Sample records for radar digital topography

  1. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom G. Farr; Paul A. Rosen; Edward Caro; Robert Crippen; Riley Duren; Scott Hensley; Michael Kobrick; Mimi Paller; Ernesto Rodriguez; Ladislav Roth; David Seal; Scott Shaffer; Joanne Shimada; Jeffrey Umland; Marian Werner; Michael Oskin; Douglas Burbank; Douglas Alsdorf

    2007-01-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission produced the most complete, highest-resolution digital elevation model of the Earth. The project was a joint endeavor of NASA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and the German and Italian Space Agencies and flew in February 2000. It used dual radar antennas to acquire interferometric radar data, processed to digital topographic data at 1 arc sec resolution.

  2. Global digital topography mapping with a synthetic aperture scanning radar altimeter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Elachi; K. E. Im; F. Li; E. Rodriguez

    1990-01-01

    Global digital topography data of the land surface is of importance in a variety of geoscientific and application disciplines. Such a database, with a spatial resolution of 150 to 500 m and height accuracy of 5 m or better can be acquired from an orbiting platform using a synthetic aperture scanning radar altimeter. Near-global coverage can be achieved within 14

  3. Global digital topography mapping with a synthetic aperture scanning radar altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Im, K. E.; Rodriguez, E.

    1990-01-01

    Global digital topography data of the land surface is of importance in a variety of geoscientific and application disciplines. Such a database, with a spatial resolution of 150 to 500 m and height accuracy of 5 m or better can be acquired from an orbiting platform using a synthetic aperture scanning radar altimeter. Near-global coverage can be achieved within 14 days from an orbiting platform in a polar or near-polar orbit.

  4. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, Tom G.; Rosen, Paul A.; Caro, Edward; Crippen, Robert; Duren, Riley; Hensley, Scott; Kobrick, Michael; Paller, Mimi; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Roth, Ladislav; Seal, David; Shaffer, Scott; Shimada, Joanne; Umland, Jeffrey; Werner, Marian; Oskin, Michael; Burbank, Douglas; Alsdorf, Douglas

    2007-06-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission produced the most complete, highest-resolution digital elevation model of the Earth. The project was a joint endeavor of NASA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and the German and Italian Space Agencies and flew in February 2000. It used dual radar antennas to acquire interferometric radar data, processed to digital topographic data at 1 arc sec resolution. Details of the development, flight operations, data processing, and products are provided for users of this revolutionary data set.

  5. Accuracy assessment of interferometric digital elevation models derived from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission X- and C-band data in a test area with rolling topography and moderate forest cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocak, G.; Buyuksalih, Gurcan; Oruc, M.

    2005-03-01

    In February 2000, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) mapped large areas of the global landmass using two radar systems operating simultaneously in X and C band. The radar mapping instrument consisted of modified versions of the SIR-C C-band and X-band radars flown on the shuttle in 1994. Modifications included a 60-m retractable boom, with C-band and X-band receive-only antennas attached to the boom's end. High-accuracy metrology systems were added to measure position and attitude of the shuttle and the positions of the boom antennas. The dual apertures at each band form radar interferometers suitable for making high-accuracy topographic maps of the Earth. The C-band data set is being processed by JPL for the archives of the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The X-band data set is processed and distributed at DLR, Germany. This paper deals with the accuracy assessments of the interferometric DEMs derived from the X- and C-band synthetic aperture radar systems over a testfield with rolling topography and moderate forest cover using the reference DEM digitized from the topographic maps of 1:25,000 scale. Obtained results for the two interferometric DEMs are similar and lie in the range of 10-11 m. The accuracy of SRTM X- and C-band DEMs was also checked against ground control points measured by differential GPS, and the rms height errors were found to be about 9 m, which confirms the results based on the reference DEM.

  6. Accuracy and resolution of shuttle radar topography mission data Bridget Smith and David Sandwell

    E-print Network

    Sandwell, David T.

    ascending and descending C-band swaths from the Shuttle interferometer were processed into a digitalAccuracy and resolution of shuttle radar topography mission data Bridget Smith and David Sandwell provided by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) through spectral comparisons with the National

  7. Vegetation height estimation from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and National Elevation Datasets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Josef Kellndorfer; Wayne Walker; Leland Pierce; Craig Dobson; Jo Ann Fites; Carolyn Hunsaker; John Vona; Michael Clutter

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility of obtaining estimates of vegetation canopy height from digital elevation data collected during the 2000 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The SRTM sensor mapped 80% of the Earth's land mass with a C-band Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) instrument, producing the most complete digital surface map of Earth. Due to the relatively

  8. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission: A Global DEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.; Kobrick, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Digital topographic data are critical for a variety of civilian, commercial, and military applications. Scientists use Digital Elevation Models (DEM) to map drainage patterns and ecosystems, and to monitor land surface changes over time. The mountain-building effects of tectonics and the climatic effects of erosion can also be modeled with DEW The data's military applications include mission planning and rehearsal, modeling and simulation. Commercial applications include determining locations for cellular phone towers, enhanced ground proximity warning systems for aircraft, and improved maps for backpackers. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) (Fig. 1), is a cooperative project between NASA and the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense. The mission is designed to use a single-pass radar interferometer to produce a digital elevation model of the Earth's land surface between about 60 degrees north and south latitude. The DEM will have 30 m pixel spacing and about 15 m vertical errors.

  9. Ocean topography experiment (TOPEX) radar altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, L. C.; Hancock, D. W.; Hayne, G. S.

    1988-01-01

    A spaceflight qualified Radar Altimeter capable of achieving the TOPEX Mission measurement precision requirement of 2-centimeters, is provided and its performance (Engineering Assessment) will be evaluated after launch and continuously during its 3-year mission operational period. Information will be provided to JPL about the calibration of the TOPEX Radar Altimeter. The specifications for the required data processing algorithms which will be necessary to convert the Radar Altimeter mission telemetry data into the geophysical data will also be provided. The stringent 2 cm precision requirement for ocean topography determination from space necessitated examining existing Radar Altimeter designs for their applicability towards TOPEX. As a result, a system configuration evolved using some flight proven designs in conjunction with needed improvements which include: (1) a second frequency or channel to remove the range delay or apparent height bias caused by the electron content of the ionosphere; (2) higher transmit pulse repetition frequencies for correlation benefits at higher sea states to maintain precision; and (3) a faster microprocessor to accommodate two channels of altimetry data. Additionally, examination of past altimeter programs associated data processing algorithms was accomplished to establish the TOPEX-class Radar Altimeter data processing algorithms, and the necessary direction was outlined to begin to generate these for the TOPEX Mission.

  10. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission is uncrated in the Multi- Payload Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) sits uncovered inside the Multi-Payload Processing Facility. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for September 1999. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth.

  11. Digital Array Radar panel development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Chappell; Caleb Fulton

    2010-01-01

    The Army Digital Array Radar (DAR) project's goal is to demonstrate how wide-bandgap semiconductor technology, highly-integrated transceivers, and the ever-increasing capabilities of commercial digital components can be leveraged to provide new capabilities and enhanced performance in future low-cost phased array systems. A 16-element, S-band subarray has been developed with panel-integrated, plastic-packaged gallium-nitride (GaN) amplifiers, multi-channel transceiver ICs, and digitization at

  12. Digital holography system for topography measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amezquita, R.; Rincon, O. J.; Torres, Y. M.; Amezquita, S.

    2011-08-01

    The optical characteristics of Diffractive Optical Elements are determined by the properties of the photosensitive film on which they are produced. When working with photoresist plates, the most important property is the change in the plate's topography for different exposures. In this case, the required characterization involves a topographic measurement that can be made using digital holography. This work presents a digital holography system in which a hologram's phase map is obtained from a single recorded image. The phase map is calculated by applying a phase-shifting algorithm to a set of images that are created using a digital phase-shifting/tilteliminating procedure. Also, the curvatures, introduced by the imaging elements used in the experimental setup, are digitally compensated for using a polynomial fitting-method. The object's topography is then obtained from this modified phase map. To demonstrate the proposed procedure, the topography of patches exposed on a Shipley 1818 photoresist plate by microlithography equipment-which is currently under construction-is shown.

  13. On the detection of underwater bottom topography by imaging radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpers, W.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model which explains basic properties of radar imaging of underwater bottom topography in tidal channels is presented. The surface roughness modulation is described by weak hydrodynamic interaction theory in the relaxation time approximation. In contrast to previous theories on short wave modulation by long ocean waves, a different approximation is used to describe short wave modulation by tidal flow over underwater bottom topography. The modulation depth is proportional to the relaxation time of the Bragg waves. The large modulation of radar reflectivity observed in SEASAT-SAR imagery of sand banks in the Southern Bight of the North Sea are explained by assuming that the relaxation time of 34 cm Bragg waves is of the order of 30-40 seconds.

  14. New Products From the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dean Gesch; Tom Farr; James Slater; Jan-Peter Muller; Sally Cook

    2006-01-01

    New data products with broad applicability to the Earth sciences are now available from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). SRTM, a joint project of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) and NASA, flew aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on an 11 day mission in February 2000 with the goal of collecting a near-global data set of high-resolution elevation data [Farr

  15. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission is uncrated in the Multi- Payload Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Inside the Multi-Payload Processing Facility, the lid covering the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is lifted from the crate. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for September 1999. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth.

  16. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission is uncrated in the Multi- Payload Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) sits inside the Multi-Payload Processing Facility after the SRTM's cover was removed. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for September 1999. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth.

  17. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission is uncrated in the Multi- Payload Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Inside the Multi-Payload Processing Facility, the lid covering the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is lifted. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for September 1999. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth.

  18. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission is uncrated in the Multi- Payload Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Inside the Multi-Payload Processing Facility, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is revealed after the lid of its container was removed. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for September 1999. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth.

  19. Satellite remote sensing of landscape freeze/thaw state dynamics for complex Topography and Fire Disturbance Areas Using multi-sensor radar and SRTM digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podest, Erika; McDonald, Kyle; Kimball, John; Randerson, James

    2003-01-01

    We characterize differences in radar-derived freeze/thaw state, examining transitions over complex terrain and landscape disturbance regimes. In areas of complex terrain, we explore freezekhaw dynamics related to elevation, slope aspect and varying landcover. In the burned regions, we explore the timing of seasonal freeze/thaw transition as related to the recovering landscape, relative to that of a nearby control site. We apply in situ biophysical measurements, including flux tower measurements to validate and interpret the remotely sensed parameters. A multi-scale analysis is performed relating high-resolution SAR backscatter and moderate resolution scatterometer measurements to assess trade-offs in spatial and temporal resolution in the remotely sensed fields.

  20. New Orleans Topography, Radar Image with Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the animation

    About the animation: This simulated view of the potential effects of storm surge flooding on Lake Pontchartrain and the New Orleans area was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Although it is protected by levees and sea walls against storm surges of 18 to 20 feet, much of the city is below sea level, and flooding due to storm surges caused by major hurricanes is a concern. The animation shows regions that, if unprotected, would be inundated with water. The animation depicts flooding in one-meter increments.

    About the image: The city of New Orleans, situated on the southern shore of Lake Pontchartrain, is shown in this radar image from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). In this image bright areas show regions of high radar reflectivity, such as from urban areas, and elevations have been coded in color using height data also from the SRTM mission. Dark green colors indicate low elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.

    New Orleans is near the center of this scene, between the lake and the Mississippi River. The line spanning the lake is the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, the world's longest overwater highway bridge. Major portions of the city of New Orleans are actually below sea level, and although it is protected by levees and sea walls that are designed to protect against storm surges of 18 to 20 feet, flooding during storm surges associated with major hurricanes is a significant concern.

    Data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C.

    Location: 30.2 degrees North latitude, 90.1 degrees East longitude Orientation: North toward the top, Mercator projection Size: 80.3 by 68.0 kilometers (49.9 by 42.3 miles) Image Data: Radar image and colored Shuttle Radar Topography Mission elevation model Date Acquired: February 2000

  1. Estimating Titan Surface Topography from Cassini Synthetic Aperture RADAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiles, B. W.; Hensley, S.; Gim, Y.; Kirk, R. L.; Zebker, H. A.; Janssen, M. A.; Johnson, W. T.; West, R. D.

    2007-12-01

    One of the more vexing dilemmas for RADAR remote sensing is the necessity to choose between altimetry and SAR imaging of a surface. Coincident surface height estimates are very useful in aiding the analysis of the unique surface features observed in the SAR imagery of Titan. Radar altimetry is optimally obtained from nadir observations, whereas SAR requires off-nadir observation in order to construct an image. Co-located nadir altimetry and SAR only occur when observations taken at different times happen to overlap. Stereo techniques can also be used to estimate topography in SAR images, but they also require multiple overlapping observations. Here we discuss a technique, SARTopo, for obtaining 10 km horizontal resolution and 75 m vertical resolution surface height estimates along each SAR swath. The height estimates comprise 1-3 cuts in each SAR pass that are 10 km wide by thousands of km long and extend along the entire long dimension of the SAR image strips. Because we obtain co-located topography along each SAR pass rather than only in regions with overlapping observations, the new technique extends the area over which we have colocated topography and SAR imagery by a couple orders of magnitude. The method is based upon Amplitude Monopulse Comparison, a technique for resolving RADAR targets developed prior to the advent of SAR. The technique requires: 1) accurate spacecraft pointing, 2) accurate spacecraft ephemeris, 3) precise knowledge of the antenna pattern of the RADAR, and 4) downlinked echo data covering the entire antenna footprint. The fourth requirement is met through synergy with Cassini SAR coverage requirements. Cassini SAR commanding and pointing is designed to utilize as much of the antenna footprint as possible in order to maximize cross-track coverage. We describe the technique and present the results for several SAR passes. We validate the technique through comparison with known features such as mountain ranges and dry lakes, and by comparison with colocated nadir altimetry and SAR stereo. In particular, we examine a strip of nadir altimetry obtained along a 1000 km strip observed by SAR a month earlier. The SARTopo height track is within 5-10 km of the nadir altimetry track for a 200 km long section. In this area, the two independent techniques agree closely. Furthermore the region contains prominent high spatial resolution topography, so it provides an excellent test of the resolution and accuracy of both techniques. SARTopo heights are also co-located and agree well with SAR stereo observations. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. New Products From the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesch, Dean; Farr, Tom; Slater, James; Muller, Jan-Peter; Cook, Sally

    2006-05-01

    New data products with broad applicability to the Earth sciences are now available from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). SRTM, a joint project of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) and NASA, flew aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on an 11 day mission in February 2000 with the goal of collecting a near-global data set of high-resolution elevation data [Farr and Kobrick, 2000]. Data from the mission have been available to researchers for several years, but newly available products offer enhanced usability and applicability. Final products include elevation data resulting from a substantial editing effort by the NGA in which water bodies and coastlines were well defined and data artifacts known as spikes and wells (single pixel errors) were removed. This second version of the SRTM data set, also referred to as `finished' data, represents a significant improvement over earlier versions that had nonflat water bodies, poorly defined coastlines, and numerous noise artifacts. The edited data are available at a one-arc-second resolution (approximately 30 meters) for the United States and its territories, and at a three-arc-second resolution (approximately 90 meters) for non-U.S. areas.

  3. STS-99 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Stability and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamelin, Jennifer L.; Jackson, Mark C.; Kirchwey, Christopher B.; Pileggi, Roberto A.

    2001-01-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) flew aboard Space Shuttle Endeavor February 2000 and used interferometry to map 80% of the Earth's landmass. SRTM employed a 200-foot deployable mast structure to extend a second antenna away from the main antenna located in the Shuttle payload bay. Mapping requirements demanded precision pointing and orbital trajectories from the Shuttle on-orbit Flight Control System (PCS). Mast structural dynamics interaction with the FCS impacted stability and performance of the autopilot for attitude maneuvers and pointing during mapping operations. A damper system added to ensure that mast tip motion remained with in the limits of the outboard antenna tracking system while mapping also helped to mitigate structural dynamic interaction with the FCS autopilot. Late changes made to the payload damper system, which actually failed on-orbit, required a redesign and verification of the FCS autopilot filtering schemes necessary to ensure rotational control stability. In-flight measurements using three sensors were used to validate models and gauge the accuracy and robustness of the pre-mission notch filter design.

  4. From AESA radar to digital radar for surface-based applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Odile Adrian; Surface Radar

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes how Thales surface radar product policy is evolving from active electronically steered antenna (AESA) radar to digital radar in order to improve its capabilities when operating in challenging electromagnetic environments. It shows how digital receiver technology (with an analogue-to-digital converter behind every receive antenna element) tailored for the digital beam forming array application is a key enabling

  5. Topography adjacent to Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Topography adjacent to Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5, showing conditions before construction, May 28, 1943, this drawing shows the Bonita Ridge access road retaining wall and general conditions at Bonita Ridge before the construction of Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5 - Fort Barry, Signal Corps Radar 296, Station 5, Transmitter Building Foundation, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  6. Digital Frequency Synthesizer For Radar Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadr, Ramin; Satorius, Edgar; Robinett, J. Loris, Jr.; Olson, Erlend

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses conceptual digital frequency synthesizer part of programmable local oscillator in radar-astronomy system. Phase must remain continuous during adjustments of frequency, phase noise must be low, and spectral purity must be high. Discusses theory of operation in some mathematical detail and presents new analysis of spectral purity of output.

  7. Toward comprehensive Titan digital topography construction: A technical demonstration with stereogrammetry and photo/radarclinometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Wan, W.; Lee, S.; Choi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Topographic reconstruction is a high priority task for the solid planet and satellite exploration missions. Laser/radar altimetry and stereo analyses have been widely used for this purpose and achieve high quality 3D topographic data over various planetary surfaces such as Venus, Mercury, Moon and Mars. However, in contrast with inner planet and satellite, the base data sets to compose digital topography over outer planets and satellites are very limited. Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn has also too limited data inventory to achieve sufficient spatial resolution in topographic data, in spite of increasing interests about the detailed topography owing to the recent interesting discoveries on methane fluvial system, aeolian geomorphologies and possible tectonic activity. Therefore the endeavours to increase the coverage of digital topography employing radargrammetry (Kirk et al. 2009), radar altimetry (Elachi, et al. 2005) and SARtopo (Stiles et al. 2009) have been actively conducted. Although these efforts result in the construction of a global topographic map, the consequent spatial resolutions of global topography are still poor (Lorentz et al. 2013). In this study, we tried to improve the coverage and the quality of Titan digital terrain model employing approaches as follows; 1) A semi-automated stereo matching scheme manipulating low signal-to-noise SAR image pair incorporating adaptive filtering and base topography, 2) the geodetic control improvement of stereo SAR pair based on altimetric measurements, 3) introduction of radarclinometry to refine the topography from stereo analyses. Especially together with the technical improvements to exploit SAR stereo pair, the possibility to mine height information from Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) was actively explored by the means of hybrid stereogrammetry between VIMS and SAR image pairs and photoclinometry. The developed scheme was applied for a few testing areas especially over Xanadu which is the largest topographic feature over Titan and well covered by SAR and VIMS. The constructed topography revealed many interesting geomorphic features such as drainage networks and rugged terrains in detail. To fully demonstrate the potential of these approaches, technical details will be continuously improved.

  8. Digital Earth Workbench: 3D Topography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Steve Maher

    1999-11-12

    The Digital Earth Workbench is an interactive application that runs on a SGI Onyx Infinite Reality system and is controlled by an Immersive Workbench, tracked stereo glasses, and a tracked wand. The application allows an unprecedented freedom to roam georeferenced datasets at multiple resolutions and timescales. This animation is one of a series of direct creen captures of the application in operation. The occasional menu appearance denotes direct intervention by the operator to add or delete data or to activate a new control option.

  9. A scanning radar altimeter for mapping continental topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    Topographic information constitutes a fundamental data set for the Earth sciences. In the geological and geophysical sciences, topography combined with gravitational information provides an important constraint on the structure and rheologic properties of the crust and lithosphere. Detailed topography data can also be used to map offsets associated with faulting and to reveal the effects of tectonic deformation. In the polar regions, elevation data form a crucial but as yet largely unavailable resource for studying ice sheet mass balance and ice flow dynamics. The vast Antarctic ice sheet is the largest fresh water reservoir on Earth and is an important influence on ocean circulation and global climate. However, our knowledge of its stability is so limited that we cannot even specify whether the Antarctic ice sheet is growing or shrinking. It is clear that there is need for high quality global topography data. A summary of potential applications with their resolution requirements is shown.

  10. Gigabit Networking: Digitized Radar Data Transfer and Beyond

    E-print Network

    Jayasumana, Anura P.

    ) and Digital Sky projects [12]. VMS is a 3-D simulator that allows users to see, move and even feel molecularGigabit Networking: Digitized Radar Data Transfer and Beyond Sangeetha L. Bangolae, Anura P facilities that were inaccessible in the past due to limited bandwidths. VCHILL project for digitized radar

  11. Mare Crisium area topography - A comparison of earth-based radar and Apollo mapping camera results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. H. Zisk

    1978-01-01

    An earth-based radar topography (ERT) map has been constructed of the Mare Crisium area. Systematic and random sources of error are discussed. A comparison between the ERT map and Lunar Topographic Orthophotomaps shows a random mean discrepancy of less than 100 m between the two maps, except for small-scale (20 km or less in diameter) features, where systematic smoothing reduces

  12. Vegetation height derivation from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission data in southeast Georgia, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Kellndorfer; W. S. Walker; M. C. Dobson; M. Vona; M. Clutter

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the extent to which data from the 2000 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) can be used to estimate vegetation canopy height in conjunction with an existing bald Earth DEM as provided by the National Elevation Dataset (NED). Intensively managed slash pine stands with canopy heights ranging from 11 to 21 m were biometrically surveyed

  13. Cassini RADAR observations of Ligeia Mare : Radiometric Properties and Stereo Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, R.; Stofan, E.; Lunine, J.; Hayes, A.; Stiles, B.; Mitchell, K.; Le Gall, A.; Zebker, H.; Wye, L.; Encrenaz, P.; Aharonson, O.; Lucas, A.; Janssen, M.; Notarnicola, C.; Casarano, D.; Ventura, B.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2012-10-01

    Ligeia Mare is the best-mapped of Titan’s three seas, and has attracted particular interest as the target of the proposed TiME (Titan Mare Explorer) mission. Here we summarize radar observations of this 400km wide feature and its environs from Cassini flybys T25, T28, T29 and T65. As noted in studies of Ontario Lacus (Hayes ref), radar reflectivity can be used with assumptions to assess liquid depth in shallow areas. Most of Ligeia is well below the noise floor of our observations (which varies across the scene - we use the most sensitive central beam where available to pose the tightest sigma-0 constraint) indicating depths likely > 10m, although we delineate some possibly shallow margins to aid in future modeling of tidal currents. In addition, the brightness temperature measured by passive radiometry (Janssen et al., 2009) places a joint constraint on the surface temperature and the emissivity, suggesting an upper limit of 10% on suspended solid material. Combination of SAR imaging from the flybys permits construction of a stereo Digital Elevation Model. This stereo topography is compared with SARtopo measurements and shows a number of 1km high mountains in the surrounding terrain: the peaks of these mountains would be above the horizon as seen from much of Ligeia. The model also places constraints on the watershed of Ligeia and thus on the hydrological balance of precipitation and evaporation. We will also report on further observations of Ligeia planned in the T86 flyby, shortly before the DPS meeting.

  14. Space Radar Image of Long Valley, California -Interferometry/Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    These four images of the Long Valley region of east-central California illustrate the steps required to produced three dimensional data and topographics maps from radar interferometry. All data displayed in these images were acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour during its two flights in April and October, 1994. The image in the upper left shows L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) SIR-C radar image data for an area 34 by 59 kilometers (21 by 37 miles). North is toward the upper right; the radar illumination is from the top of the image. The bright areas are hilly regions that contain exposed bedrock and pine forest. The darker gray areas are the relatively smooth, sparsely vegetated valley floors. The dark irregular patch near the lower left is Lake Crowley. The curving ridge that runs across the center of the image from top to bottom is the northeast rim of the Long Valley Caldera, a remnant crater from a massive volcanic eruption that occurred about 750,000 years ago. The image in the upper right is an interferogram of the same area, made by combining SIR-C L-band data from the April and October flights. The colors in this image represent the difference in the phase of the radar echoes obtained on the two flights. Variations in the phase difference are caused by elevation differences. Formation of continuous bands of phase differences, known as interferometric 'fringes', is only possible if the two observations were acquired from nearly the same position in space. For these April and October data takes, the shuttle tracks were less than 100 meters (328 feet) apart. The image in the lower left shows a topographic map derived from the interferometric data. The colors represent increments of elevation, as do the thin black contour lines, which are spaced at 50-meter (164-foot) elevation intervals. Heavy contour lines show 250-meter intervals (820-foot). Total relief in this area is about 1,320 meters (4,330 feet). Brightness variations come from the radar image, which has been geometrically corrected to remove radar distortions and rotated to have north toward the top. The image in the lower right is a three-dimensional perspective view of the northeast rim of the Long Valley caldera, looking toward the northwest. SIR-C C-band radar image data are draped over topographic data derived from the interferometry processing. No vertical exaggeration has been applied. Combining topographic and radar image data allows scientists to examine relationships between geologic structures and landforms, and other properties of the land cover, such as soil type, vegetation distribution and hydrologic characteristics. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.v.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  15. APQ-102 imaging radar digital image quality study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. R.; Estes, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    A modified APQ-102 sidelooking radar collected synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data which was digitized and recorded on wideband magnetic tape. These tapes were then ground processed into computer compatible tapes (CCT's). The CCT's may then be processed into high resolution radar images by software on the CYBER computer.

  16. Surface topography of the optic nerve head from digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sunanda; Ramirez, M.; Morales, Jose

    1992-06-01

    A novel algorithm for three-dimensional (3-D) surface representation of the optic nerve head from digitized stereo fundus images has been developed. The 3-D digital mapping of the optic nerve head is achieved by fusion of stereo depth map of a fundus image pair with a linearly stretched intensity image of the fundus. The depth map is obtained from the disparities of the features in the stereo fundus image pair, computed by a combination of cepstral analysis and a correlation-like scanning technique in the spatial domain. At present, the visualization of the optic nerve head cupping in glaucoma is clinically achieved, in most cases, by stereoscopic viewing of a fundus image pair of the suspected eye. The quantitative representation of the optic nerve head surface topography following this algorithm is not computationally intensive and should provide more useful and reproducible information than just qualitative stereoscopic viewing of the fundus.

  17. Compact Digital Receiver Development for Radar Based Remote Sensing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Yearyl; R. Kelleyl; J. Meierl; S. Ongl; R. Palmer

    2008-01-01

    This paper is the first of a series of publications that discusses the design and implementation of an inexpensive, nearly all-digital FPGA-based radar receiver which can be used in a variety of applications including single\\/dual-polarization weather radar, sidelobe cancellation, a subarray module for a digital beam-forming phased-array radar, and other applications where a compact, low-power, low-cost receiver is needed. The

  18. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Farr, Tom G., Paul A. Rosen, Edward Caro, Robert Crippen, Riley Duren, Scott Hensley, Michael

    E-print Network

    Waliser, Duane E.

    was a joint endeavor of NASA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and the German and Italian Space radar images acquired with a very small base to height ratio (typically 0.0002) to measure topography

  19. Mare Crisium area topography - A comparison of earth-based radar and Apollo mapping camera results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zisk, S.

    1978-01-01

    An earth-based radar topography (ERT) map has been constructed of the Mare Crisium area. Systematic and random sources of error are discussed. A comparison between the ERT map and Lunar Topographic Orthophotomaps shows a random mean discrepancy of less than 100 m between the two maps, except for small-scale (20 km or less in diameter) features, where systematic smoothing reduces the ERT elevation contrast

  20. DIGITAL VISION he advent of phased array radars and space-time adaptive processing has given radar

    E-print Network

    Nehorai, Arye

    © DIGITAL VISION T he advent of phased array radars and space-time adaptive processing has given radar designers the ability make radars adaptable on receive. The current state of radar technolo- gy of pairs of complementary sequences. Shortly thereafter, Welti proposed to use Golay sequences in radar

  1. Digital Doppler radial velocity data compared objectively with digital reflectivity radar data

    E-print Network

    Beaver, Thomas Foster

    1980-01-01

    DIGITAL DOPPLER RADIAL VELOCI1'( DATA COI'IVARED OBJECTIVELY MITII DIGITAL REFLECTIVITY RADAR DATA A Thes1s by THOFIAS FOSTER BEAVER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER GF SCIENCE May 1980 Major Subject: Meteorology DIGITAL DOPPLER RADIAL VELOCITY DATA COMPARED OBJECTIVELY WITH DIGITAL REFLECTIVITY RADAR DATA A Thesis by THOMAS FOSTER BEAVER Approved as to style and content by: Dr. Vance E. er...

  2. Effects of snow cover properties and path topography on front velocities measured by GEODAR radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Anselm; McElwaine, Jim; Sovilla, Betty; Steinkogler, Walter; Fischer, Jan-Thomas

    2015-04-01

    One main challenge in snow avalanche dynamics is to understand the complicated nature of the front dynamics of both cold (dry-dense, powder) and warm (moist, wet) avalanches under changing snow and topographic conditions. Even more complex, by entraining warmer snow at lower altitude, transitional avalanches are able to change the frontal dynamics from cold to warm along the path making the prediction of frontal velocity a challenging task. In order to gain an understanding on avalanche front dynamics, we analyze the front velocities of numerous avalanches measured with the GEODAR radar system installed at the Swiss Vallée de la Sionne full-scale test site. With a spatial resolution of 1 m down slope and a frame rate of 50 Hz, this radar enables the tracking of features at the avalanche front over time, thus allowing a precise definition of the front dynamics. Information on the snow cover is obtained from numerical simulation performed with the model SNOWPACK. Geo-referenced avalanche pictures together with lateral steered GEODAR reflections yield the location and path topography. We compare the front velocities of transitional avalanches with snow cover data and topography along the avalanche path. We show under which conditions changes from cold to warm flow may occur. This analysis is of fundamental importance to understand the effect of snow cover properties on the avalanches dynamics, but also to avoid erroneous interpretations in case the frontal dynamic data are used to calibrate models.

  3. 3-D representation of aquitard topography using ground-penetrating radar

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.A.; Sun, Jingsheng

    1995-12-31

    The topography of a clay aquitard is defined by 3D Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) data at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. Conventional processing augmented by multichannel domain filtering shows a strong reflection from a depth of 20-30 ft despite attenuation by an artificial clay cap approximately 2 ft thick. This reflection correlates very closely with the top of the aquitard as seen in lithology logs at 3 wells crossed by common offset radar profiles from the 3D dataset. Lateral and vertical resolution along the boundary are approximately 2 ft and 1 ft, respectively. The boundary shows abrupt topographic variation of 5 ft over horizontal distances of 20 ft or less and is probably due to vigorous erosion by streams during lowstands of ancient Lake Bonneville. This irregular topography may provide depressions for accumulation of hydrocarbons and chlorinated organic pollutants. A ridge running the length of the survey area may channel movement of ground water and of hydrocarbons trapped at the surface of the water table. Depth slices through a 3D volume, and picked points along the aquitard displayed in depth and relative elevation perspectives provide much more useful visualization than several 2D lines by themselves. The three-dimensional CPR image provides far more detailed definition of geologic boundaries than does projection of soil boring logs into two-dimensional profiles.

  4. Performance Analysis of Pulse Doppler Digital Radars with Application to the Shuttle Ku-Band System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. K. Alem; C. L. Weber

    1978-01-01

    The performance of a class of pulse Doppler radars with a digitally implemented signal processing unit is investigated. TheKuband rendezvous radar onboard the Shuttle Orbiter is a pulse Doppler radar which is in this class. The detection capability is first presented. A unified analysis of digital radar tracking loops is presented which employs logarithmic discriminants. The results are applied to

  5. 74. Transmitter building no. 102, view of radar digital test ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. Transmitter building no. 102, view of radar digital test and maintenance cabinet area control panel and date storage system showing ampex tape storage devices. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. Digital technique for generating synthetic aperture radar images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. J. van de Lindt

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes a digital processing method applicable to a synthetic aperture radar, to be carried by the space shuttle or by satellites. The method uses an earth-fixed coordinate system in which corrective procedures are invoked to compensate for errors introduced by the satellite motion, earth curvature, and wavefront curvature. Among the compensations discussed are those of the coordinate system,

  7. Radar shadow detection in synthetic aperture radar images using digital elevation model and projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasath, V. B. Surya; Haddad, Oussama

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images are currently widely used in target recognition tasks. In this work, we propose an automatic approach for radar shadow detection and extraction from SAR images utilizing geometric projections along with the digital elevation model (DEM), which corresponds to the given georeferenced SAR image. First, the DEM is rotated into the radar geometry, so that each row would match that of a radar line of sight. Next, we extract the shadow regions by processing row by row until the image is covered fully. We test the proposed shadow detection approach on different DEMs and simulated one-dimensional signals and two-dimensional hills and valleys modeled by various variance-based Gaussian functions. Experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm produces good results in detecting shadows in SAR images with high resolution.

  8. Three-Frequency Nonlinear Heterodyne Detection. 2: Digital Communications and Pulsed Radar

    E-print Network

    Teich, Malvin C.

    Three-Frequency Nonlinear Heterodyne Detection. 2: Digital Communications and Pulsed Radar Malvin Carl Teich and Rainfield Y. Yen Part 1 of this paper [Appl. Opt. 14,666 (1975)]dealt with the cw radar the technique for a number of specificpulsed radar and digital communications applications. Both the vacuum

  9. Satellites images, digitized topography, and the recognition of the Xela Caldera, Quezaltenango Valley, Guatemala

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Foley; A. McEwen; W. Duffield; G. Heiken

    1992-01-01

    The authors propose, based on reconnaissance geology studies and interpretation of landforms as depicted by Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images combined with digitized topography, that the Quezaltenango basin of Guatemala is part of a caldera. The Quezaltenango basin is an elliptical depression, about 12 by 25 km and about 500 m deep. The proposed Xela Caldera extends beyond the basin

  10. Invariant recovery of three-dimensional ice sheet surface topography from digital fusion of satellite range map and SAR/multispectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sunanda; Kher, Alok; Ramirez, Manuel

    1993-08-01

    Recent studies indicate the significance of quantitative representation of surface topography for monitoring changes in geological surfaces, in particular, the polar ice sheets. At present, digital data from different sensors such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR), laser and radar altimeters, and multispectral scanners (MSS) are used to analyze hydrologic and topographic information indicative of the geographic diversity. There are fundamental limitations, however, inherent in obtaining detailed and accurate constructions of irregular and sloping surfaces from a single sensor. Integration of information from multiple sensors provides a better representation of geologic surface variation. Thus an integrated approach to recovery of three-dimensional surface topography from range maps and intensity data is proposed. This integrated approach to a 3-D surface slope recovery involves cepstral registration, quadratic interpolation, and a new approach to combine range and intensity digital data by histogram modification and a linear stretch of intensity data prior to overlaying on the range map. The proposed algorithm retains the features in the intensity map without adding false depth to the reconstructed surface. The proposed work will apply the surface slope recovery methodology with minimized error to digital fusion of range maps and SAR/Multispectral satellite imagery.

  11. First Results of Digital Topography Applied to Macromolecular Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, J.; Soares, A. S.; Bellamy, H.; Sweet, R. M.; Snell, E. H.; Borgstahl, G.

    2004-01-01

    An inexpensive digital CCD camera was used to record X-ray topographs directly from large imperfect crystals of cubic insulin. The topographs recorded were not as detailed as those which can be measured with film or emulsion plates but do show great promise. Six reflections were recorded using a set of finely spaced stills encompassing the rocking curve of each reflection. A complete topographic reflection profile could be digitally imaged in minutes. Interesting and complex internal structure was observed by this technique.The CCD chip used in the camera has anti-blooming circuitry and produced good data quality even when pixels became overloaded.

  12. Digital meteorological radar data compared with digital infrared data from a geostationary meteorological satellite 

    E-print Network

    Henderson, Rodney Stuart

    1979-01-01

    , for providing the satellite data and advice regarding its use. Mr. Ray McAnelly, for his generation of the digital radar data used in this study, Mr. T. O. Haig, also of the Space Science and Engineering Center, for information on the McIDAS system. Mrs... (Continued) CHAPTER Page 4. Basic Characteristics of In'rared Satellite Data. 5. McIDAS Data 6. Data Reduction and Display 26 27 29 IV. COMPARISON OF DIGITAL RADAR AND SATELLITE DATA 38 1. The Ba sis for the Comparison 2. First Tilt...

  13. KARIN: The Ka-Band Radar Interferometer for the Proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel; Peral, Eva; McWatters, Dalia; Pollard, Brian; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Hughes, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Over the last two decades, several nadir profiling radar altimeters have provided our first global look at the ocean basin-scale circulation and the ocean mesoscale at wavelengths longer than 100 km. Due to sampling limitations, nadir altimetry is unable to resolve the small wavelength ocean mesoscale and sub-mesoscale that are responsible for the vertical mixing of ocean heat and gases and the dissipation of kinetic energy from large to small scales. The proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission would be a partnership between NASA, CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spaciales) and the Canadian Space Agency, and would have as one of its main goals the measurement of ocean topography with kilometer-scale spatial resolution and centimeter scale accuracy. In this paper, we provide an overview of all ocean error sources that would contribute to the SWOT mission.

  14. Performance analysis of pulse Doppler digital radars with application to the Shuttle Ku-band system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. K. Alem; C. L. Weber

    1978-01-01

    A pulse Doppler digital radar is one of the primary components of the Ku-band integrated radar and communication equipment on the Space Shuttle. The performance of the Ku-band rendezvous radar to be used on the Space Shuttle is analyzed in four parts. First an overall functional block diagram description is presented to illustrate the signal processing in the detection and

  15. Effects of digital elevation model map scale and data resolution on a topography-based watershed model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David M. Wolock; Curtis V. Price

    1994-01-01

    The effects of digital elevation model (DEM) map scale and data resolution on watershed model predictions of hydrologic characteristics were determined for TOPMODEL, a topography-based watershed model. The effects of topography on watershed hydrology are represented in TOPMODEL as the distribution of ln (a\\/tan B), where ln is the Napierian logarithm, a is the upslope area per unit contour length,

  16. Validation of Orthorectified Interferometric Radar Imagery and Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith Charles M.

    2004-01-01

    This work was performed under NASA's Verification and Validation (V&V) Program as an independent check of data supplied by EarthWatch, Incorporated, through the Earth Science Enterprise Scientific Data Purchase (SDP) Program. This document serves as the basis of reporting results associated with validation of orthorectified interferometric interferometric radar imagery and digital elevation models (DEM). This validation covers all datasets provided under the first campaign (Central America & Virginia Beach) plus three earlier missions (Indonesia, Red River: and Denver) for a total of 13 missions.

  17. Geostatistical Methods For Determination of Roughness, Topography, And Changes of Antarctic Ice Streams From SAR And Radar Altimeter Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzfeld, Ute C.

    2002-01-01

    The central objective of this project has been the development of geostatistical methods fro mapping elevation and ice surface characteristics from satellite radar altimeter (RA) and Syntheitc Aperture Radar (SAR) data. The main results are an Atlas of elevation maps of Antarctica, from GEOSAT RA data and an Atlas from ERS-1 RA data, including a total of about 200 maps with 3 km grid resolution. Maps and digital terrain models are applied to monitor and study changes in Antarctic ice streams and glaciers, including Lambert Glacier/Amery Ice Shelf, Mertz and Ninnis Glaciers, Jutulstraumen Glacier, Fimbul Ice Shelf, Slessor Glacier, Williamson Glacier and others.

  18. The effects of topography on magma chamber deformation models: Application to Mt. Etna and radar interferometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles A. Williams; Geoff Wadge

    1998-01-01

    We have used a three-dimensional elastic finite element model to examine the effects of topography on the surface deformation predicted by models of magma chamber deflation. We used the topography of Mt. Etna to control the geometry of our model, and compared the finite element results to those predicted by an analytical solution for a pressurized sphere in an elastic

  19. Elliptical storm cell modeling of digital radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    A model for spatial distributions of reflectivity in storm cells was fitted to digital radar data. The data were taken with a modified WSR-57 weather radar with 2.6-km resolution. The data consisted of modified B-scan records on magnetic tape of storm cells tracked at 0 deg elevation for several hours. The MIT L-band radar with 0.8-km resolution produced cross-section data on several cells at 1/2 deg elevation intervals. The model developed uses ellipses for contours of constant effective-reflectivity factor Z with constant orientation and eccentricity within a horizontal cell cross section at a given time and elevation. The centers of the ellipses are assumed to be uniformly spaced on a straight line, with areas linearly related to log Z. All cross sections are similar at different heights (except for cell tops, bottoms, and splitting cells), especially for the highest reflectivities; wind shear causes some translation and rotation between levels. Goodness-of-fit measures and parameters of interest for 204 ellipses are considered.

  20. Digital Radar-Signal Processors Implemented in FPGAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkun, Andrew; Andraka, Ray

    2004-01-01

    High-performance digital electronic circuits for onboard processing of return signals in an airborne precipitation- measuring radar system have been implemented in commercially available field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). Previously, it was standard practice to downlink the radar-return data to a ground station for postprocessing a costly practice that prevents the nearly-real-time use of the data for automated targeting. In principle, the onboard processing could be performed by a system of about 20 personal- computer-type microprocessors; relative to such a system, the present FPGA-based processor is much smaller and consumes much less power. Alternatively, the onboard processing could be performed by an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), but in comparison with an ASIC implementation, the present FPGA implementation offers the advantages of (1) greater flexibility for research applications like the present one and (2) lower cost in the small production volumes typical of research applications. The generation and processing of signals in the airborne precipitation measuring radar system in question involves the following especially notable steps: The system utilizes a total of four channels two carrier frequencies and two polarizations at each frequency. The system uses pulse compression: that is, the transmitted pulse is spread out in time and the received echo of the pulse is processed with a matched filter to despread it. The return signal is band-limited and digitally demodulated to a complex baseband signal that, for each pulse, comprises a large number of samples. Each complex pair of samples (denoted a range gate in radar terminology) is associated with a numerical index that corresponds to a specific time offset from the beginning of the radar pulse, so that each such pair represents the energy reflected from a specific range. This energy and the average echo power are computed. The phase of each range bin is compared to the previous echo by complex conjugate multiplication to obtain the mean Doppler shift (and hence the mean and variance of the velocity of precipitation) of the echo at that range.

  1. A Digital Array Radar with a Hierarchical System Architecture Caleb Fulton, Patrick Clough, Vijay Pai, and William Chappell

    E-print Network

    A Digital Array Radar with a Hierarchical System Architecture Caleb Fulton, Patrick Clough, Vijay -- A digital array radar system prototype is pre sented that makes use of a hierarchical digital backend for future radars that fully embrace the concept of lowcost inte gration in a panelized platform

  2. Digital beam forming on transmit and receive with an AESA FMCW radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Lievers; W. L. van Rossum; A. P. M. Maas; A. G. Huizing

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an active electronically scanned array (AESA) FMCW radar with eight transceivers. Each transceiver has its own Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) for signal generation which enables digital beam forming on transmit as well as on receive. The coherent operation of the eight transceivers and the capability to perform digital beam forming on transmit and receive is demonstrated.

  3. Performance analysis of pulse Doppler digital radars with application to the Shuttle Ku-band system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alem, W. K.; Weber, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    A pulse Doppler digital radar is one of the primary components of the Ku-band integrated radar and communication equipment on the Space Shuttle. The performance of the Ku-band rendezvous radar to be used on the Space Shuttle is analyzed in four parts. First an overall functional block diagram description is presented to illustrate the signal processing in the detection and the tracking modes. The detection capabilities and limitations of the radar are investigated taking all of the system losses into account. A new unified analysis of digital radar tracking loops is developed which takes into consideration the effects of a scintillating target and receiver front end noise. The behavior of the radar is discussed in the presence of thermal noise, amplitude scintillation, and target glint.

  4. A High Resolution Radar Altimeter to Measure the Topography of Ice Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawul, Rudolf A.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis is a reference for the Advanced Application Flight Experiment (AAFE) altimeter. The transmitter and receiver subsections are described and measurements of their current state is provided. During the 1994 NASA Greenland Experiment, the altimeter experienced several hardware malfunctions. The process of returning the radar to its fully operational state is presented in detail and necessary design modifications are explained. An updated radar user's manual is included along with various circuit designs which need to be implemented. The thesis is intended to provide an incoming graduate student with a solid foundation of the fundamentals of AAFE altimeter operation.

  5. Digital elevation models of the Moon from Earth-based radar interferometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Luc Margot; Donald B. Campbell; Raymond F. Jurgens; Martin A. Slade

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) maps of the nearside and polar regions of the Moon can be obtained with an Earth-based radar interferometer. This paper describes the theoretical background, experimental setup, and processing techniques for a sequence of observations performed with the Goldstone Solar System Radar in 1997. These data provide radar imagery and digital elevation models of the polar areas and other

  6. A digital elevation model of the Greenland Ice Sheet derived from combined laser and radar altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna; Smith, Ben; Sørensen, Louise S.; Forsberg, René

    2014-05-01

    When estimating elevation changes of ice-covered surfaces from radar altimetry, it is important to correct for slope-induced errors. They cause the reflecting point of the pulse to move up-slope and thus return estimates in the wrong coordinates. Slope-induced errors can be corrected for by introducing a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). In this work, such a DEM is developed for the Greenland Ice Sheet using a combination of Envisat radar and ICESat laser altimetry. If time permits, CryoSat radar altimetry will be included as well. The reference year is 2010 and the spatial resolution 2.5 x 2.5 km. This is in accordance with the results obtained in the ESA Ice Sheets CCI project showing that a 5 x 5 km grid spacing is reasonable for ice sheet-wide change detection (Levinsen et al., 2013). Separate DEMs will be created for the given data sets, and the geostatistical spatial interpolation method collocation will be used to merge them, thus adjusting for potential inter-satellite biases. The final DEM is validated with temporally and spatially agreeing airborne lidar data acquired in the NASA IceBridge and ESA CryoVex campaigns. The motivation for developing a new DEM is based on 1) large surface changes presently being observed, and mainly in margin regions, hence necessitating updated topography maps for accurately deriving and correcting surface elevation changes, and 2) although radar altimetry is subject to surface penetration of the signal into the snowpack, data is acquired continuously in time. This is not the case with e.g. ICESat, where laser altimetry data were obtained in periods of active lasers, i.e. three times a year with a 35-day repeat track. Previous DEMs e.g. have 2007 as the nominal reference year, or they are built merely from ICESat data. These have elevation errors as small as 10 cm, which is lower than for Envisat and CryoSat. The advantage of an updated DEM consisting of combined radar and laser altimetry therefore is the possibility of achieving a high spatial and temporal coverage, as well as the opportunity to continuously map surface changes relative to an updated topography and slopes. References: Levinsen, J. F., Khvorostovsky, K., Ticconi, F., Shepherd, A., Forsberg, R., Sørensen, L. S., Muir, A., Pie, N., Felikson, D., Flament, T., Hurkmans, R., Moholdt, G., Gunter, B., Lindenbergh, R. C., and Kleinherenbrink, M.: ESA's Ice Sheets CCI: validation and inter-comparison of surface elevation changes derived from laser and radar altimetry over Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland - Round Robin results, The Cryosphere Discuss., 7, 5433-5460, 2013.

  7. Digital signal processing techniques in a monopulse tracking radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U. Fazio; F. Ambrosioni; C. Debonis

    1979-01-01

    A description of a special-purpose Signal Processor is given. Since the Processor is highly flexible, it can be applied in a wide range of modern ground or ship-borne tracking radars, such as, Fire Control Radar for rockets or for conventional artillery (ground or anti-aircraft), Instrumentation Radar, and Tracking Radar for Command to line-of-sight missile guidance. Illustrated are the three main

  8. Comparison of radar-altimetry data over Greenland with surface topography derived from airborne laser altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. H.; Krabill, W.; Manizade, S.; Swift, R.; Brenner, A.

    1994-01-01

    During the Summers of 1991, 1992, and 1993, NASA flew a scanning laser altimeter over transects of the Greenland ice sheet. Airplane location was measured precisely using differential Global Positioning System (GPS) surveying techniques. This allowed all altimetry data to be reduced to an estimate of ice surface elevations relative to the Earth ellipsoid. Repeat flights over the same areas indicate data consistency to 10 to 20 cm. Many of the aircraft flights were made along the ERS-1 'radar-altimeter footprint track' for a commissioning phase orbit. Rigorous comparison between the ERS-1 altimeter measurements and those from the laser altimeter will require analysis of individual ERS-1 altimeter waveforms, and since the information needed to do this is not yet available, results from comparison of TOPEX (Topology Ocean Experiment) Poseidon (T/P) radar altimetry data with laser data obtained at the northernmost limit of the T/P orbits are presented.

  9. Digital Doppler radial velocity data compared objectively with digital reflectivity radar data 

    E-print Network

    Beaver, Thomas Foster

    1980-01-01

    sn sn &4 &0 KILO NIETHBS IVEST OF I'iSSL FIG. 21. 3-km CAVM, 18D5-1812 CDT, 1 May 1977 (1-km grid), Doppler data. 48 2N 28 6- 4 1O 0 14 18 O g 22 26 3O E O 38 I I 0 I I 1 I "~ I I I v I I I I f 1 I I ~~~ J~ 76 72 68... (Member) Dr. G en N. Wi cams (Member) Dr. Kenneth C. Brun s ge (Head of Department) May 1980 ABSTRACT Digital Doppler Radial Velocity Data Compared Objectively with Digital Reflectivity Radar Data. (May 1980) Thomas Foster Beaver, B. S. , Grove...

  10. Metrology, attitude, and orbit determination for spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Riley M. Duren; Ed Wong; Bill Breckenridge; Scott Shaffer; Courtney Duncan; Eldred F. Tubbs; Phil M. Salomon

    1998-01-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), scheduled for an 11 day Space Shuttle flight in 1999, will use an Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar instrument to produce a near-global digital elevation map of the earth's land surface with 16 m absolute vertical height accuracy at 30 meter postings. SRTM will achieve the required interferometric baseline by extending a receive-only radar antenna

  11. GEOS-3 ocean current investigation using radar altimeter profiling. [Gulf Stream surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitao, C. D.; Huang, N. E.; Parra, C. G.

    1978-01-01

    Both quasi-stationary and dynamic departures from the marine geoid were successfully detected using altitude measurements from the GEOS-3 radar altimeter. The quasi-stationary departures are observed either as elevation changes in single pass profiles across the Gulf Stream or at the crowding of contour lines at the western and northern areas of topographic maps generated using altimeter data spanning one month or longer. Dynamic features such as current meandering and spawned eddies can be monitored by comparing monthly mean maps. Comparison of altimeter inferred eddies with IR detected thermal rings indicates agreement of the two techniques. Estimates of current velocity are made using derived slope estimates in conjunction with the geostrophic equation.

  12. Martian topography and surface properties as seen by radar - The 1971 opposition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, G. S.; Goldstein, R. M.; Green, R. R.; Morris, G. A.; Reichley, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    Taking advantage of the favorable opposition of 1971, the Goldstone radar system, operating at 2388 MHz, was used to scan the Martian surface. Measurements of altitude and reflected power were taken approximately every 3 days. Each measurement represents an area 8 km E-W by 80 km N-S, the highest resolution attained to date. Altitude measurements obtained on different observing days were combined to produce altitude profiles for three complete rotations, each at different latitudes. Large-scale variations in altitudes cover a range of 14 km. Altitude changes of 5 in 30 km of longitude were observed. The altitude profiles show the heavy cratering of the surface, and several large craters (50-100 km) 1-2 km deep are easily seen.

  13. Surface topography of the Greenland Ice Sheet from satellite radar altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Robert A.; Zwally, H. Jay; Major, Judith A.; Brenner, Anita C.

    1989-01-01

    Surface elevation maps of the southern half of the Greenland subcontinent are produced from radar altimeter data acquired by the Seasat satellite. A summary of the processing procedure and examples of return waveform data are given. The elevation data are used to generate a regular grid which is then computer contoured to provide an elevation contour map. Ancillary maps show the statistical quality of the elevation data and various characteristics of the surface. The elevation map is used to define ice flow directions and delineate the major drainage basins. Regular maps of the Jakobshavns Glacier drainage basin and the ice divide in the vicinity of Crete Station are presented. Altimeter derived elevations are compared with elevations measured both by satellite geoceivers and optical surveying.

  14. Digital signal processing in binary phase coded CW multistatic radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Norland

    2003-01-01

    Electronic countermeasures (ECM) and homing anti-radiation missiles (ARM) pose a threat to the operability of radar. One solution to counteract the threat and continue operating radar is to separate the transmitter and receiver and spread the emitted signal in both frequency and space. The Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI) has developed a low power, bistatic, coherent, spread spectrum and continuous

  15. Advanced ground-penetrating radar for digital soil mapping

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Lambot; J. Minet; K. Z. Jadoon; E. Slob; H. Vereecken

    2009-01-01

    Sustainable and optimal agricultural and environmental management of water and land resources particularly relies on the description and understanding of soil water distribution and dynamics at different scales. We present an advanced ground penetrating radar (GPR) method for mapping the shallow soil water content and unsaturated hydraulic properties at the field scale. The radar system is based on vector network

  16. Digitized dual wavelength radar data from a Texas thunderstorm 

    E-print Network

    Radlein, Robin Ann

    1977-01-01

    ) Antenna beam width~8(horizontal) ](vertical) 0 ' 5 5 1 54 1 54 0 5 5 1 54 1 ~ 52 Antenna Gain, G~ db Minimum detectable signal, dhm 2 3 -6 Radar Constant, C, w km m mm 40 5 -107 5 1 0089%10 40 3 -107 5 8, 609%10 13 radar beam... of the most important tools for the detection of severe local storms such as tornadoes~ hailstorms~ and severe thunderstorms The usefulness of early radars was limited~ however, by the capacity of the operator to recognize the type and severity of a storm...

  17. A STATUS REPORT ON THE RF AND DIGITAL COMPONENTS OF THE MULTICHANNEL RECEIVER DEVELOPMENT AT THE NATIONAL WEATHER RADAR TESTBED

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Yeary; J. Crain; A. Zahrai; R. Kelley; J. Meier; Y. Zhang; I. Ivic; C. Curtis; R. Palmer; T.-Y. Yu; G. Zhang; R. Doviak; P. Chilson; M. Xue; Q. Xu

    This paper describes the status of a project that will simultaneously digitize the radar signals coming from eight channels on the phased array antenna at the Na- tional Weather Radar Testbed (NWRT) in Norman, Ok- lahoma. At the current time, a single-channel digital receiver is operational on this S-band radar to mimic the current WSR-88D capability. The multi-channel dig- ital

  18. Synergy and fusion of optical and synthetic aperture radar satellite data for underwater topography estimation in coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleskachevsky, Andrey; Lehner, Susanne; Heege, Thomas; Mott, Claudius

    2011-12-01

    A method to obtain underwater topography for coastal areas using state-of-the-art remote sensing data and techniques worldwide is presented. The data from the new Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite TerraSAR-X with high resolution up to 1 m are used to render the ocean waves. As bathymetry is reflected by long swell wave refraction governed by underwater structures in shallow areas, it can be derived using the dispersion relation from observed swell properties. To complete the bathymetric maps, optical satellite data of the QuickBird satellite are fused to map extreme shallow waters, e.g., in near-coast areas. The algorithms for bathymetry estimation from optical and SAR data are combined and integrated in order to cover different depth domains. Both techniques make use of different physical phenomena and mathematical treatment. The optical methods based on sunlight reflection analysis provide depths in shallow water up to 20 m in preferably calm weather conditions. The depth estimation from SAR is based on the observation of long waves and covers the areas between about 70- and 10-m water depths depending on sea state and acquisition quality. The depths in the range of 20 m up to 10 m represent the domain where the synergy of data from both sources arises. Thus, the results derived from SAR and optical sensors complement each other. In this study, a bathymetry map near Rottnest Island, Australia, is derived. QuickBird satellite optical data and radar data from TerraSAR-X have been used. The depths estimated are aligned on two different grids. The first one is a uniform rectangular mesh with a horizontal resolution of 150 m, which corresponds to an average swell wavelength observed in the 10 × 10-km SAR image acquired. The second mesh has a resolution of 150 m for depths up to 20 m (deeper domain covered by SAR-based technique) and 2.4 m resolution for the shallow domain imaged by an optical sensor. This new technique provides a platform for mapping of coastal bathymetry over a broad area on a scale that is relevant to marine planners, managers, and offshore industry.

  19. A comparison of U.S. geological survey seamless elevation models with shuttle radar topography mission data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesch, D.; Williams, J.; Miller, W.

    2001-01-01

    Elevation models produced from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data will be the most comprehensive, consistently processed, highest resolution topographic dataset ever produced for the Earth's land surface. Many applications that currently use elevation data will benefit from the increased availability of data with higher accuracy, quality, and resolution, especially in poorly mapped areas of the globe. SRTM data will be produced as seamless data, thereby avoiding many of the problems inherent in existing multi-source topographic databases. Serving as precursors to SRTM datasets, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced and is distributing seamless elevation datasets that facilitate scientific use of elevation data over large areas. GTOPO30 is a global elevation model with a 30 arc-second resolution (approximately 1-kilometer). The National Elevation Dataset (NED) covers the United States at a resolution of 1 arc-second (approximately 30-meters). Due to their seamless format and broad area coverage, both GTOPO30 and NED represent an advance in the usability of elevation data, but each still includes artifacts from the highly variable source data used to produce them. The consistent source data and processing approach for SRTM data will result in elevation products that will be a significant addition to the current availability of seamless datasets, specifically for many areas outside the U.S. One application that demonstrates some advantages that may be realized with SRTM data is delineation of land surface drainage features (watersheds and stream channels). Seamless distribution of elevation data in which a user interactively specifies the area of interest and order parameters via a map server is already being successfully demonstrated with existing USGS datasets. Such an approach for distributing SRTM data is ideal for a dataset that undoubtedly will be of very high interest to the spatial data user community.

  20. Accuracy Assessment of a Digital Height Model Derived from Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar Measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alfred Kleusberg; Hans-georg Klaedtke

    1999-01-01

    Abstract: A digital height model (DHM) derived from airborne interferometric synthetic aperture Radar (InSAR) covering about140 kmwas compared to the elevations of Trigonometric Points, the DHM of the state of Baden-Wrttemberg (DHMBa-W), and GPS derived elevations.

  1. An atlas of November 1978 synthetic aperture radar digitized imagery for oil spill studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, H. E.; Oderman, W.; Crosswell, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    A data set is described which consists of digitized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery plus correlative data and some preliminary analysis results. This data set should be of value to experimenters who are interested in the SAR instrument and its application to the detection and monitoring of oil on water and other distributed targets.

  2. Tornado identification from analyses of digital radar data

    E-print Network

    Pittman, Donald Wayne

    1976-01-01

    . There are two somewhat different types of BWERs: those of long persistence with a 5-10 km dia- meter and those of short duration with a diameter of only 1 -5 km. A dual-doppler radar study of the smaller-scale phenomena by M Carthy et al. revealed dynamics...

  3. Satellites images, digitized topography, and the recognition of the Xela Caldera, Quezaltenango Valley, Guatemala

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, D. (Pacific Lutheran Univ., Tacoma, WA (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences); McEwen, A.; Duffield, W. (Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States)); Heiken, G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The authors propose, based on reconnaissance geology studies and interpretation of landforms as depicted by Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images combined with digitized topography, that the Quezaltenango basin of Guatemala is part of a caldera. The Quezaltenango basin is an elliptical depression, about 12 by 25 km and about 500 m deep. The proposed Xela Caldera extends beyond the basin more than 10 km to the north. The geomorphological features of the area that are typical of a geologically young large-scale caldera include bounding walls that have steep interior and gentle exterior slopes; broad flat areas at the base of the walls; at least one large block, about 3 by 12 km, that only partly floundered as the caldera collapsed; resurgence of a younger volcanic dome, flow and small-scale caldera complex (last active in 1818); younger volcanoes located along the structural margin of the major caldera (one of which is currently active) lobate features on the caldera margins that may indicate a multiple sequence of eruptions; and an active, high-temperature geothermal system. The valley is coincident with a gravity low. Extensive ash-flow tuff sheets that have no identified source are located north of the caldera, and may be the outflow deposits. The Xela caldera is similar in size to the Atitlan caldera, which lies about 50 km southeast of Quezaltenango. The Xela Caldera, if confirmed by future studies, may contain undiscovered geothermal resources, may present a significant geologic hazard to the more than 400,000 people who occupy the Quezaltenango valley, and may be a new member of the list of magmatic systems that have the capability to change global climate for several years.

  4. Monitoring of Ground Movement and Generation of Digital Elevation Models Using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, B. B.

    2013-12-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has the potential for measuring deformation of the earth's surface with very high accuracy and for the development of digital elevation models. Both capabilities are of high relevance for ground movement assessment. In addition, when archived raw data is available (post 1992), recent historic movement may be quantifiable. InSAR utilizes satellite-based data acquired at two different times along orbits of a similar trajectory to detect changes in the ground surface elevation. This technique can be used to monitor ground movement for rectangular areas as large as 100 kilometers on a side. Knowledge of topography, geology, trends and mechanics of existing ground movement is required for successful interpretation of InSAR data. The detection of ground surface deformation in terrain of high slope relief terrain is difficult. For ground deformation mapping by means of InSAR it is necessary to separate the motion-related and the topographic phase contributions. This is achieved by using a low resolution digital elevation model (DEM) during the processing of InSAR data. The application of InSAR technology to mining areas provides monitoring of not only the active mine areas but also the adjacent regions that has been affected by mining. Thus InSAR technique proves to be an essential ground monitoring methods in future for mining areas. The results from the InSAR analysis are compared with data from a ground-based monitoring system comprised of measured survey prisms for an open pit mine in Canada. InSAR analysis provided the location of the stable site for relocating the crusher which was affected by movement of pit slope. The presentation will show the application of InSAR technology to various mines in USA and Canada. Besides subsidence evaluation, InSAR data is also used to generate digital elevation models (DEM) and digital terrain models (DTM). The DEM and DTM derived from InSAR data for a mine in Canada is compared with the survey and LIDAR data to demonstrate the applicability of InSAR data to model surface topography.

  5. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In 2000 the Space Shuttle Endeavour was able to conserve enough fuel to complete its mission and create the world's most accurate topographic maps. With this site, users can track the mission and view some samples of the extraordinary images being produced. At the SRTM homepage, users will find news updates, background information, some quick facts, related links, an overview of the mission's equipment, and a list of acronyms used at the site.

  6. Global search and rescue - A new concept. [orbital digital radar system with passive reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A new terrestrial search and rescue concept is defined embodying the use of simple passive radiofreqeuncy reflectors in conjunction with a low earth-orbiting, all-weather, synthetic aperture radar to detect, identify, and position locate earth-bound users in distress. Users include ships, aircraft, small boats, explorers, hikers, etc. Airborne radar tests were conducted to evaluate the basic concept. Both X-band and L-band, dual polarization radars were operated simultaneously. Simple, relatively small, corner-reflector targets were successfully imaged and digital data processing approaches were investigated. Study of the basic concept and evaluation of results obtained from aircraft flight tests indicate an all-weather, day or night, global search and rescue system is feasible.

  7. SURFACE WATER & OCEAN TOPOGRAPHY

    E-print Network

    Christian, Eric

    of the Wide Swath Ocean Altimeter (WSOA) and the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The Ku-band sampling for surface-water applications, near-global coverage, and the swath capabilities of the Ku-band/JPL ­ IIP98) · Enhancement of key technologies (Ka-band radar interferometry antenna design, onboard

  8. Spectral analysis, digital integration, and measurement of low backscatter in coherent laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, J. M.; Callan, R. D.; Bowdle, D. A.; Rothermel, J.

    1989-01-01

    A method of surface acoustic wave (SAW) spectral analysis and digital integration that has been used previously in coherent CW laser work with CO2 lasers at 10.6 microns is described. Expressions are derived for the signal to noise ratio in the measured voltage spectrum with an approximation for the general case and rigorous treatment for the low signal case. The atmospheric backscatter data accumulated by the airborne LATAS (laser true airspeed) coherent laser radar system are analyzed.

  9. Triangles: tangible interface for manipulation and exploration of digital information topography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew G. Gorbet; Maggie Orth; Hiroshi Ishii

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a system for interacting with digital information, called Triangles. The Triangles system is a physical\\/digital construction kit, which allows users to use two hands to grasp and manipulate complex digital information. The kit consists of a set of identical flat, plastic triangles, each with a microprocessor inside and magnetic edge connectors. The connectors enable the Triangles to

  10. Radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James R. Zimbelman; Kenneth S. Edgett

    1994-01-01

    Over 1,000,000 km2 of the equatorial surface of Mars west of the Arsia Mons volcano displays no 3.5-cm radar echo to the very low level of the radar system noise for the Very Large Array; the area displaying this unique property has been terms \\

  11. Digital holography with multidirectional illumination by LCoS SLM for topography measurement of high gradient reflective microstructures.

    PubMed

    Józwik, Micha?; Kozacki, Tomasz; Li?ewski, Kamil; Kostencka, Julianna

    2015-03-20

    In this paper we present a method for topography measurement of high gradient reflective microstructures that overcomes the limited numerical aperture (NA) of a digital holographic (DH) system working in reflection. We consider a case when a DH system is unable to register the light reflected from the full sample area due to insufficient NA. To overcome this problem, we propose digital holography in a microscope configuration with an afocal imaging system and a modified object arm in the measurement setup. The proposed modification includes application of a spatial light modulator (SLM) based on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) technology for multidirectional plane wave illumination. The variable off-axis illumination enables characterization of the sample regions that cannot be imaged by the limited NA of a classical DH system utilizing on-axis illumination. In the proposed method, the final object topography is merged from a set of captured object waves corresponding to various illumination directions using a novel automatic algorithm. The proposed technique is experimentally validated by full-field measurement of a silicon mold with a high gradient of shape. PMID:25968512

  12. Application of machine learning using support vector machines for crater detection from Martian digital topography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamuni?car, Goran; Lon?ari?, Sven

    In our previous work, in order to extend the GT-57633 catalogue [PSS, 56 (15), 1992-2008] with still uncatalogued impact-craters, the following has been done [GRS, 48 (5), in press, doi:10.1109/TGRS.2009.2037750]: (1) the crater detection algorithm (CDA) based on digital elevation model (DEM) was developed; (2) using 1/128° MOLA data, this CDA proposed 414631 crater-candidates; (3) each crater-candidate was analyzed manually; and (4) 57592 were confirmed as correct detections. The resulting GT-115225 catalog is the significant result of this effort. However, to check such a large number of crater-candidates manually was a demanding task. This was the main motivation for work on improvement of the CDA in order to provide better classification of craters as true and false detections. To achieve this, we extended the CDA with the machine learning capability, using support vector machines (SVM). In the first step, the CDA (re)calculates numerous terrain morphometric attributes from DEM. For this purpose, already existing modules of the CDA from our previous work were reused in order to be capable to prepare these attributes. In addition, new attributes were introduced such as ellipse eccentricity and tilt. For machine learning purpose, the CDA is additionally extended to provide 2-D topography-profile and 3-D shape for each crater-candidate. The latter two are a performance problem because of the large number of crater-candidates in combination with the large number of attributes. As a solution, we developed a CDA architecture wherein it is possible to combine the SVM with a radial basis function (RBF) or any other kernel (for initial set of attributes), with the SVM with linear kernel (for the cases when 2-D and 3-D data are included as well). Another challenge is that, in addition to diversity of possible crater types, there are numerous morphological differences between the smallest (mostly very circular bowl-shaped craters) and the largest (multi-ring) impact craters. As a solution to this problem, the CDA classifies crater-candidates according to their diameter into 7 groups (D smaller/larger then 2km, 4km, 8km, 16km, 32km and 64km), and for each group uses separate SVMs for training and prediction. For implementation of the machine-learning part and integration with the rest of the CDA, we used C.-J. Lin's et al. [http://www.csie.ntu.edu.tw/˜cjlin/] LIBSVM (A Library for Support Vector Machines) and LIBLINEAR (A Library for Large Linear Classification) libraries. According to the initial evaluation, now the CDA provides much better classification of craters as true and false detections.

  13. Digital radar-gram processing for water pipelines leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Márquez, Jorge; Flores, Ricardo; Valdivia, Ricardo; Carreón, Dora; Malacara, Zacarías; Camposeco, Arturo

    2006-02-01

    Ground penetrating radars (GPR) are useful underground exploration devices. Applications are found in archaeology, mine detection, pavement evaluation, among others. Here we use a GPR to detect by an indirect way, the anomalies caused by the presence of water in the neighborhood of an underground water pipeline. By Fourier transforming a GPR profile map we interpret the signal as spatial frequencies, instead of the temporal frequencies, that composes the profile map. This allows differentiating between signals returning from a standard subsoil feature from those coming back from anomalous zones. Facilities in Mexican cities are commonly buried up to 2.5 m. Their constituent materials are PVC, concrete or metal, typically steel. GPRs are ultra-wide band devices; leak detection must be an indirect process since echoes due to the presence of underground zones with high moisture levels are masked by dense reflections (clutter). In radargrams the presence of water is visualized as anomalies in the neighborhood of the facility. Enhancement of these anomalies will give us the information required to detect leaks.

  14. An airborne digital processor for radar scatterometer data

    E-print Network

    Yeadon, David Steven

    1977-01-01

    the binary rep- resentation of aircraft attitude parameters. These parameters are avail- able from the ADC. Unfortunately, the ADC format is incompatible with the digital processor format. Generally, the ADC format presents the data in a serial bit pulse... four-bit BCD representa- tion. The other two codes both use the Air Data Ac uisition S stem (ASO-90) format, wherein each word consists of six bits. The first bit (the index bit) is always a logical ONE. The last bit is the parity bit for that word...

  15. Digital tapped delay lines for HWIL testing of matched filter radar receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Richard F.; Braselton, William J.; Mohlere, Richard D.

    2009-05-01

    Matched filter processing for pulse compression of phase coded waveforms is a classic method for increasing radar range measurement resolution. A generic approach for simulating high resolution range extended radar scenes in a Hardware in the Loop (HWIL) test environment is to pass the phase coded radar transmit pulse through an RF tapped delay line comprised of individually amplitude- and phase-weighted output taps. In the generic approach, the taps are closely spaced relative to time intervals equivalent to the range resolution of the compressed radar pulse. For a range-extended high resolution clutter scene, the increased number of these taps can make an analog implementation of an RF tapped delay system impractical. Engineers at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) have addressed this problem by transferring RF tapped delay line signal operations to the digital domain. New digital tapped delay line (DTDL) systems have been designed and demonstrated which are physically compact compared to analog RF TDLs, leverage low cost FPGA and data converter technology, and may be readily expanded using open slots in a VME card cage. In initial HWIL applications, the new DTDLs have been shown to produce better dynamic range in pulse compressed range profiles than their analog TDL predecessors. This paper describes the signal requirements and system architecture for digital tapped delay lines. Implementation, performance, and HWIL simulation integration issues for AMRDEC's first generation DTDLs are addressed. The paper concludes with future requirements and plans for ongoing DTDL technology development at AMRDEC.

  16. Gently dipping normal faults identified with Space Shuttle radar topography data in central Sulawesi, Indonesia, and some implications for fault mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Jon E.

    2011-08-01

    Space-shuttle radar topography data from central Sulawesi, Indonesia, reveal two corrugated, domal landforms, covering hundreds to thousands of square kilometers, that are bounded to the north by an abrupt transition to typical hilly to mountainous topography. These domal landforms are readily interpreted as metamorphic core complexes, an interpretation consistent with a single previous field study, and the abrupt northward transition in topographic style is interpreted as marking the trace of two extensional detachment faults that are active or were recently active. Fault dip, as determined by the slope of exhumed fault footwalls, ranges from 4° to 18°. Application of critical-taper theory to fault dip and hanging-wall surface slope, and to similar data from several other active or recently active core complexes, suggests a theoretical limit of three degrees for detachment-fault dip. This result appears to conflict with the dearth of seismological evidence for slip on faults dipping less than ~ 30°. The convex-upward form of the gently dipping fault footwalls, however, allows for greater fault dip at depths of earthquake initiation and dominant energy release. Thus, there may be no conflict between seismological and mapping studies for this class of faults.

  17. Gently dipping normal faults identified with Space Shuttle radar topography data in central Sulawesi, Indonesia, and some implications for fault mechanics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Space-shuttle radar topography data from central Sulawesi, Indonesia, reveal two corrugated, domal landforms, covering hundreds to thousands of square kilometers, that are bounded to the north by an abrupt transition to typical hilly to mountainous topography. These domal landforms are readily interpreted as metamorphic core complexes, an interpretation consistent with a single previous field study, and the abrupt northward transition in topographic style is interpreted as marking the trace of two extensional detachment faults that are active or were recently active. Fault dip, as determined by the slope of exhumed fault footwalls, ranges from 4?? to 18??. Application of critical-taper theory to fault dip and hanging-wall surface slope, and to similar data from several other active or recently active core complexes, suggests a theoretical limit of three degrees for detachment-fault dip. This result appears to conflict with the dearth of seismological evidence for slip on faults dipping less than ~. 30??. The convex-upward form of the gently dipping fault footwalls, however, allows for greater fault dip at depths of earthquake initiation and dominant energy release. Thus, there may be no conflict between seismological and mapping studies for this class of faults. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Model-Based Estimation of Forest Canopy Height in Red and Austrian Pine Stands Using Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and Ancillary Data: a Proof-of-Concept Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brown Jr., C G; Sarabandi, K; Pierce, L E

    2007-04-06

    In this paper, accurate tree stand height retrieval is demonstrated using C-band Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) height and ancillary data. The tree height retrieval algorithm is based on modeling uniform tree stands with a single layer of randomly oriented vegetation particles. For such scattering media, the scattering phase center height, as measured by SRTM, is a function of tree height, incidence angle, and the extinction coefficient of the medium. The extinction coefficient for uniform tree stands is calculated as a function of tree height and density using allometric equations and a fractal tree model. The accuracy of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated using SRTM and TOPSAR data for 15 red pine and Austrian pine stands (TOPSAR is an airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar). The algorithm yields root-mean-square (rms) errors of 2.5-3.6 m, which is a substantial improvement over the 6.8-8.3-m rms errors from the raw SRTM minus National Elevation Dataset Heights.

  19. Measurement by Digital Image Correlation of the topography of a liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisy, Frederic; Rabaud, Marc; Salsac, Kevin

    2007-11-01

    A non intrusive method to measure the instantaneous topography of a fluid interface with a resolution of 1 ?m is presented. This method is based on the analysis of the deformation of a random pattern of points due to the refraction through the interface. The cross-correlation between an instantaneous image and a reference image obtained when the surface is flat allows for the reconstruction of the local fluid height. Movies of time-resolved circular waves created by the impact of a drop are analysed. Other applications for this method, such as fluid coating and wave turbulence, will be discussed.

  20. An analysis of the data collection modes of a digital weather radar system with respect to significant severe weather features 

    E-print Network

    Neyland, Michael Arthur

    1978-01-01

    LIST OF ACROBYMS EWER CAPPI CAZM DVIP PPI bounded weak echo region constant altitude plan position indi. cator constant altitude reflectivity map digital video integrator and processor plan position indicator. minimum detectable signal PRF... of radar, it was recognized that the device could locate and tracR areas of severe weather and precipitation. Since that time, radar has come to be considered one of the most important tools available to the meteoro- logist for the detection of severe...

  1. Digital Terrestrial Video Broadcast Interference Suppression in Forward-Looking Ground Penetrating Radar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rial, F. I.; Mendez-Rial, Roi; Lawadka, Lukasz; Gonzalez-Huici, Maria A.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we show how radio frequency interference (RFI) generated by digital video broadcasting terrestrial and digital audio broadcasting transmitters can be an important noise source for forward-looking ground penetrating radar (FLGPR) systems. Even in remote locations the average interference power sometimes exceeds ultra-wideband signals by many dB, becoming the limiting factor in the system sensitivity. The overall problem of RFI and its impact in GPR systems is briefly described and several signal processing approaches to removal of RFI are discussed. These include spectral estimation and coherent subtraction algorithms and various filter approaches which have been developed and applied by the research community in similar contexts. We evaluate the performance of these methods by simulating two different scenarios submitted to real RFI acquired with a FLGPR system developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques (FHR), (GER). The effectiveness of these algorithms in removing RFI is presented using some performance indices after suppression.

  2. The effect of topography on SAR calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Zyl, J.J. van; Chapman, B.D.; Dubois, P. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.); Shi, Jiancheng (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States))

    1993-09-01

    During normal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing, a flat earth is assumed when performing radiometric corrections such as antenna pattern and scattering area removal. Here the authors examine the effects of topographic variations on these corrections. Local slopes will cause the actual scattering area to be different from that calculated using the flat earth assumption. It is shown that this effect, which is present for both airborne and spaceborne SAR data, may easily cause calibration errors larger than a decibel. Ignoring the topography during antenna pattern removal is expected to be negligible for spaceborne SAR's. In this paper they show how these effects can be taken into account if a digital elevation model is available for the imaged area. It is also shown that not taking the topography into account during antenna pattern removal introduces polarimetric calibration errors.

  3. A new digital elevation model of the Antarctic derived from combined satellite radar altimter and GLAS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamber, J. L.; Gomez-Dans, J. L.

    2005-12-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) of Antarctica have been derived, previously, from satellite radar altimetry (SRA) and limited terrestrial data of relatively poor vertical accuracy. Near the ice sheet margins and in other areas of steep relief the SRA data tend to have both poor coverage and accuracy. To remedy this and to extend the coverage south of the latitudinal limit of the SRA missions (81.5° S) we have combined laser altimeter measurements from the Geosciences Laser Altimeter System onboard ICESat with SRA data from the geodetic phase of the ERS-1 satellite mission. The former provide decimetre vertical accuracy but with poor spatial coverage: they have, for example, an across-track spacing of about 20 km at 70° S. The latter have excellent spatial coverage away from steep relief (across-track spacing by contrast is 2.8 km at 70° S) but a poorer vertical accuracy. By combining the radar and laser data using an optimal approach we have maximised the vertical accuracy and spatial resolution of the DEM and minimised the number of grid cells with an interpolated elevation estimate. A slope-dependent bias, however, exists between the laser and radar altimeter height estimates due to the different footprint sizes of the two instruments and the way the SRA data were processed. We have calculated and removed the bias (which was found to be a function of surface slope) from the SRA data and merged them with the laser data by weighting them as a function of their RMS error. We assessed the optimum resolution for producing a DEM based on a trade-off between increased resolution and increased interpolation of grid cells. The optimum resolution was found to be 2 km, which resulted in less than 40% of cells being interpolated (i.e. cells where no measurements exist). At resolutions smaller than this the percentage of interpolated cells rapidly increases. The resolution is also a trade-off between the along and across-track spacing of the data, which varies with latitude. It reflects the spatial resolution justified by the global data coverage. Thus, close to the latitudinal limit of ICESat (86° S) a higher resolution could be justified. The accuracy of the final DEM was assessed using independent airborne laser altimeter data for a high relief region of West Antarctica. The DEM contains a wealth of information related to ice flow. This is particularly apparent for the two largest ice shelves-the Filchner-Ronne and Ross-where the effect of flow of ice streams and outlet glaciers can be traced as far as the calving fronts. Rifts are clearly visible as are the surface expression of subglacial lakes and other basal features. At this resolution, surface roughness, related to subglacial topography, is also discernable.

  4. Integration of radar altimeter, precision navigation, and digital terrain data for low-altitude flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelenka, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    Avionic systems that depend on digitized terrain elevation data for guidance generation or navigational reference require accurate absolute and relative distance measurements to the terrain, especially as they approach lower altitudes. This is particularly exacting in low-altitude helicopter missions, where aggressive terrain hugging maneuvers create minimal horizontal and vertical clearances and demand precise terrain positioning. Sole reliance on airborne precision navigation and stored terrain elevation data for above-ground-level (AGL) positioning severely limits the operational altitude of such systems. A Kalman filter is presented which blends radar altimeter returns, precision navigation, and stored terrain elevation data for AGL positioning. The filter is evaluated using low-altitude helicopter flight test data acquired over moderately rugged terrain. The proposed Kalman filter is found to remove large disparities in predicted AGL altitude (i.e., from airborne navigation and terrain elevation data) in the presence of measurement anomalies and dropouts. Previous work suggested a minimum clearance altitude of 220 ft AGL for a near-terrain guidance system; integration of a radar altimeter allows for operation of that system below 50 ft, subject to obstacle-avoidance limitations.

  5. Applications of digital radar in the analysis of severe local storms

    E-print Network

    Vogel, John Everett

    1973-01-01

    values to 100 n mi, thus 21ogr = 4. Using a value of 0. 9 for K (Greene, 1971) and the value of C 2 obtained earlier, we have log CK = -10. 5. 2 (7) 11 DIGITAL RADAR DATA FORMAT op IE A. /+~ +~ Eb g Q PV THRESHOlD LEVEL OF V INTEGERS- (dbm ) ~ I... faeae5903z 9S 1570862 'I '1 5 5 I 'I l 5 2 2 I I 2 2 4 9%54904022 122 0 '791'19&TT2 16 9049474'I 12 40000%sf? 22 14 16 90le444\\t33Z 10 'I e00 122 99 443?l 113 SI& 144 127 75 25 15 0 D 377. ?1310 4'I 39Z I'I 315. '13 lal 2'I *4 3 37 3'I 4 o o...

  6. The application of the ADSP-21020 40-bit floating point DSP microprocessor in a digital Doppler radar

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.H.; Morrison, R.E.

    1991-08-26

    A continuous wave doppler radar system has been designed which is portable, easily deployable and can be remotely controlled. The system is immune to ground clutter and is used for wind speed detection and direction determination. Nearly real time digital signal processing is performed by an Analog Devices ADSP-21020, a 40-bit floating point Digital Signal Processing (DSP) microprocessor. This paper provides an overview of the design of the system including the radio frequency (RF) to digital interface. The various DSP detection algorithms are discussed and compared to system performance and sensitivity. Finally, DSP performance is compared to the performance of an earlier system using Analog Device's ADSP-2100. 6 refs.

  7. IEEE GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING LETTERS, VOL. X, NO. X, NOVEMBER 200X 1 Digital Topography Models for Martian Surfaces

    E-print Network

    Vilalta, Ricardo

    is at the center of our current solar system explo- ration efforts. In particular, there are presently three an analysis of Martian topography data. The Martian topography data was gathered by the Mars Orbiter Laser notion of the DEM. Individual pixels in the DTM carry an array of local and regional topographical

  8. Frequency diversity wideband digital receiver and signal processor for solid-state dual-polarimetric weather radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Kumar Vijay

    The recent spate in the use of solid-state transmitters for weather radar systems has unexceptionably revolutionized the research in meteorology. The solid-state transmitters allow transmission of low peak powers without losing the radar range resolution by allowing the use of pulse compression waveforms. In this research, a novel frequency-diversity wideband waveform is proposed and realized to extenuate the low sensitivity of solid-state radars and mitigate the blind range problem tied with the longer pulse compression waveforms. The latest developments in the computing landscape have permitted the design of wideband digital receivers which can process this novel waveform on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) chips. In terms of signal processing, wideband systems are generally characterized by the fact that the bandwidth of the signal of interest is comparable to the sampled bandwidth; that is, a band of frequencies must be selected and filtered out from a comparable spectral window in which the signal might occur. The development of such a wideband digital receiver opens a window for exciting research opportunities for improved estimation of precipitation measurements for higher frequency systems such as X, Ku and Ka bands, satellite-borne radars and other solid-state ground-based radars. This research describes various unique challenges associated with the design of a multi-channel wideband receiver. The receiver consists of twelve channels which simultaneously downconvert and filter the digitized intermediate-frequency (IF) signal for radar data processing. The product processing for the multi-channel digital receiver mandates a software and network architecture which provides for generating and archiving a single meteorological product profile culled from multi-pulse profiles at an increased data date. The multi-channel digital receiver also continuously samples the transmit pulse for calibration of radar receiver gain and transmit power. The multi-channel digital receiver has been successfully deployed as a key component in the recently developed National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Dual-Frequency Dual-Polarization Doppler Radar (D3R). The D3R is the principal ground validation instrument for the precipitation measurements of the Dual Precipitation Radar (DPR) onboard the GPM Core Observatory satellite scheduled for launch in 2014. The D3R system employs two broadly separated frequencies at Ku- and Ka-bands that together make measurements for precipitation types which need higher sensitivity such as light rain, drizzle and snow. This research describes unique design space to configure the digital receiver for D3R at several processing levels. At length, this research presents analysis and results obtained by employing the multi-carrier waveforms for D3R during the 2012 GPM Cold-Season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx) campaign in Canada.

  9. Hardware description ADSP-21020 40-bit floating point DSP as designed in a remotely controlled digital CW Doppler radar

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, R.E.; Robinson, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    A continuous wave Doppler radar system has been designed which is portable, easily deployed, and remotely controlled. The heart of this system is a DSP/control board using Analog Devices ADSP-21020 40-bit floating point digital signal processor (DSP) microprocessor. Two 18-bit audio A/D converters provide digital input to the DSP/controller board for near real time target detection. Program memory for the DSP is dual ported with an Intel 87C51 microcontroller allowing DSP code to be up-loaded or down-loaded from a central controlling computer. The 87C51 provides overall system control for the remote radar and includes a time-of-day/day-of-year real time clock, system identification (ID) switches, and input/output (I/O) expansion by an Intel 82C55 I/O expander. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. An objective and reproducible landform and topography description approach based on digital terrain analysis used for soil profile site characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Fabian E.; Baruck, Jasmin; Hastik, Richard; Geitner, Clemens

    2015-04-01

    All major soil description and classification systems, including the World Reference Base (WRB) and the German Soil description guidelines (KA5), require the characterization of landform and topography for soil profile sites. This is commonly done at more than one scale, for instance at macro-, meso- and micro scale. However, inherent when humans perform such a task, different surveyors will reach different conclusions due to their subjective perception of landscape structure, based on their individual mind-model of soil-landscape structure, emphasizing different aspects and scales of the landscape. In this study we apply a work-flow using the GRASS GIS extension module r.geomorphon to make use of high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to characterize the landform elements and topography of soil profile sites at different scales, and compare the results with a large number of soil profile site descriptions performed during the course of forestry surveys in South and North Tyrol (Italy and Austria, respectively). The r.geomorphon extension module for the open source geographic information system GRASS GIS applies a pattern recognition algorithm to delineate landform elements based on an input DEM. For each raster cell it computes and characterizes the visible neighborhood using line-of-sight calculations and then applies a lookup-table to classify the raster cell into one of ten landform elements (flat, peak, ridge, shoulder, slope, spur, hollow, footslope, valley and pit). The input parameter search radius (L) represents the maximum number of pixels for line-of-sight calculation, resulting in landforms larger than L to be split into landform components. The use of these visibility calculations makes this landform delineation approach suitable for comparison with the landform descriptions of soil surveyors, as their spatial perception of the landscape surrounding a soil profile site certainly influences their classification of the landform on which the profile is situated (aided by additional information such as topographic maps and aerial images). Variation of the L-value furthermore presents the opportunity to mimic the different scales at which surveyors describe soil profile locations. We first illustrate the use of r.geomorphon for site descriptions using exemplary artificial elevation profiles resembling typic catenas at different scales (L-values). We then compare the results of a landform element map computed with r.geomorphon to the relief descriptions in the test dataset. We link the surveyors' landform classification to the computed landform elements. Using a multi-scale approach we characterize raster cell locations in a way similar to the micro-, meso- and macroscale definitions used in soil survey, resulting in so-called geomorphon-signatures, such as "pit (meso-scale) located on a ridge (macro-scale)". We investigate which ranges of L-values best represent the different observation-scales as noted by soil surveyors and discuss the impacts of using a large dataset of profile location descriptions performed by different surveyors. Issues that arise are possible individual differences in landscape structure perception, but also questions regarding the accuracy of position and resulting topographic measurements in soil profile site description.

  11. SRTM and Laser Altimeter Views of Western Washington State Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, D. J.; Carabajal, C. C.

    2001-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and laser altimeter measurements of topography provide complimentary approaches to characterize landforms. Results from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) will provide an unprecedented, near-global, public-domain topography data set at 90 m resolution using a single pass C-band (5.6 cm wavelength) radar interferometer. In vegetated terrains, the C-band radar energy will penetrate part way into vegetation cover. The elevation of the resulting radar phase center, somewhere between the canopy top and underlying ground, will depend on the vegetation density, structure, and presence or absence of foliage. The high vertical accuracy and spatial resolution achieved by laser altimeters, and their capability to directly measure vegetation height and ground topography beneath vegetation cover, provides a method to evaluate InSAR representations of topography. Here a preliminary C-band SRTM digital elevation model (DEM) for a portion of western Washington State is evaluated using laser altimeter data to assess its elevation accuracy and the extent of vegetation penetration. The SRTM DEM extends from the Cascades Range westward to the Olympic Peninsula. The laser altimeter data includes two profiles acquired by the second flight of the Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA-02) in August, 1997, numerous transects acquired by the airborne Scanning Lidar Imager of Canopies by Echo Recovery (SLICER) in September, 1995, and comprehensive mapping in the Puget Lowland region acquired by Terrapoint, LLC for the Puget Sound Lidar Consortium in the winters of 2000 and 2001. SLA-02 and SLICER acquired waveforms that record the height distribution of illuminated surfaces within 120 m and 10 m diameter footprints, respectively. The Terrapoint elevations consist of up to four discrete returns from 1 m footprints spaced 1.5 apart, with all areas mapped twice. Methods for comparing laser altimeter and SRTM topography developed here will be applied on a global basis as Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite and Vegetation Canopy Lidar laser altimeter waveform data and final SRTM products become available.

  12. Comparative analyses for the prediction of streamflow from small watershed by use of digitized radar data 

    E-print Network

    Braatz, Dean Thomas

    1973-01-01

    characteristics of the WSR-57. Table 2. Characteristics of the WSR-57 weather radar used by NSSL. (Source: NWS, NOAA) Band Wavelength Peak power Pulse repetition frequency (PRF) Pulse length Minimum detectable signal Beam wid th Antenna gain Normal scan... on radar data, After several years of development, the automatic radar- signal processing and data communication system is undergoing evaluation during the testing period of the D/RADEX as to its operational performance. Basically, each automatic...

  13. Magellan - Radar performance and data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettengill, Gordon H.; Ford, Peter G.; Johnson, William T. K.; Raney, R. Keith; Soderblom, Laurence A.

    1991-04-01

    The Magellan Venus orbiter carries only one scientific instrument: a 12.6-centimeter-wavelength radar system shared among three data-taking modes. The synthetic-aperture mode images radar echoes from the Venus surface at a resolution of between 120 and 300 meters, depending on spacecraft altitude. In the altimetric mode, relative height measurement accuracies may approach 5 meters, depending on the terrain's roughness, although orbital uncertainties place a floor of about 50 meters on the absolute uncertainty. In areas of extremely rough topography, accuracy is limited by the inherent line-of-sight radar resolution of about 88 meters. The maximum elevation observed to date, corresponding to a planetary radius of 6062 kilometers, lies within Maxwell Mons. When used as a thermal emission radiometer, the system can determine surface emissivities to an absolute accuracy of about 0.02. Mosaicked and archival digital data products will be released in compact disk (CDROM) format.

  14. Magellan: Radar performance and data products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pettengill, G.H.; Ford, P.G.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Raney, R.K.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Magellan Venus orbiter carries only one scientific instrument: a 12.6-centimeter-wavelength radar system shared among three data-taking modes. The syntheticaperture mode images radar echoes from the Venus surface at a resolution of between 120 and 300 meters, depending on spacecraft altitude. In the altimetric mode, relative height measurement accuracies may approach 5 meters, depending on the terrain's roughness, although orbital uncertainties place a floor of about 50 meters on the absolute uncertainty. In areas of extremely rough topography, accuracy is limited by the inherent line-of-sight radar resolution of about 88 meters. The maximum elevation observed to date, corresponding to a planetary radius of 6062 kilometers, lies within Maxwell Mons. When used as a thermal emission radiometer, the system can determine surface emissivities to an absolute accuracy of about 0.02. Mosaicked and archival digital data products will be released in compact disk (CDROM) format.

  15. In-flight detection of errors for enhanced aircraft flight safety and vertical accuracy improvement using digital terrain elevation data with an inertial navigation system, global positioning system and radar altimeter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Anthony Gray

    1999-01-01

    This dissertation discusses integration architectures using digital terrain elevation data (DTED) with an inertial navigation system (INS), a global positioning system (GPS) and a radar altimeter. Two integration architectures are considered: DTED with INS, GPS and radar altimeter for aircraft vertical accuracy improvement during the final approach; and DTED with kinematic GPS (KGPS) and a radar altimeter for enhanced aircraft

  16. Integration of radar altimeter, precision navigation, and digital terrain data for low-altitude flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelenka, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    A Kalman filter for the integration of a radar altimeter into a terrain database-dependent guidance system was developed. Results obtained from a low-altitude helicopter flight test data acquired over moderately rugged terrain showed that the proposed Kalman filter removes large disparities in predicted above-ground-level (AGL) altitude in the presence of measurement anomalies and dropouts. Integration of a radar altimeter makes it possible to operate a near-terrain guidance system at or below 50 ft (subject to obstacle-avoidance limitations), whereas without radar altimeter integration, a minimum clearance altitude of 220 AGL is needed, as is suggested by previous work.

  17. Soviet oceanographic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) research

    SciTech Connect

    Held, D.N.; Gasparovic, R.F.; Mansfield, A.W.; Melville, W.K.; Mollo-Christensen, E.L.; Zebker, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    Radar non-acoustic anti-submarine warfare (NAASW) became the subject of considerable scientific investigation and controversy in the West subsequent to the discovery by the Seasat satellite in 1978 that manifestations of underwater topography, thought to be hidden from the radar, were visible in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the ocean. In addition, the Seasat radar produced images of ship wakes where the observed angle between the wake arms was much smaller than expected from classical Kelvin wake theory. These observations cast doubt on the radar oceanography community's ability to adequately explain these phenomena, and by extension on the ability of existing hydrodynamic and radar scattering models to accurately predict the observability of submarine-induced signatures. If one is of the opinion that radar NAASW is indeed a potentially significant tool in detecting submerged operational submarines, then the Soviet capability, as evidenced throughout this report, will be somewhat daunting. It will be shown that the Soviets have extremely fine capabilities in both theoretical and experimental hydrodynamics, that Soviet researchers have been conducting at-sea radar remote sensing experiments on a scale comparable to those of the United States for several years longer than we have, and that they have both an airborne and spaceborne SAR capability. The only discipline that the Soviet Union appears to be lacking is in the area of digital radar signal processing. If one is of the opinion that radar NAASW can have at most a minimal impact on the detection of submerged submarines, then the Soviet effort is of little consequence and poses not threat. 280 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Digital Map Products from the Cassini RADAR in the NASA Planetary Data System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Becker, T. L.; Garcia, P.; Barrett, J. M.; Stiles, B. W.; Legall, A.; Janssen, M. A.; Wye, L.; Zebker, H. A.; Cassini RADAR Science Team

    2010-03-01

    A new set of Titan maps, made from Cassini RADAR prime mission data, will be delivered early in 2010. Consistent presentation of diverse data sets in simple projections with extensive indexing should greatly facilitate comparative Titan research.

  19. A Digital Interface for Imagery and Control of a Navico\\/Lowrance Broadband Radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adrian Dabrowski; Sebastian Busch; Roland Stelzer

    \\u000a The paper describes a method to establish compatibility between an autonomous surface vessel control system and a Navico Broadband\\u000a Radar BR24. The solution obtains radar imagery and control of the antenna unit over its standard Ethernet interface, making\\u000a the proprietary controller unit optional. It presents devices, software and methods used for empirical protocol analysis and\\u000a documents the findings. Protocol details

  20. space Radar Image of Long Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    An area near Long Valley, California, was mapped by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavor on April 13, 1994, during the first flight of the radar instrument, and on October 4, 1994, during the second flight of the radar instrument. The orbital configurations of the two data sets were ideal for interferometric combination -- that is overlaying the data from one image onto a second image of the same area to create an elevation map and obtain estimates of topography. Once the topography is known, any radar-induced distortions can be removed and the radar data can be geometrically projected directly onto a standard map grid for use in a geographical information system. The 50 kilometer by 50 kilometer (31 miles by 31 miles) map shown here is entirely derived from SIR-C L-band radar (horizontally transmitted and received) results. The color shown in this image is produced from the interferometrically determined elevations, while the brightness is determined by the radar backscatter. The map is in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates. Elevation contour lines are shown every 50 meters (164 feet). Crowley Lake is the dark feature near the south edge of the map. The Adobe Valley in the north and the Long Valley in the south are separated by the Glass Mountain Ridge, which runs through the center of the image. The height accuracy of the interferometrically derived digital elevation model is estimated to be 20 meters (66 feet) in this image. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  1. Soviet oceanographic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. N. Held; R. F. Gasparovic; A. W. Mansfield; W. K. Melville; E. L. Mollo-Christensen; H. A. Zebker

    1991-01-01

    Radar non-acoustic anti-submarine warfare (NAASW) became the subject of considerable scientific investigation and controversy in the West subsequent to the discovery by the Seasat satellite in 1978 that manifestations of underwater topography, thought to be hidden from the radar, were visible in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the ocean. In addition, the Seasat radar produced images of ship wakes

  2. Low resolution radar digital interface. [with data recorder for precipitation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This document describes the design and operation of a low resolution radar data recording system for precipitation measurements. This system records a full azimuth scan on seven track magnetic tapes every five minutes. It is designed to operate on a continuous basis with operator intervention required only for changing tape reels and calibration.

  3. Using X-band Weather Radar Measurements to Monitor the Integrity of Digital Elevation Models for Synthetic Vision Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steve; UijtdeHaag, Maarten; Sayre, Jonathon

    2003-01-01

    Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) provide pilots with displays of stored geo-spatial data representing terrain, obstacles, and cultural features. As comprehensive validation is impractical, these databases typically have no quantifiable level of integrity. Further, updates to the databases may not be provided as changes occur. These issues limit the certification level and constrain the operational context of SVS for civil aviation. Previous work demonstrated the feasibility of using a realtime monitor to bound the integrity of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) by using radar altimeter measurements during flight. This paper describes an extension of this concept to include X-band Weather Radar (WxR) measurements. This enables the monitor to detect additional classes of DEM errors and to reduce the exposure time associated with integrity threats. Feature extraction techniques are used along with a statistical assessment of similarity measures between the sensed and stored features that are detected. Recent flight-testing in the area around the Juneau, Alaska Airport (JNU) has resulted in a comprehensive set of sensor data that is being used to assess the feasibility of the proposed monitor technology. Initial results of this assessment are presented.

  4. Monthly and seasonal occurrences of potential flash flood-producing rains determined from Manually Digitized Radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of a small 4-year climatological data base of Manually Digitized Radar (MDR) data to infer the monthly and seasonal distributions of the relative frequency of occurrence of potential flash flood-producing rains over the Central and Eastern U.S. Some possible meteorological mechanisms for producing potential flash flooding rains are discussed in terms of the relative maxima and minima in the monthly and seasonal frequency distributions over the MDR network. Frequencies were found to be generally higher in more southern locations and lower farther north in all months and seasons. However, most locations experienced an annual cycle in the frequency of occurrence with maxima in summer and minima in winter. In given seasons and months, local areas of maximum and minimum occurrences may be related to quasi-stationary meteorological processes that trigger and organize intense convection over a common area.

  5. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar and the Data Collection System Digital Terrain Elevation Demonstration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Heidelbach; R. Bolus; J. Chadwick

    1994-01-01

    Digital Terrain Elevations (DTE) that can be rapidly generated, and that have better fidelity and accuracy than Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) Levels 1 or 2, would be extremely beneficial to Department of Defense (DOD) military operations, civil works programs, and various commercial applications. As a result, the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), along with the U.S. Army Topographic Engineering

  6. Global Topography and Tectonic Plates

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Greene

    The goal of this activity is to investigate global topographic and tectonic features, especially the tectonic plates and their boundaries. Using a double-page size digital topographic map of the Earth that includes both land and sea floor topography, students are asked to draw plate boundaries, deduce plate motions and interactions, and explore the connections between topography and tectonic processes at the global scale.

  7. Multidimensional radar picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waz, Mariusz

    2010-05-01

    In marine navigation systems, the three-dimensional (3D) visualization is often and often used. Echosonders and sonars working in hydroacustic systems can present pictures in three dimensions. Currently, vector maps also offer 3D presentation. This presentation is used in aviation and underwater navigation. In the nearest future three-dimensional presentation may be obligatory presentation in displays of navigation systems. A part of these systems work with radar and communicates with it transmitting data in a digital form. 3D presentation of radar picture require a new technology to develop. In the first step it is necessary to compile digital form of radar signal. The modern navigation radar do not present data in three-dimensional form. Progress in technology of digital signal processing make it possible to create multidimensional radar pictures. For instance, the RSC (Radar Scan Converter) - digital radar picture recording and transforming tool can be used to create new picture online. Using RSC and techniques of modern computer graphics multidimensional radar pictures can be generated. The radar pictures mentioned should be readable for ECDIS. The paper presents a method for generating multidimensional radar picture from original signal coming from radar receiver.

  8. Applications of digital radar in the analysis of severe local storms 

    E-print Network

    Vogel, John Everett

    1973-01-01

    ) and Wilk and Gray (1970). A block diagram describing the acquisition, recording, and processing of the signals received by the NSSL, WSR-57 radar i. s shown in Fig. 1. As shown in the diagram, the target echo is detected and processed generally... gain Pulse length Beam width Wavelength Pulse repeti. tion frequency Minimum detectable signal 450 kw 7. 079 x 10 3 1. 20 x 10 m 3 2. 0 deg 1. 04 x 10 m -1 164 sec -110 dbm STC PRE-AMP LOG IF [ Signai Averogs~ng VIDEO AMPLIFIER 200...

  9. Mars Topography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This educational brief discusses the advances in our knowledge of Mars topography brought about by the high-resolution map produced from Mars Laser Orbiter Altimeter (MOLA) data. Individual features and regions are described along with any new insights provided by MOLA into their origins.

  10. Real-time signal construction and digital quadrature modulation for pulse Doppler radar clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhiheng; Xu, Jiaxiang; Chen, Xunda

    2001-08-01

    The signal processors in pulse Doppler radar can detect the target signal which is spectrally separated from clutter, even if the signal is -60 dB weaker or more than main- lobe clutter, so in missile hardware-in-the-loop it is required that the noise resulted by clutter reconstruction architecture should be -60 dB lower than main-lobe clutter. Because of the restriction, a new method of clutter reconstruction with specific power spectrum is proposed, which include conversion from power spectrum to vector spectrum, randomization of phase, inverse Fourier transform, and then windowing and overlapping the series time domain sequence, which guarantee the expectation value and variance of random sequence continuously. The simulation results demonstrate that by applying the method, the ratio of signal to noise is increased from 30 dB to 60 dB.

  11. Opening and closing of sea ice leads - Digital measurements from synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fily, M.; Rothrock, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm that uses two sequential SAR digital images to measure the opening and closing of sea ice leads is introduced. The methods used to analyze the SAR images is described, including the mesh of tie points and the classification of leads and ice. The results of the anaylsis are compared with independent manual measurements, showing that the cells covering each lead are best interpreted as opening or closing in a group, rather than individually. Also, consideration is given to an automated algorithm for grouping cells, the possibility of simplifying the method, and the relationship between the opening and closing measurements and the theory of their parametric relation to mean deformation.

  12. VISAR: A Next Generation Inteferometric Radar for Venus Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, S.; Smrekar, S.; Shaffer, S.; Paller, M.; Figueroa, H.; Freeman, A.; Hodges, R.; Walkemayer, P.

    2015-04-01

    The VERITAS Mission is a proposed mission to Venus designed to obtain high resolution imagery and topography of the surface using an X-band radar configured as a single pass radar interferometer coupled with a multispectral NIR mapping capability.

  13. Visualizing Topography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stephen Reynolds

    2006-01-01

    Topographic maps that display three-dimensional landscapes on two-dimensional surfaces can offer a great deal of spatial information in minimal space. However, it is often difficult for people to interpret the features on a topographic map. This interactive feature adapted from Stephen Reynolds's 'Visualizing Topography' website offers color-enhanced and three-dimensional visualizations to help interpret two-dimensional topographic maps. Users can introduce shading, tilt, and rotate the maps to better see the three dimensional feature being represented by the map.

  14. The Dawn Topography Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, C. A.; Jaumann, R.; Nathues, A.; Sierks, H.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, E; Scholten, F.; Gaskell, R. W.; Jorda, L.; Keller, H.-U.; Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Mastrodemos, N.; Mottola, S.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the Dawn topography investigation is to derive the detailed shapes of 4 Vesta and 1 Ceres in order to create orthorectified image mosaics for geologic interpretation, as well as to study the asteroids' landforms, interior structure, and the processes that have modified their surfaces over geologic time. In this paper we describe our approaches for producing shape models, plans for acquiring the needed image data for Vesta, and the results of a numerical simulation of the Vesta mapping campaign that quantify the expected accuracy of our results. Multi-angle images obtained by Dawn's framing camera will be used to create topographic models with 100 m/pixel horizontal resolution and 10 m height accuracy at Vesta, and 200 m/pixel horizontal resolution and 20 m height accuracy at Ceres. Two different techniques, stereophotogrammetry and stereophotoclinometry, are employed to model the shape; these models will be merged with the asteroidal gravity fields obtained by Dawn to produce geodetically controlled topographic models for each body. The resulting digital topography models, together with the gravity data, will reveal the tectonic, volcanic and impact history of Vesta, and enable co-registration of data sets to determine Vesta's geologic history. At Ceres, the topography will likely reveal much about processes of surface modification as well as the internal structure and evolution of this dwarf planet.

  15. Gallery of Virtual Topography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stephen Reynolds

    The Gallery of Virtual Topography features virtual depictions of topography, including 3D perspectives and QuickTime Virtual Reality (QTVR) movies, created from Digital Elevation Models (DEM's). The site showcases QTVR object movies where the user can spin a 3D terrain to view it from different perspectives. It also includes static 3D-perspective images (JPEG files) of the 3D terrains for those users with slower Internet connections. Some movies and images depict only the form of the landscape, but in others topographic contours are draped over the landscape to better illustrate how contours portray different types of topography (cliffs versus badlands, for example). Some animations illustrate the significance of contours, by allowing the user to progressively fill the landscape up with water to see the water interact with different topographic features. The site also contains a topographic contour map for each 3D terrain, so that instructors can develop student exercises, such as locating points on a map and constructing topographic profiles. Some QTVR movies contain numbered topographic features just for this purpose.

  16. A new 1 km Digital Elevation Model of the Antarctic Derived From Combined Satellite Radar and Laser Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griggs, J. A.; Bamber, J. L.; Gomez-Dans, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) of Antarctica have been derived, previously, from satellite radar altimetry (SRA) and limited terrestrial data. Near the ice sheet margins and in areas of steep relief the SRA data tend to have relatively poor coverage and accuracy. To remedy this and to extend the coverage beyond the latitudinal limit of the SRA missions (81.5° S) we have combined laser altimeter measurements from the Geosciences Laser Altimeter System onboard ICESat with SRA data from the geodetic phase of ERS-1. The former provide decimetre vertical accuracy but poor spatial coverage. The latter have excellent spatial coverage but poorer vertical accuracy. By combining the radar and laser data using an optimal approach we have maximised the vertical accuracy and spatial resolution of the DEM and minimised the number of grid cells with an interpolated elevation estimate. We assessed the optimum resolution for producing a DEM which was found to be 1 km. This resulted in just under 35% of grid cells having an interpolated value. The accuracy of the final DEM was assessed using a suite of independent airborne altimeter data. The RMS error in the new DEM was found to be roughly half that of the best previous 5 km resolution, SRA-derived DEM, with marked improvements in the steeper marginal and mountainous areas and between 81.5 and 86° S. RMS differences varied from 4.84 m over the Siple Coast region of West Antarctica to 29.28 m when compared to a more limited dataset over the Antarctic Peninsula. The airborne data sets were used to produce an error map for the DEM by developing a multiple linear regression model based on the variables known to influence errors in the DEM. Errors were found to correlate highly with surface slope, roughness and density of satellite data points. Errors ranged from typically sim1 m over the ice shelves to about 4-10 m for the majority of the grounded ice sheet. In the steeply sloping margins and mountain ranges the estimated error is several 10's m. Slightly less than 7% of the area covered by the satellite data had an estimated random error greater than 20 m.

  17. Decoders for MST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Decoding techniques and equipment used by MST radars are described and some recommendations for new systems are presented. Decoding can be done either by software in special-purpose (array processors, etc.) or general-purpose computers or in specially designed digital decoders. Both software and hardware decoders are discussed and the special case of decoding for bistatic radars is examined.

  18. Target identification from radar signatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Strattan

    1978-01-01

    Modern high resolution radar techniques and real time digital signal processing advances indicate the feasibility of extracting characteristic features of aircraft targets from their radar signatures. Two basic approaches have been suggested. The low frequency approach utilizes harmonically related radar frequencies with wavelengths comparable to the target dimensions. The microwave approach utilizes spread spectrum techniques to achieve high range resolution.

  19. Radar data processing and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ausherman, D.; Larson, R.; Liskow, C.

    1976-01-01

    Digitized four-channel radar images corresponding to particular areas from the Phoenix and Huntington test sites were generated in conjunction with prior experiments performed to collect X- and L-band synthetic aperture radar imagery of these two areas. The methods for generating this imagery are documented. A secondary objective was the investigation of digital processing techniques for extraction of information from the multiband radar image data. Following the digitization, the remaining resources permitted a preliminary machine analysis to be performed on portions of the radar image data. The results, although necessarily limited, are reported.

  20. Spatial relationship of groundwater arsenic distribution with regional topography and water-table fluctuations in the shallow aquifers in Bangladesh

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Shamsudduha; L. J. Marzen; A. Uddin; M.-K. Lee; J. A. Saunders

    2009-01-01

    The present study has examined the relationship of groundwater arsenic (As) levels in alluvial aquifers with topographic elevation,\\u000a slope, and groundwater level on a large basinal-scale using high-resolution (90 m × 90 m) Shuttle Radar Topography Mission\\u000a (SRTM) digital elevation model and water-table data in Bangladesh. Results show that high As (>50 ?g\\/l) tubewells are located\\u000a in low-lying areas, where mean surface elevation is approximately

  1. Radar in transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, D. K.

    1984-12-01

    It is pointed out that radar engineers, at the end of 1984, find their field in transition between the conventional designs of the post War II era and the digitally controlled, solid-state systems which will be in place for the year 2000. The U.S. Navy has two major phased array radar systems in operation, including the rotating three-dimensional (3D) AN/SPS-48, and the phased-scanned AN/SPY-1 (Aegis) radars. The Aegis represents a major step beyond the conventional 3D and mechanical fire-control radars. However, it requires a special ship, dedicated to its use. Attention is given to questions regarding an extension of the application of Aegis technology to other U.S. Navy applications and to other navies, an ambitious solid-state radar program in the UK, and Army radars.

  2. Radar Investigations of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    Radar investigations of asteroids, including observations during 1984 to 1985 of at least 8 potential targets and continued analyses of radar data obtained during 1980 to 1984 for 30 other asteroids is proposed. The primary scientific objectives include estimation of echo strength, polarization, spectral shape, spectral bandwidth, and Doppler shift. These measurements yield estimates of target size, shape, and spin vector; place constraints on topography, morphology, density, and composition of the planetary surface; yield refined estimates of target orbital parameters; and reveals the presence of asteroidal satellites.

  3. Temperate Ice Depth-Sounding Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara-Olivares, V. A.; Player, K.; Rodriguez-Morales, F.; Gogineni, P.

    2008-12-01

    Glaciers in several parts of the world are reported to be retreating and thinning rapidly over the last decade. Radar instruments can be used to provide a wealth of information regarding the internal and basal conditions of large and small ice masses. These instruments typically operate in the VHF and UHF regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. For temperate-ice sounding, however, the high water content produces scattering and attenuation in propagating radar waves at VHF and UHF frequencies, which significantly reduce the penetration depths. Radars operating in the HF band are better suited for systematic surveys of the thickness and sub-glacial topography of temperate-ice regions. We are developing a dual-frequency Temperate-Ice-Depth Sounding Radar (TIDSoR) that can penetrate through water pockets, thus providing more accurate measurements of temperate ice properties such as thickness and basal conditions. The radar is a light-weight, low power consumption portable system for surface-based observations in mountainous terrain or aerial surveys. TIDSoR operates at two different center frequencies: 7.7 MHz and 14 MHz, with a maximum output peak power of 20 W. The transmit waveform is a digitally generated linear frequency-modulated chirp with 1 MHz bandwidth. The radar can be installed on aircrafts such as the CReSIS UAV [1], DCH-6 (Twin Otter), or P-3 Orion for aerial surveys, where it could be supported by the airplane power system. For surface based experiments, TIDSoR can operate in a backpack configuration powered by a compact battery system. The system can also be installed on a sled towed by a motorized vehicle, in which case the power supply can be replaced by a diesel generator. The radar consists of three functional blocks: the digital section, the radio-frequency (RF) section, and the antenna, and is designed to weigh less than 2 kg, excluding the power supply. The digital section generates the transmit waveforms as well as timing and control signals. It also digitizes the output signal from the receiver and stores the data in binary format using a portable computer. The RF-section consists of a high- power transmitter and a low-noise receiver with digitally controlled variable gain. The antenna is time-shared between the transmitter and receiver by means of a transmit/receive (T/R) switch. In regards to the antenna, we have made a survey study of various electrically small antennas (ESA) to choose the most suitable radiating structure for this application. Among the different alternatives that provide a good trade-off between electrical performance and small size, we have adopted an ESA dipole configuration for airborne platforms and a half-wavelength radiator for the surface-based version. The airborne antenna solution is given after studying the geometry of the aerial vehicle and its fuselage contribution to the antenna radiation pattern. Dipoles are made of 11.6 mm diameter cables (AWG 0000) or printed patches embedded into the aircraft fuselage, wings, or both. The system is currently being integrated and tested. TIDSoR is expected to be deployed during the spring 2008 either in Alaska or Greenland for surface based observations. In this paper, we will discuss our design considerations and current progress towards the development of this radar system. [1] Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (Cresis), Sept 2008, [Online]. Available: http://www.cresis.ku.edu

  4. Dunes on Titan observed by Cassini Radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Radebaugh; R. D. Lorenz; J. I. Lunine; S. D. Wall; G. Boubin; E. Reffet; R. L. Kirk; R. M. Lopes; E. R. Stofan; L. Soderblom; M. Allison; M. Janssen; P. Paillou; P. Callahan; C. Spencer

    2008-01-01

    Thousands of longitudinal dunes have recently been discovered by the Titan Radar Mapper on the surface of Titan. These are found mainly within ±30° of the equator in optically-, near-infrared-, and radar-dark regions, indicating a strong proportion of organics, and cover well over 5% of Titan's surface. Their longitudinal duneform, interactions with topography, and correlation with other aeolian forms indicate

  5. Topographic mapping using a multibeam radar altimeter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chester L. Parsons; Edward J. Walsh; Douglas C. Vandemark

    1994-01-01

    An airborne radar altimeter operating at 36 GHz is uniquely capable of measuring the topography of water, land, and ice surfaces. The Multimode Airborne Radar Altimeter (MARA) was designed to combine a narrow transmitted pulsewidth, a high transmitted power level, and a narrow antenna beam to produce a high-precision ranging capability at the nadir of the aircraft platform and at

  6. Shuttle imaging radar experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elachi, C.; Brown, W.E.; Cimino, J.B.; Dixon, T.; Evans, D.L.; Ford, J.P.; Saunders, R.S.; Breed, C.; Masursky, H.; McCauley, J.F.; Schaber, G.; Dellwig, L.; England, A.; MacDonald, H.; Martin-Kaye, P.; Sabins, F.

    1982-01-01

    The shuttle imaging radar (SIR-A) acquired images of a variety of the earth's geologic areas covering about 10 million square kilometers. Structural and geomorphic features such as faults, folds, outcrops, and dunes are clearly visible in both tropical and arid regions. The combination of SIR-A and Seasat images provides additional information about the surface physical properties: topography and roughness. Ocean features were also observed, including large internal waves in the Andaman Sea. Copyright ?? 1982 AAAS.

  7. Synthetic aperture radar and interferometry development at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-04-01

    Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Many times the imagery must be acquired in inclement weather or during night as well as day. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) provides such a capability. SAR systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex information processing capability of modern digital electronics to provide high resolution imagery. SAR complements photographic and other optical imaging capabilities because of the minimum constrains on time-of-day and atmospheric conditions and because of the unique responses of terrain and cultural targets to radar frequencies. Interferometry is a method for generating a three-dimensional image of terrain. The height projection is obtained by acquiring two SAR images from two slightly differing locations. It is different from the common method of stereoscopic imaging for topography. The latter relies on differing geometric projections for triangulation to define the surface geometry whereas interferometry relies on differences in radar propagation times between the two SAR locations. This paper presents the capabilities of SAR, explains how SAR works, describes a few SAR applications, provides an overview of SAR development at Sandia, and briefly describes the motion compensation subsystem.

  8. Topography over South America from ERS altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Anita; Frey, Herb; DiMarzio, John; Tsaoussi, Lucia

    1997-01-01

    The results of the surface topography mapping of South America during the ERS-1 geodetic mission are presented. The altimeter waveforms, the range measurement, and the internal and Doppler range corrections were obtained. The atmospheric corrections and solid tides were calculated. Comparisons between Shuttle laser altimetry and ERS-1 altimetry grid showed good agreement. Satellite radar altimetry data can be used to improve the topographic knowledge of regions for which only poor elevation data currently exist.

  9. Cassini Radar hardware technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, K.; Renick, P. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The hardware development portion of the Cassini Radar task is complete. The flight model Digital Assembly and Energy Storage Assembly have been integrated and tested, as has the engineering/qualification model Radio Frequency Electronics Assembly. Integration of the flight model Radio Frequency Electronics Assembly is ready to begin. The intent of this paper is to describe some of the more interesting technologies implemented in the electronics to achieve the requirements of the Cassini Radar experiment. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Terminal Doppler weather radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Michelson; W. W. Shrader; J. G. Wieler

    1990-01-01

    The terminal Doppler weather radar (TDWR) system, now under development, will provide automatic detection of microbursts and low-level wind shear. This paper discusses the TDWR performance parameters and describes its structural elements, including the antenna subsystem, the transmitter, the receiver\\/exciter, the digital signal processor, and the radar product generator\\/remote monitoring subsystem. Attention is also given to the processes of the

  11. Moiré topography in odontology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Moreno Yeras

    2003-01-01

    For several decades, measurement of optical techniques has been used in different branches of science and technology. One of these techniques is the so-called moiré topography (MT) that enables the accurate measurement of different parts of the human body topography. This investigation presents the measurement of topographies of teeth and gums using an automated system of shadow moiré and the

  12. Goldstone radar contributions to Mars Pathfinder landing safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slade, Martin A.; Jurgens, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    Goldstar radar can provide topography 'profiles', statistical surface roughness, and radar images within a few degrees of the sub-Earth point. Goldstone/Very Large Array (VLA) bistatic radar observations can image the whole disk of Mars with integration times on the order of ten min before pixel smearing occurs. Data from all these radar techniques can be useful for observing the local surface conditions relating to landing safety issues for Mars Pathfinder.

  13. Venus topography - A harmonic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bills, B. G.; Kobrick, M.

    1985-01-01

    A model of Venusian global topography has been obtained by fitting an eighteenth-degree harmonic series to Pioneer Venus orbiter radar altimeter data. The mean radius is (6051.45 + or - 0.04) km. The corresponding mean density is (5244.8 + or 0.5) kg/cu m. The center of figure is displaced from the center of mass by (0.339 + or - 0.088) km towards (6.6 + or 10.1) deg N, (148. 8 + or - 7.7) deg. The figure of Venus is distinctly triaxial, but the orientation and magnitudes of the principal topographic axes correlate rather poorly with the gravitational principal axes. However, the higher-degree harmonics of topography and gravity are significantly correlated. The topographic variance spectrum of Venus is very similar in form to those of the moon, Mars, and especially earth. It is suggested that this spectral similarity simply reflects a statistical balance between constructional and degradational geomorphic proceses. Venus and earth are particularly similar (and differ from the moon and Mars) in that the larger bodies both exhibit a significant low degree deficit (relative to the extrapolated trend of the higher harmonics).

  14. A new 1 km digital elevation model of the Antarctic derived from combined satellite radar and laser data Part 1: Data and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamber, J. L.; Gomez-Dans, J. L.; Griggs, J. A.

    2008-11-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) of Antarctica have been derived, previously, from satellite radar altimetry (SRA) and limited terrestrial data. Near the ice sheet margins and in other areas of steep relief the SRA data tend to have relatively poor coverage and accuracy. To remedy this and to extend the coverage beyond the latitudinal limit of the SRA missions (81.5° S) we have combined laser altimeter measurements from the Geosciences Laser Altimeter System onboard ICESat with SRA data from the geodetic phase of the ERS-1 satellite mission. The former provide decimetre vertical accuracy but with poor spatial coverage. The latter have excellent spatial coverage but a poorer vertical accuracy. By combining the radar and laser data using an optimal approach we have maximised the vertical accuracy and spatial resolution of the DEM and minimised the number of grid cells with an interpolated elevation estimate. We assessed the optimum resolution for producing a DEM based on a trade-off between resolution and interpolated cells, which was found to be 1 km. This resulted in just under 35% of grid cells having an interpolated value. The accuracy of the final DEM was assessed using a suite of independent airborne altimeter data and used to produce an error map. The RMS error in the new DEM was found to be roughly half that of the best previous 5 km resolution, SRA-derived DEM, with marked improvements in the steeper marginal and mountainous areas and between 81.5 and 86° S. The DEM contains a wealth of information related to ice flow. This is particularly apparent for the two largest ice shelves the Filchner-Ronne and Ross where the surface expression of flow of ice streams and outlet glaciers can be traced from the grounding line to the calving front. The surface expression of subglacial lakes and other basal features are also illustrated. We also use the DEM to derive new estimates of balance velocities and ice divide locations.

  15. A new 1 km digital elevation model of the Antarctic derived from combined satellite radar and laser data - Part 1: Data and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamber, J. L.; Gomez-Dans, J. L.; Griggs, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) of the whole of Antarctica have been derived, previously, from satellite radar altimetry (SRA) and limited terrestrial data. Near the ice sheet margins and in other areas of steep relief the SRA data tend to have relatively poor coverage and accuracy. To remedy this and to extend the coverage beyond the latitudinal limit of the SRA missions (81.5° S) we have combined laser altimeter measurements from the Geosciences Laser Altimeter System onboard ICESat with SRA data from the geodetic phase of the ERS-1 satellite mission. The former provide decimetre vertical accuracy but with poor spatial coverage. The latter have excellent spatial coverage but a poorer vertical accuracy. By combining the radar and laser data using an optimal approach we have maximised the vertical accuracy and spatial resolution of the DEM and minimised the number of grid cells with an interpolated elevation estimate. We assessed the optimum resolution for producing a DEM based on a trade-off between resolution and interpolated cells, which was found to be 1 km. This resulted in just under 32% of grid cells having an interpolated value. The accuracy of the final DEM was assessed using a suite of independent airborne altimeter data and used to produce an error map. The RMS error in the new DEM was found to be roughly half that of the best previous 5 km resolution, SRA-derived DEM, with marked improvements in the steeper marginal and mountainous areas and between 81.5 and 86° S. The DEM contains a wealth of information related to ice flow. This is particularly apparent for the two largest ice shelves - the Filchner-Ronne and Ross - where the surface expression of flow of ice streams and outlet glaciers can be traced from the grounding line to the calving front. The surface expression of subglacial lakes and other basal features are also illustrated. We also use the DEM to derive new estimates of balance velocities and ice divide locations.

  16. Radar sector blanker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Roger B.

    1994-03-01

    A radar sector blanker comprises in analog-to-digital converter and a sector controller unit. The analog-to-digital converter receives the analog synchro voltages describing the positioning of a radar antenna and changes these voltages into binary-coded decimal (BCD) information. The sector controller unit comprises a portable housing, a controller system, and a power supply. The controller system includes an OFF comparator circuit, an ON comparator circuit, an S-R latch, and a solid-state switch. Each comparator circuit comprises three cascaded transistor-transistor logic (TTL) integrated chips. The power supply gives a direct-current voltage to the solid-state switch and the TTL chips. The sector blanker blocks transmission for a predetermined rotational region or sector of a radar system.

  17. Digital Base Band Converter As Radar Vlbi Backend / Dbbc K? Ciparošanas Sist?ma Radara Vlbi Nov?rojumiem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccari, G.; Bezrukovs, Vl.; Nechaeva, M.

    2012-12-01

    A digital base band converter (DBBC) system has been developed by the Istituto di Radioastronomia (Noto, Italy) for increasing the sensitivity of European VLBI Network (EVN) by expanding the full observed bandwidth using numerical methods. The output data rate of this VLBI-backend is raised from 1 to 4 Gbps for each radiotelescope. All operations related to the signal processing (frequency translation, amplification, frequency generation with local oscillators, etc.) are transferred to the digital domain, which allows - in addition to well-known advantages coming from digital technologies - achieving better repeatability, precision, simplicity, etc. The maximum input band of DBBC system is 3.5 GHz, and the instantaneous bandwidth is up to 1 GHz for each radio frequency/intermediate frequency (RF/IF) out of the eight possible. This backend is a highly powerful platform for other radioastronomy applications, and a number of additional so-called personalities have been developed and used. This includes PFB (polyphase filter bank) receivers and Spectra for high resolution spectroscopy. An additional new development with the same aim - to use the DBBC system as a multi-purpose backend - is related to the bi-static radar observations including Radar VLBI. In such observations it is possible to study the population of space debris, with detection of even centimetre class fragments. A powerful transmitter is used to illuminate the sky region to be analyzed, and the echoes coming from known or unknown objects are reflected to one or more groundbased telescopes thus producing a single-dish or interferometric detection. The DBBC Radar VLBI personality is able to realize a high-resolution spectrum analysis, maintaining in the central area the echo signal at the expected frequency including the Doppler shift of frequency. For extremely weak signals a very large integration time is needed, so for this personality different input parameters are provided. The realtime information can then allow exploring easily the desired range of search for unknown or not fully determined orbit objects. These features make Radar VLBI personality most useful in the space debris measurements. DBBC sist?ma izstr?d?ta Noto Radioastronomijas instit?t?. Sist?mas galvenaisuzdevums - palielin?t visa Eiropas VLBI t?kla jut?bu - realiz?ts, palielinotvisas nov?rojam?s joslas platumu un pielietojot ciparu sign?lu apstr?des metodes.Izejas datu pl?sma palielin?ta no 1 l?dz 4 Gbps katram radioteleskopam un visasoper?cijas, kas saist?tas ar sign?lu apstr?di (frekvences p?rveidošana, pastiprin?jums,iekš?jie ?eneratori, utt.), realiz?tas digit?l? form?, kas ?auj ieg?t noz?m?gusuzlabojumus atk?rtojam?b?, precizit?t?, vienk?rš?b?, nemaz neminot visp?rzin?m?spriekšroc?bas, ko nodrošina digit?lo tehnolo?iju izmantošana. Maksim?l? ieejassign?la frekven?u josla ir 3.5 GHz, un moment?nais joslas platums ir l?dz 1 GHz uzkatru no asto?iem iesp?jamajiem RF/IF kan?liem. Š? datu re?istr?cijas sist?ma ir?oti veiktsp?j?ga platforma ne tikai EVN, bet ar? citiem radioastronomijas pielietojumiem,un papildus tiek izstr?d?ta vesela virkne programmat?ras pakot?u, kasv?l vair?k paplašina sist?mas funkcionalit?ti. Tas ietver PFB (Polif?zes FiltruBanka) uztv?r?jus "Spectra”, kas piem?roti augstas izš?irtsp?jas spektroskopijasvajadz?b?m. Papildus realiz?ts jaunas programmat?ras risin?jums, ar m?r?iizmantot DBBC sist?mu k? daudzfunkcion?lu datu ciparošanas iek?rtu, kasizmantojama bistatiskiem radara nov?rojumiem, tai skait? ar? rad

  18. An analysis of the data collection modes of a digital weather radar system with respect to significant severe weather features

    E-print Network

    Neyland, Michael Arthur

    1978-01-01

    10 ' r (9a) (9b) Finally, the value of Z is given by e 3 The digital system produces log P rather than log P . Wilk aud Kessler (1970) developed an equation whrch correct- Eq (7), but the correction is usually less than 1 dB. (01P +21ogr+w) 2..., ubstituting Eq (6) into Eq (5) we get log Z = 2 log r + log P + 9. 0 e3 r log Z = 2 log r + log P + 10. 1 e10 r (7a) (7b) The digital value of P is converted to its dBm equivalent (always r negative) through the use of calibration data for each...

  19. Survey and accuracy analysis of radar methods for the topographic photography of the lunar surface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. A. Samsonova

    1985-01-01

    Monostatic and bistatic radar studies of the lunar surface are reviewed. Particular consideration is given to the mapping of the lunar surface from orbital side-looking radar images; a comparison of earth-based radar and Apollo camera mapping results with reference to Mare Crisium area topography; lunar mapping with Apollo-17 ALSE radar imagery; and lunar slope distributions according to bistatic-radar measurements.

  20. Multichannel Receiver Design, Instrumentation, and First Results at the National Weather Radar Testbed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Yeary; Gerald Crain; Allen Zahrai; Christopher D. Curtis; John Meier; Redmond Kelley; Igor R. Ivic; Robert D. Palmer; Richard J. Doviak; G. Zhang; Tian-You Yu

    2012-01-01

    When the National Weather Radar Testbed (NWRT) was installed in 2004, a single-channel digital receiver was implemented so that the radar could mimic typical Weather Surveillance Radar (WSR) version 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) capability. This, however, left unused eight other channels, built into the antenna. This paper describes the hardware instrumentation of a recently completed project that digitizes the radar signals

  1. Radar frequency radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malowicki, E.

    1981-11-01

    A method is presented for the determination of radar frequency radiation power densities that the PAVE PAWS radar system could produce in its air and ground environment. The effort was prompted by the concern of the people in the vicinity of OTIS AFB MA and BEALE AFB CA about the possible radar frequency radiation hazard of the PAVE PAWS radar. The method is based on the following main assumptions that: (a) the total field can be computed as the vector summation of the individual fields due to each antenna element; (b) the individual field can be calculated using distances for which the field point is in the far field of the antenna element. An RFR computer program was coded for the RADC HE 6180 digital computer and exercised to calculate the radiation levels in the air and ground space for the present baseline and the possible Six DB and 10 DB growth systems of the PAVE PAWS radar system at OTIS AFB MA. The average radiation levels due to the surveillance fence were computed for three regions: in the air space in front of the radar, at the radar hazard fence at OTIS AFB MA and at representative ground points in the OTIS AFB vicinity. It was concluded that the radar frequency radiation of PAVE PAWS does not present a hazard to personnel provided there is no entry to the air hazard zone or to the area within the hazard fence. The method developed offers a cost effective way to determine radiation levels from a phased array radar especially in the near field and transition regions.

  2. A novel backpackable ice-penetrating radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Kenichi; Saito, Ryoji; Naruse, Renji

    We have developed a novel ice-penetrating radar system that can be carried on a backpack. Including batteries for a 3 hour continuous measurement, the total weight is 13 kg. In addition, it operates reliably down to -25°C, has a low power consumption of 24 W, and is semi-waterproof. The system has a built-in-one controller with a high-brightness display for reading data quickly, a receiver with 12-bit digitizing, and a 1 kV pulse transmitter in which the pulse amplitude varies by <0.2%. Optical communications between components provides low-noise data acquisition and allows synchronizing of the pulse transmission with sampling. Measurements with the system revealed the 300 m deep bed topography of a temperate valley glacier in the late ablation season.

  3. Gulf of Mexico satellite radar altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, C. G.; Forsythe, R. G.; Parsons, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic topography of the sea surface was measured. The radar altimeter measurements yield average ocean topographic data which are mapped. Seasonal deviations from a 3 year mean topography are presented. The altimeters are also instrumented with sample and hold gates which provide information about the shape and amplitude of the return waveform. Parameters including ocean surface wind speed and the significant wave height are determined. One hundred eighty six wind speed and significant wave height histograms are presented.

  4. Application of ground-penetrating radar, digital optical borehole images, and cores for characterization of porosity hydraulic conductivity and paleokarst in the Biscayne aquifer, southeastern Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents examples of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data from two study sites in southeastern Florida where karstic Pleistocene platform carbonates that comprise the unconfined Biscayne aquifer were imaged. Important features shown on resultant GPR profiles include: (1) upward and lateral qualitative interpretative distribution of porosity and hydraulic conductivity; (2) paleotopographic relief on karstic subaerial exposure surfaces; and (3) vertical stacking of chronostratigraphic high-frequency cycles (HFCs). These characteristics were verified by comparison to rock properties observed and measured in core samples, and identified in digital optical borehole images. Results demonstrate that an empirical relation exists between measured whole-core porosity and hydraulic conductivity, observed porosity on digital optical borehole images, formation conductivity, and GPR reflection amplitudes-as porosity and hydraulic conductivity determined from core and borehole images increases, formation conductivity increases, and GPR reflection amplitude decreases. This relation allows for qualitative interpretation of the vertical and lateral distribution of porosity and hydraulic conductivity within HFCs. Two subtidal HFCs in the uppermost Biscayne aquifer have significantly unique populations of whole-core porosity values and vertical hydraulic conductivity values. Porosity measurements from one cycle has a median value about two to three times greater than the values from the other HFC, and median values of vertical hydraulic-conductivity about three orders of magnitude higher than the other HFC. The HFC with the higher porosity and hydraulic conductivity values is shown as a discrete package of relatively low-amplitude reflections, whereas the HFC characterized by lower porosity and hydraulic-conductivity measurements is expressed by higher amplitude reflections. Porosity and hydraulic-conductivity values measured from whole-core samples, and vuggy porosity identified on digital borehole images from shallowing-upward, peritidal HFCs show that the highest porosity occurs at the base of the cycles, moderate porosity at the middle of the cycles, and lowest porosity occurs at the top of cycles. Hydraulic conductivity is also highest at the base of the peritidal cycles and lowest in the middle to upper parts of cycles. This change in porosity and hydraulic conductivity from bottom to top is visible as an upward variation in reflection amplitude on GPR profiles-lowest amplitudes at the base and highest at the cycle tops. This study demonstrates that GPR can be used to show the qualitative distribution of porosity and hydraulic conductivity within a cycle-stratigraphic framework composed of carbonate HFCs. The distribution of porosity and hydraulic conductivity within HFCs is related to depositional textures. The upward and lateral patterns of the rock facies within the HFCs can be translated to geophysical-log properties and radar facies configurations that could aid in interpretation and prediction of ground-water flow through a carbonate aquifer. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamic Topography Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, Louis

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic Topography Revisited Dynamic topography is usually considered to be one of the trinity of contributing causes to the Earth's non-hydrostatic topography along with the long-term elastic strength of the lithosphere and isostatic responses to density anomalies within the lithosphere. Dynamic topography, thought of this way, is what is left over when other sources of support have been eliminated. An alternate and explicit definition of dynamic topography is that deflection of the surface which is attributable to creeping viscous flow. The problem with the first definition of dynamic topography is 1) that the lithosphere is almost certainly a visco-elastic / brittle layer with no absolute boundary between flowing and static regions, and 2) the lithosphere is, a thermal / compositional boundary layer in which some buoyancy is attributable to immutable, intrinsic density variations and some is due to thermal anomalies which are coupled to the flow. In each case, it is difficult to draw a sharp line between each contribution to the overall topography. The second definition of dynamic topography does seem cleaner / more precise but it suffers from the problem that it is not measurable in practice. On the other hand, this approach has resulted in a rich literature concerning the analysis of large scale geoid and topography and the relation to buoyancy and mechanical properties of the Earth [e.g. refs 1,2,3] In convection models with viscous, elastic, brittle rheology and compositional buoyancy, however, it is possible to examine how the surface topography (and geoid) are supported and how different ways of interpreting the "observable" fields introduce different biases. This is what we will do. References (a.k.a. homework) [1] Hager, B. H., R. W. Clayton, M. A. Richards, R. P. Comer, and A. M. Dziewonski (1985), Lower mantle heterogeneity, dynamic topography and the geoid, Nature, 313(6003), 541-545, doi:10.1038/313541a0. [2] Parsons, B., and S. Daly (1983), The relationship between surface topography, gravity anomalies, and temperature structure of convection, Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth (1978-2012), 88(B2), 1129-1144, doi:10.1029/JB088iB02p01129. [3] Robinson, E. M., B. Parsons, and S. F. Daly (1987), The effect of a shallow low viscosity zone on the apparent compensation of mid-plate swells, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 82(3-4), 335-348, doi:10.1016/0012-821X(87)90207-X.

  6. Radar Studies in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Irwin I.

    1996-01-01

    We aid in a study of the solar system by means of ground-based radar. We have concentrated on (1) developing the ephemerides needed to acquire radar data at Arecibo Observatory and (2) analyzing the resultant data to: test fundamental laws of gravitation; determine the size, shape, topography, and spin vectors of the targets; and study the surface properties of these objects, through their scattering law and polarization characteristics.

  7. Reconstruction of Titan topography using generic stereo processor and its potential application for the investigation of surface process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungrack; Wan, Wanhui

    2015-04-01

    altimetry and stereo analyses have been widely used for this purpose and achieved high quality 3D topographic data over various planetary surfaces such as Venus, Mercury, Moon and Mars. However, in contrast with inner plane and satellite, the base data sets to compose digital topography over outer planets and satellites are very limited. Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn has also too limited data inventory to achieve sufficient spatial resolution in topographic data, in spite of increasing interests about the detailed topography owing to the recent interesting discoveries on methane fluvial system, aeolian geomorphologies and possible tectonic activity. Therefore the endeavours to increase the coverage of digital topography employing radargrammetry (Kirk et al. 2009), radar altimetry (Elachi, et al. 2005) and SARtopo (Stiles et al. 2009) have been actively conducted. Although these efforts result in the construction of a global topographic map, the consequent spatial resolutions of global topography is still poor and cover the resolution ranges from 520m to 1700m (Lorentz et al. 2013). In this study, we tried to improve the coverage and the quality of Titan digital terrain model employing approaches as follows; 1) A semi-automated stereo matching scheme manipulating low signal-to-noise SAR image pair incorporating adaptive filtering and base topography, 2) the geodetic control improvement of stereo SAR pair based on generic sensor model and tie points, 3) the introduction of radarclinometry to refine the topography from stereo analyses. The developed scheme was applied for a few testing areas especially over the fluvial channels and the lakes which are only the acting hydrological system in solar system except terrestrial one and well covered by SAR images. Considering geodetic controllability over the SAR images is better than 3-4 pixel when the images were projected onto zero height plane, it was evaluated that the stereo processed using the generic sensor model produced stable DTM and ortho image. The estimated max resolution of radargrammetric DTM by the proposed system is 0.7 km. The constructed topography revealed many interesting geomorphic features such as drainage networks, rugged terrains and impact craters in detail. Since geodetic accuracies of DTMs are consequently guaranteed compared with the known height ranges, it will be possible to apply the constructed DTMs for the interpretation and modelling of Titan surface processes. Therefore, we tried the hydrodynamic simulation over the channels around Ligeia Mare using DTM constructed by radargrammetry and radarclinometry and observed the accordance between the simulation output and the real world topography. To fully demonstrate the potential of these approaches, technical details will be continuously improved and applied over more test areas. The introduction of advanced radarclinometric techniques considering radar illumination conditions together with the improved image matcher incorporating contouring matching will be next tasks.

  8. Radar Entomology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    0000-00-00

    Radar tracking used to profile insect migration, mating and flight patterns. Many links to various pages include current workers in radar entomology, historical uses of the technology, and many images.

  9. Moire topography in odontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Yeras, A.

    2001-08-01

    For several decades measurement optical techniques have been used in different branches of Science and Technology and in medicine. One of these techniques is the so-called Moire topography that allows the accurate measurement of different parts of the human body topography. This investigation presents the measurement of topographies of teeth and gums using an automated system of shadow moire, with which precision can be reached up to the order of the microns by the phase shift instrumentation in an original way. Advantages and disadvantages of using the Moire topography and its comparison with other techniques used in the optical metrology are presented. Also, some positive and negative aspects of the implementation of this technique are shown in dentistry.

  10. Radar principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Toru

    1989-01-01

    Discussed here is a kind of radar called atmospheric radar, which has as its target clear air echoes from the earth's atmosphere produced by fluctuations of the atmospheric index of refraction. Topics reviewed include the vertical structure of the atmosphere, the radio refractive index and its fluctuations, the radar equation (a relation between transmitted and received power), radar equations for distributed targets and spectral echoes, near field correction, pulsed waveforms, the Doppler principle, and velocity field measurements.

  11. Using 3D Printers to Model Earth Surface Topography for Increased Student Understanding and Retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thesenga, David; Town, James

    2014-05-01

    In February 2000, the Space Shuttle Endeavour flew a specially modified radar system during an 11-day mission. The purpose of the multinational Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) was to "obtain elevation data on a near-global scale to generate the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of Earth" by using radar interferometry. The data and resulting products are now publicly available for download and give a view of the landscape removed of vegetation, buildings, and other structures. This new view of the Earth's topography allows us to see previously unmapped or poorly mapped regions of the Earth as well as providing a level of detail that was previously unknown using traditional topographic mapping techniques. Understanding and appreciating the geographic terrain is a complex but necessary requirement for middle school aged (11-14yo) students. Abstract in nature, topographic maps and other 2D renderings of the Earth's surface and features do not address the inherent spatial challenges of a concrete-learner and traditional methods of teaching can at times exacerbate the problem. Technological solutions such as 3D-imaging in programs like Google Earth are effective but lack the tactile realness that can make a large difference in learning comprehension and retention for these young students. First developed in the 1980's, 3D printers were not commercial reality until recently and the rapid rise in interest has driven down the cost. With the advent of sub US1500 3D printers, this technology has moved out of the high-end marketplace and into the local office supply store. Schools across the US and elsewhere in the world are adding 3D printers to their technological workspaces and students have begun rapid-prototyping and manufacturing a variety of projects. This project attempted to streamline the process of transforming SRTM data from a GeoTIFF format by way of Python code. The resulting data was then inputted into a CAD-based program for visualization and exporting as a .stl file for 3D printing. A proposal for improving the method and making it more accessible to middle school aged students is provided. Using the SRTM data to print a hand-held visual representation of a portion of the Earth's surface would utilize existing technology in the school and alter how topography can be taught in the classroom. Combining methods of 2D paper representations, on-screen 3D visualizations, and 3D hand-held models, give students the opportunity to truly grasp and retain the information being provided.

  12. Digital Globe

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Visitors to the Digital Globe have a front seat view of Lisbon, Portugal and the Phillipine Trench. The site offers two MPEG videos which animate topographic seafloor images. The video clips were created by David Sandwell at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Also available are nine images of seafloor topography from around the globe. Note that the videos are very large files.

  13. Metrology, attitude, and orbit determination for spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duren, Riley M.; Wong, Ed; Breckenridge, Bill; Shaffer, Scott J.; Duncan, Courtney; Tubbs, Eldred F.; Salomon, Phil M.

    1998-07-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), scheduled for an 11 day Space Shuttle flight in 1999, will use an Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar instrument to produce a near-global digital elevation map of the earth's land surface with 16 m absolute vertical height accuracy at 30 meter postings. SRTM will achieve the required interferometric baseline by extending a receive-only radar antenna on a 60 meter deployable mast from the shuttle payload bay. Continuous measurement of the interferometric baseline length, attitude, and position is required at the 2 mm, 9 arcsec, and 1 m levels, respectively, in order to obtain the desired height accuracy. The attitude and orbit determination avionics (AODA) subsystem will provide these functions for SRTM. The AODA flight sensor complement includes electro-optical metrology sensor, a star tracker, an inertial reference unit, GPS receivers, plus supporting electronics and computers. AODA ground processing computers will support SRTM system performance evaluation during the mission and baseline reconstruction after the mission. The final AODA data products will be combined with the radar data to reconstruct the height information necessary for topographic map generation. A description of the AODA system architecture, error budgets, and the major issues involved with measuring large space structures are presented.

  14. A radar image time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leberl, F.; Fuchs, H.; Ford, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    A set of ten side-looking radar images of a mining area in Arizona that were aquired over a period of 14 yr are studied to demonstrate the photogrammetric differential-rectification technique applied to radar images and to examine changes that occurred in the area over time. Five of the images are rectified by using ground control points and a digital height model taken from a map. Residual coordinate errors in ground control are reduced from several hundred meters in all cases to + or - 19 to 70 m. The contents of the radar images are compared with a Landsat image and with aerial photographs. Effects of radar system parameters on radar images are briefly reviewed.

  15. Radar image registration and rectification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naraghi, M.; Stromberg, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    Two techniques for radar image registration and rectification are presented. In the registration method, a general 2-D polynomial transform is defined to accomplish the geometric mapping from one image into the other. The degree and coefficients of the polynomial are obtained using an a priori found tiepoint data set. In the second part of the paper, a rectification procedure is developed that models the distortion present in the radar image in terms of the radar sensor's platform parameters and the topographic variations of the imaged scene. This model, the ephemeris data and the digital topographic data are then used in rectifying the radar image. The two techniques are then used in registering and rectifying two examples of radar imagery. Each method is discussed as to its benefits, shortcomings and registration accuracy.

  16. Moiré topography in odontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Yeras, A.

    2003-07-01

    For several decades, measurement of optical techniques has been used in different branches of science and technology. One of these techniques is the so-called moiré topography (MT) that enables the accurate measurement of different parts of the human body topography. This investigation presents the measurement of topographies of teeth and gums using an automated system of shadow moiré and the phase shift method in an original way. The fringe patterns used to compute the shape and the shape matrix itself are presented in the article. The phase shift method ensures precisions up to the order of microns. Advantages and disadvantages of using the MT are included. Besides, some positive and negative aspects concerned with the implementation of this technique in odontology are shown in the article.

  17. OpenTopography: Enabling Online Access to High-Resolution Lidar Topography Data and Processing Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Christopher; Nandigam, Viswanath; Baru, Chaitan; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution topography data acquired with lidar (light detection and ranging) technology are revolutionizing the way we study the Earth's surface and overlying vegetation. These data, collected from airborne, tripod, or mobile-mounted scanners have emerged as a fundamental tool for research on topics ranging from earthquake hazards to hillslope processes. Lidar data provide a digital representation of the earth's surface at a resolution sufficient to appropriately capture the processes that contribute to landscape evolution. The U.S. National Science Foundation-funded OpenTopography Facility (http://www.opentopography.org) is a web-based system designed to democratize access to earth science-oriented lidar topography data. OpenTopography provides free, online access to lidar data in a number of forms, including the raw point cloud and associated geospatial-processing tools for customized analysis. The point cloud data are co-located with on-demand processing tools to generate digital elevation models, and derived products and visualizations which allow users to quickly access data in a format appropriate for their scientific application. The OpenTopography system is built using a service-oriented architecture (SOA) that leverages cyberinfrastructure resources at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at the University of California San Diego to allow users, regardless of expertise level, to access these massive lidar datasets and derived products for use in research and teaching. OpenTopography hosts over 500 billion lidar returns covering 85,000 km2. These data are all in the public domain and are provided by a variety of partners under joint agreements and memoranda of understanding with OpenTopography. Partners include national facilities such as the NSF-funded National Center for Airborne Lidar Mapping (NCALM), as well as non-governmental organizations and local, state, and federal agencies. OpenTopography has become a hub for high-resolution topography resources. Datasets hosted by other organizations, as well as lidar-specific software, can be registered into the OpenTopography catalog, providing users a "one-stop shop" for such information. With several thousand active users, OpenTopography is an excellent example of a mature Spatial Data Infrastructure system that is enabling access to challenging data for research, education and outreach. Ongoing OpenTopography design and development work includes the archive and publication of datasets using digital object identifiers (DOIs); creation of a more flexible and scalable high-performance environment for processing of large datasets; expanded support for satellite and terrestrial lidar; and creation of a "pluggable" infrastructure for third-party programs and algorithms. OpenTopography has successfully created a facility for sharing lidar data. In the project's next phase, we are working to enable equally easy and successful sharing of services for processing and analysis of these data.

  18. Radar: the evolution since World War II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Strong

    2005-01-01

    Modern radar design has benefited from the evolution of specialized digital processing, allowing high resolution ground mapping, target identification, and target tracking under many conditions. Air-to-air interception makes use of complex decision processes to select from many modes that depend on the clutter backgrounds and flight profiles. Today's multimode radars provide this information for each task while minimizing distractions. Fire

  19. Flow Interaction with Topography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    This is a foundation module in the Mesoscale Meteorology Primer series. Topics covered include an overview of factors that control whether air will go up and over a mountain or be forced around it, the role of potential and kinetic energy, the Froude number and what it tells you, and air flow blocked by topography.

  20. Tidal Conversion by Supercritical Topography

    E-print Network

    Balmforth, Neil J.

    Calculations are presented of the rate of energy conversion of the barotropic tide into internal gravity waves above topography on the ocean floor. The ocean is treated as infinitely deep, and the topography consists of ...

  1. Satellite Laser Altimeter for Measurement of Ice Sheet Topography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack L. Bufton; John E. Robinson; Michael D. Femiano; Fred S. Flatow

    1982-01-01

    We describe the design and expected performance of a spaceborne laser altimeter based on a nadir-oriented laser transmitter, a 0.5-m-diam receiver telescope, and a high-accuracy satellite attitude measurement system. This instrument is designed for high-resolution mapping of polar ice sheet topography where conventional radar altimeters have difficulty. This instrument could also provide useful data on cloud-top heights and the ocean

  2. Spaceborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Eckerman, J.; Meneghini, R.; Atlas, D.; Boerner, W. M.; Cherry, S.; Clark, J. F.; Doviak, R. J.; Goldhirsh, J.; Lhermitte, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The spaceborne radar panel considered how radar could be used to measure precipitation from satellites. The emphasis was on how radar could be used with radiometry (at microwave, visible (VIS), and infrared (IR) wavelengths) to reduce the uncertainties of measuring precipitation with radiometry alone. In addition, the fundamental electromagnetic interactions involved in the measurements were discussed to determine the key work areas for research and development to produce effective instruments. Various approaches to implementing radar systems on satellites were considered for both shared and dedicated instruments. Finally, a research and development strategy was proposed for establishing the parametric relations and retrieval algorithms required for extracting precipitation information from the radar and associated radiometric data.

  3. Stress distribution and topography of Tellus Regio, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David R.; Greeley, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    The Tellus Regio area of Venus represents a subset of a narrow latitude band where Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) altimetry data, line-of-sight (LOS) gravity data, and Venera 15/16 radar images have all been obtained with good resolution. Tellus Regio also has a wide variety of surface morphologic features, elevations ranging up to 2.5 km, and a relatively low LOS gravity anomaly. This area was therefore chosen in order to examine the theoretical stress distributions resulting from various models of compensation of the observed topography. These surface stress distributions are then compared with the surface morphology revealed in the Venera 15/16 radar images. Conclusions drawn from these comparisons will enable constraints to be put on various tectonic parameters relevant to Tellus Regio. The stress distribution is calculated as a function of the topography, the equipotential anomaly, and the assumed model parameters. The topography data is obtained from the PVO altimetry. The equipotential anomaly is estimated from the PVO LOS gravity data. The PVO LOS gravity represents the spacecraft accelerations due to mass anomalies within the planet. These accelerations are measured at various altitudes and angles to the local vertical and therefore do not lend themselves to a straightforward conversion. A minimum variance estimator of the LOS gravity data is calculated, taking into account the various spacecraft altitudes and LOS angles and using the measured PVO topography as an a priori constraint. This results in an estimated equivalent surface mass distribution, from which the equipotential anomaly is determined.

  4. Surveillance radars - State of the art, research and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, A.; Galati, G.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment is made of the signal processing techniques currently employed by ground-based surveillance radars, and a projection is made of those techniques that are likely to be applied to such radars in the future. Further applications of such techniques in such diverse fields as multistatic and dispersed radars, AEW, and space-based radars are also considered. Attention is given to prospective technological advancements that will facilitate radar systems' future dealings with antiradiation missiles and stealth aircraft, which may include digital beam forming, adaptivity, and high resolution multidimensional processing and target classification. The advantages of multistatic radar are examined in detail.

  5. An integrated radar imaging system for the STAR2 aircraft

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Akam; R. Deane; M. Sartori; R. Lowry; B. Mercer

    1988-01-01

    A commercial lightweight, real-time digital synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) known as STAR-2 (sea-lice and terrain assessment radar) is described. The SAR system consists of the MacDonald Dettwiler integrated radar imaging system (IRIS) and is carried aboard a small executive twin-turboprop aircraft. The IRIS makes extensive use of digital electronics to provide data of high radiometric and geometric quality, in real time.

  6. One of the Space Shuttle's enduring science legacies is the near-global topographic mapping of the Earth with innovative radar remote sensing

    E-print Network

    revolution in mapping sciences. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission data set, in particular, has had for the ages. On average, one Shuttle Radar Topography Mission-derived topographic data set is downloaded from, thanks to the five shuttle flights, while producing spectacular science results. 360 Major Scientific

  7. The Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer: UAVSAR's Single-pass Ka-Band Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Sadowy, G.; Wu, X.; Carswell, J.; Fisher, C.; Michel, T.; Lou, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In May 2009 a new radar technique for mapping ice surface topography was demonstrated in a Greenland campaign as part of the NASA International Polar Year (IPY) activities. This was achieved with the airborne Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN-A): a 35.6 GHz single-pass interferometer. Although the technique of using radar interferometry for mapping terrain has been demonstrated before, this is the first such application at millimeter-wave frequencies. The proof-of-concept demonstration was achieved by interfacing Ka-band RF and antenna hardware with the Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The GLISTIN-A was implemented as a custom installation of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Gulfstream III. Instrument performance indicates swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a posting of 3m x 3m. Processing challenges were encountered in achieving the accuracy requirements on several fronts including, aircraft motion sensitivity, multipath and systematic drifts. However, through a combination of processor optimization, a modified phase-screen and motion-compensation implementations were able to minimize the impact of these systematic error sources. We will present results from the IPY data collections including system performance evaluations and imagery. This includes a large area digital elevation model (DEM) collected over Jakobshavn glacier as an illustrative science data product. Further, by intercomparison with the NASA Wallops Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and calibration targets we quantify the interferometric penetration bias of the Ka-band returns into the snow cover. Following the success of the IPY campaign, we are funded under the Earth Science Techonology Office (ESTO) Airborne Innovative Technology Transition (AITT) program to transition GLISTIN-A to a permanently-available pod-only system compatible with unpressurized operation. In addition fundamental system upgrades will greatly enhance the performance and make wider-swath and higher altitude operation possible. We will show results from first flights of GLISTIN-A and summarize the plans for the near future including GLISTIN-H: GLISTIN on the NASA Global Hawk Spring 2013.

  8. Visualization of planetary subsurface radar sounder data in three dimensions using stereoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigeri, A.; Federico, C.; Pauselli, C.; Ercoli, M.; Coradini, A.; Orosei, R.

    2010-12-01

    Planetary subsurface sounding radar data extend the knowledge of planetary surfaces to a third dimension: the depth. The interpretation of delays of radar echoes converted into depth often requires the comparative analysis with other data, mainly topography, and radar data from different orbits can be used to investigate the spatial continuity of signals from subsurface geologic features. This scenario requires taking into account spatially referred information in three dimensions. Three dimensional objects are generally easier to understand if represented into a three dimensional space, and this representation can be improved by stereoscopic vision. Since its invention in the first half of 19th century, stereoscopy has been used in a broad range of application, including scientific visualization. The quick improvement of computer graphics and the spread of graphic rendering hardware allow to apply the basic principles of stereoscopy in the digital domain, allowing the stereoscopic projection of complex models. Specialized system for stereoscopic view of scientific data have been available in the industry, and proprietary solutions were affordable only to large research institutions. In the last decade, thanks to the GeoWall Consortium, the basics of stereoscopy have been applied for setting up stereoscopic viewers based on off-the shelf hardware products. Geowalls have been spread and are now used by several geo-science research institutes and universities. We are exploring techniques for visualizing planetary subsurface sounding radar data in three dimensions and we are developing a hardware system for rendering it in a stereoscopic vision system. Several Free Open Source Software tools and libraries are being used, as their level of interoperability is typically high and their licensing system offers the opportunity to implement quickly new functionalities to solve specific needs during the progress of the project. Visualization of planetary radar data in three dimensions represents a challenging task, and the exploration of different strategies will bring to the selection of the most appropriate ones for a meaningful extraction of information from the products of these innovative instruments.

  9. Longitudinal and seasonal variations in the occurrence of sunrise undulation at the dip equator: A study using Trivandrum and Jicamarca Digital Ionosonde and Jicamarca Incoherent Scatter radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambili, K. M.; St-Maurice, Jean-Pierre; Choudhary, Raj Kumar

    At night, the absence of photo ionization in combination with sustained downward plasma motion means that the F region can be severely depleted at the magnetic equator at the end of the night. As a result, there can be, at sunrise, a sudden upward jump in altitude of the F region peak which is then followed by a quick descent in association with the downward motion of the photo ionization production peak. This constitutes what has been described as the equatorial sunrise undulation. Its anecdotal existence has been reported over Jicamarca (120 S, 76.90 W, 1.70 S dip-latitude) while it has been seen repeatedly over Trivandrum (8.470 N, 76.920 E, 0.170 S dip latitude), India, particularly during equinox conditions. Seasonal variations in the occurrence of sunrise undulation in the F-region peak height (hmF2) at two longitudinally separated geomagnetic equatorial stations, namely Jicamarca and Trivandrum are being presented. Measurements from Digital ionosondes, located at these two stations, have been used in this study. A fast descends in hmF2 after the local F region sunrise was quite visible at both the stations. The frequency of occurrence of sunrise undulation at Trivandrum, however, was high compared to the same at Jicamarca. There were noticeable differences in the seasonal occurrence of sunrise undulation at the two places. While it was observed throughout the year at Trivandrum, there was a distinct seasonal preference of occurrence at Jicamarca, at least in the year 2010, a low solar active period. Its frequency of occurrence at Jicamarca was high during winter (June) solstice, low during equinox (March) and had almost negligible occurrence during summer solstice (December). We show that (1) plasma density during sunrise at Jicamarca on average was twice as much as at Trivandrum, and (2) average height of hmF2 during night at Jicamarca was higher (~100km ) during equinox and solstice months compared to the same at Trivandrum. Our results suggest that the background density plays an important role in the observation of a sunrise undulation in the F region peak which itself is quite sensitive to the electric field seen by the plasma between sunset and sunrise. Using incoherent backscatter radar data from Jicamarca we show that the sunrise undulation can be masked when remnant plasma from the previous night does not come down to low enough altitude. We argue that this is the reason behind the lack of sunrise undulations in December at Jicamarca, given the fact that there is often very strong plasma uplift in the evening at that time of year. Thus the seasonal and longitudinal variation of sunrise ionosphere is a proxy to understand the electro-dynamical features of the night before.

  10. Phobos' shape and topography models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willner, K.; Shi, X.; Oberst, J.

    2014-11-01

    The global shape and the dynamic environment are fundamental properties of a body. Other properties such as volume, bulk density, and models for the dynamic environment can subsequently be computed based on such models. Stereo-photogrammetric methods were applied to derive a global digital terrain model (DTM) with 100 m/pixel resolution using High Resolution Stereo Camera images of the Mars Express mission and Viking Orbiter images. In a subsequent least-squares fit, coefficients of the spherical harmonic function to degree and order 45 are computed. The dynamic models for Phobos were derived from a polyhedron representation of the DTM. The DTM, spherical harmonic function model, and dynamic models, have been refined and represent Phobos' dynamic and geometric topography with much more detail when compared to Shi et al. (2012) and Willner et al. (2010) models, respectively. The volume of Phobos has been re-determined to be in the order of 5741 km3 with an uncertainty of only 0.6% of the total volume. This reduces the bulk density to 1.86±0.013 g/cm3 in comparison to previous results. Assuming a homogeneous mass distribution a forced libration amplitude for Phobos of 1.14° is computed that is in better agreement with observations by Willner et al. (2010) than previous estimates.

  11. Stereo Pair: Inverted Topography, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Meseta de Somuncura is a broad plateau capped by basalt. Near its western edge is evidence of multiple volcanic events and a complex erosion history. Most notable are the long, narrow-, and winding lava flows that run across most of the right side of the image. These formed from low-viscosity lava that flowed down gullies over fairly flat terrain. Later, erosion of the landscape continued and the solidified flows were more resistant than the older surrounding rocks. Consequently, the flows became the ridges we see here. This natural process of converting gullies to ridges is called topographic inversion. See image PIA02755 (upper left corner) for a good example of topographic inversion in its earlier stages.

    Other features seen here include numerous and varied closed depressions. The regional drainage is not well integrated, and drainage ends up in salty lakes (blue if shallow, black if deep). Wind streaks indicate that winds blow toward the east (right) and blow salt grains off the lakebeds when dry. The bowtie pattern in the upper left has resulted from differing grazing practices among fenced fields.

    This cross-eyed stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced Landsat 7satellite color image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center,Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, DC.

    Size: 21.5 kilometers (13.4 miles) x 27.2 kilometers (16.9 miles) Location: 41.6 deg. South lat., 67.9 deg. West lon. Orientation: North toward upper left Image Data: Landsat bands 1,4,7 in blue, green, red Date Acquired: February 19, 2000 (SRTM), January 22, 2000 (Landsat)

  12. Radar Image, Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The southeast part of the island of Hokkaido, Japan, is an area dominated by volcanoes and volcanic caldera. The active Usu Volcano is at the lower right edge of the circular Lake Toya-Ko and near the center of the image. The prominent cone above and to the left of the lake is Yotei Volcano with its summit crater. The city of Sapporo lies at the base of the mountains at the top of the image and the town of Yoichi -- the hometown of SRTM astronaut Mamoru Mohri -- is at the upper left edge. The bay of Uchiura-Wan takes up the lower center of the image. In this image, color represents elevation, from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest. The radar image has been overlaid to provide more details of the terrain. Due to a processing problem, an island in the center of this crater lake is missing and will be properly placed when further SRTM swaths are processed. The horizontal banding in this image is a processing artifact that will be removed when the navigation information collected by SRTM is fully calibrated. This image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 100 by 150 kilometers (62 by 93 miles) Location: 42.5 deg. North lat., 140.3 deg. East lon. Orientation: North towards upper left Image Data: SRTM Original Data Resolution: SRTM 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 17, 2000

  13. Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renzetti, N. A.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of the Goldstone Solar System Radar is the investigation of solar system bodies by means of Earth-based radar. Targets of primary interest include the Galilean moons, Saturn's rings and moons, and Earth-approaching asteroids and comets. Planets are also of interest, particularly Mercury and the planets to which NASA has not yet planned spacecraft visits. Based on a history of solid achievement, including the definition of the Astronomical Unit, imaging and topography of Mars, Venus, and Mercury, and contributions to the general theory of relativity, the program will continue to support flight project requirements and its primary objectives. The individual target objectives are presented, and information on the following topics are presented in tabular form: Deep Space Network support, compatibility tests, telemetry, command, and tracking support responsibility.

  14. Sea Surface Backscatter Distortions of Scanning Radar Altimeter Ocean Wave Measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. J. Walsh; Wright CW

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the distortions in the measured wave topography caused by sea surface backscatter variation within the 25 to 50 m antenna footprint of the 1deg antenna beam of the NASA Scanning Radar Altimeter at its typical 1.5 to 3 km operating altitude and possible corrections to the directional wave spectra computed from the wave topography

  15. Venus topography and kilometer-scale slopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Peter G.; Pettengill, Gordon H.

    1992-01-01

    During the first 8 months of the Magellan mission, the radar altimeter has made some three million measurements of the surface of Venus covering the latitude range from 85 deg N to 80 deg S. Methods involving range correlation, Doppler filtering, multiburst summation, and range migration are used to focus the observations and to achieve high surface resolution. Results are presented as maps of the global distribution of topography, meter-scale roughness, and power reflection coefficient. The results are similar to those reported in previous experiments (surface heights exhibit a unimodal distribution with more than 80 percent of the surface lying within 1 km of the 6051.84-km mean radius) but the higher resolution of the Magellan altimeter has disclosed several surprisingly steep features, e.g., the southwest face of the Maxwell Montes, the southern face of the Danu Montes, and the chasmata to the east of Thetis Regio, where average kilometer-scale slopes of greater than 30 deg are not uncommon. This conclusion is corroborated by close inspection of synthetic aperture radar imagery.

  16. ATM Coastal Topography-Mississippi, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Mississippi coastline, from Lakeshore to Petit Bois Island, acquired September 9-10, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is used routinely to create maps that represent submerged or first-surface topography.

  17. ATM Coastal Topography-Alabama 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Alabama coastline, acquired October 3-4, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface, and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for pre-survey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create maps that represent submerged or first surface topography.

  18. Radar test range design considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofianos, D.

    1980-04-01

    This report presents considerations for and the preliminary design of a synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) test range. The purpose is to present a methodology and conceptual design for a Flexible Test Bed (FTB) digital processor operational test. The objectives of this operational test are to: (1) determine whether the processor modifications improved image quality, (2) establish a processor performance baseline, and (3) determine whether the system will attain desired levels of probability of detection. It is assumed that SAI would develop a test design while GAC will fabricate and install the required radar test range.

  19. Applications of imaging radar to geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, M. I.

    Tone, texture, and features imaged by radars were studied. A variety of computer image processing techniques were developed to reveal characteristics of these scences. Field checking of sites suggests links between the geology and the images. Tonal studies examine the effects of varying frequency polarization, and illumination geometry. Most surficial geologic units in Death Valley, California, are distinguishable by use of multifrequency, multipolarization radar data. Quaternary basalt flows in Idaho are separable by changing illumination geometry in the vertical plane, whereas desert fans and dunes show little tonal variation as function of changing illumination aximuth. Topographic texture is strongly enhanced by radar's unusual imaging physics computer image processing techniques prove useful in classifying and enhancing image texture. The classification technique, yield results in good agreement with those of human interpreters. The enhancement technique resolves a plunging anticline that was not evident on unprocessed imagery. Identification of features such as lineaments and large topographic highs is critically dependent on radar system parameters. A mathematical model of topography-induced distortion provides insight into the relationship between a radar image and the illuminated terrain. Imaging radar is shown to be a useful sensor for geologic mapping, especially when complementary data are present. Careful image processing, field checking of interpretations, and an understanding of radar imaging physics are critical to effective utilization of this unusual sensor.

  20. SAR interferometry at Venus for topography and change detection Franz J. Meyer a,b,n

    E-print Network

    Sandwell, David T.

    SAR interferometry at Venus for topography and change detection Franz J. Meyer a,b,n , David T 1 March 2012 Received in revised form 4 October 2012 Accepted 5 October 2012 Keywords: Venus of Venus in the early 1990's, techniques of synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) have become

  1. Digital communications study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boorstyn, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Research is reported dealing with problems of digital data transmission and computer communications networks. The results of four individual studies are presented which include: (1) signal processing with finite state machines, (2) signal parameter estimation from discrete-time observations, (3) digital filtering for radar signal processing applications, and (4) multiple server queues where all servers are not identical.

  2. Integrated photonic analog-to-digital converters

    E-print Network

    Khilo, Anatol (Anatol M.)

    2011-01-01

    Accurate conversion of wideband multi-GHz analog signals into the digital domain has long been a target of analog-to-digital converter (ADC) developers, driven by applications in radar systems, software radio, medical ...

  3. Enhancing a RADARSAT/ICESat Digital Elevation Model of West Antarctica Using MODIS Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haran, T. M.; Scambos, T. A.

    2007-12-01

    An image enhancement approach is used to develop a new digital elevation map of West Antarctica, combining multiple MODIS images and both radar altimetry and ICESat laser altimetry Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data. The method combines the wide image coverage of MODIS, and its high radiometric sensitivity (which equates to high sunward slope sensitivity), with the high precision and accuracy of ICESat and combined ICESat and radar altimetry DEMs. We calibrate brightness-to-slope relationships for several MODIS images of the central West Antarctic using smoothed DEMs derived from both sources. Using the calibrations, we then created, first, a slope map of the ice sheet surface from the image data (regressing slope information from many images), and then integrated this absolute slope map to yield complete DEMs for the region. ICESat (as of September 2007) has acquired a series of eleven near-repeat tracks over the Antarctic during the period September 2003 to April 2007, covering the continent to 86 deg S. ICESat data are acquired as a series of spot elevations, averaging a ~60m diameter surface region every ~172m. However, ICESat track paths have spacings wide enough (2 km at 85 deg; 20 - 50 km at 75 deg) that some surface ice dynamical features (e.g. flowlines, undulations, ice rises) are missed by the track data used to construct the ICESat DEM. Radar altimetry can provide some of the missing data north of 81.5 deg, but only to a maximum resolution of about 5 km. A set of cloud-cleared MODIS band 1 data from both the Aqua and Terra platforms acquired during the 2003-2004 austral summer, used in generating the Mosaic of Antarctica, MOA, surface morphology image map, were used for the image enhancement. Past analyses of the slope-brightness relationship for MODIS have shown ice surface slope precisions of +/- 0.00015. ICESat spot elevations have nominal precisions of ~5 cm under ideal conditions, although thin-cloud effects and mislocation errors can magnify these. Only cloud-free areas of MODIS scenes that also meet specific slope, grain-size, solar zenith, brightness, latitude, and elevation criteria are used for image enhancement. A suite of applications for an enhanced DEM are identified and explored. A full representation of the WAIS undulation field permits a better investigation of the relationship between accumulation and topography, and surface temperature and topography. Further, addressing the shape modifications introduced by the variations in accumulation across undulations is a necessary prerequisite before inverting surface topography for bed elevation. Lastly, surface topography and detailed bed topography are both required for inferring sub-ice-sheet hydrostatic pressure. We will discuss these potential applications.

  4. FPGA implementation of a software-defined radar processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Hernan; Zhang, Yan Rockee

    2013-05-01

    A unified digital pulse compression processor is introduced as a radar-application-specific-processor (RASP) architecture for the next generation of adaptive radar. Based on traditional pulse compression matched filter and correlation receiver, the processor integrates specific designs to handle waveform diversities, which includes random noise waveforms, as well as digital transceiver self-reconfiguration for adaptive radars. Initial prototype of this processor is implemented with the latest Xilinx FPGA device and tested with an RF spaceborne radar transceiver testbed. Initial validation results show the effectiveness of real-time processing and engineering concepts.

  5. Using radar image simulation to assess relative geometric distortions inherent in radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaupp, V. H.; Macdonald, H. C.; Waite, W. P.

    1981-01-01

    A unique method for observing the relative contributions of backscatter and propagation effects is afforded by radar image simulation. Digital terrain data are used in modeling radar image formation. Backscatter and propagation effects are modeled separately. These are incorporated serially and the image expression of each is noted. Sequences of images are presented illustrating these effects over a range of slopes and angles of incidence. The conclusions reached are that at angles of incidence that are smaller than the average slope of the terrain in a region, propagation phenomena predominate. As the angle of incidence increases beyond this, the radar image portrays an increasingly faithful representation of the backscatter from the ground. It is also demonstrated that digital simulation affords an important tool for evaluating complex interactions between the ground and radar, for training users in radar image interpretation, and for selecting optimum sensor parameters for particular applications.

  6. Bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging for Arbitrary Flight Trajectories and Non-flat

    E-print Network

    Yazici, Birsen

    Bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging for Arbitrary Flight Trajectories and Non-flat Topography inversion method for bistatic synthetic aperture radar. A are well-known [5], [6], [7], [8], [9], [10], [11 geometry of bistatic SAR studies for the case of poor antenna directivity are limited to I. INTRODUCTION

  7. Coherent effects of moisture in backscattered radar signal from soil surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Despan; P. Borderies; J. P. Rudant

    2003-01-01

    Radar interferometry techniques are used in geodesy for investigating solid earth surface. The interferometric phase depends on topography but also on the moisture distribution at surface. Indoor experiments and theoretical modelling were used in order to study the effect of moisture on the radar phase response. A series of experiments have been performed at the European Microwave Signature Laboratory of

  8. Topography of Io (color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The images used to create this color composite of Io were acquired by Galileo during its ninth orbit (C9) of Jupiter and are part of a sequence of images designed to map the topography or relief on Io and to monitor changes in the surface color due to volcanic activity. Obtaining images at low illumination angles is like taking a picture from a high altitude around sunrise or sunset. Such lighting conditions emphasize the topography of the volcanic satellite. Several mountains up to a few miles high can be seen in this view, especially near the upper right. Some of these mountains appear to be tilted crustal blocks. Most of the dark spots correspond to active volcanic centers.

    North is to the top of the picture which merges images obtained with the clear, red, green, and violet filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. . The resolution is 8.3 kilometers per picture element. The image was taken on June 27, 1997 at a range of 817,000 kilometers by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  9. Mountains on Titan observed by Cassini Radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jani Radebaugh; Ralph D. Lorenz; Randolph L. Kirk; Jonathan I. Lunine; Ellen R. Stofan; Rosaly M. C. Lopes; Stephen D. Wall

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar mapper has observed elevated blocks and ridge-forming block chains on Saturn's moon Titan demonstrating high topography we term “mountains.” Summit flanks measured from the T3 (February 2005) and T8 (October 2005) flybys have a mean maximum slope of 37° and total elevations up to 1930 m as derived from a shape-from-shading model corrected for the probable

  10. SRTM Anaglyph: Inverted Topography, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Meseta de Somuncura is a broad plateau capped by basalt. Near its western edge is evidence of multiple volcanic events and a complex erosion history. Most notable are the long, narrow, and winding lava flows that run across most of the right side of the image. These formed from low-viscosity lava that flowed down gullies over fairly flat terrain. Later, erosion of the landscape continued, and the solidified flows were more resistant than the older surrounding rocks. Consequently, the flows became the ridges we see here. This natural process of converting gullies to ridges is called topographic inversion. See image PIA02755 (upper left corner) for a good example of topographic inversion in its earlier stages.

    Other features seen here include numerous and varied closed depressions. The regional drainage is not well integrated, but instead the drainage ends up in salty lakes (dark water, some with bright shores). Wind streaks indicate that winds blow toward the east (right) and blow salt grains off the lake beds when dry. The bowtie pattern in the upper left has resulted from differing grazing practices among fenced fields.

    This anaglyph was generated by first draping a Landsat Thematic Mapper image over a topographic map from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, then producing the two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center,Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, DC.

    Size: 21.5 kilometers (13.4 miles) x 27.2 kilometers (16.9 miles) Location: 41.6 deg. South lat., 67.9 deg. West lon. Orientation: North toward upper left Image Data: Landsat band 7 (short infrared) Date Acquired: February 19, 2000 (SRTM), January 22, 2000 (Landsat)

  11. Shuttle Radar Topography MissionShuttle Radar Topography Mission Visualization of Earth LandscapesVisualization of Earth Landscapes

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    show patterns of tropical forest clear-cutting with height differences of 4-5 meters #12;Vegetation Effects in SRTM SRTM minus NED Grand Canyon, Arizona = Tree Height = 9 m Forest #12;San Francisco: SRTM Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Unedited Edited Water Bodies & Minor Voids #12;Total SRTM United States

  12. SBRAS — an advanced simulator of spaceborne radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Min Wang; Diannong Liang; Haifeng Huang; Zhen Dong

    2007-01-01

    An application-oriented spaceborne radar advanced simulator (SBRAS) is presented in this paper. SBRAS is initiated by the technical and economical requirements to verify formation-flying distributed satellites synthetic aperture radar (SAR) scheme and simplify the instrument hardware design. The simulator develops a full flow of signal processing including formation design, SAR raw data simulation of nature scene, imaging, InSAR processing, digital

  13. Wideband OFDM system for radar and communications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dmitriy Garmatyuk; Jonathan Schuerger; Kyle Kauffman; Scott Spalding

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design and architectural composition of a radar system built on OFDM platform. The radar signal is generated digitally by forming an arbitrary-length vector of OFDM sub-carrier amplitudes and translating it in analog format via 1000 Ms\\/s D\\/A conversion. The resultant baseband signal has a bandwidth of 500 MHz, and variable number and composition of sub-carriers, which

  14. Mississippi Delta, Radar Image with Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the animation

    About the animation: This simulated view of the potential effects of storm surge flooding on Lake Pontchartrain and the New Orleans area was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Although it is protected by levees and sea walls against storm surges of 18 to 20 feet, much of the city is below sea level, and flooding due to storm surges caused by major hurricanes is a concern. The animation shows regions that, if unprotected, would be inundated with water. The animation depicts flooding in one-meter increments.

    About the image: The geography of the New Orleans and Mississippi delta region is well shown in this radar image from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. In this image, bright areas show regions of high radar reflectivity, such as from urban areas, and elevations have been coded in color using height data also from the mission. Dark green colors indicate low elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.

    New Orleans is situated along the southern shore of Lake Pontchartrain, the large, roughly circular lake near the center of the image. The line spanning the lake is the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, the world's longest over water highway bridge. Major portions of the city of New Orleans are below sea level, and although it is protected by levees and sea walls, flooding during storm surges associated with major hurricanes is a significant concern.

    Data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. The mission used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C.

    Location: 30 degrees North latitude, 90 degrees East longitude Orientation: North toward the top, Mercator projection Size: 222.6 by 192.8 kilometers (138.3 by 119.8 miles) Image Data: Radar image and colored Shuttle Radar Topography Mission elevation model Date Acquired: February 2000

  15. Suppression of sidelobe scatterers in an AESA FMCW radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. L. van Rossum; C. M. Lievers; A. P. M. Maas; A. G. Huizing

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an active electronically scanned array (AESA) FMCW radar with eight transceivers. Each transceiver has its own direct digital synthesizer (DDS) for signal generation which enables digital beam forming on transmit as well as on receive. The coherent operation of the eight transceivers and the capability to perform digital beam forming on transmit and receive is demonstrated. Also

  16. The Italian involvement in Cassini radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirchio, F.; Pernice, B.; Borgarelli, L.; Dionisio, C.

    1991-12-01

    The Radio Frequency Electronic Subsystem (RFES) of the Cassini radar is described. The requirements of the Cassini radar are summarized. The design parameters taken into consideration in developing the RFES are described. The RFES interfaces with the High Gain Antenna (HGA) for signal transmission and reception. The operational parameters of the Cassini radar are presented. The front end electronics (FEE), microwave receiver (MR), high power amplifier (HPA), frequency generator (FG), digital chip generator (DCG), Chirp Up Converter and Amplifier (CUCA) and power supply of the RFES are described.

  17. Highly Integrated Radar Sensor-on-Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mende, Ralph

    2012-05-01

    A highly integrated 24 GHz radar sensor is presented, based on a Radio Frequency Integrated Circuit (RFIC) which was specifically developed for a Frequency Modulated Shift Keying (FMSK) based Radar system design. Antenna, waveform, the Radio Frequency (RF) and Digital Signal Processor (DSP) module, the software design, cost and performance aspects will be described. The significant technical and economical advantages of the implemented Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) Bipolar CMOS (BiCMOS) transceiver are demonstrated. Some automotive and other applications based on this technology and new radar system design will be explained.

  18. Density, Isostasy, and Topography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Anne Egger

    Show caption HideA critical component of this activity involves sharing team data with the entire class, done the old-fashioned way on the chalkboard. Details This activity begins with an exploration of a topographic map of the earth, ending with the question: Why is the distribution of topography on the earth bimodal? The students then collect two forms of data. They measure the density of the most common rocks that make up oceanic crust (basalt), continental crust (granite), and the mantle (peridotite). They also measure the density of several different kinds of wood, and how high each kind floats in a tub of water. In each case, they work in teams of two or three and then the entire class shares their data. Based on the data from the wood, they derive an equation that relates the density of the wood to the height at which the block floats in the water - the isostasy equation. They then substitute density values for real rocks into their equation to derive thicknesses for average continental and oceanic crust, and apply their knowledge in order to draw a cross-section of the crust across South America. This activity gives students a real, hands-on and mathematical understanding of the principle of isostasy.

  19. Corneal topography by keratometry

    PubMed Central

    Douthwaite, W; Evardson, W

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To investigate the ability of a telecentric keratometer to describe the asphericity and curvature of convex ellipsoidal surfaces and human corneas.?METHODS—22 conicoidal convex surfaces and 30 human corneas were examined by conventional keratometry. Additional keratometric measurements were made when the surface was tilted in the horizontal plane relative to the instrument optical axis. This resulted in a series of radius measurements derived from different regions of the surface. These measurements were used to determine the apical radius and the p value of the horizontal meridian of each surface. The results were compared with those derived from measurements using the EyeSys videokeratoscope and form Talysurf analysis. The method was repeated on 30 human corneas and the results compared with those of a videokeratoscope.?RESULTS—For the aspheric buttons, the keratometric and the EyeSys results tended to give higher values for both apical radius and the p values than those of the Talysurf analysis. The best agreement was between the Talysurf and the keratometer where the results were not significantly different. For the human corneas, the apical radii were significantly different comparing the keratometer with the videokeratoscope but the p values were not significantly different.?CONCLUSION—The keratometric method for assessing curvature and asphericity appears to hold promise as a method for quantifying the corneal topography.?? PMID:10906088

  20. RADAR PRINCIPLES I Introduction

    E-print Network

    Sato, Toru

    ) bands. Antenna size of weather radarsis a few to about ten metersin diameter, but an} atmospheric radar atmospheric radars have antennas witli dialneter of 10- 300 in. Weather radars cover a wide horizontal areaRADAR PRINCIPLES I Introduction Radar is a general technique, willcli has a wide range

  1. Limitations of Radar Coordinates

    E-print Network

    Donato Bini; Luca Lusanna; Bahram Mashhoon

    2004-12-17

    The construction of a radar coordinate system about the world line of an observer is discussed. Radar coordinates for a hyperbolic observer as well as a uniformly rotating observer are described in detail. The utility of the notion of radar distance and the admissibility of radar coordinates are investigated. Our results provide a critical assessment of the physical significance of radar coordinates.

  2. Spacecraft studies of planetary surfaces using bistatic radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard A. Simpson

    1993-01-01

    Spaceborne transmitters have been used in bistatic geometries for a number of planetary surface studies including inference of topography, Fresnel reflectivity, and RMS surface slopes on the Moon, Mars, and Venus. For the Moon and Mars in particular, the bistatic geometry has enabled remote probing in regions and under conditions not obtainable with Earth-based radar systems, yielding information about surface

  3. Reconstruction of Megalake Chad using Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Leblanc; Guillaume Favreau; Jean Maley; Yahaya Nazoumou; Christian Leduc; Frank Stagnitti; Peter J. van Oevelen; François Delclaux; Jacques Lemoalle

    2006-01-01

    In the 2,500,000 km2 Lake Chad Basin in central Africa, the 2000 Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) data have been used to supplement the existing topographic data. SRTM data produce much sharper images of the region's topography and provide new insights into debates about the nature and extent of late Quaternary Lake Chad. This paper shows that the accuracy of

  4. Shape and Topography of Saturn's Satellites from Imaging Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, R. W.; Mastrodemos, N.; Rizk, B.

    2010-12-01

    Detailed global and local digital topographies of eight of Saturn's satellites are being constructed from ensembles of overlapping maplets which completely cover the visible surfaces. Each maplet is a digital representation of a piece of the surface topography and albedo constructed from imaging data with stereophotoclinometry. Multiple images projected onto the maplet provide brightness values at each pixel which are used in a least-squares estimation for slope and relative albedo. The slopes are then integrated to produce the topography solution. The central pixel of each maplet represents a control point, and the ensemble of these points is used in an estimation for their body-fixed locations, the rotational state of the body, and the position and attitude of the spacecraft. Applications of these data products include studies of cratering of icy bodies and the subsequent relaxation of the surface, while detailed shapes for the small, irregular satellites can be used to predict the surface gravity and local slope at high resolution. For a larger satellite, a precise shape determination is important because often the shape was frozen in when the body was in a different rotational state. This enables an analysis of the rotational and orbital histories of these bodies. The high resolution topography yields surface roughness, slopes, overall elevation variations, and fractal character of the surface.

  5. Mapping diverse forest cover with multipolarization airborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, J. P.; Wickland, D. E.; Sharitz, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Imaging radar backscatter in continuously forested areas contains information about the forest canopy; it also contains data about topography, landforms, and terrain texture. For purposes of radar image interpretation and geologic mapping researchers were interested in identifying and separating forest canopy effects from geologic or geomorphic effects on radar images. The objectives of this investigation was to evaluate forest canopy variables in multipolarization radar images under conditions where geologic and topographic variables are at a minimum. A subsidiary objective was to compare the discriminatory capabilities of the radar images with corresponding optical images of similar spatial resolution. It appears that the multipolarization images discriminate variation in tree density, but no evidence was found for discrimination between evergreen and deciduous forest types.

  6. FPGA based Ultra-Wideband pseudo-noise radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amutha Jayakumar; Asha Durafe

    2011-01-01

    A high accuracy experimental platform for Ultra Wide Band (UWB) PN radar performance evaluation has been created. This PN radar platform could be used for the applications such as unmanned- aerial-vehicle anti-collision and short-range distance measurement etc (3). It includes compact size X-band radar transceiver, baseband signal processing in FPGA, high speed analog to digital converter (ADC), and Matlab tools.

  7. TRMM radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, Kenichi

    1993-01-01

    The results of a conceptual design study and the performance of key components of the Bread Board Model (BBM) of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) radar are presented. The radar, which operates at 13.8 GHz and is designed to meet TRMM mission objectives, has a minimum measurable rain rate of 0.5 mm/h with a range resolution of 250 m, a horizontal resolution of about 4 km, and a swath width of 220 km. A 128-element active phased array system is adopted to achieve contiguous scanning within the swath. The basic characteristics of BBM were confirmed by experiments. The development of EM started with the cooperation of NASDA and CRL.

  8. Space Radar Image of San Rafael Glacier, Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A NASA radar instrument has been successfully used to measure some of the fastest moving and most inaccessible glaciers in the world -- in Chile's huge, remote Patagonia ice fields -- demonstrating a technique that could produce more accurate predictions of glacial response to climate change and corresponding sea level changes. This image, produced with interferometric measurements made by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flown on the Space Shuttle last fall, has provided the first detailed measurements of the mass and motion of the San Rafael Glacier. Very few measurements have been made of the Patagonian ice fields, which are the world's largest mid-latitude ice masses and account for more than 60 percent of the Southern Hemisphere's glacial area outside of Antarctica. These features make the area essential for climatologists attempting to understand the response of glaciers on a global scale to changes in climate, but the region's inaccessibility and inhospitable climate have made it nearly impossible for scientists to study its glacial topography, meteorology and changes over time. Currently, topographic data exist for only a few glaciers while no data exist for the vast interior of the ice fields. Velocity has been measured on only five of the more than 100 glaciers, and the data consist of only a few single-point measurements. The interferometry performed by the SIR-C/X-SAR was used to generate both a digital elevation model of the glaciers and a map of their ice motion on a pixel-per-pixel basis at very high resolution for the first time. The data were acquired from nearly the same position in space on October 9, 10 and 11, 1994, at L-band frequency (24-cm wavelength), vertically transmitted and received polarization, as the Space Shuttle Endeavor flew over several Patagonian outlet glaciers of the San Rafael Laguna. The area shown in these two images is 50 kilometers by 30 kilometers (30 miles by 18 miles) in size and is centered at 46.6 degrees south latitude, 73.8 degrees west longitude. North is toward the upper right. The top image is a digital elevation model of the scene, where color and saturation represent terrain height (between 0 meters and 2,000 meters or up to 6,500 feet) and brightness represents radar backscatter. Low elevations are shown in blue and high elevations are shown in pink. The digital elevation map of the glacier surface has a horizontal resolution of 15 meters (50 feet) and a vertical resolution of 10 meters (30 feet). High-resolution maps like these acquired over several years would allow scientists to calculate directly long-term changes in the mass of the glacier. The bottom image is a map of ice motion parallel to the radar look direction only, which is from the top of the image. Purple indicates ice motion away from the radar at more than 6 centimeters per day; dark blue is ice motion toward or away at less than 6 cm per day; light blue is motion toward the radar of 6 cm to 20 cm (about 2 to 8 inches) per day; green is motion toward the radar of 20 cm to 45 cm (about 8 to 18 inches) per day; yellow is 45 cm to 85 cm (about 18 to 33 inches) per day; orange is 85 cm to 180 cm (about 33 to 71 inches) per day; red is greater than 180 cm (71 inches) per day. The velocity estimates are accurate to within 5 millimeters per day. The largest velocities are recorded on the San Rafael Glacier in agreement with previous work. Other outlet glaciers exhibit ice velocities of less than 1 meter per day. Several kilometers before its terminus, (left of center) the velocity of the San Rafael Glacier exceeds 10 meters (32 feet) per day, and ice motion cannot be estimated from the data. There, a revisit time interval of less than 12 hours would have been necessary to estimate ice motion from interferometry data. The results however demonstrate that the radar interferometry technique permits the monitoring of glacier characteristics unattainable by any other means. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) are part of NASA's

  9. Characterizing Ice Sheet Surface Topography and Structure Using High-Altitude Waveform Airborne Laser Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofton, M. A.; Blair, B.; Luthcke, S. B.; Rabine, D.; McIntosh, C.; Beckley, M.

    2010-12-01

    Surface topographic information of ice surfaces is important for a wide range of applications including mass balance investigations and dynamical modeling. Airborne LIght Detection And Ranging (lidar) uses laser ranging to map surface topography with high precision and accuracy. In October-November 2010, NASA's Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor (LVIS) system imaged areas of Antarctica as part of NASA's Operation IceBridge (OIB) on board the DC-8 aircraft. The LVIS is an airborne, medium-footprint (~25 m diameter), wide swath (~2 km) full waveform-recording, scanning lidar system that has been used extensively for mapping surface structure for various investigations. The system digitally records the shape of the returning laser echo, or waveform, after its interaction with the various reflecting surfaces of the earth, providing a true 3-dimensional record of the surface structure within each footprint in the data swath. During the 2009 Antarctica deployment, LVIS Lidar data were collected over the Antarctic Peninsula, Pine Island Glacier and along a ~1100 km-long transect around 86S from flight altitudes of ~35,000' to ~39,000', and complemented and enhanced the low-altitude radar and laser datasets also collected during the mission. We examine the LVIS lidar imaging data sets, in particular that collected in the Antarctic Peninsula where an 11 hour flight enabled the complete mapping of a ~250 km by ~30 km area centered on the Crane Glacier. A precision and accuracy assessment of the high-resolution digital topographic data products is presented, as well as comparisons of the data to existing elevation maps from ASTER and SPOT5 to quantify surface changes within several mapped glacier systems. This mapping demonstrates the unprecedented spatial coverage and accuracy of the high-altitude lidar data collected during OIB.

  10. Range imaging for measuring streambed topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohoutek, Tobias K.; Nitsche, Manuel

    2010-08-01

    The characterization of streambed topography is crucial to approach problems in fluvial hydraulics, river engineering and geomorphology. In most steep alpine environments measurement apparatus like terrestrial laser scanners or airborne Lidar systems are difficult to successfully apply, because they need free sight, elevated positions and good aerial or road access. In mountain streams this is generally not the case. We describe a novel technology to acquire 3D models of nonsubmerged parts of such streambeds. The core of our range imaging system is a commercial time-of-flight video camera. The camera produces a per-pixel distance measurement using an integrated near-infrared modulated light source and an image sensor that measures the phase-shift between modulated and reflected light at each pixel. If mounted on a lightweight crane vertical above the stream, the camera can observe the streambed topography with a 3D resolution of down to 0.5 cm. However, the distance measurements degrade in accuracy under direct sunlight and when strong illumination contrasts occur. With the collected data detailed digital terrain models can be computed.

  11. Radar Studies in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaprio, Irwin I.

    1998-01-01

    We aid in study of the solar system by means of ground-based radar. We have concentrated on: (1) developing the ephemerides needed to acquire radar data at Arecibo Observatory and (2) analyzing the resultant data to: test fundamental laws of gravitation; determine the size , shape, topography, and spin vectors of the targets; and study the surface properties of these objects, through their scattering law and polarization characteristics. We are engaged in radar observations of asteroids and comets, both as systematically planned targets and as "targets of opportunity." In the course of the program, we have prepared ephemerides for about 80 asteroids and three comets, and the radar observations have been made or attempted at the Arecibo Observatory, in most cases successfully, and in some cases on more than one apparition. The results of these observations have included echo spectra for the targets and, in some cases, delay - Doppler images and measurements of the total round-trip delay to the targets. Perhaps the most dramatic of these results are the images obtained for asteroids (4179) Toutatis and 1989PB (Castalia), which were revealed to be double-lobed objects by the radar images. Besides these direct results, the radar observations have furnished information on the sizes and shapes of the targets through analysis of the Doppler width of the echoes as a function of time, and on the surface properties (such as composition, bulk density, and roughness) through analysis of the reflectivity and of the polarization state of the echoes. We have also refined the orbits of the observed asteroids as a result of the Doppler (and in some cases delay) measurements from the radar observations. Although the orbits of main-belt asteroids accessible to ground-based radar are quite well known from the available optical data, some near-Earth objects have been seen by radar very soon after their optical discovery (for example, 199OMF, just eight days after discovery). In such cases. the radar results ensure that the object in question can be anticipated and identified at the next apparition. We have also participated in radar studies of the terrestrial planets. The results of these studies have included both planetary topography profiles from the analysis of round-trip delays to points along the target Doppler equator and determinations of the target spin state. The latter is of special interest in the case of Venus, which is very close to, but not on, a multi-body spin-orbit resonance such that Venus rotates 12 times for every 8 Earth orbits and 13 Venus orbits. As a result, Venus presents nearly the same face toward Earth at each inferior conjunction. Our latest results confirm that the spin state of Venus is slightly off the resonance. The delay measurements from planetary 2 ranging have also been used in combination with other types of range data in testing general relativity with increasing accuracy. We have also been engaged in radar studies of planetary satellites. Using our ephemerides, Arecibo made radar observations of the Galilean satellites of Jupiter and of Mars' satellite Phobos during the favorable opposition seasons (1988-1992 for Jupiter and 1990 for Mars). An attempt was also made to observe Deimos, but without detecting an echo. In 1997, an attempt was made to observe Saturn's satellite Titan, using the newly upgraded Arecibo radar system for transmitting and the Goldstone radar for receiving, but no echo was detected. The study of satellites by radar is in many ways similar to that of asteroids. The results from these observations have included characterization of the surface properties from the reflectivity and polarization ratio, as well as (in the case of the large satellites of Jupiter) the variation of reflectivity with incidence angle.

  12. Nearshore Applications of Marine Radar 15 June 2006

    E-print Network

    Haller, Merrick

    wave and weather conditions 2.2 Marine radar wave imaging system 12 Radar properties and data collection parameters Nyquist wavenumber and frequency Data collection nomenclature Image stability of in situ wave and weather conditions 3.2 Data Collection Parameters 45 Digital collection parameters Data

  13. FPGA based Architecture for Radar's STC, FTC and Gain modules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joaquín García; Gilberto Viveros; René Cumplido

    Recent innovations like reconfigurable computing have allowed to easy experiment new architectures that support a wide range of applications for Digital Signal Processing (DSP). Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) provides a cheap platform for research and development. Radar signal processing is widely used for civil and military proposes. Radar's systems operate on Real-Time basis. This paper presents an architecture that

  14. R69-15 Microwave Radar and Electronic Environment Simulator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. W. Schisler

    1969-01-01

    In this paper the author describes the design, development, and application of a general-purpose radar and electromagnetic environment simulator, controlled by digital and analog computers. This simulator is being used at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) to provide direct synthesis of radar systems and their electromagnetic environment operating concurrently with missile flight simulators, range instrumentation simulations, and related test-range

  15. Countering stealth with passive, multi-static, low frequency radars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Kuschel; J. Heckenbach; S. Mu?ller; R. Appel

    2010-01-01

    The potential of passive, multi-static radars as covert sensors for the detection of low flying, stealth air targets are illustrated by multi-static RCS analysis, coverage simulations for low flight levels and measurement results obtained with an experimental passive radar using digital audio broadcast signals (DAB). The measurement sensor is described and future perspectives are pointed out.

  16. INTEGRATED CONTROL OF COMBINED SEWER REGULATORS USING WEATHER RADAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated operation was simulated of ten dynamic combined sewer regulators on a Montreal interceptor. Detailed review of digital recording weather radar capabilities indicated that it is potentially the best rainfall estimation means for accomplishing the runoff prediction that ...

  17. Forest Canopy Characterization and Vegetation Penetration Assessment with SpaceBorne Radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Imhoff; Michael Story; Charles Vermillion; Faruq Khan; Fabian Polcyn

    1986-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images from the- National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) Mission were used to analyze the effects of radar incidence angle on information content and vegetation penetration. Three SAR data sets using incidence angles of 26°, 46°, and 58° were acquired over the mangrove jungles of Southern Bangladesh. The data sets were digitally processed

  18. Digital shaded-relief map of Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrity, Christopher P.; Hackley, Paul C.; Urbani, Franco

    2004-01-01

    The Digital Shaded-Relief Map of Venezuela is a composite of more than 20 tiles of 90 meter (3 arc second) pixel resolution elevation data, captured during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) in February 2000. The SRTM, a joint project between the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), provides the most accurate and comprehensive international digital elevation dataset ever assembled. The 10-day flight mission aboard the U.S. Space Shuttle Endeavour obtained elevation data for about 80% of the world's landmass at 3-5 meter pixel resolution through the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology. SAR is desirable because it acquires data along continuous swaths, maintaining data consistency across large areas, independent of cloud cover. Swaths were captured at an altitude of 230 km, and are approximately 225 km wide with varying lengths. Rendering of the shaded-relief image required editing of the raw elevation data to remove numerous holes and anomalously high and low values inherent in the dataset. Customized ArcInfo Arc Macro Language (AML) scripts were written to interpolate areas of null values and generalize irregular elevation spikes and wells. Coastlines and major water bodies used as a clipping mask were extracted from 1:500,000-scale geologic maps of Venezuela (Bellizzia and others, 1976). The shaded-relief image was rendered with an illumination azimuth of 315? and an altitude of 65?. A vertical exaggeration of 2X was applied to the image to enhance land-surface features. Image post-processing techniques were accomplished using conventional desktop imaging software.

  19. REVS: a radar-based enhanced vision system for degraded visual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brailovsky, Alexander; Bode, Justin; Cariani, Pete; Cross, Jack; Gleason, Josh; Khodos, Victor; Macias, Gary; Merrill, Rahn; Randall, Chuck; Rudy, Dean

    2014-06-01

    Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) has developed an enhanced vision system utilizing fast-scanning 94 GHz radar technology to provide three-dimensional measurements of an aircraft's forward external scene topography. This threedimensional data is rendered as terrain imagery, from the pilot's perspective, on a Head-Up Display (HUD). The image provides the requisite "enhanced vision" to continue a safe approach along the flight path below the Decision Height (DH) in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) that would otherwise be cause for a missed approach. Terrain imagery is optionally fused with digital elevation model (DEM) data of terrain outside the radar field of view, giving the pilot additional situational awareness. Flight tests conducted in 2013 show that REVS™ has sufficient resolution and sensitivity performance to allow identification of requisite visual references well above decision height in dense fog. This paper provides an overview of the Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) concept, of the technology underlying REVS, and a detailed discussion of the flight test results.

  20. Mapping recent lava flows at Westdahl Volcano, Alaska, using radar and optical satellite imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Rykhus, R.; Masterlark, T.; Dean, K.G.

    2004-01-01

    Field mapping of young lava flows at Aleutian volcanoes is logistically difficult, and the utility of optical images from aircraft or satellites for this purpose is greatly reduced by persistent cloud cover. These factors have hampered earlier estimates of the areas and volumes of three young lava flows at Westdahl Volcano, including its most recent (1991-1992) flow. We combined information from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images with multispectral Landsat-7 data to differentiate the 1991-1992 flow from the 1964 flow and a pre-1964 flow, and to calculate the flow areas (8.4, 9.2, and 7.3 km 2, respectively). By differencing a digital elevation model (DEM) from the 1970-1980s with a DEM from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) in February 2000, we estimated the average thickness of the 1991-1992 flow to be 13 m, which reasonably agrees with field observations (5-10 m). Lava-flow maps produced in this way can be used to facilitate field mapping and flow-hazards assessment, and to study magma-supply dynamics and thus to anticipate future eruptive activity. Based on the recurrence interval of recent eruptions and the results of this study, the next eruption at Westdahl may occur before the end of this decade. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Radar image processing module development program, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of using charge coupled devices in an IPM for processing synthetic aperture radar signals onboard the NASA Convair 990 (CV990) aircraft was demonstrated. Radar data onboard the aircraft was recorded and processed using a CCD sampler and digital tape recorder. A description of equipment and testing was provided. The derivation of the digital presum filter was documented. Photographs of the sampler/tape recorder, real time display and circuit boards in the IPM were also included.

  2. Radar studies related to the earth resources program. [remote sensing programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtzman, J.

    1972-01-01

    The radar systems research discussed is directed toward achieving successful application of radar to remote sensing problems in such areas as geology, hydrology, agriculture, geography, forestry, and oceanography. Topics discussed include imaging radar and evaluation of its modification, study of digital processing for synthetic aperture system, digital simulation of synthetic aperture system, averaging techniques studies, ultrasonic modeling of panchromatic system, panchromatic radar/radar spectrometer development, measuring octave-bandwidth response of selected targets, scatterometer system analysis, and a model Fresnel-zone processor for synthetic aperture imagery.

  3. Optical-radar-DEM remote sensing data integration for geological mapping in the Afar Depression, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurmond, Allison K.; Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Thurmond, John B.

    2006-02-01

    The advantages of integrating optical (Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER)) and radar (Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR) - C, X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and RADARSAT-1) remote sensing data, and digital elevation models (DEMs) (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM)) for geological mapping in arid regions such as the Afar Depression in Ethiopia are demonstrated. The Afar Depression in NE Africa is a natural laboratory for studying processes of sea-floor spreading and the transition from rifting to true sea-floor spreading. It is ideal for geological remote sensing because of its vastness, remoteness and inaccessibility together with almost continuous exposure, and lack of vegetation and soil cover. Optical-radar-DEM remote sensing data integration is used for: (1) Distinguishing spatial and temporal distribution of individual lava flows in the Quaternary Erta 'Ale Volcanic Range in the northern part of the Afar Depression, by integrating band-ratios of ASTER thermal infrared (TIR) data with Landsat ETM+ visible and near infrared (VNIR) and SIR-C/X-SAR L-band ( ? = 24 cm) data with horizontally transmitted and horizontally received (HH) polarization. (2) Visualizing and interpreting extensional imbrication fans that constitute part of the Dobe Graben in the central part of the Afar Depression by integrating Landsat ETM+ VNIR data with RADARSAT C-band ( ? = 6 cm) data with HH polarization and SRTM DEMs. These imbrication fans were developed as layer-parallel gravitational slip of the border fault hanging-wall towards the graben center. (3) Mapping morphologically defined structures in rhyolite flows exposed on the flanks of the Tendaho Rift by merging ASTER VNIR and short wave infrared (SWIR) with RADARSAT C-band data with HH polarization. The Tendaho Rift constitutes part of the Tendaho-Gobaad Discontinuity that separates the southern and the central eastern parts of the Afar Depression. Optical-radar-DEM data integration proved to be an effective approach for aiding geological mapping and structural analysis in arid regions such as the Afar Depression.

  4. Comparison of SRTM Topography to USGS and High Resolution Laser Altimetry Topography: Case Studies From the Oregon Coast Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, W. E.; Stock, J. D.; Allen, D.; Beluggi, D.; Montgomery, D. R.; Roering, J. J.

    2001-12-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography mission (SRTM) acquired topographic data for the non-polar regions of earth at a nominal 30-m resolution. This horizontal resolution is dramatically higher than previous ~1 km data, and is likely to be used by a broad cross-section of the earth sciences community for detailed modeling of surface and coupled surface-atmospheric models. These users will need to know how SRTM topography compares with field-scale (e.g., 1-2 m) topography. We compare SRTM 30-m data to 3 sites in the forested steeplands of the Oregon Coast Range where we have acquired 2-3 m spaced topography using laser altimetry and total station surveys over areas from 2-6 km2. At each site, we have field-checked the laser altimetry with ground reconnaissance and measurements, and have identified vegetation cover. In addition, we compare the SRTM data to the existing public access data from the USGS 10- and 30-m data. We compare the coarser resolution data to high resolution data, and to re-gridded versions of the high resolution data for the following landscape metrics: 1) mean slope, 2) local slope distribution, 3) drainage density at a given area threshold, 4) relief as a function of area, 5) link magnitude distribution, and 6) slope versus area for the valley network. We also compare individual hillslope and river profiles by comparing rms error of the coarser data to fine resolution topography, and evaluate the planform errors in the coarser valley network. Our comparisons should guide user's interpretation of SRTM data where ground-truthing data are absent.

  5. Radar: The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Elachi; M. D. Allison; L. Borgarelli; P. Encrenaz; E. Im; M. A. Janssen; W. T. K. Johnson; R. L. Kirk; R. D. Lorenz; J. I. Lunine; D. O. Muhleman; S. J. Ostro; G. Picardi; F. Posa; C. G. Rapley; L. E. Roth; R. Seu; L. A. Soderblom; S. Vetrella; S. D. Wall; C. A. Wood; H. A. Zebker

    2004-01-01

    The Cassini RADAR instrument is a multimode 13.8 GHz multiple-beam sensor that can operate as a synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) imager, altimeter, scatterometer, and radiometer. The principal objective of the RADAR is to map the surface of Titan. This will be done in the imaging, scatterometer, and radiometer modes. The RADAR altimeter data will provide information on relative elevations in selected

  6. Submillimeter-Scale Topography of the Lunar Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfenstein, Paul; Shepard, Michael K.

    1999-09-01

    We have applied computer stereophotogrammetry to Apollo Lunar Surface Closeup Camera (ALSCC) pictures of the lunar surface to construct the first-ever digital topographic relief maps of undisturbed lunar soil over spatial scales from 85 ?m to 8.5 cm. Using elevation histograms, fractal analysis, and Hapke's photometric roughness model we show that Apollo 14 (Fra Mauro) Imbrium ejecta is rougher than average Apollo 11 (Mare Tranquilitatis) and Apollo 12 (Oceanus Procellarum) mare surfaces at submillimeter to decimeter size-scales. We confirm the early result of K. Lumme et al. (1985, Earth Moon Planets33, 19-29) that the cumulative distribution of elevations for lunar soil is typically well described by Gaussian statistics. However, cumulative distributions are insensitive to asymmetries in the shapes of elevation histograms: Of 11 discrete elevation histograms we measured, about half exhibit significant deviations from Gaussian behavior. We also confirm Lumme et al.'s finding that the roughnesses of all lunar surfaces increase with decreasing size-scale. We further show that the scale dependence of roughness is well represented by fractal statistics. The rates of change of roughness with size scale, represented by fractal dimension D, are remarkably similar among terrians. After correcting for the contribution of large-scale roughness, our average value of D=2.31±0.06 falls within the range 2.0?D?2.4 reported from lunar radar studies. The amplitude of roughness, which we characterize with the rms slope angle at 1-mm scale, varies significantly among terrains. For lunar mare, the average rms slope angle is 16°±4°3 and that for Fra Mauro regolith is 25°±1°. By comparison to radar data, we suggest that the roughness of Fra Mauro (Imbrium ejecta) regolith is similar to that of lunar highland terrains. We find that the Gaussian slope distribution assumed in B. W. Hapke's model (1984, Icarus59, 41-59) adequately describes typical lunar regolith surfaces. A revised form of Hapke's equation that models realistic particle phase functions and the coherent backscatter opposition effect was fitted to disk-resolved lunar photometric observations and yields estimates of overline?=27±1° for highland and overline?=24±1° for mare regolith. These values of overline? as well as the implied relative highland:mare photometric roughness ratio are best matched in our elevation data by the cummulative contributions of surface topography covering all scales greater than 0.1 mm. Less than 5% of the photometrically detected roughness of lunar regolith is contributed by surface relief at scales larger than 8 cm. This conclusion implies that values of overline? derived from whole-disk and disk-resolved photometry, respectively, may be taken to represent the same physical quantity. In addition, particulate samples used in goniophotometric measurements should not be assumed to be photometrically smooth (i.e., overline?=0°), as is often done in laboratory applications of Hapke's photometric model. The predicted photometric roughness at size scales of 0.1 mm and less significantly exceed photometric estimates and suggests that there exists a measurable size scale below which topographic relief either is not photometrically detectable or is not represented in the Hapke model as macroscopic roughness.

  7. Future Trends in Automotive Radar \\/ Imaging Radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Wenger

    1998-01-01

    There is a growing interest of car manufacturers in sensors monitoring the car's surrounding area in order to improve safety systems from mere crash survival to crash prediction or prevention by early detection of hazardous situations. Therefore radar sensors have been intensively investigated for many years. A large variety of radar based vehicular sensors have been developed. Narrow-beam radars are

  8. Radar echo processing with partitioned de-ramp

    DOEpatents

    Dubbert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.

    2013-03-19

    The spurious-free dynamic range of a wideband radar system is increased by apportioning de-ramp processing across analog and digital processing domains. A chirp rate offset is applied between the received waveform and the reference waveform that is used for downconversion to the intermediate frequency (IF) range. The chirp rate offset results in a residual chirp in the IF signal prior to digitization. After digitization, the residual IF chirp is removed with digital signal processing.

  9. Auxiliary signal processing system for a multiparameter radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekar, V.; Gray, G. R.; Caylor, I. J.

    1993-01-01

    The design of an auxiliary signal processor for a multiparameter radar is described with emphasis on low cost, quick development, and minimum disruption of radar operations. The processor is based around a low-cost digital signal processor card and personal computer controller. With the use of such a concept, an auxiliary processor was implemented for the NCAR CP-2 radar during a 1991 summer field campaign and allowed measurement of additional polarimetric parameters, namely, the differential phase and the copolar cross correlation. Sample data are presented from both the auxiliary and existing radar signal processors.

  10. Radar frequency radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Malowicki

    1981-01-01

    A method is presented for the determination of radar frequency radiation power densities that the PAVE PAWS radar system could produce in its air and ground environment. The effort was prompted by the concern of the people in the vicinity of OTIS AFB MA and BEALE AFB CA about the possible radar frequency radiation hazard of the PAVE PAWS radar.

  11. GMTI MIMO radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. W. Bliss; K. W. Forsythe; S. K. Davis; G. S. Fawcett; D. J. Rabideau; L. L. Horowitz; S. Kraut

    2009-01-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) extensions to radar systems enable a number of advantages compared to traditional approaches. These advantages include improved angle estimation and target detection. In this paper, MIMO ground moving target indication (GMTI) radar is addressed. The concept of coherent MIMO radar is introduced. Comparisons are presented comparing MIMO GMTI and traditional radar performance. Simulations and theoretical bounds for

  12. Spaceborne weather radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Meneghini; Toshiaki Kozu

    1990-01-01

    The present work on the development status of spaceborne weather radar systems and services discusses radar instrument complementarities, the current forms of equations for the characterization of such aspects of weather radar performance as surface and mirror-image returns, polarimetry, and Doppler considerations, and such essential factors in spaceborne weather radar design as frequency selection, scanning modes, and the application of

  13. Wind shear radar simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Charles L.

    1988-01-01

    Viewgraphs used in a presentation on wind shear radar simulation are given. Information on a microburst model of radar reflectivity and wind velocity, radar pulse output, the calculation of radar return, microburst power spectrum, and simulation plans are given. A question and answer session is transcribed.

  14. Radar Images of the Kuiper Quadrangle (Mercury) from Goldstone Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, R. F.; Rojas, F.; Slade, M. A.; Standish, E. M.; Haldemann, A. F. C.

    2000-01-01

    We have assembled all currently processed radar data from 1989 to 1998 into crude images covering the Kuiper (H6) region on Mercury. The data used were taken to support the ephemeris improvement and gravitational physics programs; however, the resolution is good enough in some cases to make north/south ambiguous images that show some features that can be identified with the Mariner 10 features. Topography profiles along the apparent equator are also available; some of these profiles show ridges and rills as well as crater depths and diameters. The combination of the optical imaging and the radar imaging can be helpful in understanding similar features in radar images of the optically unimaged hemisphere.

  15. An analysis of simulated stereo radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisaruck, M. A.; Kaupp, V. H.; Macdonald, H. C.; Waite, W. P.

    1983-01-01

    Simulated stereo radar imagery is used to investigate parameters for a spaceborne imaging radar. Incidence angles ranging from small to intermediate to large are used with three digital terrain model areas which are representative of relatively flat, moderately rough, and mountainous terrain. The simulated radar imagery was evaluated by interpreters for ease of stereo perception and information content, and rank order within each class of terrain. The interpreter's results are analyzed for trends between the height of a feature and either parallax or vertical exaggeration for a stereo pair. A model is developed which predicts the amount of parallax (or vertical exaggeration) an interpreter would desire for best stereo perception of a feature of a specific height. Results indicate the selection of angle of incidence and stereo intersection angle depend upon the relative relief of the terrain. Examples of the simulated stereo imagery are presented for a candidate spaceborne imaging radar having four selectable angles of incidence.

  16. Topographic Phase Recovery from Stacked ERS Interferometry and a Low-Resolution Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, David T.; Sichoix, Lydie; Frey, Herbert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid approach to topographic recovery from ERS interferometry is developed and assessed. Tropospheric/ionospheric artifacts, imprecise orbital information, and layover are key issues in recovering topography and surface deformation from repeat-pass interferometry. Previously, we developed a phase gradient approach to stacking interferograms to reduce these errors and also to reduce the short-wavelength phase noise (see Sandwell arid Price [1998] and Appendix A). Here the method is extended to use a low-resolution digital elevation model to constrain long-wavelength phase errors and an iteration scheme to minimize errors in the computation of phase gradient. We demonstrate the topographic phase recovery on 16-m postings using 25 ERS synthetic aperture radar images from an area of southern California containing 2700 m of relief. On the basis of a comparison with 81 GPS monuments, the ERS derived topography has a typical absolute accuracy of better than 10 m except in areas of layover. The resulting topographic phase enables accurate two-pass, real-time interferometry even in mountainous areas where traditional phase unwrapping schemes fail. As an example, we form a topography-free (127-m perpendicular baseline) interferogram spanning 7.5 years; fringes from two major earthquakes and a seismic slip on the San Andreas Fault are clearly isolated.

  17. New boundary conditions for the West Antarctic Ice Sheet: Subglacial topography of the Thwaites and Smith glacier catchments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John W. Holt; Donald D. Blankenship; David L. Morse; Duncan A. Young; Matthew E. Peters; Scott D. Kempf; Thomas G. Richter; David G. Vaughan; Hugh F. J. Corr

    2006-01-01

    Airborne radar sounding over the Thwaites Glacier (TG) catchment and its surroundings provides the first comprehensive view of subglacial topography in this dynamic part of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and reveals that TG is underlain by a single, broad basin fed by a dendritic pattern of valleys, while Smith Glacier lies within an extremely deep, narrow trench. Subglacial

  18. Processing for spaceborne synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lybanon, M.

    1973-01-01

    The data handling and processing in using synthetic aperture radar as a satellite-borne earth resources remote sensor is considered. The discussion covers the nature of the problem, the theory, both conventional and potential advanced processing techniques, and a complete computer simulation. It is shown that digital processing is a real possibility and suggests some future directions for research.

  19. Shuttle imaging radar-C science plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Shuttle Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) mission will yield new and advanced scientific studies of the Earth. SIR-C will be the first instrument to simultaneously acquire images at L-band and C-band with HH, VV, HV, or VH polarizations, as well as images of the phase difference between HH and VV polarizations. These data will be digitally encoded and recorded using onboard high-density digital tape recorders and will later be digitally processed into images using the JPL Advanced Digital SAR Processor. SIR-C geologic studies include cold-region geomorphology, fluvial geomorphology, rock weathering and erosional processes, tectonics and geologic boundaries, geobotany, and radar stereogrammetry. Hydrology investigations cover arid, humid, wetland, snow-covered, and high-latitude regions. Additionally, SIR-C will provide the data to identify and map vegetation types, interpret landscape patterns and processes, assess the biophysical properties of plant canopies, and determine the degree of radar penetration of plant canopies. In oceanography, SIR-C will provide the information necessary to: forecast ocean directional wave spectra; better understand internal wave-current interactions; study the relationship of ocean-bottom features to surface expressions and the correlation of wind signatures to radar backscatter; and detect current-system boundaries, oceanic fronts, and mesoscale eddies. And, as the first spaceborne SAR with multi-frequency, multipolarization imaging capabilities, whole new areas of glaciology will be opened for study when SIR-C is flown in a polar orbit.

  20. Venus surface imaging from orbital radar data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iu. V. Kornienko; D. G. Stankevich; O. T. Basilevskii; Iu. G. Shkuratov

    1982-01-01

    Visual images of the Venusian surface for the region corresponding to the landing site of Veneras 11-14 (between latitudes -17 and +41 deg and longitudes 250-330 deg) have been obtained on the basis of radar studies conducted by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter. The images, which include several axonometric projections and a stereoscopic pair, have been generated by a digital imaging

  1. Brain Topography, 2009 Author copy

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Brain Topography, 2009 Author copy On the "dependence" of "independent" group EEG sources; an EEG Stendhal, Grenoble Institute of Tecnology, Grenoble, France. b Brain Research Laboratory, New York University Medical School, Department of Psychiatry c Brain Research center Antwerp for Innovative

  2. Retrieving 3-D Topography by Using a Single-Antenna Squint-Mode Airborne SAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oleksandr O. Bezvesilniy; Ievgeniia V. Dukhopelnykova; Volodymyr V. Vynogradov; Dmytro M. Vavriv

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a novel method is proposed for retrieving 3-D topography of the ground surface by using a single-antenna squint-mode airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The main idea of the method is based on the fact that the spatial 3-D location of a target can be found as the intersection of the range sphere, the Doppler cone, and the

  3. Evolution of Neogene Dynamic Topography in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, J. D.; Roberts, G.; White, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Madagascar is located on the fringes of the African superswell. Its position and the existence of a +30 mGal long wavelength free-air gravity anomaly suggest that its present-day topography is maintained by convective circulation of the sub-lithospheric mantle. Residual depth anomalies of oceanic crust encompassing the island imply that Madagascar straddles a dynamic topographic gradient. In June-July 2012, we examined geologic evidence for Neogene uplift around the Malagasy coastline. Uplifted coral reef deposits, fossil beach rock, and terraces demonstrate that the northern and southern coasts are probably being uplifted at a rate of ~0.2 mm/yr. Rates of uplift clearly vary around the coastline. Inland, extensive peneplains occur at elevations of 1 - 2 km. These peneplains are underlain by 10 - 20 m thick laterite deposits, and there is abundant evidence for rapid erosion (e.g. lavaka). Basaltic volcanism also occurred during Neogene times. These field observations can be combined with an analysis of drainage networks to determine the spatial and temporal pattern of convectively driven uplift. ~100 longitudinal river profiles were extracted from a digital elevation model of Madagascar. An inverse model is then used to minimize the misfit between observed and calculated river profiles as a function of uplift rate history. During inversion, the residual misfit decreases from ~20 to ~4. Our results suggest that youthful and rapid uplift of 1-2 km occurred at rates of 0.2-0.4 mm/yr during the last ?15 Myr. The algorithm resolves distinct phases of uplift which generate localized swells of high topography and relief (e.g. the Hauts Plateaux). Our field observations and modeling indicate that the evolution of drainage networks may contain useful information about mantle convective processes.

  4. Foldbelt exploration with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.M.; Pruett, F.D.

    1987-05-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is being successfully used within the southern fold and thrust belt of Papua New Guinea to map surface structure and stratigraphy and to help plan a hydrocarbon exploration program. The airborne SAR imagery, along with other surface data, is used as a primary exploration tool because acquisition of acceptable seismic data is extremely costly due to extensive outcrops of Tertiary Darai Limestone which develops rugged karst topography. Most anticlines in the licenses are capped with this deeply karstified limestone. The region is ideally suited to geologic analysis using remote sensing technology. The area is seldom cloud free and is covered with tropical rain forest, and geologic field studies are limited. The widespread karst terrain is exceedingly dangerous, if not impossible, to traverse on the ground. SAR is used to guide ongoing field work, modeling of subsurface structure, and selection of well locations. SAR provides their explorationists with an excellent data base because (1) structure is enhanced with low illumination, (2) resolution is 6 x 12 m, (3) digital reprocessing is possible, (4) clouds are penetrated by the SAR, and (5) the survey was designed for stereoscopic photogeology. Landsat images and vertical aerial photographs complement SAR but provide subdued structural information because of minimal shadowing (due to high sun angles) and the jungle cover. SAR imagery reveals large-scale mass wasting that has led to a reevaluation of previously acquired field data. Lithologies can be recognized by textural and tonal changes on the SAR images despite near-continuous canopy of jungle. Reprocessing and contrast stretching of the digital radar imagery provide additional geologic information.

  5. SRTM Colored and Shaded Topography: Haro and Kas Hills, India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On January 26, 2001, the Kachchh region in western India suffered the most deadly earthquake in India's history. This shaded topography view of landforms northeast of the city of Bhuj depicts geologic structures that are of interest in the study the tectonic processes that may have led to that earthquake. However, preliminary field studies indicate that these structures are composed of Mesozoic rocks that are overlain by younger rocks showing little deformation. Thus these structures may be old, not actively growing, and not directly related to the recent earthquake.

    The Haro Hills are on the left and the Kas Hills are on the right. The Haro Hills are an 'anticline,' which is an upwardly convex elongated fold of layered rocks. In this view, the anticline is distinctly ringed by an erosion resistant layer of sandstone. The east-west orientation of the anticline may relate to the crustal compression that has occurred during India's northward movement toward, and collision with, Asia. In contrast, the largest of the Kas Hills appears to be a tilted (to the south) and faulted (on the north) block of layered rocks. Also seen here, the linear feature trending toward the southwest from the image center is an erosion-resistant 'dike,' which is an igneous intrusion into older 'host' rocks along a fault plane or other crack. These features are simple examples of how shaded topography can provide a direct input to geologic studies.

    In this image, colors show the elevation as measured by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Colors range from green at the lowest elevations, through yellow and red, to purple at the highest elevations. Elevations here range from near sea level to about 300 meters (about 1000 feet). Shading has been added, with illumination from the north (image top).

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, DC.

    Size: 26.3 x 16.6 kilometers ( 16.3 x 10.3 miles) Location: 23.4 deg. North lat., 69.8 deg. East lon. Orientation: North toward the top Date Acquired: February 2000

  6. The topography of Iapetus' leading side

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernd Giese; Tilmann Denk; Gerhard Neukum; Thomas Roatsch; Paul Helfenstein; Peter C. Thomas; Elizabeth P. Turtle; Alfred McEwen; Carolyn C. Porco

    2008-01-01

    We have used Cassini stereo images to study the topography of Iapetus' leading side. A terrain model derived at resolutions of 4–8 km reveals that Iapetus has substantial topography with heights in the range of ?10 km to +13 km, much more than observed on the other middle-sized satellites of Saturn so far. Most of the topography is older than

  7. Pulse compression hardware decoding techniques for MST radars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. P. Sulzer; R. F. Woodman

    1985-01-01

    The techniques for decoding in hardware received signals transmitted by phase-coded mesospherestratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars are reviewed. The designs consist of digital and analog types which resemble filters or correlators in their operation. A new analog design is presented, and a discussion of the choice between hardware and software decoding is given. The number of bits required for digital coherent integrators

  8. Space Radar Image of Missouri River - TOPSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a combined radar and topography image of an area along the Missouri River that experienced severe flooding and levee failure in the summer of 1993. The meandering course of the Missouri River is seen as the dark curving band on the left side of the image. The predominantly blue area on the left half of the image is the river's floodplain, which was completely inundated during the flood of 1993. The colors in the image represent elevations, with the low areas shown in purple, intermediate areas in blue, green and yellow, and the highest areas shown in orange. The total elevation range is 85 meters (279 feet). The higher yellow and orange area on the right side of the image shows the topography and drainage patterns typical of this part of the midwestern United States. Dark streaks and bands in the floodplain are agricultural areas that were severely damaged by levee failures during the flooding. The region enclosed by the C-shaped bend in the river in the upper part of the image is Lisbon Bottoms. A powerful outburst of water from a failed levee on the north side of Lisbon Bottoms scoured a deep channel across the fields, which shows up as purple band. As the flood waters receded, deposits of sand and silt were left behind, which now appear as dark, smooth streaks in the image. The yellow areas within the blue, near the river, are clumps of trees sitting on slightly higher ground within the floodplain. The radar 'sees' the treetops, and that is why they are so much higher (yellow) than the fields. The image was acquired by the NASA/JPL Topographic Synthetic Aperture Radar system (TOPSAR) that flew over the area aboard a DC-8 aircraft in August 1994. The elevations are obtained by a technique known as radar interferometry, in which the radar signals are transmitted by one antenna, and echoes are received by two antennas aboard the aircraft. The two sets of received signals are combined using computer processing to produce a topographic map. Similar techniques can be used to map the Earth's topography from satellites and from the space shuttle. The brightness of the image represents the radar backscatter at C-band, in the vertically transmitted and received polarization. The image is centered south of the town of Glasgow in central Missouri, at 39.1 degrees north latitude and 92.9 degrees west longitude. The area shown is about 5 km by 10 km (3.1 by 6.2 miles). Radar and topography data such as these are being used by scientists to more accurately assess the potential for future flooding in this region and how that might impact surrounding communities. Radar and interferometry processing for this image was performed at JPL; image generation was performed at Washington University, St. Louis.

  9. Surface Roughness of the Moon Derived from Multi-frequency Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, W.

    2011-12-01

    Surface roughness of the Moon provides important information concerning both significant questions about lunar surface processes and engineering constrains for human outposts and rover trafficabillity. Impact-related phenomena change the morphology and roughness of lunar surface, and therefore surface roughness provides clues to the formation and modification mechanisms of impact craters. Since the Apollo era, lunar surface roughness has been studied using different approaches, such as direct estimation from lunar surface digital topographic relief, and indirect analysis of Earth-based radar echo strengths. Submillimeter scale roughness at Apollo landing sites has been studied by computer stereophotogrammetry analysis of Apollo Lunar Surface Closeup Camera (ALSCC) pictures, whereas roughness at meter to kilometer scale has been studied using laser altimeter data from recent missions. Though these studies shown lunar surface roughness is scale dependent that can be described by fractal statistics, roughness at centimeter scale has not been studied yet. In this study, lunar surface roughnesses at centimeter scale are investigated using Earth-based 70 cm Arecibo radar data and miniature synthetic aperture radar (Mini-SAR) data at S- and X-band (with wavelengths 12.6 cm and 4.12 cm). Both observations and theoretical modeling show that radar echo strengths are mostly dominated by scattering from the surface and shallow buried rocks. Given the different penetration depths of radar waves at these frequencies (< 30 m for 70 cm wavelength, < 3 m at S-band, and < 1 m at X-band), radar echo strengths at S- and X-band will yield surface roughness directly, whereas radar echo at 70-cm will give an upper limit of lunar surface roughness. The integral equation method is used to model radar scattering from the rough lunar surface, and dielectric constant of regolith and surface roughness are two dominate factors. The complex dielectric constant of regolith is first estimated globally using the regolith composition and the relation among the dielectric constant, bulk density, and regolith composition. The statistical properties of lunar surface roughness are described by the root mean square (RMS) height and correlation length, which represent the vertical and horizontal scale of the roughness. The correlation length and its scale dependence are studied using the topography data from laser altimeter observations from recent lunar missions. As these two parameters are known, surface roughness (RMS slope) can be estimated by minimizing the difference between the observed and modeled radar echo strength. Surface roughness of several regions over Oceanus Procellarum and southeastern highlands on lunar nearside are studied, and preliminary results show that maira is smoother than highlands at 70 cm scale, whereas the situation turns opposite at 12 and 4 cm scale. Surface roughness of young craters is in general higher than that of maria and highlands, indicating large rock population produced during impacting process.

  10. SRTM Radar - Landsat Image Comparison, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In addition to an elevation model of most of Earth'slandmass, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission will produce C-band radar imagery of the same area. This imagery is essentially a 10-day snapshot view of the Earth, as observed with 5.8 centimeter wavelength radar signals that were transmitted from the Shuttle, reflected by the Earth, and then recorded on the Shuttle. This six-image mosaic shows two examples of SRTM radar images (center) with comparisons to images acquired by the Landsat 7 satellite in the visible wavelengths (left) and an infrared wavelength (right). Both sets of images show lava flows in northern Patagonia, Argentina. In each case, the lava flows are relatively young compared to the surrounding rock formations.

    In visible light (left) image brightness corresponds to mineral chemistry and -- as expected -- both lava flows appear dark. Generally, the upper flow sits atop much lighter bedrock, providing good contrast and making the edges of the flow distinct. However, the lower flow borders some rocks that are similarly dark, and the flow boundaries are somewhat obscured. Meanwhile, in the radar images (center), image brightness corresponds to surface roughness (and topographic orientation) and substantial differences between the flows are visible. Much of the top flow appears dark, meaning it is fairly smooth. Consequently, it forms little or no contrast with the smooth and dark surrounding bedrock and thus virtually vanishes from view. However, the lower flow appears rough and bright and mostly forms good contrast with adjacent bedrock such that the flow is locally more distinct here than in the visible Landsat view. For further comparison, infrared Landsat images (right) again show image brightnesses related to mineral chemistry, but the lava flows appear lighter than in the visible wavelengths. Consequently, the lower lava flow becomes fairly obscure among the various surrounding rocks, just as the upper flow did in the radar image. The various differences among all of these images illustrate the importance of illumination wavelength in image interpretation.

    The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper images used here were provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    The radar images shown here were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, DC.

    Size (top set): 21.3 kilometers (13.2 miles) x 25.0 kilometers (15.5 miles) Size (bottom set): 44.1 kilometers (27.3 miles) x 56.0 kilometers (34.7 miles) Location: 41.5 deg. South lat., 69 deg. West lon. Orientation: North toward upper left (top set), North toward upper right (bottom set) Image Data: Landsat bands 1,2,3 (left); SRTM Radar (middle); Landsat band 7 (right) Date Acquired: February 19, 2000 (SRTM), January 22, 2000 (Landsat)

  11. Development of an Integrated Digital Elevation Model for Safe Takeoff and Landing of the Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cie?ko, Adam; Jarmo?owski, Wojciech

    2013-12-01

    The article describes preliminary results of the augmentation of Global Navigation Satellite System/Inertial Navigation System positioning (GNSS/INS) by Digital Elevation Model (DEM) based on the data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and data from field survey. The prototype software is developed to refer the position of the aircraft to DEM and informs the user about the current relevant flight parameters. The number of the parameters may be arbitrarily increased, however, currently we investigate the altitude above the terrain and the aircraft position relative to the descent path and airfield. The study provides some information on the local SRTM accuracy in relation to the field survey of the airfield "Dajtki" - Aeroclub of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn.

  12. Radar Range Sidelobe Reduction Using Adaptive Pulse Compression Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Coon, Michael; McLinden, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Pulse compression has been widely used in radars so that low-power, long RF pulses can be transmitted, rather than a highpower short pulse. Pulse compression radars offer a number of advantages over high-power short pulsed radars, such as no need of high-power RF circuitry, no need of high-voltage electronics, compact size and light weight, better range resolution, and better reliability. However, range sidelobe associated with pulse compression has prevented the use of this technique on spaceborne radars since surface returns detected by range sidelobes may mask the returns from a nearby weak cloud or precipitation particles. Research on adaptive pulse compression was carried out utilizing a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) waveform generation board and a radar transceiver simulator. The results have shown significant improvements in pulse compression sidelobe performance. Microwave and millimeter-wave radars present many technological challenges for Earth and planetary science applications. The traditional tube-based radars use high-voltage power supply/modulators and high-power RF transmitters; therefore, these radars usually have large size, heavy weight, and reliability issues for space and airborne platforms. Pulse compression technology has provided a path toward meeting many of these radar challenges. Recent advances in digital waveform generation, digital receivers, and solid-state power amplifiers have opened a new era for applying pulse compression to the development of compact and high-performance airborne and spaceborne remote sensing radars. The primary objective of this innovative effort is to develop and test a new pulse compression technique to achieve ultrarange sidelobes so that this technique can be applied to spaceborne, airborne, and ground-based remote sensing radars to meet future science requirements. By using digital waveform generation, digital receiver, and solid-state power amplifier technologies, this improved pulse compression technique could bring significant impact on future radar development. The novel feature of this innovation is the non-linear FM (NLFM) waveform design. The traditional linear FM has the limit (-20 log BT -3 dB) for achieving ultra-low-range sidelobe in pulse compression. For this study, a different combination of 20- or 40-microsecond chirp pulse width and 2- or 4-MHz chirp bandwidth was used. These are typical operational parameters for airborne or spaceborne weather radars. The NLFM waveform design was then implemented on a FPGA board to generate a real chirp signal, which was then sent to the radar transceiver simulator. The final results have shown significant improvement on sidelobe performance compared to that obtained using a traditional linear FM chirp.

  13. Geostatistical analysis of ground-penetrating radar data: A means of describing spatial variation in the subsurface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane Rea; Rosemary Knight

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the use of ground-penetrating radar (GFR) as a means of characterizing the heterogeneity of the subsurface. Radar data were collected at several sites in southwestern British Columbia underlain by glaciodeltaic sediments. A cliff face study was conducted in which geostatistical analysis of a digitized photograph of the face and the radar image of the face showed excellent

  14. Topography, Cell Response, and Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman-Kim, Diane; Mitchel, Jennifer A.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2010-01-01

    In the body, cells encounter a complex milieu of signals, including topographical cues. Imposed topography can affect cells on surfaces by promoting adhesion, spreading, alignment, morphological changes, and changes in gene expression. Neural response to topography is complex, and depends on the dimensions and shapes of physical features. Looking toward repair of nerve injuries, strategies are being explored to engineer guidance conduits with precise surface topographies. How neurons and other cell types sense and interpret topography remains to be fully elucidated. Studies reviewed here include those of topography on cellular organization and function as well as potential cellular mechanisms of response. PMID:20438370

  15. Spaceborne radar observation of Earth and planetary environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elachi, Charles; Plaut, Jeffrey; Hensley, Scott; Moussessian, Alina; Rosen, Paul; Smrekar, Suzanne

    Spaceborne radar sensors have played critical roles in a number of planetary missions, specifically Magellan, Mars Express, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and Cassini as well as numerous Earth Science Missions. Synthetic aperture radars provide high resolution surface images independent of surface illumination (or lack of) and through cloud cover as is the case on Venus and Titan. Interferometric systems provide also three dimensional capability and sounders provide subsurface sensing capabilities particularly in icy surfaces. In this talk, we will discuss ideas for future possible investigations including Venus surface three dimensional imaging, Europa, and Ganymede subsurface sounding, comet nuclei sounding, as well as similar Earth observations of surface structure, topography, motion and cover.

  16. Observe how radar was used to map Venus

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    TERC. Center for Earth and Space Science Education

    2003-01-01

    This series of five animations summarizes how the Magellan Radar Mapping Mission created a map of Venus. High school students can see that dense cloud cover obscured the planet's surface and how radar was used to penetrate the clouds and measure the topography. The animations also demonstrate how the images were captured in long strips and sent back to Earth. Sample image strips are shown, as well as the final product: a rotating map of Venus. Movie controls allow students to repeat, pause, or step through the animation, which can give students more time to analyze the images. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

  17. Stem Cell Interaction with Topography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin K. K. Teo; Soneela Ankam; Evelyn K. F. Yim

    \\u000a The growth and differentiation of stem cells are regulated by biochemical and biophysical cues in the extracellular microenvironment.\\u000a Increasing evidences have shown that substrate topography, one of the biophysical properties of the microenvironment, can\\u000a affect stem cell fate, such as the maintenance of embryonic stem cells and the differentiation of adult and embryonic stem\\u000a cells. The underlying mechanism of how

  18. Radar images analysis for scattering surfaces characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Enrico

    1998-10-01

    According to the different problems and techniques related to the detection and recognition of airplanes and vehicles moving on the Airport surface, the present work mainly deals with the processing of images gathered by a high-resolution radar sensor. The radar images used to test the investigated algorithms are relative to sequence of images obtained in some field experiments carried out by the Electronic Engineering Department of the University of Florence. The radar is the Ka band radar operating in the'Leonardo da Vinci' Airport in Fiumicino (Rome). The images obtained from the radar scan converter are digitized and putted in x, y, (pixel) co- ordinates. For a correct matching of the images, these are corrected in true geometrical co-ordinates (meters) on the basis of fixed points on an airport map. Correlating the airplane 2-D multipoint template with actual radar images, the value of the signal in the points involved in the template can be extracted. Results for a lot of observation show a typical response for the main section of the fuselage and the wings. For the fuselage, the back-scattered echo is low at the prow, became larger near the center on the aircraft and than it decrease again toward the tail. For the wings the signal is growing with a pretty regular slope from the fuselage to the tips, where the signal is the strongest.

  19. Earth rotation and core topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.; Clayton, Robert W.; Spieth, Mary Ann

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Geodynamics program has as one of its missions highly accurate monitoring of polar motion, including changes in length of day (LOD). These observations place fundamental constraints on processes occurring in the atmosphere, in the mantle, and in the core of the planet. Short-timescale (t less than or approx 1 yr) variations in LOD are mainly the result of interaction between the atmosphere and the solid earth, while variations in LOD on decade timescales result from the exchange of angular momentum between the mantle and the fluid core. One mechanism for this exchange of angular momentum is through topographic coupling between pressure variations associated with flow in the core interacting with topography at the core-mantel boundary (CMB). Work done under another NASA grant addressing the origin of long-wavelength geoid anomalies as well as evidence from seismology, resulted in several models of CMB topography. The purpose of work supported by NAG5-819 was to study further the problem of CMB topography, using geodesy, fluid mechanics, geomagnetics, and seismology. This is a final report.

  20. Ultrawideband radar clutter measurements of forested terrain, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, D.M.; Severtsen, R.H.; Prince, J.M.; Davis, K.C.; Collins, H.D.

    1993-06-01

    The ultrawideband (UWB) radar clutter measurements project was conducted to provide radar clutter data for new ultrawideband radar systems which are currently under development. A particular goal of this project is to determine if conventional narrow band clutter data may be extrapolated to the UWB case. This report documents measurements conducted in 1991 and additional measurements conducted in 1992. The original project consisted of clutter measurements of forested terrain in the Olympic National Forest near Sequim, WA. The impulse radar system used a 30 kW peak impulse source with a 2 Gigasample/second digitizer to form a UHF (300--1000 MHz) ultrawideband impulse radar system. Additional measurements were conducted in parallel using a Systems Planning Corporation (SPC) step-chirp radar system. This system utilized pulse widths of 1330 nanoseconds over a bandwidth of 300--1000 MHz to obtain similar resolution to the impulse system. Due to the slow digitizer data throughput in the impulse radar system, data collection rates were significantly higher using the step-chirp system. Additional forest clutter measurements were undertaken in 1992 to increase the amount of data available, and especially to increase the amount of data from the impulse radar system.

  1. Imaging Radar Applications in the Death Valley Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.

    1996-01-01

    Death Valley has had a long history as a testbed for remote sensing techniques (Gillespie, this conference). Along with visible-near infrared and thermal IR sensors, imaging radars have flown and orbited over the valley since the 1970's, yielding new insights into the geologic applications of that technology. More recently, radar interferometry has been used to derive digital topographic maps of the area, supplementing the USGS 7.5' digital quadrangles currently available for nearly the entire area. As for their shorter-wavelength brethren, imaging radars were tested early in their civilian history in Death Valley because it has a variety of surface types in a small area without the confounding effects of vegetation. In one of the classic references of these early radar studies, in a semi-quantitative way the response of an imaging radar to surface roughness near the radar wavelength, which typically ranges from about 1 cm to 1 m was explained. This laid the groundwork for applications of airborne and spaceborne radars to geologic problems in and regions. Radar's main advantages over other sensors stems from its active nature- supplying its own illumination makes it independent of solar illumination and it can also control the imaging geometry more accurately. Finally, its long wavelength allows it to peer through clouds, eliminating some of the problems of optical sensors, especially in perennially cloudy and polar areas.

  2. Fracture trace expression and analysis in radar imagery of rain forest terrain (Peru)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Kaye, P. H. A.; Norman, J. W.; Skidmore, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    Mapping of minor lineaments from radar imagery of the rain forest in southeast Peru is biased due to the selective suppression of some topography which results from the observation geometry of the imaging radar system and the varied perception of lineaments on the imagery by different interpreters. Team analysis of the imagery compensates for several of the sources of bias, and results in the clear recognition of differing regimes within the regional fracture field in the study area.

  3. Local Area Weather Radar in Alpine Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savina, M.

    2012-04-01

    Space-time variability of precipitation in orographically complex regions is a challenging research topic. The difficult accessibility of remote regions and the high elevations make difficult the operation of conventional raingauges and reduce the visibility of large scale radars. A solution to this limitation might be the use of a number of cost-effective short-range X-band radars as complement to raingauges and conventional, large and expensive weather radars. This paper presents the results of a pilot experiment, which aimed at i) developing and assessing the performance of a cost-effective X-band Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) located in the orographically complex Alpine region and ii) testing whether it could lead to better understanding of the nature of the precipitation process, e.g. identifying any possible dependence between precipitation and topography. The LAWR was deployed between August 2007 and October 2011 on the summit of the Kl. Matterhorn, located in the Swiss Alps at 3883 m a.s.l. (Valais, Switzerland). This was the first time that a cost-effective X-band radar was installed at such elevation and could be tested in operation-like conditions. Beside the technological improvements that were necessary for a reliable functioning of the LAWR hardware, much effort went into the development of a set of radar corrections and into the design of a new Alpine Radar COnversion Model (ARCOM), which includes the algorithms necessary to convert radar received echoes into precipitation rates, specifically accounting for the presence of the pronounced topography. The ARCOM was developed and tested on the basis of a set of precipitation events for which precipitation was measured also by 43 automatic raingauges located within 60 km range from the radar antenna. Conversely to the state-of-the-art conversion models, ARCOM accounts not only for the seasonal climatological condition but also of geometric and orographic forcings such as partial beam filling and beam blocking. The results showed that the LAWR systems and the newly developed ARCOM can be successfully deployed in high mountain settings. Indeed the experimental LAWR was able to measure precipitation in all its forms as well as its spatial variability. The ARCOM proved to be stable and robust across seasons, precipitation types and intensities, and to be able to account for the disturbances due to orography. The LAWR observations were additionally used to study the distribution of precipitation occurrences in relation to elevation and topography. The results show in most of the observed events precipitation occurs in this sector of the Alps significantly more often in a given range of elevations, regardless of the season and of the event type. This suggests the limitation of the assumption of positive gradient of precipitation with elevation, which is frequently used in hydrological modelling applications, and points to the importance of measuring more accurately the space-time distribution of precipitation in orographically complex areas for a correct representation of the hydrologic response of mountain watersheds.

  4. Remorque RADAR Description technique

    E-print Network

    Heurteaux, Yanick

    ANNEXE: Remorque RADAR Description technique Le but de la remorque est de transporter un RADAR et pour héberger l'électronique radar et son opérateur. Caractéristiques générales de la remorque : · PTC'un côté, une baie de l'autre. Un hublot sur le toit et une baie donnant sur la partie RADAR. Un plafonnier

  5. UWB RADAR Receiver Architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nuno Paulino; Adolfo Steiger Garção; João Goes

    this chapter describes the operation of a radar system. The differences and advantages of using UWB signals in the radar system,\\u000a over traditional narrow band signals, are discussed. The radar equation, usually defined for narrow band signals, is redefined\\u000a for UWB signals. This new radar equation is used to analyze the echo signals from targets with basic shapes, resulting in

  6. The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS): An Airborne Laser Altimeter for Mapping Vegetation and Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, J.; Rabine, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) is an airborne laser altimeter designed to quickly and extensively map surface topography as well as the relative heights of other reflecting surfaces within the laser footprint. Since 1997, this instrument has primarily been used as the airborne simulator for the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mission, a spaceborne mission designed to measure tree height, vertical structure and ground topography (including sub-canopy topography). LVIS is capable of operating from 500 m to 10 km above ground level with footprint sizes from 1 to 60 m. Laser footprints can be randomly spaced within the 7 degree telescope field-of-view, constrained only by the operating frequency of the ND:YAG Q-switched laser (500 Hz). A significant innovation of the LVIS altimeter is that all ranging, waveform recording, and range gating are performed using a single digitizer, clock base, and detector. A portion of the outgoing laser pulse is fiber-optically fed into the detector used to collect the return signal and this entire time history of the outgoing and return pulses is digitized at 500 Msamp/sec. The ground return is then located using software digital signal processing, even in the presence of visibly opaque clouds. The surface height distribution of all reflecting surfaces within the laser footprint can be determined, for example, tree height and ground elevation. To date, the LVIS system has been used to monitor topographic change at Long Valley caldera, CA, as part of NASA's Topography and Surface Change program, and to map tree structure and sub-canopy topography at the La Selva Biological Research Station in Costa Rica, as part of the pre-launch calibration activities for the VCL mission. We present results that show the laser altimeter consistently and accurately maps surface topography, including sub-canopy topography, and vegetation height and structure. These results confirm the measurement concept of VCL and highlight the benefits of airborne prototypes of spaceborne instruments.

  7. Cassini Titan Radar Mapper

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHARLES ELACHI; E. Im; L. E. Roth; C. L. Werner

    1991-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper is a multimode radar instrument designed to probe the optically inaccessible surface of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. The instrument is to be included in the payload of the Cassini Saturn Mission, scheduled for launch in 1995. The individual modes of Cassini Radar Mapper will allow topographic mapping and surface imaging at few hundred meters resolution.

  8. Lunar radar backscatter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    The lunar surface material in the Plato area is characterized using Earth based visual, infrared, and radar signatures. Radar scattering in the lunar regolith with an existing optical scattering computer program is modeled. Mapping with 1 to 2 km resolution of the Moon using a 70 cm Arecibo radar is presented.

  9. The Importance of Basal Topography for Greenland Ice Sheet Margin Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, S.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Smith, L. C.; Pitcher, L. H.; Chu, V. W.

    2012-12-01

    Nearly half of the Greenland ice sheet's total mass loss is controlled by surface mass balance, primarily driven by meltwater runoff exiting at its margin via supra-, en-, and sub-glacial drainage networks into fjords and pro-glacial lakes and rivers. Despite the importance of meltwater runoff, Greenland's hydrologic drainage patterns are not well understood. This is partly due to a scarcity of ice sheet meltwater runoff observations and detailed information about supra- and sub-glacial topography, which are responsible for dictating runoff flow patterns. However, such data are available locally in southwest Greenland for the Akuliarusiarsuup Kuua (AK) River watershed. In this study, NASA IceBridge supra-glacial (Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM)) and sub-glacial (Multichannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder (MCoRDS)) topography and in situ hydrologic data from 2009-2012 are used to study three nested riverine systems within the AK River watershed ranging from 8 to 101 km2. Examination of relationships between drainage patterns modeled from topographic data and actual ice sheet runoff losses provide insight into drainage basin delineation accuracy, scale-dependency, and surface and sub-glacial topography controls on ice sheet margin hydrology. Finally, an assessment is made to determine the importance of incorporating basal topography within meltwater runoff models versus surface topography alone.

  10. Modern Radar Techniques for Geophysical Applications: Two Examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arokiasamy, B. J.; Bianchi, C.; Sciacca, U.; Tutone, G.; Zirizzotti, A.; Zuccheretti, E.

    2005-01-01

    The last decade of the evolution of radar was heavily influenced by the rapid increase in the information processing capabilities. Advances in solid state radio HF devices, digital technology, computing architectures and software offered the designers to develop very efficient radars. In designing modern radars the emphasis goes towards the simplification of the system hardware, reduction of overall power, which is compensated by coding and real time signal processing techniques. Radars are commonly employed in geophysical radio soundings like probing the ionosphere; stratosphere-mesosphere measurement, weather forecast, GPR and radio-glaciology etc. In the laboratorio di Geofisica Ambientale of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Rome, Italy, we developed two pulse compression radars. The first is a HF radar called AIS-INGV; Advanced Ionospheric Sounder designed both for the purpose of research and for routine service of the HF radio wave propagation forecast. The second is a VHF radar called GLACIORADAR, which will be substituting the high power envelope radar used by the Italian Glaciological group. This will be employed in studying the sub glacial structures of Antarctica, giving information about layering, the bed rock and sub glacial lakes if present. These are low power radars, which heavily rely on advanced hardware and powerful real time signal processing. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  11. Radar Meteorology Tutorial

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    McNoldy, Brian

    Brian McNoldy at Multi-community Environmental Storm Observatory (MESO) educates the public about the use of radar in meteorology in this pdf document. After reading about the history of radar, visitors can find out how radar can detect storms by transmitting a high-power beam of radiation. Students can learn how scatter, absorption, frequencies, scan angles, and moments impact the radar display. With the help of many example images, the author also discusses how to interpret the images collected. At the end of the online document, visitors can learn about the characteristics and capabilities of NEXRAD WSR-88D, the radar used throughout the United States.

  12. Design and simulation of a scatterometer processor using digital filtering techniques

    E-print Network

    Galka, Walter

    1975-01-01

    -Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. John W. Rouse, Jr. Dr. Jo W. Howze This report describes two digital filtering methods by which scatterometer data can be reprocessed. The processors are designed to operate on sampled data from a Doppler radar scatterometer... The Radar Scatterometer. Scope of this Report II. THE RYAN 13. 3 GHz DOPPLER RADAR SCATTEROMERER. 7 The Doppler Scatterometer. The Analog Processor The Digital Processor. III. DIGITAL FILTER DESIGN. Introduction The K-Transform. 13 19 24 24 26...

  13. The Apollo Lunar Sounder radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porcello, L. J.; Zelenka, J. S.; Adams, G. F.; Jackson, P. L.; Jordan, R. L.; Phillips, R. J.; Brown, W. E., Jr.; Ward, S. H.

    1974-01-01

    The objectives of the Apollo 17 Lunar Sounder Experiment (ALSE) were to detect subsurface geologic structures, to generate a continuous lunar profile, and to image the moon at radar wavelengths. A three-wavelength synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) operating at 60, 20, and 2 m wavelengths was designed to attain these objectives. The design choices reflected a balance of scientific requirements versus Apollo mission and hardware constraints. The radar data from the lunar mission were recorded on photographic film in a conventional SAR format, and were returned to earth for processing. A combination of optical and digital processing and exploitation techniques was applied to the scientific interpretation of the data. Some preliminary results from the lunar mission have been obtained.

  14. A transceiver module of the Mu radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, S.; Ogawa, T.; Tsuda, T.; Sato, T.; Kimura, I.; Fukao, S.

    1983-01-01

    The transceiver (TR) module of a middle and upper atmospheric radar is described. The TR module used in the radar is mainly composed of two units: a mixer (MIX unit) and a power amplifier (PA unit). The former generates the RF wave for transmission and converts the received echo to the IF signal. A 41.5-MHz local signal fed to mixers passes through a digitally controlled 8-bit phase shifter which can change its value up to 1,000 times in a second, so that the MU radar has the ability to steer its antenna direction quickly and flexibly. The MIX unit also contains a buffer amplifier and a gate for the transmitting signal and preamplifier for the received one whose noise figure is less than 5 dB. The PA unit amplifies the RF signal supplied from the MIX unit up to 63.7 dBm (2350 W), and feeds it to the crossed Yagi antenna.

  15. THE 1988 YELLOWSTONE FIRES OBSERVED BY IMAGING RADARS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Rignot; Don G. Despain; Francesco Holecz

    In 1988, nearly half a million hectares of forest burned in the Greater Yellowstone Area. Six years later, the burned areas were still visible in the dual-polarization radar images acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C (SIR-C) at both C- (5.6 cm wavelength) and L-band (24 cm) frequency. The data were georeferenced, rectified and calibrated using a digital topographic model

  16. Carbon Dioxide Exchange in Complex Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Matthias; Rotach, Mathias; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Gohm, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    On a global scale the budget of carbon dioxide (CO_2) bears a quite substantial uncertainty, which is commonly understood to be mainly due to land-surface exchange processes. In this project we investigate to what extent complex topography can amplify these land-surface exchange processes. The hypothesis is that, on the meso-scale, topography adds additional atmospheric mechanisms that drive the exchange of CO2 at the surface. This sensitivity model study investigates an idealized sine shaped valley with the atmospheric numerical model Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) coupled to the community land model (CLM) to study the effect of complex topography on the CO2 budget compared to flat terrain. The experiment is designed to estimate the effect of the topography during maximum ecosystem exchange in summer using meteorological and ecosystem conditions at solstice, the 21. of June. Systematic variation of meteorological initial conditions, plant functional types and the topography creates an ensemble that unveils the fundamental factors that dominate the differences of CO2 between simulations with topography compared to plain surfaces in the model. The sign and magnitude of the difference between the CO2 exchange over topography and over a plain simulation are strongly dependent on the CLM plant functional type, the initial temperature, the initial relative humidity, the latitude and the area height distribution of the topography. However, in this model experiment the topography is, in the mean, a sink to the CO2 budget in the order of 5% per day.

  17. Skylab earth resources experiment package /EREP/ - Sea surface topography experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.; Marsh, J. G.; Mcgoogan, J. T.; Leitao, C. D.; Vincent, S.; Wells, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    The S-193 Skylab radar altimeter was operated in a round-the-world pass on Jan. 31, 1974. The main purpose of this experiment was to test and 'measure' the variation of the sea surface topography using the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) geoid model as a reference. This model is based upon 430,000 satellite and 25,000 ground gravity observations. Variations of the sea surface on the order of -40 to +60 m were observed along this pass. The 'computed' and 'measured' sea surfaces have an rms agreement on the order of 7 m. This is quite satisfactory, considering that this was the first time the sea surface has been observed directly over a distance of nearly 35,000 km and compared to a computed model. The Skylab orbit for this global pass was computed using the Goddard Earth Model (GEM 6) and S-band radar tracking data, resulting in an orbital height uncertainty of better than 5 m over one orbital period.

  18. An update on the multi-channel phased array Weather Radar at the National Weather Radar Testbed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Yeary; G. Crain; A. Zahrai; R. Kelley; J. Meier; Y. Zhang; I. Ivic; C. Curtis; R. Palmer; T.-Y. Yu; R. Doviak

    2011-01-01

    The first phased array radar dedicated to weather observation and analysis is now instrumented with eight, simultaneous digital receivers. The multi-channel receiver will collect signals from the sum, azimuth-difference, elevation- difference, and five broad-beamed auxiliary channels. The multi-channel receiver will allow the direct implementation of interferometry techniques to estimate crossbeam wind, shear and turbulence within a radar resolution volume. Access

  19. Do you have a radar bill in your pocket?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM)

    2002-01-01

    This activity introduces students to radar bills (currency that has serial numbers that read the same forward and backward) and challenges them to estimate how frequently radar bills occur. The activity, part of the Figure This! collection of 80 math challenges emphasizing math in the real world, explains how symmetry and repeating patterns are important to mathematicians, scientists, and artists. The Hint tells students that our currency has eight-digit serial numbers, and the solution provides a table that shows the relationship between the number of digits in a serial number and the number of radar bills. Related questions ask students to solve similar problems with serial numbers that contain different numbers of digits. Answers to all questions and links to additional resources are provided. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

  20. EAARL Coastal Topography--Cape Canaveral, Florida, 2009: First Surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Plant, Nathaniel; Wright, C.W.; Nagle, D.B.; Serafin, K.S.; Klipp, E.S.

    2011-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Kennedy Space Center, FL. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the eastern Florida coastline beachface, acquired on May 28, 2009. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color-infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine aircraft, but the instrument was deployed on a Pilatus PC-6. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is used routinely to create maps that represent submerged or sub-aerial topography. Specialized filtering algorithms have been implemented to determine the "bare earth" under vegetation from a point cloud of last return elevations.

  1. EAARL Coastal Topography-Pearl River Delta 2008: First Surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Miner, Michael D.; Michael, D.; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the University of New Orleans (UNO), Pontchartrain Institute for Environmental Sciences (PIES), New Orleans, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Pearl River Delta in Louisiana and Mississippi, acquired March 9-11, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is used routinely to create maps that represent submerged or first surface topography. Specialized filtering algorithms have been implemented to determine the 'bare earth' under vegetation from a point cloud of last return elevations.

  2. EAARL Topography - Vicksburg National Military Park 2008: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Segura, Martha; Yates, Xan

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Vicksburg National Military Park in Mississippi, acquired on March 6, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is used routinely to create maps that represent submerged or first surface topography. Specialized filtering algorithms have been implemented to determine the 'bare earth' under vegetation from a point cloud of last return elevations.

  3. EAARL Coastal Topography-Pearl River Delta 2008: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Miner, Michael D.; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the University of New Orleans (UNO), Pontchartrain Institute for Environmental Sciences (PIES), New Orleans, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Pearl River Delta in Louisiana and Mississippi, acquired March 9-11, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is used routinely to create maps that represent submerged or first surface topography. Specialized filtering algorithms have been implemented to determine the 'bare earth' under vegetation from a point cloud of last return elevations.

  4. EAARL Coastal Topography-Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, 2010: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel-Cormier, Jamie M.; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Wright, C. Wayne; Nagle, David B.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Yates, Xan; Klipp, Emily S.

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) and submerged topography datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Chandeleur Islands, acquired March 3, 2010. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color-infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is used routinely to create maps that represent submerged or sub-aerial topography. Specialized filtering algorithms have been implemented to determine the 'bare earth' under vegetation from a point cloud of last return elevations. For more information about similar projects, please visit the Decision Support for Coastal Science and Management website.

  5. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northern Gulf of Mexico, 2007: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kathryn E.L.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Wright, C. Wayne; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Brock, John C.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. The purpose of this project is to provide highly detailed and accurate datasets of select barrier islands and peninsular regions of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, acquired on June 27-30, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is used routinely to create maps that represent submerged or sub-aerial topography. Specialized filtering algorithms have been implemented to determine the 'bare earth' under vegetation from a point cloud of last return elevations.

  6. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northeast Barrier Islands 2007: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Wright, C. Wayne; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the northeast coastal barrier islands in New York and New Jersey, acquired April 29-30 and May 15-16, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create maps that represent submerged or first surface topography. Specialized filtering algorithms have been implemented to determine the 'bare earth' under vegetation from a point cloud of last return elevations.

  7. ATM Coastal Topography-Florida 2001: Western Panhandle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Xan; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the western Florida panhandle coastline, acquired October 2-4 and 7-10, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create maps that represent submerged or first surface topography.

  8. ATM Coastal Topography-Texas, 2001: UTM Zone 15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klipp, Emily S.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Yates, Xan; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Texas coastline within UTM zone 15, from Matagorda Peninsula to Galveston Island, acquired October 12-13, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is used routinely to create maps that represent submerged or first-surface topography.

  9. ATM Coastal Topography-Florida 2001: Eastern Panhandle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Xan; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the eastern Florida panhandle coastline, acquired October 2, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create maps that represent submerged or first surface topography.

  10. ATM Coastal Topography-Texas, 2001: UTM Zone 14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klipp, Emily S.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Yates, Xan; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Texas coastline within UTM zone 14, acquired October 12-13, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is used routinely to create maps that represent submerged or first-surface topography.

  11. Multistatic radar systems signal processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Bradaric; G. T. Capraro; D. D. Weiner; M. C. Wicks

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a multistatic radar system with multiple receivers and one transmitter is analyzed. We address the rules for selecting the weights for fusing multiple receivers in order to meet pre-specified performance goals. A multistatic radar ambiguity function is used to relate different radar performance measures to system parameters such as radar geometry and radar waveforms. Simulations are used

  12. Rendezvous radar for the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, John W.; Olds, Keith; Parks, Howard

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Rendezvous Radar Set (RRS) for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The RRS was to be used to locate, and then provide vectoring information to, target satellites (or Shuttle or Space Station) to aid the OMV in making a minimum-fuel-consumption approach and rendezvous. The RRS design is that of an X-Band, all solid-state, monopulse tracking, frequency hopping, pulse-Doppler radar system. The development of the radar was terminated when the OMV prime contract to TRW was terminated by NASA. At the time of the termination, the development was in the circuit design stage. The system design was virtually completed, the PDR had been held. The RRS design was based on Motorola's experiences, both in the design and production of radar systems for the US Army and in the design and production of hi-rel communications systems for NASA space programs. Experience in these fields was combined with the latest digital signal processor and micro-processor technology to design a light-weight, low-power, spaceborne radar. The antenna and antenna positioner (gimbals) technology developed for the RRS is now being used in the satellite-to-satellite communication link design for Motorola's Iridium telecommunications system.

  13. Rendezvous radar for the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, John W.; Olds, Keith; Parks, Howard

    This paper describes the development of the Rendezvous Radar Set (RRS) for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The RRS was to be used to locate, and then provide vectoring information to, target satellites (or Shuttle or Space Station) to aid the OMV in making a minimum-fuel-consumption approach and rendezvous. The RRS design is that of an X-Band, all solid-state, monopulse tracking, frequency hopping, pulse-Doppler radar system. The development of the radar was terminated when the OMV prime contract to TRW was terminated by NASA. At the time of the termination, the development was in the circuit design stage. The system design was virtually completed, the PDR had been held. The RRS design was based on Motorola's experiences, both in the design and production of radar systems for the US Army and in the design and production of hi-rel communications systems for NASA space programs. Experience in these fields was combined with the latest digital signal processor and micro-processor technology to design a light-weight, low-power, spaceborne radar. The antenna and antenna positioner (gimbals) technology developed for the RRS is now being used in the satellite-to-satellite communication link design for Motorola's Iridium telecommunications system.

  14. Radar BackscatterMeasurementsFrom RADARSAT S A R Imagery of South Pole Station, Antarctica

    E-print Network

    Howat, Ian M.

    Radar BackscatterMeasurementsFrom RADARSAT S A R Imagery of South Pole Station, Antarctica Hong backscatter around South Pole Station was measured from several different azimuthal angles using RADARSAT-1 topography* INTRODUCTION Radarsat-1 acquisitions in support of the 1997 Radarsat Antarctic Mapping Project

  15. RFI suppression for ultra wideband radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Miller; L. Potter; J. McCorkle

    1997-01-01

    An estimate-and-subtract algorithm is presented for the real-time digital suppression of radio frequency interference (RFI) in ultrawideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems used for foliage- and ground-penetrating imaging. The algorithm separately processes fixed- and variable-frequency interferers. Excision of estimated targets greatly reduces bias in RFI estimates, thereby reducing target energy loss and sidelobe levels in SAR imagery. Performance is

  16. Radar Mosaic of Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is an image of equatorial Africa, centered on the equator at longitude 15degrees east. This image is a mosaic of almost 4,000 separate images obtained in 1996 by the L-band imaging radar onboard the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite. Using radar to penetrate the persistent clouds prevalent in tropical forests, the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite was able for the first time to image at high resolution this continental scale region during single flooding seasons. The area shown covers about 7.4 million square kilometers (2.8 million square miles) of land surface, spans more than 5,000 kilometers(3,100 miles) east and west and some 2,000 kilometers (1,240 miles) north and south. North is up in this image. At the full resolution of the mosaic (100 meters or 330 feet), this image is more than 500 megabytes in size, and was processed from imagery totaling more than 60 gigabytes.

    Central Africa was imaged twice in 1996, once between January and March, which is the major low-flood season in the Congo Basin, and once between October and November, which is the major high-flood season in the Congo Basin. The red color corresponds to the data from the low-flood season, the green to the high-flood season, and the blue to the 'texture' of the low-flood data. The forests appear green as a result, the flooded and palm forests, as well as urban areas, appear yellow, the ocean and lakes appear black, and savanna areas appear blue, black or green, depending on the savanna type, surface topography and other factors. The areas of the image that are black and white were mapped only between January and March 1996. In these areas, the black areas are savanna or open water, the gray are forests, and the white areas are flooded forests or urban areas. The Congo River dominates the middle of the image, where the nearby forests that are periodically flooded by the Congo and its tributaries stand out as yellow. The Nile River flows north from Lake Victoria in the middle right of the color portion of the mosaic.

    This image is one of the products resulting from the Global Rain Forest Mapping project, a joint project between the National Space Development Agency of Japan, the Space Applications Institute of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and an international team of scientists. The goal of the Global Rain Forest Mapping mission is to map with the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite the world's tropical rain forests. The Japanese satellite was launched in 1992 by the National Space Development Agency of Japan and the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry, with support from the Remote Sensing Technology Center of Japan.

  17. Physics-based modeling for high-fidelity radar retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgin, Mariko Sofie

    Knowledge of soil moisture on a global scale is crucial for understanding the Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles. This dissertation is motivated by the need for accurate soil moisture estimates and focuses on the improvement of the retrieval of soil moisture based on active remote sensing over vegetated and forested areas. It addresses three important, but often neglected, aspects in radar imaging: ionospheric effects, effects of multispecies vegetation (heterogeneity at pixel level), and heterogeneity at landscape level. The first contribution of this dissertation is the development of a generalized radar scattering model as an advancement of current radar modeling techniques for vegetated areas at a fine-scale pixel level. It consists of a realistic multispecies representation of vegetated areas, realistic subsurface soil layer modeling, and inclusion of terrain topography. This modeling improvement allows greater applicability to different land cover types and generally higher accuracy for retrieval of soil moisture. Most coarse-scale satellite pixels (km-scale or coarser) contain highly heterogeneous scenes with fine-scale (100 m or finer) variability of soil moisture, soil texture, topography, and vegetation cover types. The second contribution is the development of spatial scaling techniques to investigate effects of landscape-level heterogeneity on radar scattering signatures. Using the above radar forward scattering model, which assumes homogeneity over fine scales, tailor-made models are derived for the contribution of fine-scale heterogeneity to the coarse-scale satellite pixel for effective soil moisture retrieval. Finally, the third contribution is the development of a self-contained calibration technique based on an end-to-end radar system model. The model includes the effects of the ionosphere allowing the use of spaceborne radar signals for accurate soil moisture retrieval from lower frequencies, such as L- and P-band. These contributions in combination will greatly increase the usability of low-frequency spaceborne radar data for soil moisture retrieval: ionospheric effects are successfully mitigated, heterogeneity at landscape level is resolved, and fine-scale scenes are better modeled. All of these contributions ultimately allow improved fidelity in soil moisture retrieval. These contributions are immediately applicable in current missions such as the ongoing AirMOSS mission that observes root-zone soil moisture with a P-band radar at fine-scale resolution (100 m), and NASA's upcoming SMAP spaceborne mission, which will assess surface soil moisture with an L-band radar and radiometer at km-scale resolution (3 km).

  18. A fully photonics-based coherent radar system.

    PubMed

    Ghelfi, Paolo; Laghezza, Francesco; Scotti, Filippo; Serafino, Giovanni; Capria, Amerigo; Pinna, Sergio; Onori, Daniel; Porzi, Claudio; Scaffardi, Mirco; Malacarne, Antonio; Vercesi, Valeria; Lazzeri, Emma; Berizzi, Fabrizio; Bogoni, Antonella

    2014-03-20

    The next generation of radar (radio detection and ranging) systems needs to be based on software-defined radio to adapt to variable environments, with higher carrier frequencies for smaller antennas and broadened bandwidth for increased resolution. Today's digital microwave components (synthesizers and analogue-to-digital converters) suffer from limited bandwidth with high noise at increasing frequencies, so that fully digital radar systems can work up to only a few gigahertz, and noisy analogue up- and downconversions are necessary for higher frequencies. In contrast, photonics provide high precision and ultrawide bandwidth, allowing both the flexible generation of extremely stable radio-frequency signals with arbitrary waveforms up to millimetre waves, and the detection of such signals and their precise direct digitization without downconversion. Until now, the photonics-based generation and detection of radio-frequency signals have been studied separately and have not been tested in a radar system. Here we present the development and the field trial results of a fully photonics-based coherent radar demonstrator carried out within the project PHODIR. The proposed architecture exploits a single pulsed laser for generating tunable radar signals and receiving their echoes, avoiding radio-frequency up- and downconversion and guaranteeing both the software-defined approach and high resolution. Its performance exceeds state-of-the-art electronics at carrier frequencies above two gigahertz, and the detection of non-cooperating aeroplanes confirms the effectiveness and expected precision of the system. PMID:24646997

  19. A Systematic Study of Topography Effect of ERT Based on 3-D Modeling and Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, De-Bao; Zhou, Qi-You; Junejo, S. A.; Xiao, An-Lin

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a quick method using a digital elevation model (DEM) to obtain real terrain points for generating tetrahedral mesh has been developed, based on TetGen. Then three-dimensional (3-D) forward modeling and inversion, based on the patching method of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and which have been compared favorably with those obtained using other software, were used to study topography effect. Asystematic research of apparent resistivity features of different topographies with pole-pole array and Wenner array has been conducted in this study. Based on that, the solutions for removing topography effect are given to the two-dimensional (2-D) survey and the 3-D survey, respectively. Comparing to the inversion result, the solution for the 2-D survey can effectively remove topography influence. A 3-D inversion algorithm incorporating topography is proposed at the same time. Two synthetic models incorporating real topography with fault and ellipse anomalies were created to test the 3-D inversion algorithm, and the results show that the relative image error is less than 30 % and the correlation coefficient is more than 90 %.

  20. Apollo experience report: Lunar module landing radar and rendezvous radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozas, P.; Cunningham, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    A developmental history of the Apollo lunar module landing and rendezvous radar subsystems is presented. The Apollo radar subsystems are discussed from initial concept planning to flight configuration testing. The major radar subsystem accomplishments and problems are discussed.

  1. Shuttle Topography Data Inform Solar Power Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    The next time you flip on a light switch, there s a chance that you could be benefitting from data originally acquired during the Space Shuttle Program. An effort spearheaded by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) in 2000 put together the first near-global elevation map of the Earth ever assembled, which has found use in everything from 3D terrain maps to models that inform solar power production. For the project, called the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), engineers at JPL designed a 60-meter mast that was fitted onto Shuttle Endeavour. Once deployed in space, an antenna attached to the end of the mast worked in combination with another antenna on the shuttle to simultaneously collect data from two perspectives. Just as having two eyes makes depth perception possible, the SRTM data sets could be combined to form an accurate picture of the Earth s surface elevations, the first hight-detail, near-global elevation map ever assembled. What made SRTM unique was not just its surface mapping capabilities but the completeness of the data it acquired. Over the course of 11 days, the shuttle orbited the Earth nearly 180 times, covering everything between the 60deg north and 54deg south latitudes, or roughly 80 percent of the world s total landmass. Of that targeted land area, 95 percent was mapped at least twice, and 24 percent was mapped at least four times. Following several years of processing, NASA released the data to the public in partnership with NGA. Robert Crippen, a member of the SRTM science team, says that the data have proven useful in a variety of fields. "Satellites have produced vast amounts of remote sensing data, which over the years have been mostly two-dimensional. But the Earth s surface is three-dimensional. Detailed topographic data give us the means to visualize and analyze remote sensing data in their natural three-dimensional structure, facilitating a greater understanding of the features and processes taking place on Earth."

  2. MIMO radar, SIMO radar, and IFIR radar: a P. P. Vaidyanathan and Piya Pal

    E-print Network

    Vaidyanathan, P. P.

    MIMO radar, SIMO radar, and IFIR radar: a comparison P. P. Vaidyanathan and Piya Pal Dept and SIMO radar systems for the case where the transmitter and receiver are collocated. The simplicity of the application allows one to see clearly where the advantages of MIMO radar come from, and what the tradeoffs are

  3. JournalofGlaciology, Vo!. 45, No. 149, 1999 Surface and bed topography of Trapridge Glacier, Yukon

    E-print Network

    Flowers, Gwenn

    Territory, Canada: digital elevation lTIodels and derived hydraulic geoll1.etry GWENN E. FLOWERS, CARRY K. C approaches notation.These pre dictions are compared to hydraulic connection probabilities based on borehole drilling. IN TRODUC TION Ice-penetrating radar has been used extensively in glaciol ogy, most commonly

  4. Spatial Estimation of Soil Moisture Using Synthetic Aperture Radar in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meade, N. G.; Hinzman, L. D.; Kane, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    A spatially distributed Model of Arctic Thermal and Hydrologic processes (MATH) has been developed. One of the attributes of this model is the spatial and temporal prediction of soil moisture in the active layer. The spatially distributed output from this model required verification data obtained through remote sensing to assess performance at the watershed scale independently. Therefore, a neural network was trained to predict soil moisture contents near the ground surface. The input to train the neural network is synthetic aperture radar (SAR) pixel value, and field measurements of soil moisture, and vegetation, which were used as a surrogate for surface roughness. Once the network was trained, soil moisture predictions were made based on SAR pixel value and vegetation. These results were then used for comparison with results from the hydrologic model. The quality of neural network input was less than anticipated. Our digital elevation model (DEM) was not of high enough resolution to allow exact co-registration with soil moisture measurements; therefore, the statistical correlations were not as good as hoped. However, the spatial pattern of the SAR derived soil moisture contents compares favorably with the hydrologic MATH model results. Primary surface parameters that effect SAR include topography, surface roughness, vegetation cover and soil texture. Single parameters that are considered to influence SAR include incident angle of the radar, polarization of the radiation, signal strength and returning signal integration, to name a few. These factors influence the reflectance, but if one adequately quantifies the influences of terrain and roughness, it is considered possible to extract information on soil moisture from SAR imagery analysis and in turn use SAR imagery to validate hydrologic models

  5. Radar performance improvement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. R. Little

    1976-01-01

    The AN\\/APQ-153 fire control radar modified to provide angle tracking was evaluated for improved performance. The frequency agile modifications are discussed along with the range-rate improvement modifications, and the radar to computer interface. A parametric design and comparison of noncoherent and coherent radar systems are presented. It is shown that the shuttle rendezvous range and range-rate requirements can be made

  6. Caribbean Radar Cases

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    This module presents radar case studies taken from events in the Caribbean that highlight radar signatures of severe weather. These cases include examples of deep convection, squall lines, bow echoes, tornadoes, and heavy rain resulting in flooding. Each case study includes a discussion of the conceptual models of each type of event as a review before showing the radar signatures and allowing the learner to analyze each one.

  7. The Design of a High Performance MMW Radar System for Autonomous Land Vehicle Navigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Clark; H. Durrant Whyte

    This paper describes the design of a high performance 77GHz millimetre wave radar, signal processing and control system for use in autonomous vehicle navigation. The radar front end and intermediate frequency components are described together with a method of distinguishing pre-placed target beacons from other reflectors using the polarisation of the reflected signal. Digital signal processing hardware is described which

  8. A New Implementation of the Mellin Transform and its Application to Radar Classification of Ships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip E. Zwicke; Imre Kiss

    1983-01-01

    A modified Mellin transform for digital implementation is developed and applied to range radar profiles of naval vessels. The scale invariance property of the Mellin transform provides a means for extracting features from the profiles which are insensitive to the aspect angle of the radar. Past implementations of the Mellin transform based on the FFT have required exponential sampling, interpolation,

  9. Equatorial radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rukao, S.; Tsuda, T.; Sato, T.; Kato, S.

    1989-01-01

    A large clear air radar with the sensitivity of an incoherent scatter radar for observing the whole equatorial atmosphere up to 1000 km altitude is now being designed in Japan. The radar, called the Equatorial Radar, will be built in Pontianak, Kalimantan Island, Indonesia (0.03 N, 109.3 E). The system is a 47 MHz monostatic Doppler radar with an active phased array configuration similar to that of the MU radar in Japan, which has been in successful operation since 1983. It will have a PA product of more than 5 x 10(9) sq. Wm (P = average transmitter power, A = effective antenna aperture) with sensitivity more than 10 times that of the MU radar. This system configuration enables pulse-to-pulse beam steering within 25 deg from the zenith. As is the case of the MU radar, a variety of sophisticated operations will be made feasible under the supervision of the radar controller. A brief description of the system configuration is presented.

  10. The Invisible Radar Triangle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students learn about radar imaging and its various military and civilian applications that include recognition and detection of human-made targets, and the monitoring of space, deforestation and oil spills. They learn how the concepts of similarity and scaling are used in radar imaging to create three-dimensional models of various targets. Students apply the critical attributes of similar figures to create scale models of a radar imaging scenario using infrared range sensors (to emulate radar functions) and toy airplanes (to emulate targets). They use technology tools to measure angles and distances, and relate the concept of similar figures to real-world applications.

  11. Calculation and Error Analysis of a Digital Elevation Model of Hofsjokull, Iceland from SAR Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Jonathan S.; Hall, Dorothy K.; Sigurosson, Oddur; Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Smith, Laurence C.; Garvin, James B.

    1999-01-01

    Two ascending European Space Agency (ESA) Earth Resources Satellites (ERS)-1/-2 tandem-mode, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) pairs are used to calculate the surface elevation of Hofsjokull, an ice cap in central Iceland. The motion component of the interferometric phase is calculated using the 30 arc-second resolution USGS GTOPO30 global digital elevation product and one of the ERS tandem pairs. The topography is then derived by subtracting the motion component from the other tandem pair. In order to assess the accuracy of the resultant digital elevation model (DEM), a geodetic airborne laser-altimetry swath is compared with the elevations derived from the interferometry. The DEM is also compared with elevations derived from a digitized topographic map of the ice cap from the University of Iceland Science Institute. Results show that low temporal correlation is a significant problem for the application of interferometry to small, low-elevation ice caps, even over a one-day repeat interval, and especially at the higher elevations. Results also show that an uncompensated error in the phase, ramping from northwest to southeast, present after tying the DEM to ground-control points, has resulted in a systematic error across the DEM.

  12. Extraction of Martian valley networks from digital topography

    E-print Network

    Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    Institute, Houston, Texas, USA M. L. Collier Department of Earth Science, Rice University, Houston, Texas of streams in terrestrial river networks. This analysis, based on a sizable data set of valley networks of this possibility for our understanding of the history of water and climate on Mars and the implications

  13. Generalized radar/radiometry imaging problems

    E-print Network

    Genève, Université de

    Paper Generalized radar/radiometry imaging problems Ivan Prudyus, Sviatoslav Voloshynovskiy, Andriy- ing simulation based on radar, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and radiometry systems are presented systems, synthetic aperture radar, spatio-temporal imaging. 1. Introduction Resolution of radar

  14. Evaluation of SIR-A space radar for geologic interpretation: United States, Panama, Colombia, and New Guinea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, H.; Waite, W. P.; Kaupp, V. H.; Bridges, L. C.; Storm, M.

    1983-01-01

    Comparisons between LANDSAT MSS imagery, and aircraft and space radar imagery from different geologic environments in the United States, Panama, Colombia, and New Guinea demonstrate the interdependence of radar system geometry and terrain configuration for optimum retrieval of geologic information. Illustrations suggest that in the case of space radars (SIR-A in particular), the ability to acquire multiple look-angle/look-direction radar images of a given area is more valuable for landform mapping than further improvements in spatial resolution. Radar look-angle is concluded to be one of the most important system parameters of a space radar designed to be used for geologic reconnaissance mapping. The optimum set of system parameters must be determined for imaging different classes of landform features and tailoring the look-angle to local topography.

  15. Development of a 1310-nm, Coherent Laser Radar with RF Pulse Compression Christopher Allen, Yanki Cobanoglu, Sekken Kenny Chong, Sivaprasad Gogineni

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    on the current state of this system in this paper. SYSTEM OVERVIEW Our hybrid RF/laser radar system marries fiberDevelopment of a 1310-nm, Coherent Laser Radar with RF Pulse Compression Christopher Allen, Yanki, coherent laser radar (lidar) that uses traditional RF pulse compression and digital signal processing

  16. Digital Optical Circuit Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, B. L. (editor)

    1985-01-01

    The Proceedings for the 48th Meeting of the AGARD Avionics Panel contain the 18 papers presented a Technical Evaluation Report, and discussions that followed the presentations of papers. Seven papers were presented in the session devoted to optical bistability. Optical logic was addressed by three papers. The session on sources, modulators and demodulators presented three papers. Five papers were given in the final session on all optical systems. The purpose of this Specialists' Meeting was to present the research and development status of digital optical circuit technology and to examine its relevance in the broad context of digital processing, communication, radar, avionics and flight control systems implementation.

  17. Combined observations of rock mass movements using satellite SAR interferometry, differential GPS, airborne digital

    E-print Network

    Kääb, Andreas

    interferometry, differential GPS, airborne digital photogrammetry, and airborne photography interpretation Tazio of combined remote sensing observations from satellite and airborne microwave and optical sensors synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry, differential GPS, and airborne digital photogrammetry

  18. Radar cross calibration investigation TAMU radar polarimeter calibration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, A. J.; Newton, R. W.; Bong, S.; Kronke, C.; Warren, G. L.; Carey, D.

    1982-01-01

    A short pulse, 20 MHz bandwidth, three frequency radar polarimeter system (RPS) operates at center frequencies of 10.003 GHz, 4.75 GHz, and 1.6 GHz and utilizes dual polarized transmit and receive antennas for each frequency. The basic lay-out of the RPS is different from other truck mounted systems in that it uses a pulse compression IF section common to all three RF heads. Separate transmit and receive antennas are used to improve the cross-polarization isolation at each particular frequency. The receive is a digitally controlled gain modulated subsystem and is interfaced directly with a microprocesser computer for control and data manipulation. Antenna focusing distance, focusing each antenna pair, rf head stability, and polarization characteristics of RPS antennas are discussed. Platform and data acquisition procedures are described.

  19. Integrated approach to estimate the ocean's time variable dynamic topography including its covariance matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Silvia; Brockmann, Jan Martin; Schuh, Wolf-Dieter

    2015-04-01

    The ocean's dynamic topography as the difference between the sea surface and the geoid reflects many characteristics of the general ocean circulation. Consequently, it provides valuable information for evaluating or tuning ocean circulation models. The sea surface is directly observed by satellite radar altimetry while the geoid cannot be observed directly. The satellite-based gravity field determination requires different measurement principles (satellite-to-satellite tracking (e.g. GRACE), satellite-gravity-gradiometry (GOCE)). In addition, hydrographic measurements (salinity, temperature and pressure; near-surface velocities) provide information on the dynamic topography. The observation types have different representations and spatial as well as temporal resolutions. Therefore, the determination of the dynamic topography is not straightforward. Furthermore, the integration of the dynamic topography into ocean circulation models requires not only the dynamic topography itself but also its inverse covariance matrix on the ocean model grid. We developed a rigorous combination method in which the dynamic topography is parameterized in space as well as in time. The altimetric sea surface heights are expressed as a sum of geoid heights represented in terms of spherical harmonics and the dynamic topography parameterized by a finite element method which can be directly related to the particular ocean model grid. Besides the difficult task of combining altimetry data with a gravity field model, a major aspect is the consistent combination of satellite data and in-situ observations. The particular characteristics and the signal content of the different observations must be adequately considered requiring the introduction of auxiliary parameters. Within our model the individual observation groups are combined in terms of normal equations considering their full covariance information; i.e. a rigorous variance/covariance propagation from the original measurements to the final product is accomplished. In conclusion, the developed integrated approach allows for estimating the dynamic topography and its inverse covariance matrix on arbitrary grids in space and time. The inverse covariance matrix contains the appropriate weights for model-data misfits in least-squares ocean model inversions. The focus of this study is on the North Atlantic Ocean. We will present the conceptual design and dynamic topography estimates based on time variable data from seven satellite altimeter missions (Jason-1, Jason-2, Topex/Poseidon, Envisat, ERS-2, GFO, Cryosat2) in combination with the latest GOCE gravity field model and in-situ data from the Argo floats and near-surface drifting buoys.

  20. San Gabriel Mountains, California, Radar image, color as height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This topographic radar image shows the relationship of the urban area of Pasadena, California to the natural contours of the land. The image includes the alluvial plain on which Pasadena and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory sit, and the steep range of the San Gabriel Mountains. The mountain front and the arcuate valley running from upper left to the lower right are active fault zones, along which the mountains are rising. The chaparral-covered slopes above Pasadena are also a prime area for wildfires and mudslides. Hazards from earthquakes, floods and fires are intimately related to the topography in this area. Topographic data and other remote sensing images provide valuable information for assessing and mitigating the natural hazards for cities along the front of active mountain ranges.

    This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest elevations. This image contains about 2300 meters (7500 feet) of total relief. White speckles on the face of some of the mountains are holes in the data caused by steep terrain. These will be filled using coverage from an intersecting pass.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC.

    Size: 41 km (25 miles) x 29 km (18 miles) Location: 34.2 deg. North lat., 118.1 deg. West lon. Orientation: North toward upper right Original Data Resolution: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000

  1. Los Angeles, California, Radar Image, Wrapped Color as Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This topographic radar image shows the relationships of the dense urban development of Los Angeles and the natural contours of the land. The image includes the Pacific Ocean on the left, the flat Los Angeles Basin across the center, and the steep ranges of the Santa Monica and Verdugo mountains along the top. The two dark strips near the coast at lower left are the runways of Los Angeles International Airport. Downtown Los Angeles is the bright yellow and pink area at lower center. Pasadena, including the Rose Bowl, are seen half way down the right edge of the image. The communities of Glendale and Burbank, including the Burbank Airport, are seen at the center of the top edge of the image. Hazards from earthquakes, floods and fires are intimately related to the topography in this area. Topographic data and other remote sensing images provide valuable information for assessing and mitigating the natural hazards for cities such as Leangles.

    This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Each cycle of colors (from pink through blue back to pink) represents an equal amount of elevation difference (400 meters, or 1300 feet) similar to contour lines on a standard topographic map. This image contains about 2400 meters (8000 feet) of total relief.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC.

    Size: 41 km (25 miles) x 29 km (18 miles) Location: 34.1 deg. North lat., 118.3 deg. West lon. Orientation: North toward upper right Original Data Resolution: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000

  2. Ground validation of Dual Precipitation Radar (DPR) on GPM by rapid scan Phased Array weahter Radar (PAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Y.; Mega, T.; Shimamura, S.; Wu, T.; Kikuchi, H.; Ushio, T.; Yoshikawa, E.; Chandra, C. V.

    2014-12-01

    The core observatory satellite of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission was launched on February 27th 2014. The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the GPM core observatory is the succession of the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR). The DPR consists of a Ku-band precipitation radar and a Ka-band precipitation radar. The DPR is expected to be more sensitive than the PR especially in the measurement of light rainfall and snowfall in high latitude regions. Because of the difference of spatial and temporal resolutions, Space Radar (SR) and conventional type of Ground Radar (GR) are hard to compare.The SR observes each point of earth in short time, for example one footprint is an observation in some microseconds. Rain-gauge measurements have accurate rainfall rate, but rain-gage observes small area and accumulated rainfall in some minutes. The conventional GR can cover a wide area, however, a volume scan requires several minutes. The Phased Array weather Radar (PAR) is developed by Osaka University, Toshiba, and NICT. The PAR is a weather-radar on X-band within 100m range sampling. High spatial and temporal resolution is achieved by the PAR with pulse compression and the digital beam-forming technique. The PAR transmits a wide beam and receives narrow beams by using digital beam forming. Then, the PAR observes many elevation angles from a single pulse. The time of each volume scan is 10-30 seconds in operation, typically 30 seconds. The study shows comparisons between the DPR and the PAR by more similar spatial and temporal resolution. The rainfall region of DPR is similar to the one of PAR. Correlation coefficient of both radar reflectivity suggests more than 0.8 in the 20km range of PAR. As a result, it is considered that DPR can observe with high accuracy. We present the case study which DPR overpassed the PAR observation region in detail.

  3. The EISCAT Svalbard radar: A case study in modern incoherent scatter radar system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wannberg, G.; Wolf, I.; Vanhainen, L.-G.; Koskenniemi, K.; RöTtger, J.; Postila, M.; Markkanen, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Stenberg, A.; Larsen, R.; Eliassen, S.; Heck, S.; Huuskonen, A.

    1997-11-01

    The EISCAT (European incoherent scatter) Svalbard radar (ESR) was officially inaugurated on August 22, 1996. This event marked the successful completion on schedule of the first phase of the EISCAT Svalbard radar project. In contrast to previous incoherent scatter radars, the ESR system design was adapted to make use of commercial off-the-shelf TV transmitter hardware, thereby reducing design risk, lead times, and cost to a minimum. Commercial hardware is also used in the digital signal processing system. Control and monitoring are performed by distributed, networked VME systems. Thanks to modern reflector antenna design methods and extreme efforts to reduce the receiver noise contribution, the system noise temperature is only 70 K, thus making the ESR about 30% faster than the much more powerful EISCAT UHF radar in F region experiments! Once the transmitter power is increased to 1 MW, it will become about 2-3 times faster than the UHF radar. State-of-the-art exciter and receiver hardware has been developed in-house to accommodate the special requirements introduced by operating the radar at the exceptionally high duty cycle of 25%. The RF waveform is generated by a system based on four switchable direct digital synthesizers. Continuous monitoring of the transmitted RF waveform by the receiver system allows removal of klystron-induced spurious Doppler effects from the data. Intermediate-frequency sampling at 7.5 MHz is employed, followed by fully digital channel separation, signal detection, and postdetection filtering in six parallel receiver channels. Radar codes for both E and F layer observation have been designed and perfected. So far, more than 40 hours of good quality ionospheric data have been collected and analyzed in terms of plasma parameters. While the tragic loss of the Cluster mission suddenly changed the plans and dispositions of a majority of the ESR user community, the radar has still been in high demand since its inauguration. It is now being operated by EISCAT staff on a campaign basis, to provide ground-based support data for a number of other magnetospheric satellites, notably Polar and FAST, and will be opened to the EISCAT user community for special program operations later in 1997.

  4. Java Radar Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaczek, Mariusz P.

    2005-01-01

    Java Radar Analysis Tool (JRAT) is a computer program for analyzing two-dimensional (2D) scatter plots derived from radar returns showing pieces of the disintegrating Space Shuttle Columbia. JRAT can also be applied to similar plots representing radar returns showing aviation accidents, and to scatter plots in general. The 2D scatter plots include overhead map views and side altitude views. The superposition of points in these views makes searching difficult. JRAT enables three-dimensional (3D) viewing: by use of a mouse and keyboard, the user can rotate to any desired viewing angle. The 3D view can include overlaid trajectories and search footprints to enhance situational awareness in searching for pieces. JRAT also enables playback: time-tagged radar-return data can be displayed in time order and an animated 3D model can be moved through the scene to show the locations of the Columbia (or other vehicle) at the times of the corresponding radar events. The combination of overlays and playback enables the user to correlate a radar return with a position of the vehicle to determine whether the return is valid. JRAT can optionally filter single radar returns, enabling the user to selectively hide or highlight a desired radar return.

  5. Noncooperative rendezvous radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A fire control radar system was developed, assembled, and modified. The baseline system and modified angle tracking system are described along with the performance characteristics of the baseline and modified systems. Proposed changes to provide additional techniques for radar evaluation are presented along with flight test data.

  6. Phased-array radars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eli Brookner

    1985-01-01

    The operating principles, technology, and applications of phased-array radars are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams and photographs. Consideration is given to the antenna elements, circuitry for time delays, phase shifters, pulse coding and compression, and hybrid radars combining phased arrays with lenses to alter the beam characteristics. The capabilities and typical hardware of phased arrays are shown using the US

  7. Determination of radar MTF

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The ultimate goal of the Current Meter Array (CMA) is to be able to compare the current patterns detected with the array with radar images of the water surface. The internal wave current patterns modulate the waves on the water surface giving a detectable modulation of the radar cross-section (RCS). The function relating the RCS modulations to the current patterns is the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). By comparing radar images directly with co-located CMA measurements the MTF can be determined. In this talk radar images and CMA measurements from a recent experiment at Loch Linnhe, Scotland, will be used to make the first direct determination of MTF for an X and S band radar at low grazing angles. The technical problems associated with comparing radar images to CMA data will be explained and the solution method discussed. The results suggest the both current and strain rate contribute equally to the radar modulation for X band. For S band, the strain rate contributes more than the current. The magnitude of the MTF and the RCS modulations are consistent with previous estimates when the wind is blowing perpendicular to the radar look direction.

  8. Active radar stealth device

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. N. Cain; Albert J. Corda

    1991-01-01

    This patent discloses an active radar stealth device mounted on a host platform for minimizing the radar cross-section of the host platform. A coating which is essentially microwave transparent is attached to the surface of a host platform and is exposed to an incident microwave field. A plurality of detector\\/emitter pairs contained within the coating detect and actively cancel, respectively,

  9. Battlefield digitization with Discoverer II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Whelan; John J. Koss

    1999-01-01

    Discover II is a technology demonstration program to develop an demonstrate an affordable space-based radar (SBR) with High Range Resolution Ground Moving Target Indication, SAR imaging capabilities and Digitized Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) that will revolutionize surveillance and precision geolocation support to the tactical warfighter. The near- continuous, global access provided by the objective Discoverer II concept, in combination with

  10. Looking at Radar Images

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    These activities pertain to the value of the different types of images, including a false color mosaic, a Compressed Stokes image, a vegetation map and key, and various ground photographs. Students are given specific directions on how to decide what features of a radar image indicate such structures as upland forest, clear-cut areas, and roads. In a second activity, students look at the radar images to see if they can produce a vegetation map similar to the one they have been given. The third activity introduces 15 Decade Volcanoes that pose a particular threat to humans. Using the Decade Volcanoes as examples, students view radar images of volcanoes that occur around the world. The final exercise is aimed at helping students distinguish the differences between radar image data and visible photographs. Students will look at radar data and photographs of three sites taken by the astronauts.

  11. Spaceborne weather radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, Robert; Kozu, Toshiaki

    1990-01-01

    The present work on the development status of spaceborne weather radar systems and services discusses radar instrument complementarities, the current forms of equations for the characterization of such aspects of weather radar performance as surface and mirror-image returns, polarimetry, and Doppler considerations, and such essential factors in spaceborne weather radar design as frequency selection, scanning modes, and the application of SAR to rain detection. Attention is then given to radar signal absorption by the various atmospheric gases, rain drop size distribution and wind velocity determinations, and the characteristics of clouds, as well as the range of available estimation methods for backscattering, single- and dual-wavelength attenuation, and polarimetric and climatological characteristics.

  12. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  13. Browse > Conferences> Radar Conference, 2008. RADAR ... INDEX TERMS

    E-print Network

    Préaux, Jean-Philippe

    Browse > Conferences> Radar Conference, 2008. RADAR ... INDEX TERMS REFERENCES CITING DOCUMENTS Force, MorphoAnalysis in Signal Process. Lab., Salon-de-Provence This paper appears in: Radar Conference, 2008. RADAR '08. IEEE Issue Date: 26-30 May 2008 On page(s): 1 - 5 Location: Rome ISSN: 1097-5659 Print

  14. Pulse compression hardware decoding techniques for MST radars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. P. Sulzer; R. F. Woodman

    1985-01-01

    The techniques for decoding in hardware received signals transmitted by phase-coded mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars are reviewed. The designs consist of digital and analog types which resemble filters or correlators in their operation. A new analog design is presented, and a discussion of the choice between hardware and software decoding is given. The number of bits required for digital coherent integrators

  15. Topography, surface properties, and tectonic evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. E. McGill; J. L. Warner; M. C. Malin; R. E. Arvidson; E. Eliason; S. Nozette; R. D. Reasenberg

    1983-01-01

    Differences in atmospheric composition, atmospheric and lithospheric temperature, and perhaps mantle composition, suggest that the rock cycle on Venus is not similar to the earth's. While radar data are not consistent with a thick, widespread and porous regolith like that of the moon, wind-transported regolith could be cemented into sedimentary rock that would be indistinguishable from other rocks in radar

  16. Topography of Venus and earth - A test for the presence of plate tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, J. W.; Yuter, S. E.; Solomon, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    Comparisons of earth and Venus topography by use of Pioneer/Venus radar altimetry are examined. Approximately 93% of the Venus surface has been mapped with a horizontal resolution of 200 km and a vertical resolution of 200 m. Tectonic troughs have been indicated in plains regions which cover 65% of Venus, and hypsometric comparisons between the two planets' elevation distributions revealed that while the earth has a bimodal height distribution, Venus displays a unimodal configuration, with 60% of the planet surface within 500 m of the modal planet radius. The effects of mapping the earth at the same resolution as the Venus observations were explored. Continents and oceans were apparent, and although folded mountains appeared as high spots, no indications of tectonic activity were discernible. A NASA Venus Orbiting Imaging radar is outlined, which is designed to detect volcanoes, folded mountain ranges, craters, and faults, and thereby allow definition of possible plate-tectonic activity on Venus.

  17. Renormalisation of Global Mantle Dynamic Topography Predictions using Residual Topography Measurements for "Normal" Ocean Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, Fergus; Kusznir, Nick; Cowie, Leanne

    2015-04-01

    The best constraint on model predictions of present day mantle dynamic topography are measurements of residual topography. Residual topography is calculated by removing the isostatic effects of bathymetry, sediments, ice, crustal thickness variation and lithosphere thermal anomalies from the observed topography. Comparison of global model predictions of mantle dynamic topography with global compilations of residual topography, while showing a broadly similar pattern at long wavelengths, differ substantially in amplitude. A strong contribution to the present day surface topographic signal arises from crustal thickness variation. As a consequence it is difficult to accurately determine residual topography for continental crust and for oceanic regions with substantially thicker than average oceanic crust (e.g. oceanic crust adjacent to volcanic rifted margins, oceanic plume tracks, volcanic plateaux, micro-continents). Residual topography is best measured on ocean crust of "normal" oceanic thickness. We use global mapping of crustal thickness using gravity inversion to identify crust with thicknesses greater than that of "normal" oceanic crust in order than we can eliminate the less accurate measurements of residual topography for these thicker crustal regions. Comparison of model predicted mantle dynamic topography with residual topography measurements for the remaining regions of thinner "normal" oceanic crust shows an improved correlation but with a dynamic topography showing a positive bias with respect to residual topography and a greater amplitude. We use residual topography measurements for "normal" oceanic crust to downward shift (by approximately 600 m) and rescale (by 0.6) predicted global mantle dynamic topography. We present maps of the renormalised model predictions of global mantle topography from Steinberger (2007) and Flament et al. (2013). One consequence of renormalization is to reduce the amplitude of predicted mantle dynamic topographic uplift in the Pacific. The gravity inversion methodology includes a correction for the elevated geothermal gradient of oceanic and rifted continental margin lithosphere and sediment thickness. Caveats on this methodology are (i) that the gravity inversion methodology used to determine crustal thickness for screening out thick crust is itself dependent on mantle dynamic topography (but fortunately only weakly so) and (ii) that the renormalization procedure is biased towards oceanic regions.

  18. EAARL coastal topography--Alligator Point, Louisiana, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Wright, C.W.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Fredericks, Xan; Barras, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of Alligator Point, Louisiana, acquired on March 5 and 6, 2010. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color-infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine aircraft, but the instrument was deployed on a Pilatus PC-6. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is used routinely to create maps that represent submerged or sub-aerial topography. Specialized filtering algorithms have been implemented to determine the "bare earth" under vegetation from a point cloud of last return elevations.

  19. Use and Interpretation of Radar

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Nielsen-Gammon

    1996-01-01

    This undergraduate meteorology tutorial from Texas A&M University discusses the basic principles of operation of weather radars, describes how to interpret radar mosaics, and discusses the use of radar in weather forecasting. Students learn the relationship between range and elevation and how to use radar images and mosaics in short-range forecasting.

  20. Ground-penetrating radar methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ground-penetrating radar geophysical methods are finding greater and greater use in agriculture. With the ground-penetrating radar (GPR) method, an electromagnetic radio energy (radar) pulse is directed into the subsurface, followed by measurement of the elapsed time taken by the radar signal as it ...

  1. Radar remote sensing in biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Richard K.; Simonett, David S.

    1967-01-01

    The present status of research on discrimination of natural and cultivated vegetation using radar imaging systems is sketched. The value of multiple polarization radar in improved discrimination of vegetation types over monoscopic radars is also documented. Possible future use of multi-frequency, multi-polarization radar systems for all weather agricultural survey is noted.

  2. A general statistical instrument theory of atmospheric and ionospheric radars

    SciTech Connect

    Woodman, R.F. (Instituto Geofisico del Peru, Lima (Peru))

    1991-05-01

    Some basic functional relationships between the statistics of the signals received in a radar and the statistics of the density fluctuations of a scattering medium are derived. They vary in their degree of generality, but they are all very general in scope. They include monostatic and bistatic radars scattering from either atmospheric, ionospheric, or meteorological media. They are valid for refractive and slightly dispersive media, so they can also be used for HF ionospheric radars. They include the effects of filtering, including receiver filtering, pulse compression coding and decoding schemes, and coherent integration, or any alternative linear digital filtering scheme. Functional relationships to include cross-correlation schemes, such as Faraday rotation experiments and interferometers, are included. Some simplified expressions are derived for frequently encountered situations, where different approximations can be made. These simplified expressions cover a large number of radar techniques currently in use for atmospheric and ionospheric applications.

  3. Time-frequency analysis of synthetic aperture radar signals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.

    1996-08-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has become an important tool for remote sensing of the environment. SAR is a set of digital signal processing algorithms that are used to focus the signal returned to the radar because radar systems in themselves cannot produce the high resolution images required in remote sensing applications. To reconstruct an image, several parameters must be estimated and the quality of output image depends on the degree of accuracy of these parameters. In this thesis, we derive the fundamental SAR algorithms and concentrate on the estimation of one of its critical parameters. We show that the common technique for estimating this particular parameter can sometimes lead to erroneous results and reduced quality images. We also employ time-frequency analysis techniques to examine variations in the radar signals caused by platform motion and show how these results can be used to improve output image quality.

  4. Model for optimal parallax in stereo radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisaruck, M. A.; Kaupp, V. H.; Macdonald, H. C.; Waite, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    Simulated stereo radar imagery is used to investigate parameters for a spaceborne imaging radar. Incidence angles ranging from small to intermediate to large are used with three digital terrain model areas which are representative of relatively flat, moderately rough, and mountaneous terrain. The simulated radar imagery was evaluated by interpreters for ease of stereo perception and information content, and rank ordered within each class of terrain. The interpreter's results are analyzed for trends between the height of a feature and either parallax or vertical exaggeration for a stereo pair. A model is developed which predicts the amount of parallax (or vertical exaggeration) an interpreter would desire for best stereo perception of a feature of a specific height. Results indicate the selection of angle of incidence and stereo intersection angle depend upon the relief of the terrain. Examples of the simulated stereo imagery are presented for a candidate spaceborne imaging radar having four selectable angles of incidence.

  5. Enhanced Characterization of Niobium Surface Topography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xu, Hui Tian, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley

    2011-12-01

    Surface topography characterization is a continuing issue for the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) particle accelerator community. Efforts are underway to both to improve surface topography, and its characterization and analysis using various techniques. In measurement of topography, Power Spectral Density (PSD) is a promising method to quantify typical surface parameters and develop scale-specific interpretations. PSD can also be used to indicate how chemical processes modifiesy the roughnesstopography at different scales. However, generating an accurate and meaningful topographic PSD of an SRF surface requires careful analysis and optimization. In this report, polycrystalline surfaces with different process histories are sampled with AFM and stylus/white light interferometer profilometryers and analyzed to indicate trace topography evolution at different scales. evolving during etching or polishing. Moreover, Aan optimized PSD analysis protocol will be offered to serve the SRF surface characterization needs is presented.

  6. DBF technique for the space synchronization of bistatic (multistatic) radars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shujie Zhao; Fulu Geng; Ruyun Gao; Changrong Xie; Xudong Ma; Jianchun Chen

    1991-01-01

    The space synchronization is one of the key techniques of bistatic(multistatic) radars. The concept and main parameters in implementing the space synchronization by pulse chasing with digital beam forming (DBF) technique are discussed. A implementation scheme as well as some of the test results of a prototype are also given in this paper.

  7. Corneal topography measurements for biometric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nathan D.

    The term biometrics is used to describe the process of analyzing biological and behavioral traits that are unique to an individual in order to confirm or determine his or her identity. Many biometric modalities are currently being researched and implemented including, fingerprints, hand and facial geometry, iris recognition, vein structure recognition, gait, voice recognition, etc... This project explores the possibility of using corneal topography measurements as a trait for biometric identification. Two new corneal topographers were developed for this study. The first was designed to function as an operator-free device that will allow a user to approach the device and have his or her corneal topography measured. Human subject topography data were collected with this device and compared to measurements made with the commercially available Keratron Piccolo topographer (Optikon, Rome, Italy). A third topographer that departs from the standard Placido disk technology allows for arbitrary pattern illumination through the use of LCD monitors. This topographer was built and tested to be used in future research studies. Topography data was collected from 59 subjects and modeled using Zernike polynomials, which provide for a simple method of compressing topography data and comparing one topographical measurement with a database for biometric identification. The data were analyzed to determine the biometric error rates associated with corneal topography measurements. Reasonably accurate results, between three to eight percent simultaneous false match and false non-match rates, were achieved.

  8. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar using two satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomiyasu, K.

    1978-01-01

    The paper demonstrates the feasibility of a bistatic synthetic aperture radar (BISAR) utilizing two satellites. The proposed BISAR assumes that the direction of the two narrow antenna beams are programmed to coincide over the desired area to be imaged. Functionally, the transmitter and receiver portions can be interchanged between the two satellites. The two satellites may be in one orbit plane or two different orbits such as geosynchronous and low-earth orbits. The pulse repetition frequency and imaging geometry are constrained by contours of isodops and isodels. With two images of the same area viewed from different angles, it is possible in principle to derive three-dimensional stereo images. Applications of BISAR include topography, water resource management, and soil moisture determination.. Advantages of BISAR over a monostatic SAR are mentioned, including lower transmitter power and greater ranges in incidence angle and coverage.

  9. Spaceborne laser radar.

    PubMed

    Flom, T

    1972-02-01

    Laser radar systems are being developed to acquire and track targets in applications such as the rendezvous and docking of two spacecraft. To search effectively for and locate a target using a narrow laser beam, a scanning system is needed. This paper describes a scan technique whereby a narrow laser beam is synchronously scanned with an equally narrow receiver field-of-view without the aid of mechanical gimbals. Equations are developed in order to examine the maximum acquisition and tracking rates, and the maximum target range for a scanning laser radar system. A recently built prototype of a small, lightweight, low-power-consuming scanning laser radar is described. PMID:20111497

  10. Radar transmitter procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-03-01

    This ITOP outlines the test methods used in evaluating the performance and characteristics of general types of radar transmitters to include single or variable frequency transmitters. The test methods serve as a guide in determining the overall efficiency of such equipment as a function of their design and their recorded performance. This ITOP is limited to methods for measuring the performance of the radar transmitter under test as a major component. Some performance aspects of the transmitter can be tested only when configured as part of a total radar system.

  11. AUTOMATIC GENERATION OF BALD EARTH DIGITAL ELEVATION MODELS FROM DIGITAL SURFACE MODELS CREATED USING AIRBORNE IFSAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yandong Wang; Bryan Mercer; Vincent C. Tao; Jayanti Sharma; Scott Crawford

    This paper presents a novel approach for the automatic generation of 'bald-earth' digital elevation models (DEMs) from digital surface models (DSMs) created using STAR-3i - the Intermap Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) system. The method uses a hierarchical surface fitting technique to yield bald earth DEMs. It first generates a hierarchy of images from the original DSMs, and bald earth

  12. Sentinel-3 Surface Topography Mission (STM) User Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira Loddo, Carolina; Scharroo, Remko; Wilson, Hilary; Bonekamp, Hans

    2015-04-01

    The Sentinel-3 Surface Topography Mission (STM) is a key component of the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission, set to revolutionise operational oceanography with a suite of advanced surface topography data products over ocean and sea sea-ice. In addition the STM will collect data over all earth surfaces providing improved monitoring of River and Lake stage heights and inputs to the development of Digital Elevation Models. Sentinel-3 will be the first Earth Observation mission to provide 100% SAR altimetry coverage and LRM will be maintained as a backup operating mode. In order to fully exploit the SAR capability, and validating the algorithms evolution, lower level data products (L1A, L1B and L1B-S) will be made available to the users, in addition to the level 2 products. This poster provides an overview of the S-3 STM data products that will be generated operationally within the Sentinel-3 Payload Data Ground Segment by the Instrument Processing Facilities (IPFs), and disseminated to the users.

  13. Hurricane Rita Track Radar Image with Topographic Overlay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Animation

    About the animation: This simulated view of the potential effects of storm surge flooding on Galveston and portions of south Houston was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Although it is protected by a 17-foot sea wall against storm surges, flooding due to storm surges caused by major hurricanes remains a concern. The animation shows regions that, if unprotected, would be inundated with water. The animation depicts flooding in one-meter increments.

    About the image: The Gulf Coast from the Mississippi Delta through the Texas coast is shown in this satellite image from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) overlain with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), and the predicted storm track for Hurricane Rita. The prediction from the National Weather Service was published Sept. 22 at 4 p.m. Central Time, and shows the expected track center in black with the lighter shaded area indicating the range of potential tracks the storm could take.

    Low-lying terrain along the coast has been highlighted using the SRTM elevation data, with areas within 15 feet of sea level shown in red, and within 30 feet in yellow. These areas are more at risk for flooding and the destructive effects of storm surge and high waves.

    Data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C.

    Location: 28 degrees North latitude, 23.5 degrees West longitude Orientation: North toward the top Size:890 by 1447 kilometers (552 by 897 miles) Image Data: MODIS image and colored SRTM elevation model Date Acquired: February 2000

  14. Earth resources shuttle imaging radar. [systems analysis and design analysis of pulse radar for earth resources information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A report is presented on a preliminary design of a Synthetic Array Radar (SAR) intended for experimental use with the space shuttle program. The radar is called Earth Resources Shuttle Imaging Radar (ERSIR). Its primary purpose is to determine the usefulness of SAR in monitoring and managing earth resources. The design of the ERSIR, along with tradeoffs made during its evolution is discussed. The ERSIR consists of a flight sensor for collecting the raw radar data and a ground sensor used both for reducing these radar data to images and for extracting earth resources information from the data. The flight sensor consists of two high powered coherent, pulse radars, one that operates at L and the other at X-band. Radar data, recorded on tape can be either transmitted via a digital data link to a ground terminal or the tape can be delivered to the ground station after the shuttle lands. A description of data processing equipment and display devices is given.

  15. Laurentia crustal motion observed using TOPEX/POSEIDON radar altimetry over land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyongki; Shum, C. K.; Yi, Yuchan; Braun, Alexander; Kuo, Chung-Yen

    2008-10-01

    A new method to estimate the vertical crustal motion from satellite altimetry over land was developed. The method was tested around Hudson Bay, where the observed vertical motion is largely caused by the incomplete glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) as a result of the Laurentide ice sheet deglaciation since the last glacial maximum (LGM). Decadal (1992-2003) TOPEX/POSEIDON radar altimetry data over land surfaces were used. The results presented here are improved compared to a previous study (Lee, H., Shum, C.K., Kuo, C.Y., Yi, Y., Braun, A., 2008. Application of TOPEX altimetry for solid Earth deformation studies. Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci. 19, 37-46. doi:10.3319/TAO.2008.19.1-2.37(SA).) which estimated vertical motion only over relatively flat land surfaces (standard deviation of the height variation <40 cm). In this study, we extended the concept of traditional 1-Hz (one-per-frame) radar altimeter ocean stackfiles to build 10-Hz (10-per-frame) land stackfiles over Hudson Bay land regions, and succeeded in obtaining vertical motion estimates over much rougher surfaces (standard deviation of the height variation <2 m). 90-m C-band Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) is used as a reference surface to select an optimal waveform retracker, to correct surface gradient errors, and to calculate land surface anomalies. Here, we developed an alternative retracker, called the modified threshold retracker, resulting in decadal vertical motion time series over a 1500 km by 1000 km region covering northern Ontario, northeastern Manitoba, and the Great Lakes region which is at the margin of the former Laurentide ice sheet. The average of the estimated uncertainties for the vertical motion is 2.9 mm/year which is comparable to 2.1 mm/year of recent GPS solutions. The estimated vertical motion is compared with other geodetic observations from GPS, tide gauge/altimetry, GRACE, and several GIA models. The data agree best with the laterally varying 3D GIA model, RF3S20 ( ? = 0.4) whereas the combination of land altimetry solution with other measurements match best with the models RF3S20 ( ? = 0.0) or RF3S20 ( ? = 0.2) in terms of mean and standard deviation of the differences. It is anticipated that this innovative technique could potentially be used to provide additional constraints for GIA model improvement, and be applied to other geodynamics studies.

  16. Radar - The Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, G.

    1985-02-01

    Progress in civil and military radar units since the invention of radar in 1935 is summarized, noting the trend to multipurpose units. The earliest systems functioned at 10 cm, then 3 cm after development of a cavity magnetron to provide power for shorter wavelengths. Military needs are driving improvements in three-dimensional scanning capabilities, Primarily to locate aircraft in the presence of ground clutter and sea surface scattering. Autonomous, separate transmitter and receiver units are being tested. Lengthening ground-based radar wavelengths to tens of meters will permit over-the-horizon sensing with backscattering, ionospheric bounce, or induction of a potential in the sea surface as the possible techniques. Mode S monopulse radars will permit transponder queries between small and large aircraft. Finally, pulse Doppler SAR systems may afford terrain recognition with no corroborating data except an expert systems data base.

  17. Caribbean Radar Products

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    This module provides examples of radar imagery from various locations in the Caribbean to demonstrate the different types of images available. Also, examples of different meteorological and non meteorological features are presented to show features seen in island locations.

  18. Millimeter Waves Ballistic Radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. N. Zubkov; V. S. Gavrilov; Ya. M. Kempa; Z. V. Dufanets; N. A. Naumets

    2006-01-01

    Solid-state Doppler millimeter waves ballistic radar designed for measuring of exterior and interior ballistic parameters of highly dynamical faint objects is developed. The coherence characteristics of transmit-receive module are supported by the floating heterodyne oscillation behavior

  19. Soil moisture detection from radar imagery of the Phoenix, Arizona test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cihlar, J.; Ulaby, F. T.; Mueller, R.

    1975-01-01

    The Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM) dual-polarization X and L band radar was flown to acquire radar imagery over the Phoenix (Arizona) test site. The site was covered by a north-south pass and an east-west pass. Radar response to soil moisture was investigated. Since the ERIM radar does not have accurately measured antenna patterns, analysis of the L band data was performed separately for each of several strips along the flight line, each corresponding to a narrow angle of incidence. For the NS pass, good correlation between the radar return and mositure content was observed for each of the two nearest (to nadir) angular ranges. At higher angular ranges, no correlation was observed. The above procedure was not applied to the EW pass due to flight path misalignments. The results obtained stress the importance of radar calibration, the digitization process, and the angle of incidence.

  20. Visualizing characteristics of ocean data collected during the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilley, David G.

    1991-01-01

    Topographic measurements of sea surface elevation collected by the Surface Contour Radar (SCR) during NASA's Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B) experiment are plotted as three dimensional surface plots to observe wave height variance along the track of a P-3 aircraft. Ocean wave spectra were computed from rotating altimeter measurements acquired by the Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS). Fourier power spectra computed from SIR-B synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the ocean are compared to ROWS surface wave spectra. Fourier inversion of SAR spectra, after subtraction of spectral noise and modeling of wave height modulation, yields topography similar to direct measurements made by SCR. Visual perspectives on the SCR and SAR ocean data are compared. Threshold distinctions between surface elevation and texture modulations of SAR data are considered within the context of a dynamic statistical model of rough surface scattering. The result of these endeavors is insight as to the physical mechanism governing the imaging of ocean waves with SAR.

  1. Spotlight-Mode Synthetic Aperture Radar Processing for High-Resolution Lunar Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harcke, Leif; Weintraub, Lawrence; Yun, Sang-Ho; Dickinson, Richard; Gurrola, Eric; Hensley, Scott; Marechal, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    During the 2008-2009 year, the Goldstone Solar System Radar was upgraded to support radar mapping of the lunar poles at 4 m resolution. The finer resolution of the new system and the accompanying migration through resolution cells called for spotlight, rather than delay-Doppler, imaging techniques. A new pre-processing system supports fast-time Doppler removal and motion compensation to a point. Two spotlight imaging techniques which compensate for phase errors due to i) out of focus-plane motion of the radar and ii) local topography, have been implemented and tested. One is based on the polar format algorithm followed by a unique autofocus technique, the other is a full bistatic time-domain backprojection technique. The processing system yields imagery of the specified resolution. Products enabled by this new system include topographic mapping through radar interferometry, and change detection techniques (amplitude and coherent change) for geolocation of the NASA LCROSS mission impact site.

  2. An orbital radar mapper of venus in the 1980's: Mission design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnin, S. K.

    1973-01-01

    The examination of Venus topography, obscured for photographic imaging, is reported in the application of airborne radar mapping systems to an orbiter mission about the planet. Extrapolating the improving capabilities of earth-based radar study of Venus into the 1980's is reported which suggests that only a non-uniform, poorly resolved surface profile will be possible relative to the potential for 100% coverage at 100 meter resolution with an orbital radar. The intent of this paper is: to define mission opportunities favorable for a Venus orbital mapper during the 1980's, to examine orbit design problems associated with mapping radar systems, to establish with flexibility exists for an adaptive mapping strategy, to contribute to the sizing of particular spacecraft systems, and to suggest a reference mission design and demonstrate feasibility.

  3. Effects of Topography on Fronts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. T.; Peng, Melinda S.; Zankofski, D. A.

    1992-02-01

    The hydrostatic Boussinesq equations are used to simulate the passage of fronts over a two-dimensional mountain in a cyclic domain. The fronts are forced by a confluent, periodic deformation field that moves with the uniform mean flow over the mountain. The initial conditions are selected to give a cold front confined to the lower part of the domain. Fourth-order diffusion terms are included in the numerical model to control energy cascade to the grid size scale. A numerical frontogenesis experiment with no topography produces a realistic surface front in about two days. Numerical solutions for flow over the mountain with no front are found by integrating the equations from the initial conditions, which are semigeostrophic steady-state solutions. Various mountains are considered that have the same height but different widths. The numerical solutions for wide mountains remain close to the semigeostrophic initial conditions, while for narrower mountains vertically propagating waves and a hydraulic jump develop on the lee side of the mountain. The frontal solution and the mountain solution are combined to produce the initial conditions for the basic experiments. The numerical solutions show reduced frontogenesis on the upwind slope and increased frontogenesis on the lee slope. This behavior is caused by the mountain-forced divergence on the upwind side and convergence on the lee side in agreement with the semigeostrophic solution of Zehnder and Bannon. Further experiments with no deformation forcing are carried out to correspond to the semigeostrophic passive scalar studies of Blumen and Gross. A passive scalar that represents the perturbation potential temperature is advected with the mountain solution. The frontal scale, based on the tracer field, increases on the upwind side until it reaches a maximum at the top and then decreases on the lee side, back to its original value as the front moves away from the mountain. The numerical solutions for the interactive potential temperature field have a similar behavior, although some additional blocking effects are present. For the narrower mountains the frontal structure is distorted by the gravity waves on the lee side of the mountain. These solutions resemble those of Schumann for smaller-scale mountains.

  4. The CReSIS Radar Suite for Measurements of the Ice Sheets and Sea Ice during Operation Ice Bridge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Leuschen; P. S. Gogineni; C. Allen; J. D. Paden; R. Hale; F. Rodriguez-Morales; A. Harish; S. Seguin; E. Arnold; W. Blake; K. Byers; R. Crowe; C. Lewis; B. Panzer; A. Patel; L. Shi

    2010-01-01

    The University of Kansas, Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) has developed a suite of radar instrumentation operating at frequencies ranging from 180 MHz to 18 GHz to monitor the major Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets at varying resolution from the surface to the bed as well as the surface topography and snow cover characteristics of sea ice.

  5. Active radar stealth device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, R. N.; Corda, Albert J.

    1991-07-01

    This patent discloses an active radar stealth device mounted on a host platform for minimizing the radar cross-section of the host platform. A coating which is essentially microwave transparent is attached to the surface of a host platform and is exposed to an incident microwave field. A plurality of detector/emitter pairs contained within the coating detect and actively cancel, respectively, the microwave field at each respective detector/emitter pair.

  6. Phased-array radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookner, E.

    1985-02-01

    The operating principles, technology, and applications of phased-array radars are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams and photographs. Consideration is given to the antenna elements, circuitry for time delays, phase shifters, pulse coding and compression, and hybrid radars combining phased arrays with lenses to alter the beam characteristics. The capabilities and typical hardware of phased arrays are shown using the US military systems COBRA DANE and PAVE PAWS as examples.

  7. Multiresolution GMTI radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Guerci; A. O. Steinhardt

    2003-01-01

    The detection and tracking of ground moving vehicles from airborne radar can be challenging at slow target velocities due to the close space-time (angle-Doppler) proximity of strong competing mainbeam clutter. Moreover, in complex non-stationary clutter environments, conventional space-time adaptive processing (STAP) cannot be relied upon to provide precision ing. In this paper, we re-examine GMTI radar from a multiresolution perspective

  8. Weather Radar Network Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesc Junyent; V. Chandrasekar

    2008-01-01

    The Engineering Research Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) is investigating the use of dense networks of short-range radars for weather sensing. A first test-bed of this new paradigm is currently deployed in southwest Oklahoma. The potential benefits of closely deployed, overlapping, short-range weather radars are easy to see intuitively amounting to a greater ability to measure

  9. Doppler Radar Technology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This resource provides an introduction to the function and uses of the The National Weather Service's (NWS) Weather Surveillance Doppler Radar (WSR-88D). Topics include the components of the system, an overview of the products and overlays the system creates, and some example images with captions explaining what is being shown. There are also links to radar meteorology tutorials and to information on training to use the system and interpret its imagery.

  10. Radar network characterization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesc Junyent; V. Chandrasekar

    2007-01-01

    The use of dense networks of small radars for weather sensing is being investigated by the Engineering Research Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere, with a first test-bed of this new paradigm well underway. The potential benefits of closely-deployed, overlapping, short-range weather radars are easy to see intuitively, and can be summarized as a greater ability to mitigate

  11. Seamless Synthetic Aperture Radar Archive for Interferometry Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S.; Baru, C.; Bryson, G.; Buechler, B.; Crosby, C.; Fielding, E.; Meertens, C.; Nicoll, J.; Youn, C.

    2014-11-01

    The NASA Advancing Collaborative Connections for Earth System Science (ACCESS) seamless synthetic aperture radar (SAR) archive (SSARA) project is a collaboration between UNAVCO, the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and OpenTopography at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) to design and implement a seamless distributed access system for SAR data and derived interferometric SAR (InSAR) data products. A unified application programming interface (API) has been created to search the SAR archives at ASF and UNAVCO, 30 and 90-m SRTM DEM data available through OpenTopography, and tropospheric data from the NASA OSCAR project at JPL. The federated query service provides users a single access point to search for SAR granules, InSAR pairs, and corresponding DEM and tropospheric data products from the four archives, as well as the ability to search and download pre-processed InSAR products from ASF and UNAVCO.

  12. Determining Titan surface topography from Cassini SAR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stiles, Bryan W.; Hensley, Scott; Gim, Yonggyu; Bates, David M.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Hayes, Alex; Radebaugh, Jani; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Mitchell, Karl L.; Callahan, Philip S.; Zebker, Howard; Johnson, William T.K.; Wall, Stephen D.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Wood, Charles A.; Janssen, Michael; Pelletier, Frederic; West, Richard D.; Veeramacheneni, Chandini

    2009-01-01

    A technique, referred to as SARTopo, has been developed for obtaining surface height estimates with 10 km horizontal resolution and 75 m vertical resolution of the surface of Titan along each Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) swath. We describe the technique and present maps of the co-located data sets. A global map and regional maps of Xanadu and the northern hemisphere hydrocarbon lakes district are included in the results. A strength of the technique is that it provides topographic information co-located with SAR imagery. Having a topographic context vastly improves the interpretability of the SAR imagery and is essential for understanding Titan. SARTopo is capable of estimating surface heights for most of the SAR-imaged surface of Titan. Currently nearly 30% of the surface is within 100 km of a SARTopo height profile. Other competing techniques provide orders of magnitude less coverage. We validate the SARTopo technique through comparison with known geomorphological features such as mountain ranges and craters, and by comparison with co-located nadir altimetry, including a 3000 km strip that had been observed by SAR a month earlier. In this area, the SARTopo and nadir altimetry data sets are co-located tightly (within 5-10 km for one 500 km section), have similar resolution, and as expected agree closely in surface height. Furthermore the region contains prominent high spatial resolution topography, so it provides an excellent test of the resolution and precision of both techniques.

  13. Electronic Cigarette Topography in the Natural Environment

    PubMed Central

    Morabito, P. N.; Roundtree, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a clinical, observational, descriptive study to quantify the use patterns of electronic cigarette users in their natural environment. Previously published work regarding puff topography has been widely indirect in nature, and qualitative rather than quantitative, with the exception of three studies conducted in a laboratory environment for limited amounts of time. The current study quantifies the variation in puffing behaviors among users as well as the variation for a given user throughout the course of a day. Puff topography characteristics computed for each puffing session by each subject include the number of subject puffs per puffing session, the mean puff duration per session, the mean puff flow rate per session, the mean puff volume per session, and the cumulative puff volume per session. The same puff topography characteristics are computed across all puffing sessions by each single subject and across all subjects in the study cohort. Results indicate significant inter-subject variability with regard to puffing topography, suggesting that a range of representative puffing topography patterns should be used to drive machine-puffed electronic cigarette aerosol evaluation systems. PMID:26053075

  14. Interpretation of Radar Basal Reflectivity in Ice-Sheet Grounding Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christianson, K. A.; Jacobel, R. W.; Horgan, H. J.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Holland, D. M.; Alley, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Properly mapping bed topography and basal conditions in ice-sheet grounding zones is crucial to understanding ice-sheet evolution. Detailed maps of bed topography are needed to properly assess the impact of bed pinning points in grounding-line retreat scenarios. Other processes, including sediment deposition, till compaction, and infiltration of ocean water upstream of grounding via tidal flexure, may also have important effects on grounding-line stability. Ice-penetrating radar is the most commonly used technique to examine ice-sheet grounding zones because it supplies large amounts of useful data comparatively easily. Although mapping the bed topography is relatively straightforward, more-complete interpretations of radar data incorporating information from basal reflectivity and basal-echo phase remain difficult, even with recent advances in radar technology. Here we present a detailed interpretation of radar basal reflectivity at the grounding zone of Whillans Ice Stream, informed using active-source seismic data and dielectric modeling. Our results indicate that basal reflectivity in complex environments must be interpreted with caution, because bed returned power is substantially affected by many possible basal conditions including thin films of various materials (e.g., freshwater, seawater, debris-bearing ice, sediment of varying compaction state), widespread crevasses, and off-nadir reflections. After careful examination of these issues, our data indicate substantial mixing in the shallow water column in a subglacial embayment where several subglacial lakes drain. Basal reflectivity in nearby areas with no subglacial drainage indicates a more abrupt transition along ice flow from ice overlying till to ice overlying seawater. Thus, properly considered, radar basal reflectivity still yields valuable information about grounding-zone conditions, including water properties as the ice begins to float. We conclude by discussing ramifications of this study for interpretation of airborne radar data collected over other grounding zones, including those of Pine Island and Thwaites Glaciers.

  15. Reconstructed Paleo-topography of the Columbia Hills, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, S. B.; Watters, W. A.; Aron, F.; Squyres, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    From June 2004 through March 2010, the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit conducted a detailed campaign examining the Columbia Hills of Gusev Crater. In addition to mineralogical and chemical investigations, Spirit's stereo panoramic (Pancam) and navigation (Navcam) cameras obtained over 7,000 images of geologic targets along the West Spur of the Columbia Hills and Husband Hill, the highest peak. We have analyzed the entirety of this dataset, which includes stereo coverage of several outcrop exposures with apparent bedding. We have measured the bedding plane orientations of hundreds of fine-scale (~1-100cm) features on all of the potentially in-place outcrops using Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) derived from the rover's Pancam stereo image data, and mapped these orientations on a regional HiRISE image and DTM. Assuming that the bedding material was deposited conformably on the topography at the time of emplacement, we reconstruct the paleo-topography of the Columbia Hills. Our reconstructed paleo-topography is similar to the modern shape of Husband Hill, but with steeper slopes, consistent with a substantial amount of erosion since deposition. The Columbia Hills are an irregular, nearly-triangular edifice of uncertain origin, situated near the center of the 160km-diameter crater and hypothesized to be either the remnant of a central peak structure, or overlapping crater rims. They span ~6.6 km in the northerly direction by ~3.6 km in the easterly direction, and rise 90m above the basaltic plains that fill the floor of Gusev Crater and embay the Hills. The topography is as irregular as the perimeter, and is cut by numerous valleys of varying lengths, widths, and directional trends. Along the traverse, Spirit examined several rock classes as defined by elemental abundances from the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and identified remotely by the Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES). Unlike the Gusev Plains, the rocks of the Columbia Hills show extensive evidence of aqueous alteration. Many of the outcrops are believed to have formed from volcanic and/or impact-related airfall material, which should drape the topography that existed at the time of emplacement. Outcrop bedding plane orientations are not consistent with the depositional material draping the current Columbia Hills edifice: dip magnitudes are steeper than the modern topographic slopes, and dip directions are not correlated with the modern topographic slope directions. There are, however, regional trends consistent with the outcrops draping an ancient underlying topography. Planes representing compositionally similar outcrops on the modern Husband Hill summit and to the northwest converge over the modern Tennessee Valley. If the paleo-structure culminated in the peak suggested by the bedding plane orientations, up to 100m of material may have been removed from the Columbia Hills.

  16. Radar MeteorologyRadar Meteorology Feb 20, 1941 10 cm (S-band) radar used to track rain showers (Ligda)

    E-print Network

    Rutledge, Steven

    Radar MeteorologyRadar Meteorology Feb 20, 1941 10 cm (S-band) radar used to track rain showers similar observations in the early 1940's (U.S. Air Corps meteorologists receiving "radar" training at MIT in 1943 First operational weather radar, Panama, 1943 Science of radar meteorology born from WWII research

  17. On the potentials of passive, multistatic, low frequency radars to counter stealth and detect low flying targets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Kuschel; J. Heckenbach; S. Muller; R. Appel

    2008-01-01

    The potentials of passive, multi-static radars as covert sensors for the detection of low flying, stealth air targets are illustrated by multi-static RCS analysis, coverage simulations for low flight levels and measurement results obtained with an experimental passive radar using digital audio broadcast signals (DAB). The measurement sensor is described and future perspectives are pointed out.

  18. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar imaging for arbitrary flight trajectories.

    PubMed

    Yarman, Can Evren; Yazici, Birsen; Cheney, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analytic, filtered backprojection (FBP) type inversion method for bistatic synthetic aperture radar (BISAR). We consider a BISAR system where a scene of interest is illuminated by electromagnetic waves that are transmitted, at known times, from positions along an arbitrary, but known, flight trajectory and the scattered waves are measured from positions along a different flight trajectory which is also arbitrary, but known. We assume a single-scattering model for the radar data, and we assume that the ground topography is known but not necessarily flat. We use microlocal analysis to develop the FBP-type reconstruction method. We analyze the computational complexity of the numerical implementation of the method and present numerical simulations to demonstrate its performance. PMID:18229806

  19. Spacecraft studies of planetary surfaces using bistatic radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Richard A.

    1993-01-01

    Spaceborne transmitters have been used in bistatic geometries for a number of planetary surface studies including inference of topography, Fresnel reflectivity, and rms surface slopes on the moon, Mars, and Venus. For the moon and Mars in particular, the bistatic geometry has enabled remote probing in regions and under conditions not obtainable with Earth-based radar systems, yielding information about surface characteristics and properties on scales of centimeters to hundreds of meters that complements monostatic radar observations. A new generation of planetary spacecraft now provides opportunities for further experiments, including more nearly complete definition of the surface scattering function and, possibly, imaging. Targets of interest include the polar regions of Venus (by Magellan) and Mars (by Mars Observer), the enigmatic icy Galilean satellites of Jupiter (by Galileo), and Saturn's largest moon Titan (by Cassini).

  20. Digitize data; spot danger trees

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, M.J.

    1982-08-01

    Abstract photogrammetry is a method for digitizing large amounts of information on topography, vegetation, and equipment. But the method used can have a major impact on the efficiency of conversion. Furthermore, the resulting data base is of little value without well-coordinated application programs. British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority has improved the art of photogrammetric conversion, and has developed some high-power application programs to use these data.

  1. Interferometric swath processing of Cryosat data for glacial ice topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, L.; Burgess, D.; Copland, L.; Cullen, R.; Galin, N.; Hawley, R.; Helm, V.

    2013-12-01

    We have derived digital elevation models (DEMs) over the western part of the Devon Ice Cap in Nunavut, Canada, using "swath processing" of interferometric data collected by Cryosat between February 2011 and January 2012. With the standard ESA (European Space Agency) SARIn (synthetic aperture radar interferometry) level 2 (L2) data product, the interferometric mode is used to map the cross-track position and elevation of the "point-of-closest-approach" (POCA) in sloping glacial terrain. However, in this work we explore the extent to which the phase of the returns in the intermediate L1b product can also be used to map the heights of time-delayed footprints beyond the POCA. We show that there is a range of average cross-track slopes (~ 0.5 to ~ 2°) for which the returns will be dominated by those beneath the satellite in the main beam of the antenna so that the resulting interferometric phase allows mapping of heights in the delayed range window beyond the POCA. In this way a swath of elevation data is mapped, allowing the creation of DEMs from a sequence of L1b SARIn Cryosat data takes. Comparison of the Devon results with airborne scanning laser data showed a mean difference of order 1 m with a standard deviation of about 1 m. The limitations of swath processing, which generates almost 2 orders of magnitude more data than traditional radar altimetry, are explored through simulation, and the strengths and weaknesses of the technique are discussed.

  2. Digital Libraries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Heather

    2008-09-29

    This projects introduces digital libraries, digital initiatives, search techniques, and the Instructional Architect Review Rubric. Digital Library Information : The Scope of the Digital Library D-Lib Journal article, 1998 2008 Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (JCDL) Annual meeting devoted to Digital Libraries Initiatives : Digital Libraries Initiative The Initiative's focus is to dramatically advance the means to collect, store, and organize information in digital forms, and make it available for searching, retrieval, and processing via communication networks -- all in ...

  3. Weather Radar and Instrumentation: Laboratory Modules

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    These 16 radar education modules, developed for the Weather Radar and Instrumentation Curriculum at the University of Oklahoma, provide hands-on instruction for beginning, intermediate, or advanced students to learn about radar systems, especially weather radar. Topics include hardware, weather radar, adaptive systems, advanced hydrometeors, applications of weather radar, and atmospheric interpretations. The modules may be downloaded.

  4. Ultrawideband imaging radar based on OFDM: system simulation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmatyuk, Dmitriy

    2006-05-01

    Orthogonal frequency division-multiplexing (OFDM) is rapidly emerging as a preferred method of UWB signaling in commercial applications aimed mainly at low-power, high data-rate communications. This paper explores the possibility of applying OFDM to use in imaging radar technology. Ultra-wideband nature of the signal provides for high resolution of the radar, whereas usage of multi-sub-carrier method of modulation allows for dynamic spectrum allocation. Robust multi-path performance of OFDM signals and heavy reliance of transceiver design on digital processors easily implemented in modern VLSI technology make a number of possible applications viable, e.g.: portable high-resolution indoor radar/movement monitoring system; through-the-wall/foliage synthetic aperture imaging radar with a capability of image transmission/broadcasting, etc. Our work is aimed to provide a proof-of-concept simulation scenario to explore numerous aspects of UWB-OFDM radar imaging through evaluating range and cross-range imaging performance of such a system with an eventual goal of software-defined radio (SDR) implementation. Stripmap SAR topology was chosen for modeling purposes. Range/cross-range profiles were obtained along with full 2-D images for multi-target in noise scenarios. Model set-up and results of UWB-OFDM radar imaging simulation study using Matlab/Simulink modeling are presented and discussed in this paper.

  5. Surface undulations of Antarctic ice streams tightly controlled by bedrock topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rydt, J.; Gudmundsson, G. H.; Corr, H. F. J.; Christoffersen, P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Stokes flow-line models predict that fast-flowing ice streams transmit information about their bedrock topography most efficiently to the surface for basal undulations with length scales between 1 and 20 times the mean ice thickness. This typical behaviour is independent of the precise values of the flow law and sliding law exponents, and should be universally observable. However, no experimental evidence for this important theoretical prediction has been obtained so far, hence ignoring an important test for the physical validity of current-day ice flow models. In our work we use recently acquired airborne radar data for the Rutford Ice Stream and Evans Ice Stream, and we show that the surface response of fast-flowing ice is highly sensitive to bedrock irregularities with wavelengths of several ice thicknesses. The sensitivity depends on the slip ratio, i.e. the ratio between mean basal sliding velocity and mean deformational velocity. We find that higher values of the slip ratio generally lead to a more efficient transfer, whereas the transfer is significantly dampened for ice that attains most of its surface velocity by creep. Our findings underline the importance of bedrock topography for ice stream dynamics on spatial scales up to 20 times the mean ice thickness. Our results also suggest that local variations in the flow regime and surface topography at this spatial scale cannot be explained by variations in basal slipperiness.

  6. Surface undulations of Antarctic ice streams tightly controlled by bedrock topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rydt, Jan; Hilmar Gudmundsson, G.; Corr, Hugh F. G.; Christoffersen, Poul

    2013-04-01

    Ice dynamics models predict that fast-flowing ice streams transmit information about their bedrock topography most efficiently to the surface for basal undulations with length scales between 1 and 20 times the mean ice thickness. This typical behaviour is independent on the precise values of the flow law and sliding law exponents, and should be universally observable. However, no experimental evidence for this important theoretical prediction has been obtained so far, hence ignoring an important test for the physical validity of current-day ice flow models. In our work we use recently acquired airborne radar data for the Rutford Ice Stream and Evans Ice Stream, and we show that the surface response of fast-flowing ice is highly sensitive to bedrock irregularities with wavelengths of several ice thicknesses. The sensitivity depends on the slip ratio, i.e., the ratio between mean basal sliding velocity and mean deformational velocity. We find that higher values of the slip ratio generally lead to a more efficient transfer, whereas the transfer is significantly dampened for ice that attains most of its surface velocity by creep. Our findings underline the importance of bedrock topography for ice stream dynamics on spatial scales up to 20 times the mean ice thickness. Our results also suggest that local variations in the flow regime and surface topography at this spatial scale cannot be explained by variations in basal slipperiness.

  7. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3D vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Richard L.; Clark, Robert B.; Simonson, Dana L.; Slotwinski, Anthony R.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic of coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system.

  8. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3d vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.B.; Simonson, D.L. [and others

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic of coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system.

  9. Imaging Radar in the Mojave Desert-Death Valley Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.

    2001-01-01

    The Mojave Desert-Death Valley region has had a long history as a test bed for remote sensing techniques. Along with visible-near infrared and thermal IR sensors, imaging radars have flown and orbited over the area since the 1970's, yielding new insights into the geologic applications of these technologies. More recently, radar interferometry has been used to derive digital topographic maps of the area, supplementing the USGS 7.5' digital quadrangles currently available for nearly the entire area. As for their shorter-wavelength brethren, imaging radars were tested early in their civilian history in the Mojave Desert-Death Valley region because it contains a variety of surface types in a small area without the confounding effects of vegetation. The earliest imaging radars to be flown over the region included military tests of short-wavelength (3 cm) X-band sensors. Later, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory began its development of imaging radars with an airborne sensor, followed by the Seasat orbital radar in 1978. These systems were L-band (25 cm). Following Seasat, JPL embarked upon a series of Space Shuttle Imaging Radars: SIRA (1981), SIR-B (1984), and SIR-C (1994). The most recent in the series was the most capable radar sensor flown in space and acquired large numbers of data swaths in a variety of test areas around the world. The Mojave Desert-Death Valley region was one of those test areas, and was covered very well with 3 wavelengths, multiple polarizations, and at multiple angles. At the same time, the JPL aircraft radar program continued improving and collecting data over the Mojave Desert Death Valley region. Now called AIRSAR, the system includes 3 bands (P-band, 67 cm; L-band, 25 cm; C-band, 5 cm). Each band can collect all possible polarizations in a mode called polarimetry. In addition, AIRSAR can be operated in the TOPSAR mode wherein 2 antennas collect data interferometrically, yielding a digital elevation model (DEM). Both L-band and C-band can be operated in this way, with horizontal resolution of about 5 m and vertical errors less than 2 m. The findings and developments of these earlier investigations are discussed.

  10. Microphysical cross validation of spaceborne radar and ground polarimetric radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Chandrasekar; Steven M. Bolen; Eugenio Gorgucci

    2003-01-01

    Ground-based polarimetric radar observations along the beam path of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR), matched in resolution volume and aligned to PR measurements, are used to estimate the parameters of a gamma raindrop size distribution (RSD) model along the radar beam in the presence of rain. The PR operates at 13.8 GHz, and its signal returns

  11. RADAR: THE CASSINI TITAN RADAR MAPPER C. ELACHI1,

    E-print Network

    RADAR: THE CASSINI TITAN RADAR MAPPER C. ELACHI1, , M. D. ALLISON2 , L. BORGARELLI3 , P. ENCRENAZ4; Accepted in final form 3 June 1999) Abstract. The Cassini RADAR instrument is a multimode 13.8 GHz multiple coefficient as low as -40 dB. 1. Introduction The Cassini spacecraft, launched on October 15, 1997, carries

  12. Minimum radar cross section bounds for passive radar responsive tags

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Bidigare; T. Stevens; B Correll; M. Beauvais

    2004-01-01

    A common problem in ground moving target indication (GMTI) radar is detecting a target with even a large radar cross section (RCS) when its line-of-sight velocity falls below the minimum detectable velocity (MDV) for that radar system. In a cooperative scenario, a target may employ a tagging device, which can shift or spread its Doppler signature to become more detectable.

  13. Measuring bedrock topography using gravity to understand subsidence along a portion of the CAP canal in northeast Scottsdale. 1Paul A. Ivanich, James A. Tyburczy, J Ramn Arrowsmith, Mimi Daz. Department of Geological Sciences, Arizona State University, PO

    E-print Network

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Measuring bedrock topography using gravity to understand subsidence along a portion of the CAP.ivanich@asu.edu. ABSTRACT Subsidence due to groundwater withdrawal and resulting sediment compaction is an importantSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) data show a large subsidence bowl, approximately 4km by 2km, centered

  14. Microwave emissions from police radar 

    E-print Network

    Fink, John Michael

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate police officers exposures to microwaves emitted by traffic radar units at the ocular and testicular level. Additionally, comparisons were made of the radar manufacturers published maximum power density...

  15. Venus wind-altitude radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levanon, N.

    1974-01-01

    A design study on adding a radar altimeter to the Pioneer Venus small probe is review. Block and timing diagrams are provided. The inherent and interface ambiguities, resolution, and data handling logic for radar altimeters are described.

  16. Systems and Methods for Radar Data Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, Brian (Inventor); Szeto, Roland (Inventor); Miller, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A radar information processing system is operable to process high bandwidth radar information received from a radar system into low bandwidth radar information that may be communicated to a low bandwidth connection coupled to an electronic flight bag (EFB). An exemplary embodiment receives radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth; processes the received radar information into processed radar information, the processed radar information configured for communication over a connection operable at a second bandwidth, the second bandwidth lower than the first bandwidth; and communicates the radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth.

  17. A review of array radars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Brookner

    1981-01-01

    Achievements in the area of array radars are illustrated by such activities as the operational deployment of the large high-power, high-range-resolution Cobra Dane; the operational deployment of two all-solid-state high-power, large UHF Pave Paws radars; and the development of the SAM multifunction Patriot radar. This paper reviews the following topics: array radars steered in azimuth and elevation by phase shifting

  18. The Clementine Bistatic Radar Experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Nozette; C. L. Lichtenberg; P. Spudis; R. Bonner; W. Ort; E. Malaret; M. Robinson; E. M. Shoemaker

    1996-01-01

    During the Clementine 1 mission, a bistatic radar experiment measured the magnitude and polarization of the radar echo versus bistatic angle, beta, for selected lunar areas. Observations of the lunar south pole yield a same-sense polarization enhancement around beta = 0. Analysis shows that the observed enhancement is localized to the permanently shadowed regions of the lunar south pole. Radar

  19. SEASAT Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of radar imagery from space altitudes is discussed and the advantages of radar over passive sensor systems are outlined. Specific reference is made to the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar. Possible applications include oil spill monitoring, snow and ice reconnaissance, mineral exploration, and monitoring phenomena in the urban environment.

  20. Review of current radar interests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. I. Skolnik

    1974-01-01

    Current radar applications and problem areas are reviewed. Air traffic control, aircraft and ship navigation, remote sensing, and law enforcement are some of the applications mentioned. Both the Gemini and the Apollo space vehicles used radar for rendezvous and docking, and Apollo also utilized it for lunar landing. Equipment improvements suggested include better isolation in CW radar, efficient linear transmitters,

  1. A radar tour of Venus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. K. Beatty

    1985-01-01

    The surface of Venus is briefly characterized in a summary of results obtained by the Soviet Venera 15 and 16 8-cm synthetic-aperture radars, IR radiometers, and radar altimeters. A series of radar images, mainly from Kotelnikov et al. (1984), are presented and discussed, and the descent vehicles to be released by the two Vega spacecraft as they pass Venus in

  2. Analysis of Random Radar Networks

    E-print Network

    Adve, Raviraj

    a design tradeoff between spatial diversity and interference cancellation for multistatic radar networksAnalysis of Random Radar Networks Rani Daher, Raviraj Adve Department of Electrical and Computer.daher@utoronto.ca, rsadve@comm.utoronto.ca Abstract--We introduce the notion of random radar networks to analyze the effect

  3. Analysis of weather radar return

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Payne

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model of detected clutter from an airborne weather radar of conventional design is developed. The model is the joint probability density of samples of radar return from hydrometeors at the same nominal range and scan angle. It is developed from analysis of the effect on the received signal of the following parameters: inhomogeneous hydrometeor motion, radar frequency stability,

  4. The Relationship of the MOLA Topography of Mars to the Mean Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    1999-01-01

    The MOLA topography of Mars is based on a new mean radius of the planet and new equipotential surface for the areoid. The mean atmospheric pressure surface of 6.1mbars that has been used in the past as a reference level for topography does not apply to the zero level of MOLA elevations. The MOLA mean radius of the planet is 3389508 meters and the mean equatorial radius is 339600 meters. The areoid of the zero level of the MOLA altimetry is defined to be the potential surface with the same potential as the mean equatorial radius. The MOLA topography differs from the USGS digital elevation data by approximately 1.6 km, with MOLA higher. The average pressure on the MOLA reference surface for Ls =0 is approximately 5.1 mbars and has been derived from occultation data obtained from the tracking of Viking, Mariner, and MGS spacecraft and interpolated with the aid of the Ames Mars GCM. The new topography and the new occultation data are providing a more reliable relationship between elevation and surface pressure.

  5. Range imaging for measuring streambed topography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tobias K. Kohoutek; Manuel Nitsche

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of streambed topography is crucial to approach problems in fluvial hydraulics, river engineering and geomorphology. In most steep alpine environments measurement apparatus like terrestrial laser scanners or airborne Lidar systems are difficult to successfully apply, because they need free sight, elevated positions and good aerial or road access. In mountain streams this is generally not the case. We

  6. Virtual Field Trip: Temperate Deciduous Forest Topography

    E-print Network

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Virtual Field Trip: Temperate Deciduous Forest #12;Topography #12;Landform and Soils #12;Climate #12;Climate #12;Vegetation Structure #12;Vegetation Structure #12;Disturbance and Forest Growth Rates and Askins 1995 #12;Presettlement forest Clearing for homestead: 1740 Height of forest clearing: 1830 Farm

  7. Detecting and Quantifying Topography in Neural Maps

    PubMed Central

    Yarrow, Stuart; Razak, Khaleel A.; Seitz, Aaron R.; Seriès, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Topographic maps are an often-encountered feature in the brains of many species, yet there are no standard, objective procedures for quantifying topography. Topographic maps are typically identified and described subjectively, but in cases where the scale of the map is close to the resolution limit of the measurement technique, identifying the presence of a topographic map can be a challenging subjective task. In such cases, an objective topography detection test would be advantageous. To address these issues, we assessed seven measures (Pearson distance correlation, Spearman distance correlation, Zrehen's measure, topographic product, topological correlation, path length and wiring length) by quantifying topography in three classes of cortical map model: linear, orientation-like, and clusters. We found that all but one of these measures were effective at detecting statistically significant topography even in weakly-ordered maps, based on simulated noisy measurements of neuronal selectivity and sparse sampling of the maps. We demonstrate the practical applicability of these measures by using them to examine the arrangement of spatial cue selectivity in pallid bat A1. This analysis shows that significantly topographic arrangements of interaural intensity difference and azimuth selectivity exist at the scale of individual binaural clusters. PMID:24505279

  8. Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of the present state of the art in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars was presented. The data acquired with the SEASAT SAR (1978) and Shuttle Imaging Radar, SIR-A (1981) clearly demonstrated the important emphasis in the 80's is going to be on in-depth research investigations conducted with the more flexible and sophisticated SIR series instruments and on long term monitoring of geophysical phenomena conducted from free-flying platforms such as ERS-1 and RADARSAT.

  9. Spaceborne laser radar.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, T.

    1972-01-01

    Development of laser systems to acquire and track targets in applications such as the rendezvous and docking of two spacecraft. A scan technique is described whereby a narrow laser beam is simultaneously scanned with an equally narrow receiver field-of-view without the aid of mechanical gimbals. Equations are developed in order to examine the maximum acquisition and tracking rates, and the maximum target range for a scanning laser radar system. A recently built prototype of a small, lightweight, low-power-consuming scanning laser radar is described.

  10. Microwave radar oceanographic investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1988-01-01

    The Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS) technique was developed and demonstrated for measuring ocean wave directional spectra from air and space platforms. The measurement technique was well demonstrated with data collected in a number of flight experiments involving wave spectral comparisons with wave buoys and the Surface Contour Radar (SCR). Recent missions include the SIR-B underflight experiment (1984), FASINEX (1986), and LEWEX (1987). ROWS related activity is presently concentrating on using the aircraft instrument for wave-processes investigations and obtaining the necessary support (consensus) for a satellite instrument development program. Prospective platforms include EOS and the Canadian RADARSAT.

  11. An adaptive digital beamforming network for satellite communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, M.; Fernandez, J.; Lagunas, M. A.; Coromina, F.

    1991-10-01

    The use of adaptive digital beamforming techniques has, until recently, been largely restricted to high performance military radar systems. Recent advances in digital technology, however, have enabled the design of single chip digital beamforming networks. This, coupled with advances in digital signal processor technology, enables complete beamforming systems to be constructed at a lower cost, thus making the application of these techniques to commercial communications systems attractive. The design and development of such an adaptative digital beamforming network are described. The system is being developed as a proof of concept laboratory based demonstrator to enable the feasibility of adaptive digital beamforming techniques for communication systems to be determined. Ultimately, digital beamforming could be used in conjunction with large array antennas for communication satellite systems. This will enable the simultaneous steering of high gain antenna beams in the direction of ground based users and the nulling of unwanted interference sources, such as radar systems, to be performed.

  12. Skylab radar altimeter - Short-wavelength perturbations detected in ocean surface profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitao, C. D.; Mcgoogan, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Short-wavelength anomalies in sea surface topography, caused by the gravitational effects of major ocean bottom topographic features, have been detected by the radar altimeter aboard Skylab. Some features, such as deep ocean trenches, seamounts, and escarpments, displace the ocean surface by as much as 15 meters over 100-kilometer wavelengths. This experiment demonstrates the potential of satellite altimetry for determining the ocean geoid and for mapping major features of the ocean bottom.

  13. Including Topography and Vegetation Attributes for Developing Pedotransfer Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. K.; Mohanty, B. P.; Zhu, J.

    2006-12-01

    With the advent of advanced geographical informational systems (GIS) and remote sensing technologies in recent years, topographic (elevation, slope, aspect, and flow accumulation) and vegetation attributes are routinely available from digital elevation models (DEMs) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) at different spatial (remote sensor footprint, watershed, regional) scales. Based on the correlation of soil distribution and vegetation growth patterns across a topographically heterogeneous landscape, this study explores the use of topographic and vegetation attributes in addition to pedologic attributes to develop pedotransfer functions (PTFs) for estimating soil hydraulic properties in the Southern Great Plains of the USA. The extensive Southern Great Plains 1997 (SGP97) hydrology experiment database was used to derive these functions by using artificial neural networks. Eighteen models combining bootstrapping technique with artificial neural networks were developed in a hierarchical manner to predict the soil water contents at eight different soil water potentials (theta at 5, 10, 333, 500, 1000, 3000, 8000, and 15000 cm) and the van Genuchten hydraulic parameters (teta residual, theta saturated, a, n). The performance of the neural network models was evaluated using the Spearman correlation coefficient between the observed and the predicted values and root mean square error (RMSE). Although variability exists within bootstrapped replications, improvements (of different levels of statistical significance) were achieved with certain input combinations of basic soil properties, topography and vegetation information compared with using only the basic soil properties as inputs. Topography (DEM) and vegetation (NDVI) attributes at finer scales were useful to capture the variations within the soil mapping units for the SGP97 region dominated by perennial grass cover

  14. Space Radar Image of Death Valley in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This picture is a three-dimensional perspective view of Death Valley, California. This view was constructed by overlaying a SIR-C radar image on a U.S. Geological Survey digital elevation map. The SIR-C image is centered at 36.629 degrees north latitude and 117.069 degrees west longitude. We are looking at Stove Pipe Wells, which is the bright rectangle located in the center of the picture frame. Our vantage point is located atop a large alluvial fan centered at the mouth of Cottonwood Canyon. In the foreground on the left, we can see the sand dunes near Stove Pipe Wells. In the background on the left, the Valley floor gradually falls in elevation toward Badwater, the lowest spot in the United States. In the background on the right we can see Tucki Mountain. This SIR-C/X-SAR supersite is an area of extensive field investigations and has been visited by both Space Radar Lab astronaut crews. Elevations in the Valley range from 70 meters (230 feet) below sea level, the lowest in the United States, to more than 3,300 meters (10,800 feet) above sea level. Scientists are using SIR-C/X-SAR data from Death Valley to help the answer a number of different questions about Earth's geology. One question concerns how alluvial fans are formed and change through time under the influence of climatic changes and earthquakes. Alluvial fans are gravel deposits that wash down from the mountains over time. They are visible in the image as circular, fan-shaped bright areas extending into the darker valley floor from the mountains. Information about the alluvial fans helps scientists study Earth's ancient climate. Scientists know the fans are built up through climatic and tectonic processes and they will use the SIR-C/X-SAR data to understand the nature and rates of weathering processes on the fans, soil formation and the transport of sand and dust by the wind. SIR-C/X-SAR's sensitivity to centimeter-scale (inch-scale) roughness provides detailed maps of surface texture. Such information can be used to study the occurrence and movement of dust storms and sand dunes. The goal of these studies is to gain a better understanding of the record of past climatic changes and the effects of those changes on a sensitive environment. This may lead to a better ability to predict future response of the land to different potential global climate-change scenarios. Vertical exaggeration is 1.87 times; exaggeration of relief is a common tool scientists use to detect relationships between structure (for example, faults and fractures) and topography. Death Valley is also one of the primary calibration sites for SIR-C/X-SAR. In the lower right quadrant of the picture frame two bright dots can be seen which form a line extending to Stove Pipe Wells. These dots are corner reflectors that have been set up to calibrate the radar as the shuttle passes overhead. Thirty triangular-shaped reflectors (they look like aluminum pyramids) have been deployed by the calibration team from JPL over a 40- by 40-kilometer (25- by 25-mile) area in and around Death Valley. The signatures of these reflectors were analyzed by JPL scientists to calibrate the image used in this picture. The calibration team here also deployed transponders (electronic reflectors) and receivers to measure the radar signals from SIR-C/X-SAR on the ground. SIR-C/X-SAR radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, in conjunction with aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche

  15. Topography on Titan : New Results on Large and Small Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.; Cassini Radar Team

    2011-12-01

    Although topographic coverage of Titan is and will remain sparse, some significant results have been obtained from global, regional and local measurements, via stereo, radarclinometry (shape-from-shading), autostereo (deviation from an assumed symmetric shape due to the inclined incidence), altimetry and SARtopo (monopulse) techniques. The global ellipsoidal shape (Zebker et al., 2009) provides important geophysical constraints on the interior. Hypsometry (Lorenz et al., 2011) provides insight into the balance of constructional and erosive processes and the strength of the lithosphere. Some local observations to be summarized in the talk include the measurement of mountains, the quantification of slopes that divert dunes and that drive fluid flow in river networks, as well as depth measurement of several impact craters and the assessment of candidate cryovolcanic structures. A recent new observation is a long altimetry pass T77 along the equator at the western edge of Xanadu, acquired both to constrain Titan's global shape and to understand the surface slopes and properties that may maintain the striking contrast between the dune fields of Shangri-La and the rugged and radiometrically anomalous Xanadu region. T77 also featured a SAR observation of the Ksa impact structure (discovered in SAR on T17), allowing a stereo DEM to be constructed. A feature shared by Earth and Titan is the ephemeral topography of liquids on the surface. Titan's lakes and seas likely vary in depth on geological (Myr-Gyr) and astronomical (~10 kyr) timescales : the depth of Ontario Lacus has been observed to vary on a seasonal timescale (~1 m/yr). Periodic changes of the order of 0.2-5m may occur diurnally, forced by Saturn gravitational tides. Finally, waves may be generated, at least during the windy season (which for Titan's north may be just about to begin) which can be constrained by radar and optical scattering measurements. Looking to the future, a Phase A study of the Titan Mare Explorer (TiME) mission, to float in Ligeia Mare in 2023, raises the prospect of seabed topography measurement via an acoustic depth sounder (sonar).

  16. Description, characteristics and testing of the NASA airborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R.; Altiz, O.; Schaffner, P.; Schrader, J. H.; Blume, H. J. C.

    1991-01-01

    Presented here is a description of a coherent radar scattermeter and its associated signal processing hardware, which have been specifically designed to detect microbursts and record their radar characteristics. Radar parameters, signal processing techniques and detection algorithms, all under computer control, combine to sense and process reflectivity, clutter, and microburst data. Also presented is the system's high density, high data rate recording system. This digital system is capable of recording many minutes of the in-phase and quadrature components and corresponding receiver gains of the scattered returns for selected spatial regions, as well as other aircraft and hardware related parameters of interest for post-flight analysis. Information is given in viewgraph form.

  17. Preliminary science results from the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzek, M.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary results of analyzing digital radar imagery data obtained by the SIR-B aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger STS 41-G are presented. The data cover 5 million square kilometers of the earth surface between 57 deg north and south latitudes. Radar imagery of the same target at different incidence angles was used to classify surfaces by their backscatter response as a function of incidence angle. The SIR-B proved to be useful for collecting multiple incidence angle data sets over a broad range of targets, providing information in the areas of geology, archeology, forestry, agriculture, oceanography, geography, and hydrology. The analysis is also used to optimize radar parameters such as look angle for future missions.

  18. Development of land based radar polarimeter processor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronke, C. W.; Blanchard, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    The processing subsystem of a land based radar polarimeter was designed and constructed. This subsystem is labeled the remote data acquisition and distribution system (RDADS). The radar polarimeter, an experimental remote sensor, incorporates the RDADS to control all operations of the sensor. The RDADS uses industrial standard components including an 8-bit microprocessor based single board computer, analog input/output boards, a dynamic random access memory board, and power supplis. A high-speed digital electronics board was specially designed and constructed to control range-gating for the radar. A complete system of software programs was developed to operate the RDADS. The software uses a powerful real time, multi-tasking, executive package as an operating system. The hardware and software used in the RDADS are detailed. Future system improvements are recommended.

  19. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Horne; G. Yates

    2002-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is becoming increasingly important in many military ground surveillance and targeting roles because of its ability to operate in all weather, day and night, and to detect, classify and geolocate objects at long stand-off ranges. Bistatic SAR, where the transmitter and receiver are on separate platforms, is seen as a potential means of countering vulnerability. This

  20. Rain radar instrument definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Nicolas; Chenebault, J.; Suinot, Noel; Mancini, Paolo L.

    1996-12-01

    As a result of a pre-phase a study, founded by ESA, this paper presents the definition of a spaceborne Rain Radar, candidate instrument for earth explorer precipitation mission. Based upon the description of user requirements for such a dedicated mission, a mission analysis defines the most suitable space segment. At system level, a parametric analysis compares pros and cons of instrument concepts associated with rain rate retrieval algorithms in order to select the most performing one. Several trade-off analysis at subsystem level leads then to the definition of the proposed design. In particular, as pulse compression is implemented in order to increase the radar sensitivity, the selected method to achieve a pulse response with a side-lobe level below--60 dB is presented. Antenna is another critical rain radar subsystem and several designs are com pared: direct radiating array, single or dual reflector illuminated by single or dual feed arrays. At least, feasibility of centralized amplification using TWTA is compared with criticality of Tx/Rx modules for distributed amplification. Mass and power budgets of the designed instrument are summarized as well as standard deviations and bias of simulated rain rate retrieval profiles. The feasibility of a compliant rain radar instrument is therefore demonstrated.

  1. Bistatic radar meteorological satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathanson, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique is discussed that employs a radar transmitter with a moderate size antenna placed in a geosynchronous orbit with either a 0 degree or a low inclination orbit. The reflected signals from the precipitation are then received either on a single beam from a satellite having a beamwidth of about 6 degrees or preferably with a beam that scans the U.S. in a raster pattern with about 0.9 degrees beamwidth. While it would seem that a bistatic system with the transmitter at synchronous altitude and the receivers near the surface would not be a very efficient way of designing a radar system, it is somewhat surprising that the required power and antenna sizes are not that great. Two factors make the meteorological application somewhat more attractive than the bistatic detection of point targets. First, the bistatic reflections of radar signals from precipitation are to a large extent omnidirectional, and while raindrops are spheriods rather than spheres, the relationship of the reflectivity of the rain to rainfall rate can be easily derived. The second reason is that the rain echo signal level is independent of range from a receive only radar, and if the bistatic system works at all, it will work at long ranges.

  2. Weather and radar interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Booth

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of weather on radar system performance. This discussion were based on computer simulations and climatological data. The relationships between frequency and range were explored as they interact with the weather. This effort is being conducted in the RF Technology Division of the Applied Sensors, Guidance, and Electronics Directorate, US Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development,

  3. Distributed aperture OFDM radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Byung Wook Jung; R aviraj S. Adve; Joohwan Chun

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new method of obtaining frequency diversity using orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). Exploiting spatial diversity, the key advantage of a distributed aperture radar, requires orthogonality in, for example, the frequency, time, waveform, dimensions across sensors. This paper focuses on the simplest of these cases; frequency orthogonality. Here we address the key drawback associated with frequency diversity:

  4. Wettability influences cell behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces with different topographies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. N. Lourenco; G. Marchioli; W Song; R. L. Reis; Blitterswijk van C. A; H. B. J. Karperien; Apeldoorn van A. A; J. F. Mano

    2012-01-01

    Surface wettability and topography are recognized as critical factors influencing cell behavior on biomaterials. So far only few works have reported cell responses on surfaces exhibiting extreme wettability in combination with surface topography. The goal of this work is to study whether cell behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces is influenced by surface topography and polymer type. Biomimetic superhydrophobic rough surfaces of

  5. Experimental study of internal gravity waves generated by supercritical topography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. P. Zhang; B. King; Harry L. Swinney

    2007-01-01

    Oscillatory tides flowing over rough topography on the ocean floor generate internal gravity waves, which are a major source of ocean mixing. Linear inviscid theory can describe waves generated by gentle topography with slopes that are less steep than the propagation angle of the internal waves; such topography is termed subcritical. However, a clear physical picture of internal waves generated

  6. The Belize margin revisited. 2. Origin of Holocene antecedent topography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward G. Purdy; Eberhard Gischler; Anthony J. Lomando

    2003-01-01

    The importance of antecedent topography in dictating Holocene facies patterns has been generally recognized. There is, however, disagreement as to origin or lithology of the antecedent topography, particularly with respect to the siliciclastic or carbonate nature of the underlying topography and structural patterns. To help resolve these problems, published and unpublished information have been compiled to produce a structural fabric

  7. Monitoring River-Channel Change Using Terrestrial Oblique Digital Imagery and Automated Digital Photogrammetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jim Chandler; Peter Ashmore; Chris Paola; Mike Gooch; Fred Varkaris

    2002-01-01

    Imagery acquired using a high-resolution digital camera and ground survey has been used to monitor changes in bed topography and plan form, and to obtain synoptic water-surface and flow-depth information in the braided, gravel-bed Sunwapta River in the Canadian Rockies. Digital images were obtained during daily low flows during the summer meltwater season to maximize the exposed bed area and

  8. 25. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #2M4, (mezzanine), power supply ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #2M4, (mezzanine), power supply room; computer power supply on left and water flow on right. This room is directly below data processing area (room #318). Sign on right reads: High purity water digital rack - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  9. Controls of climate, topography, vegetation and lithology on drainage density extracted from high resolution topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangireddy, H.; Carothers, R. A.; Passalacqua, P.; Stark, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Drainage density is a useful topographic metric that varies as a function of geomorphic processes and that serves to quantify links with topography, climate, vegetation, and lithology. Here we analyze 101 sub-basins across thirteen states in the USA using high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) in combination with data on the spatial variation of precipitation, soil, geology, and land cover. We test the following hypotheses: (1) Drainage density carries strong, codependent signatures of rainfall variability, soil type, and topographic relief; (2) Drainage density reflects the extent of landscape dissection on the sub-catchment scale and the subsequent processes of vegetation recovery and gullying.We employ a dimensionless drainage density (Ddd) metric defined as the ratio of likely channelized pixels in a basin to its total number of pixels, and map this metric across meter-resolution lidar DTMs using GeoNet [Passalacqua et al., 2010]. We assess the resolution-dependent scaling of Ddd and observe that it is a much weaker scaling function of DTM resolution than the dimensional formulation of drainage density (Dg), which is classically defined as the ratio of total channel length to total basin area.In order to characterize the correlation structure of drainage density with climatic parameters such as mean annual precipitation (MAP), we use a Gaussian mixture model and identify two sub-groups of landscapes that display different correlations. We observe that Ddd and MAP are negatively correlated in arid and semi-arid environments and positively correlated in humid environments. The transition occurs at a MAP around 900-1000mm/yr and coincides with the maximum observed values of soil thickness and available water content. Landscape relief has a negative correlation with Ddd in arid environments while the correlation is positive in humid climates. We discuss the implication of our results for understanding eco-geomorphic processes and for modeling landscape evolution.References:Passalacqua, P., Do Trung, T., Foufoula-Georgiou, E., Sapiro, G., & Dietrich, W. E. (2010). A geometric framework for channel network extraction from lidar: Nonlinear diffusion and geodesic paths. Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface (2003-2012), 115(F1).

  10. Space Radar Image of Long Valley, California - 3D view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective view of Long Valley, California by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar on board the space shuttle Endeavour. This view was constructed by overlaying a color composite SIR-C image on a digital elevation map. The digital elevation map was produced using radar interferometry, a process by which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle and, which then, are compared to obtain elevation information. The data were acquired on April 13, 1994 and on October 3, 1994, during the first and second flights of the SIR-C/X-SAR radar instrument. The color composite radar image was produced by assigning red to the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) polarization; green to the C-band (vertically transmitted and received) polarization; and blue to the ratio of the two data sets. Blue areas in the image are smooth and yellow areas are rock outcrops with varying amounts of snow and vegetation. The view is looking north along the northeastern edge of the Long Valley caldera, a volcanic collapse feature created 750,000 years ago and the site of continued subsurface activity. Crowley Lake is off the image to the left. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  11. Space Radar Image of Long Valley, California in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This three-dimensional perspective view of Long Valley, California was created from data taken by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar on board the space shuttle Endeavour. This image was constructed by overlaying a color composite SIR-C radar image on a digital elevation map. The digital elevation map was produced using radar interferometry, a process by which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle. The two data passes are compared to obtain elevation information. The interferometry data were acquired on April 13,1994 and on October 3, 1994, during the first and second flights of the SIR-C/X-SAR instrument. The color composite radar image was taken in October and was produced by assigning red to the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) polarization; green to the C-band (vertically transmitted and received) polarization; and blue to the ratio of the two data sets. Blue areas in the image are smooth and yellow areas are rock outcrops with varying amounts of snow and vegetation. The view is looking north along the northeastern edge of the Long Valley caldera, a volcanic collapse feature created 750,000 years ago and the site of continued subsurface activity. Crowley Lake is the large dark feature in the foreground. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.v. (DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  12. Space Radar Image of Oetzal, Austria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a digital elevation model that was geometrically coded directly onto an X-band seasonal change image of the Oetztal supersite in Austria. The image is centered at 46.82 degrees north latitude and 10.79 degrees east longitude. This image is located in the Central Alps at the border between Switzerland, Italy and Austria, 50 kilometers (31 miles) southwest of Innsbruck. It was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 14, 1994 and on October 5, 1994. It was produced by combining data from these two different data sets. Data obtained in April is green; data obtained in October appears in red and blue, and was used as an enhancement based on the ratio of the two data sets. Areas with a decrease in backscatter from April to October appear in light blue (cyan), such as the large Gepatschferner glacier seen at the left of the image center, and most of the other glaciers in this view. A light blue hue is also visible at the east border of the dark blue Lake Reschensee at the upper left side. This shows a significant rise in the water level. Magenta represents areas with an increase of backscatter from April 10 to October 5. Yellow indicates areas with high radar signal response during both passes, such as the mountain slopes facing the radar. Low radar backscatter signals refer to smooth surface (lakes) or radar grazing areas to radar shadow areas, seen in the southeast slopes. The area is approximately 29 kilometers by 21 kilometers (18 miles by 13.5 miles). The summit of the main peaks reaches elevations of 3,500 to 3,768 meters (xx feet to xx feet)above sea level. The test site's core area is the glacier region of Venter Valley, which is one of the most intensively studied areas for glacier research in the world. Research in Venter Valley (below center)includes studies of glacier dynamics, glacier-climate regions, snowpack conditions and glacier hydrology. About 25 percent of the core test site is covered by glaciers. Corner reflectors are set up for calibration. Five corner reflectors can be seen on the Gepatschferner and two can be seen on the Vernagtferner. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.

  13. Enabling Access to High-Resolution Lidar Topography for Earth Science Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Christopher; Nandigam, Viswanath; Arrowsmith, Ramon; Baru, Chaitan

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution topography data acquired with lidar (light detection and ranging a.k.a. laser scanning) technology are revolutionizing the way we study the geomorphic processes acting along the Earth's surface. These data, acquired from either an airborne platform or from a tripod-mounted scanner, are emerging as a fundamental tool for research on a variety of topics ranging from earthquake hazards to ice sheet dynamics. Lidar topography data allow earth scientists to study the processes that contribute to landscape evolution at resolutions not previously possible yet essential for their appropriate representation. These datasets also have significant implications for earth science education and outreach because they provide an accurate digital representation of landforms and geologic hazards. However, along with the potential of lidar topography comes an increase in the volume and complexity of data that must be efficiently managed, archived, distributed, processed and integrated in order for them to be of use to the community. A single lidar data acquisition may generate terabytes of data in the form of point clouds, digital elevation models (DEMs), and derivative imagery. This massive volume of data is often difficult to manage and poses significant distribution challenges when trying to allow access to the data for a large scientific user community. Furthermore, the datasets can be technically challenging to work with and may require specific software and computing resources that are not readily available to many users. The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded OpenTopography Facility (http://www.opentopography.org) is an online data access and processing system designed to address the challenges posed by lidar data, and to democratize access to these data for the scientific user community. OpenTopography provides free, online access to lidar data in a number of forms, including raw lidar point cloud data, standard DEMs, and easily accessible Google Earth visualizations. OpenTopography uses cyberinfrastructure resources to allow users, regardless of their level of expertise, to access lidar data products that can be applied to their research. In addition to data access, the system uses customized algorithms and high-performance computing resources to allow users to perform on-the-fly data processing tasks such as the generation of custom DEMs. OpenTopography's primarily focus is on large, community-oriented, scientific data sets, such as those acquired by the NSF-funded EarthScope project. We are actively expanding our holdings through collaborations with researchers and data providers to include data from a wide variety of landscapes and geologic domains. Ultimately, the goal is for OpenTopography to be the primary clearing house for Earth science-oriented high-resolution topography. This presentation will provide an overview of the OpenTopography Facility, including available data, processing capabilities and resources, examples from scientific use cases, and a snapshot of system and data usage thus far. We will also discuss current development activities related to deploying high-performance algorithms for hydrologic processing of DEMs, geomorphic change detection analysis, and the incorporation of full waveform lidar data into the system.

  14. The effect of topography on SAR calibration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jakob J. van Zyl; Bruce D. Chapman; Pascale Dubois; Jiancheng Shi

    1993-01-01

    During normal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing, a flat Earth is assumed when performing radiometric corrections such as antenna pattern and scattering area removal. The authors examine the effects of topographic variations on these corrections. Local slopes will cause the actual scattering area to be different from that calculated using the flat Earth assumption. It is shown that this effect

  15. Quantifying the level of improvement in discharge estimation from the SRTM-era to the proposed Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT)-mission era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikder, M. S.; Hossain, F.

    2014-12-01

    It was almost 15 years ago, when the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) flew for a few days to map the elevation of earth's surface. SRTM has since become the community standard for a global digital elevation model (DEM) and has triggered numerous studies that require elevation information. One particular avenue that has benefited the hydrologic community is the space-borne discharge estimation using water slope information that is afforded by the spatial imaging concept of SRTM. Numerous feasibility studies involving SRTM data for discharge estimation in rivers have led to adopting a similar concept for the proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission (launch date: 2020). Because SWOT is expected to have significantly higher accuracy and smaller spatial scale in resolving the elevation characteristics of a water surface, it is important to understand the extent of improvement that SWOT will afford for discharge estimation once it is launched. In this study, we explored geophysical sources of uncertainty of satellite interferometric-based discharge estimation in Bangladesh delta of the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna (GBM) river basins. This exploration was carried out for two scenarios: A) using SRTM elevation data and B) using SWOT-simulated elevation data. We contextualized the improvement in accuracy as a function of river's geophysical characteristics (river width, reach averaging length, bed/water slope) and also to explored a pragmatic approach to further uncertainty reduction using water level climatology. The discharge was estimated according to the slope-area (Manning's) method using elevation data assuming availability of in-situ river bathymetry (in order to remove uncertainty due to river cross section data). A high resolution hydrodynamic model was accurately calibrated (against in-situ water level data) to simulate water level and flow dynamics along the entire river reaches of the GBM river network and served as reference for comparison with satellite-based estimates. For simulation of space-borne water elevations expected during the SWOT-era, we used a comprehensive simulator that can mimic all the likely measurement issues related to SWOT's planned orbit, inclination and sensor characteristics.

  16. Radar cross section measurements of a scale model of the space shuttle orbiter vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    A series of microwave measurements was conducted to determine the radar cross section of the Space Shuttle Orbiter vehicle at a frequency and at aspect angles applicable to re-entry radar acquisition and tracking. The measurements were performed in a microwave anechoic chamber using a 1/15th scale model and a frequency applicable to C-band tracking radars. The data were digitally recorded and processed to yield statistical descriptions useful for prediction of orbiter re-entry detection and tracking ranges.

  17. Alterations of Visual Reaction Time and Short Term Memory in Military Radar Personnel

    PubMed Central

    MORTAZAVI, Seyed Mohammad Javad; TAEB, Shahram; DEHGHAN, Naser

    2013-01-01

    Background Radar transmitters emit high-power radiofrequency radiation by creation of a high-voltage and high-frequency alternating electrical current. Methods: Health effects of occupational exposure to military radar were investigated. Visual reaction time was recorded with a simple blind computer-assisted-visual reaction time test. To assess the short-term memory, modified Wechsler Memory Scale test was performed. Results: The mean +/- SD reaction time in radar works (N=100) and the control group (N=57) were 238.58 +/? 23.47 milliseconds and 291.86 +/? 28.26 milliseconds (P<0.0001), respectively. The scores of forward digit span in radar works and the control group were 3.56 +/? 0.77 and 4.29 +/? 1.06 (P<0.0001), while the scores of backward digit span in radar works and the control group were 2.70 +/? 0.69 and 3.62 +/? 0.95 (P<0.0001). The scores of word recognition in radar works and the control group were 3.37 +/? 1.13 and 5.86 +/? 1.11 (P<0.0001). Finally, the scores of paired words in radar works and the control group were 13.56 +/? 1.78 and 15.21 +/? 2.20 (P<0.0001). It can be concluded that occupational exposures to radar radiations decreases reaction time, which may lead to a better response to different hazards. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show that occupational exposure to radar microwave radiation leads to decreased reaction time and the lower performance of short-term memory. Altogether, these results indicate that occupational exposure to radar microwave radiations may be linked to some non-detrimental and detrimental health effects. PMID:23785684

  18. Monsoon flood boundary delineation and damage assessment using space borne imaging radar and Landsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Vermillion, C.; Story, M. H.; Choudhury, A. M.; Gafoor, A.

    1987-01-01

    Space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data acquired by the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) Program and Landsat Multispectral Scanner Subsystem (MSS) Data from Landsat 4 were used to map flood boundaries for the assessment of flood damage in the Peoples Republic of Bangladesh. The cloud penetrating capabilities of the L-band radar provided a clear picture of the hydrologic conditions of the surface during a period of inclement weather at the end of the wet phase of the 1984 monsoon. The radar image data were digitally processed to geometrically rectify the pixel geometry and were filtered to subdue radar image speckle effects. Contrast enhancement techniques and density slicing were used to create discrete land-cover categories corresponding to surface conditions present at the time of the Shuttle overflight. The radar image classification map was digitally registered to a spectral signature classification map of the area derived from Landsat MSS data collected two weeks prior to the SIR-B mission. Classification accuracy comparisons were made between the radar and MSS classification maps, and flood boundary and flood damage assessment measurements were made with the merged data by adding the classifications and inventorying the land-cover classes inundated at the time of flooding.

  19. METR 4624--Radar Meteorology SPRING 2012

    E-print Network

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4624--Radar Meteorology SPRING 2012 Dr. Michael I. Biggerstaff; drdoppler@ou.edu (best method Principles of weather radar and storm observations including: radar system design, em wave propagation, radar&Q, moments of the power spectrum, ground clutter, attenuation, rainfall measurements using radar reflectivity

  20. METR 4624--Radar Meteorology SPRING 2014

    E-print Network

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4624--Radar Meteorology SPRING 2014 Dr. Michael I. Biggerstaff; drdoppler@ou.edu (best method Principles of weather radar and storm observations including: radar system design, em wave propagation, radar&Q, moments of the power spectrum, ground clutter, attenuation, rainfall measurements using radar reflectivity

  1. Comparing Goldstone Solar System Radar Earth-based Observations of Mars with Orbital Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Larsen, K. W.; Jurgens, R. F.; Slade, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) has collected a self-consistent set of delay-Doppler near-nadir radar echo data from Mars since 1988. Prior to the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) global topography for Mars, these radar data provided local elevation information, along with radar scattering information with global coverage. Two kinds of GSSR Mars delay-Doppler data exist: low 5 km x 150 km resolution and, more recently, high (5 to 10 km) spatial resolution. Radar data, and non-imaging delay-Doppler data in particular, requires significant data processing to extract elevation, reflectivity and roughness of the reflecting surface. Interpretation of these parameters, while limited by the complexities of electromagnetic scattering, provide information directly relevant to geophysical and geomorphic analyses of Mars. In this presentation we want to demonstrate how to compare GSSR delay-Doppler data to other Mars datasets, including some idiosyncracies of the radar data. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  2. An MSK Radar Waveform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Srinivasan, Meera

    2012-01-01

    The minimum-shift-keying (MSK) radar waveform is formed by periodically extending a waveform that separately modulates the in-phase and quadrature- phase components of the carrier with offset pulse-shaped pseudo noise (PN) sequences. To generate this waveform, a pair of periodic PN sequences is each passed through a pulse-shaping filter with a half sinusoid impulse response. These shaped PN waveforms are then offset by half a chip time and are separately modulated on the in-phase and quadrature phase components of an RF carrier. This new radar waveform allows an increase in radar resolution without the need for additional spectrum. In addition, it provides self-interference suppression and configurable peak sidelobes. Compared strictly on the basis of the expressions for delay resolution, main-lobe bandwidth, effective Doppler bandwidth, and peak ambiguity sidelobe, it appears that bi-phase coded (BPC) outperforms the new MSK waveform. However, a radar waveform must meet certain constraints imposed by the transmission and reception of the modulation, as well as criteria dictated by the observation. In particular, the phase discontinuity of the BPC waveform presents a significant impediment to the achievement of finer resolutions in radar measurements a limitation that is overcome by using the continuous phase MSK waveform. The phase continuity, and the lower fractional out-of-band power of MSK, increases the allowable bandwidth compared with BPC, resulting in a factor of two increase in the range resolution of the radar. The MSK waveform also has been demonstrated to have an ambiguity sidelobe structure very similar to BPC, where the sidelobe levels can be decreased by increasing the length of the m-sequence used in its generation. This ability to set the peak sidelobe level is advantageous as it allows the system to be configured to a variety of targets, including those with a larger dynamic range. Other conventionally used waveforms that possess an even greater spectral efficiency than the MSK waveform, such as linear frequency modulation (LFM) and Costas frequency hopping, have a fixed peak sidelobe level that is therefore not configurable, and can be exceeded by high contrast targets. Furthermore, in the case of a multistatic experiment observing a target in motion, self-interference from the transmitter to the receiver is mitigated by the MSK waveform. Waveforms that have delay Doppler coupling, such as LFM, provide no such protection.

  3. Recent Advances in Spaceborne Precipitation Radar Measurement Techniques and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Durden, Stephen L.; Tanelli, Simone

    2006-01-01

    NASA is currently developing advanced instrument concepts and technologies for future spaceborne atmospheric radars, with an over-arching objective of making such instruments more capable in supporting future science needs and more cost effective. Two such examples are the Second-Generation Precipitation Radar (PR-2) and the Nexrad-In-Space (NIS). PR-2 is a 14/35-GHz dual-frequency rain radar with a deployable 5-meter, wide-swath scanned membrane antenna, a dual-polarized/dual-frequency receiver, and a realtime digital signal processor. It is intended for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) operations to provide greatly enhanced rainfall profile retrieval accuracy while consuming only a fraction of the mass of the current TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR). NIS is designed to be a 35-GHz Geostationary Earth Orbiting (GEO) radar for providing hourly monitoring of the life cycle of hurricanes and tropical storms. It uses a 35-m, spherical, lightweight membrane antenna and Doppler processing to acquire 3-dimensional information on the intensity and vertical motion of hurricane rainfall.

  4. Incoherent scatter radar directional pattern using radio astronomical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, A. V.; Zavorin, A. V.; Lebedev, V. P.; Lubyshev, B. I.; Nosov, V. E.

    2002-03-01

    The Irkutsk Incoherent Scatter (IS) radar is a unique facility in Russia, designed for geophysical and radio- probing investigations of the upper atmosphere. The range of problems tackled using the radar is quite extensive. Having a high potential and investigative capability, the radar represents an extremely sophisticated engineering facility. A maximum possible knowledge of all performance data of this instrument is necessary for conducting accurate measurements of space environment parameters and for scientific experiments. Of particular interest in this regard is the radar's antenna system. The spatial distribution of the radiation power (directional pattern) of the antenna system is as yet imperfectly understood. Because of the complexity and the unconventional nature of the antenna design, a mathematical simulation and calculation of the directional pattern involves a highly cumbersome task, and the reliability of such calculations is low. The overall worldwide practice shows that the most powerful tool for obtaining the directional pattern characteristics is to measure the variations of the noise power level when various cosmic radio sources traverse the beam. The advancement of digital technology in the present state of the art makes it possible to record large amounts of information needed to construct an accurate spatial distribution of the power received and radiated by the antenna. Results, thus obtained, are useful for correctly selecting the IS radar operation modes.

  5. Target tracking for multistatic radar with transmitter uncertainty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sora Choi; Christian R. Berger; David Crouse; Peter Willett; Shengli Zhou

    2009-01-01

    We present a target tracking system for a specific sort of passive radar, that using a Digital Audio\\/Video Broadcast (DAB\\/DVB) network for illuminators of opportunity. The system can measure bi-static range and range-rate. Angular information is assumed here unavailable. The DAB\\/DVB network operates in a single frequency mode; this means the same data stream is broadcast from multiple senders in

  6. Miniature L-Band Radar Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWatters, Dalia; Price, Douglas; Edelstein, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    A miniature L-band transceiver that operates at a carrier frequency of 1.25 GHz has been developed as part of a generic radar electronics module (REM) that would constitute one unit in an array of many identical units in a very-large-aperture phased-array antenna. NASA and the Department of Defense are considering the deployment of such antennas in outer space; the underlying principles of operation, and some of those of design, also are applicable on Earth. The large dimensions of the antennas make it advantageous to distribute radio-frequency electronic circuitry into elements of the arrays. The design of the REM is intended to implement the distribution. The design also reflects a requirement to minimize the size and weight of the circuitry in order to minimize the weight of any such antenna. Other requirements include making the transceiver robust and radiation-hard and minimizing power demand. Figure 1 depicts the functional blocks of the REM, including the L-band transceiver. The key functions of the REM include signal generation, frequency translation, amplification, detection, handling of data, and radar control and timing. An arbitrary-waveform generator that includes logic circuitry and a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) generates a linear-frequency-modulation chirp waveform. A frequency synthesizer produces local-oscillator signals used for frequency conversion and clock signals for the arbitrary-waveform generator, for a digitizer [that is, an analog-to-digital converter (ADC)], and for a control and timing unit. Digital functions include command, timing, telemetry, filtering, and high-rate framing and serialization of data for a high-speed scientific-data interface. The aforementioned digital implementation of filtering is a key feature of the REM architecture. Digital filters, in contradistinction to analog ones, provide consistent and temperature-independent performance, which is particularly important when REMs are distributed throughout a large array. Digital filtering also enables selection among multiple filter parameters as required for different radar operating modes. After digital filtering, data are decimated appropriately in order to minimize the data rate out of an antenna panel. The L-band transceiver (see Figure 2) includes a radio-frequency (RF)-to-baseband down-converter chain and an intermediate- frequency (IF)-to-RF up-converter chain. Transmit/receive (T/R) switches enable the use of a single feed to the antenna for both transmission and reception. The T/R switches also afford a built-in test capability by enabling injection of a calibration signal into the receiver chain. In order of decreasing priority, components of the transceiver were selected according to requirements of radiation hardness, then compactness, then low power. All of the RF components are radiation-hard. The noise figure (NF) was optimized to the extent that (1) a low-noise amplifier (LNA) (characterized by NF < 2 dB) was selected but (2) the receiver front-end T/R switches were selected for a high degree of isolation and acceptably low loss, regardless of the requirement to minimize noise.

  7. Detecting and Quantifying Forest Change: The Potential of Existing C- and X-Band Radar Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Mihai A.; Ismail, Ismail; Lowell, Kim; Karyanto, Oka; Santoro, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates the opportunity provided by global interferometric radar datasets for monitoring deforestation, degradation and forest regrowth in tropical and semi-arid environments. The paper describes an easy to implement method for detecting forest spatial changes and estimating their magnitude. The datasets were acquired within space-borne high spatial resolutions radar missions at near-global scales thus being significant for monitoring systems developed under the United Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The approach presented in this paper was tested in two areas located in Indonesia and Australia. Forest change estimation was based on differences between a reference dataset acquired in February 2000 by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and TanDEM-X mission (TDM) datasets acquired in 2011 and 2013. The synergy between SRTM and TDM datasets allowed not only identifying changes in forest extent but also estimating their magnitude with respect to the reference through variations in forest height. PMID:26111047

  8. Radar images of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, Duane O.; Butler, Bryan J.; Grossman, Arie W.; Slade, Martin A.

    1991-01-01

    VLA radar-reflected flux-density mappings have yielded full disk images of Mars which reveal near-surface features, including a region in the Tharsis volcano area that displayed no echo to the very low level of the radar-system noise. This feature is interpreted as a deposit of dust or ash whose density is less than about 0.5 g/cu cm; it must be several meters thick, and may be much deeper. The most strongly reflecting geological feature was the south polar ice cap, which is interpretable as arising from nearly-pure CO2 or H2O ice, with less than 2 vol pct Martian dust. Only one anomalous reflecting feature was identified outside the Tharsis region.

  9. New weather radar coming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    What would you call the next generation of radar for severe weather prediction? NEXRAD, of course. A prototype for the new system was recently completed in Norman, Okla., and by the early 1990s up to 195 stations around the United States will be tracking dangerous weather and sending faster, more accurate, and more detailed warnings to the public.NEXRAD is being built for the Departments of Commerce, Transportation, and Defense by the Unisys Corporation under a $450 million contract signed in December 1987. Th e system will be used by the National Weather Service, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the U.S. Air Force and Navy. The NEXRAD radar tower in Norman is expected to be operational in October.

  10. Cognitive processing for nonlinear radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martone, Anthony; Ranney, Kenneth; Hedden, Abigail; Mazzaro, Gregory; McNamara, David

    2013-05-01

    An increasingly cluttered electromagnetic environment (EME) is a growing problem for radar systems. This problem is becoming critical as the available frequency spectrum shrinks due to growing wireless communication device usage and changing regulations. A possible solution to these problems is cognitive radar, where the cognitive radar learns from the environment and intelligently modifies the transmit waveform. In this paper, a cognitive nonlinear radar processing framework is introduced where the main components of this framework consist of spectrum sensing processing, target detection and classification, and decision making. The emphasis of this paper is to introduce a spectrum sensing processing technique that identifies a transmit-receive frequency pair for nonlinear radar. It will be shown that the proposed technique successfully identifies a transmit-receive frequency pair for nonlinear radar from data collected from the EME.

  11. A review of array radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookner, E.

    1981-10-01

    Achievements in the area of array radars are illustrated by such activities as the operational deployment of the large high-power, high-range-resolution Cobra Dane; the operational deployment of two all-solid-state high-power, large UHF Pave Paws radars; and the development of the SAM multifunction Patriot radar. This paper reviews the following topics: array radars steered in azimuth and elevation by phase shifting (phase-phase steered arrays); arrays steered + or - 60 deg, limited scan arrays, hemispherical coverage, and omnidirectional coverage arrays; array radars steering electronically in only one dimension, either by frequency or by phase steering; and array radar antennas which use no electronic scanning but instead use array antennas for achieving low antenna sidelobes.

  12. Outline of the Mu radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, S.

    1983-01-01

    A middle and upper atmospheric radar system is described. The antenna array consists of 25 groups each of which consists of 19 crossed-Yagis with three elements; each antenna has semiconductor transmitter and receiver, called a module, and each group of 19 antennas works as an independent small radar steering its radar beam under the control of a microcomputer. Thus, the total system consists of 25 small radars of this kind, enabling one to do various sophisticated operations with the system. The system is controlled by two other computers, one for radar controlling (HP9835A) and the other for data taking and on-line analysis (VAX11/750). The computer-controlled system is simple in operation for users and reliable in observation. Very quick beam steering (as quick as in a msec) is also possible because of electronic phase-changing of each module output under control of the microcomputer which is further controlled by the radar controller.

  13. Airborne bistatic radar applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James A. Foster

    1987-01-01

    Applications of bistatic radar when one or both of the units are airborne are discussed. Scenarios that merit deeper consideration are covert strike and head-on SAR using a stand-off illuminator, either airborne or space-based; area air defense with passive ground-based receivers and stand-off illuminators; an airborne picket line to detect stealth aircraft and missiles; AWACS aircraft providing mutual support in

  14. Radar receiver procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-04-01

    This International Test Operations Procedures (ITOP) outlines the test methods used in evaluating the performance and characteristics of general types of radar receivers to include single or variable frequency receivers. The test methods serve as a guide in determining the overall efficiency of such equipment as a function of their design and their recorded performance. If a conflict exists between the accuracies, frequency, and levels stated in this ITOP and those stated in the appropriate requirements documents, the requirements documents must be used.

  15. Imaging synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Burns, Bryan L. (Tijeras, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A linear-FM SAR imaging radar method and apparatus to produce a real-time image by first arranging the returned signals into a plurality of subaperture arrays, the columns of each subaperture array having samples of dechirped baseband pulses, and further including a processing of each subaperture array to obtain coarse-resolution in azimuth, then fine-resolution in range, and lastly, to combine the processed subapertures to obtain the final fine-resolution in azimuth. Greater efficiency is achieved because both the transmitted signal and a local oscillator signal mixed with the returned signal can be varied on a pulse-to-pulse basis as a function of radar motion. Moreover, a novel circuit can adjust the sampling location and the A/D sample rate of the combined dechirped baseband signal which greatly reduces processing time and hardware. The processing steps include implementing a window function, stabilizing either a central reference point and/or all other points of a subaperture with respect to doppler frequency and/or range as a function of radar motion, sorting and compressing the signals using a standard fourier transforms. The stabilization of each processing part is accomplished with vector multiplication using waveforms generated as a function of radar motion wherein these waveforms may be synthesized in integrated circuits. Stabilization of range migration as a function of doppler frequency by simple vector multiplication is a particularly useful feature of the invention; as is stabilization of azimuth migration by correcting for spatially varying phase errors prior to the application of an autofocus process.

  16. Radar gun hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-20

    Radar guns - hand-held units used by the law to nail speeders - have been in use since the early '60s. Now they've been accused of causing cancer. Police officers in several states have so far filed eight suits against the manufacturer, claiming that they have contracted rare forms of cancer, such as of the eyelid and the testicle, from frequent proximity to the devices. Spurred by concerns expressed by police groups, researchers at the Rochester Institute of Technology are conducting what they believe to be the first research of its kind in the nation. Last month psychologist John Violanti, an expert in policy psychology and health, sent out a one-page survey to 6,000 active and retired police officers in New York State, asking them about their health and their use of radar guns. Violanti says melanoma, leukemia, and lymph node cancer may be linked to these as well as other electromagnetic devices. The Food and Drug Administration earlier this year issued a warning about radar guns, telling users not to operate them closer than 6 inches from the body. But this may not be a sufficient safeguard since the instruments can give off crisscrossing wave emissions within a police vehicle. The survey will be used to help determine if it would be safer to mount the guns, which are currently either hand-held or mounted on dashboards, outside troopers' cars.

  17. Comet radar explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnham, Tony; Asphaug, Erik; Barucci, Antonella; Belton, Mike; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Brownlee, Donald; Capria, Maria Teresa; Carter, Lynn; Chesley, Steve; Farnham, Tony; Gaskell, Robert; Gim, Young; Heggy, Essam; Herique, Alain; Klaasen, Ken; Kofman, Wlodek; Kreslavsky, Misha; Lisse, Casey; Orosei, Roberto; Plaut, Jeff; Scheeres, Dan

    The Comet Radar Explorer (CORE) is designed to perform a comprehensive and detailed exploration of the interior, surface, and inner coma structures of a scientifically impor-tant Jupiter family comet. These structures will be used to investigate the origins of cometary nuclei, their physical and geological evolution, and the mechanisms driving their spectacular activity. CORE is a high heritage spacecraft, injected by solar electric propulsion into orbit around a comet. It is capable of coherent deep radar imaging at decameter wavelengths, high resolution stereo color imaging, and near-IR imaging spectroscopy. Its primary objective is to obtain a high-resolution map of the interior structure of a comet nucleus at a resolution of ¿100 elements across the diameter. This structure shall be related to the surface geology and morphology, and to the structural details of the coma proximal to the nucleus. This is an ideal complement to the science from recent comet missions, providing insight into how comets work. Knowing the structure of the interior of a comet-what's inside-and how cometary activity works, is required before we can understand the requirements for a cryogenic sample return mission. But more than that, CORE is fundamental to understanding the origin of comets and their evolution in time. The mission is made feasible at low cost by the use of now-standard MARSIS-SHARAD reflec-tion radar imaging hardware and data processing, together with proven flight heritage of solar electric propulsion. Radar flight heritage has been demonstrated by the MARSIS radar on Mars Express (Picardi et al., Science 2005; Plaut et al., Science 2007), the SHARAD radar onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (Seu et al., JGR 2007), and the LRS radar onboard Kaguya (Ono et al, EPS 2007). These instruments have discovered detailed subsurface structure to depths of several kilometers in a variety of terrains on Mars and the Moon. A reflection radar deployed in orbit about a comet will enjoy significant simplifying benefits compared to using the same instrument for Mars or lunar radar science: (1) The proximity of operations leads to a much higher signal to noise, as much as +30 dB. (2) The lack of an ionosphere simplifies data modeling and analysis. (3) The body is globally illuminated during every data acquisition, minimizing ambiguity or 'clutter' and allowing for tomographic reconstruction. What is novel is the data processing, where instead of a planar radargram approach we coherently process the data into an image of the deep interior. CORE thus uses a MARSIS-SHARAD heritage radar to make coherent reflection sounding measurements, a 'CAT SCAN' of a comet nucleus. What is unique about this mission compared to the Mars radars mentioned above, is that the target is a finite mass of dirty ice in free space, rather than a sheet of dirty ice draped on a planet surface. The depth of penetration (kilometers), attainable resolution (decameters), and the target materials, are more or less the same. This means that the science story is robust, and the radar implementation is robust. The target is comet 10P/Tempel 2, discovered by Wilhelm Tempel in 1873 and observed on most apparitions since. It has been extensively studied, in part because of interest as a CRAF target in the mid-1980s, and much is known about it. Tempel 2 is one of the largest known comet nuclei, 16×8×8 km (about the same size as Halley) [1] and has rotation period 8.9 hours [3,5,6,7,9]. The spin state is evolving with time, spinning up by ˜10 sec per perihelion pass [5,7]. The comet is active, but not exceedingly so, especially given its size. The water production is measured at ˜ 4 × 1028 mol/sec at its peak [2], a factor of 25 lower than comet Halley, and it is active over only ˜2% of its surface. The dust environment is well known, producing a factor of ˜100 less dust than Halley. Comet References: [1] A'Hearn et al., ApJ 347, 1155, 1989 [2] Feldman and Festou, ACM 1991, p. 171, 1992 [3] Jewitt and Luu, AJ 97, 1766, 1989 [4] Lamy et al., Comets II p 223. 2009 [5] Muel

  18. Spaceborne Imaging Radar Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Neil

    1986-01-01

    In June of 1985 the Project Initiation Agreement was signed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications for the Spaceborne Imaging Radar Project (SIR). The thrust of the Spaceborne Imaging Radar Project is to continue the evolution of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) science and technology developed during SEASAT, SIR-A and SIR-B missions to meet the needs of the Earth Observing System (EOS) in the mid 1990's. As originally formulated, the Project plans were for a reflight of the SIR-B in 1987, the development of a new SAR, SIR-C, for missions in mid 1989 and early 1990, and the upgrade of SIR-C to EOS configuration with a qualification flight aboard the shuttle in the 1993 time frame (SIR-D). However, the loss of the shuttle Challenger has delayed the first manifest for SIR to early 1990. This delay prompted the decision to drop SIR-B reflight plans and move ahead with SIR-C to more effectively utilize this first mission opportunity. The planning for this project is discussed.

  19. Space-based radar handbook

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leopold J. Cantafio

    1989-01-01

    The design and operation of space-based radar (SBR) systems are discussed in chapters contributed by leading experts. An overview of current and planned SBRs is presented, and particular attention is given to SBR-platform orbits, the ionospheric environment and its effects on SBR detection, space-based SARs, bistatic SBRs, rendezvous radars, radar altimeters for space vehicles, scatterometers and other modest-resolution systems, and

  20. Radar-aeolian roughness project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Dobrovolskis, A.; Gaddis, L.; Iversen, J. D.; Lancaster, N.; Leach, Rodman N.; Rasnussen, K.; Saunders, S.; Vanzyl, J.; Wall, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to establish an empirical relationship between measurements of radar, aeolian, and surface roughness on a variety of natural surfaces and to understand the underlying physical causes. This relationship will form the basis for developing a predictive equation to derive aeolian roughness from radar backscatter. Results are given from investigations carried out in 1989 on the principal elements of the project, with separate sections on field studies, radar data analysis, laboratory simulations, and development of theory for planetary applications.

  1. Overview of Radar Data Compression Valliappa Lakshmanan

    E-print Network

    Lakshmanan, Valliappa

    Overview of Radar Data Compression Valliappa Lakshmanan Cooperative Institute of Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma & National Severe Storms Laboratory Abstract Radar data is routinely transmitted in real-time from the coterminous United States (CONUS) radar sites and placed

  2. REVIEW ARTICLE Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    REVIEW ARTICLE Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Christopher T. Allen Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Radar Systems and Remote Sensing Laboratory University of Kansas Abstract. This paper provides a brief review of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (In

  3. Precise orbit determination for the shuttle radar topography mission using a new generation of GPS receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertiger, W.; Bar-Sever, Y.; Desai, S.; Duncan, C.; Haines, B.; Kuang, D.; Lough, M.; Reichert, A.; Romans, L.; Srinivasan, J.; Webb, F.; Young, L.; Zumberge, J.

    2000-01-01

    The BlackJack family of GPS receivers has been developed at JPL to satisfy NASA's requirements for high-accuracy, dual-frequency, Y-codeless GPS receivers for NASA's Earth science missions. In this paper we will present the challenges that were overcome to meet this accuracy requirement. We will discuss the various reduced dynamic strategies, Space Shuttle dynamic models, and our tests for accuracy that included a military Y-code dual-frequency receiver (MAGR).

  4. Exploring Predictive Relationships of Fluvial Morphology: Using Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, Mark Thomas

    2011-12-01

    To identify general large-scale patterns (slope, slope change, sinuosity) along a river's course the worldwide SRTM 3 arc-second DEM satellite derived data was analyzed. Longitudinal profiles were calculated for sixteen rivers. This analysis uses auxiliary data sets to develop an understanding of the external and internal influences that are pressed upon and inherent within the lower 100 meters of the river systems. Contradictory to previous findings, the sixteen rivers studied here show that slope and sinuosity are not strongly correlated at the reach scale. The total river's longitudinal profile up to 100 meters, provides an average slope and sinuosity throughout the entire system and increases the correlation between slope and sinuosity (˜0.56). Comparing the entire river's longitudinal profiles also illustrates a threshold of planform sinuosity (>1.6) in which meandering rivers are found. Using this threshold, the Indus, Mississippi, and Fly Rivers are further examined to understand lateral migration rates, the link between meandering rivers and the production of oxbow lakes throughout their floodplain. The slope of three rivers was examined for external controls by overlaying geological data of bedrock type and fault locations. Neotectonics appears to impact the slope and/or sinuosity of the Mississippi, Niger, and Magdalena rivers. Results indicate growth faulting found in the mud-dominated systems of the Mississippi and Niger influences sinuosity. The resulting sinuosity is greatest in regions where these rivers are bound by growth faults. The Magdalena has several regions where the river intersects strike-slip faults, resulting in increased slopes with the more parallel the encounter. River longitudinal profiles can also reveal areas of bedload erosion and deposition. Zones of erosion (sources) and deposition (sinks), and knowing how to locate them, are of great interest to a variety of geoscientists. These predictive relationships will provide future assistance to the field of fluvial morphology.

  5. Mariner 6 and 7 ultraviolet spectrometer experiment - Photometry and topography of Mars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    From data obtained by the ultraviolet spectrometers aboard the Mariner 6 and 7 Mars missions the reflectivity of the illuminated disk of Mars was found to have two distinct spectral types, associated with polar and nonpolar regions. In this work the characteristic spectrum of nonpolar regions on Mars is discussed. An interpretation of the variation of the intensity at 3050 A due to surface pressure variations is given. A comparison of the ultraviolet observations with pressures inferred by the infrared spectrometer is used to test this interpretation and to determine physical parameters of Mars which lead to the observed reflectance. Earth based pressures obtained by broadening of the one-micron band of CO2 and radar topography are compared with the ultraviolet results.

  6. Characteristics of gravity waves generated by surface topography on Venus - Comparison with the VEGA Balloon results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, R. E.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Schubert, G.; Seiff, A.; Linkin, V. M.; Lipatov, A. N.

    1987-09-01

    Data from the 1985 VEGA Venus Balloon Mission indicate that the mountainous region known as Aphrodite influences atmospheric motions at balloon float altitudes near 54 km, an altitude located within the middle cloud region. It is shown that stationary gravity waves, generated by surface topography and Doppler-shifted by a wind blowing over the terrain, can propagate upward to the middle cloud layers. Under the right circumstances, waves are amplified considerably in excess of their amplification due to the decrease of density with altitude. The additional amplification is due to resonance that results from variations of static stability and mean zonal wind with altitude. Computed atmospheric propagation characteristics, combined with terrain slopes in Aphrodite estimated from Pioneer Venus radar altimeter data, can be sufficient to produce wind amplitudes at 54 km comparable to those observed by the VEGA-2 balloon as it overflew Aphrodite. The dominant waves have horizontal wavelengths of the order of several hundred kilometers.

  7. Solid-state radar transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroff, E. D.; Borkowski, M.; Thomas, H.; Curtis, J.

    The technology and design procedures for introducing transistors into radio transmitters are discussed. The design characteristics of solid-state radar transmitters are described, with emphasis given to power amplifier/modules and devices for summing the output power in space or in an output combiner. Some design issues related to power supplies, pulse waveform amplitude regulation; reliability; and cost; and also considered. Some examples of successful solid-state radar systems are described, including the AN/TPS-59 radar, the AN/SPS-40 system, and the Pave/PAWS phased array radar. Black and white photographs of the different systems are provided.

  8. Digital Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakel, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Reviews research on digital preservation issues, including born-digital and digitally recreated documents. Discusses electronic records research; metadata and other standards; electronic mail; Web-based documents; moving images media; selection of materials for digitization, including primary sources; administrative issues; media stability…

  9. Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    KB Widener; K Johnson

    2005-01-30

    The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

  10. Current and future use of TOPSAR digital topographic data for volcanological research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Rowland, Scott K.; Garbeil, Harold

    1993-01-01

    In several investigations of volcanoes, high quality digital elevation models (DEM's) are required to study either the geometry of the volcano or to investigate temporal changes in relief due to eruptions. Examples include the analysis of volume changes of a volcanic dome, the prediction of flow paths for pyroclastic flows, and the quantitative investigation of the geometry of valleys carved by volcanic mudflows. Additionally, to provide input data for models of lava flow emplacement, accurate measurements are needed of the thickness of lava flows as a function of distance from the vent and local slope. Visualization of volcano morphology is also aided by the ability to view a DEM from oblique perspectives. Until recently, the generation of these DEM's has required either high resolution stereo air photographs or extensive field surveying using the Global Positioning System (GPS) and other field techniques. Through the use of data collected by the NASA/JPL TOPSAR system, it is now possible to remotely measure the topography of volcanoes using airborne radar interferometry. TOPSAR data can be collected day or night under any weather conditions, thereby avoiding the problems associated with the derivation of DEM's from air photographs that may often contain clouds. Here we describe some of our initial work on volcanoes using TOPSAR data for Mt. Hekla (Iceland) and Vesuvius (Italy). We also outline various TOPSAR topographic studies of volcanoes in the Galapagos and Hawaii that will be conducted in the near future, describe how TOPSAR complements the volcanology investigations to be conducted with orbital radars (SIR-C/X-SAR, JERS-1 and ERS-1), and place these studies into the broader context of NASA's Global Change Program.

  11. Removing interfering clutter associated with radar pulses that an airborne radar receives from a radar transponder

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C. (Albuquerque, NM); Axline, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-12-02

    Interfering clutter in radar pulses received by an airborne radar system from a radar transponder can be suppressed by developing a representation of the incoming echo-voltage time-series that permits the clutter associated with predetermined parts of the time-series to be estimated. These estimates can be used to estimate and suppress the clutter associated with other parts of the time-series.

  12. Planetary radar studies. [radar mapping of the Moon and radar signatures of lunar and Venus craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Cutts, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Progress made in studying the evolution of Venusian craters and the evolution of infrared and radar signatures of lunar crater interiors is reported. Comparison of radar images of craters on Venus and the Moon present evidence for a steady state Venus crater population. Successful observations at the Arecibo Observatory yielded good data on five nights when data for a mix of inner and limb areas were acquired. Lunar craters with radar bright ejects are discussed. An overview of infrared radar crater catalogs in the data base is included.

  13. Statistical characteristics of simulated radar imagery from bare soil surfaces: Effects of surface roughness and soil moisture variability

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, R.M.; Rundquist, D.C. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)); Pardipuram, R. (Hughes STX Corp., Lanham, MD (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The potential of high-resolution radar imagery to estimate various hydrological parameters, such as soil moisture, has long been recognized. Image simulation is one approach to study the interrelationships between the radar response and the underlying ground parameters. In order to perform realistic simulations, the authors incorporated the effects of naturally occurring spatial variability and spatial correlations of those ground parameters that affect the radar response, primarily surface roughness and soil moisture. Surface roughness and soil moisture images were generated for a hypothetical 100 x 100 m bare soil surface area at 1 m resolution using valid probability distribution and correlation lengths, These values were then used to obtain copolarized radar scattering coefficients at 2 GHz (L band) and 10 GHz (X band) frequencies using appropriate backscatter models, which were then converted to a digital number within 0--255 gray scale in order to generate radar images. The effect of surface roughness variability causes variability in the radar image, which is more apparent under smooth soil conditions. On the other hand, the inherent spatial pattern in soil moisture tends to cause similar patterns in the radar image under rougher soil conditions. The maximum difference between contrast-enhanced mean values of the radar image digital number due to moisture variations occurs at surface roughness values in the 1.5--2.0 cm range.

  14. Digital Sustainability and Digital Repositories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin Bradley

    The tasks associated with managing and backing up digital data are well known to IT managers, but the mere presence of the data stream is not the only criterion for preserving and maintaining digital content. Digital sustainability recognises that the continuity of digital information goes well beyond basic storing and managing of data and is integrated into the lifecycle of

  15. Carbon contamination topography analysis of EUV masks

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.-J.; Yankulin, L.; Thomas, P.; Mbanaso, C.; Antohe, A.; Garg, R.; Wang, Y.; Murray, T.; Wuest, A.; Goodwin, F.; Huh, S.; Cordes, A.; Naulleau, P.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Gullikson, E.; Denbeaux, G.

    2010-03-12

    The impact of carbon contamination on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks is significant due to throughput loss and potential effects on imaging performance. Current carbon contamination research primarily focuses on the lifetime of the multilayer surfaces, determined by reflectivity loss and reduced throughput in EUV exposure tools. However, contamination on patterned EUV masks can cause additional effects on absorbing features and the printed images, as well as impacting the efficiency of cleaning process. In this work, several different techniques were used to determine possible contamination topography. Lithographic simulations were also performed and the results compared with the experimental data.

  16. Bessel Function Model for Corneal Topography

    E-print Network

    Okrasi?ski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a new nonlinear mathematical model for corneal topography formulated as two-point boudary value problem. We derive it from first physical principles and provide some mathematical analysis. The existence and uniqeness theorems are proved as well as various estimates on exact solution. At the end we fit the simplified model based on Modified Bessel Function of the First Kind with the real corneal data consisting of matrix of 123x123 points and obtain an error of order of 1%.

  17. Welcome to Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Richard

    2013-11-01

    I am delighted to welcome readers to this inaugural issue of Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties (STMP). In these days of citation indexes and academic reviews, it is a tough, and maybe a brave, job to start a new journal. But the subject area has never been more active and we are seeing genuine breakthroughs in the use of surfaces to control functional performance. Most manufactured parts rely on some form of control of their surface characteristics. The surface is usually defined as that feature on a component or device, which interacts with either the environment in which it is housed (or in which the device operates), or with another surface. The surface topography and material characteristics of a part can affect how fluids interact with it, how the part looks and feels and how two bearing parts will slide together. The need to control, and hence measure, surface features is becoming increasingly important as we move into a miniaturized world. Surface features can become the dominant functional features of a part and may become large in comparison to the overall size of an object. Research into surface texture measurement and characterization has been carried out for over a century and is now more active than ever, especially as new areal surface texture specification standards begin to be introduced. The range of disciplines for which the function of a surface relates to its topography is very diverse; from metal sheet manufacturing to art restoration, from plastic electronics to forensics. Until now, there has been no obvious publishing venue to bring together all these applications with the underlying research and theory, or to unite those working in academia with engineering and industry. Hence the creation of Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties . STMP will publish the best work being done across this broad discipline in one journal, helping researchers to share common themes and highlighting and promoting the extraordinary benefits this field yields across an array of applications in the modern world. To this end, we have gathered leading experts from across our scope to form our inaugural editorial board. Their broad subject knowledge and experience will help to guide the journal and ensure we meet our goal of high-quality research, published quickly, across the breadth of the subject. We are committed to providing a rapid and yet rigorous peer review process. As a launch promotion, all STMP's published content will be free to readers during 2013. The editorial board and I hope you will be as excited by the possibilities of this new journal as we are, and that you will choose to both submit your research and read STMP in the months and years to come. We look forward to reading your papers!

  18. A Comparison of Digital Elevation Models to Accurately Predict Stream Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowbridge, Spencer

    Three separate digital elevation models (DEMs) were compared in their ability to predict stream locations. The first DEM from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission had a resolution of 90 meters, the second DEM from the National Elevation Dataset had a resolution of 30 meters, and the third DEM was created from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data and had a resolution of 4.34 meters. Ultimately, stream locations were created from these DEMs and compared to the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and stream channels traced from aerial photographs. Each bank of the named streams of the Papillion Creek Watershed were traced and samples were obtained that represent error in the placement of the derived stream locations. Measurements were taken from the centerline of the traced stream channels to where orthogonal transects intersected with the derived stream channel of the DEMs and the streams of the NHD. This study found that DEMs with differing resolutions will delineate stream channels differently and that without human assistance in processing elevation data, the finest resolution DEM was not the best at reproducing stream locations.

  19. Mountains on Titan observed by Cassini Radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radebaugh, J.; Lorenz, R.D.; Kirk, R.L.; Lunine, J.I.; Stofan, E.R.; Lopes, R.M.C.; Wall, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar mapper has observed elevated blocks and ridge-forming block chains on Saturn's moon Titan demonstrating high topography we term "mountains." Summit flanks measured from the T3 (February 2005) and T8 (October 2005) flybys have a mean maximum slope of 37?? and total elevations up to 1930 m as derived from a shape-from-shading model corrected for the probable effects of image resolution. Mountain peak morphologies and surrounding, diffuse blankets give evidence that erosion has acted upon these features, perhaps in the form of fluvial runoff. Possible formation mechanisms for these mountains include crustal compressional tectonism and upthrusting of blocks, extensional tectonism and formation of horst-and-graben, deposition as blocks of impact ejecta, or dissection and erosion of a preexisting layer of material. All above processes may be at work, given the diversity of geology evident across Titan's surface. Comparisons of mountain and blanket volumes and erosion rate estimates for Titan provide a typical mountain age as young as 20-100 million years. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mountains on Titan observed by Cassini Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, Jani; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Stofan, Ellen R.; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Wall, Stephen D.; the Cassini Radar Team

    2007-12-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar mapper has observed elevated blocks and ridge-forming block chains on Saturn's moon Titan demonstrating high topography we term "mountains." Summit flanks measured from the T3 (February 2005) and T8 (October 2005) flybys have a mean maximum slope of 37° and total elevations up to 1930 m as derived from a shape-from-shading model corrected for the probable effects of image resolution. Mountain peak morphologies and surrounding, diffuse blankets give evidence that erosion has acted upon these features, perhaps in the form of fluvial runoff. Possible formation mechanisms for these mountains include crustal compressional tectonism and upthrusting of blocks, extensional tectonism and formation of horst-and-graben, deposition as blocks of impact ejecta, or dissection and erosion of a preexisting layer of material. All above processes may be at work, given the diversity of geology evident across Titan's surface. Comparisons of mountain and blanket volumes and erosion rate estimates for Titan provide a typical mountain age as young as 20-100 million years.