Science.gov

Sample records for radar station evaluation

  1. Evaluation of radar and automatic weather station data assimilation for a heavy rainfall event in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Tuanjie; Kong, Fanyou; Chen, Xunlai; Lei, Hengchi; Hu, Zhaoxia

    2015-07-01

    To improve the accuracy of short-term (0-12 h) forecasts of severe weather in southern China, a real-time storm-scale forecasting system, the Hourly Assimilation and Prediction System (HAPS), has been implemented in Shenzhen, China. The forecasting system is characterized by combining the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model and the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVAR) package. It is capable of assimilating radar reflectivity and radial velocity data from multiple Doppler radars as well as surface automatic weather station (AWS) data. Experiments are designed to evaluate the impacts of data assimilation on quantitative precipitation forecasting (QPF) by studying a heavy rainfall event in southern China. The forecasts from these experiments are verified against radar, surface, and precipitation observations. Comparison of echo structure and accumulated precipitation suggests that radar data assimilation is useful in improving the short-term forecast by capturing the location and orientation of the band of accumulated rainfall. The assimilation of radar data improves the short-term precipitation forecast skill by up to 9 hours by producing more convection. The slight but generally positive impact that surface AWS data has on the forecast of near-surface variables can last up to 6-9 hours. The assimilation of AWS observations alone has some benefit for improving the Fractions Skill Score (FSS) and bias scores; when radar data are assimilated, the additional AWS data may increase the degree of rainfall overprediction.

  2. Long-Range Radar Station and Landfill

    This oblique aerial photograph from 2006 shows the Barter Island long-range radar station landfill threatened by coastal erosion. The landfill was subsequently relocated further inland, however, the coastal bluffs continue to retreat. ...

  3. Location plan for Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Location plan for Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5, October 8, 1943 - Fort Barry, Signal Corps Radar 296, Station 5, Transmitter Building Foundation, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  4. Comparison Between Radar and Automatic Weather Station Refractivity Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallali, Ruben; Dalaudier, Francis; Parent du Chatelet, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    Weather radars measure changes in the refractive index of air in the atmospheric boundary layer. The technique uses the phase of signals from ground targets located around the radar to provide information on atmospheric refractivity related to meteorological quantities such as temperature, pressure and humidity. The approach has been successfully implemented during several field campaigns using operational S-band radars in Canada, UK, USA and France. In order to better characterize the origins of errors, a recent study has simulated temporal variations of refractivity based on Automatic Weather Station (AWS) measurements. This reveals a stronger variability of the refractivity during the summer and in the afternoon when the refractivity is the most sensitive to humidity, probably because of turbulence close to the ground. This raises the possibility of retrieving information on the turbulent state of the atmosphere from the variability in radar refractivity. An analysis based on a 1-year dataset from the operational C-band radar at Trappes (near Paris, France) and AWS refractivity variability measurements was used to measure those temporal and spatial variabilities. Particularly during summer, a negative bias increasing with range is observed between radar and AWS estimations, and is well explained by a model based on Taylor's hypotheses. The results demonstrate the possibility of establishing, depending on season, a quantitative and qualitative link between radar and AWS refractivity variability that reflects low-level coherent turbulent structures.

  5. Performance of radar wind profilers, radiosondes, and surface flux stations at the SGP CART site

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, R.L.; Lesht, B.M.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Holdridge, D.J.; Martin, T.J.

    1995-06-01

    The performance of several routinely operating observational systems at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site has been evaluated. The results of a few specific investigations are shown here for Radar Wind Profilers (RWPs) and Radio Acoustic Sounding Systems (RASSs), Balloon-Borne Sounding Systems (BBSSs), and Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) stations.

  6. Tropical rain mapping radar on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Li, Fuk

    1989-01-01

    The conceptual design for a tropical rain mapping radar for flight on the manned Space Station is discussed. In this design the radar utilizes a narrow, dual-frequency (9.7 GHz and 24.1 GHz) beam, electronically scanned antenna to achieve high spatial (4 km) and vertical (250 m) resolutions and a relatively large (800 km) cross-track swath. An adaptive scan strategy will be used for better utilization of radar energy and dwell time. Such a system can detect precipitation at rates of up to 100 mm/hr with accuracies of roughly 15 percent. With the proposed space-time sampling strategy, the monthly averaged rainfall rate can be estimated to within 8 percent, which is essential for many climatological studies.

  7. 2-D inner-shelf current observations from a single VHF WEllen RAdar (WERA) station

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voulgaris, G.; Kumar, N.; Gurgel, K.-W.; Warner, J.C.; List, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of High Frequency (HF) radars used worldwide operate at medium to high frequencies (8 to 30 MHz) providing spatial resolutions ranging from 3 to 1.5 km and ranges from 150 to 50 km. This paper presents results from the deployment of a single Very High Frequency (VHF, 48 MHz) WEllen RAdar (WERA) radar with spatial resolution of 150 m and range 10-15 km, used in the nearshore off Cape Hatteras, NC, USA. It consisted of a linear array of 12 antennas operating in beam forming mode. Radial velocities were estimated from radar backscatter for a variety of wind and nearshore wave conditions. A methodology similar to that used for converting acoustically derived beam velocities to an orthogonal system is presented for obtaining 2-D current fields from a single station. The accuracy of the VHF radar-derived radial velocities is examined using a new statistical technique that evaluates the system over the range of measured velocities. The VHF radar velocities showed a bias of 3 to 7 cm/s over the experimental period explainable by the differences in radar penetration and in-situ measurement height. The 2-D current field shows good agreement with the in-situ measurements. Deviations and inaccuracies are well explained by the geometric dilution analysis. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  8. View of Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5 Transmitter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5 Transmitter Building foundation, showing Fire Control Stations (Buildings 621 and 622) and concrete stairway (top left) camera facing southwest - Fort Barry, Signal Corps Radar 296, Station 5, Transmitter Building Foundation, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  9. Topography adjacent to Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Topography adjacent to Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5, showing conditions before construction, May 28, 1943, this drawing shows the Bonita Ridge access road retaining wall and general conditions at Bonita Ridge before the construction of Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5 - Fort Barry, Signal Corps Radar 296, Station 5, Transmitter Building Foundation, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  10. View looking down on Signcal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking down on Signcal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5 Transmitter Building foundation from ridge, camera facing south - Fort Barry, Signal Corps Radar 296, Station 5, Transmitter Building Foundation, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  11. Telescope Array Radar (TARA) Remote Station Design and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Samridha

    2014-03-01

    The TARA project is a novel attempt utilizing a bi - static radar configuration in conjunction with a set of conventional cosmic ray detectors in the low - noise environment in Millard County, Utah, to detect Ultra - High Energy Cosmic Ray induced Extensive Air Showers. We present the design and development of the remote radar receiver system using a technique where the Doppler-shifted reflected signal off of the ionization trail from the cosmic ray is de - chirped. The approach is based on an analog frequency mixing technique whereby the input signal is mixed with a delayed copy of itself i.e s (t) ⊗ s (t - τ) , resulting in a beat frequency, f, which is proportional to the delay time multiplied by the cosmic ray-induced RF chirp rate. With appropriate filtering, the problem of chirp detection is ultimately reduced to that of detecting the down - converted monotone. In contrast to conventional signal processing via digital matched filtering, this is a mostly analog data acquisition system and has lower power consumption at a cost which is also comparatively inexpensive. The remote station is also subject to less radio interference, and adds stereoscopic measurement capabilities which allows unique determination of cosmic ray geometry and core location.

  12. Bird Activity Analysis Using Avian Radar Information in Naval Air Station airport, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Herricks, E.

    2010-12-01

    The number of bird strikes on aircraft has increased sharply over recent years and airport bird hazard management has gained increasing attention in wildlife management and control. Evaluation of bird activity near airport is very critical to analyze the hazard of bird strikes. Traditional methods for bird activity analysis using visual counting provide a direct approach to bird hazard assessment. However this approach is limited to daylight and good visual conditions. Radar has been proven to be a useful and effective tool for bird detection and movement analysis. Radar eliminates observation bias and supports consistent data collection for bird activity analysis and hazard management. In this study bird activity data from the Naval Air Station Whidbey Island was collected by Accipiter Avian Radar System. Radar data was pre-processed by filtering out non-bird noises, including traffic vehicle, aircraft, insects, wind, rainfall, ocean waves and so on. Filtered data is then statistically analyzed using MATLAB programs. The results indicated bird movement dynamics in target areas near the airport, which includes (1) the daily activity varied at dawn and dusk; (2) bird activity varied by target area due to the habitat difference; and (3) both temporal and spatial movement patterns varied by bird species. This bird activity analysis supports bird hazard evaluation and related analysis and modeling to provide very useful information in airport bird hazard management planning.

  13. Application of ground-penetrating radar at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory initiated a site investigation program at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, to characterize environmental contamination. The performance and usefulness of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) was evaluated under antarctic conditions during the initial site investigation in January 1991. Preliminary surveys were successful in defining the contact between reworked pyroclastic material and in the prefill, undisturbed pyroclastics and basalts at some sites. Interference from radio traffic at McMurdo Station was not observed, but interference was a problem in work with unshielded antennas near buildings. In general, the results of this field test suggest that high-quality, high-resolution, continuous subsurface profiles can be produced with GPR over most of McMurdo Station.

  14. Application of ground-penetrating radar at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano, J.E.

    1992-05-01

    Argonne National Laboratory initiated a site investigation program at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, to characterize environmental contamination. The performance and usefulness of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) was evaluated under antarctic conditions during the initial site investigation in January 1991. Preliminary surveys were successful in defining the contact between reworked pyroclastic material and in the prefill, undisturbed pyroclastics and basalts at some sites. Interference from radio traffic at McMurdo Station was not observed, but interference was a problem in work with unshielded antennas near buildings. In general, the results of this field test suggest that high-quality, high-resolution, continuous subsurface profiles can be produced with GPR over most of McMurdo Station.

  15. Science program for an imaging radar receiving station in Alaska. Report of the science working group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    It is argued that there would be broad scientific benefit in establishing in Alaska an imaging radar receiving station that would collect data from the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing Satellite, ERS-1. This station would acquire imagery of the ice cover from the American territorial waters of the Beaufort, Chukchi, and Bering Seas. This station, in conjunction with similar stations proposed for Kiruna, Sweden, and Prince Albert, Canada would provide synoptic coverage of nearly the entire Arctic. The value of such coverage to aspects of oceanography, geology, glaciology, and botany is considered.

  16. Direct evaluation of radar detection probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiu-Ying; Morinaga, Norihiko; Namekawa, Toshihiko

    1987-07-01

    A simple and effective procedure for evaluating detection performances in radar and sonar detection problems is derived for both fixed-threshold and adaptive-threshold detection. Using the procedure, the cumulative probabilities of the test statistic can be directly evaluated from the moment generating functions by calculating residues. The exact formulas for computing the detection performances for the chi-square family of fluctuating targets with an integer fluctuation parameter are given in a finite sum form without any special functions for both fixed threshold and cell-average constant false-alarm rate detection by using the method developed here.

  17. Ground penetrating radar field evaluation in Angola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Richard; Brown, Todd; Clodfelter, Fred; Coors, Jeff; Laudato, Stephen; Lauziere, Steve; Patrikar, Ajay; Poole, Michael; Price, Mike

    2006-05-01

    Deminers around the globe are still using handheld metal detectors that lack the capability to distinguish mines from clutter, detect mines containing very little metal, or find mines buried at deeper depths. In the southern African country of Angola, many areas and roads are impassable due to the threat of anti-tank landmines. Some of these mines are undetectable using current metal detector technology. The US Army has funded the development of the NIITEK ground penetrating radar (GPR) for detection of anti-tank (AT) landmines. This radar detects metal and plastic mines as well as mines that are buried too deep for handheld metal detectors to find. The US Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining (HD) Research & Development Program focuses on developing, testing, demonstrating, and validating new technology for immediate use in humanitarian demining operations around the globe. The HD team provided funding and guidance to NIITEK Incorporated for development of a prototype system called Mine Stalker - a relatively light-weight, remote-controlled vehicle outfitted with the NIITEK GPR, detection algorithms, and a marking system. Individuals from the HD team, NIITEK Inc, and the non-governmental organization Meschen Gegen Minen (MgM) participated in a field evaluation of the Mine Stalker in Angola. The primary aim was to evaluate the effectiveness and reliability of the NIITEK GPR under field conditions. The Mine Stalker was extremely reliable during the evaluation with no significant maintenance issues. All AT mines used to verify GPR performance were detected, even when buried to depths as deep as 25-33cm.

  18. Pavement thickness evaluation using ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Dwayne Arthur

    Accurate knowledge of pavement thickness is important information to have both at a network and project level. This information aids in pavement management and design. Much of the time this information is missing, out of date, or unknown for highway sections. Current technologies for determining pavement thickness are core drilling, falling weight deflectometer (FWD), and ground penetrating radar (GPR). Core drilling provides very accurate pin point pavement thickness information; however, it is also time consuming, labor intensive, intrusive to traffic, destructive, and limited in coverage. FWD provides nondestructive estimates of both a surface thickness and total pavement structure thickness, including pavement, base and sub-base. On the other hand, FWD is intrusive to traffic and affected by the limitations and assumptions the method used to estimate thickness. GPR provides pavement surface course thickness estimates with excellent data coverage at highway speed. Yet, disadvantages include the pavement thickness estimation being affected by the electrical properties of the pavement, limitations of the system utilized, and heavy post processing of the data. Nevertheless, GPR has been successfully utilized by a number of departments of transportation (DOTs) for pavement thickness evaluation. This research presents the GPR thickness evaluation methods, develops GPRPAVZ the software used to implement the methodologies, and addresses the quality of GPR pavement thickness evaluation.

  19. Performance evaluation of ground based radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Stanley E.

    1994-06-01

    Ground based radar systems are a critical resource to the command, control, and communications system. This thesis provides the tools and methods to better understand the actual performance of an operational ground based radar system. This thesis defines two measurable performance standards: (1) the baseline performance, which is based on the sensor's internal characteristics, and (2) the theoretical performance, which considers not only the sensor's internal characteristics, but also the effects of the surrounding terrain and atmosphere on the sensor's performance. The baseline radar system performance, often used by operators, contractors, and radar modeling software to determine the expected system performance, is a simplistic and unrealistic means to predict actual radar system performance. The theoretical radar system performance is more complex; but, the results are much more indicative of the actual performance of an operational radar system. The AN/UPS-1 at the Naval Postgraduate School was used as the system under test to illustrate the baseline and theoretical radar system performance. The terrain effects are shown by performing a multipath study and producing coverage diagrams. The key variables used to construct the multipath study and coverage diagrams are discussed in detail. The atmospheric effects are illustrated by using the Integrated Refractive Effects Prediction System (IREPS) and the Engineer's Refractive Effects Prediction System (EREPS) software tools to produce propagations conditions summaries and coverage displays.

  20. Maintenance evaluation for space station liquid systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flugel, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Many of the thermal and environmental control life support subsystems as well as other subsystems of the space station utilize various liquids and contain components which are either expendables or are life-limited in some way. Since the space station has a 20-year minimum orbital lifetime requirement, there will also be random failures occurring within the various liquid-containing subsystems. These factors as well as the planned space station build-up sequence require that maintenance concepts be developed prior to the design phase. This applies to the equipment which needs maintenance as well as the equipment which may be required at a maintenance work station within the space station. This paper presents several maintenance concepts for liquid-containing items and a flight experiment program which would allow for evaluation and improvement of these concepts so they can be incorporated in the space station designs at the outset of its design phase.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories land use permit for operations at Oliktok Alaska Long Range Radar Station.

    SciTech Connect

    Catechis, Christopher Spyros

    2013-02-01

    The property subject to this Environmental Baseline Survey (EBS) is located at the Oliktok Long Range Radar Station (LRRS). The Oliktok LRRS is located at 70%C2%B0 30' W latitude, 149%C2%B0 53' W longitude. It is situated at Oliktok Point on the shore of the Beaufort Sea, east of the Colville River. The purpose of this EBS is to document the nature, magnitude, and extent of any environmental contamination of the property; identify potential environmental contamination liabilities associated with the property; develop sufficient information to assess the health and safety risks; and ensure adequate protection for human health and the environment related to a specific property.

  2. The evaluation of satellite-borne weather radar system designs using real ground-based radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, E. B.; Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents method of evaluating proposed satellite radar systems using real radar data, and discusses methods of displaying the results which will hopefully facilitate easy comparison of systems. A single pencil beam pulsed radar system is considered while the precipitation data base comes from six rain days observed by SPANDAR. The many additional factors that must be considered in the radar equation such as attenuation and scattering (Mie and Rayleigh) are discussed along with some indication where possible errors lie.

  3. Evaluation of momentum flux with radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggin, Dennis M.; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Shinbori, Atsuki

    2016-05-01

    The statistics of gravity wave momentum flux estimation are investigated using data from the MU radar at Shigariki, Japan (136°E, 35°N). The radar has been operating during campaign periods since 1986. The first part of the paper focuses on a multi-day campaign during October 13-31, 1986. The second part of the paper investigates data after 2006 when the radar was operated in a meteor scatter mode. Momentum fluxes are derived from both the turbulent scatter and the meteor scatter measurements, but the techniques are quite different. Probability Distribution Functions are formed using turbulent scatter data. These show that wave packets sometimes have momentum flux magnitudes in excess of 100 m2 s-2. The technique for meteor radars, introduced by Hocking (2005), has been widely adopted by the radar community in recent years. The momentum flux estimated using this technique is found to be anti-correlated with the background tidal winds. A validation investigation is carried out for periods with a high meteor echo data rate. The conclusion was that the method can be used to calculate the sign of momentum flux, but does not accurately specify the magnitude.

  4. Evaluation of Various Radar Data Quality Control Algorithms Based on Accumulated Radar Rainfall Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Michael; Steiner, Matthias; Wolff, David B.; Ferrier, Brad S.; Kessinger, Cathy; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The primary function of the TRMM Ground Validation (GV) Program is to create GV rainfall products that provide basic validation of satellite-derived precipitation measurements for select primary sites. A fundamental and extremely important step in creating high-quality GV products is radar data quality control. Quality control (QC) processing of TRMM GV radar data is based on some automated procedures, but the current QC algorithm is not fully operational and requires significant human interaction to assure satisfactory results. Moreover, the TRMM GV QC algorithm, even with continuous manual tuning, still can not completely remove all types of spurious echoes. In an attempt to improve the current operational radar data QC procedures of the TRMM GV effort, an intercomparison of several QC algorithms has been conducted. This presentation will demonstrate how various radar data QC algorithms affect accumulated radar rainfall products. In all, six different QC algorithms will be applied to two months of WSR-88D radar data from Melbourne, Florida. Daily, five-day, and monthly accumulated radar rainfall maps will be produced for each quality-controlled data set. The QC algorithms will be evaluated and compared based on their ability to remove spurious echoes without removing significant precipitation. Strengths and weaknesses of each algorithm will be assessed based on, their abilit to mitigate both erroneous additions and reductions in rainfall accumulation from spurious echo contamination and true precipitation removal, respectively. Contamination from individual spurious echo categories will be quantified to further diagnose the abilities of each radar QC algorithm. Finally, a cost-benefit analysis will be conducted to determine if a more automated QC algorithm is a viable alternative to the current, labor-intensive QC algorithm employed by TRMM GV.

  5. Radar Evaluation of Optical Cloud Constraints to Space Launch Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis J.; Short, David A.; Ward, Jennifer G.

    2005-01-01

    Weather constraints to launching space vehicles are designed to prevent loss of the vehicle or mission due to weather hazards (See, e.g., Ref 1). Constraints include Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LLCC) designed to avoid natural and triggered lightning. The LLCC currently in use at most American launch sites including the Eastern Range and Kennedy Space Center require the Launch Weather Officer to determine the height of cloud bases and tops, the location of cloud edges, and cloud transparency. The preferred method of making these determinations is visual observation, but when that isn't possible due to darkness or obscured vision, it is permissible to use radar. This note examines the relationship between visual and radar observations in three ways: A theoretical consideration of the relationship between radar reflectivity and optical transparency. An observational study relating radar reflectivity to cloud edge determined from in-situ measurements of cloud particle concentrations that determine the visible cloud edge. An observational study relating standard radar products to anvil cloud transparency. It is shown that these three approaches yield results consistent with each other and with the radar threshold specified in Reference 2 for LLCC evaluation.

  6. Solvent extraction treatment of PCB contaminated soil at Sparrevohn Long Range Radar Station, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, L.D.

    1999-07-01

    This technical paper describes an on-site soil treatment project at the Sparrevohn Long-Range Radar Station (LRRS), Alaska. The project was conducted during the summer of 1996. Sparrevohn LLRS is located approximately 200 miles west of Anchorage, Alaska and is accessible only by aircraft. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) contaminated soil containing between 50 and 350 milligrams/kilogram (mg/kg) was stockpiled on-site. Terra Kleen Response Group, Inc.'s (Terra Kleen's) solvent extraction process successfully treated the stockpiled PCB contaminated soil ({approximately}290 yd{sup 3}). The PCB concentrations in the treated soil were reduced below the target treatment level of 15 mg/kg. On-site solvent extraction treatment realized considerable savings ({gt}$1,000,000) to the Government over the traditional method of hauling and off-site disposal.

  7. Low-latitude Pi2 Pulsations observed by an FM-CW Radar and CPMN Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, A.; Yumoto, K.; Uozumi, T.; Shinohara, M.; Nozaki, K.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2008-12-01

    At the onset of magnetospheric substorms, impulsive hydromagnetic oscillations occur globally in the magnetosphere with a period range from 40 to 150 seconds [e.g. Saito, 1968]. They are called Pi 2 magnetic pulsations. Pi 2 has been studied with arrays of magnetometers on the ground and with in-situ observation by satellites [e.g. Yumoto, 2001]. However characteristics of Pi 2 electric pulsations in the low-latitude ionosphere have not been clearly identified yet. We have focused on measuring the Pi 2 electric pulsations by an FM-CW (Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave) radar and clarify their characteristics. In order to detect the ionospheric electric fields, we built a FM-CW (HF) radar at Sasaguri (Magnetic Latitude: 23.2 degree, Magnetic Longitude: 199.6 degree), Fukuoka, Japan in 2002. The radar provides the Doppler shift of launched wave frequencies, which corresponds to the height variation of the ionosphere, with a high- time resolution of 3 sec. When the eastward (westward) electric field penetrates into the low-latitude ionosphere, it drifts upward (downward) through the ExB drift. Thus, using the FM-CW radar we can measure east-west electric fields (Ey) in the ionosphere [see Ikeda et al., 2008]. In this study, we also used geomagnetic field data BH at Kujyu (KUJ; M. Lat. 23.6 degree, M. Lon. 203.2 degree), a part of Circum-pan Pacific Magnetic Network (CPMN) stations [cf., Yumoto et al., 2001]. The first Pi 2 event was observed at KUJ and Sasaguri simultaneously at 1332 UT (2232 LT) on 6 November, 2003. Also positive bay was detected in the H-component (BH) at KUJ. The dominant frequencies of the electric field Ey and magnetic field BH were identical. From a cross-correlation analysis between the BH at KUJ and Ey at Sasaguri, we found that the correlation coefficient is 0.80 and phase delay is about -100 degree. Takahashi et al. (JGR, 2001) showed the expected phase relation between magnetic field of cavity- mode Pi 2 and associated electric field. Based on their result, we suggest the phase delay of -100 degree indicates that the first Pi 2 event shows a radial mode structure of cavity-mode Pi 2. The second Pi 2 event was observed at 1415 UT (2315 LT) on the same day 6 November, 2003. The dominant frequency of Ey and BH were the same and phase delay is -148 or 39 degree. Since the phase delay is almost -180 or 0 degree, this Pi 2 event can be described by as a propagating mode. Further we analyzed 26 Pi 2 events that were recorded by a CPMN magnetometer at KUJ or Kagoshima (KAG; Magnetic Latitude: 21.9 degree, Magnetic Longitude: 203.2 degree) and the FM-CW radar simultaneously within a period from Nov. 2003 to Apr. 2004. The criteria of the analyzed Pi 2 events are that Pi 2 magnetic amplitude range of the BH is more than 1 nT at KUJ or KAG. In 12 of all 26 Pi 2 events, the dominant frequency of Ey and BH are identical. Moreover we examined the phase delay of 12 Pi 2 events, and found that the only 3 events in midnight sector show the radial mode structure of cavity-mode Pi 2. Other 9 events show a propagating mode of Pi 2. The observed low-latitude Pi 2s are concluded not to be described as a simple standing or propagating mode.

  8. Step-frequency radar imaging for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weedon, William H.; Chew, Weng C.; Ruwe, Chad A.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a step-frequency microwave radar imaging system that is suitable for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) applications. The system includes a computer-automated microwave measurement apparatus along with nonlinear inverse scattering imaging algorithms. Through the use of an inverse Fourier transform, the SFR data is transformed into a synthetic time-domain pulse, and imaging algorithms are applied to the time-domain data. A calibration procedure involving the use of calibration targets is described in order to remove pulse distortions due to the effective aperture and dispersive nature of the antennas, as well as those distortions due to connectors, transmission lines, directional couplers and amplifiers. Reconstructions of various metallic and dielectric scattering objects including metallic rods, glass rods and plastic PVC pipes from real measurement data collected in our laboratory are shown.

  9. United States Air Force 611th air support group, 611th Civil Engineer Squadron, Tin City, Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Final management action plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-20

    The Tin City Long Range Radar Station (LRRS) Management Action Plan (MAP) presents a status summary of environmental restoration and compliance programs, and comprehensive strategies for implementing environmental response actions necessary to protect human health and the environment.

  10. Evaluating and managing Cold War era historic properties : the cultural significance of U.S. Air Force defensive radar systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Whorton, M.

    1999-01-20

    Aircraft and later missile radar early warning stations played an important role in the Cold War. They are associated with important technological, social, political, and military themes of the Cold War and are worthy of preservation. The scope and scale of these systems make physical preservation impractical, but the U.S. Air Force program of historical evaluation and documentation of these systems will provide valuable information to future generations studying this historic period.

  11. Flight test evaluation of a video tracker for enhanced offshore airborne radar approach capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clary, G. R.; Cooper, P. G.

    1982-01-01

    As a part of NASA's Rotorcraft All-Weather Operations Research Program, advanced airborne radar approach (ARA) concepts are being investigated. Since data from previous NASA/FAA flight tests showed significant ARA limitations, a research program was initiated at NASA Ames Research Center to determine the benefit that could be derived by automating certain radar functions and superimposing course display data on the radar display. To evaluate these concepts, a newly developed video tracking system which interfaces with weather radar was acquired. After the pilot designates a destination target, the system tracks the target video as it moves on the radar indicator. Using a small, efficient microprocessor, the autotracker presents valuable approach data on the radar screen and automatically adjusts the radar gain and tilt. Results of a limited flight test evaluation of the autotracker show that the course display concept, combined with automated gain and tilt functions, is effective for improving ARA's and reducing radar operator workload.

  12. Pi 2 Pulsations observed at the FM-CW Radar and MAGDAS station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, A.; Yumoto, K.; Uozumi, T.; Shinohara, M.; Nozaki, K.; Yoshikawa, A.; Bychkov, V.; Shevtsov, B.

    2009-12-01

    At the onset of magnetospheric substorms, Pi 2 pulsations occur globally in the magnetosphere with a period range from 40 to 150 seconds [e.g. Saito, 1968]. Pi 2 has been studied with arrays of magnetometers on the ground and with in-situ observation by satellites [e.g., Yumoto et al., 2001]. However, analysis of Pi 2 electric pulsations in the ionosphere is limited. In this study, we have focused on the phase relationship between the ionospheric Doppler velocity in the F-region detected by an FM-CW (Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave) radar and the magnetic Pi 2 pulsations observed by MAGDAS (the MAGnetic Data Acquisition System) [Yumoto and the MAGDAS Group, 2006 and 2007] at station PTK (Magnetic Latitude: 45.8 degree, Magnetic Longitude: 221.6 degree, L=2.05). During Sep., 2006 to Nov., 2007, we found about 100 Pi 2 events which (1) show high correlation coefficient between the Doppler Velocity (V) and magnetic H component (H), and (2) whose dominant frequency of V and H is the same in the local midnight sector (18-06 LT). The phase delay between V and H depends on LT and shows almost -90 degree in the local time sector of 21-06 LT By assuming that the V is owing to the eastward pulsation electric field (Ey), the phase relation of -90 degree can be explained by the radial standing wave, i.e., cavity mode oscillation suggested by Takahashi et al. [JGR, 2001]. On the other hand, Pi 2 pulsations may arise from a different mechanism in other local time sectors.

  13. Terminal Doppler weather radar operational test and evaluation, Orlando 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernella, David M.

    1991-04-01

    Lincoln Laboratory conducted an evaluation of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) system in Orlando, Florida during the summer of 1990. In previous years, evaluations have been conducted at airports in Kansas City, MO (1989) and Denver, CO (1988). Since the testing at the Kansas City International Airport, the radar was modified to operate in C-band, which is the intended frequency band for the production TDWR systems. The objectives of the 1990 evaluation period were to evaluate TDWR system performance in detecting low-altitude wind shear, specifically microbursts and gust fronts, at the Orlando International Airport and in the surrounding area; to refine the system's wind shear detection capabilities; and to evaluate elements of the system developed by the contractor, which were new for the C-band system and therefore not available for evaluation in previous years. Some performance comparisons are made among results from the vastly different weather environments of Denver, Kansas City, and Orlando. Statistics are presented and discussed for the performance of the system in detecting and predicting microbursts and gust fronts. A significant use of the prediction capability is its potential use for air traffic control (ATC) personnel to plan airport operations when hazardous weather is predicted. Issues such as low velocity ground clutter (from tree leaves, road traffic, and dense urban areas) that affect prediction performance are discussed along with possible software modification to account for them.

  14. Coordinated MST radar and lidar observations for the study of mesospheric structures over a tropical station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat Ratnam, M.; Narayana Rao, D.; Narayana Rao, T.; Krishnaiah, M.; Bhavani Kumar, Y.; Siva Kumar, V.; Rao, P. B.

    2002-02-01

    VHF radar observations at a frequency of 53MHz at Gadanki /(13.5°N,79.2°E), India, during the period from September 1995 to August 1999 are used to study the tropical mesospheric structures. MST radar echoes have shown an enhancement in echo power of about 6-8dB above the average noise level. These echoes are intermittent in time and can be observed at an altitude between 70 and 76km. The seasonal variation of these echoes shows the maximum percentage occurrence during summer, closely followed by equinoxes and minimum during winter. This seasonal variation is also accompanied by shifting of height to lower heights during winter. Coordinated MST radar and Nd:YAG lidar observations were conducted to study the mesospheric structures during March 1998-June 1999. In the Lidar temperature profiles, inversion of about 20-30K is observed at the heights of the MST radar-enhanced echoes. Enhanced radar reflectivity is observed on both the preceding and succeeding days of lidar observations of strong temperature inversion. Percentage occurrence of MST radar echoes and temperature inversions show one-to-one correspondence for most of the cases. The effect of temperature inversion on the radar reflectivity is also studied. The presence of temperature inversion and enhanced radar reflectivity are discussed in the light of gravity-wave breaking processes at that height region.

  15. Evaluation of TRMM Ground-Validation Radar-Rain Errors Using Rain Gauge Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jianxin; Wolff, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Ground-validation (GV) radar-rain products are often utilized for validation of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spaced-based rain estimates, and hence, quantitative evaluation of the GV radar-rain product error characteristics is vital. This study uses quality-controlled gauge data to compare with TRMM GV radar rain rates in an effort to provide such error characteristics. The results show that significant differences of concurrent radar-gauge rain rates exist at various time scales ranging from 5 min to 1 day, despite lower overall long-term bias. However, the differences between the radar area-averaged rain rates and gauge point rain rates cannot be explained as due to radar error only. The error variance separation method is adapted to partition the variance of radar-gauge differences into the gauge area-point error variance and radar rain estimation error variance. The results provide relatively reliable quantitative uncertainty evaluation of TRMM GV radar rain estimates at various times scales, and are helpful to better understand the differences between measured radar and gauge rain rates. It is envisaged that this study will contribute to better utilization of GV radar rain products to validate versatile spaced-based rain estimates from TRMM, as well as the proposed Global Precipitation Measurement, and other satellites.

  16. Evaluation of radar multiple scattering effects in Cloudsat configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, A.; Ajewole, M. O.; Simmer, C.

    2007-04-01

    MonteCarlo simulations have been performed to evaluate the importance of multiple scattering effects in co- and cross-polar radar returns for 94 GHz radars in Cloudsat and airborne configurations. Thousands of vertically structured profiles derived from some different cloud resolving models are used as a test-bed. Mie theory is used to derive the single scattering properties of the atmospheric hydrometeors. Multiple scattering effects in the co-polar channel (reflectivity enhancement) are particularly elusive, especially in airborne configuration. They can be quite consistent in satellite configurations, like CloudSat, especially in regions of high attenuation and in the presence of highly forward scattering layers associated with snow and graupel particles. When the cross polar returns are analysed [but note that CloudSat does not measure any linear depolarization ratio (LDR hereafter)], high LDR values appear both in space and in airborne configurations. The LDR signatures are footprints of multiple scattering effects; although depolarization values as high as -5 dB can be generated including non-spherical particles in single scattering modelling, multiple scattering computations can produce values close to complete depolarization (i.e. LDR=0 dB). Our simulated LDR profiles from an air-borne platform well reproduce, in a simple frame, some experimental observations collected during the Wakasa Bay experiment. Since LDR instrumental uncertainties were not positively accounted for during that experiment, more focused campaigns with air-borne polarimetric radar are recommended. Multiple scattering effects can be important for CloudSat applications like rainfall and snowfall retrievals since single scattering based algorithms will be otherwise burdened by positive biases.

  17. Determination of U, V, and W from single station Doppler radar radial velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. L.; Green, J. L.; Warnock, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The ST/MST (stratosphere troposphere/mesosphere stratosphere troposphere) clear air Doppler radar, or wind profiler, is an important tool in observational meteorology because of its capability to remote observe dynamic parameters of the atmosphere. There are difficulties in transforming the observed radial velocities into meteorological wind components. How this problem has been treated in the past is reviewed, and some of the analysis is recast to a form more suited to the high diagnostic abilities of a number of fixed beam configurations with reference to a linear wind field. The results, in conjunction with other works which treats problems such as the effects of finite sample volumes in the presence of nonhomogeneous atmospheric reflectivity, have implications important to the design of both individual MST/ST radars and MST/ST radar networks. The key parameters to uncoupling terms in the scaling equations are w sub x and w sub y. Whenever the stratiform condition, which states that these two parameters are negligible, is satisfied, a five beam ST radar may determine unbiased values of u, v, and w for sample volumes directly above the radar. The divergence and partial deformation of the flow may also be determined. Three beam systems can determine w and w sub z, but are unable to obtain u and v wind components uncontaminated by vertical sheer terms, even when the stratiform condition is satisfied.

  18. Night-side DP-2 type fluctuations observed by the FM-CW Radar and MAGDAS stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, A.; Yumoto, K.; Uozumi, T.; Abe, S.; Shinohara, M.; Nozaki, K.; Yoshikawa, A.; Bychkov, V.; Shevtsov, B.; Sugon, Q.; McNamara, D.

    2010-12-01

    DP-2 type fluctuations caused by IMF southward/northward variations have important information about how the solar wind effects are transferred into the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and on the ground. Since dayside ground magnetic field variations are significantly enhanced during DP-2 events, dayside DP-2 fluctuations have been investigated for many years. However night-side DP-2 variations are not yet investigated sufficiently. In this study, we examined night-side magnetic and electric field variations when DP-2 was observed in dayside. Ground data from MAGDAS/CPMN (MAGnetic Data Acqisition System and Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network) stations were analyzed. We also investigated the association of DP-2 with the ionospheric electric fields obtained by the FM-CW (Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave) radar at PTK (M.Lat. = 45.8 degree, M.Lon.= 221.6 degree) and solar wind parameters from the ACE satellite. The amplitudes of night-side DP-2 on 11 Oct., 2008 became greater with increasing of the latitude of 210 MM stations. While there were no Pi 2 pulsations, and signatures of substorms were not detected with the DP 2. At the time, westward electric field was observed by the FM-CW radar in the night-side sector simultaneously with the positive variation of night-side ground magnetic fields. Therefore the night-side DP-2 magnetic fluctuation is found not to be caused by the ionospheric currents.

  19. Analytical evaluation of an ESM/radar track association algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Rajat K.

    1992-08-01

    A number of applications exist for which association of target tracks obtained from different types of sensors is required, and an algorithm to aid the user in performing the association is desired. Depending on the application, the association algorithm must satisfy a set of system requirements, e.g., minimum acceptable probability of correct association, maximum elapsed time for association after target detection or automatic track initiation, maximum acceptable probability of false track-to-track association, etc. Evaluation of such algorithms are usually conducted using time consuming Monte Carlo simulations and are sensitive to the scenarios chosen for this purpose. This paper describes an ESM/radar track association algorithm and an analytical technique to evaluate this algorithm which avoids Monte Carlo simulation. Closed form mathematical expressions for the probabilities of correct association and false correlation are derived. In addition, trade-off studies involving several system parameters are also presented.

  20. Impulse radar evaluation of reinforced concrete bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Charles L.; Chung, T.; Reel, R.; Tharmabala, T.; Wood, D.

    1995-05-01

    The Ministry of Transportation, Ontario has taken a leading role in applying the latest technology to the rehabilitation of bridge decks by developing a system called Deck Assessment by Radar Technology (DART). Impulse radar signals propagate through the bridge deck materials and reflect wherever there is a change in the dielectric properties of the propagation medium. This change in dielectric constant is usually an indication of: an interface, such as the asphalt-concrete boundary; or, a layer of reinforcement; or damaged structure, such as a delamination. In this paper, temporal waveforms obtained from real bridge decks are presented and spectral plots are employed to gain insight to the signal properties. A methodology for the detection of delamination is presented which evaluates the shape of the reflection at the concrete boundary. The results from two actual surveys are presented which highlights measurements of asphalt thickness, cover over reinforcement, and detection of delaminations obtained by DART survey. It is demonstrated that DART survey provides predictions very close to actual deck conditions.

  1. Antenna evaluation study for the shuttle multispectral radar, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, E. L., III; Carver, K. R.

    1977-01-01

    The results of the second phase of the Antenna Evaluation Study for the Shuttle Imaging Radar are presented. The objectives of Phase II were (1) to complete the specifications for the subarray test panels, (2) to begin a study of the effects of electrical and mechanical tolerance variations on overall SIRA performance, (3) to initiate the development of a mathematical model which adequately described the array performance and (4) to begin the development of a comprehensive computer program which will eventually simulate the performance characteristics of the antenna in a spaceborne environment. Items (2), (3), and (4) were begun in Phase I (ahead of schedule), and because of this, it has been possible to accelerate the Phase II modeling/simulation objectives to the point where simulations of expected mechanical/electrical errors have already been produced.

  2. Technology evaluation for space station atmospheric leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Friesel, M.A.; Griffin, J.W.; Skorpik, J.R.; Shepard, C.L.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1990-02-01

    A concern in operation of a space station is leakage of atmosphere through seal points and through the walls as a result of damage from particle (space debris and micrometeoroid) impacts. This report describes a concept for a monitoring system to detect atmosphere leakage and locate the leak point. The concept is based on analysis and testing of two basic methods selected from an initial technology survey of potential approaches. 18 refs., 58 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Comprehensive Testing and Evaluation of the Hydro-NEXRAD Multiple Radar-Rainfall Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, B.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2008-05-01

    Ordinary approaches to quantitatively estimate radar rainfall are based on single radar rainfall processing. Sometimes, limited coverage and beam geometry problems (e.g. blockage and vertical gaps) prevent using single radar data for hydrologic and atmospheric applications. Some of those restrictions can be mitigated by combining data from two or more radars. Merging multiple radar data enables studies that need to cover larger hydrologic units represented by watersheds or basins. However, numerous challenges associated with temporal and spatial synchronization, as well as calibration differences among WSR-88Ds, still remain to be solved. The Hydro-NEXRAD multiple radar rainfall estimation algorithms include two options: (1) data-based merging; and (2) product-based merging. Data-based merging takes reflectivity data from all radars involved through preprocessing algorithm that performs volume scan data quality control, interpolates data to synchronize temporal scale between individual radars, and finally combines data onto a common geographic grid. Reflectivity values for a given location are assigned by a weighting function with respect to the distance from the radar. This single reflectivity field is then converted to rainfall amounts using a user-requested standard approach. In product-based merging reflectivity data from multiple radars are all converted to rainfall using the same, user- specified algorithm. These products are then combined into the final one using a weighting function that expresses the uncertainty of estimated rainfall amounts. The uncertainty model used accounts for effects of range from radar, and rainfall amount. The authors present comprehensive testing and comparison results for the Hydro-NEXRAD rainfall estimates. They evaluate the Hydro-NEXRAD products with another multiple radar rainfall estimates (no bias removal) from National Center for Environmental Prediction, operational NEXRAD products (Stage III) from regional River Forecast Centers, and rain gauge data. The results show that more sophisticated algorithms that account for range correction and other improvements lead to better performance of the multiple radar rainfall estimates.

  4. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  5. Evaluation of multifrequency range-imaging technique implemented on the Chung-Li VHF atmospheric radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.-S.; Tsai, S.-C.; Su, C.-L.; Chu, Y.-H.

    2015-09-01

    Multifrequency range imaging technique (RIM) has been implemented on the Chung-Li VHF-array radar since 2008 after its renovation. This study made a more complete examination and evaluation of the RIM technique to facilitate the performance of the radar for atmospheric studies. Various experiments of RIM with different radar parameters such as pulse length, pulse shape, receiver bandwidth, transmitter frequency set, and so on, were conducted. The radar data employed for the study were collected from 2008 to 2013. It has been shown that two factors, the range/time delay of the signal traveling in the media and the standard deviation of Gaussian-shaped range-weighting function, play crucial roles in ameliorating the RIM-produced brightness (or power distribution); the two factors are associated with some radar parameters. In addition to radar parameters, long-term RIM data show that the aging of cable lines or key components of the radar system may result in an increase of the range/time delay of signal. It is also found that the range/time delay was visibly different for the echoes from the atmosphere with and without the presence of significant precipitation. A procedure of point-by-point correction of range/time delay was thus conducted to minimize the bogus brightness discontinuity at range gate boundaries. With the RIM technique, the Chung-Li VHF radar demonstrates its first successful observation of double-layer structures as well as their temporal and spatial variations with time.

  6. Evaluation of space station solar array technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The research concerning lightweight solar array assemblies since 1970 is reported. A bibliography of abstracts of documents used for reference during this period is included along with an evaluation of available solar array technology. A list of recommended technology programs is presented.

  7. 2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar towards, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  8. Evaluation of Icebridge Snow Radar Measurements over Sea Ice in the Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derksen, C.; King, J. M.; Howell, S.; Toose, P.; Silis, A.; Rutter, N.

    2014-12-01

    Recent efforts to retrieve snow depth on sea ice using the Operation IceBridge (OIB) snow radar have identified uncertainties related to the vertical heterogeneity of snow, ice deformation, and radar side lobes (e.g. Farrell, et. Al., 2012, Kurtz et. Al., 2013, Kwok and Maksym, 2014). To characterize and evaluate snow depth retrieval uncertainties as related to snow physical properties, an OIB mission was flown near Eureka, Nunavut (79°59'20"N, 85°56'27"W) within the Canadian Arctic archipelago as part of the 2014 OIB Arctic campaign. A series of 12 parallel flight lines covered a narrow swath of first year sea ice approximately 50 km in length. Immediately following the OIB mission, an intensive 10-day field campaign was completed to characterize snow and ice properties within the footprint of the OIB snow radar at multiple scales. Measurements were divided between two observation areas: (1) a primary sampling transect along the length of the flights to characterize horizontal variability in bulk snow properties and (2) a set of intensive grids (250 m x 250) to evaluate variations in snow properties sub-grid to OIB products. As part of each experiment, standard sampling methods were used to collect geo-located snow depth and snow pit measurements (stratigraphy, density, grain size, and salinity). More than 30,000 geo-located snow depth measurements were collected along the primary transect with 94% located within the snow radar footprint. The substantial volume of field measurements coincident with OIB snow radar observations provides an excellent opportunity to evaluate and advance the retrieval of radar-derived snow depth over sea ice. In this study, we present statistical analysis of the observed radar signal and measured snow properties at multiple scales to address previously identified ambiguities in the interpretation of the radar returns.

  9. Photovoltaic-system evaluation at the Northeast Residential Experiment Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Five residential photovoltaic systems were tested and the systems' performance and cost was evaluated. The five systems each consist of an unoccupied structure employing a roof mounted photovoltaic array and a utility connected power inverter capable of sending excess PV generated energy to the local utility system. The photovoltaic systems are designed to meet at least 50% of the total annual electrical demand of residences in the cold climate regions of the country. The following specific issues were investigated: photovoltaic array and inverter system power rating and performance characterization, system energy production, reliability and system cost/worth. Summary load data from five houses in the vicinity of the Northeast Residential Experiment Station, and meteorological data from the station's weather station are also presented.

  10. Evaluation of radar-based precipitation estimates for flash flood forecasting in the Three Gorges Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Yang, D.; Hong, Y.; Qi, Y.; Cao, Q.

    2015-05-01

    Spatial rainfall pattern plays a critical role in determining hydrological responses in mountainous areas, especially for natural disasters such as flash floods. In this study, to improve the skills of flood forecasting in the mountainous Three Gorges Region (TGR) of the Yangtze River, we developed a first version of a high-resolution (1 km) radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) consideration of many critical procedures, such as beam blockage analysis, ground-clutter filter, rain type identification and adaptive Z-R relations. A physically-based distributed hydrological model (GBHM) was established and further applied to evaluate the performance of radar-based QPE for regional flood forecasting, relative to the gauge-driven simulations. With two sets of input data (gauge and radar) collected during summer 2010, the applicability of the current radar-based QPE to rainstorm monitoring and flash flood forecasting in the TGR is quantitatively analysed and discussed.

  11. PQLX: A Software Tool to Evaluate Seismic Station Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Boaz, R. I.

    2006-12-01

    We present a new tool that will allow users to evaluate seismic station performance and characteristics by providing quick and easy transitions between visualizations of the frequency and time domains. The software is based on the probability density functions (PDF) of power spectral densities (PSD) (McNamara and Buland, 2004). The computed PSDs are stored in a MySQL database, allowing a user to access specific time periods of PSDs (PDF subsets) and time series segments through a GUI-driven interface. The power of the method and software lies in the fact that there is no need to screen the data for system transients, earthquakes or general data artifacts since they map into a background probability level. In fact, examination of artifacts related to station operation and episodic cultural noise allow us to estimate both the overall station quality and a baseline level of earth noise at each site. The output of this analysis tool is useful for both operational and scientific applications. Operationally, it is useful for characterizing the current and past performance of existing broadband stations, for conducting tests on potential new seismic station locations, for detecting problems with the recording system or sensors, and for evaluating the overall quality of data and meta-data. Scientifically, the tool allows for mining of PSDs for investigations on the evolution of seismic noise (see Aster et al., Hutt et al., Leeds et al., and Oneel et al., this meeting). The PDF algorithm and initial software were developed by the USGS as a part of the ANSS/GSN data and network QC system. Further development, supported by the IRIS Data Management Center, integrated the PDF algorithm into the IRIS QUACK system. The newest version, PQLX, combines the PDF system with the PQL time series viewing tool developed with support from IRIS PASSCAL. Currently, PQLX is operational at the USGS ANSS NOC and ASL for station performance monitoring.

  12. Shuttle orbiter Ku-band radar/communications system design evaluation. Deliverable test equipment evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maronde, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    The Ku-band test equipment, known as the Deliverable System Test equipment (DSTE), is reviewed and evaluated. The DSTE is semiautomated and computer programs were generated for 14 communication mode tests and 17 radar mode tests. The 31 test modules provide a good cross section of tests with which to exercise the Ku-band system; however, it is very limited when being used to verify Ku-band system performance. More detailed test descriptions are needed, and a major area of concern is the DSTE sell-off procedure which is inadequate.

  13. Technology transfer and evaluation for Space Station telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Charles R.; Stokes, Lebarian; Diftler, Myron A.

    1994-01-01

    The international space station (SS) must take advantage of advanced telerobotics in order to maximize productivity and safety and to reduce maintenance costs. The Automation and Robotics Division at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) has designed, developed, and constructed the Automated Robotics Maintenance of Space Station (ARMSS) facility for the purpose of transferring and evaluating robotic technology that will reduce SS operation costs. Additionally, JSC had developed a process for expediting the transfer of technology from NASA research centers and evaluating these technologies in SS applications. Software and hardware system developed at the research centers and NASA sponsored universities are currently being transferred to JSC and integrated into the ARMSS for flight crew personnel testing. These technologies will be assessed relative to the SS baseline, and, after refinements, those technologies that provide significant performance improvements will be recommended as upgrades to the SS. Proximity sensors, vision algorithms, and manipulator controllers are among the systems scheduled for evaluation.

  14. Study to investigate and evaluate means of optimizing the radar function for the space shuttle. [(pulse radar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Results are discussed of a study to define a radar and antenna system which best suits the space shuttle rendezvous requirements. Topics considered include antenna characteristics and antenna size tradeoffs, fundamental sources of measurement errors inherent in the target itself, backscattering crosssection models of the target and three basic candidate radar types. Antennas up to 1.5 meters in diameter are within specified installation constraints, however, a 1 meter diameter paraboloid and a folding, four slot backfeed on a two gimbal mount implemented for a spiral acquisition scan is recommended. The candidate radar types discussed are: (1) noncoherent pulse radar (2) coherent pulse radar and (3) pulse Doppler radar with linear FM ranging. The radar type recommended is a pulse Doppler with linear FM ranging. Block diagrams of each radar system are shown.

  15. Linking the Annual Variation of Snow Radar-derived Accumulation in West Antarctica to Long-term Automatic Weather Station Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, B.; Braaten, D. A.; Gogineni, P.; Paden, J. D.; Leuschen, C.; Purdon, K.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the snow accumulation rate on polar ice sheets is important in assessing mass balance and ice sheet contribution to sea level rise. Measuring annual accumulation on a regional scale and extending back in time several decades has been accomplished using the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) Snow Radar on the NASA DC-8 that is part of NASA's Ice-Bridge project. The Snow Radar detects and maps near-surface internal layers in polar firn, operating from 2- 6 GHz and providing a depth resolution of ~4 cm. During November 2011, Snow Radar data were obtained for large areas of West Antarctica, including a flight segment that passed within ~70 km of Byrd Station (80°S, 119°W). Byrd Station has a very long automatic weather station (AWS) record, extending from present to 1980, with 3 relatively brief gaps in the record. The AWS data for Byrd Station were obtained from the Antarctic Meteorological Research Center (AMRC) at the University of Wisconsin. The L1B Snow Radar data products, available from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), were analyzed using layer picking software to obtain the depth of reflectors in the firn that are detected by the radar. These reflectors correspond to annual markers in the firn, and allow annual accumulation to be determined. Using the distance between the reflectors and available density profiles from ice cores, water equivalent accumulation for each annual layer back to 1980 is obtained. We are analyzing spatial variations of accumulation along flight lines, as well as variations in the time series of annual accumulation. We are also analyzing links between annual accumulation and surface weather observations from the Byrd Station AWS. Our analyses of surface weather observations have focused on annual temperature, atmospheric pressure and wind extremes (e.g. 5th and 95th percentiles) and links to annual snow accumulation. We are also examining satellite-derived sea ice extent records for the Bellingshausen and Amundsen seas sector (60°W-120°W) over the same 31-year time period and comparing results to annual snow accumulation. Results from this work will be presented at the meeting.

  16. Study to investigate and evaluate means of optimizing the radar function. [systems engineering of pulse radar for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The investigations for a rendezvous radar system design and an integrated radar/communication system design are presented. Based on these investigations, system block diagrams are given and system parameters are optimized for the noncoherent pulse and coherent pulse Doppler radar modulation types. Both cooperative (transponder) and passive radar operation are examined including the optimization of the corresponding transponder design for the cooperative mode of operation.

  17. Antenna evaluation study for the shuttle multispectral radar, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, E. L., III; Carver, K. R.

    1976-01-01

    Critical parameters of the shuttle multispectral radar antenna (SMRA) which most affect antenna performance were identified. A preliminary methematical model is presented for describing SMRA performance under the influence of various physical and environmental factors which might degrade performance. Because user groups have not agreed on optimum frequencies best suited for the broadest range of application, the study incorporates frequencies ranging from 1.2 to 14.5 GHz, as well as a consideration of incidence angles from near nadir to nearly 50 deg.

  18. Estimation of mesospheric vertical winds from a VHF meteor radar at King Sejong Station, Antarctica (62.2S, 58.8W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Lee, C.; Kim, J.; Jee, G.

    2013-12-01

    For the first time, vertical winds near the mesopause region were estimated from radial velocities of meteor echoes detected by a VHF meteor radar at King Sejong Station (KSS) in 2011 and 2012. Since the radar usually detects more than a hundred echoes every hour in an altitude bin of 88 - 92 km, much larger than other radars, we were able to fit measured radial velocities of these echoes with a 6 component model that consists of horizontal winds, spatial gradients of horizontal winds and vertical wind. The conventional method of deriving horizontal winds from meteor echoes utilizes a 2 component model, assuming that vertical winds and spatial gradients of horizontal winds are negligible. We analyzed the radar data obtained for 8400 hours in 2012 and 8100 hours in 2011. We found that daily mean values of vertical winds are mostly within +/- 1 m/s, whereas those of zonal winds are a few tens m/s mostly eastward. The daily mean vertical winds sometimes stay positive or negative for more than 20 days, implying that the atmosphere near the mesopause experiences episodically a large scale low and high pressure environments, respectively, like the tropospheric weather system. By conducting Lomb-normalized periodogram analysis, we also found that the vertical winds have diurnal, semidiurnal and terdiurnal tidal components with about equal significance, in contrast to horizontal winds that show a dominant semidiurnal one. We will discuss about uncertainties of the estimated vertical wind and possible reasons of its tidal and daily variations.

  19. Evaluation of high-resolution precipitation analyses using a dense station network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kann, A.; Meirold-Mautner, I.; Schmid, F.; Kirchengast, G.; Fuchsberger, J.; Meyer, V.; Tüchler, L.; Bica, B.

    2015-03-01

    The ability of radar-rain gauge merging algorithms to precisely analyse convective precipitation patterns is of high interest for many applications, e.g. hydrological modelling, thunderstorm warnings, and, as a reference, to spatially validate numerical weather prediction models. However, due to drawbacks of methods like cross-validation and due to the limited availability of reference data sets on high temporal and spatial scales, an adequate validation is usually hardly possible, especially on an operational basis. The present study evaluates the skill of very high-resolution and frequently updated precipitation analyses (rapid-INCA) by means of a very dense weather station network (WegenerNet), operated in a limited domain of the southeastern parts of Austria (Styria). Based on case studies and a longer-term validation over the convective season 2011, a general underestimation of the rapid-INCA precipitation amounts is shown by both continuous and categorical verification measures, although the temporal and spatial variability of the errors is - by convective nature - high. The contribution of the rain gauge measurements to the analysis skill is crucial. However, the capability of the analyses to precisely assess the convective precipitation distribution predominantly depends on the representativeness of the stations under the prevalent convective condition.

  20. Measurement and evaluation of radar cross section for furniture in an indoor propagation channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maw, M. M.; Supanakoon, P.; Promwong, S.; Takada, J.

    2014-11-01

    This paper has attempted to evaluate the radar cross section (RCS) of two furniture items in an indoor environment in a frequency range of 3-7 GHz of the ultra-wideband (UWB) range. The RCS evaluation is achieved through an extended version of the radar equation that incorporates the channel transfer function of scattering. The time-gating method was applied to remove the multipath effect, a phenomenon which typically occurs in the indoor environment. Two double-ridged waveguide horn antennas for both vertical and horizontal polarizations were used to obtain the transfer function of scattering of the furniture prior to analysis in order to derive their bistatic RCS. The RCS results validate the applicability of the proposed extended radar equation to the indoor propagation prediction.

  1. Evaluating Pseudorange Multipath at CGPS Stations Spanning Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, G.; Bennett, R. A.; Spinler, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    A research study was conducted in order to quantify and analyze the amount of pseudorange multipath at continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) stations spanning Mexico. These CGPS stations are administered by a variety of organizations, including government agencies and public universities, and thus serve a wide range of positioning needs. Despite the diversity of the networks and their intended audiences, a core function of all of the networks is to provide a stable framework for high-precision positioning in support of diverse commercial and scientific applications. CGPS data from a large number of publicly available networks located in Mexico were studied. These include the RGNA (National Active Geodetic Network) administered by INEGI (National Institute of Statistics and Geography), the PBO network (Plate Boundary Observatory) funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and operated by UNAVCO (University NAVstar Consortium), the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN), which is a collaboration effort of the United States Geological Survey (USGS), Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the UNAM network, operated by the National Seismological System (SSN) and the Institute of Geophysics of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), the Suominet Geodetic Network (SNG) and the CORS (Continuously Operating Reference Station) network, operated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). A total of 54 CGPS stations were evaluated, where dual-frequency geodetic-grade receivers collected GPS data continuously during the period from 1994 to 2013. It is usually assumed that despite carefully selected locations, all CGPS stations are to some extent, affected by the presence of signal multipath. In addition, the geographic distribution of stations provides a nation-wide access to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). For real-time kinematic (RTK) and rapid static applications that depend on the pseudo-range observable, the accuracy with which a roaming user may locate their assets with respect to the ITRF may be limited by site-specific multipath. The issue is particularly critical for users depending on pseudorange measurements for 'real-time' (or 'near-real-time') kinematic GPS positioning, where ambiguity resolution is a critical step. Therefore, to identify the most and the least affected GPS stations we analyzed the averaged daily root mean square pseudorange multipath variations (MP1-RMS and MP2-RMS) for all feasible satellites tracked by the CGPS networks. We investigated the sources of multipath, including changes associated with hardware replacement (i.e., receiver and antenna type) and receiver firmware upgrades.

  2. A review of selected ground penetrating radar applications to mineral resource evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francke, Jan

    2012-06-01

    Since the commercialisation of ground penetrating radar (GPR) in the 1970s, the technology has been relegated to niche applications in the mining industry. Advances in radar technology, such as flexible collinear antennas and the integration of live differential GPS positioning, have spurred GPR's acceptance in recent years as a standard exploration method for a number of deposit types. Provided herein is an overview of commercialised GPR applications for surface mineral resource evaluations, covering examples of alluvial channels, nickel and bauxitic laterites, iron ore deposits, mineral sands, coal and kimberlites.

  3. Performance evaluation of a W-band monopulse radar in rotorcraft brownout landing aid application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guoqing; Yang, Ken; Sykora, Brian; Salha, Imad

    2009-05-01

    BAE Systems recently developed a rotorcraft brownout landing aid system technology (BLAST) to satisfy the urgent need for brownout landing capability. BLAST uses a W-band monopulse (MP) radar in conjunction with radar signal processing and synthetic display techniques to paint a three-dimensional (3-D) perspective of the landing zone (LZ) in real time. Innovative radar signal processing techniques are developed to process the radar data and generate target data vectors for 3-D image synthesis and display. Field tests are conducted to characterize the performance of BLAST with MP and non-MP (only using the sum channel of the MP radar) modes in clear and brownout conditions. Data processing and analysis are performed to evaluate the system's performance in terms of visual effect, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), target height estimation, ground-mapping effect, and false alarm rate. Both MP and non-MP modes reveal abilities to sufficiently display the 3-D volume of the LZ; the former shows advantage over the latter in providing accurate ground mapping and object height determination.

  4. Evaluation of synthetic aperture radar for oil-spill response. Final report, June 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hover, G.L.; Mastin, G.A.; Axline, R.M.; Bradley, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    This report provides a detailed evaluation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) as a potential technology improvement over the Coast Guard's existing side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) for oil-spill surveillance applications. The U.S. Coast Guard Research and Development Center (RD Center), Environmental Safety Branch, sponsored a joint experiment including the U.S. Coast Guard, Sandia National Laboratories, and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Hazardous Materials Division. Radar imaging missions were flown on six days over the coastal waters off Santa Barbara, CA, where there are constant natural seeps of oil. Both the Coast Guard SLAR and the Sandia National Laboratories SAR were employed to acquire simultaneous images of oil slicks and other natural sea surface features that impact oil-spill interpretation. Surface truth and other environmental data were also recorded during the experiment. The experiment data were processed at Sandia National Laboratories and delivered to the RD Center on a PC-based computer workstation for analysis by experiment participants. Synthetic aperture radar, Side looking airborne radar, Oil slicks.

  5. Moving target Detector/Airport Surveillance radar (ASR-7) field evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, W.

    1981-08-01

    The Moving Target Detector (MTD) II, a sophisticated radar processor, was evaluated to determine its capability to provide improved radar detection in an air traffic control (ATC) environment. The MTD II was installed on one channel of an airport surveillance radar (ASR-7) at Burlington, Vermont. The major objective of testing was to compare the performance of the MTD II with that of the ASR-7 Moving Target Indicator (MTI). This report concentrates on the comparative probability of detection, false alarm rate, MTI improvement factor, subclutter visibility, dynamic range, velocity response, and the simultaneous flight test results of the two systems. Comparison of the MTD II to the MTD I system is made when necessary to show major improvements or deficiencies in the MTD II design. The results of the tests have shown that the MTD II provides surveillance capabilities superior to those of the ASR-7/MTI.

  6. 5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, operations building, and central heating plant - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  7. 4. VIEW NORTHEAST, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHEAST, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, emergency power building, and height finder radar tower - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  8. Evaluation plan for space station network interface units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Alfred C.

    1990-01-01

    Outlined here is a procedure for evaluating network interface units (NIUs) produced for the Space Station program. The procedures should be equally applicable to the data management system (DMS) testbed NIUs produced by Honeywell and IBM. The evaluation procedures are divided into four areas. Performance measurement tools are hardware and software that must be developed in order to evaluate NIU performance. Performance tests are a series of tests, each of which documents some specific characteristic of NIU and/or network performance. In general, these performance tests quantify the speed, capacity, latency, and reliability of message transmission under a wide variety of conditions. Functionality tests are a series of tests and code inspections that demonstrate the functionality of the particular subset of ISO protocols which have been implemented in a given NIU. Conformance tests are a series of tests which would expose whether or not selected features within the ISO protocols are present and interoperable.

  9. Summary of monitoring station component evaluation project 2009-2011.

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Darren M.

    2012-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is regarded as a center for unbiased expertise in testing and evaluation of geophysical sensors and instrumentation for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring (GNEM) systems. This project will sustain and enhance our component evaluation capabilities. In addition, new sensor technologies that could greatly improve national monitoring system performance will be sought and characterized. This work directly impacts the Ground-based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring mission by verifying that the performance of monitoring station sensors and instrumentation is characterized and suitable to the mission. It enables the operational monitoring agency to deploy instruments of known capability and to have confidence in operational success. This effort will ensure that our evaluation capabilities are maintained for future use.

  10. Shuttle orbiter Ku-band radar/communications system design evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, J.; Holmes, J.; Huth, G. K.; Iwasaki, R.; Maronde, R.; Polydoros, A.; Weber, C.; Broad, P.

    1980-01-01

    Tasks performed in an examination and critique of a Ku-band radar communications system for the shuttle orbiter are reported. Topics cover: (1) Ku-band high gain antenna/widebeam horn design evaluation; (2) evaluation of the Ku-band SPA and EA-1 LRU software; (3) system test evaluation; (4) critical design review and development test evaluation; (5) Ku-band bent pipe channel performance evaluation; (6) Ku-band LRU interchangeability analysis; and (7) deliverable test equipment evaluation. Where discrepancies were found, modifications and improvements to the Ku-band system and the associated test procedures are suggested.

  11. Evaluating the Potential of Radar-based Rainfall Estimates for Stream Flow Simulation in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abon, C. C.; Kneis, D.; Bronstert, A.; Crisologo, I.; David, C. P. C.; Heistermann, M.

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluates the suitability of radar-based quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE) for the simulation of stream flow in the Marikina River Basin (535 km2), The Philippines. We used observed reflectivity from the wet season period of 2012 and 2013 from an S-band radar near Subic. Radar data processing and precipitation estimation were carried out using the Open Source library wradlib. To evaluate the potential added value of radar-based QPE, we generated a benchmark precipitation product based on the interpolation of rain gauge observations (GO product). The GO product was also used to quantify rainfall estimation errors at the point scale. For stream flow simulation, we used a semi-distributed conceptual hydrological model based on the Open Source ECHSE framework. At the point scale, the radar-based QPE was benchmarked against the GO product at daily and hourly accumulation intervals. It turned out that the radar-based QPE outperformed the GO product in the 2012 while the performance was similar in the 2013. For both periods, estimation errors substantially increased from the daily to the hourly accumulation intervals, most likely due to a lack of representativeness at the point scale. Interestingly, though, the hourly rainfall estimates allowed for a good simulation of observed stream flow when used to force the hydrological model. In particular, the two main flood events, induced by an enhanced South-West monsoon, are well represented using both hourly rainfall products. The results show that the quality of the simulated stream flow was well in line with the point-based verification: while the radar-based QPE clearly outperforms the GO product in 2012, both perform similarly in 2013. The hydrological model had been recalibrated for each rainfall product to allow for a fair comparison of the two competing rainfall products. As the Marikina River Basin has a comparatively dense rain gauge network, the results of this study are encouraging with respect to usability of the radar-based QPE in other parts of the Philippines where dense rain gauge network are not available.

  12. Evaluation of Radar Reflectivity Based Estimates of Water Content in Stratiform Marine Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosov, Sergey Y.; Uttal, Taneil; Hazen, Duane A.

    2004-04-01

    The performance of radar reflectivity (Ze) based relations for retrievals of marine stratiform cloud liquid water content (LWC) is evaluated by comparing liquid water path (LWP) estimates from microwave radiometers with vertically integrated LWC values retrieved from radar measurements. Based on a measurement dataset from a research vessel in the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean, it is shown that reflectivity thresholding allows minimizing of the influence of drizzle drops present in marine stratiform clouds to the extent that LWP estimates from a ground-/shipborne radar can have uncertainties that might be acceptable for different applications. The accuracies of Ze-based retrievals depend on the thresholding level Zet, and they are generally better than a factor of 2 for Zet -15 dBZ. These accuracies typically improve when Zet is lowered; however, the amount of cloud profiles that pass thresholding diminishes as Zet is decreased from about 50% for a -15-dbZ threshold to only about 10% for a -25-dBZ threshold. Different thresholding strategies are considered. Ancillary information on cloud-base heights can improve LWP estimates from reflectivities. The ship-based dataset was used to simulate measurements from prospective 94-GHz spaceborne cloud radar (CloudSat). CloudSat measurements would, on average, detect about 75% of warm marine stratiform clouds, though many clouds with negligible presence of drizzle will be missed. Because of sensitivity and resolution issues for the spaceborne radar, reflectivity-based estimates of LWP are generally biased toward high values and have higher uncertainties when compared with the ground-based radar, for the same Zet.

  13. Experimental evaluation of cursors for B-2 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvin, Janet G.; Doyal, Jeffrey A.; Sharp, Earl D.; Lasalvia, James M.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the current and two alternative cursors for B-2 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery application and to recommend an alternative design. This study was conducted in response to problems crewmembers are experiencing with the current cursor on the B-2 SAR display. In particular, the design of the current radar cursor (i.e., the width of the cursor bars) makes it difficult to accomplish fine cursor positioning (i.e., accurate placement of the cursor within the desired one pixel of the target.) This affects the accuracy of radar updates and impacts the precision of the navigation and bombing solutions. The experiment evaluated the current cursor and two alternative designs in terms of designation speed and accuracy. Eighteen subjects completed experimental trials in which they performed a SAR radar update procedure (i.e., identified and designated specified aim points). This procedure was conducted using simulated SAR imagery presented on a multipurpose display unit (MDU) within the Computer-Assisted Procedures Trainer (CAPT) residentat Armstrong Laboratory. The results indicated that one of the alternative cursor designs elicited significantly higher designation accuracy (mean error = 1.94 pixels) than the current cursor (mean error = 2.36 pixels) or the second alternative cursor (mean error = 2.28 pixels). Designation speed did not vary significantly across cursors. Subjective data and comments gathered from subjects supported these findings, with the most accurate alternative cursor being rated as very effective and the current cursor being rated as 'somewhat ineffective.'

  14. Application of 50 MHz doppler radar wind profiler to launch operations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Robin S.; Taylor, Gregory E.; Smith, Steve A.; Wilfong, Timothy L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a case study where a significant wind shift, not detected by jimspheres, was detected by the 50 MHz DRWP (Doppler Radar Wind Profiler) and evaluated to be acceptable prior to the launch of a Shuttle. This case study illustrates the importance of frequent upper air wind measurements for detecting significant rapidly changing features as well as for providing confidence that the features really exist and are not due to instrumentation error. Had the release of the jimsphere been timed such that it would have detected the entire wind shift, there would not have been sufficient time to release another jimsphere to confirm the existence of the feature prior to the scheduled launch. We found that using a temporal median filter on the one minute spectral estimates coupled with a constraining window about a first guess velocity effectively removes nearly all spurious signals from the velocity profile generated by NASA's 50 MHz DRWP while boosting the temporal resolution to as high as one profile every 3 minutes. The higher temporal resolution of the 50 MHz DRWP using the signal processing algorithm described in this paper ensures the detection of rapidly changing features as well as provides the confidence that the features are genuine. Further benefit is gained when the profiles generated by the DRWP are examined in relation to the profiles measured by jimspheres and/or rawinsondes. The redundancy offered by using two independent measurements can dispel or confirm any suspicion regarding instrumentation error or malfunction and wind profiles can be examined in light of their respective instruments' strengths and weaknesses.

  15. Evaluation of space station ATCS evolution growth paths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Brian E.; Petete, Patricia A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper determines the feasibility of potential Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) growth paths by assessing thermal, integration, and implementation impacts. Thermal Radiation Analysis System/Infrared Radiation Transfer (TRASYS/IRTRAN) models were used to evaluate the effects of increased radiator temperature, increased radiator area, and radiator wing addition on Space Station Freedom (SSF) elements, including energy reflected back to the ATCS. Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer/Fluid Integrator (SINDA/FLUINT) models were used to determine the heat rejection capability of an ATCS loop with an integrated heat pump that operates with Electric Power System (EPS) peak power. The effects of upgrading the ATCS by advanced technology Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) implementation during maintenance replacements was also evaluated. The study results presented lead to conclusions on which paths are best suited for different growth scenarios.

  16. High level waste (HLW) steam reducing station evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, R.E.

    1993-09-29

    Existing pressure equipment in High Level Waste does not have a documented technical baseline. Based on preliminary reviews, the existing equipment seems to be based on system required capacity instead of system capability. A planned approach to establish a technical baseline began September 1992 and used the Works Management System preventive maintenance schedule. Several issues with relief valves being undersized on steam reducing stations created a need to determine the risk of maintaining the steam in service. An Action Plan was developed to evaluate relief valves that did not have technical baselines and provided a path forward for continued operation. Based on Action Plan WER-HLE-931042, the steam systems will remain in service while the designs are being developed and implemented.

  17. Microbial Diversity Aboard Spacecraft: Evaluation of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Victoria A.; Thrasher, Adrianna N.; Healy, Mimi; Ott, C. Mark; Pierson, Duane L.

    2003-01-01

    An evaluation of the microbial flora from air, water, and surface samples provided a baseline of microbial diversity onboard the International Space Station (ISS) to gain insight into bacterial and fungal contamination during the initial stages of construction and habitation. Using 16S genetic sequencing and rep-PeR, 63 bacterial strains were isolated for identification and fingerprinted for microbial tracking. The use of these molecular tools allowed for the identification of bacteria not previously identified using automated biochemical analysis and provided a clear indication of the source of several ISS contaminants. Fungal and bacterial data acquired during monitoring do not suggest there is a current microbial hazard to the spacecraft, nor does any trend indicate a potential health risk. Previous spacecraft environmental analysis indicated that microbial contamination will increase with time and require continued surveillance.

  18. Shuttle imaging radar-A (SIR-A) data analysis. [geology of the Ozark Plateau of southern Missouri, land use in western Illinois, and vegetation types at Koonamore Station, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The utility of shuttle imaging radar (SIR-A) data was evaluated in several geological and environmental contexts. For the Ozark Plateau of southern Missouri, SIR-A data were of little use in mapping structural features, because of generally uniform returns. For western Illinois, little was to be gained in terms of identifying land use categories by examining differences between overlapping passes. For southern Australia (Koonamore Station), information ion vegetation types that was not obtainable from LANDSAT MSS data alone was obtained. Specifically, high SIR-A returns in the Australian site were found to correlate with locations where shrubs increase surface roughness appreciably. The Australian study site results demonstrate the synergy of acquiring spectral reflectance and radar data over the same location and time. Such data are especially important in that region, since grazing animals have substantially altered and are continuing to alter the distribution of shrublands, grasslands, and soil exposures. Periodic, synoptic acquisition of MSS and SAR data would be of use in monitoring the dynamics of land-cover change in this environment.

  19. Design of an orbital debris radar ground demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paz, I.; Carl, J. R.; Shaw, R. W.; Kovitz, J. K.; Arndt, G. D.

    1989-01-01

    A breadboard radar system is being designed and tested at NASA Johnson for dealing with the space debris problem that could present a growing threat to Space Station Freedom. The major design problems are due to the small radar cross section of such debris (below -30 dBm2), the high closing velocities of the particles with respect to the Space Station (10 km/sec and higher), and the stringent weight, power-consumption, maintenance, and reliability constraints on spaceborne systems. Consideration is given to the preliminary implementation of a ground demonstration radar for testing concepts, technologies, and performance envelopes for application to the space-borne debris detection and tracking radar. Simulation results and techniques developed for predicting system performance and for evaluating antenna parameters are given. The design process of the electronically steered phased array antenna is briefly described, and block diagrams for the implementation of the radar system are given.

  20. State-space adjustment of radar rainfall and skill score evaluation of stochastic volume forecasts in urban drainage systems.

    PubMed

    Löwe, Roland; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Rasmussen, Michael R; Madsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Merging of radar rainfall data with rain gauge measurements is a common approach to overcome problems in deriving rain intensities from radar measurements. We extend an existing approach for adjustment of C-band radar data using state-space models and use the resulting rainfall intensities as input for forecasting outflow from two catchments in the Copenhagen area. Stochastic grey-box models are applied to create the runoff forecasts, providing us with not only a point forecast but also a quantification of the forecast uncertainty. Evaluating the results, we can show that using the adjusted radar data improves runoff forecasts compared with using the original radar data and that rain gauge measurements as forecast input are also outperformed. Combining the data merging approach with short-term rainfall forecasting algorithms may result in further improved runoff forecasts that can be used in real time control. PMID:23925186

  1. A study of an orbital radar mapping mission to Venus. Volume 2: Configuration comparisons and systems evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Configuration comparisons and systems evaluation for the orbital radar mapping mission of the planet Venus are discussed. Designs are recommended which best satisfy the science objectives of the Venus radar mapping concept. Attention is given to the interaction and integration of those specific mission-systems recommendations with one another, and the final proposed designs are presented. The feasibility, cost, and scheduling of these configurations are evaluated against assumptions of reasonable state-of-the-art growth and space funding expectations.

  2. Combined observations of meteors by image-orthicon television camera and multi-station radar. [to compare ionization with luminosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, A. F.; Forti, G.; Mccrosky, R. E.; Posen, A.; Southworth, R. B.; Williams, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    Observations from multiple sites of a radar network and by television of 29 individual meteors from February 1969 through June 1970 are reported. Only 12 of the meteors did not appear to fragment over all the observed portion of their trajectories. From these 12, the relation for the radar magnitude to the panchromatic absolute magnitude was found in terms of velocity of the meteor. A very tentative fit to the data on the duration of long enduring echoes versus visual absolute magnitude is made. The exponential decay characteristics of the later parts of several of the light curves are pointed out as possible evidence of mutual coalescence of droplets into which the meteoroid has completely broken.

  3. Evaluation of holographic subsurface radar for NDE of space shuttle thermal protection tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Thomas; Snapp, Cooper; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Thakoor, Anilkumar; Bechtel, Tim; Ivashov, Sergey; Vasiliev, Igor

    2007-04-01

    Experiments have been carried out to evaluate holographic subsurface radar (RASCAN) for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of subnominal bond conditions between the Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System tiles and the aluminum substrate. Initial results have shown detection of small voids and spots of moisture between Space Shuttle thermal protection tiles and underlying aluminum substrate. The characteristic feature of this device is the ability to obtain one-sided radar soundings/images with high sensitivity (detecting of wire of 20 micron and less in diameter), and high resolution (2 cm lateral resolution) in the frequency band of 3.6-4.0 GHz. JPL's advanced high-speed image processing and pattern recognition algorithms can be used to process the data generated by the holographic radar and automatically detect and measure the defects. Combining JPL's technologies with the briefcase size, portable RASCAN system will produce a simple and fully automated scanner capable of inspecting dielectric heat shielding materials or other spacecraft structures for cracks, voids, inclusions, delamination, debonding, etc.. We believe this technology holds promise to significantly enhance the safety of the Space Shuttle and the future CEV and other space exploration missions.

  4. United States Air Force 611th Civil Engineer Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Cape Lisburne Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Quality program plan, addendum for interim remedial actions. Final

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The Air Force is conducting interim remedial action at Cape Lisburne Long Range Radar Station (LRRS) as part of the Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The remedial actions are to be conducted at Sites LF01 (Landfill and Waste Accumulation Area No. 2/Dump No. 1), SS03 (White Alice Site), SS08 (Upper Camp Transformer Building) and SS09 (Lower Camp Transformer Building). This QPP is site-specific to work at the Cape Lisburne LRRS, and is an addendum to the Program Quality Program Plan (QPP) dated June 1995. This QPP Addendum includes: Construction Quality Plan (includes Waste Plan); Health and Safety Plan; and Sampling and Analysis Plan, including Quality Assurance Project Plan and Field Sampling Plan.

  5. United States Air Force 611th air support group, 611th Civil Engineer Squadron, Tin City Long Range Radar Station, Alaska final remedial investigation/feasibility study. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-30

    This Final Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study describes the work performed; explains project objectives; and presents data collected during project activities, results, and conclusions for the Installation Restoration Program at Tin City Longe Range Radar Station, Alaska. The report describes the risks posed by the site and gives the basis for selecting remedies to mitigate the risks.

  6. In-Service Evaluation of the Turbulence Auto-PIREP System and Enhanced Turbulence Radar Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Jason B.; Buck, Bill K.; Robinson, Paul A.; Ryan, Tim

    2007-01-01

    From August 2003 to December 2006, In-Service Evaluations (ISE) of the Turbulence Auto-PIREP System (TAPS) and Enhanced Turbulence (E-Turb) Radar, technologies developed in NASA's Turbulence Prediction and Warning System (TPAWS) element of its Aviation Safety and Security Program (AvSSP), were conducted. NASA and AeroTech Research established an industry team comprising AeroTech, Delta Air Lines, Rockwell Collins, and ARINC to conduct the ISEs. The technologies were installed on Delta aircraft and their effectiveness was evaluated in day-to-day operations. This report documents the establishment and conduct of the ISEs and presents results and feedback from various users.

  7. [Evaluation of medication advertising broadcast on radio stations].

    PubMed

    Batista, Almária Mariz; Carvalho, Maria Cleide Ribeiro Dantas de

    2013-02-01

    The scope of this paper was to evaluate advertising for medication broadcast on radio stations in Natal, State of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, from April to September 2008 and from April to September 2010. The advertising was recorded and transcribed in order to conduct legal analysis and content analysis based on the precepts of Laurence Bardin. Both the advertising recorded during the first stage (regulated by RDC 102/00) and the second stage (regulated by RDC 96/08) contained some form of legal violation. Content analysis detected practically the same violations in both stages, namely the lack of information regarding adverse effects of the medication, appeal to consumption, exaggeration of efficiency/effectiveness and abusive exploitation of illness. Despite the inclusion of more modern and restrictive legislation, radio advertising continues to violate the law blatantly, committing abuse and disrespecting the population's entitlement to good health. The study reveals the need for medication advertising to be dealt with in a broader context, in other words to be treated as a public health concern. It must take into consideration the socio-historical scenario in which it evolved, since the legislation alone is insufficient to combat abuse committed to the detriment of public health. PMID:23358781

  8. Results of the Kansas City 1989 Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) operational evaluation testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. E.

    1990-08-01

    The Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) testbed was used at the Kansas City International (KCI) airport during the summer of 1989. The objective was to test and refine previous tested techniques for the automatic detection of low-altitude wind shear phenomena (specifically microbursts and gun fronts) and heavy precipitation in a midwest weather environment, as well as to assess possible new products such as storm movement predictions. A successful operation evaluation of the TDWR products took place at the KCI tower and terminal radar control room (TRACON). Several supervisor and controller display refinements were assessed as effective. The system was successful in terms of aircraft at KCI avoiding wind shear encounters during the operational period, and it was assessed as very good in usefulness for continuing operation by the KCI air traffic control (ATC) personnel. The probability of detection for microbursts was substantially better than that in Denver. However, the false-alarm probability was found to be substantially higher in Kansas City due to a combination of weather and clutter phenomena. By optimizing the site-adaptation capabilities of the TDWR meteorological and data quality algorithms, the required false-alarm probability was achieved. The gust front performance was generally poorer than in Denver due to a combination of unfavorable radar-airport-gust front geometry of false alarms induced by low-level jets. Gust front algorithm refinements which should provide improved performance are discussed.

  9. Properties of inertia gravity waves in the lower stratosphere as observed by the PANSY radar over Syowa Station in the Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalikova, Maria; Sato, Kaoru; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Sato, Toru

    2015-04-01

    The Inertia-gravity waves (IGWs) are an important component for the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. However, observational studies needed to constrain their forcing are still insufficient. The PANSY radar is a Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere/Incoherent Scatter (MST/IS) radar installed at Syowa Station (69°00'S, 39°35'E) in the Antarctic region. This type of radar is useful to clarify the role of atmospheric gravity waves at high latitudes in the troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere because it provides high resolution vertical profiles of wind vectors including their vertical components with high accuracy at time intervals of about one minute. A partial system of the PANSY radar is in operation since May 2012 and thus provides long-term observations to examine IGW characteristics in terms of the seasonal variation in the lower and middle atmosphere. In the present study, observational data of the horizontal and vertical wind components (vertical resolution of 150m and temporal resolution of 30 minutes) are used to derive statistical analysis of the properties of IGWs with short vertical wavelengths (≤4km) and ground-based periods longer than 4 hours. The study concentrates on the lowermost part of the stratosphere just above the tropopause level (height range 10km to 12km). The properties of IGWs from January 2013 until December 2013 are derived using the hodograph analysis. The annual cycle of the parameters of the observed IGWs (intrinsic frequency, horizontal propagation direction, vertical and horizontal wavelength) are obtained. The annual cycles for the cases of IGWs with upward and downward propagation of the energy are also derived and compared in the individual months. We also investigate the momentum flux for the considered cases of IGWs. Notable property is quite large temporal change of the ratio of downward propagating waves during the year. Their percentage ranges from 9% to 22% in the summer and winter months respectively. This is more than the previously reported in the studies from mid-latitudes and model-based studies. The higher percentage of the downward propagating waves in the winter months agrees with the findings of radiosonde data based studies from the Antarctic region.

  10. Off the Radar: Comparative Evaluation of Radial Visualization Solutions for Composite Indicators.

    PubMed

    Albo, Yael; Lanir, Joel; Bak, Peter; Rafaeli, Sheizaf

    2016-01-01

    A composite indicator (CI) is a measuring and benchmark tool used to capture multi-dimensional concepts, such as Information and Communication Technology (ICT) usage. Individual indicators are selected and combined to reflect a phenomena being measured. Visualization of a composite indicator is recommended as a tool to enable interested stakeholders, as well as the public audience, to better understand the indicator components and evolution over time. However, existing CI visualizations introduce a variety of solutions and there is a lack in CI's visualization guidelines. Radial visualizations are popular among these solutions because of CI's inherent multi-dimensionality. Although in dispute, Radar-charts are often used for CI presentation. However, no empirical evidence on Radar's effectiveness and efficiency for common CI tasks is available. In this paper, we aim to fill this gap by reporting on a controlled experiment that compares the Radar chart technique with two other radial visualization methods: Flower-charts as used in the well-known OECD Betterlife index, and Circle-charts which could be adopted for this purpose. Examples of these charts in the current context are shown in Figure 1. We evaluated these charts, showing the same data with each of the mentioned techniques applying small multiple views for different dimensions of the data. We compared users' performance and preference empirically under a formal task-taxonomy. Results indicate that the Radar chart was the least effective and least liked, while performance of the two other options were mixed and dependent on the task. Results also showed strong preference of participants toward the Flower chart. Summarizing our results, we provide specific design guidelines for composite indicator visualization. Fig. 1: Three radial solutions for composite indicator visualizations compared empirically for users' performance and preferences. PMID:26529525

  11. Site evaluation for laser satellite-tracking stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, N. H.; Mohr, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Twenty-six locations for potential laser satellite-tracking stations, four of them actually already occupied in this role, are reviewed in terms of their known local and regional geology and geophysics. The sites are also considered briefly in terms of weather and operational factors. Fifteen of the sites qualify as suitable for a stable station whose motions are likely to reflect only gross plate motion. The others, including two of the present laser station sites (Arequipa and Athens), fail to qualify unless extra monitoring schemes can be included, such as precise geodetic surveying of ground deformation.

  12. Conceptual design and evaluation of selected Space Station concepts, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Space Station configuration concepts are defined to meet the NASA Headquarters Concept Development Group (CDG) requirements. Engineering and programmatic data are produced on these concepts suitable for NASA and industry dissemination. A data base is developed for input to the CDG's evaluation of generic Space Station configurations and for use in the critique of the CDG's generic configuration evaluation process.

  13. Evaluation of interpolating methods for daily precipitation at various station densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Xu, C.-Y.; Chen, H.; Zhang, Z. X.; Xu, H. L.

    2012-04-01

    Spatial continuous data play a significant role in planning, risk assessment and decision making in climate research and geosciences. It is essential to get accurate grid precipitation data of high resolution in hydrological modeling and water resources management. In recent years, radar and satellite provide an alternative way for spatial precipitation data, but due to technique problems and deficient accuracy, interpolating the observed point data is still the common way to obtain gridding precipitation data for research and management purposes. Many interpolating methods have been proposed and great effort has been made to evaluate and compare them. But by far, no universal method is widely accepted because of the diversity in study regions, difference in climate situations, and differences in data quality and quantity, and selected methods in comparisons. It has been well known that the most paramount factor affecting the performance of interpolating methods is the density of sampling points. However, the performance of different interpolating methods at various sampling densities, which means the performance degradation caused by density changes, has not been deeply examined. This work focuses on the evaluation of interpolating methods in daily precipitation at various station densities and tries to provide guidance on choosing interpolating method under different circumstance. To fill this objective, we choose five commonly used or recommended interpolation methods, i.e. nearest neighbor (NN), inverse distance weighting (IDW), Gradient plus Inverse Distance Squared (GIDS), ordinary kriging (OK) and simple kriging (SK) at five designed sampling densities ranging from 22.6 to 9.8 stations per ten thousand square kilometers at Xiangjiang River basin during 2000 to 2005 when the precipitation data were in the highest density. Four criteria were used for method assessment, i.e., mean error (ME), root mean absolute error (RMSE), model efficient (EF) and index of agreement (IOA) via cross-validation. To further observe their performance in interpolating different precipitation parameters, we also analyzed the changes of performance of the five methods in estimating daily maximum precipitation and precipitation values at different quintiles (5%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 95%) with different sampling densities.

  14. Height-error analysis for the FAA-Air Force replacement radar program (FARR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Michael F.

    1991-08-01

    This report documents an evaluation of three methods for determining radar beam height at 40 proposed FAA and USAF radar stations. All three methods were compared to radiosonde observations (RAOBs), which are assumed to be ground truth, in order to determine height errors. The report concluded that climatology was superior to the triexponcntial model at 70 percent of the stations studied. Both climatology and the triexponential model were found to be superior to the standard atmosphere.

  15. Performance evaluation of a Doppler radar system for wind shear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalaf, Camille S.; Hibey, Joseph L.; Staton, Leo D.

    1990-01-01

    Nonlinear stochastic differential equations are used to model wind shear, and extended Kalman filters are used to generate state estimates from measurements received from a Doppler radar onboard an aircraft. Likelihood-ratio tests are then used to detect the presence of wind shear. The performance of the system is evaluated by deriving theoretical expressions for the false alarm and miss error probabiilties. The approach uses a Fokker-Planck equation. The overall methodology is general and should be of interest in other applications.

  16. Evaluation of MELCOR improvements: Peach Bottom station blackout analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Madni, I.K.

    1993-12-31

    Long-term station blackout analyses in Peach Bottom were first carried out using MELCOR 1.8BC, and later with 1.8DN, as part of an overall program between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), to provide independent assessment of MELCOR as a severe accident/source term analysis tool. In addition to the reference MELCOR calculation, several sensitivity calculations were also performed to explore the impact of varying user-input modeling and timestep control parameters on the accident progression and radionuclide releases to the environment calculated by MELCOR. An area of concern that emerged from these studies was the impact of the selection of maximum allowable timestep ({Delta}t{sub max}) on the calculational behavior of MELCOR, where the results showed significant differences in timing of key events, and a lack of convergence of the solution with reduction of {Delta}t{sub max}. These findings were reported to the NRC, SNL, and the MELCOR Peer Review Committee. As a consequence, a significant effort was undertaken to eliminate or mitigate these sensitivities. The latest released version of MELCOR, Version 1.8.2, released in April 1993, contains several new or improved models, and has corrections to mitigate numerical sensitivities. This paper presents the results of updating the earlier sensitivity studies on maximum timestep, to more properly represent the abilities of the improved MELCOR version 1.8.2. Results are presenter in terms of timing of key events, thermal-hydraulic response of the system, and environmental release of radionuclides. The impact of some of the newer models, such as falling debris quench model, and ORNL`s new BH model, is also evaluated.

  17. Launch delays in the evaluation of Space Station supportability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejulio, Edmund; Strickland, Christopher; McCormick, James

    1991-11-01

    The National Space Transportation System (NSTS) will be the sole provider of assembly items and support resources to Space Station Freedom. Using an operations simulation tool, the consequences of spares provisioning levels and launch schedule perturbations to onorbit systems' effectiveness are explored. The extent of post-Challenger launch delay experiences and how they are modeled are described. By using simulation modeling, the operational availability of space station hardware and distinctions in support requirements are investigated for the Mission Build flights, MB-1 through MB-7.

  18. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  19. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  20. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  1. FIRE_CI2_ETL_RADAR

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-25

    FIRE_CI2_ETL_RADAR Project Title:  FIRE II CIRRUS Discipline:  ... Platform:  Ground Station Instrument:  Radar Spatial Coverage:  (37.06, -95.34) Spatial ... Search Guide Documents:  ETL_RADAR Guide Readme Files:  Readme ETL_RADAR (PS) ...

  2. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  3. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  4. 1. VIEW NORTHWEST, operations building, height finder radar tower, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW NORTHWEST, operations building, height finder radar tower, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  5. Ranger Station Solar-Energy System Receives Economic Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Economic performance of Glendo Reservoir Ranger Station solar-energy system in Wyoming and extrapolated performance in four other locations around the U.S. is reviewed in report. System is a passive drain-down system using water as heat-transfer medium for space and hot-water heating.

  6. Statistical evaluation of a radar rainfall system for sewer system management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieux, B. E.; Vieux, J. E.

    2005-09-01

    Urban areas are faced with mounting demands for managing waste and stormwater for a cleaner environment. Rainfall information is a critical component in efficient management of urban drainage systems. A major water quality impact affecting receiving waterbodies is the discharge of untreated waste and stormwater during precipitation, termed wet weather flow. Elimination or reduction of wet weather flow in metropolitan sewer districts is a major goal of environmental protection agencies and often requires considerable capital improvements. Design of these improvements requires accurate rainfall data in conjunction with monitored wastewater flow data. Characterizing the hydrologic/hydraulic performance of the sewer using distant rain gauges can cause oversizing and wasted expenditures. Advanced technology has improved our ability to measure accurately rainfall over large areas. Weather radar, when combined with rain gauge measurements, provides detailed information concerning rainfall intensities over specific watersheds. Knowing how much rain fell over contributing areas during specific periods aids in characterizing inflow and infiltration to sanitary and combined sewers, calibration of sewer system models, and in operation of predictive real-time control measures. Described herein is the design of a system for managing rainfall information for sewer system management, along with statistical analysis of 60 events from a large metropolitan sewer district. Analysis of the lower quartile rainfall events indicates that the expected average difference is 25.61%. Upper quartile rainfall events have an expected average difference of 17.25%. Rain gauge and radar accumulations are compared and evaluated in relation to specific needs of an urban application. Overall, the events analyzed agree to within ± 8% based on the median average difference between gauge and radar.

  7. Evaluation of Single-Doppler Radar Wind Retrievals in Flat and Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, Rob K.; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.; Xu, Qin; Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Qing; Shaw, William J.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2014-08-01

    The accuracy of winds derived from NEXRAD level II data is assessed by comparison with independent observations from 915 MHz radar wind profilers. The evaluation is carried out at two locations with very different terrain characteristics. One site is located in an area of complex terrain within the State Line Wind Energy Center in northeast Oregon. The other site is located in an area of flat terrain on the east-central Florida coast. The National Severe Storm Laboratory’s 2DVar algorithm is used to retrieve wind fields from the KPDT (Pendleton OR) and KMLB (Melbourne FL) NEXRAD radars. Comparisons between the 2DVar retrievals and the radar profilers were conducted over a period of about 6 months and at multiple height levels at each of the profiler sites. Wind speed correlations at most observation height levels fell in the range from 0.7 to 0.8, indicating that the retrieved winds followed temporal fluctuations in the profiler-observed winds reasonably well. The retrieved winds, however, consistently exhibited slow biases in the range of1 to 2 ms-1. Wind speed difference distributions were broad with standard deviations in the range from 3 to 4 ms-1. Results from the Florida site showed little change in the wind speed correlations and difference standard deviations with altitude between about 300 and 1400 m AGL. Over this same height range, results from the Oregon site showed a monotonic increase in the wind speed correlation and a monotonic decrease in the wind speed difference standard deviation with increasing altitude. The poorest overall agreement occurred at the lowest observable level (~300 m AGL) at the Oregon site, where the effects of the complex terrain were greatest.

  8. Conceptual design and evaluation of selected Space Station concepts: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The results of a space station conceptual design and evaluation study are summarized. The study represented a temporary focusing. Three space station configurations are characterized for user and crew requirements, operation and safety accommodations, engineering considerations including assembly and growth, structural dynamics, communications, thermal control and power systems, as well as system cost.

  9. Evaluation of absorption cycle for space station environmental control system application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. H.; Oneill, M. J.; Reid, H. C.; Bisenius, P. M.

    1972-01-01

    The study to evaluate an absorption cycle refrigeration system to provide environmental control for the space stations is reported. A zero-gravity liquid/vapor separator was designed and tested. The results were used to design a light-weight, efficient generator for the absorption refrigeration system. It is concluded that absorption cycle refrigeration is feasible for providing space station environmental control.

  10. Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) build 5 Test and Evaluation Master Plan (TEMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcich, Elizabeth; Cranston, Robert

    1994-05-01

    This document presents the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR), Build 5 enhancement, Test and Evaluation Master Plan (TEMP). This Build 5 TEMP identifies Operational Test and Evaluation (OT&E) objectives, responsibilities, resources, schedules, and critical test issues. The Build 5 enhancement consists of a Build 5A which provides connectivity to the Low Level Wind Shear Alert System (LLWAS) 2, and a Build 5B which provides connectivity to an LLWAS III. Build 5A displays LLWAS 2 wind data along with TDWR hazardous weather data on TDWR Geographic Situation Displays (GSD) and Ribbon Display Terminals (RDT). Build 5B provides additional capabilities such as having a Microburst Shear Integration Algorithm (MSIA), TDWR/LLWAS 3 Integration Algorithm, 15-day archiving and TDWR, LLWAS 2 and LLWAS 3 data integration.

  11. Seasonal Variation in Meteor Decay Time Profiles Measured by a Meteor Radar at King Sejong Station (62°S, 58°W), Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Kim, J.; Lee, C.; Jee, G.

    2008-12-01

    A VHF meteor radar at King Sejong Station (62°S, 58°W), Antarctica has been detecting echoes from more than 20,000 meteors per day since March 2007. Meteor echoes are decayed typically within seconds as meteor trail plasma spread away or are neutralized. Assuming that diffusion is the only process for decay of meteor echo signals, the atmospheric temperatures and pressures have been inferred from the measured meteor decay times at the peak meteor altitudes around 90 km. In this study, we analyze altitude profiles of meteor decay times in each month, which clearly show a maximum at 80 ~ 85 km. The maximum appears at higher altitude during austral summer than winter. The fast decay of meteor signals below the maximum cannot be explained by atmospheric diffusion which decreases with increasing atmospheric densities. We find that the measured meteor decay time profiles can be fitted with a loss rate profile, in addition to diffusion, with a peak altitude of 55 ~ 73 km and a peak rate of 4 ~ 15 sec- 1. The additional loss of meteor plasma may be due to electron absorption by icy particles in the mesosphere, but the estimated peak altitudes are much lower than the layers of NLC or PME. The estimated peak loss rates seem to be too large to be accounted by absorption by icy or dust particles. We will discuss other processes to explain the fast meteor times and their variation over season.

  12. The undersea habitat as a space station analog: Evaluation of research and training potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.; Wilhelm, John A.

    1985-01-01

    An evaluation is given of the utility of undersea habitats for both research and training on behavioral issues relative to the space station. The feasibility of a particular habitat, La Chalupa, is discussed.

  13. Accuracy Evaluation of Tracking Equipment Based on Star- Station- Difference Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, LiJian; Huang, XiaoJuan; Pan, Liang; Xu, RuXiang

    2016-02-01

    An approach based on the star station difference technology is proposed for accuracy evaluation of tracking and controlling shipboard equipments in this paper. The proposed method has the advantages of simple equipment, convenient measurement, and low requirements on environmental conditions.

  14. Evaluation of SO{sub 2} control technologies for three SCE&G power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.A. Jr.; Wiggins, D.S.

    1995-06-01

    South Carolina Electric and Gas, Co. (SCE&G) commissioned a detailed engineering study evaluating flue gas desulphurization (FGD) equipment for three coal fired generating stations in 1993. Raytheon Engineers and Constructors performed the study evaluating wet and dry FGD processes at three of SCE&G`s generating stations. This paper presents the results and conclusions from the study. The following areas are discussed: (1) Station Descriptions; (2) Process Design Criteria; (3) Study Goals and Methodology; (4) Results from the Economic and Kepner-Tregoe Analysis; and (5) Study Recommendations. The paper concludes with a lessons learned section discussing issues which arose during the study.

  15. The Retrieval of Ice Water Content from Radar Reflectivity Factor and Temperature and Its Use in Evaluating a Mesoscale Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Robin J.; Mittermaier, Marion P.; Illingworth, Anthony J.

    2006-02-01

    Ice clouds are an important yet largely unvalidated component of weather forecasting and climate models, but radar offers the potential to provide the necessary data to evaluate them. First in this paper, coordinated aircraft in situ measurements and scans by a 3-GHz radar are presented, demonstrating that, for stratiform midlatitude ice clouds, radar reflectivity in the Rayleigh-scattering regime may be reliably calculated from aircraft size spectra if the “Brown and Francis” mass size relationship is used. The comparisons spanned radar reflectivity values from -15 to +20 dBZ, ice water contents (IWCs) from 0.01 to 0.4 g m-3, and median volumetric diameters between 0.2 and 3 mm. In mixed-phase conditions the agreement is much poorer because of the higher-density ice particles present. A large midlatitude aircraft dataset is then used to derive expressions that relate radar reflectivity and temperature to ice water content and visible extinction coefficient. The analysis is an advance over previous work in several ways: the retrievals vary smoothly with both input parameters, different relationships are derived for the common radar frequencies of 3, 35, and 94 GHz, and the problem of retrieving the long-term mean and the horizontal variance of ice cloud parameters is considered separately. It is shown that the dependence on temperature arises because of the temperature dependence of the number concentration “intercept parameter” rather than mean particle size. A comparison is presented of ice water content derived from scanning 3-GHz radar with the values held in the Met Office mesoscale forecast model, for eight precipitating cases spanning 39 h over southern England. It is found that the model predicted mean IWC to within 10% of the observations at temperatures between -30° and -10°C but tended to underestimate it by around a factor of 2 at colder temperatures.

  16. Grumman evaluates Space Station thermal control and power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kandebo, S.W.

    1985-09-01

    Attention is given to the definition of requirements for the NASA Space Station's electrical power and thermal control systems, which must be highly dependable to minimize the need for external support and will embody a highly flexible modular design concept. Module maintenance will be performed by in-orbit replacement of failed modules, and energy storage system growth will be accomplished by the incorporation of additional modules. Both photovoltaic and solar heat-driven electrical generator concepts are under consideration as the basis of the power system.

  17. Performance evaluation of SPE electrolyzer for Space Station life support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, A. C.; Puskar, M. C.; Zagaja, J. A.; Miller, P. S.

    1987-01-01

    An static water-vapor feed electrolyzer has been developed as a candidate for Space Station life-support oxygen generation. The five-cell electrolysis module has eliminated the need for phase separation devices, pumps, and deionizers by transporting only water vapor to the solid polymer electrolyte cells. The introduction of an innovative electrochemical hydrogen pump allows the use of low-pressure reclaimed water to generate gas pressures of up to 230 psia. The electrolyzer has been tested in a computer-controlled test stand featuring continuous, cyclic, and standby operation (including automatic shutdown with fault detection).

  18. Tree Roots in Agroforestry: Evaluating Biomass and Distribution with Ground Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borden, Kira Alia

    The root systems of five tree species (Populus deltoides x nigra clone DN-177, Juglans nigra, Quercus rubra, Picea abies, and Thuja occidentalis) are described following non-intrusive imaging using ground penetrating radar (GPR). This research aimed to 1) assess the utility of GPR for in situ root studies and 2) employ GPR to estimate tree root biomass and distribution in an agroforestry system in southern Ontario, Canada. The mean coarse root biomass estimated from GPR analysis was 54.1 +/- 8.7 kg tree-1 (+/- S.E.; n=12), within 1 % of the mean coarse root biomass measured from matched excavations. The vertical distribution of detected roots varied among species, with T. occidentalis and P. abies roots concentrated in the top 20 cm and J. nigra and Q. rubra roots distinctly deeper. I evaluate these root systems based on their C storage potential and complementary root stratification with adjacent crops.

  19. Evaluation of a new wavelet-based compression algorithm for synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jun; Guo, Haitao; Wells, Raymond O., Jr.; Burrus, C. Sidney; Odegard, Jan E.

    1996-06-01

    In this paper we will discuss the performance of a new wavelet based embedded compression algorithm on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image data. This new algorithm uses index coding on the indices of the discrete wavelet transform of the image data and provides an embedded code to successively approximate it. Results on compressing still images, medical images as well as seismic traces indicate that the new algorithm performs quite competitively with other image compression algorithms. The evaluation for SAR image compression of it will be presented in this paper. One advantage of the new algorithm presented here is that the compressed data is encoded in such a way as to facilitate processing in the compressed wavelet domain, which is a significant aspect considering the rate at which SAR data is collected and the desire to process the data 'near real time'.

  20. 47 CFR 80.389 - Frequencies for maritime support stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... associated public coast station. (b) Shore radar and radiolocation tests. The following frequency bands are available for assignment to demonstrate radar and radiolocation equipment. The use of frequencies...

  1. 47 CFR 80.389 - Frequencies for maritime support stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... associated public coast station. (b) Shore radar and radiolocation tests. The following frequency bands are available for assignment to demonstrate radar and radiolocation equipment. The use of frequencies...

  2. 47 CFR 80.389 - Frequencies for maritime support stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... associated public coast station. (b) Shore radar and radiolocation tests. The following frequency bands are available for assignment to demonstrate radar and radiolocation equipment. The use of frequencies...

  3. 47 CFR 80.389 - Frequencies for maritime support stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... associated public coast station. (b) Shore radar and radiolocation tests. The following frequency bands are available for assignment to demonstrate radar and radiolocation equipment. The use of frequencies...

  4. 47 CFR 80.389 - Frequencies for maritime support stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... associated public coast station. (b) Shore radar and radiolocation tests. The following frequency bands are available for assignment to demonstrate radar and radiolocation equipment. The use of frequencies...

  5. Generalized Geologic evaluation of side looking radar imagery of the Teton Range and Jackson Hole, northwestern Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, J. D.

    1970-01-01

    A generalized geologic evaluation of lines, localities, and features of various types that are visible on a series of radar image strips covering the Teton Range and Jackson Hole in northwestern Wyoming, is given. No attempt was made to collate a complete geologic map with the radar image at each locality. Formation names, problems of geologic interpretation, and details of stratigraphy and structure that are not directly pertinent to a study of the imagery are omitted, but reference is made to publications that contain this type of supplementary information.

  6. Study to investigate and evaluate means of optimizing the radar function for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the spiral scan was performed for antenna sizes ranging from 20 inches to 36 inches in diameter and for search angles characteristic of both the radar and the communication acquisition modes. The power budgets for passive target radar detection were calculated for antenna diameters ranging from 20 to 36 inches. Dwell times commensurate with spiral scan were used for these budget calculations. The signal design for the candidate pulse Doppler system is summarized. Ground return analysis carried out for the passive target radar mode is examined, and the details are presented. A concluding description of the proposed candidate radar/communication system configuration is given.

  7. An evaluation of oxygen-hydrogen propulsion systems for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemetson, R. W.; Garrison, P. W.; Hannum, N. P.

    1985-01-01

    Conceptual designs for O2/H2 chemical and resistojet propulsion systems for the space station was developed and evaluated. The evolution of propulsion requirements was considered as the space station configuration and its utilization as a space transportation node change over the first decade of operation. The characteristics of candidate O2/H2 auxiliary propulsion systems are determined, and opportunities for integration with the OTV tank farm and the space station life support, power and thermal control subsystems are investigated. OTV tank farm boiloff can provide a major portion of the growth station impulse requirements and CO2 from the life support system can be a significant propellant resource, provided it is not denied by closure of that subsystem. Waste heat from the thermal control system is sufficient for many propellant conditioning requirements. It is concluded that the optimum level of subsystem integration must be based on higher level space station studies.

  8. An evaluation of oxygen/hydrogen propulsion systems for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemetson, R. W.; Garrison, P. W.; Hannum, N. P.

    1985-01-01

    Conceptual designs for O2/H2 chemical and resistojet propulsion systems for the Space Station was developed and evaluated. The evolution of propulsion requirements was considered as the Space Station configuration and its utilization as a space transportation node change over the first decade of operation. The characteristics of candidate O2/H2 auxiliary propulsion systems are determined, and opportunities for integration with the OTV tank farm and the Space Station life support, power and thermal control subsystems are investigated. OTV tank farm boiloff can provide a major portion of the growth station impulse requirements and CO2 from the life support system can be a significant propellant resource, provided it is not denied by closure of that subsystem. Waste heat from the thermal control system is sufficient for many propellant conditioning requirements. It is concluded that the optimum level of subsystem integration must be based on higher level Space Station studies.

  9. Evaluation of vapor recovery systems efficiency and personal exposure in service stations in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Núñez, Xochitl; Hernández-Solís, José M; Ruiz-Suárez, Luis G

    2003-06-20

    Results of a field study on the efficiency of vapor recovery systems currently used in gasoline service stations in Mexico City are presented. Nine gasoline stations were studied, representing the several technologies available in Mexico City. The test was applied to a fixed vehicular fleet of approximately 10 private and public service vehicles. Each one of the gasoline service stations tested reported efficiencies above 80% in the recovery of vapor losses from gasoline which is the minimum permissible value by Mexican regulations. Implications to the emissions inventory are discussed. A second goal of this study was to measure the potential exposure of service attendants to three important components of gasoline: benzene; toluene; and xylenes. The influence of spatial location of personnel within the service station was also evaluated by measuring levels of the three compounds both at the refueling area and in the service station office. Results are discussed and compared to a previous study. PMID:12798092

  10. International Space Station Bacteria Filter Element Service Life Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) uses high-efficiency particulate air filters to remove particulate matter from the cabin atmosphere. Known as bacteria filter elements (BFEs), there are 13 elements deployed on board the ISS's U.S. segment in the flight 4R assembly level. The preflight service life prediction of 1 yr for the BFEs is based upon engineering analysis of data collected during developmental testing that used a synthetic dust challenge. While this challenge is considered reasonable and conservative from a design perspective, an understanding of the actual filter loading is required to best manage the critical ISS program resources. Testing was conducted on BFEs returned from the ISS to refine the service life prediction. Results from this testing and implications to ISS resource management are provided.

  11. Use of radars to monitor stream discharge by noncontact methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, J.E.; Cheng, R.T.; Haeni, F.P.; Melcher, N.; Spicer, K.R.; Hayes, E.; Plant, W.; Hayes, K.; Teague, C.; Barrick, D.

    2006-01-01

    Conventional measurements of river flows are costly, time-consuming, and frequently dangerous. This report evaluates the use of a continuous wave microwave radar, a monostatic UHF Doppler radar, a pulsed Doppler microwave radar, and a ground-penetrating radar to measure river flows continuously over long periods and without touching the water with any instruments. The experiments duplicate the flow records from conventional stream gauging stations on the San Joaquin River in California and the Cowlitz River in Washington. The purpose of the experiments was to directly measure the parameters necessary to compute flow: surface velocity (converted to mean velocity) and cross-sectional area, thereby avoiding the uncertainty, complexity, and cost of maintaining rating curves. River channel cross sections were measured by ground-penetrating radar suspended above the river. River surface water velocity was obtained by Bragg scattering of microwave and UHF Doppler radars, and the surface velocity data were converted to mean velocity on the basis of detailed velocity profiles measured by current meters and hydroacoustic instruments. Experiments using these radars to acquire a continuous record of flow were conducted for 4 weeks on the San Joaquin River and for 16 weeks on the Cowlitz River. At the San Joaquin River the radar noncontact measurements produced discharges more than 20% higher than the other independent measurements in the early part of the experiment. After the first 3 days, the noncontact radar discharge measurements were within 5% of the rating values. On the Cowlitz River at Castle Rock, correlation coefficients between the USGS stream gauging station rating curve discharge and discharge computed from three different Doppler radar systems and GPR data over the 16 week experiment were 0.883, 0.969, and 0.992. Noncontact radar results were within a few percent of discharge values obtained by gauging station, current meter, and hydroacoustic methods. Time series of surface velocity obtained by different radars in the Cowlitz River experiment also show small-amplitude pulsations not found in stage records that reflect tidal energy at the gauging station. Noncontact discharge measurements made during a flood on 30 January 2004 agreed with the rated discharge to within 5%. Measurement at both field sites confirm that lognormal velocity profiles exist for a wide range of flows in these rivers, and mean velocity is approximately 0.85 times measured surface velocity. Noncontact methods of flow measurement appear to (1) be as accurate as conventional methods, (2) obtain data when standard contact methods are dangerous or cannot be obtained, and (3) provide insight into flow dynamics not available from detailed stage records alone. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Evaluation of active thermal control options for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, J. R.; Gruszczynski, M. J.; Owen, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of various Space Station (MSS) active thermal control systems options under consideration because of their potential low weight, efficiency and reliability is reported. The study addressed ordinary and diode-action body mounted radiators, thermal storage, the area and pumping power requirements for single-phase cooling of cold plates, and single-phase and two-phase active cooling loops. The base configuration considered was a core MSS formed by four habitable modules on which are mounted heat pipe radiators articulated to be always edge-on to the sun. A simulation was performed which accounted for the available heat sinks, several thermal loads and the heat rejection capability. No benefits were found with diode-action radiators if the solar absorption is 0.1 or less, although diode-action heat pipes will maintain a higher level of performance in the presence of coating degradation. Thermal storage becomes important only with radiator coating degradation. Water can be up to three times as efficient as Freon as a heat transfer medium. Finally, single-phase cooling offers a lower system mass than two-phase cooling if varying temperature heat loads can be accommodated.

  13. Anatolian surface wave evaluated at GEOFON Station ISP Isparta, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erduran, Murat; Çakır, Özcan; Tezel, Timur; Şahin, Şakir; Alptekin, Ömer

    2007-04-01

    We have studied seismic surface waves of 255 shallow regional earthquakes recently recorded at GEOFON station ISP (Isparta, Turkey) and have selected these 52 recordings with high signal-to-noise ratio for further analysis. An attempt was made by the simultaneous use of the Rayleigh and Love surface wave data to interpret the planar crust and uppermost mantle velocity structure beneath the Anatolian plate using a differential least-square inversion technique. The shear-wave velocities near the surface show a gradational change from approximately 2.2 to 3.6 km s - 1 in the depth range 0-10 km. The mid-crustal depth range indicating a weakly developed low velocity zone has shear-wave velocities around 3.55 km s - 1 . The Moho discontinuity characterizing the crust-mantle velocity transition appears somewhat gradual between the depth range ˜ 25-45 km. The surface waves approaching from the northern Anatolia are estimated to travel a crustal thickness of ˜ 33 km whilst those from the southwestern Anatolia and part of east Mediterranean Sea indicate a thicker crust at ˜ 37 km. The eastern Anatolia events traveled even thicker crust at ˜ 41 km. A low sub-Moho velocity is estimated at ˜ 4.27 km s - 1 , although consistent with other similar studies in the region. The current velocities are considerably slower than indicated by the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) in almost all depth ranges.

  14. Remote infrared signage evaluation for transit stations and intersections.

    PubMed

    Crandall, W; Brabyn, J; Bentzen, B L; Myers, L

    1999-10-01

    Opportunities for education and employment depend upon effective and independent travel. For mainstream society, this is accomplished to a large extent by printed signs. People who are print disabled, visually impaired, or totally blind are at a disadvantage because they do not have access to signage. Remote infrared signage, such as the Talking Signs (TS) system, provides a solution to this need by labeling the environment for distant viewing. The system uses a transmitting "sign" and a hand-held receiver to tell people about their surroundings. In a seamless infrared signage environment, a visually impaired traveler could: walk safely across an intersection to an ATM or fare machine, from fare machine to bus stop, from bus stop to bus; from bus to building, from building to elevator, from elevator to office, from office to restroom, and so forth. This paper focuses on two problems that are among the most challenging and dangerous faced by blind travelers: negotiating complex transit stations and controlled intersections. We report on human factors studies of TS in these critical tasks, examining such issues as how much training is needed to use the system, its impact on performance and safety, benefits for different population subgroups and user opinions of its value. Results indicate that blind people can quickly and easily learn to use remote infrared signage effectively, and that its use improves travel safety, efficiency, and independence. PMID:10678457

  15. Evaluating Frontal Precipitation with a Spectral Microphysics Mesoscale Model and a Satellite Simulator as Compared to Radar and Radiometer Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, M.; Braun, S. A.; Matsui, T.; Iguchi, T.; Williams, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) onboard NASA Aqua satellite and a ground-based precipitation profiling radar sampled a frontal precipitation event in the US west coast on 30 to 31 December 2005. Simulations with bulk microphysics schemes in the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model have been evaluated with those remote sensing data. In the current study, we continue similar work to evaluate a spectral bin microphysics (SBM) scheme, HUCM, in the WRF model. The Goddard-Satellite Data Simulation Unit (G-SDSU) is used to simulate quantities observed by the radar and radiometer. With advanced representation of cloud and precipitation microphysics processes, the HUCM scheme predicts distributions of 7 hydrometeor species as storms evolve. In this study, the simulation with HUCM well captured the structure of the precipitation and its microphysics characteristics. In addition, it improved total precipitation ice mass simulation and corrected, to a certain extent, the large low bias of ice scattering signature in the bulk scheme simulations. However, the radar reflectivity simulations with the HUCM scheme were not improved as compared to the bulk schemes. We conducted investigations to understand how microphysical processes and properties, such as snow break up parameter and particle fall velocities would influence precipitation size distribution and spectrum of water paths, and further modify radar and/or radiometer simulations. Influence by ice nuclei is going to be examined as well.

  16. Multi-hundred kilowatt roll ring assembly evaluation results. [for Space Station power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, David D.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has been evaluating low loss multi-hundred-kilowatt Roll Ring assemblies (an 8 circuit and a 4 circuit) for use on Space Station as the rotating joint power transfer device. In this device ac or dc power is transferred across the rotating joint through compressed rotating flexures. Results and conclusions of the evaluation program are presented.

  17. Ground penetrating radar and direct current resistivity evaluation of the desiccation test cap, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.E.; Cumbest, R.J.

    1996-04-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has a variety of waste units that may be temporarily or permanently stabilized by closure using an impermeable cover to prevent groundwater infiltration. The placement of an engineered kaolin clay layer over a waste unit is an accepted and economical technique for providing an impermeable cover but the long term stability and integrity of the clay in non-arid conditions is unknown. A simulated kaolin cap has been constructed at the SRA adjacent to the Burial Ground Complex. The cap is designed to evaluate the effects of desiccation on clay integrity, therefore half of the cap is covered with native soil to prevent drying, while the remainder of the cap is exposed. Measurements of the continuing impermeability of a clay cap are difficult because intrusive techniques may locally compromise the structure. Point measurements made to evaluate clay integrity, such as those from grid sampling or coring and made through a soil cover, may miss cracks, joints or fissures, and may not allow for mapping of the lateral extent of elongate features. Because of these problems, a non-invasive technique is needed to map clay integrity, below a soil or vegetation cover, which is capable of moderate to rapid investigation speeds. Two non-intrusive geophysical techniques, direct current resistivity and ground penetrating radar (GPR), have been successful at the SRS in geologically mapping shallow subsurface clay layers. The applicability of each technique in detecting the clay layer in the desiccation test cap and associated anomalies was investigated.

  18. 51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner building 105 from upper catwalk level showing emanating waveguides from upper switch (upper one-fourth of photograph) and emanating waveguides from lower radar scanner switch in vertical runs. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  19. Performance Evaluation of Target Detection with a Near-Space Vehicle-Borne Radar in Blackout Condition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanpeng; Li, Xiang; Wang, Hongqiang; Deng, Bin; Qin, Yuliang

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a very important sensor in surveillance applications. Near-space vehicle-borne radar (NSVBR) is a novel installation of a radar system, which offers many benefits, like being highly suited to the remote sensing of extremely large areas, having a rapidly deployable capability and having low vulnerability to electronic countermeasures. Unfortunately, a target detection challenge arises because of complicated scenarios, such as nuclear blackout, rain attenuation, etc. In these cases, extra care is needed to evaluate the detection performance in blackout situations, since this a classical problem along with the application of an NSVBR. However, the existing evaluation measures are the probability of detection and the receiver operating curve (ROC), which cannot offer detailed information in such a complicated application. This work focuses on such requirements. We first investigate the effect of blackout on an electromagnetic wave. Performance evaluation indexes are then built: three evaluation indexes on the detection capability and two evaluation indexes on the robustness of the detection process. Simulation results show that the proposed measure will offer information on the detailed performance of detection. These measures are therefore very useful in detecting the target of interest in a remote sensing system and are helpful for both the NSVBR designers and users. PMID:26751445

  20. Performance Evaluation of Target Detection with a Near-Space Vehicle-Borne Radar in Blackout Condition.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanpeng; Li, Xiang; Wang, Hongqiang; Deng, Bin; Qin, Yuliang

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a very important sensor in surveillance applications. Near-space vehicle-borne radar (NSVBR) is a novel installation of a radar system, which offers many benefits, like being highly suited to the remote sensing of extremely large areas, having a rapidly deployable capability and having low vulnerability to electronic countermeasures. Unfortunately, a target detection challenge arises because of complicated scenarios, such as nuclear blackout, rain attenuation, etc. In these cases, extra care is needed to evaluate the detection performance in blackout situations, since this a classical problem along with the application of an NSVBR. However, the existing evaluation measures are the probability of detection and the receiver operating curve (ROC), which cannot offer detailed information in such a complicated application. This work focuses on such requirements. We first investigate the effect of blackout on an electromagnetic wave. Performance evaluation indexes are then built: three evaluation indexes on the detection capability and two evaluation indexes on the robustness of the detection process. Simulation results show that the proposed measure will offer information on the detailed performance of detection. These measures are therefore very useful in detecting the target of interest in a remote sensing system and are helpful for both the NSVBR designers and users. PMID:26751445

  1. Performance evaluation of the Enraf-Nonius Model 872 radar gage

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.J.; Park, W.R.

    1992-12-01

    There are indications that the Enraf-Nonius Radar Gage installed in Tank 241-SY-101 may not be providing an accurate reading of the true surface level in the waste tank. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) performed an initial study to determine the effect of the following items on the distance read by the gage: Tank riser; Material permittivity and conductivity Foam; Proportion of supernatant to solid material in the field of view of the instrument; Physical geometry of the supernatant and solid material changing in the field of view with respect to time; and Varying water content in the solid material. The results of the tests indicate that distance measured by the radar gage is affected by the permittivity, conductivity, and angle of the target surface. These parameters affect the complex input impedance of the signal received by the radar gage to measure the distance to the target. In Tank 101-SY, the radar gage is placed on top of a 12 in. diameter riser. The riser affects the field of view of the instrument, and a much smaller target surface is detected when the radar beam propagates through a riser. In addition, the riser acts as a waveguide, and standing waves are enhanced between the target surface and the radar gage. The result is a change in the level measured by the radar gage due to changing properties of the target surface even when the distance to the target does not change. The test results indicate that the radar will not detect dry crust or foam. However, if the crust or foam is stirred so that it becomes wet, then the crust or foam became detectable. The level read using the radar gage decreased as the moisture in the crust or foam evaporated.

  2. Test and evaluation of the Airport Surveillance Radar (ASR)-8 wind shear detection system (phase 2), revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offi, D. L.; Lewis, W.; Lee, T.; Delamarche, A.

    1980-08-01

    A wind shear detection system developed by the Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) to operate with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Airport Surveillance Radar (ASR)-8 was installed and is being tested at the FAA technical Center. Initial efforts, previously reported in Report NA-78-59-LR, were directed toward hardware and software shakedown and feasibility determination. Second phase tests compared radar with aircraft and tower winds, evaluated the wind shear measurement capability under various weather conditions, and investigated the effectiveness of a simple two-azimuth pointing strategy and system capabilities and limitations. Results showed the system to be compatible with and to operate satisfactorily with the ASR-8. The processing and spectral display of clear air and precipitation returns is feasible. The accuracy of agreement between radar-measured winds and components of the aircraft-measured winds in both radially oriented flights and runway offset flights, using a two-azimuth pointing technique, was examined. Radar versus tower wind agreement was also examined. Potentially dangerous wind shears associated with weather during these tests were detectable. Certain system limitations also have been defined and considered. It is recommended that tests continue to complete definition of and demonstrate capabilities in all weather situations, to optimize performance, and to provide information to specify system design for possible development of a prototype model.

  3. Evaluation of X-band polarimetric radar estimation of rainfall and rain drop size distribution parameters in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffi, A. K.; Gosset, M.; Zahiri, E.-P.; Ochou, A. D.; Kacou, M.; Cazenave, F.; Assamoi, P.

    2014-06-01

    As part of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) field campaign an X-band dual-polarization Doppler radar was deployed in Benin, West-Africa, in 2006 and 2007, together with a reinforced rain gauge network and several optical disdrometers. Based on this data set, a comparative study of several rainfall estimators that use X-band polarimetric radar data is presented. In tropical convective systems as encountered in Benin, microwave attenuation by rain is significant and quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) at X-band is a challenge. Here, several algorithms based on the combined use of reflectivity, differential reflectivity and differential phase shift are evaluated against rain gauges and disdrometers. Four rainfall estimators were tested on twelve rainy events: the use of attenuation corrected reflectivity only (estimator R(ZH)), the use of the specific phase shift only R(KDP), the combination of specific phase shift and differential reflectivity R(KDP,ZDR) and an estimator that uses three radar parameters R(ZH,ZDR,KDP). The coefficients of the power law relationships between rain rate and radar variables were adjusted either based on disdrometer data and simulation, or on radar-gauges observations. The three polarimetric based algorithms with coefficients predetermined on observations outperform the R(ZH) estimator for rain rates above 10 mm/h which explain most of the rainfall in the studied region. For the highest rain rates (above 30 mm/h) R(KDP) shows even better scores, and given its performances and its simplicity of implementation, is recommended. The radar based retrieval of two parameters of the rain drop size distribution, the normalized intercept parameter NW and the volumetric median diameter Dm was evaluated on four rainy days thanks to disdrometers. The frequency distributions of the two parameters retrieved by the radar are very close to those observed with the disdrometer. NW retrieval based on a combination of ZH-KDP-ZDR works well whatever the a priori assumption made on the drop shapes. Dm retrieval based on ZDR alone performs well, but if satisfactory ZDR measurements are not available, the combination ZH-KDP provides satisfactory results for both Dm and NW if an appropriate a priori assumption on drop shape is made.

  4. Tracking Ability Evaluation and Calculation of Shipborne Tracking Radar for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yuanxin; Cong, Bo

    2016-02-01

    This paper analyzes the dynamic lag and tracking ability of shipborne tracking radar for space applications. A novel calculation formula of azimuth accuracy is proposed which is more reasonable compared with conventional methods.

  5. Geostatistical evaluation of satellite radar altimetry for high-resolution mapping of Lambert Glacier, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzfeld, Ute C.; Lingle, Craig S.; Lee, Li-Her

    1993-01-01

    The potential of satellite radar altimetry for high-resolution mapping of Antarctic ice streams is evaluated, using retracked and slope-corrected data from the Lambert Glacier and Amery Ice Shelf area, East Antarctica, acquired by Geosat during the Exact Repeat Mission (ERM), 1986-89. The map area includes lower Lambert Glacier north of 72.18 deg S, the southern Amery Ice Shelf, and the grounded inland ice sheet on both sides. The Geosat ERM altimetry is found to provide substantially more complete coverage than the 1978 Seasat altimetry, due to improved tracking. Variogram methods are used to estimate the noise levels in the data as a function of position throughout the map area. The spatial structure in the data is quantified by constructing experimental variograms using altimetry from the area of the grounding zone of Lambert Glacier, which is the area chiefly of interest in this topographically complex region. Kriging is employed to invert the along-track height measurements onto a fine-scale 3 km grid. The unsmoothed along-track Geosat ERM altimetry yields spatially continuous maps showing the main topographic features of lower Lambert Glacier, upper Amery Ice Shelf and the adjacent inland ice sheet. The probable position of the grounding line of Lambert Glacier is identified from a break in slope at the grounded ice/floating ice transition. The approximate standard error of the kriged map is inferred from the data noise levels.

  6. The Pyla 2001 Experiment: Evaluation of Polarimetric Radar Capabilities over a Forested Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechambre, M.; Le Hgarat, S.; Cavelier, S.; Dreuillet, P.; Champion, I.

    2003-04-01

    Low frequency SAR (P-band) represents a promising tool for remote sensing, since it allows us to investigate the sub-surface down to several meters under certain circumstances as well as the vegetation cover. On the other hand, polarimetric capabilities of such system bring also new contributions in SAR measurements. ONERA developed a multi-frequency, full polarimetric, high resolution airborne SAR facility named RAMSES which now operates at P- band (435 MHz). An experiment was performed over the Pyla region near Bordeaux, in France during April and May 2001, in order to assess the benefit of low frequency, multi-polarization and polarimetric in interpreting SAR measurements over natural sites. This area was chosen as a suitable laboratory site for fieldwork validation : (1) sub- surface soil moisture detection (Pyla sand dune), (2) biomass evaluation (Nezer forest), (3) mapping of the ocean bathymetry and salinity (basin of Arcachon), and (4) archeology. In addition, a dedicated P-band calibration site was set up in order to fully exploit the polarimetric information as well as ground measurements in order to derive the biophysical and geophysical characteristics of the terrain. During this workshop, firt results of this experiment obtained over the Nezer test site (a forested area located in les Landes) will be investigated. Amplitude and phase distributions of the radar signal derived from several images will be considered in terms of the geometrical tree parameters and the biomass.

  7. Evaluation of Technologies for Inclusion in the US Army Counterfire Radar Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kaldenbach, Brian J; Killough, Stephen M; Moore, Michael Roy; Buckner, Mark A; Dobies, Stan

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the effort by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to identify technologies that can be inserted into counterfire radar programs over the next 2 to 20 years. The investigation was funded by the U.S. Army PM (Project Manager) Radars. There are four broad time increments under consideration: (1) incremental improvements to currently fielded systems such as AN/TPQ-36, (2) technologies that can be inserted into near-future systems such as EQ-36, (3) technologies that can be an integral part of conceptual designs of multi-mission radar (MMR) for Future Combat Systems Brigade Combat Team [FCS (BCT)] and (4) technologies that could enable capabilities beyond MMR, such as true on-the-move radar sensors. The science of each technology is described, and how it could add capabilities to counterfire radar is discussed. The approach used for this paper is a combination of a top-down analysis of program requirements and a bottom-up review of potential technologies. An emphasis is placed on reviewing technologies beyond those already planned for ongoing radar upgrades. Drawing on broad areas of expertise such as material sciences and information processing, technologies outside the normal scope of radar designers were identified for analysis. To establish a baseline, current radar systems and lessons learned from deployment of those systems were reviewed, along with requirements, plans, user interviews, and policies regarding future systems. A limited analysis of capability gaps and capability requirements was performed to help prioritize the technologies reviewed. As potential technologies were identified, their utility to address the identified capability needs was analyzed and described.

  8. Evaluation of pan evaporation modeling with two different neural networks and weather station data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungwon; Singh, Vijay P.; Seo, Youngmin

    2014-07-01

    This study evaluates neural networks models for estimating daily pan evaporation for inland and coastal stations in Republic of Korea. A multilayer perceptron neural networks model (MLP-NNM) and a cascade correlation neural networks model (CCNNM) are developed for local implementation. Five-input models (MLP 5 and CCNNM 5) are generally found to be the best for local implementation. The optimal neural networks models, including MLP 4, MLP 5, CCNNM 4, and CCNNM 5, perform well for homogeneous (cross-stations 1 and 2) and nonhomogeneous (cross-stations 3 and 4) weather stations. Statistical results of CCNNM are better than those of MLP-NNM during the test period for homogeneous and nonhomogeneous weather stations except for MLP 4 being better in BUS-DAE and POH-DAE, and MLP 5 being better in POH-DAE. Applying the conventional models for the test period, it is found that neural networks models perform better than the conventional models for local, homogeneous, and nonhomogeneous weather stations.

  9. Planetary Radar with the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Alyson; Ford, John M.; Watts, Galen

    2014-11-01

    The large aperture and sensitive receivers of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) make it an attractive receiving station for bistatic radar experiments. Consequently, it has been used as a receive station for radar observations since its commissioning in 2001. The GBT is equipped with receivers for all common planetary radar transmitters at P, S, and X band, as well as for future radars at up to 86 GHz. We describe the technical capabilities of the GBT and its instrumentation in terms of its tracking and RF performance, the available radar backends, and select science results obtained through the use of the GBT.

  10. EVALUATION OF FULL SCALE FABRIC FILTERS ON UTILITY BOILERS: SPS HARRINGTON STATION UNIT 3

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of total mass and fractional size particulate emission tests at Southwestern Public Service's Harrington Station Unit 3 from July 8 to 11, 1981, as part of a program to evaluate and characterize the performance of full-scale fabric filter units installed ...

  11. Radar Scan Strategies for the Patrick Air Force Base Weather Surveillance Radar, Model-74C, Replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David

    2008-01-01

    The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) is replacing the Weather Surveillance Radar, Model 74C (WSR-74C) at Patrick Air Force Base (PAFB), with a Doppler, dual polarization radar, the Radtec 43/250. A new scan strategy is needed for the Radtec 43/250, to provide high vertical resolution data over the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) launch pads, while taking advantage of the new radar's advanced capabilities for detecting severe weather phenomena associated with convection within the 45 WS area of responsibility. The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed several scan strategies customized for the operational needs of the 45 WS. The AMU also developed a plan for evaluating the scan strategies in the period prior to operational acceptance, currently scheduled for November 2008.

  12. Evaluation of Two Methods for Determining Surface Soil Moisture from Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, D.; Moran, M.; Bryant, R.; Holifield, C.; Skirvin, S.; Rahman, M.; Kershner, C.; Watts, J.; Slocum, K.

    2003-12-01

    Distributed soil moisture data are useful for determining cross-country mobility, irrigation scheduling, pest management strategy, biomass production and potential for soil erosion and infiltration. Large area monitoring of surface soil moisture (to depths of 5 cm) is possible with radar remote sensing techniques, but accuracy must be assessed before it can be implemented operationally. Two methods for predicting surface soil moisture from radar satellite imagery were tested in sparsely vegetated, semi-arid Arizona rangelands. In the first approach, the Integral Equation Method (IEM) model was run in the forward direction to generate a Look-Up-Table (LUT) of radar backscatter for the expected range of surface roughness and moisture content in the study area. The LUT was used to derive surface soil moisture estimates from radar images acquired at the study site. In the second approach, a difference index was made from time series differences in radar backscatter signals from wet and dry soils. The difference index minimized variations in surface roughness and resulted in a direct relation between difference and surface soil moisture. For both approaches, results were validated against in situ measurements of surface soil moisture at 46 sites with dielectric probes at the time of satellite overpass. The modeling approach requires surface roughness inputs which may be difficult to obtain, whereas the difference technique requires only a dry surface reference backscatter for comparison with wetter surface backscatter to determine moisture content.

  13. Neutral buoyancy evaluation of technologies for space station external operations. [EVA weightlessness simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, D. L.; Bowden, M. L.; Spofford, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    In order to perform a complete systems analysis for almost any large space program, it is vital to have a thorough understanding of human capabilities in extravehicular activity (EVA). The present investigation is concerned with the most significant results from the MIT Space Systems Lab's neutral buoyancy tests. An evaluation of neutral buoyancy is considered along with the tested structures, aspects of learning, productivity, time and motion analysis, and assembly loads. Attention is given to EVA assembly with a manned maneuvering unit, teleoperated structural assembly, an integrated control station, a beam assembly teleoperator, and space station proximity operations.

  14. Evaluation of the effectiveness of shielding and filtering of HVDC converter stations

    SciTech Connect

    Dallaire, R.D.; Maruvada, P.S.

    1989-04-01

    The electromagnetic interference (EMI) generated by the periodic turn-on and turn-off of the valves is an important consideration in the design of HVDC converter stations. Remedial measures such as shielding the valve hall and filtering have been used in order to reduce the interference levels to acceptable values. The application of recently-developed Numerical Electromagnetic Code (NEC) to the problem of EMI from HVDC converter stations is investigated in this paper, with particular emphasis on evaluating the effectiveness of valve hall shielding and filtering.

  15. Evaluation of emergency drug releases from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Quarantine Stations.

    PubMed

    Roohi, Shahrokh; Grinnell, Margaret; Sandoval, Michelle; Cohen, Nicole J; Crocker, Kimberly; Allen, Christopher; Dougherty, Cindy; Jolly, Julian; Pesik, Nicki

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Quarantine Stations distribute select lifesaving drug products that are not commercially available or are in limited supply in the United States for emergency treatment of certain health conditions. Following a retrospective analysis of shipment records, the authors estimated an average of 6.66 hours saved per shipment when drug products were distributed from quarantine stations compared to a hypothetical centralized site from CDC headquarters in Atlanta, GA. This evaluation supports the continued use of a decentralized model which leverages CDC's regional presence and maximizes efficiency in the distribution of lifesaving drugs. PMID:25779896

  16. CETF Space Station payload pointing system design and analysis feasibility study. [Critical Evaluation Task Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smagala, Tom; Mcglew, Dave

    1988-01-01

    The expected pointing performance of an attached payload coupled to the Critical Evaluation Task Force Space Station via a payload pointing system (PPS) is determined. The PPS is a 3-axis gimbal which provides the capability for maintaining inertial pointing of a payload in the presence of disturbances associated with the Space Station environment. A system where the axes of rotation were offset from the payload center of mass (CM) by 10 in. in the Z axis was studied as well as a system having the payload CM offset by only 1 inch. There is a significant improvement in pointing performance when going from the 10 in. to the 1 in. gimbal offset.

  17. Evaluation of two algorithms for a network of coastal HF radars in the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohut, Josh; Roarty, Hugh; Randall-Goodwin, Evan; Glenn, Scott; Lichtenwalner, C. Sage

    2012-06-01

    The National High Frequency (HF) Surface Current Mapping Radar Network is being developed as a backbone system within the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System. This paper focuses on the application of HF radar-derived surface current maps to U.S. Coast Guard Search and Rescue operations along the Mid-Atlantic coast of the USA. In that context, we evaluated two algorithms used to combine maps of radial currents into a single map of total vector currents. In situ data provided by seven drifter deployments and four bottom-mounted current meters were used to (1) evaluate the well-established unweighted least squares (UWLS) and the more recently adapted optimal interpolation (OI) algorithms and (2) quantify the sensitivity of the OI algorithm to varying decorrelation scales and error thresholds. Results with both algorithms were shown to depend on the location within the HF radar data footprint. The comparisons near the center of the HF radar coverage showed no significant difference between the two algorithms. The most significant distinction between the two was seen in the drifter trajectories. With these simulations, the weighting of radial velocities by distance in the OI implementation was very effective at reducing both the distance between the actual drifter and the cluster of simulated particles as well as the scale of the search area that encompasses them. In this study, the OI further reduced the already improved UWLS-based search areas by an additional factor of 2. The results also indicated that the OI output was relatively insensitive to the varying decorrelation scales and error thresholds tested.

  18. Noncooperative rendezvous radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A fire control radar system was developed, assembled, and modified. The baseline system and modified angle tracking system are described along with the performance characteristics of the baseline and modified systems. Proposed changes to provide additional techniques for radar evaluation are presented along with flight test data.

  19. Vehicle-mounted ground penetrating radar (Mine Stalker III) field evaluation in Angola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudato, Stephen; Hart, Kerry; Nevard, Michael; Lauziere, Steven; Grant, Shaun

    2014-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining Research and Development (HD R&D) Program, Non-Intrusive Inspection Technology (NIITEK), Inc. and The HALO Trust have over the last decade funded, developed and tested various prototype vehicle mounted ground penetrating radar (GPR) systems named the Mine Stalker. The HD R&D Program and NIITEK developed the Mine Stalker to detect low metal anti-tank (LM-AT) mines in roads. The country of Angola is severely affected by LM-AT mines in and off road, some of which are buried beyond the effective range of detection sensors current used in country. The threat from LM-AT mines such as the South African Number 8 (No. 8) and the Chinese Type 72 (72AT) still persist from Angola's 30 years of civil war. These LM-AT threats are undetectable at depths greater than 5 to 10 centimeters using metal detection technology. Clearing commerce routes are a critical requirement before Angola can rebuild its infrastructure and improve safety conditions for the local populace. The Halo Trust, a non-governmental demining organization (NGO) focused on demining and clearance of unexploded ordnance (UXO), has partnered with the HD R&D Program to conduct an operational field evaluation (OFE) of the Mine Stalker III (MS3) in Angola. Preliminary testing and training efforts yielded encouraging results. This paper presents a review of the data collected, testing results, system limitations and deficiencies while operating in a real world environment. Our goal is to demonstrate and validate this technology in live minefield environments, and to collect data to prompt future developments to the system.

  20. Evaluation of wind profiles from the NERC MST Radar, Aberystwyth, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. F.; Vaughan, G.; Hooper, D. A.

    2014-05-01

    This study quantifies the uncertainties in winds measured by the Aberystwyth Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere (MST) radar (52.4° N, 4.0° W), before and after its renovation in March 2011. 127 radiosondes provide an independent measure of winds. Differences between radiosonde and radar-measured horizontal winds are correlated with long-term averages of vertical velocities, suggesting an influence from local mountain waves. These local influences are an important consideration when using radar winds as a measure of regional conditions, particularly for numerical weather prediction. In those applications, local effects represent a source of sampling error additional to the inherent uncertainties in the measurements themselves. The radar renovation improved the SNR of measurements, with correspondingly improved altitude coverage. It also corrected an under-estimate of horizontal wind speeds attributed to beam formation problems, due to component failure pre-renovation. The standard error in radar-measured winds averaged over half-an-hour increases with wind speed and altitude, and is 0.6-2.5 m s-1 (5-20% of wind speed) for post-renovation horizontal winds. Pre-renovation values are typically 0.4 m s-1 (0.03 m s-1) larger. The standard error in radial velocities is < 0.04 m s-1. Eight weeks of special radar operation are used to investigate the effects of echo power aspect sensitivity. Corrections for echo power aspect sensitivity remove an underestimate of horizontal wind speeds, however aspect sensitivity is azimuthally anisotropic at the scale of routine observations (≈ 1 h). This anisotropy introduces additional random error into wind profiles. For winds averaged over half-an-hour, the random error is around 3.5% above 8 km, but as large as 4.5% in the mid-troposphere.

  1. Evaluation of wind profiles from the NERC MST radar, Aberystwyth, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. F.; Vaughan, G.; Hooper, D. A.

    2014-09-01

    This study quantifies the uncertainties in winds measured by the Aberystwyth Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere (MST) radar (52.4° N, 4.0° W), before and after its renovation in March 2011. A total of 127 radiosondes provide an independent measure of winds. Differences between radiosonde and radar-measured horizontal winds are correlated with long-term averages of vertical velocities, suggesting an influence from local mountain waves. These local influences are an important consideration when using radar winds as a measure of regional conditions, particularly for numerical weather prediction. For those applications, local effects represent a source of sampling error additional to the inherent uncertainties in the measurements themselves. The radar renovation improved the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of measurements, with a corresponding improvement in altitude coverage. It also corrected an underestimate of horizontal wind speeds attributed to beam formation problems, due to pre-renovation component failure. The root mean square error (RMSE) in radar-measured horizontal wind components, averaged over half an hour, increases with wind speed and altitude, and is 0.8-2.5 m s-1 (6-12% of wind speed) for post-renovation winds. Pre-renovation values are typically 0.1 m s-1 larger. The RMSE in radial velocities is <0.04 m s-1. Eight weeks of special radar operation are used to investigate the effects of echo power aspect sensitivity. Corrections for echo power aspect sensitivity remove an underestimate of horizontal wind speeds; however aspect sensitivity is azimuthally anisotropic at the scale of routine observations (≈1 h). This anisotropy introduces random error into wind profiles. For winds averaged over half an hour, the RMSE is around 3.5% above 8 km, but as large as 4.5% in the mid-troposphere.

  2. Evaluation of tag entanglement as a factor in harmonic radar studies of insect dispersal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The observation of insects and other small organisms entangled in the habitat after the addition of vertical or trailing electronic tags to their body has generated concerns on the suitability of harmonic radars to track the dispersal of insects. This study compared the walking behavior of adult Co...

  3. Lava flows in mare imbrium: An evaluation of anomalously low earth-based radar reflectivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, G.G.; Thompson, T.W.; Zisk, S.H.

    1975-01-01

    The lunar maria reflect two to five times less Earth-based radar power than the highlands, the spectrally blue maria surfaces returning the lowest power levels. This effect of weakening signal return has been attributed to increased signal absorption related to the electrical and magnetic characteristics of the mineral ilmenite (FeTiO3). The surface of Mare Imbrium contains some of the most distinct red-blue colorimetric boundaries and depolarized 70 cm wavelength reflectivity variations on the near side of the Moon. The weakest levels of both 3.8 cm and 70 cm reflectivity within Imbrium are confined to regional mare surfaces of the blue spectral type that can be recognized as stratigraphically unique flow surfaces. Frequency distributions of the 70 cm polarized and depolarized radar return power for five mare surfaces within the basin indicate that signal absorption, and probably the ilmenite content, increases generally from the beginning of the Imbrian Period to the end of the Eratosthenian Period with slight reversal between the end of the Imbrian and beginning of the Eratosthenian. TiO2 calibrated radar reflectivity curves can be utilized for lunar maria geochemical mapping in the same manner as the TiO2 calibrated spectral reflectivity curves of Charette et al. (1974). The long wavelength radar data may be a sensitive indicator of mare chemical variations as it is unaffected by the normal surface rock clutter that includes ray materials from large impact craters. ?? 1975 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  4. Shuttle orbiter KU-band radar/communications system design evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An expanded introduction is presented which addresses the in-depth nature of the tasks and indicates continuity of the reported effort and results with previous work and related contracts, and the two major modes of operation which exist in the Ku-band system, namely, the radar mode and the communication mode, are described. The Ku-band radar system is designed to search for a target in a designated or undesignated mode, then track the detected target, which might be cooperative (active) or passive, providing accurate, estimates of the target range, range rate, angle and angle rate to enable the orbiter to rendezvous with this target. The radar mode is described along with a summary of its predicted performance. The principal sub-unit that implements the radar function is the electronics assembly 2(EA-2). The relationship of EA-2 to the remainder of the Ku-band system is shown. A block diagram of EA-2 is presented including the main command and status signals between EA-2 and the other Ku-band units.

  5. Technical evaluation report on the adequacy of station electric distribution system voltages for the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. Units 2 and 3

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.L.

    1982-06-21

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the adequacy of the station electric distribution system voltages for the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Units 2 and 3. The evaluation is to determine if the onsite distribution system, in conjunction with the offsite power sources, has sufficient capacity to automatically start and operate all Class 1E loads within the equipment voltage ratings under certain conditions established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The analysis submitted indicates that the capacity is sufficient to meet the NRC requirements provided specific plant procedures are followed for shutting down the second unit after an accident in the first unit and with a loss of one offsite source.

  6. A volatile organic analyzer for Space Station: Description and evaluation of a gas chromatography/ ion mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.

    1994-01-01

    A Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA) is being developed as an essential component of the Space Station's Environmental Health System (EHS) air quality monitoring strategy to provide warning to the crew and ground personnel if volatile organic compounds exceed established exposure limits. The short duration of most Shuttle flights and the relative simplicity of the contaminant removal mechanism have lessened the concern about crew exposure to air contaminants on the Shuttle. However, the longer missions associated with the Space Station, the complex air revitalization system and the proposed number of experiments have led to a desire for real-time monitoring of the contaminants in the Space Station atmosphere. Achieving the performance requirements established for the VOA within the Space Station resource (e.g., power, weight) allocations led to a novel approach that joined a gas chromatograph (GC) to an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). The authors of this paper will discuss the rational for selecting the GC/IMS technology as opposed to the more established gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the foundation of the VOA. The data presented from preliminary evaluations will demonstrate the versatile capability of the GC/IMS to analyze the major contaminants expected in the Space Station atmosphere. The favorable GC/IMS characteristics illustrated in this paper included excellent sensitivity, dual-mode operation for selective detection, and mobility drift times to distinguish co-eluting GC peaks. Preliminary studies have shown that the GC/IMS technology can meet surpass the performance requirements of the Space Station VOA.

  7. A quantitative evaluation of the annual variation in teleseismic detection capability at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Takaki; Kanao, Masaki

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we evaluate the annual variation in teleseismic detection capability at Syowa Station (69.0°S, 39.6°E) located in East Antarctica, a variation that has been noted in previous studies. For the quantitative evaluation of the annual variation, we introduced a statistical model of a magnitude-frequency distribution of earthquakes covering the entire magnitude range. The annual variation in the model parameter that quantifies the detection capability was then estimated by using Bayesian analysis. In the estimation, we incorporated the annual variation in air temperature at the station and succeeded in clarifying the significant effect that the variation in temperature has on the teleseismic detection capability.

  8. Space Radar Image of Star City, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the Star City cosmonaut training center, east of Moscow, Russia. Four American astronauts are training here for future long-duration flights aboard the Russian Mir space station. These joint flights are giving NASA and the Russian Space Agency experience necessary for the construction of the international Alpha space station, beginning in late 1997. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR), on its 62nd orbit on October 3, 1994. This Star City image is centered at 55.55 degrees north latitude and 38.0 degrees east longitude. The area shown is approximately 32 kilometers by 49 kilometers (20 miles by 30 miles). North is to the top in this image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The image was produced using three channels of SIR-C radar data: red indicates L-band (23 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and received); green indicates L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue indicates C-band (6 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In general, dark pink areas are agricultural; pink and light blue areas are urban communities; black areas represent lakes and rivers; dark blue areas are cleared forest; and light green areas are forested. The prominent black runways just right of center are Shchelkovo Airfield, about 4 km long. The textured pale blue-green area east and southeast of Shchelkovo Airfield is forest. Just east of the runways is a thin railroad line running southeast; the Star City compound lies just east of the small bend in the rail line. Star City contains the living quarters and training facilities for Russian cosmonauts and their families. Moscow's inner loop road is visible at the lower left edge of the image. The Kremlin is just off the left edge, on the banks of the meandering Moskva River. The Klyazma River snakes to the southeast from the reservoir in the upper left (shown in bright red), passing just east of Star City and flowing off the lower right edge of the image. The dark blue band of the Vorya River runs north-south in the upper right quadrant, east of Star City. SIR-C/X-SAR radar images are being compared with data from the Russian radar satellite Almaz to evaluate the usefulness of a permanent orbital radar platform in monitoring Earth s environment and ecology.

  9. 1. DISTANT VIEW OF RADAR DOMES, STRUCTURE 409 ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. DISTANT VIEW OF RADAR DOMES, STRUCTURE 409 ON THE RIGHT AND 411 ON THE LEFT, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Radar Domes, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  10. 3. EXTERIOR VIEW OF THE NORTHEAST RADAR DOME COMPLEX, STRUCTURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EXTERIOR VIEW OF THE NORTHEAST RADAR DOME COMPLEX, STRUCTURE 411, LOOKING NORTH. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Radar Domes, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  11. The ATC evaluation of the prototype Airport Surveillance Radar Wind Shear Processor (ASR-WSP) at Orlando International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Radame

    1993-03-01

    The Airport Surveillance Radar Wind Shear Processor (ASR-WSP), also known as Airport Surveillance Radar-9 (ASR-9) modification for low altitude wind shear detection, is a production ASR-9 with an expanded weather channel for added processing capabilities. The primary mission of the ASR-WSP is to enhance the safety of air travel through the timely detection and reporting of hazardous wind shear in and near the terminal approach and departure zones of the airport. It will also improve the management of air traffic (AT) in the terminal area through the forecast of precipitation, and ultimately the detection of other hazardous weather phenomena. The ASR-WSP may be used as a stand-alone system at airports without a Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) or Enhanced-Low Level Wind Shear Alert System (E-LLWAS), or in an integrated mode with either or both the TDWR and E-LLWAS. An operational evaluation of a prototype ASR-WSP, developed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratories (MIT/LL), was conducted at the Orlando International Airport (MCO) in Orlando, Florida, during the period 29 Jun. to 31 Aug. 1992. The objective of the evaluation was to obtain Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic controller reaction to the prototype ASR-WSP weather data and display equipment. The following are highlights of the evaluation: (1) the ASW-WSP is very useful when making runway configuration changes; (2) the ASR-WSP is not perceived to be as accurate as the prototype TDWR; (3) the gust front prediction feature is not reliable; and (4) the information provided on both the RDT and the GSD is very useful.

  12. Evaluating storm-scale groundwater recharge dynamics with coupled weather radar data and unsaturated zone modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasta, P.; Gates, J. B.; Lock, N.; Houston, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater recharge rates through the unsaturated zone emerge from complex interactions within the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system that derive from nonlinear relationships amongst atmospheric boundary conditions, plant water use and soil hydraulic properties. While it is widely recognized that hydrologic models must capture soil water dynamics in order to provide reliable recharge estimates, information on episodic recharge generation remains uncommon, and links between storm-scale weather patterns and their influence on recharge is largely unexplored. In this study, the water balance of a heterogeneous one-dimensional soil domain (3 m deep) beneath a typical rainfed corn agro-ecosystem in eastern Nebraska was numerically simulated in HYDRUS-1D for 12 years (2001-2012) on hourly time steps in order to assess the relationships between weather events and episodic recharge generation. WSR-88D weather radar reflectivity data provided both rainfall forcing data (after estimating rain rates using the z/r ratio method) and a means of storm classification on a scale from convective to stratiform using storm boundary characteristics. Individual storm event importance to cumulative recharge generation was assessed through iterative scenario modeling (773 total simulations). Annual cumulative recharge had a mean value of 9.19 cm/yr (about 12 % of cumulative rainfall) with coefficient of variation of 73%. Simulated recharge generation events occurred only in late winter and spring, with a peak in May (about 35% of total annual recharge). Recharge generation is observed primarily in late spring and early summer because of the combination of high residual soil moisture following a winter replenishment period, heavy convective storms, and low to moderate potential evapotranspiration rates. During the growing season, high rates of root water uptake cause rapid soil water depletion, and the concurrent high potential evapotranspiration and low soil moisture prevented recharge generation until late winter, even when intense convective storms took place. For this reason, about 86% of all precipitation events produce insignificant recharge contributions. Recharge responses to individual storms were nonlinear and did not cluster well with either storm amount or storm classification type. For example, ~7% of rainfall events fall near the 1:1 rainfall/recharge line and these events represent about 37% of cumulative recharge, and individual storms accounted for up to 4% of their annual totals. However, recharge events in late winter are mainly triggered by stratiform precipitation whereas in spring they are generally generated by convective storms. This novel approach to assessing storm-scale recharge may be relevant to several current challenges in the characterization of groundwater recharge processes, including the evaluation of their spatiotemporal distributions and the impacts of climate change on groundwater.

  13. Characterization and evaluation of five jaboticaba accessions at the subtropical horticulture research station in Miami, Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit of five Jaboticaba (Myrciaria caulifloria) cultivars ‘MC-05-06’, ‘MC-05-14’, ‘MC-05-12’, ‘MC-06-15,’ and ‘MC-06-14’ were evaluated and characterized at the National Germplasm Repository, Subtropical horticulture Research Station (SHRS) Miami, Florida. Thirty fruits were harvested from clona...

  14. Efficiency evaluation of ground-penetrating radar by the results of measurement of dielectric properties of soils

    SciTech Connect

    Khakiev, Zelimkhan; Kislitsa, Konstantin; Yavna, Victor

    2012-12-15

    The work considers the depth evaluation of ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys using the attenuation factor of electromagnetic radiation in a medium. A method of determining the attenuation factor of low-conductive non-magnetic soils is developed based on the results of direct measurements of permittivity and conductivity of soils in the range of typical frequencies of GPR. The method relies on measuring the shift and width of the resonance line after a soil sample is being placed into a tunable cavity resonator. The advantage of this method is the preservation of soil structure during the measurement.

  15. Retrieval and Evaluation of Wind Vectors and Advective Surface Velocities from Synthetic Aperture Radar and Infrared Radiometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, Gisela; Eriksson, Leif E. B.

    Analysis of ocean surface dynamics has been proven to be of vital importance in many areas (e.g. shipping, fishing). Two important parameters to describe the ocean dynamics are the wind velocity (speed and direction) and advective surface velocities (ocean current velocity). These parameters are currently provided operationally by forecast models, surface sensors (e.g. buoys, coastal radar) and satellite sensors. However, coverage limitations, low resolution and limited temporal availability impose a need for implementation and evaluation of new data sources and techniques for estimation of these parameters. In this paper we implement and evaluate known techniques for determination of wind and ocean current velocity from satellite data. Wind is determined from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data by applying two algo-rithms. First, the Local Gradient method is implemented to extract wind direction from the SAR data, and then the CMOD-5 Geophysical Model Function of the backscatter is inverted to obtain the wind speed as a function of the wind direction and the incidence angle. Current propagation is estimated by analyzing the Sea Surface Temperature propagation in two consec-utive infrared images of the same area from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The evaluation shows a good agreement between estimated wind vectors from SAR and scat-terometer data. Comparison with merged ocean current estimates is addressed. The methods will be implemented in the maritime security service provided by the SECTRONIC project funded by the EU 7th framework program.

  16. Intelligent radar data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbaur, Ulrich D.

    The application of artificial intelligence principles to the processing of radar signals is considered theoretically. The main capabilities required are learning and adaptation in a changing environment, processing and modeling information (especially dynamics and uncertainty), and decision-making based on all available information (taking its reliability into account). For the application to combat-aircraft radar systems, the tasks include the combination of data from different types of sensors, reacting to electronic counter-countermeasures, evaluation of how much data should be acquired (energy and radiation management), control of the radar, tracking, and identification. Also discussed are related uses such as monitoring the avionics systems, supporting pilot decisions with respect to the radar system, and general applications in radar-system R&D.

  17. Radar principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Toru

    1989-01-01

    Discussed here is a kind of radar called atmospheric radar, which has as its target clear air echoes from the earth's atmosphere produced by fluctuations of the atmospheric index of refraction. Topics reviewed include the vertical structure of the atmosphere, the radio refractive index and its fluctuations, the radar equation (a relation between transmitted and received power), radar equations for distributed targets and spectral echoes, near field correction, pulsed waveforms, the Doppler principle, and velocity field measurements.

  18. 47 CFR 80.104 - Identification of radar transmissions not authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Identification of radar transmissions not... Procedures-General § 80.104 Identification of radar transmissions not authorized. This section applies to all maritime radar transmitters except radar beacon stations. (a) Radar transmitters must not transmit...

  19. 47 CFR 80.104 - Identification of radar transmissions not authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Identification of radar transmissions not... Procedures-General § 80.104 Identification of radar transmissions not authorized. This section applies to all maritime radar transmitters except radar beacon stations. (a) Radar transmitters must not transmit...

  20. 47 CFR 80.104 - Identification of radar transmissions not authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Identification of radar transmissions not... Procedures-General § 80.104 Identification of radar transmissions not authorized. This section applies to all maritime radar transmitters except radar beacon stations. (a) Radar transmitters must not transmit...

  1. 47 CFR 80.104 - Identification of radar transmissions not authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Identification of radar transmissions not... Procedures-General § 80.104 Identification of radar transmissions not authorized. This section applies to all maritime radar transmitters except radar beacon stations. (a) Radar transmitters must not transmit...

  2. 47 CFR 80.104 - Identification of radar transmissions not authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Identification of radar transmissions not... Procedures-General § 80.104 Identification of radar transmissions not authorized. This section applies to all maritime radar transmitters except radar beacon stations. (a) Radar transmitters must not transmit...

  3. The Solid Rocket Motor Slag Population: Results of a Radar-based Regressive Statistical Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Matthew F.; Xu, Yu-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Solid rocket motor (SRM) slag has been identified as a significant source of man-made orbital debris. The propensity of SRMs to generate particles of 100 m and larger has caused concern regarding their contribution to the debris environment. Radar observation, rather than in-situ gathered evidence, is currently the only measurable source for the NASA/ODPO model of the on-orbit slag population. This simulated model includes the time evolution of the resultant orbital populations using a historical database of SRM launches, propellant masses, and estimated locations and times of tail-off. However, due to the small amount of observational evidence, there can be no direct comparison to check the validity of this model. Rather than using the assumed population developed from purely historical and physical assumptions, a regressional approach was used which utilized the populations observed by the Haystack radar from 1996 to present. The estimated trajectories from the historical model of slag sources, and the corresponding plausible detections by the Haystack radar, were identified. Comparisons with observational data from the ensuing years were made, and the SRM model was altered with respect to size and mass production of slag particles to reflect the historical data obtained. The result is a model SRM population that fits within the bounds of the observed environment.

  4. Ada compiler evaluation on the Space Station Freedom Software Support Environment project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badal, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the work in progress to select the Ada compilers for the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) Software Support Environment (SSE) project. The purpose of the SSE Ada compiler evaluation team is to establish the criteria, test suites, and benchmarks to be used for evaluating Ada compilers for the mainframes, workstations, and the realtime target for flight- and ground-based computers. The combined efforts and cooperation of the customer, subcontractors, vendors, academia and SIGAda groups made it possible to acquire the necessary background information, benchmarks, test suites, and criteria used.

  5. Detail view of southeast corner of Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of southeast corner of Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5 Transmitter Building foundation, showing Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5 Tower concrete pier in background, camera facing north - Fort Barry, Signal Corps Radar 296, Station 5, Transmitter Building Foundation, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  6. Application of HF radar currents to oil spill modelling.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Ana J; Castanedo, Sonia; Medina, Raul; Losada, Inigo J; Alvarez-Fanjul, Enrique

    2009-02-01

    In this work, the benefits of high-frequency (HF) radar currents for oil spill modeling and trajectory analysis of floating objects are analyzed. The HF radar performance is evaluated by means of comparison between a drifter buoy trajectory and the one simulated using a Lagrangian trajectory model. A methodology to optimize the transport model performance and to calculate the search area of the predicted positions is proposed. This method is applied to data collected during the Galicia HF Radar Experience. This experiment was carried out to explore the capabilities of this technology for operational monitoring along the Spanish coast. Two long-range HF radar stations were installed and operated between November 2005 and February 2006 on the Galician coast. In addition, a drifter buoy was released inside the coverage area of the radar. The HF radar currents, as well as numerical wind data were used to simulate the buoy trajectory using the TESEO oil spill transport model. In order to evaluate the contribution of HF radar currents to trajectory analysis, two simulation alternatives were carried out. In the first one, wind data were used to simulate the motion of the buoy. In the second alternative, surface currents from the HF radar were also taken into account. For each alternative, the model was calibrated by means of the global optimization algorithm SCEM-UA (Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis) in order to obtain the probability density function of the model parameters. The buoy trajectory was computed for 24h intervals using a Monte Carlo approach based on the results provided in the calibration process. A bivariate kernel estimator was applied to determine the 95% confidence areas. The analysis performed showed that simulated trajectories integrating HF radar currents are more accurate than those obtained considering only wind numerical data. After a 24h period, the error in the final simulated position improves using HF radar currents. Averaging the information from all the simulated daily periods, the mean search and rescue area calculated using HF radar currents, is reduced by approximately a 62% in comparison with the search area calculated without these data. These results show the positive contribution of HF radar currents for trajectory analysis, and demonstrate that these data combined with atmospheric forecast models, are of value for trajectory analysis of oil spills or floating objects. PMID:18996546

  7. Performance evaluation of the retrieval of a two hours rainfall event through microwave tomography applied to a network of radio-base stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facheris, L.; Cuccoli, F.; Baldini, L.

    2012-04-01

    Critical precipitation events occurred over the Italian territory have been often characterized by high intensity and very fast development, frequently over small catchment areas. The detection of this kind of phenomena is a major issue that poses remarkable problems that cannot be tackled completely only with 'standard' instrumentation (even when available), such as a weather radars or raingauges. Indeed, the rainfall sampling modalities of these instruments may jeopardize the attempts to provide a sufficiently fast risk alert: - the point-like, time-integrated way of sampling of raingauges can completely/partially miss local rainfall cores of high intensity developing in the neighborhoods. Moreover, raingauges provide cumulated rainfall measurements intrinsically affected by a time delay. - In the case of weather radars, several factors may limit the advantages brought by range resolution and instantaneous sampling: precipitation might be sampled at an excessive height due to the distance of the radar site and/or the orography surrounding the valleys/catchments where the aforementioned kind of events is more likely to form up; distance may limit the resolution in the cross-range direction; beam screening due to orography causes a loss of power that is interpreted in the farther range bins as a reduced precipitation intensity. In this context, a positive role for flagging the criticality of a precipitation event can be played by signal attenuation measurements made along microwave links, as available through the infrastructure of a mobile communications network. Three are the interesting features of such networks: 1) the communications among radio-base stations occur where point-to-point electromagnetic visibility is guaranteed, namely along valleys or between tops/flanks of hills or mountains; 2) the extension of these links (few kilometres) is perfectly compatible with the detection of severe but localized precipitation events; 3) measurements can be made on a practically continuous-time basis. In the past years, we showed that new scenarios for tomographic rainfall monitoring have been disclosed by the availability of widespread networks of radio-base stations for mobile communications (i.e., GSM, GPRS, UMTS). Such networks could be employed as the backbone of a low cost system able to provide 2D estimates of rainfall in real time. Monitoring capabilities increase in more populated sites, as urban areas, where such radio links form up a dense network that can be exploited to get detailed information also about structure and evolution of rainfall phenomena. In 2010, we presented a novel tomographic processing method for rainfall rate estimation, specifically adaptable to the dense and asymmetric topologies of urban networks of radio-base stations. In this paper, we show its application to a simulated time sequence of specific attenuation (K) maps, derived from true weather radar data gathered during a rainfall event specifically selected to evaluate the performance of the tomographic retrieval in critical conditions. The event was in fact very localized and intense and lasted two hours. 12 GHz is assumed for the carrier frequency of the radio-base network. We show the reconstruction performance of the 2D K fields achieved resorting first to a symmetric, regular network and then to a couple of totally asymmetric ones.

  8. Evaluation of a highway pavement using non destructive tests: Falling Weight Deflectometer and Ground Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marecos, Vania; Fontul, Simona; de Lurdes Antunes, Maria

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the results of the application of Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to assess the bearing capacity of a rehabilitated flexible highway pavement that began to show the occurrence of cracks in the surface layer, about one year after the improvement works. A visual inspection of the surface of the pavement was performed to identify and characterize the cracks. Several core drills were done to analyse the cracks propagation in depth, these cores were also used for GPR data calibration. From the visual inspection it was concluded that the development of the cracks were top-down and that the cracks were located predominantly in the wheel paths. To determine the thickness of the bituminous and granular layers GPR tests were carried out using two horn antennas of 1,0 GHz and 1,8 GHz and a radar control unit SIR-20, both from GSSI. FWD load tests were performed on the wheel paths and structural models were established, based on the deflections measured, through back calculation. The deformation modulus of the layers was calculated and the bearing capacity of the pavement was determined. Summing up, within this study the GPR was used to continuously detect the layer thickness and the GPR survey data was calibrated with core drills. The results showed variations in the bituminous layer thickness in comparison to project data. From the load tests it was concluded that the deformation modulus of the bituminous layers were also vary variable. Limitations on the pavement bearing capacity were detected in the areas with the lower deformation modulus. This abstract is of interest for COST Action TU1208 Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar.

  9. Radar-based Flood Warning System for Houston, Texas and Its Performance Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, N.; Bedient, P.

    2009-12-01

    Houston has a long history of flooding problems as a serious nature. For instance, Houstonians suffered from severe flood inundation during Tropical Storm Allison in 2001 and Hurricane Ike in 2008. Radar-based flood warning systems as non-structural tools to provide accurate and timely warnings to the public and private entities are greatly needed for urban areas prone to flash floods. Fortunately, the advent of GIS, radar-based rainfall estimation using NEXRAD, and real-time delivery systems on the internet have allowed flood alert systems to provide important advanced warning of impending flood conditions. Thus, emergency personnel can take proper steps to mitigate against catastrophic losses. The Rice and Texas Medical Center (TMC) Flood Alert System (FAS2) has been delivering warning information with 2 to 3 hours of lead time to facility personnel in a readily understood format for more than 40 events since 1997. The system performed well during these major rainfall events with R square value of 93%. The current system has been improved by incorporating a new hydraulic prediction tool - FloodPlain Map Library (FPML). The FPML module aims to provide visualized information such as floodplain maps and water surface elevations instead of just showing hydrographs in real time based on NEXRAD radar rainfall data. During Hurricane Ike (September, 2008), FAS2 successfully provided precise and timely flood warning information to TMC with the peak flow difference of 3.6% and the volume difference of 5.6%; timing was excellent for this double-peaked event. With the funding from the Texas Department of Transportation, a similar flood warning system has been developed at a critical transportation pass along Highway 288 in Houston, Texas. In order to enable emergency personnel to begin flood preparation with as much lead time as possible, FAS2 is being used as a prototype to develop warning system for other flood-prone areas such as City of Sugar Land.

  10. The Solid Rocket Motor Slag Population: Results of a Radar-Based Regressive Statistical Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstman, Matthew

    Solid rocket motor (SRM) slag has been identified as a potential source of man-made orbital debris. The possibility that SRMs (in addition to generating dust particles in the sub-millimeter range) may generate particles up to centimeters in size has caused concern regarding their contribution to the debris environment. Returned surfaces from space do not have sufficient area or exposure time to provide a clear picture of the SRM millimeter and centimeter debris population. Currently, radar observation is probably the only way to collect data showing the debris contribution from SRMs. Such observation is used to sample the debris environment, but it is difficult to obtain accurate orbital elements for the detected debris objects. NASA has developed several models to describe the different orbital debris populations, based on assumed debris production mechanisms to create clouds of debris objects that can be propagated in time. The NASA model, LEGEND (LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris), functions as a timetested debris model for most debris sources. However, the current LEGEND model does not include contributions from the SRM population. An SRM model has recently been developed by NASA, based on purely theoretical details of SRM production and known SRM launches, but verification with hard data is needed. Because the detections of individual SRM objects cannot be deterministically separated from the total debris observed by radar, the validation of the SRM model can only be done by combining it with the LEGEND breakup model and comparing it with data. By applying observational constraints, the degree of SRM slag contribution to the environment may be estimated. This serves as an observationally sound method from which to calibrate a purely theoretical model into something more realistic. For this study, we use the populations observed by the Haystack radar from 1996 to present. For the SRM debris, we use a historical database of SRM launches, propellant masses, and estimated locations and times of tail-off to produce and propagate the SRM debris clouds. Comparisons with radar data from the ensuing years were made, and the SRM model was altered with respect to size and mass production of slag particles to reflect the populations estimated from the data. The result is a model SRM population that fits within the bounds of the observed environment and estimates of the production and contribution of SRM debris to the environment.

  11. The Solid Rocket Motor Slag Population: Results of a Radar-Based Regressive Statistical Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Matthew F.; Xu, Yu-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Solid rocket motor (SRM) slag has been identified as a potential source of man-made orbital debris. The possibility that SRMs (in addition to generating dust particles in the sub-millimeter range) may generate particles up to centimeters in size has caused concern regarding their contribution to the debris environment. Returned surfaces from space do not have sufficient area or exposure time to provide a clear picture of the SRM millimeter and centimeter debris population. Currently, radar observation is probably the only way to collect data showing the debris contribution from SRMs. Such observation is used to sample the debris environment, but it is difficult to obtain accurate orbital elements for the detected debris objects. NASA has developed several models to describe the different orbital debris populations, based on assumed debris production mechanisms to create clouds of debris objects that can be propagated in time. The NASA model, LEGEND (LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris), functions as a time-tested debris model for most debris sources. However, the current LEGEND model does not include contributions from the SRM population. An SRM model has recently been developed by NASA, based on purely theoretical details of SRM production and known SRM launches, but verification with hard data is needed. Because the detections of individual SRM objects cannot be deterministically separated from the total debris observed by radar, the validation of the SRM model can only be done by combining it with the LEGEND breakup model and comparing it with data. By applying observational constraints, the degree of SRM slag contribution to the environment may be estimated. This serves as an observationally sound method from which to calibrate a purely theoretical model into something more realistic. For this study, we use the populations observed by the Haystack radar from 1996 to present. For the SRM debris, we use a historical database of SRM launches, propellant masses, and estimated locations and times of tailoff to produce and propagate the SRM debris clouds. Comparisons with radar data from the ensuing years were made, and the SRM model was altered with respect to size and mass production of slag particles to reflect the populations estimated from the data. The result is a model SRM population that fits within the bounds of the observed environment and estimates of the production and contribution of SRM debris to the environment.

  12. Using SHARAD radar soundings to evaluate the origin of martian gullies and pingos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, D. C.; Smrekar, S. E.; Safaeinili, A.; Phillips, R. J.; Seu, R.

    2008-12-01

    Gullies are some of the geologically youngest features on Mars (< 10 Myr), and their morphology, defined normally by alcove-channel-aprons, led instantly to the hypothesis of formation by the action of fluid water. Hence, gullies might offer an opportunity to constrain the recent history of water on the planet. Different models propose a variety of mechanisms to produce the liquid, with sources generally falling into either surficial (mantling) deposits or ground water/ice. The SHARAD sounding radar aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, with a ~10 m subsurface vertical resolution, may have a strong role to play in testing the water hypothesis for the origin of gullies and in characterizing the source of the fluid. We have surveyed radar data for nearly 50 gullies, which occur predominantly at mid-latitudes on both hemispheres of Mars. In most of these cases, strong subsurface reflectors are not observed. In the few cases where strong subsurface reflections are observed, they possibly relate to volcanic units (e.g. Amazonis and Arcadia Planitiae). Weak, near-surface (< 200 m) reflectors appear to be present at some but not all gullies. We are also examining another type of feature postulated to arise from subsurface water/ice activity: pingos. These are nearly circular mounds hundreds of meters across and tens of meters high that are characterized by fractures or collapsed pits on their crests. On Earth, pressurization at depth leads to injection and subsequent freezing of water into the shallow subsurface. The uplifted layer of permafrost cracks as the mound grows and collapse pits form over time due to ice loss. As in the case of gullies, weak shallow subsurface reflections are present in some of the pingo occurrences. Up to this point, however, our limited survey of gullies and pingos is not supportive of shallow aquifers, as the high dielectric constant of liquid water would produce strong reflections, according to simple propagation models. The weak reflections observed are more consistent with variations in lithic compositions and perhaps an ice component. Interpretation of reflections is non-unique because radar is susceptible to changes in dielectric properties that are not due exclusively to the presence of water/ice. The most robust inferences will be derived from the analysis of datasets from multiple remote sensing techniques and geologic settings. This limited survey represents our initial effort in utilizing SHARAD data to address the question on the origin of gullies and pingos, as radar coverage of these small features is still growing.

  13. Micropower impulse radar

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S.; McEwan, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    Invented and developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is an inexpensive and highly sensitive, low-power radar system that produces and samples extremely short pulses of energy at the rate of 2 million per second. Called micropower impulse radar (MIR), it can detect objects at a greater variety of distances with greater sensitivity than conventional radar. Its origins in the Laboratory`s Laser Directorate stem from Nova`s transient digitizer. The MIR`s extraordinary range of applications include security, search and rescue, life support, nondestructive evaluation, and transportation.

  14. Evaluation of 1D numerical models in the prediction of distributed flow series constrained by radar altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getirana, A. C.; Bonnet, M.; Roux, E.; Rotunno, O. C.

    2007-12-01

    Recently, efforts have been done forward the development of methodologies to obtain flow estimates from time series of water height at virtual stations (VS - intersections between satellite tracks and water surfaces) from Topex/Poseidon (TP) and ENVISAT radar mission measurements. Relatively simple 1D propagation models such as Muskingum-Cunge (M-C) Routing Model have presented good results in the water flow propagation in Amazonian rivers. These regions suffer, in most cases, of lack of information witch constrains more accurate hydrologic and hydraulic studies. Nevertheless, these M-C models make a lot of simplification witch may cause the lost of important information that these quasi-ungaged basins can offer. This paper presents a comparison between two propagation models to the estimation of water flow series constrained by T/P and ENVISAT data. The models are: ProGUM, a Muskingum-Cunge flow routing model with diffusion-cum-dynamic wave propagation, and HEC-RAS, a well-known 1D hydrodynamic model. The verification was made in four reaches in the Negro River Basin. Each of these reaches are limited by two gauge stations, one upstream and the other one downstream. A total of five VS distributed over the reaches were analyzed. Previous studies have shown that ProGUM may yield errors less then 10% in validation phases. Here, it is demonstrated that, no much improvements can be achieved by using a more complete model capable to absorb the available data and simplifications of a M-C Model do not make significant modifications in the results of rating curve generation from satellite altimetry.

  15. Evaluating local-scale anisotropy and heterogeneity along a fractured sedimentary bedrock river using EM azimuthal resistivity and ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steelman, C. M.; Parker, B. L.; Kennedy, C. S.

    2015-05-01

    Fractured sedimentary bedrock rivers exhibit complicated flow patterns controlled by the geometry, extent and connectivity of fractures and dissolution-enhanced conduits. In a bedrock river environment these features variably connect surface water to groundwater. Given the nature of discrete fracture and conduit networks, these flow systems can be anisotropic and heterogeneous over a wide range of scales. Portable and non-invasive geophysical methods are ideal for the initial characterization of shallow hydrogeologic systems in ecologically sensitive environments. Here, we evaluate the utility of the electromagnetic (EM) azimuthal resistivity method for characterizing shallow vertical and subvertical fracture set orientations in the presence of localized dissolution-enhanced features near a sedimentary bedrock river located in Southern Ontario, Canada. Multiple EM coil spacings ranging from 1 to 10 m in vertical and horizontal dipole modes were applied at two locations within a 10 × 25 m study plot; azimuthal rotations were conducted using symmetric and asymmetric geometries. The observed anisotropic response was evaluated using 100 MHz ground-penetrating radar (GPR) measurements collected across the study plot area. A joint analysis of EM and GPR data revealed that fracture-based anisotropy can be identified in the presence of local heterogeneities (i.e., dissolution-enhanced features) at scales considerably smaller than those of previous studies. These non-invasive geophysical data sets can be used to optimize the design of multi-borehole groundwater monitoring stations along bedrock river channels, such that angled boreholes could be emplaced and orientated to intercept major fracture networks and local dissolution features. These data could also improve 3-D fracture network conceptualizations utilizing discrete information from angled and vertical boreholes.

  16. Application of radar observations to the evaluation and improvement of high resolution model simulations of cloud populations in MJO (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagos, S. M.; Feng, Z.; Long, C. N.; Lim, K.

    2013-12-01

    S-Pol radar data collected during the 2011 AMIE/DYNAMO field campaign is used to evaluate the performance of microphysical schemes in cloud permitting regional model simulations of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). In general, several of the current state-of-the-art schemes overestimate precipitation from large, deep convective systems. The sensitivity of this bias to various assumptions in microphysics processes of each bulk microphysics scheme is evaluated. Processes that limit the slope of raindrop size distribution for large raindrops, such shattering, are found to be important for realistic simulation of the cloud rain rate statistics. The results of the simulation and field campaign data are used to investigate convective organization, and shallow to deep transition in the context of the November 2011 episode of the MJO.

  17. Integration of a road network into a radar ground moving target tracking (GMTT) system and its performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Sam; Fong, Kathy; Carroll, Douglas E.; Lancaster, Justin; Dempster, Robert

    2009-08-01

    This paper discusses the application of multiple hypothesis tracking (MHT) to the processing of ground target data collected with a long range surveillance radar. A key element in the successful tracking of ground targets is the use of road networks. Thus, the paper begins with an overview of the alternative approaches that have been considered for incorporating road data into a ground target tracker and then it gives a detailed description of the methods that have been chosen. The major design issues to be addressed include the manner in which road filter models are included into a Variable-Structure Interacting Multiple Model (IMM) filtering scheme, how the road filter models are chosen to handle winding roads and intersections, and the tracking of targets that go on and off-road. Performance will be illustrated using simulated data and real data collected from a large surveillance area with a GMTI radar. The area considered contains regions of heavy to moderate target densities and clutter. Since the real data included only targets of opportunity (TOO), it was necessary to define metrics to evaluate relative performance as alternative tracking methods/parameters are considered. These metrics are discussed and comparative results are presented.

  18. Evaluation of genotoxic effects of benzene and its derivatives in workers of gas stations.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Patrícia; da Silva, Juliane Nascimento; da Silva, Alessandra Pawelec; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano Machado; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Thiesen, Flávia Valladão; de Oliveira, Ceres Andréia Vieira; Zen, Paulo Ricardo Gazzola

    2014-04-01

    The search for reliable biomarkers of human exposure to benzene and its derivatives is still subject of research. Many of the proposed biomarkers have limitations ranging from the low sensitivity to the wide variability of results. Thus, the aim of our study was to assess the frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities (CA) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in workers of gas stations, with (cases, n = 19) and without (local controls, n = 6) risk of exposure to benzene and its derivatives, comparing them with the results from the general population (external controls, n = 38). The blood dosages of benzene, toluene, and xylenes were measured in all participants. Blood solvent levels were compared with the findings obtained in cytogenetic evaluation and a research protocol which included data of the workplace, lifestyle, and health of the individuals. We did not detect the presence of benzene and its derivatives and did not find chromosomal damage that may be associated with the gas station activity in cases. Moreover, although we found an association of increased SCE and the working time in the local controls, the values found for SCE are within normal limits. Thus, our evaluation of SCE and CA reflected the levels of benzene and its derivatives observed in the blood. We believe, therefore, that SCE and CA may actually constitute possible tests for the evaluation of these exposures. However, we believe that further studies, including individuals at risk, are important to confirm this assertion. PMID:24292950

  19. Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Various Metallic Materials for the International Space Station Water Recycling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    A stress corrosion evaluation was performed on Inconel 625, Hastelloy C276, titanium commercially pure (TiCP), Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-4V extra low interstitial, and Cronidur 30 steel as a consequence of a change in formulation of the pretreatment for processing the urine in the International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Urine Processing Assembly from a sulfuric acid-based to a phosphoric acid-based solution. The first five listed were found resistant to stress corrosion in the pretreatment and brine. However, some of the Cronidur 30 specimens experienced reduction in load-carrying ability.

  20. A human factors evaluation of the robotic interface for Space Station Freedom orbital replaceable units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampaio, Carlos E.; Hwang, Ellen Y.; Fleming, Terence F.; Stuart, Mark A.; Legendre, A. Jay

    1992-01-01

    An orbital replaceable unit (ORU) is often defined as any orbital unit aboard Space Station with a wearout life of less than 30 years. The capability of successful changeout of these units by remote manipulation is critical to the ORU to telerobot interface design. A human factors evaluation of the selected interface showed certain inadequacies of the alignment target concept that was part of the interface package. Alternative target concepts which addressed these inadequacies were developed and are presented. Recommendations will be incorporated into NASA requirements documents which ORU suppliers and manufacturers must then build to.

  1. Test evaluation of space station ECLSS maintenance concepts. [Environmental Control and Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reysa, R. P.; Flugel, C. W.; Thompson, C. D.

    1978-01-01

    The Space Station Prototype (SSP) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware was designed and built to be maintainable by the flight crew. To achieve this goal, subsystems were designed for ease of component removal and installation, which included accessibility to component fasteners and connectors, adequate tool clearance, minimum fluid loss during changeout, positive capture of loose parts during changeout, replacement by one crewman, and protection of adjacent parts during maintenance. During testing of this hardware, many day-to-day problems arose which allowed the evaluation of the maintenance concepts under actual maintenance conditions. This paper briefly discusses the maintenance objectives of the hardware design. Specific maintenance designs and their test evaluations are discussed. A removable cartridge valve concept for liquid line components and threaded mechanical fittings and V-band couplings for gaseous line components are critiqued. Other maintenance devices are also evaluated.

  2. Evaluation of auxiliary tempering pump effectiveness at Chalk Point Steam Electric Station

    SciTech Connect

    Wendling, L.C.; Holland, A.F.

    1989-08-01

    The effectiveness of auxiliary tempering pump operation at Chalk Point Steam Electric Station (SES) at reducing plant-induced mortality of aquatic biota was evaluated. Several Representative Important Species (RIS) and dominant benthic and zooplankton species were used in the evaluation as indicators of overall system-wide responses. Expected mortality with and without auxiliary pump operation was estimated using thermal tolerance data available from the scientific literature for blue crabs, white perch, striped bass, spot, Macoma balthica and Acartia tonsa. The evaluation led to the conclusion that the operation of auxiliary tempering pumps at Chalk Point SES increases plant-induced mortality of spot, white perch, striped bass, and zooplankton. Operation of the tempering pumps may reduce blue crab mortality slightly under certain circumstances, and Macoma balthica mortality is probably largely unaffected by their operation.

  3. Evaluating the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission with NOAA/NSSL Multi-Radar Multisensor: Past, Current Status and Future Directions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstetter, P. E.; Hong, Y.; Gourley, J. J.; Carr, N.; Petersen, W. A.; Schwaller, M.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Kummerow, C. D.; Ferraro, R. R.; Wang, N. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate characterization of uncertainties in precipitation estimates derived from space-borne measurements is critical for many applications including water budget studies or prediction of natural hazards caused by extreme rainfall events. GPM precipitation level II estimates are compared to the NEXRAD-based precipitation estimates derived from NOAA/NSSL's Multi-Radar, Multisensor (MRMS) platform. The NEXRAD network has undergone an upgrade in technology with dual-polarization capabilities. These new polarimetric variables are being incorporated in MRMS to improve quality control of reflectivity data and to correct for partial beam blockages. The MRMS products, after having been adjusted by rain gauges and passing several quality controls and filtering procedures, are 1) accurate with known uncertainty bounds and 2) measured at a resolution below the pixel sizes of the GPM radar and radiometer observations. They are used by a number of NASA investigators to evaluate level II and level III satellite rainfall algorithms. The at-launch GPM Radiometer algorithm uses matches of coincident overpasses of various radiometers with surface rainfall from the MRMS database developed for the GPM project. Statistics from TRMM level II products serve as a benchmark to evaluate GPM precipitation estimates. Comparisons have been carried out at fine scale (e.g. instantaneous and 5 km for DPR) within a comparison framework developed to examine the consistency of the ground and space-based sensors in term of precipitation detection, characterization (e.g. convective, stratiform) and quantification. Specific error factors for passive (e.g. surface conditions for GMI) and active (e.g. attenuation of the radar signal, non uniform beam filling for DPR) sensors are investigated. Systematic biases and random errors quantified at the satellite estimation scale are useful for satellite-based Level III precipitation products. An online validation tool was designed to provide, for the first time, statistical evaluations and graphical representations of the uncertainties with GPM precipitation estimates over the CONUS. This cross-platform error characterization ultimately acts as a bridge to intercalibrate active and passive microwave measurements from the GPM core satellite to the constellation satellites.

  4. Preliminary geologic evaluation of L-band radar imagery: Arkansas test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, H.; Waite, W. P.

    1977-01-01

    The relatively small angles of incidence (steep depression angles) of the L-band system provide minimal shadowing on terrain back-slopes and considerable foreshortening on terrain fore-slopes which sacrifice much of the topographic enhancement afforded by a more oblique angle of illumination. In addition, the dynamic range of the return from vegetated surfaces is substantially less for the L-band system, and many surface features defined primarily by subtle changes in vegetation are lost. In areas having terrain conditions similar to those of northern Arkansas, and where LANDSAT and shorter wavelength aircraft radar data are available, the value of the JPL L-band imagery as either a complimentary or supplementary geologic data source is not obvious.

  5. Experimental evaluation of battery cells for space-based radar application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskell, Craig A.; Metcalfe, John R.

    1994-01-01

    A test program was conducted to characterize five space-quality nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) battery cells. A subset of those tests was also done on five commercial nickel-cadmium (NiCd) cells, for correlation to the characteristics of an Energy Storage Unit Simulator. The test program implemented the recommendations of a 1991 study, as reported to IECEC-92. The findings of the tests are summarized, and expected impacts on the performance of the electrical power system (EPS) of a large space-based radar (SBR) surveillance satellite are derived. The main characteristics examined and compared were terminal voltage (average and transient) and capacity through discharge, equivalent series resistance, derived inductance and capacitance, charge return efficiency, and inter-pulse charge effectiveness.

  6. The Evaluation of Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. M.; Bassinger, V. J.; Fontenot, S. L.; Castro, V. A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) represents a semi-closed environment with a high level of crewmember interaction. As community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a health concern in environments with susceptible hosts in close proximity, an evaluation of isolates of clinical and environmental Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococcus was performed to determine if this trend was also present in astronauts aboard ISS or the space station itself. Rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis of archived ISS isolates confirmed our earlier studies indicating a transfer of S. aureus between crewmembers. In addition, this fingerprinting also indicated a transfer between crewmembers and their environment. While a variety of S. aureus were identified from both the crewmembers and the environment, phenotypic evaluations indicated minimal methicillin resistance. However, positive results for the Penicillin Binding Protein, indicative of the presence of the mecA gene, were detected in multiple isolates of archived Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Phenotypic analysis of these isolates confirmed their resistance to methicillin. While MRSA has not been isolated aboard ISS, the potential exists for the transfer of the gene, mecA, from coagulase negative environmental Staphylococcus to S. aureus creating MRSA strains. This study suggests the need to expand environmental monitoring aboard long duration exploration spacecraft to include antibiotic resistance profiling.

  7. Evaluation of prototype air/fluid separator for Space Station Freedom Health Maintenance Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, Roger; Smith, Maureen; Murphy, Linda; Kizzee, Victor D.

    1991-01-01

    A prototype air/fluid separator suction apparatus proposed as a possible design for use with the Health Maintenance Facility aboard Space Station Freedom (SSF) was evaluated. A KC-135 parabolic flight test was performed for this purpose. The flights followed the standard 40 parabola profile with 20 to 25 seconds of near-zero gravity in each parabola. A protocol was prepared to evaluate the prototype device in several regulator modes (or suction force), using three fluids of varying viscosity, and using either continuous or intermittent suction. It was felt that a matrixed approach would best approximate the range of utilization anticipated for medical suction on SSF. The protocols were performed in one-gravity in a lab setting to familiarize the team with procedures and techniques. Identical steps were performed aboard the KC-135 during parabolic flight.

  8. Summary of Turbulence Data Obtained During United Air Lines Flight Evaluation of an Experimental C Band (5.5 cm) Airborne Weather Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, E. C.; Fetner, M. W.

    1954-01-01

    Data on atmospheric turbulence in the vicinity of thunderstorms obtained during a flight evaluation of an experimental C band (5.5 cm) airborne radar are summarized. The turbulence data were obtained with an NACA VGH recorder installed in a United Air Lines DC-3 airplane.

  9. Evaluation of SIR-A space radar for geologic interpretation: United States, Panama, Colombia, and New Guinea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, H.; Waite, W. P.; Kaupp, V. H.; Bridges, L. C.; Storm, M.

    1983-01-01

    Comparisons between LANDSAT MSS imagery, and aircraft and space radar imagery from different geologic environments in the United States, Panama, Colombia, and New Guinea demonstrate the interdependence of radar system geometry and terrain configuration for optimum retrieval of geologic information. Illustrations suggest that in the case of space radars (SIR-A in particular), the ability to acquire multiple look-angle/look-direction radar images of a given area is more valuable for landform mapping than further improvements in spatial resolution. Radar look-angle is concluded to be one of the most important system parameters of a space radar designed to be used for geologic reconnaissance mapping. The optimum set of system parameters must be determined for imaging different classes of landform features and tailoring the look-angle to local topography.

  10. MER vistas: ground-truth for Earth-based radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldemann, Albert F.; Larsen, Kristopher W.; Jurgens, Raymond F.; Golombek, Matthew P.; Slade, Martin A.

    2004-01-01

    Earth-based delay-Doppler radar observations of Mars with four receiving stations were carried out during the Mars oppositions of 2001 and 2003 in support of Mars Exploration Rover landing site selection. This interferometric planetary radar technique has demonstrated radar mapping of Mars with a 5 km spatial resolution.

  11. Spaceborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Eckerman, J.; Meneghini, R.; Atlas, D.; Boerner, W. M.; Cherry, S.; Clark, J. F.; Doviak, R. J.; Goldhirsh, J.; Lhermitte, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The spaceborne radar panel considered how radar could be used to measure precipitation from satellites. The emphasis was on how radar could be used with radiometry (at microwave, visible (VIS), and infrared (IR) wavelengths) to reduce the uncertainties of measuring precipitation with radiometry alone. In addition, the fundamental electromagnetic interactions involved in the measurements were discussed to determine the key work areas for research and development to produce effective instruments. Various approaches to implementing radar systems on satellites were considered for both shared and dedicated instruments. Finally, a research and development strategy was proposed for establishing the parametric relations and retrieval algorithms required for extracting precipitation information from the radar and associated radiometric data.

  12. Evaluation of chromic acid anodized aluminum foil coated composite tubes for the Space Station truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dursch, Harry W.; Slemp, Wayne S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of chromic acid anodized (CAA) Al foil as a protective and thermal control coating for graphite/epoxy tubes designed for the Space Station truss structure. Special consideration is given to the development of solar-absorptance and thermal-emittance properties required of Al foil, the development of CAA parameters necessary to achieve these optical properties, and the atomic oxygen and UV testing of CAA Al foil. Results showed that 0.003-in CAA Al foil cocured or secondary bonded to graphite/epoxy tubes with thin epoxy film adhesive retains excellent bond strength and provides a superior protective and thermal control coating to the LEO environment. Processes were developed for CAA Al foils long enough to continuously wrap the 23-ft-long diagonal struts of the Space Station truss structure. Specifications are presented for the processes of chromic acid anodizing of Al foil and for the bonding of anodized Al foil to graphite/epoxy tubes.

  13. Evaluation of available analytical techniques for monitoring the quality of space station potable water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geer, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    To assure the quality of potable water (PW) on the Space Station (SS) a number of chemical and physical tests must be conducted routinely. After reviewing the requirements for potable water, both direct and indirect analytical methods are evaluated that could make the required tests and improvements compatible with the Space Station operation. A variety of suggestions are made to improve the analytical techniques for SS operation. The most important recommendations are: (1) the silver/silver chloride electrode (SB) method of removing I sub 2/I (-) biocide from the water, since it may interfere with analytical procedures for PW and also its end uses; (2) the orbital reactor (OR) method of carrying out chemistry and electrochemistry in microgravity by using a disk shaped reactor on an orbital table to impart artificial G force to the contents, allowing solution mixing and separation of gases and liquids; and (3) a simple ultra low volume highly sensitive electrochemical/conductivity detector for use with a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus. It is also recommended, since several different conductivity and resistance measurements are made during the analysis of PW, that the bipolar pulse measuring circuit be used in all these applications for maximum compatibility and redundancy of equipment.

  14. Merging of rain gauge and radar data for urban hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, Christian; Haberlandt, Uwe

    2015-04-01

    Urban hydrological processes are generally characterised by short response times and therefore rainfall data with a high resolution in space and time are required for their modelling. In many smaller towns, no recordings of rainfall data exist within the urban catchment. Precipitation radar helps to provide extensive rainfall data with a temporal resolution of five minutes, but the rainfall amounts can be highly biased and hence the data should not be used directly as a model input. However, scientists proposed several methods for adjusting radar data to station measurements. This work tries to evaluate rainfall inputs for a hydrological model regarding the following two different applications: Dimensioning of urban drainage systems and analysis of single event flow. The input data used for this analysis can be divided into two groups: Methods, which rely on station data only (Nearest Neighbour Interpolation, Ordinary Kriging), and methods, which incorporate station as well as radar information (Conditional Merging, Bias correction of radar data based on quantile mapping with rain gauge recordings). Additionally, rainfall intensities that were directly obtained from radar reflectivities are used. A model of the urban catchment of the city of Brunswick (Lower Saxony, Germany) is utilised for the evaluation. First results show that radar data cannot help with the dimensioning task of sewer systems since rainfall amounts of convective events are often overestimated. Gauges in catchment proximity can provide more reliable rainfall extremes. Whether radar data can be helpful to simulate single event flow depends strongly on the data quality and thus on the selected event. Ordinary Kriging is often not suitable for the interpolation of rainfall data in urban hydrology. This technique induces a strong smoothing of rainfall fields and therefore a severe underestimation of rainfall intensities for convective events.

  15. Ground penetrating radar and microwave tomography 3D applications for the deck evaluation of the Musmeci bridge in Potenza, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavusi, Massimo; Soldovieri, Francesco; Di Napoli, Rosario; Loperte, Antonio; Di Cesare, Antonio; Carlo Ponzo, Felice; Lapenna, Vincenzo

    2011-09-01

    An extensive experimental and numerical investigation has been carried out to assess the status of the 'Ponte sul Basento' (1967-1976), in the town of Potenza (Basilicata region, southern Italy), better known as the Musmeci bridge. Architecturally, the bridge is a considerable reinforced 20th century concrete structure that was designed and built by the Italian architect Sergio Musmeci (1926-1981). Moreover, the bridge represents an important element of the infrastructural network, linking the city centre to the Potenza-Sicignano highway, crossing the Basento river and the railway close to the main train station of the city. Recently, due to ageing and continuous and significant traffic, the bridge started to be affected by several problems such as water infiltration. Within the presented study, a widespread ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey has been designed to investigate the geometrical characteristics of the bridge deck (Gerber saddles, internal stiffening walls, pillar supports) and detect the presence of defects or damage due to water infiltration and traffic fatigue. Concerning this, a 900 MHz 3D GPR survey has been performed along a zone of one of the lanes on the road surface. Moreover, a second 1500 MHz 3D survey has been carried out at the bottom of the bridge deck in order to gain detailed information about an important structural element of the bridge, the Gerber saddle. Both results have been processed following two approaches: the first a classical time-domain processing session based on commercial software and the use of migration; the second in microwave tomography, an advanced frequency domain automatic PC-based inversion algorithm. In this paper, we present a comparative interpretation of both kinds of processed results, and provide considerations about the investigated structures.

  16. Evaluation of the soil moisture prediction accuracy of a space radar using simulation techniques. [Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T. (Principal Investigator); Dobson, M. C.; Stiles, J. A.; Moore, R. K.; Holtzman, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Image simulation techniques were employed to generate synthetic aperture radar images of a 17.7 km x 19.3 km test site located east of Lawrence, Kansas. The simulations were performed for a space SAR at an orbital altitude of 600 km, with the following sensor parameters: frequency = 4.75 GHz, polarization = HH, and angle of incidence range = 7 deg to 22 deg from nadir. Three sets of images were produced corresponding to three different spatial resolutions; 20 m x 20 m with 12 looks, 100 m x 100 m with 23 looks, and 1 km x 1 km with 1000 looks. Each set consisted of images for four different soil moisture distributions across the test site. Results indicate that, for the agricultural portion of the test site, the soil moisture in about 90% of the pixels can be predicted with an accuracy of = + or - 20% of field capacity. Among the three spatial resolutions, the 1 km x 1 km resolution gave the best results for most cases, however, for very dry soil conditions, the 100 m x 100 m resolution was slightly superior.

  17. Evaluation of the hydrologic measure quality of the Saint Nizier weather radar data on the local urban area of Greater Lyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, F.; Faure, D.; Comby, J.

    2009-04-01

    The meteorological radar of Saint Nizier d'Azergues, part of Meteo France network Aramis, is situated at only 40 km from the urban community of Greater Lyon, in the north of the Rhne valley, south-east of France. This area gathers many human, environmental and materials stakes and vulnerability. From an operational use, an assessment based on a simulation and analysis of real data has identified certain sectors of the community affected by problems of ground clutter, which have to be filtered before any furthermore hydrologic use. There is a very good consistency between the two types of analysis. This agreement helps to confirm the cause and extent of sources of error in the real images. These confirm the areas within the urban area affected by the phenomena of ground clutter. The list of these pixels considered less reliable, has been compiled and they were screened to very locally compare the radar values to the values of rainfall in the urban community of Lyon. Indeed, Lyon has a network of measuring the rain in urban areas among the densest in Europe, totaling about fifty rainfall stations of various organizations on its territory, which creates a density of about one rain gauge for sixteen km. In this study, only raingauges properties of the Urban Community of Lyon were used: 29 tipping bucket devices currently in operation, providing data each 6 minutes. The average rain radar on the town were calculated for the sample of 17 rain episodes from the period 2001 - 2005, and compared to average from 29 rain gauges Grand Lyon. The differences between radar estimations and rainfall values show high amplitude over time, especially in winter. Thus, a factor based on raingauges was assigned to radar data in order to match the average values and radar rainfall for each rain events. These radar adjusted data were then compared to each punctual rainfall values associated (each raingauge value has been compared to a radar pixel value associated thanks to a vertical extraction). The comparison of surface and punctual radar data to the values of the dense network of rain gauges in the community showed a small difference between these measurement values after the use of a spatial uniform weighting ratio, and filtering pixels of lower quality. Specifically, the average difference between radar data and rainfall values around 20% episodes all together, but drops to nearly 10% during exceptionally abundant or long term time rainy episodes potentially harmful. To provide complete coverage of data on the study territory, especially on ground clutter zones filtered, two spatialization techniques were used. The results of the cross validation have shown the usefulness of ordinary kriging compared to cokriging, which is a lot more complicated to use and not really better in this precise study case.

  18. Evaluation of a voice recognition system for the MOTAS pseudo pilot station function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Langley Research Center has undertaken a technology development activity to provide a capability, the mission oriented terminal area simulation (MOTAS), wherein terminal area and aircraft systems studies can be performed. An experiment was conducted to evaluate state-of-the-art voice recognition technology and specifically, the Threshold 600 voice recognition system to serve as an aircraft control input device for the MOTAS pseudo pilot station function. The results of the experiment using ten subjects showed a recognition error of 3.67 percent for a 48-word vocabulary tested against a programmed vocabulary of 103 words. After the ten subjects retrained the Threshold 600 system for the words which were misrecognized or rejected, the recognition error decreased to 1.96 percent. The rejection rates for both cases were less than 0.70 percent. Based on the results of the experiment, voice recognition technology and specifically the Threshold 600 voice recognition system were chosen to fulfill this MOTAS function.

  19. Design and evaluation of FDDI fiber optics networkfor Ethernets, VAX's and Ingraph work stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernicki, M. Chris

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to design and evaluate the FDDI Fiber Optics Network for Ethernets, VAX's, and Ingraph work stations. From the KSC Headquarters communication requirement, it would be necessary to develop the FDDI network based on IEEE Standards outlined in the ANSI X3T9.5, Standard 802.3 and 802.5 topology - direct link via intermediate concentrator and bridge/router access. This analysis should examine the major factors that influence the operating conditions of the Headquarters Fiber plant. These factors would include, but are not limited to the interconnecting devices such as repeaters, bridges, routers and many other relevant or significant FDDI characteristics. This analysis is needed to gain a better understanding of overall FDDI performance.

  20. Evaluation of speech recognizers for use in advanced combat helicopter crew station research and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Carol A.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Army Crew Station Research and Development Facility uses vintage 1984 speech recognizers. An evaluation was performed of newer off-the-shelf speech recognition devices to determine whether newer technology performance and capabilities are substantially better than that of the Army's current speech recognizers. The Phonetic Discrimination (PD-100) Test was used to compare recognizer performance in two ambient noise conditions: quiet office and helicopter noise. Test tokens were spoken by males and females and in isolated-word and connected-work mode. Better overall recognition accuracy was obtained from the newer recognizers. Recognizer capabilities needed to support the development of human factors design requirements for speech command systems in advanced combat helicopters are listed.

  1. Satellite-Based Investigation and Evaluation of the Observational Environment of Meteorological Stations in Anhui Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Bin; Shi, Tao; Yang, Yuan-Jian; Wu, Bi-Wen; Wang, La-Bao; Shi, Chun-E.; Guo, Jian-Xia; Ji, Cheng-Li; Wen, Hua-Yang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, by using multi-temporal and high resolution Landsat data and geographic information system techniques, the land use/land cover (LULC) in the 2-km buffer zone of 52 meteorological stations in the Anhui province of China is retrieved and categorized into three types: vegetation (including farmland, forest and grass land), water (including lakes, rivers and pools), and construction (including buildings and roads). Besides, the land surface temperature (LST) in the buffer zone of these stations is also obtained from thermal infrared data. The normalized LST index (NLI) and the heat effect contribution index (HECI) of different LULC types are calculated. Via case studies and statistical analysis, the LULC and thermal environment's temporal-spatial variance in the 2-km buffer zone of these stations are surveyed, and their impacts on the observational environment are investigated. The study shows that the observational environments of the meteorological stations in Anhui province have been greatly influenced by rapid urbanization. The study proposes two new methods to classify the stations' observational environment into three types (urban, sub-urban, and rural). One uses the NLI and the other uses the HECI. The NLI method needs only LST information. The HECI method combines both LULC and LST information and, hence, is considered more reliable. The evaluation methods and criteria can be used conveniently, effectively, and quantitatively, and are especially useful when analyzing observational data from meteorological stations in weather and climate research and when choosing a location for a new meteorological station.

  2. Evaluation of Radar Vegetation Indices for Vegetation Water Content Estimation Using Data from a Ground-Based SMAP Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Prashant K.; O'Neill, Peggy; Cosh, Michael; Lang, Roger; Joseph, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation water content (VWC) is an important component of microwave soil moisture retrieval algorithms. This paper aims to estimate VWC using L band active and passive radar/radiometer datasets obtained from a NASA ground-based Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) simulator known as ComRAD (Combined Radar/Radiometer). Several approaches to derive vegetation information from radar and radiometer data such as HH, HV, VV, Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI), HH/VV ratio, HV/(HH+VV), HV/(HH+HV+VV) and Radar Vegetation Index (RVI) are tested for VWC estimation through a generalized linear model (GLM). The overall analysis indicates that HV radar backscattering could be used for VWC content estimation with highest performance followed by HH, VV, MPDI, RVI, and other ratios.

  3. Evaluation of temperature differences for paired stations of the U.S. Climate Reference Network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallo, K.P.

    2005-01-01

    Adjustments to data observed at pairs of climate stations have been recommended to remove the biases introduced by differences between the stations in time of observation, temperature instrumentatios, latitude, and elevation. A new network of climate stations, located in rural settings, permits comparisons of temperatures for several pairs of stations without two of the biases (time of observation and instrurtientation). The daily, monthly, and annual minimum, maximum, and mean temperatures were compared for five pairs of stations included in the U.S. Climate Reference Network. Significant differences were found between the paired stations in the annual minimum, maximum, and mean temperatures for all five pairs of stations. Adjustments for latitude and elevation differences contributed to greater differences in mean annual temperature for four of the five stations. Lapse rates computed from the mean annual temperature differences between station pairs differed from a constant value, whether or not latitude adjustments were made to the data. The results suggest that microclimate influences on temperatures observed at nearby (horizontally and vertically) stations are potentially much greater than influences that might be due to latitude or elevation differences between the stations. ?? 2005 American Meteorological Society.

  4. Range-only multistatic radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montana, D. M.; Herd, R. S.

    1985-10-01

    A range-only multistatic radar system has a plurality of radar stations located in a square grid pattern. Each radar station has a plurality of low power pulsed transmitters and receivers that operate on omnidirection whip antennas. Echo information received by the receivers is transmitted to a computer wherein a technique is employed to deghost and identify real targets. The computer applies a range difference similarity test, a uniqueness test, and a position test to determine real targets from the plurality of echo returns received.

  5. The Patriot radar in tactical air defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, David R.; Evans, William

    1988-05-01

    The Patriot radar is a C-band, phased-array, multifunction radar that, under the control of the weapon control computer in the engagement control station, performs target search and track; missile search, track, and communications during midcourse guidance; and target-via-missile terminal guidance. This paper describes the functions the radar performs and provides descriptions of the subsystems. The use of a multichannel, multifunction receiver and digital signal processor is emphasized to demonstrate the control and processing for multiple radar actions required to support the tactical air defense mission. A summary of results of an extensive test program at the White Sands Missile Range is presented.

  6. Evaluation of grout behind the lining of shield tunnels using ground-penetrating radar in the Shanghai Metro Line, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiongyao; Liu, Yujian; Huang, Hongwei; Du, Jun; Zhang, Fengshou; Liu, Lanbo

    2007-09-01

    For shield tunnelling construction in soft soil areas, the coverage uniformity and quality of consolidation of the injected grout mortar behind the prefabricated tunnel segment is the main concern for tunnel safety and ground settlement. In this paper, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) was applied to evaluate the grout behind the tunnel lining segments in Shanghai, China. The dielectric permittivity of the grout material in Shanghai Metro tunnelling construction was measured in the laboratory. Combining physical modelling results with finite different time domain numerical modelling results, we suggest that the antenna with frequency 200 MHz is well suited to penetrate the reinforced steel bar network of the tunnel lining segment and testing grout patterns behind the segment. The electromagnetic velocity of the grout behind the segment of the tunnel is 0.1 m ns-1 by the analysis of field common-middle point data. A wave-translated method was put forward to process the GPR images. Furthermore, combining the information acquired by GPR with experience data, a GPR non-destructive test standard for the grout mortar evaluation in Shanghai Metro tunnel construction was brought forward. The grout behind the tunnel lining segment is classified into three types: uncompensated grout mortar with a thickness less than 10 cm, normal grout mortar with a thickness between 10 cm and 30 cm and overcompensated grout mortar, which is more than 30 cm thick. The classified method is easily put into practice.

  7. New weather radar coming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    What would you call the next generation of radar for severe weather prediction? NEXRAD, of course. A prototype for the new system was recently completed in Norman, Okla., and by the early 1990s up to 195 stations around the United States will be tracking dangerous weather and sending faster, more accurate, and more detailed warnings to the public.NEXRAD is being built for the Departments of Commerce, Transportation, and Defense by the Unisys Corporation under a $450 million contract signed in December 1987. Th e system will be used by the National Weather Service, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the U.S. Air Force and Navy. The NEXRAD radar tower in Norman is expected to be operational in October.

  8. Report by the International Space Station (ISS) Management and Cost Evaluation (IMCE) Task Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. Thomas; Kellogg, Yvonne (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Management and Cost Evaluation Task Force (IMCE) was chartered to conduct an independent external review and assessment of the ISS cost, budget, and management. In addition, the Task Force was asked to provide recommendations that could provide maximum benefit to the U.S. taxpayers and the International Partners within the President's budget request. The Task Force has made the following principal findings: (1) The ISS Program's technical achievements to date, as represented by on-orbit capability, are extraordinary; (2) The Existing ISS Program Plan for executing the FY 02-06 budget is not credible; (3) The existing deficiencies in management structure, institutional culture, cost estimating, and program control must be acknowledged and corrected for the Program to move forward in a credible fashion; (4) Additional budget flexibility, from within the Office of Space Flight (OSF) must be provided for a credible core complete program; (5) The research support program is proceeding assuming the budget that was in place before the FY02 budget runout reduction of $1B; (6) There are opportunities to maximize research on the core station program with modest cost impact; (7) The U.S. Core Complete configuration (three person crew) as an end-state will not achieve the unique research potential of the ISS; (8) The cost estimates for the U.S.-funded enhancement options (e.g., permanent seven person crew) are not sufficiently developed to assess credibility. After these findings, the Task Force has formulated several primary recommendations which are published here and include: (1) Major changes must be made in how the ISS program is managed; (2) Additional cost reductions are required within the baseline program; (3) Additional funds must be identified and applied from the Human Space Flight budget; (4) A clearly defined program with a credible end-state, agreed to by all stakeholders, must be developed and implemented.

  9. Evaluation of areal precipitation estimates based on downscaled reanalysis and station data by hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duethmann, D.; Zimmer, J.; Gafurov, A.; Güntner, A.; Merz, B.; Vorogushyn, S.

    2012-09-01

    In data sparse regions, as in many mountainous catchments, it is a challenge to generate suitable precipitation input fields for hydrological modelling, as station data do not provide enough information to derive areal precipitation estimates. This study presents a method using the spatial variation of precipitation from downscaled reanalysis data for the interpolation of gauge observations. The second aim of this study is the evaluation of different precipitation estimates by hydrological modelling. Study area is the Karadarya catchment in Central Asia (11 700 km2). ERA-40 reanalysis data are downscaled with the regional climate model Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF). Precipitation data from gauge observations are interpolated (i) using monthly accumulated WRF precipitation data, (ii) using monthly fields from multiple linear regression against topographical variables and (iii) with the inverse distance approach. These precipitation data sets are also compared to (iv) the direct use of the precipitation output from the WRF downscaled ERA-40 data and (v) precipitation from the APHRODITE data set. Our study suggests that using monthly fields from downscaled reanalysis data can be a good approach for the interpolation of station data in data sparse mountainous regions. Compared to mean annual precipitation from continental and global scale gridded data sets our precipitation estimates for the study area are considerably higher. The introduction of a calibrated precipitation bias factor for the comparison of different precipitation estimates by hydrological modelling allows for a more informed differentiation with regard to the temporal dynamics, on the one hand, and the overall bias, on the other hand. Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses suggest that our results are robust against uncertainties in the calibration parameters, other model parameters and inputs, and the selected calibration period.

  10. Evaluate the Application of TPH test kits to Identify the Potential Contaminants in Gas Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, P. Y.; Liu, C. W.; Liu, W. Y.

    2012-04-01

    This study is focusing on the utility and applicability of the portable equipments such as, photo ionization detector (PID) and flame ionization detector (FID) for the determination of contaminants during the investigation of various gas stations. According to the onsite screening results, high contaminated soil samples were sent to analytical laboratory for the detection and quantification of the contaminants present therein. However, due to limitations, PID and FID cannot detect the low vapor pressure components. Hence, they cannot reflect the real situation of the contaminated soil samples and areas. This study summarizes the analytical results of total 37 soil samples, collecting from 17 gas stations. Soil samples were not only analyzed according to the standard method of Taiwan EPA in the laboratory, but also tested using the Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH) test kits, following the USEPA method 9074, to evaluate the TPH concentration in soil samples. With test kits, onsite, first the TPH was extracted from the soil samples using methanol and then mixed with emulsifier to produce turbidity, and finally then measured using the turbidity meter. The TPH test kits method is simple and rapid, and not time consuming like the laboratory method. A positive relationship has been observed (co-efficient of determination, R2 = 0.74) comparing between the results obtained from the laboratory test and kits test methods, especially for the high carbon content oil such as, diesel, but it does not show the obvious relationship with gasoline. Number of advantages has been considered in using the TPH test kits including, easily portable, simple and rapid testing, cost-effective, and onsite quantification. The technique can be applied for high carbon content oil contamination sites during soil sampling, to realize the actual situations and the promoting confirmation efficiency.

  11. Performance Evaluation of the Operational Air Quality Monitor for Water Testing Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Macatangay, Ariel V.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernandez, Facundo M.

    2014-01-01

    In the history of manned spaceflight, environmental monitoring has relied heavily on archival sampling. For short missions, this type of sample collection was sufficient; returned samples provided a snapshot of the presence of chemical and biological contaminants in the spacecraft air and water. However, with the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) and the subsequent extension of mission durations, soon to be up to one year, the need for enhanced, real-time environmental monitoring became more pressing. The past several years have seen the implementation of several real-time monitors aboard the ISS, complemented with reduced archival sampling. The station air is currently monitored for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (Air Quality Monitor [AQM]). The water on ISS is analyzed to measure total organic carbon and biocide concentrations using the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) and the Colorimetric Water Quality Monitoring Kit (CWQMK), respectively. The current air and water monitors provide important data, but the number and size of the different instruments makes them impractical for future exploration missions. It is apparent that there is still a need for improvements in environmental monitoring capabilities. One such improvement could be realized by modifying a single instrument to analyze both air and water. As the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for target compounds present in air samples, and many of the compounds are also targets for water quality monitoring, this instrument provides a logical starting point to evaluate the feasibility of this approach. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent studies aimed at determining an appropriate method for introducing VOCs from water samples into the gas phase and our current work, in which an electro-thermal vaporization unit has been interfaced with the AQM to analyze target analytes at the relevant concentrations at which they are routinely detected in archival water samples from the ISS.

  12. Evaluating space station applications of automation and robotics technologies from a human productivity point of view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    The role that automation, robotics, and artificial intelligence will play in Space Station operations is now beginning to take shape. Although there is only limited data on the precise nature of the payoffs that these technologies are likely to afford there is a general consensus that, at a minimum, the following benefits will be realized: increased responsiveness to innovation, lower operating costs, and reduction of exposure to hazards. Nevertheless, the question arises as to how much automation can be justified with the technical and economic constraints of the program? The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology which can be used to evaluate and rank different approaches to automating the functions and tasks planned for the Space Station. Special attention is given to the impact of advanced automation on human productivity. The methodology employed is based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process. This permits the introduction of individual judgements to resolve the confict that normally arises when incomparable criteria underly the selection process. Because of the large number of factors involved in the model, the overall problem is decomposed into four subproblems individually focusing on human productivity, economics, design, and operations, respectively. The results from each are then combined to yield the final rankings. To demonstrate the methodology, an example is developed based on the selection of an on-orbit assembly system. Five alternatives for performing this task are identified, ranging from an astronaut working in space, to a dexterous manipulator with sensory feedback. Computational results are presented along with their implications. A final parametric analysis shows that the outcome is locally insensitive to all but complete reversals in preference.

  13. Shuttle orbiter radar cross-sectional analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; James, R.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretical and model simulation studies on signal to noise levels and shuttle radar cross section are described. Pre-mission system calibrations, system configuration, and postmission system calibration of the tracking radars are described. Conversion of target range, azimuth, and elevation into radar centered east north vertical position coordinates are evaluated. The location of the impinging rf energy with respect to the target vehicles body axis triad is calculated. Cross section correlation between the two radars is presented.

  14. Properties of inertia-gravity waves in the lowermost stratosphere as observed by the PANSY radar over Syowa Station in the Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalikova, Maria; Sato, Kaoru; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Sato, Toru

    2016-05-01

    Inertia-gravity waves (IGWs) are an important component for the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. However, observational studies needed to constrain their forcing are still insufficient especially in the remote areas of the Antarctic region. One year of observational data (January to December 2013) by the PANSY radar of the wind components (vertical resolution of 150 m and temporal resolution of 30 min) are used to derive statistical analysis of the properties of IGWs with short vertical wavelengths ( ≤ 4 km) and ground-based periods longer than 4 h in the lowermost stratosphere (height range 10 to 12 km) with the help of the hodograph method. The annual change of the IGWs parameters are inspected but no pronounced year cycle is found. The year is divided into two seasons (summer and winter) based on the most prominent difference in the ratio of Coriolis parameter (f) to intrinsic frequency (ω^) distribution. Average of f/ω^ for the winter season is 0.40 and for the summer season 0.45 and the average horizontal wavelengths are 140 and 160 km respectively. Vertical wavelengths have an average of 1.85 km through the year. For both seasons the properties of IGWs with upward and downward propagation of the energy are also derived and compared. The percentage of downward propagating waves is 10.7 and 18.4 % in the summer and winter season respectively. This seasonal change is more than the one previously reported in the studies from mid-latitudes and model-based studies. It is in agreement with the findings of past radiosonde data-based studies from the Antarctic region. In addition, using the so-called dual-beam technique, vertical momentum flux and the variance of the horizontal perturbation velocities of IGWs are examined. Tropospheric disturbances of synoptic-scale are suggested as a source of episodes of IGWs with large variance of horizontal perturbation velocities, and this is shown in a number of cases.

  15. Atomic oxygen durability evaluation of the flexible batten for the photovoltaic array mast on Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stidham, Curtis R.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Flaherty, David S.; Roig, David M.; Edwards, Jonathan L.

    1994-01-01

    A test program was conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Lewis Research Center (LeRC) to evaluate the long term low Earth orbital (LEO) atomic oxygen (AO) durability of a flexible (fiberglass-epoxy composite) batten. The flexible batten is a component used to provide structural rigidity in the photovoltaic array mast on Space Station. The mast is used to support and articulate the photovoltaic array, therefore, the flexible batten must be preloaded for the 15 year lifetime of an array blanket. Development hardware and composite materials were evaluated in ground testing facilities for AO durability and dynamic retraction-deployment cyclic loading representative of expected full life in-space application. The CV1144 silicone (AO protective) coating was determined to provide adequate protection against AO degradation of the composite material and provided fiber containment, thus the structural integrity of the flexible batten was maintained. Both silicone coated and uncoated flexible battens maintained load carrying capabilities. Results of the testing did indicate that the CV1144 silicone protective coating was oxidized by AO reactions to form a brittle glassy (SiO2) skin that formed cracking patterns on all sides of the coated samples. The cracking was observed in samples that were mechanically stressed as well as samples in non-stressed conditions. The oxidized silicon was observed to randomly spall in small localized areas, on the flexible battens that underwent retraction-deployment cycling. Some darkening of the silicon, attributed to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, was observed.

  16. Frequency-Modulated Continuous-Wave Fm-Cw Radar for Evaluation of Refractory Structures Used in Glass Manufacturing Furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, B.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.; Limmer, R.

    2009-03-01

    A frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FM-CW) handheld radar operating in the frequency range of 8-18 GHz, resulting in a relatively fine range resolution was designed and constructed for on-site inspection of refractory structure thickness. This paper presents the design of the radar and the results of measurements conducted on typical refractory furnace structures assembled in the laboratory.

  17. Terrestrial ecosystem recovery following removal of a PCB point source at a former pole vault line radar station in Northern Labrador.

    PubMed

    Ficko, Sarah A; Luttmer, Carol; Zeeb, Barbara A; Reimer, Kenneth

    2013-09-01

    Saglek Bay (LAB-2), located on the northeast coast of Labrador is a former Polevault station that was operated by the U.S. Air Force from 1953 to 1971 when it was abandoned. An environmental assessment carried out in 1996 determined that the site was contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) with concentrations in soils far exceeding the Canadian Environmental Protection Agency (CEPA) regulation of 50 μg/g in three areas of the site (Beach, Site Summit, Antenna Hill). This led to remediation work carried out between 1999 and 2004 to remove and/or isolate all PCB-contaminated soil exceeding 50 μg/g and to further remediate parts of the site to <5 μg/g PCBs. In this study, spatial and temporal trends of PCB concentrations in soil, vegetation (Betula glandulosa and Salix spp.), and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were investigated over a period of fourteen (1997-2011) years in an effort to track ecosystem recovery following the removal of the PCB point sources. The data collected shows that PCB levels in vegetation samples are approximately four times lower in 2011 than pre-remediation in 1997. Similarly, PCB concentrations in deer mice in 2011 are approximately three times lower than those measured in 1997/98. Spatial trends in vegetation and deer mice continue to demonstrate that areas close to the former point sources of PCBs have higher PCB concentrations than those further away (and higher than background levels) and these residual PCB levels are not likely to decrease in the foreseeable future given the persistent nature of PCBs in general in the environment, and in particular in cold climates. PMID:23712118

  18. Evaluating PRISM precipitation grid data as possible surrogates for station data at four sites in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of climate-sensitive decision support for agriculture or water resource management requires long time series of monthly precipitation for specific locations. Archived station data for many locations is available, but time continuity, quality, and spatial coverage of station data rem...

  19. Using Radar Charts with Qualitative Evaluation: Techniques to Assess Change in Blended Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaczynski, Dan; Wood, Leigh; Harding, Ansie

    2008-01-01

    When university academics implement changes in learning, such as introducing blended learning, it is conventional practice to examine and evaluate the impact of the resulting curriculum reform. Judging the worth and impact of an educational development is a complex task involving subtle differences in learning. Qualitative methods to explore these…

  20. Evaluation of shoulder integrity in space: first report of musculoskeletal US on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fincke, E. Michael; Padalka, Gennady; Lee, Doohi; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Martin, David; Melton, Shannon L.; McFarlin, Kellie; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    Investigative procedures were approved by Henry Ford Human Investigation Committee and NASA Johnson Space Center Committee for Protection of Human Subjects. Informed consent was obtained. Authors evaluated ability of nonphysician crewmember to obtain diagnostic-quality musculoskeletal ultrasonographic (US) data of the shoulder by following a just-in-time training algorithm and using real-time remote guidance aboard the International Space Station (ISS). ISS Expedition-9 crewmembers attended a 2.5-hour didactic and hands-on US training session 4 months before launch. Aboard the ISS, they completed a 1-hour computer-based Onboard Proficiency Enhancement program 7 days before examination. Crewmembers did not receive specific training in shoulder anatomy or shoulder US techniques. Evaluation of astronaut shoulder integrity was done by using a Human Research Facility US system. Crew used special positioning techniques for subject and operator to facilitate US in microgravity environment. Common anatomic reference points aided initial probe placement. Real-time US video of shoulder was transmitted to remote experienced sonologists in Telescience Center at Johnson Space Center. Probe manipulation and equipment adjustments were guided with verbal commands from remote sonologists to astronaut operators to complete rotator cuff evaluation. Comprehensive US of crewmember's shoulder included transverse and longitudinal images of biceps and supraspinatus tendons and articular cartilage surface. Total examination time required to guide astronaut operator to acquire necessary images was approximately 15 minutes. Multiple arm and probe positions were used to acquire dynamic video images that were of excellent quality to allow evaluation of shoulder integrity. Postsession download and analysis of high-fidelity US images collected onboard demonstrated additional anatomic detail that could be used to exclude subtle injury. Musculoskeletal US can be performed in space by minimally trained operators by using remote guidance. This technique can be used to evaluate shoulder integrity in symptomatic crewmembers after strenuous extravehicular activities or to monitor microgravity-associated changes in musculoskeletal anatomy. Just-in-time training, combined with remote experienced physician guidance, may provide a useful approach to complex medical tasks performed by nonexperienced personnel in a variety of remote settings, including current and future space programs. (c) RSNA, 2004.

  1. Evaluation of shoulder integrity in space: first report of musculoskeletal US on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Fincke, E Michael; Padalka, Gennady; Lee, Doohi; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Sargsyan, Ashot E; Hamilton, Douglas R; Martin, David; Melton, Shannon L; McFarlin, Kellie; Dulchavsky, Scott A

    2005-02-01

    Investigative procedures were approved by Henry Ford Human Investigation Committee and NASA Johnson Space Center Committee for Protection of Human Subjects. Informed consent was obtained. Authors evaluated ability of nonphysician crewmember to obtain diagnostic-quality musculoskeletal ultrasonographic (US) data of the shoulder by following a just-in-time training algorithm and using real-time remote guidance aboard the International Space Station (ISS). ISS Expedition-9 crewmembers attended a 2.5-hour didactic and hands-on US training session 4 months before launch. Aboard the ISS, they completed a 1-hour computer-based Onboard Proficiency Enhancement program 7 days before examination. Crewmembers did not receive specific training in shoulder anatomy or shoulder US techniques. Evaluation of astronaut shoulder integrity was done by using a Human Research Facility US system. Crew used special positioning techniques for subject and operator to facilitate US in microgravity environment. Common anatomic reference points aided initial probe placement. Real-time US video of shoulder was transmitted to remote experienced sonologists in Telescience Center at Johnson Space Center. Probe manipulation and equipment adjustments were guided with verbal commands from remote sonologists to astronaut operators to complete rotator cuff evaluation. Comprehensive US of crewmember's shoulder included transverse and longitudinal images of biceps and supraspinatus tendons and articular cartilage surface. Total examination time required to guide astronaut operator to acquire necessary images was approximately 15 minutes. Multiple arm and probe positions were used to acquire dynamic video images that were of excellent quality to allow evaluation of shoulder integrity. Postsession download and analysis of high-fidelity US images collected onboard demonstrated additional anatomic detail that could be used to exclude subtle injury. Musculoskeletal US can be performed in space by minimally trained operators by using remote guidance. This technique can be used to evaluate shoulder integrity in symptomatic crewmembers after strenuous extravehicular activities or to monitor microgravity-associated changes in musculoskeletal anatomy. Just-in-time training, combined with remote experienced physician guidance, may provide a useful approach to complex medical tasks performed by nonexperienced personnel in a variety of remote settings, including current and future space programs. PMID:15533948

  2. Invacuo tribological evaluation of coarse-pitch gears for use on the Space Station alpha joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Scotty R.

    1992-01-01

    Existing invacuo or ambient test data of slow-speed (less than 30 meters/minute pitch line velocity), coarse-pitch gears could not be found suitable for use in evaluating gear materials and surface treatments for the gear-driven bearing race of the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) for Space Station Freedom (SSF). Gear testing was conducted by AEC-Able Engineering Company, Inc. to obtain design data for this critical SSF component. Some bull gear/pinion/lubrication combinations endured over 600,000 cycles (100 SSF years) without measurable wear, while other combinations experienced surface treatment degradation after only 40,000 cycles (seven SSF years). No catastrophic failures, such as seizing or tooth breakage, occurred during any test, all of which were run at least 201,000 cycles (34.5 SSF years). Specific results such as debris characteristics, mechanical efficiencies, effectiveness and degradation of lubrication, and wear data for the various gear combinations tested are described.

  3. Evaluation of force-torque displays for use with space station telerobotic activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrich, Robert C.; Bierschwale, John M.; Manahan, Meera K.; Stuart, Mark A.; Legendre, A. Jay

    1992-01-01

    Recent experiments which addressed Space Station remote manipulation tasks found that tactile force feedback (reflecting forces and torques encountered at the end-effector through the manipulator hand controller) does not improve performance significantly. Subjective response from astronaut and non-astronaut test subjects indicated that force information, provided visually, could be useful. No research exists which specifically investigates methods of presenting force-torque information visually. This experiment was designed to evaluate seven different visual force-torque displays which were found in an informal telephone survey. The displays were prototyped in the HyperCard programming environment. In a within-subjects experiment, 14 subjects nullified forces and torques presented statically, using response buttons located at the bottom of the screen. Dependent measures included questionnaire data, errors, and response time. Subjective data generally demonstrate that subjects rated variations of pseudo-perspective displays consistently better than bar graph and digital displays. Subjects commented that the bar graph and digital displays could be used, but were not compatible with using hand controllers. Quantitative data show similar trends to the subjective data, except that the bar graph and digital displays both provided good performance, perhaps do to the mapping of response buttons to display elements. Results indicate that for this set of displays, the pseudo-perspective displays generally represent a more intuitive format for presenting force-torque information.

  4. Evaluation of the Air Quality Monitor's Performance on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Reese, Eric; Ballard, Ken; Durham, Tamara

    2010-01-01

    The Air Quality Monitor (AQM) was flown to the International Space Station (ISS) as an experiment to evaluate its potential to replace the aging Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA), which ceased operations in August 2009. The AQM (Figure 1) is a small gas chromatography/differential mobility spectrometer (GC/DMS) manufactured by Sionex. Data was presented at last year s ISIMS conference that detailed the preparation of the AQM for flight, including instrument calibration. Furthermore, initial AQM data was compared to VOA results from simultaneous runs of the two instruments. Although comparison with VOA data provided a measure of confidence in the AQM performance, it is the comparison with results from simultaneously acquired air samples (grab sample containers-GSCs) that will define the success (or failure) of the AQM performance. This paper will update the progress in the AQM investigation by comparing AQM data to results from the analyses of GSC samples, returned from ISS. Additionally, a couple of example will illustrate the AQM s ability to detect disruptions in the spacecraft s air quality. Discussion will also focus upon a few unexpected issues that have arisen and how these will be a addressed in the final operational unit now being built.

  5. Evaluation of Low-Earth-Orbit Environmental Effects on International Space Station Thermal Control Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.

    1998-01-01

    Many spacecraft thermal control coatings in low Earth orbit (LEO) can be affected by solar ultraviolet radiation and atomic oxygen. Ultraviolet radiation can darken some polymers and oxides commonly used in thermal control materials. Atomic oxygen can erode polymer materials, but it may reverse the ultraviolet-darkening effect on oxides. Maintaining the desired solar absorptance for thermal control coatings is important to assure the proper operating temperature of the spacecraft. Thermal control coatings to be used on the International Space Station (ISS) were evaluated for their performance after exposure in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Atomic Oxygen-Vacuum Ultraviolet Exposure (AO-VUV) facility. This facility simulated the LEO environments of solar vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation (wavelength range, 115 to 200 nanometers (nm)) and VUV combined with atomic oxygen. Solar absorptance was measured in vacuo to eliminate the "bleaching" effects of ambient oxygen on VUV-induced degradation. The objective of these experiments was to determine solar absorptance increases of various thermal control materials due to exposure to simulated LEO conditions similar to those expected for ISS. Work was done in support of ISS efforts at the requests of Boeing Space and Defense Systems and Lockheed Martin Vought Systems.

  6. Structural evaluation of concepts for a solar energy concentrator for Space Station advanced development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, Winfred S.; Rhodes, Marvin D.

    1994-01-01

    Solar dynamic power systems have a higher thermodynamic efficiency than conventional photovoltaic systems; therefore they are attractive for long-term space missions with high electrical power demands. In an investigation conducted in support of a preliminary concept for Space Station Freedom, an approach for a solar dynamic power system was developed and a number of the components for the solar concentrator were fabricated for experimental evaluation. The concentrator consists of hexagonal panels comprised of triangular reflective facets which are supported by a truss. Structural analyses of the solar concentrator and the support truss were conducted using finite-element models. A number of potential component failure scenarios were postulated and the resulting structural performance was assessed. The solar concentrator and support truss were found to be adequate to meet a 1.0-Hz structural dynamics design requirement in pristine condition. However, for some of the simulated component failure conditions, the fundamental frequency dropped below the 1.0-Hz design requirement. As a result, two alternative concepts were developed and assessed. One concept incorporated a tetrahedral ring truss support for the hexagonal panels: the second incorporated a full tetrahedral truss support for the panels. The results indicate that significant improvements in stiffness can be obtained by attaching the panels to a tetrahedral truss, and that this concentrator and support truss will meet the 1.0-Hz design requirement with any of the simulated failure conditions.

  7. Structural evaluation of concepts for a solar energy concentrator for Space Station advanced development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenner, Winfred S.; Rhodes, Marvin D.

    1994-02-01

    Solar dynamic power systems have a higher thermodynamic efficiency than conventional photovoltaic systems; therefore they are attractive for long-term space missions with high electrical power demands. In an investigation conducted in support of a preliminary concept for Space Station Freedom, an approach for a solar dynamic power system was developed and a number of the components for the solar concentrator were fabricated for experimental evaluation. The concentrator consists of hexagonal panels comprised of triangular reflective facets which are supported by a truss. Structural analyses of the solar concentrator and the support truss were conducted using finite-element models. A number of potential component failure scenarios were postulated and the resulting structural performance was assessed. The solar concentrator and support truss were found to be adequate to meet a 1.0-Hz structural dynamics design requirement in pristine condition. However, for some of the simulated component failure conditions, the fundamental frequency dropped below the 1.0-Hz design requirement. As a result, two alternative concepts were developed and assessed. One concept incorporated a tetrahedral ring truss support for the hexagonal panels: the second incorporated a full tetrahedral truss support for the panels. The results indicate that significant improvements in stiffness can be obtained by attaching the panels to a tetrahedral truss, and that this concentrator and support truss will meet the 1.0-Hz design requirement with any of the simulated failure conditions.

  8. An Evaluation of Technology to Remove Problematic Organic Compounds from the International Space Station Potable Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Metselaar, Carol; Peyton, Barbara; Steele, John; Michalek, William; Bowman, Elizabeth; Wilson, Mark; Gazda, Daniel; Carter, Layne

    2014-01-01

    Since activation of the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) on the International Space Station (ISS) in November of 2008, there have been three events in which the TOC (Total Organic Carbon) in the product water has increased to approximately 3 mg/L and has subsequently recovered. Analysis of the product water in 2010 identified the primary component of the TOC as dimethylsilanediol (DMSD). An investigation into the fate of DMSD in the WPA ultimately determined that replacement of both Multifiltration (MF) Beds is the solution to recovering product water quality. The MF Beds were designed to ensure that ionic breakthrough occurs before organic breakthrough. However, DMSD saturated both MF Beds in the series, requiring removal and replacement of both MF Beds with significant life remaining. Analysis of the MF Beds determined that the adsorbent was not effectively removing DMSD, trimethylsilanol, various polydimethylsiloxanes, or dimethylsulfone. Coupled with the fact that the current adsorbent is now obsolete, the authors evaluated various media to identify a replacement adsorbent as well as media with greater capacity for these problematic organic contaminants. This paper provides the results and recommendations of this collaborative study.

  9. Evaluating a Radar-Based, Non Contact Streamflow Measurement System in the San Joaquin River at Vernalis, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Mason, Jr., Robert R.; Costa, John E.; Plant, William J.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Haeni, F. Peter; Melcher, Nick B.; Keller, William C.; Hayes, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Accurate measurement of flow in the San Joaquin River at Vernalis, California, is vital to a wide range of Federal and State agencies, environmental interests, and water contractors. The U.S. Geological Survey uses a conventional stage-discharge rating technique to determine flows at Vernalis. Since the flood of January 1997, the channel has scoured and filled as much as 20 feet in some sections near the measurement site resulting in an unstable stage-discharge rating. In response to recent advances in measurement techniques and the need for more accurate measurement methods, the Geological Survey has undertaken a technology demonstration project to develop and deploy a radar-based streamflow measuring system on the bank of the San Joaquin River at Vernalis, California. The proposed flow-measurement system consists of a ground-penetrating radar system for mapping channel geometries, a microwave radar system for measuring surface velocities, and other necessary infrastructure. Cross-section information derived from ground penetrating radar provided depths similar to those measured by other instruments during the study. Likewise, surface-velocity patterns and magnitudes measured by the pulsed Doppler radar system are consistent with near surface current measurements derived from acoustic velocity instruments. Since the ratio of surface velocity to mean velocity falls to within a small range of theoretical value, using surface velocity as an index velocity to compute river discharge is feasable. Ultimately, the non-contact radar system may be used to make continuous, near-real-time flow measurements during high and medium flows. This report documents the data collected between April 14, 2002 and May 17, 2002 for the purposes of testing this radar based system. Further analyses of the data collected during this field effort will lead to further development and improvement of the system.

  10. Evaluating the surface circulation in the Ebro delta (northeastern Spain) with quality-controlled high-frequency radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, P.; Piedracoba, S.; Soto-Navarro, J.; Alvarez-Fanjul, E.

    2015-11-01

    The Ebro River delta is a relevant marine protected area in the western Mediterranean. In order to promote the conservation of its ecosystem and support operational decision making in this sensitive area, a three-site standard-range (13.5 MHz) CODAR SeaSonde high-frequency (HF) radar was deployed in December 2013. The main goal of this work is to explore basic features of the sea surface circulation in the Ebro deltaic region as derived from reliable HF radar surface current measurements. For this aim, a combined quality control methodology was applied: firstly, 1-year long (2014) real-time web monitoring of nonvelocity-based diagnostic parameters was conducted to infer both radar site status and HF radar system performance. The signal-to-noise ratio at the monopole exhibited a consistent monthly evolution, although some abrupt decreases (below 10 dB), occasionally detected in June for one of the radar sites, impacted negatively on the spatiotemporal coverage of total current vectors. It seemed to be sporadic episodes since radar site overall performance was found to be robust during 2014. Secondly, a validation of HF radar data with independent in situ observations from a moored current meter was attempted for May-October 2014. The accuracy assessment of radial and total vectors revealed a consistently high agreement. The directional accuracy of the HF radar was rated at better than 8°. The correlation coefficient and root mean square error (RMSE) values emerged in the ranges [0.58-0.83] and [4.02-18.31] cm s-1, respectively. The analysis of the monthly averaged current maps for 2014 showed that the HF radar properly represented basic oceanographic features previously reported, namely, the predominant southwestward flow, the coastal clockwise eddy confined south of the Ebro delta mouth, or the Ebro River impulsive-type freshwater discharge. The EOF analysis related the flow response to local wind forcing and confirmed that the surface current field evolved in space and time according to three significantly dominant modes of variability.

  11. Bistatic and Multistatic Radar: Surveillance, Countermeasures, and Radar Cross Sections. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, testing, and evaluation of bistatic and multistatic radar used in surveillance and countermeasure technology. Citations discuss radar cross sections, target recognition and characteristics, ghost recognition, motion image compensation, and wavelet analysis. Stealth aircraft design, stealth target tracking, synthetic aperture radar, and space applications are examined.

  12. Bistatic and Multistatic Radar: Surveillance, Countermeasures, and Radar Cross Sections. (Latest Citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, testing, and evaluation of bistatic and multistatic radar used in surveillance and countermeasure technology. Citations discuss radar cross sections, target recognition and characteristics, ghost recognition, motion image compensation, and wavelet analysis. Stealth aircraft design, stealth target tracking, synthetic aperture radar, and space applications are examined.

  13. Stereo side-looking radar experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leberl, F.; Raggam, J.; Kobrick, M.

    1980-01-01

    The application of side-looking radar images in geoscience fields can be enhanced when using overlapping image strips that are viewed in stereo. A question concerns the quality of stereo radar. This quality is described evaluating stereo viewability and using the concept of vertical exaggeration with sets of actual radar images. A conclusion is that currently available stereo radar data are not optimized, that therefore a better quality can be achieved if data acquisition is appropriately arranged, and that the actual limitations of stereo radar are still unexplored.

  14. Precise gravity-field modeling in the area of the Japanese Antarctic station Syowa and evaluation of recent EGMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yoichi; Nogi, Yoshifumi; Matsuzaki, Kazuya

    2016-03-01

    By combining a Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) Earth Gravity Model (EGM) and in situ gravity data obtained from the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) surveys, we estimated the regional gravity field in the area of Syowa Station, a Japanese research station located in Lützow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica. In situ data sets that were used consisted of land gravity data collected since 1967, shipborne data collected since 1985 and airborne gravity data collected in 2006. The GOCE direct (DIR) solution release 5 (R5) model was used as the long-wavelength reference of the gravity field. Using these data sets, we calculated gravity anomalies and geoid heights at 1-by-1‧ grid by means of least-squares collocation. The resulting geoid height at Syowa Station was compared with a local height based on GPS, spirit leveling and tide gauge data. The result suggests that the sea surface height at Syowa Station is -1.57 m, which is consistent with a dynamic ocean topography model. During this investigation, we also evaluated GOCE EGMs and other recent EGMs by comparing them with the airborne gravity data. The results indicate that the GOCE DIR R5 produced the smallest RMS (Root Mean Square) differences and that the newer models performed nearly as well. These comparisons demonstrate the importance of using reliable in situ data when evaluating satellite-only EGMs.

  15. Radar Performance Improvement. Angle Tracking Modification to Fire Control Radar System for Space Shuttle Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The AN/APQ-153 fire control radar modified to provide angle tracking was evaluated for improved performance. The frequency agile modifications are discussed along with the range-rate improvement modifications, and the radar to computer interface. A parametric design and comparison of noncoherent and coherent radar systems are presented. It is shown that the shuttle rendezvous range and range-rate requirements can be made by a Ku-Band noncoherent pulse radar.

  16. Using radar and lidar instrument simulators to evaluate moist processes in the Community Atmosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, J. E.; Gettelman, A.; Zhang, Y.; Stephens, G. L.

    2009-12-01

    Global vertically-profiling active satellite observations and instrument simulator packages enable new exposure of moist processes in global climate models. We evaluate the representation of cloud and precipitation processes within two versions of NCARs Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) that will be used for IPCC integrations (CAM3.5, CAM4). The two CAM model versions have large differences in cloud water content, cloud particle size, tropospheric humidity, and precipitation frequency and intensity. CloudSat and CALIOP observations and the COSP simulator package are used to produce apple-to-apple comparisons between observed and modeled cloud and precipitation properties. We then assess the fidelity of CAM3.5 and CAM4 cloud and precipitation fields to the CloudSat and CALIOP observations in three areas of climatological interest: the Pacific stratocumulus regions, the Tropical Pacific warm pool, and the North Pacific mid-latitude storm track. In addition to observational comparison, the climate implications of the revealed inter-model and observational differences will be discussed.

  17. Venus - First Radar Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    After traveling more than 1.5 billion kilometers (948 million miles), the Magellan spacecraft was inserted into orbit around Venus on Aug. 10, 1990. This mosaic consists of adjacent pieces of two Magellan image strips obtained on Aug. 16 in the first radar test. The radar test was part of a planned In Orbit Checkout sequence designed to prepare the Magellan spacecraft and radar to begin mapping after Aug. 31. The strip on the left was returned to the Goldstone Deep Space Network station in California; the strip to the right was received at the DSN in Canberra, Australia. A third station that will be receiving Magellan data is located near Madrid, Spain. Each image strip is 20 km (12 miles) wide and 16,000 km (10,000 miles) long. This mosaic is a small portion 80 km (50 miles) long. This image is centered at 21 degrees north latitude and 286.8 degrees east longitude, southeast of a volcanic highland region called Beta Regio. The resolution of the image is about 120 meters (400 feet), 10 times better than previous images of the same area of Venus, revealing many new geologic features. The bright line trending northwest southeast across the center of the image is a fracture or fault zone cutting the volcanic plains. In the upper left corner of the image, a multiple ring circular feature of probable volcanic origin can be seen, approximately 4.27 km (2.65 miles) across. The bright and dark variations seen in the plains surrounding these features correspond to volcanic lava flows of varying ages. The volcanic lava flows in the southern half of the image have been cut by north south trending faults. This area is similar geologically to volcanic deposits seen on Earth at Hawaii and the Snake River Plains in Idaho.

  18. Evaluation of the 29-km Eta Model. Part 1; Objective Verification at Three Selected Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nutter, Paul A.; Manobianco, John; Merceret, Francis J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes an objective verification of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) 29-km eta model from May 1996 through January 1998. The evaluation was designed to assess the model's surface and upper-air point forecast accuracy at three selected locations during separate warm (May - August) and cool (October - January) season periods. In order to enhance sample sizes available for statistical calculations, the objective verification includes two consecutive warm and cool season periods. Systematic model deficiencies comprise the larger portion of the total error in most of the surface forecast variables that were evaluated. The error characteristics for both surface and upper-air forecasts vary widely by parameter, season, and station location. At upper levels, a few characteristic biases are identified. Overall however, the upper-level errors are more nonsystematic in nature and could be explained partly by observational measurement uncertainty. With a few exceptions, the upper-air results also indicate that 24-h model error growth is not statistically significant. In February and August 1997, NCEP implemented upgrades to the eta model's physical parameterizations that were designed to change some of the model's error characteristics near the surface. The results shown in this paper indicate that these upgrades led to identifiable and statistically significant changes in forecast accuracy for selected surface parameters. While some of the changes were expected, others were not consistent with the intent of the model updates and further emphasize the need for ongoing sensitivity studies and localized statistical verification efforts. Objective verification of point forecasts is a stringent measure of model performance, but when used alone, is not enough to quantify the overall value that model guidance may add to the forecast process. Therefore, results from a subjective verification of the meso-eta model over the Florida peninsula are discussed in the companion paper by Manobianco and Nutter. Overall verification results presented here and in part two should establish a reasonable benchmark from which model users and developers may pursue the ongoing eta model verification strategies in the future.

  19. 47 CFR 87.107 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... consisting of the name of the company owning or operating the aircraft, followed by the word “Maintenance... of stations are exempted from the use of a call sign: Airborne weather radar, radio altimeter,...

  20. 47 CFR 87.107 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... consisting of the name of the company owning or operating the aircraft, followed by the word “Maintenance... of stations are exempted from the use of a call sign: Airborne weather radar, radio altimeter,...

  1. 47 CFR 87.107 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... consisting of the name of the company owning or operating the aircraft, followed by the word “Maintenance... of stations are exempted from the use of a call sign: Airborne weather radar, radio altimeter,...

  2. 47 CFR 87.107 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... consisting of the name of the company owning or operating the aircraft, followed by the word “Maintenance... of stations are exempted from the use of a call sign: Airborne weather radar, radio altimeter,...

  3. 47 CFR 87.107 - Station identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... consisting of the name of the company owning or operating the aircraft, followed by the word “Maintenance... of stations are exempted from the use of a call sign: Airborne weather radar, radio altimeter,...

  4. Simulation of a weather radar display for over-water airborne radar approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clary, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne radar approach (ARA) concepts are being investigated as a part of NASA's Rotorcraft All-Weather Operations Research Program on advanced guidance and navigation methods. This research is being conducted using both piloted simulations and flight test evaluations. For the piloted simulations, a mathematical model of the airborne radar was developed for over-water ARAs to offshore platforms. This simulated flight scenario requires radar simulation of point targets, such as oil rigs and ships, distributed sea clutter, and transponder beacon replies. Radar theory, weather radar characteristics, and empirical data derived from in-flight radar photographs are combined to model a civil weather/mapping radar typical of those used in offshore rotorcraft operations. The resulting radar simulation is realistic and provides the needed simulation capability for ongoing ARA research.

  5. Evaluation of RTV coating for station insulators subjected to coastal contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Carberry, R.E.; Schneider, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements and analysis of contaminant samples from a nuclear power station which has suffered flashovers due to wind-swept salt spray are presented. The results of a program of laboratory tests on artificially contaminated porcelain station insulators, with and without a room temperature vulcanized (RTV) silicone rubber coating, are reported. Data from clean fog and salt mist tests are used to determine the improvement in flashover voltage level over a range of high contamination severity on RTV coated insulators. Visual observations and leakage current measurements made during surface discharge activity are utilized to demonstrate the influence of the RTV coating on discharge behavior. Switching impulse test results are also presented.

  6. 33. Site Plan: Custer Air Force Station, Battle Creek, Michigan, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Site Plan: Custer Air Force Station, Battle Creek, Michigan, FD Radar Facilities-FPS-27, Electrical Plot Plan and Duet Details, USACOE, not date. - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  7. TRMM radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, Kenichi

    1993-01-01

    The results of a conceptual design study and the performance of key components of the Bread Board Model (BBM) of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) radar are presented. The radar, which operates at 13.8 GHz and is designed to meet TRMM mission objectives, has a minimum measurable rain rate of 0.5 mm/h with a range resolution of 250 m, a horizontal resolution of about 4 km, and a swath width of 220 km. A 128-element active phased array system is adopted to achieve contiguous scanning within the swath. The basic characteristics of BBM were confirmed by experiments. The development of EM started with the cooperation of NASDA and CRL.

  8. Radars in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delnore, Victor E.

    1990-01-01

    The capabilities of active microwave devices operating from space (typically, radar, scatterometers, interferometers, and altimeters) are discussed. General radar parameters and basic radar principles are explained. Applications of these parameters and principles are also explained. Trends in space radar technology, and where space radars and active microwave sensors in orbit are going are discussed.

  9. Recent Radar Speckle Observations of Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Michael W.; Benner, Lance; Brozovic, Marina; Nolan, Michael C.; Springmann, Alessondra; Taylor, Patrick A.

    2014-11-01

    Radar speckle tracking is an observational technique to constrain the spin state of a target object. When illuminated by a monochromatic radar beam, the target scatters light into regions of constructive and destructive interference - a speckle pattern. This pattern moves as the target rotates, with a speed and direction determined by the object’s rotation rate and spin vector. By tracking the motion of a radar speckle pattern between two or more receiving stations, we can constrain the spin state of the target.First applied to measure the spin state of Mercury, since 2008 radar speckle tracking has become one of the standard techniques for radar observations of near-Earth asteroids. We transmit with either of the Arecibo and Goldstone planetary radars, receive with elements of the Very Long Baseline Array or of the Very Large Array, and measure the time lags between the speckle pattern as seen by each station. Starting with the first asteroid observed with speckle observations, 2008 EV5, this technique has allowed us to resolve ambiguities in asteroids’ spin states that delay-Doppler radar imaging and lightcurve observations did not.Recent radar speckle targets have included the near-Earth asteroids 1998 ML14, 2005 WK4, and 2014 HQ124. ML14 was observed with radar shortly after its discovery in 1998, but the earlier radar observations did not yield a unique pole direction constraint. HQ124 is a contact-binary object and was one of the best radar targets of 2014.

  10. Microcomputer Learning Stations and Student Health and Safety: Planning, Evaluation, and Revision of Physical Arrangements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeaman, Andrew R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety's recommendations for computer stations in industrial settings and proposes their adaptation to educational institutions. The human side of computer applications is stressed; solutions to educational problems are described; and a checklist of requirements for student comfort is…

  11. Evaluating the potential use of a high-resolution X-band polarimetric radar observations in Urban Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostou, Marios N.; Kalogiros, John; Marzano, Frank S.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Baldini, Luca; Nikolopoulos, EfThymios; Montopoli, Mario; Picciotti, Errico

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean area concentrates the major natural risks related to the water cycle, including heavy precipitation and flash-flooding during the fall season. Every year in central and south Europe we witness several fatal and economical disasters from severe storm rainfall triggering Flash Floods, and its impacts are increasing worldwide, but remain very difficult to manage. The spatial scale of flash flood occurrence is such that its vulnerability is often focused on dispersed urbanization, transportation and tourism infrastructures (De Marchi and Scolobig 2012). Urbanized and industrialized areas shows peculiar hydrodynamic and meteo-oceanographic features and they concentrate the highest rates of flash floods and fatal disasters. The main causes of disturbance being littoral urban development and harbor activities, the building of littoral rail- and highways, and the presence of several polluted discharges. All the above mentioned characteristics limit our ability to issue timely flood warnings. Precipitation estimates based on raingauge networks are usually associated with low coverage density, particularly at high altitudes. On the other hand, operational weather radar networks may provide valuable information of precipitation at these regimes but reliability of their estimates is often limited due to retrieval (e.g. variability in the reflectivity-to-rainfall relationship) and spatial extent constrains (e.g. blockage issues, overshooting effects). As a result, we currently lack accurate precipitation estimates over urban complex terrain areas, which essentially means that we lack accurate knowledge of the triggering factor for a number of hazards like flash floods and debris flows/landslides occurring in those areas. A potential solution to overcome sampling as well as retrieval uncertainty limitations of current observational networks might be the use of network of low-power dual-polarization X-band radars as complement to raingauges and gap-filling to operational, low-frequency (C-band or S-ban) and high-power weather radars. The above hypothesis is examined using data collected during the HyMEX 2012 Special Observation Period (Nov-Feb) the urban and sub-urban complex terrain area in the Central Italy (CI). The area is densely populated and it includes the high-density populated urban and industrial area of Rome. The orography of CI is quite complex, going from sea level to nearly 3000 m in less than 150 km. The CI area involves many rivers, including two major basins: the Aniene-Tiber basin (1000 km long) and the Aterno-Pescara basin (300 km long), respectively on the west and on the east side of the Apennines ridge. Data include observations from i) the National Observatory of Athens' X-band polarimetric weather radar (XPOL), ii) two X-band miniradars (WR25X located in CNR, WR10X located in Rome Sapienza), iii) a dense network of raingauges and disdrometers (i.e. Parsivel type and 2D-video type). In addition, the experimental area is also covered from the nearby the National Research Council (CNR)'s C-band dual-polarization weather radar (Polar55C), which were involved also in the analysis. A number of storm events are selected and compared with the nearby C-band radar to investigate the potential of using high-resolution and microphysically-derived rainfall based on X-band polarimetric radar observations. Events have been discriminated on the basis of rainfall intensity and hydrological response. Results reveal that in contrast with the other two rainfall sources (in situ and C-band radar), X-band radar rainfall estimates offer an improved representation of the local precipitation variability, which turns to have a significant impact in simulating the peak flows associated with these events.

  12. Modelisation du Signal Radar EN Milieu Stratifie et Evaluation de Techniques de Mesure de L'humidite du Sol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, Johanne

    La presente etude se penche sur des problemes relies a l'echantillonnage de l'humidite de sol et a l'estimation du signal radar sur sols nus. Le travail se divise en deux volets. Le volet 1 evalue trois techniques de mesure de l'humidite du sol (gravimetrie, reflectometrie temporelle et sonde dielectrique) et deux protocoles d'echantillonnage. Dans le volet 2, un modele de simulation du signal en milieu stratifie est developpe, et les estimes de signal obtenus sont compares aux estimes bases uniquement sur une valeur moyenne d'humidite du sol prise sur une profondeur fixe d'echantillonnage. Les differences entre les deux estimes dependent de la frequence et du choix judicieux de la profondeur d'echantillonnage; elles sont plus importantes aux faibles angles et en polarisation HV, puis VV. Le modele de simulation a aussi ete utilise pour etudier la profondeur de penetration du signal et en deduire la profondeur optimale d'echantillonnage en tenant compte des caracteristiques du signal. Une variation de 25 ^circ de l'angle d'incidence a peu d'effet sur la profondeur de penetration en bande Ku; l'ecart reste inferieur ou egal a 0,5 cm en bande C mais peut atteindre 1,3 cm en bande L. L'impact de la polarisation est nul en bande Ku mais croi t avec l'angle d'incidence en bande C et L. A 50^circ, il est, en moyenne de 1 cm en bande C et de 2 cm en bande L. En polarisation VV, la profondeur croi t avec une augmentation de l'angle alors que l'effet est inverse en polarisation HH. Deux methodes pour estimer la profondeur d'echantillonnage en conditions operationnelles sont presentees. Lorsqu'on inverse un modele pour estimer l'humidite du sol a partir du signal, ces methodes permettent aussi d'estimer l'epaisseur de sol representee par l'humidite ainsi estimee.

  13. Post-Flight Back Pain Following International Space Station Missions: Evaluation of Spaceflight Risk Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, M. S.; Murray, J. D.; Wear, M. L.; Van Baalen, M.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Back pain during spaceflight has often been attributed to the lengthening of the spinal column due to the absence of gravity during both short and long-duration missions. Upon landing and re-adaptation to gravity, the spinal column reverts back to its original length thereby causing some individuals to experience pain and muscular spasms, while others experience no ill effects. With International Space Station (ISS) missions, cases of back pain and injury are more common post-flight, but little is known about the potential risk factors. Thus, the purpose of this project was to perform an initial evaluation of reported post-flight back pain and injury cases to relevant spaceflight risk factors in United States astronauts that have completed an ISS mission. METHODS All US astronauts who completed an ISS mission between Expeditions (EXP) 1 and 41 (2000-2015) were included in this evaluation. Forty-five astronauts (36 males and 9 females) completed 50 ISS missions during the study time period, as 5 astronauts completed 2 ISS missions. Researchers queried medical records of the 45 astronauts for occurrences of back pain and injury. A case was defined as any reported event of back pain or injury to the cervical, thoracic, lumbar, sacral, or coccyx spine regions. Data sources for the cases included the Flight Medicine Clinic's electronic medical record; Astronaut Strength, Conditioning and Rehabilitation electronic documentation; the Private Medical Conference tool; and the Space Medicine Operations Team records. Post-flight cases were classified as an early case if reported within 45 days of landing (R + 45) or a late case if reported from R + 46 to R + 365 days after landing (R + 1y). Risk factors in the astronaut population for back pain include age, sex, prior military service, and prior history of back pain. Additionally, spaceflight specific risk factors such as type of landing vehicle and onboard exercise countermeasures were included to evaluate their contribution to post-flight cases. Prior history of back pain included back pain recorded in the medical record within 3 years prior to launch. Landing vehicle was included in the model to discern if more astronauts experienced back pain or injury following a Shuttle or Soyuz landing. Onboard exercise countermeasures were noted for those astronauts who had a mission following 2009 deployment of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) (EXP 19 to 41). T-test and chi-squared tests were performed to evaluate the association between each individual risk factor and post-flight case. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the combined contribution of all the risk factors on post-flight cases. Separate models were calculated for cases reported by R + 45 and R + 1y. RESULTS During the study time period, there were 13 post-flight cases reported by R + 45 and an additional 5 reported by R + 1y. Most of these cases have been reported since EXP 19 with 10 cases by R + 45 and 4 by R + 1y. Individual risk factors of age, sex, landing vehicle, and prior military service were not significantly associated with post-flight cases identified at R + 45 or R + 1y (p greater than 0.05). Having back pain or injury within 3 years prior to launch significantly increased the likelihood of becoming a case by R + 1y (p = 0.041), but not at R+45 (p=0.204). Additionally, astronauts who experienced onboard exercise countermeasures that included aRED had a significantly increased risk of becoming a case at R + 45 (p = 0.024) and R + 1y (p=0.003). Multiple logistic regression evaluating all the risk factors for cases identified no significant risk factors at either the R + 45 or R + 1y time period (p greater than 0.05). Overall model fit was poor for both the R + 45 (R(exp 2) = 0.132) and R + 1y (R(exp 2) = 0.186) cases showing that there are risk factors not represented in our model. CONCLUSIONS Regardless of cause, post-flight cases are reported more often since aRED was deployed in 2009. This may reflect improved documentation or unidentified risk factors. No spaceflight risk factor explains the data fully. Post-flight cases are probably due to multi-faceted factors that are not easily elucidated in the medical data.

  14. [Evaluating psychophysiologic adaptation state in operators of Bilibino nuclear power station].

    PubMed

    Isaeva, N A; Torubarov, F S; Denisova, E A; Zvereva, Z F; Koronotova, M A

    2014-01-01

    The study revealed that 60% operators of Bilibino nuclear power station suffer from psychosomatic diseases, 41.7% of them are assigned to occupational group of workers, and major part of the examinees with psychosomatic diseases (45.82%) are aged 41-50, high integral level ofpsychophysiologic adaptation is revealed in 5 examinees (12.5%), medium integral level--in 12 examinees (30%). Lower integral level of psychophysiologic adaptation manifested in decrease in psychophysiologic and physiologic levels. PMID:25845144

  15. A simulation model for reliability evaluation of Space Station power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, C.; Patton, A. D.; Kumar, Mudit; Wagner, H.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed simulation model for the hybrid Space Station power system is presented which allows photovoltaic and solar dynamic power sources to be mixed in varying proportions. The model considers the dependence of reliability and storage characteristics during the sun and eclipse periods, and makes it possible to model the charging and discharging of the energy storage modules in a relatively accurate manner on a continuous basis.

  16. 23. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING RADAR CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - RADAR CONTROL INTERFACE "RCL NO. 2" WITH COMPUTER CONTROL DISC DRIVE UNITS IN FOREGROUND. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  17. 8. View of power plant and radar tower, looking southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View of power plant and radar tower, looking southwest - Naval Air Station Fallon, Power Plant, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  18. 1. View of east elevation of power plant, radar tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of east elevation of power plant, radar tower in background, looking west - Naval Air Station Fallon, Power Plant, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  19. 3. View of north elevation of fuel tanks, radar tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of north elevation of fuel tanks, radar tower in the background, looking southwest - Naval Air Station Fallon, Fuel Tanks, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  20. 5. View of east elevation of fuel tanks, radar tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of east elevation of fuel tanks, radar tower and power plant in background, looking west - Naval Air Station Fallon, Fuel Tanks, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  1. Categorisation of air quality monitoring stations by evaluation of PM(10) variability.

    PubMed

    Barrero, M A; Orza, J A G; Cabello, M; Cantón, L

    2015-08-15

    Air Quality Monitoring Networks (AQMNs) are composed by a number of stations, which are typically classified as urban, suburban or rural, and background, industrial or traffic, depending on the location and the influence of the immediate surroundings. These categories are not necessarily homogeneous and distinct from one another, regarding the levels of the monitored pollutants. A classification providing groups with these features is of interest for air quality management and research purposes, and therefore, other classification criteria should be explored. In this work, the variations of PM10 concentrations in 43 stations in the AQMN of the Basque Country in the period 2005-2012 have been studied to group them according to common characteristics. The characteristic variations in time are synthesised by the autocorrelation function (ACF), with both daily and hourly data, and by the average diurnal evolution pattern of the normalised concentrations on a seasonal basis (Evol-P). A methodology based on k-means clustering of these features is proposed. Each classification gives a different piece of information that has been phenomenologically related with specific dispersion and emission dynamics. The classification based on Evol-Ps is found to be the most influential one when comparing PM10 levels between groups. A combination of these categorisations provides 5 groups with significantly different levels of PM10, improving the discrimination of the conventional classification. Our results indicate that the time series of the pollutant concentrations contain enough information to provide an objective classification of the monitoring stations in an AQMN. PMID:25897730

  2. 50. View of waveguides beginning to move toward two radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. View of waveguides beginning to move toward two radar scanner switches (two per radar scanner building) by vertical bends; also tuning devices are located here. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  3. 9. View southeast corner of perimeter acquisition radar power plant ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. View southeast corner of perimeter acquisition radar power plant room #214, control room; showing central monitoring station console in foreground. Well and booster control panel in left background and electric power management panel on far right - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Power Plant, In Limited Access Area, Southwest of PARB at end of Service Road B, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  4. Agricultural and hydrological applications of radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.

    1976-01-01

    Program objectives, covering a wide range of disciplines and activities in radar remote sensing, include radar systems development and analysis, data processing and display, and data interpretation in geology, geography and oceanography. Research was focused on the evaluation of radar remote sensing applications in hydrology and agriculture based on data acquired with the Microwave Active Spectrometer (MAS) system. The title, author(s) and abstract of each of the 62 technical reports generated under this contract are appended.

  5. Noise level evaluation for a natural gas compressor station driven by gas turbines at the planning stage after four years of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, F.; Hiemer, H.; Mann, J.

    1987-01-01

    For a southern german gas turbine compressor station sound emission levels and noise control thereoff are evaluated based on authority specified emmission levels. Project history, planning and operating experience is shown.

  6. Possibility of investigating star systems by radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzhiga, O. N.

    1986-01-01

    There is no fundamental reason why radar cannot be used in investigations of star systems. In order to detect star systems by radar it is necessary to construct an antenna with a diameter of several tens of kilometers and a transmitter whose power is commensurable with the power of all electric power stations on the Earth. Such an antenna should be in outer space in order to avoid the influence of radio ray refraction in the Earth's troposphere and to to give rise to radio noise. At present the construction of such a radar apparatus may seem incredible, but there are no fundamentally insoluble problems. The closest stars are 10,000 times more distant from the Sun than Pluto. In order to make successful radar observations of star systems there would have to be the same jump in energy potential as with the transition from radar observations of the Moon to radar observations of Pluto. If the rates of increase in energy potential persist, radar observations of star systems will become realistic by the middle of the 21st century. A system for interstellar communication having a receiving antenna with an effective area of 2 x 10 to the 9th power square meters operating at a wavelength of 3 cm with a receiver noise temperature of 10 K can ensure transmission of a television signal from a distance of 4.34 light years with use at the transmitting end of an antenna with a diameter of 10 m and a transmitter with a power of 1 million W. Radar observations of star systems will open the way to interstellar ships in the same way that radar observations of planets in the solar system opened the way for the interplanetary stations.

  7. Post-Flight Back Pain Following International Space Station Missions: Evaluation of Spaceflight Risk Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Mitzi S.; Murray, Jocelyn D.; Wear, Mary L.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Back pain during spaceflight has often been attributed to the lengthening of the spinal column due to the absence of gravity during both short and long-duration missions. Upon landing and re-adaptation to gravity, the spinal column reverts back to its original length thereby causing some individuals to experience pain and muscular spasms, while others experience no ill effects. With International Space Station (ISS) missions, cases of back pain and injury are more common post-flight, but little is known about the potential risk factors.

  8. State of subsoil in a former petrol station: physicochemical characterization and hydrocarbon contamination evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Rosales, Rosa; Martinez-Pagán, Pedro; Faz, Ángel; Bech, Jaume

    2013-04-01

    Former petrol stations are, possibly, potential hydrocarbon contaminated soil areas due to leakage in Underground Storage Tanks and fuel dispensing activities. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in gasoline, like benzene and semi-volatile organics in diesel, are carcinogenic and very toxic substances which can involve a serious risk for ecosystem and human health. Based on Electrical Resistivity Tomography 2D results from a previous work, there have been selected three potentially contaminated goal areas in a former petrol station located in SE Spain in order to obtain soil samples by drilling and to assess the gasoline and diesel contamination. A special sampling design was carried out and soil samples for VOCs were preserved at field with a KCl solution to minimize volatilization losses. It had been chosen Headspace-GC-MS as the better technique to quantify individual VOCs and GC-FID to get a Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH) assessment after a solid/fluid pressurized extraction. The physicochemical characterization of the subsoil was performed to know how humidity, clay content or pH data could be related to the presence of hydrocarbons in the soil samples. Results show that VOCs concentrations in subsoil samples of the petrol station are around ppb levels. TPH ranged between 17 mg/kg soil and 93 mg/kg soil (ppm levels) what involves diesel and gasoline leaks due to these detected residual concentrations in the subsoil. The maximum value was found at 6 m deep in an intermediate zone between Underground Storage Tanks positions (located at 4 m deep). Therefore, these results confirm that organic compounds transference with strong vertical component has taken place. It has been observed that humidity minimum values in the subsoil are related to TPH maximum values that could be explained because of the vapour phase and the retention of hydrocarbon in soil increases when humidity goes down. Adsorption of hydrocarbons in the subsoil tend to be pH-dependent and clay content dependent: maximum of adsorption taken place at minimum pH what encourage protonation and minimum clay content in the subsoil make organic compounds infiltration downstream easier. It could be noticed the importance of physicochemical subsoil characterization and contamination assessment in the subsoil of petrol stations in order to avoid the hydrocarbons pollution of the groundwater. Then plan the best remediation technique according to this characterization taking into account the residual hydrocarbon concentration in the subsoil and the associated risk for human and ecosystems.

  9. Lunar radar mapping: Correlation between radar reflectivity and stratigraphy in north-western mare imbrium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, G.G.; Eggleton, R.E.; Thompson, T.W.

    1970-01-01

    DELAY-DOPPLER radar maps of the Moon obtained with the 430 MHz (70 cm wavelength) radar of the Arecibo Ionospheric Observatory in Puerto Rico (Thompson, unpublished) are at present being studied to correlate geological information with the radar reflexion characteristics of the lunar surface. Preliminary evaluation of the radar data for the Sinus Iridum quadrangle (32??-48?? N; 14??-38?? W) has revealed that the lowest values of radar reflectivity are closely correlated with the mare materials of lowest albedo mapped by Schaber1 as of most recent volcanic origin. These radar data were obtained with a surface resolution of 50 to 100 km2 on January 24 and April 17, 1967. A detailed account of the delay-doppler radar mapping technique can be found in unpublished reports by Thompson. ?? 1970 Nature Publishing Group.

  10. A methodology for automation and robotics evaluation applied to the space station telerobotic servicer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey H.; Gyanfi, Max; Volkmer, Kent; Zimmerman, Wayne

    1988-01-01

    The efforts of a recent study aimed at identifying key issues and trade-offs associated with using a Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) to aid in Space Station assembly-phase tasks is described. The use of automation and robotic (A and R) technologies for large space systems would involve a substitution of automation capabilities for human extravehicular or intravehicular activities (EVA, IVA). A methodology is presented that incorporates assessment of candidate assembly-phase tasks, telerobotic performance capabilities, development costs, and effect of operational constraints (space transportation system (STS), attached payload, and proximity operations). Changes in the region of cost-effectiveness are examined under a variety of systems design assumptions. A discussion of issues is presented with focus on three roles the FTS might serve: (1) as a research-oriented testbed to learn more about space usage of telerobotics; (2) as a research based testbed having an experimental demonstration orientation with limited assembly and servicing applications; or (3) as an operational system to augment EVA and to aid the construction of the Space Station and to reduce the programmatic (schedule) risk by increasing the flexibility of mission operations.

  11. Multibeam synthetic aperture radar for global oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.

    1979-01-01

    A single-frequency multibeam synthetic aperture radar concept for large swath imaging desired for global oceanography is evaluated. Each beam iilluminates a separate range and azimuth interval, and images for different beams may be separated on the basis of the Doppler spectrum of the beams or their spatial azimuth separation in the image plane of the radar processor. The azimuth resolution of the radar system is selected so that the Doppler spectrum of each beam does not interfere with the Doppler foldover due to the finite pulse repetition frequency of the radar system.

  12. GEOS-3 C-Band radar investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The absolute accuracy of instrumentation radar systems, refined methods of calibrating these systems, and the techniques employed in processing the associated data. A world-wide network of C-Band instrumentation radars augmented by lasers and other tracking instrumentation systems were used. The NASA WFC AN/FPQ-6 instrumentation radar and the AN/FPS-16 instrumentation radar also located at NASA WFC were the primary instruments used in the accuracy and calibration evaluations. The results achieved at WFC were then disseminated to other Ranges where they were verified, augmented and used as part of routine operations.

  13. Cassini RADAR Observations of Phoebe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostro, S. J.; Elachi, C.; Anderson, Y.; Boehmer, R.; Callahan, P.; Hamilton, G.; Janssen, M.; Johnson, W.; Kelleher, K.; Lopes, R.; Roth, L.; Wall, S.; West, R.; Allison, M.; Kirk, R.; Wood, C.; Posa, F.; Stofan, E.; Zebker, H.; Lorenz, R.; Lunine, J.; Francescetti, G.; Picardi, G.; Seu, R.; Muhleman, D.; Encrenaz, P.; Cassini RADAR Science; Instrument Operations

    2004-11-01

    The Cassini RADAR instrument, operating in its scatterometry mode, obtained continuous-wave (cw) echo power spectra from Phoebe during the inbound and outbound legs of the flyby, 4 h before and 2.5 h after closest approach. Phoebe's distance and subradar coordinates were approximately (93,000 km, 247 deg W, 26 deg S) inbound and (56,000 km, 323 deg W, 26 deg N) outbound. The durations of the cw sequences were 6 and 5 minutes. Larger intervals in the RADAR windows were devoted to observations with a chirp waveform able to provide range as well as Doppler resolution, and to passive radiometry; those data are not yet reduced. For Phoebe (and Dione, Mimas, Iapetus, Enceladus, Rhea, Hyperion, and Tethys), scatterometry aims to use estimates of radar albedo and angular scattering law to constrain the near-surface bulk density and/or the relative cleanliness of the icy regolith. The RADAR instrument's wavelength is 2.2 cm, vs. 3.5 cm or 13 cm for most groundbased radar astronomy, but Arecibo and Goldstone observations of the icy Galilean satellites and of asteroids give us no reason to expect significant wavelength dependence in this regime. Comparison of RADAR measurements of Titan and Iapetus with groundbased results will let us evaluate this expectation and will be key to calibrating both our measurements and their interpretation. Our inbound and outbound Phoebe echoes indicate Lambertian scattering, which requires structural complexity at scales no smaller than a centimeter. However, despite Phoebe's prominent large-scale topography, our spectra are nearly featureless, suggesting that the radar roughness is sub-topographic. We probably are seeing a combination of single scattering and multiple scattering from surface and subsurface structure. At this writing, our calibration indicates that Phoebe's average radar albedo is much closer to that of Iapetus than to those of the icy Galilean satellites.

  14. Cassini RADAR Observations of Phoebe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostro, S. J.; Elachi, C.; Anderson, Y.; Boehmer, R.; Callahan, P.; Hamilton, G.; Janssen, M.; Johnson, W.; Kelleher, K.; Lopes, R.; Roth, L.; Wall, S.; West, R.; Allison, M.; Kirk, R.; Wood, C.; Posa, F.; Stofan, E.; Zebker, H.; Lorenz, R.; Lunine, J.; Francescetti, G.; Picardi, G.; Seu, R.; Muhleman, D.; Encrenaz, P.

    2004-12-01

    The Cassini RADAR instrument, operating in its scatterometry mode, obtained continuous-wave (cw) echo power spectra from Phoebe during the inbound and outbound legs of the flyby, 4 h before and 2.5 h after closest approach. Phoebe's distance and subradar coordinates were approximately (93,000 km, 247 deg W, 26 deg S) inbound and (56,000 km, 323 deg W, 26 deg N) outbound. The durations of the cw sequences were 6 and 5 minutes. Larger intervals in the RADAR windows were devoted to observations with a chirp waveform able to provide range as well as Doppler resolution, and to passive radiometry; those data are not yet reduced. For Phoebe (and Dione, Mimas, Iapetus, Enceladus, Rhea, Hyperion, and Tethys), scatterometry aims to use estimates of radar albedo and angular scattering law to constrain the near-surface bulk density and/or the relative cleanliness of the icy regolith. The RADAR instrument's wavelength is 2.2 cm, vs. 3.5 cm or 13 cm for most groundbased radar astronomy, but Arecibo and Goldstone observations of the icy Galilean satellites and of asteroids give us no reason to expect significant wavelength dependence in this regime. Comparison of RADAR measurements of Titan and Iapetus with groundbased results will let us evaluate this expectation and will be key to calibrating both our measurements and their interpretation. Our inbound and outbound Phoebe echoes indicate Lambertian scattering, which requires structural complexity at scales no smaller than a centimeter. However, despite Phoebe's prominent large-scale topography, our spectra are nearly featureless, suggesting that the radar roughness is sub-topographic. We probably are seeing a combination of single scattering and multiple scattering from surface and subsurface structure. At this writing, our calibration indicates that Phoebe's average radar albedo is much closer to that of Iapetus than to those of the icy Galilean satellites.

  15. Analysis of Borehole-Radar Reflection Data from Machiasport, Maine, December 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Carole D.; Joesten, Peter K.

    2005-01-01

    In December 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, collected borehole-radar reflection logs in two boreholes in Machiasport, Maine. These bedrock boreholes were drilled as part of a hydrogeologic investigation of the area surrounding the former Air Force Radar Tracking Station site on Howard Mountain near Bucks Harbor. The boreholes, MW09 and MW10, are located approximately 50 meters (m) from, and at the site of, respectively, the locations of former buildings where trichloroethylene was used as part of defense-site operations. These areas are thought to be potential source areas for contamination that has been detected in downgradient bedrock wells. This investigation focused on testing borehole-radar methods at this site. Single-hole radar-reflection surveys were used to identify the depth, orientation, and spatial continuity of reflectors that intersect and surround the boreholes. In addition, the methods were used to (1) identify the radial depth of penetration of the radar waves in the electrically resistive bimodal volcanic formation at the site, (2) provide information for locating additional boreholes at the site, and (3) test the potential applications of borehole-radar methods for further aquifer characterization and (or) evaluation of source-area remediation efforts. Borehole-radar reflection logging uses a pair of downhole transmitting and receiving antennas to record the reflected wave amplitude and transit time of high-frequency electromagnetic waves. For this investigation, 60- and 100-megahertz antennas were used. The electromagnetic waves emitted by the transmitter penetrate into the formation surrounding the borehole and are reflected off of a material with different electromagnetic properties, such as a fracture or change in rock type. Single-hole directional radar surveys indicate the bedrock surrounding these boreholes is highly fractured, because several reflectors were identified in the radar-reflection data. There are several steeply dipping reflectors with orientations similar to the fracture patterns observed with borehole imaging techniques and in outcrops. The radar-reflection data showed that the vitrophyre in borehole MW09 was more highly fractured than the underlying gabbroic unit. The velocities of radar waves in the bedrock surrounding the boreholes were determined using single-hole vertical radar profiling. Velocities of 114 and 125 meters per microsecond were used to determine the distance to reflectors, the radial depth of penetration, and the dip of reflectors. The bimodal volcanic units appear to be ideal for radar-wave propagation. For the radar surveys collected at this site, radar reflections were detected up to 40 m into the rock from the borehole. These results indicate that boreholes could conservatively be spaced about 15-20 m apart for hole-to-hole radar methods to be effective for imaging between the boreholes and monitoring remediation. Integrated analysis of drilling and borehole-geophysical logs indicates the vitrophyric formation is more fractured than the more mafic gabbroic units in these boreholes. There does not, however, appear to be a quantifiable difference in the radar-wave penetration in these two rock units.

  16. Detail view of northwest side of Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of northwest side of Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5 Transmitter Building foundation, showing portion of concrete gutter drainage system and asphalt floor tiles, camera facing north - Fort Barry, Signal Corps Radar 296, Station 5, Transmitter Building Foundation, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  17. Radar and Lidar Radar DEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liskovich, Diana; Simard, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Using radar and lidar data, the aim is to improve 3D rendering of terrain, including digital elevation models (DEM) and estimates of vegetation height and biomass in a variety of forest types and terrains. The 3D mapping of vegetation structure and the analysis are useful to determine the role of forest in climate change (carbon cycle), in providing habitat and as a provider of socio-economic services. This in turn will lead to potential for development of more effective land-use management. The first part of the project was to characterize the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission DEM error with respect to ICESat/GLAS point estimates of elevation. We investigated potential trends with latitude, canopy height, signal to noise ratio (SNR), number of LiDAR waveform peaks, and maximum peak width. Scatter plots were produced for each variable and were fitted with 1st and 2nd degree polynomials. Higher order trends were visually inspected through filtering with a mean and median filter. We also assessed trends in the DEM error variance. Finally, a map showing how DEM error was geographically distributed globally was created.

  18. Application of the Doppler weather radar in real-time quality control of hourly gauge precipitation in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Lingzhi; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Lin; Yang, Jinhong; Zou, Fengling

    2016-05-01

    The current real-time operational quality control method for hourly rain gauge records at meteorological stations of China is primarily based on a comparison with historical extreme records, and the spatial and temporal consistencies of rain records. However, this method might make erroneous judgments for heavy precipitation because of its remarkable inhomogeneous features. In this study, we develop a Radar Supported Operational Real-time Quality Control (RS_ORQC) method to improve hourly gauge precipitation records in eastern China by using Doppler weather radar data and national automatic rain-gauge network in JJA (i.e., June, July and August) between 2010 and 2011. According to the probability density function (PDF) and cumulative probability density function (CDF), we establish the statistic relationships between NSN precipitation records under 7 radar coverage and radar quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE). The other NSN records under 5 radar coverage are used for the verification. The results show that the correct rate of this radar-supported new method in judging gauge precipitation is close to 99.95% when the hourly rainfall rate is below 10 mm h- 1 and is 96.21% when the rainfall intensity is above 10 mm h- 1. Moreover, the improved quality control method is also applied to evaluate the quality of provincial station network (PSN) precipitation records over eastern China. The correct rate of PSN precipitation records is 99.92% when the hourly rainfall rate is below 10 mm h- 1, and it is 93.33% when the hourly rainfall rate is above 10 mm h- 1. Case studies also exhibit that the radar-supported method can make correct judgments for extreme heavy rainfall.

  19. Shuttle orbiter Ku-band radar/communications system design evaluation: High gain antenna/widebeam horn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaki, R.; Dodds, J. G.; Broad, P.

    1979-01-01

    The physical characteristics of the high gain antenna reflector and feed elements are described. Deficiencies in the sum feed are discussed, and lack of atmospheric venting is posed as a potential problem area. The measured RF performance of the high gain antenna is examined and the high sidelobe levels measured are related to the physical characteristics of the antenna. An examination of the attributes of the feed which might be influenced by temperature extremes shows that the antenna should be insensitive to temperature variations. Because the feed support bipod structure is considered a significant contributor to the high sidelobe levels measured in the azimuth plane, pod relocation, material changes, and shaping are suggested as improvements. Alternate feed designs are presented to further improve system performance. The widebeam horn and potential temperature effects due to the polarizer are discussed as well as in the effects of linear polarization on TDRS acquisition, and the effects of circular polarization on radar sidelobe avoidance. The radar detection probability is analyzed as a function of scan overlap and target range.

  20. Multiple Object Tracking Radar - Performance results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegall, Ralph L.

    Attention is given to the Multiple Object Tracking Radar (MOTR), a precision instrumentation radar designed to support range safety, weapon development, operational test and evaluation, and training exercises involving realistic scenarios. This paper reviews the MOTR Serial Number 1 acceptance test program and presents performance results of factory tests and field tests at the White Sands Missile Range.

  1. A comparison and evaluation of satellite derived positions of tracking stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, S. F.; Strange, W. E.; Marsh, J. G.

    1971-01-01

    A comparison is presented of sets of satellite tracking station coordinate values published in the past few years by a number of investigators, i.e. Goddard Space Flight Center, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Ohio State University, The Naval Weapons Laboratory, Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories, and Wallops Island. The comparisons have been made in terms of latitude, longitude and height. The results of the various solutions have been compared directly and also with external standards such as local survey data and gravimetrically derived geoid heights. After taking into account systematic rotations, latitude and longitude agreement on a global basis is generally 15 meters or better, on the North American Datum agreement is generally better than 10 meters. Allowing for scale differences (of the order of 2 ppm) radial agreement is generally of the order of 10 meters.

  2. Evaluation of the Biolog MicroStation system for yeast identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, M. R.; Molina, T. C.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.

    1996-01-01

    One hundred and fifty-nine isolates representing 16 genera and 53 species of yeasts were processed with the Biolog MicroStation System for yeast identification. Thirteen genera and 38 species were included in the Biolog database. For these 129 isolates, correct identifications to the species level were 13.2, 39.5 and 48.8% after 24, 48 and 72 hours incubation at 30 degrees C, respectively. Three genera and 15 species which were not included in the Biolog database were also tested. Of the 30 isolates studied, 16.7, 53.3 and 56.7% of the isolates were given incorrect names from the system's database after 24,48 and 72 h incubation at 30 degrees C, respectively. The remaining isolates of this group were not identified.

  3. An application of multiattribute decision analysis to the Space Station Freedom program. Case study: Automation and robotics technology evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey H.; Levin, Richard R.; Carpenter, Elisabeth J.

    1990-01-01

    The results are described of an application of multiattribute analysis to the evaluation of high leverage prototyping technologies in the automation and robotics (A and R) areas that might contribute to the Space Station (SS) Freedom baseline design. An implication is that high leverage prototyping is beneficial to the SS Freedom Program as a means for transferring technology from the advanced development program to the baseline program. The process also highlights the tradeoffs to be made between subsidizing high value, low risk technology development versus high value, high risk technology developments. Twenty one A and R Technology tasks spanning a diverse array of technical concepts were evaluated using multiattribute decision analysis. Because of large uncertainties associated with characterizing the technologies, the methodology was modified to incorporate uncertainty. Eight attributes affected the rankings: initial cost, operation cost, crew productivity, safety, resource requirements, growth potential, and spinoff potential. The four attributes of initial cost, operations cost, crew productivity, and safety affected the rankings the most.

  4. Evaluation of the MICAST #2-12 AI-7wt%Si Sample Directionally Solidified Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, Surendra N.; Ghods, Masoud; Angart, Samuel G.; Lauer, Mark; Grugel, Richard N.; Poirier, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The US team of the European led "MIcrostructure Formation in CASTing of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions" (MICAST) program recently received a third Aluminum - 7wt% silicon alloy that was processed in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station. The sample, designated MICAST#2-12, was directionally solidified in the Solidification with Quench Furnace (SQF) at a constant rate of 40micometers/s through an imposed temperature gradient of 31K/cm. Procedures taken to evaluate the state of the sample prior to sectioning for metallographic analysis are reviewed and rational for measuring the microstructural constituents, in particular the primary dendrite arm spacing (Lambda (sub1)), is given. The data are presented, put in context with the earlier samples, and evaluated in view of a relevant theoretical model.

  5. Performance and evaluation of gas-engine-driven split-system cooling equipment at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, P.R.; Schmelzer, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    DOE`s Federal Energy Management Program supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenditures within the federal sector; one such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP)(formerly the Test Bed Demonstration program), seeks to evaluate new energy saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the federal government. This report describes the field evaluation conducted to examine the performance of a 15-ton natural-gas-engine- driven, split-system, air-conditioning unit. The unit was installed at a multiple-use building at Willow Grove Naval Air Station, a regular and reserve training facility north of Philadelphia, and its performance was monitored under the NTDP.

  6. Applying bias correction for merging rain gauge and radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabiei, E.; Haberlandt, U.

    2015-03-01

    Weather radar provides areal rainfall information with very high temporal and spatial resolution. Radar data has been implemented in several hydrological applications despite the fact that the data suffers from varying sources of error. Several studies have attempted to propose methods for solving these problems. Additionally, weather radar usually underestimates or overestimates the rainfall amount. In this study, a new method is proposed for correcting radar data by implementing the quantile mapping bias correction method. Then, the radar data is merged with observed rainfall by conditional merging and kriging with external drift interpolation techniques. The merging product is analysed regarding the sensitivity of the two investigated methods to the radar data quality. After implementing bias correction, not only did the quality of the radar data improve, but also the performance of the interpolation techniques using radar data as additional information. In general, conditional merging showed greater sensitivity to radar data quality, but performed better than all the other interpolation techniques when using bias corrected radar data. Furthermore, a seasonal variation of interpolation performances has in general been observed. A practical example of using radar data for disaggregating stations from daily to hourly temporal resolution is also proposed in this study.

  7. Evaluation of radar rainfall estimates and nowcasts to prevent flash flood in real time by using a road submersion warning tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versini, Pierre-Antoine; Sempere-Torres, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Important damages occur in small headwater catchments when they are hit by severe storms with complex spatio-temporal structure, sometimes resulting in flash floods. As these catchments are mostly not covered by sensor networks, it is difficult to forecast these floods. This is particularly true for road submersions. These are major concerns for flood event managers. The use of Quantitative Precipitation Estimates and Forecasts (QPE/QPF) especially based on radar measurements could particularly be adequate to evaluate rainfall-induced risks. Although their characteristic time and space scales would make them suitable for flash flood modelling, the impact of their uncertainties remain uncertain and have to be evaluated. The Gard region (France) has been chosen as case study. This area is frequently affected by severe flash floods and different kinds of rainfall observations are available in real time: radar rainfall estimates and nowcasts from METEO FRANCE and the CALAMAR system from SPC (state authority in charge of flood forecasting). An application devoted to the road network, has also been recently developed for this region. It combines distributed hydro-meteorological very short range forecasts and vulnerability analysis to provide warnings of road submersions. The first results demonstrate that it is technically possible to provide distributed short-term forecasts for a large number of sites. The study also demonstrates that a reliable estimation of the spatial distribution of rainfall is essential. For this reason, the road submersion warning system can be used to evaluate the quality of rainfall estimates and nowcasts. The warning system has been tested on the specific storm of the 29-30 September 2007. During this event, more than 300mm dropped on the South part of the Gard and many roads were submerged. Each of the mentioned rainfall datasets (i.e. estimates and nowcasts) was available in real time. They have been used to forecast the exact location of road submersions and the results have been compared to the effective road submersions actually occurred during the event as listed by the emergency services. The results confirm that the road submersion warning system represents a promising tool for anticipating and quantifying the consequences of storm events at ground. It rates the submersion risk with an acceptable level of accuracy and a reasonable false alarm ratio. It demonstrates also the quality of high spatial and temporal resolution radar rainfall data in real time, and the possibility to use them despite their uncertainties. However because of the quality of rainfall nowcasts falls drastically with time, it is not often sufficient to provide valuable information for lead times exceeding one hour.

  8. Using Radar Interferometry (DinSAR) to Evaluate Land Subsidence Caused by Excessive Groundwater Withdrawal in Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, M. C.; Milewski, A.; El Kadiri, R.

    2013-12-01

    The combination of natural, anthropogenic, and climate change impacts on the water resources of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has devastated its water resources well beyond its current and projected populations. The increased exploitation of groundwater resources in the past half-century coupled with successive droughts has resulted in the acceleration of subsidence rates in the Souss and Massa basins in Morocco. We have completed a preliminary investigation of these impacts on the Souss and Massa basins (~27,000 km2) in the southwestern part of Morocco. This area is characterized by a semi-arid climate (annual precipitation 70-250 mm/year) with agriculture, tourism, and commercial fishing as the primary economic activities, all of which require availability of adequate freshwater resources. Additionally the primary groundwater aquifer (Plio-Quaternary Plain Aquifer), an unconfined aquifer formed mostly of sand and gravel, is being harvested by >20,000 wells at a rate of 650 MCM/yr., exceeding the rate of recharge by 260 MCM/year. Intense development over the past 50 years has exposed the aquifer to a serious risk of groundwater table drawdown (0.5m-2.5m/yr.), land subsidence, loss of artesian pressure, salinization, salt water intrusions along the coast, and deterioration of water quality across the watershed. Differential Interferometry Synthetique Aperture Radar (DInSAR) was utilized to measure ground subsidence induced by groundwater withdrawal. Land subsidence caused by excessive groundwater extraction was determined using a threefold methodology: (1) extraction of subsidence and land deformation patterns using radar interferometry, (2) correlation of the high subsidence areas within the basins to possible natural and anthropogenic factors (e.g. sea level rise, unconsolidated lithological formations distribution, urbanization, excessive groundwater extraction), and (3) forecasting the future of the Souss and Massa basins over the next century if both subsidence and groundwater extraction continue at present rates. Interferometric processing (persistent scatter and small baseline subset) was conducted using ENVI's SARscape program with 168 archived ENVISAT SLC images and 350 ERS1/2 SLC images acquired through the European Space Agency. Radar interferometry results are spatially and temporally consistent with groundwater extraction rates. This analysis has provided insight into the impacts that land subsidence will have on the infrastructure, the population, and the economy of the Souss and Massa basins. Our results could be used to develop management plans for modulating these adverse effects and could be vital to the Moroccan economy and the livelihood of the citizens that inhabit the basins. More broadly, this approach could be applied to other areas within the MENA region facing similar impacts.

  9. Performance evaluation of lunar penetrating radar onboard the rover of CE-3 probe based on results from ground experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-Bo; Zheng, Lei; Su, Yan; Fang, Guang-You; Zhou, Bin; Feng, Jian-Qing; Xing, Shu-Guo; Dai, Shun; Li, Jun-Duo; Ji, Yi-Cai; Gao, Yun-Ze; Xiao, Yuan; Li, Chun-Lai

    2014-12-01

    Lunar Penetrating Radar (LPR) onboard the rover that is part of the Chang'e-3 (CE-3) mission was firstly utilized to obtain in situ measurements about geological structure on the lunar surface and the thickness of the lunar regolith, which are key elements for studying the evolutional history of lunar crust. Because penetration depth and resolution of LPR are related to the scientific objectives of this mission, a series of ground-based experiments using LPR was carried out, and results of the experimental data were obtained in a glacial area located in the northwest region of China. The results show that the penetration depth of the first channel antenna used for LPR is over 79 m with a resolution of 2.8 m, and that for the second channel antenna is over 50.8 m with a resolution of 17.1 cm.

  10. Evaluation of Maximal Oxygen Uptake and Submaximal Estimates of VO2max Before, During, and After Long Duration International Space Station Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation of Maximal Oxygen Uptake and Submaximal Estimates of VO2max Before, During, and After Long Duration International Space Station Missions (VO2max) will document changes in maximum oxygen uptake for crewmembers onboard the International Space Station (ISS) on long-duration missions, greater than 90 days. This investigation will establish the characteristics of VO2max during flight and assess the validity of the current methods of tracking aerobic capacity change during and following the ISS missions.

  11. Evaluation of EBR-II driver-fuel elements following an unprotected station blackout accident

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.K.; Bottcher, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    One of the current design objectives for a liquid metal reactor (LMR) is the inherent shutdown-cooling capability of the reactor, such that the reactor itself can safely reduce power following a total loss of pump power without activating the reactor shutdown system (RSS). Following a loss-of-flow (LOF) accident and a failure of RSS, in EBR-II, reactor core damage and plant restartability is of considerable interest. In the LOF event, high temperature in the reactor causes negative reactivity feedback that reduces reactor power. After an accident, reactor fuel performance is one of the factors used to assess the restartability of the plant. A thermal-hydraulic-neutronic analysis was performed to determine the response of the plant and the temperature of individual subassemblies. These temperatures were then used to assess the damage to driver fuel elements caused by the station blackout accident. The maximum depth of cladding wastage from molten eutectic at temperatures >715/sup 0/C was found to be 0.0053 mm for the hottest subassembly; this value is considerably less than the 0.28 mm cladding thickness. 12 refs.

  12. Evaluation of Electrochemically Generated Potable Water Disinfectants for Use on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Branelle; Anderson, Molly; Adams, Niklas; Vega, Leticia; Botkin, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Microbial contamination and subsequent growth in spacecraft water systems are constant concerns for missions involving human crews. The current potable water disinfectant for the International Space Station (ISS) is iodine; however, with the end of the Space Shuttle Program, there is a need to develop redundant biocide systems that do not require regular up-mass dependencies. Throughout the course of a year, four different electrochemical systems were investigated as a possible biocide for potable water on the ISS. Research has indicated that a wide variability exists with regards to efficacy in both concentration and exposure time of these disinfectants; therefore, baseline efficacy values were established. This paper describes a series of tests performed to establish optimal concentrations and exposure times for four disinfectants against single and mixed species planktonic and biofilm bacteria. Results of the testing determined whether these electrochemical disinfection systems are able to produce a sufficient amount of chemical in both concentration and volume to act as a biocide for potable water on the ISS.

  13. Electrochemical Disinfection Feasibility Assessment Materials Evaluation for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Branelle; Shindo, David; Montgomery, Eliza

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Program recognizes the risk of microbial contamination in their potable and non-potable water sources. The end of the Space Shuttle Program limited the ability to send up shock kits of biocides in the event of an outbreak. Currently, the United States Orbital Segment water system relies primarily on iodine to mitigate contamination concerns, which has been successful in remediating the small cases of contamination documented. However, a secondary method of disinfection is a necessary investment for future space flight. Over the past year, NASA Johnson Space Center has investigated the development of electrochemically generated systems for use on the ISS. These systems include: hydrogen peroxide, ozone, sodium hypochlorite, and peracetic acid. To use these biocides on deployed water systems, NASA must understand of the effect these biocides have on current ISS materials prior to proceeding forward with possible on-orbit applications. This paper will discuss the material testing that was conducted to assess the effects of the biocides on current ISS materials.

  14. Evaluation of Electrochemically Generated Potable Water Disinfectants for Use on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Branelle; Anderson, Molly; Anderson, Molly; Adam, Niklas; Vega, Leticia; Modica, Catherine; Bodkin, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Microbial contamination and subsequent growth in spacecraft water systems are constant concerns for missions involving human crews. The current potable water disinfectant for the International Space Station (ISS) is iodine; however, with the end of the Space Shuttle program, there is a need to develop redundant biocide systems that do not require regular up ]mass dependencies. Throughout the course of a year, four different electrochemical systems were investigated as a possible biocide for potable water on the ISS. Research has indicated that there is a wide variability with regards to efficacy in both concentration and exposure time of these disinfectants, therefore baseline efficacy values were established. This paper describes a series of tests performed in order to establish optimal concentrations and exposure times for four disinfectants against single and mixed species planktonic and biofilm bacteria. Results of the testing determined whether these electrochemical disinfection systems are able to produce a sufficient amount of chemical in both concentration and volume to act as a biocide for potable water on ISS.

  15. Evaluation of Electrochemically Generated Potable Water Disinfectants for Use on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vega, Leticia; Aber, Gregory; Adam, Niklas; Clements, Anna; Modica, Catherine; Younker, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Microbial contamination and subsequent growth in spacecraft water systems are constant concerns for missions involving human crews. The current potable water disinfectant is iodine; however, with the end of the Space Shuttle program, there is a need to develop redundant biocide systems which are less dependent on hardware that would need to be launched on a regular basis. Three systems for electrochemical production of potable water disinfectants are being assessed for use on the International Space Station (ISS). Since there is a wide variability in the literature with regards to efficacy in both concentration and exposure time of these disinfectants, there is a need to establish baseline efficacy values. This paper describes a series of tests performed in order to establish optimal concentrations and exposure times for four disinfectants against single and mixed species planktonic and biofilm bacteria and to determine whether these electrochemical disinfection devices are able to produce a sufficient amount of chemical in both concentration and volume to act as a biocide for potable water on ISS.

  16. Evaluation of Low Earth Orbit Environmental Effects on International Space Station Thermal Control Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Reed, Charles K.

    1998-01-01

    Samples of International Space Station (ISS) thermal control coatings were exposed to simulated low Earth orbit (LEO) environmental conditions to determine effects on optical properties. In one test, samples of the white paint coating Z-93P were coated with outgassed products from Tefzel(R) (ethylene tetrafluoroethylene copolymer) power cable insulation as-may occur on ISS. These samples were then exposed, along with an uncontaminated Z-93P witness sample, to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation to determine solar absorptance degradation. The Z-93P samples coated with Tefzel(R) outgassing products experienced greater increases in solar absorptance than witness samples not coated with Tefzel(R) outgassing products. In another test, samples of second surface silvered Teflon(R) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), SiO. (where x=2)-coated silvered Teflon(R) FEP, and Z-93P witness samples were exposed to the combined environments of atomic oxygen and VLTV radiation to determine optical properties changes due to these simulated ISS environmental effects. This test verified the durability of these materials in the absence of contaminants.

  17. Microstructural Evaluation and Comparison of Solder Samples Processed Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Hua, F.; Anilkumar, A. V.

    2008-01-01

    Samples from the In-Space Soldering Investigation (ISSI), conducted aboard the International Space Station (ISS), are being examined for post-solidification microstructural development and porosity distribution. In this preliminary study, the internal structures of two ISSI processed samples are compared. In one case 10cm of rosin-core solder was wrapped around a coupon wire and melted by conduction, whereas, in the other a comparable length of solder was melted directly onto the hot wire; in both cases the molten solder formed ellipsoidal blobs, a shape that was maintained during subsequent solidification. In the former case, there is clear evidence of porosity throughout the sample, and an accumulation of larger pores near the hot end that implies thermocapillary induced migration and eventual coalescence of the flux vapor bubbles. In the second context, when solder was fed onto the wire. a part of the flux constituting the solder core is introduced into and remains within the liquid solder ball, becoming entombed upon solidification. In both cases the consequential porosity, particularly at a solder/contact interface, is very undesirable. In addition to compromising the desired electrical and thermal conductivity, it promotes mechanical failure.

  18. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 94-0273-2556, Bruce Mansfield Power Station, Shippingport, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Mattorano, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    In response to a request from the Plumbers and Steamfitters Union Local 47, an investigation was begun into possible exposure to arsenic and other heavy metals during the rebuilding of coal fired boilers at the Bruce Mansfield Power Station (SIC-4911), Shippingport, Pennsylvania. Metal concentrations were measured in 45 personal breathing zone (PBZ) samples; an additional 12 PBZ samples were monitored for exposure to respirable dust and silica. Eight bulk ash samples and 11 hand wipe samples were taken. The workers put in 60 hour work weeks, 10 hours a day for 6 days. Arsenic was detected in 18 samples and ranged from 0.30 to 31 micrograms/cubic meter (microg/m3) with three of the samples exceeding the adjusted OSHA permissible exposure limit of 5.6microg/m3. In 11 samples, beryllium was detected, and ranged from 0.02 to 0.04microg/m3. Cadmium was detected in seven samples and ranged from 0.17 to 2.5microg/m3. Both the beryllium and cadmium concentrations were below the allowable limits. Lead concentrations were measurable in 12 samples and ranged from 1.7 to 1.82microg/m3, with one sample exceeding the OSHA limit of 28microg/m3. Crystalline silica was below the detectable limit.

  19. Multiparameter radar analysis using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Ben Bella Sayed

    Multiparameter radars have been used in the interpretation of many meteorological phenomena. Rainfall estimates can be obtained from multiparameter radar measurements. Studying and analyzing spatial variability of different rainfall algorithms, namely R(ZH), the algorithm based on reflectivity, R(ZH, ZDR), the algorithm based on reflectivity and differential reflectivity, R(KDP), the algorithm based on specific differential phase, and R(KDP, Z DR), the algorithm based on specific differential phase and differential reflectivity, are important for radar applications. The data used in this research were collected using CSU-CHILL, CP-2, and S-POL radars. In this research multiple objectives are addressed using wavelet analysis namely, (1)space time variability of various rainfall algorithms, (2)separation of convective and stratiform storms based on reflectivity measurements, (3)and detection of features such as bright bands. The bright band is a multiscale edge detection problem. In this research, the technique of multiscale edge detection is applied on the radar data collected using CP-2 radar on August 23, 1991 to detect the melting layer. In the analysis of space/time variability of rainfall algorithms, wavelet variance introduces an idea about the statistics of the radar field. In addition, multiresolution analysis of different rainfall estimates based on four algorithms, namely R(ZH), R( ZH, ZDR), R(K DP), and R(KDP, Z DR), are analyzed. The flood data of July 29, 1997 collected by CSU-CHILL radar were used for this analysis. Another set of S-POL radar data collected on May 2, 1997 at Wichita, Kansas were used as well. At each level of approximation, the detail and the approximation components are analyzed. Based on this analysis, the rainfall algorithms can be judged. From this analysis, an important result was obtained. The Z-R algorithms that are widely used do not show the full spatial variability of rainfall. In addition another intuitively obvious result was observed namely, R( KDP) has reduced the spatial variability due to smoothing of KDP estimates. The convective and stratiform separation was studied using multiresolution analysis. The June 22, 1995 data collected by CSU-CHILL radar were used to evaluate the technique. Another set of data collected on August 23, 1991 representing stratiform conditions were also studied.

  20. Terminal doppler weather radar (TDWR) build 5B operational test and evaluation (OT&E) integration and OT&E operational test plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Radame; Viveiros, Steven; Wedge, Donne; Guthlein, Peter

    1995-03-01

    The Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) Build 5B Enhancement Operational Test and Evaluation (OT&E) Integration and OT&E Operational Test Plan provides the overall philosophy and approach to Build 5B OT&E testing, and identifies OT&E objectives, responsibilities, and resources. The TDWR Build 5B Enhancement provides connectivity to the Low Level Wind Shear Alert System (LLWAS) III to display LLWAS III data along with TDWR hazardous weather data on TDWR Geographic Situation Displays (GSD) and Ribbon Display Terminals (RDT). The TDWR Build 5B OT&E is scheduled to occur at the TDWR sites in Denver, CO, November and December 1994, and in Orlando, FL, spring 1995.

  1. Fifty years of radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skolnik, M. I.

    1985-02-01

    A development history of radar technology is presented, with attention to the driving of radar system design advances by the emergence of such weapon systems as long range aircraft and cruise missiles in World War II and the range of current applications for state-of-the-art radar techniques. The applications noted encompass over-the-horizon backscatter radars for aircraft detection at 500-1800 nmi ranges, ultralow sidelobe antenna military radars, a long range, frequency scanning three-dimensional S-band radar, a shipborne phased array radar for the collection of exoatmospheric and endoatmospheric data on ballistic missile reentry vehicles, multimission/multimode X-band fighter aircraft radars, and phased array air defense radars.

  2. [Study on pollution evaluation of heavy metal in surface soil of the original site of Qingdao North Station].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Jia, Yong-gang; Pan, Yu-ying

    2013-09-01

    The determination of pollution extent and health risk assessment are the premise of heavy metal contaminated site remediation. The content of Cu, Cr, Pb, Cd, Zn, Ni in Qingdao North Station was detected, and the correlation of the 6 kinds of heavy metal content was analyzed. The pollution extent in excess of background values was characterized by anthropogenic influence multiple, and the pollution of heavy metal in soil was evaluated using geoaccumulation index and a new method which connects geoaccumulation index with Nemero index. Finally, human health risk assessment was carried out with health risk assessment model for heavy metal content. The results showed that Qingdao North Station soil were polluted by heavy metals. Six heavy metal pollution levels were: Cd > Cu > Ni > Pb > Cr > Zn, and Cd had reached the severity pollution level, Cu and Ni followed by, Cr, Pb and Zn were in minor pollution level. The order of coefficient variation in all heavy metals was: Cd > Ni > Cr > Zn > Pb > Cu. Within the study area soil heavy metal distribution was different, but overall discrepancy was small. The order of non-cancer hazards of heavy metals in soil was Cr > Pb > Cu > Ni > Cd > Zn, and the order of carcinogen risks of heavy metals was Ni > Cd. The non-cancer hazard and carcinogen risks values of metals were both lower than that their threshold values. They were not the direct threats to human health. PMID:24289020

  3. Evaluation of the prompt alerting systems at four nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Towers, D.A.; Anderson, G.S.; Keast, D.N.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1982-09-01

    This report presents evaluations of the prompt notification siren systems at the following four US nuclear power facilities: Trojan, Three Mile Island, Indian Point, and Zion. The objective of these evaluations was to provide examples of an analytical procedure for predicting siren-system effectiveness under specific conditions in the 10-mile emergency planning zone (EPZ) surrounding nuclear power plants. This analytical procedure is discussed in report No. PNL-4227.

  4. Evaluation of the 29-km Eta Model. Part I: Objective Verification at Three Selected Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manobianco, John; Nutter, Paul

    1998-01-01

    A subjective evaluation of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction 29-km (meso-) eta model during the 1996 warm (May-August) and cool (October-January) seasons is described. The overall evaluation assessed the utility of the model for operational weather forecasting by the U.S. Air Force 45th Weather Squadron, National Weather Service (NWS) Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) and NWS Office in Melbourne, FL.

  5. Initial Evaluation of Dual Frequency Radar (DPR) on Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory and Global Precipitation Map (GSMaP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oki, R.; Kachi, M.; Kubota, T.; Masaki, T.; Kaneko, Y.; Takayabu, Y. N.; Iguchi, T.; Nakamura, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory was successfully launched on February 28, 2014 (JST) from the JAXA Tanegashima Space Center by the H-IIA F23 rocket. The GPM mission is a satellite program led by Japan and the U.S. to measure the global distribution of precipitation accurately in a sufficient frequency. The GPM Core Observatory carries the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The frequent precipitation measurement about every three hours will be achieved by constellation satellites with microwave radiometers or microwave sounders, which are provided by international partners. JAXA also provides the Global Change Observation Mission (GCOM) - Water (GCOM-W) named "SHIZUKU," as one of the constellation satellites. The Japanese GPM research project conducts scientific activities on algorithm development, ground validation, application research. JAXA develops the DPR Level 1 algorithm, and the NASA-JAXA Joint Algorithm Team develops the DPR Level 2 and DPR-GMI combined Level 2 algorithms. JAXA also develops the new version of Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP) algorithm, which is hourly and 0.1-degree spatial resolution rain map, as one of the national products.After the 2-months initial checkout of the satellite and the sensors, calibration and validation of DPR and other products have been implemented toward the public release. For DPR evaluation includes: (1) sensitivity, observation range, etc., (2) consistency with TRMM, (3) comparison with ground rain gauge data, (4) ground based Ka radar validation and others. Initial results of quick data evaluation, validation and status of data processing will be presented.

  6. Study to investigate and evaluate means of optimizing the Ku-band combined radar/communication functions for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, C. L.; Udalov, S.; Alem, W.

    1977-01-01

    The performance of the space shuttle orbiter's Ku-Band integrated radar and communications equipment is analyzed for the radar mode of operation. The block diagram of the rendezvous radar subsystem is described. Power budgets for passive target detection are calculated, based on the estimated values of system losses. Requirements for processing of radar signals in the search and track modes are examined. Time multiplexed, single-channel, angle tracking of passive scintillating targets is analyzed. Radar performance in the presence of main lobe ground clutter is considered and candidate techniques for clutter suppression are discussed. Principal system parameter drivers are examined for the case of stationkeeping at ranges comparable to target dimension. Candidate ranging waveforms for short range operation are analyzed and compared. The logarithmic error discriminant utilized for range, range rate and angle tracking is formulated and applied to the quantitative analysis of radar subsystem tracking loops.

  7. Evaluating the Medical Kit System for the International Space Station(ISS) - A Paradigm Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey, Melinda J.; Urbina, Michelle C.; Hughlett, Jessica L.; Gilmore, Stevan; Locke, James; Reyna, Baraquiel; Smith, Gwyn E.

    2010-01-01

    Medical capabilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) have been packaged to help astronaut crew medical officers (CMO) mitigate both urgent and non-urgent medical issues during their 6-month expeditions. Two ISS crewmembers are designated as CMOs for each 3-crewmember mission and are typically not physicians. In addition, the ISS may have communication gaps of up to 45 minutes during each orbit, necessitating medical equipment that can be reliably operated autonomously during flight. The retirement of the space shuttle combined with ten years of manned ISS expeditions led the Space Medicine Division at the NASA Johnson Space Center to reassess the current ISS Medical Kit System. This reassessment led to the system being streamlined to meet future logistical considerations with current Russian space vehicles and future NASA/commercial space vehicle systems. Methods The JSC Space Medicine Division coordinated the development of requirements, fabrication of prototypes, and conducted usability testing for the new ISS Medical Kit System in concert with implementing updated versions of the ISS Medical Check List and associated in-flight software applications. The teams constructed a medical kit system with the flexibility for use on the ISS, and resupply on the Russian Progress space vehicle and future NASA/commercial space vehicles. Results Prototype systems were developed, reviewed, and tested for implementation. Completion of Preliminary and Critical Design Reviews resulted in a streamlined ISS Medical Kit System that is being used for training by ISS crews starting with Expedition 27 (June 2011). Conclusions The team will present the process for designing, developing, , implementing, and training with this new ISS Medical Kit System.

  8. Modeling and dosimetric performance evaluation of the RayStation treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Mzenda, Bongile; Mugabe, Koki V; Sims, Rick; Godwin, Guy; Loria, Dayan

    2014-01-01

    The physics modeling, dose calculation accuracy and plan quality assessment of the RayStation (v3.5) treatment planning system (TPS) is presented in this study, with appropriate comparisons to the more established Pinnacle (v9.2) TPS. Modeling and validation for the Elekta MLCi and Agility beam models resulted in a good match to treatment machine-measured data based on tolerances of 3% for in-field and out-of-field regions, 10% for buildup and penumbral regions, and a gamma 2%/2mm dose/distance acceptance criteria. TPS commissioning using a wide range of appropriately selected dosimetry equipment, and following published guidelines, established the MLC modeling and dose calculation accuracy to be within standard tolerances for all tests performed. In both homogeneous and heterogeneous mediums, central axis calculations agreed with measurements within 2% for open fields and 3% for wedged fields, and within 4% off-axis. Treatment plan comparisons for identical clinical goals were made to Pinnacle for the following complex clinical cases: hypofractionated non-small cell lung carcinoma, head and neck, stereotactic spine, as well as for several standard clinical cases comprising of prostate, brain, and breast plans. DVHs, target, and critical organ doses, as well as measured point doses and gamma indices, applying both local and global (Van Dyk) normalization at 2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm (10% lower threshold) acceptance criteria for these composite plans were assessed. In addition 3DVH was used to compare the perturbed dose distributions to the TPS 3D dose distributions. For all 32 cases, the patients QA checks showed > 95% of pixels passing 3% global/3mm gamma. PMID:25207563

  9. Evaluation of geophysical logs, Phase I, at Willow Grove Naval Air Station, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conger, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Between April and June 1997, the U.S. Navy contracted Brown and Root Environmental, Inc., to drill 20 monitor wells at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station in Horsham Township, Montgomery County, Pa. The wells were installed to monitor water levels and allow collection of water samples from shallow, intermediate, and deep water-bearing zones. Analysis of the samples will determine the horizontal and vertical distribution of any contaminated ground water migrating from known contaminant sources. Eight wells were drilled near the Fire Training Area (Site 5), five wells near the 9th Street Landfill (Site 3), four wells at the Antenna Field Landfill (Site 2), and three wells near Privet Road Compound (Site 1). Depths range from 73 to 167 feet below land surface. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted borehole-geophysical and borehole-video logging to identify water-bearing zones so that appropriate intervals could be screened in each monitor well. Geophysical logs were run on the 20 monitor wells and 1 existing well. Video logs were run on 16 wells. Caliper and video logs were used to locate fractures, inflections on fluid-temperature and fluid-resistivity logs were used to locate possible water-bearing fractures, and flowmeter measurements verified these locations. Single-point-resistance and natural-gamma logs provided information on stratigraphy. After interpretation of geophysical logs, video logs, and driller's notes, all wells were screened such that water-level fluctuations could be monitored and discrete water samples collected from one or more shallow and intermediate water-bearing zones in each borehole.

  10. Use of meteorological radar to estimate leaf wetness as data input for application of territorial epidemiological model (downy mildew—Plasmopara viticola)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicogna, A.; Dietrich, S.; Gani, M.; Giovanardi, R.; Sandra, M.

    The grapevine downy mildew ( Plasmopara viticola) represents the most important disease of the grapevine in Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region (Italy). The development of this disease depends from the meteorological conditions and particularly by air humidity, rain and leaf wetness (LW here after). Forecast models can help the technicians of the extension services to predict the timing and the best technique to use in operative programs. Unfortunately these models require data, coming from meteorological stations which are often variable in space (e.g. rain, leaf wetness) and hardly spatializable. In the first part of this work, a case study is presented to show the great difference between maps of daily rain duration, obtained by radar, and those created by spatialization of data and obtained by weather stations. Then the possibility to use the radar rain maps appears very interesting to estimate LW over a large area. LW and daily rain measurements, obtained by 14 weather stations of Friuli-Venezia Giulia plain (Italy), are compared with rain maps obtained by polarimetric radar GPM-500 placed in Fossalon di Grado (Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Italy). The reference measurements are made during two periods: from 1/4/2000 to 30/9/2000 and from 1/4/2001 to 30/9/2001. From radar maps rain measurements estimated are extracted above each weather station and these data are integrated for every hour. These radar data of hourly rain are compared to the corresponding measurementes of LW and rain obtained by weather stations. From this analysis it appears that there is a good correlation between the number of rain hours estimated by radar and the number of LW hours measured by stations: in the observed cases, the error found is lower than 2%; then radar has a good precision to estimate LW due to rain. Therefore the use of Radar is foretold to give meteorological inputs in simulation models that can work to evaluate the development of fungal diseases. In the second part a model to daily display the infections of downy mildew all over the plain of Friuli-Venezia Giulia is described. Elements of this model are: the creation of a daily grid of rain estimated by a meteorological polarimetric radar (GPM-500) located in Fossalon di Grado; the creation of a daily grid of temperature, air humidity, solar radiation, wind speed using data coming from 14 synoptic meteorological stations located in the plain of the region; the creation of a daily grid of leaf-wetness computed using the SWEB model for the data measured or estimated in the previous point; the estimation of the P. viticola infection level using a forecast model (in this case Goidanich). The daily graphical output in every point of the grid is: number of the actual cycles of P. viticola infections; number of days required for the next infection; annual amount of infective cycles. The model has been checked in a limited area (about 200 km 2) with an high presence of grapevine (DOC Aquileia) in the period from may 2000 to september 2000. In this area the data from eight meteorological automatic stations installed for diseases-defence purposes are used as test, and has been calculated the downy mildew infections using the Goidanich model. These grids have been compared with the maps calculated using data coming from meteorological radar and synoptic stations. The outputs are similar and the proposed method can be considered a good approach in the operative use of radar in the crop protection.

  11. Evaluation of a Treadmill with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization (TVIS) for use on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    McCrory, J L; Lemmon, D R; Sommer, H J; Prout, B; Smith, D; Korth, D W; Lucero, J; Greenisen, M; Moore, J; Kozlovskaya, I; Pestov, I; Stepansov, V; Miyakinchenko, Y; Cavanagh, P R

    1999-08-01

    A treadmill with vibration isolation and stabilization designed for the International Space Station (ISS) was evaluated during Shuttle mission STS-81. Three crew members ran and walked on the device, which floats freely in zero gravity. For the majority of the more than 2 hours of locomotion studied, the treadmill showed peak to peak linear and angular displacements of less than 2.5 cm and 2.5 degrees, respectively. Vibration transmitted to the vehicle was within the microgravity allocation limits that are defined for the ISS. Refinements to the treadmill and harness system are discussed. This approach to treadmill design offers the possibility of generating 1G-like loads on the lower extremities while preserving the microgravity environment of the ISS for structural safety and vibration free experimental conditions. PMID:11541844

  12. Risk-based evaluation of technical specification problems at the La Salle County Nuclear Station: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bizzak, D.J.; Trainer, J.E.; McClymont, A.S.

    1987-06-01

    Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods are used to evaluate alternatives to existing requirements for three operationally burdensome technical specifications at La Salle Nuclear Station. The study employs a decision logic to minimize the detailed analysis necessary to show compliance with given acceptance criteria; in this case, no risk increase resulting from a proposed change. The analyses provide insights to choose from among alternative options. The SOCRATES computer code was used for the probabilistic analysis. Results support a change to less frequent diesel generator testing, eliminations of one reactor scram setpoint, and establishing an allowed out-of-service time for valves in a reactor scram system. In each case, the change would result in a safety improvement.

  13. Evaluation on the environmental radioactivity in Shanghai city during the normal operational condition of Qinshan nuclear power station.

    PubMed

    Lu, Heqing; Wang, Qiang

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the impact of environmental radioactivity in Shanghai from the operation of Qinshan Nuclear Power Station (QNPS). The levels of terrestrial gamma radiation and radioactivities in the drinking water, main food and soils in the Jinshan area where is only 38 km far away from the QNPS were continuously measured in the past 19 y. Both the levels of terrestrial gamma radiation and the radioactivities in the samples were on the normal background levels. No significant changes were found before and after the running of QNPS. The annual public exposure to the terrestrial gamma radiation was estimated to be ?0.1 mSv, and the annual exposure from intakes of (90)Sr and (137)Cs in food was ?0.5 ?Sv. In the past 19 y, no significant impact on the environmental radioactivity in Shanghai was observed due to the operation of QNPS. PMID:23427205

  14. XOQDOQ: computer program for the meteorological evaluation of routine effluent releases at nuclear power stations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sagendorf, J.F.; Goll, J.T.; Sandusky, W.F.

    1982-09-01

    Provided is a user's guide for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) computer program X0QDOQ which implements Regulatory Guide 1.111. This NUREG supercedes NUREG-0324 which was published as a draft in September 1977. This program is used by the NRC meteorology staff in their independent meteorological evaluation of routine or anticipated intermittent releases at nuclear power stations. It operates in a batch input mode and has various options a user may select. Relative atmospheric dispersion and deposition factors are computed for 22 specific distances out to 50 miles from the site for each directional sector. From these results, values for 10 distance segments are computed. The user may also select other locations for which atmospheric dispersion deposition factors are computed. Program features, including required input data and output results, are described. A program listing and test case data input and resulting output are provided.

  15. Evaluation of Two Ionic Liquid-Based Epoxies from the MISSE-8 (Materials International Space Station Experiment-8) Sample Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabenberg, Ellen; Kaukler, William; Grugel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Two sets of epoxy mixtures, both containing the same ionic liquid (IL) based resin but utilizing two different curing agents, were evaluated after spending more than two years of continual space exposure outside of the International Space Station on the MISSE-8 sample rack. During this period the samples, positioned on nadir side, also experienced some 12,500 thermal cycles between approximately -40?C and +40 C. Initial examination showed some color change, a miniscule weight variance, and no cracks or de-bonding from the sample substrate. Microscopic examination of the surface reveled some slight deformities and pitting. These observations, and others, are discussed in view of the ground-based control samples. Finally, the impetus of this study in terms of space applications is presented.

  16. Evaluation of a Treadmill with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization (TVIS) for Use on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCrory, Jean L.; Lemmon, David R.; Sommer, H. Joseph; Prout, Brian; Smith, Damon; Korth, Deborah W.; Lucero, Javier; Greenisen, Michael; Moore, Jim

    1999-01-01

    A treadmill with vibration isolation and stabilization designed for the International Space Station (ISS) was evaluated during Shuttle mission STS-81. Three crew members ran and walked on the device, which floats freely in zero gravity. For the majority of the more than 2 hours of locomotion studied, the treadmill showed peak to peak linear and angular displacements of less than 2.5 cm and 2.5 deg, respectively. Vibration transmitted to the vehicle was within the microgravity allocation limits that are defined for the ISS. Refinements to the treadmill and harness system are discussed. This approach to treadmill design offers the possibility of generating 1G-like loads on the lower extremities while preserving the microgravity environment of the ISS for structural safety and vibration free experimental conditions.

  17. Real-Time Risk and Fault Management in the Mission Evaluation Room of the International Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Nelson; Steven D. Novack

    2003-05-01

    Effective anomaly resolution in the Mission Evaluation Room (MER) of the International Space Station (ISS) requires consideration of risk in the process of identifying faults and developing corrective actions. Risk models such as fault trees from the ISS Probablistic Risk Assessment (PRA) can be used to support anomaly resolution, but the functionality required goes significantly beyond what the PRA could provide. Methods and tools are needed that can systematically guide the identification of root causes for on-orbit anomalies, and to develop effective corrective actions that address the event and its consequences without undue risk to the crew or the mission. In addition, an overall information management framework is needed so that risk can be systematically incorporated in the process, and effectively communicated across all the disciplines and levels of management within the space station program. The commercial nuclear power industry developed such a decision making framework, known as the critical safety function approach, to guide emergency response following the accident at Three Mile Island in 1979. This report identifies new methods, tools, and decision processes that can be used to enhance anomaly resolution in the ISS Mission Evaluation Room. Current anomaly resolution processes were reviewed to identify requirements for effective real-time risk and fault management. Experience gained in other domains, especially the commercial nuclear power industry, was reviewed to identify applicable methods and tools. Recommendations were developed for next-generation tools to support MER anomaly resolution, and a plan for implementing the recommendations was formulated. The foundation of the proposed toolset will be a "Mission Success Framework" designed to integrate and guide the anomaly resolution process, and to facilitate consistent communication across disciplines while focusing on the overriding importance of mission success.

  18. Real-Time Risk and Fault Management in the Mission Evaluation Room for the International Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; Novack, S.D.

    2003-05-30

    Effective anomaly resolution in the Mission Evaluation Room (MER) of the International Space Station (ISS) requires consideration of risk in the process of identifying faults and developing corrective actions. Risk models such as fault trees from the ISS Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) can be used to support anomaly resolution, but the functionality required goes significantly beyond what the PRA could provide. Methods and tools are needed that can systematically guide the identification of root causes for on-orbit anomalies, and to develop effective corrective actions that address the event and its consequences without undue risk to the crew or the mission. In addition, an overall information management framework is needed so that risk can be systematically incorporated in the process, and effectively communicated across all the disciplines and levels of management within the space station program. The commercial nuclear power industry developed such a decision making framework, known as the critical safety function approach, to guide emergency response following the accident at Three Mile Island in 1979. This report identifies new methods, tools, and decision processes that can be used to enhance anomaly resolution in the ISS Mission Evaluation Room. Current anomaly resolution processes were reviewed to identify requirements for effective real-time risk and fault management. Experience gained in other domains, especially the commercial nuclear power industry, was reviewed to identify applicable methods and tools. Recommendations were developed for next-generation tools to support MER anomaly resolution, and a plan for implementing the recommendations was formulated. The foundation of the proposed tool set will be a ''Mission Success Framework'' designed to integrate and guide the anomaly resolution process, and to facilitate consistent communication across disciplines while focusing on the overriding importance of mission success.

  19. An Evaluation of a Welding Fumes Exhaust System. Agricultural Experiment Station Research Report 284.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, C. O.

    A study evaluated the feasibility of introducing unheated outside air into the airstream of a cross-flow welding exhaust system to reduce heating energy costs of a school welding laboratory. The physical facility used was the agricultural mechanics laboratory at the University of Arizona, which is similar to facilities in which instruction in…

  20. Health hazard evaluation report No. HETA 81-112-1372, Culley Generating Station, Yankeetown, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Zey, J.N.; Donohue, M.

    1983-09-01

    To evaluate worker exposure to boiler gases and coal dust, NIOSH conducted a combined environmental and medical evaluation at the Culley facility in August 1981. Environmental samples were collected to evaluate employee exposure to airborne concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, sulfur dioxide, coal dust, fly ash, crystalline silica, and asbestos. In addition, boiler gas leaks were evaluated. While the majority of personal samples were below current criteria, a health hazard did exist for some employees exposed to sulfur dioxide. In addition, a potential for exposure to boiler gases exists due to boiler leaks. Respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm production, and wheezing were twice the expected rate for this group of workers. The X-ray data revealed four cases of pneumoconiosis in the Culley workers. The relative youth and the low seniority of this workforce may explain the absence of group PFT reductions. If preventive engineering measures are employed, the occurrence of continued group health effects will likely be reduced. Recommendations are made for an improved respiratory protection program, reducing leaks from process equipment, and for periodic environmental monitoring of the employees.

  1. Microwave emissions from police radar.

    PubMed

    Fink, J M; Wagner, J P; Congleton, J J; Rock, J C

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated police officers' exposures to microwaves emitted by traffic radar units. Exposure measurements were taken at approximated ocular and testicular levels of officers seated in patrol vehicles. Comparisons were made of the radar manufacturers' published maximum power density specifications and actual measured power densities taken at the antenna faces of those units. Four speed-enforcement agencies and one transportation research institute provided 54 radar units for evaluation; 17 different models, encompassing 4 frequency bands and 3 antenna configurations, were included. Four of the 986 measurements taken exceeded the 5 mW/cm2 limit accepted by the International Radiation Protection Association and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement, though none exceeded the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, American National Standards Institute, Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, or Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard of 10 mW/cm2. The four high measurements were maximum power density readings taken directly in front of the radar. Of the 812 measurements taken at the officers' seated ocular and testicular positions, none exceeded 0.04 mW/cm2; the highest of these (0.034 mW/cm2) was less than 1% of the most conservative current safety standards. High exposures in the limited region directly in front of the radar aperture are easily avoided with proper training. Results of this study indicate that police officer exposure to microwave radiation is apparently minimal. However, because of uncertainty in the medical and scientific communities concerning nonionizing radiation, it is recommended that law enforcement agencies implement a policy of prudent avoidance, including purchasing units with the lowest published maximum power densities, purchasing dash/rear deck-mounted units with antennae mounted outside the patrol vehicle, and training police officers to use the "stand-by" mode when not actually using radar. PMID:10671181

  2. An overview of developments and applications of oceanographic radar networks in Asia and Oceania countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Satoshi; Heron, Malcolm L.; Kim, Kuh; Lai, Jian-Wu; Lee, Sang-Ho; Wu, Xiangbai; Wu, Xiongbin; Wyatt, Lucy R.; Yang, Wen-Chang

    2013-03-01

    More than 110 radar stations are in operation at the present time in Asia and Oceania countries, which is nearly half of all the existing radar stations in the world, for purposes related to marine safety, oil spill response, tsunami warning, coastal zone management and understanding of ocean current dynamics, depending mainly on each country's coastal sea characteristics. This paper introduces the oceanographic radar networks of Australia, China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan, presented at the 1st Ocean Radar Conference for Asia (ORCA) held in May 2012, Seoul, Korea, to share information about the radar network developments and operations, knowledge and experiences of data management, and research activity and application of the radar-derived data of neighbouring countries. We hope this overview paper may contribute as the first step to promotion of regional collaborations in the radar observations and data usages and applications in order to efficiently monitor the coastal and marginal sea waters along the western Pacific Ocean periphery.

  3. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

  4. Evaluation of 3% hydrogen peroxide for use as an environmental disenfectant aboard the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucia, Helen L.; Mishra, S. K.; Gunter, Emelie G.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1993-01-01

    We evaluate the ability of a 3% (8800 micromolar) solution of hydogen peroxide to kill 12 strains of bacteria and 12 strains of fungi. A 1:4 dilution of 3% H2O2 equivalent to 1100 micromolar, was lethal to all the tested strains. If the situation calls for a nonagressive disinfectant without residue or toxic aftereffects, 3% H2O2 seems an ideal choice.

  5. Characterization of ice cloud properties obtained by shipborne radar/lidar over the tropical western Pacific Ocean for evaluation of an atmospheric general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kaori; Okamoto, Hajime; Takemura, Toshihiko; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Nobuo

    2010-08-01

    This study analyzed 95-GHz radar/lidar data collected from the R/V Mirai over the tropical western Pacific to characterize the vertical distribution of ice cloud effective radius reff, ice water content IWC, and in-cloud vertical velocity of the region in conjunction with weather regimes classified by International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cluster analysis. Ice clouds observed from the Mirai were roughly consistent with the ISCCP weather regimes; more convectively active regimes had larger amounts of high cloud consisting of deeper cloud with larger ice water path (IWP) and precipitating ice fraction. Ice cloud microphysics of the Center for Climate System Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Frontier Research Center for Global Change atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) was then evaluated using the radar-lidar simulator and ISCCP weather regimes for comparison of the statistics at different scales. The model tended to produce a high cloud fraction that was two times larger in the cirrus regimes but 50% lower in the deepest convective regime. The simulated IWP could only weakly reproduce the observed variety and generally underestimated the observed values despite the weather regimes. Cutoff in the simulated grid mean IWC around 0.1 g-3 was too small, especially above 11 km. The AGCM successfully predicted the observed frequency distribution for reff above 11 km, but produced large overestimation in the peak value below 11 km due to the excessively large fraction of reff ˜100 μm. Establishing a cutoff for cloud ice at reff > 120 μm was found to be quite reasonable, although it would miss some of the larger particles that were observed.

  6. Evaluation of 25 y of environmental monitoring data around Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS), Kalpakkam, India.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, S; Brindha, J Thulasi; Sreedevi, K R; Manu, Anitha; Thilakavathi, A; Ramkumar, S; Santhanakrishnan, V; Balagurunathan, M R; Jesan, T; Kannan, V; Hegde, A G

    2010-12-01

    The Environmental Survey Laboratory at Kalpakkam, India carries out elaborate monitoring programme involving atmospheric, terrestrial and aquatic samples for radioactivity to evaluate the impact of operating two pressurised heavy water reactors. This paper presents the evaluation of 25 y (1983-2008) data. Statistical analysis of the environmental data for different radionuclides showed that the data best fits log-normal distribution. The data analysed showed that fission products such as (137)Cs, (90)Sr and (131)I were due to global fallout only. A ratio of 0.2 was obtained for (90)Sr to (137)Cs in air filter samples, only during Chernobyl accident period. The transfer factor of (137)Cs and (90)Sr for rice was computed to be 0.23 and 0.03 and vegetables 0.25 and 0.10, respectively. Activation products (3)H and (41)Ar are the only radionuclides that are related to MAPS operation. A strong correlation (r = 0.9) was observed between (3)H activity in air and (3)H discharged to the atmosphere. A similar correlation (r = 0.8) was observed in (3)H concentration in seawater and (3)H discharged in the liquid waste. The annual internal dose due to (3)H and annual external dose due to (41)Ar evaluated in the last 25 y show that the members of the public received less than 2 % of the dose limit (1 mSv y(-1)) set by ICRP 72. PMID:20829204

  7. Airborne derivation of microburst alerts from ground-based Terminal Doppler Weather Radar information: A flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, David A.

    1993-01-01

    An element of the NASA/FAA windshear program is the integration of ground-based microburst information on the flight deck, to support airborne windshear alerting and microburst avoidance. NASA conducted a windshear flight test program in the summer of 1991 during which airborne processing of Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) data was used to derive microburst alerts. Microburst information was extracted from TDWR, transmitted to a NASA Boeing 737 in flight via data link, and processed to estimate the windshear hazard level (F-factor) that would be experienced by the aircraft in each microburst. The microburst location and F-factor were used to derive a situation display and alerts. The situation display was successfully used to maneuver the aircraft for microburst penetrations, during which atmospheric 'truth' measurements were made. A total of 19 penetrations were made of TDWR-reported microburst locations, resulting in 18 airborne microburst alerts from the TDWR data and two microburst alerts from the airborne reactive windshear detection system. The primary factors affecting alerting performance were spatial offset of the flight path from the region of strongest shear, differences in TDWR measurement altitude and airplane penetration altitude, and variations in microburst outflow profiles. Predicted and measured F-factors agreed well in penetrations near microburst cores. Although improvements in airborne and ground processing of the TDWR measurements would be required to support an airborne executive-level alerting protocol, the practicality of airborne utilization of TDWR data link data has been demonstrated.

  8. Laser radar II

    SciTech Connect

    Becherer, R.J.; Harney, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among the following sessions: Strategic Defense Initiative laser radar technology; Advanced laser devices; Systems analysis and computer simulations; and Laser radar applications and system components.

  9. The MST Radar Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roettger, J.

    1984-01-01

    The coherent radar technique is reviewed with special emphasis to mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars operating in the VHF band. Some basic introduction to Doppler radar measurements and the radar equation is followed by an outline of the characteristics of atmospheric turbulence, viewed from the scattering and reflection processes of radar signals. Radar signal acquisition and preprocessing, namely coherent detection, digital sampling, pre-integration and coding, is briefly discussed. The data analysis is represented in terms of the correlation and spectrum analysis, yielding the essential parameters: power, signal-to-noise ratio, average and fluctuating velocity and persistency. The techniques to measure wind velocities, viz. the different modes of the Doppler method as well as the space antenna method are surveyed and the feasibilities of the MST radar interferometer technique are elucidated. A general view on the criteria to design phased array antennas is given. An outline of the hardware of a typical MST radar system is presented.

  10. Imaging radar observations of Askja Caldera, Iceland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, M. C.; Evans, D.; Elachi, C.

    1978-01-01

    A 'blind' test involving interpretation of computer-enhanced like- and cross-polarized radar images is used to evaluate the surface roughness of Askja Caldera, a large volcanic complex in central Iceland. The 'blind' test differs from earlier analyses of radar observations in that computer-processes images and both qualitative and quantitative analyses are used. Attention is given to photogeologic examination and subsequent survey-type field observations, along with aerial photography during the field trip. The results indicate that the 'blind' test of radar interpretation of the Askja volcanic area can be considered suitable within the framework of limitations of radar data considered explicitly from the onset. The limitations of the radar techniques can be eliminated by using oblique-viewing conditions to remove geometric distortions and slope effects.

  11. Doppler radar results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are covered in viewgraph form and include the following: (1) a summary of radar flight data collected; (2) a video of combined aft cockpit, nose camera, and radar hazard displays; (3) a comparison of airborne radar F-factor measurements with in situ and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) F-factors for some sample events; and (4) a summary of wind shear detection performance.

  12. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system.

  13. Comparison and evaluation of nuclear power plant options for geosynchronous power stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The suitability of eleven types of nuclear fission reactors in combination with five potential energy conversion systems for use in geosynchronous power plants is evaluated. Gas turbine, potassium Rankine liquid metal MHD, and thermionic energy conversion systems are considered. The existing technology of reactors in near-term, intermediate-term, and long-term classes is discussed, together with modifications for use in large-scale power production in space. Unless the temperature is high enough for MHD, reactors which heat gases are generally more suitable for use with gas turbines. Those which heat liquid metals will be more useful for potassium Rankine or liquid metal MHD conversion systems.

  14. Lunar radar backscatter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    The lunar surface material in the Plato area is characterized using Earth based visual, infrared, and radar signatures. Radar scattering in the lunar regolith with an existing optical scattering computer program is modeled. Mapping with 1 to 2 km resolution of the Moon using a 70 cm Arecibo radar is presented.

  15. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 82-093-1453, Southwest Power Station City Utilities, Springfield, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Zey, J.N.; Aw, T.C.

    1984-04-01

    In response to a request from the Safety Department of City Utilities to evaluate employee exposures to coal and other dusts and fumes at the Southwest Power Facility (SIC-4911), Springfield, Missouri a visit was made to the site. All personal coal dust, fly ash, crystalline silica (14808607), nitrogen-dioxide (10102440), nitric-oxide (10102439), and sulfuric-acid (7664939) samples were below the lowest current criterion level. Four of eight personal sulfur-dioxide (7446095) samples exceeded the NIOSH recommended criterion of 1.3mg/cu m. Medical evaluation resulted in the identification of three workers with chronic bronchitis each of whom smoked cigarettes, eight workers with pulmonary function test abnormalities indicating obstructive airways disease, and two workers with features of restrictive lung disease. One chest X-ray was consistent with pneumoconiosis. The authors conclude that a health hazard existed for employees exposed to sulfur-dioxide and noise. A potential hazard also existed for employee exposure to heat stress in certain locations in the facility. The authors recommend improvements in the respiratory protection program, use of personal protective equipment, and initiation of an employee training program and environmental monitoring by management.

  16. Health hazard evaluation report No. HETA 81-278-1371, Warrick Generating Station, Yankeetown, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Zey, J.N.; Donohue, M.

    1983-09-01

    Environmental samples were collected to evaluate employee exposures to airborne concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, sulfur dioxide, coal dust, fly ash, crystalline silica, and inorganic metals. In addition, gas leaks from the boilers were evaluated. While the majority of personal samples were below current criteria, a health hazard did exist for some employees exposed to sulfur dioxide, coal dust, and crystalline silica. Highest concentrations were obtained on samples worn by electrical and maintenance personnel and employees working on the positive pressure boiler (unit 4). In addition, the potential exists for employee exposure to boiler gases due to boiler leaks. Respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm production, and wheezing were twice the expected rate for this group of workers. If preventive maintenance and engineering measures are employed, the occurrence of continued group health effects will likely be reduced. Recommendations are made in the body of the full report for an improved respiratory protection program, reducing leaks from boiler units, and for periodic environmental monitoring of the employees.

  17. Evaluation of a Gas Chromatograph-Differential Mobility Spectrometer for Potential Water Monitoring on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Macatangay, Ariel V.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernandez, Facundo M.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental monitoring for manned spaceflight has long depended on archival sampling, which was sufficient for short missions. However, the longer mission durations aboard the International Space Station (ISS) have shown that enhanced, real-time monitoring capabilities are necessary in order to protect both the crewmembers and the spacecraft systems. Over the past several years, a number of real-time environmental monitors have been deployed on the ISS. Currently, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the station air are monitored by the Air Quality Monitor (AQM), a small, lightweight gas chromatograph-differential mobility spectrometer. For water monitoring, real-time monitors are used for total organic carbon (TOC) and biocide analysis. No information on the actual makeup of the TOC is provided presently, however. An improvement to the current state of environmental monitoring could be realized by modifying a single instrument to analyze both air and water. As the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for VOCs in air samples, this instrument provides a logical starting point to evaluate the feasibility of this approach. The major hurdle for this effort lies in the liberation of the target analytes from the water matrix. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent studies, in which an electro-thermal vaporization unit has been interfaced with the AQM to analyze target VOCs at the concentrations at which they are routinely detected in archival water samples from the ISS. We will compare the results of these studies with those obtained from the instrumentation routinely used to analyze archival water samples.

  18. A Critical Evaluation of Ground-Penetrating Radar Methodology on the Kalavasos and Maroni Built Environments (KAMBE) Project, Cyprus (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, J.; Urban, T.; Gerard-Little, P.; Kearns, C.; Manning, S. W.; Fisher, K.; Rogers, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Kalavasos and Maroni Built Environments (KAMBE) Project is a multi-year investigation of the urban fabric and architectural organization of two Late Bronze Age (c. 1650-1100 BCE) polities on Cyprus. The Late Bronze Age (known also as the Late Cypriot period on Cyprus) is characterized by the emergence of a number of large, urban settlements on the island. The amalgamation of large populations at centralized sites coincides with contemporary social, economic and political changes, including a growing disparity in funerary goods, an increased emphasis on metallurgy (specifically copper mining and smelting for the production of bronze), and the construction of monumental buildings. The initial phase of the project centered on geophysical survey at two archaeological sites in adjacent river valleys in south-central Cyprus: Kalavasos-Ayios Dhimitrios and the Maroni settlement cluster [1]. These sites are thought to be two of the earliest 'urban' settlements on the island and provide a unique opportunity to explore how urban space was instrumental in the development of social and political complexity during this transformative period. The formation of these Late Bronze Age urban landscapes is, we argue, not simply the result of this emerging social complexity, but is instead an key tool in the creation and maintenance of societal boundaries. Indeed, the process of 'place-making'--the dynamic creation of socially meaningful spaces, likely by elites--may well have been one of the most effective arenas that elites used to re-enforce the growing socio-political disparity. The KAMBE Project investigates the layout and organization of these new 'urban' spaces to better understand how built-space impacted social developments. Geophysical survey methods are ideal for large-scale data collection both to identify potential areas for targeted archaeological excavation, and to provide proxy data for architectural plans that allow us to comment on the nature of the urban fabric at these settlements. Having just completed this first phase of the project, we report on the results of large-scale geophysical survey, including the identification of at least two previously unknown building complexes (one at each site). Here we focus particularly on ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data and survey methodology, in an effort to critically examine the range of approaches applied throughout the project (e.g. various antennae frequencies, data-collection densities, soil moisture/seasonality of survey, and post-collection data processing [2]), and to identify the most effective parameters for archaeological geophysical survey in the region. This paper also advocates for the role of geophysical survey within a multi-component archaeological project, not simply as a prospection tool but as an archaeological data collection method in its own right. 1]Fisher, K. D., J. Leon, S. Manning, M. Rogers, and D. Sewell. In Press. 2011-2012. 'The Kalavasos and Maroni Built Environments Project: Introduction and preliminary report on the 2008 and 2010 seasons. Report of the Department of Antiquities, Cyprus. 2] e.g. Rogers, M., J. F. Leon, K. D. Fisher, S. W. Manning and D. Sewell. 2012. 'Comparing similar ground-penetrating radar surveys under different soil moisture conditions at Kalavasos-Ayios Dhimitrios, Cyprus.' Archaeological Prospection 19 (4): 297-305.

  19. Evaluating spatial variability of free-phase gas in peat using ground-penetrating radar and direct measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strack, M.; Mierau, T.

    2010-06-01

    Several recent studies have estimated that peatlands may have substantial quantities (up to 15-20% by volume) of biogenic free-phase gas (FPG) below the water table. The presence, distribution, and release of this FPG play important roles in peatland hydrology and biogeochemistry. Despite its importance, investigation of FPG is difficult because most measurement techniques involve disturbance of the peat, potentially altering gas volume in the process. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) provides a noninvasive approach to quantify gas content in peat; however, its use for investigating variability in gas content at the microform scale across a peatland and with depth has been limited to date. We investigated variability in subsurface CH4 stock and FPG content between peatland microforms using (1) GPR and the common midpoint method to determine subsurface electromagnetic wave velocity and (2) direct measurement in order to estimate FPG content at three ridges and three hollows in a peatland in northern Alberta, Canada. Higher volumes of FPG were associated with higher CH4 concentrations, suggesting that a reliable estimate of gas volume could also serve as an estimate of stored CH4. In general, both methods found higher volumes of gas under ridges than hollows. When electromagnetic wave velocity was considered, a significant correlation was present with direct measurement of FPG volume. Zones with FPG content up to 20% of peat volume were observed throughout the peat profile including within the upper 1.5 m of peat. Further research is needed to determine physical, chemical, and biological controls on the variability of FPG volume in peat.

  20. Vector quantization and learning vector quantization for radar target classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Clayton V.; Lu, Yi-Chuan; Larson, Victor J.

    1993-10-01

    Radar target classification performance is greatly dependent on how the classifier represents the strongly angle dependent radar target signatures. This paper compares the performance of classifiers that represent radar target signatures using vector quantization (VQ) and learning vector quantization (LVQ). The classifier performance is evaluated with a set of high resolution millimeter-wave radar data from four ground vehicles (Camaro, van, pickup, and bulldozer). LVQ explicitly includes classification performance in its data representation criterion, whereas VQ only makes use of a distortion measure such as mean square distance. The classifier that uses LVQ to represent the radar data has a much higher probability of correct classification than VQ.

  1. Redetermination of the precise gravity fields around the Japanese Antarctic Station, Syowa, and evaluation of GOCE EGMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Y.; Nogi, Y.; Matsuzaki, K.

    2014-12-01

    We have been conducting the precise gravity field determination around the Japanese Antarctic Station, Syowa in Lützow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica. So far, we employed GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer) RL-4 and earlier versions of the EGMs and the in-situ gravity data obtained by the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE), i.e., land gravity data since 1967, surface ship data since 1985 and airborne gravity data in 2006. Using these data sets, we calculated the precise gravity fields by means of Least Squares Colocations (LSC) and evaluated the GOCE EGMs by comparing with the in-situ gravity data. Recently, new GOCE EGMs, TIM RL-5 and DIR RL-5 have been released. In addition, JARE ship borne gravity data have been reprocessed following a more unified procedure and some land gravity data have been added. Accordingly, we have recalculated the gravity fields using all the data combined. Practically, using those data sets, we estimated gravity anomalies and geoid heights in the area of 60-80S and 20-60E by means of LSC using a GOCE EGM as the long wave-length gravity fields and an empirical covariance function estimated from the airborne gravity data. In this procedure as well as using the obtained gravity field data, we also evaluated GOCE EGMs and other recent EGMs.

  2. Space Station operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    An evaluation of the success of the Space Station will be based on the service provided to the customers by the Station crew, the productivity of the crew, and the costs of operation. Attention is given to details regarding Space Station operations, a summary of operational philosophies and requirements, logistics and resupply operations, prelaunch processing and launch operations, on-orbit operations, aspects of maintainability and maintenance, habitability, and questions of medical care. A logistics module concept is considered along with a logistics module processing timeline, a habitability module concept, and a Space Station rescue mission.

  3. Pattern recognition applied to seismic signals of Llaima volcano (Chile): An evaluation of station-dependent classifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curilem, Millaray; Huenupan, Fernando; Beltrán, Daniel; San Martin, Cesar; Fuentealba, Gustavo; Franco, Luis; Cardona, Carlos; Acuña, Gonzalo; Chacón, Max; Khan, M. Salman; Becerra Yoma, Nestor

    2016-04-01

    Automatic pattern recognition applied to seismic signals from volcanoes may assist seismic monitoring by reducing the workload of analysts, allowing them to focus on more challenging activities, such as producing reports, implementing models, and understanding volcanic behaviour. In a previous work, we proposed a structure for automatic classification of seismic events in Llaima volcano, one of the most active volcanoes in the Southern Andes, located in the Araucanía Region of Chile. A database of events taken from three monitoring stations on the volcano was used to create a classification structure, independent of which station provided the signal. The database included three types of volcanic events: tremor, long period, and volcano-tectonic and a contrast group which contains other types of seismic signals. In the present work, we maintain the same classification scheme, but we consider separately the stations information in order to assess whether the complementary information provided by different stations improves the performance of the classifier in recognising seismic patterns. This paper proposes two strategies for combining the information from the stations: i) combining the features extracted from the signals from each station and ii) combining the classifiers of each station. In the first case, the features extracted from the signals from each station are combined forming the input for a single classification structure. In the second, a decision stage combines the results of the classifiers for each station to give a unique output. The results confirm that the station-dependent strategies that combine the features and the classifiers from several stations improves the classification performance, and that the combination of the features provides the best performance. The results show an average improvement of 9% in the classification accuracy when compared with the station-independent method.

  4. Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Martin; Höller, Hartmut; Schmidt, Kersten

    Precipitation or weather radar is an essential tool for research, diagnosis, and nowcasting of precipitation events like fronts or thunderstorms. Only with weather radar is it possible to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure of thunderstorms and to investigate processes like hail formation or tornado genesis. A number of different radar products are available to analyze the structure, dynamics and microphysics of precipitation systems. Cloud radars use short wavelengths to enable detection of small ice particles or cloud droplets. Their applications differ from weather radar as they are mostly orientated vertically, where different retrieval techniques can be applied.

  5. Holographic neural networks versus conventional neural networks: a comparative evaluation for the classification of landmine targets in ground-penetrating radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudigonda, Naga R.; Kacelenga, Ray; Edwards, Mark

    2004-09-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of a holographic neural network in comparison with a conventional feedforward backpropagation neural network for the classification of landmine targets in ground penetrating radar images. The data used in the study was acquired from four different test sites using the landmine detection system developed by General Dynamics Canada Ltd., in collaboration with the Defense Research and Development Canada, Suffield. A set of seven features extracted for each detected alarm is used as stimulus inputs for the networks. The recall responses of the networks are then evaluated against the ground truth to declare true or false detections. The area computed under the receiver operating characteristic curve is used for comparative purposes. With a large dataset comprising of data from multiple sites, both the holographic and conventional networks showed comparable trends in recall accuracies with area values of 0.88 and 0.87, respectively. By using independent validation datasets, the holographic network"s generalization performance was observed to be better (mean area = 0.86) as compared to the conventional network (mean area = 0.82). Despite the widely publicized theoretical advantages of the holographic technology, use of more than the required number of cortical memory elements resulted in an over-fitting phenomenon of the holographic network.

  6. Multidimensional radar picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waz, Mariusz

    2010-05-01

    In marine navigation systems, the three-dimensional (3D) visualization is often and often used. Echosonders and sonars working in hydroacustic systems can present pictures in three dimensions. Currently, vector maps also offer 3D presentation. This presentation is used in aviation and underwater navigation. In the nearest future three-dimensional presentation may be obligatory presentation in displays of navigation systems. A part of these systems work with radar and communicates with it transmitting data in a digital form. 3D presentation of radar picture require a new technology to develop. In the first step it is necessary to compile digital form of radar signal. The modern navigation radar do not present data in three-dimensional form. Progress in technology of digital signal processing make it possible to create multidimensional radar pictures. For instance, the RSC (Radar Scan Converter) - digital radar picture recording and transforming tool can be used to create new picture online. Using RSC and techniques of modern computer graphics multidimensional radar pictures can be generated. The radar pictures mentioned should be readable for ECDIS. The paper presents a method for generating multidimensional radar picture from original signal coming from radar receiver.

  7. Planetary radar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostro, Steven J.

    The scientific aims, theoretical principles, techniques and instrumentation, and future potential of radar observations of solar-system objects are discussed in a general overview. Topics examined include the history of radar technology, echo detectability, the Arecibo and Goldstone radar observatories, echo time delay and Doppler shift, radar waveforms, albedo and polarization ratio, measurement of dynamical properties, and the dispersion of echo power. Consideration is given to angular scattering laws; the radar signatures of the moon and inner planets, Mars, and asteroids; topographic relief; delay-Doppler radar maps and their physical interpretation; and radar observations of the icy Galilean satellites of Jupiter, comets, and the rings of Saturn. Diagrams, drawings, photographs, and sample maps and images are provided.

  8. Planetary radar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, Steven J.

    1987-01-01

    The scientific aims, theoretical principles, techniques and instrumentation, and future potential of radar observations of solar-system objects are discussed in a general overview. Topics examined include the history of radar technology, echo detectability, the Arecibo and Goldstone radar observatories, echo time delay and Doppler shift, radar waveforms, albedo and polarization ratio, measurement of dynamical properties, and the dispersion of echo power. Consideration is given to angular scattering laws; the radar signatures of the moon and inner planets, Mars, and asteroids; topographic relief; delay-Doppler radar maps and their physical interpretation; and radar observations of the icy Galilean satellites of Jupiter, comets, and the rings of Saturn. Diagrams, drawings, photographs, and sample maps and images are provided.

  9. Locating narrow bipolar events with single-station measurement of low-frequency magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Lu, Gaopeng; Qie, Xiushu; Jiang, Rubin; Fan, Yanfeng; Tian, Ye; Sun, Zhuling; Liu, Mingyuan; Wang, Zhichao; Liu, Dongxia; Feng, Guili

    2016-06-01

    We developed a method to locate the narrow bipolar events (NBEs) based on the single-station measurement of low-frequency (LF, 40-500 kHz) magnetic fields. The direction finding of a two-axis magnetic sensor provides the azimuth of NBEs relative to the measurement site; the ionospheric reflection pairs in the lightning sferics are used to determine the range and height. We applied this method to determine the three-dimensional (3D) locations of 1475 NBEs with magnetic signals recorded during the SHandong Artificially Triggered Lightning Experiment (SHATLE) in summer of 2013. The NBE detections are evaluated on a storm basis by comparing with radar observations of reflectivity and lightning data from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) for two mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) of different sizes. As revealed by previous studies, NBEs are predominately produced in the convective regions with relatively strong radar echo (with composite reflectivity ≥30 dBZ), although not all the convections with high reflectivity and active lightning production are in favor of NBE production. The NBEs located by the single-station magnetic method also exhibit the distinct segregation in altitude for positive and negative NBEs, namely positive NBEs are mainly produced between 7 km and 15 km, while negative NBEs are predominantly produced above 14 km. In summary, the results of comparison generally show that the single-station magnetic method can locate NBEs with good reliability, although the accuracy of 3D location remains to be evaluated with the traditional multi-station method based on the time-of-arrival technique. This method can be applied to track the motion of storm convection within 800 km, especially when they move out to ocean beyond the detection range (typically <400 km) of meteorological radars, making it possible to study NBEs in oceanic thunderstorms for which the location with multiple ground-based stations is usually not feasible.

  10. The evaluation of 3cm-wavelength radar for mapping surface deposits in the Bristol Lake/Granite Mountain area, Mojave Desert, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, R.; Sabins, F. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Surface deposits in the Bristol Lake/Granite Mountains area, Mojave Desert, California were mapped using high resolution 3 cm wavelength radar images. The surface deposits range from silt to boulders in size and were separated into six radar-rock units on the basis of radar return signatures (brightness and texture) and geomorphic expression. Field reconnaissance of the six units showed that the brightness of the radar signatures on the images correlates with the surface roughness of each unit. Two major radar signatures anomalies were noted during the study. A dark radar signature for the large sand ridges in the Kelso Dunes area and a distinct northwest trending contrast boundary between bright and dark radar signatures in the Bristol Dry Lake area. Field reconnaissance of the two areas indicated that near surface moisture may be the cause of dark signatures. Dune areas with little to no vegetation produce a dark signature, whereas areas with sparse to moderate vegetation produce an intermediate to dark signature.

  11. Satellite radar for monitoring forest resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, Roger M.; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    1990-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the computer analysis results of a study which used Seasat satellite radar data obtained in 1978 and Shuttle Imaging Radar-B data obtained in 1984. The change-detection procedures employed demonstrate that deforestation and reforestation activities can be effectively monitored on the basis of radar data gathered at satellite altitudes. The computer-processing techniques applied to the data encompassed (1) overlay display, (2) ratios, (3) differences, (4) principal-component analysis, and (5) classification; of these, overlay display is noted to quickly and easily yield a qualitative display of the multidate data.

  12. May tropospheric noise in satellite radar data affect decision making results?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloutsos, Aristeidis; Bekri, Eleni; Moschas, Fanis; Saltogianni, Vasso; Stiros, Stathis; Yannopoulos, Panayotis

    2015-04-01

    Meteorological and air pollution conditions affect the satellite positioning signals. To investigate the uncertainty introduced in these signals in various meteorological and air pollution conditions, an array of GPS/GNSS stations and another of meteorological and air pollution stations has been established. The study area is expanded next to Patraikos and Corinth Gulf (NW Peloponnisos, Greece), which is characterized by high variability sequences from hot to cold weather, low to high relative humidity and clear to cloudy or/and Sahara dusty atmosphere, as a result of the particular geographical and topographical features of the study area. The GNSS recordings from several stations with very high vertical separation (with altitude up to 1600m and with a gradient of up to 20%) are analyzed in order to control in some extend both the vertical and the horizontal variability of the atmospheric effects, as well as the noise of geodetic recordings. Then, the GPS results will be combined with meteorological and atmospheric pollution data, as well as satellite radar data, in order to evaluate the enhanced troposphere noise in satellite radar and to estimate the magnitude of uncertainty that may cause alterations to decision making results in the management of water and other natural resources. This project takes advantage of GPS stations established in wider study area in the framework of the Corinth Rift Laboratory (http://crlab.eu/) in conjunction to the air pollution and meteorological monitoring stations of the Environmental Engineering Laboratory of the Department of Civil Engineering of the University of Patras. Regarding GPS stations, the project has been partly funded by the PLATO Project of the Greek Secretariat for Research and Technology.

  13. 52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch with open port door in radar scanner building 105 showing emanating waveguides from lower switch in vertical run; photograph also shows catwalk to upper scanner switch in upper left side of photograph and structural supports. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  14. Software For Clear-Air Doppler-Radar Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Bruce W.

    1990-01-01

    System of software developed to present plan-position-indicator scans of clear-air Doppler radar station on color graphical cathode-ray-tube display. Designed to incorporate latest accepted standards for equipment, computer programs, and meteorological data bases. Includes use of Ada programming language, of "Graphical-Kernel-System-like" graphics interface, and of Common Doppler Radar Exchange Format. Features include portability and maintainability. Use of Ada software packages produced number of software modules reused on other related projects.

  15. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-262-1994, Chapman Corporation, Albright Power Station, Albright, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, R.L.

    1989-11-01

    In response to a request from the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local 425, an evaluation was made of possible asbestos exposures to electrical workers employed by Chapman Corporation engaged in electrical rewiring tasks on a boiler at the Albright Power Station, Albright, West Virginia. At the time the survey was undertaken, a complete refurbishing of boiler number 3 was being performed, part of which included an asbestos-abatement project. The electricians in question did not work inside the asbestos-containment area during the survey, but they did perform work outside and around the asbestos-containment area. Air sampling results indicated that asbestos-fiber releases did occur outside the containment area. Bulk samples of settled dust revealed asbestos contamination in the work areas surrounding the boiler. There were several deficiencies in the abatement program, including the lack of adequate containment and breaches in the enclosure. The study concludes that workers in the vicinity of this boiler had potential exposure to airborne asbestos fibers. Recommendations are made to help management representatives minimize potential risks through the establishment of a comprehensive asbestos-abatement program and policies.

  16. Evaluation of R. Paul Smith Steam Electric Station thermal discharge effects on finfish and macroinvertebrate communities, summer/fall 1980. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate the thermal effects of the R. P. Smith steam Electric Station upon the finfish and macroinvertebrates communities during summer and fall, on the Potomac River. The finfish community was sampled during August and September 1980 with electrofishing gear. The increased water temperature along the Maryland shore appeared to influence the distribution of spotfin shiner and smallmouth bass. Carp, although not statistically tested, appeared to be more abundant in the thermal plume than at stations outside the thermal plume. The thermal discharge exhibited no discernible influence on the composition of the benthic or drift macroinvertebrate communities.

  17. Performance and evaluation of gas engine driven rooftop air conditioning equipment at the Willow Grove (PA) Naval Air Station

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, P.R.; Conover, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    In a field evaluation conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the performance of a new US energy-related technology under the FEMP Test Bed Demonstration Program. The technology was a 15-ton natural gas engine driven roof top air conditioning unit. Two such units were installed on a naval retail building to provide space conditioning to the building. Under the Test Bed Demonstration Program, private and public sector interests are focused to support the installation and evaluation of new US technologies in the federal sector. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE were the American Gas Cooling Center, Philadelphia Electric Company, Thermo King Corporation, and the US Naval Air Station at Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Equipment operating and service data as well as building interior and exterior conditions were secured for the 1992 cooling season. Based on a computer assessment of the building using standard weather data, a comparison was made with the energy and operating costs associated with the previous space conditioning system. Based on performance during the 1992 cooling season and adjusted to a normal weather year, the technology will save the site $6,000/yr in purchased energy costs. An additional $9,000 in savings due to electricity demand ratchet charge reductions will also be realized. Detailed information on the technology, the installation, and the results of the technology test are provided to illustrate the advantages to the federal sector of using this technology. A history of the CRADA development process is also reported.

  18. Ground penetrating radar evaluation of the internal structure of fluvial tufa deposits (Dévanos-Añavieja system, NE Spain): an approach to different scales of heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchuela, Ó. Pueyo; Luzón, A.; Pérez, A.; Muñoz, A.; Mayayo, M. J.; Garbi, H. Gil

    2016-04-01

    The Quaternary Añavieja-Dévanos tufa system is located in the northern sector of the Iberia Chain. It has been previously tackled by means sedimentological studies focused on the available outcrops and some boreholes. They have permitted the proposal of a sedimentary scenario that fits with a pool-barrage fluvial tufa model. However a better knowledge of the characteristics and internal distribution of the usually non-outcropping pool deposits as well as of its relationship with barrage deposits has not been evaluated in detail yet. Palaeoenvironmental studies on tufas are usually biased because tufas are commonly delicate facies exposed to intense erosion during water level fall stages; for this reason outcrops are usually scarce and very often coincide with the most cemented barrage deposits. In order to analyse the internal characteristics of the tufa deposits under study, but also the lateral correlation among different facies, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) has been employed both for the evaluation of its applicability in such kind of environments and to improve, if possible, the sedimentary model using geophysical data in sectors without outcrops. A GPR survey including different antennas ranging from 50 to 500 MHz along different sectors and its comparison with natural outcrops has been carried out. GPR results have permitted to deduce clear differences between pool and barrage deposits and to recognise its internal structure and geometrical relationships. The survey also permitted an approach to different scales of heterogeneities in the radarfacies evaluation by using distinct antennas and therefore, reaching different resolutions and penetrations. The resulting integration from different antennas allows three different attenuant and eight reflective radarfacies to be defined permitting a better approach to the real extension of the pool areas. These results have permitted to decipher the horizontal and vertical facies changes and the identification of a scarcer development of pool deposits than expected in the studied system.

  19. The Mid-Canada Radar Line and First Nations' people of the James Bay region, Canada: an evaluation using log-linear contingency modelling to analyze organochlorine frequency data.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Leonard J S; Wainman, Bruce C; Martin, Ian D; Weber, Jean-Philippe; Sutherland, Celine; Elliott, J Richard; Nieboer, Evert

    2005-09-01

    Abandoned radar line stations in the North American arctic and sub-arctic regions are point sources of contamination, especially for PCBs. Few data exist with respect to human body burden of organochlorines (OCs) in residents of communities located in close proximity to these radar line sites. We compared plasma OC concentration (unadjusted for total lipids) frequency distribution data using log-linear contingency modelling for Fort Albany First Nation, the site of an abandoned Mid-Canada Radar Line station, and two comparison populations (the neighbouring community of Kashechewan First Nation without such a radar installation, and Hamilton, a city in southern Ontario, Canada). This type of analysis is important as it allows for an initial investigation of contaminant data without imputing any values. The two-state log-linear model (employing both non-detectable and detectable concentration frequencies and applicable to PCB congeners 28 and 105 and cis-nonachlor) and the four-state log-linear model (using quartile concentration frequencies for Aroclor 1260, PCB congeners [99,118,138,153,156,170,180,183,187], beta-HCH, p,p'-DDT +p,p'-DDE, HCB, mirex, oxychlordane, and trans-nonachlor) revealed that the effects of subject gender were inconsequential. Significant differences (p < 0.05) between the groups examined were attributable to the effect of location on the frequency of detection of OCs or on their differential distribution among the concentration quartiles. In general, people from Hamilton had higher frequencies of non-detections and of concentrations in the first quartile (p < 0.05) for most OCs compared to people from Fort Albany and Kashechewan (who consume a traditional diet of wild meats that does not include marine mammals). An unexpected finding was that, for Kashechewan males, the frequency of many OCs was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the 4th concentration quartile than that predicted by the four-state log-linear model, but significantly lower than expected in the 1st quartile for beta-HCH. The levels of PCBs found for women in Fort Albany and Kashechewan were greater than those reported for Dene (First Nation people) and Métis (mixed heritage) of the western Northwest Territories (NWT) who did not consume marine mammals, and for Inuit living in the central NWT (occasional consumers of marine mammals). Moreover, the levels of total p,p'-DDT were greater for Fort Albany and Kashechewan women compared to these same aboriginal groups. PMID:16121269

  20. Rendezvous radar for the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, John W.; Olds, Keith; Parks, Howard

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Rendezvous Radar Set (RRS) for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The RRS was to be used to locate, and then provide vectoring information to, target satellites (or Shuttle or Space Station) to aid the OMV in making a minimum-fuel-consumption approach and rendezvous. The RRS design is that of an X-Band, all solid-state, monopulse tracking, frequency hopping, pulse-Doppler radar system. The development of the radar was terminated when the OMV prime contract to TRW was terminated by NASA. At the time of the termination, the development was in the circuit design stage. The system design was virtually completed, the PDR had been held. The RRS design was based on Motorola's experiences, both in the design and production of radar systems for the US Army and in the design and production of hi-rel communications systems for NASA space programs. Experience in these fields was combined with the latest digital signal processor and micro-processor technology to design a light-weight, low-power, spaceborne radar. The antenna and antenna positioner (gimbals) technology developed for the RRS is now being used in the satellite-to-satellite communication link design for Motorola's Iridium telecommunications system.

  1. Determining asteroid spin states using radar speckles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Michael W.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Brisken, Walter; Ostro, Steven J.; Benner, Lance A. M.; Giorgini, Jon D.; Nolan, Michael C.

    2010-10-01

    Knowing the shapes and spin states of near-Earth asteroids is essential to understanding their dynamical evolution because of the Yarkovsky and YORP effects. Delay-Doppler radar imaging is the most powerful ground-based technique for imaging near-Earth asteroids and can obtain spatial resolution of <10 m, but frequently produces ambiguous pole direction solutions. A radar echo from an asteroid consists of a pattern of speckles caused by the interference of reflections from different parts of the surface. It is possible to determine an asteroid's pole direction by tracking the motion of the radar speckle pattern. Speckle tracking can potentially measure the poles of at least several radar targets each year, rapidly increasing the available sample of NEA pole directions. We observed the near-Earth asteroid 2008 EV5 with the Arecibo planetary radar and the Very Long Baseline Array in December 2008. By tracking the speckles moving from the Pie Town to Los Alamos VLBA stations, we have shown that EV5 rotates retrograde. This is the first speckle detection of a near-Earth asteroid.

  2. Radar sounder performances for ESA JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berquin, Y. P.; Kofman, W. W.; Heggy, E.; Hérique, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Jupiter Icy moons Explorer (JUICE) is the first Large-class mission chosen as part of ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program. The mission will study Jovian icy moons Ganymede and Europa as potential habitats for life, addressing two key themes of Cosmic Vision namely the conditions for planet formation and the emergence of life, and the Solar System interactions. The radar sounder instrument on this mission will have great potential to address specific science questions such as the presence of subsurface liquid water and ice shell geophysical structures. One major constraint for radar sounding is the roughness of the planetary surface. The work presented will focus on the characterization of Ganymede's surface topography to better understand its surface properties from a radar point of view. These results should help to put constraints on the design of JUICE's radar sounder. We use topographic data derived from the Voyager and Galileo missions images to try to characterize the surface structure and to quantify its geometry (in terms of slopes and RMS heights mainly). This study will help us evaluating the radar budget in a statistical approach. In addition, deterministic simulations of surface radar echoes conducted on synthetic surfaces -extrapolated from Digital Elevation Models- will be presented to better assess radar sounding performances.

  3. 30. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, showing radar control. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, showing radar control. Console and line printers - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  4. Space stations - A historical perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logsdon, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses the historical evolution of the space station concept, with particular attention to NASA plans in the 1960-1980 period. Emphasis is given to the changing justification presented for station development during that period and to the political context within which station proposals were evaluated.

  5. Planetary radar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Cutts, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    A catalog of lunar and radar anomalies was generated to provide a base for comparison with Venusian radar signatures. The relationships between lunar radar anomalies and regolith processes were investigated, and a consortium was formed to compare lunar and Venusian radar images of craters. Time was scheduled at the Arecibo Observatory to use the 430 MHz radar to obtain high resolution radar maps of six areas of the lunar suface. Data from 1978 observations of Mare Serenitas and Plato are being analyzed on a PDP 11/70 computer to construct the computer program library necessary for the eventual reduction of the May 1981 and subsequent data acquisitions. Papers accepted for publication are presented.

  6. Space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Donald F.; Hayes, Judith

    1989-01-01

    The history of American space flight indicates that a space station is the next logical step in the scientific pursuit of greater knowledge of the universe. The Space Station and its complement of space vehicles, developed by NASA, will add new dimensions to an already extensive space program in the United States. The Space Station offers extraordinary benefits for a comparatively modest investment (currently estimated at one-ninth the cost of the Apollo Program). The station will provide a permanent multipurpose facility in orbit necessary for the expansion of space science and technology. It will enable significant advancements in life sciences research, satellite communications, astronomy, and materials processing. Eventually, the station will function in support of the commercialization and industrialization of space. Also, as a prerequisite to manned interplanetary exploration, the long-duration space flights typical of Space Station missions will provide the essential life sciences research to allow progressively longer human staytime in space.

  7. The Goldstone solar system radar: A science instrument for planetary research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorsky, J. D.; Renzetti, N. A.; Fulton, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) station at NASA's Deep Space Communications Complex in California's Mojave Desert is described. A short chronological account of the GSSR's technical development and scientific discoveries is given. This is followed by a basic discussion of how information is derived from the radar echo and how the raw information can be used to increase understanding of the solar system. A moderately detailed description of the radar system is given, and the engineering performance of the radar is discussed. The operating characteristics of the Arcibo Observatory in Puerto Rico are briefly described and compared with those of the GSSR. Planned and in-process improvements to the existing radar, as well as the performance of a hypothetical 128-m diameter antenna radar station, are described. A comprehensive bibliography of referred scientific and engineering articles presenting results that depended on data gathered by the instrument is provided.

  8. Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderton, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The official start of a bold new space program, essential to maintain the United States' leadership in space was signaled by a Presidential directive to move aggressively again into space by proceeding with the development of a space station. Development concepts for a permanently manned space station are discussed. Reasons for establishing an inhabited space station are given. Cost estimates and timetables are also cited.

  9. Bistatic-radar investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, H. T.; Tyler, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    A bistatic-radar study during the Apollo 15 flight is reviewed, with the orbiting command module as one terminal. Bistatic-radar slopes are compared to geological maps of Copernicus and Riphaeus mountain regions and Kepler region. Basic theory is discussed, including the radar echoes composed of the sum of the reflections from the moon area that is mutually visible from the spacecraft and earth. A signal receiving system and data processing system are outlined schematically.

  10. Historical sketch: Radar geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, H.

    1980-01-01

    A chronological assessment is given of the broad spectra of technology associated with radar geology. Particular attention is given to the most recent developments made in the areas of microwave Earth resources applications and geologic remote sensing from aircraft and satellite. The significance of space derived radar in geologic investigations is discussed and the scientific basis for exploiting the sensitivity of radar signals to various aspects of geologic terrain is given.

  11. Performance Evaluation of UHF RFID Technologies for Real-Time Bus Recognition in the Taipei Bus Station

    PubMed Central

    Own, Chung-Ming; Lee, Da-Sheng; Wang, Ti-Ho; Wang, De-Jun; Ting, Yu-Lun

    2013-01-01

    Transport stations such as airports, ports, and railways have adopted blocked-type pathway management to process and control travel systems in a one-directional manner. However, this excludes highway transportation where large buses have great variability and mobility; thus, an instant influx of numerous buses increases risks and complicates station management. Focusing on Taipei Bus Station, this study employed RFID technology to develop a system platform integrated with modern information technology that has numerous characteristics. This modern information technology comprised the following systems: ultra-high frequency (UHF) radio-frequency identification (RFID), ultrasound and license number identification, and backstage graphic controls. In conclusion, the system enabled management, bus companies, and passengers to experience the national bus station's new generation technology, which provides diverse information and synchronization functions. Furthermore, this technology reached a new milestone in the energy-saving and efficiency-increasing performance of Taiwan's buses. PMID:23778192

  12. Equatorial radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rukao, S.; Tsuda, T.; Sato, T.; Kato, S.

    1989-01-01

    A large clear air radar with the sensitivity of an incoherent scatter radar for observing the whole equatorial atmosphere up to 1000 km altitude is now being designed in Japan. The radar, called the Equatorial Radar, will be built in Pontianak, Kalimantan Island, Indonesia (0.03 N, 109.3 E). The system is a 47 MHz monostatic Doppler radar with an active phased array configuration similar to that of the MU radar in Japan, which has been in successful operation since 1983. It will have a PA product of more than 5 x 10(9) sq. Wm (P = average transmitter power, A = effective antenna aperture) with sensitivity more than 10 times that of the MU radar. This system configuration enables pulse-to-pulse beam steering within 25 deg from the zenith. As is the case of the MU radar, a variety of sophisticated operations will be made feasible under the supervision of the radar controller. A brief description of the system configuration is presented.

  13. Radar meteor atmospheric speeds determined from echo profile measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggaley, W. J.; Bennett, R. G. T.; Taylor, A. D.

    1997-05-01

    A backscatter radar echo from meteoric ionization is produced from the contributions from successive Fresnel zones as the meteor passes the specular condition. The time variation of the reflection coefficient given in terms of the Fresnel Function is related to the creation rate of zones and hence to meteoroid atmospheric speed. Such echo-profile speeds have been measured using the AMOR facility (New Zealand) and compared with meteoroid speeds simultaneously obtained using both spaced - station timing and whole - profile Fresnel oscillation patterns. The close agreement achieved confirms this simple technique - available to single station radar systems - as valuable in establishing meteoroid speeds.

  14. Monitoring by holographic radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Crocco, Lorenzo; Affinito, Antonio; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays, radar technology represents a significant opportunity to collect useful information for the monitoring and conservation of critical infrastructures. Radar systems exploit the non-invasive interaction between the matter and the electromagnetic waves at microwave frequencies. Such an interaction allows obtaining images of the region under test from which one can infer the presence of potential anomalies such as deformations, cracks, water infiltrations, etc. This information turns out to be of primary importance in practical scenarios where the probed structure is in a poor state of preservation and renovation works must be planned. In this framework, the aim of this contribution is to describe the potentialities of the holographic radar Rascan 4/4000, a holographic radar developed by Remote Sensing Laboratory of Bauman Moscow State Technical University, as a non-destructive diagnostic tool capable to provide, in real-time, high resolution subsurface images of the sounded structure [1]. This radar provides holograms of hidden anomalies from the amplitude of the interference signal arising between the backscattered signal and a reference signal. The performance of the holographic radar is appraised by means of several experiments. Preliminary tests concerning the imaging below the floor and inside wood structures are carried out in controlled conditions at the Electromagnetic Diagnostic Laboratory of IREA-CNR. After, with reference to bridge monitoring for security aim, the results of a measurement campaign performed on the Musmeci bridge are presented [2]. Acknowledgments This research has been performed in the framework of the "Active and Passive Microwaves for Security and Subsurface imaging (AMISS)" EU 7th Framework Marie Curie Actions IRSES project (PIRSES-GA-2010-269157). REFERENCES [1] S. Ivashov, V. Razevig, I. Vasilyev, A. Zhuravlev, T. Bechtel, L. Capineri, The holographic principle in subsurface radar technology, International Symposium to Commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the Invention of Holography, Springfield, Massachusetts USA, October 27-29, pp. 183-197, 2008. [2] I. Catapano, L. Crocco, A. F. Morabito, F. Soldovieri, "Tomographic imaging of holographic GPR data for non-invasive structural assessment: the Musmeci bridge investigation", Nondestructive testing and evaluation, vol. 27, pp. 229-237, 2012.

  15. Intercomparison of snowfall estimates derived from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar and the ground based weather radar network over Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norin, L.; Devasthale, A.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Wood, N. B.; Smalley, M.

    2015-08-01

    To be able to estimate snowfall accurately is important for both weather and climate applications. Ground-based weather radars and space-based satellite sensors are often used as viable alternatives to rain-gauges to estimate precipitation in this context. The Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) onboard CloudSat is especially proving to be a useful tool to map snowfall globally, in part due to its high sensitivity to light precipitation and ability to provide near-global vertical structure. The importance of having snowfall estimates from CloudSat/CPR further increases in the high latitude regions as other ground-based observations become sparse and passive satellite sensors suffer from inherent limitations. Here we intercompared snowfall estimates from two observing systems, CloudSat and Swerad, the Swedish national weather radar network. Swerad offers one of the best calibrated data sets of precipitation amount at very high latitudes that are anchored to rain-gauges and that can be exploited to evaluate usefulness of CloudSat/CPR snowfall estimates in the polar regions. In total 7.2×105 matchups of CloudSat and Swerad over Sweden were inter-compared covering all but summer months (October to May) from 2008 to 2010. The intercomparison shows encouraging agreement between these two observing systems despite their different sensitivities and user applications. The best agreement is observed when CloudSat passes close to a Swerad station (46-82 km), when the observational conditions for both systems are comparable. Larger disagreements outside this range suggest that both platforms have difficulty with shallow snow but for different reasons. The correlation between Swerad and CloudSat degrades with increasing distance from the nearest Swerad station as Swerad's sensitivity decreases as a function of distance and Swerad also tends to overshoots low level precipitating systems further away from the station, leading to underestimation of snowfall rate and occasionally missing the precipitation altogether. Further investigations of various statistical metrics, such as the probability of detection, false alarm rate, hit rate, and the Hanssen-Kuipers skill scores, and the sensitivity of these metrics to snowfall rate and the distance from the radar station, were carried out. The results of these investigations highlight the strengths and the limitations of both observing systems at the lower and upper ends of snowfall distributions and the range of uncertainties that could be expected from these systems in the high latitude regions.

  16. Noise properties of HF radar measurement of ocean surface currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    High-frequency (HF) radars are commonly used for coastal circulation monitoring. The objective of the study is to assess what is the minimum timescale of variability of the geophysical surface currents that are accessible to the radar measurement given the intrinsic noise of this measurement. Noise properties are derived from the power density spectra (PDSs) of radial current records, which are compared to a model of the PDS of idealized currents contaminated by an additive white noise. The data were collected by two radar systems operating in the Northwestern Mediterranean. Periods of 3 weeks to 7 months are considered. Most of measured currents are affected by a white noise effect. Noise properties vary in time and space and are not specific to a particular radar station or to the radar signal processing method used (beam forming or direction finding). An increase of the noise level reduces the effective temporal resolution of radar-derived currents and then increases the minimum observable timescale of variability of geophysical currents. Our results are consistent with results of comparison found in literature between in situ sensors and radar measurements as well as between two radars operating along a same base line. The study suggests a self-sufficient method, requiring no external data, to estimate the minimum sampling period to consider for getting data sets having a minimized contamination by instrumental noise. This period can also be taken for smoothing or filtering measured currents.

  17. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission is moved to a workstand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    After being lifted off the transporter (lower right) in the Space Station Processing Facility, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) moves across the floor toward a workstand. The SRTM, which is the primary payload on mission STS-99, consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for launch in September 1999. The objective of this radar system is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth. It will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. SRTM will be making use of a technique called radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. To get two radar images taken from different locations, the SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle.

  18. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission is moved to a workstand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The move of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is nearly complete as it is lowered onto the workstand in the Space Station Processing Facility. The SRTM, which is the primary payload on mission STS-99, consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for launch in September 1999. The objective of this radar system is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth. It will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. SRTM will be making use of a technique called radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. To get two radar images taken from different locations, the SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle.

  19. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission is moved to a workstand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, workers watch as an overhead crane is lowered for lifting the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) from the transporter it is resting on. The SRTM is being moved to a workstand. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for launch in September 1999. The objective of this radar system is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth. It will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. SRTM will be making use of a technique called radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. To get two radar images taken from different locations, the SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle.

  20. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission is moved to a workstand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Workers inside the Space Station Processing Facility keep watch as an overhead crane begins lifting the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) from the transporter below. The SRTM is being moved to a workstand. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for launch in September 1999. The objective of this radar system is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth. It will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. SRTM will be making use of a technique called radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. To get two radar images taken from different locations, the SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle.

  1. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission is moved to a workstand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, workers at each end of a workstand watch as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) begins its descent onto it. The SRTM, which is the primary payload on mission STS-99, consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for launch in September 1999. The objective of this radar system is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth. It will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. SRTM will be making use of a technique called radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. To get two radar images taken from different locations, the SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle.

  2. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission is moved to a workstand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is maneuvered by an overhead crane toward a workstand below. The SRTM, which is the primary payload on mission STS-99, consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for launch in September 1999. The objective of this radar system is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth. It will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. SRTM will be making use of a technique called radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. To get two radar images taken from different locations, the SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle.

  3. Imaging radar for bridge deck inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Warhus, J.; Mast, J.; Nelson, S.

    1995-04-13

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)l is developing a prototype imaging radar for inspecting steel reinforced concrete bridge decks. The system is designed to acquire Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data and provide high-resolution images of internal structure, flaws, and defects enabling bridge inspectors to nondestructively evaluate and characterize bridge deck condition. Concrete delamination resulting from corrosion of steel reinforcing bars (rebars) is an important structural defect that the system is designed to detect. The prototype system uses arrays of compact, low-cost Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) modules, supported by appropriate data acquisition and storage subsystems, to generate and collect the radar data, and unique imaging codes to reconstruct images of bridge deck internals. In this paper, we provide an overview of the prototype system concept, discuss its expected performance, and present recent experimental results showing the capability of this approach to detect thin delamination simulations embedded in concrete.

  4. 46 CFR 28.875 - Radar, depth sounding, and auto-pilot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... screen mounted at the operating station, and facilities on the bridge for plotting radar readings. (b) Each vessel must be fitted with a suitable echo depth sounding device. (c) Except as provided in 33...

  5. 46 CFR 28.875 - Radar, depth sounding, and auto-pilot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... screen mounted at the operating station, and facilities on the bridge for plotting radar readings. (b) Each vessel must be fitted with a suitable echo depth sounding device. (c) Except as provided in 33...

  6. 46 CFR 28.875 - Radar, depth sounding, and auto-pilot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... screen mounted at the operating station, and facilities on the bridge for plotting radar readings. (b) Each vessel must be fitted with a suitable echo depth sounding device. (c) Except as provided in 33...

  7. 46 CFR 28.875 - Radar, depth sounding, and auto-pilot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... screen mounted at the operating station, and facilities on the bridge for plotting radar readings. (b) Each vessel must be fitted with a suitable echo depth sounding device. (c) Except as provided in 33...

  8. 46 CFR 28.875 - Radar, depth sounding, and auto-pilot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... screen mounted at the operating station, and facilities on the bridge for plotting radar readings. (b) Each vessel must be fitted with a suitable echo depth sounding device. (c) Except as provided in 33...

  9. 10. Perimeter acquisition radar power plant (upper level) room #219E, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Perimeter acquisition radar power plant (upper level) room #219E, station services room; showing air compressors which provide diesel generators with internal power kick-on - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Power Plant, In Limited Access Area, Southwest of PARB at end of Service Road B, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  10. 34. Site Plan: Fort Custer Air Force Station, Fort Custer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Site Plan: Fort Custer Air Force Station, Fort Custer, Michigan, Modification of Electrical Distribution, General Site Plan, USACOE, no date. - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  11. 17. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW WITH PROJECT NEARING COMPLETION. VIEW SHOWS "A" FACE (LEFT) AND "B" FACE OF RADAR ARRAY SYSTEM. NOTE THAT NORTH IS GENERALLY TO RIGHT OF VIEW. - Cape Cod Air Station, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  12. 30. Construction Drawing: Fort Custer Air Force Station, Battle Creek, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Construction Drawing: Fort Custer Air Force Station, Battle Creek, Michigan, Emergency Power Building, Sections and Elevations, USACOE, no date. - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  13. 31. Construction Drawing: Fort Custer Air Force Station, Battle Creek, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Construction Drawing: Fort Custer Air Force Station, Battle Creek, Michigan, Emergency Power Building, Floor Plans and Details, USACOE, no date. - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  14. Evaluation of local versus remote areas of CH4 sources at IC3 stations using a combined analysis of 222Rn tracer and Atmospheric Particles Transport Model (APTM) results. Application at the Gredos and Iruelas station (GIC3), Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, Claudia; Morguí, Josep Anton; Curcoll, Roger; Àgueda, Alba; Arnold, Delia; Batet, Oscar; Cañas, Lidia; Nofuentes, Manel; Occhipinti, Paola; Vogel, Felix; Vargas, Arturo; Rodó, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    The Gredos and Iruelas station (GIC3) is part of the IC3 (Institut Català de Ciències del Clima) atmospheric monitoring network. This station is located in the Gredos Natural Park (40.22º N; -5.14º E) in the Spanish central plateau. The IC3 network consists of 8 stations distributed across Spain. It has been developed with the aim of studying climatic processes and the responses of impacted systems at different temporal and spatial scales. Since 2012, CO2, CH4, 222Rn (a natural radioactive gas) and meteorological variables are continuously measured at GIC3 at 20 m a.g.l. (1100 m a.s.l.). Furthermore, 4-days backward simulations are run daily for each IC3 station using the FLEXPART model. Simulations use ECMWF meteorological data as input and a horizontal spatial resolution of 0.2 degrees. The Laboratory of the Atmosphere and the Oceans (LAO) of the IC3 has elaborated a new approach to evaluate the local or remote greenhouse gases emissions using the radon gas as tracer and the atmospheric particles transport model FLEXPART under nocturnal and winter conditions. The ratios between the normalized and rescaled measured concentrations of CH4 and 222Rn during nocturnal hours (21h, 00h, 03h and 06h) and in the winter season, in order to reduce local radon flux and methane source due to seasonal livestock migration and to get stable atmospheric conditions, have been analyzed in relation to the influence of the local area (set to an initial dimension of 20x20 km2). The influence area (IA) has been defined as the percentage of the ratio between the residence time of the fictitious particles released in FLEXPART simulations over the area of interest (TLocal Area) and the residence time of these fictitious particles over the total area included in the simulation (TTotal Area ), i.e. IA = (TLocal Area/TTotal Area * 100). First results considering an area of interest of 20x20 km2 show a linear increase of the radon concentration with IA until reaching a maximum when IA is about 50%. This can be explained taking into consideration that GIC3 station area has high radon exhalation rates according to the literature and the radon uptake from air masses can reach a plateau. On the other hand, CH4 concentrations do not seem to be significantly influenced by IA. The log-log plot between the ratio of normalized and rescaled gases concentrations (CH4/222Rn) and the percentage of the influence of the local area shows a negative linear relation under nocturnal and winter conditions which could depend on the increase of the radon not compensated by the methane increase. Indeed, when the influence of the local area of Gredos and Iruelas station is under the 20% the major methane contribution seems to come from outside the 20x20 km2 IA. Results considering a larger area of interest (up to 80x80 km2) may indicate possible methane sources detected at the GIC3 station.

  15. Evaluation of ground-penetrating radar to detect free-phase hydrocarbons in fractured rocks - Results of numerical modeling and physical experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, J.W., Jr.; Buursink, M.L.; Haeni, F.P.; Versteeg, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    The suitability of common-offset ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to detect free-phase hydrocarbons in bedrock fractures was evaluated using numerical modeling and physical experiments. The results of one- and two-dimensional numerical modeling at 100 megahertz indicate that GPR reflection amplitudes are relatively insensitive to fracture apertures ranging from 1 to 4 mm. The numerical modeling and physical experiments indicate that differences in the fluids that fill fractures significantly affect the amplitude and the polarity of electromagnetic waves reflected by subhorizontal fractures. Air-filled and hydrocarbon-filled fractures generate low-amplitude reflections that are in-phase with the transmitted pulse. Water-filled fractures create reflections with greater amplitude and opposite polarity than those reflections created by air-filled or hydrocarbon-filled fractures. The results from the numerical modeling and physical experiments demonstrate it is possible to distinguish water-filled fracture reflections from air- or hydrocarbon-filled fracture reflections, nevertheless subsurface heterogeneity, antenna coupling changes, and other sources of noise will likely make it difficult to observe these changes in GPR field data. This indicates that the routine application of common-offset GPR reflection methods for detection of hydrocarbon-filled fractures will be problematic. Ideal cases will require appropriately processed, high-quality GPR data, ground-truth information, and detailed knowledge of subsurface physical properties. Conversely, the sensitivity of GPR methods to changes in subsurface physical properties as demonstrated by the numerical and experimental results suggests the potential of using GPR methods as a monitoring tool. GPR methods may be suited for monitoring pumping and tracer tests, changes in site hydrologic conditions, and remediation activities.The suitability of common-offset ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to detect free-phase hydrocarbons in bedrock fractures was evaluated using numerical modeling and physical experiments. The results of one- and two-dimensional numerical modeling at 100 megahertz indicate that GPR reflection amplitudes are relatively insensitive to fracture apertures ranging from 1 to 4 mm. The numerical modeling and physical experiments indicate that differences in the fluids that fill fractures significantly affect the amplitude and the polarity of electromagnetic waves reflected by subhorizontal fractures. Air-filled and hydrocarbon-filled fractures generate low-amplitude reflections that are in-phase with the transmitted pulse. Water-filled fractures create reflections with greater amplitude and opposite polarity than those reflections created by air-filled or hydrocarbon-filled fractures. The results from the numerical modeling and physical experiments demonstrate it is possible to distinguish water-filled fracture reflections from air- or hydrocarbon-filled fracture reflections, nevertheless subsurface heterogeneity, antenna coupling changes, and other sources of noise will likely make it difficult to observe these changes in GPR field data. This indicates that the routine application of common-offset GPR reflection methods for detection of hydrocarbon-filled fractures will be problematic. Ideal cases will require appropriately processed, high-quality GPR data, ground-truth information, and detailed knowledge of subsurface physical properties. Conversely, the sensitivity of GPR methods to changes in subsurface physical properties as demonstrated by the numerical and experimental results suggests the potential of using GPR methods as a monitoring tool. GPR methods may be suited for monitoring pumping and tracer tests, changes in site hydrologic conditions, and remediation activities.

  16. Alpine radar conversion for LAWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savina, M.; Burlando, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) is a ship-born weather radar system operating in X-band developed by the DHI Group to detect precipitation in urban areas. To date more than thirty units are installed in different settings around the world. A LAWR was also deployed in the Alps, at 3883 m a.s.l. on the Kl. Matterhorn (Valais, Switzerland). This was the highest LAWR of the world and it led to the development of an Alpine LAWR system that, besides featuring important technological improvements needed to withstand the severe Alpine conditions, required the development of a new Alpine Radar COnversion Model (ARCOM), which is the main focus of this contribution. The LAWR system is equipped with the original FURUNO fan-beam slotted antenna and the original logarithmic receiver, which limits the radar observations to the video signal (L) withour providing the reflectivity (Z). The beam is 0.95 deg wide and 20 deg high. It can detect precipitation to a max range of 60 km. In order to account for the limited availability of raw signal and information and the specific mountain set-up, the conversion model had to be developed differently from the state-of-the-art radar conversion technique used for this class of radars. In particular, the ARCOM is based on a model used to simulate a spatial dependent factor, hereafter called ACF, which is in turn function of parameters that take in account climatological conditions, also used in other conversion methods, but additionally accounting for local radar beam features and for orographic forcings such as the effective sampling power (sP), which is modelled by means of antenna pattern, geometric ground clutter and their interaction. The result is a conversion factor formulated to account for a range correction that is based on the increase of the sampling volume, partial beam blocking and local climatological conditions. The importance of the latter in this study is double with respect to the standard conversion technique for this class of radars, because it accounts for the large variability of hydrometeors reflectivity and vertical hydrometeors positioning (echo-top), which is strongly influenced by the high location of the radar. The ARCOM procedure is in addition embedded in a multistep quality control framework, which also includes the calibration on raingauge observations, and can be summarized as follow: 1) correction of both LAWR and raingauge observations for known errors (e.g. magnetron decay and heated-related water loss) 2) evaluation of the local Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) as estimator of the linear correlation between raingauge and LAWR observations (logarithmic receiver); 3) computation of the local ACF in the form of the local linear regression coefficient between raingauge and LAWR observations; 4) calibration of the ARCOM, i.e. definition of the parametrization able to reproduce the spatial variability of ACF as function of the local sP, being the PCCs used as weight in the calibration procedure. The resulting calibrated ARCOM finally allows, in any ungauged mountain spot, to convert LAWR observations into precipitation rate. The temporal and the spatial transferability of the ARCOM are evaluated via split-sample and a take-one-out cross validation. The results revealed good spatial transferability and a seasonal bias within 7%, thus opening new opportunities for local range distributed measurements of precipitation in mountain regions.

  17. The PROUST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, F.; Glass, M.; Ney, R.; Petitdidier, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST) radar called PROUST works at 935 MHz using the same klystron and antenna as the coherent-scatter radar. The use of this equipment for ST work has required some important modifications of the transmitting system and the development of receiving, data processing and acquisition (1984,1985) equipment. The modifications are discussed.

  18. Radar illusion via metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2011-02-01

    An optical illusion is an image of a real target perceived by the eye that is deceptive or misleading due to a physiological illusion or a specific visual trick. The recently developed metamaterials provide efficient approaches to generate a perfect optical illusion. However, all existing research on metamaterial illusions has been limited to theory and numerical simulations. Here, we propose the concept of a radar illusion, which can make the electromagnetic (EM) image of a target gathered by radar look like a different target, and we realize a radar illusion device experimentally to change the radar image of a metallic target into a dielectric target with predesigned size and material parameters. It is well known that the radar signatures of metallic and dielectric objects are significantly different. However, when a metallic target is enclosed by the proposed illusion device, its EM scattering characteristics will be identical to that of a predesigned dielectric object under the illumination of radar waves. Such an illusion device will confuse the radar, and hence the real EM properties of the metallic target cannot be perceived. We designed and fabricated the radar illusion device using artificial metamaterials in the microwave frequency, and good illusion performances are observed in the experimental results.

  19. Java Radar Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaczek, Mariusz P.

    2005-01-01

    Java Radar Analysis Tool (JRAT) is a computer program for analyzing two-dimensional (2D) scatter plots derived from radar returns showing pieces of the disintegrating Space Shuttle Columbia. JRAT can also be applied to similar plots representing radar returns showing aviation accidents, and to scatter plots in general. The 2D scatter plots include overhead map views and side altitude views. The superposition of points in these views makes searching difficult. JRAT enables three-dimensional (3D) viewing: by use of a mouse and keyboard, the user can rotate to any desired viewing angle. The 3D view can include overlaid trajectories and search footprints to enhance situational awareness in searching for pieces. JRAT also enables playback: time-tagged radar-return data can be displayed in time order and an animated 3D model can be moved through the scene to show the locations of the Columbia (or other vehicle) at the times of the corresponding radar events. The combination of overlays and playback enables the user to correlate a radar return with a position of the vehicle to determine whether the return is valid. JRAT can optionally filter single radar returns, enabling the user to selectively hide or highlight a desired radar return.

  20. Evaluation of the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) flowsheet for decontamination of high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D. O.; Collins, E. D.; King, L. J.; Knauer, J. B.

    1980-07-01

    This report discusses the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) flowsheet for decontamination of the high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station was evaluated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a study that included filtration tests, ion exchange column tests, and ion exchange distribution tests. The contaminated waters, the SDS flowsheet, and the experiments made are described. The experimental results were used to predict the SDS performance and to indicate potential improvements.

  1. Equatorial MU Radar project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Hashiguchi, H.; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University (RISH) has been studying the atmosphere by using radars. The first big facility was the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar installed in Shiga, Japan in 1984. This is one of the most powerful and multi-functional radar, and is successful of revealing importance of atmospheric waves for the dynamical vertical coupling processes. The next big radar was the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) installed at Kototabang, West Sumatra, Indonesia in 2001. The EAR was operated under close collaboration with LAPAN (Indonesia National Institute for Aeronautics and Space), and conducted the long-term continuous observations of the equatorial atmosphere/ionosphere for more than 10 years. The MU radar and the EAR are both utilized for inter-university and international collaborative research program for long time. National Institute for Polar Research (NIPR) joined EISCAT Scientific Association together with Nagoya University, and developed the PANSY radar at Syowa base in Antarctica as a joint project with University of Tokyo. These are the efforts of radar study of the atmosphere/ionosphere in the polar region. Now we can find that Japan holds a global network of big atmospheric/ionospheric radars. The EAR has the limitation of lower sensitivity compared with the other big radars shown above. RISH now proposes a plan of Equatorial MU Radar (EMU) that is to establish the MU-radar class radar next to the EAR. The EMU will have an active phased array antenna with the 163m diameter and 1055 cross-element Yagis. Total output power of the EMU will be more than 500kW. The EMU can detect turbulent echoes from the mesosphere (60-80km). In the ionosphere incoherent-scatter observations of plasma density, drift, and temperature would be possible. Multi-channel receivers will realize radar-imaging observations. The EMU is one of the key facilities in the project "Study of coupling processes in the solar-terrestrial system" for Master Plan 2014 of the Science Council of Japan (SCJ). We show the EMU project and its science in the presentation.

  2. Evaluation of station blackout accidents at nuclear power plants: Technical findings related to unresolved safety issue A-44: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    ''Station Blackout,'' which is the complete loss of alternating current (AC) electrical power in a nuclear power plant, has been designated as Unresolved Safety Issue A-44. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on AC power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. This report documents the findings of technical studies performed as part of the program to resolve this issue. The important factors analyzed include: the fequency of loss of offsite power; the probability that emergency or onsite AC power supplies would be unavailable; the capability and reliability of decay heat removal systems independent of AC power; and the likelihood that offsite power would be restored before systems that cannot operate for extended periods without AC power fail, thus resulting in core damage. This report also addresses effects of different designs, locations, and operational features on the estimated frequency of core damage resulting from station blackout events.

  3. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  4. Laser radar improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelalian, A. V.

    1981-11-01

    A short history of the uses of various laser radars is presented, and appropriate applications of laser and microwave radars are discussed. CO2 laser radar, operating at 10.6 microns, is considered for use in aircraft navigation systems, fire-control systems for armored vehicle and aircraft, missile guidance, severe storm research, line-of-sight command of missiles, wind turbine site surveys, clear-air turbulence monitors for aircraft, and satellite tracking. Microwave radar is all-weather, but is subject to multipath inaccuracies, countermeasures, and angular resolution limitations, so hybrid laser microwave systems look promising for microwave target acquisition and laser tracking. Advantages and disadvantages of the use of ruby, YAG, and CO2 lasers in varying atmospheric conditions are discussed. Development of a laser radar pod for obstacle detection, Doppler navigation, automatic terrain following, hover control, weapon delivery, and precision searching is noted.

  5. Meteorological radar calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, D. B.

    1978-01-01

    A meteorological radar calibration technique is developed. It is found that the integrated, range corrected, received power saturates under intense rain conditions in a manner analogous to that encountered for the radiometric path temperature. Furthermore, it is found that this saturation condition establishes a bound which may be used to determine an absolution radar calibration for the case of radars operating at attenuating wavelengths. In the case of less intense rainfall or for radars at nonattenuating wavelengths, the relationship for direct calibration in terms of an independent measurement of radiometric path temperature is developed. This approach offers the advantage that the calibration is in terms of an independent measurement of the rainfall through the same elevated region as that viewed by the radar.

  6. Spaceborne weather radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, Robert; Kozu, Toshiaki

    1990-01-01

    The present work on the development status of spaceborne weather radar systems and services discusses radar instrument complementarities, the current forms of equations for the characterization of such aspects of weather radar performance as surface and mirror-image returns, polarimetry, and Doppler considerations, and such essential factors in spaceborne weather radar design as frequency selection, scanning modes, and the application of SAR to rain detection. Attention is then given to radar signal absorption by the various atmospheric gases, rain drop size distribution and wind velocity determinations, and the characteristics of clouds, as well as the range of available estimation methods for backscattering, single- and dual-wavelength attenuation, and polarimetric and climatological characteristics.

  7. SU-E-T-162: Evaluation of Dose Calculation of RayStation Planning System in Heterogeneous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H; Yi, B; Chung, H; Prado, K; Chen, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical reliability of heterogeneity-based dose algorithm using RayStation treatment planning system v.4.0. Methods: The collapsed cone dose calculations in RayStation (RaySearch, Sweden) were compared with the measurements (ion chamber and EBT2 film) and with an in-house Monte Carlo algorithm. A heterogeneous multi-layer phantom and CT images of 4 lung cancer patients were used here. The phantom, composed of multiple solid water slabs and Styrofoams, was irradiated with 6MV beams perpendicular to the layers. The MLC-defined field sizes were 5×5, 10×10, 15×15 and 20×20cm{sup 2}. The chamber was positioned at center of central solid water layer, and the films were placed at interfaces of solid water and Styrofoam. The RayStation dose and Monte Carlo dose were compared by performing absolute gamma analysis (3mm/3%): 1D gamma for PDD in the phantom and 3D gamma for patient volumes receiving dose above 10% of maximum dose. Results: The point dose differences between RayStation and ion chamber measurement were smaller than 1% for all of the field sizes. Between RayStation and film measurement, 5×5cm2 field had the maximum differences : <4mm for the penumbra and <0.3mm for the field width at all Styrofoam-and-solid-water interfaces. The absolute gamma analysis showed good agreement between RayStation and Monte Carlo. For PDD along beam axis in the phantom, the 1D gamma was 95.4, 98.6, 99.6 and 99.3% for field size 5×5, 10×10, 15×15 and 20×202 respectively. For dose comparison using patient CT images, 3D gamma was > 95% for all the patients. Conclusion: With respect to ion chamber/film measurement and Monte Carlo calculation, the collapsed cone algorithm in RayStation computed reasonable dose in both phantom and patient cases. Heterogeneity-based dose calculation of RayStation is clinically acceptable in heterogeneous media.

  8. Radar sensors for automotive collision warning and avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosch, Theodore O.

    1995-06-01

    Many different sensors and systems, from sonar to machine vision, have been installed on ground vehicles and automobiles. This paper describes the use of radar to improve driving safety and convenience. Radars are valuable sensors for all weather operation and experiments with automotive radar sensors have been conducted for over 40 years. This paper shows the advantages and disadvantages of applying microwave and millimeter wave radar to obstacle detection and collision avoidance in a roadway environment. The performance differences between avoidance and warning sensors are discussed and a problem set is devised for a typical forward-looking collision warning application. Various radar systems have been applied to this problem that include pulse and continuous wave transceivers. These system types are evaluated as to their suitability as a collision warning sensor. The various possible solutions are reduced to a small number of candidate radar types, and one such radar was chosen for full scale development. A low cost frequency modulated/continuous wave radar system was developed for automotive collision warning. The radar is attached to the sun visor inside the vehicle, and has been in operation for over four years. The radar monitors the range and range-rate of other vehicles and obstacles, and warns the driver when it perceives that a dangerous situation is developing. A system description and measured data is presented that shows how the 24.075 to 24.175 GHz band can be used for an adequate early warning system.

  9. Input uncertainty in catchment models: an evaluation of the suitability of multiplicative rainfall error models using high resolution raingauge and radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Bethanna; McMillan, Hilary; Clark, Martyn; Kavetski, Dmitri; Woods, Ross

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents an investigation of rainfall error models used in rainfall-runoff model calibration and prediction. A growing number of studies now specify an error model for rainfall input, usually simple in form due to computational constraints during parameter estimation. Such rainfall error models have not typically been validated against experimental evidence. If the data uncertainty hypotheses and assumptions are unsupported, the interactions between input and structural model error may significantly contaminate the inference and lead to unreliable parameter estimates and model predictions. It is therefore important that the data error models should be developed using data analysis that is independent from the hydrological model calibration, to bring genuine independent information into the inference. In this study we use data from the 50 km2 Mahurangi catchment in Northland, New Zealand, where there is detailed space-time information on rainfall from both a dense tipping bucket raingauge network (13 stations) and X-band radar rainfall estimates. This high resolution data is used to provide insights on the suitability of the common multiplicative rainfall error model for use at varying spatial and temporal scales of hydrological models. We first present an analysis of the spatial variability and uncertainty in rainfall when considered solely as a binary (wet/dry) process. This type of analysis is a crucial check on the assumptions underlying multiplicative rainfall error models, since the latter cannot account for rain events with only partial catchment cover that are hence not recorded by a rain gauge. Secondly, we examine the consistency of rainfall quantities over the catchment; based both on complete rainfall records and also for individual storm events when correct estimation of rainfall is most crucial. This allows us to estimate the statistical distributions of rainfall multipliers and test if these could form the basis of an adequate rainfall error model and put multipliers into the context of events. Results highlight some important results for understanding rainfall uncertainty and deriving data-based probabilistic error models for use in hydrological calibration. In the Mahurangi catchment, multiplicative error appears to be a suitable formulation for correcting mean catchment rainfall values during high-rainfall periods (e.g. intensities over 1 mm/hour); or for longer timesteps at any rainfall intensity (timestep 1 day or greater). We suggest that the effect of timestep on multiplier suitability is regulated by catchment size: specifically the time required for typical raincells to cross the catchment could be used as a first estimate of critical timestep. The standard distribution used for rainfall multipliers, the lognormal, provided a relatively close fit to the empirical multiplier distributions. However the empirical distributions have greater excess kurtosis and positive skew than the lognormal. Since heavy rainfall events display multiplier distributions differing most significantly from the lognormal, a skewed and heavier-tailed distribution to be used for times of high rainfall would more faithfully reproduce the observed error characteristics. Lastly, the high resolution of the data available demonstrated the time/space complexity of rainfall behaviour that cannot be corrected by a simple multiplicative error on measured rainfall. A hydrological model that aims to capture the full effects of rainfall variability would need an additional mechanism, such as a distribution function approach to rainfall input; or a blurred threshold for processes such as infiltration excess.

  10. An Evaluation of the General Dynamics 20 Khz 5 Kw Breadboard for Space Station Electrical Power at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David K.; Kapustka, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    The results and observations are discussed of tests made on the General Dynamics 20 kHz Breadboard for Space Station Electrical Power. The General Dynamics 20 kHz system only is considered, and not the issue of the use of 20 kHz ac Power for Spacecraft Applications.

  11. The use of digital RF memories in radar signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. G. D.; Ingram, P. M.

    This paper describes the use that may be made of Digital RF Memories in developing and evaluating new radar systems. It outlines the basic DRFM technology showing how a DRFM works and the sort of performance that may be expected. The application of this technology to radar is then discussed showing the advantages that may be obtained through the use of coherent digital IF processing. Finally some experimental DRFM based radar configurations are described illustrating the results that have been achieved and the implications that these might have on future radar systems.

  12. Dynamic Performance of a Landing Radar BBM in Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Takahide; Fukuda, Seisuke; Sakai, Tomohiko; Okada, Yu; Sato, Teppei; Kishimoto, Kenji

    The Institute of Space and Astronautical Science JAXA is developing a landing radar comprising a radio altimeter and a velocity meter, which are two of the mandatory navigation sensors for a planetary lander. The landing radar employs a pulse-type radar using 4.3GHz C-band microwave radiation. It has a wide beam for measuring the altitude in vertical direction, as well as four narrow tilted beams for measuring the velocity in horizontal direction. A BBM of the landing radar has been evaluated on natural terrains by using a helicopter. This paper introduces the BBM hardware and discusses the dynamic performance in field experiments.

  13. Airborne Doppler radar flight experiments for the detection of microbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, Hans-J. C.; Lytle, C. D.; Jones, W. R.; Bracalente, E. M.; Britt, C. L.

    1989-01-01

    In the interest of aviation safety, NASA and the FAA are jointly conducting research to determine the applicability of airborne, coherent Doppler radar techniques to detect early microburst in wind shear conditions during aircraft takeoff and landing. Researchers have developed a computer model of the radar which predicts its response when viewing a simulated microburst against the simulated clutter background of an airport, the so-called radar microburst ground clutter model. Studies employing this model revealed that Doppler radar can accurately detect microburst ahead of the aircraft in time for pilot evasive response, but flight experiments will be required for complete performance evaluation of the system. An experimental X band radar is being developed for future flight experiments to verify the simulation modeling results. A description of the experimental radar, recording equipment, and its installation on the NASA 515 aircraft is presented. The flight experiments to be conducted are also described.

  14. The design and implementation of a multi-waveform radar echo simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yinghui; Gao, Xiaoxiao; Li, Yachao; Xing, Mengdao

    2015-10-01

    Radar simulator is an effective tool for performance assessment of radar systems by accurately reproducing echo signals from complicated environment. This paper presents a design of fast multi-waveform radar echo generation based on deconvolution method. First, scene information is retrieved from outfield data based on improved conjugate gradient algorithm. Then, the new radar echoes are generated through convolution of new transmitted signal and restored scene information. A fast and area-efficient field programmable gate array realization is provided to meet the real-time requirement of radar echo simulation. Finally, a series of experiments are performed to evaluate the effectiveness of proposed radar simulation instrument.

  15. Radar Location Equipment Development Program: Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Sandness, G.A.; Davis, K.C.

    1985-06-01

    The work described in this report represents the first phase of a planned three-phase project designed to develop a radar system for monitoring waste canisters stored in a thick layer of bedded salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The canisters will be contained in holes drilled into the floor of the underground waste storage facility. It is hoped that these measurements can be made to accuracies of +-5 cm and +-2/sup 0/, respectively. The initial phase of this project was primarily a feasibility study. Its principal objective was to evaluate the potential effectiveness of the radar method in the planned canister monitoring application. Its scope included an investigation of the characteristics of radar signals backscattered from waste canisters, a test of preliminary data analysis methods, an assessment of the effects of salt and bentonite (a proposed backfill material) on the propagation of the radar signals, and a review of current ground-penetrating radar technology. A laboratory experiment was performed in which radar signals were backscattered from simulated waste canisters. The radar data were recorded by a digital data acquisition system and were subsequently analyzed by three different computer-based methods to extract estimates of canister location and tilt. Each of these methods yielded results that were accurate within a few centimeters in canister location and within 1/sup 0/ in canister tilt. Measurements were also made to determine the signal propagation velocities in salt and bentonite (actually a bentonite/sand mixture) and to estimate the signal attenuation rate in the bentonite. Finally, a product survey and a literature search were made to identify available ground-penetrating radar systems and alternative antenna designs that may be particularly suitable for this unique application. 10 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Evaluation of prototype Advanced Life Support (ALS) pack for use by the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on Space Station Freedom (SSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupa, Debra T.; Gosbee, John; Murphy, Linda; Kizzee, Victor D.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose is to evaluate the prototype Advanced Life Support (ALS) Pack which was developed for the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF). This pack will enable the Crew Medical Officer (CMO) to have ready access to advanced life support supplies and equipment for time critical responses to any situation within the Space Station Freedom. The objectives are: (1) to evaluate the design of the pack; and (2) to collect comments for revision to the design of the pack. The in-flight test procedures and other aspects of the KC-135 parabolic test flight to simulate weightlessness are presented.

  17. Radar remote sensing in biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Richard K.; Simonett, David S.

    1967-01-01

    The present status of research on discrimination of natural and cultivated vegetation using radar imaging systems is sketched. The value of multiple polarization radar in improved discrimination of vegetation types over monoscopic radars is also documented. Possible future use of multi-frequency, multi-polarization radar systems for all weather agricultural survey is noted.

  18. Ground-penetrating radar methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ground-penetrating radar geophysical methods are finding greater and greater use in agriculture. With the ground-penetrating radar (GPR) method, an electromagnetic radio energy (radar) pulse is directed into the subsurface, followed by measurement of the elapsed time taken by the radar signal as it ...

  19. Goldstone solar system radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, Raymond F.

    1988-01-01

    Planning, direction, experimental design, and coordination of data-acquisition and engineering activities in support of all Goldstone planetary radar astronomy were performed. This work demands familiarity with the various components of a planetary radar telescope (transmitter, receiver, antenna, computer hardware and software) as well as knowledge of how the entire system must function as a cohesive unit to meet the particular scientific objectives at hand in a given observation. Support radar data-processing facilities, currently being used for virtually all Goldstone data reduction includes: a VAX 11/780 computer system, an FPS 5210 array processor, terminals, tape drives, and image-display devices, as well as a large body of data-reduction software to accommodate the variety of data-acquisition formats and strategems. Successful 113-cm radar observation of Callisto and the near-Earth asteroid 1981 Midas and Goldstone/VLA radar observations of Saturn's rings were obtained. Quick-look verification programs from data taken with phase-coded cw (i.e., ranging) waveforms, applicable to Venus, the Moon, and small bodies were completed. Definition of scientific and engineering requirements on instrument performance, radar system configuration, and personnel, for all 1988 Goldstone radar investigations was accomplished.

  20. Study to investigate and evaluate means of optimizing the Ku-band combined radar/communication functions for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, C. L.; Alem, W. K.; Simon, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    The Ku band radar system on the shuttle orbiter operates in both a search and a tracking mode, and its transmitter and antennas share time with the communication mode in the integrated system. The power allocation properties and the Costa subloop subcarrier tracking performance associated with the baseline digital phase shift implementation of the three channel orbiter Ku band modulator are discussed.

  1. Hazard Evaluation for the Mars Pathfinder Prime Landing Site from Synthesis of Radar Ranging and Continuous Wave Observations during the 1995 Mars Opposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slade, M. A.; Jurgens, R. F.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Mitchell, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    During the 1995 Mars opposition, Earth-based radars had a favorable angle for viewing many of the possible landing sites for Mars Pathfinder. The Goldstone 70-m antenna was used at X-band (3.5 cm) to get a measure of roughness to nearly that size.

  2. Radar applications overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenspan, Marshall

    1996-06-01

    During the fifty years since its initial development as a means of providing early warning of airborne attacks against allied countries during World War II, radar systems have developed to the point of being highly mobile and versatile systems capable of supporting a wide variety of remote sensing applications. Instead of being tied to stationary land-based sites, radar systems have found their way into highly mobile land vehicles as well as into aircraft, missiles, and ships of all sizes. Of all these applications, however, the most exciting revolution has occurred in the airborne platform arena where advanced technology radars can be found in all shapes and sizes...ranging from the large AWACS and Joint STARS long range surveillance and targeting systems to small millimeter wave multi-spectral sensors on smart weapons that can detect and identify their targets through the use of highly sophisticated digital signal processing hardware and software. This paper presents an overview of these radar applications with the emphasis on modern airborne sensors that span the RF spectrum. It will identify and describe the factors that influence the parameters of low frequency and ultra wide band radars designed to penetrate ground and dense foliage environments and locate within them buried mines, enemy armor, and other concealed or camouflaged weapons of war. It will similarly examine the factors that lead to the development of airborne radar systems that support long range extended endurance airborne surveillance platforms designed to detect and precision-located both small high speed airborne threats as well as highly mobile time critical moving and stationary surface vehicles. The mission needs and associated radar design impacts will be contrasted with those of radar systems designed for high maneuverability rapid acquisition tactical strike warfare platforms, and shorter range cued air-to-surface weapons with integral smart radar sensors.

  3. Radar Imaging of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, M.; Harmon, J.

    2004-11-01

    Radar images of the entire Mercurian surface have been created using the Arecibo S-band radar (wavelength 12.6cm) and the long code delay-Doppler method. We have mapped the locations of midlatitude radar-bright craters across all longitudes, and in the Mariner-10 imaged hemisphere we find several disagreements between the features that appear freshest in the unpolarized radar images and those that have been classified as most recent in the USGS geologic maps. All USGS c5 craters correspond to bright features in our same-circular polarized radar images; however, several c1 and c2 craters have radar-bright deposits as well. In our radar maps of the Skinakas Basin region of the Mariner-10 unimaged hemisphere, we find little agreement between the proposed basin rim locations and the radar features. We have mapped the south polar region using new data from April 2004 with a sub-Earth latitude of 4.5S, this being our first chance to view the south pole since the Arecibo telescope upgrade. We confirm the locations of features seen in the pre-upgrade maps and we identify 15 new "ice" features extending to latitudes as low as 73S. All south polar features have circular polarization inversions (average SC/OC=1.38) that are consistent with volume scattering off cold-trapped volatiles. We also present a preliminary analysis of our August 2004 observations, including new radar images of "Feature C" (the strongest echo feature in the Mariner-10 unimaged hemisphere) and of the north polar region. This research was funded by the NSF as part of the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program.

  4. Laser radar observation of the polar stratospheric aerosol layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaka, Y.; Hirasawa, T.; Fukunishi, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Fujii, R.; Miyaoka, H.

    1985-01-01

    The polar stratosphere has been speculated to be an active sink region of various stratospheric materials; ozone, water vapor, NOX, aerosol particles and so on, but this process is not theoretically and/or observationally made clear. The observation of the polar stratospheric aerosol layer using laser radar certainly contributes to the study of the global transport of these stratospheric minor constituents. In addition to this, from the viewpoint of aerosol science, there may be many interesting phenomena which cannot be found in the stratosphere at mid and low latitudes; the effect of precipitation of high energy molecules and atoms, of very cold winter stratosphere, of very cold mesopause in summer. Laser radar observation is one of the main activities of the Antarctic Middle Atmosphere (AMA) project at Syowa Station (69.00 deg S, 39.35 deg E), Antarctica since May 1983. Laser radar measurement at Syowa Station is discussed in detail.

  5. Space station propulsion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briley, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    The progress on the Space Station Propulsion Technology Program is described. The objectives are to provide a demonstration of hydrogen/oxygen propulsion technology readiness for the Initial Operating Capability (IOC) space station application, specifically gaseous hydrogen/oxygen and warm hydrogen thruster concepts, and to establish a means for evolving from the IOC space station propulsion to that required to support and interface with advanced station functions. The evaluation of concepts was completed. The accumulator module of the test bed was completed and, with the microprocessor controller, delivered to NASA-MSFC. An oxygen/hydrogen thruster was modified for use with the test bed and successfully tested at mixture ratios from 4:1 to 8:1.

  6. Space station technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumulty, W. T.

    In an evaluation of the current technological basis for a space station, the Space Station Technology Steering Committee (SSTSC) came to the conclusion that a space station could certainly be made with existing technology. It was, however, found that state-of-the-art technology would not provide for the evolutionary growth aspects of a long life system. In the process of its reviews, the SSTSC identified 10 specific disciplines to categorize the technology which was found to be relevant or potentially applicable to a future space station design. Attention is given to the objectives for the advanced development program, systems and operations, data management, crew and life support, power, thermal management, human capability, auxiliary propulsion, fluid management systems, attitude control and stabilization, structures and mechanisms, and communications.

  7. Polarimetric Doppler Weather Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringi, V. N.; Chandrasekar, V.

    2001-10-01

    This work provides a detailed introduction to the principles of Doppler and polarimetric radar, focusing in particular on their use in the analysis of weather systems. The authors first discuss underlying topics such as electromagnetic scattering, polarization, and wave propagation. They then detail the engineering aspects of pulsed Doppler polarimetric radar, before examining key applications in meteorology and remote sensing. The book is aimed at graduate students of electrical engineering and atmospheric science as well as practitioners involved in the applications of polarimetric radar.

  8. Asteroid radar astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, S. J.; Jurgens, R. F.; Rosema, K. D.; Winkler, R.; Yeomans, D. K.; Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, J. F.; Shapiro, I. I.; Hine, A. A.; Velez, R.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of time delay and Doppler frequency are reported for asteroid-radar echoes obtained at Arecibo and Goldstone during 1980-1990. Radar astrometry is presented for 23 near-earth asteroids and three mainbelt asteroids. These measurements, which are orthogonal to optical, angular-position measurements, and typically have a fractional precision between 10 to the -5th and 10 to the -8th, permit significant improvement in estimates of orbits and hence in the accuracy of prediction ephemerides. Estimates are also reported of radar cross-section and circular polarization ratio for all asteroids observed astrometrically during 1980-1990.

  9. Radar investigation of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostro, S. J.

    1981-05-01

    Efforts were focused on: (1) acquisition of radar data at Arecibo; (2) examination of raw data; (3) reduction of the unmodulated data to background-free, calibrated spectra; (4) integration and coherent analyses of the phase-coded data; and (5) calculation of Doppler shifts and preliminary values for echo limb-to-limb bandwidths, radar cross sections, and circular polarization ratios. Asteroids observed to data have radar properties distinct from those of the rocky terrestrial planets and those of the icy Galilean satellites.

  10. Active radar jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jernemalm, Veine

    1988-09-01

    Active radar jammers are described. In confusion jammers the perturbing action is produced by thermal noise which is intensified, or by a carrier wave modulated by a noise signal, or by a carrier wave which is frequency modulated with a lot of sine waves of different frequencies. There are jammers to be used once, which are fired to the spot or hang from a parachute. Deception jammers (misleading jammers) emit false radar echoes, one or several produced by a repetition system, requiring a certain form of memory. It is shown how to emit varying false distance or velocities, and how to disturb angles in a radar used to guide artillery fire.

  11. Radar Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    This lecture was just a taste of radar remote sensing techniques and applications. Other important areas include Stereo radar grammetry. PolInSAR for volumetric structure mapping. Agricultural monitoring, soil moisture, ice-mapping, etc. The broad range of sensor types, frequencies of observation and availability of sensors have enabled radar sensors to make significant contributions in a wide area of earth and planetary remote sensing sciences. The range of applications, both qualitative and quantitative, continue to expand with each new generation of sensors.

  12. 37. View of detection radar environmental display (DRED) console for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. View of detection radar environmental display (DRED) console for middle DR 2 (structure no. 736) antenna, located in MWOC facility. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  13. 10. View of back side of radar scanner building no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View of back side of radar scanner building no. 104 showing passageway links to other building to east and DR 1 antenna in background. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  14. 9. View of back side of radar scanner building no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. View of back side of radar scanner building no. 106 showing passageway links to other buildings east and west, and DR 3 antenna in background. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  15. 23. View of junction of passageway link with radar transmitter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. View of junction of passageway link with radar transmitter building 102 (view looking south) showing main personnel entrance door. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  16. 74. Transmitter building no. 102, view of radar digital test ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. Transmitter building no. 102, view of radar digital test and maintenance cabinet area control panel and date storage system showing ampex tape storage devices. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  17. 78. View of radar systems technical publication library, transmitter building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. View of radar systems technical publication library, transmitter building no. 102, second floor. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  18. Space Station initiates permanent space facility development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, Joseph P., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The proposed development of the Space Station is examined. The functions and advantages of the Space Station are described. The use of a solar array system for power generation on the Station is studied; the capabilities of various other generation systems are also evaluated. The Space Station's development schedule is discussed.

  19. Space Station - Toward Station operability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Gregory R.; Paddock, Stephen G.

    1988-11-01

    Systematic operations engineering and the development of an automated operations management system (OMS) are presented as key elements of NASA's Space Station design development effort. The OMS software, which will take care of routine Space Station operations, encompasses on-board and ground-based components. Flight profiles, resource-utilization plans, crew training plans, flight-support operations, flight rules, and crew timelines all inform the OMS data base.

  20. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 93-1062-2558, Texas Utilities Electric Company, Martin Lake Steam Electric Station, Tatum, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Malkin, R.; Moss, C.E.; Reh, C.M.; Ragab, M.

    1996-01-01

    In response to a request from workers at the Texas Utilities Electric Company (SIC-4911), Martin Lake Steam Electric Station in Tatum, Texas, the incidence of neurologic symptoms and exposure to electromagnetic fields and organophosphates were investigated. Workers reported neurological symptoms, including memory loss, dizziness and fatigue. A site visit to the station revealed electromagnetic field levels below the current occupational standard of 10 gauss. The use of an organophosphate containing fire resistant hydraulic fluid, Fyrquel-EH (1330785), was reported by employees. A significant correlation was identified between memory of past symptoms indicative of acute organophosphate exposure after working with Fyrquel-EH and current symptoms; however, blood cholinesterase levels were all within the normal range and no relevant neurologic abnormalities were noted on neurological examinations. The authors conclude that a hazard existed from the use of Fyrquel-EH. The authors recommend measures for the safe handling of organophosphate compounds.

  1. An evaluation of the effect of volcanic eruption on the solar radiation at Australian and Canadian stations

    SciTech Connect

    Yatko, B.R.; Garrison, J.D.

    1996-11-01

    Peak (most probable) and average values of {angstrom}`s turbidity coefficient {beta} and peak (most probable) and average values of the diffuse index k{sub d} are obtained from the solar radiation data from 21 stations in Australia and 5 stations in Canada. These data exhibit clear increases in their values when the volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere increase following volcanic eruptions of sufficient magnitude. The effect of the eruptions of Fuego (1974), El Chichon (1982) and Pinatubo (1991) are seen most clearly in the data. The effect of lesser eruptions is also seen. The store of volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere shifts with the season so that scattering by volcanic aerosols in the spring half of the year is stronger than in the fall.

  2. Comparison of Ambient Noise From Two Station Designs, Evaluating USArray's Transportable and Flexible Arrays in the Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, M.; Alvarez, M.; Woodward, R.; Yang, Z.

    2009-12-01

    The USArray program within the National Science Foundation-funded Earthscope program is comprised of two portable broadband seismic projects; the Transportable Array (TA), and the Flexible Array (FA). The TA consists of 400 stations occupy locations within the United States on a nominal 70 km spacing for a period of approximately 24 months. As a network, these TA stations roll from west to east so that within 10 years the entire lower 48 states will have been occupied by the TA network. As a complementary component of USArray, the FA pool of instruments is comprised of 1200 active-source, 120 short-period and 326 broadband portable stations. These instruments are used by Principal Investigator-driven studies which focus on geologic targets within the TA footprint. Currently the TA network is transitioning from the Rocky Mountains into the Great Plains. The FA currently has four experiments installed. In this study we quantify the overall performance of these two tandem networks using a controlled set of continuous recordings in Western Washington. We compare the background noise levels between the standard deep TA and shallow FA broadband sensor vault system. We use McNamaras probability density function (PDF) analysis as the basis of the comparison. We combine the network wide PDFs of each network for a period of over 600 days of contemporaneous recordings. Preliminary analysis using data from 28 TA stations in western Washington and 47 nearby FA stations from the CAFE experiment (Abers, et al. Eos Trans. AGU 88(52), Fall Meet. Suppl. S43D-07), show that the TA stations are quieter at periods below 20 seconds by about 12 dB on the horizontal components. The vertical components for both the TA and FA are equivalent for periods below 5 seconds. At higher frequencies (> 2 Hz), however, the FA shallower vault is quieter by approximately 10 dB on both the vertical and horizontal components. The question addressed is, what is contributing to the difference in ambient noise level? Both vault systems are designed to minimize noise from either cultural, electronic or environmental sources. In the case for the TA vault, a 2 meter deep hole is dug using heavy excavation equipment with over a square meter of concrete used for a base and Earth coupling. A deeper vault is known to reduce the diurnal temperature fluctuations that are a major source of noise for the broadband sensor. The standard FA vault is typically less than 1 meter deep dug by hand with approximately 1/10 square meter of concrete as a base. The construction materials and the seismic equipment for both these vaults are otherwise equivalent. We propose the following explanation for the difference in noise levels as a function of frequency and sensor component. The deeper TA vault is more stable with respect tilt which reduces the diurnal and seasonal temperature changes resulting in quieter horizontal data. The general location of TA stations near cultural noise sources such as roadways and population centers contribute to the elevated high frequency noise as compared to FA stations that are often located in very remote locations.

  3. AN AUTOMATED METHOD FOR DETECTING PRECIPITATION AND CELL TYPE FROM RADAR PRODUCTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is of interest for many purposes, including nowcasting, to evaluate the structure of radar images in an effort to produce more accurate estimates of rainfall totals from radar data. Although subjective analysis can reliably determine the structure of radar imagery, computational techniques exist ...

  4. Software Radar signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grydeland, T.; Lind, F. D.; Erickson, P. J.; Holt, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    Software infrastructure is a growing part of modern radio science systems. As part of developing a generic infrastructure for implementing Software Radar systems, we have developed a set of reusable signal processing components. These components are generic software-based implementations for use on general purpose computing systems. The components allow for the implementation of signal processing chains for radio frequency signal reception, correlation-based data processing, and cross-correlation-based interferometry. The components have been used to implement the signal processing necessary for incoherent scatter radar signal reception and processing as part of the latest version of the Millstone Hill Data Acquisition System (MIDAS-W). Several hardware realizations with varying capabilities have been created, and these have been used successfully with different radars. We discuss the signal processing components in detail, describe the software patterns in which they are used, and show example data from the Millstone Hill, EISCAT Svalbard, and SOUSY Svalbard radars.

  5. Radar investigation of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostro, S. J.

    For 80 Sappho, 356 Liguria, 694 Ekard, and 2340 Hathor, data were taken simultaneously in the same sense of circular polarization as transmitted (SC) as well as in the opposite (OC) sense. Graphs show the average OC and SC radar echo power spectra soothed to a resolution of EFB Hz and plotted against Doppler frequency. Radar observations of the peculiar object 2201 Oljato reveal an unusual set of echo power spectra. The albedo and polarization ratio remain fairly constant but the bandwidths range from approximately 0.8 Hz to 1.4 Hz and the spectral shapes vary dramatically. Echo characteristics within any one date's approximately 2.5-hr observation period do not fluctuate very much. Laboratory measurements of the radar frequency electrical properties of particulate metal-plus-silicate mixtures can be combined with radar albedo estimates to constrain the bulk density and metal weight, fraction in a hypothetical asteroid regolith having the same particle size distribution as lab samples.

  6. Radar investigation of asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    For 80 Sappho, 356 Liguria, 694 Ekard, and 2340 Hathor, data were taken simultaneously in the same sense of circular polarization as transmitted (SC) as well as in the opposite (OC) sense. Graphs show the average OC and SC radar echo power spectra soothed to a resolution of EFB Hz and plotted against Doppler frequency. Radar observations of the peculiar object 2201 Oljato reveal an unusual set of echo power spectra. The albedo and polarization ratio remain fairly constant but the bandwidths range from approximately 0.8 Hz to 1.4 Hz and the spectral shapes vary dramatically. Echo characteristics within any one date's approximately 2.5-hr observation period do not fluctuate very much. Laboratory measurements of the radar frequency electrical properties of particulate metal-plus-silicate mixtures can be combined with radar albedo estimates to constrain the bulk density and metal weight, fraction in a hypothetical asteroid regolith having the same particle size distribution as lab samples.

  7. Radar - The Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, G.

    1985-02-01

    Progress in civil and military radar units since the invention of radar in 1935 is summarized, noting the trend to multipurpose units. The earliest systems functioned at 10 cm, then 3 cm after development of a cavity magnetron to provide power for shorter wavelengths. Military needs are driving improvements in three-dimensional scanning capabilities, Primarily to locate aircraft in the presence of ground clutter and sea surface scattering. Autonomous, separate transmitter and receiver units are being tested. Lengthening ground-based radar wavelengths to tens of meters will permit over-the-horizon sensing with backscattering, ionospheric bounce, or induction of a potential in the sea surface as the possible techniques. Mode S monopulse radars will permit transponder queries between small and large aircraft. Finally, pulse Doppler SAR systems may afford terrain recognition with no corroborating data except an expert systems data base.

  8. Earth resources shuttle imaging radar. [systems analysis and design analysis of pulse radar for earth resources information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A report is presented on a preliminary design of a Synthetic Array Radar (SAR) intended for experimental use with the space shuttle program. The radar is called Earth Resources Shuttle Imaging Radar (ERSIR). Its primary purpose is to determine the usefulness of SAR in monitoring and managing earth resources. The design of the ERSIR, along with tradeoffs made during its evolution is discussed. The ERSIR consists of a flight sensor for collecting the raw radar data and a ground sensor used both for reducing these radar data to images and for extracting earth resources information from the data. The flight sensor consists of two high powered coherent, pulse radars, one that operates at L and the other at X-band. Radar data, recorded on tape can be either transmitted via a digital data link to a ground terminal or the tape can be delivered to the ground station after the shuttle lands. A description of data processing equipment and display devices is given.

  9. Rendezvous radar for the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, John W.; Olds, Keith A.; Quaid, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The Rendezvous Radar Set (RRS) was designed at Motorola's Strategic Electronics Division in Chandler, Arizona, to be a key subsystem aboard NASA's Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). The unmanned OMV, which was under development at TRW's Federal Systems Division in Redondo Beach, California, was designed to supplement the Shuttle's satellite delivery, retrieval, and maneuvering activities. The RRS was to be used to locate and then provide the OMV with vectoring information to the target satellite (or Shuttle or Space Station) to aid the OMV in making a minimum fuel consumption approach and rendezvous. The OMV development program was halted by NASA in 1990 just as parts were being ordered for the RRS engineering model. The paper presented describes the RRS design and then discusses new technologies, either under development or planned for development at Motorola, that can be applied to radar or alternative sensor solutions for the Automated Rendezvous and Capture problem.

  10. Downhole pulse radar

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Hsi-Tien

    1987-09-28

    A borehole logging tool generates a fast rise-time, short duration, high peak-power radar pulse having broad energy distribution between 30 MHz and 300 MHz through a directional transmitting and receiving antennas having barium titanate in the electromagnetically active region to reduce the wavelength to within an order of magnitude of the diameter of the antenna. Radar returns from geological discontinuities are sampled for transmission uphole. 7 figs.

  11. Downhole pulse radar

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Hsi-Tien

    1989-01-01

    A borehole logging tool generates a fast rise-time, short duration, high peak-power radar pulse having broad energy distribution between 30 MHz and 300 MHz through a directional transmitting and receiving antennas having barium titanate in the electromagnetically active region to reduce the wavelength to within an order of magnitude of the diameter of the antenna. Radar returns from geological discontinuities are sampled for transmission uphole.

  12. Inversion and assessment of swell waveheights from HF radar spectra in the Iroise Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weili; Forget, Philippe; Guan, Changlong

    2016-04-01

    As an extension of previous work in Wang et al. (Ocean Dyn 64:1447-1456, 2014), this article presents significant waveheights of swell inverted from a 13 month dataset of two high-frequency (HF) phased array radars. As an important intermediate variable in the calculation of significant waveheights, relative swell directions obtained by two different methods from a single radar station are also presented. The impact of the inaccuracy of relative swell direction on the calculation of waveheight is investigated and an alternative way of using constant swell direction is proposed. Radar-inverted swell significant waveheights using different ranges of relative swell directions are investigated. Results are assessed by WAVEWATCH III model hind casts. Analysis of the complete database shows that radar-inverted swell significant waveheights agree reasonably well with model estimates with large scatter. Standard deviation of the difference between the two estimations increases with waveheight, whereas the relative standard deviation, normalized by waveheight, keeps nearly constant. The constant direction scheme of waveheight inversion gives good estimations except for energetic swell exceeding the small perturbation assumption. Statistical analysis suggests that radar measurement uncertainty explains a considerable part of the difference between radar and model estimates. Swell estimates from both radar stations are consistent. This enables combined use of both radar spectra at common radar cells. Use of double spectra solves the ambiguity of relative swell direction, i.e., absolute swell direction is obtained, and effectively improves the accuracy of swell direction by the least-squares method.

  13. Inversion and assessment of swell waveheights from HF radar spectra in the Iroise Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weili; Forget, Philippe; Guan, Changlong

    2016-03-01

    As an extension of previous work in Wang et al. (Ocean Dyn 64:1447-1456, 2014), this article presents significant waveheights of swell inverted from a 13 month dataset of two high-frequency (HF) phased array radars. As an important intermediate variable in the calculation of significant waveheights, relative swell directions obtained by two different methods from a single radar station are also presented. The impact of the inaccuracy of relative swell direction on the calculation of waveheight is investigated and an alternative way of using constant swell direction is proposed. Radar-inverted swell significant waveheights using different ranges of relative swell directions are investigated. Results are assessed by WAVEWATCH III model hind casts. Analysis of the complete database shows that radar-inverted swell significant waveheights agree reasonably well with model estimates with large scatter. Standard deviation of the difference between the two estimations increases with waveheight, whereas the relative standard deviation, normalized by waveheight, keeps nearly constant. The constant direction scheme of waveheight inversion gives good estimations except for energetic swell exceeding the small perturbation assumption. Statistical analysis suggests that radar measurement uncertainty explains a considerable part of the difference between radar and model estimates. Swell estimates from both radar stations are consistent. This enables combined use of both radar spectra at common radar cells. Use of double spectra solves the ambiguity of relative swell direction, i.e., absolute swell direction is obtained, and effectively improves the accuracy of swell direction by the least-squares method.

  14. The value of weather radar data for the estimation of design storms - an analysis for the Hannover region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberlandt, Uwe; Berndt, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Pure radar rainfall, station rainfall and radar-station merging products are analysed regarding extreme rainfall frequencies with durations from 5 min to 6 h and return periods from 1 year to 30 years. Partial duration series of the extremes are derived from the data and probability distributions are fitted. The performance of the design rainfall estimates is assessed based on cross validations for observed station points, which are used as reference. For design rainfall estimation using the pure radar data, the pixel value at the station location is taken; for the merging products, spatial interpolation methods are applied. The results show, that pure radar data are not suitable for the estimation of extremes. They usually lead to an overestimation compared to the observations, which is opposite to the usual behaviour of the radar rainfall. The merging products between radar and station data on the other hand lead usually to an underestimation. They can only outperform the station observations for longer durations. The main problem for a good estimation of extremes seems to be the poor radar data quality.

  15. Technical evaluation of the noise and isolation testing of the safety features actuation system at the Davis Besse Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1

    SciTech Connect

    Selan, J.C.

    1981-07-01

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the noise and isolation testing of the safety features actuation system at the Davis Besse Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. The tests were to verify that faults on the non-Class 1E circuits would not propagate to the Class 1E circuits and degrade them below acceptable levels. The tests conducted demonstrated that the safety features actuation system did not degrade below acceptable levels nor was the system's ability to perform its protective functions affected.

  16. Technical evaluation of the noise and isolation testing of the reactor protection system for the Davis Besse Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1

    SciTech Connect

    Selan, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the noise and isolation testing of the reactor protection system (RPS) for the Davis Besse Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. The testing was performed in accordance to Section 4.6.11, Susceptibility, of MIL-N-19900B, and NRC approved plant test methods. Analysis of the test results shows that the reactor protection system did not degrade below acceptable levels when subjected to electromagnetic, electrostatic, isolation and noise level tests, nor was the system's ability to perform its Class 1E protective functions affected.

  17. Evaluation of Cloud Microphysics in JMA-NHM Simulations Using Bin or Bulk Microphysical Schemes through Comparison with Cloud Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iguchi, Takamichi; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Khain, Alexander P.; Saito, Kazuo; Takemura, Toshihiko; Okamoto, Hajime; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2012-01-01

    Numerical weather prediction (NWP) simulations using the Japan Meteorological Agency NonhydrostaticModel (JMA-NHM) are conducted for three precipitation events observed by shipborne or spaceborneW-band cloud radars. Spectral bin and single-moment bulk cloud microphysics schemes are employed separatelyfor an intercomparative study. A radar product simulator that is compatible with both microphysicsschemes is developed to enable a direct comparison between simulation and observation with respect to theequivalent radar reflectivity factor Ze, Doppler velocity (DV), and path-integrated attenuation (PIA). Ingeneral, the bin model simulation shows better agreement with the observed data than the bulk modelsimulation. The correction of the terminal fall velocities of snowflakes using those of hail further improves theresult of the bin model simulation. The results indicate that there are substantial uncertainties in the masssizeand sizeterminal fall velocity relations of snowflakes or in the calculation of terminal fall velocity of snowaloft. For the bulk microphysics, the overestimation of Ze is observed as a result of a significant predominanceof snow over cloud ice due to substantial deposition growth directly to snow. The DV comparison shows thata correction for the fall velocity of hydrometeors considering a change of particle size should be introducedeven in single-moment bulk cloud microphysics.

  18. Observation Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Heather

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how a teacher integrates science observations into the writing center. At the observation station, students explore new items with a science theme and use their notes and questions for class writings every day. Students are exposed to a variety of different topics and motivated to write in different styles all while…

  19. Intercontinental Bistatic Radar Test Observation of Asteroid 1998 WT24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righini, S.; Poppi, S.; Montebugnoli, S.; DiMartino, M.; Saba, L.; Delbo, M.; Ostro, S.; Monari, J.; Poloni, M.; Orlati, A.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the first intercontinental planetary radar test performed in Italy observing the near Earth asteroid (NEA) 33342 (1998 WT24) in December 2001 by means of the bistatic configurations Goldstone (California, USA)-Medicina (Italy) and Evpatoria (Ukraine)-Medicina. The experiment goal was to characterize the system for realtime radar follow-up observations of NEAs and artificial orbiting debris, in the framework of a feasibility study which aims at using the Sardinia Radio Telescope, at present under construction, also as a planetary radar facility. We report the preliminary results of the radar observations carried out by the IRA-CNR (Instituto di Radioastronomia - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche) and the OATo (Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino) groups, aimed at exploring the scientific potentials of a new space radar program, using the existing facilities in Italy. The planetary radar technique is uniquely capable of investigating geometry and surface properties of various solar system objects, demonstrating advantages over the optical methods in its high spatial resolution and ability to obtain three-dimensional images. A single radar detection allows to obtain extremely accurate orbital elements, improving the instantaneous positional uncertainties by orders of magnitude with respect to an optically determined orbit. Radar is a powerful means to spatially resolve NEAs by measuring the distribution of the echo power in time delay (range) and Doppler frequency (line-of-sight velocity) with extreme precision in each coordinate, as it provides detailed information about the target physical properties like size, shape, rotation, near-surface bulk density and roughness and internal density distribution. The Medicina 32m antenna had been successfully used for the first time as the receiving part of a bistatic configuration during a test experiment (September 2001) held to check the capabilities of the entire data acquisition system. This test was possible thanks to the collaboration undertaken with the Evpatoria radar station, and consisted in the observation of the ETALON-1 low orbit satellite

  20. Wave parameters comparisons between High Frequency (HF) radar system and an in situ buoy: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Maria; Alonso-Martirena, Andrés; Agostinho, Pedro; Sanchez, Jorge; Ferrer, Macu; Fernandes, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    The coastal zone is an important area for the development of maritime countries, either in terms of recreation, energy exploitation, weather forecasting or national security. Field measurements are in the basis of understanding how coastal and oceanic processes occur. Most processes occur over long timescales and over large spatial ranges, like the variation of mean sea level. These processes also involve a variety of factors such as waves, winds, tides, storm surges, currents, etc., that cause huge interference on such phenomena. Measurement of waves have been carried out using different techniques. The instruments used to measure wave parameters can be very different, i.e. buoys, ship base equipment like sonar and satellites. Each equipment has its own advantage and disadvantage depending on the study subject. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the behaviour of a different technology available and presently adopted in wave measurement. In the past few years the measurement of waves using High Frequency (HF) Radars has had several developments. Such a method is already established as a powerful tool for measuring the pattern of surface current, but its use in wave measurements, especially in the dual arrangement is recent. Measurement of the backscatter of HF radar wave provides the raw dataset which is analyzed to give directional data of surface elevation at each range cell. Buoys and radars have advantages, disadvantages and its accuracy is discussed in this presentation. A major advantage with HF radar systems is that they are unaffected by weather, clouds or changing ocean conditions. The HF radar system is a very useful tool for the measurement of waves over a wide area with real-time observation, but it still lacks a method to check its accuracy. The primary goal of this study was to show how the HF radar system responds to high energetic variations when compared to wave buoy data. The bulk wave parameters used (significant wave height, period and direction) were obtained during 2013 and 2014 from one 13.5 MHz CODAR SeaSonde radar station from Hydrographic Institute, located in Espichel Cape (Portugal). These data were compared with those obtained from one wave buoy Datawell Directional Waverider, also from Hydrographic Institute, moored inbound Sines (Portugal) at 100 m depth. For this first approach, was assumed that all the waves are in a deep water situation. Results showed that during high energetic periods, the HF radar system revealed a good correlation with wave buoy data following the bulk wave parameters gradient variations.

  1. Inversion of swell frequency from a 1-year HF radar dataset collected in Brittany (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weili; Forget, Philippe; Guan, Changlong

    2014-10-01

    This article presents long period ocean wave (swell) frequencies inverted from a 13-month dataset of high-frequency (HF) phased array radars and an assessment of these estimates by comparison with WAVEWATCH III model data. The method of swell frequency inversion from high-frequency radar sea echo Doppler spectra is described. Radar data were collected from a two-site HF Wellen Radar (WERA) radar system on the west coast of Brittany (France) operating at 12 MHz. A standard beam-forming processing technique has been used to obtain Doppler spectra of processed radar cells. Swell frequencies are obtained from the frequencies of particular spectral peaks of the second-order continuum in hourly averaged Doppler spectra. The data coverage of effective Doppler spectra considered for swell frequency estimates shows the influence of islands and shallow water effects. Swell estimates from both radar stations are in good agreement. The comparison of radar-derived results to WAVEWATCH III (WW3) estimates shows that radar measurements agree quite well with model results. The bias and standard deviation between two estimates are very small for swells with frequency less than 0.09 Hz (period >11 s), whereas radar estimates are generally lower than model estimates for shorter swells, along with higher standard deviation. Statistical analysis suggests that radar measurement uncertainty explains most of the difference between radar and model estimates. For each swell event, time series of frequency exhibits a quasi-linear frequency increase which is associated with the dispersive property of wave phase velocity. The use of swell frequency estimates from both radars on common radar cells only slightly increases the accuracy of swell frequency measurement.

  2. Estimating vegetation biomass using synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronti, Stefano; Luciani, S.; Paloscia, Simonetta; Schiavon, G.; Sigismondi, S.; Solimini, Domenico

    1994-12-01

    A significant experiment for evaluating the potential of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) in monitoring soil and vegetation parameters is being carried out on an agricultural area located in Central Italy. The site has been imaged in 1991 by NASA/JPL AIRSAR during the MAC-91 Campaign and subsequently by ESA/ERS-1 and NASDA JERS-1 in 1992. The sensitivity to vegetation biomass of backscattering coefficient measured by ERS-1 and JERS-1 radars is discussed and compared with the best results achieved using the multifrequency polarimetric AIRSAR data.

  3. Broad perspectives in radar for ocean measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.

    1978-01-01

    The various active radar implementation options available for the measurement functions of interest for the SEASAT follow-on missions were evaluated. These functions include surface feature imaging, surface pressure and vertical profile, atmospheric sounding, surface backscatter and wind speed determination, surface current location, wavelength spectra, sea surface topography, and ice/snow thickness. Some concepts for the Synthetic Aperture Imaging Radar were examined that may be useful in the design and selection of the implementation options for these missions. The applicability of these instruments for the VOIR mission was also kept under consideration.

  4. 66. VIEW SHOWING HOLD FOR RADAR CABLES AT RADAR SITE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. VIEW SHOWING HOLD FOR RADAR CABLES AT RADAR SITE, LOOKING NORTH Everett Weinreb, photographer, March 1988 - Mount Gleason Nike Missile Site, Angeles National Forest, South of Soledad Canyon, Sylmar, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. Urban Flood Warning Systems using Radar Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, N.; Bedient, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    There have been an increasing number of urban areas that rely on weather radars to provide accurate precipitation information for flood warning purposes. As non-structural tools, radar-based flood warning systems can provide accurate and timely warnings to the public and private entities in urban areas that are prone to flash floods. The wider spatial and temporal coverage from radar increases flood warning lead-time when compared to rain and stream gages alone. The Third Generation Rice and Texas Medical Center (TMC) Flood Alert System (FAS3) has been delivering warning information with 2 to 3 hours of lead time and a R2 value of 93% to facility personnel in a readily understood format for more than 50 events in the past 15 years. The current FAS utilizes NEXRAD Level II radar rainfall data coupled with a real-time hydrologic model (RTHEC-1) to deliver warning information. The system has a user-friendly dashboard to provide rainfall maps, Google Maps based inundation maps, hydrologic predictions, and real-time monitoring at the bayou. This paper will evaluate its reliable performance during the recent events occurring in 2012 and 2013 and the development of a similar radar-based flood warning system for the City of Sugar Land, Texas. Having a significant role in the communication of flood information, FAS marks an important step towards the establishment of an operational and reliable flood warning system for flood-prone urban areas.

  6. RAPIER: a new relocatable VHF coherent radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popple, M.; Chapman, P. J.; Thomas, E. C.; Jones, T. B.

    1997-06-01

    VHF coherent radar observations of the high latitude ionosphere have contributed significantly to our understanding of the complex processes which couple the ionosphere, magnetosphere and the solar wind. In addition, these observations have also improved our knowledge of the physics of the ionospheric plasma irregularities and their scattering properties. In this article the design of a new mobile coherent radar system is described. The new system, RAPIER (Relocatable Auroral Polar Ionospheric Radar), was initially collocated with the existing SABRE radar and simultaneous operations undertaken to evaluate RAPIER's performance in its beam scanning mode. In this way the performance of the new system was quantitatively compared with that of a well established auroral radar facility. The velocities measured by the new RAPIER system are well correlated with those observed by SABRE. The received backscatter powers observed by the two systems were, however, less well correlated, mainly caused by differences between their respective antenna elevation polar diagrams. As expected from system considerations, SABRE was found to be more sensitive than RAPIER at slant ranges corresponding to the maxima in the SABRE elevation polar diagrams. However, RAPIER's improved elevation polar diagram, superior instantaneous dynamic range and its ability to alter its receiver gain with pointing direction ensured that it could accurately measure targets over a much greater spatial region than SABRE. This effect became more pronounced when regions of intense backscatter were monitored.

  7. Enhanced Mars Radar Observations with the Goldstone Solar System Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Jurgens, R. F.; Anderson, F. S.; Slade, M. A.

    2000-10-01

    The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) has successfully collected radar echo data from Mars over the past 30 years. GSSR radar data were critical in assessing the Viking Lander 1 as well as the Mars Pathfinder landing sites. A reprocessing to common format of the last ten years worth of GSSR Mars delay-Doppler sub-Earth radar track profiles was recently completed in aid of landing site characterization. The radar data obtained since 1988 by the GSSR comprise some 73 delay-Doppler radar tracks. Sixteen of those tracks also have interferometric radar data, which has never been processed, because the signal to noise is insufficient to constrain both the phases and the radar scattering parameters. The new topographic data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft offer the best means to finally make radar maps that extend the radar properties coverage some 3 to 4 degrees beyond the sub-Earth radar track. This would be a significant expansion of the dataset, and is all the more warranted as the radar spatial resolution improves away from the sub-Earth track. At the outer edges the radar resolution cell is of the same order of size as the landing site ellipses for future mission (approximately 20 km diameter). Initial results of processing the interferometric data will be presented at the meeting. The 2001 Mars opposition offers an opportunity to fill in some areas where radar data are lacking in the current dataset. We are planning 18 radar experiments from May through July of 2001. The goal of the observations will be to provide new, interferometric, improved-spatial-resolution radar data over the equatorial regions (latitudes -2 to +7) of Mars, in particular over the so-called Hematite Site in Sinus Meridiani. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, with funding from the Mars Data Analysis Program of NASA OSS.

  8. A barrier radar concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Ball, C.; Weissman, I.

    A description is given of a low power, light-weight radar that can be quickly set up and operated on batteries for extended periods of time to detect airborne intruders. With low equipment and operating costs, it becomes practical to employ a multiplicity of such radars to provide an unbroken intrusion fence over the desired perimeter. Each radar establishes a single transmitted fan beam extending vertically from horizon to horizon. The beam is generated by a two-face array antenna built in an A-frame configuration and is shaped, through phasing of the array elements, to concentrate the transmitter power in a manner consistent with the expected operating altitude ceiling of the targets of interest. The angular width of this beam in the dimension transverse to the fan depends on the radar transmission frequency and the antenna aperture dimension, but is typically wide enough so that a target at the maximum altitude or range will require tens of seconds to pass through the beam. A large number of independent samples of radar data will thus be available to provide many opportunities for target detection.

  9. Noise calibration and the development of remote receiver stations for TARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Samridha

    2013-04-01

    The Telescope Array RAdar (TARA) detector is based on a remote sensing technique known as bi-static radar that aims to achieve remote coverage over large portions of the Earth's surface in search of cosmic ray induced radio echoes. In conjunction with North America's largest cosmic ray observatory (The Telescope Array) in radio quiet western Utah, the radar project's pilot receiver and transmitter stations have been functional for just over a year and a half, giving insight into the detect-ability of air shower radar echoes. Currently the receiver stations comprise an array of Log Periodic Dipole Antennas with an oscilloscope-based data acquisition system implemented for noise calibration including tracking galactic noise as the galactic plane migrates through the sky. Our experiences thus far have given impetus for upgrades, including the deployment of additional remote receiver stations. We discuss some of the results of this oscilloscope-based DAQ system and the development of these remote stations.

  10. Developing Lightning Prediction Tools for the CCAFS Dual-Polarimetric Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, W. A.; Carey, L. D.; Deierling, W.; Johnson, E.; Bateman, M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama Huntsville are collaborating with the 45th Weather Squadron (45WS) to develop improved lightning prediction capabilities for the new C-band dual-polarimetric weather radar being acquired for use by 45WS and launch weather forecasters at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). In particular, these algorithms will focus on lightning onset, cessation and combined lightning-radar applications for convective winds assessment. Research using radar reflectivity (Z) data for prediction of lightning onset has been extensively discussed in the literature and subsequently applied by launch weather forecasters as it pertains to lightning nowcasting. Currently the forecasters apply a relatively straight forward but effective temperature-Z threshold algorithm for assessing the likelihood of lightning onset in a given storm. In addition, a layered VIL above the freezing level product is used as automated guidance for the onset of lightning. Only limited research and field work has been conducted on lightning cessation using Z and vertically-integrated Z for determining cessation. Though not used operationally vertically-integrated Z (basis for VIL) has recently shown promise as a tool for use in nowcasting lightning cessation. The work discussed herein leverages and expands upon these and similar reflectivity-threshold approaches via the application/addition of over two decades of polarimetric radar research focused on distinct multi-parameter radar signatures of ice/mixed-phase initiation and ice-crystal orientation in highly electrified convective clouds. Specifically, our approach is based on numerous previous studies that have observed repeatable patterns in the behavior of the vertical hydrometeor column as it relates to the temporal evolution of differential reflectivity and depolarization (manifested in either LDR or p(sub hv)), development of in-situ mixed and ice phase microphysics, electric fields, and ensuing lightning in the sub-tropical/tropical convection typical of the southeastern U.S., Maritime Continent, and southwestern Amazon. The polarimetric signatures detected in this setting provide a basis for automated 3-D detection of hydrometeor types in fuzzy logic hydrometeor identification algorithms (HID). Our working hypothesis is that improvement in lightning onset warning lead time and specificity for a given storm, relative to application of a Z-threshold algorithm, should arise as a consequence of the ability of dual-polarimetric radar to unambiguously detect and identify (through HID algorithms) the updraft elevation of rain-water cores above the freezing level and subsequent onset of drop freezing, riming, and robust mixed phase processes leading to significant charge separation and lightning. This type of algorithm, though dependent on the quality of the polarimetric data should be less susceptible to variable Z-calibration that can impact a given Z-threshold approach. To facilitate development of the algorithm while the 45WS dual-pol radar is in its current test stages and to evaluate the impact of polarimetric data quality (e.g., modified scan parameters and sampling) on the ensuing algorithms, we are using the ARMOR C-band dual-pol radar in Huntsville combined with N. Alabama LMA data and ARMOR HID algorithms [NCAR algorithm modified for application at C-band] in a testbed fashion. For lightning cessation we are revisiting the application of differential propagation phase variables for the monitoring of ice crystal alignment driven by in-cloud electric fields combined with metrics of ice water path (i.e., vertically integrated reflectivity). Importantly it should be noted that this approach is still very much a research topic and as such, we will explore operational applications that involve radar frequencies other than C-Band by using the UAH MAX X-band dual-pol radar in slow staring modes.

  11. Space station structures development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teller, V. B.

    1986-01-01

    A study of three interrelated tasks focusing on deployable Space Station truss structures is discussed. Task 1, the development of an alternate deployment system for linear truss, resulted in the preliminary design of an in-space reloadable linear motor deployer. Task 2, advanced composites deployable truss development, resulted in the testing and evaluation of composite materials for struts used in a deployable linear truss. Task 3, assembly of structures in space/erectable structures, resulted in the preliminary design of Space Station pressurized module support structures. An independent, redundant support system was developed for the common United States modules.

  12. 33. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #320, perimeter acquisition radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #320, perimeter acquisition radar operations center (PAROC), contains the tactical command and control group equipment required to control the par site. Showing spacetrack monitor console - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  13. Evaluation of Kapton pyrolysis, arc tracking, and arc propagation on the Space Station Freedom (SSF) solar array Flexible Carrier (FCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Stueber, T.J.

    1991-11-01

    Recent studies involving the use of polyimide Kapton coated wires indicate that if a momentary electrical short circuit occurs between two wires, sufficient heating of the Kapton can occur to thermally char (pyrolyze) the Kapton. Such charred Kapton has sufficient electrical conductivity to create an arc which tracks down the wires and possibly propagates to adjoining wires. These studies prompted an investigation to ascertain the likelihood of the Kapton pyrolysis, arc tracking and propagation phenomena, and the magnitude of destruction conceivably inflicted on Space Station Freedom's (SSF) Flexible Current Carrier (FCC) for the photovoltaic array. The geometric layout of the FCC, having a planar-type orientation as opposed to bundles, may reduce the probability of sustaining an arc. An experimental investigation was conducted to simulate conditions under which an arc can occur on the FCC of SSF, and the consequences of arc initiation.

  14. Test and evaluation of load converter topologies used in the Space Station Freedom Power Management and distribution DC test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Ramon C.; Oliver, Angela C.; Bodi, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    Power components hardware in support of the Space Station Freedom dc Electrical Power System were tested. One type of breadboard hardware tested is the dc Load Converter Unit, which constitutes the power interface between the electric power system and the actual load. These units are dc to dc converters that provide the final system regulation before power is delivered to the load. Three load converters were tested: a series resonant converter, a series inductor switchmode converter, and a switching full-bridge forward converter. The topology, operation principles, and tests results are described, in general. A comparative analysis of the three units is given with respect to efficiency, regulation, short circuit behavior (protection), and transient characteristics.

  15. Evaluation of Manual Ultrasonic Examinations Applied to Detect Flaws in Primary System Dissimilar Metal Welds at North Anna Power Station

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2012-06-01

    During a recent inservice inspection (ISI) of a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) in an inlet (hot leg) steam generator nozzle at North Anna Power Station Unit 1, several axially oriented flaws went undetected by the licensee's manual ultrasonic testing (UT) technique. The flaws were subsequently detected as a result of outside diameter (OD) surface machining in preparation for a full structural weld overlay. The machining operation uncovered the existence of two through-wall flaws, based on the observance of primary water leaking from the DMW. Further ultrasonic tests were then performed, and a total of five axially oriented flaws, classified as primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), were detected in varied locations around the weld circumference.

  16. An evaluation of the accuracy of geomagnetic data obtained from an unattended, automated, quasi-absolute station

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herzog, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison is made of geomagnetic calibration data obtained from a high-sensitivity proton magnetometer enclosed within an orthogonal bias coil system, with data obtained from standard procedures at a mid-latitude U.S. Geological Survey magnetic observatory using a quartz horizontal magnetometer, a Ruska magnetometer, and a total field magnetometer. The orthogonal coil arrangement is used with the proton magnetometer to provide Deflected-Inclination-Deflected-Declination (DIDD) data from which quasi-absolute values of declination, horizontal intensity, and vertical intensity can be derived. Vector magnetometers provide the ordinate values to yield baseline calibrations for both the DIDD and standard observatory processes. Results obtained from a prototype system over a period of several months indicate that the DIDD unit can furnish adequate absolute field values for maintaining observatory calibration data, thus providing baseline control for unattended, remote stations. ?? 1990.

  17. Evaluation of representativeness of near-surface winds in station measurements, global and regional reanalysis for Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, Frank; Kaiser-Weiss, Andrea K.; Heene, Vera; Borsche, Michael; Keller, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Within the preparation activities for a European COPERNICUS Climate Change Service (C3S) several ongoing research projects analyse the potential of global and regional model-based climate reanalyses for applications. A user survey in the FP7-project CORE-CLIMAX revealed that surface wind (10 m) is among the most frequently used parameters of global reanalysis products. The FP7 project UERRA (Uncertainties in Ensembles of Regional Re-Analysis) has the focus on regional European reanalysis and the associated uncertainties, also from a user perspective. Especially in the field of renewable energy planning and production there is a need for climatological information across all spatial scales, i.e., from climatology at a certain site to the spatial scale of national or continental renewable energy production. Here, we focus on a comparison of wind measurements of the Germany's meteorological service (Deutscher Wetterdienst, DWD) with global reanalyses of ECWMF and a regional reanalysis for Europe based on DWD's NWP-model COSMO (performed by the Hans-Ertel-Center for Weather Research, University of Bonn). Reanalyses can provide valuable additional information on larger scale variability, e.g. multi-annual variation over Germany. However, changes in the observing system, model errors and biases have to be carefully considered. On the other hand, the ground-based observation networks partly suffer from change of the station distribution, changes in instrumentation, measurements procedures and quality control as well as local changes which might modify their spatial representativeness. All these effects might often been unknown or hard to characterize, although plenty of the meta-data information has been recorded for the German stations. One focus of the presentation will be the added-value of the regional reanalysis.

  18. Phase modulating the Urbana radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrington, L. J., Jr.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and operation of a switched phase modulation system for the Urbana Radar System are discussed. The system is implemented and demonstrated using a simple procedure. The radar system and circuits are described and analyzed.

  19. 1. View of three detection radar (DR) antennas. DR 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of three detection radar (DR) antennas. DR 1 (structure no. 735) on left, DR 2 (structure no. 736) in center, and DR 3 (structure no. 737) looking north 30 degrees west, with tracking radar (large radome) and satcom (satellite communication) system in small radome in view between DR 2 and DR 3 antennae. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  20. Characteristics of Sunset radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Located in a narrow canyon 15 km west of Boulder, Colorado, the Sunset pulsed Doppler radar was the first radar designed and constructed specifically as a VHF ST radar. The antenna system is a phased array of coaxial-colinear dopoles with computer-controlled phase shifters for each line of dipoles. It operates at a frequency of 40.475 MHz and a wavelength of 7.41M. Peak transmitter power is 100 kW. Aperture efficiency is 0.58 and resistive loss is 0.30 for its 3600 sq m area. The practical steering rate is 1 record/minute/position to any arbitrary antenna beam position. The first clear-air turbulence echoes and wind velocity measurements were obtained in 1974. Significant accomplishments are listed.