the waves, and there is also mounting evidence that waves are responsible for accelerating the hydrogen atoms, the most common constituent of the solar wind. Future observations are needed to establish this fact. Many other kinds of particles, such as helium (second most common) have never been observed in the accelerating part of the corona, and new observations are also needed to refine our understanding of how the waves interact with the solar wind as a whole," said Dr. Steven Cranmer of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, lead author of the research to be published in the Astrophysical Journal*. Nevertheless, SOHO has again been able to reveal another of the Sun's mysteries: "This is another triumph for SOHO, stealing a long-held secret from our Sun", said Dr Martin Huber, Head of ESA Space Science Department and co-investigator for UVCS. *Ref. Article by S.Cranmer, G.B. Field and J.L. Kohl on Astrophysical Journal ( June 20, Vol 518, p. 937-947) available on the web at: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/ApJ/journal/issues/ApJ/v518n2/39802/sc0.html

  14. Solar winds surfs waves in the Sun's atmosphere!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    opposite ends after threading it through an object, like a ring. If one person wiggles the string rapidly up and down, waves form in the string that move toward the person at the other end. The ring will "surf" these waves and move toward the other person as well. Try it! "Even with this major discovery, there are questions left to answer. The observations have made it abundantly clear that heavy particles like oxygen 'surf' on the waves, and there is also mounting evidence that waves are responsible for accelerating the hydrogen atoms, the most common constituent of the solar wind. Future observations are needed to establish this fact. Many other kinds of particles, such as helium (second most common) have never been observed in the accelerating part of the corona, and new observations are also needed to refine our understanding of how the waves interact with the solar wind as a whole," said Dr. Steven Cranmer of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, lead author of the research to be published in the Astrophysical Journal*. Nevertheless, SOHO has again been able to reveal another of the Sun's mysteries: "This is another triumph for SOHO, stealing a long-held secret from our Sun", said Dr Martin Huber, Head of ESA Space Science Department and co-investigator for UVCS. *Ref. Article by S.Cranmer, G.B. Field and J.L. Kohl on Astrophysical Journal ( June 20, Vol 518, p. 937-947) available on the web at: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/ApJ/journal/issues/ApJ/v518n2/39802/sc0.html

  15. Using the Space Glove to Teach Spatial Thinking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The challenge of extending students' skills in spatial thinking to astronomical scales was the central focus of our K-8 curriculum development. When the project's lead teacher requested a curriculum that cumulatively built on each prior year's learning in a spiral fashion, I knew exactly what the school was asking for. Second and third graders began by noticing the cyclical patters that the sun, moon, and stars make in the sky. Fourth graders explored the phases of the moon by taking turns modeling and sketching them in their classroom and then comparing them to the real sky. Sixth !graders used real telescopes to observe a moving model of our solar system and walked a scale model of the planets' orbits. The curriculum is designed to expand students' capacity to visualize space in a hierarchical fashion that asks them to imagine themselves from a broader number of spatial perspectives through hands-on activities. The "situational awareness" Peter's story describes is a hallmark of high-performance engineering and innovation. Keeping in mind the potential outcomes of multiple paths of pursuit from multiple perspectives while keeping track of their relative merits and performance requirements is a demanding spatial task. What made it possible for Peter to transform the failure of his first glove into triumph was the mental space in which that failure provided exactly the information needed for a new breakthrough. In at least two cases, Peter could immediately "see" the full implications of what his hands were telling him. He tells the story of how putting his hands in a Phase VI astronaut glove instantly transformed his understanding of the glove challenge. Six months into his development, the failure of circumferentially wrapped cords to produce a sufficiently flexible glove again forced him to abandon his assumptions. His situational awareness was so clear and compelling it became a gut-level response. Peter's finely developed spatial skills enabled him to almost

  16. The Road to Mach 10: A History of the X-43A Hypersonic Flight Test Program at NASA Dryden...Toward the Future. Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peebles, Curtis

    2007-01-01

    contractor personnel, providing them with experience in ground testing and component development; vehicle design, construction, integration, system checkout, and, ultimately, flight testing and data analysis. Additionally, researchers learned the practical details of running a project within finite budget and time limits, about the ambiguousness of risk assessment, and about the need to spend a significant amount of time and effort dealing with engineering problems, such as those with the FAS, that have nothing to do with the project's research goals. Finally, all those who worked on the X-43A project now know what it is like to spend years transforming an idea into a functional vehicle, only for it to be lost in a matter of seconds. And then to go through years of work to correct the problems, to face the possibility that still more might exist, and finally to savor the triumph of two successful flights. For those who will work on the hypersonic projects that emerge in coming years, these experiences may prove to be the most valuable of all.

  17. Obituary: Ralph Asher Alpher, 1921-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopman, Rebecca A.

    2007-12-01

    Ralph Asher Alpher, noted cosmologist, physicist, and educator, died on August 12, 2007, in Austin, Texas. Alpher developed the first model for primordial nucleosynthesis in the hot early Universe and, with Robert Herman, first predicted the cosmic microwave background radiation. During his long and productive career, he published over one-hundred papers, a book translation, chapters in a number of books (primarily in cosmology), and The Genesis of the Big Bang, a book about his life in cosmology, co-authored with Robert Herman. Ralph's work has been cited by the American Physical Society News as one of the Top Ten Astronomical Triumphs of the Millennium. Born in Washington, D.C., on February 3, 1921, Ralph was the youngest of four children of building contractor Samuel and Rose Maleson Alpher, immigrants from Russia and Latvia. He attended Roosevelt High School in Washington, graduating at the age of sixteen. A scholarship was offered by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, but then suddenly withdrawn after a meeting with an alumnus. (Ralph would wonder all his life whether the withdrawal was due to his Jewish background.) Instead, he attended evening classes at George Washington University while working full time, earning his B.S. in 1943, his M.S. in 1945, and his Ph.D. in 1948. Ralph's master's thesis on the sources of energy in stars was completed with mentor George Gamow. Gamow then accepted him to work on a Ph.D. dissertation on the formation of galaxies, studying the growth of condensations in a relativistic homogeneous and isotropic expanding medium. Ralph found that such condensations would not grow, but before he finished writing, E. M. Lifshitz independently published similar results in 1946. Ralph started anew, this time modeling the buildup of elements by neutron capture in the hot, early phase of the Universe. Despite the approximations necessary in the pre-computer age, he found consistency with observed abundances of hydrogen and helium. The

  18. Young Star May Be Belching Spheres of Gas, Astronomers Say

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    observational project," said Luis F. Rodriguez, of Mexico's National Autonomous University. The arc of water masers can be fit to a nearly-perfect circle to within one part in a thousand. That, the researchers say, means that the water vapor in the arc most likely is part of a complete sphere. "The arc we see fits a circle so well that it is unlikely that any geometry other than that of a sphere would produce it," Ho said. The sphere would be about 1.5 times the size of the Solar System. Because the arc, and presumably the sphere of which it is part, is so thin and so uniform, the researchers say that it came from a single, short-lived ejection. In addition, other evidence suggests that the sphere from an earlier ejection now is being overtaken by a newer spherical bubble that took only about 33 years after being ejected to reach its observed size. "We now have at least one case, we believe, in which a young star has repeatedly ejected mass spherically in short bursts," Guillem Anglada, of the Institute of Astrophysics of Andalucia (CSIC), in Granada, Spain, said. "In light of our current understanding of star formation, we don't yet understand how this can happen, so we have an exciting new scientific challenge. It is surprising that nature can maintain such perfect symmetry, especially since the environment around the young star must be so varied. This appears to be a triumph of order over chaos," he added. The researchers, in addition to Rodriguez, Ho and Anglada, are: Jose M. Torrelles, Institute for Space Studies of Catalonia (IEEC)-Spanish Research Council (CSIC), Spain; Nimesh A. Patel and Lincoln Greenhill, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; Jose F. Gomez, Laboratory for Space Astrophysics and Theoretical Physics of the National Institute for Aerospace Technology, Madrid, Spain; Salvador Curiel and Jorge Canto, of Mexico's National Autonomous University; and Guido Garay, Department of Astronomy of the University of Chile. The VLBA is part of the Natio

  19. Obituary: Andrew Stephen Wilson, 1947-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    fellow students to celebrate the end of their exams, Andrew met Finnish summer student, Kaija Kettunen, whom he married in 1975 in her home town of Lieksa, Finland. They had a son, Daniel, now living in South Riding, Virginia, and a daughter, Caroline, living in Oakland, California. In 1973, Andrew obtained his doctorate degree in physics at the Cavendish Laboratory, working under the direction of Martin Ryle, winner of the 1974 Nobel Prize in physics. Andrew's PhD was dedicated to a study of the Crab Nebula at the highest radio frequencies at which the Cambridge One-mile Telescope could operate. This work, which included both intensity and polarization data, was a triumph of perseverance and skill in the reduction of an extremely complex data set. This experience stood him in excellent stead for his future career. After his PhD, Andrew went on to be a postdoctoral research fellow at Sterrewacht, Leiden, Netherlands, and then at the Astronomy Centre of the University of Sussex, England. By that time, Andrew wanted to leave England, because he thought that he would be able to secure a permanent position in astronomy faster in another country. He also loved traveling and getting to know other cultures, and he learned foreign languages easily. In 1978, Andrew and his wife had two choices: One was to accept a position at the European Southern Observatory in Garching and the other was to come to the University of Maryland. Together they decided to come to the United States rather than go to Germany because of the language and culture. Andrew remained at the University of Maryland for his entire career. He was a scientist of extraordinary productivity and impact over his lifetime: He wrote more than three-hundred scientific publications and accumulated more than 11,000 citations to this large body of work. In the 1970s and 1980s, he pioneered the use of radio telescopes for the study of active galactic nuclei, writing in collaboration with his students a number of seminal

  20. ASA's Chandra Neon Discovery Solves Solar Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-07-01

    heated to millions of degrees, neon shines brightly in X-rays. Stars like the sun are covered in this super-heated gas that is betrayed by the white corona around them during solar eclipses. However, observations of the sun's corona are very difficult to analyze. Labeled Illustration of Convection in Sun-like Star Labeled Illustration of Convection in Sun-like Star To probe the neon content, Drake and his colleague Paola Testa of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass., observed 21 sun-like stars within a distance of 400 light years from Earth. These local stars and the sun should contain about the same amount of neon when compared to oxygen. However, these close stellar kin were found to contain on average almost three times more neon than is believed for the sun. "Either the sun is a freak in its stellar neighborhood, or it contains a lot more neon than we think," Testa said. These Chandra results reassured astronomers the detailed physical theory behind the solar model is secure. Scientists use the model of the sun as a basis for understanding the structure and evolution of other stars, as well as many other areas of astrophysics. "If the higher neon abundance measured by Drake and Testa is right, then it is a simultaneous triumph for Chandra and for the theory of how stars shine," said John Bahcall of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, N.J. Bahcall is an expert in the field who was not involved in the Chandra study. Drake is lead author of the study published in this week's issue of the journal Nature. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the agency's Science Mission Directorate. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass. Additional information and images are available at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://chandra.nasa.gov