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Sample records for radial flow chromatography

  1. High throughput purification of recombinant human growth hormone using radial flow chromatography.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surinder M; Sharma, Aparna; Panda, Amulya K

    2009-11-01

    Recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) was expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies. Using fed-batch fermentation process, around 670 mg/L of r-hGH was produced at a cell OD600 of 35. Cell lysis followed by detergent washing resulted in semi-purified inclusion bodies with more than 80% purity. Purified inclusion bodies were homogenous in preparation having an average size of 0.6 microm. Inclusion bodies were solubilized at pH 12 in presence of 2M urea and refolded by pulsatile dilution. Refolded protein was purified with DEAE-anion exchange chromatography using both radial and axial flow column (50 ml bed volume each). Higher buffer flow rate (30 ml/min) in radial flow column helped in reducing the batch processing time for purification of refolded r-hGH. Radial column based purification resulted in high throughput recovery of diluted refolded r-hGH in comparison to axial column. More than 40% of inclusion body protein could be refolded into bioactive form using the above method in a single batch. Purified r-hGH was analyzed by mass spectroscopy and found to be bioactive by Nb2 cell line proliferation assay. Inclusion body enrichment, mild solubilization, pulsatile refolding and radial flow chromatography worked co-operatively to improve the overall recovery of bioactive protein from inclusion bodies. PMID:19500673

  2. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  3. Radial flow pulse jet mixer

    DOEpatents

    VanOsdol, John G.

    2013-06-25

    The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing vessel is comprised of a sludge basin, a flow surface surrounding the sludge basin, and a downcoming flow annulus between the flow surface and an inner shroud. The pulse jet mixing vessel is additionally comprised of an upper vessel pressurization volume in fluid communication with the downcoming flow annulus, and an inner shroud surge volume separated from the downcoming flow annulus by the inner shroud. When the solid particles are resting on the sludge basin and a fluid such as water is atop the particles and extending into the downcoming flow annulus and the inner shroud surge volume, mixing occurs by pressurization of the upper vessel pressurization volume, generating an inward radial flow over the flow surface and an upwash jet at the center of the sludge basin.

  4. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  5. Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, Carl F.

    1995-01-01

    A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

  6. Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, Carl F.

    1995-11-07

    A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

  7. Fast radial flows in transition disk holes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Chiang, Eugene

    2014-02-20

    Protoplanetary 'transition' disks have large, mass-depleted central cavities, yet also deliver gas onto their host stars at rates comparable to disks without holes. The paradox of simultaneous transparency and accretion can be explained if gas flows inward at much higher radial speeds inside the cavity than outside the cavity, since surface density (and by extension optical depth) varies inversely with inflow velocity at fixed accretion rate. Radial speeds within the cavity might even have to approach free-fall values to explain the huge surface density contrasts inferred for transition disks. We identify observational diagnostics of fast radial inflow in channel maps made in optically thick spectral lines. Signatures include (1) twisted isophotes in maps made at low systemic velocities and (2) rotation of structures observed between maps made in high-velocity line wings. As a test case, we apply our new diagnostic tools to archival Atacama Large Millimeter Array data on the transition disk HD 142527 and uncover evidence for free-fall radial velocities inside its cavity. Although the observed kinematics are also consistent with a disk warp, the radial inflow scenario is preferred because it predicts low surface densities that appear consistent with recent observations of optically thin CO isotopologues in this disk. How material in the disk cavity sheds its angular momentum wholesale to fall freely onto the star is an unsolved problem; gravitational torques exerted by giant planets or brown dwarfs are briefly discussed as a candidate mechanism.

  8. Radial Chromatography for the Separation of Nitroaniline Isomers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Robert B.; Case, William S.

    2011-01-01

    Separation techniques are usually presented in the undergraduate organic laboratory to teach students how to purify and isolate compounds. Often the concept of liquid chromatography is introduced by having students create "silica gel columns" to separate components of a reaction mixture. Although useful, column chromatography can be a laborious…

  9. Radial Chromatography for the Separation of Nitroaniline Isomers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Robert B.; Case, William S.

    2011-01-01

    Separation techniques are usually presented in the undergraduate organic laboratory to teach students how to purify and isolate compounds. Often the concept of liquid chromatography is introduced by having students create "silica gel columns" to separate components of a reaction mixture. Although useful, column chromatography can be a laborious

  10. Radial flow afterburner for event generators and the baryon puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuautle, E.; Paic, G.

    2008-07-01

    A simple afterburner to add radial flow to the randomized transverse momentum obtained from event generators, PYTHIA and HIJING, has been implemented to calculate the p/π ratios and compare them with available data. A coherent trend of qualitative agreement has been obtained in pp and Au+Au collisions for various centralities. These results indicate that the radial flow does play an important role in the so-called baryon puzzle anomaly.

  11. Generation of Transmissivity Fields with Non-radial Flow Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. O.; Roberts, R. M.; Holt, R. M.

    2006-12-01

    Non-radial flow signatures are seen in many hydraulic tests in fractured media. The generalized radial flow approach, which uses a variable flow dimension (n), is increasingly used to interpret hydraulic tests to account for non-radial flow. Flow dimension can be estimated directly from the second derivative of pumping test drawdown versus log time and can be described as the change in cross-sectional area of flow with respect to radial distance from the borehole. Previously, it was not clear if flow dimension was an intrinsic property of a medium or an artifact of the analysis technique. Representing non-radial flow in a 2D numerical model has been problematic. As part of an effort to understand how to structure heterogeneous transmissivity to create the type of non-radial flow signatures commonly observed, we generated spatially correlated binary random transmissivity fields with directional anisotropy in the correlation length. Analysis of simulated pumping tests in these fields provided the same types of non-radial diagnostic responses commonly observed in pumping tests in a fractured dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. Our method may provide insight into how to better conceptualize flow systems and, with further analysis and understanding, allow us to condition future transmissivity fields. Acknowledgements: This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Dynamics of a vortex pair in radial flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bannikova, E. Yu. Kontorovich, V. M. Reznik, G. M.

    2007-10-15

    The problem of vortex pair motion in two-dimensional radial flow is solved. Under certain conditions for flow parameters, the vortex pair can reverse its motion within a bounded region. The vortex-pair translational velocity decreases or increases after passing through the source/sink region, depending on whether the flow is diverging or converging, respectively. The rotational motion of a corotating vortex pair in a quiescent environment transforms into motion along a logarithmic spiral in radial flow. The problem may have applications in astrophysics and geophysics.

  13. Sugar Determination in Foods with a Radially Compressed High Performance Liquid Chromatography Column.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ondrus, Martin G.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Advocates use of Waters Associates Radial Compression Separation System for high performance liquid chromatography. Discusses instrumentation and reagents, outlining procedure for analyzing various foods and discussing typical student data. Points out potential problems due to impurities and pump seal life. Suggests use of ribose as internal…

  14. Accretion, radial flows and abundance gradients in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzulli, Gabriele; Fraternali, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The metal-poor gas continuously accreting on to the discs of spiral galaxies is unlikely to arrive from the intergalactic medium (IGM) with exactly the same rotation velocity as the galaxy itself and even a small angular momentum mismatch inevitably drives radial gas flows within the disc, with significant consequences to galaxy evolution. Here, we provide some general analytic tools to compute accretion profiles, radial gas flows and abundance gradients in spiral galaxies as a function of the angular momentum of the accreting material. We generalize existing solutions for the decomposition of the gas flows, required to reproduce the structural properties of galaxy discs, into direct accretion from the IGM and a radial mass flux within the disc. We then solve the equation of metallicity evolution in the presence of radial gas flows with a novel method, based on characteristic lines, which greatly reduces the numerical demand on the computation and sheds light on the crucial role of boundary conditions on the abundance profiles predicted by theoretical models. We also discuss how structural and chemical constraints can be combined to disentangle the contributions of inside-out growth and radial flows in the development of abundance gradients in spiral galaxies. Illustrative examples are provided throughout with parameters plausible for the Milky Way. We find that the material accreting on the Milky Way should rotate at 70-80 per cent of the rotational velocity of the disc, in agreement with previous estimates.

  15. The vergence eye movements induced by radial optic flow

    PubMed Central

    Kodaka, Y.; Sheliga, B. M.; FitzGibbon, E. J.; Miles, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Radial optic flow applied to large random dot patterns is known to elicit horizontal vergence eye movements at short latency, expansion causing convergence and contraction causing divergence: the Radial Flow Vergence Response (RFVR). We elicited RFVRs in human subjects by applying radial motion to concentric circular patterns whose radial luminance modulation was that of a square wave lacking the fundamental: the missing fundamental (mf) stimulus. The radial motion consisted of successive ¼-wavelength steps, so that the overall pattern and the 4n+1 harmonics (where n=integer) underwent radial expansion (or contraction), whereas the 4n-1 harmonics—including the strongest Fourier component (the 3rd harmonic)—underwent the opposite radial motion. Radial motion commenced only after the subject had fixated the center of the pattern. The initial RFVRs were always in the direction of the 3rd harmonic, e.g., expansion of the mf pattern causing divergence. Thus, the earliest RFVRs were strongly dependent on the motion of the major Fourier component, consistent with early spatio-temporal filtering prior to motion detection, as in the well-known energy model of motion analysis. If the radial mf stimulus was reduced to just two competing harmonics—the 3rd and 5th—the initial RFVRs showed a nonlinear dependence on their relative contrasts: when the two harmonics differed in contrast by more than about an octave then the one with the higher contrast completely dominated the RFVRs and the one with lower contrast lost its influence: winner-take-all. We suggest that these nonlinear interactions result from mutual inhibition between the mechanisms sensing the motion of the different competing harmonics. If single radial-flow steps were used, a brief inter-stimulus interval resulted in reversed RFVRs, consistent with the idea that the motion detectors mediating these responses receive a visual input whose temporal impulse response function is strongly biphasic. Lastly, all of these characteristics of the RFVR, which we attribute to the early cortical processing of visual motion, are known to be shared by the Ocular Following Response (OFR)—a conjugate tracking (version) response elicited at short-latency by linear motion—and even the quantitative details are generally very similar. Thus, although the RFVR and OFR respond to very different patterns of global motion—radial vs. linear—they have very similar local spatiotemporal properties as though mediated by the same low-level, local-motion detectors, which we suggest are in the striate cortex. PMID:17706738

  16. Self-sustained radial oscillating flows between parallel disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, S.; Yang, W.-J.

    1985-05-01

    It is pointed out that radial flow between parallel circular disks is of interest in a number of physical systems such as hydrostatic air bearings, radial diffusers, and VTOL aircraft with centrally located downward-positioned jets. The present investigation is concerned with the problem of instability in radial flow between parallel disks. A time-dependent numerical study and experiments are conducted. Both approaches reveal the nucleation, growth, migration, and decay of annular separation bubbles (i.e. vortex or recirculation zones) in the laminar-flow region. A finite-difference technique is utilized to solve the full unsteady vorticity transport equation in the theoretical procedure, while the flow patterns in the experiments are visualized with the aid of dye-injection, hydrogen-bubble, and paraffin-mist methods. It is found that the separation and reattachment of shear layers in the radial flow through parallel disks are unsteady phenomena. The sequence of nucleation, growth, migration, and decay of the vortices is self-sustained.

  17. Oculomotor response to radial optic flow in infancy.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Elizabeth; Nawrot, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Research with infants has illustrated the development of adult-like smooth pursuit gain by five months-of-age and links this to the development of sensitivity to depth from motion parallax. Ocular following response eye movements to radial optic flow stimuli may also be an indicator of sensitivity to changes in depth. An expanding flow field elicits convergent eye movements while a contracting one elicits divergent eye movements. This response suggests the visual system is interpreting the radial flow as a change in depth. We measured the oculomotor response to radial optic flow in infants across the age range where smooth pursuit gain is developing. Vergence eye movements were elicited from 56 infants 8-20 weeks-of-age. The stimulus comprised a radial optic flow pattern that expanded or contracted across eight 400 msec trials. The order of the four expanding and four contracting trials was randomized and eye position was monitored with a Tobii X120 eye-tracker. We defined the threshold for a vergence eye movement as velocity greater than 0.3 deg/sec. The majority of infants produced vergence eye movements in response to the expanding and contracting trials with about half producing either a convergence or divergence response appropriate to the stimuli. Approximately one-quarter produced both convergence and divergence responses. However, there was no relationship between age and the presence/absence of the vergence response or its velocity. We did find a significant positive correlation between age and smooth pursuit gain in a subset of these infants as expected. It may be that the vergence response is already developing at the youngest age. Similar to research on infants' reactions to looming stimuli, these results suggest that sensitivity to depth from radial optic flow may develop very early. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326486

  18. Linear stability of radially-heated circular Couette flow with simulated radial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagg, Randy; Weidman, Patrick D.

    2007-05-01

    The stability of circular Couette flow between vertical concentric cylinders in the presence of a radial temperature gradient is considered with an effective “radial gravity.” In addition to terrestrial buoyancy - ρg e z we include the term - ρg m f(r)e r where g m f(r) is the effective gravitational acceleration directed radially inward across the gap. Physically, this body force arises in experiments using ferrofluid in the annular gap of a Taylor Couette cell whose inner cylinder surrounds a vertical stack of equally spaced disk magnets. The radial dependence f(r) of this force is proportional to the modified Bessel function K 1(κr), where 2π/κ is the spatial period of the magnetic stack and r is the radial coordinate. Linear stability calculations made to compare with conditions reported by Ali and Weidman (J. Fluid Mech., 220, 1990) show strong destabilization effects, measured by the onset Rayleigh number R, when the inner wall is warmer, and strong stabilization effects when the outer wall is warmer, with increasing values of the dimensionless radial gravity γ = g m /g. Further calculations presented for the geometry and fluid properties of a terrestrial laboratory experiment reveal a hitherto unappreciated structure of the stability problem for differentially-heated cylinders: multiple wavenumber minima exist in the marginal stability curves. Transitions in global minima among these curves give rise to a competition between differing instabilities of the same spiral mode number, but widely separated axial wavenumbers.

  19. Non-radial flow in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J. D.; Paularena, K. I.; Gazis, P. R.

    1995-01-01

    Although the radial component of the solar wind dominates the solar wind speed, significant non-radial velocity components are also present. These flows are more difficult to measure accurately, but we now have data sets including the east-west (tangential) and north-south (normal) flows from PVO at Venus, IMP 8 at Earth, and Voyagers 1 and 2 from 1 to 45 AU. We compare the non-radial flow observations from these spacecraft. One of the more interesting features is that the north-south flow angle observed at Earth and Venus oscillates with the period of a local (Earth or Venus) year. These oscillations occur throughout two solar cycles in the IMP 8 data set and are very apparent in the PVO data from 1978 to 1986 but less obvious after this. We will report on the origin of this feature. The tangential flow observed by both IMP 8 and Voyager is on average slightly positive (approximately 1.75 km/s). The magnitudes of the nonradial velocity components decrease with distance from the Sun.

  20. FUEL SUBASSEMBLY CONSTRUCTION FOR RADIAL FLOW IN A NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1962-12-25

    An assembly of fuel elements for a boiling water reactor arranged for radial flow of the coolant is described. The ingress for the coolant is through a central header tube, perforated with parallel circumferertial rows of openings each having a lip to direct the coolant flow downward. Around the central tube there are a number of equally spaced concentric trays, closely fitiing the central header tube. Cylindrical fuel elements are placed in a regular pattern around the central tube, piercing the trays. A larger tube encloses the arrangement, with space provided for upward flow of coolart beyond the edge of the trays. (AEC)

  1. Radial gas flows and star formation in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Tony Hao

    We present high-resolution (6″) observations of CO in seven nearby spiral galaxies made with the BIMA interferometer. Complementary single-dish data allow us to produce maps that recover flux on all spatial scales down to the interferometer resolution. The CO data are used in conjunction with previously published H I data to search for evidence of radial inflows in galaxy disks. Utilizing the Fourier decomposition of velocity fields developed by Schoenmakers et al. (1997), we construct simple models illustrating the effects of radial inflow, warps, and bar or spiral-arm streaming on the observed Fourier coefficients. In all seven galaxies we find kinematic evidence for warps, elliptical streaming motions, or both. These futures lead to apparent inflow or outflow velocities of up to 50 km s-1, masking the effect of any net radial flows. In the inner disks of NGC 5033 and 5055, where the velocity fields show well-ordered rotation, we place an upper limit of 5 km s -1 on any axisymmetric radial flows. We then consider possible indirect evidence for radial flows, based on gas consumption arguments and radial abundance gradients. Applying extinction corrections that vary with gas density, we find gas depletion times of roughly 1 Gyr in the central regions and increasing with radius, similar to the situation in the Milky Way. Combined with estimates of the birthrate parameter, our results are difficult to reconcile with closed-box evolution models. The observed abundance gradients are also steeper than would be expected for a closed-box model, but could be accounted for with fairly modest (<1 km s-1) radial inflows. Finally we consider the relationship between gas content and the star formation rate as traced by Halpha emission. Depending on the extinction corrections applied, our results support the existence of a Schmidt law with a power-law index of 1.1--1.7. An a1ternative star formation law, in which the star formation timescale is proportional to the orbital timescale, also matches the data if radially varying extinction corrections are used. The gravitational stability parameter Q does not appear to be related to star formation, at least when only the gas is considered; inclusion of the stellar component may be necessary to allow Q ˜ 1 for low gas fractions. We find that the ratio of H I to H 2 increases with galactocentric radius as R 1.5 and propose that it is determined largely by the interstellar pressure. Our results suggest that the interstellar pressure and metallicity control the formation of molecular clouds from H I, whereas star formation in molecular clouds occurs at a roughly constant rate per unit H2 mass.

  2. Macrodispersion by diverging radial flows in randomly heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severino, Gerardo; Santini, Alessandro; Sommella, Angelo

    2011-04-01

    Radial flow takes place in a heterogeneous porous formation where the transmissivity T is modelled as a stationary random space function ( RSF). The steady flow is driven by a given rate, and the mean velocity is radial. A pulse-like of a tracer is injected in the porous formation, and the thin plume spreads due to the fluctuations of the velocity which results a RSF as well. Transport is characterized by the mean front, and by the second spatial moment of the plume. We are primarily interested in tracer macrodispersion modelling. With the neglect of pore-scale dispersion, macrodispersion coefficients are computed at the second order of approximation, without neglecting the head-gradient fluctuations. Although transport is non-ergodic at the source, it is shown that ergodicity is achieved at small distances from the source. This is due to the fact that close to the source local velocities are quite large, and therefore solute particles become uncorrelated very soon. Under ergodic conditions, we compare macrodispersion mechanism in radial flows with that occurring in mean uniform flows. At short distances the spreading effect is highly enhanced by the large variability of the flow field, whereas at large distances transport exhibits a lesser dispersion due to the reduction of velocities. This supports the explanation provided by Indelman and Dagan (1999) to justify why the macrodispersivity is found smaller than that pertaining to mean uniform flows. The model is tested against a tracer transport experiment (Fernàndez-Garcia et al., 2004) by comparing the theoretical and experimental breakthrough curves. The accordance with real data, that is achieved without any fitting to concentration values, strengthens the capability of the proposed model to grasp the main features of such an experiment, the approximations as well as experimental uncertainties notwithstanding.

  3. Multiphase flow modeling in centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Adelmann, S; Schwienheer, C; Schembecker, G

    2011-09-01

    The separation efficiency in Centrifugal Partition Chromatography (CPC) depends on selection of a suitable biphasic solvent system (distribution ratio, selectivity factor, sample solubility) and is influenced by hydrodynamics in the chambers. Especially the stationary phase retention, the interfacial area for mass transfer and the flow pattern (backmixing) are important parameters. Their relationship with physical properties, operating parameters and chamber geometry is not completely understood and predictions are hardly possible. Experimental flow visualization is expensive and two-dimensional only. Therefore we simulated the flow pattern using a volume-of-fluid (VOF) method, which was implemented in OpenFOAM®. For the three-dimensional simulation of a rotating FCPC®-chamber, gravitational centrifugal and Coriolis forces were added to the conservation equation. For experimental validation the flow pattern of different solvent systems was visualized with an optical measurement system. The amount of mobile phase in a chamber was calculated from gray scale values of videos recorded by an image processing routine in ImageJ®. To visualize the flow of the stationary phase polyethylene particles were used to perform a qualitative particle image velocimetry (PIV) analysis. We found a good agreement between flow patterns and velocity profiles of experiments and simulations. By using the model we found that increasing the chamber depth leads to higher specific interfacial area. Additionally a circular flow in the stationary phase was identified that lowers the interfacial area because it pushes the jet of mobile phase to the chamber wall. The Coriolis force alone gives the impulse for this behavior. As a result the model is easier to handle than experiments and allows 3D prediction of hydrodynamics in the chamber. Additionally it can be used for optimizing geometry and operating parameters for given physical properties of solvent systems. PMID:21324465

  4. A New Power Flow Method in Radial Distribution Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohyoshi, Wataru; Mori, Hiroyuki

    In this paper, a new efficient method is proposed for power flow calculation in radial distribution systems. The distribution busines is changing the need to plan and respond to technical change, growth in distributed generation and deregulated power markets. Thus, it is important to improve fundamental analytical tools in distribution systems. This paper proposes a new method for the power flow calculation in distribution systems. The Newton-Raphson method does not work in some distribution systems. As a result, DistFlow that focuses on the network topology was developed to overcome the problem. However, there is still room for improvement in terms of computational efficiency. In this paper, a method is proposed to improve the efficiency in creating the Jacobian.

  5. Onset of radial flow in p+p collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jiang, Kun; Zhu, Yinying; Liu, Weitao; Chen, Hongfang; Li, Cheng; Ruan, Lijuan; Tang, Zebo; Xu, Zhangbu

    2015-02-23

    It has been debated for decades whether hadrons emerging from p+p collisions exhibit collective expansion. The signal of the collective motion in p+p collisions is not as clear as in heavy-ion collisions because of the low multiplicity and large fluctuation in p+p collisions. Tsallis Blast-Wave (TBW) model is a thermodynamic approach, introduced to handle the overwhelming correlation and fluctuation in the hadronic processes. We have systematically studied the identified particle spectra in p+p collisions from RHIC to LHC using TBW and found no appreciable radial flow in p+p collisions below √s = 900 GeV. At LHC higher energy of 7more »TeV in p+p collisions, the radial flow velocity achieves an average of (β) = 0.320 ± 0.005. This flow velocity is comparable to that in peripheral (40-60%) Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In addition, breaking of the identified particle spectra mT scaling was also observed at LHC from a model independent test.« less

  6. Radial accretion flows on static spherically symmetric black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaverra, Eliana; Sarbach, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the steady radial accretion of matter into a nonrotating black hole. Neglecting the self-gravity of the accreting matter, we consider a rather general class of static, spherically symmetric and asymptotically flat background spacetimes with a regular horizon. In addition to the Schwarzschild metric, this class contains certain deformation of it, which could arise in alternative gravity theories or from solutions of the classical Einstein equations in the presence of external matter fields. Modeling the ambient matter surrounding the black hole by a relativistic perfect fluid, we reformulate the accretion problem as a dynamical system, and under rather general assumptions on the fluid equation of state, we determine the local and global qualitative behavior of its phase flow. Based on our analysis and generalizing previous work by Michel, we prove that for any given positive particle density number at infinity, there exists a unique radial, steady-state accretion flow which is regular at the horizon. We determine the physical parameters of the flow, including its accretion and compression rates, and discuss their dependency on the background metric.

  7. Onset of radial flow in p+p collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jiang, Kun; Zhu, Yinying; Liu, Weitao; Chen, Hongfang; Li, Cheng; Ruan, Lijuan; Tang, Zebo; Xu, Zhangbu

    2015-02-23

    It has been debated for decades whether hadrons emerging from p+p collisions exhibit collective expansion. The signal of the collective motion in p+p collisions is not as clear as in heavy-ion collisions because of the low multiplicity and large fluctuation in p+p collisions. Tsallis Blast-Wave (TBW) model is a thermodynamic approach, introduced to handle the overwhelming correlation and fluctuation in the hadronic processes. We have systematically studied the identified particle spectra in p+p collisions from RHIC to LHC using TBW and found no appreciable radial flow in p+p collisions below √s = 900 GeV. At LHC higher energy of 7more » TeV in p+p collisions, the radial flow velocity achieves an average of (β) = 0.320 ± 0.005. This flow velocity is comparable to that in peripheral (40-60%) Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In addition, breaking of the identified particle spectra mT scaling was also observed at LHC from a model independent test.« less

  8. Exact Convex Relaxation of Optimal Power Flow in Radial Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, LW; Li, N; Topcu, U; Low, SH

    2015-01-01

    The optimal power flow (OPF) problem determines a network operating point that minimizes a certain objective such as generation cost or power loss. It is nonconvex. We prove that a global optimum of OPF can be obtained by solving a second-order cone program, under a mild condition after shrinking the OPF feasible set slightly, for radial power networks. The condition can be checked a priori, and holds for the IEEE 13, 34, 37, 123-bus networks and two real-world networks.

  9. A visual study of radial inward choked flow of liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.; Hsu, Y. Y.

    1973-01-01

    A visual study of the radial inward choked flow of liquid nitrogen was conducted. Data and high speed moving pictures were obtained. The study indicated the following: (1) steady radial inward choked flow seems equivalent to steady choked flow through axisymmetric nozzles, (2) transient choked flows through the radial gap are not uniform and the discharge pattern appears as nonuniform impinging jets, and (3) the critical mass flow rate data for the transient case appear different from those of the steady case.

  10. Separation of Metal Complexes with Counter Ions by Tube Radial Distribution Chromatography Using a Ternary Solvent Containing 8-quinolinol.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yuji; Fujinaga, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Masahiko; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    An open-tubular capillary chromatography system (tube radial distribution chromatography, TRDC) was developed using a ternary solvent (water-acetonitrile-ethyl acetate; volume ratio, 3:8:4) containing 10 mmol L(-1) 8-quinolinol for the separation of nitrate, chloride, and sulfate compounds of Ni(II), Al(III), and Fe(III). When a mixed solution of the Ni(II) compounds was injected into an untreated fused-silica capillary tube (90 cm × 75 μm i.d.) with a ternary solvent flow rate of 0.8 μL min(-1), the compounds were eluted in the following order: [Ni(II)-(8-quinolinol)3] complex, [Ni(II)-(8-quinolinol)]-nitrate ion interaction complex, [Ni(II)-(8-quinolinol)]-chloride ion interaction complex, and [Ni(II)-(8-quinolinol)]-sulfate ion interaction complex. The elution of mixtures of the Al(III) and Fe(III) compounds showed similar trends. PMID:26561263

  11. Linear and radial flow targets for characterizing downhole flow in perforations

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, M. ); Tariq, S.M. ); Halleck, P.M. )

    1989-08-01

    Two types of sandstone targets are commonly used to test flow efficiency of shaped-charge jet perforations: linear targets, in which flow enters only the unperforated end of the cylindrical sample, and radial targets, in which flow enters through the end and sides of the sample. To determine which of these targets best represents downhole conditions, the flow distribution along the length of a perforation has been studied by three-dimensional (3D) finite-element analyses. Linear and radial laboratory targets have been compared with downhole perforations under varying conditions. For ideal perforations, the low-shot-density (LSD) case is adequately represented by the radial target, while the high-shot-density (HSD) case falls between the two targets. With realistic crushed and damaged zones, the HSD closely matches the linear target, and the LSD case falls between the two targets.

  12. Boiling radial flow in fractures of varying wall porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Barnitt, Robb Allan

    2000-06-01

    The focus of this report is the coupling of conductive heat transfer and boiling convective heat transfer, with boiling flow in a rock fracture. A series of experiments observed differences in boiling regimes and behavior, and attempted to quantify a boiling convection coefficient. The experimental study involved boiling radial flow in a simulated fracture, bounded by a variety of materials. Nonporous and impermeable aluminum, highly porous and permeable Berea sandstone, and minimally porous and permeable graywacke from The Geysers geothermal field. On nonporous surfaces, the heat flux was not strongly coupled to injection rate into the fracture. However, for porous surfaces, heat flux, and associated values of excess temperature and a boiling convection coefficient exhibited variation with injection rate. Nucleation was shown to occur not upon the visible surface of porous materials, but a distance below the surface, within the matrix. The depth of boiling was a function of injection rate, thermal power supplied to the fracture, and the porosity and permeability of the rock. Although matrix boiling beyond fracture wall may apply only to a finite radius around the point of injection, higher values of heat flux and a boiling convection coefficient may be realized with boiling in a porous, rather than nonporous surface bounded fracture.

  13. An investigation of radial tracer flow in naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Jetzabeth, Ramirez-Sabag; Fernando, Samaniego V.; Jesus, Rivera R.; Fernando Rodriguez

    1991-01-01

    This study presents a general solution for the radial flow of tracers in naturally fractured reservoirs. Continuous and finite step injection of chemical and radioactive tracers are considered. The reservoir is treated as being composed of two regions: a mobile region where longitudinal dispersion and convection take place and a stagnant region where only diffusion and adsorption are allowed. Radioactive decay is considered in both regions. The model of this study is thoroughly compared to those previously presented in literature by Moench and Ogata, Tang et al., Chen et al., and Hsieh et al. The solution is numerically inverted by means of the Crump algorithm. A detailed validation of the model with respect to solutions previously presented and/or simplified physical conditions solutions (i.e., homogeneous case) or limit solutions (i.e., for short times) was carried out. The influence of various dimensionless parameters that enter into the solution was investigated. A discussion of results obtained through the Crump and Stehfest algorithm is presented, concluding that the Crump method provides more reliable tracer concentrations.

  14. A visual study of radial inward choked flow of liquid nitrogen.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.; Hsu, Y. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Data and high speed movies were acquired on pressurized subcooled liquid nitrogen flowing radially inward through a 0.0076 cm gap. The stagnation pressure ranged from 0.7 to 4 MN/sq m. Steady radial inward choked flow appears equivalent to steady choked flow through axisymmetric nozzles. Transient choked flows through the radial gap are not uniform and the discharge pattern appears as nonuniform impinging jets. The critical mass flow rate data for the transient case appear different from those for the steady case. On the mass flow rate vs pressure map, the slope and separation of the isotherms appear to be less for transient than for steady radial choked flow.

  15. Computational investigations of axial and radial flow compressor aeromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Kishore

    The focus of this research is aeromechanics issues in advanced compressors of the type used in modern day high thrust-to-weight ratio aircraft gas turbine engines. The driving factor for the studies undertaken is the High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) failure of gas turbine blades. HCF is a key technology issue in the development and endurance of gas turbine engines that arises primarily due to resonant response of turbomachine blading to unsteady aerodynamic excitation. Because it is a truly coupled nonlinear fluid-structure problem, predicting HCF requires a unified approach to modeling both the fluid and the structure. Considering the serious nature of HCF and the inadequacy of lower order design systems to accurately predict blade vibratory stress, the need to develop advanced predictive tools is pressing. The first aspect of this research therefore addresses the development of a turbomachinery coupled fluid-structure interaction tool to predict flow-induced blade vibration. To this end, the TAM-ALE3D solver is further developed as a derivative of the ALE3D code of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the second aspect of this research, TAM-ALE3D is validated by predicting viscous blade row unsteady aerodynamics and the modal properties of the stator vane in the baseline configuration of the Purdue Transonic Compressor. It is then used to predict the vane vibratory response excited by rotor wakes at resonance, with the resulting stresses in the range expected. For radial flow compressors, a very limited knowledge base exists on the unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic mechanisms that result in HCF. The bulk of this research is thus directed at the understanding of these fundamental unsteady phenomena using TAM-ALE3D as an investigative tool. The energy transfer from the downstream diffuser generated forcing function to the impeller blading is addressed by means of unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses. From these computational investigations, the details of the impeller blade excitation are elucidated, and promising directions for future research are identified.

  16. Flow field thermal gradient gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Boeker, Peter; Leppert, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Negative temperature gradients along the gas chromatographic separation column can maximize the separation capabilities for gas chromatography by peak focusing and also lead to lower elution temperatures. Unfortunately, so far a smooth thermal gradient over a several meters long separation column could only be realized by costly and complicated manual setups. Here we describe a simple, yet flexible method for the generation of negative thermal gradients using standard and easily exchangeable separation columns. The measurements made with a first prototype reveal promising new properties of the optimized separation process. The negative thermal gradient and the superposition of temperature programming result in a quasi-parallel separation of components each moving simultaneously near their lowered specific equilibrium temperatures through the column. Therefore, this gradient separation process is better suited for thermally labile molecules such as explosives and natural or aroma components. High-temperature GC methods also benefit from reduced elution temperatures. Even for short columns very high peak capacities can be obtained. In addition, the gradient separation is particularly beneficial for very fast separations below 1 min overall retention time. Very fast measurements of explosives prove the benefits of using negative thermal gradients. The new concept can greatly reduce the cycle time of high-resolution gas chromatography and can be integrated into hyphenated or comprehensive gas chromatography setups. PMID:26235451

  17. Radial Gas Flows in Colliding Galaxies: Connecting Simulations and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iono, Daisuke; Yun, Min S.; Mihos, J. Christopher

    2004-11-01

    We investigate the detailed response of gas to the formation of transient and long-lived dynamical structures induced in the early stages of a disk-disk collision and identify observational signatures of radial gas inflow through a detailed examination of the collision simulation of an equal-mass bulge-dominated galaxy. Our analysis and discussion mainly focuses on the evolution of the diffuse and dense gas in the early stages of the collision, when the two disks are interacting but have not yet merged. Stars respond to the tidal interaction by forming both transient arms and long-lived m=2 bars, but the gas response is more transient, flowing directly toward the central regions within about 108 yr after the initial collision. The rate of inflow declines when more than half of the total gas supply reaches the inner few kiloparsecs, where the gas forms a dense nuclear ring inside the stellar bar. The average gas inflow rate to the central 1.8 kpc is ~7 Msolar yr-1 with a peak rate of 17 Msolar yr-1. Gas with high volume density is found in the inner parts of the postcollision disks at size scales close to the spatial resolution of the simulations, and this may be a direct result of shocks traced by the discontinuity in the gas velocity field. The evolution of gas in a bulgeless progenitor galaxy is also discussed, and a possible link to the ``chain galaxy'' population observed at high redshifts is inferred. The evolution of the structural parameters such as asymmetry and concentration of both stars and gas are studied in detail. Further, a new structure parameter (the compactness parameter K) that traces the evolution of the size scale of the gas relative to the stellar disk is introduced, and this may be a useful tracer to determine the merger chronology of colliding systems. Noncircular gas kinematics driven by the perturbation of the nonaxisymmetric structure can produce distinct emission features in the ``forbidden velocity quadrants'' of the position-velocity diagram (PVD). The dynamical mass calculated using the rotation curve derived from fitting the emission envelope of the PVD can determine the true mass to within 20%-40%. The evolution of the molecular fraction (MH2/MH2+HI) is a potential tracer to quantitatively assign the age of the interaction, but the application to real systems may require additional observational diagnostics to properly assess the exact chronology of the merger evolution.

  18. Flow control by combining radial pulsation and rotation of a cylinder in uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oualli, H.; Hanchi, S.; Bouabdallah, A.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2008-11-01

    Flow visualizations and hot-wire measurements are carried out to study a circular cylinder undergoing simultaneous radial pulsation and rotation and placed in a uniform flow. The Reynolds number is in the range of 1,000--22,000, for which transition in the shear layers and near wake is expected. Our previous experimental and numerical investigations in this subcritical flow regime have established the existence of an important energy transfer mechanism from the mean flow to the fluctuations. Radial pulsations cause and enhance that energy transfer. Certain values of the amplitude and frequency of the pulsations lead to negative drag (i.e. thrust). The nonlinear interaction between the Magnus effect induced by the steady rotation of the cylinder and the near-wake modulated by the bluff body's pulsation leads to alteration of the omnipresent Krmn vortices and the possibility of optimizing the lift-to-drag ratio as well as the rates of heat and mass transfer. Other useful applications include the ability to enhance or suppress the turbulence intensity, and to avoid the potentially destructive lock-in phenomenon in the wake of bridges, electric cables and other structures.

  19. Detailed kinetic performance analysis of micromachined radially elongated pillar array columns for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Callewaert, Manly; Desmet, Gert; Ottevaere, Heidi; De Malsche, Wim

    2016-02-12

    The individual factors that determine the kinetic performance (B- and C-term band broadening and bed permeability Kv) of radially elongated pillar (REP) columns are studied. To this end, columns with REPs having 4 different aspect ratios (AR=9, 12, 15, 20) were characterized experimentally and by means of numerical simulations. A tortuosity and retention based plate height equation was established, enabling a good global fit for all studied conditions. The B-term plate height contribution appears to decrease with a factor equaling the square of the flow path tortuosity τ. Going from AR=12 to AR=20 (τ=5.7 and τ=9.0 respectively), this resulted in a shift in plate height expressed in axial coordinates from Hmin=0.42μm to Hmin=0.25 for non-retained conditions and from H=0.77μm to H=0.57μm for a component with k=1.0. The obtained parameters were combined to predict optimal time-efficiency combinations for all possible channel lengths. This revealed an efficiency limit of N=10(7) plates for a non-retained component and N=7-8×10(6) for k=1 for a channel with an AR=20, corresponding to a channel length of 2.5m and a void time of 2.4h. PMID:26795281

  20. One-dimensional analysis of plane and radial thin film flows including solid-body rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, S.; Hankey, W.; Faghri, A.; Swanson, T.

    1989-01-01

    The flow of a thin liquid film with a free surface along a horizontal plate which emanates from a pressurized vessel is examined by integrating the equations of motion across the thin liquid layer and discretizing the integrated equations using finite difference techniques. The effects of 0-g and solid-body rotation will be discussed. The two cases of interest are plane flow and radial flow. In plane flow, the liquid is considered to be flowing along a channel with no change in the width of the channel, whereas in radial flow the liquid spreads out radially over a disk, so that the area changes along the radius. It is desired to determine the height of the liquid film at any location along the plate of disk, so that the heat transfer from the plate or disk can be found. The possibility that the flow could encounter a hydraulic jump is accounted for.

  1. On the Problem of Theoretical Pressure of a Radial-Flow Pump Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlechko, V. N.; Protasov, S. K.

    2014-11-01

    An analysis has been made of the velocity of motion of a medium in the wheel of a radial-flow pump unit under the action of a centrifugal force and overcoming the medium's inertial force with its blades. Relations for the pressure produced by the radial-flow pump unit as a function of the angle of inclination of its blades have been derived. The well-known Euler equation describing the dynamic pressure of the radial-flow pump unit has been supplemented to determine its static pressure. An analysis of the obtained results has shown that the pressure of the radial-flow pump unit is maximum at an angle of inclination of its blades of 110o and negative at 140o or larger angles.

  2. Computer program for the analysis of the cross flow in a radial inflow turbine scroll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Abdallah, S.; Tabakoff, W.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program was used to solve the governing of the potential flow in the cross sectional planes of a radial inflow turbine scroll. A list of the main program, the subroutines, and typical output example are included.

  3. MODFLOW procedure to simulate axisymmetric flow in radially heterogeneous and layered aquifer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louwyck, Andy; Vandenbohede, Alexander; Bakker, Mark; Lebbe, Luc

    2014-08-01

    A procedure is outlined to simulate axisymmetric groundwater flow in radially heterogeneous and layered aquifer systems using the unmodified version of MODFLOW. The procedure is straightforward, as it only requires correction of some of the input parameters. In contrast to other MODFLOW procedures to simulate axisymmetric flow, no restrictions are imposed on the type of flow, the discretization of radial distance, or the parameter values. Hence, the method can deal with both confined and unconfined flow, wellbore storage, and axisymmetric aquifer inhomogeneities including effects of finite-thickness skin and gravel pack. Several test cases are presented, which compare the calculated results with existing analytical solutions, the analytic element solver TTim, and the axisymmetric, finite-difference model MAxSym. It is concluded that the MODFLOW procedure is capable of simulating accurately axisymmetric flow in radially heterogeneous multi-aquifer systems.

  4. Parameter Estimation of Transmissivity Fields with Non-radial Flow Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. O.; Roberts, R. M.; Holt, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Non-radial flow signatures are seen in many hydraulic tests in fractured media. The generalized radial flow approach, which uses a variable flow dimension (n) to incorporate changing cross-sectional area of flow, is increasingly used to account for non-radial flow in hydraulic test interpretation. Representing non-radial flow in a 2-D numerical model has been problematic. As part of an effort to understand the structuring of heterogeneous transmissivity that produces persisting non-radial flow dimensions, we generated spatially correlated binary random transmissivity fields. Simulated pumping in these fields produced delta pressures, log-derivatives, and flow dimensions similar to those observed in pumping tests conducted in fractured dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. As the main point of interest for pumping tests is the estimation of aquifer parameters (i.e., storativity (S) and hydraulic conductivity (K)), we evaluate two methods of parameter estimation in our binary random fields: a variable geometry approach and a variable K approach. We examine error in aquifer parameter estimates for each method and characterize the sources of error. Our methods may provide insight into how to better understand and apply parameter estimation techniques in similar flow systems and reveal possible pitfalls that exist in assuming radial flow geometries. Acknowledgements This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Transient radial flow to a well in an unconfined aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Zhu, Ming.

    1991-08-01

    The analytic solutions of Boulton (1954) and Neuman (1972) for transient flow to a well in an unconfined aquifer are based on the assumption that the role of the unsaturated zone can be adequately accounted for by restricting attention to the release of water from the zone through which the water table moves. Both researchers mathematically treat this released water as a time-dependent source term. The differences between the models of Boulton and Neuman are that the former neglects vertical components of flow in the aquifer, but allows for an exponential process for the release of water as a function of time, whereas the latter assumes instantaneous release from storage, but accounts for vertical components of flow. Given this set of assumptions, we examine the applicability of these two methods using a general purpose numerical model through a process of verification extension and comparison. The issues addressed include: the role of well-bore storage in masking intermediate-time behavior, combined effects of exponential release as well as vertical flow, logic for vertical averaging of drawdowns, and the sensitivity of system response to the magnitude of specific yield. The issue of how good the assumptions of Boulton and Neuman are in the context of the general theory of unsaturated flow is addressed in part 2 of this two-part series of reports.

  6. Phase Change Effects on Immiscible Flow Displacements in Radial Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadlouydarab, Majid; Azaiez, Jalel; Chen, Zhangxin

    2014-11-01

    We report a systematic simulation of immiscible fluid-fluid displacements in radial injection in the presence of phase change. Due to the presence of two fluid-fluid interfaces in the system, a special treatment has been adopted. To track the leading interface position, two highly accurate methods including Level Set and Immersed Interface Method were used, while for locating the trailing interface an energy equation was adopted assuming the existence of a constant thin condensate layer. Dimensional analysis led to three important dimensionless groups including capillary number (Ca), Jacob number (Ja) and viscosity ratios (M) of the three fluids. Simulation results indicate significant influences of these parameters on the development of the instability and the interfacial morphology of fingers. Increasing Ca or M tends to amplify the interfacial instability, fingertip splitting, and results in longer fingers. In contrast, increasing Ja has stabilizing effects due to an increase of the thickness of the condensate layer. On the other hand at lower viscosity ratios as well as lower Ca, because of compensation effects of the phase change, both leading and trailing interfaces are found to be less unstable. Moreover accumulated condensate and oil saturation depletion curves show increasing and decreasing trends, respectively, when the Ca increases. Although viscosity ratio and Ja have similar effects on the accumulated condensate, they do not show any effect on the oil depletion saturation.

  7. Flow behavior in inlet guide vanes of radial turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokhey, J.; Tabakoff, W.; Hosny, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    Scroll flow is discussed. Streamline pattern and velocity distribution in the guide vanes are calculated. The blade surface temperature distribution is also determined. The effects of the blade shapes and the nozzle channel width on the velocity profiles at inlet to the guide vanes are investigated.

  8. Fluctuations of harmonic and radial flow in heavy ion collisions with principal components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazeliauskas, Aleksas; Teaney, Derek

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the spectrum of harmonic flow, vn(pT) for n =0 -5 , in event-by-event hydrodynamic simulations of Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (√{sN N}=2.76 TeV ) with principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA procedure finds two dominant contributions to the two-particle correlation function. The leading component is identified with the event plane vn(pT) , while the subleading component is responsible for factorization breaking in hydrodynamics. For v0, v1, and v3 the subleading flow is a response to the radial excitation of the corresponding eccentricity. By contrast, for v2 the subleading flow in peripheral collisions is dominated by the nonlinear mixing between the leading elliptic flow and radial flow fluctuations. In the v2 case, the sub-sub-leading mode more closely reflects the response to the radial excitation of ɛ2. A consequence of this picture is that the elliptic flow fluctuations and factorization breaking change rapidly with centrality, and in central collisions (where the leading v2 is small and nonlinear effects can be neglected) the sub-sub-leading mode becomes important. Radial flow fluctuations and nonlinear mixing also play a significant role in the factorization breaking of v4 and v5. We construct good geometric predictors for the orientation and magnitudes of the leading and subleading flows based on a linear response to the geometry, and a quadratic mixing between the leading principal components. Finally, we suggest a set of measurements involving three point correlations which can experimentally corroborate the nonlinear mixing of radial and elliptic flow and its important contribution to factorization breaking as a function of centrality.

  9. Preprocessor and postprocessor computer programs for a radial-flow finite-element model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pucci, A.A., Jr.; Pope, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Preprocessing and postprocessing computer programs that enhance the utility of the U.S. Geological Survey radial-flow model have been developed. The preprocessor program: (1) generates a triangular finite element mesh from minimal data input, (2) produces graphical displays and tabulations of data for the mesh , and (3) prepares an input data file to use with the radial-flow model. The postprocessor program is a version of the radial-flow model, which was modified to (1) produce graphical output for simulation and field results, (2) generate a statistic for comparing the simulation results with observed data, and (3) allow hydrologic properties to vary in the simulated region. Examples of the use of the processor programs for a hypothetical aquifer test are presented. Instructions for the data files, format instructions, and a listing of the preprocessor and postprocessor source codes are given in the appendixes. (Author 's abstract)

  10. Anomalous magnetosheath flows and distorted subsolar magnetopause for radial interplanetary magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shue, J.-H.; Chao, J.-K.; Song, P.; McFadden, J. P.; Suvorova, A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Plaschke, F.

    2009-09-01

    On 12 August 2007 from 1436 to 1441 UT, when the five THEMIS probes (THA, THB, THC, THD, and THE) were located near the subsolar magnetopause, a sunward flow was observed in the magnetosheath. A fast anti-sunward flow (-280 km/s) was observed in the magnetosheath before the sunward flow. Although THA observed this fast anti-sunward flow, THC and THD, which were also in the magnetosheath, instead observed a slow flow, indicating that the fast flow was small in scale. With the observed flow vectors and the magnetopause normal directions estimated from tangential discontinuity analysis, we conclude that this fast flow creates an indentation on the magnetopause, 1 R E deep and 2 R E wide. The magnetopause subsequently rebounds, rotating the flow direction sunward along the surface of the magnetopause. The fast flow is likely related to the radial interplanetary magnetic field.

  11. Anomalous Magnetosheath Flows and Distorted Subsolar Magnetopause for Radial Interplanetary Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shue, J.; Chao, J. K.; Song, P.; McFadden, J. P.; Suvorova, A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Glassmeier, K.; Plaschke, F.

    2009-12-01

    On 12 August 2007 from 1436 to 1441 UT, when the five THEMIS probes (THA, THB, THC, THD, and THE) were located near the subsolar magnetopause, a sunward flow was observed in the magnetosheath. A fast anti-sunward flow (-280 km/s) was observed in the magnetosheath before the sunward flow. Although THA observed this fast anti-sunward flow, THC and THD, which were also in the magnetosheath, instead observed a slow flow, indicating that the fast flow was small in scale. With the observed flow vectors and the magnetopause normal directions estimated from tangential discontinuity analysis, we conclude that this fast flow creates an indentation on the magnetopause, 1 Re deep and 2 Re wide. The magnetopause subsequently rebounds, rotating the flow direction sunward along the surface of the magnetopause. The fast flow is likely related to the radial interplanetary magnetic field.

  12. Travel time statistics under radially converging flow in single fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotovac, Hrvoje; Srzic, Veljko; Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Kekez, Toni; Malenica, Luka

    2015-04-01

    A stochastic methodology based on Adaptive Fup Monte Carlo Method is used to investigate transport of a conservative solute by steady flow to a single pumping well in two-dimensional randomly heterogeneous single fractures. The spatially variable hydraulic transmissivity is modeled as a stationary random function for three different correlation structures (multi-Gaussian, connected and disconnected fields with correlated mean, high and low lnT values, respectively, according to the Zinn and Harvey, 2003) and heterogeneity levels (lnT variance is 1 and 8). Initially, solute particles are injected at outer circle located at 32 correlation lengths from well according to the in flux and resident injection mode. Therefore, breakthrough curve (BTC) statistics in single well due to different spatial structures, heterogeneity levels, injection modes and dispersion influence is considered. For small heterogeneity, all considered effects have small influences on BTC and related moments. As expected in single fractures, high lnT variance is more usual case which considerably changes flow patterns including channelling effect and fact that only few narrow channels carry out most pumping flow rate. Channelling implies significant differences between different injection modes. Resident mode uniformly injects particles implying that most particles pass through "slower" zones that especially increase late arrivals and contribute to the non-Fickian behaviour of transport. Contrary, "in flux" mode drastically reduces first arrivals and mean values, especially for connected correlation fields. The results from two injection modes lie on different sides of homogeneous mean travel time solution and give complementary information for complete representation of conservative transport. For advection transport, correlation structure and especially lnT variance seems to have major influence on BTC characteristics. On the other side, influence of longitudinal and lateral local scale dispersion are negligible, especially for resident injection mode.

  13. Origin and stability of radial density stratification in vortical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Harish; Govindarajan, Rama

    2009-11-01

    A density interface near a vortex winds into a spiral. In the absence of gravity we have shown numerically and through stability analysis that this leads to spiral Kelvin-Helmholtz and centrifugal Rayleigh-Taylor (CRT) instabilities, often reducing the life-time of the vortex dramatically. In this talk we focus on CRT instability, which is driven by centrifugal forces, so flows where the vortex core is heavier than the surroundings are expected to be unstable. Indeed, Sipp et al. (JFM, 2005) and Joly et al. (JFM, 2005), prescribing Gaussian vorticity and density profiles, find no instability in light-cored vortices. Surprisingly however, for some range of parameters, with a Rankine vortex and a step circular density jump we find that making the core lighter can lead to instability. The sharpness of the profiles are thus relevant. The mechanism for this instability, studied by constructing planar analogues in the form of stratified shear flows, bearing similarities with Craik & Adams (JFM, 1979), will be discussed. So will the nonlinear stages of these instabilities from our direct numerical simulations.

  14. Three-dimensional flow measurements in a vaneless radial turbine scroll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabakoff, W.; Wood, B.; Vittal, B. V. R.

    1982-01-01

    The flow behavior in a vaneless radial turbine scroll was examined experimentally. The data was obtained using the slant sensor technique of hot film anemometry. This method used the unsymmetric heat transfer characteristics of a constant temperature hot film sensor to detect the flow direction and magnitude. This was achieved by obtaining a velocity vector measurement at three sensor positions with respect to the flow. The true magnitude and direction of the velocity vector was then found using these values and a Newton-Raphson numerical technique. The through flow and secondary flow velocity components are measured at various points in three scroll sections.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL CHARACTERIZATION OF COHERENT, RADIALLY-SHEARED ZONAL FLOWS IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    MCKEE,GR; FONCK,RJ; JAKUBOWSKI,M; BURRELL,KH; HALLATSCHEK,K; MOYER,RA; NEVINS,W; PORTER,GD; RUDAKOV,DL; XU,X

    2002-11-01

    A271 EXPERIMENTAL CHARACTERIZATION OF COHERENT, RADIALLY-SHEARED ZONAL FLOWS IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK. Application of time-delay-estimation techniques to two-dimensional measurements of density fluctuations, obtained with beam emission spectroscopy in DIII-D plasmas, has provided temporally and spatially resolved measurements of the turbulence flow-field. Features that are characteristic of self-generated zonal flows are observed in the radial region near 0.85 {<=} r/a {<=} 1.0. These features include a coherent oscillation (approximately 15 kHz) in the poloidal flow of density fluctuations that has a long poloidal wavelength, possibly m = 0, narrow radial extent (k{sub r}{rho}{sub I} < 0.2), and whose frequency varies monotonically with the local temperature. The approximate effective shearing rate, dv{sub {theta}}/dr, of the flow is of the same order of magnitude as the measured nonlinear decorrelation rate of the turbulence, and the density fluctuation amplitude is modulated at the frequency of the observed flow oscillation. Some phase coherence is observed between the higher wavenumber density fluctuations and low frequency poloidal flow fluctuations, suggesting a Reynolds stress contribution. These characteristics are consistent with predicted features of zonal flows, specifically identified as geodesic acoustic modes, observed in 3-D Braginskii simulations of core/edge turbulence.

  16. Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantley, L. Reed, Sr.; Demanche, Edna L.; Klemm, E. Barbara; Kyselka, Will; Phillips, Edwin A.; Pottenger, Francis M.; Yamamoto, Karen N.; Young, Donald B.

    This booklet presents some activities on chromatography. Directions for preparing leaf pigment extracts using alcohol are given, and paper chromatography and thin-layer chromatography are described as modifications of the basic principles of chromatography. (KHR)

  17. Three dimensional unsteady flow calculations in radial components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatsis, A.

    A numerical model to predict the impeller response due to the downstream static pressure distortion caused by the volute when a centrifugal compressor works at off design conditions is presented. The three dimensional Euler equations are solved by a time marching technique allowing the evaluation of the unsteady flowfield using the finite volume space discretization and Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme. Phase lagged periodicity conditions were used in the computations of the unsteady flow upstream and downstream the blade channel. Reflecting and non-reflecting boundary conditions were tested. It was demonstrated that the latter result in faster convergence than the former. A cyclic variation of the impeller flowfield due to the donwstream static pressure non-uniform distribution is observed.

  18. Radial heterogeneity of some analytical columns used in high-performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Mriziq, Khaled S; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-01-01

    An on-column electrochemical microdetector was used to determine accurately the radial distribution of the mobile phase velocity and of the column efficiency at the exit of three common analytical columns, namely a 100 mm x 4.6 mm C18 bonded silica-based monolithic column, a 150 mm x 4.6 mm column packed with 2.7 {micro}m porous shell particles of C18 bonded silica (HALO), and a 150 mm x 4.6 mm column packed with 3 {micro}m fully porous C18 bonded silica particles (LUNA). The results obtained demonstrate that all three columns are not radially homogeneous. In all three cases, the efficiency was found to be lower in the wall region of the column than in its core region (the central core with a radius of 1/3 the column inner radius). The decrease in local efficiency from the core to the wall regions was lower in the case of the monolith (ca. 25%) than in that of the two particle-packed columns (ca. 35-50%). The mobile phase velocity was found to be ca. 1.5% higher in the wall than in the core region of the monolithic column while, in contrast, it was ca. 2.5-4.0% lower in the wall region for the two particle-packed columns.

  19. Effects of Skeletonized versus Pedicled Radial Artery on Postoperative Graft Patency and Flow

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, Rômulo C. Arnal; Staico, Rodolfo; Issa, Mario; Arnoni, Antoninho Sanfins; Chaccur, Paulo; Abdulmassih, Camilo; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas Jackson; Paulista, Paulo Paredes; de Souza, Luiz Carlos Bento; Moreira, Luiz Felipe P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Radial artery (RA) was the second arterial graft introduced in clinical practice for myocardial revascularization. The skeletonization technique of the left internal thoracic artery (LITA) may actually change the graft's flow capacity with potential advantages. This leads to the assumption that the behavior of the RA, as a coronary graft, is similar to that of the LITA, when skeletonized. Objective This study evaluated 'free' aortic-coronary radial artery (RA) grafts, whether skeletonized or with adjacent tissues. Methods A prospective randomized study comparing 40 patients distributed into two groups was conducted. In group I, we used skeletonized radial arteries (20 patients), and in group II, we used radial arteries with adjacent tissues (20 patients). After the surgical procedure, patients underwent flow velocity measurements. Results The main surgical variables were: RA internal diameter, RA length, and free blood flow in the radial artery. The mean RA graft diameters as calculated using quantitative angiography in the immediate postoperative period were similar, as well as the flow velocity measurement variables. On the other hand, coronary cineangiography showed the presence of occlusion in one RA graft and stenosis in five RA grafts in GII, while GI presented stenosis in only one RA graft (p = 0.045). Conclusion These results show that the morphological and pathological features, as well as the hemodynamic performance of the free radial artery grafts, whether prepared in a skeletonized manner or with adjacent tissues, are similar. However, a larger number of non-obstructive lesions may be observed when RA is prepared with adjacent tissues. PMID:24918911

  20. Modelling of turbulent flow in a radial reactor with fixed bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhapbasbayev, U. K.; Ramazanova, G. I.; Kenzhaliev, O. B.

    2015-03-01

    The data of the computation of turbulent flow in the CF- π and CP- π configurations of the radial reactor with a fixed bed are presented. The Reynolds motion equations have been solved jointly with the k- ɛ turbulence model. To couple the parameters of flows at the interface free part-fixed bed the classical continuity equations were used. The computational data are obtained for the averaged and turbulent characteristics, and it is shown that the flow in the fixed bed causes the generation of the turbulence kinetic energy and its dissipation rate; the flow in the CF- π configuration is distributed more uniformly as compared to the CP- π configuration of the radial reactor. Computed data are compared with the experimental ones.

  1. Solids removal from a coldwater recirculating system - comparison of swirl separator and radial-flow settlers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solids removal across two settling devices, i.e., a swirl separator and a radial-flow settler, and across a microscreen drum filter was evaluated in a fully recirculating system containing a single 150 m3 'Cornell-type' dual-drain tank during the production of food-size Arctic char and rainbow trout...

  2. Radial Flow Fludized Filter Finds Niche as a Pretreatment System for Surface Water in Small Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    An emerging technology called radial flow fluidized filter (R3f) has been developed as a low cost simplistic filtration technology for small communities of less than 10,000 people. Fouling is a major impediment to the sustainability of membrane technology particularly for small ...

  3. Designing and updating the flow part of axial and radial-axial turbines through mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanov, Andrey; Rusanov, Roman; Lampart, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    The paper describes an algorithm for the design of axial and radial-axial type turbines. The algorithm is based on using mathematical models of various levels of complexity - from 1D to 3D. Flow path geometry is described by means of analytical methods of profiling using a limited number of parameters. 3D turbulent flow model is realised in the program complex IPMFlow, developed based on the earlier codes FlowER and FlowER-U. Examples of developed or modernized turbines for differentpurpose power machines are presented. They are: an expansion turbine, ORC turbine and cogeneration mediumpressure turbine.

  4. Response of a radial-bladed centrifugal pump to sinusoidal disturbances for noncavitating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. A.; Blade, R. J.; Stevans, W.

    1971-01-01

    A radial-bladed centrifugal pump was run in water with sinusoidal fluctuations of pressure and flow rate imposed at the pump inlet. Since the flow was noncavitating, zero gain was assumed in computing pump impedance. The inertive reactance became greater than the resistance at relatively low frequencies. An electric circuit model was developed in order to explain the trends of inertance and resistance with frequency.

  5. Secondary Floquet modes of instability in Taylor-Couette flow with axial and radial through-flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinand, Denis; Serre, Eric; Lueptow, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Injecting a fluid between a fixed outer impermeable cylinder and concentric rotating permeable inner one and driving it axially is a set-up used in some filtration devices or enzymatic reactors, where the rotation of the inner cylinder promotes mixing or prevents accumulation processes. This set-up can be seen as a Taylor-Couette flow with superimposed axial and radial through-flows and a precise knowledge of the flow structures at stake is a prerequisite for improving these devices. We address the instabilities observed after the laminar flow of a pure, Newtonian solvent has undergone its first two transitions. Previous linear stability analysis has shown that critical convective instabilities take the form of travelling toroidal vortices, turning to helical vortices as the axial flow is increased. Moreover, a weakly non-linear analysis have shown that this primary transition can be subcritical as the radial flow is increased. Based on these previous results, the stability of these primary modes is studied by Floquet analysis. Depending on the strength of the axial and radial flows, harmonic or subharmonic secondary modes are found to be the most dangerous ones. The analytical results are compared to direct numerical simulations using a pseudo-spectral method.

  6. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

    1985-01-04

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  7. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Charles C.; Taylor, Larry T.

    1986-01-01

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  8. Three-dimensional inviscid analysis of radial turbine flow and a limited comparison with experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Y. K.; Civinskas, K. C.

    1985-01-01

    The three-dimensional inviscid DENTON code is used to analyze flow through a radial-inflow turbine rotor. Experimental data from the rotor are compared with analytical results obtained by using the code. The experimental data available for comparison are the radial distributions of circumferentially averaged values of absolute flow angle and total pressure downstream of the rotor exit. The computed rotor-exit flow angles are generally underturned relative to the experimental values, which reflect the boundary-layer separation at the trailing edge and the development of wakes downstream of the rotor. The experimental rotor is designed for a higher-than-optimum work factor of 1.126 resulting in a nonoptimum positive incidence and causing a region of rapid flow adjustment and large velocity gradients. For this experimental rotor, the computed radial distribution of rotor-exit to turbine-inlet total pressure ratios are underpredicted due to the errors in the finite-difference approximations in the regions of rapid flow adjustment, and due to using the relatively coarser grids in the middle of the blade region where the flow passage is highly three-dimensional. Additional results obtained from the three-dimensional inviscid computation are also presented, but without comparison due to the lack of experimental data. These include quasi-secondary velocity vectors on cross-channel surfaces, velocity components on the meridional and blade-to-blade surfaces, and blade surface loading diagrams. Computed results show the evolution of a passage vortex and large streamline deviations from the computational streamwise grid lines. Experience gained from applying the code to a radial turbine geometry is also discussed.

  9. Simulating MODFLOW-based reactive transport under radially symmetric flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Ilka; Prommer, Henning; Post, Vincent; Vandenbohede, Alexander; Simmons, Craig T

    2013-01-01

    Radially symmetric flow and solute transport around point sources and sinks is an important specialized topic of groundwater hydraulics. Analysis of radial flow fields is routinely used to determine heads and flows in the vicinity of point sources or sinks. Increasingly, studies also consider solute transport, biogeochemical processes, and thermal changes that occur in the vicinity of point sources/sinks. Commonly, the analysis of hydraulic processes involves numerical or (semi-) analytical modeling methods. For the description of solute transport, analytical solutions are only available for the most basic transport phenomena. Solving advanced transport problems numerically is often associated with a significant computational burden. However, where axis-symmetry applies, computational cost can be decreased substantially in comparison with full three-dimensional (3D) solutions. In this study, we explore several techniques of simulating conservative and reactive transport within radial flow fields using MODFLOW as the flow simulator, based on its widespread use and ability to be coupled with multiple solute and reactive transport codes of different complexity. The selected transport simulators are MT3DMS and PHT3D. Computational efficiency and accuracy of the approaches are evaluated through comparisons with full 2D/3D model simulations, analytical solutions, and benchmark problems. We demonstrate that radial transport models are capable of accurately reproducing a wide variety of conservative and reactive transport problems provided that an adequate spatial discretization and advection scheme is selected. For the investigated test problems, the computational load was substantially reduced, with the improvement varying, depending on the complexity of the considered reaction network. PMID:22900478

  10. Stability results for multi-layer radial Hele-Shaw and porous media flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gin, Craig; Daripa, Prabir

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by stability problems arising in the context of chemical enhanced oil recovery, we perform linear stability analysis of Hele-Shaw and porous media flows in radial geometry involving an arbitrary number of immiscible fluids. Key stability results obtained and their relevance to the stabilization of fingering instability are discussed. Some of the key results, among many others, are (i) absolute upper bounds on the growth rate in terms of the problem data; (ii) validation of these upper bound results against exact computation for the case of three-layer flows; (iii) stability enhancing injection policies; (iv) asymptotic limits that reduce these radial flow results to similar results for rectilinear flows; and (v) the stabilizing effect of curvature of the interfaces. Multi-layer radial flows have been found to have the following additional distinguishing features in comparison to rectilinear flows: (i) very long waves, some of which can be physically meaningful, are stable; and (ii) eigenvalues can be complex for some waves depending on the problem data, implying that the dispersion curves for one or more waves can contact each other. Similar to the rectilinear case, these results can be useful in providing insight into the interfacial instability transfer mechanism as the problem data are varied. Moreover, these can be useful in devising smart injection policies as well as controlling the complexity of the long-term dynamics when drops of various immiscible fluids intersperse among each other. As an application of the upper bound results, we provide stabilization criteria and design an almost stable multi-layer system by adding many layers of fluid with small positive jumps in viscosity in the direction of the basic flow.

  11. Pre-equilibrium radial flow from central shock-wave collisions in AdS 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romatschke, Paul; Hogg, J. Drew

    2013-04-01

    Using gauge/gravity duality, central ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions are modelled as collisions of shock waves in five-dimensional asymptotic AdS space. For early times after the collision, it is possible to analytically match the metric from the past to the future light-cone. This allows extraction of the pre-equilibrium energy-momentum tensor of the strongly coupled, large N gauge theory. For central collisions, this allows qualitative statements concerning the build-up of radial flow at mid-rapidity in AA and pA collisions. We find that the early-time radial flow buildup is identical to that expected from ideal hydrodynamics with an entropy density proportional to the square root of the product of the matter densities in the individual "nuclei".

  12. Enhanced mixing via alternating injection in radial Hele-Shaw flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Huang, Yi-Cheng; Huang, Yu-Sheng; Miranda, Jos A.

    2015-10-01

    Mixing at low Reynolds numbers, especially in the framework of confined flows occurring in Hele-Shaw cells, porous media, and microfluidic devices, has attracted considerable attention lately. Under such circumstances, enhanced mixing is limited due to the lack of turbulence, and absence of sizable inertial effects. Recent studies, performed in rectangular Hele-Shaw cells, have demonstrated that the combined action of viscous fluid fingering and alternating injection can dramatically improve mixing efficiency. In this work, we revisit this important fluid mechanical problem, and analyze it in the context of radial Hele-Shaw flows. The development of radial fingering instabilities under alternating injection conditions is investigated by intensive numerical simulations. We focus on the impact of the relevant physical parameters of the problem (Pclet number Pe , viscosity contrast A , and injection time interval ? t ) on fluid mixing performance.

  13. Influence of inertia on viscous fingering patterns: Rectangular and radial flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Eduardo O.; Miranda, José A.

    2011-06-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in the impact of inertial effects on the development of the Saffman-Taylor instability. Experiments and theory indicate that inertia may have a significant influence on the system’s behavior. We employ a perturbative-mode-coupling method to examine how the stability and morphology of the viscosity-driven fingering patterns are affected by inertia. Both rectangular and radial Hele-Shaw flow geometries are considered. In the rectangular configuration useful results can be deduced analytically, and in closed form. In particular, we have found that inertia has a stabilizing role at the linear stage, and tends to widen the fingers at the weakly nonlinear regime. These analytical results are consistent with existing experimental findings. The analysis of the system is not as simple in radial flow geometry, but it still allows the capture of inertially induced, enhanced finger tip splitting events at the onset of nonlinearities.

  14. Measurement of Pfirsch-Schluter flows and radial electric field in the HSX Stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. T. A.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Anderson, D. T.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2014-10-01

    Inboard-outboard asymmetry in the toroidal C +6 ion flow has been measured using the Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy in the HSX stellarator. Measurements indicate the presence of counter-streaming Pfirsch-Schluter (PS) ion flows. Experiments are done in 100 kW ECRH heated methane plasmas of line averaged density ~ 4e18/m3 and central electron temperature ~2 keV. Measurements are made for both the quasi-helically symmetric configuration and for the configuration where the symmetry is deliberately broken using auxiliary coils. It has been observed that the flows, both mean and the PS flows, are larger for the broken symmetry configuration compared to the helically symmetric configuration. The radial electric field, which is proportional to the magnitude of the PS flow, is larger than the previous measurements but still significantly less than the neoclassically calculated value. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  15. Porcine Circovirus (PCV) Removal by Q Sepharose Fast Flow Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Wang, Hua; Ho, Cintia; Lester, Philip; Chen, Qi; Neske, Florian; Baylis, Sally A; Blümel, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    The recently discovered contamination of oral rotavirus vaccines led to exposure of millions of infants to porcine circovirus (PCV). PCV was not detected by conventional virus screening tests. Regulatory agencies expect exclusion of adventitious viruses from biological products. Therefore, methods for inactivation/removal of viruses have to be implemented as an additional safety barrier whenever feasible. However, inactivation or removal of PCV is difficult. PCV is highly resistant to widely used physicochemical inactivation procedures. Circoviruses such as PCV are the smallest viruses known and are not expected to be effectively removed by currently-used virus filters due to the small size of the circovirus particles. Anion exchange chromatography such as Q Sepharose® Fast Flow (QSFF) has been shown to effectively remove a range of viruses including parvoviruses. In this study, we investigated PCV1 removal by virus filtration and by QSFF chromatography. As expected, PCV1 could not be effectively removed by virus filtration. However, PCV1 could be effectively removed by QSFF as used during the purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and a log10 reduction value (LRV) of 4.12 was obtained. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 29:1464–1471, 2013 PMID:24039195

  16. Occurrence of turbulent flow conditions in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ruben; Choikhet, Konstantin; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2014-09-26

    Having similar densities as liquids but with viscosities up to 20 times lower (higher diffusion coefficients), supercritical CO2 is the ideal (co-)solvent for fast and/or highly efficient separations without mass-transfer limitations or excessive column pressure drops. Whereas in liquid chromatography the flow remains laminar in both the packed bed and tubing, except in extreme cases (e.g. in a 75 μm tubing, pure acetonitrile at 5 ml/min), a supercritical fluid can experience a transition from laminar to turbulent flow in more typical operation modes. Due to the significant lower viscosity, this transition for example already occurs at 1.3 ml/min for neat CO2 when using connection tubing with an ID of 127 μm. By calculating the Darcy friction factor, which can be plotted versus the Reynolds number in a so-called Moody chart, typically used in fluid dynamics, higher values are found for stainless steel than PEEK tubing, in agreement with their expected higher surface roughness. As a result turbulent effects are more pronounced when using stainless steel tubing. The higher than expected extra-column pressure drop limits the kinetic performance of supercritical fluid chromatography and complicates the optimization of tubing ID, which is based on a trade-off between extra-column band broadening and pressure drop. One of the most important practical consequences is the non-linear increase in extra-column pressure drop over the tubing downstream of the column which leads to an unexpected increase in average column pressure and mobile phase density, and thus decrease in retention. For close eluting components with a significantly different dependence of retention on density, the selectivity can significantly be affected by this increase in average pressure. In addition, the occurrence of turbulent flow is also observed in the detector cell and connection tubing. This results in a noise-increase by a factor of four when going from laminar to turbulent flow (e.g. going from 0.5 to 2.5 ml/min for neat CO2). PMID:25145564

  17. Laser velocimeter measurements in shrouded and unshrouded radial flow pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, C. P.; Flack, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    Shrouded and unshrouded versions of a four-vaned radial flow impeller with a design flow coefficient of 0.063 were tested in a volute pump using a two-component frequency-shifted laser velocimeter. Velocity profiles were measured at six flow rates and at four radial and six circumferential positions in the volute. The variations of the velocity from blade to blade and in the axial direction were measured and are presented. A passage vortex caused by tip leakage and relative casing wall velocity was found in the unshrouded impeller. The tip leakage did not accumulate in the suction wake region; the suction wake region was only 30 to 50 percent as large in the unshrouded impeller as compared to the shrouded impeller. The slip was 30 percent higher in the unshrouded impeller and the variation of slip with flow rate is presented. At no measured position in the impellers did the slip factor reach unity; the closest approach was 0.90. Reverse loadings of the vanes at outer radii were found for flow rates below the impeller/volute matching point for both impellers.

  18. Comparison of the flows and radial electric field in the HSX stellarator to neoclassical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briesemeister, A.; Zhai, K.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic flow velocities of up to ˜20 km s-1 have been measured using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) in the quasi-helically symmetric HSX stellarator and are compared with the neoclassical values calculated using an updated version (Lore 2010 Measurement and Transport Modeling with Momentum Conservation of an Electron Internal Transport Barrier in HSX (Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin); Lore et al 2010 Phys. Plasmas 17 056101) of the PENTA code (Spong 2005 Phys. Plasmas. 12 056114). PENTA uses the monoenergetic transport coefficients calculated by the drift kinetic equation solver code (Hirshman et al 1986 Phys. Fluids 29 2951; van Rij and Hirshman 1989 Phys. Fluids B 1 563), but corrects for momentum conservation. In the outer half of the plasma good agreement is seen between the measured parallel flow profile and the calculated neoclassical values when momentum correction is included. The flow velocity in HSX is underpredicted by an order of magnitude when this momentum correction is not applied. The parallel flow is calculated to be approximately equal for the majority hydrogen ions and the C6+ ions used for the CHERS measurements. The pressure gradient of the protons is the primary drive of the calculated parallel flow for a significant portion of the outer half of the plasma. The values of the radial electric field calculated with and without momentum correction were similar, but both were smaller than the measured values in the outer half of the plasma. Differences between the measured and predicted radial electric field are possibly a result of uncertainty in the composition of the ion population and sensitivity of the ion flux calculation to resonances in the radial electric field.

  19. An analysis of the viscous flow through a compact radial turbine by the average passage approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D.; Beach, Timothy A.

    1990-01-01

    A steady, three-dimensional viscous average passage computer code is used to analyze the flow through a compact radial turbine rotor. The code models the flow as spatially periodic from blade passage to blade passage. Results from the code using varying computational models are compared with each other and with experimental data. These results include blade surface velocities and pressures, exit vorticity and entropy contour plots, shroud pressures, and spanwise exit total temperature, total pressure, and swirl distributions. The three computational models used are inviscid, viscous with no blade clearance, and viscous with blade clearance. It is found that modeling viscous effects improves correlation with experimental data, while modeling hub and tip clearances further improves some comparisons. Experimental results such as a local maximum of exit swirl, reduced exit total pressures at the walls, and exit total temperature magnitudes are explained by interpretation of the flow physics and computed secondary flows. Trends in the computed blade loading diagrams are similarly explained.

  20. Radial distribution of the flow velocity, efficiency and concentration in a wide HPLC column

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, T.; Sepaniak, M.J.; Guiochon, G.

    1997-08-01

    The use of optical fibers in a fluorescence-detection scheme permits the accurate determination of the radial distribution of the transit time, the column efficiency, and the analyte concentration at the exit of a chromatographic axial-compression column (50 mmID). The results obtained demonstrate that the column is not homogeneous, but suggest a nearly cylindrical distribution of the packing density. The average velocity close to the column wall is 7% lower than along its axis and the HETP 25% higher. The lack of homogeneity of the column packing is another source of band broadening not taken into account in chromatography so far. It causes the apparent HETP derived from the conventional elution chromatogram recorded on the bulk eluent to be larger than the local HETP and the band profile to be unsymmetrical with a slight tail reminiscent of kinetic tailing.

  1. Chromatography

    MedlinePlus

    Chromatography is a way of separating two or more chemical compounds. Chemical compounds are chemicals that are ... of chemical compound. There are different kinds of chromatography. These include gas, high pressure liquid, or ion ...

  2. Cyclic and radial variation of ultrasonic backscatter from flowing porcine blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paeng, Dong-Guk

    The ultrasonic backscattering from flowing blood was investigated using several hemodynamic parameters and a physiological parameter. Acceleration was hypothesized to enhance the aggregation of red blood cells (RBCs), and this is the first time that acceleration is suggested and experimentally verified as having an effect on aggregation of RBC. Two interesting phenomena, the 'Black Hole (BH)' phenomenon and the 'Bright Collapsing Ring (BCR)' phenomenon, were observed under pulsatile flow in B-mode cross sectional images. The BH phenomenon describes a dark hypoechoic hole at the center of the tube surrounded by a bright hyperechoic zone in B-mode cross sectional images, and the BCR phenomenon describes the appearance of a bright hyperechoic ring at the periphery of the tube at early systole and its convergence from the periphery to the center of the tube, finally collapsing as flow develops. Doppler power variation was observed only from porcine whole blood, which led to a conclusion that the ultrasonic backscattering was mainly dependent on the RBC aggregation under steady and pulsatile flow. The pattern of the cyclic variation of the Doppler power to have a maximum power at peak systole was mainly due to the enhanced rouleaux formation by acceleration. The BCR phenomenon was observed from the cyclic variation pattern of the Doppler power at different radial positions; the Doppler power peak was observed at early systole at the periphery of the tube and lagged the flow as close from the periphery to the center of the tube. The BCR phenomenon from porcine whole blood in a mock flow loop was further examined in real time in B-mode images under pulsatile flow. At low hematocrit of 12%, no BCR phenomenon was discernable although it was observed at higher hematocrits. The pattern of the nonlinear relationship between echogenicity and hematocrit varied with radial positions. The BH phenomenon was also observed under certain hemodynamic conditions and varied over a pulsatile cycle. The BCR phenomenon was also observed from human carotid arteries from 10 subjects only in the harmonic images. In order to better understand these phenomena, the cyclic and radial variation of echogenicity under oscillatory flow was measured and the results showed a different pattern from that under pulsatile flow. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  3. On the nature of radial transport across sheared zonal flows in electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient gyrokinetic tokamak turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Raul; Newman, David E; Leboeuf, Jean-Noel; Carreras, Benjamin A; Decyk, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    It is argued that the usual understanding of the suppression of radial turbulent transport across a sheared zonal flow based on a reduction in effective transport coefficients is, by itself, incomplete. By means of toroidal gyrokinetic simulations of electrostatic, ion-temperature-gradient turbulence, it is found instead that the character of the radial transport is altered fundamentally by the presence of a sheared zonal flow, changing from diffusive to anticorrelated and subdiffusive. Furthermore, if the flows are self-consistently driven by the turbulence via the Reynolds stresses (in contrast to being induced externally), radial transport becomes non-Gaussian as well. These results warrant a reevaluation of the traditional description of radial transport across sheared flows in tokamaks via effective transport coefficients, suggesting that such description is oversimplified and poorly captures the underlying dynamics, which may in turn compromise its predictive capabilities.

  4. On the nature of radial transport across sheared zonal flows in electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient gyrokinetic tokamak plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.; Newman, D. E.; Leboeuf, J.-N.; Carreras, B. A.; Decyk, V. K.

    2009-05-15

    It is argued that the usual understanding of the suppression of radial turbulent transport across a sheared zonal flow based on a reduction in effective transport coefficients is, by itself, incomplete. By means of toroidal gyrokinetic simulations of electrostatic, ion-temperature-gradient turbulence, it is found instead that the character of the radial transport is altered fundamentally by the presence of a sheared zonal flow, changing from diffusive to anticorrelated and subdiffusive. Furthermore, if the flows are self-consistently driven by the turbulence via the Reynolds stresses (in contrast to being induced externally), radial transport becomes non-Gaussian as well. These results warrant a reevaluation of the traditional description of radial transport across sheared flows in tokamaks via effective transport coefficients, suggesting that such description is oversimplified and poorly captures the underlying dynamics, which may in turn compromise its predictive capabilities.

  5. Direct numerical simulation of Taylor-Couette flow subjected to a radial temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Hao; Liu, Nansheng; Lu, Xiyun; Khomami, Bamin

    2015-12-01

    Direct numerical simulations have been performed to study the Taylor-Couette (TC) flow between two rotating, coaxial cylinders in the presence of a radial temperature gradient. Specifically, the influence of the buoyant force and the outer cylinder rotation on the turbulent TC flow system with the radius ratio η = 0.912 was examined. For the co-rotating TC flows with Rei (inner cylinder) =1000 and Reo (outer cylinder) =100, a transition pathway to highly turbulent flows is realized by increasing σ, a parameter signifying the ratio of buoyant to inertial force. This nonlinear flow transition involves four intriguing states that emerge in sequence as chaotic wavy vortex flow for σ = 0, wavy interpenetrating spiral flows for σ = 0.02 and 0.05, intermittent turbulent spirals for σ = 0.1 and 0.2, and turbulent spirals for σ = 0.4. Overall, the fluid motion changes from a centrifugally driven flow regime characterized by large-scale wavy Taylor vortices (TVs) to a buoyancy-dominated flow regime characterized by small-scale turbulent vortices. Commensurate changes in turbulence statistics and heat transfer are seen as a result of the weakening of large-scale TV circulations and enhancement of turbulent motions. Additionally, the influence of variation of the outer cylinder rotation, -500 < Reo < 500 in presence of buoyancy (σ = 0.1) with Rei = 1000, has been considered. Specifically, it is demonstrated that this variation strongly influences the azimuthal and axial mean flows with a weaker influence on the fluctuating fluid motions. Of special interest, here are the turbulent dynamics near the outer wall where a marked decrease of turbulence intensity and a sign inversion of the Reynolds stress Rrz are observed for the strongly counter-rotating regimes (Reo = - 300 and -500). To this end, it has been shown that the underlying flow physics for this drastic modification are associated with the modification of the correlation between the radial and axial fluctuating motions. In turn, the intriguing effects of this modification on the mean axial flow, turbulent statistics, force balance, and dynamic processes such as turbulence production and dissipation are discussed.

  6. Direct numerical simulation of Taylor-Couette flow subjected to a radial temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Hao; Liu, Nansheng Lu, Xiyun; Khomami, Bamin

    2015-12-15

    Direct numerical simulations have been performed to study the Taylor-Couette (TC) flow between two rotating, coaxial cylinders in the presence of a radial temperature gradient. Specifically, the influence of the buoyant force and the outer cylinder rotation on the turbulent TC flow system with the radius ratio η = 0.912 was examined. For the co-rotating TC flows with Re{sub i} (inner cylinder) =1000 and Re{sub o} (outer cylinder) =100, a transition pathway to highly turbulent flows is realized by increasing σ, a parameter signifying the ratio of buoyant to inertial force. This nonlinear flow transition involves four intriguing states that emerge in sequence as chaotic wavy vortex flow for σ = 0, wavy interpenetrating spiral flows for σ = 0.02 and 0.05, intermittent turbulent spirals for σ = 0.1 and 0.2, and turbulent spirals for σ = 0.4. Overall, the fluid motion changes from a centrifugally driven flow regime characterized by large-scale wavy Taylor vortices (TVs) to a buoyancy-dominated flow regime characterized by small-scale turbulent vortices. Commensurate changes in turbulence statistics and heat transfer are seen as a result of the weakening of large-scale TV circulations and enhancement of turbulent motions. Additionally, the influence of variation of the outer cylinder rotation, −500 < Re{sub o} < 500 in presence of buoyancy (σ = 0.1) with Re{sub i} = 1000, has been considered. Specifically, it is demonstrated that this variation strongly influences the azimuthal and axial mean flows with a weaker influence on the fluctuating fluid motions. Of special interest, here are the turbulent dynamics near the outer wall where a marked decrease of turbulence intensity and a sign inversion of the Reynolds stress R{sub rz} are observed for the strongly counter-rotating regimes (Re{sub o} = − 300 and −500). To this end, it has been shown that the underlying flow physics for this drastic modification are associated with the modification of the correlation between the radial and axial fluctuating motions. In turn, the intriguing effects of this modification on the mean axial flow, turbulent statistics, force balance, and dynamic processes such as turbulence production and dissipation are discussed.

  7. Application of radial-equilibrium condition to axial-flow compressor and turbine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Chung-Hua; Wolfenstein, Lincoln

    1950-01-01

    Basic general equations governing the three-dimensional compressible flow of gas through a compressor or turbine are given in terms of total enthalpy, entropy, and velocity components of the gas. Two methods of solution are obtained for the simplified, steady axially symmetric flow; one involves the use of a number of successive planes normal to the axis of the machine and short distances apart, and the other involves only three stations for a stage in which an appropriate radial-flow path is used. Methods of calculation for the limiting cases of zero and infinite blade aspect ratios and an approximate method of calculation for finite blade aspect ratio are also given. In these methods, the blade loading and the shape of the annular passage wall may be arbitrarily specified.

  8. Intrapericardial denervation - Radial artery blood flow and heart rate responses to LBNP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeever, Kenneth H.; Skidmore, Michael G.; Keil, Lanny C.; Sandler, Harold

    1990-01-01

    The effects of intrapericardial denervation on the radial artery blood flow velocity (RABFV) and heart rate (HR) responses to LBNP in rhesus monkeys were investigated by measuring the RABFV transcutaneously by a continuous-wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter in order to derive an index of forearm blood flow response to low (0 to -20 mm Hg) and high (0 to -60 mm Hg) ramp exposures during supine LBNP. Four of the eight subjects were subjected to efferent and afferent cardiac denervation. It was found that, during low levels of LBNP, monkeys with cardiac denervation exhibited no cardiopulmonary baroreceptor-mediated change in the RABFV or HR, unlike the intact animals, which showed steady decreases in RABFV during both high- and low-pressure protocols. It is suggested that forearm blood flow and HR responses to low-level LBNP, along with pharmacological challenge, are viable physiological tests for verifying the completeness of atrial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptor denervation.

  9. An analytical solution for transient radial flow through unsaturated fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Pan, Lehua

    2004-02-13

    This paper presents analytical solutions for one-dimensional radial transient flow through horizontal, unsaturated fractured rock formation. In these solutions, unsaturated flow through fractured media is described by a linearized Richards' equation, while fracture-matrix interaction is handled using the dual-continuum concept. Although linearizing Richards' equation requires a specially correlated relationship between relative permeability and capillary pressure functions for both fractures and matrix, these specially formed relative permeability and capillary pressure functions are still physically meaningful. These analytical solutions can thus be used to describe the transient behavior of unsaturated flow in fractured media under the described model conditions. They can also be useful in verifying numerical simulation results, which, as demonstrated in this paper, are otherwise difficult to validate.

  10. A cubic matrix-fracture geometry model for radial tracer flow in naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Jetzabeth Ramirez-Sabag; Fernando Samaniego V.

    1992-01-01

    This study presents a general solution for the radial flow of tracers in naturally fractured reservoirs, with cubic blocks matrix-fracture geometry. Continuous and finite step injection of chemical and radioactive tracers are considered. The reservoir is treated as being composed of two regions: a mobile where dispersion and convection take place and a stagnant where only diffusion and adsorption are allowed. Radioactive decay is considered in both regions. The model of this study is thoroughly compared under proper simplified conditions to those previously presented in the literature. The coupled matrix to fracture solution in the Laplace space is numerically inverted by means of the Crump algorithm. A detailed validation of the model with respect to solutions previously presented and/or simplified physical conditions solutions (i.e., homogeneous case) or limit solutions (i.e., naturally fractured nearly homogeneous) was carried out. The influence of the three of the main dimensionless parameters that enter into the solution was carefully investigated. A comparison of results for three different naturally fractured systems, vertical fractures (linear flow), horizontal fractures (radial flow) and the cubic geometry model of this study, is presented.

  11. Radial Dupuit interface flow to assess the aquifer storage and recovery potential of saltwater aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Mark

    2010-02-01

    A new accurate numerical solution is presented for aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems in coastal aquifers; flow is approximated as radial Dupuit interface flow. The radial velocities of points on the interface are a function of time, the vertical coordinate, and the dimensionless parameter D (the discharge of the well divided by the product of the hydraulic conductivity, the square of the aquifer thickness, and the dimensionless density difference). The recovery efficiency of an ASR system (the ratio of the recovered volume of water divided by the injected volume of water) is determined by D and by the relative lengths of the injection, storage and recovery periods. Graphs are produced for the recovery efficiency as a function of parameter D for ASR operations with and without storage periods and for multiple cycles. The presented solutions and graphs are to be used as screening tools to assess the feasibility of specific injection, storage and recovery scenarios of planned ASR systems in saltwater aquifers without having to run complicated flow and transport models. When the screening tool indicates that recovery efficiencies are acceptable, the consideration of other features such as mixing and chemistry is warranted.

  12. Series solution for unsteady axisymmetric flow and heat transfer over a radially stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid, M.; Ahmad, I.; Hayat, T.; Ayub, M.

    2008-12-01

    This paper deals with the unsteady axisymmetric flow and heat transfer of a viscous fluid over a radially stretching sheet. The heat is prescribed at the surface. The modelled non-linear partial differential equations are solved using an analytic approach namely the homotopy analysis method. Unlike perturbation technique, this approach gives accurate analytic approximation uniformly valid for all dimensionless time. The explicit expressions for velocity, temperature and skin friction coefficient are developed. The influence of time on the velocity, temperature and skin friction coefficient is discussed.

  13. Proton/pion ratios and radial flow in pp and peripheral heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuautle, E.; Paić, G.

    2006-09-01

    The production of baryon and mesons in the RHIC heavy-ion experiments has received a lot of attention lately. Although not widely known, the pp data measured concurrently with heavy ion collisions do not find a convincing explanation in terms of simple models. We present the results of an afterburner to Pythia and Hijing event generators, simulating radial flow which seems to qualitatively explain the experimental results when applied to the pp collision data from RHIC at 200 GeV center-of-mass energy.

  14. Proton/pion ratios and radial flow in pp and peripheral heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cuautle, E.; Paic, G.

    2006-09-25

    The production of baryon and mesons in the RHIC heavy-ion experiments has received a lot of attention lately. Although not widely known, the pp data measured concurrently with heavy ion collisions do not find a convincing explanation in terms of simple models. We present the results of an afterburner to Pythia and Hijing event generators, simulating radial flow which seems to qualitatively explain the experimental results when applied to the pp collision data from RHIC at 200 GeV center-of-mass energy.

  15. Identification of Phytoplankton from Flow Cytometry Data by Using Radial Basis Function Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, M. F.; Boddy, Lynne; Morris, C. W.; Jonker, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    We describe here the application of a type of artificial neural network, the Gaussian radial basis function (RBF) network, in the identification of a large number of phytoplankton strains from their 11-dimensional flow cytometric characteristics measured by the European Optical Plankton Analyser instrument. The effect of network parameters on optimization is examined. Optimized RBF networks recognized 34 species of marine and freshwater phytoplankton with 91.5% success overall. The relative importance of each measured parameter in discriminating these data and the behavior of RBF networks in response to data from novel species (species not present in the training data) were analyzed. PMID:10508067

  16. Eigenmodes of Ducted Flows With Radially-Dependent Axial and Swirl Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kousen, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    This report characterizes the sets of small disturbances possible in cylindrical and annular ducts with mean flow whose axial and tangential components vary arbitrarily with radius. The linearized equations of motion are presented and discussed, and then exponential forms for the axial, circumferential, and time dependencies of any unsteady disturbances are assumed. The resultant equations form a generalized eigenvalue problem, the solution of which yields the axial wavenumbers and radial mode shapes of the unsteady disturbances. Two numerical discretizations are applied to the system of equations: (1) a spectral collocation technique based on Chebyshev polynomial expansions on the Gauss-Lobatto points, and (2) second and fourth order finite differences on uniform grids. The discretized equations are solved using a standard eigensystem package employing the QR algorithm. The eigenvalues fall into two primary categories: a discrete set (analogous to the acoustic modes found in uniform mean flows) and a continuous band (analogous to convected disturbances in uniform mean flows) where the phase velocities of the disturbances correspond to the local mean flow velocities. Sample mode shapes and eigensystem distributions are presented for both sheared axial and swirling flows. The physics of swirling flows is examined with reference to hydrodynamic stability and completeness of the eigensystem expansions. The effect of assuming exponential dependence in the axial direction is discussed.

  17. Quantification of the secondary flow in a radial coupled centrifugal blood pump based on particle tracking velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobuo; Masuda, Takaya; Iida, Tomoya; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Tetsuo; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-01-01

    Secondary flow in the centrifugal blood pump helps to enhance the washout effect and to minimize thrombus formation. On the other hand, it has an adverse effect on pump efficiency. Excessive secondary flow may induce hemolytic effects. Understanding the secondary flow is thus important to the design of a compact, efficient, biocompatible blood pump. This study examined the secondary flow in a radial coupled centrifugal blood pump based on a simple particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) technique. A radial magnetically coupled centrifugal blood pump has a bell-shaped narrow clearance between the impeller inner radius and the pump casing. In order to vary the flow levels through the clearance area, clearance widths of 0.25 mm and 0.50 mm and impeller washout holes with diameters of 0 mm, 2.5 mm, and 4 mm were prepared. A high-speed video camera (2000 frames per second) was used to capture the particle images from which radial flow components were derived. The flow in the space behind the impeller was assumed to be laminar and Couette type. The larger the inner clearance or diameter of washout hole, the greater was the secondary flow rate. Without washout holes, the flow behind the impeller resulted in convection. The radial flow through the washout holes of the impeller was conserved in the radial as well as in the axial direction behind the impeller. The increase in the secondary flow reduced the net pump efficiency. Simple PTV was successful in quantifying the flow in the space behind the impeller. The results verified the hypothesis that the flow behind the impeller was theoretically Couette along the circumferential direction. The convection flow observed behind the impeller agreed with the reports of other researchers. Simple PTV was effective in understanding the fluid dynamics to help improve the compact, efficient, and biocompatible centrifugal blood pump for safe clinical applications. PMID:15644080

  18. Evidence for Radial Flow of Thermal Dileptons in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Banicz, K.; Damjanovic, S.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.; Falco, A. de; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.

    2008-01-18

    The NA60 experiment at the CERN SPS has studied low-mass dimuon production in 158A GeV In-In collisions. An excess of pairs above the known meson decays has been reported before. We now present precision results on the associated transverse momentum spectra. The slope parameter T{sub eff} extracted from the spectra rises with dimuon mass up to the {rho}, followed by a sudden decline above. While the initial rise is consistent with the expectations for radial flow of a hadronic decay source, the decline signals a transition to an emission source with much smaller flow. This may well represent the first direct evidence for thermal radiation of partonic origin in nuclear collisions.

  19. Viscous fingering in a magnetic fluid. I. Radial Hele-Shaw flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flament, C.; Pacitto, G.; Bacri, J.-C.; Drikis, I.; Cebers, A.

    1998-10-01

    Viscous fingering phenomena in a circular geometry are studied for a magnetic fluid submitted to a perpendicular magnetic field. Air is injected at the center of a Hele-Shaw cell filled with a viscous magnetic fluid. The instability of the interface between the air and the magnetic fluid is favored by the presence of a magnetic field. More precisely, the threshold of the instability is magnetic field dependent. The patterns obtained for high values of the magnetic field with a low injection rate are similar to those obtained in the absence of an external field and at high flow rates. We also give a linear analysis for the stability of radial flow under the influence of a magnetic field. This calculation provides us with an understanding of the magnetic field effect.

  20. A PC-based inverse design method for radial and mixed flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoe, Ivar Helge

    1991-01-01

    An Inverse Design Method suitable for radial and mixed flow turbomachinery is presented. The codes are based on the streamline curvature concept; therefore, it is applicable for current personal computers from the 286/287 range. In addition to the imposed aerodynamic constraints, mechanical constraints are imposed during the design process to ensure that the resulting geometry satisfies production consideration and that structural considerations are taken into account. By the use of Bezier Curves in the geometric modeling, the same subroutine is used to prepare input for both aero and structural files since it is important to ensure that the geometric data is identical to both structural analysis and production. To illustrate the method, a mixed flow turbine design is shown.

  1. A study of radial-flow turbomachinery blade vibration measurements using Eulerian laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberholster, A. J.; Heyns, P. S.

    2014-05-01

    The structural integrity of blades is critical to the health of turbomachinery. Since operational failure of these blades can possibly lead to catastrophic failure of the machine, it is important to have knowledge of blade conditions in an online fashion. Due to several practical implications, it is desired to measure blade vibration with a non-contact technique. The application of laser Doppler vibrometry towards the vibration based condition monitoring of axial-flow turbomachinery blades has been successfully demonstrated in previous work. In this paper the feasibility of using laser Doppler vibrometry to measure radial-flow turbomachinery blade vibrations is investigated with the aid of digital image correlation and strain gauge telemetry.

  2. Flow regimes in a vertical Taylor-Couette system with a radial thermal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillerm, R.; Kang, C.; Savaro, C.; Lepiller, V.; Prigent, A.; Yang, K.-S.; Mutabazi, I.

    2015-09-01

    A rich variety of flow regimes in a Newtonian fluid inside a vertical large-aspect ratio and a wide-gap Taylor-Couette system with a radial temperature gradient has been determined in experiments and in direct numerical simulations (DNSs). Compared to previous experiments and numerical studies, a wider range of temperature differences (i.e., of the Grashof number Gr) and of the rotation rate (the Taylor number Ta) has been covered. The combined effect of rotation and of the radial temperature gradient is the occurrence of helicoidal vortices or modulated waves at the onset. Stationary axisymmetric vortices are found for very weak temperature differences. A good agreement was found for critical states between results from experiments, linear stability analysis, and DNS. Higher instability modes have been determined for a wide range of parameters and a state diagram of observable flow regimes has been established in the plane spanned by Gr and Ta. Some higher states observed in experiments were retrieved in DNS.

  3. Radially Dependent Large Scale Dynamos in Global Cylindrical Shear Flows and the Local Cartesian Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, F.; Blackman, E. G.

    2016-03-01

    For cylindrical differentially rotating plasmas, we study large-scale magnetic field generation from finite amplitude non-axisymmetric perturbations by comparing numerical simulations with quasi-linear analytic theory. When initiated with a vertical magnetic field of either zero or finite net flux, our global cylindrical simulations exhibit the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and large scale dynamo growth of radially alternating mean fields, averaged over height and azimuth. This dynamo growth is explained by our analytic calculations of a non-axisymmetric fluctuation-induced EMF that is sustained by azimuthal shear of the fluctuating fields. The standard "Ω effect" (shear of the mean field by differential rotation) is unimportant. For the MRI case, we express the large-scale dynamo field as a function of differential rotation. The resulting radially alternating large-scale fields may have implications for angular momentum transport in disks and corona. To connect with previous work on large scale dynamos with local linear shear and identify the minimum conditions needed for large scale field growth, we also solve our equations in local Cartesian coordinates. We find that large scale dynamo growth in a linear shear flow without rotation can be sustained by shear plus non-axisymmetric fluctuations-even if not helical, a seemingly previously unidentified distinction. The linear shear flow dynamo emerges as a more restricted version of our more general new global cylindrical calculations.

  4. Electromagnetic gauge for measuring the radial particle velocity in 2-D flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, G.; Yaziv, D.; Mayseless, M.

    1982-04-01

    Applications of existing EMV gauges are limited for uniaxial strain configurtions, since the gauge length must remain fixed during the motion. A modification of the electromagnetic technique which provides measurements in 2-D flow is presented. When the problem of a projectile impacting a target is described in cylindrical coordinates (r,z) with z as axis of symmetry, the flow can be defined by the particle velocity components Uz,Ur. A new gauge is made of a thin copper wire having a circular turn shape. The gauge is embedded in the target material in a plane normal to the z axis axisymetrically. Magnetic field is generated by a solenoid wrapped around the target so that the field lines are parallel to the z axis. In a configuration like this, only the radial motion contributes to the EMF, therefore in a uniform filed, B, the measured EMF depends on the radial particle velocity: E=2πBr(t)Ur(t), where the circular turn radius, r(t), is obtained by integrating the velocity Ur(t). This new method hjas been demonstrted by experiment, impacting a rod shaped projectile made of PMMA into a target of the same material. Results are compared with 2-D calculation.

  5. Radially dependent large-scale dynamos in global cylindrical shear flows and the local cartesian limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, F.; Blackman, E. G.

    2016-06-01

    For cylindrical differentially rotating plasmas, we study large-scale magnetic field generation from finite amplitude non-axisymmetric perturbations by comparing numerical simulations with quasi-linear analytic theory. When initiated with a vertical magnetic field of either zero or finite net flux, our global cylindrical simulations exhibit the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and large-scale dynamo growth of radially alternating mean fields, averaged over height and azimuth. This dynamo growth is explained by our analytic calculations of a non-axisymmetric fluctuation-induced electromotive force that is sustained by azimuthal shear of the fluctuating fields. The standard `Ω effect' (shear of the mean field by differential rotation) is unimportant. For the MRI case, we express the large-scale dynamo field as a function of differential rotation. The resulting radially alternating large-scale fields may have implications for angular momentum transport in discs and corona. To connect with previous work on large-scale dynamos with local linear shear and identify the minimum conditions needed for large-scale field growth, we also solve our equations in local Cartesian coordinates. We find that large-scale dynamo growth in a linear shear flow without rotation can be sustained by shear plus non-axisymmetric fluctuations - even if not helical, a seemingly previously unidentified distinction. The linear shear flow dynamo emerges as a more restricted version of our more general new global cylindrical calculations.

  6. Width and rugosity of the topological plasma flow structures and their relation to the radial flights of particle tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, L.; Llerena Rodríguez, I.; Carreras, B. A.

    2015-09-01

    An analysis of the distributions of the width and rugosity of topological plasma flow structures is presented for some resistive pressure-gradient-driven turbulence results. The distributions of the radial excursions of particle tracers during trappings are compared with those of the width and rugosity of the flow structures.

  7. An interactive grid generation procedure for axial and radial flow turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    A combination algebraic/elliptic technique is presented for the generation of three dimensional grids about turbo-machinery blade rows for both axial and radial flow machinery. The technique is built around use of an advanced engineering workstation to construct several two dimensional grids interactively on predetermined blade-to-blade surfaces. A three dimensional grid is generated by interpolating these surface grids onto an axisymmetric grid. On each blade-to-blade surface, a grid is created using algebraic techniques near the blade to control orthogonality within the boundary layer region and elliptic techniques in the mid-passage to achieve smoothness. The interactive definition of bezier curves as internal boundaries is the key to simple construction. This procedure lends itself well to zonal grid construction, an important example being the tip clearance region. Calculations done to date include a space shuttle main engine turbopump blade, a radial inflow turbine blade, and the first stator of the United Technologies Research Center large scale rotating rig. A finite Navier-Stokes solver was used in each case.

  8. An interactive grid generation procedure for axial and radial flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Timothy A.

    1989-01-01

    A combination algebraic/elliptic technique is presented for the generation of three dimensional grids about turbo-machinery blade rows for both axial and radial flow machinery. The technique is built around use of an advanced engineering workstation to construct several two dimensional grids interactively on predetermined blade-to-blade surfaces. A three dimensional grid is generated by interpolating these surface grids onto an axisymmetric grid. On each blade-to-blade surface, a grid is created using algebraic techniques near the blade to control orthogonality within the boundary layer region and elliptic techniques in the mid-passage to achieve smoothness. The interactive definition of bezier curves as internal boundaries is the key to simple construction. This procedure lends itself well to zonal grid construction, an important example being the tip clearance region. Calculations done to date include a space shuttle main engine turbopump blade, a radial inflow turbine blade, and the first stator of the United Technologies Research Center large scale rotating rig. A finite Navier-Stokes solver was used in each case.

  9. Neoclassical calculations of radial electric field and plasma flow in HSX beyond the monoenergetic assumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoniewski, J.; Talmadge, J. N.; Kumar, S. T. A.; Satake, S.; Landreman, M.

    2014-10-01

    The radial electric field in the plasma core has been measured to be in the range of 2-5 kV/m during ECRH. The measured value is in good agreement with the ion root electric field calculated using the neoclassical code PENTA. However, PENTA also calculates that there should be a large electron root very close to the axis on the order of 30-50 kV/m. To date, no evidence of this electric field has been found. The PENTA code is a momentum conserving extension of the DKES code. The underlying DKES code makes a monoenergetic approximation which is known to break down when the electric field is near resonant values. We present electric field and plasma flow results from the SFINCS and FORTEC-3D codes, neither of which make the monoenergetic assumption, to benchmark the PENTA calculations. SFINCS is a drift-kinetic continuum code, and FORTEC-3D is a Monte Carlo code that also retains radial coupling. Initial results appear to show little difference between the three codes for HSX relevant parameters. In addition, we present recent results from bias probe experiments. Supported by US DoE award DE-FG02-93ER54222.

  10. Three-dimensional flow in radial turbomachinery and its impact on design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Choon S.; Hawthorne, William

    1993-01-01

    In the two papers on the 'Theory of Blade Design for Large Deflections' published in 1984, a new inverse design technique was presented for designing the shape of turbomachinery blades in three-dimensional flow. The technique involves the determination of the blade profile from the specification of a distribution of the product of the radius and the pitched averaged tangential velocity (i.e., r bar-V(sub theta), the mean swirl schedule) within the bladed region. This is in contrast to the conventional inverse design technique for turbomachinery blading in two dimensional flow in which the blade surface pressure or velocity distribution is specified and the blade profile determined as a result; this is feasible in two-dimensional flow because the streamlines along the blade surfaces are known a priori. However, in three-dimensional flow, the stream surface is free to deform within the blade passage so that the streamlines on the blade surfaces are not known a priori; thus it is difficult and not so useful to prescribe the blade surface pressure or velocity distribution and determine the resulting blade profile. It therefore seems logical to prescribe the swirl schedule within the bladed region for designing a turbomachinery blade profile in three-dimensional flow. Furthermore, specifying r bar-V(sub theta) has the following advantages: (1) it is related to the circulation around the blade (i.e., it is an aerodynamic quantity); (2) the work done or extracted is approximately proportional to the overall change in r bar-V(sub theta) across a given blade row (Euler turbine equation); and (3) the rate of change of r bar-V(sub theta) along the mean streamline at the blade is related to the pressure jump across the blade and therefore the blade loading. Since the publications of those two papers, the technique has been applied to the design of a low speed as well as a high speed radial inflow turbine (for turbocharger applications) both of which showed definite improvements in performance over that of wheels of conventional designs, the design study of a high pressure ratio radial inflow turbine with and without splitter blades.

  11. Estimated Performance of Radial-Flow Exit Nozzles for Air in Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, Gerald W.; Kochendorfer, Fred D.

    1959-01-01

    The thrust, boundary-layer, and heat-transfer characteristics were computed for nozzles having radial flow in the divergent part. The working medium was air in chemical equilibrium, and the boundary layer was assumed to be all turbulent. Stagnation pressure was varied from 1 to 32 atmospheres, stagnation temperature from 1000 to 6000 R, and wall temperature from 1000 to 3000 R. Design pressure ratio was varied from 5 to 320, and operating pressure ratio was varied from 0.25 to 8 times the design pressure ratio. Results were generalized independent of divergence angle and were also generalized independent of stagnation pressure in the temperature range of 1000 to 3000 R. A means of determining the aerodynamically optimum wall angle is provided.

  12. Evaluating the Uncertainty of Regional Flow by Using Radial Basis Function Network and Bootstrap Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, P.

    2011-12-01

    This study employs radial basis function network (RBFNN) to simulate regional runoff in the future climate condition in Taiwan and bootstrap sampling technique to evaluate uncertainties of RBFNN. The hydrological and meteorological data (such as rainfall, river flow) in northern area of Taiwan during 1981 to 1999 are adopted as the training dataset to RBFNN, in which the parameters of RBFNN are optimized with genetic algorithm (GA). Meanwhile, the bootstrap sampling technique is applied for uncertainty analysis of RBFNN. The simulated results show that RBFNN with GA simulating the regional runoff reveals good performance and corresponding uncertainty can be evaluated by the bootstrap sampling technique. The results also illustrate that selecting training datasets randomly and repeatedly can reduce the possibility of model over-fitting of RBFNN. The regional runoff in the future can be estimated into an interval representing the possibility of the runoff by the proposed approach.

  13. Raman scattering of InGaAs/InP grown by uniform radial flow epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Z. C.; Allerman, A. A.; Barnes, P. A.; Perkowitz, S.

    1992-01-01

    Uniform radial flow epitaxy, a novel growth technique, has been used to grown InGaAs films on InP. Epitaxial layers above and below the critical thickness for the onset of slip were grown. Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the quality of epitaxial layers, determine alloy composition, and measure the strain. Raman spectra from both pseudomorphic (strained) and relaxed (unstrained) InGaAs films were obtained at 300 and 80 K. The difference in the frequencies of their GaAs-like longitudinal optical phonons was used to calculate stress for the strained InGaAs/InP, leading to a direct formula for the evaluation of the layer stress.

  14. Aerodynamic design of turbomachinery blading in three-dimensional flow - An application to radial inflow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Y. L.; Tan, C. S.; Hawthorne, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    A computational method, based on a theory for turbomachinery blading design in three-dimensional inviscid flow, is applied to a parametric design study of a radial inflow turbine wheel. As the method requires the specification of swirl distribution, a technique for its smooth generation within the blade region is proposed. Excellent agreements have been obtained between the computed results from this design method and those from direct Euler computations, demonstrating the correspondence and consistency between the two. The computed results indicate the sensitivity of the pressure distribution to a lean in the stacking axis and a minor alteration in the hub/shroud profiles. Analysis based on Navier-Stokes solver shows no breakdown of flow within the designed blade passage and agreement with that from design calculation; thus the flow in the designed turbine rotor closely approximates that of an inviscid one. These calculations illustrate the use of a design method coupled to an analysis tool for establishing guidelines and criteria for designing turbomachinery blading.

  15. Radial-radial single rotor turbine

    DOEpatents

    Platts, David A.

    2006-05-16

    A rotor for use in turbine applications has a radial compressor/pump having radially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and a radial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the radial compressor/pump flows. The rotor can, in some applications, be used to produce electrical power.

  16. PIV investigation of the flow induced by a passive surge control method in a radial compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou, Erwann; Gancedo, Matthieu; Gutmark, Ephraim; Mohamed, Ashraf

    2012-09-01

    Due to recent emission regulations, the use of turbochargers for force induction of internal combustion engines has increased. Actually, the trend in diesel engines is to downsize the engine by use of turbochargers that operate at higher pressure ratios. Unfortunately, increasing the impeller rotational speed of turbocharger radial compressors tends to reduce their range of operation, which is limited at low mass flow rate by the occurrence of surge. In order to extend the operability of turbochargers, compressor housings can be equipped with a passive surge control device such as a "ported shroud." This specific casing treatment has been demonstrated to enhance the surge margin with minor negative impact on the compressor efficiency. However, the actual working mechanisms of the system remain not well understood. Hence, in order to optimize the design of the ported shroud, it is crucial to identify the dynamic flow changes induced by the implementation of the device to control instabilities. From the full dynamic survey of the compressor performance characteristics obtained with and without ported shroud, specific points of operation were selected to carry out planar flow visualization. At normal working, both standard and stereoscopic particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed to evaluate instantaneous and mean velocity flow fields at the inlet of the compressor. At incipient and full surge, phase-locked PIV measurements were added. As a result, satisfying characterization of the compressor instabilities was provided at different operational speeds. Combining transient pressure data and PIV measurements, the time evolution of the complex flow patterns occurring at surge was reconstructed and a better insight into the bypass mechanism was achieved.

  17. Axial development and radial non-uniformity of flow in packed columns.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaekeun C; Raghavan, Karthik; Gibbs, Stephen J

    2002-02-01

    Flow inhomogeneity and axial development in low-pressure chromatographic columns have been studied by magnetic resonance imaging velocimetry. The columns studied included (a) an 11.7-mm I.D. column packed with either 50 microm diameter porous polyacrylamide, or 99 or 780 microm diameter impermeable polystyrene beads, and (b) a 5-mm I.D. column commercially packed with 10 microm polymeric beads. The packing methods included gravity settling, slurry packing, ultrasonication, and dry packing with vibration. The magnetic resonance method used averaged apparent fluid velocity over both column cross-sections and fluid displacements greater than one particle diameter and hence permits assessment of macroscopic flow non-uniformities. The results confirm that now non-uniformities induced by the conical distributor of the 11.7-mm I.D. column or the presence of voids at the column entrance relax on a length scale of the column radius. All of the 11.7-mm I.D. columns examined exhibit near wall channeling within a few particle diameters of the wall. The origins of this behavior are demonstrated by imaging of the radial dependence of the local porosity for a column packed with 780 microm beads. Columns packed with the 99-microm beads exhibit reduced flow in a region extending from ten to three-to-five particle diameters from the wall. This velocity reduction is consistent with a reduced porosity of 0.35 in this region as compared to approximately 0.43 in the bulk of the column. Ultrasonicated and dry-packed columns exhibit enhanced flow in a region located between approximately eight and 20 particle diameters from the wall. This enhancement maybe caused by packing density inhomogeneity and/or particle size segregation caused by vibration during the packing process. No significant non-uniformities on length scales of 20 microm or greater were observed in the commercially packed column packed with 10 microm particles. PMID:11860146

  18. Study of Radially Varying Magnetic Field on Blood Flow through Catheterized Tapered Elastic Artery with Overlapping Stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, S.; Ijaz, S.

    2015-11-01

    A precise model has been developed for studying the influence of metallic nanoparticles on blood flow through catheterized tapered elastic arteries with radially varying magnetic field. The model is solved under the mild stenosis approximation by considering blood as viscous fluid. The influence of different flow parameters associated with this problem such as Hartmann number, nanoparticle volume fraction, Grashof number and heat source or sink parameter is analyzed by plotting the graphs of the wall shear stress, resistance impedance to blood flow and stream lines. The influence of the radially varying magnetic field on resistance impedance to flow is analyzed and it is observed that the significantly strong magnetic force tends to increase in resistance.

  19. Evaluation of Radial Flow Fluidized Filter (R3F) Followed by Microfiltration and Ultrafiltration Systems in Calimesa, California

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA coordinated a field study with South Mesa Water Utility to look for treatment alternatives for California State Project Water in the small community of Calimesa, California. EPA evaluated the performance of a system comprised of Radial Flow Fluidized Filtration (R3f) fo...

  20. 1r2dinv: A finite-difference model for inverse analysis of two dimensional linear or radial groundwater flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohling, G.C.; Butler, J.J., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a program for inverse analysis of two-dimensional linear or radial groundwater flow problems. The program, 1r2dinv, uses standard finite difference techniques to solve the groundwater flow equation for a horizontal or vertical plane with heterogeneous properties. In radial mode, the program simulates flow to a well in a vertical plane, transforming the radial flow equation into an equivalent problem in Cartesian coordinates. The physical parameters in the model are horizontal or x-direction hydraulic conductivity, anisotropy ratio (vertical to horizontal conductivity in a vertical model, y-direction to x-direction in a horizontal model), and specific storage. The program allows the user to specify arbitrary and independent zonations of these three parameters and also to specify which zonal parameter values are known and which are unknown. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used to estimate parameters from observed head values. Particularly powerful features of the program are the ability to perform simultaneous analysis of heads from different tests and the inclusion of the wellbore in the radial mode. These capabilities allow the program to be used for analysis of suites of well tests, such as multilevel slug tests or pumping tests in a tomographic format. The combination of information from tests stressing different vertical levels in an aquifer provides the means for accurately estimating vertical variations in conductivity, a factor profoundly influencing contaminant transport in the subsurface. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Experimental evaluation of connectivity influence on dispersivity under confined and unconfined radial convergent flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzi, Silvia; Molinari, Antonio; Fallico, Carmine; Pedretti, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    Heterogeneity and connectivity have a significant impact on the fate and transport of contaminants due to the occurrence of formations with largest permeability than the surrounding geological materials, which can originate preferential pathways in groundwater system. These issues are usually addressed by tracer tests and a radial convergent (RC) flow setting is typically selected for convenience but more complicated for model interpretation than uniform flow transport. An experimental investigation was performed using RC tracer tests in a 3D intermediate scale physical model to illustrate the role of connected features on the estimation of dispersivity using the classical Sauty solution and the method of moments, under confined and unconfined aquifer conditions. The physical model consists of 26 piezometers located at difference distances from a constant-discharge central pumping well. The box is filled with gravel channels embedded in a sandy matrix and organized in different layers. Materials have been well characterized before and after the test. For the confined configuration, a silt layer was placed above the previous layers. Tracer tests were performed using potassium iodide solutions with concentration of 3•10-3 M and under a constant pumping flow rate of 0.05 L/s. To mimic a pulse injection in each piezometer we used syringes and pipes, whereas a probe allowed continuous measuring of tracer concentration. Average velocity and longitudinal dispersion coefficient were defined from the first and second central moment of the observed breakthrough curves for each piezometer (integrated over the outflow boundary of the domain) and using the classical curve matching from the Sauty's solution at different Péclet numbers. Results reveal in some cases that estimates of hydrodynamic parameters from the Sauty solution and the method of moments seem to be different. This is related to the different basic assumptions of the two methods applied, and especially because of the presence of preferential flow paths which have been found to strongly control the highest values of the average velocity at the source and affect the resulting longitudinal dispersion coefficient. This study showed additional lights on the impact of connectivity on transport and its role to obtain effective measurements of macrodispersion throughout the aquifer under RC transport. Reference: Fernàndez-Garcia D. et al. (2002) Convergent-flow tracer tests in heterogeneous media. Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 57 129-145. Fischer H. B. (1966) Longitudinal Dispersion in Laboratory and Natural Streams. Technical Rep. KH-R-12, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California. Gaspar E. (1987) Modern Trends in Tracer Hydrology, Volume II. CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, FL, USA.

  2. Flow Characterization and Dynamic Analysis of a Radial Compressor with Passive Method of Surge Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou, Erwann

    Due to recent emission regulations, the use of turbochargers for force induction of internal combustion engines has increased. Actually, the trend in diesel engines is to downsize the engine by use of turbochargers that operate at higher pressure ratio. Unfortunately, increasing the rotational speed tends to reduce the turbocharger radial compressor range of operation which is limited at low mass flow rate by the occurrence of surge. In order to extent the operability of turbochargers, compressor housings can be equipped with a passive surge control device also known as ported shroud. This specific casing treatment has been demonstrated to enhance surge margin with minor negative impact on the compressor efficiency. However, the actual working mechanisms of the bypass system remain not well understood. In order to optimize the design of the ported shroud, it is then crucial to identify the dynamic flow changes induced by the implementation of the device to control instabilities. Experimental methods were used to assess the development of instabilities from stable, stall and eventually surge regimes of a ported shroud centrifugal compressor. Systematic comparison was conducted with the same compressor design without ported shroud. Hence, the full pressure dynamic survey of both compressors' performance characteristics converged toward two different and probably interrelated driving mechanisms to the development and/or propagation of unsteadiness within each compressor. One related the pressure disturbances at the compressor inlet, and notably the more apparent development of perturbations in the non-ported compressor impeller, whereas the other was attributed to the pressure distortions induced by the presence of the tongue in the asymmetric design of the compressor volute. Specific points of operation were selected to carry out planar flow measurements. At normal working, both standard and stereoscopic particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed to calculate the instantaneous and mean velocity fields at the inlet of the compressor. At incipient and full surge, phase-locked PIV measurements were added. In this work, satisfying characterization of the compressor inlet flow instabilities was obtained at different operational speeds. Combining transient pressure data and PIV measurements, the time evolution of the complex flow patterns occurring at surge was reconstructed and a better insight into the bypass mechanisms was achieved.

  3. Proximal radial artery ligation after distalization of a high flow brachio-cephalic fistula. A novel approach to inflow reduction.

    PubMed

    Smith, J B; Calder, F R

    2008-01-01

    High flow fistulae present a common challenge to vascular access (VA) surgeons and many strategies have been described, each with their benefits and limitations. There are no NK-DOQI guidelines for the management of high flow fistulae or indeed the management of those refractory to more conventional approaches. We discuss a novel technique to inflow reduction in a previously distalized brachiocephalic fistula and recommend the technique of proximal radial artery ligation. PMID:19085900

  4. A Miniature Radial-Flow Wind Turbine Using Piezoelectric Transducers and Magnetic Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, H.; Yeatman, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a miniature radial-flow piezoelectric wind turbine for harvesting airflow energy. The turbine's transduction is achieved by magnetic “plucking”of a piezoelectric beam by the passing rotor. The magnetic coupling is formed by two magnets on the beam's free end and on the rotor plate. Frequency up-conversion is realized by the magnetic excitation, allowing the rotor to rotate at any low frequency while the beam can vibrate at its resonant frequency after each plucking. The operating range of the device is, therefore, expanded by this mechanism. Two arrangements of magnetic orientation have been investigated, showing that the repulsive arrangement has higher output power. The influence of the vertical gap between magnets was also examined, providing guidance for the final design. A prototype was built and tested in a wind tunnel. A peak power output of 159 μW was obtained with a 270 kΩ load at 2.7 m/s airflow speed. The device started working at 3.5 m/s and kept operating when the airflow speed fell to 1.84 m/s.

  5. The origins of radial fracture systems and associated large lava flows on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parfitt, Elisabeth A.; Wilson, Lionel; Head, James W., III

    1992-01-01

    Magellan images have revealed the existence of systems of radial fractures on venus that are very similar in form to terrestrial dike swarms such as the Mackenzie swarm in Northern Canada. The association of many of the fracture systems with lava flows, calderas, and volcanic edifices further support the idea of a dike emplacement origin. A global survey of the Magellan images has allowed the location of 300 such fracture systems. Two types of fracture systems are defined. A series of models were developed to simulate the emplacement of dikes on Venus. Observations of fracture lengths and widths were then used to constrain the emplacement conditions. The model results show that the great length and relatively large width of the fractures can only be explained if the dikes that produce them were emplaced in high driving pressure (pressure buffered) conditions. Such conditions imply high rates of melt production, which is consistent with the melt being derived directly from a plume head. We have recently modeled the vertical emplacement of a dike from the top of a mantle plume and calculated the eruption rates such a dike would produce on reaching the surface. This modeling shows that eruption rates of approximately 0.1 cu km/hr can readily be generated by such a dike, consistent with the above results. However, the sensitivity of the model to dike width and therefore driving pressure means that eruption rates from dikes emplaced from the base of the crust or the head of a mantle plume could be orders of magnitude higher than this. Clearly, therefore, the model needs to be refined in order to better constrain eruption conditions. However, it is worth noting here that the initial results do show that even for moderate dike widths, eruption rates could be at least on the order of those estimated for terrestrial flood basalts.

  6. Proton and pion transverse spectra at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider from radial flow and finite size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Alejandro; Cuautle, Eleazar; Magnin, J.; Montano, Luis Manuel

    2006-12-15

    We show that the proton and pion transverse momentum distributions measured at BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), for all collision centralities for pions and most of the collision centralities for protons, can be simultaneously described in terms of a thermal model with common values for the radial flow and temperature, when accounting for the finite size of the interaction region at the time of decoupling. We show that this description is obtained in terms of a simple scaling law of the size of the interaction region with the number of participants in the collision. The behavior of the proton to pion ratio at mid-rapidity can also be understood as a consequence of the strength of the radial flow and system size reached at RHIC energies.

  7. Aerothermal investigations of mixing flow phenomena in case of radially inclined ejection holes at the leading edge

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, D.E.; Kusterer, K.A.

    2000-04-01

    A leading edge cooling configuration is investigated numerically by application of a three-dimensional conjugate fluid flow and heat transfer solver, CHT-flow. The code has been developed at the Institute of Steam and Gas Turbines, Aachen University of Technology. It works on the basis of an implicit finite volume method combined with a multi-block technique. The cooling configuration is an axial turbine blade cascade with leading edge ejection through two rows of cooling holes. The rows are located in the vicinity of the stagnation line, one row on the suction side, the other row is on the pressure side. the cooling holes have a radial ejection angle of 45 degrees. This configuration has been investigated experimentally by other authors and the results have been documented as a test case for numerical calculations of ejection flow phenomena. The numerical investigations focus on the aerothermal mixing process in the cooling jets and the impact on the temperature distribution on the blade surface. The radial ejection angles lead to a fully three-dimensional and asymmetric jet flow field. Within a secondary flow analysis, the cooling fluid jets are investigated in detail. The secondary flow fields include asymmetric kidney vortex systems with one dominating vortex on the back side of the jets. The numerical and experimental data show a respectable agreement concerning the vortex development.

  8. Anatomical features that facilitate radial flow across growth rings and from xylem to cambium in Cryptomeria japonica

    PubMed Central

    Kitin, Peter; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Abe, Hisashi; Takata, Katsuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Although the lateral movement of water and gas in tree stems is an important issue for understanding tree physiology, as well as for the development of wood preservation technologies, little is known about the vascular pathways for radial flow. The aim of the current study was to understand the occurrence and the structure of anatomical features of sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) wood including the tracheid networks, and area fractions of intertracheary pits, tangential walls of ray cells and radial intercellular spaces that may be related to the radial permeability (conductivity) of the xylem. Methods Wood structure was investigated by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of traditional wood anatomical preparations and by a new method of exposed tangential faces of growth-ring boundaries. Key Results Radial wall pitting and radial grain in earlywood and tangential wall pitting in latewood provide a direct connection between subsequent tangential layers of tracheids. Bordered pit pairs occur frequently between earlywood and latewood tracheids on both sides of a growth-ring boundary. In the tangential face of the xylem at the interface with the cambium, the area fraction of intertracheary pit membranes is similar to that of rays (2·8 % and 2·9 %, respectively). The intercellular spaces of rays are continuous across growth-ring boundaries. In the samples, the mean cross-sectional area of individual radial intercellular spaces was 1·2 µm2 and their total volume was 0·06 % of that of the xylem and 2·07 % of the volume of rays. Conclusions A tracheid network can provide lateral apoplastic transport of substances in the secondary xylem of sugi. The intertracheid pits in growth-ring boundaries can be considered an important pathway, distinct from that of the rays, for transport of water across growth rings and from xylem to cambium. PMID:19258338

  9. Characterization of azimuthal and radial velocity fields induced by rotors in flows with a low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J.; Friedrich, J.; Ostendorf, A.; Gurevich, E. L.

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the flow field that emerges from a rodlike microrotor rotating about its center in a nonaxisymmetric manner. A simple theoretical model is proposed that uses a superposition of two rotlets as a fundamental solution to the Stokes equation. The predictions of this model are compared to measurements of the azimuthal and radial microfluidic velocity field components that are induced by a rotor composed of fused microscopic spheres. The rotor is driven magnetically and the fluid flow is measured with the help of a probe particle fixed by an optical tweezer. We find considerable deviations of the mere azimuthal flow pattern induced by a single rotating sphere as it has been reported by Di Leonardo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 134502 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.134502]. Notably, the presence of a radial velocity component that manifests itself by an oscillation of the probe particle with twice the rotor frequency is observed. These findings open up a way to discuss possible radial transport in microfluidic devices.

  10. Viscous Fingering Induced Flow Instability in Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, Kirsty; Shalliker, R. Andrew; Catchpoole, Heather J.; Sweeney, Alan P.; Wong, Victor; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-07-01

    Viscous fingering is a flow instability phenomenon that results in the destabilisation of the interface between two fluids of differing viscosities. The destabilised interface results in a complex mixing of the two fluids in a pattern that resembles fingers. The conditions that enhance this type of flow instability can be found in coupled chromatographic separation systems, even when the solvents used in each of the separation stages have seemingly similar chemical and physical properties (other than viscosity). For example, the viscosities of acetonitrile and methanol are sufficiently different that instability at the interface between these two solvents can be established and viscous fingering results. In coupled chromatographic systems, the volume of solvent transported from one separation dimension to the second often exceeds the injection volume by two or more orders of magnitude. As a consequence, viscous fingering may occur, when otherwise following the injection of normal analytical size injection plugs viscous fingering would not occur. The findings in this study illustrate the onset of viscous fingering in emulated coupled chromatographic systems and show the importance of correct solvent selection for optimum separation performance.

  11. Accurate on-line mass flow measurements in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tarafder, Abhijit; Vajda, Péter; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-12-13

    This work demonstrates the possible advantages and the challenges of accurate on-line measurements of the CO2 mass flow rate during supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) operations. Only the mass flow rate is constant along the column in SFC. The volume flow rate is not. The critical importance of accurate measurements of mass flow rates for the achievement of reproducible data and the serious difficulties encountered in supercritical fluid chromatography for its assessment were discussed earlier based on the physical properties of carbon dioxide. In this report, we experimentally demonstrate the problems encountered when performing mass flow rate measurements and the gain that can possibly be achieved by acquiring reproducible data using a Coriolis flow meter. The results obtained show how the use of a highly accurate mass flow meter permits, besides the determination of accurate values of the mass flow rate, a systematic, constant diagnosis of the correct operation of the instrument and the monitoring of the condition of the carbon dioxide pump. PMID:24210558

  12. Alternative plugs flow liquid chromatography (APFLC)/EI-MS system using a T-shaped flow path.

    PubMed

    Tanikawa, Isao; Konuma, Miwako; Hosono, Hiroko; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The vapor condensation method can be used for forming an alternative flow of liquid masses using a single solvent for alternative plugs flow liquid chromatography (APFLC), described in our previous paper. APFLC is more effective when adopting a T-shaped flow path and aqueous-organic solvents with a liquid-to-gas volume ratio (bulk fraction; ?) ranging between 0.0006 and 0.004 in an open tubular GC capillary column at below 70C. High-density plugs flow by a T-shaped flow path leads to extremely high resolution. Alternative plugs flow is formed when the liquid contact angle to the solid phase is above 75. An aqueous mixture of the usual HPLC solvent can be readily used for APFLC. An EI-mass spectrum is obtained that is comparable with that in the NIST library, except for the DMF mixture medium. Due to low-pressure loss properties in the column, the system does not require a high-pressure liquid pump. Solid hydrocarbon resin with a contact angle to water of between 75 and 79, such as polystyrene and olefinic polymers, is anticipated to be applicable to APFLC and hydro-membrane gas chromatography (HMGC) by a consideration of their surface tensions. PMID:21233568

  13. A Galerkin finite-element flow model to predict the transient response of a radially symmetric aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reilly, Thomas E.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program developed to evaluate radial flow of ground water, such as at a pumping well, recharge basin, or injection well, is capable of simulating anisotropic, inhomogenous, confined, or pseudo-unconfined (constant saturated thickness) conditions. Results compare well with those calculated from published analytical and model solutions. The program is based on the Galerkin finite-element technique. A sample model run is presented to illustrate the use of the program; supplementary material provides the program listing as well as a sample problem data set and output. From the text and other material presented, one can use the program to predict drawdowns from pumping and ground-water buildups from recharge in a radially symmetric ground-water system.

  14. Onset of radial flow in p+p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Kun; Zhu, Yinying; Liu, Weitao; Chen, Hongfang; Li, Cheng; Ruan, Lijuan; Tang, Zebo; Xu, Zhangbu

    2015-02-23

    It has been debated for decades whether hadrons emerging from p+p collisions exhibit collective expansion. The signal of the collective motion in p+p collisions is not as clear as in heavy-ion collisions because of the low multiplicity and large fluctuation in p+p collisions. Tsallis Blast-Wave (TBW) model is a thermodynamic approach, introduced to handle the overwhelming correlation and fluctuation in the hadronic processes. We have systematically studied the identified particle spectra in p+p collisions from RHIC to LHC using TBW and found no appreciable radial flow in p+p collisions below √s = 900 GeV. At LHC higher energy of 7 TeV in p+p collisions, the radial flow velocity achieves an average of (β) = 0.320 ± 0.005. This flow velocity is comparable to that in peripheral (40-60%) Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In addition, breaking of the identified particle spectra mT scaling was also observed at LHC from a model independent test.

  15. Onset of radial flow in p+p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Kun; Zhu, Yinying; Liu, Weitao; Chen, Hongfang; Li, Cheng; Ruan, Lijuan; Tang, Zebo; Xu, Zhangbu

    2015-02-23

    It has been debated for decades whether hadrons emerging from p+p collisions exhibit collective expansion. The signal of the collective motion in p+p collisions is not as clear as in heavy-ion collisions because of the low multiplicity and large fluctuation in p+p collisions. Tsallis Blast-Wave (TBW) model is a thermodynamic approach, introduced to handle the overwhelming correlation and fluctuation in the hadronic processes. We have systematically studied the identified particle spectra in p+p collisions from RHIC to LHC using TBW and found no appreciable radial flow in p+p collisions below ?s = 900 GeV. At LHC higher energy of 7 TeV in p+p collisions, the radial flow velocity achieves an average of (?) = 0.320 0.005. This flow velocity is comparable to that in peripheral (40-60%) Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In addition, breaking of the identified particle spectra mT scaling was also observed at LHC from a model independent test.

  16. A design methodology for a magnetorheological fluid damper based on a multi-stage radial flow mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C. R.; Zhao, D. X.; Xie, L.; Liu, Q.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper based on a multi-stage radial flow mode is put forward, compared with traditional ones with annular damping channel which are of low magnetic field utilization and high energy consumption. The equivalent magnetic circuit model is derived, along with the relation between the magnetic induction at the working gap and the exciting current in the field coils. The finite-element software ANYSY is used to analyze the distribution of the magnetic field in the MR valve. The flow differential equation for a MR fluid in radial flow is theoretically set up, and the numerical solution is validated by means of the Herschel-Bulkley constitutive model. A MR damper was designed and fabricated in Chongqing University in accordance with the technical requirements of a railway vehicle anti-yaw damper, and the force-displacement characteristic of the damper was tested with J95-I type shock absorber test-bed. The results show that the experimental damping forces are in good agreement with the analytical ones, and the methodology is believed to help predict the damping force of a MR damper.

  17. E × B flow shear effects on radial correlation length of turbulence and gyroradius scaling of confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, T. S.; Burrell, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    The radial correlation length of the turbulence responsible for transport can have a different gyroradius scaling in low (L)-mode and high (H)-mode plasmas due to E×B flow shear effects, as predicted by the two-point nonlinear analysis in general tokamak geometry [Phys. Plasmas 2, 1648 (1995)]. This difference offers a possible understanding of the recent ρ*-scan experiment results on DIII-D [Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)] L-mode and H-mode plasmas [Phys. Plasmas 2, 2342 (1995)]. Within our model, thermal diffusivity in H-mode plasmas scales like gyro-Bohm, independent of the scaling in L-mode plasmas.

  18. Final Technical Report: Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Eugenio

    2014-05-02

    The strong coupling between the different physical variables involved in the plasma transport phenomenon and the high complexity of its dynamics call for a model-based, multivariable approach to profile control where those predictive models could be exploited. The overall objective of this project has been to extend the existing body of work by investigating numerically and experimentally active control of unstable fluctuations, including fully developed turbulence and the associated cross-field particle transport, via manipulation of flow profiles in a magnetized laboratory plasma device. Fluctuations and particle transport can be monitored by an array of electrostatic probes, and Ex#2;B flow profiles can be controlled via a set of biased concentric ring electrodes that terminate the plasma column. The goals of the proposed research have been threefold: i- to develop a predictive code to simulate plasma transport in the linear HELCAT (HELicon-CAThode) plasma device at the University of New Mexico (UNM), where the experimental component of the proposed research has been carried out; ii- to establish the feasibility of using advanced model-based control algorithms to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles, iii- to investigate the fundamental nonlinear dynamics of turbulence and transport physics. Lehigh University (LU), including Prof. Eugenio Schuster and one full-time graduate student, has been primarily responsible for control-oriented modeling and model-based control design. Undergraduate students have also participated in this project through the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program. The main goal of the LU Plasma Control Group has been to study the feasibility of controlling turbulence-driven transport by shaping the radial poloidal flow profile (i.e., by controlling flow shear) via biased concentric ring electrodes.

  19. Hydrodynamic chromatography using flow of a highly concentrated dextran solution through a coiled tube.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Yoichi; Morisada, Shintaro; Ohto, Keisuke; Hidetaka, Kawakita

    2016-08-01

    Separation of colloidal particles in non-Newtonian fluid is important in food engineering. Using hydrodynamic chromatography, colloidal particles and starch granules originating from corn were individually injected into dextran solutions (Mw 2,000,000g/mol) flowing through a coiled tube for efficient size separation. Rheological properties of dextran solutions ranging from 50 to 250g/L were determined, revealing pseudoplastic fluid behavior. Velocity profiles for dextran solution flow in coiled tubes were obtained from rheological power law parameters. Suspensions of colloidal particles of diameters 1.0 and 20μm were individually injected into the dextran flows, demonstrating that dextran solutions at high concentration separated colloidal particles. Starch granules were separated by size using a dextran solution flow (250g/L). Thus, we expect to obtain efficient separation of colloidal particles in foods using highly concentrated dextran solutions. PMID:27112856

  20. Computations of the three-dimensional flow and heat transfer within a coolant passage of a radial turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I.-P.; Roelke, R. J.; Steinthorsson, E.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical code is developed for computing three-dimensional, turbulent, compressible flow within coolant passages of turbine blades. The code is based on a formulation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in a rotating frame of reference in which the velocity dependent variable is specified with respect to the rotating frame instead of the inertial frame. The algorithm employed to obtain solutions to the governing equation is a finite-volume LU algorithm that allows convection, source, as well as diffusion terms to be treated implicitly. In this study, all convection terms are upwind differenced by using flux-vector splitting, and all diffusion terms are centrally differenced. This paper describes the formulation and algorithm employed in the code. Some computed solutions for the flow within a coolant passage of a radial turbine are also presented.

  1. Cylindrically confined pair-ion-electron and pair-ion plasmas having axial sheared flow and radial gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Batool, Nazia; Saleem, H.

    2013-10-15

    The linear and nonlinear dynamics of pair-ion (PI) and pair-ion-electron plasmas (PIE) have been investigated in a cylindrical geometry with a sheared plasma flow along the axial direction having radial dependence. The coupled linear dispersion relation of low frequency electrostatic waves has been presented taking into account the Guassian profile of density and linear gradient of sheared flow. It is pointed out that the quasi-neutral cold inhomogeneous pure pair ion plasma supports only the obliquely propagating convective cell mode. The linear dispersion relation of this mode has been solved using boundary conditions. The nonlinear structures in the form of vortices formed by different waves have been discussed in PI and PIE plasmas.

  2. Cylindrically confined pair-ion-electron and pair-ion plasmas having axial sheared flow and radial gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batool, Nazia; Saleem, H.

    2013-10-01

    The linear and nonlinear dynamics of pair-ion (PI) and pair-ion-electron plasmas (PIE) have been investigated in a cylindrical geometry with a sheared plasma flow along the axial direction having radial dependence. The coupled linear dispersion relation of low frequency electrostatic waves has been presented taking into account the Guassian profile of density and linear gradient of sheared flow. It is pointed out that the quasi-neutral cold inhomogeneous pure pair ion plasma supports only the obliquely propagating convective cell mode. The linear dispersion relation of this mode has been solved using boundary conditions. The nonlinear structures in the form of vortices formed by different waves have been discussed in PI and PIE plasmas.

  3. Stopping and radial flow in central 58Ni+58Ni collisions between 1A and 2A GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, B.; Herrmann, N.; Ritman, J. L.; Best, D.; Gobbi, A.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Kirejczyk, M.; Leifels, Y.; Pinkenburg, C.; Reisdorf, W.; Schüll, D.; Sodan, U.; Wang, G. S.; Wienold, T.; Alard, J. P.; Amouroux, V.; Bastid, N.; Belyaev, I.; Berek, G.; Biegansky, J.; Buta, A.; Coffin, J. P.; Crochet, P.; de Schauenburg, B.; Dona, R.; Dupieux, P.; Eskef, M.; Fintz, P.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Genoux-Lubain, A.; Goebels, G.; Guillaume, G.; Häfele, E.; Jundt, F.; Kecskemeti, J.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Kuhn, C.; Lebedev, A.; Legrand, I.; Maazouzi, C.; Manko, V.; Mösner, J.; Mohren, S.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Pras, P.; Rami, F.; Roy, C.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Somov, A.; Tizniti, L.; Trzaska, M.; Vasiliev, M. A.; Wagner, P.; Wohlfarth, D.; Zhilin, A.

    1998-01-01

    The production of charged pions, protons, and deuterons has been studied in central collisions of 58Ni on 58Ni at incident beam energies of 1.06A, 1.45A, and 1.93A GeV. The dependence of transverse-momentum and rapidity spectra on the beam energy and on the centrality of the collison is presented. It is shown that the scaling of the mean rapidity shift of protons established for between 10A and 200A GeV at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS accelerators energies is valid down to 1A GeV. The degree of nuclear stopping is discussed; quantum molecular dynamics calculations reproduce the measured proton rapidity spectra for the most central events reasonably well, but do not show any sensitivity between the soft and the hard equation of state. A radial flow analysis, using the midrapidity transverse-momentum spectra, delivers freeze-out temperatures T and radial flow velocities βr which increase with beam energy up to 2A GeV; in comparison to the existing data of Au on Au over a large range of energies, only βr shows a system size dependence.

  4. Universality Results for Multi-layer Radial Hele-Shaw Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daripa, Prabir; Gin, Craig; Daripa Research Team

    2014-03-01

    Saffman-Taylor instability is a well known viscosity driven instability of an interface separating two immiscible fluids. We study linear stability of this displacement process in multi-layer radial Hele-Shaw geometry involving an arbitrary number of immiscible fluid phases. Universal stability results have been obtained and applied to design displacement processes that are considerably less unstable than the pure Saffman-Taylor case. In particular, we derive universal formula which gives specific values of the viscosities of the fluid layers corresponding to smallest unstable band. Other similar universal results will also be presented. The talk is based on ongoing work. Supported by an NPRP Grant # 08-777-1-141 from the Qatar National Research Fund (a member of the Qatar Foundation). The statements made herein are solely the responsibility of the authors.

  5. The investigation of flow instabilities on a rotating disk with curvature in the radial direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intemann, P. A.; Clarkson, M. H.

    1982-01-01

    The major objective is to explore any visible differences of the flow field with wall curvature of the test body, including possible interaction between Taylor-Gortler instabilities present along concave walls and the inflexional instabilities investigated here. An experimental study was conducted with emphasis placed on making visual observations and recording photographically the flow instabilities present under three different rotating bodies: a flat disk, a concave paraboloid, and a convex paraboloid. The data collected for the three test bodies lead to the conclusion that the wall curvature of the concave and convex paraboloids did not alter the observed flow field significantly from that observed on the flat disk.

  6. Presentation of the MERC work-flow for the computation of a 2D radial reflector in a PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Clerc, T.; Hebert, A.; Leroyer, H.; Argaud, J. P.; Poncot, A.; Bouriquet, B.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a work-flow for computing an equivalent 2D radial reflector in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core, in adequacy with a reference power distribution, computed with the method of characteristics (MOC) of the lattice code APOLLO2. The Multi-modelling Equivalent Reflector Computation (MERC) work-flow is a coherent association of the lattice code APOLLO2 and the core code COCAGNE, structured around the ADAO (Assimilation de Donnees et Aide a l'Optimisation) module of the SALOME platform, based on the data assimilation theory. This study leads to the computation of equivalent few-groups reflectors, that can be spatially heterogeneous, which have been compared to those obtained with the OPTEX similar methodology developed with the core code DONJON, as a first validation step. Subsequently, the MERC work-flow is used to compute the most accurate reflector in consistency with all the R and D choices made at Electricite de France (EDF) for the core modelling, in terms of number of energy groups and simplified transport solvers. We observe important reductions of the power discrepancies distribution over the core when using equivalent reflectors obtained with the MERC work-flow. (authors)

  7. Simultaneous effects of radial magnetic field and wall properties on peristaltic flow of Carreau-Yasuda fluid in curved flow configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Tanveer, A.; Alsaadi, F.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of present article is to address the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) peristaltic flow of Carreau-Yasuda fluid in a curved geometry. The channel boundaries satisfy wall slip and compliant properties. The fluid is electrically conducting through an applied magnetic field in the radial direction. Heat transfer is also studied. Governing equation comprised the viscous dissipation effects. The non-linear expressions are first obtained and then approximated using long wavelength and low Reynolds number considerations. The resulting systems are solved for the series solutions. The expressions of velocity, temperature, heat transfer coefficient and stream function are obtained and analyzed via graphical illustrations.

  8. Determination of adsorption entropies on solid surfaces by reversed-flow gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dremetsika, A V; Siskos, P A; Katsanos, N A

    2007-11-19

    The reversed-flow gas chromatography (RF-GC) method has been applied to measure the time separation of adsorption entropies and their probability density functions, when acetic and formic acid vapors, responsible for artifacts degradation inside museums, are adsorbed on various heterogeneous surfaces. The solid materials studied were Penteli marble and solid metals (lead, copper and iron), which are commonly used for the construction of the artifacts. Physicochemical measurements were performed at various temperatures in the range 353-473 K, the surface coverage theta being also calculated over time. A new mathematical model, based on well known equations was used in order to extract the above quantities. PMID:17706346

  9. An experimental and computational investigation of flow in a radial inlet of an industrial pipeline centrifugal compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Flathers, M.B.; Bache, G.E.; Rainsberger, R.

    1996-04-01

    The flow field of a complex three-dimensional radial inlet for an industrial pipeline centrifugal compressor has been experimentally determined on a half-scale model. Based on the experimental results, inlet guide vanes have been designed to correct pressure and swirl angle distribution deficiencies. The unvaned and vaned inlets are analyzed with a commercially available fully three-dimensional viscous Navier-Stokes code. Since experimental results were available prior to the numerical study, the unvaned analysis is considered a postdiction while the vaned analysis is considered a prediction. The computational results of the unvaned inlet have been compared to the previously obtained experimental results. The experimental method utilized for the unvaned inlet is repeated for the vaned inlet and the data have been used to verify the computational results. The paper will discuss experimental, design, and computational procedures, grid generation, boundary conditions, and experimental versus computational methods. Agreement between experimental and computational results is very good, both in prediction and postdiction modes. The results of this investigation indicate that CFD offers a measurable advantage in design, schedule, and cost and can be applied to complex, three-dimensional radial inlets.

  10. Electron source of triode type with radial converging electron flow for irradiation of cylindrical targets

    SciTech Connect

    Engelko, V. I.; Kuznetsov, V. S.; Mueller, Georg

    2009-01-15

    Design of an electron source of triode type is described, which produces a radial converging electron beam employed for modification of the outer surface of fuel element claddings. Experimental investigations of the source showed that beam current magnitude, efficiency of beam focusing to the target, stability of source operation, and beam pulse duration become worse when the target diameter drops below certain values. A method for the calculation of the source operation was developed. Calculations showed that the reason of worse source operation is the initial angular spread of electrons when the target diameter is small. Because of the angular spread a part of electrons passes by the target and oscillates between the target and cathode. The space charge of the oscillating electrons lowers the emission current magnitude and leads to the formation of a virtual cathode in the grid-target gap despite the fact that the emission beam current is less than the limiting one. Formation of a virtual cathode is a reason for the unstable source operation and restriction of the beam pulse duration. Recommendations for the improvement of the source design are suggested.

  11. Distributed control of reactive power flow in a radial distribution circuit with high photovoltaic penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael; Turitsyn, Konstantin; Backhaus, Scott; Sule, Petr

    2009-01-01

    We show how distributed control of reactive power can serve to regulate voltage and minimize resistive losses in a distribution circuit that includes a significant level of photovoltaic (PV) generation. To demonstrate the technique, we consider a radial distribution circuit with a single branch consisting of sequentially-arranged residential-scale loads that consume both real and reactive power. In parallel, some loads also have PV generation capability. We postulate that the inverters associated with each PV system are also capable of limited reactive power generation or consumption, and we seek to find the optimal dispatch of each inverter's reactive power to both maintain the voltage within an acceptable range and minimize the resistive losses over the entire circuit. We assume the complex impedance of the distribution circuit links and the instantaneous load and PV generation at each load are known. We compare the results of the optimal dispatch with a suboptimal local scheme that does not require any communication. On our model distribution circuit, we illustrate the feasibility of high levels of PV penetration and a significant (20% or higher) reduction in losses.

  12. Rotor cavity flow and heat transfer with inlet swirl and radial inflow of cooling air

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    To improve the reliability of turbine disc life prediction, experimental verification is required of analytical tools that calculate the flow field and heat transfer coefficients in turbine-stator cavities. In these experiments a full-scale model of the aft (downstream) cavity of a typical aircraft gas turbine was employed using a high-molecular-weight gas (Refrigerant-12) at ambient pressure and temperature conditions to match the dimensionless parameters at engine conditions. The cavity temperature and selected cavity velocity profiles were measured. Electrical heat addition was employed with liquid crystal surface temperature measurement to obtain local disc heat transfer coefficients. Cooling gas flow was added with inlet swirl near the outer diameter of the rotor and discharged near the rotor hub. Rotational Reynolds numbers were varied up to 8 {times} 10{sup 6} with the swirl Reynolds number variation up to 1.4 {times} 10{sup 5}. Rotor heat transfer coefficients are larger when they are dominated by either the inlet swirl flow or by the rotor angular velocity and are the lowest when neither inlet swirl flow nor the rotor velocity are dominant. A CFD code was employed to illustrate the effect of the velocity field on disc heat transfer.

  13. E{times}B flow shear effects on radial correlation length of turbulence and gyroradius scaling of confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.; Burrell, K.H.

    1996-01-01

    The radial correlation length of the turbulence responsible for transport can have a different gyroradius scaling in low (L)-mode and high (H)-mode plasmas due to {bold E{times}B} flow shear effects, as predicted by the two-point nonlinear analysis in general tokamak geometry [Phys. Plasmas {bold 2}, 1648 (1995)]. This difference offers a possible understanding of the recent {rho}{sub {asterisk}}-scan experiment results on DIII-D [Fusion Technol. {bold 8}, 441 (1985)] L-mode and H-mode plasmas [Phys. Plasmas {bold 2}, 2342 (1995)]. Within our model, thermal diffusivity in H-mode plasmas scales like gyro-Bohm, independent of the scaling in L-mode plasmas. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes stage analysis of the flow through a compact radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D.

    1991-01-01

    A steady, three dimensional Navier-Stokes average passage computer code is used to analyze the flow through a compact radial turbine stage. The code is based upon the average passage set of equations for turbomachinery, whereby the flow fields for all passages in a given blade row are assumed to be identical while retaining their three-dimensionality. A stage solution is achieved by alternating between stator and rotor calculations, while coupling the two solutions by means of a set of axisymmetric body forces which model the absent blade row. Results from the stage calculation are compared with experimental data and with results from an isolated rotor solution having axisymmetric inlet flow quantities upstream of the vacated stator space. Although the mass-averaged loss through the rotor is comparable for both solutions, the details of the loss distribution differ due to stator effects. The stage calculation predicts smaller spanwise variations in efficiency, in closer agreement with the data. The results of the study indicate that stage analyses hold promise for improved prediction of loss mechanisms in multi-blade row turbomachinery, which could lead to improved designs through the reduction of these losses.

  15. Numerical simulation of the flow field from a radially lobed nozzle and validation via HWA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Noushin; Sekaran, Aarthi

    2014-11-01

    With a constant need for higher performance and efficiency in engineering (particularly aerospace) applications, lobed nozzles have experienced a regained interest in the recent past, owing to their superior mixing capabilities. Although previous experimental studies (Hu et al. 1999, Hu et al. 2008) have analyzed the flow field from lobed nozzles and made conjectures about the physics and flow mechanisms involved, the absence of a ``complete'' 3D dataset elicits unanswered questions. The present numerical study is intended as a complement to an existing experimental (single component hot wire anemometry) investigation, involving the analysis of the flow field downstream of a six lobed nozzle (N. Amini et al., 2012). A full 3D URANS simulation of the lobed nozzle is carried out, initially validated with experimental data, and then used to examine the stream-wise vortices and obtain a visual corroboration of the structure formation and breakup mechanism as described earlier (Hu et al., 2008). Further, the study takes a close look at the nature of the instabilities which trigger and enhance the mixing process in lobed nozzles in order to determine the precise role of the lobes and eventually obtain more effective mixing in industrial applications.

  16. Flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using ≈4mLmin(-1) gas flows.

    PubMed

    Franchina, Flavio A; Maimone, Mariarosa; Tranchida, Peter Q; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of the herein described research was focused on performing satisfactory flow modulation (FM), in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS), using an MS-compatible second-dimension gas flow of approx. 4mLmin(-1). The FM model used was based on that initially proposed by Seeley et al. [3]. The use of limited gas flows was enabled through fine tuning of the FM parameters, in particular the duration of the re-injection (or flushing) process. Specifically, the application of a long re-injection period (i.e., 700ms) enabled efficient accumulation-loop flushing with gas flows of about 4mLmin(-1). It was possible to apply such extended re-injection periods by using different restrictor lengths in the connections linking the modulator to the auxiliary pressure source. FM GC×GC-MS applications were performed on a mixture containing C9-10 alkanes, and on a sample of essential oil. GC×GC-MS sensitivity was compared with that attained by using conventional GC-MS analysis, in essential oil applications. It was observed that signal intensities were, in general, considerably higher in the FM GC×GC-MS experiments. PMID:26968229

  17. Mixing characteristics of mixers in flow analysis. Application to two-dimensional detection in ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hongzhu; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Srinivasan, Kannan; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Three mixer designs, a back-flow tee mixer (BT), an end-blocked membrane tee mixer (EMT), and a tubular membrane mixer (TM), were fabricated and compared to three commercially available mixers, Visco-Jet Micro mixer (VJM) and HS binary tee mixer with 2 and 10 ?L volume (HS-2 and HS-10) mixing cartridges. Internal volumes ranged from 8.3 to 20.3 ?L. Performance characteristics were evaluated by the Villermaux-Dushman reaction, noise in baseline conductance upon mixing an electrolyte solution with water, and dispersion/relative dispersion of an injected solute. No single characteristic would uniquely qualify a particular device. In typical postcolumn use when a small reagent flow is added to a principal flow stream using a low-pulsation high-end chromatographic pump, with the worst of these mixers, imperfect mixing accounted for 99.6% of the observed noise. EMT, BT, and TM with asymmetric inlets provided better mixing performances relative to VJM, HS-2, and HS-10 with symmetric inlet ports, especially when the secondary liquid flow rate was much lower than the principal stream-flow rate. Dispersion per unit residence time was singularly large for HS-2. Based on its mixing efficiency and small dispersion, the BT design was found to be the best for practicing postcolumn reaction. As an illustrative application, this was then used to introduce electrogenerated LiOH in a suppressed ion chromatography system to perform sensitive detection of weak acids in a second dimension. PMID:25426864

  18. A reversed-flow differential flow modulator for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Griffith, James F; Winniford, William L; Sun, Kefu; Edam, Rob; Luong, Jim C

    2012-02-24

    A simple and reliable differential flow modulator has been demonstrated which reverses the flow during the flush step. The modulator is constructed with commercially available capillary flow technology tees which simplifies the apparatus and permits wide range of column dimensions to be used because the modulator volume is adjustable. Using a reverse flush arrangement the tailing of the peak at the base (baseline rise between modulations) is reduced 10-20 fold as compared to forward flush modulation. This is most easily observed for peaks overloaded in the first dimension. Excellent reproducibility (<2% RSD) of area measurements has been demonstrated with a complex fragrance sample as well as the capacity to handle significant overloading without loss of resolution in the second dimension. Further demonstrating the flexibility of this modulator, separation of C1-6 alkanes and olefins are demonstrated with two porous layer open tubular columns. PMID:22192563

  19. Large Eddy Simulations and an Analysis of the Flow Field of a Radially Lobed Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Noushin; Sekaran, Aarthi

    2015-11-01

    Lobed nozzles have been a subject of regained interest over the past couple of decades owing to their established mixing capabilities. Despite experimental (Hu et al., 1999 and Hu et al., 2008) and limited numerical studies (Boulenouar et al. 2011 and Cooper et al., 2005), the exact nature of the jet ensuing from this nozzle is yet to be completely understood. The present numerical study is intended to complement prior experimental investigation, involving the analysis of the flow field downstream of a six lobed nozzle (Amini et al., 2012). Preliminary results (presented at DFD 2014, Amin and Sekaran), which involved three dimensional simulations of the full domain via URANS and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) were used to assess the domain extents and simulation technique. Based on these results it was seen that LES were able to capture the region of interest satisfactorily and a qualitative corroboration with previous studies was obtained. The study is thus extended to analyzing the flow originating from within the nozzle, following it downstream in order to confirm the vortical interaction mechanisms inside the lobed nozzle.

  20. Approximate analysis of three-dimensional groundwater flow toward a radial collector well in a finite-extent unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.-S.; Chen, J.-J.; Yeh, H.-D.

    2016-01-01

    This study develops a three-dimensional (3-D) mathematical model for describing transient hydraulic head distributions due to pumping at a radial collector well (RCW) in a rectangular confined or unconfined aquifer bounded by two parallel streams and no-flow boundaries. The streams with low-permeability streambeds fully penetrate the aquifer. The governing equation with a point-sink term is employed. A first-order free surface equation delineating the water table decline induced by the well is considered. Robin boundary conditions are adopted to describe fluxes across the streambeds. The head solution for the point sink is derived by applying the methods of finite integral transform and Laplace transform. The head solution for a RCW is obtained by integrating the point-sink solution along the laterals of the RCW and then dividing the integration result by the sum of lateral lengths. On the basis of Darcy's law and head distributions along the streams, the solution for the stream depletion rate (SDR) can also be developed. With the aid of the head and SDR solutions, the sensitivity analysis can then be performed to explore the response of the hydraulic head to the change in a specific parameter such as the horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities, streambed permeability, specific storage, specific yield, lateral length, and well depth. Spatial head distributions subject to the anisotropy of aquifer hydraulic conductivities are analyzed. A quantitative criterion is provided to identify whether groundwater flow at a specific region is 3-D or 2-D without the vertical component. In addition, another criterion is also given to allow for the neglect of vertical flow effect on SDR. Conventional 2-D flow models can be used to provide accurate head and SDR predictions if satisfying these two criteria.

  1. Analysis of three-dimensional groundwater flow toward a radial collector well in a finite-extent unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.-S.; Chen, J.-J.; Yeh, H.-D.

    2015-08-01

    This study develops a three-dimensional mathematical model for describing transient hydraulic head distributions due to pumping at a radial collector well (RCW) in a rectangular confined or unconfined aquifer bounded by two parallel streams and no-flow boundaries. The governing equation with a point-sink term is employed. A first-order free surface equation delineating the water table decline induced by the well is considered. The head solution for the point sink is derived by applying the methods of double-integral transform and Laplace transform. The head solution for a RCW is obtained by integrating the point-sink solution along the laterals of the RCW and then dividing the integration result by the sum of lateral lengths. On the basis of Darcy's law and head distributions along the streams, the solution for the stream depletion rate (SDR) can also be developed. With the aid of the head and SDR solutions, the sensitivity analysis can then be performed to explore the response of the hydraulic head to the change in a specific parameter such as the horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities, streambed permeability, specific storage, specific yield, lateral length and well depth. Spatial head distributions subject to the anisotropy of aquifer hydraulic conductivities are analyzed. A quantitative criterion is provided to identify whether groundwater flow at a specific region is 3-D or 2-D without the vertical component. In addition, another criterion is also given to allow the neglect of vertical flow effect on SDR. Conventional 2-D flow models can be used to provide accurate head and SDR predictions if satisfying these two criteria.

  2. Analytical and experimental study of flow through an axial turbine stage with a nonuniform inlet radial temperature profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwab, J. R.; Stabe, R. G.; Whitney, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented for a typical nonuniform inlet radial temperature profile through an advanced single-stage axial turbine and compared with the results obtained for a uniform profile. Gas temperature rises of 40 K to 95 K are predicted at the hub and tip corners at the trailing edges of the pressure surfaces in both the stator and rotor due to convection of hot fluid from the mean by the secondary flow. The inlet temperature profile is shown to be mixed out at the rotor exit survey plane (2.3 axial chords downstream of the rotor trailing edge) in both the analysis and the experiment. The experimental rotor exit angle profile for the nonuniform inlet temperature profile indicates underturning at the tip caused by increased clearance. Severe underturning also occurs at the mean, both with and without the nonuniform inlet temperature profile. The inviscid rotational flow code used in the analysis fails to predict the underturning at the mean, which may be caused by viscous effects. Previously announced in STAR as N83-27958

  3. Analytical and Experimental Study of Flow Through an Axial Turbine Stage with a Nonuniform Inlet Radial Temperature Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwab, J. R.; Stabe, R. G.; Whitney, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented for a typical nonuniform inlet radial temperature profile through an advanced single-stage axial turbine and compared with the results obtained for a uniform profile. Gas temperature rises of 40 K to 95 K are predicted at the hub and tip corners at the trailing edges of the pressure surfaces in both the stator and rotor due to convection of hot fluid from the mean by the secondary flow. The inlet temperature profile is shown to be mixed out at the rotor exit survey plane (2.3 axial chords downstream of the rotor trailing edge) in both the analysis and the experiment. The experimental rotor exit angle profile for the nonuniform inlet temperature profile indicates underturning at the tip caused by increased clearance. Severe underturning also occurs at the mean, both with and without the nonuniform inlet temperature profile. The inviscid rotational flow code used in the analysis fails to predict the underturning at the mean, which may be caused by viscous effects.

  4. Possible evidence for radial flow of heavy mesons in d + Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickles, Anne M.

    2014-04-01

    Recent measurements of particle correlations and the spectra of hadrons at both RHIC and the LHC are suggestive of hydrodynamic behavior in very small collision systems (p + Pb, d + Au and possibly high multiplicity p + p collisions at the LHC). The measurements in p + Pb and d + Au collisions are both qualitatively and quantitatively similar to what is seen in heavy ion collisions where low viscosity hot nuclear matter is formed. While light quarks and gluons are thought to make up the bulk matter, one of the most surprising results in heavy ion collisions is that charm quarks also have a large v2. Measurements of the transverse momentum spectra of electrons from the decay of D and B mesons in d + Au collisions show an enhancement in central collisions relative to p + p collisions. We employ the blast-wave model to determine if the flow of heavy quarks in d + Au and p + Pb collisions is able to explain the enhancement observed in the data. We find a reasonable description of the data with blast-wave parameters extracted from fits to the light hadron spectra, suggesting hydrodynamics as a possible explanation.

  5. A flow-through chromatography process for influenza A and B virus purification.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Thomas; Solomaier, Thomas; Peuker, Alessa; Pathapati, Trinath; Wolff, Michael W; Reichl, Udo

    2014-10-01

    Vaccination is still the most efficient measure to protect against influenza virus infections. Besides the seasonal wave of influenza, pandemic outbreaks of bird or swine flu represent a high threat to human population. With the establishment of cell culture-based processes, there is a growing demand for robust, economic and efficient downstream processes for influenza virus purification. This study focused on the development of an economic flow-through chromatographic process avoiding virus strain sensitive capture steps. Therefore, a three-step process consisting of anion exchange chromatography (AEC), Benzonase(®) treatment, and size exclusion chromatography with a ligand-activated core (LCC) was established, and tested for purification of two influenza A virus strains and one influenza B virus strain. The process resulted in high virus yields (≥68%) with protein contamination levels fulfilling requirements of the European Pharmacopeia for production of influenza vaccines for human use. DNA was depleted by ≥98.7% for all strains. The measured DNA concentrations per dose were close to the required limits of 10ng DNA per dose set by the European Pharmacopeia. In addition, the added Benzonase(®) could be successfully removed from the product fraction. Overall, the presented downstream process could potentially represent a simple, robust and economic platform technology for production of cell culture-derived influenza vaccines. PMID:24992667

  6. Local Time Variations of Radial Plasma Flow in Saturn's Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. J.; Bagenal, F.; Delamere, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    Extracting plasma parameters from a non-spinning spacecraft such as Cassini is very hard, however recent advances in forward model techniques and error analysis have led to refined values. Prior analysis on Saturnian inner magnetosphere ion data had provided values with uncertainties that were acceptable for large valued parameters such as VΦ. However for parameters of smaller magnitude, such as Vr, their uncertainties were often greater than 100% - such that setting Vr = 0 was a possibility and no correlations with any co-ordinate system could be carried out. With our improved techniques and error analysis the uncertainties can be reduced allowing us to explore trends in Vr for the first time. While one might expect an average slow outflow at all local times in the inner magnetosphere, the data actually shows an asymmetry: near dusk the Vr component tends to be negative, while near dawn it's positive. Such asymmetries have been identified before in various datasets, discussed recently by Thomsen et al. (2012), including moon absorption micro-signatures observed offset from the moon's orbit, high energy electrons and isotropic thermal electron and plasma temperatures. They suggest that a noon-to-midnight electric field would explain the data. By assuming a uniform electric field they infer the resultant drift velocity of the plasma due to the field. However they did not have Vr data to compare with. The new Vr data presented here adds to their work, while allowing their drift velocity calculation to be tested. Our Vr data is supportive, however implies a velocity drift a factor of 2-3 times greater. The Vr data also suggests that rather than the induced flow being aligned strictly dusk-to-dawn (towards 06 LT), it is slightly offset and directed towards ~08 LT.

  7. Hydrodynamic chromatography and field flow fractionation in finite aspect ratio channels.

    PubMed

    Shendruk, T N; Slater, G W

    2014-04-25

    Hydrodynamic chromatography (HC) and field-flow fractionation (FFF) separation methods are often performed in 3D rectangular channels, though ideal retention theory assumes 2D systems. Devices are commonly designed with large aspect ratios; however, it can be unavoidable or desirable to design rectangular channels with small or even near-unity aspect ratios. To assess the significance of finite-aspect ratio effects and interpret experimental retention results, an ideal, analytical retention theory is needed. We derive a series solution for the ideal retention ratio of HC and FFF rectangular channels. Rather than limiting devices' ability to resolve samples, our theory predicts that retention curves for normal-mode FFF are well approximated by the infinite plate solution and that the performance of HC is actually improved. These findings suggest that FFF devices need not be designed with large aspect ratios and that rectangular HC channels are optimal when the aspect ratio is unity. PMID:24674643

  8. A novel micropreconcentrator employing a laminar flow patterned heater for micro gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.-C.; Wu, T. H.; Lu, C.-J.; Chen, W. R.; Sheen, H. J.

    2012-06-01

    A simple micromachined process based on one photomask is developed for a novel micropreconcentrator (PCT) used in a micro gas chromatograph (GC). Unique thick silver heating microstructures with a high surface area for microheater of PCT are fabricated by combining the microfluidic laminar flow technique and the Tollens reaction within a microchannel. Silver deposition using this laminar flow patterning technique provides a higher deposition rate and easier microfabrication compared to conventional micromachined technologies for thick metal microstructures (>200 m). An amorphous and porous carbon film that functions as an adsorbent is grown on microheaters inside the microchannel. The PCT can be heated to >300 C rapidly by applying a constant electrical power of 1 W with a heating rate of 10 C s-1. Four volatile organic compounds, acetone, benzene, toluene and xylene, are collected through the proposed novel PCTs and separated successfully using a 17 m long gas chromatography column. The peak widths at half height (PWHHs) of the four compounds are relatively narrow (<6 s), and the minimum PWHH of 3.75 s is obtained for acetone. The preconcentration factors are >38 000 for benzene and toluene.

  9. Column properties and flow profiles of a flat, wide column for high-pressure liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Mriziq, Khaled S; Guiochon, Georges A

    2008-01-01

    The design and the construction of a pressurized, flat, wide column for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are described. This apparatus, which is derived from instruments that implement over-pressured thin layer chromatography, can carry out only uni-dimensional chromatographic separations. However, it is intended to be the first step in the development of more powerful instruments that will be able to carry out two-dimensional chromatographic separations, in which case, the first separation would be a space-based separation, LC{sup x}, taking place along one side of the bed and the second separation would be a time-based separation, LC{sup t}, as in classical HPLC but proceeding along the flat column, not along a tube. The apparatus described consists of a pressurization chamber made of a Plexiglas block and a column chamber made of stainless steel. These two chambers are separated by a thin Mylar membrane. The column chamber is a cavity which is filled with a thick layer (ca. 1 mm) of the stationary phase. Suitable solvent inlet and outlet ports are located on two opposite sides of the sorbent layer. The design allows the preparation of a homogenous sorbent layer suitable to be used as a chromatographic column, the achievement of effective seals of the stationary phase layer against the chamber edges, and the homogenous flow of the mobile phase along the chamber. The entire width of the sorbent layer area can be used to develop separations or elute samples. The reproducible performance of the apparatus is demonstrated by the chromatographic separations of different dyes. This instrument is essentially designed for testing detector arrays to be used in a two-dimensional LC{sup x} x LC{sup t} instrument. The further development of two-dimension separation chromatographs based on the apparatus described is sketched.

  10. Spatial analysis of aquifer response times for radial flow processes: Nondimensional analysis and laboratory-scale tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazaei, Farhad; Simpson, Matthew J.; Clement, T. Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental concept in groundwater hydrology is the notion of steady state, or equilibrium conditions. When a system at some initial steady state condition is perturbed by pumping, a transient cone of depression will develop and the system will approach a new steady state condition. Understanding the time scale required for the transient process to occur is of practical interest since it would help practitioners decide whether to use a steady state model or a more complicated transient model. Standard approaches to estimate the response time use simple scaling relationships which neglect spatial variations. Alternatively, others define the response time to be the amount of time taken for the difference between the transient and steady state solutions to fall below some arbitrary tolerance level. Here, we present a novel approach and use the concept of mean action time to predict aquifer response time scales in a two-dimensional radial geometry for pumping, injection and recovery processes. Our approach leads to relatively simple closed form expressions that explicitly show how the time scale depends on the hydraulic parameters and position. Furthermore, our dimensionless framework allows us to predict the response time scales for a range of applications including small scale laboratory problems and large scale field problems. Our analysis shows that the response time scales vary spatially, but are equivalent for pumping, injection and associated recovery processes. Furthermore, the time scale is independent of the pumping or injection flow rate. We test these predictions in a laboratory scale aquifer and find that our physical measurements corroborate the theoretical predictions.

  11. Impact of higher alginate expression on deposition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in radial stagnation point flow and reverse osmosis systems.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Moshe; Rezene, Tesfalem Zere; Ziemba, Christopher; Gillor, Osnat; Mathee, Kalai

    2009-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) have major impact on biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. On one hand, EPS can reduce membrane permeability and on the other, EPS production by the primary colonizers may influence their deposition and attachment rate and subsequently affect the biofouling propensity of the membrane. The role of bacterial exopolysaccharides in bacterial deposition followed by the biofouling potential of an RO membrane was evaluated using an alginate overproducing (mucoid) Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The mucoid P. aeruginosa PAOmucA22 was compared with its isogenic nonmucoid prototypic parent PAO1 microscopically in a radial stagnation point flow (RSPF) system for their bacterial deposition characteristics. Then, biofouling potential of PAO1 and PAOmucA22 was determined in a crossflow rectangular plate-and-frame membrane cell, in which the strains were cultivated on a thin-film composite, polyamide, flat RO membrane coupon (LFC-1) under laminar flow conditions. In the RSPF system, the observed deposition rate of the mucoid strain was between 5- and 10-fold lower than of the wild type using either synthetic wastewater medium (with ionic strength of 14.7 mM and pH 7.4) or 15 mM KCl solution (pH of 6.2). The slower deposition rate of the mucoid strain is explained by 5- to 25-fold increased hydrophilicity of the mucoid strain as compared to the isogenic wild type, PAO1. Corroborating with these results, a significant delay in the onset of biofouling of the RO membrane was observed when the mucoid strain was used as the membrane colonizer, in which the observed time for the induced permeate flux decline was delayed (ca. 2-fold). In conclusion, the lower initial cell attachment of the mucoid strain decelerated biofouling of the RO membrane. Bacterial deposition and attachment is a critical step in biofilm formation and governed by intimate interactions between outer membrane proteins of the bacteria and the surface. Shielding these interactions by a hydrated and hydrophilic alginate capsule is shown to dramatically lessen the biofouling potential of the membrane colonizers. PMID:19848149

  12. Method for (236)U Determination in Seawater Using Flow Injection Extraction Chromatography and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Steier, Peter; Nielsen, Sven; Golser, Robin

    2015-07-21

    An automated analytical method implemented in a flow injection (FI) system was developed for rapid determination of (236)U in 10 L seawater samples. (238)U was used as a chemical yield tracer for the whole procedure, in which extraction chromatography (UTEVA) was exploited to purify uranium, after an effective iron hydroxide coprecipitation. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was applied for quantifying the (236)U/(238)U ratio, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was used to determine the absolute concentration of (238)U; thus, the concentration of (236)U can be calculated. The key experimental parameters affecting the analytical effectiveness were investigated and optimized in order to achieve high chemical yields and simple and rapid analysis as well as low procedure background. Besides, the operational conditions for the target preparation prior to the AMS measurement were optimized, on the basis of studying the coprecipitation behavior of uranium with iron hydroxide. The analytical results indicate that the developed method is simple and robust, providing satisfactory chemical yields (80-100%) and high analysis speed (4 h/sample), which could be an appealing alternative to conventional manual methods for (236)U determination in its tracer application. PMID:26105019

  13. Microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography in suppressed electroosmotic flow environment. Separation of fat-soluble vitamins.

    PubMed

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, S; Naess, O; Moestue, S; Rasmussen, K E

    2000-04-21

    Microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) was carried out in a pH 2.5 phosphate buffer to effectively suppress the electroosmotic flow (EOF). With 66.6% (w/w) 25 mM phosphate buffer pH 2.5, 20.0% (w/w) 2-propanol, 6.6% (w/w) 1-butanol, 6.0% (w/w) sodium lauryl sulphate (SDS), and 0.8% (w/w) n-octane as the separation medium, the fat-soluble vitamins A palmitate, E acetate, and D3 were baseline separated within 11 min. With strongly suppressed EOF, the polarity of the separation voltage was reversed (positive electrode at the outlet); the n-octane micro droplets surrounded by negatively charged SDS molecules migrated towards the detector. The aqueous part of the microemulsion was modified with 20% (w/w) 2-propanol to improve partition between the n-octane phase and the surrounding aqueous medium. The fat-soluble vitamins were separated in order of decreasing hydrophobicity with a high migration time stability (repeatable within 0.1% RSD). Excellent accuracy and precision were obtained when the system was applied for the determination of vitamin E acetate in commercial vitamin tablets; quantitative data corresponded to 97.0% of label claim, intra-day results varied within 1.72% RSD (n=6), and inter-day results varied within 3.22% RSD (n=5). PMID:10823515

  14. Selective and Sensitive Chemiluminescence Determination of MCPB: Flow Injection and Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Meseguer-Lloret, Susana; Torres-Cartas, Sagrario; Catalá-Icardo, Mónica; Gómez-Benito, Carmen

    2016-02-01

    Two new chemiluminescence (CL) methods are described for the determination of the herbicide 4-(4-chloro-o-tolyloxy) butyric acid (MCPB). First, a flow injection chemiluminescence (FI-CL) method is proposed. In this method, MCPB is photodegraded with an ultraviolet (UV) lamp and the photoproducts formed provide a great CL signal when they react with ferricyanide in basic medium. Second, a high-performance liquid chromatography chemiluminescence (HPLC-CL) method is proposed. In this method, before the photodegradation and CL reaction, the MCPB and other phenoxyacid herbicides are separated in a C18 column. The experimental conditions for the FI-CL and HPLC-CL methods are optimized. Both methods present good sensitivity, the detection limits being 0.12 µg L(-1) and 0.1 µg L(-1) (for FI-CL and HPLC-CL, respectively) when solid phase extraction (SPE) is applied. Intra- and interday relative standard deviations are below 9.9%. The methods have been satisfactorily applied to the analysis of natural water samples. FI-CL method can be employed for the determination of MCPB in simple water samples and for the screening of complex water samples in a fast, economic, and simple way. The HPLC-CL method is more selective, and allows samples that have not been resolved with the FI-CL method to be solved. PMID:26903566

  15. A flexible loop-type flow modulator for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Quinto; Purcaro, Giorgia; Visco, Alessandro; Conte, Lanfranco; Dugo, Paola; Dawes, Peter; Mondello, Luigi

    2011-05-27

    The present investigation is focused on a simple flow modulator (FM), for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC). The interface is stable at high temperatures, and consists of a metallic disc (located inside the GC oven) with seven ports, which are connected to an auxiliary pressure source via two branches, to the first and second dimension, to a waste branch (linked to a needle valve) and to an exchangeable modulation loop (2 ports). The ports are connected via micro-channels, etched on one of the inner surfaces of the disc. Modulation is achieved using a two-way electrovalve, connected on one side to the additional pressure source, and to the two metal branches, on the other. An FM enantio-GC×polar-GC method (using a flame ionization detector) was optimized (a 40-μL loop was employed), for the analysis of essential oils. As an example, an application on spearmint oil is shown; the method herein proposed was subjected to validation. Finally, an FM GC×GC diesel experiment was carried out, using an apolar-polar column combination, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the modulator in the analysis of a totally different sample-type. PMID:21256493

  16. Reducing NO(x) emissions from a nitric acid plant of domestic petrochemical complex: enhanced conversion in conventional radial-flow reactor of selective catalytic reduction process.

    PubMed

    Abbasfard, Hamed; Hashemi, Seyed Hamid; Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza; Jokar, Seyyed Mohammad; Ghader, Sattar

    2013-01-01

    The nitric acid plant of a domestic petrochemical complex is designed to annually produce 56,400 metric tons (based on 100% nitric acid). In the present work, radial-flow spherical bed reactor (RFSBR) for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides (NO(x)) from the stack of this plant was modelled and compared with the conventional radial-flow reactor (CRFR). Moreover, the proficiency of a radial-flow (water or nitrogen) membrane reactor was also compared with the CRFR which was found to be inefficient at identical process conditions. In the RFSBR, the space between the two concentric spheres is filled by a catalyst. A mathematical model, including conservation of mass has been developed to investigate the performance of the configurations. The model was checked against the CRFR in a nitric acid plant located at the domestic petrochemical complex. A good agreement was observed between the modelling results and the plant data. The effects of some important parameters such as pressure and temperature on NO(x) conversion were analysed. Results show 14% decrease in NO(x) emission annually in RFSBR compared with the CRFR, which is beneficial for the prevention of NO(x) emission, global warming and acid rain. PMID:24527652

  17. Quantitative multi-residue method for determination antibiotics in chicken meat using turbulent flow chromatography coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bousova, Katerina; Senyuva, Hamide; Mittendorf, Klaus

    2013-01-25

    A multi-class method for identification and quantification of 36 antibiotics from seven different chemical classes (aminoglycosides, macrolides, lincosamides, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, quinolones and trimethoprim) has been developed by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The method was optimised for detection of antibiotics in chicken meat. Sample preparation including extraction with a mixture of acetonitrile:2% trichloroacetic acid (45:55, v/v), centrifugation and filtration was followed by on-line clean-up using turbulent flow chromatography. Using this automated on-line technique enabled a larger number of samples to be analysed per day than with a traditional clean-up technique (e.g. solid phase extraction). The optimised method was validated according to the European Commission Directive 2002/657/EC. In-house validation was performed by fortifying the blank matrix at three levels 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 MRL (maximum residue limit), or respectively, at concentrations as low as possible for substances without an MRL. Precision in terms of repeatability standard deviation ranged from 3 to 28% and recovery values were between 80 and 120% in most cases. All calculated validation parameters including CCα and CCβ were in the compliance with the legislative requirements. PMID:23298848

  18. Using active flow technology columns for high through-put and efficient analyses: The drive towards ultra-high through-put high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectral detection.

    PubMed

    Kocic, Danijela; Shalliker, R Andrew

    2015-11-20

    The performance of active flow technology chromatography columns in parallel segmented flow mode packed with 5 μm Hypersil GOLD particles was compared to conventional UHPLC columns packed with 1.9 μm Hypersil GOLD particles. While the conventional UHPLC columns produced more theoretical plates at the optimum flow rate, when separations were performed at maximum through-put the larger particle size AFT column out-performed the UHPLC column. When both the AFT column and the UHPLC column were operated such that they yielded the same number of theoretical plates per separation, the separation on the AFT column was twice as fast as that on the UHPLC column, with the same level of sensitivity and at just 70% of the back pressure. Furthermore, as the flow velocity further increased the performance gain on the AFT column compared to the UHPLC column improved. An additional advantage of the AFT column was that the flow stream at the exit of the column was split in the radial cross section of the peak profile. This enables the AFT column to be coupled to a flow limiting detector, such as a mass spectrometer. When operated under high through-put conditions separations as fast as six seconds, using mobile phase flow rates in the order of 5-6 mL/min have been recorded. PMID:26363945

  19. Differences in the Properties of the Radial Artery between Cun, Guan, Chi, and Nearby Segments Using Ultrasonographic Imaging: A Pilot Study on Arterial Depth, Diameter, and Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeuk U.; Lee, Yu Jung; Kim, Jong Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the Study. The three conventional pulse-diagnostic palpation locations (PLs) on both wrists are Cun, Guan, and Chi, and each location reveals different clinical information. To identify anatomical or hemodynamic specificity, we used ultrasonographic imaging to determine the arterial diameter, radial artery depth, and arterial blood flow velocity at the three PLs and at nearby non-PL segments. Methods. We applied an ultrasound scanner to 44 subjects and studied the changes in the arterial diameter and depth as well as in the average/maximum blood flow velocities along the radial artery at three PLs and three non-PLs located more proximally than Chi. Results. All of the measurements at all of the PLs were significantly different (P < 0.01). Artery depth was significantly different among the non-PLs; however, this difference became insignificant after normalization to the arm circumference. Conclusions. Substantial changes in the hemodynamic and anatomical properties of the radial artery around the three PLs were insignificant at the nearby non-PLs segments. This finding may provide a partial explanation for the diagnostic use of Cun, Guan, and Chi. PMID:25763090

  20. Home-made online hyphenation of pressurized liquid extraction, turbulent flow chromatography, and high performance liquid chromatography, Cistanche deserticola as a case study.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingqing; Li, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Liping; Jiang, Yong; Song, Yuelin; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-03-18

    Incompatibility between the conventional pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) devices and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) extensively hinders direct and green chemical analysis of herbal materials. Herein, a facile PLE module was configured, and then it was online hyphenated with HPLC via a turbulent flow chromatography (TFC) column. Regarding PLE module, a long PEEK tube (0.13×1000mm) was employed to generate desired pressure (approximately 13.0MPa) when warm acidic water (70°C) was delivered as extraction solvent at a high flow rate (2.5mL/min), and a hollow guard column (3.0×4.0mm) was implemented to hold crude materials. Effluent was collected from the outlet of PEEK tube, concentrated, and subjected onto HPLC coupled with hybrid ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometer to assess the extraction efficiency and also to profile the chemical composition of Cistanche deserticola (CD) that is honored as "Ginseng of the desert". Afterwards, a TFC column was introduced to accomplish online transmission of low molecule weight components from PLE module to HPLC coupled with diode array detection, and two electronic 6-port/2-channel valves were in charge of alternating the whole system between extraction (0-3.0min) and elution (3.0-35.0min) phases. Quantitative method was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of eight primary phenylethanoid glycosides in CD using online PLE-TFC-HPLC. All findings demonstrated that the home-made platform is advantageous at direct chemical analysis, as well as time-, solvent-, and material-savings, suggesting a robust tool for chemical fingerprinting of herbs. PMID:26896915

  1. Radial engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kmicikiewicz, M.A.

    1988-03-01

    A radial engine is described comprising: a housing; equally spaced openings disposed in ring-like arrangement on the periphery of the housing; a piston and cylinder arrangement in each of the opening, a piston rod for each arrangement fixed to and extending radially inwardly from its respective piston and through its respective opening; shoe means pivotally attached at the other end of each of the piston rod; radial guide means extending in the housing in line with each of the piston rods, and the shoe means provided with guide means followers to ensure radial reciprocal movement of the piston rods and shoe means; and a connecting ring journaled on a crankshaft for circular translation motion in the housing, the ring including a circular rim. Each shoe means includes an arcuate follower member being slidably connected to the rim of the connecting ring.

  2. Simultaneous separation of ribonucleotides, nucleosides and nitrogen bases by ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography on columns with radial compression.

    PubMed

    Pimenov, A M; Tikhonov YuV; Meisner, I S; Toguzov, R T

    1986-09-19

    A method is described for the simultaneous analysis of twelve major nucleotides, certain biochemically essential nucleosides and nitrogen bases. The separation was achieved using an ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) system with a radially compressed NovaPak C18 cartridge and tetrabutylammonium phosphate (TBA) as a mobile phase modifier under acetonitrile gradient conditions. The effects of TBA and acetonitrile on the retention of major nucleotides were studied. The retention of nucleotides increased significantly with an increase in the TBA concentration from 0 to 2 mM and remained constant up to 5 mM TBA. The logarithm of the capacity factor decreased in proportion to the concentration of acetonitrile in the mobile phase. The separation of nitrogen bases, nucleosides and some of their deoxy forms was performed on an isocratic ion-pair reversed-phase HPLC system with pentanesulphonic and heptanesulphonic acid using a mu Bondapak C18 column. The described chromatographic procedures were applied to the separation of various biological extracts. PMID:3771704

  3. Analysis of endocrine disrupters and related compounds in sediments and sewage sludge using on-line turbulent flow chromatography-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gorga, Marina; Insa, Sara; Petrovic, Mira; Barceló, Damià

    2014-07-25

    A novel fully automated method based on dual column switching using turbulent flow chromatography followed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (TFC-LC-MS/MS) was applied for the determination of endocrine disruptors (EDCs) and related compounds in sediment and sewage sludge samples. This method allows the unequivocal identification and quantification of the most relevant environmental EDCs such as natural and synthetic estrogens and their conjugates, antimicrobials, parabens, bisphenol A (BPA), alkylphenolic compounds, benzotriazoles, and organophosphorus flame retardants, minimizing time of analysis and alleviating matrix effects. Applying this technique, after the extraction of the target compounds by pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), sediment and sewage sludge extracts were directly injected to the chromatographic system and the analytes were concentrated into the clean-up loading column. Using six-port switching system, the analytes were transferred to the analytical column for subsequent detection by MS-MS (QqQ). In order to optimize this multiplexing system, a comparative study employing six types of TurboFlow™ columns, with different chemical modifications, was performed to achieve the maximum retention of analytes and best elimination of matrix components. Using the optimized protocol low limits of quantification (LOQs) were obtained ranging from 0.0083 to 1.6 ng/g for sediment samples and from 0.10 to 125 ng/g for sewage sludge samples (except for alkylphenol monoethoxylate). The method was used to evaluate the presence and fate of target EDCs in the Ebro River which is the most important river in Spain with intensive agricultural and industrial activities in the basin that contribute to deteriorating soil and water quality. PMID:24909438

  4. Packing of large-scale chromatography columns with irregularly shaped glass based resins using a stop-flow method

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Sun Chau; Chia, Celeste; Mok, Yanglin; Pattnaik, Priyabrata

    2014-01-01

    Rigid chromatography resins, such as controlled pore glass based adsorbents, offer the advantage of high permeability and a linear pressure-flow relationship irrespective of column diameter which improves process time and maximizes productivity. However, the rigidity and irregularly shaped nature of these resins often present challenges in achieving consistent and uniform packed beds as formation of bridges between resin particles can hinder bed consolidation. The standard flow-pack method when applied to irregularly shaped particles does not yield well-consolidated packed beds, resulting in formation of a head space and increased band broadening during operation. Vibration packing methods requiring the use of pneumatically driven vibrators are recommended to achieve full packed bed consolidation but limitations in manufacturing facilities and equipment may prevent the implementation of such devices. The stop-flow packing method was developed as an improvement over the flow-pack method to overcome these limitations and to improve bed consolidation without the use of vibrating devices. Transition analysis of large-scale columns packed using the stop-flow method over multiple cycles has shown a two- to three-fold reduction of change in bed integrity values as compared to a flow-packed bed demonstrating an improvement in packed bed stability in terms of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) and peak asymmetry (As). PMID:25080096

  5. Application of a quasi-3D inviscid flow and boundary layer analysis to the hub-shroud contouring of a radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Civinskas, K. C.; Povinelli, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    Application of a quasi-3D approach to the aerodynamic analysis of several radial turbine configurations is described. The objective was to improve the rotor aerodynamic characteristics by hub-shroud contouring. The approach relies on available 2D inviscid methods coupled with boundary layer analysis to calculate profile, mixing, and endwall losses. Windage, tip clearance, incidence, and secondary flow losses are estimated from correlations. To eliminate separation along the hub and blade suction surfaces of a baseline rotor, the analysis was also applied to three alternate hub-shroud geometries. Emphasis was on elimination an inducer velocity overshoot as well as increasing hub velocities. While separation was never eliminated, the extent of the separated area was progressively reduced. Results are presented in terms of mid-channel and blade surface velocities; kinetic energy loss coefficients; and efficiency. The calculation demonstrates a first step for a systematic approach to radial turbine design that can be used to identify and control aerodynamic characteristics that ultimately determine heat transfer and component life. Experimentation will be required to assess the extent to which flow and boundary layer behavior were predicted correctly.

  6. Effects of Flow Rate and Alkali-to-Acid Ratio on the Displacement of Acidic Oil by Alkaline Solutions in Radial Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Hornof; Neale; Gholam-Hosseini

    2000-11-01

    Alkaline flooding is a method of enhanced oil recovery that relies on the formation of surface-active substances in situ by a chemical reaction between acidic components in the oil and an alkaline reagent. As the injected alkali advances through the porous medium, it keeps contacting fresh oil. At some moment dependent on the alkali/acid concentrations and the velocity, the alkali at the advancing front may become depleted and the flood becomes interfacially nonreactive. The present study is aimed at investigating the above-mentioned phenomena. Displacement studies were conducted in radial cells containing sintered glass beads as a porous medium. Light paraffin oil acidified with 10 mmol/L of linoleic acid served as the displaced (oil) phase while the displacing aqueous solution contained 0-25 mmol/L of sodium hydroxide. The highest oil recovery was obtained under the conditions of low flow rate and high alkali concentration. Increasing the flow rate at high NaOH concentration resulted in decreasing oil recovery up to a certain threshold flow rate. Conversely, the amount of oil recovered by waterflooding only (no alkali) initially increased with increasing flow rate up to the same threshold flow rate beyond which there was no difference between the alkaline flood and a waterflood. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:11082266

  7. Minimizing ultraviolet noise due to mis-matches between detector flow cell and post column mobile phase temperatures in supercritical fluid chromatography: effect of flow cell design.

    PubMed

    Berger, Terry A

    2014-10-17

    A mis-match between the post-column mobile phase temperature and the UV detector flow cell temperature can cause significant UV noise in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Deviations as little as 5 °C can increase noise as much as 5 times, making the detector unsuited for trace analysis. Two approaches were used to minimize this noise. When a flow cell was in direct thermal contact (metal on metal) with the detector optical bench, the mobile phase temperature was actively controlled to the measured flow cell temperature, by using one of the heat exchangers (HX) in the column compartment. However, with some older, but still widely used flow cell designs, this required repeated, hourly monitoring of the flow cell temperature and repeated manual adjustment of the heat exchanger temperature, due to thermal drift. Flow cell design had a strong influence on susceptibility to this thermally induced noise. Thermally insulating the flow cell from the optical bench made some cells much less susceptible to such thermally induced noise. Five different flow cells, some insulated, some un-insulated, were evaluated. Most had a truncated conical flow path, but one had a cylindrical flow path. Using either approach, the ASTM noise, with a 10mm, 13 μL conical flow cell, could be optimized to ≈0.007 mAU at 2.5 Hz, in SFC, which is very near the 0.006 mAU manufacturer's specification for HPLC. The insulated version of this flow cell required far less optimization, compared to the un-insulated version. At 150 bar, an experimental 3mm, 2 μL flow cell, with only one side insulated, yielded noise slightly too high (≈0.16-0.18 mAU) for trace analysis, at 80 Hz. However, at 200 bar, noise at 80 Hz was <0.06 mAU, which should allow quantification of a 1 mAU tall trace component with a signal to noise ratio (S/N) >10. Even partially un-insulated, this flow cell design was much less susceptible to thermally induced noise. Further insulating this flow cell design failed to improve performance. PMID:25189330

  8. Peristaltic flow of a Jeffrey fluid under the effect of radially varying magnetic field in a tube with an endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Alla, A. M.; Abo-Dahab, S. M.; Kilicman, A.

    2015-06-01

    The influence of an endoscope on peristaltic flow of a Jeffrey fluid through the cylindrical cavity between concentric tubes with variable magnetic field has been investigated. The governing equations of two dimensional fluid have been simplified under the consideration of long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximation. Exact analytical calculations are carried out for the pressure gradient, velocity, pressure rise, friction force on the inner and outer tubes and shear stress. The effect of the non-dimensional wave amplitude, the variable magnetic field, the ratio of relaxation of retardation time, the radius ratio and the non-dimensional volume flow are analyzed theoretically and computed numerically. Comparison was made with the results obtained in the presence and absence of variable magnetic field and an endoscope. The results indicate that the effect of the non-dimensional wave amplitude, variable magnetic field, ratio of relaxation to retardation time, radius ratio and non-dimensional volume flow on peristaltic flow are very pronounced.

  9. Transient radial flow to a well in an unconfined aquifer. Part 1, An evaluation of some conceptual methods

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Zhu, Ming

    1991-08-01

    The analytic solutions of Boulton (1954) and Neuman (1972) for transient flow to a well in an unconfined aquifer are based on the assumption that the role of the unsaturated zone can be adequately accounted for by restricting attention to the release of water from the zone through which the water table moves. Both researchers mathematically treat this released water as a time-dependent source term. The differences between the models of Boulton and Neuman are that the former neglects vertical components of flow in the aquifer, but allows for an exponential process for the release of water as a function of time, whereas the latter assumes instantaneous release from storage, but accounts for vertical components of flow. Given this set of assumptions, we examine the applicability of these two methods using a general purpose numerical model through a process of verification extension and comparison. The issues addressed include: the role of well-bore storage in masking intermediate-time behavior, combined effects of exponential release as well as vertical flow, logic for vertical averaging of drawdowns, and the sensitivity of system response to the magnitude of specific yield. The issue of how good the assumptions of Boulton and Neuman are in the context of the general theory of unsaturated flow is addressed in part 2 of this two-part series of reports.

  10. MHD flow and heat transfer of a viscous fluid over a radially stretching power-law sheet with suction/injection in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M.; Munir, A.; Shahzad, A.; Shah, A.

    2015-03-01

    A steady boundary layer flow and heat transfer over a radially stretching isothermal porous sheet is analyzed. Stretching is assumed to follow a radial power law, and the fluid is electrically conducting in the presence of a transverse magnetic field with a very small magnetic Reynolds number. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using appropriate similarity transformations, which are solved analytically by the homotopy analysis method (HAM) and numerically by employing the shooting method with the adaptive Runge-Kutta method and Broyden's method in the domain [0,∞). Analytical expressions for the velocity and temperature fields are derived. The influence of pertinent parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles is discussed in detail. The skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are calculated as functions of several influential parameters. The results predicted by both methods are demonstrated to be in excellent agreement. Moreover, HAM results for a particular problem are also compared with exact solutions.

  11. Mixing Limited Reaction Rates in Radial Groundwater Flow Upscaled by the Lamella Approach at Continuum-Scales.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. A. M.; Ginn, T. R.; Le Borgne, T.; Dentz, M.

    2014-12-01

    Upscaling mixing-limited reactive transport of injectates involved in in-situ groundwater treatment schemes remains challenging due to the non-commutation between averaging approaches and nonlinearities in the reaction rate expressions and due to the difficulty in quantifying mixing. The Eulerian effective plume model (macrodispersion model) generally overestimates the reaction rate due to the overestimated mixing of the plume, whereas Lagrangian particle or streamtube approaches do not provide an explicit means for keeping track of mixing extent. The lamella approach is a new modeling tool that overcomes the abovementioned shortcomings by combining mixing measures such as the scalar dissipation rate with a Lagrangian modeling focus on front-tracking. This approach involves dividing the moving interface between the displacing-displaced solutions into approximately linear segments (set of lamellae) on which the mixing-limited reactions take place and studying the transport mechanisms and the chemical reactions on them. This approach is summarized in application to idealized radial injection, where mixing between the injected and displaced solutions leads to calcite precipitation..The theoretical reaction rate found via the simplified lamella approach is compared with explicit simulation using a finite elements (COMSOL) framework fitted with the representative multicomponent equilibrium reaction network.

  12. Recent developments in electrochemical flow detections--a review part II. Liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Trojanowicz, Marek

    2011-02-28

    This article is a review of the progress in application of electrochemical detections in liquid chromatography in recent 15-20 years. Based on 238 references, mostly to original research papers, it presents applications of amperometric and voltammetric detections, as well as coulometric, conductimetric and potentiometric ones. In case of those which have reached already the stage of routinely employed detections with commercially available instrumentation (amperometry, coulometry, conductometry) especially novel and original applications are presented. In case of voltammetric and potentiometric detections a ways of their improvements are showed, directed towards obtaining competitive results with other detection methods. PMID:21296201

  13. ANALYTICAL APPROXIMATION OF THE BIODEGRADATION RATE FOR IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER UNDER IDEAL RADIAL FLOW CONDITIONS. (R824785)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We derive the long-term biodegradation rate of an organic contaminant (substrate) for an in situ bioremediation model with axisymmetric flow conditions. The model presumes that a nonsorbing electron acceptor is injected into a saturated homogeneous porous medium which initially c...

  14. Determination of carboxylic acids in water by gas chromatography using several detectors after flow preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Jurado-Sánchez, Beatriz; Ballesteros, Evaristo; Gallego, Mercedes

    2010-11-19

    A novel analytical method is reported that combines continuous solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography for the determination of 22 carboxylic acids in water. The highly polar and hydrophilic analytes were preferentially sorbed on a mixture of LiChrolut EN-Supelclean ENVI-18 (1:1) sorbent column and eluted with methanol; this extraction process did not require derivatisation. The extract was analysed by gas chromatography coupled to a flame ionisation detector as well as a mass spectrometer with electron impact (EI) or positive chemical ionisation modes. The highest sensitivity was achieved when using MS-EI, with good linearity in calibration curves and low detection limits (2-40ngL(-1)) for 50mL of sample. The entire procedure from raw aqueous sample to a ready-to-inject methanol solution of the acids requires less than 15min. Another benefit of this method is the good accuracy (recoveries between 93 and 102%) and precision (relative standard deviation, 3.4-6.2%), which allows the determination of carboxylic acids in environmental water and in real chlorinated and ozonated drinking water. PMID:20970143

  15. Radial lean direct injection burner

    DOEpatents

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-09-04

    A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

  16. The effects of the secondary fluid temperature on the energy transfer in an unsteady ejector with a radial-flow diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababneh, Amer Khalil; Jawarneh, Ali M.; Tlilan, Hitham M.; Ababneh, Mohammad K.

    2009-11-01

    Unsteady ejectors are devices whereby energy is exchanged between directly interacting fluids. Unlike steady ejectors, the mechanism responsible for the energy transfer is reversible in nature and thus higher efficiencies are perceivable. A potential application for PEE is for enhancement in output power per weight as in turbochargers. The unsteady ejector when used as a turbocharger the device is expected to perform under wide range of ambient temperatures. Therefore, it is important to investigate the effects of the temperature of the induced ambient air on the energy transfer. The radial-flow ejector, which usually leads to higher-pressure ratios with fewer stages, was selected for the investigation. The flow field is investigated at two Mach numbers 2.5 and 3.0 utilizing rectangular short-length supersonic nozzles for accelerating the primary fluid. Fundamental to the enhancement of these devices performance relies on the management of the flow field in such a way to minimize entropy production. The numerical analyses were conducted utilizing a package of computational fluid dynamics.

  17. Online spectrophotometric determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) by flow injection combined with low pressure ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shujuan; Li, Nan; Zhang, Xinshen; Yang, Dongjing; Jiang, Heimei

    2015-03-01

    A simple and new low pressure ion chromatography combined with flow injection spectrophotometric procedure for determining Fe(II) and Fe(III) was established. It is based on the selective adsorption of low pressure ion chromatography column to Fe(II) and Fe(III), the online reduction reaction of Fe(III) and the reaction of Fe(II) in sodium acetate with phenanthroline, resulting in an intense orange complex with a suitable absorption at 515nm. Various chemical (such as the concentration of colour reagent, eluant and reductive agent) and instrumental parameters (reaction coil length, reductive coil length and wavelength) were studied and were optimized. Under the optimum conditions calibration graph of Fe(II)/Fe(III) was linear in the Fe(II)/Fe(III) range of 0.040-1.0mg/L. The detection limit of Fe(III) and Fe(II) was respectively 3.09 and 1.55μg/L, the relative standard deviation (n=10) of Fe(II) and Fe(III) 1.89% and 1.90% for 0.5mg/L of Fe(II) and Fe(III) respectively. About 2.5 samples in 1h can be analyzed. The interfering effects of various chemical species were studied. The method was successfully applied in the determination of water samples. PMID:25523043

  18. Online spectrophotometric determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) by flow injection combined with low pressure ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shujuan; Li, Nan; Zhang, Xinshen; Yang, Dongjing; Jiang, Heimei

    2015-03-01

    A simple and new low pressure ion chromatography combined with flow injection spectrophotometric procedure for determining Fe(II) and Fe(III) was established. It is based on the selective adsorption of low pressure ion chromatography column to Fe(II) and Fe(III), the online reduction reaction of Fe(III) and the reaction of Fe(II) in sodium acetate with phenanthroline, resulting in an intense orange complex with a suitable absorption at 515 nm. Various chemical (such as the concentration of colour reagent, eluant and reductive agent) and instrumental parameters (reaction coil length, reductive coil length and wavelength) were studied and were optimized. Under the optimum conditions calibration graph of Fe(II)/Fe(III) was linear in the Fe(II)/Fe(III) range of 0.040-1.0 mg/L. The detection limit of Fe(III) and Fe(II) was respectively 3.09 and 1.55 μg/L, the relative standard deviation (n = 10) of Fe(II) and Fe(III) 1.89% and 1.90% for 0.5 mg/L of Fe(II) and Fe(III) respectively. About 2.5 samples in 1 h can be analyzed. The interfering effects of various chemical species were studied. The method was successfully applied in the determination of water samples.

  19. Preparation of pure, high titer, pseudoinfectious Flavivirus particles by hollow fiber tangential flow filtration and anion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mundle, Sophia T; Giel-Moloney, Maryann; Kleanthous, Harry; Pugachev, Konstantin V; Anderson, Stephen F

    2015-08-20

    Purification of enveloped viruses such as live flavivirus vaccine candidates poses a challenge as one must retain viral infectivity to preserve immunogenicity. Here we describe a laboratory-scale purification procedure for two replication defective (single-cycle) flavivirus variants for use in a pre-clinical setting. The two step purification scheme based on hollow fiber tangential flow filtration (TFF) followed by anion exchange chromatography using convective interaction media (CIM(®)) monoliths results in a ∼60% recovery of infectious virus titer and can be used to prepare nearly homogenous, highly purified vaccine viruses with titers as high as 1×10(9) focus forming units per mL. Flavivirus virions prepared by this method are 2 and 3 orders of magnitude more pure with respect to dsDNA and BHK host cell proteins, respectively, as compared to the raw feed stream. PMID:25498209

  20. Rapid identification of airborne biological particles by flow cytometry, gas chromatography, and genetic probes. Final report, January 1995-January 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, C.H.; Carlon, H.R.; Edmonds, R.L.; Robert, L.; Blew, J.

    1997-09-01

    Detection of airborne biological particulates is a primary mission of the U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center biological defense program. If biological particles could be characterized according to their unique physical and biochemical profiles, detection and perhaps even identification of the particles might be possible. This study focused upon microbial particles, more specifically upon fungal spores, yeast cells, and bacterial cells. Physical characteristics of the particles, it was proposed, could be detected by flow cytometry, while their biochemical profiles could be determined by gas chromatography, and their genetic identity could be obtained by either a suitable genetic probe or by matching its genetic fingerprint. Genetic techniques were not attempted in the work reported here, but the approach was investigated further. Trial results were encouraging.

  1. High-speed analysis of residual solvents by flow-modulation gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wittrig, Rebecca E; Dorman, Frank L; English, Christopher M; Sacks, Richard D

    2004-02-20

    High-speed gas chromatographic (GC) separation of residual solvents in pharmaceutical preparations, using a flow-modulation technique, is described. These volatile compounds are separated on a series-coupled (tandem) column ensemble consisting of a polyethylene glycol column and a trifluoropropylmethyl/dimethylpolysiloxane column. This column ensemble is operated in stop-flow mode to enhance, or "tune", the separation. A valve between the junction point of the tandem column ensemble and a source of carrier gas at a pressure above the GC inlet pressure is opened for intervals of 2-8 s. This stops or slightly reverses the flow of carrier gas in the first column. Stop-flow pulses are used to increase the separation of target analytes that overlap in the total ensemble chromatogram, compared to non-stop-flow, or conventional, operation. All 36 target compounds, based on ICH Classes I and II residual solvent lists, are resolved in 12 min using the stop-flow technique and a single chromatographic analysis. PMID:14971486

  2. Radial Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The ejecta surrounding the crater (off image to the left) in this image has undergone significant erosion by the wind. The wind has stripped the surface features from the ejecta and has started to winnow away the ejecta blanket. Near the margin of the ejecta the wind is eroding along a radial pattern -- taking advantage of radial emplacement. Note the steep margin of the ejecta blanket. Most, if not all, of the fine ejecta material has been removed and the wind in now working on the more massive continuous ejecta blanket.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.5, Longitude 197.4 East (162.6 West). 37 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Radial and circumferential flow surveys at the inlet and exit of the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Turbine Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, S. T.; Bordelon, W. J., Jr.; Smith, A. W.; Ramachandran, N.

    1995-01-01

    The main objective of this test was to obtain detailed radial and circumferential flow surveys at the inlet and exit of the SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbine model using three-hole cobra probes, hot-film probes, and a laser velocimeter. The test was designed to meet several objectives. First, the techniques for making laser velocimeter, hot-film probe, and cobra probe measurements in turbine flows were developed and demonstrated. The ability to use the cobra probes to obtain static pressure and, therefore, velocity had to be verified; insertion techniques had to be established for the fragile hot-film probes; and a seeding method had to be established for the laser velocimetry. Once the measurement techniques were established, turbine inlet and exit velocity profiles, temperature profiles, pressure profiles, turbulence intensities, and boundary layer thicknesses were measured at the turbine design point. The blockage effect due to the model inlet and exit total pressure and total temperature rakes on the turbine performance was also studied. A small range of off-design points were run to obtain the profiles and to verify the rake blockage effects off-design. Finally, a range of different Reynolds numbers were run to study the effect of Reynolds number on the various measurements.

  4. Numerical investigation of a coupled moving boundary model of radial flow in low-permeable stress-sensitive reservoir with threshold pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Chao, Liu; Yue-Wu, Liu; Cong-Cong, Niu; Guo-Feng, Han; Yi-Zhao, Wan

    2016-02-01

    The threshold pressure gradient and formation stress-sensitive effect as the two prominent physical phenomena in the development of a low-permeable reservoir are both considered here for building a new coupled moving boundary model of radial flow in porous medium. Moreover, the wellbore storage and skin effect are both incorporated into the inner boundary conditions in the model. It is known that the new coupled moving boundary model has strong nonlinearity. A coordinate transformation based fully implicit finite difference method is adopted to obtain its numerical solutions. The involved coordinate transformation can equivalently transform the dynamic flow region for the moving boundary model into a fixed region as a unit circle, which is very convenient for the model computation by the finite difference method on fixed spatial grids. By comparing the numerical solution obtained from other different numerical method in the existing literature, its validity can be verified. Eventually, the effects of permeability modulus, threshold pressure gradient, wellbore storage coefficient, and skin factor on the transient wellbore pressure, the derivative, and the formation pressure distribution are analyzed respectively. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51404232), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M561074), and the National Science and Technology Major Project, China (Grant No. 2011ZX05038003).

  5. Microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography coupling with field amplified sample injection and electroosmotic flow suppressant for analysis of some quinolizidine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lishuang; Xu, Xueqin; Huang, Lu; Lin, Jinming; Chen, Guonan

    2008-07-11

    A new rapid and reproducible method using microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) combining field amplified sample injection and electroosmotic flow suppressant for the analysis of five quinolizidine alkaloids is developed in this paper. For the separation of five quinolizidine alkaloids, a running buffer composed of 1.2% (v/v) 1-butanol, 0.6% (v/v) ethyl acetate and 98.2% (v/v) 1 mM Na(2)B(4)O(7)-2 mM NaH(2)PO(4) buffer solution containing 21 mM sodium cholate (SC) (pH 6.5) was developed. The resolution of the analytes was improved significantly by adding a divalent cation (e.g., Mg(2+)) to the running buffer as an electroosmotic flow modification. In order to analyze trace quinolizidine alkaloids in traditional Chinese herbal medicines, field amplified sample injection (FASI) was applied to increase the detection sensitivity. The detection limits (defined as S/N=3) for the analytes could be as low as 0.0001 microg/mL. This method was applied for the determination of quinolizidine alkaloids in real samples with simple extraction procedures, and the assay results were satisfactory. PMID:18533172

  6. Development and validation of a radial inflow turbine model for simulation of the SNL S-CO2 split-flow loop.

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R. B.

    2012-07-31

    A one-dimensional model for a radial inflow turbine has been developed for super-critical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle applications. The model accounts for the main phenomena present in the volute, nozzle, and impeller of a single-stage turbine. These phenomena include internal losses due to friction, blade loading, and angle of incidence and parasitic losses due to windage and blade-housing leakage. The model has been added as a component to the G-PASS plant systems code. The model was developed to support the analysis of S-CO{sub 2} cycles in conjunction with small-scale loop experiments. Such loops operate at less than a MWt thermal input. Their size permits components to be reconfigured in new arrangements relatively easily and economically. However, the small thermal input combined with the properties of carbon dioxide lead to turbomachines with impeller diameters of only one to two inches. At these sizes the dominant phenomena differ from those in larger more typical machines. There is almost no treatment in the literature of turbomachines at these sizes. The present work therefore is aimed at developing turbomachine models that support the task of S-CO{sub 2} cycle analysis using small-scale tests. Model predictions were compared against data from an experiment performed for Sandia National Laboratories in the split-flow Brayton cycle loop currently located at Barber-Nichols Inc. The split-flow loop incorporates two turbo-alternator-compressor (TAC) units each incorporating a radial inflow turbine and a radial flow compressor on a common shaft. The predicted thermodynamic conditions at the outlet of the turbine on the main compressor shaft were compared with measured values at different shaft speeds. Two modifications to the original model were needed to better match the experiment data. First, a representation of the heat loss from the volute downstream of the sensed inlet temperature was added. Second, an empirical multiplicative factor was applied to the Euler head and another to the head loss to bring the predicted outlet pressure into better agreement with the experiment. These changes also brought the overall efficiency of the turbine into agreement with values cited by Barber Nichols for small turbines. More generally, the quality of measurement set data can in the future be improved by additional steps taken in the design and operation of the experimental apparatus. First, a thermocouple mounted at the nozzle inlet would provide a better indication of temperature at this key point. Second, heat losses from the turbine should be measured directly. Allowing the impeller to free wheel at inlet conditions and measuring the temperature drop between inlet and outlet would provide a more accurate measure of heat loss. Finally, the enthalpy change during operation is more accurately obtained by measuring the torque on the stator using strain gauges rather than by measuring pressure and temperature at inlet and outlet to infer thermodynamic states.

  7. Top-down and bottom-up lipidomic analysis of rabbit lipoproteins under different metabolic conditions using flow field-flow fractionation, nanoflow liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Seul Kee; Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Ju Yong; Chung, Bong Chul; Seo, Hong Seog; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-07-31

    This study demonstrated the performances of top-down and bottom-up approaches in lipidomic analysis of lipoproteins from rabbits raised under different metabolic conditions: healthy controls, carrageenan-induced inflammation, dehydration, high cholesterol (HC) diet, and highest cholesterol diet with inflammation (HCI). In the bottom-up approach, the high density lipoproteins (HDL) and the low density lipoproteins (LDL) were size-sorted and collected on a semi-preparative scale using a multiplexed hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation (MxHF5), followed by nanoflow liquid chromatography-ESI-MS/MS (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis of the lipids extracted from each lipoprotein fraction. In the top-down method, size-fractionated lipoproteins were directly infused to MS for quantitative analysis of targeted lipids using chip-type asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (cAF4-ESI-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The comprehensive bottom-up analysis yielded 122 and 104 lipids from HDL and LDL, respectively. Rabbits within the HC and HCI groups had lipid patterns that contrasted most substantially from those of controls, suggesting that HC diet significantly alters the lipid composition of lipoproteins. Among the identified lipids, 20 lipid species that exhibited large differences (>10-fold) were selected as targets for the top-down quantitative analysis in order to compare the results with those from the bottom-up method. Statistical comparison of the results from the two methods revealed that the results were not significantly different for most of the selected species, except for those species with only small differences in concentration between groups. The current study demonstrated that top-down lipid analysis using cAF4-ESI-MS/MS is a powerful high-speed analytical platform for targeted lipidomic analysis that does not require the extraction of lipids from blood samples. PMID:26087967

  8. Radial Inflow Turboexpander Redesign

    SciTech Connect

    William G. Price

    2001-09-24

    Steamboat Envirosystems, LLC (SELC) was awarded a grant in accordance with the DOE Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Development. Atlas-Copco Rotoflow (ACR), a radial expansion turbine manufacturer, was responsible for the manufacturing of the turbine and the creation of the new computer program. SB Geo, Inc. (SBG), the facility operator, monitored and assisted ACR's activities as well as provided installation and startup assistance. The primary scope of the project is the redesign of an axial flow turbine to a radial inflow turboexpander to provide increased efficiency and reliability at an existing facility. In addition to the increased efficiency and reliability, the redesign includes an improved reduction gear design, and improved shaft seal design, and upgraded control system and a greater flexibility of application

  9. Revised FORTRAN program for calculating velocities and streamlines on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of an axial-, radial-, or mixed-flow turbomachine or annular duct. 2: Programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.; Mcnally, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV computer program has been developed that obtains a detailed subsonic or shock free transonic flow solution on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of a turbomachine. The blade row may be fixed or rotating, and the blades may be twisted and leaned. Flow may be axial, mixed, or radial. Upstream and downstream flow variables may vary from hub to shroud, and provisions are made to correct for loss of stagnation pressure. The results include velocities, streamlines, and flow angles on the stream surface and approximate blade surface velocities.

  10. Simulations of the Neutral-beam-induced Rotation, Radial Electric Field, and Flow Shearing Rate in Next-step Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2002-08-13

    Toroidal rotation of plasmas in present tokamaks is beneficial for increasing the stability to wall-induced MHD and appears to reduce the anomalous transport associated with micro-turbulence. This paper calculates the toroidal rotation expected from neutral-beam injection in the proposed FIRE and ITER-FEAT tokamak reactors. Self-consistent burning plasmas for these tokamaks have been constructed using the TRANSP plasma analysis code. Neutral-beam injection has been proposed for FIRE and ITER-FEAT. The neutral-beam-induced torques are computed, and assumptions for the anomalous transport of toroidal angular momentum are used to calculate the toroidal rotation profiles. The central Mach numbers are about 3-8%. The ratio of the rotation speed to the Alfvin speed is less than 1%. Assuming neoclassical poloidal rotation and force balance, the radial electric field and flow shearing rate are calculated. Peak shearing rates near the outboard edge are in the 10-100 krad/s range.

  11. A plant kinetic study of alcoholic fermentation using reversed-flow gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Economopoulos, N.; Athanassopoulos, N. ); Katsanos, N.A.; Karaiskakis, G.; Agathonos, P.; Vassilakos, Ch. )

    1992-12-01

    The reversed-flow gas chromatographic sampling technique is used to study the kinetics of alcoholic fermentation in a factory in conjunction with measurements of suspended particles in the fermenting medium. It was found that the overall process consists of four phases which have different first-order rate constants during ethanol formation. The second phase is the slowest with its rate constant being 4.3 and 13 times smaller than that of the first and third phases, respectively. There is also a decrease of suspended particles during the second phase. These results show that there is the possibility of increasing the rate constant during this phase, thereby increasing the overall production rate of ethanol significantly and thus lowering its cost of production.

  12. Quantification of Docetaxel in Serum Using Turbulent Flow Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry (TFC-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Crutchfield, Christopher A; Marzinke, Mark A; Clarke, William A

    2016-01-01

    Docetaxel is a second-generation taxane and is used clinically as an anti-neoplastic agent in cancer chemotherapy via an anti-mitotic mechanism. Its efficacy is limited to a narrow therapeutic window. Inappropriately high concentrations may cause erythema, fluid retention, nausea, diarrhea, and neutropenia. As a result, dosing recommendations have changed from high dosage loading every 3 weeks to lower dosage loading weekly. We describe a method that can be used for therapeutic drug monitoring of docetaxel levels using turbulent flow liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (TFC-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). The method is rapid, requiring only 6.3 min per analytical run following a simple protein crash. The method requires only 100 μL of serum. Concentrations of docetaxel were quantified by a calibration curve relating the peak-area ratio of docetaxel to a deuterated internal standard (docetaxel-D9). The method was linear from 7.8 to 1000 ng/mL, with imprecision ≤6.2 %. PMID:26660181

  13. Flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow combined with laser ablation for direct analysis of compounds separated by thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cegłowski, Michał; Smoluch, Marek; Reszke, Edward; Silberring, Jerzy; Schroeder, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    A thin-layer chromatography-mass spectrometry (TLC-MS) setup for characterization of low molecular weight compounds separated on standard TLC plates has been constructed. This new approach successfully combines TLC separation, laser ablation, and ionization using flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) source. For the laser ablation, a low-priced 445-nm continuous-wave diode laser pointer, with a power of 1 W, was used. The combination of the simple, low-budget laser pointer and the FAPA ion source has made this experimental arrangement broadly available, also for small laboratories. The approach was successfully applied for the characterization of low molecular weight compounds separated on TLC plates, such as a mixture of pyrazole derivatives, alkaloids (nicotine and sparteine), and an extract from a drug tablet consisting of paracetamol, propyphenazone, and caffeine. The laser pointer used was capable of ablating organic compounds without the need of application of any additional substances (matrices, staining, etc.) on the TLC spots. The detection limit of the proposed method was estimated to be 35 ng/cm(2) of a pyrazole derivative. Graphical abstract Schematic illustration of new TLC-FAPA setup with diode laser ablation. PMID:26563110

  14. On-line flow injection-cloud point preconcentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheuk Fai; Wong, Jonathan W C; Huie, Carmen W; Choi, Martin M F

    2008-12-19

    Cloud point methodology has been used to develop a novel preconcentration and an analytical method for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil sample. The nonionic surfactant Tergitol 15-S-7 was successfully used as the surfactant-mediated extractant in both ultrasonic and microwave-assisted extractions. Over 90% of recoveries for various PAHs in soil were obtained under the optimal experimental conditions. The extracts were then preconcentrated and analyzed by our proposed on-line coupling method "flow injection-cloud point preconcentration-high-performance liquid chromatography" (FI-CPP-HPLC) equipped with a fluorescence detector and an excitation/emission wavelength program. The preconcentration system and optimal working conditions were established. The limit of detection of the FI-CPE-HPLC system ranges from 0.101 to 0.456 microg/L for the selected PAHs, i.e., phenanthrene, pyrene, chrysene, benzo[k]fluoranthene and benzo[a]pyrene. Our proposed technique provides a reliable, simple and automatic analytical method for the determination of PAHs in environmental soil samples. PMID:19004448

  15. High-pressure size exclusion chromatography analysis of dissolved organic matter isolated by tangential-flow ultra filtration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Everett, C.R.; Chin, Y.-P.; Aiken, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    A 1,000-Dalton tangential-flow ultrafiltration (TFUF) membrane was used to isolate dissolved organic matter (DOM) from several freshwater environments. The TFUF unit used in this study was able to completely retain a polystyrene sulfonate 1,800-Dalton standard. Unaltered and TFUF-fractionated DOM molecular weights were assayed by high-pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). The weight-averaged molecular weights of the retentates were larger than those of the raw water samples, whereas the filtrates were all significantly smaller and approximately the same size or smaller than the manufacturer-specified pore size of the membrane. Moreover, at 280 nm the molar absorptivity of the DOM retained by the ultrafilter is significantly larger than the material in the filtrate. This observation suggests that most of the chromophoric components are associated with the higher molecular weight fraction of the DOM pool. Multivalent metals in the aqueous matrix also affected the molecular weights of the DOM molecules. Typically, proton-exchanged DOM retentates were smaller than untreated samples. This TFUF system appears to be an effective means of isolating aquatic DOM by size, but the ultimate size of the retentates may be affected by the presence of metals and by configurational properties unique to the DOM phase.

  16. Integration of continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry with chromatography and mass-selective detection.

    PubMed

    Flarakos, Jimmy; Liberman, Rosa G; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Skipper, Paul L

    2008-07-01

    Physical combination of an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) instrument with a conventional gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) is described. The resulting hybrid instrument (GC/MS/AMS) was used to monitor mass chromatograms and radiochromatograms simultaneously when (14)C-labeled compounds were injected into the gas chromatograph. Combination of the two instruments was achieved by splitting the column effluent and directing half to the mass spectrometer and half to a flow-through CuO reactor in line with the gas-accepting AMS ion source. The reactor converts compounds in the GC effluent to CO2 as required for function of the ion source. With cholesterol as test compound, the limits of quantitation were 175 pg and 0.00175 dpm injected. The accuracy achieved in analysis of five nonzero calibration standards and three quality control standards, using cholesterol-2,2,3,4,4,6-d6 as injection standard, was 100 +/- 11.8% with selected ion monitoring and 100 +/- 16% for radiochromatography. Respective values for interday precision were 1.0-3.2 and 22-32%. Application of GC/MS/AMS to a current topic of interest was demonstrated in a model metabolomic study in which cultured primary hepatocytes were given [(14)C]glucose and organic acids excreted into the culture medium were analyzed. PMID:18494504

  17. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... from your elbow to your wrist. The radial head is at the top of the radius bone, ... bone. The most common cause of a radial head fracture is falling with an outstretched arm.

  18. Simultaneous determination of aflatoxin B₁, B₂, G₁, and G₂ in corn powder, edible oil, peanut butter, and soy sauce by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry utilizing turbulent flow chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fan, Sufang; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Cui, Xiaobin; Zhang, Dongsheng; Zhang, Yan

    2015-05-01

    A novel fully automated method based on dual column switching using turbulent flow chromatography followed by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was developed for the determination of aflatoxin B1 , B2 , G1 , and G2 in corn powder, edible oil, peanut butter, and soy sauce samples. After ultrasound-assisted extraction, samples were directly injected to the chromatographic system and the analytes were concentrated into the clean-up loading column. Through purge switching, the analytes were transferred to the analytical column for subsequent detection by mass spectrometry. Different types of TurboFlow(TM) columns, transfer flow rate, transfer time were optimized. The limits of detection and quantification of this method ranged between 0.2-2.0 and 0.5-4.0 μg/kg for aflatoxins in different matrixes, respectively. Recoveries of aflatoxins were in range of 83-108.1% for all samples, matrix effects were in range of 34.1-104.7%. The developed method has been successfully applied in the analysis of aflatoxin B1 , B2 , G1 , and G2 in real samples. PMID:25683560

  19. Screening for multiple weight loss and related drugs in dietary supplement materials by flow injection tandem mass spectrometry and their confirmation by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Fenhong; Monroe, Douglas; El-Demerdash, Aref; Palmer, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    A new method has been developed using flow injection tandem mass spectrometry to semi-quantitatively screen for weight loss drugs, including sibutramine, N-desmethylsibutramine, N-didesmethylsibutramine, and phenolphthalein in dietary supplements. Positive identification of these drugs in samples was further confirmed and quantified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The degradation products of sibutramine were observed and identified by LC-MS/MS which include N-desmethylsibutramine, N-didesmethylsibutramine, N-formyldesmethylsibutramine, and N-formyldidesmethylsibutramine. PMID:24055849

  20. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  1. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  2. Sorption of para-xylene vapors on salt-treated soils measured by flow-equilibration and gas chromatography methods

    SciTech Connect

    Rhue, R.D.; Pennell, K.D.; Reve, W.H.

    1993-07-01

    The impact of soil properties other than organic C content and surface area on vapor-phase sorption has rarely been considered. This study was conducted to determine the effect of salt, namely CaCl{sub 2}, on the sorption of p-xylene vapor under anhydrous and hydrated conditions. Sorption on Webster soil (Typic Haploquolls) before and after removal of organic C was measured using a flow-equilibration method. in addition, the utility of an eluted pulse gas chromatography method was evaluated using the sand fraction of Oldsmar soil (Alfic Arenic Haplaquods) as a column-packing material. The CaCl{sub 2} significantly decreased p-xylene sorption at both 0 and 90% RH for both adsorbents. Under anhydrous conditions, reduced sorption by Oldsmar sand was evidenced at low p-xylene vapor pressures by a constant net retention volume and symmetrical peaks, indicating linear sorption and ideal behavior at these vapor pressures (i.e., the Henry`s region). In the absence of salt, the net retention volume continued to increase at p-xylene vapor pressures as low as 0.33 Pa, indicating isotherm nonlinearity, even at this low vapor pressure. This difference in retention behavior suggests that salt modified the nature of the surface of the sorbents. Under hydrated conditions, the reduction in sorption may be related to the salting-out effect of CaCl{sub 2} on gas solubility in adsorbed water films. These data suggest that the distribution and migration of organic vapors may be substantially greater in salt-affected soils due to reduced sorption on both the dry and water-coated solid phases that am present. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  3. CALIBRATION OF SUBMERGED RADIAL GATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calibration equations for free-flowing radial gates typically provide sufficient accuracy for irrigation district operations. However, many districts have difficulty in determining accurate discharges when the downstream water level begins to submerge the gate. Based on laboratory studies, we have d...

  4. Revised FORTRAN program for calculating velocities and streamlines on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of an axial-, radial-, or mixed-flow turbomachine or annular duct. 1: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.; Mcnally, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A FORTRAN 4 computer program was developed that obtains a detailed subsonic or shock-free transonic flow solution on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of a turbomachine. The blade row may be fixed or rotating, and the blades may be twisted and leaned. Flow may be axial, mixed, or radial. Upstream and downstream flow variables may vary from hub to shroud, and provision is made to correct for loss of stagnation pressure. The results include velocities, streamlines, and flow angles on the stream surface as well as approximate blade surface velocities. Subsonic solutions are obtained by a finite-difference, stream-function solution. Transonic solutions are obtained by a velocity-gradient method that uses information from a finite-difference, stream-function solution at a reduced mass flow.

  5. Flow mechanism of Forchheimer's cubic equation in high-velocity radial gas flow through porous media. [High-velocity, high-pressure gas flow through porous media near the wellbore

    SciTech Connect

    Ezeudembah; Dranchuk, P.M.

    1982-09-01

    Until recently, the visco-inertial flow equation, which is an adaptation of Forchheimer's quadratic equation, has been used to describe gas flow behavior at higher flow rates and pressures. The inability of this equation, in some cases, to fully describe high-velocity, high-pressure gas flow behavior, especially around the well bore, led to the consideration of other empirical equations. In this paper, formal derivation of Forchheimer's cubic equation is made by considering the kinetic energy equation of mean flow and dimensional relations for one-dimensional, linear, incompressible fluid flow. By the addition of the cubic term, this equation is regarded as a modified Forchheimer's quadratic equation which accounts for the flow rates obtained beyond the laminar flow condition. The cubic equation spans a wide range of flow rates and regimes, i.e. Darcy type, inertial type, and turbulent. For suitable use in gas flow studies, this equation has been adapted, modified, and corrected for the gas slippage effect. The physical basis of the cubic term has been established by using boundary layer theory to explain the high-velocity, high-pressure flow behavior through a porous path. Gamma, the main parameter in the cubic term, is directly related to a characteristic, dimensionless shape factor which is significant at higher flow rates. It is inversely related to viscosity, but has no dependence on the gas slippage coefficient in the higher flow regime.

  6. NASA contributions to radial turbine aerodynamic analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief description of the radial turbine and its analysis needs is followed by discussions of five analytical areas; design geometry and performance, off design performance, blade row flow, scroll flow, and duct flow. The functions of the programs, areas of applicability, and limitations and uncertainties are emphasized. Both past contributions and current activities are discussed.

  7. Differentiating organically and conventionally grown oregano using ultraperformance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (headspace-GC-FID), and flow injection mass spectrum (FIMS) fingerprints combined with multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Boyan; Qin, Fang; Ding, Tingting; Chen, Yineng; Lu, Weiying; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2014-08-13

    Ultraperformance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), flow injection mass spectrometry (FIMS), and headspace gas chromatography (headspace-GC) combined with multivariate data analysis techniques were examined and compared in differentiating organically grown oregano from that grown conventionally. It is the first time that headspace-GC fingerprinting technology is reported in differentiating organically and conventionally grown spice samples. The results also indicated that UPLC-MS, FIMS, and headspace-GC-FID fingerprints with OPLS-DA were able to effectively distinguish oreganos under different growing conditions, whereas with PCA, only FIMS fingerprint could differentiate the organically and conventionally grown oregano samples. UPLC fingerprinting provided detailed information about the chemical composition of oregano with a longer analysis time, whereas FIMS finished a sample analysis within 1 min. On the other hand, headspace GC-FID fingerprinting required no sample pretreatment, suggesting its potential as a high-throughput method in distinguishing organically and conventionally grown oregano samples. In addition, chemical components in oregano were identified by their molecular weight using QTOF-MS and headspace-GC-MS. PMID:25050447

  8. Applying Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Jessie W.; Patev, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Presents three experiments to introduce students to different kinds of chromatography: (1) paper chromatography; (2) gel filtration chromatography; and (3) reverse-phase liquid chromatography. Written in the form of a laboratory manual, explanations of each of the techniques, materials needed, procedures, and a glossary are included. (PVD)

  9. On-line stop-flow two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the separation and identification of triterpenoid saponins from ginseng extract.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuangyuan; Qiao, Lizhen; Shi, Xianzhe; Hu, Chunxiu; Kong, Hongwei; Xu, Guowang

    2015-01-01

    A method based on stop-flow two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (2D LC-ESI MS) was established and applied to analyze triterpenoid saponins from the main root of ginseng. Due to the special structure of triterpenoid saponins (they contain polar sugar side chains and nonpolar aglycones), hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) were used for the two dimensions, respectively. A trap column was used to connect the two dimensions. The dilution effect, which is one of the main shortcomings of traditional comprehensive 2D LC methods, was largely avoided. The peak capacity of this system was 747 and the orthogonality was 56.6 %. Compared with one-dimensional HILIC or RP LC MS analysis, 257 and 185 % more mass spectral peaks (ions with intensities that were higher than 1,000) were obtained from the ginseng main root extracts, and 94 triterpenoid saponins were identified based on MS(n) information and summarized aglycone structures. Given its good linearity and repeatability, the established method was successfully applied to classify ginsengs of different ages (i.e., years of growth), and 19 triterpenoid saponins were found through statistical analysis to vary in concentration depending on the age of the ginseng. PMID:25410638

  10. Rapid determination of 88 veterinary drug residues in milk using automated TurborFlow online clean-up mode coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei-xia; Yang, Ji-zhou; Wang, Zhao-xing; Wang, Cai-juan; Liu, Ya-feng; Zhang, Li

    2016-02-01

    A novel method based on TurborFlow online solid phase extraction (SPE) combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been established for simultaneous screening and confirmation of 88 wide-range veterinary drugs belonging to eight families (20 sulfonamides, 7 macrolides, 15 quinolones, 8 penicillins, 13 benzimidazoles, 4 tetracyclines, 2 sedatives, and 19 hormones) in milk. The preparation method consists of sample dilution and ultrasonic extraction, followed by an automated turbulent flow cyclone chromatography sample clean-up system. The detection was achieved in selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM). The total run time was within 39 min, including automated extraction, analytical chromatography and re-equilibration of the turboflow system. The optimization of different experimental parameters including extraction, purification, separation, and detection were evaluated separately in this study. The developed method was validated and good performing characteristics were obtained. The linear regression coefficients (R(2)) of matrix-match calibration standard curves established for quantification were higher than 0.9930. The limits of detection (LOD) were in the range of 0.2-2.0 μg/kg given by signal-noise ratio ≥3 (S/N) and the limits of quantification (LOQ, S/N≥10) ranged between 0.5 μg/kg and 10 μg/kg. Average recoveries of spiked target compounds with different levels were between 63.1% and 117.4%, with percentage relative standard deviations (RSD) in the range of 3.3-17.6%. The results indicated that the developed method has great potential for the routine laboratory analysis of large numbers of samples on measuring different classes of compounds. In comparison to traditional procedures, the automated sample clean-up ensures rapid, effective, sensitive analyses of veterinary drugs in milk. PMID:26653466

  11. On-line coupling of macroporous resin column chromatography with direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry utilizing a surface flowing mode sample holder.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Shanshan; Wang, Lu; Chen, Teng; Qu, Haibin

    2014-02-01

    A surface flowing mode sample holder was designed as an alternative sampling strategy for direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS). With the sample holder, the on-line coupling of macroporous resin column chromatography with DART-MS was explored and the new system was employed to monitor the column chromatography elution process of Panax notoginseng. The effluent from macroporous resin column was first diluted and mixed with a derivatization reagent on-line, and the mixture was then directly transferred into the ionization region of DART-MS by the sample holder. Notoginsenosides were methylated and ionized in a metastable helium gas stream, and was introduced into MS for detection. The on-line system showed reasonable repeatability with a relative standard deviation of 12.3% for the peak area. Three notoginsenosides, i.e. notoginsenoside R1, ginsenoside Rb1 and ginsenoside Rg1, were simultaneously determined during the eluting process. The alteration of the chemical composition in the effluent was accurately identified in 9 min, agreeing well with the off-line analysis. The presented technique is more convenient compared to the traditional UPLC method. These results suggest that the surface flowing mode DART-MS has a good potential for the on-line process monitoring in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:24456593

  12. Improving Peak Capacity in Fast On-Line Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography with Post First Dimension Flow-Splitting

    PubMed Central

    Filgueira, Marcelo R.; Huang, Yuan; Witt, Klaus; Castells, Cecilia; Carr, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    The use of flow splitters between the two dimensions in on-line comprehensive two dimensional liquid chromatography (LC×LC) has not received very much attention in comparison to their use in GC×GC where they are quite common. In principle, splitting the flow after the first dimension column and performing on-line LC×LC on this constant fraction of the first dimension effluent should allow the two dimensions to be optimized almost independently. When there is no flow splitting any change in the first dimension flow rate has an immediate impact on the second dimension. With a flow splitter one could for example double the flow rate into the first dimension column and do a 1:1 flow split without changing the sample loop size or the sampler’s collection time. Of course, the sensitivity would be diminished but this can be partially compensated by use of a larger injection; this will likely only amount to a small price to pay for this increased resolving power and system flexibility. Among other benefits, we found a 2-fold increase in the corrected 2D peak capacity and the number of observed peaks for a 15 min analysis time by using a post first dimension flow splitter. At a fixed analysis time this improvement results primarily from an increase in the gradient time resulting from the reduced system re-equilibration time and to a smaller extent it is due to the increased peak capacity achieved by full optimization of the first dimension. PMID:22017622

  13. Novel Integration Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth; Brown, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics; separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and magnetic field modeling results will be presented.

  14. Novel Integrated Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Brown, Gary L.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics, separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and analysis results will be presented.

  15. Radial artery graft vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Gabe, E D; Figal, J C; Wisner, J N; Laguens, R

    2001-01-01

    We report an unusual case of vasospasm of a grafted radial artery complicated with ventricular fibrillation during the postoperative course of coronary artery bypass graft surgery. To our knowledge this is the first documented case of a radial artery graft spasm leading to a severe arrhythmia. The arrhythmia resolved spontaneously. Radial artery graft spasm was demonstrated by angiography and was successfully resolved by intravenous nitroglycerin administration. PMID:11163573

  16. Radial arm strike rail

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1991-01-01

    The radial arm strike rail assembly is a system for measurement of bearings, directions, and stereophotography for geologic mapping, particularly where magnetic compasses are not appropriate. The radial arm, pivoting around a shaft axis, provides a reference direction determination for geologic mapping and bearing or direction determination. The centerable and levelable pedestal provide a base for the radial arm strike rail and the telescoping camera pedestal. The telescoping feature of the radial arm strike rail allows positioning the end of the rail for strike direction or bearing measurement with a goniometer.

  17. Plastic Models Designed to Produce Large Height-to-Length Ratio Steady-State Planar and Axisymmetric (Radial) Viscous Liquid Laminar Flow Gravity Currents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanck, Harvey F.

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring gravity currents include events such as air flowing through an open front door, a volcanic eruption's pyroclastic flow down a mountainside, and the spread of the Bhopal disaster's methyl isocyanate gas. Gravity currents typically have a small height-to-distance ratio. Plastic models were designed and constructed with a…

  18. Plastic Models Designed to Produce Large Height-to-Length Ratio Steady-State Planar and Axisymmetric (Radial) Viscous Liquid Laminar Flow Gravity Currents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanck, Harvey F.

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring gravity currents include events such as air flowing through an open front door, a volcanic eruption's pyroclastic flow down a mountainside, and the spread of the Bhopal disaster's methyl isocyanate gas. Gravity currents typically have a small height-to-distance ratio. Plastic models were designed and constructed with a

  19. Method for the quantification of vanadyl porphyrins in fractions of crude oils by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Flow Injection-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandekoken, Flávia G.; Duyck, Christiane B.; Fonseca, Teresa C. O.; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D.

    2016-05-01

    High performance liquid chromatography hyphenated by flow injection to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-FI-ICP-MS) was used to investigate V linked to porphyrins present in fractions of crude oil. First, the crude oil sample was submitted to fractionation by preparative liquid chromatography with UV detection, at the porphyrin Soret band wavelength (400 nm). The obtained porphyrin fractions were then separated in a 250 mm single column, in the HPLC, and eluted with different mobile phases (methanol or methanol:toluene (80:20; v:v)). The quantification of V-porphyrins in the fractions eluted from HPLC was carried out by online measuring the 51V isotope in the ICP-MS, against vanadyl octaethylporphine standard solutions (VO-OEP), prepared in the same solvent as the mobile phase, and injected post-column directly into the plasma. A 20 μg L- 1 Ge in methanol was used as internal standard for minimizing non-spectral interference, such as short-term variations due to injection. The mathematical treatment of the signal based on Fast Fourier Transform smoothing algorithm was employed to improve the precision. The concentrations of V as V-porphyrins were between 2.7 and 11 mg kg- 1 in the fractions, which were close to the total concentration of V in the porphyrin fractions of the studied crude oil.

  20. The development and validation of a turbulent flow chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the endogenous steroid profiling of equine serum.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Benjamin C; Stanley, Scott D

    2012-09-15

    A method for the detection and quantitation of 35 endogenous steroids in equine serum was developed and validated. Androgens, estrogens, progestins and their metabolites potentially present in serum were simultaneously monitored in one method using on-line sample extraction by turbulent flow chromatography (TFC) on a 2-dimensional liquid chromatography system and detected on a triple-stage quadrupole mass spectrometer by electrospray ionization. Analytes were detected and quantitated by single-reaction monitoring or selected-ion monitoring. Limits of detection (range 0.025-10 ng mL(-1)) and quantitation (range 0.125-25 ng mL(-1)) along with recovery and matrix effects were determined for each analyte. Inter- and intra-day accuracy and precision was assessed for with the majority of analytes having %CV less than 20% and accuracy within 20% of the expected concentrations. Eight of the 35 analytes were unable to meet these guidelines across all of the quality control concentrations monitored for each analyte. This method was used to determine the endogenous steroid profiles of Thoroughbred horses and has been modified for use in non-human primates and cell culture. PMID:22902915

  1. Triple acting radial seal

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, Todd A; Carella, John A

    2012-03-13

    A triple acting radial seal used as an interstage seal assembly in a gas turbine engine, where the seal assembly includes an interstage seal support extending from a stationary inner shroud of a vane ring, the interstage seal support includes a larger annular radial inward facing groove in which an outer annular floating seal assembly is secured for radial displacement, and the outer annular floating seal assembly includes a smaller annular radial inward facing groove in which an inner annular floating seal assembly is secured also for radial displacement. A compliant seal is secured to the inner annular floating seal assembly. The outer annular floating seal assembly encapsulates the inner annular floating seal assembly which is made from a very low alpha material in order to reduce thermal stress.

  2. Simultaneous determination of aflatoxin B1 and M1 in milk, fresh milk and milk powder by LC-MS/MS utilising online turbulent flow chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fan, Sufang; Li, Qiang; Sun, Lei; Du, Yanshan; Xia, Jing; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    A novel, fully automated method based on dual-column switching using online turbulent flow chromatography followed by LC-MS/MS was developed for the determination of aflatoxin B1 and M1 in milk, fresh milk and milk powder samples. After ultrasound-assisted extraction, samples were directly injected into the chromatographic system and the analytes were concentrated on the clean-up loading column. Through purge switch, analytes were transferred to the analytical column for subsequent detection by mass spectrometry. Different types of TurboFlow(TM) columns, transfer flow rates and transfer times were optimised. Method limits of detection obtained for AFB1 and AFM1 were 0.05 μg kg(-1), and limits of quantification were 0.1 μg kg(-1). Recoveries of aflatoxin B1 and M1 were in range of 81.1-102.1% for all samples. Matrix effects of aflatoxin B1 and M1 were in range of 63.1-94.3%. The developed method was successfully used for the analysis of aflatoxin B1 and M1 in real samples. PMID:25952817

  3. Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Gary R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents selected recent advances in immobilization chemistry which have important connections to affinity chromatography. Discusses ligand immobilization and support modification. Cites 51 references. (CS)

  4. Automated on-line renewable solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography exploiting multisyringe flow injection-bead injection lab-on-valve analysis.

    PubMed

    Quintana, José Benito; Miró, Manuel; Estela, José Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2006-04-15

    In this paper, the third generation of flow injection analysis, also named the lab-on-valve (LOV) approach, is proposed for the first time as a front end to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) sample processing by exploiting the bead injection (BI) concept. The proposed microanalytical system based on discontinuous programmable flow features automated packing (and withdrawal after single use) of a small amount of sorbent (<5 mg) into the microconduits of the flow network and quantitative elution of sorbed species into a narrow band (150 microL of 95% MeOH). The hyphenation of multisyringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) with BI-LOV prior to HPLC analysis is utilized for on-line postextraction treatment to ensure chemical compatibility between the eluate medium and the initial HPLC gradient conditions. This circumvents the band-broadening effect commonly observed in conventional on-line SPE-based sample processors due to the low eluting strength of the mobile phase. The potential of the novel MSFI-BI-LOV hyphenation for on-line handling of complex environmental and biological samples prior to reversed-phase chromatographic separations was assessed for the expeditious determination of five acidic pharmaceutical residues (viz., ketoprofen, naproxen, bezafibrate, diclofenac, and ibuprofen) and one metabolite (viz., salicylic acid) in surface water, urban wastewater, and urine. To this end, the copolymeric divinylbenzene-co-n-vinylpyrrolidone beads (Oasis HLB) were utilized as renewable sorptive entities in the micromachined unit. The automated analytical method features relative recovery percentages of >88%, limits of detection within the range 0.02-0.67 ng mL(-1), and coefficients of variation <11% for the column renewable mode and gives rise to a drastic reduction in operation costs ( approximately 25-fold) as compared to on-line column switching systems. PMID:16615800

  5. Measurement of bromate in bottled water by high-performance liquid chromatography with post-column flow reactor detection.

    PubMed

    Warner, C R; Daniels, D H; Joe, F L; Diachenko, G W

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a reliable, rugged high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for determination of trace levels of bromate (< 10 micrograms/l) in bottled water. HPLC separation was achieved by ion interaction chromatography using a C-18 reversed-phase column and a mobile phase consisting of methanol/water (20:80, v/v) with tetrabutylammonium acetate as the ion interaction reagent. A post-column reaction based on oxidation of o-dianisidine in acidic solution to a product detected at 500 nm provided selective measurement of the oxidants. The limit of detection and the limit of quantitation were 1 and 3 micrograms/l, respectively. Iodate, chlorite, and nitrite were chromatographically separated from bromate and measured by monitoring the post-column reaction. Chloride and chlorate at levels that might be found in bottled water did not interfere with the determination of bromate. Bromate was detected in bottled waters at concentrations up to 40 micrograms/l. PMID:8871120

  6. Radial heat flux transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basiulis, A.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Unit moves heat radially from small diameter shell to larger diameter shell, or vice versa, with negligible temperature drop, making device useful wherever heating or cooling of concentrically arranged materials, substances, and structures is desired.

  7. Four-stage (low-)flow modulation comprehensive gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry for the determination of recently-highlighted cosmetic allergens.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Q; Maimone, Mariarosa; Franchina, Flavio A; Bjerk, Thiago Rodrigues; Zini, Cláudia Alcaraz; Purcaro, Giorgia; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-03-25

    The present research is based on the development and use of a flow-modulation (FM) comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC×GC-qMS) method for the determination of recently-highlighted (by the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety) fragrance allergens (54) in cosmetics. FM GC×GC-qMS conditions were finely tuned to generate flow conditions (≈7mLmin(-1)) compatible with the qMS system used. Six-point calibration curves, over the range 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100mgL(-1), were constructed for the 54 target allergens, with satisfactory linearity observed in all cases. Absolute quantification was performed by using extracted ions; target analyte identification was performed through measurement of ion ratios (qualifier/quantifier), full-scan MS database matching and the use of linear retention indices. Additional analytical figures of merit subjected to measurement were intra-day repeatability, accuracy at the 25 and 5mgL(-1) levels, and limits of detection and quantification. The number of data points per peak, along with mass spectral skewing, was also subjected to evaluation. Finally, the FM GC×GC-qMS method was used not only for the quantification of target allergens in five commercial perfumes, but also for general qualitative profiling. PMID:26718184

  8. Simultaneous Analysis of Monovalent Anions and Cations with a Sub-Microliter Dead-Volume Flow-Through Potentiometric Detector for Ion Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dumanli, Rukiye; Attar, Azade; Erci, Vildan; Isildak, Ibrahim

    2016-04-01

    A microliter dead-volume flow-through cell as a potentiometric detector is described in this article for sensitive, selective and simultaneous detection of common monovalent anions and cations in single column ion chromatography for the first time. The detection cell consisted of less selective anion- and cation-selective composite membrane electrodes together with a solid-state composite matrix reference electrode. The simultaneous separation and sensitive detection of sodium (Na(+)), potassium (K(+)), ammonium (NH4 (+)), chloride (Cl(-)) and nitrate (NO3 (-)) in a single run was achieved by using 98% 1.5 mM MgSO4 and 2% acetonitrile eluent with a mixed-bed ion-exchange separation column without suppressor column system. The separation and simultaneous detection of the anions and cations were completed in 6 min at the eluent flow-rate of 0.8 mL/min. Detection limits, at S/N = 3, were ranged from 0.2 to 1.0 µM for the anions and 0.3 to 3.0 µM for the cations, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of monovalent anions and cations in several environmental and biological samples. PMID:26786906

  9. Evaluation of a novel helium ionization detector within the context of (low-)flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Franchina, Flavio A; Maimone, Mariarosa; Sciarrone, Danilo; Purcaro, Giorgia; Tranchida, Peter Q; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-07-10

    The present research is focused on the use and evaluation of a novel helium ionization detector, defined as barrier discharge ionization detector (BID), within the context of (low-)flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (FM GC×GC). The performance of the BID device was compared to that of a flame ionization detector (FID), under similar FM GC×GC conditions. Following development and optimization of the FM GC×GC method, the BID was subjected to fine tuning in relation to acquisition frequency and discharge flow. Moreover, the BID performance was measured and compared to that of the FID, in terms of extra-column band broadening, sensitivity and dynamic range. The comparative study was carried out by using standard compounds belonging to different chemical classes, along with a sample of diesel fuel. Advantages and disadvantages of the BID system, also within the context of FM GC×GC, are critically discussed. In general, the BID system was characterized by a more limited dynamic range and increased sensitivity, compared to the FID. Additionally, BID and FID contribution to band broadening was found to be similar under the operational conditions applied. Particular attention was devoted to the behaviour of the FM GC×GC-BID system toward saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, for a possible future use in the field of mineral-oil food contamination research. PMID:26032893

  10. Determination of histamine in wines with an on-line pre-column flow derivatization system coupled to high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    García-Villar, Natividad; Saurina, Javier; Hernández-Cassou, Santiago

    2005-09-01

    A new rapid and sensitive high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for determining histamine in red wine samples, based on continuous flow derivatization with 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonate (NQS), is proposed. In this system, samples are derivatized on-line in a three-channel flow manifold for reagent, buffer and sample. The reaction takes place in a PTFE coil heated at 80 degrees C and with a residence time of 2.9 min. The reaction mixture is injected directly into the chromatographic system, where the histamine derivative is separated from other aminated compounds present in the wine matrix in less than ten minutes. The HPLC procedure involves a C18 column, a binary gradient of 2% acetic acid-methanol as a mobile phase, and UV detection at 305 nm. Analytical parameters of the method are evaluated using red wine samples. The linear range is up to 66.7 mg L(-1) (r = 0.9999), the precision (RSD) is 3%, the detection limit is 0.22 mg L(-1), and the average histamine recovery is 101.5% +/- 6.7%. Commercial red wines from different Spanish regions are analyzed with the proposed method. PMID:16096675

  11. Radial flow in non-extensive thermodynamics and study of particle spectra at LHC in the limit of small (q - 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Trambak; Cleymans, Jean; Khuntia, Arvind; Pareek, Pooja; Sahoo, Raghunath

    2016-02-01

    We expand the Tsallis distribution in a Taylor series of powers of ( q - 1), where q is the Tsallis parameter, assuming q is very close to 1. This helps in studying the degree of deviation of transverse momentum spectra and other thermodynamic quantities from a thermalized Boltzmann distribution. After checking thermodynamic consistency, we provide analytical results for the Tsallis distribution in the presence of collective flow up to the first order of ( q - 1). The formulae are compared with the experimental data.

  12. Periostin, discovered by nano-flow liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, is a novel marker of diabetic retinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, Michiya; Ban, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Gou; Ueda, Toshihiko; Saito, Yuta; Nishimura, Eiichi; Fujisawa, Kunimi; Koide, Ryohei; Mizutani, Masakazu; Kozawa, Tadahiko; Shiraishi, Yuji; Bando, Yasuhiko; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Hirano, Tsutomu

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} In proliferative membrane and epiretinal membrane specimens, the numbers of proteins are 225 and 154, respectively, and 123 proteins are common to both. {yields} Periostin and thrombospondin-1 proteins are unique to the proliferative membrane specimens. {yields} The expression of periostin is significantly up-regulated in proliferative membrane specimens. -- Abstract: Diabetes can lead to serious microvascular complications including proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), the leading cause of blindness in adults. Recent studies using gene array technology have attempted to apply a hypothesis-generating approach to elucidate the pathogenesis of PDR, but these studies rely on mRNA differences, which may or may not be related to significant biological processes. To better understand the basic mechanisms of PDR and to identify potential new biomarkers, we performed shotgun liquid chromatography (LC)/tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis on pooled protein extracts from neovascular membranes obtained from PDR specimens and compared the results with those from non-vascular epiretinal membrane (ERM) specimens. We detected 226 distinct proteins in neovascular membranes and 154 in ERM. Among these proteins, 102 were specific to neovascular membranes and 30 were specific to ERM. We identified a candidate marker, periostin, as well as several known PDR markers such as pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). We then performed RT-PCR using these markers. The expression of periostin was significantly up-regulated in proliferative membrane specimens. Periostin induces cell attachment and spreading and plays a role in cell adhesion. Proteomic analysis by LC/MS/MS, which permits accurate quantitative comparison, was useful in identifying new candidates such as periostin potentially involved in the pathogenesis of PDR.

  13. Gas Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karasek, Francis W.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This review covers fundamental developments in gas chromatography during 1982 and 1983. Literature is considered under these headings: columns; liguid phases; solid supports; sorption processes and solvents; open tubular column gas chromatography; instrumentation; high-resolution columns and applications; other techniques; qualitative and…

  14. Dielectrokinetic chromatography devices

    DOEpatents

    Chirica, Gabriela S; Fiechtner, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K

    2014-12-16

    Disclosed herein are methods and devices for dielectrokinetic chromatography. As disclosed, the devices comprise microchannels having at least one perturber which produces a non-uniformity in a field spanning the width of the microchannel. The interaction of the field non-uniformity with a perturber produces a secondary flow which competes with a primary flow. By decreasing the size of the perturber the secondary flow becomes significant for particles/analytes in the nanometer-size range. Depending on the nature of a particle/analyte present in the fluid and its interaction with the primary flow and the secondary flow, the analyte may be retained or redirected. The composition of the primary flow can be varied to affect the magnitude of primary and/or secondary flows on the particles/analytes and thereby separate and concentrate it from other particles/analytes.

  15. A new physical model based on cascading column experiments to reproduce the radial flow and transport of micro-iron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comba, Silvia; Braun, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    In the field of aquifer restoration and civil engineering, fluids and suspensions are delivered in porous media via well injection. The flow field resulting around the well is three-dimensional. Since two and three-dimensional experiments which can be used to reproduce such flow fields are, although accurate, extremely elaborate and time consuming, the authors suggest to substitute them by a cascade of interdependent, one-dimensional (column) experiments. The new method is used to simulate the injection in aquifers of micro-iron particles dispersed in a shear thinning gel of guar gum and allows the prediction of iron particle distribution around the well and of injection pressure. The method respects the mass balance at the field scale and its predictions are in good agreement with those of a mathematical model proposed in the literature. The method is consistent with the Triad Approach, a way to improve remediation efficiency proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The representativeness of the proposed tests combined with their simplicity and relative inexpensiveness make this new method applicable and useful in the planning and design of real remediation.

  16. Measurement of radionuclides using ion chromatography and flow-call scintillation counting with pulse shape discrimination: Topical report, September 15, 1996--October 3, 1996, Tasks 1.11, 1.12 and 1.13

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Several flow-cell radiation detector systems are commercially available for quantification of aqueous radioactive solutions. These systems do not use the technique of pulse shape discrimination to identify the incident radiation and therefore are limited in environmental characterization application when coupled to an ion chromatography system. The advantages of the pulse shape discriminating flow-cell detector over the commercially available systems include: (1) lower minimum detectable activity for alpha radiation, (2) reduced radiological interferences that may exist between co-eluted alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides, and (3) possible isotopic information from the ion chromatography system. For Tasks 1.1.1 and 1.1.2 of this project, several scintillation materials were investigated for pulse shape (alpha and beta) discrimination capabilities and the best candidate material was optimized. In addition, the following detector properties were also optimized: scintillator particle size, flow-cell tubing type, and electromagnetic as well as optical crosstalk between the photomultiplier tubes.

  17. [Approaches to radial shaft].

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, J; Naňka, O; Tuček, M

    2015-10-01

    In the clinical practice, radial shaft may be exposed via two approaches, namely the posterolateral Thompson and volar (anterior) Henry approaches. A feared complication of both of them is the injury to the deep branch of the radial nerve. No consensus has been reached, yet, as to which of the two approaches is more beneficial for the proximal half of radius. According to our anatomical studies and clinical experience, Thompson approach is safe only in fractures of the middle and distal thirds of the radial shaft, but highly risky in fractures of its proximal third. Henry approach may be used in any fracture of the radial shaft and provides a safe exposure of the entire lateral and anterior surfaces of the radius.The Henry approach has three phases. In the first phase, incision is made along the line connecting the biceps brachii tendon and the styloid process of radius. Care must be taken not to damage the lateral cutaneous nerve of forearm.In the second phase, fascia is incised and the brachioradialis identified by the typical transition from the muscle belly to tendon and the shape of the tendon. On the lateral side, the brachioradialis lines the space with the radial artery and veins and the superficial branch of the radial nerve running at its bottom. On the medial side, the space is defined by the pronator teres in the proximal part and the flexor carpi radialis in the distal part. The superficial branch of the radial nerve is retracted together with the brachioradialis laterally, and the radial artery medially.In the third phase, the attachment of the pronator teres is identified by its typical tendon in the middle of convexity of the lateral surface of the radial shaft. The proximal half of the radius must be exposed very carefully in order not to damage the deep branch of the radial nerve. Dissection starts at the insertion of the pronator teres and proceeds proximally along its lateral border in interval between this muscle and insertion of the supinator. During release and retraction of the supinator posterolaterally, it is beneficial to supinate the proximal fragment of the shaft as much as possible, preferably by K-wire drilled perpendicular into the anterior surface of the fragment and rotated externally. As a result, canalis supinatorius is moved posteriorly which reduces the risk of injury to the deep branch of the radial nerve. The supinator is released always from distal to proximal. Approximately at the level of the biceps brachii tendon, it is usually necessary to identify and ligate the radial recurrent artery and vein which prevent retraction of the radial vessels medially. After detachment of the whole supinator, a small Hohmann elevator is carefully inserted between the muscle and the bone. If necessary, it is now possible to open the anterior surface of the joint capsule and revise the humeroradial joint. PMID:26556019

  18. Reverse Phase-ultra Flow Liquid Chromatography-diode Array Detector Quantification of Anticancerous and Antidiabetic Drug Mangiferin from 11 Species of Swertia from India

    PubMed Central

    Kshirsagar, Parthraj R.; Gaikwad, Nikhil B.; Panda, Subhasis; Hegde, Harsha V.; Pai, Sandeep R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Genus Swertia is valued for its great medicinal potential, mainly Swertia chirayita (Roxb. ex Fleming) H. Karst. is used in traditional medicine for a wide range of diseases. Mangiferin one of xanthoids is referred with enormous pharmacological potentials. Objective: The aim of the study was to quantify and compare the anticancerous and antidiabetic drug mangiferin from 11 Swertia species from India. The study also evaluates hierarchical relationships between the species based on mangiferin content using multivariate analysis. Materials and Methods: The reverse phase-ultra flow liquid chromatography-diode array detector analyses was performed and chromatographic separation was achieved on a Lichrospher 100, C18e (5 μm) column (250–4.6 mm). Mobile phase consisting of 0.2% triethylamine (pH-4 with O-phosphoric acid) and acetonitrile (85:15) was used for separation with injection volume 20 μL and detection wave length at 257 nm. Results: Results indicated that concentration of mangiferin has been found to vary largely between Swertia species collected from different regions. Content of mangiferin was found to be highest in Swertia minor compared to other Swertia species studied herein from the Western Ghats and Himalayan region also. The same was also evident in the multivariate analysis, wherein S. chirayita, S. minor and Swertia paniculata made a separate clade. Conclusion: Conclusively, the work herein provides insights of mangiferin content from 11 Swertia species of India and also presents their hierarchical relationships. To best of the knowledge this is the first report of higher content of mangiferin from any Swertia species. SUMMARY The present study quantifies and compares mangiferin in 11 species of Swertia from India. The study also evaluates hierarchical relationships between the species based on mangiferin content using multivariate analysis. The mangiferin content was highest in S. minor compared to the studied Swertia species. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of higher content of mangiferin from Swertia species. Abbreviations used: LOD: Limit of detection, LOQ: Limit of quantification, RP-UFLC-DAD: Reverse phase-ultra flow liquid chromatography-diode array detector, RSD: Relative standard deviation, SAN: Swertia angustifolia, SAP: Swertia angustifolia var. pulchella, SBI: S. bimaculata, SCH: S. chirayita, SCO: S. corymbosa, SDE: S. densifolia, SDI: S. dialatata, SLA: S. lawii, SMI: S. minor; SNE: S. nervosa, and SPA: S. paniculata PMID:27041855

  19. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Radial turbines have been used extensively in many applications including small ground based electrical power generators, automotive engine turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. In all of these applications the turbine inlet temperature is limited to a value commensurate with the material strength limitations and life requirements of uncooled metal rotors. To take advantage of all the benefits that higher temperatures offer, such as increased turbine specific power output or higher cycle thermal efficiency, requires improved high temperature materials and/or blade cooling. Extensive research is on-going to advance the material properties of high temperature superalloys as well as composite materials including ceramics. The use of ceramics with their high temperature potential and low cost is particularly appealing for radial turbines. However until these programs reach fruition the only way to make significant step increases beyond the present material temperature barriers is to cool the radial blading.

  20. NEW CALIBRATION PROCEDURE FOR SUBMERGED RADIAL GATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calibration equations for free-flowing radial gates typically provide sufficient accuracy for irrigation district operations. However, many districts have difficulty in determining accurate discharges when the downstream water level begins to submerge the gate. Based on laboratory studies, we have d...

  1. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  2. Gas Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cram, Stuart P.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Selects fundamental developments in theory, methodology, and instrumentation in gas chromatography (GC). A special section reviews GC in the People's Republic of China. Over 1,000 references are cited. (CS)

  3. Development of a multiplex flow-through immunoaffinity chromatography test for the on-site screening of 14 sulfonamide and 13 quinolone residues in milk.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenxiao; Beloglazova, Natalia V; Wang, Zhanhui; Jiang, Haiyang; Wen, Kai; de Saeger, Sarah; Luo, Pengjie; Wu, Yongning; Shen, Jianzhong

    2015-04-15

    In this paper, a rapid and sensitive multiplex flow-through immunoaffinity chromatography test (FTIACT) was developed for the on-site screening of 14 sulfonamide and 13 quinolone residues in milk. The developed FTIACT method combines the purification, preconcentration and immunochemical detection of multiple antibiotics on the sepharose gel test layers. The use of liposome-encapsulated quantum dots (LQDs) with the FTIACT method exhibited the best results, with limits of detection (LODs) of 1 and 0.5ng/mL for the sulfonamides (SAs) and quinolones (QNs), respectively, through qualitative analysis (visual detection by the naked eye). In order to achieve low detection limit, the color intensity of the images were converted into relative optical density values to enable a quantitative evaluation. Quantitative analysis of the samples enabled the detection of SAs (0.13ng/mL) and QNs (0.062ng/mL) in spiked milk samples. The FTIACT described in this work shows promise as a multiplex immunoassay for the qualitative and quantitative screening of multiple chemical residues in milk. PMID:25460892

  4. Determination of aromatic sulphur compounds in heavy gas oil by using (low-)flow modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Franchina, Flavio Antonio; Machado, Maria Elisabete; Tranchida, Peter Quinto; Zini, Cláudia Alcaraz; Caramão, Elina Bastos; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-03-27

    The present research is focused on the development of a flow-modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (FM GC × GC-MS/MS) method for the determination of classes of aromatic organic sulphur compounds (benzothiophenes, dibenzothiophenes, and benzonaphthothiophene) in heavy gas oil (HGO). The MS/MS instrument was used to provide both full-scan and multiple-reaction-monitoring (MRM) data. Linear retention index (LRI) ranges were used to define the MRM windows for each chemical class. Calibration solutions (internal standard: 1-fluoronaphthalene) were prepared by using an HGO sample, depleted of S compounds. Calibration information was also derived for the thiophene class (along with MRM and LRI data), even though such constituents were not present in the HGO. Linearity was satisfactory over the analyzed concentration range (1-100 mg/L); intra-day precision for the lowest calibration point was always below 17%. Accuracy was also satisfactory, with a maximum percentage error of 3.5% (absolute value) found among the S classes subjected to (semi-)quantification. The highest limit of quantification was calculated to be 299 μg/L (for the C1-benzothiophene class), while the lowest was 21 μg/L (for the C4-benzothiophene class). PMID:25704775

  5. A novel strategy for the discrimination of gelatinous Chinese medicines based on enzymatic digestion followed by nano-flow liquid chromatography in tandem with orbitrap mass spectrum detection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huan; Shen, Yuping; Xu, Ying; Maqueda, Aida Serra; Zheng, Jie; Wu, Qinan; Tam, James P

    2015-01-01

    Gelatinous Chinese medicines made from mammalian skin or horn or reptile shell are a very important type of animal-derived Chinese medicine. They have been extensively used either as both hemopoietic and hemostatic agents to treat vertigo, palpitation, hematuria, and insomnia in traditional Chinese medicine clinics; consumed as a popular tonic for weaker persons such as the elderly or women after giving birth; or further manufactured to health supplements for certain populations. However, they cannot be discriminated from each other by only using the routine approach in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia, as it lacks enough specificity and, consequently, and the requirements can be met even by adding assayed ingredients. In this study, our efforts to differentiate three gelatinous Chinese medicines, Asini Corii Colla, Cervi Cornus Colla, and Testudinis Carapacis ET Plastri Colla, are presented, and a novel strategy based on enzymatic digestion followed by nano-flow liquid chromatography in tandem with orbitrap mass spectrum detector analysis is proposed herein. Fourteen diagnostic fragments identified from the digests of these medicines were exclusively selected for their discrimination. By taking advantage of the favorable features of this strategy, it is feasible and convenient to identify enzymatic-digested peptides originated from signature proteins in each medicine, which thus could be employed as potential biomarkers for their form of raw medicinal material, and the pulverized and the complex especially, that being the direct basis for authentication purpose. PMID:26345994

  6. Development of a flow-through enzyme immunoassay and application in screening green coffee samples for ochratoxin A with confirmation by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sibanda, L; De Saeger, S; Bauters, T G; Nelis, H J; Van Peteghem, C

    2001-10-01

    A flow-through enzyme immunoassay has been developed for the screening of green coffee bean samples for ochratoxin A (OA) and was later used in a survey on OA in green coffee from different countries. The test has a sensitivity of 8 ng/g, and calculated recoveries ranged from 70 to 89% and from 86 to 95% for spiked and naturally contaminated samples, respectively. There were no significant differences in within-day and between-day assay performance (P > 0.05). Green coffee samples (15 Arabica and 7 Robusta) received from an international coffee trader were analyzed for intrinsic fungal contamination, screened for OA, and subsequently confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). All 22 samples were contaminated by fungal species of the genus Aspergillus, while Penicillium species were isolated from a mere 13.6% of the total number of samples. Isolates were tested for their ability to produce OA, and only 3.9% were positive. There was no correlation between occurrence of OA-producing isolates and levels of OA in contaminated samples. Results of the screening procedure showed that 4 of the 22 samples were contaminated with 8 ng/g or higher. The HPLC method confirmed that the OA levels ranged from 27 to 168 ng/g. A fifth sample, which was shown to be negative during screening, had an OA concentration of 4 ng/g. There were no false negatives or positives recorded, and the flow-through enzyme immunoassay results correlated with those obtained by HPLC. PMID:11601711

  7. Simultaneous determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in tannery wastewater using low pressure ion chromatography combined with flow injection spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shujuan; Zhang, Xinshen; Yu, Lingyun; Wang, Li; Li, Hui

    2012-03-01

    Trivalent and hexavalent chromium have been successfully separated and determined using low pressure ion chromatography combined with flow injection spectrophotometric analysis (LPIC-FIA). A column packed with crosslinking starch microspheres was used for on-line separation of Cr(III) from Cr(VI) in a flow-injection system because of its absorptive effect on Cr(III). To determine the concentration of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in samples, we used 3.0 mmol/L nitric acid to elute adsorbed Cr(III) from the column and then used ceric sulfate-sulfuric acid as oxidant to convert all Cr(III) into Cr(VI). Then, Cr(VI) directly came from the samples and Cr(VI) came from Cr(III) successively formed a amaranthine complex with diphenycarbazide and the complex shows a maximum absorption at 530 nm. Analytical parameters including the concentration of eluent and oxidant solution, oxidizing temperature, length of oxidizing reaction coil, reaction coil and injection coil, interfering effects, etc., were optimized. The limit of detection was 1.25 μg/L for Cr(VI) and 3.76 μg/L for Cr(III). The linear relationship between absorption with the concentration of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) was 0.001-1.000 mg/L and 0.030-1.000 mg/L with correlation coefficients of 0.9995 and 0.9994, respectively. The relative standard deviation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) was 1.21% and 1.66%, respectively (n = 10). Major cations and anions did not show any interference. We validated this method through certified reference materials and through measuring the recovery in tannery wastewater.

  8. [Determination of five imidazole pesticide residues in fruits by Turbo flow online purification-ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Kong, Xianghong; He, Qiang; Zhang, Longzhuang; Li, Jianhu

    2014-06-01

    A Turbo flow-ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (TF-UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for the determination of five imidazole pesticides (imazapyr, triazoxide, rabenzazole, prochloraz and fenamidone) in fruits. The fruit samples were dissolved in saturated sodium chloride solution and extracted by acetonitrile. After the acetonitrile layer was evaporated and redissolved with acetonitrile-water (1 :1, v/v), the fruit samples were analyzed by TF-UPLC-MS/MS. The main factors influencing the purification efficiency including the TF column, mobile phase, elution solution and elution rate were optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the analytes were purified by Turbo flow C18 column (50 mm x 1.0 mm) and separated on a Hypersil GOLD aQ column (100 mm x 2.1 mm) using the mobile phases of acetonitrile and 5 mmol/L ammonium acetate (containing 0.1% (v/v) formic acid) aqueous solution with gradient elution. The compounds were detected by selective reaction monitoring (SRM) via positive electrospray ionization (ESI(+)). The linear range of the method ranged from 0.007 5 to 0.75 mg/L for all the five imidazole pesticides, with the correlation coefficients (r2) greater than 0.99. The limits of quantification were 0.005 mg/kg for all the five imidazole pesticides. The recoveries were in the range from 71.2% to 122.4% at the spiked levels of 0.005, 0.01, 0.05 and 0.5 mg/kg with the relative standard deviations ranging from 0.5% to 8.9% in actual samples. The results indicate that the developed method is simple, efficient and precise, and can be a reliable technique for the determination of the five imidazole pesticides in fruit samples. PMID:25269251

  9. Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Radial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Radial Halbach magnetic bearings are based on the same principle as that of axial Halbach magnetic bearings, differing in geometry as the names of these two types of bearings suggest. Both radial and axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings were described in Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings (LEW-18066-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 85. In the remainder of this article, the description of the principle of operation from the cited prior article is recapitulated and updated to incorporate the present radial geometry. In simplest terms, the basic principle of levitation in an axial or radial Halbach magnetic bearing is that of the repulsive electromagnetic force between (1) a moving permanent magnet and (2) an electric current induced in a stationary electrical conductor by the motion of the magnetic field. An axial or radial Halbach bearing includes multiple permanent magnets arranged in a Halbach array ("Halbach array" is defined below) in a rotor and multiple conductors in the form of wire coils in a stator, all arranged so the rotary motion produces an axial or radial repulsion that is sufficient to levitate the rotor. A basic Halbach array (see Figure 1) consists of a row of permanent magnets, each oriented so that its magnetic field is at a right angle to that of the adjacent magnet, and the right-angle turns are sequenced so as to maximize the magnitude of the magnetic flux density on one side of the row while minimizing it on the opposite side. The advantage of this configuration is that it makes it possible to approach the theoretical maximum force per unit area that could be exerted by a given amount of permanent-magnet material. The configuration is named after physicist Klaus Halbach, who conceived it for use in particle accelerators. Halbach arrays have also been studied for use in magnetic-levitation ("maglev") railroad trains. In a radial Halbach magnetic bearing, the basic Halbach arrangement is modified into a symmetrical arrangement of sector-shaped permanent magnets mounted on the outer cylindrical surface of a drum rotor (see Figure 2). The magnets are oriented to concentrate the magnetic field on their radially outermost surface. The stator coils are mounted in a stator shell surrounding the rotor.

  10. Variable stator radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.; Hajek, T.; Chen, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A radial turbine stage with a variable area nozzle was investigated. A high work capacity turbine design with a known high performance base was modified to accept a fixed vane stagger angle moveable sidewall nozzle. The nozzle area was varied by moving the forward and rearward sidewalls. Diffusing and accelerating rotor inlet ramps were evaluated in combinations with hub and shroud rotor exit rings. Performance of contoured sidewalls and the location of the sidewall split line with respect to the rotor inlet was compared to the baseline. Performance and rotor exit survey data are presented for 31 different geometries. Detail survey data at the nozzle exit are given in contour plot format for five configurations. A data base is provided for a variable geometry concept that is a viable alternative to the more common pivoted vane variable geometry radial turbine.

  11. Radial inflow gas turbine engine with advanced transition duct

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, David J

    2015-03-17

    A gas turbine engine (10), including: a turbine having radial inflow impellor blades (38); and an array of advanced transition combustor assemblies arranged circumferentially about the radial inflow impellor blades (38) and having inner surfaces (34) that are adjacent to combustion gases (40). The inner surfaces (34) of the array are configured to accelerate and orient, for delivery directly onto the radial inflow impellor blades (38), a plurality of discrete flows of the combustion gases (40). The array inner surfaces (34) define respective combustion gas flow axes (20). Each combustion gas flow axis (20) is straight from a point of ignition until no longer bound by the array inner surfaces (34), and each combustion gas flow axis (20) intersects a unique location on a circumference defined by a sweep of the radial inflow impellor blades (38).

  12. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, Thomas H.; Call, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side.

  13. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1989-01-24

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side. 5 figs.

  14. Radial Field Piezoelectric Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, R. G.; Effinger, R. T., IV; Copeland, B. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A series of active piezoelectric diaphragms were fabricated and patterned with several geometrically defined Inter-Circulating Electrodes "ICE" and Interdigitated Ring Electrodes "ICE". When a voltage potential is applied to the electrodes, the result is a radially distributed electric field that mechanically strains the piezoceramic along the Z-axis (perpendicular to the applied electric field). Unlike other piezoelectric bender actuators, these Radial Field Diaphragms (RFDs) strain concentrically yet afford high displacements (several times that of the equivalent Unimorph) while maintaining a constant circumference. One of the more intriguing aspects is that the radial strain field reverses itself along the radius of the RFD while the tangential strain remains relatively constant. The result is a Z-deflection that has a conical profile. This paper covers the fabrication and characterization of the 5 cm. (2 in.) diaphragms as a function of poling field strength, ceramic thickness, electrode type and line spacing, as well as the surface topography, the resulting strain field and displacement as a function of applied voltage at low frequencies. The unique features of these RFDs include the ability to be clamped about their perimeter with little or no change in displacement, the environmentally insulated packaging, and a highly repeatable fabrication process that uses commodity materials.

  15. Development of an Online Cell-Based Bioactivity Screening Method by Coupling Liquid Chromatography to Flow Cytometry with Parallel Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Reka A; van Nierop, Pim; Niessen, Wilfried M A; Kini, R Manjunatha; Somsen, Govert W; Smit, August B; Kool, Jeroen

    2016-05-01

    This study describes a new platform for the fast and efficient functional screening for bioactive compounds in complex natural mixtures using a cell-based assay. The platform combines reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) with online flow cytometry (FC) and mass spectrometry (MS). As a model (an example or proof-of-concept study) we have used a functional calcium-flux assay in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells stably overexpressing the α-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR), a potential therapeutic target for central nervous system (CNS) related diseases. We have designed the coupled LC-FC system employing the neuroblastoma cells followed by analytical and pharmacological evaluation of the hyphenated setup in agonist and mixed antagonist-agonist assay modes. Using standard receptor ligands we have validated pharmacological responses and standardized good assay quality parameters. The applicability of the screening system was evaluated by analysis of various types of natural samples, such as a tobacco plant extract (in agonist assay mode) and snake venoms (in mixed antagonist-agonist assay mode). The bioactivity responses were correlated directly to the respective accurate masses of the compounds. Using simultaneous functional agonist and antagonist responses nicotine and known neurotoxins were detected from tobacco extract and snake venoms, respectively. Thus, the developed analytical screening technique represents a new tool for rapid measurement of functional cell-based responses and parallel separation and identification of compounds in complex mixtures targeting the α7-nAChR. It is anticipated that other fast-response cell-based assays (e.g., other ion flux assays) can be incorporated in this analytical setup. PMID:27046509

  16. Ion Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulik, James D.; Sawicki, Eugene

    1979-01-01

    Accurate for the analysis of ions in solution, this form of analysis enables the analyst to directly assay many compounds that previously were difficult or impossible to analyze. The method is a combination of the methodologies of ion exchange, liquid chromatography, and conductimetric determination with eluant suppression. (Author/RE)

  17. Comparison of cryogenic and differential flow (forward and reverse fill/flush) modulators and applications to the analysis of heavy petroleum cuts by high-temperature comprehensive gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Duhamel, Chloé; Cardinael, Pascal; Peulon-Agasse, Valérie; Firor, Roger; Pascaud, Laurent; Semard-Jousset, Gaëlle; Giusti, Pierre; Livadaris, Vincent

    2015-03-27

    The development of new efficient conversion processes to transform heavy petroleum fractions into valuable products, such as diesel, requires improved chemical knowledge of the latter. High-temperature comprehensive gas chromatography (HT-GC × GC) has proven to be a powerful technique for characterizing such complex samples. This paper reports on an evaluation of the performances of four different differential flow modulators, including two original ones that have not been previously described in the literature, in terms of dispersion, peak intensity, peak capacity and overloading. These modulators, all of which are based on Agilent capillary flow technology (CFT), are forward fill/flush (FFF) differential flow modulators with an integrated collection channel or an adjustable channel (new) and reverse fill/flush (RFF) differential flow modulators with an integrated collection channel (new) or an adjustable channel. First, the optimization of the collection channel dimensions is described. Second, an RFF and an FFF differential flow modulator possessing the same collection channel were compared. The reverse differential flow modulation significantly reduced band broadening compared to forward differential flow modulation, and the peak intensity doubled for every modulated peak when an RFF differential flow modulator was used. Then, an RFF differential flow modulator and CO2 dual-jet modulator were compared. Whereas the percentages of separation space used were similar (61% with the HT-GC × GC method using a cryogenic modulator and 59% with the method using an RFF differential flow modulator), the peak capacities were at least three times more important with differential flow modulation due to the greater length of the column used in the second dimension. The results demonstrate that the RFF differential flow modulator is an excellent tool for studying heavy petroleum cuts. It demonstrates the best performances and it is the most versatile modulator. In its two-plate version, it gives more flexibility regarding the set of columns, the flow rates and the modulation periods that can be used compared with the others. PMID:25704768

  18. Radial cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, M.C.

    1997-01-08

    The project`s aim is to complete development of the Radial Cutting Torch, a pyrotechnic cutter, for use in all downhole tubular cutting operations in the petroleum industry. Project objectives are to redesign and pressure test nozzle seals to increase product quality, reliability, and manufacturability; improve the mechanical anchor to increase its temperature tolerance and its ability to function in a wider variety of wellbore fluids; and redesign and pressure test the RCT nozzle for operation at pressures from 10 to 20 ksi. The proposal work statement is included in the statement of work for the grant via this reference.

  19. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  20. Radial Reflection diffraction tomorgraphy

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K

    2013-11-19

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  1. The ARCS radial collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, M. B.; Niedziela, J. L.; Overbay, M. A.; Abernathy, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. We present here characterization of the collimator's performance and methodologies for its effective use.

  2. Spiral Countercurrent Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoichiro; Knight, Martha; Finn, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    For many years, high-speed countercurrent chromatography conducted in open tubing coils has been widely used for the separation of natural and synthetic compounds. In this method, the retention of the stationary phase is solely provided by the Archimedean screw effect by rotating the coiled column in the centrifugal force field. However, the system fails to retain enough of the stationary phase for polar solvent systems such as the aqueous–aqueous polymer phase systems. To address this problem, the geometry of the coiled channel was modified to a spiral configuration so that the system could utilize the radially acting centrifugal force. This successfully improved the retention of the stationary phase. Two different types of spiral columns were fabricated: the spiral disk assembly, made by stacking multiple plastic disks with single or four interwoven spiral channels connected in series, and the spiral tube assembly, made by inserting the tetrafluoroethylene tubing into a spiral frame (spiral tube support). The capabilities of these column assemblies were successfully demonstrated by separations of peptides and proteins with polar two-phase solvent systems whose stationary phases had not been well retained in the earlier multilayer coil separation column for high-speed countercurrent chromatography. PMID:23833207

  3. Experimental feasibility study of radial injection cooling of three-pad radial air foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Suman K.

    Air foil bearings use ambient air as a lubricant allowing environment-friendly operation. When they are designed, installed, and operated properly, air foil bearings are very cost effective and reliable solution to oil-free turbomachinery. Because air is used as a lubricant, there are no mechanical contacts between the rotor and bearings and when the rotor is lifted off the bearing, near frictionless quiet operation is possible. However, due to the high speed operation, thermal management is one of the very important design factors to consider. Most widely accepted practice of the cooling method is axial cooling, which uses cooling air passing through heat exchange channels formed underneath the bearing pad. Advantage is no hardware modification to implement the axial cooling because elastic foundation structure of foil bearing serves as a heat exchange channels. Disadvantage is axial temperature gradient on the journal shaft and bearing. This work presents the experimental feasibility study of alternative cooling method using radial injection of cooling air directly on the rotor shaft. The injection speeds, number of nozzles, location of nozzles, total air flow rate are important factors determining the effectiveness of the radial injection cooling method. Effectiveness of the radial injection cooling was compared with traditional axial cooling method. A previously constructed test rig was modified to accommodate a new motor with higher torque and radial injection cooling. The radial injection cooling utilizes the direct air injection to the inlet region of air film from three locations at 120° from one another with each location having three axially separated holes. In axial cooling, a certain axial pressure gradient is applied across the bearing to induce axial cooling air through bump foil channels. For the comparison of the two methods, the same amount of cooling air flow rate was used for both axial cooling and radial injection. Cooling air flow rate was referenced to the rotor surface speed for radial injection cooling. The mass flow rates for the radial injection were 0.032, 0.0432, 0.054 and 0.068 Kg/min, which result in average injection speed of 150, 200, 250 and 300% of rotor surface speed. Several thermocouples were attached at various circumferential directions of the bearing sleeve, two plenums, bearing holder and ball bearing housings to collect the temperature data of the bearing at 30krpm under 10lb of load. Both axial cooling and radial injection are effective cooling mechanism and effectiveness of both cooling methods is directly proportional to the total mass flow rates. However, axial cooling is slightly more efficient in controlling the average temperature of the bearing sleeve, but results in higher thermal gradient of the shaft along the axial direction and also higher thermal gradient of the bearing sleeve along the circumferential direction compared to the radial injection cooling. The smaller thermal gradient of the radial injection cooling is due to the direct cooling effect of the shaft by impinging jets. While the axial cooling has an effect on only the bearing, the radial injection has a cooling effect on both the bearing sleeve and shaft. It is considered the radial injection cooling needs to be further optimized in terms of number of injection holes and their locations.

  4. Comparison of perfusion media and monoliths for protein and virus-like particle chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yige; Abraham, Dicky; Carta, Giorgio

    2016-05-20

    Structural and performance characteristics of perfusion chromatography media (POROS HS 20 and 50) and those of a polymethacrylate monolith (CIM SO3-1 tube monolith column) are compared for protein and virus-like particle chromatography using 1mL columns. Axial flow columns are used for POROS while the monolith has a radial flow configuration, which provides comparable operating pressures. The POROS beads contain a bimodal distribution of pore sizes, some as large as 0.5μm, which allow a small fraction of the mobile phase to flow within the particles, while the monolith contains 1-2μm flow channels. For proteins (lysozyme and IgG), the dynamic binding capacity of the POROS columns is more than twice that of the monolith at longer residence times. While the DBC of the POROS HS 50 column decreases at shorter residence times, the DBC of the POROS HS 20 column for IgG remains nearly twice that of the monolith at residence times at least as low as 0.2min as a result of intraparticle convection. Protein recoveries are comparable for all three columns. For VLPs, however, the eluted peaks are broader and recovery is lower for the monolith than for the POROS columns and is dependent on the direction of flow in the monolith, which is attributed to denser layer observed by SEM at the inlet surface of the monolith that appears to trap VLPs when loading in the normal flow direction. PMID:27106397

  5. Management of an iatrogenic radial artery perforation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Buturak, Ali; Demirci, Yasemin; Dağdelen, Sinan

    2013-06-01

    A 73-year-old female patient underwent transradial coronary angiography with stable angina and signs of significant myocardial ischemia revealed by exercise stress test. After insertion of a 6F radial sheath into the right radial artery and intra-arterial administration of heparin plus verapamil, the hydrophilic guidewire could not be advanced under fluoroscopic guidance. Immediately afterwards, radial angiography was performed, which displayed a radial artery perforation with significant contrast extravasation. The perforated segment was crossed meticulously with the same guidewire after additional vasodilator drug administration. Afterwards, a 5F TIG catheter was advanced to the axillary artery and held in place for 20 minutes with application of external compression with a sphygmomanometer cuff at the level of systolic blood pressure. The same maneuver was again performed following cuff deflation and completion of coronary angiography with the 5F catheter. Final angiography displayed complete sealing of the perforation without a need for neutralization of heparin. External compression was continued for two hours, and after documentation of normal triphasic radial artery flow by Doppler ultrasound (DUS), the radial sheath was removed. The patient was discharged the following day with no evidence of hand ischemia and well-palpable radial artery pulse. DUS demonstrated normal radial artery flow one month later. This unusual complication was managed successfully with a simple and easily applicable technique that can be performed in such cases. PMID:23760121

  6. Improved quantification of livestock associated odorous volatile organic compounds in a standard flow-through system using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuyan; Zhu, Wenda; Koziel, Jacek A; Cai, Lingshuang; Jenks, William S; Laor, Yael; Leeuwen, J Hans van; Hoff, Steven J

    2015-10-01

    Aerial emissions of odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are an important nuisance factor from livestock production systems. Reliable air sampling and analysis methods are needed to develop and test odor mitigation technologies. Quantification of VOCs responsible for livestock odor remains an analytical challenge due to physicochemical properties of VOCs and the requirement for low detection thresholds. A new air sampling and analysis method was developed for testing of odor/VOCs mitigation in simulated livestock emissions system. A flow-through standard gas generating system simulating odorous VOCs in livestock barn emissions was built on laboratory scale and tested to continuously generate ten odorous VOCs commonly defining livestock odor. Standard VOCs included sulfur VOCs (S-VOCs), volatile fatty acids (VFAs), and p-cresol. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was optimized for sampling of diluted odorous gas mixtures in the moving air followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. CAR/PDMS 85μm fiber was shown to have the best sensitivity for the target odorous VOCs. A practical 5-min sampling time was selected to ensure optimal extraction of VFAs and p-cresol, as well as minimum displacement of S-VOCs. Method detection limits ranged from 0.39 to 2.64ppbv for S-VOCs, 0.23 to 0.77ppbv for VFAs, and 0.31ppbv for p-cresol. The method developed was applied to quantify VOCs and odorous VOC mitigation with UV light treatment. The measured concentrations ranged from 20.1 to 815ppbv for S-VOCs, 10.3 to 315ppbv for VFAs, and 4.73 to 417ppbv for p-cresol. Relative standard deviations between replicates ranged from 0.67% to 12.9%, 0.50% to 11.4%, 0.83% to 5.14% for S-VOCs, VFAs, and p-cresol, respectively. This research shows that a simple manual SPME sampler could be used successfully for quantification of important classes of odorous VOCs at concentrations relevant for real aerial emissions from livestock operations. PMID:26456221

  7. On-line UV-photooxidation with peroxodisulfate for automated flow injection and for high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsalev, Dimiter L.; Sperling, Michael; Welz, Bernhard

    2000-04-01

    An automated on-line UV photooxidation with peroxodisulfate of some environmentally relevant organoarsenic and organotin compounds in a system built from commercially available modules has been studied and optimised with a view to both species-independent quantification of the total arsenic or tin in samples containing different organic species by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-HGAAS) and speciation analysis by coupled high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with HGAAS detection. For organoarsenicals, the reaction with alkaline peroxodisulfate in a 10-15-m knotted reactor for >1.5 min insures >90% transformation of inorganic As(III) and six organoarsenic species to arsenate: monomethylarsonate, dimethylarsinate, arsenobetaine, arsenocholine, trimethylarsine oxide and tetramethylarsonium. For organotins, the UV photooxidation with acidic peroxodisulfate at 95-100°C provides recoveries of >80% for the inorganic tin, dimethyltin, trimethyltin, triethyltin, tripropyltin, triphenyltin, monobutyltin, dibutyltin and tributyltin but only approximately 15% for tetrabutyltin. The best characteristic masses in integrated absorbance ( Aint) and peak-height ( Ap) measurements, respectively, are 30 pg and 480 pg for arsenic(V) and 22 pg and 410 pg for tin(IV), employing 100-μl injections. The RSDs are 5.5% and 8.5% at 5 ng As(V) levels and 4.3% and 6.4% at 10 ng Sn(IV) levels in Aint and Ap modes, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD, 3σ) for As are 7 μg l -1 and 4 μg l -1 in FI-UV-HGAAS and HPLC-UV-HGAAS, respectively. The LODs for i-Sn(IV) are 2 μg l -1 in FI-UV-HGAAS, with both Aint and Ap measurements. The sample throughput rates are 20 and 12 samples per hour with 10-m and 15-m knotted reactors (i.d. 0.5 mm), respectively. Urine certified reference materials containing 0.052-0.48 μg ml -1 As have been analysed for their total arsenic content.

  8. COMMISSION 30: Radial Velocities*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordström, Birgitta; Udry, Stephane; Dravins, D.; Fekel, F.; Glushkova, E.; Levato, H.; Pourbaix, D.; Smith, M. A.; Szabados, L.; Torres, G.

    2007-03-01

    This report from Commission 30 covers the salient areas in which major progress has been made in the triennium covered by the present volume. The principal scientific areas are: The Milky Way, star clusters, spectroscopic binaries, extrasolar planets, pulsating stars and stellar oscillations. Following these, an account is given of the progress in techniques and methodology for radial velocity determinations. Finally, a summary is given of the progress made by the working groups of the Commission, followed by a list of key papers in the triennium. A more extensive report also covering extragalactic work, which due to unforeseen circumstances could not be included here, can be found at the web page of Commission 30 (http://www.iau.org/IAU/Organization/divcom/).

  9. Radial gate hoist mechanisms mounted above radial gates, view to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Radial gate hoist mechanisms mounted above radial gates, view to the east - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Wasteway No. 1, Wellton-Mohawk Canal, North side of Wellton-Mohawk Canal, bounded by Gila River to North & the Union Pacific Railroad & Gila Mountains to south, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  10. Gas Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Michael C.

    Gas chromatography (GC) has many applications in the analysis of food products. GC has been used for the determination of fatty acids, triglycerides, cholesterol, gases, water, alcohols, pesticides, flavor compounds, and many more. While GC has been used for other food components such as sugars, oligosaccharides, amino acids, peptides, and vitamins, these substances are more suited to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography. GC is ideally suited to the analysis of volatile substances that are thermally stable. Substances such as pesticides and flavor compounds that meet these criteria can be isolated from a food and directly injected into the GC. For compounds that are thermally unstable, too low in volatility, or yield poor chromatographic separation due to polarity, a derivatization step must be done before GC analysis. The two parts of the experiment described here include the analysis of alcohols that requires no derivatization step, and the analysis of fatty acids which requires derivatization. The experiments specify the use of capillary columns, but the first experiment includes conditions for a packed column.

  11. Vortex rings in radially confined domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Kelley C.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2012-10-01

    The dynamics of vortex rings generated within confined domains are relevant to important hydrodynamic processes such as flow past heart valves or severe arterial constrictions. However, despite their importance, these flows have not received much attention to date. This study examines the development and evolution of radially confined vortex rings. Time-resolved digital particle image velocimetry was used to investigate two levels of radial confinement and a range of vortex ring strengths. We found that for severely confined vortex rings, the formation time and peak circulation values were unaffected for L/D 0 < 4 cases and slightly affected for larger L/D 0 cases. After pinch-off, circulation decay was observed with an approximately constant normalized circulation decay rate. We found that with increasing circulation strength, the nondimensional time delay between the pinch-off and the onset of circulation decay reduced due to an increased vortex ring diameter within the confinement domain and a reduction in the necessary time for the surface induced and core vorticity regions to interact. This study uncovers the dynamics of radially confined vortex rings and show that the nondimensional rate of circulation decay is dependent on the vortex ring confinement ratio (ratio of the vortex ring orifice diameter to the diameter of the outer cylinder), and the time delay between the vortex pinch-off and the onset of circulation is dependent on the vortex ring circulation strength.

  12. Fundamentals of preparative and nonlinear chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Guiochon, Georges A; Felinger, Attila; Katti, Anita; Shirazi, Dean G

    2006-02-01

    The second edition of Fundamentals of Preparative and Nonlinear Chromatography is devoted to the fundamentals of a new process of purification or extraction of chemicals or proteins widely used in the pharmaceutical industry and in preparative chromatography. This process permits the preparation of extremely pure compounds satisfying the requests of the US Food and Drug Administration. The book describes the fundamentals of thermodynamics, mass transfer kinetics, and flow through porous media that are relevant to chromatography. It presents the models used in chromatography and their solutions, discusses the applications made, describes the different processes used, their numerous applications, and the methods of optimization of the experimental conditions of this process.

  13. DESIGN ANALYSIS OF RADIAL INFLOW TURBINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    This program performs a velocity-diagram analysis required for determining geometry and estimating performance for radial-inflow turbines. Input design requirements are power, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotative rate. The design variables include stator-exit angle, rotor-exit-tip to rotor-inlet radius ratio, rotor-exit-hub to tip radius ratio, and the magnitude and radial distribution of rotor-exit tangential velocity. The program output includes diameters, total and static efficiences, all absolute and relative temperatures, pressures, and velocities, and flow angles at stator inlet, stator exit, rotor inlet, and rotor exit. Losses accounted for in this program by the internal loss model are three-dimensional (profile plus end wall) viscous losses in the stator and the rotor, the disk-friction loss on the back side of the rotor, the loss due to the clearance between the rotor tip and the outer casing, and the exit velocity loss. The flow analysis is one-dimensional at the stator inlet, stator exit, and rotor inlet, each of these calculation stations being at a constant radius. At the rotor exit where there is a variation in flow-field radius, an axisymmetric two-dimensional analysis is made using constant height sectors. Simple radial equilibrium is used to establish the static pressure gradient at the rotor exit. This program is written in FORTRAN V and has been implemented on a UNIVAC 1100 series computer with a memory requirement of approximately 22K of 36 bit words.

  14. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a sliding plate system, consisting of two flat surfaces, one of which has a recessed channel. A fluid flow is produced by axially sliding one plate past another, where the fluid has mechanical shear forces imposed at each point along the channel length. The shear-induced flow rates are very reproducible, and do not have pressure or voltage gradient limitations. SDC opens up a new range of enhanced separation kinetics by permitting the sample confinement with submicron dimensions. Small, highly confined liquid is advantageous for chromatographic separation because the separation rate is known to scale according to the square of the confined sample diameter. In addition, because shear-driven flows are not limited by fluid velocity, shear-driven liquid chromatography may provide up to 100,000 plate efficiency.

  15. Radial systems of dark globules

    SciTech Connect

    Gyul'budagyn, A.L.

    1986-03-01

    The author gives examples of radial systems consisting of dark globules and ''elephant trunks''. Besides already known systems, which contain hot stars at their center, data are given on three radial systems of a new kind, at the center of which there are stars of spectral types later than B. Data are given on 32 globules of radial systems of the association Cep OB2. On the basis of the observational data, it is concluded that at least some of the isolated Bok globules derive from elephant trunks and dark globules forming radial systems around hot stars. It is also suggested that the two molecular clouds situated near the Rosette nebula and possessing velocities differing by ca 20 km/sec from the velocity of the nebula could have been ejected in opposite directions from the center of the nebula. One of these clouds consists of dark globules forming the radial system of the Rosette nebula.

  16. Development and validation of two LC-MS/MS methods for the detection and quantification of amphetamines, designer amphetamines, benzoylecgonine, benzodiazepines, opiates, and opioids in urine using turbulent flow chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Nadine; Peters, Benjamin; Schmidt, Peter; Ewald, Andreas H

    2013-01-01

    In the context of driving ability diagnostics in Germany, administrative cutoffs for various drugs and pharmaceuticals in urine have been established. Two liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods for simultaneous detection and quantification of amphetamines, designer amphetamines, benzoylecgonine, benzodiazepines, opiates, and opioids in urine were developed and validated. A 500-?L aliquot of urine was diluted and fortified with an internal standard solution. After enzymatic cleavage, online extraction was performed by an ion-exchange/reversed-phase turbulent flow column. Separation was achieved by using a reversed-phase column and gradient elution. For detection, a Thermo Fisher TSQ Quantum Ultra Accurate Mass tandem mass spectrometer with positive electrospray ionization was used, and the analytes were measured in multiple-reaction monitoring mode detecting two transitions per precursor ion. The total run time for both methods was about 15 min. Validation was performed according to the guidelines of the Society of Toxicological and Forensic Chemistry. The results of matrix effect determination were between 78% and 116%. The limits of detection and quantification for all drugs, except zopiclone, were less than 10 ng/mL and less than 25 ng/mL, respectively. Calibration curves ranged from 25 to 200 ng/mL for amphetamines, designer amphetamines, and benzoylecgonine, from 25 to 250 ng/mL for benzodiazepines, from 12.5 to 100 ng/mL for morphine, codeine, and dihydrocodeine, and from 5 to 50 ng/mL for buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine. Intraday and interday precision values were lower than 15%, and bias values within 15% were achieved. Turbulent flow chromatography needs no laborious sample preparation, so the workup is less time-consuming compared with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods. The methods are suitable for quantification of multiple analytes at the cutoff concentrations required for driving ability diagnostics in Germany. PMID:23076398

  17. Dielectrokinetic chromatography and devices thereof

    DOEpatents

    Chirica, Gabriela S; Fiechtner, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed herein are methods and devices for dielectrokinetic chromatography. As disclosed, the devices comprise microchannels having at least one perturber which produces a non-uniformity in a field spanning the width of the microchannel. The interaction of the field non-uniformity with a perturber produces a secondary flow which competes with a primary flow. By decreasing the size of the perturber the secondary flow becomes significant for particles/analytes in the nanometer-size range. Depending on the nature of a particle/analyte present in the fluid and its interaction with the primary flow and the secondary flow, the analyte may be retained or redirected. The composition of the primary flow can be varied to affect the magnitude of primary and/or secondary flows on the particles/analytes and thereby separate and concentrate it from other particles/analytes.

  18. Atomic force microscope mediated chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. S.

    2013-02-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) is presented as an instrument for rapid, miniaturized chromatography. The AFM is used to inject a sample, provide shear driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. The components are then analyzed with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy using AFM deposition of gold nanoparticles on the separated bands. This AFM mediated chromatography (AFM-MC) is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chemistry. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with 25 μm length scale and 1 s separation times. AFM-MC has general applications to trace chemical analysis and microfluidics.

  19. Instrumentation: Ion Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, James S.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the importance of ion chromatography in separating and measuring anions. The principles of ion exchange are presented, along with some applications of ion chromatography in industry. Ion chromatography systems are described, as well as ion pair and ion exclusion chromatography, column packings, detectors, and programming. (TW)

  20. Hydrodynamic constraints on the radial structure of late-type galaxy disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struck-Marcell, Curtis

    1991-01-01

    Hydrodynamic constraints or driving forces that determine steady disk gas radial distributions are discussed, and observed gas distributions in late-type disks and correlations with disk rotation curves are analyzed. Evidence for quasi-steady states with radial gas flow is examined, and gas consumption rates and stellar density profiles are discussed, as are models of steady states with radial flows and more extreme 'driven' disks. The results indicate that the radial structure of a gas-rich disk can be simply and consistently accounted for as an azimuthally averaged hydrodynamic steady state in a fixed gravitational potential.

  1. The identification and quantification of a high molecular weight light stabilizer in polycarbonate by application of an online coupling of size exclusion chromatography in stopped flow mode with pyrolysis gas chromatography time of flight mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brander, Eric; Wold, Christian

    2014-10-01

    The identification and quantification of a high molecular weight light stabilizer (Uvinul 3030™) in an unknown polycarbonate sample was achieved through the application of SEC-Py-TOF-GCMS. A size exclusion column optimized to achieve resolution in the lower mass range was applied to allow the fractionation of an individual additive peak. A commercially available sampling interface was operated in stop flow mode and fractions were pyrolyzed to allow chromatographic separation of the fragments of the otherwise non-volatile stabilizer. After identification on the basis of accurate mass and elemental composition of the additive the quantification was compared using the available SEC-UV and SEC-PY-GC-TOFMS data. The resulting method provided a high degree of certainty in identification and flexibility in quantification expected to be applicable to other additives of similar volatilities or functional class. PMID:25160954

  2. Evaluation of Performance of Radial Collector Wells Using a Detailed Numerical Modeling Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Park, S.; Kim, J.

    2013-12-01

    A detailed numerical modeling technique was developed to evaluate quantitatively and accurately performance of radial collector wells for large-capacity indirect intake of riverside groundwater. The detailed numerical modeling technique consists of the three components such as precise spatial discretization of complicated structures (a vertical collector well with radial arms) of radial collector wells, rigorous realization of actual pumping schemes (pumping water drained from radial arms to a vertical collector well) of radial collector wells, and integrated simulation of saturated-unsaturated groundwater flow. However, previous numerical simulation studies did not consider such complicated structures and actual pumping schemes of radial collector wells as well as unsaturated groundwater flow. Such a detailed numerical modeling technique is then numerically implemented into a generalized multidimensional groundwater flow and solute transport finite element model COFAT3D (Kim and Yeh, 2004~2012). Finally, a series of numerical simulations was performed using the detailed numerical modeling technique to evaluate impacts of specifications (length and number of radial arms) of a radial collector well on its performance (steady-state water intake rate) and efficiency (steady-state water intake rate per length of radial arms or per radial arm). The numerical simulation results show that the performance increases, whereas the efficiency initially increases and then decreases as the length or number of radial arms increases. It arises because hydrologic interference among radial arms begins to occur beyond a certain length and number of radial arms. Therefore, the numerical simulation results suggest that the detailed numerical modeling technique can be utilized as a robust tool or methodology to evaluate and to optimize performance and efficiency of radial collector wells for large-capacity indirect intake of riverside groundwater. This work was supported by the Program of Advanced Technology for Groundwater Development and Application in Riversides (Geowater+) funded by the Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement (KAIA), Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport, Republic of Korea.

  3. Some observations of the effects of radial distortions on performance of a transonic rotating blade row

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandercock, D. M.; Sanger, N. L.

    1974-01-01

    A single rotating blade row was tested with two magnitudes of tip radial distortion and two magnitudes of hub radial distortion imposed on the inlet flow. The rotor was about 50 centimeters (20 in.) in diameter and had a design operating tip speed of approximately 420 meters per second (1380 ft/sec). Overall performance at 60, 80, and 100 percent of equivalent design speed generally showed a decrease (compared to undistorted flow) in rotor stall margin with tip radial distortion but no change, or a slight increase, in rotor stall margin with hub radial distortion. At design speed there was a decrease in rotor overall total pressure ratio and choke flow with all inlet flow distortions. Radial distributions of blade element parameters are presented for selected operating conditions at design speed.

  4. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation of Aqueous C60 Nanoparticles with Size Determination by Dynamic Light Scattering and Quantification by Liquid Chromatography Atmospheric Pressure Photo-Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    A size separation method was developed for aqueous C60 fullerene aggregates (aqu/C60) using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to a dynamic light scattering detector in flow through mode. Surfactants, which are commonly used in AF4, were avoided as they may al...

  5. Numerical calculation and analysis of radial force on the single-action vane pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y He, Y.; Y Kong, F.

    2013-12-01

    Unbalanced radial force is a serious adversity that restricts the working pressure and reduces service life of the single-action vane pump. For revealing and predicting the distribution of radial force on the rotor, a numerical simulation about its transient flow field was performed by using dynamic mesh method with RNG ? ?-turbulent model. The details of transient flow characteristic and pressure fluctuation were obtained, and the radial force and periodic variation can be calculated based on the details. The results show: the radial force has a close relationship with the pressure pulsation; the radial force can be reduced drastically by optimizing the angle of port plate and installing the V-shaped cavity; if the odd number vanes are chosen, it will help reduce the radial force of rotor and optimize the pressure fluctuation effectively.

  6. Gas turbine engine with radial diffuser and shortened mid section

    SciTech Connect

    Charron, Richard C.; Montgomery, Matthew D.

    2015-09-08

    An industrial gas turbine engine (10), including: a can annular combustion assembly (80), having a plurality of discrete flow ducts configured to receive combustion gas from respective combustors (82) and deliver the combustion gas along a straight flow path at a speed and orientation appropriate for delivery directly onto the first row (56) of turbine blades (62); and a compressor diffuser (32) having a redirecting surface (130, 140) configured to receive an axial flow of compressed air and redirect the axial flow of compressed air radially outward.

  7. Erosion in radial inflow turbines. Volume 2: Balance of centrifugal and radial drag forces on erosive particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenger, W. B., Jr.; Tabakoff, W.

    1974-01-01

    The particle motion in two-dimensional free and forced inward flowing vortices is considered. A particle in such a flow field experiences a balance between the aerodynamic drag forces that tend to drive erosive particles toward the axis, and centrifugal forces that prevent these particles from traveling toward the axis. Results predict that certain sizes of particles will achieve a stable orbit about the turbine axis in the inward flowing free vortex. In this condition, the radial drag force is equal to the centrifugal force. The sizes of particles that will achieve a stable orbit is shown to be related to the gas flow velocity diagram at a particular radius. A second analysis yields a description of particle sizes that will experience a centrifugal force that is greater than the radial component of the aerodynamic drag force for a more general type of particle motion.

  8. Effects of radial motion on interchange injections at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranicas, C.; Thomsen, M. F.; Achilleos, N.; Andriopoulou, M.; Badman, S. V.; Hospodarsky, G.; Jackman, C. M.; Jia, X.; Kennelly, T.; Khurana, K.; Kollmann, P.; Krupp, N.; Louarn, P.; Roussos, E.; Sergis, N.

    2016-01-01

    Charged particle injections are regularly observed in Saturn's inner magnetosphere by Cassini. They are attributed to an ongoing process of flux-tube interchange driven by the strong centrifugal force associated with Saturn's rapid rotation. Numerical simulations suggest that these interchange injections can be associated with inward flow channels, in which plasma confined to a narrow range of longitudes moves radially toward the planet, gaining energy, while ambient plasma in the adjacent regions moves more slowly outward. Most previous analyses of these events have neglected this radial motion and inferred properties of the events under the assumption that they appear instantaneously at the spacecraft's L-shell and thereafter drift azimuthally. This paper describes features of injections that can be related to their radial motion prior to observation. We use a combination of phase space density profiles and an updated version of a test-particle model to quantify properties of the injection. We are able to infer the longitudinal width of the injection, the radial travel time from its point of origin, and the starting L shell of the injection. We can also predict which energies can remain inside the channel during the radial transport. To highlight the effects of radial propagation at a finite speed, we focus on those interchange injections without extensive features of azimuthal dispersion. Injections that have traveled radially for one or more hours prior to observation would have been initiated at a different local time than that of the observation. Finally, we describe an injection where particles have drifted azimuthally into a flow channel prior to observation by Cassini.

  9. Effect of rotor meridional velocity ratio on response to inlet radial and circumferential distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanger, N. L.

    1979-01-01

    Three single transonic fan stages, each having a different meridional velocity ratio across its rotor, were tested with two magnitudes of tip radial distortion and with a 90 deg circumferential distortion imposed on the inlet flow. The rotor with the lowest meridional velocity ratio (less than 0.9 at the tip) demonstrated the least degradation of performance due to these distortions. Loss and deviation angle data (as needed for performance prediction with radial distortion) calculated along actual streamlines for radially distorted flow and correlated against diffusion factor, showed consistent agreement with data calculated along design streamlines for undistorted flow.

  10. Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Rodney R.

    1985-01-01

    Supports, affinity ligands, immobilization, elution methods, and a number of applications are among the topics considered in this discussion of affinity chromatography. An outline of the basic principles of affinity chromatography is included. (JN)

  11. Parachute drag and radial force

    SciTech Connect

    Purvis, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a combination of old and new wind tunnel data in a format which illustrates the effects of inflated diameter, geometric porosity, reefing line length, suspension line length, number of gores, and number of ribbons on parachute drag. A new definition of radial force coefficient is presented, as well as a universal drag curve for flat circular and conical parachutes.

  12. Chromatography: concepts and contrasts

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    As the author states in the Preface, this text attempts to provide a unified approach to chromatography (hence the title) by way of contrasting similarities and differences between gas chromatography (GC), column liquid chromatography (LC), and thin-layer chromatography (TLC). This book is also said to be pitched at an elementary level, suitable for most newcomers to the field (e.g., advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students in the academic world, as well as bench-level chemists in industry).

  13. CRC handbook of chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides technology for routine analysis or developing new methods of chromatography or organic materials. In this book Section 1 presents the principles, techniques, quantitative determinations and detection methods used in chromatographic analysis. In the major part of the book, Section 2 summarizes data in voluminous tabular/graphic form on paper, thin layer, liquid and gas chromatography. Section 3 lists important books on electrophoreses, gel permeation chromatography, and ion exchange, in addition to the other forms of chromatography.

  14. An automated method for the simultaneous measurement of azole antifungal drugs in human plasma or serum using turbulent flow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Couchman, L; Buckner, S L; Morgan, P E; Ceesay, M M; Pagliuca, A; Flanagan, R J

    2012-08-01

    Azole antifungal drugs are important in the prophylaxis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis. Therapeutic drug monitoring may be indicated to (1) monitor adherence, (2) guide dosage and (3) minimise the risk of drug-drug interactions and dose-related toxicity. TurboFlow(TM) technology offers online, automated sample preparation. An Aria Transcend(TM) TLX-II coupled with a TSQ Vantage(TM) MS was used. Centrifuged samples (25 μL) were mixed with internal standard solution (975 μL) and 30 μL injected directly onto a C18-P-XL TurboFlow column. Analytes were focussed onto a Phenomenex Gemini Phenyl analytical column and eluted using a methanol/water gradient (flow-rate, 0.8 mL/min). Analytes were monitored in selected reaction monitoring mode (two transitions per analyte, positive mode APCI). Calibration ranges were as follows: itraconazole, hydroxyitraconazole, and posaconazole 0.05-5.0 mg/L; voriconazole and fluconazole 0.1-10 mg/L. Total analysis time was 12 min. TurboFlow column recovery was >77% for all analytes. Calibration was linear (R (2) > 0.99) for all analytes. Inter- and intra-assay imprecision (% RSD) was <8% and accuracy (nominal internal quality control values) 90-105% for all analytes. The limit of detection was 0.01 mg/L for all analytes. No matrix effects were observed. This method is simple, robust and suitable for measuring these compounds at concentrations attained during therapy. PMID:22695504

  15. Interface evolution during radial miscible viscous fingering.

    PubMed

    Chui, Jane Y Y; de Anna, Pietro; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-10-01

    We study experimentally the miscible radial displacement of a more viscous fluid by a less viscous one in a horizontal Hele-Shaw cell. For the range of tested injection rates and viscosity ratios we observe two regimes for the evolution of the fluid-fluid interface. At early times the interface length increases linearly with time, which is typical of the Saffman-Taylor instability for this radial configuration. However, as time increases, the interface growth slows down and scales as ∼t(1/2), as one expects in a stable displacement, indicating that the overall flow instability has shut down. Surprisingly, the crossover time between these two regimes decreases with increasing injection rate. We propose a theoretical model that is consistent with our experimental results, explains the origin of this second regime, and predicts the scaling of the crossover time with injection rate and the mobility ratio. The key determinant of the observed scalings is the competition between advection and diffusion time scales at the displacement front, suggesting that our analysis can be applied to other interfacial-evolution problems such as the Rayleigh-Bénard-Darcy instability. PMID:26565159

  16. Interface evolution during radial miscible viscous fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, Jane Y. Y.; de Anna, Pietro; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-10-01

    We study experimentally the miscible radial displacement of a more viscous fluid by a less viscous one in a horizontal Hele-Shaw cell. For the range of tested injection rates and viscosity ratios we observe two regimes for the evolution of the fluid-fluid interface. At early times the interface length increases linearly with time, which is typical of the Saffman-Taylor instability for this radial configuration. However, as time increases, the interface growth slows down and scales as ˜t1/2 , as one expects in a stable displacement, indicating that the overall flow instability has shut down. Surprisingly, the crossover time between these two regimes decreases with increasing injection rate. We propose a theoretical model that is consistent with our experimental results, explains the origin of this second regime, and predicts the scaling of the crossover time with injection rate and the mobility ratio. The key determinant of the observed scalings is the competition between advection and diffusion time scales at the displacement front, suggesting that our analysis can be applied to other interfacial-evolution problems such as the Rayleigh-Bénard-Darcy instability.

  17. Reactive-infiltration instability in radial geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzki, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    A planar dissolution front propagating through a homogeneous porous matrix is unstable with respect to small variations in local permeability; regions of high permeability dissolve faster because of enhanced transport of reactants, which leads to increased rippling of the front. This phenomenon, usually referred to known as reactive-infiltration instability is an important mechanism for pattern development in geology, with a range of morphologies and scales, from cave systems running for hundreds of miles to laboratory acidization on the scale of centimeters. In general, this instability is characterized by two length scales: the diffusive length (D/v) and the reactant penetration length (v/r), where v is the Darcy velocity, D - the diffusion constant and r - the dissolution rate. If the latter scale is much smaller than the former one can adopt the so-called thin front limit, where the interface is treated as a discontinuity in porosity, with a completely dissolved phase on one side and an undissolved phase on the other. Linear stability analysis for this case has been carried out by Chadam et al. [1], and the corresponding dispersion relation shows that long wavelengths are unstable, whereas short wavelengths are stabilized by diffusion. In their derivation, Chadam et al. have considered a linear geometry with a uniform pressure gradient applied along one of the directions. However, in many cases (e.g. in the acidization techniques used in oil industry) the reactive fluids are injected through a well and thus the relevant geometry is radial rather than linear. Motivated by this, we have carried out the linear stability analysis of the reactive-infiltration problem in radial geometry, with the fluid injection at the centre of the system. We stay within the thin-front limit and derive the corresponding dispersion relation, which shows the stable regions for both the long-wavelength and short-wavelength modes, and the unstable region in between. Next, we study how the instability growth rate depends on the Peclet number (Pe) and permeability contrast between the undissolved and dissolved phase (Γ) and find the region in the (Pe,Γ) space when the system is absolutely stable. This behaviour is in contrast to the viscous fingering problem in radial geometry [2], where for a given flow rate the front always becomes eventually unstable, after reaching a certain critical radius R. [1] J. Chadam, D. Ho , E. Merino, P. Ortoleva, A. Sen, Reactive In ltration Instabilities, IMA J. Appl. Math. 36, 207-221 (1986) [2] L. Paterson, Radial fingering in a Hele Shaw cell, J. Fluid Mech. 113, 513-529 (1981)

  18. Simultaneous detection of multi-allergens in an incurred food matrix using ELISA, multiplex flow cytometry and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS).

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Ahmed; Boye, Joyce

    2015-05-15

    Food allergy is a public health concern and an important food safety issue. Food allergies affect up to 6% of infants and children and 4% of adults. The objective of this work was to determine differences in the detection of single and multiple allergens (i.e., casein, soy protein, and gluten) in an incurred food matrix before and after baking. Cookies were used as a model food system. Three methods, namely, multiplex assay (a new optimized method based on flow cytometry for multiple allergen analysis), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using commercial kits and LC-MS were used to detect allergens in the samples before and after baking. The ELISA kits performed well in detecting allergens in the raw samples with recoveries of 91-108%, 88-127% and 85-108% for casein, soy protein and gluten, respectively. Recoveries were poor for the baked cookies (67-90%, 66-95% and 66-88% for casein, soy protein and gluten, respectively). The multiplex flow cytometry assay permitted multiple allergen detection in the raw samples, with the following recoveries based on soluble protein: casein, 95-107%; soy protein, 92-97%, and gluten, 96-99%. Data for the baked cookies were as follows: casein, 84-90%; soy protein, 80-88%, and gluten, 80-90%. The LC-MS technique detected marker peptides that could be used to identify allergens in the baked food samples up to concentrations of 10 ppm for casein and soy protein, and 100 ppm for gluten. To the best of our knowledge, the current study is the first to compare ELISA, LC-MS and multiplex flow cytometry methods for the detection of multiple allergens simultaneously incurred in a model food system. PMID:25577123

  19. Effects of stream-associated fluctuations upon the radial variation of average solar wind parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A numerical MHD model in both spherically symmetric time-dependent and corotating equatorial flow approximations is used to compute the effects of nonlinear fluctuations due to solar wind streams upon radial gradients of average solar wind parameters. Significant effects of correlations between fluctuations on the gradients of azimuthal magnetic field, radial velocity, density, and azimuthal velocity are found. It is found that nonlinear fluctuations are a significant effect in determining the radial gradients of the solar wind at distances as small as 0.2 AU; at distances greater than 1 AU, nonlinear fluctuations dominate the behavior of the radial gradients.

  20. The effect of radial pressure force on rotating double tearing mode in compressible plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-Qu; Xiong, Guo-Zhen; Li, Xiao-Qing

    2016-05-01

    The role of radial pressure force in the interlocking dynamics of double tearing modes (DTMs) is investigated by force balance analysis based on the compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model. It is found that the stability of symmetric DTMs is dominated by the radial pressure force rather than the field line bending force. Owing to the compressibility of rotating plasmas, unbalanced radial forces can just result in the rotating islands drift toward each other in the radial direction but do not trigger the explosive growth of the mode in the interlocking process, which is different from that of antisymmetric DTM without flow.

  1. Potential of the reversed-inject differential flow modulator for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography in the quantitative profiling and fingerprinting of essential oils of different complexity.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Chiara; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Cobelli, Luigi; Stani, Gianluca; Miliazza, Armando; Giardina, Matthew; Firor, Roger; Bicchi, Carlo

    2015-10-23

    In this study, the first capillary flow technology reverse-inject differential flow modulator was implemented with different column configurations (lengths, diameters and stationary phase coupling) and detector combinations (mass spectrometry--MS and flame ionization detection--FID) to evaluate its potential in the quantitative profiling and fingerprinting of medium-to-highly complex essential oils. In particular, a parallel dual-secondary column dual-detection configuration that has shown to improve the information potential also with thermally modulated GC × GC platforms (MS identification reliability and accurate FID quantitation), was tested. Several system performance parameters (separation measure SGC × GC, modulation ratio MR, separation space used and peak symmetry) were evaluated by analyzing a mixture of volatiles of interest in the flavor and fragrance field. The systems demonstrating the best chromatographic performance were selected for quantitative profiling of lavender and mint essential oils and fingerprinting of vetiver essential oil. Experimental results demonstrate that careful tuning of column dimensions and system configurations yields improved: (a) selectivity; (b) operable carrier gas linear velocities at close-to-optimal values; (c) (2)D separation power by extending the modulation period and (d) handling of overloaded peaks without dramatic losses in resolution and quantitative accuracy. PMID:26387790

  2. Thermal structure, radial anisotropy, and dynamics of oceanic boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Ludwig; Becker, Thorsten W.; Boschi, Lapo; Schmerr, Nicholas

    2015-11-01

    Defining the oceanic lithosphere as a thermal boundary layer allows to explain, to first order, age-dependent bathymetry and isotropic wave speeds. In contrast, SS precursors and receiver functions suggest a subhorizontal interface within this layer, on top of a radially anisotropic zone. Comparing a suite of geodynamic scenarios against surface wave dispersion data and seismic discontinuities, we find that only weak age dependency of the radially anisotropic zone is compatible with observations. We show that this zone is confined from below by a second weaker seismic interface. While observed azimuthal anisotropy is consistent with lattice-preferred orientation of olivine due to asthenospheric flow underneath the lithosphere, radial anisotropy requires additional contributions, perhaps from petrological fabrics or melt ponding. This implies that seismic reflectors previously associated with the base of the lithosphere are instead associated with preserved structures embedded in it. They carry information about plate formation but have little control on plate deformation.

  3. Radial Stability in Stratified Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Jonas P.; Rueda, Jorge A.

    2015-03-01

    We formulate within a generalized distributional approach the treatment of the stability against radial perturbations for both neutral and charged stratified stars in Newtonian and Einstein's gravity. We obtain from this approach the boundary conditions connecting any two phases within a star and underline its relevance for realistic models of compact stars with phase transitions, owing to the modification of the star's set of eigenmodes with respect to the continuous case.

  4. Velocidades radiales en Collinder 121

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, M.; Morrell, N.

    Se han llevado a cabo observaciones espectroscópicas de unas treinta estrellas que son posibles miembros del cúmulo abierto Collinder 121. Las mismas fueron realizadas con el telescopio de 2.15m del Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO). El análisis de las velocidades radiales derivadas del material obtenido, confirma la realidad de Collinder 121, al menos desde el punto de vista cinemático. La velocidad radial baricentral (LSR) del cúmulo es de +17 ± 3 km.s-1. Esta velocidad coincide, dentro de los errores, con la velocidad radial (LSR) de la nebulosa anillo S308, la cual es de ~20 ± 10 km.s-1. Como S308 se encuentra físicamente asociada a la estrella Wolf-Rayet HD~50896, es muy probable que esta última sea un miembro de Collinder 121. Desde un punto de vista cinemático, la supergigante roja HD~50877 (K3Iab) también pertenecería a Collinder 121. Basándonos en la pertenencia de HD~50896 a Collinder 121, y en la interacción encontrada entre el viento de esta estrella y el medio interestelar circundante a la misma, se estima para este cúmulo una distancia del orden de 1 kpc.

  5. Tachoastrometry: astrometry with radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquini, L.; Cortés, C.; Lombardi, M.; Monaco, L.; Leão, I. C.; Delabre, B.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Spectra of composite systems (e.g., spectroscopic binaries) contain spatial information that can be retrieved by measuring the radial velocities (i.e., Doppler shifts) of the components in four observations with the slit rotated by 90 degrees in the sky. Aims: We aim at developing a framework to describe the method and to test its capabilities in a real case. Methods: By using basic concepts of slit spectroscopy we show that the geometry of composite systems can be reliably retrieved by measuring only radial velocity differences taken with different slit angles. The spatial resolution is determined by the precision with which differential radial velocities can be measured. Results: We use the UVES spectrograph at the VLT to observe the known spectroscopic binary star HD 188088 (HIP 97944), which has a maximum expected separation of 23 milli-arcseconds. We measure an astrometric signal in radial velocity of 276 m s-1 , which corresponds to a separation between the two components at the time of the observations of 18 ± 2 milli-arcseconds. The stars were aligned east-west. We describe a simple optical device to simultaneously record pairs of spectra rotated by 180 degrees, thus reducing systematic effects. We compute and provide the function expressing the shift of the centroid of a seeing-limited image in the presence of a narrow slit. Conclusions: The proposed technique is simple to use and our test shows that it is amenable for deriving astrometry with milli-arcsecond accuracy or better, beyond the diffraction limit of the telescope. The technique can be further improved by using simple devices to simultaneously record the spectra with 180 degrees angles. This device together with an optimized data analysis will further reduce the measurement errors. With tachoastrometry, radial velocities and astrometric positions can be measured simultaneously for many double line system binaries in an easy way. The method is not limited to binary stars, but can be applied to any astrophysical configuration in which spectral lines are generated by separate (non-rotational symmetric) regions.

  6. A model of a radially expanding and contracting lymphangion.

    PubMed

    Rahbar, Elaheh; Moore, James E

    2011-04-01

    The lymphatic system is an extensive vascular network featuring valves and contractile walls that pump interstitial fluid and plasma proteins back to the main circulation. Immune function also relies on the lymphatic system's ability to transport white blood cells. Failure to drain and pump this excess fluid results in edema characterized by fluid retention and swelling of limbs. It is, therefore, important to understand the mechanisms of fluid transport and pumping of lymphatic vessels. Unfortunately, there are very few studies in this area, most of which assume Poiseuille flow conditions. In vivo observations reveal that these vessels contract strongly, with diameter changes of the order of magnitude of the diameter itself over a cycle that lasts typically 2-3s. The radial velocity of the contracting vessel is on the order of the axial fluid velocity, suggesting that modeling flow in these vessels with a Poiseuille model is inappropriate. In this paper, we describe a model of a radially expanding and contracting lymphatic vessel and investigate the validity of assuming Poiseuille flow to estimate wall shear stress, which is presumably important for lymphatic endothelial cell mechanotransduction. Three different wall motions, periodic sinusoidal, skewed sinusoidal and physiologic wall motions, were investigated with steady and unsteady parabolic inlet velocities. Despite high radial velocities resulting from the wall motion, wall shear stress values were within 4% of quasi-static Poiseuille values. Therefore, Poiseuille flow is valid for the estimation of wall shear stress for the majority of the lymphangion contractile cycle. PMID:21377158

  7. Calculation of heat transfer in a radially rotating coolant passage

    SciTech Connect

    Tolpadi, A.K. )

    1994-12-01

    The three-dimensional flow field and heat transfer in a radially rotating coolant passage are studied numerically. The passage chosen has a square cross section with smooth isothermal walls of finite length. The axis rotation is normal to the flow direction with the flow radially outward. The effects of Coriolis forces, centrifugal buoyancy, and fluid Reynolds number on the flow and heat transfer have all been considered. The analysis has been performed by using a fully elliptic, three-dimensional, body-fitted computational fluid dynamics code based on pressure correction techniques. The numerical technique employs a multigrid iterative solution procedure and the standard k [minus] [epsilon] turbulence model for both the hydrodynamics and heat transfer. The effect of rotation is included by considering the governing equations of motion in a relative frame of reference that moves with the passage. The consequence of rotation is to bring higher velocity fluid from the core to the trailing surface, thereby increasing both the friction and heat transfer at this face. At the same time, the heat transfer is predicted to decrease along the leading surface. The effect of buoyancy is to increase the radial velocity of the fluid, thus generally increasing the heat transfer along both the leading and trailing surfaces. These effects and trends that have been predicted are in agreement with experimental heat transfer data available in the literature. The quantitative agreement with the data was also found to be quite satisfactory.

  8. RTOD- RADIAL TURBINE OFF-DESIGN PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The RTOD program was developed to accurately predict radial turbine off-design performance. The radial turbine has been used extensively in automotive turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. It is now being given serious consideration for primary powerplant applications. In applications where the turbine will operate over a wide range of power settings, accurate off-design performance prediction is essential for a successful design. RTOD predictions have already illustrated a potential improvement in off-design performance offered by rotor back-sweep for high-work-factor radial turbines. RTOD can be used to analyze other potential performance enhancing design features. RTOD predicts the performance of a radial turbine (with or without rotor blade sweep) as a function of pressure ratio, speed, and stator setting. The program models the flow with the following: 1) stator viscous and trailing edge losses; 2) a vaneless space loss between the stator and the rotor; and 3) rotor incidence, viscous, trailing-edge, clearance, and disk friction losses. The stator and rotor viscous losses each represent the combined effects of profile, endwall, and secondary flow losses. The stator inlet and exit and the rotor inlet flows are modeled by a mean-line analysis, but a sector analysis is used at the rotor exit. The leakage flow through the clearance gap in a pivoting stator is also considered. User input includes gas properties, turbine geometry, and the stator and rotor viscous losses at a reference performance point. RTOD output includes predicted turbine performance over a specified operating range and any user selected flow parameters. The RTOD program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 100K of 8 bit bytes. The RTOD program was developed in 1983.

  9. Confirmation of radial velocity variability in Arcturus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents results of high-precision measurements of radial-velocity variations in Alpha Boo. Significant radial-velocity variability is detected well in excess of the random and systematic measurement errors. The radial velocity varies by an amount greater than 200 m/sec with a period of around 2 days.

  10. Implementing radial motion to the booster simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    It's a puzzle that high intensity beams prefer a particular radial motion during transition in the Booster, and the result of removing such a radial motion is to increase the transition loss. In order to understand this observation, the radial motion should be taken into account in the longitudinal simulation.

  11. RADIAL STELLAR PULSATION AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION. II. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION IN FULL AMPLITUDE RADIAL PULSATION

    SciTech Connect

    Geroux, Chris M.; Deupree, Robert G.

    2013-07-10

    We have developed a three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code to simulate the interaction of convection and radial pulsation in classical variable stars. One key goal is the ability to carry these simulations to full amplitude in order to compare them with observed light curves. Previous multi-dimensional calculations were prevented from reaching full amplitude because of drift in the radial coordinate system, due to the algorithm defining radial movement of the coordinate system during the pulsation cycle. We have removed this difficulty by defining our radial coordinate flow algorithm to require that the mass in a spherical shell remain constant for every time step throughout the pulsation cycle. We have used our new code to perform two-dimensional (2D) simulations of the interaction of radial pulsation and convection. We have made comparisons between light curves from our 2D convective simulations with observed light curves and find that our 2D simulated light curves are better able to match the observed light curve shape near the red edge of the RR Lyrae instability strip than light curves from previous one-dimensional time-dependent convective models.

  12. Chromatography resin support

    DOEpatents

    Dobos, James G.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

  13. Evaluation of interactions between metal ions and nonionic surfactants in high-concentration HCl using low-pressure high-performance liquid chromatography with low-flow-resistance polystyrene-based monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Tomohiko; Kitagawa, Shinya; Ohtani, Hajime; Kinoshita, Takehiko; Ishigaki, Yuzo; Shibata, Nobuyuki; Nii, Susumu

    2013-10-01

    A method for evaluating the interactions between metal ions and nonionic surfactants in aqueous solutions containing high-concentration HCl, using gas pressure-driven low-pressure high-performance liquid chromatography (LP-HPLC) as a highly acid-resistant HPLC system, was developed. To construct the LP-HPLC for this purpose, poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene)-based low-flow-resistance monolithic columns tolerant to highly acidic conditions were prepared using low-conversion thermal polymerization. Thermal polymerization at 65 °C for 1.5 h (monomer conversions, 33% for styrene and 59% for divinylbenzene) allowed preparation of a column with both high separation efficiency (around 60,000 plates m(-1) for alkylbenzenes) and a quite low back pressure of 0.14 MPa at a linear flow rate of 1 mm s(-1) (2.8 × 10(-13) m(2) in permeability). The base column prepared under the above conditions was coated with a nonionic surfactant, polyoxyethylene nonylphenyl ether (PONPE, average oxyethylene unit numbers (n) = 3, 7.5, 15, and 20), and used for evaluation of the interactions between PONPEs and metal ions in 6 M HCl. The interactions between PONPEs and Au(III), Ga(III), Fe(III), Zn(II), and Cu(II) were successfully evaluated using both breakthrough and chromatographic methods. Furthermore, a study of the effect of the polyoxyethylene (POE) chain length revealed that the use of PONPE with the longer POE moiety enhanced the magnitude of the interaction together with the increase in the amount of oxyethylene (OE) units coated on the monolith. Moreover, the interactions of metal ions with a single OE unit were almost constant in the range of n = 7.5-20, whereas the suppression of the interaction between Au(III) with the shortest PONPE chain (n = 3) was also observed. PMID:23884474

  14. Axial and Radial Oxylipin Transport.

    PubMed

    Gasperini, Debora; Chauvin, Adeline; Acosta, Ivan F; Kurenda, Andrzej; Stolz, Stéphanie; Chételat, Aurore; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Farmer, Edward E

    2015-11-01

    Jasmonates are oxygenated lipids (oxylipins) that control defense gene expression in response to cell damage in plants. How mobile are these potent mediators within tissues? Exploiting a series of 13-lipoxygenase (13-lox) mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that displays impaired jasmonic acid (JA) synthesis in specific cell types and using JA-inducible reporters, we mapped the extent of the transport of endogenous jasmonates across the plant vegetative growth phase. In seedlings, we found that jasmonate (or JA precursors) could translocate axially from wounded shoots to unwounded roots in a LOX2-dependent manner. Grafting experiments with the wild type and JA-deficient mutants confirmed shoot-to-root oxylipin transport. Next, we used rosettes to investigate radial cell-to-cell transport of jasmonates. After finding that the LOX6 protein localized to xylem contact cells was not wound inducible, we used the lox234 triple mutant to genetically isolate LOX6 as the only JA precursor-producing LOX in the plant. When a leaf of this mutant was wounded, the JA reporter gene was expressed in distal leaves. Leaf sectioning showed that JA reporter expression extended from contact cells throughout the vascular bundle and into extravascular cells, revealing a radial movement of jasmonates. Our results add a crucial element to a growing picture of how the distal wound response is regulated in rosettes, showing that both axial (shoot-to-root) and radial (cell-to-cell) transport of oxylipins plays a major role in the wound response. The strategies developed herein provide unique tools with which to identify intercellular jasmonate transport routes. PMID:26338953

  15. Fun with Paper Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Dava; Hounshell, Paul B.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses paper chromatographic techniques and provides examples of typical classroom activities. Includes description of retardation values obtained during chromatography exercises and suggests using them for math lessons. (JN)

  16. Ion chromatography applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book describes recent advances in ion chromatography and demonstrates how it is used to solve scientific and industrial problems. The basic principles of ion chromatography are explained, including gradient elution of ions and micromembrane suppressors. The various anion and cation exchange columns together with various detection methods and applications of ion chromatography in the environmental and life sciences and industry are reviewed. Over 100 chromatograms which illustrate parameters needed to perform analysis and data on gradient and mobile phase ion chromatography are included.

  17. PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITIES WITH CSHELL

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Christopher J.; Prato, L.; Mahmud, Naved I.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Beichman, Charles A. E-mail: lprato@lowell.edu E-mail: cmj@rice.edu

    2011-07-10

    Radial velocity (RV) identification of extrasolar planets has historically been dominated by optical surveys. Interest in expanding exoplanet searches to M dwarfs and young stars, however, has motivated a push to improve the precision of near-infrared RV techniques. We present our methodology for achieving 58 m s{sup -1} precision in the K band on the M0 dwarf GJ 281 using the CSHELL spectrograph at the 3 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We also demonstrate our ability to recover the known 4 M{sub JUP} exoplanet Gl 86 b and discuss the implications for success in detecting planets around 1-3 Myr old T Tauri stars.

  18. Should the radial artery be used as a bypass graft following radial access coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lisa M; Galvin, Sean D; Javid, Mohamed; Matalanis, George

    2014-02-01

    The radial artery (RA) is often selected as the next conduit of choice following the internal thoracic artery for coronary artery bypass grafting operations (CABG). Radial access coronary angiography (RA-CA) has grown in popularity among cardiologists and has been advocated as the access route of choice for coronary angiography and intervention by many groups. However, sheath insertion and instrumentation may lead to structural and functional damage to the RA, which may preclude its use as a bypass conduit. The increasing use of RA-CA may therefore have an adverse effect on the ability to use the RA as a bypass conduit at subsequent CABG. To review this, a best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: 'should the radial artery be used as a bypass conduit following radial access coronary angiography'? Altogether, 167 papers were found using the reported search; 11 papers were identified that provided the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these studies were tabulated. Acute RA occlusion occurs in 2.3-30.5% of patients undergoing RA-CA. While a significant number of occluded RA's show recanalization on early follow-up, markers of endothelial function such as intima-media thickening (IMT) and flow-mediated dilatation remain impaired. RA-CA causes structural injury to the RA with evidence of histological injury (including intimal hyperplasia, periarterial tissue/fat necrosis and adventitial inflammation) along with intimal tears and medial dissections evident along the entire length of the vessel. Only one paper directly assesses patency rates of RA's used as bypass grafts following RA-CA finding a significant adverse effect on graft patency (77% patency in RA-CA, compared with 98% in the control group). We recommend avoiding the RA as a bypass conduit if it has previously been used for RA-CA. In situations where conduit options are limited, if possible, the RA should be avoided for at least 3 months following RA-CA and it may be beneficial to assess the RA's patency and flow characteristics with Doppler ultrasound preoperatively. PMID:24254539

  19. Fluctuating Pressure Environments and Hydrodynamic Radial Force Mitigation for a Two Blade Unshrouded Inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulder, Andrew; Skelley, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuating pressure data from water flow testing of an unshrouded two blade inducer revealed a cavitation induced oscillation with the potential to induce a radial load on the turbopump shaft in addition to other more traditionally analyzed radial loads. Subsequent water flow testing of the inducer with a rotating force measurement system confirmed that the cavitation induced oscillation did impart a radial load to the inducer. After quantifying the load in a baseline configuration, two inducer shroud treatments were selected and tested to reduce the cavitation induced load. The first treatment was to increase the tip clearance, and the second was to introduce a circumferential groove near the inducer leading edge. Increasing the clearance resulted in a small decrease in radial load along with some steady performance degradation. The groove greatly reduced the hydrodynamic load with little to no steady performance loss. The groove did however generate some new, relatively high frequency, spatially complex oscillations to the flow environment.

  20. Radial-Electric-Field Piezoelectric Diaphragm Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G.; Working, Dennis C.; Mossi, Karla; Castro, Nicholas D.; Mane, Pooma

    2009-01-01

    In a recently invented class of piezoelectric diaphragm pumps, the electrode patterns on the piezoelectric diaphragms are configured so that the electric fields in the diaphragms have symmetrical radial (along-the-surface) components in addition to through-the-thickness components. Previously, it was accepted in the piezoelectric-transducer art that in order to produce the out-of-plane bending displacement of a diaphragm needed for pumping, one must make the electric field asymmetrical through the thickness, typically by means of electrodes placed on only one side of the piezoelectric material. In the present invention, electrodes are placed on both sides and patterned so as to produce substantial radial as well as through-the-thickness components. Moreover, unlike in the prior art, the electric field can be symmetrical through the thickness. Tests have shown in a given diaphragm that an electrode configuration according to this invention produces more displacement than does a conventional one-sided electrode pattern. The invention admits of numerous variations characterized by various degrees of complexity. Figure 1 is a simplified depiction of a basic version. As in other piezoelectric diaphragm pumps of similar basic design, the prime mover is a piezoelectric diaphragm. Application of a suitable voltage to the electrodes on the diaphragm causes it to undergo out-of-plane bending. The bending displacement pushes a fluid out of, or pulls the fluid into, a chamber bounded partly by the diaphragm. Also as in other diaphragm pumps in general, check valves ensure that the fluid flows only in through one port and only out through another port.

  1. Radial blanket assembly orificing arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, J.F.

    1975-07-01

    A nuclear reactor core for a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor is described in which means are provided for increasing the coolant flow through the reactor fuel assemblies as the reactor ages by varying the coolant flow rate with the changing coolant requirements during the core operating lifetime. (auth)

  2. Advanced proteomic liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Smith, Richard D.; Shen, Yufeng

    2012-10-26

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is the predominant platform used to analyze proteomics samples consisting of large numbers of proteins and their proteolytic products (e.g., truncated polypeptides) and spanning a wide range of relative concentrations. This review provides an overview of advanced capillary liquid chromatography techniques and methodologies that greatly improve separation resolving power and proteomics analysis coverage, sensitivity, and throughput.

  3. Liquid Chromatography in 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, David H.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews trends in liquid chromatography including apparatus, factors affecting efficient separation of a mixture (peak sharpness and speed), simplified problem-solving, adsorption, bonded phase chromatography, ion selectivity, and size exclusion. The current trend is to control chemical selectivity by the liquid phase. (Author/JN)

  4. Column Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majors, Ronald E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature covering developments of column liquid chromatography during 1982-83. Areas considered include: books and reviews; general theory; columns; instrumentation; detectors; automation and data handling; multidimensional chromatographic and column switching techniques; liquid-solid chromatography; normal bonded-phase, reversed-phase,…

  5. Analyses of hydrodynamic radial forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adkins, D. R.; Brennen, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the hydrodynamic interactions occurring between a centrifugal pump impeller and a volute is presented. The theoretical analysis provides a quasi-one-dimensional treatment of the flow in the volute, and it is extended to include the hydrodynamic force perturbations caused by the impeller whirling eccentrically in the volute. It is noted that these perturbations are often destabilizing. The theoretical models were found to accurately predict the radial forces caused by the flow through the impeller. The pressure acting on the front shroud of the impeller is shown to have a significant effect on the destabilizing hydrodyamic forces.

  6. Analyses of hydrodynamic radial forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, D. R.; Brennen, C. E.

    1988-03-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the hydrodynamic interactions occurring between a centrifugal pump impeller and a volute is presented. The theoretical analysis provides a quasi-one-dimensional treatment of the flow in the volute, and it is extended to include the hydrodynamic force perturbations caused by the impeller whirling eccentrically in the volute. It is noted that these perturbations are often destabilizing. The theoretical models were found to accurately predict the radial forces caused by the flow through the impeller. The pressure acting on the front shroud of the impeller is shown to have a significant effect on the destabilizing hydrodyamic forces.

  7. Radial migration in barred galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Matteo, P.; Haywood, M.; Combes, F.; Semelin, B.; Babusiaux, C.; Gomez, A.

    2015-03-01

    In this talk, I will present the result of high resolution numerical simulations of disk galaxies with various bulge/disk ratios evolving isolated, showing that: • Most of migration takes place when the bar strength is high and decreases in the phases of low activity (in agreement with the results by Brunetti et el. 2011, Minchev et al. 2011). • Most of the stars inside the corotation radius (CR) do not migrate in the outer regions, but stay confined in the inner disk, while stars outside CR can migrate either inwards or outwards, diffusing over the whole disk. • Migration is accompanied by significative azimuthal variations in the metallicity distribution, of the order of 0.1 dex for an initial gradient of ~-0.07 dex/kpc. • Boxy bulges are an example of stellar structures whose properties (stellar content, vertical metallicity, [α/Fe] and age gradients, ..) are affected by radial migration (see also Fig. 1).

  8. A fully relativistic radial fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.; Ritter, Patxi

    2014-10-01

    Radial fall has historically played a momentous role. It is one of the most classical problems, the solutions of which represent the level of understanding of gravitation in a given epoch. A gedankenexperiment in a modern frame is given by a small body, like a compact star or a solar mass black hole, captured by a supermassive black hole. The mass of the small body itself and the emission of gravitational radiation cause the departure from the geodesic path due to the back-action, that is the self-force. For radial fall, as any other non-adiabatic motion, the instantaneous identity of the radiated energy and the loss of orbital energy cannot be imposed and provide the perturbed trajectory. In the first part of this paper, we present the effects due to the self-force computed on the geodesic trajectory in the background field. Compared to the latter trajectory, in the Regge-Wheeler, harmonic and all others smoothly related gauges, a far observer concludes that the self-force pushes inward (not outward) the falling body, with a strength proportional to the mass of the small body for a given large mass; further, the same observer notes a higher value of the maximal coordinate velocity, this value being reached earlier during infall. In the second part of this paper, we implement a self-consistent approach for which the trajectory is iteratively corrected by the self-force, this time computed on osculating geodesics. Finally, we compare the motion driven by the self-force without and with self-consistent orbital evolution. Subtle differences are noticeable, even if self-force effects have hardly the time to accumulate in such a short orbit.

  9. Liquid-phase chromatography detector

    DOEpatents

    Voigtman, Edward G.; Winefordner, James D.; Jurgensen, Arthur R.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid-phase chromatography detector comprising a flow cell having an inlet tubular conduit for receiving a liquid chromatographic effluent and discharging it as a flowing columnar stream onto a vertically adjustable receiving surface spaced apart from and located vertically below and in close proximity to the discharge end of the tubular conduit; a receiver adapted to receive liquid overflowing from the receiving surface; an exit conduit for continuously removing liquid from the receiver; a light source for focussing fluorescence-producing light pulses on the flowing columnar stream as it passes from the outlet of the conduit to the receiving surface and a fluorescence detector to detect the produced fluorescence; a source of light pulse for producing acoustic waves in the columnar stream as it passes from the conduit outlet to the receiving surface; and a piezoelectric transducer adapted to detect those waves; and a source of bias voltage applied to the inlet tubular conduit and adapted to produce ionization of the liquid flowing through the flow cell so as to produce photocurrents therein and an electrical system to detect and record the photocurrents. This system is useful in separating and detecting individual chemical compounds from mixtures thereof.

  10. Liquid-phase chromatography detector

    DOEpatents

    Voigtman, E.G.; Winefordner, J.D.; Jurgensen, A.R.

    1983-11-08

    A liquid-phase chromatography detector comprises a flow cell having an inlet tubular conduit for receiving a liquid chromatographic effluent and discharging it as a flowing columnar stream onto a vertically adjustable receiving surface spaced apart from and located vertically below and in close proximity to the discharge end of the tubular conduit; a receiver adapted to receive liquid overflowing from the receiving surface; an exit conduit for continuously removing liquid from the receiver; a light source for focusing fluorescence-producing light pulses on the flowing columnar stream as it passes from the outlet of the conduit to the receiving surface and a fluorescence detector to detect the produced fluorescence; a source of light pulse for producing acoustic waves in the columnar stream as it passes from the conduit outlet to the receiving surface; and a piezoelectric transducer adapted to detect those waves; and a source of bias voltage applied to the inlet tubular conduit and adapted to produce ionization of the liquid flowing through the flow cell so as to produce photocurrents therein and an electrical system to detect and record the photocurrents. This system is useful in separating and detecting individual chemical compounds from mixtures thereof. 5 figs.

  11. Rapid determination of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol (paracetamol) in urine by tandem mass spectrometry coupled with on-line clean-up by two dimensional turbulent flow/reversed phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Modick, Hendrik; Schütze, André; Pälmke, Claudia; Weiss, Tobias; Brüning, Thomas; Koch, Holger M

    2013-04-15

    N-Acetyl-4-aminophenol (NAAP) is the major urinary metabolite of aniline. The general population is known to be ubiquitously exposed to aniline through various sources. Furthermore, NAAP, known under the trade name paracetamol (resp. acetaminophen), is one of the most commonly used over-the-counter analgesics. Recent studies suggest anti-androgenic properties of NAAP. Although NAAP has been used as a pain reliever over decades and its role in aniline metabolism is well known there is a lack of internal exposure data both in environmental and occupational settings. To determine the internal NAAP exposure of the general population, workers exposed to aniline and users of paracetamol we developed a fast on-line HPLC-MS/MS method with isotope dilution quantification of NAAP after enzymatic hydrolysis of its conjugates in urine. We achieved minimal sample pretreatment through on-line extraction and enrichment of the analyte by turbulent flow chromatography on a Waters Oasis HLB phase followed by back-flush transfer onto the analytical column. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.75 μg/L. In a pilot study, urine samples of 21 volunteers, not occupationally exposed to aniline, were analyzed for NAAP. NAAP was detected in all samples in a wide concentration range between 8.7 μg/L and 22100 μg/L (median 85.7 μg/L). The highest concentration was measured in a volunteer who took paracetamol one day ago. Half of the volunteers quoted to either never have taken paracetamol or at least not during several weeks before the study. Therefore, other routes of exposure than direct use of paracetamol, like aniline or paracetamol contaminated foodstuff, leading to the NAAP excretions have to be taken into account. PMID:23518644

  12. Radial and vertical mixing in protoplanetary accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrstedt, Michael; Gail, H.-P.

    Crystalline silicates and aliphatic hydrocarbons in comets as well as deuterated species in several solar system bodies indicate an extensive radial mixing in the primodial solar nebula, i.e. the protoplanetary accretion disk of our solar system. To study the radial transport of matter within protoplanetary disks it is essential to resolve the vertical direction since matter is mixed radially outward by vertical `detour' in the complex flow of the disk. In this work we perform numerical models of protoplanetary accretion disks with radial and vertical mixing by solving a set of 2-dimensional diffusion-advection-reaction equations for different tracers self-consistently with the set of disk equations in the 1+1-dimensional approximation. Tracers are silicate grains (olivine, pyroxene) which anneal in the warm inner parts of the disk and carbonaceous grains which combust by surface reaction with OH molecules. Considerable fractions of crystallized silicates as well as methan as a product of carbon combustion are transported to the location of formation of comets afar from the protosun.

  13. Magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with a radial magnetic driver.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hideo; Katakoa, Kiroyuki; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Asama, Jun-ichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Shimokohbe, Akira; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-01-01

    A new magnetic bearing has been designed to achieve a low electronic power requirement and high stiffness. The magnetic bearing consists of 1) radial passive forces between the permanent magnet ring mounted inside the impeller rotor and the electromagnet core materials in the pump casing and 2) radial active forces generated by the electromagnets using the two gap sensor signals. The magnetic bearing was assembled into a centrifugal rotary blood pump (CRBP) driven with a radial, magnetic coupled driver. The impeller vane shape was designed based upon the computational fluid dynamic simulation. The diameter and height of the CRBP were 75 mm and 50 mm, respectively. The magnetic bearing system required the power of 1.0-1.4 W. The radial impeller movement was controlled to within +/- 10 microm. High stiffness in the noncontrolled axes, Z, phi, and theta, was obtained by the passive magnetic forces. The pump flow of 5 L/min against 100 mm Hg head pressure was obtained at 1,800 rpm with the electrical to hydraulic efficiency being greater than 15%. The Normalized Index of Hemolysis (NIH) of the magnetic bearing CRBP was one fifth of the BioPump BP-80 and one half of the NIKKISO HPM-15 after 4 hours. The newly designed magnetic bearing with two degrees of freedom control in combination with optimized impeller vane was successful in achieving an excellent hemolytic performance in comparison with the clinical centrifugal blood pumps. PMID:15745136

  14. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  15. An overview of sequential injection chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chocholous, Petr; Solich, Petr; Satínský, Dalibor

    2007-09-26

    New generation of sequential injection analysis (SIA) called sequential injection chromatography (SIC) has already been consolidated as a good alternative of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for fast analysis of simple samples. Benefits of flow methods are automation, miniaturization and low sample and mobile phase consumption. Implementation of short monolithic chromatographic column into SIA opens new area-on-line chromatographic separation of multi-compound sample in low-pressure flow system, with the advantage of flow programming and possibility of sample manipulation. In the presented review the potential of SIC and its comparison with HPLC for determination of pharmaceutical mixtures is discussed and outlines past and recent trends focused on separation with SIC. PMID:17903474

  16. High performance stationary phases for planar chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Salwa K; Poole, Colin F

    2011-05-13

    The kinetic performance of stabilized particle layers, particle membranes, and thin films for thin-layer chromatography is reviewed with a focus on how layer characteristics and experimental conditions affect the observed plate height. Forced flow and pressurized planar electrochromatography are identified as the best candidates to overcome the limited performance achieved by capillary flow for stabilized particle layers. For conventional and high performance plates band broadening is dominated by molecular diffusion at low mobile phase velocities typical of capillary flow systems and by mass transfer with a significant contribution from flow anisotropy at higher flow rates typical of forced flow systems. There are few possible changes to the structure of stabilized particle layers that would significantly improve their performance for capillary flow systems while for forced flow a number of avenues for further study are identified. New media for ultra thin-layer chromatography shows encouraging possibilities for miniaturized high performance systems but the realization of their true performance requires improvements in instrumentation for sample application and detection. PMID:21056422

  17. Relaminarization of fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimha, R.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanisms of the relaminarization of turbulent flows are investigated with a view to establishing any general principles that might govern them. Three basic archetypes of reverting flows are considered: the dissipative type, the absorptive type, and the Richardson type exemplified by a turbulent boundary layer subjected to severe acceleration. A number of other different reverting flows are then considered in the light of the analysis of these archetypes, including radial Poiseuille flow, convex boundary layers, flows reverting by rotation, injection, and suction, as well as heated horizontal and vertical gas flows. Magnetohydrodynamic duct flows are also examined. Applications of flow reversion for turbulence control are discussed.

  18. Numerical modeling of the elution peak profiles of retained solutes in supercritical fluid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2011-01-01

    In supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC), the significant expansion of the mobile phase along the column causes the formation of axial and radial gradients of temperature. Due to these gradients, the mobile phase density, its viscosity, its velocity, its diffusion coefficients, etc. are not constant throughout the column. This results in a nonuniform flow velocity distribution, itself causing a loss of column efficiency in certain cases, even at low flow rates, as they do in HPLC. At high flow rates, an important deformation of the elution profiles of the sample components may occur. The model previously used to account satisfactorily for the retention of an unsorbed solute in SFC is applied to the modeling of the elution peak profiles of retained compounds. The numerical solution of the combined heat and mass balance equations provides the temperature and the pressure profiles inside the column and values of the retention time and the band profiles of retained compounds that are in excellent agreement with independent experimental data for large value of mobile phase reduced density. At low reduced densities, the band profiles can strongly depend on the column axial distribution of porosity.

  19. Fabrication of cooled radial turbine rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, A. N.; Aigret, G. G.; Psichogios, T. P.; Rodgers, C.

    1986-01-01

    A design and fabrication program was conducted to evaluate a unique concept for constructing a cooled, high temperature radial turbine rotor. This concept, called split blade fabrication was developed as an alternative to internal ceramic coring. In this technique, the internal cooling cavity is created without flow dividers or any other detail by a solid (and therefore stronger) ceramic plate which can be more firmly anchored within the casting shell mold than can conventional detailed ceramic cores. Casting is conducted in the conventional manner, except that the finished product, instead of having finished internal cooling passages, is now a split blade. The internal details of the blade are created separately together with a carrier sheet. The inserts are superalloy. Both are produced by essentially the same software such that they are a net fit. The carrier assemblies are loaded into the split blade and the edges sealed by welding. The entire wheel is Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIPed), braze bonding the internal details to the inside of the blades. During this program, two wheels were successfully produced by the split blade fabrication technique.

  20. Continuous time random walks for non-local radial solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentz, Marco; Kang, Peter K.; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-08-01

    This study formulates and analyzes continuous time random walk (CTRW) models in radial flow geometries for the quantification of non-local solute transport induced by heterogeneous flow distributions and by mobile-immobile mass transfer processes. To this end we derive a general CTRW framework in radial coordinates starting from the random walk equations for radial particle positions and times. The particle density, or solute concentration is governed by a non-local radial advection-dispersion equation (ADE). Unlike in CTRWs for uniform flow scenarios, particle transition times here depend on the radial particle position, which renders the CTRW non-stationary. As a consequence, the memory kernel characterizing the non-local ADE, is radially dependent. Based on this general formulation, we derive radial CTRW implementations that (i) emulate non-local radial transport due to heterogeneous advection, (ii) model multirate mass transfer (MRMT) between mobile and immobile continua, and (iii) quantify both heterogeneous advection in a mobile region and mass transfer between mobile and immobile regions. The expected solute breakthrough behavior is studied using numerical random walk particle tracking simulations. This behavior is analyzed by explicit analytical expressions for the asymptotic solute breakthrough curves. We observe clear power-law tails of the solute breakthrough for broad (power-law) distributions of particle transit times (heterogeneous advection) and particle trapping times (MRMT model). The combined model displays two distinct time regimes. An intermediate regime, in which the solute breakthrough is dominated by the particle transit times in the mobile zones, and a late time regime that is governed by the distribution of particle trapping times in immobile zones. These radial CTRW formulations allow for the identification of heterogeneous advection and mobile-immobile processes as drivers of anomalous transport, under conditions relevant for field tracer tests.

  1. Special Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Indu; Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    1985-01-01

    Describes the nature of affinity chromatography and its use in purifying enzymes, studying cell interactions, exploring hormone receptors, and other areas. The potential the technique may have in treating disease is also considered. (JN)

  2. Autumn Leaf Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharmann, Lawrence C.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to introduce students to chromatographic techniques. Also describes a teacher demonstration in which leaves obtained during the spring and fall are analyzed using chromatography. Procedures for both the experiment and the demonstration are outlined. (JN)

  3. Gas chromatography in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akapo, S. O.; Dimandja, J. M.; Kojiro, D. R.; Valentin, J. R.; Carle, G. C.

    1999-01-01

    Gas chromatography has proven to be a very useful analytical technique for in situ analysis of extraterrestrial environments as demonstrated by its successful operation on spacecraft missions to Mars and Venus. The technique is also one of the six scientific instruments aboard the Huygens probe to explore Titan's atmosphere and surface. A review of gas chromatography in previous space missions and some recent developments in the current environment of fiscal constraints and payload size limitations are presented.

  4. Advanced proteomic liquid chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fang; Smith, Richard D.; Shen, Yufeng

    2012-01-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is the predominant platform used to analyze proteomics samples consisting of large numbers of proteins and their proteolytic products (e.g., truncated polypeptides) and spanning a wide range of relative concentrations. This review provides an overview of advanced capillary liquid chromatography techniques and methodologies that greatly improve separation resolving power and proteomics analysis coverage, sensitivity, and throughput. PMID:22840822

  5. Radial forces in a centrifugal compressor; Experimental investigation by using magnetic bearings and static pressure distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reunanen, Arttu; Larjola, Jaakko

    2005-03-01

    The volute of a centrifugal compressor causes a non-uniform pressure distribution which leads to a radial force on the impeller. This force was measured using magnetic bearings. In addition, the radial force was estimated using the static pressure distribution measured at the impeller outlet. The impeller force was found to be the highest at choke, the lowest at the design flow and moderate at stall. The radial force determined from the pressure measurements was only slightly different from the force obtained from the bearing measurements. The rotational speed was seen to affect the force to some extent.

  6. Experimental evaluation of a translating nozzle sidewall radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.; Rogo, Casimir

    1987-01-01

    An experimental performance evaluation was made of two movable sidewall variable area radial turbines. The turbine designs were representative of the gas generator turbine of a variable flow capacity rotorcraft engine. The first turbine was an uncooled design while the second turbine had a cooled nozzle but an uncooled rotor. The cooled nozzle turbine was evaluated both with and without coolant flow. The test results showed that the movable nozzle wall is a viable and efficient means to effectively control the flow capacity of a radial turbine. Peak efficiencies of the second turbine with and without nozzle coolant were 86.5 and 88 percent respectively. These values are comparable to pivoting vane variable geometry turbines; however, the decrease in efficiency as the flow was varied from the design value was much less for the movable wall turbine. Several design improvements which should increase the turbine efficiency one or two more points are identified. These design improvements include reduced leakage losses and relocation of the vane coolant ejection holes to reduce mainstream disturbance.

  7. Combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing is disclosed that allows for both radial and thrust axes control of an associated shaft. The combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing comprises a rotor and a stator. The rotor comprises a shaft, and first and second rotor pairs each having respective rotor elements. The stator comprises first and second stator elements and a magnet-sensor disk. In one embodiment, each stator element has a plurality of split-poles and a corresponding plurality of radial force coils and, in another embodiment, each stator element does not require thrust force coils, and radial force coils are replaced by double the plurality of coils serving as an outer member of each split-pole half.

  8. Radial spin Hall effect of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Weixing; Ke, Yougang; Liu, Yachao; Ling, Xiaohui; Luo, Hailu; Yin, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    We propose and realize a radial spin Hall effect (SHE) of light by using a dielectric metasurface. The metasurface with radially varying optical axes introduces a Pancharatnam-Berry (PB) geometrical phase to the incident light. The spatial gradient of PB phase accounts for a shift in the momentum space and thus leads the light to split radially into two concentric rays with opposite spin in the position space, which is called a radial SHE. Further experiments verify that the magnitude of the splitting increases with the rotation rate of the optical-axis orientation and the propagation distance, thereby allowing for macroscopic observation of the SHE. We also find that the phase of the incident light influences the profiles of the two split rays, while the polarization determines their intensities. The results provide methods to tune the SHE of light by engineering metasurfaces and modulating the incident light, and this radial SHE may be extrapolated to other physical systems.

  9. Aerodynamic Evaluation of Two Compact Radial-Inflow Turbine Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonyi, P. Susan; Roelke, Richard J.; Stabe, Roy G.; Nowlin, Brentley C.; Dicicco, Danielle

    1995-01-01

    The aerodynamic evaluation of two highly loaded compact radial turbine rotors was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center Small Engine Component Test Facility (SECTF). The experimental results were used for proof-of-concept, for modeling radial inflow turbine rotors, and for providing data for code verification. Two rotors were designed to have a shorter axial length, up to a 10-percent reduced diameter, a lighter weight, and equal or higher efficiencies with those of conventional radial inflow turbine rotors. Three configurations were tested: rotor 1, having a 40-percent shorter axial length, with the design stator (stator 1); rotor 1 with the design stator vanes closed down (stator 2); and rotor 2, slightly shorter axially and having higher loading, with stator 2. The stator had 36 vanes and the rotors each had 14 solid blades. Although presently uncooled, the rotor blades were designed for thicknesses which would allow cooling passages to be added. The overall stage performance measurements and the rotor and stator exit flow field surveys were obtained. Measurements of steady state temperatures, pressures, mass flow rates, flow angles, and output power were made at various operating conditions. Data were obtained at corrected speeds of 80, 90, 100, 110, and 120 percent of design over a range of equivalent inlet-to-exit pressure ratios of 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0, the maximum pressure ratio achieved. The test showed that the configuration of rotor 1 with stator 1 running at the design pressure ratio produced a flow rate which was 5.6 percent higher than expected. This result indicated the need to close down the stator flow area to reduce the flow. The flow area reduction was accomplished by restaggering the vanes. Rotor 1 was retested with the closed-down stator vanes and achieved the correct mass flow. Rotor 2 was tested only with the restaggered vanes. The test results of the three turbine configurations were nearly identical. Although the measured efficiencies of the compact designs fell 2 to 3 points below the predicted efficiency of 91 percent, they did meet and exceed by up to 2.5 percentage points the efficiences of state-of-the-art turbines found in the literature.

  10. Design and Numerical Simulation of Radial Inflow Turbine Volute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Samip P.; Channiwala, S. A.; Kulshreshtha, D. B.; Chaudhari, Gaurang

    2014-12-01

    The volute of a radial inflow turbine has to be designed to ensure that the desired rotor inlet conditions like absolute Mach number, flow angle etc. are attained. For the reasonable performance of vaneless volute turbine care has to be taken for reduction in losses at an appropriate flow angle at the rotor inlet, in the direction of volute, whose function is to convert gas energy into kinetic energy and direct the flow towards the rotor inlet at an appropriate flow angle with reduced losses. In literature it was found that the incompressible approaches failed to provide free vortex and uniform flow at rotor inlet for compressible flow regimes. So, this paper describes a non-dimensional design procedure for a vaneless turbine volute for compressible flow regime and investigates design parameters, such as the distribution of area ratio and radius ratio as a function of azimuth angle. The nondimensional design is converted in dimensional form for three different volute cross sections. A commercial computational fluid dynamics code is used to develop numerical models of three different volute cross sections. From the numerical models, losses generation in the different volutes are identified and compared. The maximum pressure loss coefficient for Trapezoidal cross section is 0.1075, for Bezier-trapezoidal cross section is 0.0677 and for circular cross section is 0.0438 near tongue region, which suggested that the circular cross section will give a better efficiency than other types of volute cross sections.

  11. Transition to turbulence in a tall annulus submitted to a radial temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepiller, Valérie; Prigent, Arnaud; Dumouchel, Fabien; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2007-05-01

    We have investigated the transition to turbulence in a water flow confined inside a tall vertical cylindrical annulus submitted to a radial temperature gradient using the space-time diagrams technique. As soon as a small radial temperature gradient is applied to the annular flow, the radial stratification of density induces a torque that produces a large convection cell. The first instability of this flow occurs via a supercritical bifurcation and gives rise to axisymmetric rolls localized in the middle of the system. Just above the onset, the pattern contains spatiotemporal defects. For large values of the control parameter, we have observed a coexistence of turbulent bursts and laminar domains. We have measured the turbulent fraction and have performed a statistical analysis of the laminar and turbulent zones, and have found that they bear the main characteristics of spatiotemporal intermittency.

  12. Selectivity in microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, S; Gabel-Jensen, C; Honoré Hansen, S

    2000-11-01

    Microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) is a most promising separation technique providing good selectivity and high separation efficiency of anionic, cationic as well as neutral solutes. In MEEKC lipophilic organic solvents dispersed as tiny droplets in an aqueous buffer by the use of surfactants provide a pseudo-stationary phase to which the solutes may have an affinity either to the surface or they may even partition into the droplets. When the droplets are charged, typically negatively, they will migrate opposite to the electroosmotic flow and hence separation of neutral solutes may take place. In the present paper focus has been set on how to change selectivity in MEEKC. Changes in the nature of surfactant as well as in pH have been shown to be powerful tools in changing the selectivity. The type of lipophilic organic phase is of less importance for the separation of fairly lipophilic solutes. Also changes in the temperature surrounding the capillary may alter the selectivity. PMID:11128221

  13. Freeze chromatography method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.

    1987-04-16

    A freeze chromatography method and apparatus are provided which enable separation of the solutes contained in a sample. The apparatus includes an annular column construction comprising cylindrical inner and outer surfaces defining an annular passage therebetween. One of the surfaces is heated and the other cooled while passing an eluent through the annular passageway so that the eluent in contact with the cooled surface freezes and forms a frozen eluent layer thereon. A mixture of solutes dissolved in eluent is passed through the annular passageway in contact with the frozen layer so that the sample solutes in the mixture will tend to migrate either toward or away the frozen layer. The rate at which the mixture flows through the annular passageway is controlled so that the distribution of the sample solutes approaches that at equilibrium and thus a separation between the sample solutes occurs. 3 figs.

  14. Radial Force Balance in Plasma Hole and Role of Centrifugal Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Kono, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Masayoshi

    2006-10-01

    A large-scale monopole vortex has been observed in a cylindrical magnetized plasma produced in the HYPER-I device at National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. It is spontaneously formed with a deep density hole in its core and is referred to as plasma hole from the impression of the end-view image taken by a CCD camera. The flow-velocity field of the plasma hole exhibits two characteristic features: a supersonic azimuthal rotation caused by a strong radial electric field and an inward radial flow. Since the latter is not driven in axisymmetric collisionless invicid plasma, it implies finite viscosity of the plasma. It is revealed that quasi-neutrality breaking (δn/n˜10-3), which is the source of strong electric field, occurs in the hole region. To develop a deeper understanding on the structure of the flow-velocity field, we have analyzed the radial force balance including the nonlinear terms, i.e. the dynamic pressure due to radial flow and the centrifugal force. It is found that the centrifugal force dominates the radial electric field in the hole region, giving rise to a rigid rotor equilibrium which is similar to the fast rotation mode realized in pure electron plasmas.

  15. Eddy Current Minimizing Flow Plug for Use in Flow Conditioning and Flow Metering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An eddy-current-minimizing flow plug has an outer radial wall with open flow channels formed between the plug's inlet and outlet. The plug has a central region coupled to the inner surface of the outer radial wall. Each open flow channel includes (i) a first portion originating at the inlet and converging to a location in the plug where convergence is contributed to by changes in thickness of the outer radial wall and divergence of the central region, and (ii) a second portion originating in the plug and diverging to the outlet where divergence is contributed to by changes in thickness of the outer radial wall and convergence of the central region. For at least a portion of the open flow channels, a central axis passing through the first and second portions is non-parallel with respect to the given direction of the flow.

  16. AUTO-EXPANSIVE FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physics suggests that the interplay of momentum, continuity, and geometry in outward radial flow must produce density and concomitant pressure reductions. In other words, this flow is intrinsically auto-expansive. It has been proposed that this process is the key to understanding...

  17. Catalogue of radial velocities of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, G.G.S.

    1983-01-01

    The Catalogue of Radial Velocities of Galaxies is a survey of radial velocities of redshifts of the galaxies in the universe. It lists all available measurements for each galaxy (including Russian citations) from the measurement of the first radial velocity by Slipher in 1914 through December 1980. It includes optical and radio measurements for all galaxies in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. In bringing together uniformly and concisely all published references, the catalogue affords readers the opportunity to evaluate the data and determine which measurement for the radical velocity of each galaxy.

  18. Scaling laws for radial foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honavara Prasad, Srikanth

    The effects of fluid pressurization, structural deformation of the compliant members and heat generation in foil bearings make the design and analysis of foil bearings very complicated. The complex fluid-structural-thermal interactions in foil bearings also make modeling efforts challenging because these phenomena are governed by highly non-linear partial differential equations. Consequently, comparison of various bearing designs require detailed calculation of the flow fields (velocities, pressures), bump deflections (structural compliance) and heat transfer phenomena (viscous dissipation in the fluid, frictional heating, temperature profile etc.,) resulting in extensive computational effort (time/hardware). To obviate rigorous computations and aid in feasibility assessments of foil bearings of various sizes, NASA developed the "rule of thumb" design guidelines for estimation of journal bearing load capacity. The guidelines are based on extensive experimental data. The goal of the current work is the development of scaling laws for radial foil bearings to establish an analytical "rule of thumb" for bearing clearance and bump stiffness. The use of scale invariant Reynolds equation and experimentally observed NASA "rule of thumb" yield scale factors which can be deduced from first principles. Power-law relationships between: a. Bearing clearance and bearing radius, and b. bump stiffness and bearing radius, are obtained. The clearance and bump stiffness values obtained from scaling laws are used as inputs for Orbit simulation to study various cases. As the clearance of the bearing reaches the dimensions of the material surface roughness, asperity contact breaks the fluid film which results in wear. Similarly, as the rotor diameter increases (requiring larger bearing diameters), the load capacity of the fluid film should increase to prevent dry rubbing. This imposes limits on the size of the rotor diameter and consequently bearing diameter. Therefore, this thesis aims to provide the upper and lower bounds for the developed scale laws in terms of the bearing diameter.

  19. Hydrodynamic effects in a misaligned radial face seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1978-01-01

    Hydrodynamic effects in a flat seal having an angular misalignment are analyzed, taking into account the radial variation in seal clearance. An analytical solution for axial force, restoring moment, and transverse moment is presented that covers the whole range from zero to full angular misalignment. Both low pressure seals with cavitating flow and high pressure seals with full fluid film are considered. Strong coupling is demonstrated between angular misalignment and transverse moment which leads the misalignment vector by 90 degrees. This transverse moment, which is entirely due to hydrodynamic effects, may be a significant factor in seal operating mechanism.

  20. Hydrodynamic effects in a misaligned radial face seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1977-01-01

    Hydrodynamic effects in a flat seal having an angular misalignment are analyzed, taking into account the radial variation in seal clearance. An analytical solution for axial force, restoring moment, and transverse moment is presented that covers the whole range from zero to full angular misalignment. Both low pressure seals with cavitating flow and high pressure seals with full fluid film are considered. Strong coupling is demonstrated between angular misalignment and transverse moment which leads the misalignment vector by 90 degrees. This transverse moment, which is entirely due to hydrodynamic effects, is a significant factor in the seal operating mechanism.

  1. High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talcott, Stephen

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has many applications in food chemistry. Food components that have been analyzed with HPLC include organic acids, vitamins, amino acids, sugars, nitrosamines, certain pesticides, metabolites, fatty acids, aflatoxins, pigments, and certain food additives. Unlike gas chromatography, it is not necessary for the compound being analyzed to be volatile. It is necessary, however, for the compounds to have some solubility in the mobile phase. It is important that the solubilized samples for injection be free from all particulate matter, so centrifugation and filtration are common procedures. Also, solid-phase extraction is used commonly in sample preparation to remove interfering compounds from the sample matrix prior to HPLC analysis.

  2. Design of a Polymer-Based Radial Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Akanksha; Yee, Shannon

    2014-03-01

    Polymers possess desirable properties such as low thermal conductivity, low cost, and scalable processability as compared to inorganic materials. These characteristics make polymers attractive for thermoelectric (TE) applications. Current examples of polymer thin-film TE devices are limited to traditional rectangular/parallel plate geometries. The focus of this work is to investigate the effect of radial device geometry on TE performance. Each TE module consists of many divided discs of p- and n-type polymers on a thermally insulating circular substrate. In the center of the disc a channel of warm fluid flows as the source of heat, which creates a radial temperature gradient across the TE. Many discs can be stacked and connected electrically in series, thus generating an appreciable output voltage. In this work, analytic thermal and electrical models are developed to present an optimized device geometry for maximum power, maximum efficiency, and low /W scenarios. While the efficiency equation is identical to that for a rectangular geometry, the non-linear resistance of the radial device offers a higher power density and greater thermal insulation than traditional rectangular TEs. Graduate student at Georgia Tech

  3. Effect of blade outlet angle on radial thrust of single-blade centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Y.; Fukutomi, J.; Fujiwara, R.

    2012-11-01

    Single-blade centrifugal pumps are widely used as sewage pumps. However, a large radial thrust acts on a single blade during pump operation because of the geometrical axial asymmetry of the impeller. This radial thrust causes vibrations of the pump shaft, reducing the service life of bearings and shaft seal devices. Therefore, to ensure pump reliability, it is necessary to quantitatively understand the radial thrust and clarify the behavior and generation mechanism. This study investigated the radial thrust acting on two kinds of single-blade centrifugal impellers having different blade outlet angles by experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Furthermore, the radial thrust was modeled by a combination of three components, inertia, momentum, and pressure, by applying an unsteady conservation of momentum to this impeller. As a result, the effects of the blade outlet angle on both the radial thrust and the modeled components were clarified. The total head of the impeller with a blade outlet angle of 16 degrees increases more than the impeller with a blade outlet angle of 8 degrees at a large flow rate. In this case, since the static pressure of the circumference of the impeller increases uniformly, the time-averaged value of the radial thrust of both impellers does not change at every flow rate. On the other hand, since the impeller blade loading becomes large, the fluctuation component of the radial thrust of the impeller with the blade outlet angle of 16 degrees increases. If the blade outlet angle increases, the fluctuation component of the inertia component will increase, but the time-averaged value of the inertia component is located near the origin despite changes in the flow rate. The fluctuation component of the momentum component becomes large at all flow rates. Furthermore, although the time-averaged value of the pressure component is almost constant, the fluctuation component of the pressure component becomes large at a large flow rate. In addition to the increase of the fluctuation component of this pressure component, because the fluctuation component of the inertia and momentum components becomes large (as mentioned above), the radial thrust increases at a large flow rate, as is the case for the impeller with a large blade outlet angle.

  4. Radial construction of an arterial wall

    PubMed Central

    Greif, Daniel M.; Kumar, Maya; Lighthouse, Janet K.; Hum, Justine; An, Andrew; Ding, Ling; Red-Horse, Kristy; Espinoza, F. Hernan; Olson, Lorin; Offermanns, Stefan; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Some of the most serious diseases involve altered size and structure of the arterial wall. Elucidating how arterial walls are built could aid understanding of these diseases, but little is known about how concentric layers of muscle cells and the outer adventitial layer are assembled and patterned around endothelial tubes. Using histochemical, clonal, and genetic analysis in mice, here we show that the pulmonary artery wall is constructed radially, from the inside out, by two separate but coordinated processes. One is sequential induction of successive cell layers from surrounding mesenchyme. The other is controlled invasion of outer layers by inner layer cells through developmentally-regulated cell reorientation and radial migration. We propose that a radial signal gradient controls these processes and provide evidence that PDGF-B and at least one other signal contribute. Modulation of such radial signaling pathways may underlie vessel-specific differences and pathological changes in arterial wall size and structure. PMID:22975322

  5. Polarizability of radially anisotropic elliptic inclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimpilinen, T.; Walln, H.; Sihvola, A.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses a two-dimensional electrostatic scattering problem where an elliptic inclusion is suspended in a homogeneous background and impinged by an electric field which is uniform and static. The novelty of the discussion stems from the inclusion's material parameters. The material of the inclusion is assumed to be axially anisotropic, so that the axis of anisotropy aligns itself with the radial unit vector of the elliptic coordinate system. Similar varieties of anisotropy have been formerly referred to as radial anisotropy, and the same term is employed herein. The radially anisotropic elliptic inclusions are studied with an analytic method. The validation is likewise analytic. The validation method compares the new results with the results for radially anisotropic circles and homogeneous two-dimensional needles. The elliptic inclusion is found to facilitate both cloaking and field concentration.

  6. Radial/axial power divider/combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaddiparty, Yerriah P. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An electromagnetic power divider/combiner comprises N radial outputs (31) having equal powers and preferably equal phases, and a single axial output (20). A divider structure (1) and a preferably identical combiner structure (2) are broadside coupled across a dielectric substrate (30) containing on one side the network of N radial outputs (31) and on its other side a set of N equispaced stubs (42) which are capacitively coupled through the dielectric substrate (30) to the N radial outputs (31). The divider structure (1) and the combiner structure (2) each comprise a dielectric disk (12, 22, respectively) on which is mounted a set of N radial impedance transformers (14, 24, respectively). Gross axial coupling is determined by the thickness of the dielectric layer (30). Rotating the disks (12, 22) with respect to each other effectuates fine adjustment in the degree of axial coupling.

  7. Radial Velocity Fluctuations of RZ Psc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potravnov, I. S.; Gorynya, N. A.; Grinin, V. P.; Minikulov, N. Kh.

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of the radial velocity of the UX Ori type star RZ Psc is studied. The existence of an inner cavity with a radius of about 0.7 a.u. in the circumstellar disk of this star allows to suggest the presence of a companion. A study of the radial velocity of RZ Psc based on our own measurements and published data yields no periodic component in its variability. The two most accurate measurements of V r , based on high resolution spectra obtained over a period of three months, show that the radial velocity is constant over this time interval to within 0.5 km/s. This imposes a limit of M p ≤10 M Jup on the mass of the hypothetical companion. Possible reasons for the observed strong fluctuations in the radial velocity of this star are discussed.

  8. Radial transport with perturbed magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazeltine, R. D.

    2015-05-01

    It is pointed out that the viscosity coefficient describing radial transport of toroidal angular momentum is proportional to the second power of the gyro-radius—like the corresponding coefficients for particle and heat transport—regardless of any geometrical symmetry. The observation is widely appreciated, but worth emphasizing because some literature gives the misleading impression that asymmetry can allow radial moment transport in first-order.

  9. Complex Elbow Instability: Radial Head and Coronoid.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, David; Vogel, Laura A; Levine, William N

    2015-11-01

    A standardized and systematic approach for the management of an acute complex elbow dislocation involving the radial head and coronoid will maximize clinical outcomes. The cornerstones of surgical management include primary restoration of the ulnohumeral joint by reduction of the intact joint or coronoid fracture fixation, followed by radial head fixation or replacement. The lateral ulnar collateral ligament complex is then repaired before assessing elbow stability within a functional sagittal arc of motion. PMID:26498544

  10. Radial transport with perturbed magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R. D.

    2015-05-15

    It is pointed out that the viscosity coefficient describing radial transport of toroidal angular momentum is proportional to the second power of the gyro-radius—like the corresponding coefficients for particle and heat transport—regardless of any geometrical symmetry. The observation is widely appreciated, but worth emphasizing because some literature gives the misleading impression that asymmetry can allow radial moment transport in first-order.

  11. Experimental studies using a confined radial nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Stromblad, B.; Marongiu, M.J.; Cosley, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    Thermal management of high power electronic components with dissipation ratings of over 2--3 W/cm{sup 2} clearly demands non-traditional means to be successful. Many different approaches have been attempted in the past with varying degrees of success. In the last 8 years radial jet reattachment (RJR) has been proven in the laboratory to be a novel and effective mechanism for high surface heat removal rates with negligible downward force as compared with impinging open jets. These nozzles produce only positive forces on the impingement surface. Impinging jets in confined conditions (inside enclosures or between parallel plates) have also been proven to be highly effective with high heat removal rates, suggesting the use of radial nozzles in similar conditions. Thus, confined radial jet reattachment has the potential of achieving even higher rates than impinging jets. However, no data (pressures or heat transfer) are available using confined radial nozzles as explained above. The experiments reported herein were carried out using one radial nozzle discharging in confined conditions (air issuing inside two parallel plates, for example.) Surface pressure distributions over both plates are presented for different geometrical and operational conditions. Results indicate that for the cases tested the radial jet almost always reattaches to the bottom surface, and that the Reynolds number is an important parameter.

  12. Analytical design of an advanced radial turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Large, G.D.; Finger, D.G.; Linder, C.G.

    1981-02-01

    The analytical design of an advanced radial turbine, which is part of an optimum ceramic radial inflow, single-stage turbine system for an advanced automotive gas turbine engine is reported. The turbine study program is based on an advanced gas turbine cycle, 100.67-kW (135-shp) engine for use in a 1588-kg (3500-lb) automobile, with a specific fuel consumption of 0.227 kg/kW-hr (0.373 lb/hp-hr). Utilization of high turbine cycle temperatures of 1370/sup 0/C and ceramic materials are prime features of this study. The program objective was to investigate the effects of tip speed, non-radial rotor blading, inducer-to-exducer work split, and deswirl vanes on the system efficiency and mechanical reliability of a single-stage, ceramic, radial turbine designed to meet the performance requirements of an advanced automotive gas turbine cycle. Analysis results indicate that, based on projected 1983 aerodynamic performance and ceramic material properties, radial blade rotor configurations with a tip speed of 701 m/sec (2300 fps) are feasible and satisfy the goals of 87.0% system efficiency and 0.9999 cumulative probability of success mechanically. As compared with the blade stress complications of nonradial rotor configurations, from aerodynamic, mechanical, and off-design considerations, the radial-blade rotor appears to offer the lowest overall risk and is the optimum configuration considered in this study.

  13. Effects of design parameters on the radial force of percutaneous aortic valve stents.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gideon V Praveen; Mathew, Lazar

    2010-01-01

    Valve stents are small cylindrical structures introduced in stenosed valves to replace them and restore blood flow. High radial force has become an essential feature of these stents. The primary aim of this investigation was to investigate the effects of varying stent "design parameters" on its radial force by using the finite element method (FEM). The improved model design was carried out to meet the functional and surgical requirements. The finite element model to evaluate radial force of stent was dependant on various design parameters. The results show that amplitude was the dominant parameter in this study. Increasing either strut circumference or thickness generally improved radial force of stent. However, increasing either amplitude or radius of curvature generally weakened it. In conclusion, FEM can quantify the compressive mechanical property of stent and help designers to optimize stent systems. PMID:20347800

  14. Extending Paper Chromatography Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finson, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    One of the "good old" standard activities middle school students seem to enjoy is paper chromatography. The procedures and materials needed are relatively simple and the results can be colorful. All too often, the activity ends just after these colorful results are obtained, cutting short the potential it holds for some further inquiry. With some

  15. Liposomes in chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cserháti, T; Szögyi, M

    2010-12-01

    The newest achievements in the application of liposomes in different chromatographic technologies such as high-performance liquid chromatography and electrically driven separation methods was compiled and critically evaluated. The employment of chromatographic methodologies for the determination of molecular parameters of biological importance is also discussed in detail. The future trends of the use of liposomes is also shortly discussed. PMID:21077245

  16. Modern Thin-Layer Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Colin F.; Poole, Salwa K.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the important modern developments of thin-layer chromatography are introduced. Discussed are the theory and instrumentation of thin-layer chromatography including multidimensional and multimodal techniques. Lists 53 references. (CW)

  17. The effects of radiation drag on radial, relativistic hydromagnetic winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Chiueh, Tzihong

    1992-01-01

    The effects of drag on an idealized relativistic MHD wind of radial geometry are studied. The astrophysical motivation is to understand the effects of radiation drag on the dynamics of a jet or wind passing through the intense radiation field of an accreting compact object. From a critical point analysis, it is found that a slow magnetosonic point can appear in a dragged flow even in the absence of gravitational force, as a result of a balance between the drag force and the combination of thermal pressure and centrifugal forces. As in the undragged case, the Alfven point does not impose any constraints on the flow. Although it is formally possible for a dragged flow to possess more than one fast magnetosonic point, it is shown that this is unlikely in practice. In the limit of a 'cold', centrifugally driven flow, it is shown that the fast magnetosonic point moves to infinite radius, just as in the drag-free case. For a given mass flux, the total energy output carried to infinity, and the final partition between the kinetic energy and the Poynting flux, are the same for the dragged and the drag-free flows. The main effects of radiation drag are to increase the amount of energy and angular momentum extracted from the source and to redistribute the regions where acceleration occurs in the flow. This is accomplished through the storage and release of magnetic energy, as a result of additional winding and compression of the field caused by the action of the drag. For a relativistic wind, the dissipated energy can exceed the final kinetic energy of the flow and may be comparable to the total flow energy (which is dominated by Poynting flux). The energy lost to radiation drag will appear as a Doppler-boosted beam of scattered radiation, which could dominate the background radiation if the flow is well-collimated.

  18. Rotating stall control in a high-speed stage with inlet distortion. Part 1: Radial distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Spakovszky, Z.S.; Weigl, H.J.; Paduano, J.D.; Schalkwyk, C.M. van; Suder, K.L.; Bright, M.M.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the first attempt to stabilize rotating stall in a single-stage transonic axial flow compressor with inlet distortion using active feedback control. The experiments were conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center on a single-stage transonic core compressor inlet stage. An annular array of 12 jet-injectors located upstream of the rotor tip was used for forced response testing and to extend the compressor stable operating range. Results for radial distortion are reported in this paper. First, the effects of radial distortion on the compressor performance and the dynamic behavior were investigated. Control laws were designed using empirical transfer function estimates determined from forced response results. The transfer function indicated that the compressor dynamics are decoupled with radial inlet distortion, as they are for the case of undistorted inlet flow. Single-input-single-output (SISO) control strategies were therefore used for the radial distortion controller designs. Steady axisymmetric injection of 4 percent of the compressor mass flow resulted in a reduction in stalling mass flow of 9.7 percent relative to the case with inlet distortion and no injection. Use of a robust H{sub {infinity}} controller with unsteady nonaxisymmetric injection achieved a further reduction in stalling mass flow of 7.5 percent, resulting in a total reduction of 17.2 percent.

  19. Radial tidal current field in a semi-enclosed rectangular basin: formation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xuesheng; Chen, Yongping; Zhang, Changkuan; Pan, Yi; Das, Himangshu

    2015-07-01

    The radial tidal current field accounts for the formation of the radial sand ridges in the South Yellow Sea. Understanding the formation and evolution of this radial tidal current field is vital to assessing the morphodynamic features in the area. A semi-enclosed rectangular basin with and without a coastal barrier was schematized from the topography of the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea. The 2D tidal current field in this basin was simulated using the DELFT3D-FLOW model. The concept of tidal wave refraction, which highlights the effect of the sloped or stepped submarine topography on the propagation of the tidal waves, was introduced to explain the formation of the radial tidal current field. Under the effect of tidal wave refraction, co-phase lines of the counterclockwise rotating tidal wave and incident tidal wave are transformed into clockwise and counterclockwise deflections, respectively, leading to the convergence and divergence of the flow field. Regardless of whether a coastal barrier exists or not, the outer radial tidal current field might emerge over certain topography. The responses of the radial tidal current field in this basin to the environmental variations such as coastline changes and bottom erosions were discussed. Results show that local protrusion near the focal point of the radial tidal current field will have limited effects on the location of the tidal system. However, a remarkable shift of the amphidromic point toward the entrance and central axis of this basin and a movement of the focal point of the radial tidal current field toward the entrance could be caused by the significant seaward coastline advance and submarine slope erosion.

  20. Waves in Radial Gravity Using Magnetic Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlsen, D. R.; Hart, J. E.; Weidman, P. D.

    1999-01-01

    Terrestrial laboratory experiments studying various fluid dynamical processes are constrained, by being in an Earth laboratory, to have a gravitational body force which is uniform and unidirectional. Therefore fluid free-surfaces are horizontal and flat. Such free surfaces must have a vertical solid boundary to keep the fluid from spreading horizontally along a gravitational potential surface. In atmospheric, oceanic, or stellar fluid flows that have a horizontal scale of about one-tenth the body radius or larger, sphericity is important in the dynamics. Further, fluids in spherical geometry can cover an entire domain without any sidewall effects, i.e. have truly periodic boundary conditions. We describe spherical body-force laboratory experiments using ferrofluid. Ferrofluids are dilute suspensions of magnetic dipoles, for example magnetite particles of order 10 nm diameter, suspended in a carrier fluid. Ferrofluids are subject to an additional body force in the presence of an applied magnetic field gradient. We use this body force to conduct laboratory experiments in spherical geometry. The present study is a laboratory technique improvement. The apparatus is cylindrically axisymmetric. A cylindrical ceramic magnet is embedded in a smooth, solid, spherical PVC ball. The geopotential field and its gradient, the body force, were made nearly spherical by careful choice of magnet height-to-diameter ratio and magnet size relative to the PVC ball size. Terrestrial gravity is eliminated from the dynamics by immersing the "planet" and its ferrofluid "ocean" in an immiscible silicone oil/freon mixture of the same density. Thus the earth gravity is removed from the dynamics of the ferrofluid/oil interface and the only dynamically active force there is the radial magnetic gravity. The entire apparatus can rotate, and waves are forced on the ferrofluid surface by exterior magnets. The biggest improvement in technique is in the wave visualization. Fluorescing dye is added to the oil/freon mixture and an argon ion laser generates a horizontal light that can be scanned vertically. Viewed from above, the experiment is a black circle with wave deformations surrounded by a light background. A contour of the image intensity at any light sheet position gives the surface of the ferrofluid "ocean" at that "latitude". Radial displacements of the waves as a function of longitude are obtained by subtracting the contour line positions from a no-motion contour at that laser sheet latitude. The experiments are run by traversing the forcing magnet with the laser sheet height fixed and images are frame grabbed to obtain a time-series at one latitude. The experiment is then re-run with another laser-sheet height to generate a full picture of the three-dimensional wave structure in the upper hemisphere of the ball as a function of time. We concentrate here on results of laboratory studies of waves that are important in Earth's atmosphere and especially the ocean. To get oceanic scaling in the laboratory, the experiment must rotate rapidly (4-second rotation period) so that the wave speed is slow compared to the planetary rotation speed as in the ocean. In the Pacific Ocean, eastward propagating Kelvin waves eventually run into the South American coast. Theory predicts that some of the wave energy should scatter into coastal-trapped Kelvin waves that propagate north and south along the coast. Some of this coastal wave energy might then scatter into mid-latitude Rossby waves that propagate back westward. Satellite observations of the Pacific Ocean sea-surface temperature and height seem to show signatures of westward propagating mid-latitude Rossby waves, 5 to 10 years after the 1982-83 El Nino. The observational data is difficult to interpret unambiguously owing to the large range of motions that fill the ocean at shorter timescales. This series of reflections giving eastward, north- ward, and then westward traveling waves is observed cleanly in the laboratory experiments, confirming the theoretical expectations.

  1. [Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral proximal radial shaft fracture and radial head dislocation].

    PubMed

    Köhn, N; Mendel, T; Ullrich, B W

    2015-11-01

    Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral proximal radial shaft fracture and dislocated radial head is a rarely described injury. In this article we present the case of a 23-year-old man with this injury. After the initial diagnostics, the radial shaft fracture was osteosynthetically fixed, whereby the anatomical positions of all parts of the elbow joint were correctly aligned and the medial collateral ligament was reconstructed. After 4.5 months the radial shaft fracture was healed with nearly complete functional recovery of the upper extremity. Thus, a good outcome can be expected when all aspects of bony and ligamentous injuries are accurately addressed. PMID:25666185

  2. High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costanzo, Samuel J.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies where in the scheme of modern chromatography high performance thin layer chromatography (TLC) fits and why in some situations it is a viable alternative to gas and high performance liquid chromatography. New TLC plates, sample applications, plate development, and instrumental techniques are considered. (JN)

  3. Variable area radial turbine fabrication and test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.

    1986-01-01

    A variable area radial turbine with a moveable nozzle sidewall was experimentally evaluated. The turbine was designed for an advanced variable capacity gas turbine rotorcraft engine. The turbine has a mass flow rate of 2.27 kg/sec (5.0 lbs/sec), and a rotor inlet temperature of 1477K (2200 F). Testing was conducted at a reduced inlet temperature, but the aerodynamic parameters and Reynolds numbers were duplicated. Overall performance was obtained for a range of nozzle areas from 50% to 100% of the maximum area. The test program determined the effect on performance of: (1) Moving the hub or shroud sidewall; (2) Sidewall-vane clearance leakage; (3) Vaneless space geometry change; and (4) Nozzle cooling flows. Data were obtained for a range of pressure ratios and speeds and are presented in a number of performance maps.

  4. Computer program for design analysis of radial-inflow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program written in FORTRAN that may be used for the design analysis of radial-inflow turbines was documented. The following information is included: loss model (estimation of losses), the analysis equations, a description of the input and output data, the FORTRAN program listing and list of variables, and sample cases. The input design requirements include the power, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotational speed. The program output data includes various diameters, efficiencies, temperatures, pressures, velocities, and flow angles for the appropriate calculation stations. The design variables include the stator-exit angle, rotor radius ratios, and rotor-exit tangential velocity distribution. The losses are determined by an internal loss model.

  5. Cooled High-temperature Radial Turbine Program 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Philip H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was the design and fabrication of a air-cooled high-temperature radial turbine (HTRT) intended for experimental evaluation in a warm turbine test facility at the LeRC. The rotor and vane were designed to be tested as a scaled version (rotor diameter of 14.4 inches diameter) of a 8.021 inch diameter rotor designed to be capable of operating with a rotor inlet temperature (RIT) of 2300 F, a nominal mass flow of 4.56 lbm/sec, a work level of equal or greater than 187 Btu/lbm, and efficiency of 86 percent or greater. The rotor was also evaluated to determine it's feasibility to operate at 2500 F RIT. The rotor design conformed to the rotor blade flow path specified by NASA for compatibility with their test equipment. Fabrication was accomplished on three rotors, a bladeless rotor, a solid rotor, and an air-cooled rotor.

  6. Experimental evaluation of a translating nozzle sidewall radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.; Rogo, Casimir

    1987-01-01

    Studies have shown that reduced specific fuel consumption of rotorcraft engines can be achieved with a variable capacity engine. A key component in such an engine in a high-work, high-temperature variable geometry gas generator turbine. An optimization study indicated that a radial turbine with a translating nozzle sidewall could produce high efficiency over a wide range of engine flows but substantiating data were not available. An experimental program with Teledyne CAE, Toledo, Ohio was undertaken to evaluate the moving sidewall concept. A variety of translating nozzle sidewall turbine configurations were evaluated. The effects of nozzle leakage and coolant flows were also investigated. Testing was done in warm air (121 C). The results of the contractual program were summarized.

  7. A mini axial and a permanent maglev radial heart pump.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kun-Xi; Ru, Wei-Min; Wang, Hao; Jing, Teng

    2007-01-01

    The implantability and durability have been for decades the focus of artificial heart R&D. A mini axial and a maglev radial pump have been developed to meet with such requirements.The mini axial pump weighing 27g (incl.5g rotor) has an outer diameter of 21mm and a length of 10mm in its largest point, but can produce a maximal blood flow of 6l/min with 50mmHg pressure increase. Therefore, it is suitable for the patients of 40-60kg body weight. For other patients of 60-80kg or 80-100kg body weight, the mini axial pumps of 23mm and 25mm outer diameter had been developed before, these devices were acknowledged to be the world smallest LVADs by Guinness World Record Center in 2004.The permanent maglev radial pump weighing 150g is a shaft-less centrifugal pump with permanent magnetic bearings developed by the author. It needs no second coil for suspension of the rotor except the motor coil, different from all other maglev pumps developed in USA, Japan, European, etc. Thus no detecting and controlling systems as well as no additional power supply for maglev are necessary. The pump can produce a blood flow up to as large as 10l/min against 100mmHg pressure.An implantable and durable blood pump will be a viable alternative to natural donor heart for transplantation. PMID:19662120

  8. Formation and evolution of radial fracture systems on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parfitt, E. A.; Head, James W.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of approximately 90 percent of the surface of Venus using Magellan data has been carried out to locate all radial fracture systems and to assess their association with other features such as volcanic edifices and coronae. Squyres et al. and Stofan et al. have discussed the association of radial fracture features in relation to coronae features, our approach was to assess the associations of all of the fracture systems. These fracture systems have two broad types of form - some fracture systems are associated with updomed topography, radiate from a point and have relatively uniform fracture lengths while others have a wider range of fracture lengths and radiate from the outer edge of a central caldera. Squyres et al. and Stofan et al. have interpreted both types of feature as reflecting tectonic fracturing resulting from uplift of the surface as a mantle plume impinges upon the crust. While it is true that a number of features are related to uplift and that such uplift will induce stresses consistent with radial fracturing, we explore the possibility that these fractures are not exclusively of tectonic origin. Purely tectonic fracturing will tend to generate a few main fractures/faults along which most of the stresses due to uplift will be accommodated leading to the triple-junction form common for terrestrial updoming. Though this type of feature is observed on Venus (e.g., feature located at 34S86), the majority of radial fracture systems display much more intensive fracturing than this through a full 360 degrees; this is difficult to explain by purely tectonic processes. The association of many of the fractures with radial lava flows leads us to interpret these fractures as reflecting dike emplacement: the form of the fractures being consistent with primarily vertical propagation from the head of a mantle plume. In the case of the second type of fracture system (those radiating from a central caldera), an even stronger case can be made that the fractures are not of tectonic origin. These features are not as commonly associated with updoming of the surface and where they are, the fractures extend out well beyond the edge of the topographic rise - an observation which is not consistent with the fractures being of tectonic uplift origin. Furthermore the fractures have a distribution of lengths (many short, fewer long) which is characteristic of dike swarms, and show direct associations with calderas and lava flows consistent with a volcanic origin. In addition, the longest fractures have a radial pattern only close to the center of the system but bend with distance to align themselves with the regional stress field - this behavior is very difficult to explain on purely tectonic grounds but is a pattern commonly seen for terrestrial dikes. For these reasons, we argue that many, if not the majority, of radial fracture systems found on Venus are the surface reflection of dike swarms, those associated with positive topography reflecting vertical emplacement and those radiating from calderas reflecting lateral propagation.

  9. Simulating retention in gas-liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.G.; Siepmann, J.I.; Schure, M.R.

    1999-12-16

    Accurate predictions of retention times, retention indices, and partition constants are a long sought-after goal for theoretical studies in chromatography. Configurational-bias Monte Carlo (CBMC) simulations in the Gibbs ensemble using the transferable potentials for phase equilibria-united atom (TraPPE-UA) force field have been carried out to obtain a microscopic picture of the partitioning of 10 alkane isomers between a helium vapor phase and a squalane liquid phase, a protypical gas-liquid chromatography system. The alkane solutes include some topological isomers that differ only in the arrangement of their building blocks (e.g., 2,5-dimethylhexane and 3,4-dimethylhexane), for which the prediction of the retention order is particularly difficult. The Kovats retention indices, a measure of the relative retention times, are calculated directly from the partition constants and are in good agreement with experimental values. The calculated Gibbs free energies of transfer for the normal alkanes conform to Martin's equation which is the basis of linear free energy relationships used in many process modeling packages. Analysis of radial distribution functions and the corresponding energy integrals does not yield evidence for specific retention structures and shows that the internal energy of solvation is not the main driving force for the separation of topological isomers in this system.

  10. Effects of secondary flow on heat transfer in rotating passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Joan G.; Moore, John

    1990-02-01

    Secondary flow in rotating cooling passages of jet engine turbine rotors is considered. A Navier-Stokes calculation procedure for turbulent flow is used to compute flow development in a radially outward flow channel, round a sharp 180 degree bend, and in the radially inward flow channel downstream. Areas of high and low heat transfer are explained by secondary flow development and quantitative results show regions of design interest.

  11. Fluctuating Pressure Environments and Hydrodynamic Radial Force Mitigation for a Two Blade Unshrouded Inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulder, Andrew; Skelley, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuating pressure data from water flow testing of an unshrouded two blade inducer revealed a cavitation induced oscillation with the potential to induce a radial load on the turbopump shaft in addition to other more traditionally analyzed radial loads. Subsequent water flow testing of the inducer with a rotating force measurement system confirmed that the cavitation induced oscillation did impart a radial load to the inducer. After quantifying the load in a baseline configuration, two inducer shroud treatments were selected and tested to reduce the cavitation induced load. The first treatment was to increase the tip clearance, and the second was to introduce a circumferential groove near the inducer leading edge. Increasing the clearance resulted in a small load decrease along with some steady performance degradation. The groove greatly reduced the hydrodynamic load with little to no steady performance loss. The groove did however generate some new, relatively high frequency, spatially complex oscillations to the environment.

  12. Determination of alkylphenols by gas chromatography, elution liquid chromatography, and gel permeation chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Wittmann, S.; Decsy, Z.; Regensperger, S.; Pudmer, E.

    1984-01-01

    The separation and determination of groups of alkylphenols with C/sub 15/-C/sub 33/ isoalkane chains by gas chromatography, elution liquid chromatography, and gel permeation chromatography are described. Paraffinic hydrocarbons, monoalkylphenols, dialkylphenols, and bis(hydroxyphenyl)alkanes were identified in industrial alkylphenols by mass spectrometry. 7 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Radial Tunnel Syndrome, Diagnostic and Treatment Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Jupiter, Jess B

    2015-07-01

    Radial tunnel syndrome is a disease which we should consider it in elbow and forearm pains. It is diagnosed with lateral elbow and dorsal forearm pain may radiate to the wrist and dorsum of the fingers. The disease is more prevalent in women with the age of 30 to 50 years old. It occurs by intermittent compression on the radial nerve from the radial head to the inferior border of the supinator muscle, without obvious extensor muscle weakness. Compression could happen in five different sites but the arcade of Frose is the most common area that radial nerve is compressed. To diagnosis radial tunnel syndrome, clinical examination is more important than paraclinic tests such as electrodiagnsic test and imaging studies. The exact site of the pain which can more specified by rule of nine test and weakness of the third finger and wrist extension are valuable physical exams to diagnosis. MRI studies my show muscle edema or atrophy along the distribution of the posterior interosseous nerve. Although non-surgical treatments such as rest, NSAIDs, injections and physiotherapy do not believe to have permanent relief, but it is justify undergoing them before surgery. Surgery could diminish pain and symptoms in 67 to 93 percents of patients completely. PMID:26213698

  14. Radial Tunnel Syndrome, Diagnostic and Treatment Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Jupiter, Jess B

    2015-01-01

    Radial tunnel syndrome is a disease which we should consider it in elbow and forearm pains. It is diagnosed with lateral elbow and dorsal forearm pain may radiate to the wrist and dorsum of the fingers. The disease is more prevalent in women with the age of 30 to 50 years old. It occurs by intermittent compression on the radial nerve from the radial head to the inferior border of the supinator muscle, without obvious extensor muscle weakness. Compression could happen in five different sites but the arcade of Frose is the most common area that radial nerve is compressed. To diagnosis radial tunnel syndrome, clinical examination is more important than paraclinic tests such as electrodiagnsic test and imaging studies. The exact site of the pain which can more specified by rule of nine test and weakness of the third finger and wrist extension are valuable physical exams to diagnosis. MRI studies my show muscle edema or atrophy along the distribution of the posterior interosseous nerve. Although non-surgical treatments such as rest, NSAIDs, injections and physiotherapy do not believe to have permanent relief, but it is justify undergoing them before surgery. Surgery could diminish pain and symptoms in 67 to 93 percents of patients completely. PMID:26213698

  15. An unusual course of the radial artery.

    PubMed

    Pelin, C; Zagyapan, R; Mas, N; Karabay, G

    2006-11-01

    Radial artery variations are of importance for clinicians, whether in angiographic examinations or surgical approaches. The high origin radial artery is the most frequent arterial variation observed in the upper limb, showing an incidence of 14.27% in dissection material and 9.75% in angiographic examination. In the present study an unusual course of the radial artery and its relation with the median nerve has been evaluated. During embryological development the radial artery sprouts from two arterial buds arising from the lateral side of the brachial artery and coalescing with each other. The artery lies in the forearm and is overlapped by the brachioradial muscle. In this particular case the radial artery originated from the medial side of the brachial artery and crossed the median nerve twice in an unusual manner 8 cm below the point at which the deep brachial artery arose and 12 cm above the intercondylar line. These results will enhance anatomical knowledge of the region and reduce complication in surgical approaches. PMID:17171625

  16. Radial velocity studies of cool stars.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh R A; Barnes, John; Tuomi, Mikko; Jenkins, James S; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

    2014-04-28

    Our current view of exoplanets is one derived primarily from solar-like stars with a strong focus on understanding our Solar System. Our knowledge about the properties of exoplanets around the dominant stellar population by number, the so-called low-mass stars or M dwarfs, is much more cursory. Based on radial velocity discoveries, we find that the semi-major axis distribution of M dwarf planets appears to be broadly similar to those around more massive stars and thus formation and migration processes might be similar to heavier stars. However, we find that the mass of M dwarf planets is relatively much lower than the expected mass dependency based on stellar mass and thus infer that planet formation efficiency around low-mass stars is relatively impaired. We consider techniques to overcome the practical issue of obtaining good quality radial velocity data for M dwarfs despite their faintness and sustained activity and emphasize (i) the wavelength sensitivity of radial velocity signals, (ii) the combination of radial velocity data from different experiments for robust detection of small amplitude signals, and (iii) the selection of targets and radial velocity interpretation of late-type M dwarfs should consider H? behaviour. PMID:24664922

  17. Classification of volcanoes of the Kane Patera Quadrangle of Io: Proportions of lava flows and pyroclastic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elston, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    Voyager 1 images show 14 volcanic centers wholly or partly within the Kane Patera quadrangle of Io, which are divided into four major classes: (1) shield with parallel flows; (2) shield with early radial fan shapd flows; (3) shield with radial fan shaped flows, surfaces of flows textured with longitudinal ridges; and (4) depression surrounded by plateau-forming scarp-bounded, untextured deposits. The interpretation attempted here hinges largely on the ability to distinguish lava flows from pyroclastic flows by remote sensing.

  18. Numerical modeling of elution peak profiles in supercritical fluid chromatography. Part I-Elution of an unretained tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    When chromatography is carried out with high-density carbon dioxide as the main component of the mobile phase (a method generally known as 'supercritical fluid chromatography' or SFC), the required pressure gradient along the column is moderate. However, this mobile phase is highly compressible and, under certain experimental conditions, its density may decrease significantly along the column. Such an expansion absorbs heat, cooling the column, which absorbs heat from the outside. The resulting heat transfer causes the formation of axial and radial gradients of temperature that may become large under certain conditions. Due to these gradients, the mobile phase velocity and most physico-chemical parameters of the system (viscosity, diffusion coefficients, etc.) are no longer constant throughout the column, resulting in a loss of column efficiency, even at low flow rates. At high flow rates and in serious cases, systematic variations of the retention factors and the separation factors with increasing flow rates and important deformations of the elution profiles of all sample components may occur. The model previously used to account satisfactorily for the effects of the viscous friction heating of the mobile phase in HPLC is adapted here to account for the expansion cooling of the mobile phase in SFC and is applied to the modeling of the elution peak profiles of an unretained compound in SFC. The numerical solution of the combined heat and mass balance equations provides temperature and pressure profiles inside the column, and values of the retention time and efficiency for elution of this unretained compound that are in excellent agreement with independent experimental data.

  19. Supercritical fluid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Gere, D.R.

    1983-10-21

    Chromatographic separations with a supercritical fluid as the mobile phase were suggested more than 20 years ago. Availability of commercial hardware makes this technique more widely usable today. Many separations by this method are now carried out with supercritical carbon dioxide as the mobile phase and packed liquid-chromatography columns as the stationary phase. Although carbon dioxide has many practical advantages, including its near-ambient critical temperature and minimal interference with spectrometric detection, the use of other supercritical fluids or addition of modifiers to carbon dioxide may extend the applications of this technique. Some mixtures that are difficult to analyze by other chromatographic methods may be susceptible to separation by supercritical fluid chromatography. Mixtures that have been separated with supercritical carbon dioxide include resin acids with the empirical formula C/sub 20/H/sub 30/O/sub 2/ and ubiquinones from bacterial cell wall extracts of Legionella pneumophila. 60 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Chromatography in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenmakers, Peter

    2009-07-01

    This review focuses on the chromatography research that has been carried out within industry or in close cooperation with industry and that has been reported in the scientific literature between 2006 and mid-2008. Companies in the health care sector, such as pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, are the largest contributors. Industrial research seems to take place in an open environment in cooperation with academia, peer companies, and institutions. Industry appears ready to embrace new technologies as they emerge, but they focus strongly on making chromatography work robustly, reliably, rapidly, and automatically. “Hyphenated” systems that incorporate on-line sample-preparation techniques and mass-spectrometric detection are the rule rather than the exception. Various multidimensional separation methods are finding numerous applications. Strategies aimed at speeding up the development of new chromatographic methods remain the focus of attention. Also, there is a clear trend toward exploring chromatographic methods for parallel processing along with other strategies for high-throughput analysis.

  1. Details of left ventricular radial wall motion supporting the ventricular theory of the third heart sound obtained by cardiac MR

    PubMed Central

    Robson, M D; Rider, O J; Pegg, T J; Dasanu, C A; Jung, B A; Rotaru, N; Clarke, K; Holloway, C J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Obtaining new details of radial motion of left ventricular (LV) segments using velocity-encoding cardiac MRI. Methods: Cardiac MR examinations were performed on 14 healthy volunteers aged between 19 and 26 years. Cine images for navigator-gated phase contrast velocity mapping were acquired using a black blood segmented κ-space spoiled gradient echo sequence with a temporal resolution of 13.8 ms. Peak systolic and diastolic radial velocities as well as radial velocity curves were obtained for 16 ventricular segments. Results: Significant differences among peak radial velocities of basal and mid-ventricular segments have been recorded. Particular patterns of segmental radial velocity curves were also noted. An additional wave of outward radial movement during the phase of rapid ventricular filling, corresponding to the expected timing of the third heart sound, appeared of particular interest. Conclusion: The technique has allowed visualization of new details of LV radial wall motion. In particular, higher peak systolic radial velocities of anterior and inferior segments are suggestive of a relatively higher dynamics of anteroposterior vs lateral radial motion in systole. Specific patterns of radial motion of other LV segments may provide additional insights into LV mechanics. Advances in knowledge: The outward radial movement of LV segments impacted by the blood flow during rapid ventricular filling provides a potential substrate for the third heart sound. A biphasic radial expansion of the basal anteroseptal segment in early diastole is likely to be related to the simultaneous longitudinal LV displacement by the stretched great vessels following repolarization and their close apposition to this segment. PMID:24641347

  2. Generalized radially self-accelerating helicon beams.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Christian; Eichelkraut, Toni; Ornigotti, Marco; Szameit, Alexander

    2014-10-31

    We report, in theory and experiment, on a new class of optical beams that are radially self-accelerating and nondiffracting. These beams continuously evolve on spiraling trajectories while maintaining their amplitude and phase distribution in their rotating rest frame. We provide a detailed insight into the theoretical origin and characteristics of radial self-acceleration and prove our findings experimentally. As radially self-accelerating beams are nonparaxial and a solution to the full scalar Helmholtz equation, they can be implemented in many linear wave systems beyond optics, from acoustic and elastic waves to surface waves in fluids and soft matter. Our work generalized the study of classical helicon beams to a complete set of solutions for rotating complex fields. PMID:25396370

  3. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, P.; Bottom, M.; Davison, C.; Mills, S.; Ciardi, D. R.; Brinkworth, C.; Tanner, A. M.; Beichman, C. A.; Catanzarite, J.; Crawford, S.; Wallace, J.; Mennesson, B.; Johnson, J. A.; White, R. J.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; von Braun, K.; Walp, B.; Vasisht, G.; Kane, S. R.; Prato, L. A.; NIRRVs

    2014-01-01

    We present precise radial velocity time-series from a 2.3 micron pilot survey to detect exoplanets around red, low mass, and young stars. We use the CSHELL spectrograph with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility. We present an overview of our Nelder-Mead simplex optimization pipeline for extracting radial velocities. We will also present first light data at 1.6 microns from a near-infrared fiber scrambler used in tandem with our gas cell and CSHELL at IRTF. The fiber scrambler makes use of non-circular core fibers to stabilize the illumination of the slit and echelle grating against changes in seeing, focus, guiding and other sources of systematic radial velocity noise, complementing the wavelength calibration of a gas cell.

  4. Manufacturing of Precision Forgings by Radial Forging

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, S.; Harrer, O.; Buchmayr, B.; Hofer, F.

    2011-01-17

    Radial forging is a multi purpose incremental forging process using four tools on the same plane. It is widely used for the forming of tool steels, super alloys as well as titanium- and refractory metals. The range of application goes from reducing the diameters of shafts, tubes, stepped shafts and axels, as well as for creating internal profiles for tubes in Near-Net-Shape and Net-Shape quality. Based on actual development of a weight optimized transmission input shaft, the specific features of radial forging technology is demonstrated. Also a Finite Element Model for the simulation of the process is shown which leads to reduced pre-processing effort and reduced computing time compared to other published simulation methods for radial forging. The finite element model can be applied to quantify the effects of different forging strategies.

  5. Dispersion-free radial transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Nelson, Scott D.

    2011-04-12

    A dispersion-free radial transmission line ("DFRTL") preferably for linear accelerators, having two plane conductors each with a central hole, and an electromagnetically permeable material ("EPM") between the two conductors and surrounding a channel connecting the two holes. At least one of the material parameters of relative magnetic permeability, relative dielectric permittivity, and axial width of the EPM is varied as a function of radius, so that the characteristic impedance of the DFRTL is held substantially constant, and pulse transmission therethrough is substantially dispersion-free. Preferably, the EPM is divided into concentric radial sections, with the varied material parameters held constant in each respective section but stepwise varied between sections as a step function of the radius. The radial widths of the concentric sections are selected so that pulse traversal time across each section is the same, and the varied material parameters of the concentric sections are selected to minimize traversal error.

  6. Radial magnetic field in magnetic confinement device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hao; Liu, Ming-Hai; Chen, Ming; Rao, Bo; Chen, Jie; Chen, Zhao-Quan; Xiao, Jin-Shui; Hu, Xi-Wei

    2015-09-01

    The intrinsic radial magnetic field (Br) in a tokamak is explored by the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation in axisymmetric configurations through an expansion of the four terms of the magnetic surfaces. It can be inferred from the simulation results that at the core of the device, the tokamak should possess a three-dimensional magnetic field configuration, which could be reduced to a two-dimensional one when the radial position is greater than 0.6a. The radial magnetic field and the amzimuthal magnetic field have the same order of magnitude at the core of the device. These results can offer a reference for the analysis of the plasma instability, the property of the core plasma, and the magnetic field measurement. Project supported by the Special Domestic Program of ITER, China (Grant No. 2009GB105003).

  7. Manufacturing of Precision Forgings by Radial Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, S.; Harrer, O.; Buchmayr, B.; Hofer, F.

    2011-01-01

    Radial forging is a multi purpose incremental forging process using four tools on the same plane. It is widely used for the forming of tool steels, super alloys as well as titanium- and refractory metals. The range of application goes from reducing the diameters of shafts, tubes, stepped shafts and axels, as well as for creating internal profiles for tubes in Near-Net-Shape and Net-Shape quality. Based on actual development of a weight optimized transmission input shaft, the specific features of radial forging technology is demonstrated. Also a Finite Element Model for the simulation of the process is shown which leads to reduced pre-processing effort and reduced computing time compared to other published simulation methods for radial forging. The finite element model can be applied to quantify the effects of different forging strategies.

  8. Instrumentation for analytical scale supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Berger, Terry A

    2015-11-20

    Analytical scale supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is largely a sub-discipline of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), in that most of the hardware and software can be used for either technique. The aspects that separate the 2 techniques stem from the use of carbon dioxide (CO2) as the main component of the mobile phase in SFC. The high compressibility and low viscosity of CO2 mean that pumps, and autosamplers designed for HPLC either need to be modified or an alternate means of dealing with compressibility needs to be found. The inclusion of a back pressure regulator and a high pressure flow cell for any UV-Vis detector are also necessary. Details of the various approaches, problems and solutions are described. Characteristics, such as adiabatic vs. isothermal compressibility, thermal gradients, and refractive index issues are dealt with in detail. PMID:26212805

  9. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Furlan, Elise; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Bottom, Michael; Tanner, Angelle; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; White, Russel; Davison, Cassy; Mills, Sean; Beichman, Chas; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David; Wallace, Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; Vasisht, Gautam; Prato, Lisa; Kane, Stephen; Crawford, Sam; Crawford, Tim; Sung, Keeyoon; Drouin, Brian; Lin, Sean; Leifer, Stephanie; Catanzarite, Joe; Henry, Todd; von Braun, Kaspar; Walp, Bernie; Geneser, Claire; Ogden, Nick; Stufflebeam, Andrew; Pohl, Garrett; Regan, Joe

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of two 2.3 ?m near-infrared (NIR) radial velocity (RV) surveys to detect exoplanets around 36 nearby and young M dwarfs. We use the CSHELL spectrograph (R ~ 46,000) at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF), combined with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration. We have developed a sophisticated RV forward modeling code that accounts for fringing and other instrumental artifacts present in the spectra. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm, we are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~20-30 m s-1 on our survey targets.

  10. The radial velocity search for extrasolar planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    Radial velocity measurements are being made to search for planets orbiting stars other than the Sun. The reflex acceleration induced on stars by planets can be sensed by measuring the small, slow changes in the line-of-site velocities of stars. To detect these planetary perturbations, the data series must be made on a uniform instrumental scale for as long as it takes a planet to orbit its star. A spectrometer of extreme stability and unprecedented sensitivity to changes in stellar radial velocities was operated.

  11. Aircraft radial-belted tire evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Stubbs, Sandy M.; Davis, Pamela A.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of the ongoing joint NASA/FAA/Industry Surface Traction And Radial Tire (START) Program being conducted at NASA Langley's Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF). The START Program involves tests using three different tire sizes to evaluate tire rolling resistance, braking, and cornering performance throughout the aircraft ground operational speed range for both dry and wet runway surfaces. Preliminary results from recent 40 x 14 size bias-ply, radial-belted, and H-type aircraft tire tests are discussed. The paper concludes with a summary of the current program status and planned ALDF test schedule.

  12. Application of radial-splitters for improved wide-angle diffuser performance in a blowdown tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.; Seshadri, S. N.

    1976-01-01

    Severe flow separation in the 15:1 area-ratio, 38 deg total angle conical diffuser preceding the settling-chamber of an intermittent blowdown wind tunnel was eliminated by the use of a novel radial-splitter arrangement. As a consequence, the operating life of settling-chamber screens was greatly extended and test-section flow steadiness improved, with no penalty in the tunnel running time.

  13. Impact of radial migration on stellar and gas radial metallicity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, Robert J. J.; Kawata, Daisuke; Cropper, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Radial migration is defined as the change in guiding centre radius of stars and gas caused by gains or losses of angular momentum that result from gravitational interaction with non-axisymmetric structure. This has been shown to have significant impact on the metallicity distribution in galactic discs, and therefore affects the interpretation of Galactic archaeology. We use a simulation of a Milky Way-sized galaxy to examine the effect of radial migration on the star and gas radial metallicity distribution. We find that both the star and gas component show significant radial migration. The stellar radial metallicity gradient remains almost unchanged but the radial metallicity distribution of the stars is broadened to produce a greater dispersion at all radii. However, the metallicity dispersion of the gas remains narrow. We find that the main drivers of the gas metallicity distribution evolution are metal enrichment and mixing: more efficient metal enrichment in the inner region maintains a negative slope in the radial metallicity distribution, and the metal mixing ensures the tight relationship of the gas metallicity with the radius. The metallicity distribution function reproduces the trend in the age-metallicity relation found from observations for stars younger than 1.0 Gyr in the Milky Way.

  14. One-year results of cemented bipolar radial head prostheses for comminuted radial head fractures

    PubMed Central

    Laun, Reinhold; Wild, Michael; Hakimi, Mohssen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Comminuted radial head fractures (Mason type III) continue to pose a challenge to orthopedic surgeons. When internal fixation is not possible, radial head arthroplasty has been advocated as the treatment of choice. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate clinical and radiological short-term results of patients with Mason type III radial head fractures treated with a cemented bipolar radial prosthesis. Methods: Twelve patients received cemented bipolar radial head hemiarthroplasty for comminuted radial head fractures. In all patients a CT scan was obtained prior to surgical treatment to assess all associated injuries. Postoperatively an early motion protocol was applied. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically at an average of 12.7 months. Results: According to the Mayo Modified Wrist Score, the Mayo Elbow Performance Score, the functional rating index of Broberg and Morrey, and the DASH Score good to excellent results were obtained. Grip strength and range of motion were almost at the level of the unaffected contralateral side. Patient satisfaction was high, no instability or signs of loosening of the implant, and only mild signs of osteoarthritis were seen. Conclusion: Overall good to excellent short-term results for primary arthroplasty for comminuted radial head fractures were observed. These encouraging results warrant the conduction of further studies with long-term follow-up and more cases to see if these short-term results can be maintained over time. PMID:26734534

  15. Radial velocities of Planetary Nebulae revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Roberto; Ayala, Sandra A.; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Contreras, María E.; Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Guillén, Pedro F.; Olguín, Lorenzo; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo; Sabin, Laurence; Zavala, Saúl A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new determination of radial velocities of a sample of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (PNe) using a systematic method and the same instrumental setting: the long-slit high-dispersion Manchester Echelle Spectrograph (MES) on the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro Mártir Observatory (OAN-SPM; Mexico). This project was inspired by the work of Schneider et al. (1983, A&AS, 52, 399), which has been an important reference during the last decades. Radial velocities of gaseous nebulae can be obtained using the central wavelength of a Gaussian fit, even when there is an expansion velocity, as expected in PNe, but with not enough resolution to see a spectral line splitting. We have used the software SHAPE, a morpho-kinematic modeling and reconstruction tool for astrophysical objects (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to prove that non-uniform density or brightness, on an expanding shell, can lead to mistaken conclusions about the radial velocity. To determine radial velocities, we only use the spectral data in which a spectral line-splitting is seen, avoiding thus the problem of the possible biased one-Gaussian fit. Cases when this method is not recommended are discussed.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  16. Legal and malpractice implications of radial keratotomy.

    PubMed

    Scholles, J R

    1986-08-01

    Radial keratotomy has the potential to produce a new malpractice crisis for ophthalmology. Though the surgery is often successful in reducing myopia, there are a great many undesirable side effects. The endothelial cell loss frequently resulting from the procedure bodes long term caution. PMID:3745772

  17. Dielectric well logging with radially oriented coils

    SciTech Connect

    Meador, R.A.; Nussbaum, T.W.

    1982-03-09

    A dielectric well logging system has its coils aligned radially, rather than in alignment, with respect to the longitudinal axis of a sonde which moves the coils through a borehole. Improved shielding is also provided. The coils have different and improved response characteristics.

  18. MMICs with Radial Probe Transitions to Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Pukala, David; Soria, Mary; Fung, King Man; Gaier, Todd; Radisic, Vesna; Lai, Richard

    2009-01-01

    A document presents an update on the innovation reported in Integrated Radial Probe Transition From MMIC to Waveguide (NPO-43957), NASA Tech Briefs Vol. 31, No. 5 (May 2007), page 38. To recapitulate: To enable operation or testing of a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC), it is necessary to mount the MMIC in a waveguide package that typically has cross-sectional waveguide dimensions of the order of a few hundred microns. A radial probe transition between an MMIC operating at 340 GHz and a waveguide had been designed (but not yet built and tested) to be fabricated as part of a monolithic unit that would include the MMIC. The radial probe could readily be integrated with an MMIC amplifier because the design provided for fabrication of the transition on a substrate of the same material (InP) and thickness (50 m) typical of substrates of MMICs that can operate above 300 GHz. As illustrated in the updated document by drawings, photographs, and plots of test data, the concept has now been realized by designing, fabricating, and testing several MMIC/radial- probe integrated-circuit chips and designing and fabricating a waveguide package to contain each chip.

  19. Swept Inducer Blades With Tandem Radial Slots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Sen Y.

    1995-01-01

    Slanted radial slots at tandem positions along approximate streamlines incorporated into swept inducer blades in turbopump, according to proposal. With suitable design, slots suppress low-frequency oscillations induced by cavitation, without causing excessive loss of inducer head. Slots cut into solid blades by wire electrical-discharge machining.

  20. Determining Enzyme Activity by Radial Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Bill D.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses advantages of radial diffusion assay in determining presence of enzyme and/or rough approximation of amount of enzyme activities. Procedures are included for the preparation of starch-agar plates, and the application and determination of enzyme. Techniques using plant materials (homogenates, tissues, ungerminated embryos, and seedlings)…

  1. Determining Enzyme Activity by Radial Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Bill D.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses advantages of radial diffusion assay in determining presence of enzyme and/or rough approximation of amount of enzyme activities. Procedures are included for the preparation of starch-agar plates, and the application and determination of enzyme. Techniques using plant materials (homogenates, tissues, ungerminated embryos, and seedlings)

  2. Modeling of thermal processes in high pressure liquid chromatography II. Thermal heterogeneity at very high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-01-01

    Advanced instruments for liquid chromatography enables the operation of columns packed with sub-2 {micro}m particles at the very high inlet pressures, up to 1000 bar, that are necessary to achieve the high column efficiency and the short analysis times that can be provided by the use of these columns. However, operating rather short columns at high mobile phase velocities, under high pressure gradients causes the production of a large amount of heat due to the viscous friction of the eluent percolating through the column bed. The evacuation of this heat causes the formation of significant axial and radial temperature gradients. Due to these thermal gradients, the retention factors of analytes and the mobile phase velocity are no longer constant throughout the column. The consequence of this heat production is a loss of column efficiency. We previously developed a model combining the heat and mass balance of the column, the equations of flow through porous media, and a linear isotherm model of the analyte. This model was solved and validated for conventional columns operated under moderate pressures. We report here on the results obtained when this model is applied to columns packed with very fine particles, operated under very high pressures. These results prove that our model accounts well for all the experimental results. The same column that elutes symmetrical, nearly Gaussian peaks at low flow rates, under relatively low pressure drops, provides strongly deformed, unsymmetrical peaks when operated at high flow rates, under high pressures, and under different thermal environments. The loss in column efficiency is particularly important when the column wall is kept at constant temperature, by immersing the column in a water bath.

  3. The Transverse Radial Diverging Initiation Behavior of PBX 9502

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyer, Terry; Aslam, Tariq

    2015-06-01

    A series of experiments examining the transverse radial initiation behavior of PBX 9502 has been fielded in a geometric configuration of PBX 9502 acceptor annulus and PBX 9501 donor core. The experiments were specifically designed to examine diverging initiation from the core. For sufficient diameter, the cylindrical donor core initiates the acceptor annulus with behavior akin to typical corner turning with the expected dead zone features. Even though PBX 9501 is significantly more energetic than PBX 9502, the critical initiation diameter is greater than the critical failure diameter of PBX 9502. The behavior of this initiation threshold is studied along with the dynamics of the shock initiating layer between the two dissimilar explosives. Streak camera imaging is used to examine the wave dynamics at the periphery of the PBX 9502 acceptor annulus, and to take measurements of the initiating layer at the material interface for comparison to the analogous behavior in the layered slab geometry. Additionally, proton radiographic imaging is used to examine the complex internal initiation dynamics, and high fidelity reactive flow modeling is used to accurately predict the transverse radial initiation behavior in the geometry of the test.

  4. Forced responses on a radial turbine with nozzle guide vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixiong; Yang, Ce; Ma, Chaochen; Lao, DaZhong

    2014-04-01

    Radial turbines with nozzle guide vanes are widely used in various size turbochargers. However, due to the interferences with guide vanes, the blades of impellers are exposed to intense unsteady aerodynamic excitations, which cause blade vibrations and lead to high cycle failures (HCF). Moreover, the harmonic resonance in some frequency regions are unavoidable due to the wide operation conditions. Aiming to achieve a detail insight into vibration characteristics of radial flow turbine, a numerical method based on fluid structure interaction (FSI) is presented. Firstly, the unsteady aerodynamic loads are determined by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). And the fluctuating pressures are transformed from time domain to frequency domain by fast Fourier-transform (FFT). Then, the entire rotor model is adopted to analyze frequencies and mode shapes considering mistuning in finite element (FE) method. Meanwhile, harmonic analyses, applying the pressure fluctuation from CFD, are conducted to investigate the impeller vibration behavior and blade forced response in frequency domain. The prediction of the vibration dynamic stress shows acceptable agreement to the blade actual damage in consistent tendency.

  5. Experimental Characterization of Piezoelectric Radial Field Diaphragms for Fluidic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, R. G.; Kavli, S. E.; Thomas, R. A., Jr.; Darji, K. J.; Mossi, K. M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA has recently developed a new piezoelectric actuator, the Radial Field Diaphragm or RFD. This actuator uses a radially-directed electric field to generate concentric out-of-plane (Z-axis) motion that allows this packaged device to be used as a pump or valve diaphragm. In order to efficiently use this new active device, experimental determination of pressure, flow rate, mechanical work, power consumption and overall efficiency needs to be determined by actually building a pump. However, without an optimized pump design, it is difficult to assess the quality of the data, as these results are inherent to the actual pump. Hence, separate experiments must be conducted in order to generate independent results to help guide the design criteria and pump quality. This paper focuses on the experiments used to generate the RFD's operational parameters and then compares these results to the experimentally determined results of several types of ball pumps. Also discussed are how errors are inherently introduced into the experiments, the pump design, experimental hardware and their effects on the overall system efficiency.

  6. P wave azimuthal and radial anisotropy of the Hokkaido subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiongwei; Zhao, Dapeng; Li, Jiabiao; Ruan, Aiguo

    2016-04-01

    We present the first three-dimensional P wave radial anisotropy tomography of the Hokkaido subduction zone, as well as P wave azimuthal anisotropy and S wave tomography, which are determined by inverting 298,430 P wave and 233,934 S wave arrival times from 14,245 local earthquakes recorded by 344 seismic stations. Our results reveal significant velocity heterogeneity, seismic anisotropy, and upwelling flows beneath the study region. In the mantle wedge, prominent low-velocity (low-V) anomalies exhibit trench-normal fast-velocity directions (FVDs) and a negative radial anisotropy (i.e., vertical velocity > horizontal velocity), which may reflect upwelling mantle flows. Fan-shaped FVDs are found at depths of 65-90 km, and a detailed 3-D mantle flow pattern is revealed, which may be caused by a combination of oblique subduction of the Pacific plate and collision of the Kuril arc with the Honshu arc beneath southern Hokkaido. The radial anisotropy changes at ~100 km depth, which may reflect variations in temperature and fluid conditions there. The subducting Pacific slab exhibits a positive radial anisotropy (i.e., horizontal velocity > vertical velocity), which may reflect the original fossil anisotropy when the Pacific plate formed at the mid-ocean ridge.

  7. Radial forces analysis and rotational speed test of radial permanent magnetic bearing for horizontal axis wind turbine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriswanto, Jamari

    2016-04-01

    Permanent magnet bearings (PMB) are contact free bearings which utilize the forces generated by the magnets. PMB in this work is a type of radial PMB, which functions as the radial bearings of the Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) rotor shaft. Radial PMB should have a greater radial force than the radial force HAWT rotor shaft (bearing load). This paper presents a modeling and experiments to calculate the radial force of the radial PMB. This paper also presents rotational speed test of the radial PMB compared to conventional bearings for HAWT applications. Modeling using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3b with the magnetic fields physics models. Experiments were conducted by measuring the displacement of the rotor to the stator for a given load variation. Results of the two methods showed that the large displacement then the radial force would be greater. Radial forces of radial PMB is greater than radial forces of HAWT rotor shaft. The rotational speed test results of HAWT that used radial PMB produced higher rotary than conventional bearings with an average increase of 87.4%. Increasing rotational speed occured because radial PMB had no friction. HAWT that used radial PMB rotated at very low wind speeds are 1.4 m/s with a torque of 0.043 Nm, while the HAWT which uses conventional bearing started rotating at a wind speed of 4.4 m/s and required higher torque of 0.104 N.

  8. Development of a thermal and structural analysis procedure for cooled radial turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Deanna, Russell G.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure for computing the rotor temperature and stress distributions in a cooled radial turbine is considered. Existing codes for modeling the external mainstream flow and the internal cooling flow are used to compute boundary conditions for the heat transfer and stress analyses. An inviscid, quasi three-dimensional code computes the external free stream velocity. The external velocity is then used in a boundary layer analysis to compute the external heat transfer coefficients. Coolant temperatures are computed by a viscous one-dimensional internal flow code for the momentum and energy equation. These boundary conditions are input to a three-dimensional heat conduction code for calculation of rotor temperatures. The rotor stress distribution may be determined for the given thermal, pressure and centrifugal loading. The procedure is applied to a cooled radial turbine which will be tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Representative results from this case are included.

  9. Development of a thermal and structural analysis procedure for cooled radial turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Deanna, Russell G.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure for computing the rotor temperature and stress distributions in a cooled radial turbine are considered. Existing codes for modeling the external mainstream flow and the internal cooling flow are used to compute boundary conditions for the heat transfer and stress analysis. The inviscid, quasi three dimensional code computes the external free stream velocity. The external velocity is then used in a boundary layer analysis to compute the external heat transfer coefficients. Coolant temperatures are computed by a viscous three dimensional internal flow cade for the momentum and energy equation. These boundary conditions are input to a three dimensional heat conduction code for the calculation of rotor temperatures. The rotor stress distribution may be determined for the given thermal, pressure and centrifugal loading. The procedure is applied to a cooled radial turbine which will be tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Representative results are given.

  10. The Stationary Condensation and Radial Outflow of a Liquid Film on a Horizontal Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolshinskiy, Leonid; Frenkel, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The application of capillary screen liquid acquisition devices to space-based cryogenic propulsion systems is expected to necessitate thermodynamic conditioning in order to stabilize surface tension retention characteristics. The present results have been obtained in the framework of the research of low gravity condensation-flow processes for conditioning cryogenic liquid acquisition devices. The following system is studied: On the top of a subcooled horizontal disk, a liquid film condenses from the ambient saturated vapor. The liquid is forcedly removed at the disk edge, and there is an outward radial flow of the film. Stationary regimes of the flow are uncovered such that (i) the gravity is negligible, being eclipsed by the capillary forces; (ii) the film thickness is everywhere much smaller than the disk radius; and (iii) the slow-flow lubrication approximation is valid. A nonlinear differential equation for the film thickness as a function of the radial coordinate is obtained. The (two-dimensional) fields of velocities, temperature and pressure in the film are explicitly determined by the radial profile of its thickness. The equilibrium is controlled by two parameters: (i) the vapor-disk difference of temperatures and (ii) the liquid exhaust rate. For the flow regimes with a nearly uniform film thickness, the governing equation linearizes, and the film interface is analytically predicted to have a concave-up quartic parabola profile. Thus, perhaps counter-intuitively, the liquid film is thicker at the edge and thinner at the center of the disk.

  11. Lysozyme fractionation from egg white at pilot scale by means of tangential flow membrane adsorbers: Investigation of the flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Brand, Janina; Voigt, Katharina; Zochowski, Bianca; Kulozik, Ulrich

    2016-03-18

    The application of membrane adsorbers instead of classical packed bed columns for protein fractionation is still a growing field. In the case of egg white protein fractionation, the application of classical chromatography is additionally limited due to its high viscosity that impairs filtration. By using tangential flow membrane adsorbers as stationary phase this limiting factor can be left out, as they can be loaded with particle containing substrates. The flow conditions existing in tangential flow membrane adsorbers are not fully understood yet. Thus, the aim of the present study was to gain a deeper understanding of the transport mechanisms in tangential flow membrane adsorbers. It was found that loading in recirculation mode instead of single pass mode increased the binding capacity (0.39 vs. 0.52mgcm(-2)). Further, it was shown that either higher flow rates (0.39mgcm(-2) vs. 0.57mgcm(-2) at 1CVmin(-1) or 20CVmin(-1), respectively) or higher amounts of the target protein in the feed (0.24mgcm(-2) vs. 0.85mgcm(-2) for 2.5 or 39.0g lysozyme, respectively) led to more protein binding. These results show that, in contrast to radial flow or flat sheet membrane adsorbers, the transport in tangential flow membrane adsorbers is not purely based on convection, but on a mix of convection and diffusion. Additionally, investigations concerning the influence of fouling formation were performed that can lead to transport limitations. It was found that this impact is neglectable. It can be concluded that the usage of tangential flow membrane adsorbers is very recommendable for egg white protein fractionations, although the transport is partly diffusion-limited. PMID:26898148

  12. New Measurements of Radial Mode Eigenfrequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laske, G.; Masters, G.; Dziewonski, A. M.

    2001-12-01

    Radial mode eigenfrequencies are commonly thought to be measured with great ease and precision. The reason for this is that these modes have no geographic pattern so one should be able to measure frequencies from a spectrum observed at any station in the world. Yet, radial modes often seem inconsistent with spherical Earth models that fit all other mode frequencies. It turns out that radial modes are sometimes strongly coupled. The strongest coupling is predicted to be with l=2 modes which is caused by the Earth's hydrostatic ellipticity and aspherical structure of harmonic degree 2. In such cases, mode-coupling due to ellipticity alone can cause a frequency shift for the radial modes by more than 4 microHz. Given that mode frequencies can be measured to within 0.1 microHz, this shift is significant, and some singlets of l=2 modes have indeed been misidentified as the radial mode in the past. Including the spectra of the June 23, 2001 Southern Peru Earthquake we have re-analyzed radial mode eigenfrequencies and present a mode dataset that is internally more consistent than previous ones. We construct spherical Earth models that are consistent with our new data, the Earth's mass and moment of inertia and the current best estimates of ``Reference Normal Mode Data'' (available on the Reference Earth Model web site: //mahi.ucsd.edu/Gabi/rem.html). We seek the smallest perturbation to PREM but update the Q-structure as well as the depths of the upper mantle discontinuities (418~km and 660~km as first order discontinuities; 520~km as change in gradient). The best fitting 1D model is transversely isotropic but we also show isotropic models that fit the data to within their errors. We show that the 220~km discontinuity is not required in the isotropic model but that there exists a trade-off between high shear-velocities in the lid and a low-density zone beneath it. We also investigate ways of truncating transverse isotropy without the 220.

  13. Radial gas motions in The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Tobias M.; Bigiel, Frank; Klessen, Ralf S.; de Blok, W. J. G.

    2016-04-01

    The study of 21 cm line observations of atomic hydrogen allows detailed insight into the kinematics of spiral galaxies. We use sensitive high-resolution Very Large Array data from The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS) to search for radial gas flows primarily in the outer parts (up to 3 × r25) of 10 nearby spiral galaxies. Inflows are expected to replenish the gas reservoir and fuel star formation under the assumption that galaxies evolve approximately in steady state. We carry out a detailed investigation of existing tilted ring fitting schemes and discover systematics that can hamper their ability to detect signatures of radial flows. We develop a new Fourier decomposition scheme that fits for rotational and radial velocities and simultaneously determines position angle and inclination as a function of radius. Using synthetic velocity fields we show that our novel fitting scheme is less prone to such systematic errors and that it is well suited to detect radial inflows in discs. We apply our fitting scheme to 10 THINGS galaxies and find clear indications of, at least partly previously unidentified, radial gas flows, in particular for NGC 2403 and NGC 3198 and to a lesser degree for NGC 7331, NGC 2903 and NGC 6946. The mass flow rates are of the same order but usually larger than the star formation rates. At least for these galaxies a scenario in which continuous mass accretion feeds star formation seems plausible. The other galaxies show a more complicated picture with either no clear inflow, outward motions or complex kinematic signatures.

  14. Low profile radial nerve palsy orthosis with radial and ulnar deviation.

    PubMed

    Peck, Jean; Ollason, Jennie

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who sustain damage to the radial nerve experience a significant loss in functional use of the hand. Traditional orthoses have been effective in providing assistance with wrist stabilization and finger/thumb MP extension. These authors adapted a low profile orthosis to provide the necessary support while allowing radial and ulnar deviation of the wrist, thus increasing functional use of the hand.--Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:26190027

  15. A Better Method for Filling Pasteur Pipet Chromatography Columns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruekberg, Ben

    2006-01-01

    An alternative method for the preparation of Pasteur pipet chromatography columns is presented that allows the column to be filled with solvent without bubbles and allows greater control of fluid flow while the materials to be separated are added. Students are required to wear gloves and goggles and caution should be used while handling glass

  16. A Better Method for Filling Pasteur Pipet Chromatography Columns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruekberg, Ben

    2006-01-01

    An alternative method for the preparation of Pasteur pipet chromatography columns is presented that allows the column to be filled with solvent without bubbles and allows greater control of fluid flow while the materials to be separated are added. Students are required to wear gloves and goggles and caution should be used while handling glass…

  17. Stationary axially symmetric relativistic thin discs with nonzero radial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Guillermo A.; Gutiérrez-Piñeres, Antonio C.

    2012-07-01

    A detailed analysis of the surface energy-momentum (SEMT) tensor of stationary axially symmetric relativistic thin discs with nonzero radial pressure is presented. The physical content of the SEMT is analysed and expressions for the velocity vector, energy density, principal stresses and heat flow are obtained. We also present the counter-rotating model interpretation for these discs by considering the SEMT as the superposition of two counter-rotating perfect fluids. We analyse the possibility of counter-rotation along geodesics as well as counter-rotation with equal and opposite tangential velocities, and explicit expressions for the velocities are obtained in both the cases. By assuming a given choice for the counter-rotating velocities, explicit expressions for the energy densities and pressures of the counter-rotating fluids are then obtained. Some simple thin disc models obtained from the Kerr solution are also presented.

  18. Continuous Spore Disruption Using Radially Focused, High-Frequency Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Brown, Jeremy D.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J. ); Olson, Lydia; Posakony, Gerald J. ); Stults, Jennie R.; Valentine, Nancy B. ); Bond, Leonard J. )

    2000-12-01

    ABSTRACT-We report on the development of a novel, continuous-flow, radially focused ultrasonic disruptor capable of lysing Bacillus spores in the absence of added chemical denaturants, enzymes, or microparticles. Greater than 99% disruption was achieved for Bacillus globigii spores and Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis vegetative cells with sample residence times of 62, 12, and 12 s, respectively. Microscopic and SEM images indicated that at equivalent power levels, the incidence of cell death or loss of viability typically exceeded the efficiency of (visible) cell lysis. However, semiquantitative PCR showed up to a 1000-fold increase in intracellular DNA availability from ultrasonically disrupted spores, and liberated DNA was intact and available for subsequent detection.

  19. Cooled variable-area radial turbine technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Large, G. D.; Meyer, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this study was a conceptual evaluation and design analyses of a cooled variable-area radial turbine capable of maintaining nearly constant high efficiency when operated at a constant speed and pressure ratio over a range of flows corresponding to 50- to 100-percent maximum engine power. The results showed that a 1589K (2400 F) turbine was feasible that would satisfy a 4000-hour duty cycle life goal. The final design feasibility is based on 1988 material technology goals. A peak aerodynamic stage total efficiency of 0.88 was predicted at 100 percent power. Two candidate stators were identified: an articulated trailing-edge and a locally movable sidewall. Both concepts must be experimentally evaluated to determine the optimum configuration. A follow-on test program is proposed for this evaluation.

  20. New Research on the Cowling and Cooling of Radial Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molloy, Richard C.; Brewster, James H., III

    1943-01-01

    An extensive series of wind-tunnel tests on a half-scale conventional, nacelle model were made by the United Aircraft Corporation to determine and correlate the effects of many variables on cooling air flow and nacelle drag. The primary investigation was concerned with the reaction of these factors to varying conditions ahead of, across, and behind the engine. In the light of this investigation, common misconceptions and factors which are frequently overlooked in the cooling and cowling of radial engines are considered in some detail. Data are presented to support certain design recommendations and conclusions which should lead toward the improvement of present engine installations. Several charts are included to facilitate the estimation of cooling drag, available cooling pressure, and cowl exit area.

  1. Radial head prosthesis after radial head and neck fractures - current literature and quality of evidence.

    PubMed

    Zwingmann, J; Bode, G; Hammer, T; Südkamp, N P; Strohm, P C

    2015-01-01

    Due to the elbow joint's complex functional anatomy, the multifragmentary nature of many fractures and concomitant destabilizing associated injuries, dislocated fractures of the radial head and neck still present a serious challenge for the orthopedic surgeon. Thorough knowledge of the elbow's anatomy and biomechanics is essential to analyze and understand the injury and plan its treatment. The aim of a differentiated therapy approach is to restore the joint's anatomy and kinetics, stable and painless joint function, and to avoid or at least delay posttraumatic joint changes. The degree of dislocation, stability of fragments, size and number of fractured joint surfaces and associated bony and ligamentous injuries (and the instability they incur) must be addressed in the therapy regimen. There are various treatment options depending on the injury's classification, i.e. a Mason I fracture is treated conservatively, while more severe injuries may require osteosynthesis and endoprosthesis. There is a lack of clear therapy recommendations based on solid evidence regarding Mason classification types III-IV. In particular expert opinions diverge and study results are inconsistent. Especially the value of radial head arthroplasty is still hotly debated. Key words: radial head fracture, radial head prosthesis, radial neck fracture, Mason classification, radial head arthroplasty, elbow injury. PMID:26317287

  2. Experimental Evaluation of a Cooled Radial-inflow Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tirres, Lizet; Dicicco, L. Danielle; Nowlin, Brent C.

    1993-01-01

    Two 14.4 inch tip diameter rotors were installed and tested in the Small Engines Component Turbine Facility (SECTF) at NASA Lewis Research Center. The rotors, a solid and a cooled version of a radial-inflow turbine, were tested with a 15 vane stat or over a set of rotational speeds ranging from 80 to 120 percent design speed (17,500 to 21,500 rpm). The total-to-total stage pressure ratios ranged from 2.5 to 5.5. The data obtained at the equivalent conditions using the solid version of the rotor are presented with the cooled rotor data. A Reynolds number of 381,000 was maintained for both rotors, whose stages had a design mass flow of 4.0 Ibm/sec, a design work level of 59.61 Btu/lbm, and a design efficiency of 87 percent. The results include mass flow data, turbine torque, turbine exit flow angles, stage efficiency, and rotor inlet and exit surveys.

  3. Top-down identification and quantification of stable isotope labeled proteins from Aspergillus flavus using online nano-flow reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to a LTQ-FTICR mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Collier, Timothy S; Hawkridge, Adam M; Georgianna, D Ryan; Payne, Gary A; Muddiman, David C

    2008-07-01

    Online liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric (LC-MS) analysis of intact proteins (i.e., top-down proteomics) is a growing area of research in the mass spectrometry community. A major advantage of top-down MS characterization of proteins is that the information of the intact protein is retained over the vastly more common bottom-up approach that uses protease-generated peptides to search genomic databases for protein identification. Concurrent to the emergence of top-down MS characterization of proteins has been the development and implementation of the stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) method for relative quantification of proteins by LC-MS. Herein we describe the qualitative and quantitative top-down characterization of proteins derived from SILAC-labeled Aspergillus flavus using nanoflow reversed-phase liquid chromatography directly coupled to a linear ion trap Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (nLC-LTQ-FTICR-MS). A. flavus is a toxic filamentous fungus that significantly impacts the agricultural economy and human health. SILAC labeling improved the confidence of protein identification, and we observed 1318 unique protein masses corresponding to 659 SILAC pairs, of which 22 were confidently identified. However, we have observed some limiting issues with regard to protein quantification using top-down MS/MS analyses of SILAC-labeled proteins. The role of SILAC labeling in the presence of competing endogenously produced amino acid residues and its impact on quantification of intact species are discussed in detail. PMID:18512951

  4. SpicyNodes Radial Map Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douma, M.; Ligierko, G.; Angelov, I.

    2008-10-01

    The need for information has increased exponentially over the past decades. The current systems for constructing, exploring, classifying, organizing, and searching information face the growing challenge of enabling their users to operate efficiently and intuitively in knowledge-heavy environments. This paper presents SpicyNodes, an advanced user interface for difficult interaction contexts. It is based on an underlying structure known as a radial map, which allows users to manipulate and interact in a natural manner with entities called nodes. This technology overcomes certain limitations of existing solutions and solves the problem of browsing complex sets of linked information. SpicyNodes is also an organic system that projects users into a living space, stimulating exploratory behavior and fostering creative thought. Our interactive radial layout is used for educational purposes and has the potential for numerous other applications.

  5. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Furlan, Elise; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Bottom, Michael; Tanner, Angelle; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; White, Russel; Davison, Cassy; Mills, Sean; Beichman, Chas; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David; Wallace, Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; Vasisht, Gautam; Prato, Lisa; Kane, Stephen; Crawford, Sam; Crawford, Tim; Sung, Keeyoon; Drouin, Brian; Lin, Sean; Leifer, Stephanie; Catanzarite, Joe; Henry, Todd; von Braun, Kaspar; Walp, Bernie; Geneser, Claire; Ogden, Nick; Stufflebeam, Andrew; Pohl, Garrett; Regan, Joe

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of two 2.3 μm near-infrared (NIR) radial velocity (RV) surveys to detect exoplanets around 36 nearby and young M dwarfs. We use the CSHELL spectrograph (R ~ 46,000) at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF), combined with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration. We have developed a sophisticated RV forward modeling code that accounts for fringing and other instrumental artifacts present in the spectra. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm, we are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~20-30 m s-1 on our survey targets.

  6. Radial spline assembly for antifriction bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jerry H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An outer race carrier is constructed for receiving an outer race of an antifriction bearing assembly. The carrier in turn is slidably fitted in an opening of a support wall to accommodate slight axial movements of a shaft. A plurality of longitudinal splines on the carrier are disposed to be fitted into matching slots in the opening. A deadband gap is provided between sides of the splines and slots, with a radial gap at ends of the splines and slots and a gap between the splines and slots sized larger than the deadband gap. With this construction, operational distortions (slope) of the support wall are accommodated by the larger radial gaps while the deadband gaps maintain a relatively high springrate of the housing. Additionally, side loads applied to the shaft are distributed between sides of the splines and slots, distributing such loads over a larger surface area than a race carrier of the prior art.

  7. TMT and Exoplanet Radial Velocity Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Angelle; Crossfield, Ian

    2014-07-01

    With echelle spectrometers on the verge of crossing over the 0.1 m/s radial velocity (RV) measurement precision threshold needed to detect habitable Earth mass planets around Sun-like stars, conducing such surveys on state-of-the-art telescopes is an imperative. RV exoplanets surveys conducted with the optical and infrared echelle spectrometers being built for the TMT have the potential to complete a census of the population of Earth-mass planets in our local stellar neighborhood. The detection of such systems will provide a valuable stellar sample for follow-up exoplanet studies which would characterize the atmospheres of these or additional planets found in these nearby solar systems. Here, we will further discuss the impact of the TMT on radial velocity exoplanet surveys.

  8. Simple proposal for radial 3D needlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durastanti, C.; Fantaye, Y.; Hansen, F.; Marinucci, D.; Pesenson, I. Z.

    2014-11-01

    We present here a simple construction of a wavelet system for the three-dimensional ball, which we label radial 3D needlets. The construction envisages a data collection environment in which an observer located at the center of the ball is surrounded by concentric spheres with the same pixelization at different radial distances, for any given resolution. The system is then obtained by weighting the projector operator built on the corresponding set of eigenfunctions and performing a discretization step which turns out to be computationally very convenient. The resulting wavelets can be shown to have very good localization properties in the real and harmonic domain; their implementation is computationally very convenient, and they allow for exact reconstruction as they form a tight frame system. Our theoretical results are supported by an extensive numerical analysis.

  9. Radial inlet guide vanes for a combustor

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Simons, Derrick; York, William; Ziminsky, Willy S

    2013-02-12

    A combustor may include an interior flow path therethrough, a number of fuel nozzles in communication with the interior flow path, and an inlet guide vane system positioned about the interior flow path to create a swirled flow therein. The inlet guide vane system may include a number of windows positioned circumferentially around the fuel nozzles. The inlet guide vane system may also include a number of inlet guide vanes positioned circumferentially around the fuel nozzles and adjacent to the windows to create a swirled flow within the interior flow path.

  10. Brachial-to-radial systolic blood pressure amplification in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Climie, R E D; Picone, D S; Keske, M A; Sharman, J E

    2016-06-01

    Brachial-to-radial-systolic blood pressure amplification (Bra-Rad-SBPAmp) can affect central SBP estimated by radial tonometry. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have vascular irregularities that may alter Bra-Rad-SBPAmp. By comparing T2DM with non-diabetic controls, we aimed to determine the (1) magnitude of Bra-Rad-SBPAmp; (2) haemodynamic factors related to Bra-Rad-SBPAmp; and (3) effect of Bra-Rad-SBPAmp on estimated central SBP. Twenty T2DM (64±8 years) and 20 non-diabetic controls (60±8 years; 50% male both) underwent simultaneous cuff deflation and two-dimensional ultrasound imaging of the brachial and radial arteries. The first Korotkoff sound (denoting SBP) was identified from the first inflection point of Doppler flow during cuff deflation. Bra-Rad-SBPAmp was calculated by radial minus brachial SBP. Upper limb and systemic haemodynamics were recorded by tonometry and ultrasound. Radial SBP was higher than brachial SBP for T2DM (136±19 vs 127±17 mm Hg; P<0.001) and non-diabetic controls (135±12 vs 121±11 mm Hg; P<0.001), but Bra-Rad-SBPAmp was significantly lower in T2DM (9±8 vs 14±7 mm Hg; P=0.042). The product of brachial mean flow velocity × brachial diameter was inversely and independently correlated with Bra-Rad-SBPAmp in T2DM (β=-0.033 95% confidence interval -0.063 to -0.004, P=0.030). When radial waveforms were calibrated using radial, compared with brachial SBP, central SBP was significantly higher in both groups (T2DM, 116±13 vs 125±15 mm Hg; and controls, 112±10 vs 124±11 mm Hg; P<0.001 both) and there was a significant increase in the number of participants classified with 'central hypertension' (SBP⩾130 mm Hg; P=0.004). Compared with non-diabetic controls, Bra-Rad-SBPAmp is significantly lower in T2DM. Regardless of disease status, radial SBP is higher than brachial SBP and this results in underestimation of central SBP using brachial-BP-calibrated radial tonometry. PMID:26446391

  11. Radially Localized Helicon Modes in Nonuniform Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Breizman, Boris N.; Arefiev, Alexey V.

    2000-04-24

    A radial density gradient in an axisymmetric cylindrical plasma column forms a potential well for nonaxisymmetric helicon modes (m{ne}0 ). This paper presents an analytic description of such modes in the limit of small longitudinal wave numbers. The corresponding mode equation indicates the possibility of efficient resonant absorption of rf power in helicon discharges at unusually low frequencies. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  12. Radial rib antenna surface deviation analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed which analyzes any radial rib antenna with ribs radiating from a central hub. The program has the capability for calculating the antenna surface contour (reversed pillowing effect), the optimum rib shape for minimizing the rms surface error, and the actual rms surface error. Rib deflection due to mesh tension and catenary cable tension can also be compensated for, and the pattern from which the mesh gores are cut can be determined.

  13. Development of a Radial Deconsolidation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Helmreich, Grant W.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Hunn, John D.

    2015-12-01

    A series of experiments have been initiated to determine the retention or mobility of fission products* in AGR fuel compacts [Petti, et al. 2010]. This information is needed to refine fission product transport models. The AGR-3/4 irradiation test involved half-inch-long compacts that each contained twenty designed-to-fail (DTF) particles, with 20-μm thick carbon-coated kernels whose coatings were deliberately fabricated such that they would crack under irradiation, providing a known source of post-irradiation isotopes. The DTF particles in these compacts were axially distributed along the compact centerline so that the diffusion of fission products released from the DTF kernels would be radially symmetric [Hunn, et al. 2012; Hunn et al. 2011; Kercher, et al. 2011; Hunn, et al. 2007]. Compacts containing DTF particles were irradiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) [Collin, 2015]. Analysis of the diffusion of these various post-irradiation isotopes through the compact requires a method to radially deconsolidate the compacts so that nested-annular volumes may be analyzed for post-irradiation isotope inventory in the compact matrix, TRISO outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC), and DTF kernels. An effective radial deconsolidation method and apparatus appropriate to this application has been developed and parametrically characterized.

  14. Multiplex gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, Jose R.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the multiplex gas chromatography (GC) technique, which is a possible candidate for chemical analysis of planetary atmospheres, are discussed. Particular attention is given to the chemical modulators developed by present investigators for multiplex GC, namely, the thermal-desorption, thermal-decomposition, and catalytic modulators, as well as to mechanical modulators. The basic technique of multiplex GC using chemical modulators and a mechanical modulator is demonstrated. It is shown that, with the chemical modulators, only one gas stream consisting of the carrier in combination with the components is being analyzed, resulting in a simplified instrument that requires relatively few consumables. The mechanical modulator demonstrated a direct application of multiplex GC for the analysis of gases in atmosphere of Titan at very low pressures.

  15. Microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Buchberger, Wolfgang W

    2008-01-01

    Microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) is an attractive capillary electrophoretic technique in which a microemulsion is used as carrier electrolyte. Analytes may partition between the aqueous phase of the microemulsion and its oil droplets, which act as a pseudostationary phase. It is well suited for the separation of neutral analytes, but can also be employed for charged analytes. A single set of separation parameters may be sufficient for separation of a wide range of analytes. Fine-tuning of the separation may be achieved by addition of organic solvents to the microemulsion or by changes in the nature of the surfactant used for stabilization of the microemulsion. In this chapter, MEEKC conditions are summarized that have proven their reliability for routine purposes. Furthermore, microemulsions can be used for on-capillary preconcentration of analytes so that the problem of poor concentration sensitivity of ultraviolet detection in capillary electrophoresis is circumvented. PMID:18392591

  16. Pressurized continuous chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Canon, R.M.; Begovich, J.M.; Sisson, W.G.

    1980-04-01

    A pressurized continuous annular chromatograph has been developed for preparative separations. This device utilizes a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material, fixed multiple feed points, and fixed withdrawal locations. Most of our investigations have been performed with a 28-cm-diam column, but a larger model is being designed and constructed. The separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a carbonate solution has been studied in detail. This solution simulates the leach liquor from the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Use of continuous gradient elution has been demonstrated. Recent studies have investigated several separations, including that of zirconium and hafnium (necessary for the production of zirconium for use in nuclear reactors), on a preparative scale. This system, because of its continuous feed and product withdrawal, its adaptability to large-scale operations, and its ability to separate many components, is expected to make chromatography a more competitive process in the industrial sector.

  17. Compact bypass-flow filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, W. G.; Ulanovsky, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Annular filter consisting of stacked rings separates particulates from bypass fluid passing through it in radial direction without slowing down main flow across unimpeded flow of fluid through its center. Applications include fluidized bed reactors, equipment for catalyst operations, and water purification.

  18. Aerodynamically induced radial forces in a centrifugal gas compressor. Part 1: Experimental measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.J.; Flathers, M.B.

    1998-04-01

    Net radial loading arising from asymmetric pressure fields in the volutes of centrifugal pumps during off-design operation is well known and has been studied extensively. In order to achieve a marked improvement in overall efficiency in centrifugal gas compressors, vaneless volute diffusers are matched to specific impellers to yield improved performance over a wide application envelope. As observed in centrifugal pumps, nonuniform pressure distributions that develop during operation above and below the design flow create static radial loads on the rotor. In order to characterize these radial forces, a novel experimental measurement and post-processing technique is employed that yields both the magnitude and direction of the load by measuring the shaft centerline locus in the tilt-pad bearings. The method is applicable to any turbomachinery operating on fluid film radial bearings equipped with proximity probes. The forces are found to be a maximum near surge and increase with higher pressures and speeds. The results are nondimensionalized, allowing the radial loading for different operating conditions to be predicted.

  19. Operation and Improvement of Liquid Nitrogen Pumps with Radial High- Temperature Superconductor Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Q. X.; Jiang, D. H.; Deng, Z. G.; Ma, G. T.; Zheng, J.; Wang, W. J.; Shin, D. I.; Gu, X.; Lin, N.; Shao, M. L.

    2015-09-01

    This paper reviews the advantages of replacing the mechanical bearings of low-temperature pumps by radial high- temperature superconductor (HTS) bearings. Radial HTS bearings have the advantage of being non-abrasive, so that the working life is increased significantly. In this article, two types of liquid nitrogen pump with radial HTS bearings are proposed. To reduce heat leakage, one pump uses a permanent magnet (PM) coupling and the other uses a long hollow pipe coupling. Successful stable operation of these two pumps means that radial HTS bearings have the potential to be applied in liquid nitrogen pumps. Test results show that the flow rate is influenced mainly by rotational speed but not by the coupling component. Further designs of the two types of pump for practical applications are described, and their characteristics are analyzed: the pump with a PM coupling has lower heat leakage, whereas the pump with a long hollow pipe coupling can solve the force creep problem of the HTS bearing. The design of the pump with a long hollow pipe coupling is based on the pump that is already in practical use, and therefore has greater feasibility for practical applications. Finally, improvements of the liquid nitrogen pump by improving the structure of the pump and the performance of the radial HTS bearing are discussed.

  20. 1936 SPILLWAY, RADIAL GATE (PARTIALLY RAISED POSITION) AND BRIDGE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1936 SPILLWAY, RADIAL GATE (PARTIALLY RAISED POSITION) AND BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTH FROM UPSTREAM SIDE OF DAM - Kachess Dam, 1936 Spillway and Radial Gates, Kachess River, 1.5 miles north of Interstate 90, Easton, Kittitas County, WA

  1. Combining Astrometric and Radial Velocity Techniques for Detecting Outer Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, J. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2001-05-01

    With the advent of powerful new optical interferometers like Keck Interferometer and SIM, sensitive searches for the astrometric signatures of extra-solar planets will become possible. These searches will supplement sensitive radial velocity surveys that are currently underway. We are investigating the benefits of combining astrometric and radial velocity observations for detecting extra-solar planets. We find that combined astrometric and radial velocity observations yield significant increases in sensitivity, especially for outer planets, than either astrometric or radial velocity observations alone.

  2. WAVE-VORTEX MODE COUPLING IN ASTROPHYSICAL ACCRETION DISKS UNDER COMBINED RADIAL AND VERTICAL STRATIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Salhi, A.; Lehner, T.; Godeferd, F.; Cambon, C.

    2013-07-10

    We examine accretion disk flow under combined radial and vertical stratification utilizing a local Cartesian (or ''shearing box'') approximation. We investigate both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric disturbances with the Boussinesq approximation. Under axisymmetric disturbances, a new dispersion relation is derived. It reduces to the Solberg-Hoieland criterion in the case without vertical stratification. It shows that, asymptotically, stable radial and vertical stratification cannot induce any linear instability; Keplerian flow is accordingly stable. Previous investigations strongly suggest that the so-called bypass concept of turbulence (i.e., that fine-tuned disturbances of any inviscid smooth shear flow can reach arbitrarily large transient growth) can also be applied to Keplerian disks. We present an analysis of this process for three-dimensional plane-wave disturbances comoving with the shear flow of a general rotating shear flow under combined stable radial and vertical rotation. We demonstrate that large transient growth occurs for K{sub 2}/k{sub 1} >> 1 and k{sub 3} = 0 or k{sub 1} {approx} k{sub 3}, where k{sub 1}, K{sub 2}, and k{sub 3} are the azimuthal, radial, and vertical components of the initial wave vector, respectively. By using a generalized ''wave-vortex'' decomposition of the disturbance, we show that the large transient energy growth in a Keplerian disk is mainly generated by the transient dynamics of the vortex mode. The analysis of the power spectrum of total (kinetic+potential) energy in the azimuthal or vertical directions shows that the contribution coming from the vortex mode is dominant at large scales, while the contribution coming from the wave mode is important at small scales. These findings may be confirmed by appropriate numerical simulations in the high Reynolds number regime.

  3. Heat Transfer Experiments in the Internal Cooling Passages of a Cooled Radial Turbine Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Wagner, J. H.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted (1) to experimentally measure, assess and analyze the heat transfer within the internal cooling configuration of a radial turbine rotor blade and (2) to obtain heat transfer data to evaluate and improve computational fluid dynamics (CFD) procedures and turbulent transport models of internal coolant flows. A 1.15 times scale model of the coolant passages within the NASA LERC High Temperature Radial Turbine was designed, fabricated of Lucite and instrumented for transient beat transfer tests using thin film surface thermocouples and liquid crystals to indicate temperatures. Transient heat transfer tests were conducted for Reynolds numbers of one-fourth, one-half, and equal to the operating Reynolds number for the NASA Turbine. Tests were conducted for stationary and rotating conditions with rotation numbers in the range occurring in the NASA Turbine. Results from the experiments showed the heat transfer characteristics within the coolant passage were affected by rotation. In general, the heat transfer increased and decreased on the sides of the straight radial passages with rotation as previously reported from NASA-HOST-sponsored experiments. The heat transfer in the tri-passage axial flow region adjacent to the blade exit was relatively unaffected by rotation. However, the heat transfer on one surface, in the transitional region between the radial inflow passage and axial, constant radius passages, decreased to approximately 20 percent of the values without rotation. Comparisons with previous 3-D numerical studies indicated regions where the heat transfer characteristics agreed and disagreed with the present experiment.

  4. The second five years of sequential injection chromatography: significant developments in the technology and methodologies.

    PubMed

    Idris, Abubakr M

    2014-01-01

    Sequential injection chromatography was proposed in 2003 to perform a simple, rapid, reagent-saving, environmentally benign, on-site, and instrumentally inexpensive separation procedure. Sequential injection chromatography is a version of sequential injection analysis, which is the second generation in the family of flow injection techniques. Despite its advantages over high-performance liquid chromatography, sequential injection chromatography has confronted some challenges. Furthermore, the applications of sequential injection chromatography in its first five years are almost all limited to pharmaceutical analysis. Interestingly, in its second five years, various developments in sequential injection chromatography technology were achieved. The developments have enhanced the efficiency of sequential injection chromatography and hence its applications have extended to biological, food, and environmental analyses. The main objectives of this review are to examine recent developments (2008-2013) in sequential injection chromatography and to describe how these developments improve the efficiency of the technology. The sequential injection chromatography methodologies reported during that period are also discussed along with controlling conditions and analytical results. The review also describes the principles, instrumentation, and procedure behind sequential injection chromatography. PMID:25391562

  5. Traumatic Axillary Artery Dissection with Radial Artery Embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hwan-Hoon; Cha, Sang Hoon Cho, Sung Bum; Kim, Jung Hyuck; Lee, Seung Hwa; Shin, Jae Seung; Park, Sang Woo

    2006-04-15

    This report describes a case of pathologically proven traumatic arterial dissection, presenting as complete occlusion of the axillary artery with radial artery embolism. Occlusion of the axillary artery by traumatic dissection mimicked transection and radial artery embolism mimicked congenital absence of the radial artery on the initial angiogram, but these were correctly diagnosed with the following sonogram.

  6. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  7. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  8. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  9. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  10. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  11. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  12. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  13. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  14. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  15. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  16. Automated gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Mowry, Curtis D.; Blair, Dianna S.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Reber, Stephen D.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute.

  17. Determination of nanogram per liter concentrations of volatile organic compounds in water by capillary gas chromatography and selected ion monitoring mass spectrometry and its use to define groundwater flow directions in Edwards Aquifer, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buszka, P.M.; Rose, D.L.; Ozuna, G.B.; Groschen, G.E.

    1995-01-01

    A method has been developed to measure nanogram per liter amounts of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including dichlorodifluoromethane, trichlorofluoromethane, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and the isomers of dichlorobenzene in water. The method uses purge-and-trap techniques on a 100 mL sample, gas chromatography with a megabore capillary column, and electron impact, selected ion monitoring mass spectrometry. Minimum detection levels for these compounds ranged from 1 to 4 ng/L in water. Recoveries from organic-free distilled water and natural groundwater ranged from 70.5% for dichlorodifluoromethane to 107.8% for 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Precision was generally best for cis-1,2-dichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and the dichlorobenzene isomers and worst for dichlorodifluoromethane and trichlorofluoromethane. Blank data indicated persistent, trace-level introduction of dichlorodifluoromethane, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, and tetrachloroemene to samples during storage and shipment at concentrations less than the method reporting limits. The largest concentrations of the selected VOCs in 27 water samples from the Edwards aquifer near San Antonio, TX, were from confined-zone wells near an abandoned landfill. The results defined a zone of water with no detectable VOCs in nearly all of the aquifer west of San Antonio and from part of the confined zone beneath San Antonio.

  18. Radially Magnetized Protoplanetary Disk: Vertical Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Matthew; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the response of a thin accretion disk to an external radial magnetic field. Our focus is on protoplanetary disks (PPDs), which are exposed during their later evolution to an intense, magnetized wind from the central star. A radial magnetic field is mixed into a thin surface layer, wound up by the disk shear, and pushed downward by a combination of turbulent mixing and ambipolar and ohmic drift. The toroidal field reaches much greater strengths than the seed vertical field that is usually invoked in PPD models, even becoming superthermal. Linear stability analysis indicates that the disk experiences the magnetorotational instability (MRI) at a higher magnetization than a vertically magnetized disk when both the effects of ambipolar and Hall drift are taken into account. Steady vertical profiles of density and magnetic field are obtained at several radii between 0.06 and 1 AU in response to a wind magnetic field Br ˜ (10-4-10-2)(r/ AU)-2 G. Careful attention is given to the radial and vertical ionization structure resulting from irradiation by stellar X-rays. The disk is more strongly magnetized closer to the star, where it can support a higher rate of mass transfer. As a result, the inner ˜1 AU of a PPD is found to evolve toward lower surface density. Mass transfer rates around 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 are obtained under conservative assumptions about the MRI-generated stress. The evolution of the disk and the implications for planet migration are investigated in the accompanying paper.

  19. Axial and Radial Oxylipin Transport1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gasperini, Debora; Chauvin, Adeline; Acosta, Ivan F.; Kurenda, Andrzej; Stolz, Stéphanie; Chételat, Aurore; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Farmer, Edward E.

    2015-01-01

    Jasmonates are oxygenated lipids (oxylipins) that control defense gene expression in response to cell damage in plants. How mobile are these potent mediators within tissues? Exploiting a series of 13-lipoxygenase (13-lox) mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that displays impaired jasmonic acid (JA) synthesis in specific cell types and using JA-inducible reporters, we mapped the extent of the transport of endogenous jasmonates across the plant vegetative growth phase. In seedlings, we found that jasmonate (or JA precursors) could translocate axially from wounded shoots to unwounded roots in a LOX2-dependent manner. Grafting experiments with the wild type and JA-deficient mutants confirmed shoot-to-root oxylipin transport. Next, we used rosettes to investigate radial cell-to-cell transport of jasmonates. After finding that the LOX6 protein localized to xylem contact cells was not wound inducible, we used the lox234 triple mutant to genetically isolate LOX6 as the only JA precursor-producing LOX in the plant. When a leaf of this mutant was wounded, the JA reporter gene was expressed in distal leaves. Leaf sectioning showed that JA reporter expression extended from contact cells throughout the vascular bundle and into extravascular cells, revealing a radial movement of jasmonates. Our results add a crucial element to a growing picture of how the distal wound response is regulated in rosettes, showing that both axial (shoot-to-root) and radial (cell-to-cell) transport of oxylipins plays a major role in the wound response. The strategies developed herein provide unique tools with which to identify intercellular jasmonate transport routes. PMID:26338953

  20. Isotopic dependence of residual zonal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, T. S.; Wang, Lu; Wang, W. X.; Yoon, E. S.; Duthoit, F. X.

    2013-07-01

    We identify an isotopic dependence of residual zonal flows from an analytic calculation. While the well-known Rosenbluth-Hinton residual zonal flows with radial scale greater than the magnetically trapped ion radial width ρbi have no isotopic dependence (Rosenbluth and Hinton 1998 Phys. Rev. Lett. 80 724), we find that shorter radial scale (shorter than ρbi, but larger than the magnetically trapped electron radial width ρbe) residual zonal flows (Wang and Hahm 2009 Phys. Plasmas 16 062309) exhibit isotopic dependence. These finer scale zonal flows in deuterium (D) plasmas can be stronger than those of hydrogen (H) plasmas, and possibly lead to lower turbulence and transport and better confinement in qualitative agreement with experimental results.