Science.gov

Sample records for radial forces derived

  1. Parachute drag and radial force

    SciTech Connect

    Purvis, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a combination of old and new wind tunnel data in a format which illustrates the effects of inflated diameter, geometric porosity, reefing line length, suspension line length, number of gores, and number of ribbons on parachute drag. A new definition of radial force coefficient is presented, as well as a universal drag curve for flat circular and conical parachutes.

  2. Radial forces in a misaligned radial face seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1977-01-01

    Radial forces on the primary seal ring of a flat misaligned seal are analyzed, taking into account the radial variation in seal clearance. An analytical solution for both hydrostatic and hydrodynamic effects is presented that covers the whole range from zero to full angular misalignment. The net radial force on the primary seal ring is always directed so as to produce a radial eccentricity which generates inward pumping. Although the radial force is usually very small, in some cases it may be one of the reasons for excessive leakage through both the primary and secondary seals of a radial face seal.

  3. Radial forces in a misaligned radial face seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1978-01-01

    Radial forces on the primary seal ring of a flat misaligned seal are analyzed, taking into account the radial variation in seal clearance. An analytical solution for both hydrostatic and hydrodynamic effects is presented that covers the whole range from zero to full angular misalignment. The net radial force on the primary seal ring is always directed so as to produce a radial eccentricity which generates inward pumping. Although the radial force is usually very small, in some cases it may be one of the reasons for excessive leakage through both the primary and secondary seals of a radial face seal.

  4. Radial force in a bearingless reluctance motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Akira; Rahman, M. A.; Fukao, Tadashi

    1991-03-01

    A four-pole reluctance synchronous machine with additional two-pole windings was constructed. The additional winding currents produce the radial force to act as a magnetic bearing. Expressions for the machine inductance functions are given. Inductance functions with respect to the eccentric displacement of the rotor were measured. The contribution of these inductances to the radial force production is established.

  5. Anomalous optical forces on radially anisotropic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. L.; Gao, L.

    2015-11-01

    Full-wave electromagnetic scattering theory and Maxwell stress tensor integration techniques have been established to study the optical force on the radially anisotropic nanowires. The optical forces on the isotropic nanowires are dependent on the size of the nanowire and the wave vector in the media with the Rayleigh's law. However, the optical forces on the anisotropic nanowires have the anomalous behaviors under non-Rayleigh vanishing condition and non-Rayleigh diverging condition. Therefore, the optical forces on the anisotropic nanowires may be enhanced or reduced by tuning the anisotropic parameters. These results may promote the potential applications in the field of nanotechnology.

  6. Radial forces analysis and rotational speed test of radial permanent magnetic bearing for horizontal axis wind turbine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriswanto, Jamari

    2016-04-01

    Permanent magnet bearings (PMB) are contact free bearings which utilize the forces generated by the magnets. PMB in this work is a type of radial PMB, which functions as the radial bearings of the Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) rotor shaft. Radial PMB should have a greater radial force than the radial force HAWT rotor shaft (bearing load). This paper presents a modeling and experiments to calculate the radial force of the radial PMB. This paper also presents rotational speed test of the radial PMB compared to conventional bearings for HAWT applications. Modeling using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3b with the magnetic fields physics models. Experiments were conducted by measuring the displacement of the rotor to the stator for a given load variation. Results of the two methods showed that the large displacement then the radial force would be greater. Radial forces of radial PMB is greater than radial forces of HAWT rotor shaft. The rotational speed test results of HAWT that used radial PMB produced higher rotary than conventional bearings with an average increase of 87.4%. Increasing rotational speed occured because radial PMB had no friction. HAWT that used radial PMB rotated at very low wind speeds are 1.4 m/s with a torque of 0.043 Nm, while the HAWT which uses conventional bearing started rotating at a wind speed of 4.4 m/s and required higher torque of 0.104 N.

  7. Analyses of hydrodynamic radial forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adkins, D. R.; Brennen, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the hydrodynamic interactions occurring between a centrifugal pump impeller and a volute is presented. The theoretical analysis provides a quasi-one-dimensional treatment of the flow in the volute, and it is extended to include the hydrodynamic force perturbations caused by the impeller whirling eccentrically in the volute. It is noted that these perturbations are often destabilizing. The theoretical models were found to accurately predict the radial forces caused by the flow through the impeller. The pressure acting on the front shroud of the impeller is shown to have a significant effect on the destabilizing hydrodyamic forces.

  8. Radial force development during root growth measured by photoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Evelyne; Hartmann, Christian; Genet, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical and topological properties of a soil like the global porosity and the distribution of void sizes greatly affect the development of a plant root, which in turn affects the shoot development. In particular, plant roots growing in heterogeneous medium like sandy soils or cracked substrates have to adapt their morphology and exert radial forces depending on the pore size in which they penetrate. We propose a model experiment in which a pivot root (chick-pea seeds) of millimetric diameter has to grow in a size-controlled gap δ (δ ranging 0.5-2.3 mm) between two photoelastic grains. By time-lapse imaging, we continuously monitored the root growth and the development of optical fringes in the photoelastic neighbouring grains when the root enters the gap. Thus we measured simultaneously and in situ the root morphological changes (length and diameter growth rates, circumnutation) as well as the radial forces the root exerts. Radial forces were increasing in relation with gap constriction and experiment duration but a levelling of the force was not observed, even after 5 days and for narrow gaps. The inferred mechanical stress was consistent with the turgor pressure of compressed cells. Therefore our set-up could be a basis for testing mechanical models of cellular growth.

  9. Radial forcing and Edgar Allan Poe's lengthening pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Blasing, David; Whitney, Heather M.

    2013-09-01

    Inspired by Edgar Allan Poe's The Pit and the Pendulum, we investigate a radially driven, lengthening pendulum. We first show that increasing the length of an undriven pendulum at a uniform rate does not amplify the oscillations in a manner consistent with the behavior of the scythe in Poe's story. We discuss parametric amplification and the transfer of energy (through the parameter of the pendulum's length) to the oscillating part of the system. In this manner, radial driving can easily and intuitively be understood, and the fundamental concept applied in many other areas. We propose and show by a numerical model that appropriately timed radial forcing can increase the oscillation amplitude in a manner consistent with Poe's story. Our analysis contributes a computational exploration of the complex harmonic motion that can result from radially driving a pendulum and sheds light on a mechanism by which oscillations can be amplified parametrically. These insights should prove especially valuable in the undergraduate physics classroom, where investigations into pendulums and oscillations are commonplace.

  10. Forced responses on a radial turbine with nozzle guide vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixiong; Yang, Ce; Ma, Chaochen; Lao, DaZhong

    2014-04-01

    Radial turbines with nozzle guide vanes are widely used in various size turbochargers. However, due to the interferences with guide vanes, the blades of impellers are exposed to intense unsteady aerodynamic excitations, which cause blade vibrations and lead to high cycle failures (HCF). Moreover, the harmonic resonance in some frequency regions are unavoidable due to the wide operation conditions. Aiming to achieve a detail insight into vibration characteristics of radial flow turbine, a numerical method based on fluid structure interaction (FSI) is presented. Firstly, the unsteady aerodynamic loads are determined by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). And the fluctuating pressures are transformed from time domain to frequency domain by fast Fourier-transform (FFT). Then, the entire rotor model is adopted to analyze frequencies and mode shapes considering mistuning in finite element (FE) method. Meanwhile, harmonic analyses, applying the pressure fluctuation from CFD, are conducted to investigate the impeller vibration behavior and blade forced response in frequency domain. The prediction of the vibration dynamic stress shows acceptable agreement to the blade actual damage in consistent tendency.

  11. The effect of radial pressure force on rotating double tearing mode in compressible plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-Qu; Xiong, Guo-Zhen; Li, Xiao-Qing

    2016-05-01

    The role of radial pressure force in the interlocking dynamics of double tearing modes (DTMs) is investigated by force balance analysis based on the compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model. It is found that the stability of symmetric DTMs is dominated by the radial pressure force rather than the field line bending force. Owing to the compressibility of rotating plasmas, unbalanced radial forces can just result in the rotating islands drift toward each other in the radial direction but do not trigger the explosive growth of the mode in the interlocking process, which is different from that of antisymmetric DTM without flow.

  12. Erosion in radial inflow turbines. Volume 2: Balance of centrifugal and radial drag forces on erosive particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenger, W. B., Jr.; Tabakoff, W.

    1974-01-01

    The particle motion in two-dimensional free and forced inward flowing vortices is considered. A particle in such a flow field experiences a balance between the aerodynamic drag forces that tend to drive erosive particles toward the axis, and centrifugal forces that prevent these particles from traveling toward the axis. Results predict that certain sizes of particles will achieve a stable orbit about the turbine axis in the inward flowing free vortex. In this condition, the radial drag force is equal to the centrifugal force. The sizes of particles that will achieve a stable orbit is shown to be related to the gas flow velocity diagram at a particular radius. A second analysis yields a description of particle sizes that will experience a centrifugal force that is greater than the radial component of the aerodynamic drag force for a more general type of particle motion.

  13. Investigation on impeller radial force for double-suction centrifugal pump with staggered blade arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. C.; Wang, F. J.; Yao, Z. F.; Leng, H. F.; Zhou, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    In order to find the effects of blade arrangement on impeller radial force, a double-suction centrifugal pump with two impeller configurations is investigated by using CFD approach. The two impeller have same geometry, same blade number, and different blade arrangement. One is staggered impeller in which the blades are arranged with half of blade phase angle staggered in circular direction, another is traditional symmetrical impeller with symmetrical blade arrangement. Results show that the radial force vector diagram for symmetrical impeller is a hexagonal, while it is nearly a circle for staggered impeller. The staggered impeller results no radial force saltation which exists in symmetrical impeller. The blade passing frequency dominates the radial force fluctuation in symmetrical impeller, while this frequency is almost not existed in staggered impeller. The results indicate that staggered blade arrangement can significantly reduce radial force fluctuation in double-suction centrifugal pump.

  14. Rotary and radial forcing effects on center-of-mass locomotion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z H; Larson, P L; Seipel, J E

    2014-09-01

    Rotary and radial forcing are two common actuation methods for legged robots. However, these two orthogonal methods of center-of-mass (CoM) forcing have not been compared as potentially alternative strategies of actuation. In this paper, we compare the CoM stability and energetics of running with rotary and radial actuation through the simulation of two models: the rotary-forced spring-loaded inverted pendulum (rotary-forced-SLIP), and the radially-forced-SLIP. We model both radial and rotary actuation in the simplest way, applying them as a constant force during the stance portion of the gait. A simple application of constant rotary forcing throughout stance is capable of producing fully-asymptotically stable motion; however, a similarly constant application of radial forcing throughout the stance is not capable of producing stable solutions. We then allow both the applied rotary and radial forcing functions to turn on or off based on the occurrence of the mid-stance event, which breaks the symmetry of actuation during stance towards a net forward propulsion. We find that both a rotary force applied in the first half of stance and a radial force applied in the second half of stance, are capable of stabilizing running. Interestingly, these two forcing methods improve the motion stability in different ways. Rotary forcing first reduces then greatly increases the size of the stable parameter region when gradually increased. Radial forcing expands the stable parameter region, but only in a moderate way. Also, it is found that parameter region stabilized by rotary and radial forcing are largely complementary. Overall, rotary forcing can better stabilize running for both constant and event-based forcing functions that were attempted. This indicates that rotary forcing has an inherent capability of stabilizing running, even when minimal time-or-event-or-state feedback is present. Radial forcing, however, tends to be more energy efficient when compared to rotary forcing

  15. Radial-vertical profiles of tropical cyclone derived from dropsondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yifang

    The scopes of this thesis research are two folds: the first one is to the construct the intensity-based composite radial-vertical profiles of tropical cyclones (TC) using GPS-based dropsonde observations and the second one is to identify the major deficiencies of Mathur vortices against the dropsonde composites of TCs. The intensity-based dropsonde composites of TCs advances our understanding of the dynamic and thermal structure of TCs of different intensity along the radial direction in and above the boundary layer where lies the devastating high wind that causes property damages and storm surges. The identification of the major deficiencies of Mathur vortices in representing the radial-vertical profiles of TC of different intensity helps to improve numerical predictions of TCs since most operational TC forecast models need to utilize bogus vortices, such as Mathur vortices, to initialize TC forecasts and simulations. We first screen all available GPS dropsonde data within and round 35 named TCs over the tropical Atlantic basin from 1996 to 2010 and pair them with TC parameters derived from the best-track data provided by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) and select 1149 dropsondes that have continuous coverage in the lower troposphere. The composite radial-vertical profiles of tangential wind speed, temperature, mixing ratio and humidity are based for each TC category ranging from "Tropical Storm" (TS) to "Hurricane Category 1" (H1) through "Hurricane Category 5" (H5). The key findings of the dropsonde composites are: (i) all TCs have the maximum tangential wind within 1 km above the ground and a distance of 1-2 times of the radius of maximum wind (RMW) at the surface; (ii) all TCs have a cold ring surrounding the warm core near the boundary layer at a distance of 1-3 times of the RMW and the cold ring structure gradually diminishes at a higher elevation where the warm core structure prevails along the radial direction; (iii) the existence of such shallow cold

  16. Estimation of the radial force using a disturbance force observer for a magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Pai, C N; Shinshi, T; Shimokohbe, A

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the hydraulic forces in a magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump is important from the point of view of the magnetic bearing design. Direct measurement is difficult due to the absence of a rotor shaft, and computational fluid dynamic analysis demands considerable computational resource and time. To solve this problem, disturbance force observers were developed, using the radial controlled magnetic bearing of a centrifugal blood pump, to estimate the radial forces on the maglev impeller. In order to design the disturbance observer, the radial dynamic characteristics of a maglev impeller were evaluated under different working conditions. It was observed that the working fluid affects the additional mass and damping, while the rotational speed affects the damping and stiffness of the maglev system. Based on these results, disturbance force observers were designed and implemented. The designed disturbance force observers present a bandwidth of 45 Hz. In non-pulsatile conditions, the magnitude of the estimated radial thrust increases in proportion to the flowrate, and the rotational speed has little effect on the force direction. At 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, the estimated radial thrust is 0.95 N. In pulsatile conditions, this method was capable of estimating the pulsatile radial thrust with good response. PMID:20839658

  17. Eulerian derivation of the Coriolis force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Akira; Hyodo, Mamoru

    2006-02-01

    In textbooks of geophysical fluid dynamics, the Coriolis force and the centrifugal force in a rotating fluid system are derived by making use of the fluid parcel concept. In contrast to this intuitive derivation to the apparent forces, more rigorous derivation would be useful not only for the pedagogical purpose but also for the applications to other kinds of rotating geophysical systems rather than the fluid. The purpose of this paper is to show a general procedure to derive the transformed equations in the rotating frame of reference based on the local Galilean transformation and rotational coordinate transformation of field quantities. The generality and usefulness of this Eulerian approach is demonstrated in the derivation of apparent forces in rotating fluids as well as the transformed electromagnetic field equation in the rotating system.

  18. Computation of unbalanced radial force in permanent magnet motors

    SciTech Connect

    Salon, S.J.; Howe, M.; Slavik, C.J.; DeBortoli, M.J.; Nevins, R.J.

    1998-10-01

    Nonuniformity in magnet strength in permanent magnet motors results in a vibration-inducing unbalanced force acting on the rotor. This force is the difference of two large numbers and as such is difficult to determine precisely with numerical models. In this paper, a permanent magnet motor with unbalanced magnets is analyzed by the finite element method. Three different techniques for computing the net force on the rotor, including a recently developed field-correction approach, are compared. Sensitivities of the techniques to computational limitations and finite element mesh characteristics are discussed.

  19. SCM Forcing Data Derived from NWP Analyses

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jakob, Christian

    2008-01-15

    Forcing data, suitable for use with single column models (SCMs) and cloud resolving models (CRMs), have been derived from NWP analyses for the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites of Manus Island and Nauru.

  20. Ball to separator contact forces in angular contact ball bearings under thrust and radial loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental data are reported on ball to cage contact forces in a 110 mm bore ball bearing operating at speeds to 12,000 rpm under radial and thrust loads. Information is also reported on cage to inner race land contact force, cage to inner race land clearance, and cage to shaft speed ratios.

  1. Radial alignment of elliptical galaxies by the tidal force of a cluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Yu; Yi, Shu-Xu; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Tu, Hong

    2015-08-01

    Unlike the random radial orientation distribution of field elliptical galaxies, galaxies in a cluster are expected to point preferentially towards the centre of the cluster, as a result of the cluster's tidal force on its member galaxies. In this work, an analytic model is formulated to simulate this effect. The deformation time-scale of a galaxy in a cluster is usually much shorter than the time-scale of change of the tidal force; the dynamical process of tidal interaction within the galaxy can thus be ignored. The equilibrium shape of a galaxy is then assumed to be the surface of equipotential that is the sum of the self-gravitational potential of the galaxy and the tidal potential of the cluster at this location. We use a Monte Carlo method to calculate the radial orientation distribution of cluster galaxies, by assuming a Navarro-Frenk-White mass profile for the cluster and the initial ellipticity of field galaxies. The radial angles show a single-peak distribution centred at zero. The Monte Carlo simulations also show that a shift of the reference centre from the real cluster centre weakens the anisotropy of the radial angle distribution. Therefore, the expected radial alignment cannot be revealed if the distribution of spatial position angle is used instead of that of radial angle. The observed radial orientations of elliptical galaxies in cluster Abell 2744 are consistent with the simulated distribution.

  2. Magnetic Circuit Model of PM Motor-Generator to Predict Radial Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLallin, Kerry (Technical Monitor); Kascak, Peter E.; Dever, Timothy P.; Jansen, Ralph H.

    2004-01-01

    A magnetic circuit model is developed for a PM motor for flywheel applications. A sample motor is designed and modeled. Motor configuration and selection of materials is discussed, and the choice of winding configuration is described. A magnetic circuit model is described, which includes the stator back iron, rotor yoke, permanent magnets, air gaps and the stator teeth. Iterative solution of this model yields flux linkages, back EMF, torque, power, and radial force at the rotor caused by eccentricity. Calculated radial forces are then used to determine motor negative stiffness.

  3. Fluctuating Pressure Environments and Hydrodynamic Radial Force Mitigation for a Two Blade Unshrouded Inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulder, Andrew; Skelley, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuating pressure data from water flow testing of an unshrouded two blade inducer revealed a cavitation induced oscillation with the potential to induce a radial load on the turbopump shaft in addition to other more traditionally analyzed radial loads. Subsequent water flow testing of the inducer with a rotating force measurement system confirmed that the cavitation induced oscillation did impart a radial load to the inducer. After quantifying the load in a baseline configuration, two inducer shroud treatments were selected and tested to reduce the cavitation induced load. The first treatment was to increase the tip clearance, and the second was to introduce a circumferential groove near the inducer leading edge. Increasing the clearance resulted in a small decrease in radial load along with some steady performance degradation. The groove greatly reduced the hydrodynamic load with little to no steady performance loss. The groove did however generate some new, relatively high frequency, spatially complex oscillations to the flow environment.

  4. Study of radial compression elasticity of single xanthan molecules by vibrating scanning polarization force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huabin; Zhou, Xingfei; An, Hongjie; Sun, Jielin; Zhang, Yi; Hu, Jun

    2008-08-01

    Individual xanthan molecules were prepared on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface with a modified spin-casting technique. Then the radial compression elasticity of single xanthan molecules was investigated by vibrating scanning polarization force microscopy. The effective elastic moduli of xanthan molecules are estimated to be approximately 20-100 MPa under loads below 0.4 nN. PMID:19049142

  5. Aerodynamically induced radial forces in a centrifugal gas compressor. Part 1: Experimental measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.J.; Flathers, M.B.

    1998-04-01

    Net radial loading arising from asymmetric pressure fields in the volutes of centrifugal pumps during off-design operation is well known and has been studied extensively. In order to achieve a marked improvement in overall efficiency in centrifugal gas compressors, vaneless volute diffusers are matched to specific impellers to yield improved performance over a wide application envelope. As observed in centrifugal pumps, nonuniform pressure distributions that develop during operation above and below the design flow create static radial loads on the rotor. In order to characterize these radial forces, a novel experimental measurement and post-processing technique is employed that yields both the magnitude and direction of the load by measuring the shaft centerline locus in the tilt-pad bearings. The method is applicable to any turbomachinery operating on fluid film radial bearings equipped with proximity probes. The forces are found to be a maximum near surge and increase with higher pressures and speeds. The results are nondimensionalized, allowing the radial loading for different operating conditions to be predicted.

  6. Effect of Stent Radial Force on Stress Pattern After Deployment: A Finite Element Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Alessandro; Murphy, Olive; Bahmanyar, Reza; McLeod, Chris

    2014-07-01

    The present article presents a method for assessing the radial stiffness of nitinol stents. An idealized stent model was created, and its radial stiffness was calculated by means of finite element modeling. The calculations were validated against experimental measurements. The variation of radial stiffness with geometrical dimensions was calculated, and the effect of increasing radial stiffness on endovascular deployment was analyzed. Peak tensile and compressive stresses as well as stent penetration were calculated in the case of an idealized pulmonary artery model having realistic dimensions as well as stiffness. The results of stress calculations were compared with a second set of simulations, where an idealized behavior of the stent (uniform expansion to a theoretical contact diameter) was modeled. The results show how in reality nitinol stents behave in a non-ideal way, having a non-uniform expansion and exerting non-uniform pressure on the contact areas with the artery. Such non-ideality decreases though with the increase in radial stiffness. The radial force alone may be insufficient in describing the stent-artery interaction, and numerical modeling proves to be necessary for capturing such complexity.

  7. On the radial force balance in the quiet time magnetotail current sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.

    2016-05-01

    Using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions spacecraft observations of the quite magnetotail current sheet within the r∈[9,35]RE region (r is the radial distance from Earth and RE is Earth's radius), we investigate the thermal plasma pressure distribution along the magnetotail. Taking advantage of flapping motions of an ensemble of current sheets at various distances, we estimate the current density magnitude jy (in GSM coordinates). Comparing the tension force jyBz (Bz is the magnetic field component) with the radial gradient of the plasma pressure demonstrates that this gradient is only a small fraction, ˜10-15%, of the Ampere force exerted on the cross-tail current, in the r > 15RE region. We also estimate the contribution of the electron temperature anisotropy to the pressure balance: in the r > 15RE region the corresponding force can balance only 10-15% of the observed tension force jyBz. Thus, we conclude that about 70% of the tension force is not balanced by the combination of isotropic radial pressure gradient or the electron anisotropy. We discuss mechanisms that could be responsible for balancing the magnetotail current sheet.

  8. Radial force on the vacuum chamber wall during thermal quench in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2015-12-01

    The radial force balance during a thermal quench in tokamaks is analyzed. As a rule, the duration τtp of such events is much shorter than the resistive time τw of the vacuum chamber wall. Therefore, the perturbations of the magnetic field B produced by the evolving plasma cannot penetrate the wall, which makes different the magnetic pressures on its inner and outer sides. The goal of this work is the analytical estimation of the resulting integral radial force on the wall. The plasma is considered axially symmetric; for the description of radial forces on the wall, the results of V.D. Shafranov's classical work [J. Nucl. Energy C 5, 251 (1963)] are used. Developed for tokamaks, the standard equilibrium theory considers three interacting systems: plasma, poloidal field coils, and toroidal field coils. Here, the wall is additionally incorporated with currents driven by ∂ B/∂ t≠0 accompanying the fast loss of the plasma thermal energy. It is shown that they essentially affect the force redistribution, thereby leading to large loads on the wall. The estimates prove that these loads have to be accounted for in the disruptive scenarios in large tokamaks.

  9. Radial force on the vacuum chamber wall during thermal quench in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2015-12-15

    The radial force balance during a thermal quench in tokamaks is analyzed. As a rule, the duration τ{sub tp} of such events is much shorter than the resistive time τ{sub w} of the vacuum chamber wall. Therefore, the perturbations of the magnetic field B produced by the evolving plasma cannot penetrate the wall, which makes different the magnetic pressures on its inner and outer sides. The goal of this work is the analytical estimation of the resulting integral radial force on the wall. The plasma is considered axially symmetric; for the description of radial forces on the wall, the results of V.D. Shafranov’s classical work [J. Nucl. Energy C 5, 251 (1963)] are used. Developed for tokamaks, the standard equilibrium theory considers three interacting systems: plasma, poloidal field coils, and toroidal field coils. Here, the wall is additionally incorporated with currents driven by ∂B/∂t≠0 accompanying the fast loss of the plasma thermal energy. It is shown that they essentially affect the force redistribution, thereby leading to large loads on the wall. The estimates prove that these loads have to be accounted for in the disruptive scenarios in large tokamaks.

  10. Analysis of radially cracked ring segments subject to forces and couples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.; Strawley, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Results of planar boundary collocation analysis are given for ring segment (C shaped) specimens with radial cracks, subjected to combined forces and couples. Mode I stress intensity factors and crack mouth opening displacements were determined for ratios of outer to inner radius in the range 1.1 to 2.5, and ratios of crack length to segment width in the range 0.1 to 0.8.

  11. Analysis of radially cracked ring segments subject to forces and couples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.; Srawley, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Results of planar boundary collocation analysis are given for ring segment (C-shaped) specimens with radial cracks, subjected to combined forces and couples. Mode I stress intensity factors and crack mouth opening displacements were determined for ratios of outer to inner radius in the range 1.1 to 2.5 and ratios of crack length to segment width in the range 0.1 to 0.8.

  12. Optimal design of high damping force engine mount featuring MR valve structure with both annular and radial flow paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Choi, S. B.; Lee, Y. S.; Han, M. S.

    2013-11-01

    This paper focuses on the optimal design of a compact and high damping force engine mount featuring magnetorheological fluid (MRF). In the mount, a MR valve structure with both annular and radial flows is employed to generate a high damping force. First, the configuration and working principle of the proposed MR mount is introduced. The MRF flows in the mount are then analyzed and the governing equations of the MR mount are derived based on the Bingham plastic behavior of the MRF. An optimal design of the MR mount is then performed to find the optimal structure of the MR valve to generate a maximum damping force with certain design constraints. In addition, the gap size of MRF ducts is empirically chosen considering the ‘lockup’ problem of the mount at high frequency. Performance of the optimized MR mount is then evaluated based on finite element analysis and discussions on performance results of the optimized MR mount are given. The effectiveness of the proposed MR engine mount is demonstrated via computer simulation by presenting damping force and power consumption.

  13. Three-dimensional analysis of optical forces generated by an active tractor beam using radial polarization.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Luis; Acebal, Pablo; Blaya, Salvador

    2014-02-10

    We theoretically study the three-dimensional behavior of nanoparticles in an active optical conveyor. To do this, we solved the Langevin equation when the forces are generated by a focusing system at the near field. Analytical expressions for the optical forces generated by the optical conveyor were obtained by solving the Richards and Wolf vectorial diffraction integrals in an approximated form when a mask of two annular pupils is illuminated by a radially polarized Hermite-Gauss beam. Trajectories, in both the transverse plane and the longitudinal direction, are analyzed showing that the behavior of the optical conveyor can be optimized by conveniently choosing the configuration of the mask of the two annular pupils (inner and outer radius of the two rings) in order to trap and transport all particles at the focal plane. PMID:24663619

  14. On the effect of the Boussinesq-Basset force on the radial migration of a Stokes particle in a vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelier, F.; Angilella, J. R.; Souhar, M.

    2004-05-01

    The trajectory of an isolated solid particle dropped in the core of a vertical vortex is investigated theoretically and experimentally, in order to analyze the effect of the history force on the radial migration of the inclusion. Both the Stokes number (based on the particle radius and the fluid angular velocity) and the particle Reynolds number are small. The particle is heavier than the fluid, and is therefore expelled from the center of the vortex. An experimental device using spherical particles injected in a rotating cylindrical tank filled with silicone oil has been built. Experimental trajectories are compared to analytical solutions of the motion equations, which are obtained by making use of classical Laplace transforms. The analytical expression of the history force and the ejection rate are carried out. This force does not vanish, but increases exponentially and has to be taken into account for efficient predictions. In particular, calculations without history force overestimate particle ejection. The relative difference between the ejection rate with and without history force scales like the square root of the Stokes number, so that differences of the order of 10% are visible as soon as the Stokes number is of the order of 0.01. Also, agreement between experimental and theoretical trajectories is observed only if the acceleration term in the history integral involves the time derivative of the fluid velocity following the particle, rather than the acceleration of fluid points at the particle location, even for small particle Reynolds numbers. Finally, analytical calculations show that the particle ejection rate is more sensitive to the Boussinesq-Basset force than to Saffman's lift.

  15. Inversion of radial distribution functions to pair forces by solving the Yvon-Born-Green equation iteratively.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyung Min; Chu, Jhih-Wei

    2009-10-01

    We develop a new method to invert the target profiles of radial distribution functions (RDFs) to the pair forces between particles. The target profiles of RDFs can be obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations or experiments and the inverted pair forces can be used in molecular simulations at a coarse-grained (CG) scale. Our method is based on a variational principle that determines the mean forces between CG sites after integrating out the unwanted degrees of freedom. The solution of this variational principle has been shown to correspond to the Yvon-Born-Green (YBG) equation [Noid et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 111, 4116 (2007)]. To invert RDFs, we solve the YBG equation iteratively by running a CG MD simulation at each step of iteration. A novelty of the iterative-YBG method is that during iteration, CG forces are updated according to the YBG equation without imposing any approximation as is required by other methods. As a result, only three to ten iterations are required to achieve convergence for all cases tested in this work. Furthermore, we show that not only are the target RDFs reproduced by the iterative solution; the profiles of the three-body correlation function in the YBG equation computed from all-atom and CG simulations also have a better agreement. The iterative-YBG method is applied to compute the CG forces of four molecular liquids to illustrate its efficiency and robustness: water, ethane, ethanol, and a water/methanol mixture. Using the resulting CG forces, all of the target RDFs observed in all-atom MD simulations are reproduced. We also show that the iterative-YBG method can be applied with a virial constraint to expand the representability of a CG force field. The iterative-YBG method thus provides a general and robust framework for computing CG forces from RDFs and could be systematically generalized to go beyond pairwise forces and to include higher-body interactions in a CG force field by applying the aforementioned variational

  16. Linear stability of a circular Couette flow under a radial thermoelectric body force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, H. N.; Meyer, A.; Crumeyrolle, O.; Mutabazi, I.

    2015-03-01

    The stability of the circular Couette flow of a dielectric fluid is analyzed by a linear perturbation theory. The fluid is confined between two concentric cylindrical electrodes of infinite length with only the inner one rotating. A temperature difference and an alternating electric tension are applied to the electrodes to produce a radial dielectrophoretic body force that can induce convection in the fluid. We examine the effects of superposition of this thermoelectric force with the centrifugal force including its thermal variation. The Earth's gravity is neglected to focus on the situations of a vanishing Grashof number such as microgravity conditions. Depending on the electric field strength and of the temperature difference, critical modes are either axisymmetric or nonaxisymmetric, occurring in either stationary or oscillatory states. An energetic analysis is performed to determine the dominant destabilizing mechanism. When the inner cylinder is hotter than the outer one, the circular Couette flow is destabilized by the centrifugal force for weak and moderate electric fields. The critical mode is steady axisymmetric, except for weak fields within a certain range of the Prandtl number and of the radius ratio of the cylinders, where the mode is oscillatory and axisymmetric. The frequency of this oscillatory mode is correlated with a Brunt-Väisälä frequency due to the stratification of both the density and the electric permittivity of the fluid. Under strong electric fields, the destabilization by the dielectrophoretic force is dominant, leading to oscillatory nonaxisymmetric critical modes with a frequency scaled by the frequency of the inner-cylinder rotation. When the outer cylinder is hotter than the inner one, the instability is again driven by the centrifugal force. The critical mode is axisymmetric and either steady under weak electric fields or oscillatory under strong electric fields. The frequency of the oscillatory mode is also correlated with the

  17. Investigation on the forced response of a radial turbine under aerodynamic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chaochen; Huang, Zhi; Qi, Mingxu

    2016-04-01

    Rotor blades in a radial turbine with nozzle guide vanes typically experience harmonic aerodynamic excitations due to the rotor stator interaction. Dynamic stresses induced by the harmonic excitations can result in high cycle fatigue (HCF) of the blades. A reliable prediction method for forced response issue is essential to avoid the HCF problem. In this work, the forced response mechanisms were investigated based on a fluid structure interaction (FSI) method. Aerodynamic excitations were obtained by three-dimensional unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation with phase shifted periodic boundary conditions. The first two harmonic pressures were determined as the primary components of the excitation and applied to finite element (FE) model to conduct the computational structural dynamics (CSD) simulation. The computed results from the harmonic forced response analysis show good agreement with the predictions of Singh's advanced frequency evaluation (SAFE) diagram. Moreover, the mode superposition method used in FE simulation offers an efficient way to provide quantitative assessments of mode response levels and resonant strength.

  18. Experimental measurements of hydrodynamic radial forces and stiffness matrices for a centrifugal pump-impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamieh, D. S.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the steady-state hydrodynamic forces on a centrifugal pump impeller are presented as a function of position within two geometrically different volutes. These correspond to the forces experienced by the impeller at zero whirl frequency. The hydrodynamic force matrices derived from these measurements exhibit both diagonal and off-diagonal terms of substantial magnitude. These terms are of the form which would tend to excite a whirl motion in a rotordynamic analysis of the pump; this may be the cause of 'rough running' reported in many pumps. Static pressure measurements in the impeller discharge flow show that the hydrodynamic force on the impeller contains a substantial component due to the nonisotropy of the net momentum flux leaving the impeller. A similar breakdown of the contributions to the stiffness matrices reveals that the major component of these matrices results from the nonisotropy of the momentum flux.

  19. Method for Cleanly and Precisely Breaking Off a Rock Core Using a Radial Compressive Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Megan; Lin, Justin

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Sample Return mission has the goal to drill, break off, and retain rock core samples. After some results gained from rock core mechanics testing, the realization that scoring teeth would cleanly break off the core after only a few millimeters of penetration, and noting that rocks are weak in tension, the idea was developed to use symmetric wedging teeth in compression to weaken and then break the core at the contact plane. This concept was developed as a response to the break-off and retention requirements. The wedges wrap around the estimated average diameter of the core to get as many contact locations as possible, and are then pushed inward, radially, through the core towards one another. This starts a crack and begins to apply opposing forces inside the core to propagate the crack across the plane of contact. The advantage is in the simplicity. Only two teeth are needed to break five varieties of Mars-like rock cores with limited penetration and reasonable forces. Its major advantage is that it does not require any length of rock to be attached to the parent in order to break the core at the desired location. Test data shows that some rocks break off on their own into segments or break off into discs. This idea would grab and retain a disc, push some discs upward and others out, or grab a segment, break it at the contact plane, and retain the portion inside of the device. It also does this with few moving parts in a simple, space-efficient design. This discovery could be implemented into a coring drill bit to precisely break off and retain any size rock core.

  20. Application of a compliant foil bearing for the thrust force estimation in the single stage radial blower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łagodzinski, Jakub; Miazga, Kacper; Musiał, Izabela

    2015-08-01

    The paper presents the application of a compliant foil bearing for estimation of the thrust force in a single stage radial blower under operational conditions. The bump foil of the thrust bearing behaves as a nonlinear spring. The knowledge of the spring deflection curve allows estimation of the actual thrust force for a measured bump deflection at the given rotational speed. To acquire the deflection curve, static calibration of the axial shaft displacement sensor was performed. During the calibration, the information about voltage signals of the sensor for the given loading force was collected. The measured voltage values at different speeds and loadswere then converted into the thrust force. The results were verified by comparison to the thrust force resulting from the pressure distribution on the impeller.

  1. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the axial and radial force of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W. G.; Y He, M.; Qi, C. X.; Li, Y. B.

    2013-12-01

    Varying of the wear-ring clearance not only has a distinct effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump including the axial and radial forces. Comparing with the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some special advantages, such as the low cost, fast and high efficiency, and convenient to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study in recent years. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the force performance of the centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump with three variable styles of the wear-rings was simulated: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Comparing with the experiment, numerical results show a good agreement. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the axial force of the centrifugal pump, while has tiny effect on the radial force for all the conditions.

  2. Aerodynamically induced radial forces in a centrifugal gas compressor: Part 2 -- Computational investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Flathers, M.B.; Bache, G.E.

    1999-10-01

    Radial loads and direction of a centrifugal gas compressor containing a high specific speed mixed flow impeller and a single tongue volute were determined both experimentally and computationally at both design and off-design conditions. The experimental methodology was developed in conjunction with a traditional ASME PTC-10 closed-loop test to determine radial load and direction. The experimental study is detailed in Part 1 of this paper (Moore and Flathers, 1998). The computational method employs a commercially available, fully three-dimensional viscous code to analyze the impeller and the volute interaction. An uncoupled scheme was initially used where the impeller and volute were analyzed as separate models using a common vaneless diffuser geometry. The two calculations were then repeated until the boundary conditions at a chosen location in the common vaneless diffuser were nearly the same. Subsequently, a coupled scheme was used where the entire stage geometry was analyzed in one calculation, thus eliminating the need for manual iteration of the two independent calculations. In addition to radial load and direction information, this computational procedure also provided aerodynamic stage performance. The effect of impeller front face and rear face cavities was also quantified. The paper will discuss computational procedures, including grid generation and boundary conditions, as well as comparisons of the various computational schemes to experiment. The results of this study will show the limitations and benefits of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for determination of radial load, direction, and aerodynamic stage performance.

  3. Electromagnetic Radial Forces in a Hybrid Eight-Stator-Pole, Six-Rotor-Pole Bearingless Switched-Reluctance Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Siebert, Mark W.; Ho, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis and experimental measurement of the electromagnet force loads on the hybrid rotor in a novel bearingless switched-reluctance motor (BSRM) have been performed. A BSRM has the combined characteristics of a switched-reluctance motor and a magnetic bearing. The BSRM has an eight-pole stator and a six-pole hybrid rotor, which is composed of circular and scalloped lamination segments. The hybrid rotor is levitated using only one set of stator poles. A second set of stator poles imparts torque to the scalloped portion of the rotor, which is driven in a traditional switched reluctance manner by a processor. Analysis was done for nonrotating rotor poles that were oriented to achieve maximum and minimum radial force loads on the rotor. The objective is to assess whether simple one-dimensional magnetic circuit analysis is sufficient for preliminary evaluation of this machine, which may exhibit strong three-dimensional electromagnetic field behavior. Two magnetic circuit geometries, approximating the complex topology of the magnetic fields in and around the hybrid rotor, were employed in formulating the electromagnetic radial force equations. Reasonable agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions was obtained with typical magnetic bearing derating factors applied to the predictions.

  4. Displacement coefficients along the inner boundaries of radially cracked ring segments subject to forces and couples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.

    1978-01-01

    Displacement results of plane boundary collocation analysis are given for various locations on the inner boundaries of radially cracked ring segments (C-shaped specimens) subject to two complementary types of loading. Results are presented for ratios of outer to inner radius in the range of 1.1 to 2.5 and ratios a/W in the range 0.1 to 0.8, where a is the crack length for a specimen of wall thickness W. By combination of these results the resultant displacement coefficient or the corresponding influence coefficient can be obtained for any practical load line location of a pin-loaded specimen.

  5. Radial distribution of space-charge force in compensated positive-ion beams (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dölling, R.; Pozimski, J.; Gross, P.

    1998-02-01

    The space-charge compensated state of drifting dc beams of He+ ions of 10 keV ion energy and 0.14 and 1.5 mA current was determined with an electron beam probe, a rf resonance probe, the analysis of residual gas ion energies, and emittance measurement. The results are compatible with a basic model describing a two-dimensional multiplicity of possible self-consistent radial density distributions of beam ions, residual gas ions, and compensating electrons. The effects of electron drainage and beam current oscillations on space-charge compensation are pointed out.

  6. Collision of viscoelastic bodies: Rigorous derivation of dissipative force.

    PubMed

    Goldobin, Denis S; Susloparov, Eugeniy A; Pimenova, Anastasiya V; Brilliantov, Nikolai V

    2015-06-01

    We report a new theory of dissipative forces acting between colliding viscoelastic bodies. The impact velocity is assumed not to be large to neglect plastic deformations in the material and propagation of sound waves. We consider the general case of bodies of an arbitrary convex shape and of different materials. We develop a mathematically rigorous perturbation scheme to solve the continuum mechanics equations that deal with both displacement and displacement rate fields and accounts for the dissipation in the bulk of the material. The perturbative solution of these equations allows to go beyond the previously used quasi-static approximation and obtain the dissipative force. The derived force does not suffer from the inconsistencies of the quasi-static approximation, like the violation of the third Newton's law for the case of different materials, and depends on particle deformation and deformation rate. PMID:26087916

  7. Displacement coefficients along the inner boundaries of radially cracked ring segments subject to forces and couples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.

    1977-01-01

    Displacement results of plane boundary collocation analysis are given for various locations on the inner boundaries of radially cracked ring segments (C-shaped specimens) subject to two complementary types of loading. Results are presented for ratios of outer to inner radius R sub o/R sub i in the range of 1.1 to 2.5, and ratios a/W in the range 0.1 to 0.8 where a is the crack length for a specimen of wall thickness W. By combination of these results the resultant displacement coefficient delta or the corresponding influence coefficient, can be obtained for any practical load line location of a pin loaded specimen.

  8. Accurate Satellite-Derived Estimates of Tropospheric Ozone Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Platnick, Steven; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of the radiative forcing due to anthropogenically-produced tropospheric O3 are derived primarily from models. Here, we use tropospheric ozone and cloud data from several instruments in the A-train constellation of satellites as well as information from the GEOS-5 Data Assimilation System to accurately estimate the instantaneous radiative forcing from tropospheric O3 for January and July 2005. We improve upon previous estimates of tropospheric ozone mixing ratios from a residual approach using the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) by incorporating cloud pressure information from OMI. Since we cannot distinguish between natural and anthropogenic sources with the satellite data, our estimates reflect the total forcing due to tropospheric O3. We focus specifically on the magnitude and spatial structure of the cloud effect on both the shortand long-wave radiative forcing. The estimates presented here can be used to validate present day O3 radiative forcing produced by models.

  9. Comparison of Response Surface Construction Methods for Derivative Estimation Using Moving Least Squares, Kriging and Radial Basis Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Thiagarajan

    2005-01-01

    Response construction methods using Moving Least Squares (MLS), Kriging and Radial Basis Functions (RBF) are compared with the Global Least Squares (GLS) method in three numerical examples for derivative generation capability. Also, a new Interpolating Moving Least Squares (IMLS) method adopted from the meshless method is presented. It is found that the response surface construction methods using the Kriging and RBF interpolation yields more accurate results compared with MLS and GLS methods. Several computational aspects of the response surface construction methods also discussed.

  10. Analysis of radial and longitudinal force of plasma wakefield generated by a chirped pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemi, Leila; Afhami, Saeedeh; Eslami, Esmaeil

    2015-08-15

    In present paper, the chirp effect of an electromagnetic pulse via an analytical model of wakefield generation is studied. Different types of chirps are employed in this study. Our results show that by the use of nonlinear chirped pulse the longitudinal wakefield and focusing force is stronger than that of linear chirped pulse. It is indicated that quadratic nonlinear chirped pulses are globally much efficient than periodic nonlinear chirped pulses. Our calculations also predict that in nonlinear chirped pulse case, the overlap of focusing and accelerating regions is broader than that achieved in linear chirped pulse.

  11. Derivation of a Molecular Mechanics Force Field for Cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Cournia, Zoe; Vaiana, Andrea C.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Ullmann, G. Matthias M.

    2004-01-01

    As a necessary step toward realistic cholesterol:biomembrane simulations, we have derived CHARMM molecular mechanics force-field parameters for cholesterol. For the parametrization we use an automated method that involves fitting the molecular mechanics potential to both vibrational frequencies and eigenvector projections derived from quantum chemical calculations. Results for another polycyclic molecule, rhodamine 6G, are also given. The usefulness of the method is thus demonstrated by the use of reference data from two molecules at different levels of theory. The frequency-matching plots for both cholesterol and rhodamine 6G show overall agreement between the CHARMM and quantum chemical normal modes, with frequency matching for both molecules within the error range found in previous benchmark studies.

  12. Brachial blood pressure-independent relations between radial late systolic shoulder-derived aortic pressures and target organ changes.

    PubMed

    Norton, Gavin R; Majane, Olebogeng H I; Maseko, Muzi J; Libhaber, Carlos; Redelinghuys, Michelle; Kruger, Deirdre; Veller, Martin; Sareli, Pinhas; Woodiwiss, Angela J

    2012-04-01

    Central aortic blood pressure (BP; BPc) predicts outcomes beyond brachial BP. In this regard, the application of a generalized transfer function (GTF) to radial pulse waves for the derivation of BPc is an easy and reproducible measurement technique. However, the use of the GTF may not be appropriate in all circumstances. Although the peak of the second shoulder of the radial waveform (P2) is closely associated with BPc, and, hence, BPc may be assessed without the need for a GTF, whether P2-derived BPc is associated with adverse cardiovascular changes independent of brachial BP is uncertain. Thus, P2- and GTF-derived aortic BPs were assessed using applanation tonometry and SphygmoCor software. Left ventricular mass was indexed for height(1.7) (n=678) and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT; n=462) was determined using echocardiography and vascular ultrasound. With adjustments for nurse-derived brachial pulse pressure (PP), P2-derived central PP was independently associated with left ventricular mass indexed for height(1.7) (partial r=0.18; P<0.0001) and IMT (partial r=0.40; P<0.0001). These relations were similar to nurse-derived brachial PP-independent relations between GTF-derived central PP and target organ changes (left ventricular mass indexed for height(1.7): partial r=0.17, P<0.0001; IMT: partial r=0.37, P<0.0001). In contrast, with adjustments for central PP, nurse-derived brachial PP-target organ relations were eliminated (partial r=-0.21 to 0.05). Twenty-four-hour, day, and night PP-target organ relations did not survive adjustments for nurse-derived brachial BP. In conclusion, central PP derived from P2, which does not require a GTF, is associated with cardiovascular target organ changes independent of brachial BP. Thus, when assessing adverse cardiovascular effects of aortic BP independent of brachial BP, P2-derived measures may complement GTF-derived measures of aortic BP. PMID:22331378

  13. Analysis of bearing stiffness variations, contact forces and vibrations in radially loaded double row rolling element bearings with raceway defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Dick; Howard, Carl; Sawalhi, Nader; Moazen Ahmadi, Alireza; Singh, Sarabjeet

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating and analyzing the quasi-static load distribution and varying stiffness of a radially loaded double row bearing with a raceway defect of varying depth, length, and surface roughness. The method is applied to ball bearings on gearbox and fan test rigs seeded with line or extended outer raceway defects. When balls pass through the defect and lose all or part of their load carrying capacity, the load is redistributed between the loaded balls. This includes balls positioned outside the defect such that good raceway sections are subjected to increased loading when a defect is present. The defective bearing stiffness varies periodically at the ball spacing, and only differs from the good bearing case when balls are positioned in the defect. In this instance, the stiffness decreases in the loaded direction and increases in the unloaded direction. For an extended spall, which always has one or more balls positioned in the defect, this results in an average stiffness over the ball spacing period that is lower in the loaded direction in comparison to both the line spall and good bearing cases. The variation in bearing stiffness due to the defect produces parametric excitations of the bearing assembly. The qualitative character of the vibration response correlates to the character of the stiffness variations. Rapid stiffness changes at a defect exit produce impulses. Slower stiffness variations due to large wavelength waviness features in an extended spall produce low frequency excitation which results in defect components in the velocity spectra. The contact forces fluctuate around the quasi-static loads on the balls, with rapid stiffness changes producing high magnitude impulsive force fluctuations. Furthermore, it is shown that analyzing the properties of the dynamic model linearized at the quasi-static solutions provides greater insight into the time-frequency characteristics of the vibration response. This is demonstrated by relating

  14. Radial derivatives of the mouse ventral pallium traced with Dbx1-LacZ reporters.

    PubMed

    Puelles, Luis; Medina, Loreta; Borello, Ugo; Legaz, Isabel; Teissier, Anne; Pierani, Alessandra; Rubenstein, John L R

    2016-09-01

    The progeny of Dbx1-expressing progenitors was studied in the developing mouse pallium, using two transgenic mouse lines: (1) Dbx1(nlslacZ) mice, in which the gene of the β-galactosidase reporter (LacZ) is inserted directly under the control of the Dbx1 promoter, allowing short-term lineage tracing of Dbx1-derived cells; and (2) Dbx1(CRE) mice crossed with a Cre-dependent reporter strain (ROSA26(loxP-stop-loxP-LacZ)), in which the Dbx1-derived cells result permanently labeled (Bielle et al., 2005). We thus examined in detail the derivatives of the postulated longitudinal ventral pallium (VPall) sector, which has been defined among other features by its selective ventricular zone expression of Dbx1 (the recent ascription by Puelles, 2014 of the whole olfactory cortex primordium to the VPall was tested). Earlier notions about a gradiental caudorostral reduction of Dbx1 signal were corroborated, so that virtually no signal was found at the olfactory bulb and the anterior olfactory area. The piriform cortex was increasingly labeled caudalwards. The only endopiriform grisea labeled were the ventral endopiriform nucleus and the bed nucleus of the external capsule. Anterior and basolateral parts of the whole pallial amygdala also were densely marked, in contrast to the negative posterior parts of these pallial amygdalar nuclei (leaving apart medial amygdalar parts ascribed to subpallial or extratelencephalic sources of Dbx1-derived GABAergic and non-GABAergic neurons). Alternative tentative interpretations are discussed to explain the partial labeling obtained of both olfactory and amygdaloid structures. This includes the hypothesis of an as yet undefined part of the pallium, potentially responsible for the posterior amygdala, or the hypothesis that the VPall may not be wholly characterized by Dbx1 expression (this gene not being necessary for VPall molecular distinctness and histogenetic potency), which would leave a dorsal Dbx1-negative VPall subdomain of variable size

  15. Multiple scale derivation of the relativistic ponderomotive force

    SciTech Connect

    Startsev, E.A.; McKinstrie, C.J.

    1997-06-01

    In this paper we use simple physical reasoning to deduce a formula for the ponderomotive force exerted by an intense laser pulse on an electron. We verify this formula numerically, for three cases of current interest, and analytically, using the method of multiple scales. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Astrometric light-travel time signature of sources in nonlinear motion. I. Derivation of the effect and radial motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglada-Escudé, G.; Torra, J.

    2006-04-01

    Context: .Very precise planned space astrometric missions and recent improvements in imaging capabilities require a detailed review of the assumptions of classical astrometric modeling.Aims.We show that Light-Travel Time must be taken into account in modeling the kinematics of astronomical objects in nonlinear motion, even at stellar distances.Methods.A closed expression to include Light-Travel Time in the current astrometric models with nonlinear motion is provided. Using a perturbative approach the expression of the Light-Travel Time signature is derived. We propose a practical form of the astrometric modelling to be applied in astrometric data reduction of sources at stellar distances(d>1 pc).Results.We show that the Light-Travel Time signature is relevant at μ as accuracy (or even at mas) depending on the time span of the astrometric measurements. We explain how information on the radial motion of a source can be obtained. Some estimates are provided for known nearby binary systemsConclusions.Given the obtained results, it is clear that this effect must be taken into account in interpreting precise astrometric measurements. The effect is particularly relevant in measurements performed by the planned astrometric space missions (GAIA, SIM, JASMINE, TPF/DARWIN). An objective criterion is provided to quickly evaluate whether the Light-Travel Time modeling is required for a given source or system.

  17. A new model of Earth's radial conductivity structure derived from over 10 yr of satellite and observatory magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püthe, Christoph; Kuvshinov, Alexey; Khan, Amir; Olsen, Nils

    2015-12-01

    We present a new model of the radial (1-D) conductivity structure of Earth's mantle. This model is derived from more than 10 yr of magnetic measurements from the satellites Ørsted, CHAMP, SAC-C and the Swarm trio as well as the global network of geomagnetic observatories. After removal of core and crustal field as predicted by a recent field model, we fit the magnetic data with spherical harmonic coefficients describing ring current activity and associated induction effects and estimate global C-responses at periods between 1.5 and 150 d. The C-responses are corrected for 3-D effects due to induction in the oceans and inverted for a 1-D model of mantle conductivity using both probabilistic and deterministic methods. Very similar results are obtained, consisting of a highly resistive upper mantle, an increase in conductivity in and beneath the transition zone and a conductive lower mantle. Analysis of the Hessian of the cost function reveals that the data are most sensitive to structures at depths between 800 and 1200 km, in agreement with the results obtained from the probabilistic approach. Preliminary interpretation of the inverted conductivity structure based on laboratory-based conductivity profiles shows that the recovered structure in the lower mantle either requires higher temperatures or the presence of material of high conductivity related to ponding of carbonate melts below the transition zone.

  18. A new model of Earth's radial conductivity structure derived from over 10 years of satellite and observatory magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püthe, Christoph; Kuvshinov, Alexey; Olsen, Nils; Khan, Amir

    2015-04-01

    We present a new model of the radial (1-D) conductivity structure of Earth's mantle. This model was derived from more than ten years of magnetic measurements taken by the satellites Ørsted, CHAMP, SAC-C and the Swarm trio as well as the global network of geomagnetic observatories. After removal of core and crustal field as predicted by a recent field model we fit the data with spherical harmonic coefficients describing ring current activity and associated induction effects, and estimate global C-responses at periods between 1.5 days and 150 days. An iterative approach is used to correct the estimated C-responses for 3-D effects arising from induction in a heterogeneous surface shell that takes into account the distribution of oceans and continents. We invert the corrected C-responses for a 1-D model of mantle conductivity using both probabilistic and deterministic methods. The different methods yield very similar results, consisting of a highly resistive upper mantle, a conductive lower mantle, and an increase in conductivity in and beneath the transition zone. Analysis of the Hessian of the cost function reveals that the data are most sensitive to structures at depths between 700 km and 1200 km, in agreement with the results obtained from the probabilistic approach. The recovered models feature a marked kink in this well-resolved depth range.

  19. Stromal derived factor-1α in hippocampus radial glial cells in vitro regulates the migration of neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Jin, Guo-Hua; Zou, Lin-Qing; Zhang, Xiao-Qing; Li, Hao-Ming; Tao, Xue-Lei; Zhang, Xin-Hua; Qin, Jian-Bing; Tian, Mei-Ling

    2015-06-01

    Stromal derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), a critical chemokine that promotes cell homing to target tissues, was presumed to be involved in the traumatic brain injury cortex. In this study, we determined the expression of SDF-1α in the hippocampus after transection of the fimbria fornix (FF). Realtime PCR and ELISA showed that mRNA transcription and SDF-1α proteins increased significantly after FF transection. In vitro, the expression of SDF-1α in radial glial cells (RGCs) incubated with deafferented hippocampus extracts was observed to be greater than in those incubated with normal hippocampus extracts. The co-culture of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and RGCs indicated that the extracts of deafferented hippocampus induced more NPCs migrating toward RGCs than the normal extracts. Suppression or overexpression of SDF-1α in RGCs markedly either decreased or increased, respectively, the migration of NPCs. These results suggest that after FF transection, SDF-1α in the deafferented hippocampus was upregulated and might play an important role in RGC induction of NPC migration; therefore, SDF-1α is a target for additional research for determining new therapy for brain injuries. PMID:25604551

  20. Derivation of Equivalent Continuous Dilution for Cyclic, Unsteady Driving Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Technical University of Denmark, Department of Civil Engineering; Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2010-12-15

    This article uses an analytical approach to determine the dilution of an unsteadily-generated solute in an unsteady solvent stream, under cyclic temporal boundary conditions. The goal is to find a simplified way of showing equivalence of such a process to a reference case where equivalent dilution is defined as a weighted average concentration. This derivation has direct applications to the ventilation of indoor spaces where indoor air quality and energy consumption cannot in general be simultaneously optimized. By solving the equation we can specify how much air we need to use in one ventilation pattern compared to another to obtain same indoor air quality. Because energy consumption is related to the amount of air exchanged by a ventilation system, the equation can be used as a first step to evaluate different ventilation patterns effect on the energy consumption. The use of the derived equation is demonstrated by representative cases of interest in both residential and non-residential buildings.

  1. Bounce-averaged approach to radial diffusion modeling: From a new derivation of the instantaneous rate of change of the third adiabatic invariant to the characterization of the radial diffusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejosne, SolèNe; Boscher, Daniel; Maget, Vincent; Rolland, Guy

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a new approach for the derivation of the instantaneous rate of change of the third adiabatic invariant is introduced. It is based on the tracking of the bounce-averaged motion of guiding centers with assumptions that are only kept to the necessary conditions for definition and conservation of the first two adiabatic invariants. The derivation is first given in the case of trapped equatorial particles drifting in a time varying magnetic field in the absence of electrostatic potential. It is then extended to more general cases including time varying electric potentials and non-equatorial particles. Finally, the general formulation of the third adiabatic invariant time derivative is related to the description of the radial diffusion process occurring in the radiation belts. It highlights the links that exist between previous theoretical works with the objective of a better understanding of the radial diffusion process. A theoretical validation in the specific case of equatorial particles drifting in a magnetic field model whose disturbed part is limited to the first terms of a spherical expansion is also presented.

  2. A Simple Adaptive Transfer Function for Deriving the Central Blood Pressure Waveform from a Radial Blood Pressure Waveform.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingwu; Rose, William C; Fetics, Barry; Kass, David A; Chen, Chen-Huan; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Generalized transfer functions (GTFs) are available to compute the more relevant central blood pressure (BP) waveform from a more easily measured radial BP waveform. However, GTFs are population averages and therefore may not adapt to variations in pulse pressure (PP) amplification (ratio of radial to central PP). A simple adaptive transfer function (ATF) was developed. First, the transfer function is defined in terms of the wave travel time and reflection coefficient parameters of an arterial model. Then, the parameters are estimated from the radial BP waveform by exploiting the observation that central BP waveforms exhibit exponential diastolic decays. The ATF was assessed using the original data that helped popularize the GTF. These data included radial BP waveforms and invasive reference central BP waveforms from cardiac catheterization patients. The data were divided into low, middle, and high PP amplification groups. The ATF estimated central BP with greater accuracy than GTFs in the low PP amplification group (e.g., central systolic BP and PP root-mean-square-errors of 3.3 and 4.2 mm Hg versus 6.2 and 7.1 mm Hg; p ≤ 0.05) while showing similar accuracy in the higher PP amplification groups. The ATF may permit more accurate, non-invasive central BP monitoring in elderly and hypertensive patients. PMID:27624389

  3. Branched chain amino acids improve radial-arm maze acquisition and water maze forced-choice learning in rat offspring exposed in utero to hyperphenylalaninemia.

    PubMed

    Vorhees, C V; Acuff-Smith, K D; Weisenburger, W P; Minck, D R; Berry, H K

    1992-01-01

    Maternal phenylketonuria results in a high incidence of children born mentally retarded. We showed that the large neutral amino acids valine, isoleucine, and leucine (VIL) ameliorate the effects of intrauterine hyperphenylalaninemia in rats on a test of complex maze learning. To further test the ameliorative effects of VIL on intrauterine CNS development during hyperphenylalaninemia, gravid rats were administered a phenylalanine/p-chlorophenylalanine (index group) supplemented diet with or without VIL added. Controls were given standard diet with or without VIL. All groups were pair-fed to the index group. As adults, the progeny exposed in utero to hyperphenylalaninemia showed characteristic learning impairments in a complex water (Cincinnati) maze on forced and elective-choice phases of the task and deficits in radial-arm maze and Morris maze acquisition, whereas those exposed to hyperphenylalaninemia combined with VIL showed no deficits in the forced-choice phase of Cincinnati maze learning and no evidence of radial-arm maze deficits. However, the improvement was not complete, with no ameliorative effects obtained on the elective-choice phase of the Cincinnati maze or on the Morris hidden platform test. No deficits were seen on phases containing test trials for memory function (Olton and Morris mazes). The acquisition differences occurred in the absence of any effects of VIL on maternal weight gain during gestation, maternal serum amino acid concentrations of phenylalanine or tyrosine, or effects on offspring growth. VIL alone produced no adverse or enhancing effects on learning or memory. Based on these data it was concluded that the VIL supplement continues to show promise as a potential treatment for intrauterinely acquired mental deficiency associated with maternal phenylketonuria. PMID:1593977

  4. Measurement of radial deformation of single-wall carbon nanotubes induced by intertube van der Waals forces

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Y. Y.; Kim, T.; Zuo, J. M.; Zhou, W.; Huang, Y.

    2008-04-15

    A cylindrical single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) deforms in a nanotube bundle by van der Waals forces. The deformation is hard to measure, but is required in order to understand the properties of bundles. Here, we show that such deformations can be measured from changes in electron diffraction intensities. We demonstrate this for a bundle of two SWCNTs (d=2.05 and 1.56 nm). Deformation model predicted by atomistic simulations is scaled to fit the experiment. We show that the best fit gives flattening values of 0.7 and 0.35 A at the middle of the binding surface for the two SWCNTs.

  5. The Sensitivity of Simulated Ocean Biogeochemistry to Forcing Fields Derived from NCEP and MERRA Reanalysis Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson; Casey, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Ocean biogeochemistry models are typically forced by atmospheric and oceanic data derived from reanalysis products. For the NASA Ocean Biogeochemistry Model (NOBM) such reanalysis forcing fields include: surface wind stress, sea surface temperature, ice distributions, shortwave radiation, surface wind speeds and surface atmospheric pressure. Additionally, proper computation of ocean irradiance requires reanalysis products of relative humidity and precipitable water (in addition to aerosol and cloud information which is derived from satellite data). The question posed here is, does the choice of reanalysis products make a difference in the representation of ocean biology and biogeochemistry? NOBM was forced by NCEP and MERRA reanalysis products for the period 2002-2009. We find that in 2009 global distributions and abundances of biological variables (total chlorophyll and nutrients) and carbon (dissolved inorganic and organic carbon and surface pCO2) were similar between the two different forcing fields. Global statistical comparisons with satellite and in situ data also showed negligible differences.

  6. Use of first derivative of displacement vs. force profiles to determine deformation behavior of compressed powders.

    PubMed

    Gharaibeh, Shadi F; Aburub, Aktham

    2013-03-01

    Displacement (D) vs. force (F) profiles obtained during compaction of powders have been reported by several researchers. These profiles are usually used to obtain mechanical energies associated with the compaction of powders. In this work, we obtained displacement-force data associated with the compression of six powders; Avicel PH101, Avicel PH301, pregelatinized corn starch, anhydrous lactose, dicalcium phosphate, and mannitol. The first three powders are known to deform predominantly by plastic behavior while the later ones are known to deform predominantly by brittle fracture. Displacement-force data was utilized to perform in-die Heckel analysis and to calculate the first derivative (dD/dF) of displacement-force plots. First derivative results were then plotted against mean force (F') at each point and against 1/F' at compression forces between 1 and 20 kN. Results of the in-die Heckle analysis are in very good agreement with the known deformation behavior of the compressed materials. First derivative plots show that materials that deform predominantly by plastic behavior have first derivative values (0.0006-0.0016 mm/ N) larger than those of brittle materials (0.0004 mm/N). Moreover, when dD/dF is plotted against 1/F' for each powder, a linear correlation can be obtained (R2=>0.98). The slopes of the dD/dF vs. 1/F' plots for plastically deforming materials are relatively larger than those for materials that deform by brittle behavior. It is concluded that first derivative plots of displacement-force profiles can be used to determine deformation behavior of powders. PMID:23341076

  7. Towards 3D charge localization by a method derived from atomic force microscopy: the electrostatic force distance curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Boudou, L.; Makasheva, K.; Teyssedre, G.

    2014-11-01

    Charges injection and accumulation in the dielectric remains a critical issue, mainly because these phenomena are involved in a great number of failure mechanisms in cables or electronic components. Achieving a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to charge injection, transport and trapping under electrical stress and of the relevant interface phenomena is a high priority. The classical methods used for space charge density profile measurements have a limited spatial resolution, which prevents them being used for investigating thin dielectric layers or interface processes. Thus, techniques derived from atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been investigated more and more for this kind of application, but so far they have been limited by their lack of in-depth sensitivity. In this paper a new method for space charge probing is described, the electrostatic force distance curve (EFDC), which is based on electrostatic force measurements using AFM. A comparison with the results obtained using kelvin force microscopy (KFM) allowed us to highlight the fact that EFDC is sensitive to charges localized in the third-dimension.

  8. Numerical derivation of forces on particles and agglomerates in a resonant acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2013-10-01

    Particles and agglomerates are investigated in gaseous acoustic flow fields. Acoustic fields exert forces on solid objects, which can influence the shape of the exposed bodies, even to the point of breakage of the structures. Motivated by experimentally observed breakage of agglomerates in an acoustic levitator (f = 20 kHz), a numerical study is presented that derives the acoustic forces on a complex model agglomerate from the pressure and velocity fields of a resonant standing ultrasound wave, calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is distinguished between the drag and lift/lateral forces on the overall agglomerate and on the different primary particles of the model.

  9. Carbon nanofibers with radially grown graphene sheets derived from electrospinning for aqueous supercapacitors with high working voltage and energy density.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Qiu, Yejun; Yu, Jie; Deng, Xianyu; Dai, Chenglong; Bai, Xuedong

    2013-06-01

    Improvement of energy density is an urgent task for developing advanced supercapacitors. In this paper, aqueous supercapacitors with high voltage of 1.8 V and energy density of 29.1 W h kg(-1) were fabricated based on carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and Na2SO4 electrolyte. The CNFs with radially grown graphene sheets (GSs) and small average diameter down to 11 nm were prepared by electrospinning and carbonization in NH3. The radially grown GSs contain between 1 and a few atomic layers with their edges exposed on the surface. The CNFs are doped with nitrogen and oxygen with different concentrations depending on the carbonizing temperature. The supercapacitors exhibit excellent cycling performance with the capacity retention over 93.7% after 5000 charging-discharging cycles. The unique structure, possessing radially grown GSs, small diameter, and heteroatom doping of the CNFs, and application of neutral electrolyte account for the high voltage and energy density of the present supercapacitors. The present supercapacitors are of high promise for practical application due to the high energy density and the advantages of neutral electrolyte including low cost, safety, low corrosivity, and convenient assembly in air. PMID:23624805

  10. Carbon nanofibers with radially grown graphene sheets derived from electrospinning for aqueous supercapacitors with high working voltage and energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Qiu, Yejun; Yu, Jie; Deng, Xianyu; Dai, Chenglong; Bai, Xuedong

    2013-05-01

    Improvement of energy density is an urgent task for developing advanced supercapacitors. In this paper, aqueous supercapacitors with high voltage of 1.8 V and energy density of 29.1 W h kg-1 were fabricated based on carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and Na2SO4 electrolyte. The CNFs with radially grown graphene sheets (GSs) and small average diameter down to 11 nm were prepared by electrospinning and carbonization in NH3. The radially grown GSs contain between 1 and a few atomic layers with their edges exposed on the surface. The CNFs are doped with nitrogen and oxygen with different concentrations depending on the carbonizing temperature. The supercapacitors exhibit excellent cycling performance with the capacity retention over 93.7% after 5000 charging-discharging cycles. The unique structure, possessing radially grown GSs, small diameter, and heteroatom doping of the CNFs, and application of neutral electrolyte account for the high voltage and energy density of the present supercapacitors. The present supercapacitors are of high promise for practical application due to the high energy density and the advantages of neutral electrolyte including low cost, safety, low corrosivity, and convenient assembly in air.

  11. Gravitational self-force in nonvacuum spacetimes: An effective field theory derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Peter

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we investigate the motion of small compact objects in nonvacuum spacetimes using methods from effective field theory in curved spacetime. Although a vacuum formulation is sufficient in many astrophysical contexts, there are applications such as the role of the self-force in enforcing cosmic censorship in the context of the overcharging problem, which necessitate an extension into the nonvacuum regime. The defining feature of the self-force problem in nonvacuum spacetimes is the coupling between gravitational and nongravitational field perturbations. The formulation of the self-force problem for nonvacuum spacetimes was recently provided in simultaneous papers by Zimmerman and Poisson [Gravitational self-force in nonvacuum spacetimes, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084030 (2014)] and Linz, Friedmann, and Wiseman [Combined gravitational and electromagnetic self-force on charged particles in electrovac spacetimes, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084031 (2014)]. Here we distinguish ourselves by working with the effective action rather than the field equations. The formalism utilizes the multi-index notation developed by Zimmerman and Poisson [Gravitational self-force in nonvacuum spacetimes, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084030 (2014) to accommodate the coupling between the different fields. Using dimensional regularization, we arrive at a finite expression for the local self-force expressed in terms of multi-index quantities evaluated in the background spacetime. We then apply the formalism to compute the coupled gravitational self-force in two explicit cases. First, we calculate the self-force on a massive particle possessing scalar charge and moving in a scalarvac spacetime. We then derive an expression for the self-force on an electrically charged, massive particle moving in an electrovac spacetime. In both cases, the force is expressed as a sum of local terms involving tensors defined in the background spacetime and evaluated at the current position of the particle, as well as tail integrals

  12. THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY. William F. McDonnell Human Studies Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, RTP, NC 27711.
    Short-term exposure to ozone results in a neurally-mediated decrease in the ab...

  13. Satellite-derived aerosol radiative forcing from the 2004 British Columbia wildfires

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, S.; Leighton, H.

    2008-01-01

    The British Columbia wildfires of 2004 was one of the largest wildfire events in the last ten years in Canada. Both the shortwave and longwave smoke aerosol radiative forcing at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) are investigated using data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments. Relationships between the radiative forcing fluxes (??F) and wildfire aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 0.55 ??m (??0.55) are deduced for both noontime instantaneous forcing and diurnally averaged forcing. The noontime averaged instantaneous shortwave and longwave smoke aerosol radiative forcing at the TOA are 45.8??27.5 W m-2 and -12.6??6.9 W m-2, respectively for a selected study area between 62??N and 68??N in latitude and 125??W and 145??W in longitude over three mainly clear-sky days (23-25 June). The derived diurnally averaged smoke aerosol shortwave radiative forcing is 19.9??12.1 W m-2 for a mean ??0.55 of 1.88??0.71 over the same time period. The derived ??F-?? relationship can be implemented in the radiation scheme used in regional climate models to assess the effect of wildfire aerosols.

  14. Accuracy of temperature-derivative of radial distribution function calculated under approximations in Ornstein-Zernike theory for one-component Lennard-Jones fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Tatsuhiko; Miyazaki, Sanae

    2016-08-01

    The accuracy of the temperature derivative of radial distribution function obtained under hypernetted chain (HNC), Kovalenko-Hirata (KH), Percus-Yevick (PY) and Verlet-modified (VM) closure approximations is examined for one-component Lennard-Jones fluid. As relevant thermodynamic quantities, constant-volume heat capacity and thermal pressure coefficient are investigated in terms of their accuracy under the above four approximations. It is found that HNC and KH closures overestimate these quantities, whereas PY closure tends to underestimate them. VM closure predicts rather accurately the quantities. A significant cancellation is observed along the integration for the above quantities under HNC and KH closures, especially at high density state.

  15. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  16. Radial dependence of solar energetic particles derived from the 15 March 2013 solar energetic particle event and global MHD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Liou, Kan; Wu, S. T.; Dryer, Murray; Plunkett, Simon

    2016-03-01

    We study an unusual solar energetic particle (SEP) event that was associated with the coronal mass ejection (CME) on March 15, 2013. Enhancements of the SEP fluxes were first detected by the ACE spacecraft at 14:00 UT, ˜7 hours after the onset of the CME (07:00 UT), and the SEP's peak intensities were recorded ˜36 hours after the onset of the CME. Our recent study showed that the CME-driven shock Mach number, based on a global three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation, is well correlated with the time-intensity of 10-30 MeV and 30-80 MeV protons. Here we focus on the radial dependence (r-α) of 4He (3.43-41.2 MeV/n) and O (7.30-89.8 MeV/n) energetic particles from ACE/SIS. It is found that the scaling factor (α) ranges between 2 and 4 for most of the energy channels. We also found that the correlation coefficients tend to increase with SEP energies.

  17. Geometric derivation of the microscopic stress: A covariant central force decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Vanegas, Juan M.; Arroyo, Marino

    2016-08-01

    We revisit the derivation of the microscopic stress, linking the statistical mechanics of particle systems and continuum mechanics. The starting point in our geometric derivation is the Doyle-Ericksen formula, which states that the Cauchy stress tensor is the derivative of the free-energy with respect to the ambient metric tensor and which follows from a covariance argument. Thus, our approach to define the microscopic stress tensor does not rely on the statement of balance of linear momentum as in the classical Irving-Kirkwood-Noll approach. Nevertheless, the resulting stress tensor satisfies balance of linear and angular momentum. Furthermore, our approach removes the ambiguity in the definition of the microscopic stress in the presence of multibody interactions by naturally suggesting a canonical and physically motivated force decomposition into pairwise terms, a key ingredient in this theory. As a result, our approach provides objective expressions to compute a microscopic stress for a system in equilibrium and for force-fields expanded into multibody interactions of arbitrarily high order. We illustrate the proposed methodology with molecular dynamics simulations of a fibrous protein using a force-field involving up to 5-body interactions.

  18. Seasonal variation of surface and atmospheric cloud radiative forcing over the globe derived from satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Shashi K.; Staylor, W. Frank; Darnell, Wayne L.; Wilber, Anne C.; Ritchey, Nancy A.

    1993-01-01

    Global distributions of surface and atmospheric cloud radiative forcing parameters have been derived using parameterized radiation models with satellite meteorological data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, and directly measured top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Specifically, shortwave, longwave, and total cloud forcing at the surface, and column-averaged values of longwave cloud forcing of the atmosphere were derived for the midseasonal months of April, July, and October 1985 and January 1986, covering a complete annual cycle. Seasonal variability is illustrated by comparing the results for July 1985 and January 1986, which represent the seasonal extremes. Surface shortwave cloud forcing is always negative, representing a cooling of the surface, with strongest cooling (-120 to -180 W/sq m) occurring over midlatitude storm tracks of the summer hemisphere. Surface longwave cloud forcing is always positive, representing a warming of the surface, with strongest warming (60 to 75 W/sq m) occurring over storm tracks of the winter hemisphere. Zonal averages show the entire summer hemisphere dominated by shortwave cooling, the middle and high latitudes of the winter hemisphere dominated by longwave warming, and a broad zone of transition in between. The globally averaged total cloud forcing amounts to a cooling throughout the year, ranging from a low of about -12 W/sq m for July 1985 to a high of about -25 W/sq m for January 1986. The longwave cloud forcing of the atmosphere shows a strong warming over deep convective regions in the tropics and a moderate cooling outside the tropics, amounting to a weak cooling (-2 to -5 W/sq m) in the global average. Comparisons of the results with general circulation model simulations show broad qualitative agreement regarding the locations of prominent warming and cooling regions. Quantitative comparisons, on the other hand, show significant differences between the

  19. Proximity force approximation for the Casimir energy as a derivative expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosco, César D.; Lombardo, Fernando C.; Mazzitelli, Francisco D.

    2011-11-01

    The proximity force approximation (PFA) has been widely used as a tool to evaluate the Casimir force between smooth objects at small distances. In spite of being intuitively easy to grasp, it is generally believed to be an uncontrolled approximation. Indeed, its validity has only been tested in particular examples, by confronting its predictions with the next-to-leading-order (NTLO) correction extracted from numerical or analytical solutions obtained without using the PFA. In this article we show that the PFA and its NTLO correction may be derived within a single framework, as the first two terms in a derivative expansion. To that effect, we consider the Casimir energy for a vacuum scalar field with Dirichlet conditions on a smooth curved surface described by a function ψ in front of a plane. By regarding the Casimir energy as a functional of ψ, we show that the PFA is the leading term in a derivative expansion of this functional. We also obtain the general form of the corresponding NTLO correction, which involves two derivatives of ψ. We show, by evaluating this correction term for particular geometries, that it properly reproduces the known corrections to PFA obtained from exact evaluations of the energy.

  20. Sliding-mode and proportional-derivative-type motion control with radial basis function neural network based estimators for wheeled vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamosoaji, Anugrah K.; Thuong Cat, Pham; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2014-12-01

    An obstacle avoidance problem of rear-steered wheeled vehicles in consideration of the presence of uncertainties is addressed. Modelling errors and additional uncertainties are taken into consideration. Controller designs for driving and steering motors are designed. A proportional-derivative-type driving motor controller and a sliding-mode steering controller combined with radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) based estimators are proposed. The convergence properties of the RBFNN-based estimators are proven by the Stone-Weierstrass theorem. The stability of the proposed control law is proven using Lyapunov stability analysis. The obstacle avoidance strategy utilising the sliding surface adjustment to an existing navigation method is presented. It is concluded that the driving velocity and steering-angle performances of the proposed control system are satisfactory.

  1. Filament lattice of frog striated muscle. Radial forces, lattice stability, and filament compression in the A-band of relaxed and rigor muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Millman, B M; Irving, T C

    1988-01-01

    Repulsive pressure in the A-band filament lattice of relaxed frog skeletal muscle has been measured as a function of interfilament spacing using an osmotic shrinking technique. Much improved chemical skinning was obtained when the muscles were equilibrated in the presence of EGTA before skinning. The lattice shrank with increasing external osmotic pressure. At any specific pressure, the lattice spacing in relaxed muscle was smaller than that of muscle in rigor, except at low pressures where the reverse was found. The lattice spacing was the same in the two states at a spacing close to that found in vivo. The data were consistent with an electrostatic repulsion over most of the pressure range. For relaxed muscle, the data lay close to electrostatic pressure curves for a thick filament charge diameter of approximately 26 nm, suggesting that charges stabilizing the lattice are situated about midway along the thick filament projections (HMM-S1). At low pressures, observed spacings were larger than calculated, consistent with the idea that thick filament projections move away from the filament backbone. Under all conditions studied, relaxed and rigor, at short and very long sarcomere lengths, the filament lattice could be modeled by assuming a repulsive electrostatic pressure, a weak attractive pressure, and a radial stiffness of the thick filaments (projections) that differed between relaxed and rigor conditions. Each thick filament projection could be compressed by approximately 5 or 2.6 nm requiring a force of 1.3 or 80 pN for relaxed and rigor conditions respectively. PMID:3264728

  2. [Diagnosis of phosphorus nutrition in winter wheat based on first derivative spectra and radial basis function neural network].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Chang, Qing-Rui; Guo, Man; Xing, Dong-Xing; Yuan, Yong-Sheng

    2011-04-01

    The hyperspectral leaf reflectance in winter wheat was measured under 4 phosphorus levels at different growth stages, i.e. revival stage, jointing stage, tassel stage and grouting stage. And their first derivative of spectra were calculated and denoised by the threshold denoising method based on wavelet transform. After studying characteristics of the two kinds of spectra resulting from different phosphorus contents levels as well as correlations between leaf phosphorus contents and spectral values, sensitive wavebands and four kinds of absorption areas were extracted. Then the four kinds of absorption areas and their corresponding leaf phosphorus content were normalized and input to RBFNN. Results show that: (1) Sensitive wavebands for monitoring leaf phosphorus contents in original leaf spectra are 426-435 and 669-680 nm. (2) Sensitive wavebands in first derivative of spectra are 481-493 and 685-696 nm. (3) Trained RBFNN can learn and seize the linearity/non-linearity mapping between samples and output targets. PMID:21714267

  3. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  4. Development of a Forced Oscillation System for Measuring Dynamic Derivatives of Fluidic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trieu, B. C.; Tyler, T. R.; Stewart, B. K.; Chamock, J. K.; Fisher, D. W.; Heim, E. H.; Brandon, J.; Grafton, S. B.

    2006-01-01

    A new Forced Oscillation System (FOS) has been designed and built at NASA Langley Research Center that provides new capabilities for aerodynamic researchers to investigate the dynamic derivatives of vehicle configurations. Test vehicles may include high performance and general aviation aircraft, re-entry spacecraft, submarines and other fluidic vehicles. The measured data from forced oscillation testing is used in damping characteristic studies and in simulation databases for control algorithm development and performance analyses. The newly developed FOS hardware provides new flexibility for conducting dynamic derivative studies. The design is based on a tracking principle where a desired motion profile is achieved via a fast closed-loop positional controller. The motion profile for the tracking system is numerically generated and thus not limited to sinusoidal motion. This approach permits non-traditional profiles such as constant velocity and Schroeder sweeps. Also, the new system permits changes in profile parameters including nominal offset angle, waveform, and associated parameters such as amplitude and frequency. Most importantly, the changes may be made remotely without halting the FOS and the tunnel. System requirements, system analysis, and the resulting design are addressed for a new FOS in the 12-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). The overall system including mechanical, electrical, and control subsystems is described. The design is complete, and the FOS has been built and installed in the 12-Foot LSWT. System integration and testing have verified design intent and safe operation. Currently it is being validated for wind-tunnel operations and aerodynamic testing. The system is a potential major enhancement to forced oscillation studies. The productivity gain from the motion profile automation will shorten the testing cycles needed for control surface and aircraft control algorithm development. The new motion capabilities also will serve as a test bed for

  5. On the use of the proximity force approximation for deriving limits to short-range gravitational-like interactions from sphere-plane Casimir force experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Onofrio, Roberto

    2009-09-15

    We discuss the role of the proximity force approximation in deriving limits to the existence of Yukawian forces--predicted in the submillimeter range by many unification models--from Casimir force experiments using the sphere-plane geometry. Two forms of this approximation are discussed, the first used in most analyses of the residuals from the Casimir force experiments performed so far, and the second recently discussed in this context in R. Decca et al.[Phys. Rev. D 79, 124021 (2009)]. We show that the former form of the proximity force approximation overestimates the expected Yukawa force and that the relative deviation from the exact Yukawa force is of the same order of magnitude, in the realistic experimental settings, as the relative deviation expected between the exact Casimir force and the Casimir force evaluated in the proximity force approximation. This implies both a systematic shift making the actual limits to the Yukawa force weaker than claimed so far, and a degree of uncertainty in the {alpha}-{lambda} plane related to the handling of the various approximations used in the theory for both the Casimir and the Yukawa forces. We further argue that the recently discussed form for the proximity force approximation is equivalent, for a geometry made of a generic object interacting with an infinite planar slab, to the usual exact integration of any additive two-body interaction, without any need to invoke approximation schemes. If the planar slab is of finite size, an additional source of systematic error arises due to the breaking of the planar translational invariance of the system, and we finally discuss to what extent this may affect limits obtained on power-law and Yukawa forces.

  6. COFFDROP: A Coarse-Grained Nonbonded Force Field for Proteins Derived from All-Atom Explicit-Solvent Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe the derivation of a set of bonded and nonbonded coarse-grained (CG) potential functions for use in implicit-solvent Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acids. Bonded potential functions were derived from 1 μs MD simulations of each of the 20 canonical amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms; nonbonded potential functions were derived from 1 μs MD simulations of every possible pairing of the amino acids (231 different systems). The angle and dihedral probability distributions and radial distribution functions sampled during MD were used to optimize a set of CG potential functions through use of the iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method. The optimized set of potential functions—which we term COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representation Of Proteins)—quantitatively reproduced all of the “target” MD distributions. In a first test of the force field, it was used to predict the clustering behavior of concentrated amino acid solutions; the predictions were directly compared with the results of corresponding all-atom explicit-solvent MD simulations and found to be in excellent agreement. In a second test, BD simulations of the small protein villin headpiece were carried out at concentrations that have recently been studied in all-atom explicit-solvent MD simulations by Petrov and Zagrovic (PLoS Comput. Biol.2014, 5, e1003638). The anomalously strong intermolecular interactions seen in the MD study were reproduced in the COFFDROP simulations; a simple scaling of COFFDROP’s nonbonded parameters, however, produced results in better accordance with experiment. Overall, our results suggest that potential functions derived from simulations of pairwise amino acid interactions might be of quite broad applicability, with COFFDROP likely to be especially useful for modeling unfolded or intrinsically

  7. Possibilities of the regional gravity field recovery from first-, second- and third-order radial derivatives of the disturbing gravitational potential measured on moving platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitonak, Martin; Sprlak, Michal; Novak, Pavel; Tenzer, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Recently realized gravity-dedicated satellite missions allow for measuring values of scalar, vectorial (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment - GRACE) and second-order tensorial (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer - GOCE) parameters of the Earth's gravitational potential. Theoretical aspects related to using moving sensors for measuring elements of the third-order gravitational tensor are currently under investigation, e.g., the gravity field-dedicated satellite mission OPTIMA (OPTical Interferometry for global Mass change detection from space) should measure third-order derivatives of the Earth's gravitational potential. This contribution investigates regional recovery of the disturbing gravitational potential on the Earth's surface from satellite and aerial observations of the first-, second- and third-order radial derivatives of the disturbing gravitational potential. Synthetic measurements along a satellite orbit at the altitude of 250 km and along an aircraft track at the altitude of 10 km are synthetized from the global gravitational model EGM2008 and polluted by the Gaussian noise. The process of downward continuation is stabilized by the Tikhonov regularization. Estimated values of the disturbing gravitational potential are compared with the same quantity synthesized directly from EGM2008.

  8. Regional Recovery of the Disturbing Gravitational Potential from Satellite Observations of First-, Second- and Third-order Radial Derivatives of the Disturbing Gravitational Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, P.; Pitonak, M.; Sprlak, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently realized gravity-dedicated satellite missions allow for measuring values of scalar, vectorial (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment - GRACE) and second-order tensorial (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer - GOCE) parameters of the Earth's gravitational potential. Theoretical aspects related to using moving sensors for measuring elements of a third-order gravitational tensor are currently under investigation, e.g. the gravity-dedicated satellite mission OPTIMA (OPTical Interferometry for global Mass change detection from space) should measure third-order derivatives of the Earth's gravitational potential. This contribution investigates regional recovery of the disturbing gravitational potential on the Earth's surface from satellite observations of first-, second- and third-order radial derivatives of the disturbing gravitational potential. Synthetic measurements along a satellite orbit at the altitude of 250 km are synthetized from the global gravitational model EGM2008 and polluted by the Gaussian noise. The process of downward continuation is stabilized by the Tikhonov regularization. Estimated values of the disturbing gravitational potential are compared with the same quantity synthesized directly from EGM2008. Finally, this contribution also discusses merging a regional solution into a global field as a patchwork.

  9. Strategy to use the Terra Aerosol Information to Derive the Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing of Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Terra will derive the aerosol optical thickness and properties. The aerosol properties can be used to distinguish between natural and human-made aerosol. In the polar orbit Terra will measure aerosol only once a day, around 10:30 am. How will we use this information to study the global radiative impacts of aerosol on climate? We shall present a strategy to address this problem. It includes the following steps: - From the Terra aerosol optical thickness and size distribution model we derive the effect of aerosol on reflection of solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. In a sensitivity study we show that the effect of aerosol on solar fluxes can be derived 10 times more accurately from the MODIS data than derivation of the optical thickness itself. Applications to data over several regions will be given. - Using 1/2 million AERONET global data of aerosol spectral optical thickness we show that the aerosol optical thickness and properties during the Terra 10:30 pass are equivalent to the daily average. Due to the aerosol lifetime of several days measurements at this time of the day are enough to assess the daily impact of aerosol on radiation. - Aerosol impact on the top of the atmosphere is only part of the climate question. The INDOEX experiment showed that addressing the impact of aerosol on climate, requires also measurements of the aerosol forcing at the surface. This can be done by a combination of measurements of MODIS and AERONET data.

  10. Relativistic version of the Feynman–Dyson–Hughes derivation of the Lorentz force law and Maxwell's homogeneous equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essén, Hanno; Nordmark, Arne B.

    2016-09-01

    The canonical Poisson bracket algebra of four-dimensional relativistic mechanics is used to derive the equation of motion for a charged particle, with the Lorentz force, and the homogeneous Maxwell equations.

  11. Investigation of polymer derived ceramics cantilevers for application of high speed atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chia-Yun

    High speed Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a wide variety of applications ranging from nanomanufacturing to biophysics. In order to have higher scanning speed of certain AFM modes, high resonant frequency cantilevers are needed; therefore, the goal of this research is to investigate using polymer derived ceramics for possible applications in making high resonant frequency AFM cantilevers using complex cross sections. The polymer derived ceramic that will be studied, is silicon carbide. Polymer derived ceramics offer a potentially more economic fabrication approach for MEMS due to their relatively low processing temperatures and ease of complex shape design. Photolithography was used to make the desired cantilever shapes with micron scale size followed by a wet etching process to release the cantilevers from the substrates. The whole manufacturing process we use borrow well-developed techniques from the semiconducting industry, and as such this project also could offer the opportunity to reduce the fabrication cost of AFM cantilevers and MEMS in general. The characteristics of silicon carbide made from the precursor polymer, SMP-10 (Starfire Systems), were studied. In order to produce high qualities of silicon carbide cantilevers, where the major concern is defects, proper process parameters needed to be determined. Films of polymer derived ceramics often have defects due to shrinkage during the conversion process. Thus control of defects was a central issue in this study. A second, related concern was preventing oxidation; the polymer derived ceramics we chose is easily oxidized during processing. Establishing an environment without oxygen in the whole process was a significant challenge in the project. The optimization of the parameters for using photolithography and wet etching process was the final and central goal of the project; well established techniques used in microfabrication were modified for use in making the cantilever in the project. The techniques

  12. Invariant tori for a derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation with quasi-periodic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Si, Jianguo

    2015-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a one dimensional derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation with quasi-periodic forcing under periodic boundary conditions i u t + u x x + i g ( β t ) ( f ( |u|2 ) u ) x = 0 , x ∈ T ≔ R / 2 π Z , where g(βt) is real analytic and quasi-periodic on t with frequency vector β = (β1, β2, …, βm). f is real analytic in some neighborhood of the origin in ℂ, f(0) = 0 and f'(0) ≠ 0. We show that the above equation admits Cantor families of smooth quasi-periodic solutions of small amplitude. The proof is based on an abstract infinite dimensional Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser theorem for unbounded perturbation vector fields and partial Birkhoff normal form.

  13. Atomic force microscope observation of branching in single transcript molecules derived from human cardiac muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jason; Hsueh, Carlin; Mishra, Bud; Gimzewski, James K.

    2008-09-01

    We have used an atomic force microscope to examine a clinically derived sample of single-molecule gene transcripts, in the form of double-stranded cDNA, (c: complementary) obtained from human cardiac muscle without the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. We observed a log-normal distribution of transcript sizes, with most molecules being in the range of 0.4-7.0 kilobase pairs (kb) or 130-2300 nm in contour length, in accordance with the expected distribution of mRNA (m: messenger) sizes in mammalian cells. We observed novel branching structures not previously known to exist in cDNA, and which could have profound negative effects on traditional analysis of cDNA samples through cloning, PCR and DNA sequencing.

  14. Air Force use of civil airworthiness criteria for testing and acceptance of military derivative transport aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, R.I.; Chapman, D.M.; Langley, M.J.; Fouts, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    A review of commercial aircraft programs and the use of FAA certification criteria in the acquisition of off-the-shelf transport aircraft by the USAF to fulfill its airlift requirements is presented. In addition, major differences between military and commercial test programs and acquisition are cited to illustrate the principal benefits to the Air Force of this method. Significantly reduced acquisition time, and reduced ground and flight testing and development costs are shown as benefits of this process. The unique aspects of certification of military derivatives, recent initiatives to codify the processes, and the impacts on changes required in the manner in which the USAF currently contracts for aircraft are discussed. 20 refs.

  15. Capillary Force Seeding of Hydrogels for Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Delivery in Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Ravi K.; Rennert, Robert C.; Duscher, Dominik; Sorkin, Michael; Kosaraju, Revanth; Auerbach, Lauren J.; Lennon, James; Chung, Michael T.; Paik, Kevin; Nimpf, Johannes; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Longaker, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Effective skin regeneration therapies require a successful interface between progenitor cells and biocompatible delivery systems. We previously demonstrated the efficiency of a biomimetic pullulan-collagen hydrogel scaffold for improving bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell survival within ischemic skin wounds by creating a “stem cell niche” that enhances regenerative cytokine secretion. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) represent an even more appealing source of stem cells because of their abundance and accessibility, and in this study we explored the utility of ASCs for hydrogel-based therapies. To optimize hydrogel cell seeding, a rapid, capillary force-based approach was developed and compared with previously established cell seeding methods. ASC viability and functionality following capillary hydrogel seeding were then analyzed in vitro and in vivo. In these experiments, ASCs were seeded more efficiently by capillary force than by traditional methods and remained viable and functional in this niche for up to 14 days. Additionally, hydrogel seeding of ASCs resulted in the enhanced expression of multiple stemness and angiogenesis-related genes, including Oct4, Vegf, Mcp-1, and Sdf-1. Moving in vivo, hydrogel delivery improved ASC survival, and application of both murine and human ASC-seeded hydrogels to splinted murine wounds resulted in accelerated wound closure and increased vascularity when compared with control wounds treated with unseeded hydrogels. In conclusion, capillary seeding of ASCs within a pullulan-collagen hydrogel bioscaffold provides a convenient and simple way to deliver therapeutic cells to wound environments. Moreover, ASC-seeded constructs display a significant potential to accelerate wound healing that can be easily translated to a clinical setting. PMID:25038246

  16. Radially composite piezoelectric ceramic tubular transducer in radial vibration.

    PubMed

    Shuyu, Lin; Shuaijun, Wang

    2011-11-01

    The radially composite piezoelectric tubular transducer is studied. It is composed of radially poled piezoelectric and a long metal tube. The electro-mechanical equivalent circuit of the radially poled piezoelectric and metal tube in radial vibration is obtained. Based on the force and velocity boundary conditions, the six-port electro-mechanical equivalent circuit for the composite tubular transducer is given and the resonance/anti-resonance frequency equations are obtained. The relationship between the resonance frequency and the dimensions is analyzed. Numerically simulated results obtained by the finite element method are compared with those from the analytical method. Composite piezoelectric tubular transducers are designed and manufactured. The resonance/anti-resonance frequencies are measured, and it is shown that the theoretical results are in good agreement with the simulated and experimental results. It is expected that radially composite piezoelectric tubular transducers can be used as high-power ultrasonic radiators in ultrasonic applications, such as ultrasonic liquid processing. PMID:22083782

  17. A Comparative Study of Wave Forcing Derived from Era-40 and Era-Interim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracegirdle, T.; Lu, H.; Phillips, T.; Turner, J.

    2014-12-01

    This study examines the wave forcing estimated from the ERA-40 and ERA-Interim reanalyses during northern winter. The discrepancies in the wave forcing are most significant at high latitudes and are marked by vertically alternating positive-negative anomalies of the Eliassen-Palm (E-P) flux divergence. In the stratosphere, the discrepancies intensify with altitude and expand equatorwards in the upper stratosphere. They are mainly associated with the vertical E-P fluxes and due primarily to differences in the climatology. The magnitude of discrepancies is about 20-40% of the climatology derived from ERA-Interim and can be greater than the interannual variability of the E-P flux divergence in certain regions. The dynamical implications of these discrepancies on the Brewer-Dobson circulation are also studied. A sudden drop in the 100hPa poleward eddy heat flux is detected in ERA-40 over subtropical oceans after the 1990/1991 northern winter. It is likely related to the bias corrections applied to the infrared radiances from the NOAA-12 High-resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder, which was known to be contaminated by volcanic aerosol from the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. A sudden increase in 10hPa poleward eddy heat flux is detected in ERA-Interim at high latitudes after the 1997/1998 winter, likely due in part to the use of uncorrected radiances from the NOAA-15 Advanced Microwave Sounding Units. These sudden changes induced artificial trends in stratospheric wave forcing in the affected reanalysis.

  18. Contrail microphysical properties and radiative forcing over the Northern Hemisphere derived using MODIS infrared observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedka, S. T.; Minnis, P.; Duda, D. P.; Spangenberg, D.; Chee, T.; Khlopenkov, K. V.

    2015-12-01

    One of the primary ways that air traffic affects the Earth's radiation budget is through the formation of contrails. In order to quantify the radiative impact of contrails, one must assess their macro and microphysical properties (e.g. contrail temperature, optical depth and effective particle size) as well as the characteristics of the environment in which they occur (e.g. background radiation field and cloud properties). In-situ measurements of contrail microphysical properties are limited, and hence the retrieval of such properties from remotely sensed satellite data is useful. This paper details the ongoing progress being made to retrieve contrail properties and calculate the contrail radiative forcing from 2 years of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Aqua and Terra data. Contrail microphysical properties from the seasonal months (January, April, July, October) of 2006 and 2012 are derived using an infrared-only heritage algorithm developed at NASA Langley for the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) program. Results are subset by day/night, although the same retrieval algorithm will be used for all granules. Contrail properties and background cloud properties are then used as input into the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model to compute the overall contrail radiative forcing.

  19. Active-Region Twist Derived from Magnetic Tongues and Linear Force-Free Extrapolations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Mariano; López Fuentes, Marcelo; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Démoulin, Pascal

    2015-11-01

    The main aim of this study is to compare the amount of twist present in emerging active regions (ARs) from photospheric and coronal data. We use linear force-free field models of the observed coronal structure of ARs to determine the global twist. The coronal twist is derived, on one hand, from the force-free parameter [α] of the model and, on the other, from the computed coronal magnetic helicity normalized by the magnetic flux squared. We compare our results, for the same set of ARs, with those of Poisson et al. ( Solar Phys. 290, 727, 2015), in which the twist was estimated using the so-called magnetic tongues observed in line-of-sight magnetograms during AR emergence. We corroborate the agreement between the photospheric and coronal twist-sign and the presence of magnetic tongues as an early proxy of the AR non-potentiality. We find a globally linear relationship between the coronal twist and the one previously deduced for the emerging AR flux rope at the photospheric level. The coronal-twist value is typically lower by a factor of six than the one deduced for the emerging flux rope. We interpret this result as due to the partial emergence of the flux rope that forms the region.

  20. Atomic force microscopy combined with human pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes for biomechanical sensing.

    PubMed

    Pesl, Martin; Pribyl, Jan; Acimovic, Ivana; Vilotic, Aleksandra; Jelinkova, Sarka; Salykin, Anton; Lacampagne, Alain; Dvorak, Petr; Meli, Albano C; Skladal, Petr; Rotrekl, Vladimir

    2016-11-15

    Cardiomyocyte contraction and relaxation are important parameters of cardiac function altered in many heart pathologies. Biosensing of these parameters represents an important tool in drug development and disease modeling. Human embryonic stem cells and especially patient specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are well established as cardiac disease model.. Here, a live stem cell derived embryoid body (EB) based cardiac cell syncytium served as a biorecognition element coupled to the microcantilever probe from atomic force microscope thus providing reliable micromechanical cellular biosensor suitable for whole-day testing. The biosensor was optimized regarding the type of cantilever, temperature and exchange of media; in combination with standardized protocol, it allowed testing of compounds and conditions affecting the biomechanical properties of EB. The studied effectors included calcium , drugs modulating the catecholaminergic fight-or-flight stress response such as the beta-adrenergic blocker metoprolol and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Arrhythmogenic effects were studied using caffeine. Furthermore, with EBs originating from patient's stem cells, this biosensor can help to characterize heart diseases such as dystrophies. PMID:27266660

  1. Electrostatic Forces: Formulas for the First Derivatives of a Polarizable, Anisotropic Electrostatic Potential Energy Function Based on Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Mills, Matthew J L; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-09-01

    Explicit formulas are derived analytically for the first derivatives of a (i) polarizable, (ii) high-rank multipolar electrostatic potential energy function for (iii) flexible molecules. The potential energy function uses a machine learning method called Kriging to predict the local-frame multipole moments of atoms defined via the Quantum Chemical Topology (QCT) approach. These atomic multipole moments then interact via an interaction tensor based on spherical harmonics. Atom-centered local coordinate frames are used, constructed from the internal geometry of the molecular system. The forces involve derivatives of both this geometric dependence and of the trained kriging models. In the near future, these analytical forces will enable molecular dynamics and geometry optimization calculations as part of the QCT force field. PMID:26588529

  2. Radial Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The ejecta surrounding the crater (off image to the left) in this image has undergone significant erosion by the wind. The wind has stripped the surface features from the ejecta and has started to winnow away the ejecta blanket. Near the margin of the ejecta the wind is eroding along a radial pattern -- taking advantage of radial emplacement. Note the steep margin of the ejecta blanket. Most, if not all, of the fine ejecta material has been removed and the wind in now working on the more massive continuous ejecta blanket.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.5, Longitude 197.4 East (162.6 West). 37 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Radial-radial single rotor turbine

    DOEpatents

    Platts, David A.

    2006-05-16

    A rotor for use in turbine applications has a radial compressor/pump having radially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and a radial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the radial compressor/pump flows. The rotor can, in some applications, be used to produce electrical power.

  4. Radial systems of dark globules

    SciTech Connect

    Gyul'budagyn, A.L.

    1986-03-01

    The author gives examples of radial systems consisting of dark globules and ''elephant trunks''. Besides already known systems, which contain hot stars at their center, data are given on three radial systems of a new kind, at the center of which there are stars of spectral types later than B. Data are given on 32 globules of radial systems of the association Cep OB2. On the basis of the observational data, it is concluded that at least some of the isolated Bok globules derive from elephant trunks and dark globules forming radial systems around hot stars. It is also suggested that the two molecular clouds situated near the Rosette nebula and possessing velocities differing by ca 20 km/sec from the velocity of the nebula could have been ejected in opposite directions from the center of the nebula. One of these clouds consists of dark globules forming the radial system of the Rosette nebula.

  5. Effect of the radial buoyancy on a circular Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Antoine; Yoshikawa, Harunori N.; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2015-11-01

    The effect of a radial temperature gradient on the stability of a circular Couette flow is investigated when the gravitational acceleration is neglected. The induced radial stratification of the fluid density coupled with the centrifugal acceleration generates radial buoyancy which is centrifugal for inward heating and centripetal for outward heating. This radial buoyancy modifies the Rayleigh discriminant and induces the asymmetry between inward heating and outward heating in flow behavior. The critical modes are axisymmetric and stationary for inward heating while for outward heating, they can be oscillatory axisymmetric or nonaxisymmetric depending on fluid diffusion properties, i.e., on the Prandtl number Pr. The dependence of the critical modes on Pr is explored for different values of the radius ratio of the annulus. The power input of the radial buoyancy is compared with other power terms. The critical frequency of the oscillatory axisymmetric modes is linked to the Brunt-Väisälä frequency due to the density stratification in the radial gravity field induced by the rotation. These modes are associated with inertial waves. The dispersion relation of the oscillatory axisymmetric modes is derived in the vicinity of the critical conditions. A weakly nonlinear amplitude equation with a forcing term is proposed to explain the domination of these axisymmetric oscillatory modes over the stationary centrifugal mode.

  6. Generating and characterizing the mechanical properties of cell-derived matrices using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tello, Marta; Spenlé, Caroline; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Mercier, Luc; Fabre, Roxane; Allio, Guillaume; Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Goetz, Jacky G

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical interaction between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) controls key processes such as proliferation, differentiation and motility. For many years, two-dimensional (2D) models were used to better understand the interactions between cells and their surrounding ECM. More recently, variation of the mechanical properties of tissues has been reported to play a major role in physiological and pathological scenarios such as cancer progression. The 3D architecture of the ECM finely tunes cellular behavior to perform physiologically relevant tasks. Technical limitations prevented scientists from obtaining accurate assessment of the mechanical properties of physiologically realistic matrices. There is therefore a need for combining the production of high-quality cell-derived 3D matrices (CDMs) and the characterization of their topographical and mechanical properties. Here, we describe methods that allow to accurately measure the young modulus of matrices produced by various cellular types. In the first part, we will describe and review several protocols for generating CDMs matrices from endothelial, epithelial, fibroblastic, muscle and mesenchymal stem cells. We will discuss tools allowing the characterization of the topographical details as well as of the protein content of such CDMs. In a second part, we will report the methodologies that can be used, based on atomic force microscopy, to accurately evaluate the stiffness properties of the CDMs through the quantification of their young modulus. Altogether, such methodologies allow characterizing the stiffness and topography of matrices deposited by the cells, which is key for the understanding of cellular behavior in physiological conditions. PMID:26439175

  7. On the Problem of Theoretical Pressure of a Radial-Flow Pump Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlechko, V. N.; Protasov, S. K.

    2014-11-01

    An analysis has been made of the velocity of motion of a medium in the wheel of a radial-flow pump unit under the action of a centrifugal force and overcoming the medium's inertial force with its blades. Relations for the pressure produced by the radial-flow pump unit as a function of the angle of inclination of its blades have been derived. The well-known Euler equation describing the dynamic pressure of the radial-flow pump unit has been supplemented to determine its static pressure. An analysis of the obtained results has shown that the pressure of the radial-flow pump unit is maximum at an angle of inclination of its blades of 110o and negative at 140o or larger angles.

  8. Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Radial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Radial Halbach magnetic bearings are based on the same principle as that of axial Halbach magnetic bearings, differing in geometry as the names of these two types of bearings suggest. Both radial and axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings were described in Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings (LEW-18066-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 85. In the remainder of this article, the description of the principle of operation from the cited prior article is recapitulated and updated to incorporate the present radial geometry. In simplest terms, the basic principle of levitation in an axial or radial Halbach magnetic bearing is that of the repulsive electromagnetic force between (1) a moving permanent magnet and (2) an electric current induced in a stationary electrical conductor by the motion of the magnetic field. An axial or radial Halbach bearing includes multiple permanent magnets arranged in a Halbach array ("Halbach array" is defined below) in a rotor and multiple conductors in the form of wire coils in a stator, all arranged so the rotary motion produces an axial or radial repulsion that is sufficient to levitate the rotor. A basic Halbach array (see Figure 1) consists of a row of permanent magnets, each oriented so that its magnetic field is at a right angle to that of the adjacent magnet, and the right-angle turns are sequenced so as to maximize the magnitude of the magnetic flux density on one side of the row while

  9. Improvements in the LLNL objective analysis scheme for deriving forcing fields for single-column models using ARM data

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, M.J.; Yio, J.J.; Cederwall, R.T.

    1997-03-01

    The objective analysis method use for deriving Single-Column Model (SCM) forcing fields with ARM data (Leach, et al., 1996) is undergoing continual improvement. Several improvements were identified at the SCM Workshop held at LLNL in April 1996. These include incorporating large-scale analyses in the objective analysis, and time-filtering input data streams.

  10. Quantum Derivative Fitting and Biomolecular Force Fields: Functional Form, Coupling Terms, Charge Flux, Nonbond Anharmonicity, and Individual Dihedral Potentials.

    PubMed

    Hagler, A T

    2015-12-01

    Computer simulations are increasingly prevalent, complementing experimental studies in all fields of biophysics, chemistry, and materials. Their utility, however, is critically dependent on the validity of the underlying force fields employed. In this Perspective we review the ability of quantum mechanics, and in particular analytical ab initio derivatives, to inform on the nature of intra- and intermolecular interactions. The power inherent in the exploitation of forces and second derivatives (Hessians) to derive force fields for a variety of compound types, including inorganic, organic, and biomolecules, is explored. We discuss the use of these quantities along with QM energies and geometries to determine force constants, including nonbond and electrostatic parameters, and to assess the functional form of the energy surface. The latter includes the optimal form of out-of-plane interactions and the necessity for anharmonicity, and terms to account for coupling between internals, to adequately represent the energy of intramolecular deformations. In addition, individual second derivatives of the energy with respect to selected interaction coordinates, such as interatomic distances or individual dihedral angles, have been shown to select out for the corresponding interactions, annihilating other interactions in the potential expression. Exploitation of these quantities allows one to probe the individual interaction and explore phenomena such as, for example, anisotropy of atom-atom nonbonded interactions, charge flux, or the functional form of isolated dihedral angles, e.g., a single dihedral X-C-C-Y about a tetrahedral C-C bond. PMID:26642978

  11. Can satellite-derived aerosol optical depth quantify the surface aerosol radiative forcing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Ceamanos, Xavier; Roujean, Jean-Louis; Carrer, Dominique; Xue, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the climate of the Earth through aerosol radiative forcing (ARF). Nowadays, aerosol particles are detected, quantified and monitored by remote sensing techniques using low Earth orbit (LEO) and geostationary (GEO) satellites. In the present article, the use of satellite-derived AOD (aerosol optical depth) products is investigated in order to quantify on a daily basis the ARF at the surface level (SARF). By daily basis we mean that an average SARF value is computed every day based upon the available AOD satellite measurements for each station. In the first part of the study, the performance of four state-of-art different AOD products (MODIS-DT, MODIS-DB, MISR, and SEVIRI) is assessed through comparison against ground-based AOD measurements from 24 AERONET stations located in Europe and Africa during a 6-month period. While all AOD products are found to be comparable in terms of measured value (RMSE of 0.1 for low and average AOD values), a higher number of AOD estimates is made available by GEO satellites due to their enhanced frequency of scan. Experiments show a general lower agreement of AOD estimates over the African sites (RMSE of 0.2), which show the highest aerosol concentrations along with the occurrence of dust aerosols, coarse particles, and bright surfaces. In the second part of this study, the lessons learned about the confidence in aerosol burden derived from satellites are used to estimate SARF under clear sky conditions. While the use of AOD products issued from GEO observations like SEVIRI brings improvement in the SARF estimates with regard to LEO-based AOD products, the resulting absolute bias (13 W/m2 in average when AERONET AOD is used as reference) is judged to be still high in comparison with the average values of SARF found in this study (from - 25 W/m2 to - 43 W/m2) and also in the literature (from - 10 W/m2 to - 47 W/m2).

  12. Aerosol Radiative Forcing Derived From SeaWIFS - Retrieved Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Mong-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Wang, Menghua; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To understand climatic implications of aerosols over global oceans, the aerosol optical properties retrieved from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) are analyzed, and the effects of the aerosols on the Earth's radiation budgets (aerosol radiative forcing, ARF) are computed using a radiative transfer model. It is found that the distribution of the SeaWiFS-retrieved aerosol optical thickness is distinctively zonal. The maximum in the equatorial region coincides with the Intertropical Convergence Zone, and the maximum in the Southern Hemispheric high latitudes coincides with the region of prevailing westerlies. The minimum aerosol optical thickness is found in the subtropical high pressure regions, especially in the Southern Hemisphere. These zonal patterns clearly demonstrate the influence of atmospheric circulation on the oceanic aerosol distribution. Over global oceans, aerosols reduce the annual mean net downward solar flux by 5.4 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere and by 6.1 W m-2 at the surface. The largest ARF is found in the tropical Atlantic, Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal, the coastal regions of Southeast and East Asia, and the Southern Hemispheric high latitudes. During the period of the Indonesian big fires (September-December 1997), the cooling due to aerosols is greater than 15 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere and greater than 30 W m(exp -1) at the surface in the vicinity of the maritime continents. The atmosphere receives extra solar radiation by greater than 15 W m(exp -1) over a large area. These large changes in radiative fluxes are expected to have enhanced the atmospheric stability, weakened the atmospheric circulation, and augmented the drought condition during that period. It would be very instructive to simulate the regional climatic. The model-calculated clear sky solar flux at the top of the atmosphere is compared with that derived from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES). The net downward solar flux of

  13. The R.E.D. tools: advances in RESP and ESP charge derivation and force field library building.

    PubMed

    Dupradeau, François-Yves; Pigache, Adrien; Zaffran, Thomas; Savineau, Corentin; Lelong, Rodolphe; Grivel, Nicolas; Lelong, Dimitri; Rosanski, Wilfried; Cieplak, Piotr

    2010-07-28

    Deriving atomic charges and building a force field library for a new molecule are key steps when developing a force field required for conducting structural and energy-based analysis using molecular mechanics. Derivation of popular RESP charges for a set of residues is a complex and error prone procedure because it depends on numerous input parameters. To overcome these problems, the R.E.D. Tools (RESP and ESP charge Derive, ) have been developed to perform charge derivation in an automatic and straightforward way. The R.E.D. program handles chemical elements up to bromine in the periodic table. It interfaces different quantum mechanical programs employed for geometry optimization and computing molecular electrostatic potential(s), and performs charge fitting using the RESP program. By defining tight optimization criteria and by controlling the molecular orientation of each optimized geometry, charge values are reproduced at any computer platform with an accuracy of 0.0001 e. The charges can be fitted using multiple conformations, making them suitable for molecular dynamics simulations. R.E.D. allows also for defining charge constraints during multiple molecule charge fitting, which are used to derive charges for molecular fragments. Finally, R.E.D. incorporates charges into a force field library, readily usable in molecular dynamics computer packages. For complex cases, such as a set of homologous molecules belonging to a common family, an entire force field topology database is generated. Currently, the atomic charges and force field libraries have been developed for more than fifty model systems and stored in the RESP ESP charge DDataBase. Selected results related to non-polarizable charge models are presented and discussed. PMID:20574571

  14. The R.E.D. Tools: Advances in RESP and ESP charge derivation and force field library building

    PubMed Central

    Dupradeau, François-Yves; Pigache, Adrien; Zaffran, Thomas; Savineau, Corentin; Lelong, Rodolphe; Grivel, Nicolas; Lelong, Dimitri; Rosanski, Wilfried; Cieplak, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Deriving atomic charges and building a force field library for a new molecule are key steps when developing a force field required for conducting structural and energy-based analysis using molecular mechanics. Derivation of popular RESP charges for a set of residues is a complex and error prone procedure, because it depends on numerous input parameters. To overcome these problems, the R.E.D. Tools (RESP and ESP charge Derive, http://q4md-forcefieldtools.org/RED/) have been developed to perform charge derivation in an automatic and straightforward way. The R.E.D. program handles chemical elements up to bromine in the periodic table. It interfaces different quantum mechanical programs employed for geometry optimization and computing molecular electrostatic potential(s), and performs charge fitting using the RESP program. By defining tight optimization criteria and by controlling the molecular orientation of each optimized geometry, charge values are reproduced at any computer platform with an accuracy of 0.0001 e. The charges can be fitted using multiple conformations, making them suitable for molecular dynamics simulations. R.E.D. allows also for defining charge constraints during multiple molecule charge fitting, which are used to derive charges for molecular fragments. Finally, R.E.D. incorporates charges into a force field library, readily usable in molecular dynamics computer packages. For complex cases, such as a set of homologous molecules belonging to a common family, an entire force field topology database is generated. Currently, the atomic charges and force field libraries have been developed for more than fifty model systems and stored in the RESP ESP charge DDataBase. Selected results related to non-polarizable charge models are presented and discussed. PMID:20574571

  15. Combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing is disclosed that allows for both radial and thrust axes control of an associated shaft. The combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing comprises a rotor and a stator. The rotor comprises a shaft, and first and second rotor pairs each having respective rotor elements. The stator comprises first and second stator elements and a magnet-sensor disk. In one embodiment, each stator element has a plurality of split-poles and a corresponding plurality of radial force coils and, in another embodiment, each stator element does not require thrust force coils, and radial force coils are replaced by double the plurality of coils serving as an outer member of each split-pole half.

  16. Complex force history of a calving-generated glacial earthquake derived from broadband seismic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, Amandine; Mangeney, Anne; Stutzmann, Eléonore; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Walter, Fabian; Moretti, Laurent; Castelnau, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    The force applied to the Earth by the calving of two icebergs at Jakobshavn Isbrae, Greenland, has been quantified. The source force history was recovered by inversion of regional broadband seismograms without any a priori constraint on the source time function, in contrast with previous studies. For periods 10-100 s, the three-component force can be obtained from distant stations alone and is proportional to the closest station seismograms. This inversion makes it possible to quantify changes of the source force direction and amplitude as a function of time and frequency. A detailed comparison with a video of the event was used to identify four forces associated with collision, then bottom-out and top-out rotation of the first and second icebergs, and ice mélange motion. Only the two iceberg rotations were identified in previous studies. All four processes are found here to contribute to the force amplitude and variability. Such a complete time-frequency force history provides unique dynamical constraints for mechanical calving models.

  17. Assessing the accuracy of improved force-matched water models derived from Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Köster, Andreas; Spura, Thomas; Rutkai, Gábor; Kessler, Jan; Wiebeler, Hendrik; Vrabec, Jadran; Kühne, Thomas D

    2016-07-15

    The accuracy of water models derived from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations by means on an improved force-matching scheme is assessed for various thermodynamic, transport, and structural properties. It is found that although the resulting force-matched water models are typically less accurate than fully empirical force fields in predicting thermodynamic properties, they are nevertheless much more accurate than generally appreciated in reproducing the structure of liquid water and in fact superseding most of the commonly used empirical water models. This development demonstrates the feasibility to routinely parametrize computationally efficient yet predictive potential energy functions based on accurate ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for a large variety of different systems. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27232117

  18. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kijlstra, Jan David; Hu, Dongjian; Mittal, Nikhil; Kausel, Eduardo; van der Meer, Peter; Garakani, Arman; Domian, Ibrahim J

    2015-12-01

    The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can be used to quantify changes in cellular morphology over time and compute contractile kinetics. Using a biomechanical model that incorporates substrate stiffness, we calculate cardiomyocyte force generation at single-cell resolution and validate this approach with conventional traction force microscopy. The addition of fluorescent calcium indicators or membrane potential dyes allows the simultaneous analysis of contractility and calcium handling or action potential morphology. Accordingly, our approach has the potential for broad application in the study of cardiac disease, drug discovery, and cardiotoxicity screening. PMID:26626178

  19. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kijlstra, Jan David; Hu, Dongjian; Mittal, Nikhil; Kausel, Eduardo; van der Meer, Peter; Garakani, Arman; Domian, Ibrahim J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can be used to quantify changes in cellular morphology over time and compute contractile kinetics. Using a biomechanical model that incorporates substrate stiffness, we calculate cardiomyocyte force generation at single-cell resolution and validate this approach with conventional traction force microscopy. The addition of fluorescent calcium indicators or membrane potential dyes allows the simultaneous analysis of contractility and calcium handling or action potential morphology. Accordingly, our approach has the potential for broad application in the study of cardiac disease, drug discovery, and cardiotoxicity screening. PMID:26626178

  20. Deriving the Work Done by an Inverse Square Force in Non-Calculus-Based Introductory Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    I describe a method of evaluating the integral of 1/r[superscript 2] with respect to r that uses only algebra and the concept of area underneath a curve, and which does not formally employ any calculus. This is useful for algebra-based introductory physics classes (where the use of calculus is forbidden) to derive the work done by the force of one…

  1. Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in Asia Derived From Regional Models With Atmospheric and Aerosol Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Chul Eddy; Ramanathan, V.; Carmichael, Gregory; Kulkarni, S.; Tang, Youhua; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun

    2010-07-05

    A high-resolution estimate of monthly 3D aerosol solar heating rates and surface solar fluxes in Asia from 2001 to 2004 is described here. This product stems from an Asian aerosol assimilation project, in which a) the PNNL regional model bounded by the NCEP reanalyses was used to provide meteorology, b) MODIS and AERONET data were integrated for aerosol observations, c) the Iowa aerosol/chemistry model STEM-2K1 used the PNNL meteorology and assimilated aerosol observations, and d) 3D (X-Y-Z) aerosol simulations from the STEM-2K1 were used in the Scripps Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation (MACR) model to produce total and anthropogenic aerosol direct solar forcing for average cloudy skies. The MACR model and STEM both used the PNNL model resolution of 0.45º×0.4º in the horizontal and of 23 layers in the troposphere. The 2001–2004 averaged anthropogenic all-sky aerosol forcing is -1.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +7.3 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and -8.6 Wm-2 (surface) averaged in Asia (60-138°E & Eq. -45°N). In the absence of AERONET SSA assimilation, absorbing aerosol concentration (especially BC aerosol) is much smaller, giving -2.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +4.5 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and -6.8 Wm-2 (surface), averaged in Asia. In the vertical, monthly forcing is mainly concentrated below 600hPa with maxima around 800hPa. Seasonally, low-level forcing is far larger in dry season than in wet season in South Asia, whereas the wet season forcing exceeds the dry season forcing in East Asia. The anthropogenic forcing in the present study is similar to that in Chung et al.’s [2005] in overall magnitude but the former offers fine-scale features and simulated vertical profiles. The interannual variability of the computed anthropogenic forcing is significant and extremely large over major emission outflow areas. In view of this, the present study’s estimate is within the implicated range of the 1999 INDOEX result. However, NCAR/CCSM3

  2. On the ability of molecular dynamics force fields to recapitulate NMR derived protein side chain order parameters.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Evan S; Wand, A Joshua; Sharp, Kim A

    2016-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have become a central tool for investigating various biophysical questions with atomistic detail. While many different proxies are used to qualify MD force fields, most are based on largely structural parameters such as the root mean square deviation from experimental coordinates or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts and residual dipolar couplings. NMR derived Lipari-Szabo squared generalized order parameter (O(2) ) values of amide NH bond vectors of the polypeptide chain were also often employed for refinement and validation. However, with a few exceptions, side chain methyl symmetry axis order parameters have not been incorporated into experimental reference sets. Using a test set of five diverse proteins, the performance of several force fields implemented in the NAMDD simulation package was examined. It was found that simulations employing explicit water implemented using the TIP3 model generally performed significantly better than those using implicit water in reproducing experimental methyl symmetry axis O(2) values. Overall the CHARMM27 force field performs nominally better than two implementations of the Amber force field. It appeared that recent quantum mechanics modifications to side chain torsional angles of leucine and isoleucine in the Amber force field have significantly hindered proper motional modeling for these residues. There remained significant room for improvement as even the best correlations of experimental and simulated methyl group Lipari-Szabo generalized order parameters fall below an R(2) of 0.8. PMID:26990788

  3. Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing Derived from Sea WiFS-Inferred Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Wang, Menghua

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol optical properties inferred from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) radiance measurements are used to compute the aerosol shortwave radiative forcing using a radiative transfer model. The aerosol optical thickness at the wavelength of 865-nm is taken from the SeaWIFS archive. It is found that the nominal optical thickness over oceans ranges from 0.1 to 0.2. Using a maritime aerosol model and the radiances measured at the various SeaWiFS channels, the Angstrom exponent is determined to be 0.2174, the single-scattering albedo to be 0.995, and the asymmetry factor to be 0.786. The radiative transfer model has eight bands in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions and three bands in the near infrared. It includes the absorption due to aerosols, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and oxygen, and the scattering due to aerosols and gases (Rayleigh scattering). The radiative forcing is computed over global oceans for four months (January, April, July, and October, 1998) to represent four seasons. It is found that the aerosol radiative forcing is large and changes significantly with seasons near the continents with large-scale forest fires and desert dust. Averaged over oceans and the four months, the aerosol radiative forcing is approximately 7 W/sq m at the top of the atmosphere. This large radiative forcing is expected to have a significant cooling effect on the Earth's climate as implied from simulations of a number of general circulation models.

  4. Derivation of revised formulae for eddy viscous forces used in the ocean general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ru Ling

    1988-01-01

    Presented is a re-derivation of the eddy viscous dissipation tensor commonly used in present oceanographic general circulation models. When isotropy is imposed, the currently-used form of the tensor fails to return to the laplacian operator. In this paper, the source of this error is identified in a consistent derivation of the tensor in both rectangular and earth spherical coordinates, and the correct form of the eddy viscous tensor is presented.

  5. Roll Damping Derivatives from Generalized Lifting-Surface Theory and Wind Tunnel Forced-Oscillation Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2014-01-01

    Improving aerodynamic models for adverse loss-of-control conditions in flight is an area being researched under the NASA Aviation Safety Program. Aerodynamic models appropriate for loss of control conditions require a more general mathematical representation to predict nonlinear unsteady behaviors. As more general aerodynamic models are studied that include nonlinear higher order effects, the possibility of measurements that confound aerodynamic and structural responses are probable. In this study an initial step is taken to look at including structural flexibility in analysis of rigid-body forced-oscillation testing that accounts for dynamic rig, sting and balance flexibility. Because of the significant testing required and associated costs in a general study, it makes sense to capitalize on low cost analytical methods where possible, especially where structural flexibility can be accounted for by a low cost method. This paper provides an initial look at using linear lifting surface theory applied to rigid-body aircraft roll forced-oscillation tests.

  6. Longitudinal Dispersivity in a Radial Diverging Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, J. C.; Wilson, M.; Bertsch, P. M.; Aburime, S. A.

    2005-12-01

    Hydrodynamic dispersion is an important factor controlling contaminant migration in the subsurface environment. However, few comprehensive data sets exist for evaluating the impact of travel distance and site heterogeneity on solute dispersion under non-uniform flow conditions. In addition, anionic tracers are often used to estimate physical transport parameters based on an erroneous assumption of conservative (i.e., non-reactive) behavior. Therefore, a series of field experiments using tritiated water and several other commonly used hydrologic tracers (Br, Cl, FBAs) were conducted in the water-table aquifer on the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (Aiken, SC) to evaluate solute transport processes in a diverging radial flow field. For each experiment, tracer-free groundwater was injected for approximately 24 hours at a fixed rate of 56.7 L/min (15 gpm) to establish a forced radial gradient prior to the introduction of a tracer pulse. After the tracer pulse, the forced gradient was maintained throughout the experiment using non-labeled groundwater. Tracer migration was monitored using a set of six sampling wells radially spaced at approximate distances of 1.5, 3, and 4.5 meters from a central injection well. Each sampling well was further divided into three discrete sampling depths that were monitored continuously throughout the course of the tracer experiment. At various time intervals, discrete groundwater samples were collected from all 18 sampling ports for tritium analysis. Longitudinal dispersivity for tritium breakthrough at each sampling location was estimated using analytical approximations of the convection dispersion equation (CDE) for radial flow assuming an instantaneous Dirac pulse and a pulse of known duration. The results were also compared to dispersivity values derived from fitting the tracer data to analytical solutions derived from assuming uniform flow conditions. Tremendous variation in dispersivity values and tracer arrival

  7. First order derivative spectrophotometric method for the determination of benidipine hydrochloride pharmaceutical preparations and forced degradation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasaka, Ayça

    2015-06-01

    A simple and rapid first order derivative spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of benidipine hydrochloride in pure form and pharmaceutical preparations. For the first derivative spectrophotometric method, the distances between two extremum values l (peak-to-peak amplitudes), 230.2/241.5 nm. The proposed method was validated according to the ICH guidelines with respect to linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, accuracy, precision (intra- and inter-day) and recovery were evaluated. The linearity of the method was in the range of 0.2-2.0 μg/mL. Limits of detection and quantification were 0.58 and 1.73 μg/mL, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of pharmaceutical preparations. In addition, forced degradation studies were performed on the benidipine hydrochloride drag substance. The drug substance was exposed to the stress conditions of hydrolysis (acid and base).

  8. Simulations of cloud-radiation interaction using large-scale forcing derived from the CINDY/DYNAMO northern sounding array

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H.; Fridlind, A. M.; Feng, Zhe; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Minnis, Patrick; Nordeen, Michelle L.

    2015-09-26

    The recently completed CINDY/DYNAMO field campaign observed two Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) events in the equatorial Indian Ocean from October to December 2011. Prior work has indicated that the moist static energy anomalies in these events grew and were sustained to a significant extent by radiative feedbacks. We present here a study of radiative fluxes and clouds in a set of cloud-resolving simulations of these MJO events. The simulations are driven by the large scale forcing dataset derived from the DYNAMO northern sounding array observations, and carried out in a doubly-periodic domain using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. simulated cloud properties and radiative fluxes are compared to those derived from the S-Polka radar and satellite observations. To accommodate the uncertainty in simulated cloud microphysics, a number of single moment (1M) and double moment (2M) microphysical schemes in the WRF model are tested.

  9. Altered calcium handling and increased contraction force in human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes following short term dexamethasone exposure.

    PubMed

    Kosmidis, Georgios; Bellin, Milena; Ribeiro, Marcelo C; van Meer, Berend; Ward-van Oostwaard, Dorien; Passier, Robert; Tertoolen, Leon G J; Mummery, Christine L; Casini, Simona

    2015-11-27

    One limitation in using human pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) for disease modeling and cardiac safety pharmacology is their immature functional phenotype compared with adult cardiomyocytes. Here, we report that treatment of human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) with dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid, activated glucocorticoid signaling which in turn improved their calcium handling properties and contractility. L-type calcium current and action potential properties were not affected by dexamethasone but significantly faster calcium decay, increased forces of contraction and sarcomeric lengths, were observed in hESC-CMs after dexamethasone exposure. Activating the glucocorticoid pathway can thus contribute to mediating hPSC-CMs maturation. PMID:26456652

  10. Surface force measurements and simulations of mussel-derived peptide adhesives on wet organic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Levine, Zachary A; Rapp, Michael V; Wei, Wei; Mullen, Ryan Gotchy; Wu, Chun; Zerze, Gül H; Mittal, Jeetain; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2016-04-19

    Translating sticky biological molecules-such as mussel foot proteins (MFPs)-into synthetic, cost-effective underwater adhesives with adjustable nano- and macroscale characteristics requires an intimate understanding of the glue's molecular interactions. To help facilitate the next generation of aqueous adhesives, we performed a combination of surface forces apparatus (SFA) measurements and replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations on a synthetic, easy to prepare, Dopa-containing peptide (MFP-3s peptide), which adheres to organic surfaces just as effectively as its wild-type protein analog. Experiments and simulations both show significant differences in peptide adsorption on CH3-terminated (hydrophobic) and OH-terminated (hydrophilic) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), where adsorption is strongest on hydrophobic SAMs because of orientationally specific interactions with Dopa. Additional umbrella-sampling simulations yield free-energy profiles that quantitatively agree with SFA measurements and are used to extract the adhesive properties of individual amino acids within the context of MFP-3s peptide adhesion, revealing a delicate balance between van der Waals, hydrophobic, and electrostatic forces. PMID:27036002

  11. Entropic forces in Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Nico

    2014-12-01

    Interest in the concept of entropic forces has risen considerably since Verlinde proposed in 2011 to interpret the force in Newton's second law and gravity as entropic forces. Brownian motion—the motion of a small particle (pollen) driven by random impulses from the surrounding molecules—may be the first example of a stochastic process in which such forces are expected to emerge. In this article, it is shown that at least two types of entropic force can be identified in three-dimensional Brownian motion. This analysis yields simple derivations of known results of Brownian motion, Hooke's law, and—applying an external (non-radial) force—Curie's law and the Langevin-Debye equation.

  12. Electrocatalytic Alcohol Oxidation with TEMPO and Bicyclic Nitroxyl Derivatives: Driving Force Trumps Steric Effects.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Mohammad; Miles, Kelsey C; Stahl, Shannon S

    2015-11-25

    Bicyclic nitroxyl derivatives, such as 2-azaadamantane N-oxyl (AZADO) and 9-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane N-oxyl (ABNO), have emerged as highly effective alternatives to TEMPO-based catalysts for selective oxidation reactions (TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidine N-oxyl). Their efficacy is widely attributed to their smaller steric profile; however, electrocatalysis studies described herein show that the catalytic activity of nitroxyls is more strongly affected by the nitroxyl/oxoammonium redox potential than by steric effects. The inexpensive, high-potential TEMPO derivative, 4-acetamido-TEMPO (ACT), exhibits higher electrocatalytic activity than AZADO and ABNO for the oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols. Mechanistic studies provide insights into the origin of these unexpected reactivity trends. The superior activity of ACT is especially noteworthy at high pH, where bicyclic nitroxyls are inhibited by formation of an oxoammonium hydroxide adduct. PMID:26505317

  13. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... the radius bone, just below your elbow. A fracture is a break in your bone. The most common cause of a radial head fracture is falling with an outstretched arm.

  14. Test and evaluation of shale derived jet fuel by the United States Air Force

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    In June 1980, the United States Congress passed the Energy Security Act which provided for the formation of the United States Synthetic Fuels Corporation and amended the Defense Production Act of 1950 to provide for synthetic fuels for the Department of Defense (DOD). A subsequent law, P.L., 96-304, appropriated up to $20 billion for financial incentives to foster a national synthetic fuel industry. The initial synthetic fuel project funded under the Energy Security Act is the Unocal Parachute Creek Project in Colorado with an expected shale oil production of 10,000 bbls/day. The Defense Fuel Supply Center (DFSC) contracted with Gary Energy Refining Company, Fruita, Colorado to provide approximately 5,000 bbls/day of shale JP-4 for the United States Air Force (USAF) using crude from the Parachute Creek Project, with initial deliveries to begin in 1985.

  15. A General Quantum Mechanically Derived Force Field (QMDFF) for Molecules and Condensed Phase Simulations.

    PubMed

    Grimme, Stefan

    2014-10-14

    A black-box type procedure is presented for the generation of molecule-specific, classical potential energy functions (force-field, FF) solely from quantum mechanically (QM) computed input data. The approach can treat covalently bound molecules and noncovalent complexes with almost arbitrary structure. The necessary QM information consists of the equilibrium structure and the corresponding Hessian matrix, atomic partial charges, and covalent bond orders. The FF fit is performed automatically without any further input and yields a specific (nontransferable) potential which very closely resembles the QM reference potential near the equilibrium. The resulting atomistic, fully flexible FF is anharmonic and allows smooth dissociation of covalent bonds into atoms. A newly proposed force-constant-bond-energy relation with little empiricism provides reasonably accurate (about 5-10% error) atomization energies for almost arbitrary diatomic and polyatomic molecules. Intra- and intermolecular noncovalent interactions are treated by using well established and accurate D3 dispersion coefficients, CM5 charges from small basis set QM calculations, and a new interatomic repulsion potential. Particular attention has been paid to the construction of the torsion potentials which are partially obtained from automatic QM-tight-binding calculations for model systems. Detailed benchmarks are presented for conformational energies, atomization energies, vibrational frequencies, gas phase structures of organic molecules, and transition metal complexes. Comparisons to results from standard FF or semiempirical methods reveal very good accuracy of the new potential. While further studies are necessary to validate the approach, the initial results suggest QMDFF as a routine tool for the computation of a wide range of properties and systems (e.g., for molecular dynamics of isolated molecules, explicit solvation, self-solvation (melting) or even for molecular crystals) in particular when standard

  16. Single-Molecule Tribology: Force Microscopy Manipulation of a Porphyrin Derivative on a Copper Surface.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Rémy; Ouyang, Wengen; Filippov, Alexander E; Kalikhman-Razvozov, Lena; Kawai, Shigeki; Glatzel, Thilo; Gnecco, Enrico; Baratoff, Alexis; Zheng, Quanshui; Hod, Oded; Urbakh, Michael; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-01-26

    The low-temperature mechanical response of a single porphyrin molecule attached to the apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip during vertical and lateral manipulations is studied. We find that approach-retraction cycles as well as surface scanning with the terminated tip result in atomic-scale friction patterns induced by the internal reorientations of the molecule. With a joint experimental and computational effort, we identify the dicyanophenyl side groups of the molecule interacting with the surface as the dominant factor determining the observed frictional behavior. To this end, we developed a generalized Prandtl-Tomlinson model parametrized using density functional theory calculations that includes the internal degrees of freedom of the side group with respect to the core and its interactions with the underlying surface. We demonstrate that the friction pattern results from the variations of the bond length and bond angles between the dicyanophenyl side group and the porphyrin backbone as well as those of the CN group facing the surface during the lateral and vertical motion of the AFM tip. PMID:26571003

  17. Functional maturation of human pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes in vitro--correlation between contraction force and electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Marcelo C; Tertoolen, Leon G; Guadix, Juan A; Bellin, Milena; Kosmidis, Georgios; D'Aniello, Cristina; Monshouwer-Kloots, Jantine; Goumans, Marie-Jose; Wang, Yu-Li; Feinberg, Adam W; Mummery, Christine L; Passier, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC-CM) have many potential applications in disease modelling and drug target discovery but their phenotypic similarity to early fetal stages of cardiac development limits their applicability. In this study we compared contraction stresses of hPSC-CM to 2nd trimester human fetal derived cardiomyocytes (hFetal-CM) by imaging displacement of fluorescent beads by single contracting hPSC-CM, aligned by microcontact-printing on polyacrylamide gels. hPSC-CM showed distinctly lower contraction stress than cardiomyocytes isolated from hFetal-CM. To improve maturation of hPSC-CM in vitro we made use of commercial media optimized for cardiomyocyte maturation, which promoted significantly higher contraction stress in hPSC-compared with hFetal-CM. Accordingly, other features of cardiomyocyte maturation were observed, most strikingly increased upstroke velocities and action potential amplitudes, lower resting membrane potentials, improved sarcomeric organization and alterations in cardiac-specific gene expression. Performing contraction force and electrophysiology measurements on individual cardiomyocytes revealed strong correlations between an increase in contraction force and a rise of the upstroke velocity and action potential amplitude and with a decrease in the resting membrane potential. We showed that under standard differentiation conditions hPSC-CM display lower contractile force than primary hFetal-CM and identified conditions under which a commercially available culture medium could induce molecular, morphological and functional maturation of hPSC-CM in vitro. These results are an important contribution for full implementation of hPSC-CM in cardiac disease modelling and drug discovery. PMID:25771005

  18. A fully relativistic radial fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.; Ritter, Patxi

    2014-10-01

    Radial fall has historically played a momentous role. It is one of the most classical problems, the solutions of which represent the level of understanding of gravitation in a given epoch. A gedankenexperiment in a modern frame is given by a small body, like a compact star or a solar mass black hole, captured by a supermassive black hole. The mass of the small body itself and the emission of gravitational radiation cause the departure from the geodesic path due to the back-action, that is the self-force. For radial fall, as any other non-adiabatic motion, the instantaneous identity of the radiated energy and the loss of orbital energy cannot be imposed and provide the perturbed trajectory. In the first part of this paper, we present the effects due to the self-force computed on the geodesic trajectory in the background field. Compared to the latter trajectory, in the Regge-Wheeler, harmonic and all others smoothly related gauges, a far observer concludes that the self-force pushes inward (not outward) the falling body, with a strength proportional to the mass of the small body for a given large mass; further, the same observer notes a higher value of the maximal coordinate velocity, this value being reached earlier during infall. In the second part of this paper, we implement a self-consistent approach for which the trajectory is iteratively corrected by the self-force, this time computed on osculating geodesics. Finally, we compare the motion driven by the self-force without and with self-consistent orbital evolution. Subtle differences are noticeable, even if self-force effects have hardly the time to accumulate in such a short orbit.

  19. Radial arm strike rail

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1991-01-01

    The radial arm strike rail assembly is a system for measurement of bearings, directions, and stereophotography for geologic mapping, particularly where magnetic compasses are not appropriate. The radial arm, pivoting around a shaft axis, provides a reference direction determination for geologic mapping and bearing or direction determination. The centerable and levelable pedestal provide a base for the radial arm strike rail and the telescoping camera pedestal. The telescoping feature of the radial arm strike rail allows positioning the end of the rail for strike direction or bearing measurement with a goniometer.

  20. Novel Integration Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth; Brown, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics; separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and magnetic field modeling results will be presented.

  1. Novel Integrated Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Brown, Gary L.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics, separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and analysis results will be presented.

  2. R.E.D. Server: a web service for deriving RESP and ESP charges and building force field libraries for new molecules and molecular fragments

    PubMed Central

    Vanquelef, Enguerran; Simon, Sabrina; Marquant, Gaelle; Garcia, Elodie; Klimerak, Geoffroy; Delepine, Jean Charles; Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves

    2011-01-01

    R.E.D. Server is a unique, open web service, designed to derive non-polarizable RESP and ESP charges and to build force field libraries for new molecules/molecular fragments. It provides to computational biologists the means to derive rigorously molecular electrostatic potential-based charges embedded in force field libraries that are ready to be used in force field development, charge validation and molecular dynamics simulations. R.E.D. Server interfaces quantum mechanics programs, the RESP program and the latest version of the R.E.D. tools. A two step approach has been developed. The first one consists of preparing P2N file(s) to rigorously define key elements such as atom names, topology and chemical equivalencing needed when building a force field library. Then, P2N files are used to derive RESP or ESP charges embedded in force field libraries in the Tripos mol2 format. In complex cases an entire set of force field libraries or force field topology database is generated. Other features developed in R.E.D. Server include help services, a demonstration, tutorials, frequently asked questions, Jmol-based tools useful to construct PDB input files and parse R.E.D. Server outputs as well as a graphical queuing system allowing any user to check the status of R.E.D. Server jobs. PMID:21609950

  3. R.E.D. Server: a web service for deriving RESP and ESP charges and building force field libraries for new molecules and molecular fragments.

    PubMed

    Vanquelef, Enguerran; Simon, Sabrina; Marquant, Gaelle; Garcia, Elodie; Klimerak, Geoffroy; Delepine, Jean Charles; Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves

    2011-07-01

    R.E.D. Server is a unique, open web service, designed to derive non-polarizable RESP and ESP charges and to build force field libraries for new molecules/molecular fragments. It provides to computational biologists the means to derive rigorously molecular electrostatic potential-based charges embedded in force field libraries that are ready to be used in force field development, charge validation and molecular dynamics simulations. R.E.D. Server interfaces quantum mechanics programs, the RESP program and the latest version of the R.E.D. tools. A two step approach has been developed. The first one consists of preparing P2N file(s) to rigorously define key elements such as atom names, topology and chemical equivalencing needed when building a force field library. Then, P2N files are used to derive RESP or ESP charges embedded in force field libraries in the Tripos mol2 format. In complex cases an entire set of force field libraries or force field topology database is generated. Other features developed in R.E.D. Server include help services, a demonstration, tutorials, frequently asked questions, Jmol-based tools useful to construct PDB input files and parse R.E.D. Server outputs as well as a graphical queuing system allowing any user to check the status of R.E.D. Server jobs. PMID:21609950

  4. [Zaidemberg's vascularized radial graft].

    PubMed

    Saint-Cast, Y

    2010-12-01

    In 1991, Carlos Zaidemberg described a new technique to repair scaphoid non-unions with a vascularized bone graft harvested from the radial styloid process. An anatomic study based on 30 dissections after colorized latex injection established the constancy of the radial styloid process's artery, while showing that its origin, course and length were subject to variations. In a retrospective series of 38 cases over a period of 10 years, the vascularized bone graft was indicated for: (1) scaphoid non-union with the presence of avascular changes of the proximal fragment (23 cases); (2) failed prior reconstruction with bone graft and internal fixation (nine cases); (3) degenerative styloid-scaphoid arthritis (three cases); (4) fracture on Preiser dystrophy (three cases). The five steps of the simplified operative technique without dissection of the vascular pedicle include: (1) longitudinal dorso-radial approach, identification of the periosteal portion of the radial styloid process artery; (2) incision of the first and second compartments, longitudinal arthrotomy under the second compartment; (3) styloidectomy and transversal resection of the scaphoid non-union and sclerotic bone; (4) elevation of the vascularized bone graft; (5) transversal and radial insertion of the vascularized bone graft, osteosynthesis by two or three K-wire touching the scaphoid's radial edge. Scaphoid union was obtained in 33 cases out of 38. The only postoperative complications were two transient radial paresthesia. The standardized surgical procedure using vascularized bone graft harvested from the radial styloid process provides an efficient scaphoid reconstruction. PMID:21087882

  5. Weak Radial Artery Pulse

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Poothirikovil; Sivakumar, Puthuval; Ardley, Robert G.; Oates, Crispian

    2012-01-01

    We present an 11year-old boy with a weak right radial pulse, and describe the successful application of vascular ultrasound to identify the ulnar artery dominance and a thin right radial artery with below normal Doppler flow velocity that could explain the discrepancy. The implications of identifying this anomaly are discussed. PMID:22375269

  6. Triple acting radial seal

    DOEpatents

    Ebert, Todd A; Carella, John A

    2012-03-13

    A triple acting radial seal used as an interstage seal assembly in a gas turbine engine, where the seal assembly includes an interstage seal support extending from a stationary inner shroud of a vane ring, the interstage seal support includes a larger annular radial inward facing groove in which an outer annular floating seal assembly is secured for radial displacement, and the outer annular floating seal assembly includes a smaller annular radial inward facing groove in which an inner annular floating seal assembly is secured also for radial displacement. A compliant seal is secured to the inner annular floating seal assembly. The outer annular floating seal assembly encapsulates the inner annular floating seal assembly which is made from a very low alpha material in order to reduce thermal stress.

  7. Evaluation of β1-integrin expression on chondrogenically differentiating human adipose-derived stem cells using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Quisenberry, Chrystal R; Nazempour, Arshan; Van Wie, Bernard J; Abu-Lail, Nehal I

    2016-06-01

    The expression of β1-integrin on human adipose-derived stem cells, differentiating toward a chondrogenic lineage, is hypothesized to decrease when cells are grown under in vivo-like environments due to sufficient extracellular matrix (ECM) buildup in the engineered tissues. The opposite is true when cells are grown in static cultures such as in pellet or micromass. To probe β1-integrin distribution on cellular surfaces, atomic force microscopy cantilevers modified with anti-β1-integrin antibodies were used. Specific antibody-antigen adhesion forces were identified and indicated the locations of β1-integrins on cells. ECM properties were assessed by estimating the Young's modulus of the matrix. Specific single antibody-antigen interactions averaged 78 ± 10 pN with multiple bindings occurring at approximate multiples of 78 pN. The author's results show that upregulated β1-integrin expression coincided with a less robust ECM as assessed by mechanical properties of tissues. In micromass and pellet cultures, transforming growth factor β3(TGF-β3) elicited a decrease in Young's modulus by 3.7- and 4.4-fold while eliciting an increase in β1-integrin count by 1.1- and 1.3-fold, respectively. β1-integrin counts on cells grown in the presence of TGF-β3 with oscillating hydrostatic pressure decreased by a 1.1-fold while the Young's modulus increased by a 1.9-fold. Collectively, our results suggest that cells in insufficiently robust ECM express more integrin perhaps to facilitate cell-ECM adhesion and compensate for a looser less robust ECM. PMID:27106564

  8. An analytical estimate of the coefficient for radial charged particle diffusion in Jupiter's magnetosphere using plasma radial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubar, Yu. I.

    2015-11-01

    A radial profile of the plasma mass distribution in Jupiter's magnetosphere in the region beyond Io's orbit up to ˜15 Jupiter radii R J constructed according to the results of measurements on the Voyager 1 and Galileo spacecraft is used to determine the radial dependence and radial diffusion coefficient D LL . The initial profile is approximated by a function decreasing as L -5 ± 1. For this radial mass distribution, radial ion diffusion outside of Io's orbit caused by centrifugal forces is possible. An estimate of (1.2-6.7)10-11 L 6 ± 1 for D LL was obtained.

  9. Simulations of cloud-radiation interaction using large-scale forcing derived from the CINDY/DYNAMO northern sounding array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H.; Fridlind, Ann; Feng, Zhe; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Minnis, Patrick; Nordeen, Michele L.

    2015-09-01

    The recently completed CINDY/DYNAMO field campaign observed two Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) events in the equatorial Indian Ocean from October to December 2011. Prior work has indicated that the moist static energy anomalies in these events grew and were sustained to a significant extent by radiative feedbacks. We present here a study of radiative fluxes and clouds in a set of cloud-resolving simulations of these MJO events. The simulations are driven by the large-scale forcing data set derived from the DYNAMO northern sounding array observations, and carried out in a doubly periodic domain using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Simulated cloud properties and radiative fluxes are compared to those derived from the S-PolKa radar and satellite observations. To accommodate the uncertainty in simulated cloud microphysics, a number of single-moment (1M) and double-moment (2M) microphysical schemes in the WRF model are tested. The 1M schemes tend to underestimate radiative flux anomalies in the active phases of the MJO events, while the 2M schemes perform better, but can overestimate radiative flux anomalies. All the tested microphysics schemes exhibit biases in the shapes of the histograms of radiative fluxes and radar reflectivity. Histograms of radiative fluxes and brightness temperature indicate that radiative biases are not evenly distributed; the most significant bias occurs in rainy areas with OLR less than 150 W/m2 in the 2M schemes. Analysis of simulated radar reflectivities indicates that this radiative flux uncertainty is closely related to the simulated stratiform cloud coverage. Single-moment schemes underestimate stratiform cloudiness by a factor of 2, whereas 2M schemes simulate much more stratiform cloud.

  10. Simulations of Cloud-Radiation Interaction Using Large-Scale Forcing Derived from the CINDY/DYNAMO Northern Sounding Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H.; Fridlind, Ann; Feng, Zhe; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Minnis, Patrick; Nordeen, Michele L.

    2015-01-01

    The recently completed CINDY/DYNAMO field campaign observed two Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) events in the equatorial Indian Ocean from October to December 2011. Prior work has indicated that the moist static energy anomalies in these events grew and were sustained to a significant extent by radiative feedbacks. We present here a study of radiative fluxes and clouds in a set of cloud-resolving simulations of these MJO events. The simulations are driven by the large-scale forcing data set derived from the DYNAMO northern sounding array observations, and carried out in a doubly periodic domain using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Simulated cloud properties and radiative fluxes are compared to those derived from the S-PolKa radar and satellite observations. To accommodate the uncertainty in simulated cloud microphysics, a number of single-moment (1M) and double-moment (2M) microphysical schemes in the WRF model are tested. The 1M schemes tend to underestimate radiative flux anomalies in the active phases of the MJO events, while the 2M schemes perform better, but can overestimate radiative flux anomalies. All the tested microphysics schemes exhibit biases in the shapes of the histograms of radiative fluxes and radar reflectivity. Histograms of radiative fluxes and brightness temperature indicate that radiative biases are not evenly distributed; the most significant bias occurs in rainy areas with OLR less than 150 W/ cu sq in the 2M schemes. Analysis of simulated radar reflectivities indicates that this radiative flux uncertainty is closely related to the simulated stratiform cloud coverage. Single-moment schemes underestimate stratiform cloudiness by a factor of 2, whereas 2M schemes simulate much more stratiform cloud.

  11. Global Comparison of CFD and Wind-Tunnel-Derived Force and Moment Databases for the Space Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently a very large (739 runs) collection of high-fidelity RANS CFD solutions was obtained for Space Launch System ascent aerodynamics for the vehicle to be used for the first exploratory (unmanned) mission (EM-1). The extensive computations, at full-scale conditions, were originally developed to obtain detailed line and protuberance loads and surface pressures for venting analyses. The line loads were eventually integrated for comparison of the resulting forces and moments to the database that was derived from wind tunnel tests conducted at sub-scale conditions. The comparisons presented herein cover the ranges 0.5 < or = M(infinity) < or = 5, -6deg < or = alpha < or = 6deg, and -6deg < or = beta < or = 6deg. For detailed comparisons, slender-body-theory-based component build-up aero models from missile aerodynamics are used. The differences in the model fit coefficients are shown to be relatively small except for the low supersonic Mach number range, 1.1 < or = M(infinity) < or = 2.0. The analysis is intended to support process improvement and development of uncertainty models.

  12. The variational explicit polarization potential and analytical first derivative of energy: Towards a next generation force field

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wangshen; Song, Lingchun; Truhlar, Donald G.; Gao, Jiali

    2008-01-01

    A previous article proposed an electronic structure-based polarizable potential, called the explicit polarization (X-POL) potential, to treat many-body polarization and charge delocalization effects in polypeptides. Here, we present a variational version of the X-POL potential, in which the wave function of the entire molecular system is variationally optimized to yield the minimum total electronic energy. This allows the calculation of analytic gradients, a necessity for efficient molecular dynamics simulations. In this paper, the detailed derivations of the Fock matrix and analytic force are presented and discussed. The calculations involve a double self-consistent-field procedure in which the wave function of each fragment is self-consistently optimized in the presence of other fragments, and in addition the polarization of the entire system is self-consistently optimized. The variational X-POL potential has been implemented in the Chemistry at Harvard Molecular Mechanics (CHARMM) package and tested successfully for small model compounds. PMID:18570492

  13. Protein-specific force field derived from the fragment molecular orbital method can improve protein-ligand binding interactions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Le; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Kuwata, Kazuo; Takada, Shoji

    2013-05-30

    Accurate computational estimate of the protein-ligand binding affinity is of central importance in rational drug design. To improve accuracy of the molecular mechanics (MM) force field (FF) for protein-ligand simulations, we use a protein-specific FF derived by the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method and by the restrained electrostatic potential (RESP) method. Applying this FMO-RESP method to two proteins, dodecin, and lysozyme, we found that protein-specific partial charges tend to differ more significantly from the standard AMBER charges for isolated charged atoms. We did not see the dependence of partial charges on the secondary structure. Computing the binding affinities of dodecin with five ligands by MM PBSA protocol with the FMO-RESP charge set as well as with the standard AMBER charges, we found that the former gives better correlation with experimental affinities than the latter. While, for lysozyme with five ligands, both charge sets gave similar and relatively accurate estimates of binding affinities. PMID:23420697

  14. Inherently-Forced Tensile Strain in Nanodiamond-Derived Onion-like Carbon: Consequences in Defect-Induced Electrochemical Activation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young-Jin; Cho, Jung-Min; Kim, Inho; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Park, Jong-Keuk; Baik, Young-Joon; Choi, Heon-Jin; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Wook-Seong

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the nanodiamond-derived onion-like carbon (OLC) as function of synthesis temperature (1000~1400 °C), by high-resolution electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, visible-Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The temperature dependences of the obtained properties (averaged particle size, tensile strain, defect density, density of states, electron transfer kinetics, and electrochemical oxidation current) unanimously coincided: they initially increased and saturated at 1200 °C. It was attributed to the inherent tensile strains arising from (1) the volume expansion associated with the layer-wise diamond-to-graphite transformation of the core, which caused forced dilation of the outer shells during their thermal synthesis; (2) the extreme curvature of the shells. The former origin was dominant over the latter at the outermost shell, of which the relevant evolution in defect density, DOS and electron transfer kinetics determined the electrochemical performances. In detection of dopamine (DA), uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) using the OLC as electrode, their oxidation peak currents were enhanced by factors of 15~60 with annealing temperature. Their limit of detection and the linear range of detection, in the post-treatment-free condition, were as excellent as those of the nano-carbon electrodes post-treated by Pt-decoration, N-doping, plasma, or polymer. PMID:27032957

  15. Inherently-Forced Tensile Strain in Nanodiamond-Derived Onion-like Carbon: Consequences in Defect-Induced Electrochemical Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Young-Jin; Cho, Jung-Min; Kim, Inho; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Park, Jong-Keuk; Baik, Young-Joon; Choi, Heon-Jin; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Wook-Seong

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed the nanodiamond-derived onion-like carbon (OLC) as function of synthesis temperature (1000~1400 °C), by high-resolution electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, visible-Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The temperature dependences of the obtained properties (averaged particle size, tensile strain, defect density, density of states, electron transfer kinetics, and electrochemical oxidation current) unanimously coincided: they initially increased and saturated at 1200 °C. It was attributed to the inherent tensile strains arising from (1) the volume expansion associated with the layer-wise diamond-to-graphite transformation of the core, which caused forced dilation of the outer shells during their thermal synthesis; (2) the extreme curvature of the shells. The former origin was dominant over the latter at the outermost shell, of which the relevant evolution in defect density, DOS and electron transfer kinetics determined the electrochemical performances. In detection of dopamine (DA), uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) using the OLC as electrode, their oxidation peak currents were enhanced by factors of 15~60 with annealing temperature. Their limit of detection and the linear range of detection, in the post-treatment-free condition, were as excellent as those of the nano-carbon electrodes post-treated by Pt-decoration, N-doping, plasma, or polymer.

  16. Inherently-Forced Tensile Strain in Nanodiamond-Derived Onion-like Carbon: Consequences in Defect-Induced Electrochemical Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young-Jin; Cho, Jung-Min; Kim, Inho; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Park, Jong-Keuk; Baik, Young-Joon; Choi, Heon-Jin; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Wook-Seong

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the nanodiamond-derived onion-like carbon (OLC) as function of synthesis temperature (1000~1400 °C), by high-resolution electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, visible-Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The temperature dependences of the obtained properties (averaged particle size, tensile strain, defect density, density of states, electron transfer kinetics, and electrochemical oxidation current) unanimously coincided: they initially increased and saturated at 1200 °C. It was attributed to the inherent tensile strains arising from (1) the volume expansion associated with the layer-wise diamond-to-graphite transformation of the core, which caused forced dilation of the outer shells during their thermal synthesis; (2) the extreme curvature of the shells. The former origin was dominant over the latter at the outermost shell, of which the relevant evolution in defect density, DOS and electron transfer kinetics determined the electrochemical performances. In detection of dopamine (DA), uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) using the OLC as electrode, their oxidation peak currents were enhanced by factors of 15~60 with annealing temperature. Their limit of detection and the linear range of detection, in the post-treatment-free condition, were as excellent as those of the nano-carbon electrodes post-treated by Pt-decoration, N-doping, plasma, or polymer. PMID:27032957

  17. FAME Radial Velocity Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, S.; Gould, A.

    2000-12-01

    Full-Sky Astrometric Mapping Explorer (FAME) belongs to a new generation of astrometry satellites and will probe the surrounding space some 20 times deeper than its predecessor Hipparcos. As a result we will acquire precise knowledge of 5 out of 6 components of phase-space for millions of stars. The remaining coordinate, radial velocity, will remain unknown. In this study, we look at how the knowledge of radial velocity affects the determination of the structure of the Galaxy, and its gravitational potential. We therefore propose a radial velocity survey of FAME stars, and discuss its feasibility and technical requirements.

  18. Radial nerve dysfunction (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The radial nerve travels down the arm and supplies movement to the triceps muscle at the back of the upper arm. ... the wrist and hand. The usual causes of nerve dysfunction are direct trauma, prolonged pressure on the ...

  19. Radial heat flux transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basiulis, A.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Unit moves heat radially from small diameter shell to larger diameter shell, or vice versa, with negligible temperature drop, making device useful wherever heating or cooling of concentrically arranged materials, substances, and structures is desired.

  20. Radial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... may occur: Abnormal sensations to the hand or forearm ("back" of the hand), "thumb side" (radial surface) ... wrist or fingers Muscle loss ( atrophy ) in the forearm Weakness of the wrist and finger Wrist or ...

  1. Radial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... nerve leads to problems with movement in the arm and wrist and with sensation in the back of the arm or hand. ... to the radial nerve, which travels down the arm and controls movement of the triceps muscle at ...

  2. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  3. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  4. QuickFF: A program for a quick and easy derivation of force fields for metal-organic frameworks from ab initio input.

    PubMed

    Vanduyfhuys, Louis; Vandenbrande, Steven; Verstraelen, Toon; Schmid, Rochus; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique

    2015-05-15

    QuickFF is a software package to derive accurate force fields for isolated and complex molecular systems in a quick and easy manner. Apart from its general applicability, the program has been designed to generate force fields for metal-organic frameworks in an automated fashion. The force field parameters for the covalent interaction are derived from ab initio data. The mathematical expression of the covalent energy is kept simple to ensure robustness and to avoid fitting deficiencies as much as possible. The user needs to produce an equilibrium structure and a Hessian matrix for one or more building units. Afterward, a force field is generated for the system using a three-step method implemented in QuickFF. The first two steps of the methodology are designed to minimize correlations among the force field parameters. In the last step, the parameters are refined by imposing the force field parameters to reproduce the ab initio Hessian matrix in Cartesian coordinate space as accurate as possible. The method is applied on a set of 1000 organic molecules to show the easiness of the software protocol. To illustrate its application to metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), QuickFF is used to determine force fields for MIL-53(Al) and MOF-5. For both materials, accurate force fields were already generated in literature but they requested a lot of manual interventions. QuickFF is a tool that can easily be used by anyone with a basic knowledge of performing ab initio calculations. As a result, accurate force fields are generated with minimal effort. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25740170

  5. A moiré method of visualizing electromagnetic force lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuk, K. C.; Lee, T. H.; Chang, S.

    2008-08-01

    We propose a simple moiré method of visualizing electromagnetic force lines. The indicial equation is first derived for the tangent (or normal) curve to the electric field (or magnetic induction) around two parallel-line charges (or currents). The derived equation is then shown to have a one-to-one correspondence with that of the moiré fringe formed by two overlapped radial gratings. Since the tangent (or normal) curve to the electric field (or the magnetic induction) corresponds to the direction of the electric (or magnetic) force on a test charge (or current), the radial grating moirés can be used for the visualization of electric (or magnetic) force lines.

  6. Radial slot flows in solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbing, J. H.; Heister, S. D.

    1993-06-01

    A series of parametric numerical solutions have been generated to characterize the two-dimensional flowfield due to the presence of a radial slot in a solid rocket propellant grain. Results have been parameterized in terms of upstream core Mach number, slot contraction ratio, and slot-to-core mass flow and momentum ratios. Numerical solutions of the axisymmetric Euler equations have been obtained on a 'generic' slot geometry using a cell-centered, finite volume scheme. Results indicate that both the stagnation pressure loss and grain suction force on the propellant segment downstream of the slot correlate well with slot-to-core momentum ratio; a parameter which has not been used in previous studies. Significant differences (in stagnation pressure losses) have been identified between the 2-D numerical results and the 1-D methods applied in current state-of-the-art ballistics codes. We anticipate that the correlations derived through this parametric study can be used in preliminary performance and grain stress analyses performed during the motor development process.

  7. Experimental research on cavitation inception and the forces impinging on displaceable runner blade parts of a doubly controllable radial turbine with n sub q(opt) = 31 in aerial tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrille, W.

    An experimental determination is presented of the cavitation number for the inception of cavitation and for the static loads on displaceable runner blade parts of doubly controllable radial turbines with an alternately impinged runner wheel. The results show that the characteristic curves and the efficiency provide no advantage over conventional Francis model turbines of the same specific rotation number.

  8. [Approaches to radial shaft].

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, J; Naňka, O; Tuček, M

    2015-10-01

    In the clinical practice, radial shaft may be exposed via two approaches, namely the posterolateral Thompson and volar (anterior) Henry approaches. A feared complication of both of them is the injury to the deep branch of the radial nerve. No consensus has been reached, yet, as to which of the two approaches is more beneficial for the proximal half of radius. According to our anatomical studies and clinical experience, Thompson approach is safe only in fractures of the middle and distal thirds of the radial shaft, but highly risky in fractures of its proximal third. Henry approach may be used in any fracture of the radial shaft and provides a safe exposure of the entire lateral and anterior surfaces of the radius.The Henry approach has three phases. In the first phase, incision is made along the line connecting the biceps brachii tendon and the styloid process of radius. Care must be taken not to damage the lateral cutaneous nerve of forearm.In the second phase, fascia is incised and the brachioradialis identified by the typical transition from the muscle belly to tendon and the shape of the tendon. On the lateral side, the brachioradialis lines the space with the radial artery and veins and the superficial branch of the radial nerve running at its bottom. On the medial side, the space is defined by the pronator teres in the proximal part and the flexor carpi radialis in the distal part. The superficial branch of the radial nerve is retracted together with the brachioradialis laterally, and the radial artery medially.In the third phase, the attachment of the pronator teres is identified by its typical tendon in the middle of convexity of the lateral surface of the radial shaft. The proximal half of the radius must be exposed very carefully in order not to damage the deep branch of the radial nerve. Dissection starts at the insertion of the pronator teres and proceeds proximally along its lateral border in interval between this muscle and insertion of the supinator

  9. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Radial turbines have been used extensively in many applications including small ground based electrical power generators, automotive engine turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. In all of these applications the turbine inlet temperature is limited to a value commensurate with the material strength limitations and life requirements of uncooled metal rotors. To take advantage of all the benefits that higher temperatures offer, such as increased turbine specific power output or higher cycle thermal efficiency, requires improved high temperature materials and/or blade cooling. Extensive research is on-going to advance the material properties of high temperature superalloys as well as composite materials including ceramics. The use of ceramics with their high temperature potential and low cost is particularly appealing for radial turbines. However until these programs reach fruition the only way to make significant step increases beyond the present material temperature barriers is to cool the radial blading.

  10. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  11. Radially uniform electron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D.; Bame, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    A thermionic electron source capable of producing uniform count rates in a number of channel electron multipliers simultaneously was required for conditioning multipliers for an extended space mission. It was found that a straight tungsten filament in the center of a cylindrically symmetric geometry surrounded by an array of multipliers emits a radially asymmetric distribution of electrons that changes with time. A source was developed which successfully produces a time-independent radially uniform distribution of electrons by moving the filament out of the direct line of sight and replacing it with a centrally located electron 'cloud.'

  12. Intercomparison of atmospheric reanalysis data in the Arctic region: To derive site-specific forcing data for terrestrial models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, J.; Saito, K.; Machiya, H.; Yabuki, H.; Ikawa, H.; Ohta, T.; Iijima, Y.; Kotani, A.; Suzuki, R.; Miyazaki, S.; Sato, A.; Hajima, T.; Sueyoshi, T.

    2015-12-01

    An intercomparison project for the Arctic terrestrial (physical and ecosystem) models, GTMIP, is conducted, targeting at improvements in the existing terrestrial schemes, as an activity of the Terrestrial Ecosystem research group in the Arctic of Japan GRENE Arctic Climate Change Research Project (GRENE-TEA). For site simulations for four GRENE-TEA sites (i.e., Fairbanks/AK, Kevo/Finland, Tiksi and Yakutsk/Siberia), we needed to prepare continuous, site-fit forcing data ready to drive the models. Due to scarcity of site observations in the region, however, it was difficult to make such data directly from the observations. Therefore, we decided to create a backbone dataset (Level 0 or Lv0) first by utilizing the reanalysis data to derive the site-specific data (Level 1 or Lv1). For selection of the best dataset for our purpose, we compared four atmospheric reanalysis datasets, i.e., ERA Interim, JRA-55, NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 1, and NCEP-DOE Reanalysis 2, in terms of the climatic reproducibility (w.r.t. temperature at 2 m and precipitation) in the region north of 60°N. CRU for temperature and GPCP for precipitation were also used for monthly-mean ground-level climate. As we will show ERA-Interim showed the smallest bias for both the parameters in terms of RMSE. Especially, air temperature in the cold period was reproduced better in ERA-Interim than is in JRA-55 or other reanalysis products. Therefore, we created Lv0 from ERA-Interim. Comparison between the site observations and Lv0 showed good agreement except for wind speed at all sites and air temperature at Tiksi, a coastal site in the eastern Siberia. Air temperature of ERA-Interim showed significantly continental characteristics while the site observation more coastal. The 34-year-long, hourly, site-fit continuous data (Lv1) for each of the GRENE-TEA sites was then created from the Lv0 values at the grid point closest to the site, by merging with the observations.

  13. The rotational barrier of ethane and some of its hexasubstituted derivatives in terms of the forces acting on the electron distribution.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Cuevas, Gabriel; Martín Pendás, Ángel; Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús

    2015-07-15

    A novel and alternative explanation of the rotational barrier of ethane and several hexasubstituted derivatives, CX3CX3 (X = H, F, CH3, Cl, Br), is suggested based on the evaluation of the properties of the electron distribution. The forces exerted on the electron density of the topological atoms making up a molecule, the Ehrenfest forces, are analyzed and, with the help of the virial theorem, they are used to explain the experimental rotational barriers. According to this approach, the barrier is mainly a consequence of the decrease of the always attractive Ehrenfest forces (EFs) linking the two C atoms. In addition, the behavior of the EFs is related to a decrease of stability of the central C atoms, which is not compensated by the stabilization of the substituents. Also, during rotation from the staggered to the equilibrium conformation, the electron density at the C-C bond critical point and the electron delocalization between C atoms decrease and are accompanied by an increase of electron delocalization between the substituents. According to the analysis of the EF field lines and to the behavior of the integrated forces, the rotational barrier cannot be explained as a result of any repulsive forces acting on the electron density, although a possible interpretation of the quantum force that balances the EF in stationary states as a measure of traditional Pauli repulsions is also examined. PMID:26126983

  14. Heterogeneous Force Chains in Cellularized Biopolymer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher Allen Rucksack; Sun, Bo; Jiao, Yang

    Biopolymer Networks play an important role in coordinating and regulating collective cellular dynamics via a number of signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the mechanical response of a model biopolymer network due to the active contraction of embedded cells. Specifically, a graph (bond-node) model derived from confocal microscopy data is used to represent the network microstructure, and cell contraction is modeled by applying correlated displacements at specific nodes, representing the focal adhesion sites. A force-based stochastic relaxation method is employed to obtain force-balanced network under cell contraction. We find that the majority of the forces are carried by a small number of heterogeneous force chains emerged from the contracting cells. The force chains consist of fiber segments that either possess a high degree of alignment before cell contraction or are aligned due to the reorientation induced by cell contraction. Large fluctuations of the forces along different force chains are observed. Importantly, the decay of the forces along the force chains is significantly slower than the decay of radially averaged forces in the system, suggesting that the fibreous nature of biopolymer network structure could support long-range mechanical signaling between cells.

  15. Prediction of refractive correction with radial keratotomy.

    PubMed

    Kremer, F B; Steer, R A

    1985-10-01

    Multiple regression analysis was employed to estimate the amount of preoperative correction required to achieve emmetropia in 129 spherical radial keratotomy procedures. Age, intraocular pressure, central corneal thickness, number of incisions, number of zones, and central optical zone size are variables that describe the amount of refractive correction required in order to achieve emmetropia. The surgical procedures from which these estimates are derived yield meaningful reductions in myopia. Recommendations for further research on the prediction of optimal response to radial keratotomy are included. PMID:4073725

  16. Surface potential measurement of fullerene derivative/copper phthalocyanine on indium tin oxide electrode by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Nobuo; Yamaki, Michio; Noda, Kei; Katori, Shigetaka; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2015-08-01

    We have investigated the organic semiconductor thin films deposited by vacuum evaporation deposition using intersecting metal shadow masks on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode/glass substrates to simulate organic solar cells by simultaneous observation with dynamic force microscopy (DFM)/Kelvin-probe force microscopy (KFM). The energy band diagram was depicted by simultaneously obtaining topographic and surface potential images of the same area using DFM/KFM. We considered the charge behavior at the interface having band bending in the phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) film.

  17. Variable stator radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.; Hajek, T.; Chen, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A radial turbine stage with a variable area nozzle was investigated. A high work capacity turbine design with a known high performance base was modified to accept a fixed vane stagger angle moveable sidewall nozzle. The nozzle area was varied by moving the forward and rearward sidewalls. Diffusing and accelerating rotor inlet ramps were evaluated in combinations with hub and shroud rotor exit rings. Performance of contoured sidewalls and the location of the sidewall split line with respect to the rotor inlet was compared to the baseline. Performance and rotor exit survey data are presented for 31 different geometries. Detail survey data at the nozzle exit are given in contour plot format for five configurations. A data base is provided for a variable geometry concept that is a viable alternative to the more common pivoted vane variable geometry radial turbine.

  18. Radial Inflow Turboexpander Redesign

    SciTech Connect

    William G. Price

    2001-09-24

    Steamboat Envirosystems, LLC (SELC) was awarded a grant in accordance with the DOE Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Development. Atlas-Copco Rotoflow (ACR), a radial expansion turbine manufacturer, was responsible for the manufacturing of the turbine and the creation of the new computer program. SB Geo, Inc. (SBG), the facility operator, monitored and assisted ACR's activities as well as provided installation and startup assistance. The primary scope of the project is the redesign of an axial flow turbine to a radial inflow turboexpander to provide increased efficiency and reliability at an existing facility. In addition to the increased efficiency and reliability, the redesign includes an improved reduction gear design, and improved shaft seal design, and upgraded control system and a greater flexibility of application

  19. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1989-01-24

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side. 5 figs.

  20. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, Thomas H.; Call, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side.

  1. A model for the radiative forcing during ACE-Asia derived from CIRPAS Twin Otter and R/V Ronald H. Brown data and comparison with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conant, William C.; Seinfeld, John H.; Wang, Jian; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Tang, Youhua; Uno, Itsushi; Flatau, Piotr J.; Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Quinn, Patricia K.

    2003-12-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol size, composition, and hygroscopic behavior from Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration R/V Ronald H. Brown observations are used to construct a generic optical model of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) aerosol. The model accounts for sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, sea salt, and mineral dust. The effects of relative humidity and mixing assumptions (internal versus external, coating of dust by pollutants) are explicitly accounted for. The aerosol model is integrated with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model to compute direct radiative forcing in the solar spectrum. The predicted regional average surface aerosol forcing efficiency (change in clear-sky radiative flux per unit aerosol optical depth at 500 nm) during the ACE-Asia intensive period is -65 Wm-2 for pure dust and -60 Wm-2 for pure pollution aerosol (clear skies). A three-dimensional atmospheric chemical transport model (Chemical Weather Forecast System (CFORS)) is used with the radiative transfer model to derive regional radiative forcing during ACE-Asia in clear and cloudy skies. Net regional solar direct radiative forcing during the 5-15 April 2001 dust storm period is -3 Wm-2 at the top of the atmosphere and -17 W m-2 at the surface for the region from 20°N to 50°N and 100°E to 150°E when the effects of clouds on the direct forcing are included. The model fluxes and forcing efficiencies are found to be in good agreement with surface radiometric observations made aboard the R.H. Brown. Mean cloud conditions are found to moderate the top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing by a factor of ˜3 compared to clear-sky calculations, but atmospheric absorption by aerosol is not strongly affected by clouds in this study. The regional aerosol effect at the TOA ("climate forcing") of -3 Wm-2 is comparable in magnitude, but of opposite

  2. The stability of Taylor-Couette flow with radial heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mohamed El-Sayed

    The stability of circular Couette flow with radial heating across vertically oriented coaxial cylinders is investigated using linearized stability theory. The physical problem is governed by five parameters: the Taylor number Ta, the Groshof number G, the Prandtl number Pr, the cylinder aspect ration A, and the radius ratio eta. In the model infinite aspect ratio is assumed and critical stability boundaries are calculated for a conduction regime base flow. A rational analysis is made to derive the full governing perturbation equations and test flow stability subject to both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric disturbances. The flow may be driven to instability by competition between centrifugal, buoyancy, and shear force mechanisms. In spite of this complexity, the existence of solution symmetries of the perturbation equations with respect to the sense of radial heating and the sense of cylinder rotation are proven. The linear boundary-value problem defined by 16 first-order differential equations is solved using the software package SUPORT in combination with the nonlinear equation solver SNSQE. Critical stability boundaries at fixed Pr and eta were determined by searching for the minimum value of either Ta or G over all wavelengths K and mode numbers n.

  3. Radially inhomogeneous bounded plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri-Khatir, H.; Aghamir, F. M.

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of kinetic theory along with self-consistent field equations, the expressions for dielectric tensor of radially inhomogeneous magnetized plasma columns are obtained. The study of dielectric tensor characteristics allows the accurate analysis of the inhomogeneous properties, beyond limitations that exist in the conventional method. Through the Bessel–Fourier transformation, the localized form of material equations in a radially inhomogeneous medium are obtained. In order to verify the integrity of the model and reveal the effect of inhomogeneity, a special case of a cylindrical plasma waveguide completely filled with inhomogeneous magnetized cold plasma was considered. The dispersion relation curves for four families of electromagnetic (EH and HE) and electrostatic (SC and C) modes are obtained and compared with the findings of the conventional model. The numerical analysis indicates that the inhomogeneity effect leads to coupling of electromagnetic and electrostatic modes each having different radial eigen numbers. The study also reveals that the electrostatic modes are more sensitive to inhomogeneous effects than the electromagnetic modes.

  4. Radial Field Piezoelectric Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, R. G.; Effinger, R. T., IV; Copeland, B. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A series of active piezoelectric diaphragms were fabricated and patterned with several geometrically defined Inter-Circulating Electrodes "ICE" and Interdigitated Ring Electrodes "ICE". When a voltage potential is applied to the electrodes, the result is a radially distributed electric field that mechanically strains the piezoceramic along the Z-axis (perpendicular to the applied electric field). Unlike other piezoelectric bender actuators, these Radial Field Diaphragms (RFDs) strain concentrically yet afford high displacements (several times that of the equivalent Unimorph) while maintaining a constant circumference. One of the more intriguing aspects is that the radial strain field reverses itself along the radius of the RFD while the tangential strain remains relatively constant. The result is a Z-deflection that has a conical profile. This paper covers the fabrication and characterization of the 5 cm. (2 in.) diaphragms as a function of poling field strength, ceramic thickness, electrode type and line spacing, as well as the surface topography, the resulting strain field and displacement as a function of applied voltage at low frequencies. The unique features of these RFDs include the ability to be clamped about their perimeter with little or no change in displacement, the environmentally insulated packaging, and a highly repeatable fabrication process that uses commodity materials.

  5. Radial velocity studies of cool stars.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh R A; Barnes, John; Tuomi, Mikko; Jenkins, James S; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

    2014-04-28

    Our current view of exoplanets is one derived primarily from solar-like stars with a strong focus on understanding our Solar System. Our knowledge about the properties of exoplanets around the dominant stellar population by number, the so-called low-mass stars or M dwarfs, is much more cursory. Based on radial velocity discoveries, we find that the semi-major axis distribution of M dwarf planets appears to be broadly similar to those around more massive stars and thus formation and migration processes might be similar to heavier stars. However, we find that the mass of M dwarf planets is relatively much lower than the expected mass dependency based on stellar mass and thus infer that planet formation efficiency around low-mass stars is relatively impaired. We consider techniques to overcome the practical issue of obtaining good quality radial velocity data for M dwarfs despite their faintness and sustained activity and emphasize (i) the wavelength sensitivity of radial velocity signals, (ii) the combination of radial velocity data from different experiments for robust detection of small amplitude signals, and (iii) the selection of targets and radial velocity interpretation of late-type M dwarfs should consider Hα behaviour. PMID:24664922

  6. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-08-08

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  7. An Ensemble Three-Dimensional Constrained Variational Analysis Method to Derive Large-Scale Forcing Data for Single-Column Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shuaiqi

    Atmospheric vertical velocities and advective tendencies are essential as large-scale forcing data to drive single-column models (SCM), cloud-resolving models (CRM) and large-eddy simulations (LES). They cannot be directly measured or easily calculated with great accuracy from field measurements. In the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, a constrained variational algorithm (1DCVA) has been used to derive large-scale forcing data over a sounding network domain with the aid of flux measurements at the surface and top of the atmosphere (TOA). We extend the 1DCVA algorithm into three dimensions (3DCVA) along with other improvements to calculate gridded large-scale forcing data. We also introduce an ensemble framework using different background data, error covariance matrices and constraint variables to quantify the uncertainties of the large-scale forcing data. The results of sensitivity study show that the derived forcing data and SCM simulated clouds are more sensitive to the background data than to the error covariance matrices and constraint variables, while horizontal moisture advection has relatively large sensitivities to the precipitation, the dominate constraint variable. Using a mid-latitude cyclone case study in March 3rd, 2000 at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, we investigate the spatial distribution of diabatic heating sources (Q1) and moisture sinks (Q2), and show that they are consistent with the satellite clouds and intuitive structure of the mid-latitude cyclone. We also evaluate the Q1 and Q2 in analysis/reanalysis, finding that the regional analysis/reanalysis all tend to underestimate the sub-grid scale upward transport of moist static energy in the lower troposphere. With the uncertainties from large-scale forcing data and observation specified, we compare SCM results and observations and find that models have large biases on cloud properties which could not be fully explained by the uncertainty from the large-scale forcing

  8. Radial Rydberg wavepacket maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeibel, J. G.; Jones, R. R.

    2001-04-01

    Picosecond laser pulses have been used to excite radial Rydberg wavepackets in Ca. Time-delayed, unipolar, `half-cycle' electric field pulses are used to probe the evolution of the wavepackets as a continuous function of binding energy. The data provide three-dimensional maps of wavepacket recurrence probability versus binding energy versus time. A rescaling of the energy and time coordinate axes allows the visualization of the distinct difference between the initial oscillations of the wavepacket and those that occur at integer and fractional revivals.

  9. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  10. Radial Reflection diffraction tomorgraphy

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K

    2013-11-19

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  11. Underground radial pipe network

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.L.

    1984-04-24

    The network, useful in conducting fluids to underground sites, is an assembly of flexible pipes or tubes, suspended from and connected to a drill pipe. The flexible pipes, assembled in a bundle, are spring biased to flare outwardly in an arcuate manner when a releasable cap on the distal end of the bundle is removed. The assembled bundle is inserted into and lowered down a bore hole. When the cap is released, the pipes flare radially and outwardly. Fluid, pumped into and through the assembly, can be directed into the underground formation for various purposes.

  12. Radial cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, M.C.

    1997-01-08

    The project`s aim is to complete development of the Radial Cutting Torch, a pyrotechnic cutter, for use in all downhole tubular cutting operations in the petroleum industry. Project objectives are to redesign and pressure test nozzle seals to increase product quality, reliability, and manufacturability; improve the mechanical anchor to increase its temperature tolerance and its ability to function in a wider variety of wellbore fluids; and redesign and pressure test the RCT nozzle for operation at pressures from 10 to 20 ksi. The proposal work statement is included in the statement of work for the grant via this reference.

  13. Vector Design Tour de Force: Integrating Combinatorial and Rational Approaches to Derive Novel Adeno-associated Virus Variants

    PubMed Central

    Marsic, Damien; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Currlin, Seth; Markusic, David M; Tseng, Yu-Shan; Herzog, Roland W; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Zolotukhin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Methodologies to improve existing adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors for gene therapy include either rational approaches or directed evolution to derive capsid variants characterized by superior transduction efficiencies in targeted tissues. Here, we integrated both approaches in one unified design strategy of “virtual family shuffling” to derive a combinatorial capsid library whereby only variable regions on the surface of the capsid are modified. Individual sublibraries were first assembled in order to preselect compatible amino acid residues within restricted surface-exposed regions to minimize the generation of dead-end variants. Subsequently, the successful families were interbred to derive a combined library of ~8 × 105 complexity. Next-generation sequencing of the packaged viral DNA revealed capsid surface areas susceptible to directed evolution, thus providing guidance for future designs. We demonstrated the utility of the library by deriving an AAV2-based vector characterized by a 20-fold higher transduction efficiency in murine liver, now equivalent to that of AAV8. PMID:25048217

  14. Vector design Tour de Force: integrating combinatorial and rational approaches to derive novel adeno-associated virus variants.

    PubMed

    Marsic, Damien; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Currlin, Seth; Markusic, David M; Tseng, Yu-Shan; Herzog, Roland W; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Zolotukhin, Sergei

    2014-11-01

    Methodologies to improve existing adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors for gene therapy include either rational approaches or directed evolution to derive capsid variants characterized by superior transduction efficiencies in targeted tissues. Here, we integrated both approaches in one unified design strategy of "virtual family shuffling" to derive a combinatorial capsid library whereby only variable regions on the surface of the capsid are modified. Individual sublibraries were first assembled in order to preselect compatible amino acid residues within restricted surface-exposed regions to minimize the generation of dead-end variants. Subsequently, the successful families were interbred to derive a combined library of ~8 × 10(5) complexity. Next-generation sequencing of the packaged viral DNA revealed capsid surface areas susceptible to directed evolution, thus providing guidance for future designs. We demonstrated the utility of the library by deriving an AAV2-based vector characterized by a 20-fold higher transduction efficiency in murine liver, now equivalent to that of AAV8. PMID:25048217

  15. Large atmospheric shortwave radiative forcing by Mediterranean aerosols derived from simultaneous ground-based and spaceborne observations and dependence on the aerosol type and single scattering albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Biagio, Claudia; di Sarra, Alcide; Meloni, Daniela

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol optical properties and shortwave irradiance measurements at the island of Lampedusa (central Mediterranean) during 2004-2007 are combined with Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System observations of the outgoing shortwave flux at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The measurements are used to estimate the surface (FES), the top of the atmosphere (FETOA), and the atmospheric (FEATM) shortwave aerosol forcing efficiencies for solar zenith angle (θ) between 15° and 55° for desert dust (DD), urban/industrial-biomass burning aerosols (UI-BB), and mixed aerosols (MA). The forcing efficiency at the different atmospheric levels is derived by applying the direct method, that is, as the derivative of the shortwave net flux versus the aerosol optical depth at fixed θ. The diurnal average forcing efficiency at the surface/TOA at the equinox is (-68.9 ± 4.0)/(-45.5 ± 5.4) W m-2 for DD, (-59.0 ± 4.3)/(-19.2 ± 3.3) W m-2 for UI-BB, and (-94.9 ± 5.1)/(-36.2 ± 1.7) W m-2 for MA. The diurnal average atmospheric radiative forcing at the equinox is (+7.3 ± 2.5) W m-2 for DD, (+8.4 ± 1.9) W m-2 for UI-BB, and (+8.2 ± 1.9) W m-2 for MA, suggesting that the mean atmospheric forcing is almost independent of the aerosol type. The largest values of the atmospheric forcing may reach +35 W m-2 for DD, +23 W m-2 for UI-BB, and +34 W m-2 for MA. FETOA is calculated for MA and 25° ≤ θ ≤ 35° for three classes of single scattering albedo (0.7 ≤ ω < 0.8, 0.8 ≤ ω < 0.9, and 0.9 ≤ ω ≤ 1) at 415.6 and 868.7 nm: FETOA increases, in absolute value, for increasing ω. A 0.1 increment in ω determines an increase in FETOA by 10-20 W m-2.

  16. Probing the interaction forces of prostate cancer cells with collagen I and bone marrow derived stem cells on the single cell level.

    PubMed

    Sariisik, Ediz; Docheva, Denitsa; Padula, Daniela; Popov, Cvetan; Opfer, Jan; Schieker, Matthias; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Benoit, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion of metastasizing prostate carcinoma cells was quantified for two carcinoma model cell lines LNCaP (lymph node-specific) and PC3 (bone marrow-specific). By time-lapse microscopy and force spectroscopy we found PC3 cells to preferentially adhere to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SCP1 cell line). Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based force spectroscopy, the mechanical pattern of the adhesion to SCP1 cells was characterized for both prostate cancer cell lines and compared to a substrate consisting of pure collagen type I. PC3 cells dissipated more energy (27.6 aJ) during the forced de-adhesion AFM experiments and showed significantly more adhesive and stronger bonds compared to LNCaP cells (20.1 aJ). The characteristic signatures of the detachment force traces revealed that, in contrast to the LNCaP cells, PC3 cells seem to utilize their filopodia in addition to establish adhesive bonds. Taken together, our study clearly demonstrates that PC3 cells have a superior adhesive affinity to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, compared to LNCaP. Semi-quantitative PCR on both prostate carcinoma cell lines revealed the expression of two Col-I binding integrin receptors, α1β1 and α2β1 in PC3 cells, suggesting their possible involvement in the specific interaction to the substrates. Further understanding of the exact mechanisms behind this phenomenon might lead to optimized therapeutic applications targeting the metastatic behavior of certain prostate cancer cells towards bone tissue. PMID:23472100

  17. Probing the Interaction Forces of Prostate Cancer Cells with Collagen I and Bone Marrow Derived Stem Cells on the Single Cell Level

    PubMed Central

    Sariisik, Ediz; Docheva, Denitsa; Padula, Daniela; Popov, Cvetan; Opfer, Jan; Schieker, Matthias; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Benoit, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion of metastasizing prostate carcinoma cells was quantified for two carcinoma model cell lines LNCaP (lymph node-specific) and PC3 (bone marrow-specific). By time-lapse microscopy and force spectroscopy we found PC3 cells to preferentially adhere to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SCP1 cell line). Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based force spectroscopy, the mechanical pattern of the adhesion to SCP1 cells was characterized for both prostate cancer cell lines and compared to a substrate consisting of pure collagen type I. PC3 cells dissipated more energy (27.6 aJ) during the forced de-adhesion AFM experiments and showed significantly more adhesive and stronger bonds compared to LNCaP cells (20.1 aJ). The characteristic signatures of the detachment force traces revealed that, in contrast to the LNCaP cells, PC3 cells seem to utilize their filopodia in addition to establish adhesive bonds. Taken together, our study clearly demonstrates that PC3 cells have a superior adhesive affinity to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, compared to LNCaP. Semi-quantitative PCR on both prostate carcinoma cell lines revealed the expression of two Col-I binding integrin receptors, α1β1 and α2β1 in PC3 cells, suggesting their possible involvement in the specific interaction to the substrates. Further understanding of the exact mechanisms behind this phenomenon might lead to optimized therapeutic applications targeting the metastatic behavior of certain prostate cancer cells towards bone tissue. PMID:23472100

  18. Coherent anti-phasing between solar forcing and tropical Pacific climate over the past millennium: derivation and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emile-Geay, J.; Cobb, K.; Mann, M. E.; Wittenberg, A. T.

    2011-12-01

    Using a compilation of the most recent, high-resolution proxy data from the tropics, and a state-of-the-art climate reconstruction technique (RegEM iTTLS; Emile-Geay et al, submitted), we reconstruct sea-surface temperature (SST) in the central equatorial Pacific (NINO3.4 region) over the past millennium. Using frozen network experiments and pseudoproxy validation, the reconstruction is found skillful back to 1150 C.E., with inevitable amplitude reduction before 1500 C.E. due to the paucity of proxy predictors. Despite this caveat, wavelet coherency analysis reveals a marked anticorrelation between solar forcing (as estimated from cosmogenic isotope concentrations; Bard et al., 2007; Steinhilber et al., 2009) and the reconstructed NINO3.4 in the ~sim205-year spectral range (DeVries cycle). The phase angle between both signals is 156 ± 33o in this range, indicating that periods of high solar irradiance coincide with cool conditions in the NINO3.4 region, with time lag of 14 ± 19 years. We find this result robust to the reconstruction method, estimate of solar forcing, or analysis method used to estimate the phasing. We then discuss the implication of this result for the response of tropical Pacific climate to radiative forcing. While the anti-phasing seems to favor the ``ocean dynamical thermostat'' hypothesis of Clement et al [1996], this feedback appears subdued in most IPCC-class coupled general circulation models (CGCMs), where it is almost completely compensated by changes in the Pacific trade winds, linked to changes in the vertical structures of atmospheric moisture and temperature (Knutson & Manabe 1995; Held & Soden 2006; Vecchi et al. 2006). If the reconstruction is correct that past NINO3.4 SSTs have varied out of phase with solar irradiance on bicentennial scales, this would pose a new challenge both for CGCM simulations and for our understanding of the equatorial Pacific response to radiative forcing Clement, A. C., Seager, R., Cane, M. A., and Zebiak

  19. Linear stability of radially-heated circular Couette flow with simulated radial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagg, Randy; Weidman, Patrick D.

    2007-05-01

    The stability of circular Couette flow between vertical concentric cylinders in the presence of a radial temperature gradient is considered with an effective “radial gravity.” In addition to terrestrial buoyancy - ρg e z we include the term - ρg m f(r)e r where g m f(r) is the effective gravitational acceleration directed radially inward across the gap. Physically, this body force arises in experiments using ferrofluid in the annular gap of a Taylor Couette cell whose inner cylinder surrounds a vertical stack of equally spaced disk magnets. The radial dependence f(r) of this force is proportional to the modified Bessel function K 1(κr), where 2π/κ is the spatial period of the magnetic stack and r is the radial coordinate. Linear stability calculations made to compare with conditions reported by Ali and Weidman (J. Fluid Mech., 220, 1990) show strong destabilization effects, measured by the onset Rayleigh number R, when the inner wall is warmer, and strong stabilization effects when the outer wall is warmer, with increasing values of the dimensionless radial gravity γ = g m /g. Further calculations presented for the geometry and fluid properties of a terrestrial laboratory experiment reveal a hitherto unappreciated structure of the stability problem for differentially-heated cylinders: multiple wavenumber minima exist in the marginal stability curves. Transitions in global minima among these curves give rise to a competition between differing instabilities of the same spiral mode number, but widely separated axial wavenumbers.

  20. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  1. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  2. Case study of spatial and temporal variability of snow cover, grain size, albedo and radiative forcing in the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountain snowpack derived from imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Felix C.; Rittger, Karl; McKenzie Skiles, S.; Molotch, Noah P.; Painter, Thomas H.

    2016-06-01

    Quantifying the spatial distribution and temporal change in mountain snow cover, microphysical and optical properties is important to improve our understanding of the local energy balance and the related snowmelt and hydrological processes. In this paper, we analyze changes of snow cover, optical-equivalent snow grain size (radius), snow albedo and radiative forcing by light-absorbing impurities in snow and ice (LAISI) with respect to terrain elevation and aspect at multiple dates during the snowmelt period. These snow properties are derived from the NASA/JPL Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data from 2009 in California's Sierra Nevada and from 2011 in Colorado's Rocky Mountains, USA. Our results show a linearly decreasing snow cover during the ablation period in May and June in the Rocky Mountains and a snowfall-driven change in snow cover in the Sierra Nevada between February and May. At the same time, the snow grain size is increasing primarily at higher elevations and north-facing slopes from 200 microns to 800 microns on average. We find that intense snowmelt renders the mean grain size almost invariant with respect to elevation and aspect. Our results confirm the inverse relationship between snow albedo and grain size, as well as between snow albedo and radiative forcing by LAISI. At both study sites, the mean snow albedo value decreases from approximately 0.7 to 0.5 during the ablation period. The mean snow grain size increased from approximately 150 to 650 microns. The mean radiative forcing increases from 20 W m-2 up to 200 W m-2 during the ablation period. The variability of snow albedo and grain size decreases in general with the progression of the ablation period. The spatial variability of the snow albedo and grain size decreases through the melt season while the spatial variability of radiative forcing remains constant.

  3. The impact of wave-induced Coriolis-Stokes forcing on satellite-derived ocean surface currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Zhenli; Xu, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Ocean surface currents estimated from the satellite data consist of two terms: Ekman currents from the wind stress and geostrophic currents from the sea surface height (SSH). But the classical Ekman model does not consider the wave effects. By taking the wave-induced Coriolis-Stokes forcing into account, the impact of waves (primarily the Stokes drift) on ocean surface currents is investigated and the wave-modified currents are formed. The products are validated by comparing with OSCAR currents and Lagrangian drifter velocity. The result shows that our products with the Stokes drift are better adapted to the in situ Lagrangian drifter currents. Especially in the Southern Ocean region (40°S-65°S), 90% (91%) of the zonal (meridional) currents have been improved compared with currents that do not include Stokes drift. The correlation (RMSE) in the Southern Ocean has also increased (decreased) from 0.78 (13) to 0.81 (10.99) for the zonal component and 0.76 (10.87) to 0.79 (10.09) for the meridional component. This finding provides the evidence that waves indeed play an important role in the ocean circulation, and need to be represented in numerical simulations of the global ocean circulation. This article was corrected on 10 FEB 2016. See the end of the full text for details.

  4. On Deriving Requirements for the Surface Mass Balance forcing of a Greenland Ice Sheet Model using Uncertainty Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, N.; Larour, E. Y.; Box, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    During July of 2012, the percentage of the Greenland surface exposed to melt was the largest in recorded history. And, even though evidence of increased melt rates had been captured by remote sensing observations throughout the last decade, this particular event took the community by surprise. How Greenland ice flow will respond to such an event or to increased frequencies of extreme melt events in the future is unclear, as it requires detailed comprehension of Greenland surface climate and the ice sheet's sensitivity to associated uncertainties. With established uncertainty quantification (UQ) tools embedded within the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), we conduct decadal-scale forward modeling experiments to 1) quantify the spatial resolution needed to effectively force surface mass balance (SMB) in various regions of the ice sheet and 2) determine the dynamic response of Greenland outlet glaciers to variations in SMB. First, we perform sensitivity analyses to determine how perturbations in SMB affect model output; results allow us to investigate the locations where variations most significantly affect ice flow, and on what spatial scales. Next, we apply Monte-Carlo style sampling analyses to determine how errors in SMB propagate through the model as uncertainties in estimates of Greenland ice discharge and regional mass balance. This work is performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cryosphere Program.

  5. Quartic force field-derived vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants for the isomeric pair SNO and OSN and isotopologues

    SciTech Connect

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Francisco, Joseph S.

    2015-08-28

    The SNO and OSN radical isomers are likely to be of significance in atmospheric and astrochemistry, but very little is known about their gas phase spectroscopic properties. State-of-the-art ab initio composite quartic force fields are employed to analyze the rovibrational features for both systems. Comparison to condensed-phase experimental data for SNO has shown that the 1566.4 cm{sup −1} ν{sub 1} N–O stretch is indeed exceptionally bright and likely located in this vicinity for subsequent gas phase experimental analysis. The OSN ν{sub 1} at 1209.4 cm{sup −1} is better described as the antisymmetric stretch in this molecule and is also quite bright. The full vibrational, rotational, and rovibrational data are provided for SNO and OSN and their single {sup 15}N, {sup 18}O, and {sup 34}S isotopic substitutions in order to give a more complete picture as to the chemical physics of these molecules.

  6. Local nonlinear rf forces in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiale; Gao, Zhe

    2014-06-15

    The local nonlinear forces induced by radio frequency (rf) waves are derived in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas, where the inhomogeneity exists in the rf fields, in the static magnetic field as well as in the equilibrium density and temperature. The local parallel force is completely resonant, but a novel component dependent on those inhomogeneities is obtained as the result of the inhomogeneous transport of parallel resonant-absorbed momentum by the nonlinear perpendicular drift flux. In the local poloidal force, the component induced by the inhomogeneity of rf power absorption is also confirmed and it can be recognized as the residual effect from the incomplete cancellation between the rate of the diamagnetic poloidal momentum gain and the Lorentz force due to the radial diffusion-like flux. The compact expression for radial force is also obtained for the first time, whose nonresonant component is expressed as the sum of the ponderomotive force on particles and the gradients of the nonresonant perpendicular pressure and of the nonresonant momentum flux due to the finite temperature effect. Numerical calculations in a 1-D slab model show that the resonant component dependent on the inhomogeneities may be significant when the ion absorption dominates the resonant wave-particle interaction. A quantitative estimation shows that the novel component in the parallel force is important to understand the experiments of the ion-cyclotron-frequency mode-conversion flow drive.

  7. Effect of injecting primary myoblasts versus putative muscle-derived stem cells on mass and force generation in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Gunhild M; O'Day, Terry; Watchko, Jon F; Ontell, Marcia

    2002-06-10

    It is well established that the injection of normal myoblasts or of muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) into the muscle of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice results in the incorporation of a number of donor myoblasts into the host muscle. However, the effect of the injected exogenous cells on mdx muscle mass and functional capacity has not been evaluated. This study evaluates the mass and functional capacity of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of adult, male mdx mice that received intramuscular injections of primary myoblasts or of MDSCs (isolated by a preplating technique; Qu, Z., Balkir, L., van Deutekom, J.C., Robbins, P.D., Pruchnic, R., and Huard, J., J. Cell Biol. 1998;142:1257-1267) derived from normal mice. Evaluations were made 9 weeks after cell transplantation. Uninjected mdx EDL muscles have a mass 50% greater than that of age-matched C57BL/10J (normal) EDL muscles. Injections of either primary myoblasts or MDSCs have no effect on the mass of mdx EDL muscles. EDL muscles of mdx mice generate 43% more absolute twitch tension and 43% less specific tetanic tension then do EDL muscles of C57BL/10J mice. However, the absolute tetanic and specific twitch tension of mdx and C57BL/10J EDL muscles are similar. Injection of either primary myoblasts or MDSCs has no effect on the absolute or specific twitch and tetanic tensions of mdx muscle. Approximately 25% of the myofibers in mdx EDL muscles that received primary myoblasts react positively with antibody to dystrophin. There is no significant difference in the number of dystrophin-positive myofibers when MDSCs are injected. Regardless of the source of donor cells, dystrophin is limited to short distances (60-900 microm) along the length of the myofibers. This may, in part, explain the failure of cellular therapy to alter the contractile properties of murine dystrophic muscle. PMID:12067441

  8. Radial gate hoist mechanisms mounted above radial gates, view to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Radial gate hoist mechanisms mounted above radial gates, view to the east - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Wasteway No. 1, Wellton-Mohawk Canal, North side of Wellton-Mohawk Canal, bounded by Gila River to North & the Union Pacific Railroad & Gila Mountains to south, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  9. Forces in General Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  10. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  11. A Cubic Radial Basis Function in the MLPG Method for Beam Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Phillips, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    A non-compactly supported cubic radial basis function implementation of the MLPG method for beam problems is presented. The evaluation of the derivatives of the shape functions obtained from the radial basis function interpolation is much simpler than the evaluation of the moving least squares shape function derivatives. The radial basis MLPG yields results as accurate or better than those obtained by the conventional MLPG method for problems with discontinuous and other complex loading conditions.

  12. Radial and azimuthal beam parameters.

    PubMed

    Lumer, Yaakov; Moshe, Inon

    2009-02-01

    Global invariant parameters are introduced to characterize the radial and azimuthal content of totally polarized beams. Such parameters are written in terms of the second moments of the optical beam and are invariant in propagation through symmetric first-order optical systems described by the ABCD matrix. Since it was proven in the past that the usual definition for radial polarization is not invariant, such invariance is novel in characterizing the radial and azimuthal polarizations content of optical beams. The possibility of obtaining a pure mode from a given beam using the proposed parameters is discussed. PMID:19183626

  13. A canonical approach to forces in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Jay R.; Rivera-Rivera, Luis A.; Lucchese, Robert R.; Bevan, John W.

    2016-08-01

    In previous studies, we introduced a generalized formulation for canonical transformations and spectra to investigate the concept of canonical potentials strictly within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Data for the most accurate available ground electronic state pairwise intramolecular potentials in H2+, H2, HeH+, and LiH were used to rigorously establish such conclusions. Now, a canonical transformation is derived for the molecular force, F(R), with H2+ as molecular reference. These transformations are demonstrated to be inherently canonical to high accuracy but distinctly different from those corresponding to the respective potentials of H2, HeH+, and LiH. In this paper, we establish the canonical nature of the molecular force which is key to fundamental generalization of canonical approaches to molecular bonding. As further examples Mg2, benzene dimer and to water dimer are also considered within the radial limit as applications of the current methodology.

  14. Coplanar Waveguide Radial Line Stub

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, R. N.; Taub, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    A coplanar waveguide radial line stub resonator is experimentally characterized with respect to stub radius, sectoral angle, substrate thickness, and relative dielectric constant. A simple closed-form design equation which predicts the resonance radius of the stub is presented.

  15. Coupling Between Velocities in a Radial Supercharger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlechko, V. N.; Petrov, O. A.

    2014-03-01

    We have analyzed the velocities of the medium and impeller in a radial supercharger with consideration of the Coriolis acceleration. We have derived an expression for determining the angular velocity of the medium that differs from the angular velocity of the impeller. Dependences have been obtained to determine the velocity of the medium at the exit from the impeller on the inclination angle of the supercharger blades and their coupling with the circumferential velocity of the impeller in the absence of energy losses. Graphical dependences of velocities on the inclination angle of the blades at different ratios of inside radius to outside radius have been constructed.

  16. Analysis of an Externally Radially Cracked Ring Segment Subject to Three-Point Radial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.; Srawlwy, J. E.; Shannon, J. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The boundary collocation method was used to generate Mode 1 stress intensity and crack mouth opening displacement coefficients for externally radially cracked ring segments subjected to three point radial loading. Numerical results were obtained for ring segment outer-to-inner radius ratios (R sub o/R sub i) ranging from 1.10 to 2.50 and crack length to segment width ratios (a/W) ranging from 0.1 to 0.8. Stress intensity and crack mouth displacement coefficients were found to depend on the ratios R sub o/R sub i and a/W as well as the included angle between the directions of the reaction forces.

  17. Modelling spatio-temporal variability of Mytilus edulis (L.) growth by forcing a dynamic energy budget model with satellite-derived environmental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Yoann; Mazurié, Joseph; Alunno-Bruscia, Marianne; Bacher, Cédric; Bouget, Jean-François; Gohin, Francis; Pouvreau, Stéphane; Struski, Caroline

    2011-11-01

    In order to assess the potential of various marine ecosystems for shellfish aquaculture and to evaluate their carrying capacities, there is a need to clarify the response of exploited species to environmental variations using robust ecophysiological models and available environmental data. For a large range of applications and comparison purposes, a non-specific approach based on 'generic' individual growth models offers many advantages. In this context, we simulated the response of blue mussel ( Mytilus edulis L.) to the spatio-temporal fluctuations of the environment in Mont Saint-Michel Bay (North Brittany) by forcing a generic growth model based on Dynamic Energy Budgets with satellite-derived environmental data (i.e. temperature and food). After a calibration step based on data from mussel growth surveys, the model was applied over nine years on a large area covering the entire bay. These simulations provide an evaluation of the spatio-temporal variability in mussel growth and also show the ability of the DEB model to integrate satellite-derived data and to predict spatial and temporal growth variability of mussels. Observed seasonal, inter-annual and spatial growth variations are well simulated. The large-scale application highlights the strong link between food and mussel growth. The methodology described in this study may be considered as a suitable approach to account for environmental effects (food and temperature variations) on physiological responses (growth and reproduction) of filter feeders in varying environments. Such physiological responses may then be useful for evaluating the suitability of coastal ecosystems for shellfish aquaculture.

  18. High power radial klystron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Arman, M.J.

    1995-11-01

    The advantages of the radial klystron amplifier over the conventional klystron amplifier have been reported by Arman et al. Briefly, the radial structure of this design allows for much smaller impedances and thus higher power, the beam-cavity coupling is stronger because the beam travels inside the cavity, and the source is much more compact because there is no need for external magnetic fields. Here the author reports on possible advantages of the radial klystron oscillator over the radial klystron amplifier. The amplifying nature of certain HPM sources is often mandated by the requirement for synchronization and phase-locking of a number of sources in specific applications. In situations where amplification is solely adhered to for the purpose of achieving higher powers, the oscillator will be a better choice if a mechanism can be found to grow the desired mode at the required frequency. By switching to the oscillator mode there will be no need for priming the cavity or maintaining the phase. This simplifies the design and reduces the operational and maintenance cost of the source. Here he reports that an oscillator version of the radial klystron is possible and in fact more suitable for many applications. The mechanism for exciting and growing the mode will be transit-time effects thus providing all the beneficial features of the transit-time oscillators. The complications due to the presence of thin foils in the radial design still persist and will be dealt with in subsequent works. Numerical simulations using the PIC codes MAGIC and SOS indicate the radial klystron oscillator is a viable and efficient means of rf generation.

  19. Radial lean direct injection burner

    DOEpatents

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-09-04

    A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

  20. Stellar Mass Radial Profiles of Pan-STARRS MDS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheng; Thilker, D. A.; Heckman, T. M.

    2013-01-01

    Six-band (ugrizy) surface brightness radial profiles are derived for a sample of 48 late-type face-on non-interacting nearby galaxies using the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Survey stack imaging (grizy) and the CFHT deep u-band imaging data. The surface brightnesses are measured down to ~ 29-30 ABmag/arcsec^2. The SB radial profiles are then fed into the advanced SED fitting software MAGPHYS (da Cunha et al. 2008) to derive radial profiles of stellar mass surface density as well as other parameters, such as metallicity and star formation history. The output stellar mass surface density profiles can be classified into three types (single exponential, down-bending, and up-bending), which is consistent with the results of Polen & Trujillo (2006). But the up-bending profiles are more common than indicated in PT06.

  1. Reactive-infiltration instability in radial geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzki, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    A planar dissolution front propagating through a homogeneous porous matrix is unstable with respect to small variations in local permeability; regions of high permeability dissolve faster because of enhanced transport of reactants, which leads to increased rippling of the front. This phenomenon, usually referred to known as reactive-infiltration instability is an important mechanism for pattern development in geology, with a range of morphologies and scales, from cave systems running for hundreds of miles to laboratory acidization on the scale of centimeters. In general, this instability is characterized by two length scales: the diffusive length (D/v) and the reactant penetration length (v/r), where v is the Darcy velocity, D - the diffusion constant and r - the dissolution rate. If the latter scale is much smaller than the former one can adopt the so-called thin front limit, where the interface is treated as a discontinuity in porosity, with a completely dissolved phase on one side and an undissolved phase on the other. Linear stability analysis for this case has been carried out by Chadam et al. [1], and the corresponding dispersion relation shows that long wavelengths are unstable, whereas short wavelengths are stabilized by diffusion. In their derivation, Chadam et al. have considered a linear geometry with a uniform pressure gradient applied along one of the directions. However, in many cases (e.g. in the acidization techniques used in oil industry) the reactive fluids are injected through a well and thus the relevant geometry is radial rather than linear. Motivated by this, we have carried out the linear stability analysis of the reactive-infiltration problem in radial geometry, with the fluid injection at the centre of the system. We stay within the thin-front limit and derive the corresponding dispersion relation, which shows the stable regions for both the long-wavelength and short-wavelength modes, and the unstable region in between. Next, we study how

  2. High pressure superconducting radial magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eyssa, Y. M.; Huang, X.

    1990-01-01

    In a conventional radial magnetic bearing, the rotor (soft magnetic material) can only have attraction force from one of the electromagnets in the stator. The stator electromagnets consist of small copper windings with a soft magnetic material iron yoke. The maximum pressure obtainable is about 200 N/sq cm. It is shown that replacing the stator copper winding by a superconducting winding in the above configuration can increase the pressure to about 1000 N/sq cm. It is also shown that replacing the iron in the rotor by a group of superconducting windings in persistent mode and using a group of saddle coils in the stator can produce a pressure in excess of 2000 N/sq cm.

  3. A design methodology for a magnetorheological fluid damper based on a multi-stage radial flow mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C. R.; Zhao, D. X.; Xie, L.; Liu, Q.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper based on a multi-stage radial flow mode is put forward, compared with traditional ones with annular damping channel which are of low magnetic field utilization and high energy consumption. The equivalent magnetic circuit model is derived, along with the relation between the magnetic induction at the working gap and the exciting current in the field coils. The finite-element software ANYSY is used to analyze the distribution of the magnetic field in the MR valve. The flow differential equation for a MR fluid in radial flow is theoretically set up, and the numerical solution is validated by means of the Herschel-Bulkley constitutive model. A MR damper was designed and fabricated in Chongqing University in accordance with the technical requirements of a railway vehicle anti-yaw damper, and the force-displacement characteristic of the damper was tested with J95-I type shock absorber test-bed. The results show that the experimental damping forces are in good agreement with the analytical ones, and the methodology is believed to help predict the damping force of a MR damper.

  4. Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Ozeke, Louis G; Mann, Ian R; Murphy, Kyle R; Jonathan Rae, I; Milling, David K

    2014-01-01

    We present analytic expressions for ULF wave-derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, as a function of L and Kp, which can easily be incorporated into global radiation belt transport models. The diffusion coefficients are derived from statistical representations of ULF wave power, electric field power mapped from ground magnetometer data, and compressional magnetic field power from in situ measurements. We show that the overall electric and magnetic diffusion coefficients are to a good approximation both independent of energy. We present example 1-D radial diffusion results from simulations driven by CRRES-observed time-dependent energy spectra at the outer boundary, under the action of radial diffusion driven by the new ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients and with empirical chorus wave loss terms (as a function of energy, Kp and L). There is excellent agreement between the differential flux produced by the 1-D, Kp-driven, radial diffusion model and CRRES observations of differential electron flux at 0.976 MeV—even though the model does not include the effects of local internal acceleration sources. Our results highlight not only the importance of correct specification of radial diffusion coefficients for developing accurate models but also show significant promise for belt specification based on relatively simple models driven by solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed or geomagnetic indices such as Kp. Key Points Analytic expressions for the radial diffusion coefficients are presented The coefficients do not dependent on energy or wave m value The electric field diffusion coefficient dominates over the magnetic PMID:26167440

  5. Precise radial velocities of giant stars. VIII. Testing for the presence of planets with CRIRES infrared radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, Trifon; Reffert, Sabine; Zechmeister, Mathias; Reiners, Ansgar; Quirrenbach, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Context. We have been monitoring 373 very bright (V ≤ 6 mag) G and K giants with high precision optical Doppler spectroscopy for more than a decade at Lick Observatory. Our goal was to discover planetary companions around those stars and to better understand planet formation and evolution around intermediate-mass stars. However, in principle, long-term, g-mode nonradial stellar pulsations or rotating stellar features, such as spots, could effectively mimic a planetary signal in the radial velocity data. Aims: Our goal is to compare optical and infrared radial velocities for those stars with periodic radial velocity patterns and to test for consistency of their fitted radial velocity semiamplitudes. Thereby, we distinguish processes intrinsic to the star from orbiting companions as reason for the radial velocity periodicity observed in the optical. Methods: Stellar spectra with high spectral resolution have been taken in the H-band with the CRIRES near-infrared spectrograph at ESO's VLT for 20 stars of our Lick survey. Radial velocities are derived using many deep and stable telluric CO2 lines for precise wavelength calibration. Results: We find that the optical and near-infrared radial velocities of the giant stars in our sample are consistent. We present detailed results for eight stars in our sample previously reported to have planets or brown dwarf companions. All eight stars passed the infrared test. Conclusions: We conclude that the planet hypothesis provides the best explanation for the periodic radial velocity patterns observed for these giant stars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under program IDs 088.D-0132, 089.D-0186, 090.D-0155 and 091.D-0365.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Waves in Radial Gravity Using Magnetic Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlsen, D. R.; Hart, J. E.; Weidman, P. D.

    1999-01-01

    Terrestrial laboratory experiments studying various fluid dynamical processes are constrained, by being in an Earth laboratory, to have a gravitational body force which is uniform and unidirectional. Therefore fluid free-surfaces are horizontal and flat. Such free surfaces must have a vertical solid boundary to keep the fluid from spreading horizontally along a gravitational potential surface. In atmospheric, oceanic, or stellar fluid flows that have a horizontal scale of about one-tenth the body radius or larger, sphericity is important in the dynamics. Further, fluids in spherical geometry can cover an entire domain without any sidewall effects, i.e. have truly periodic boundary conditions. We describe spherical body-force laboratory experiments using ferrofluid. Ferrofluids are dilute suspensions of magnetic dipoles, for example magnetite particles of order 10 nm diameter, suspended in a carrier fluid. Ferrofluids are subject to an additional body force in the presence of an applied magnetic field gradient. We use this body force to conduct laboratory experiments in spherical geometry. The present study is a laboratory technique improvement. The apparatus is cylindrically axisymmetric. A cylindrical ceramic magnet is embedded in a smooth, solid, spherical PVC ball. The geopotential field and its gradient, the body force, were made nearly spherical by careful choice of magnet height-to-diameter ratio and magnet size relative to the PVC ball size. Terrestrial gravity is eliminated from the dynamics by immersing the "planet" and its ferrofluid "ocean" in an immiscible silicone oil/freon mixture of the same density. Thus the earth gravity is removed from the dynamics of the ferrofluid/oil interface and the only dynamically active force there is the radial magnetic gravity. The entire apparatus can rotate, and waves are forced on the ferrofluid surface by exterior magnets. The biggest improvement in technique is in the wave visualization. Fluorescing dye is added to

  7. Effects of radial motion on interchange injections at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranicas, C.; Thomsen, M. F.; Achilleos, N.; Andriopoulou, M.; Badman, S. V.; Hospodarsky, G.; Jackman, C. M.; Jia, X.; Kennelly, T.; Khurana, K.; Kollmann, P.; Krupp, N.; Louarn, P.; Roussos, E.; Sergis, N.

    2016-01-01

    Charged particle injections are regularly observed in Saturn's inner magnetosphere by Cassini. They are attributed to an ongoing process of flux-tube interchange driven by the strong centrifugal force associated with Saturn's rapid rotation. Numerical simulations suggest that these interchange injections can be associated with inward flow channels, in which plasma confined to a narrow range of longitudes moves radially toward the planet, gaining energy, while ambient plasma in the adjacent regions moves more slowly outward. Most previous analyses of these events have neglected this radial motion and inferred properties of the events under the assumption that they appear instantaneously at the spacecraft's L-shell and thereafter drift azimuthally. This paper describes features of injections that can be related to their radial motion prior to observation. We use a combination of phase space density profiles and an updated version of a test-particle model to quantify properties of the injection. We are able to infer the longitudinal width of the injection, the radial travel time from its point of origin, and the starting L shell of the injection. We can also predict which energies can remain inside the channel during the radial transport. To highlight the effects of radial propagation at a finite speed, we focus on those interchange injections without extensive features of azimuthal dispersion. Injections that have traveled radially for one or more hours prior to observation would have been initiated at a different local time than that of the observation. Finally, we describe an injection where particles have drifted azimuthally into a flow channel prior to observation by Cassini.

  8. Radial elasticity of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Michael W. Smith, Cheol Park, Meng Zheng, Changhong Ke ,In-Tae Bae, Kevin Jordan

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the radial mechanical properties of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MW-BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy. The employed MW-BNNTs were synthesized using pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) methods and were dispersed in aqueous solution using ultrasonication methods with the aid of ionic surfactants. Our nanomechanical measurements reveal the elastic deformational behaviors of individual BNNTs with two to four tube walls in their transverse directions. Their effective radial elastic moduli were obtained through interpreting their measured radial deformation profiles using Hertzian contact mechanics models. Our results capture the dependences of the effective radial moduli of MW-BNNTs on both the tube outer diameter and the number of tube layers. The effective radial moduli of double-walled BNNTs are found to be several-fold higher than those of single-walled BNNTs within the same diameter range. Our work contributes directly to a complete understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and the pursuits of their novel structural and electronics applications.

  9. Outer Belt Radial Transport Signatures in Drift Phase Structure - Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, T. P., III; Kwan, B. P.; Skov, T. M.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Roeder, J. L.; Green, J. C.; Fennell, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    During geomagnetic storms, the Earth's outer radiation belt experiences enhanced radial transport. Different modes of radial transport have different temporal signatures in the particle phase-space density on timescales shorter than a drift period. We use such drift phase structure in time series particle flux observations to identify transport signatures of impulsive and oscillatory drift resonant transport. We perform multiple case studies of geomagnetic storms using particle flux taken near geostationary orbit. We estimate the radial diffusion coefficients from the drift phase structures. We show how these radial diffusion coefficients derived from particle data compare to transport coefficients deduced from wave observations.

  10. Outer Belt Radial Transport Signatures in Drift Phase Structure - Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul; Green, Janet; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Roeder, James; Kwan, Betty; Mulligan Skov, Tamitha

    2016-07-01

    During geomagnetic storms, the Earth's outer radiation belt experiences enhanced radial transport. Different modes of radial transport have different temporal signatures in the particle phase-space density on timescales shorter than a drift period. We use such drift phase structure in time series particle flux observations to identify transport signatures of impulsive and oscillatory drift resonant transport. We perform multiple case studies of geomagnetic storms using particle flux taken near geostationary orbit. We estimate the radial diffusion coefficients from the drift phase structures. We show how these radial diffusion coefficients derived from particle data compare to transport coefficients deduced from wave observations.

  11. Severity grading in radial dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Vilkki, S K

    2014-11-01

    A functional scoring method to grade the usefulness and quality of the upper limbs in congenital radial dysplasia is presented. It is based on the author's examinations of 44 arms with congenital deficiency of the radius. The hand (H), wrist (W) and proximal parts (P) of the extremity are each scored from 0 to 10 points for severity. The scoring is expressed similarly to the TNM (tumour, nodes, metastasis) tumour classification, for example as H5W4P2. The maximum severity index is 30 points. A severity grade of mild is between 1 and 8 points, moderate between 9 and 16 points and severe 17 points and over. In the author's series, the grades were mild in eight, moderate in 21 and severe in 15 cases. The functional severity grading should allow better comparison of radially deficient limbs and the results of treatment between groups of patients. PMID:24401744

  12. A Technique for Assimilating GOES-Derived Land Surface Products into Regional Models to Improve the Representation of Land Surface Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapenta, William M.; Suggs, Ron; McNider, Richard T.; Jedlovec, Gary

    1998-01-01

    As the parameterizations of surface energy budgets in regional models have become more complete physically, models have the potential to be much more realistic in simulations of coupling between surface radiation, hydrology, and surface energy transfer. Realizing the importance of properly specifying the surface energy budget, many institutions are using land-surface models to represent the lower boundary forcing associated with biophysical processes and soil hydrology. However, the added degrees of freedom due to inclusion of such land-surface schemes require the specification of additional parameters within the model system such as vegetative resistances, green vegetation fraction, leaf area index, soil physical and hydraulic characteristics, stream flow, runoff, and the vertical distribution of soil moisture. A technique has been developed for assimilating GOES-IR skin temperature tendencies into the surface energy budget equation of a mesoscale model so that the simulated rate of temperature change closely agrees with the satellite observations. A critical assumption of the technique is that the availability of moisture (either from the soil or vegetation) is the least known term in the model's surface energy budget. Therefore, the simulated latent heat flux, which is a function of surface moisture availability, is adjusted based upon differences between the modeled and satellite-observed skin temperature tendencies. An advantage of this technique is that satellite temperature tendencies are assimilated in an energetically consistent manner that avoids energy imbalances and surface stability problems that arise from direct assimilation of surface shelter temperatures. The fact that the rate of change of the satellite skin temperature is used rather than the absolute temperature means that sensor calibration is not as critical. An advantage of this technique for short-range forecasts is that it does not require a complex land-surface formulation within the

  13. Comparison of a radial fractional transport model with tokamak experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kullberg, A. Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.

    2014-03-15

    A radial fractional transport model [Kullberg et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 052115 (2013)], that correctly incorporates the geometric effects of the domain near the origin and removes the singular behavior at the outer boundary, is compared to results of off-axis heating experiments performed in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP), ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D tokamak devices. This comparative study provides an initial assessment of the presence of fractional transport phenomena in magnetic confinement experiments. It is found that the nonlocal radial model is robust in describing the steady-state temperature profiles from RTP, but for the propagation of heat waves in ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D the model is not clearly superior to predictions based on Fick's law. However, this comparative study does indicate that the order of the fractional derivative, α, is likely a function of radial position in the devices surveyed.

  14. Comparison of a radial fractional transport model with tokamak experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullberg, A.; Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.

    2014-03-01

    A radial fractional transport model [Kullberg et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 052115 (2013)], that correctly incorporates the geometric effects of the domain near the origin and removes the singular behavior at the outer boundary, is compared to results of off-axis heating experiments performed in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP), ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D tokamak devices. This comparative study provides an initial assessment of the presence of fractional transport phenomena in magnetic confinement experiments. It is found that the nonlocal radial model is robust in describing the steady-state temperature profiles from RTP, but for the propagation of heat waves in ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D the model is not clearly superior to predictions based on Fick's law. However, this comparative study does indicate that the order of the fractional derivative, α, is likely a function of radial position in the devices surveyed.

  15. Velocidades radiales en Collinder 121

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, M.; Morrell, N.

    Se han llevado a cabo observaciones espectroscópicas de unas treinta estrellas que son posibles miembros del cúmulo abierto Collinder 121. Las mismas fueron realizadas con el telescopio de 2.15m del Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO). El análisis de las velocidades radiales derivadas del material obtenido, confirma la realidad de Collinder 121, al menos desde el punto de vista cinemático. La velocidad radial baricentral (LSR) del cúmulo es de +17 ± 3 km.s-1. Esta velocidad coincide, dentro de los errores, con la velocidad radial (LSR) de la nebulosa anillo S308, la cual es de ~20 ± 10 km.s-1. Como S308 se encuentra físicamente asociada a la estrella Wolf-Rayet HD~50896, es muy probable que esta última sea un miembro de Collinder 121. Desde un punto de vista cinemático, la supergigante roja HD~50877 (K3Iab) también pertenecería a Collinder 121. Basándonos en la pertenencia de HD~50896 a Collinder 121, y en la interacción encontrada entre el viento de esta estrella y el medio interestelar circundante a la misma, se estima para este cúmulo una distancia del orden de 1 kpc.

  16. Radial Electromagnetic Press for IGNITOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchiaro, A.; Anzidei, L.; Capriccioli, A.; Celentano, G.; Crescenzi, C.; Gasparotto, M.; Guerrieri, A.; Pizzuto, A.; Palmieri, A.; Rita, C.; Roccella, M.; Coppi, B.

    1998-11-01

    The structural performance of the IGNITOR machine relies upon a combination of both bucking between Toroidal Field Coils (TFCs), Central Solenoid (CS) and the Central Post (CP), and wedging in a well-defined area of the TFCs and of the magnet mechanical structure (called C-Clamps). This requires a pre-loading system to enhance the load bearing capability. Several solutions have been assessed and compared with each other within the operational scenarios and eventually a radial electromagnetic press has been selected as reference(Pizzuto A. et al., ENEA Report IGN/MAC/001/96). The loading system is made up by active coils and passive restraining rings. The radial active press consists of two pairs of coils (200x200mm each), symmetrically located relative to the machine equatorial plane and seating onto the passive rings. The permanent pre--load of the rings is applied through a wedging system with a load of about 120 MN. A radial electromagnetic press has the purpose of modulating the axial pressure on the TFC inner legs during the pulse. Design aspects including stress analysis, manufacturing, assembly and operational scenarios of the selected solution are presented in this paper.

  17. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE): First Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, M.; Zwitter, T.; Siebert, A.; Watson, F. G.; Freeman, K. C.; Munari, U.; Campbell, R.; Williams, M.; Seabroke, G. M.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Parker, Q. A.; Bienaymé, O.; Roeser, S.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Burton, D.; Cass, C. J. P.; Dawe, J. A.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Russell, K. S.; Saunders, W.; Enke, H.; Bailin, J.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Dehnen, W.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Evans, N. W.; Fiorucci, M.; Fulbright, J. P.; Gerhard, O.; Jauregi, U.; Kelz, A.; Mijović, L.; Minchev, I.; Parmentier, G.; Peñarrubia, J.; Quillen, A. C.; Read, M. A.; Ruchti, G.; Scholz, R.-D.; Siviero, A.; Smith, M. C.; Sordo, R.; Veltz, L.; Vidrih, S.; von Berlepsch, R.; Boyle, B. J.; Schilbach, E.

    2006-10-01

    We present the first data release of the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), an ambitious spectroscopic survey to measure radial velocities and stellar atmosphere parameters (temperature, metallicity, and surface gravity) of up to one million stars using the Six Degree Field multiobject spectrograph on the 1.2 m UK Schmidt Telescope of the Anglo-Australian Observatory. The RAVE program started in 2003, obtaining medium-resolution spectra (median R=7500) in the Ca-triplet region (8410-8795 Å) for southern hemisphere stars drawn from the Tycho-2 and SuperCOSMOS catalogs, in the magnitude range 9radial velocities for 24,748 individual stars (25,274 measurements when including reobservations). Those data were obtained on 67 nights between 2003 April 11 and 2004 April 3. The total sky coverage within this data release is ~4760 deg2. The average signal-to-noise ratio of the observed spectra is 29.5, and 80% of the radial velocities have uncertainties better than 3.4 km s-1. Combining internal errors and zero-point errors, the mode is found to be 2 km s-1. Repeat observations are used to assess the stability of our radial velocity solution, resulting in a variance of 2.8 km s-1. We demonstrate that the radial velocities derived for the first data set do not show any systematic trend with color or signal-to-noise ratio. The RAVE radial velocities are complemented in the data release with proper motions from Starnet 2.0, Tycho-2, and SuperCOSMOS, in addition to photometric data from the major optical and infrared catalogs (Tycho-2, USNO-B, DENIS, and the Two Micron All Sky Survey). The data release can be accessed via the RAVE Web site.

  18. Property of radially quadratic reflector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizusawa, M.; Katagi, T.

    1986-01-01

    This report shows that when considered in terms of optical geometry, radially parabolic and radially hyperbolic mirrors used as mirrors for Cassegrain and parabolic antennas possess values similar to common conical horn reflector antennas.

  19. Radial gravitational gliding on passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobbold, P. R.; Szatmari, P.

    1991-03-01

    Gravitational gliding of uppermost sediments down a passive margin is possible if there is a basal layer of evaporite or other soft material to allow detachment. In examples from the Gulf of Mexico and the Brazilian margin, gliding has produced three main structural domains: an uppermost domain of downdip extension; an intermediate domain of rigid gliding; and a lowermost domain of downdip contraction. Domain boundaries are established by changes in slope. In this paper, we examine three kinds of gravitational gliding, depending on the paths followed by material particles. In ideal parallel gliding, particle paths are parallel straight lines, trending downslope. This should occur where the margin is perfectly straight. In ideal radial gliding, particle paths are radii of a circle and the margin is shaped like a circular cone. Natural margins will not have ideal shapes; but divergent gliding will tend to occur off coastal salients; convergent gliding, off coastal re-entrants. A simple kinematic model based on ductile behaviour illustrates some essential features of radial gliding. Changes in radius during divergent gliding produce strike-parallel extension; during convergent gliding, they produce strike-parallel contraction. Vertical strains also differ. Divergent gliding produces an uppermost domain of strong vertical thinning, balanced by extensions in all horizontal directions. Similarly, convergent gliding produces a lowermost domain of strong vertical thickening, balanced by contractions in all horizontal directions. These deformed states cannot be restored by simple techniques based on section balancing. We have done three experiments using analogue materials: sand, to model the brittle behaviour of sediments; silicone putty, to model the ductile behaviour of basal layers of evaporite. The experiments were properly scaled to account for gravitational forces. Experiment I reproduced convergent gliding above a basement with a conical upper surface. Strike

  20. A density functional theory derived force field for p-cresol. Use of the ultraviolet resonance Raman intensities to check the vibrational analysis accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagant, P.; Gallouj, H.; Vergoten, G.

    1995-11-01

    An ab initio force field for p-cresol has been deduced from calculations based on density functional theory. A careful scaling of the internal force constants using correct vibrational assignments is shown to predict quite accurately the experimental vibrational frequencies and the potential energy distribution for p-cresol and all its deuterated analogs. Using this vibrational analysis, an attempt was made to predict the resonance Raman intensities for totally symmetric modes using the A-term part of the scattering tensor.

  1. Comet P/Encke's nongravitational force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    A'Hearn, Michael F.; Schleicher, David G.

    1988-01-01

    A nearly direct measurement of the nongravitational force on a cometary nucleus is presented. IUE spectra of comet P/Encke show significant Greenstein effects even when centered on the nucleus. These imply net heliocentric components of outflow of 1.6 and 0.3 km/s for the OH radicals before and after perihelion near r = 0.8 AU. This implies a large asymmetry in the radial nongravitational acceleration (A1) about perihelion, which must be taken into account in order to derive the mass of the nucleus. The asymmetry is consistent with Sekanina's (1988) latest model for the Encke nucleus, but the measurements suggest an outflow velocity near 2 km/s, significantly greater than generally accepted values. A tentative value for the mass of the Encke nucleus is proposed, although improved modeling of the nongravitational acceleration is required to obtain a definitive value.

  2. Implementing radial motion to the booster simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    It's a puzzle that high intensity beams prefer a particular radial motion during transition in the Booster, and the result of removing such a radial motion is to increase the transition loss. In order to understand this observation, the radial motion should be taken into account in the longitudinal simulation.

  3. A Determination of the Benefits Derived by the Air Force from Providing Air Force Officers in the Logistics Field with Graduate Degrees in the Business Area from Civilian Graduate Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlin, Brian; Smith, Richard A.

    This thesis is concerned with what benefits the Air Force receives from sending logistics officers to civilian graduate institutions (CID). Additionally, the authors wanted to find how CID graduates fare as compared with graduates of the Graduate Logistics Management (GL). Three samples gathered were for CID graduates, the non-degree group…

  4. Parameterization of backbone flexibility in a coarse-grained force field for proteins (COFFDROP) derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations of all possible two-residue peptides

    PubMed Central

    Frembgen-Kesner, Tamara; Andrews, Casey T.; Li, Shuxiang; Ngo, Nguyet Anh; Shubert, Scott A.; Jain, Aakash; Olayiwola, Oluwatoni; Weishaar, Mitch R.; Elcock, Adrian H.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported the parameterization of a set of coarse-grained (CG) nonbonded potential functions, derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acid pairs, and designed for use in (implicit-solvent) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins; this force field was named COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representations Of Proteins). Here, we describe the extension of COFFDROP to include bonded backbone terms derived from fitting to results of explicit-solvent MD simulations of all possible two-residue peptides containing the 20 standard amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms. The iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method was used to optimize new CG potential functions for backbone-related terms by attempting to reproduce angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions generated by the MD simulations. In a simple test of the transferability of the extended force field, the angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions obtained from BD simulations of 56 three-residue peptides were compared to results from corresponding explicit-solvent MD simulations. In a more challenging test of the COFFDROP force field, it was used to simulate eight intrinsically disordered proteins and was shown to quite accurately reproduce the experimental hydrodynamic radii (Rhydro), provided that the favorable nonbonded interactions of the force field were uniformly scaled downwards in magnitude. Overall, the results indicate that the COFFDROP force field is likely to find use in modeling the conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins and multi-domain proteins connected by flexible linkers. PMID:26574429

  5. PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITIES WITH CSHELL

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Christopher J.; Prato, L.; Mahmud, Naved I.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Beichman, Charles A. E-mail: lprato@lowell.edu E-mail: cmj@rice.edu

    2011-07-10

    Radial velocity (RV) identification of extrasolar planets has historically been dominated by optical surveys. Interest in expanding exoplanet searches to M dwarfs and young stars, however, has motivated a push to improve the precision of near-infrared RV techniques. We present our methodology for achieving 58 m s{sup -1} precision in the K band on the M0 dwarf GJ 281 using the CSHELL spectrograph at the 3 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We also demonstrate our ability to recover the known 4 M{sub JUP} exoplanet Gl 86 b and discuss the implications for success in detecting planets around 1-3 Myr old T Tauri stars.

  6. Radial Wettable Gradient of Hot Surface to Control Droplets Movement in Directions

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shile; Wang, Sijie; Tao, Yuanhao; Shang, Weifeng; Deng, Siyan; Zheng, Yongmei; Hou, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    A radial wettable gradient was fabricated on the surface of graphite plate by a simple one-step anodic oxidation process. It was found that the direction and value of the wettable gradient could be easily controlled by adjusting current and oxidation time gradient. With the increase of surface temperature, droplets on surface not only exhibited the transition of boiling mode, but also showed the controlled radial spreading, evaporation and movement behaviors. These phenomena could be attributed to the cooperation of wettability force, hysteresis force and vapor pressure (Leidenfrost effect). Especially, the controlled radial convergence or divergence of droplets with high velocity were realized on the surfaces with either inside or outside radial gradient, which would have crucial applications in the design of microfluidic devices and the exploration of the biotechnology. PMID:25975722

  7. Radial Wettable Gradient of Hot Surface to Control Droplets Movement in Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shile; Wang, Sijie; Tao, Yuanhao; Shang, Weifeng; Deng, Siyan; Zheng, Yongmei; Hou, Yongping

    2015-05-01

    A radial wettable gradient was fabricated on the surface of graphite plate by a simple one-step anodic oxidation process. It was found that the direction and value of the wettable gradient could be easily controlled by adjusting current and oxidation time gradient. With the increase of surface temperature, droplets on surface not only exhibited the transition of boiling mode, but also showed the controlled radial spreading, evaporation and movement behaviors. These phenomena could be attributed to the cooperation of wettability force, hysteresis force and vapor pressure (Leidenfrost effect). Especially, the controlled radial convergence or divergence of droplets with high velocity were realized on the surfaces with either inside or outside radial gradient, which would have crucial applications in the design of microfluidic devices and the exploration of the biotechnology.

  8. SCM-Forcing Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Xie, Shaocheng; Tang,Shuaiqi; Zhang,Yunyan; Zhang,Minghua

    2016-07-01

    Single-Column Model (SCM) Forcing Data are derived from the ARM facility observational data using the constrained variational analysis approach (Zhang and Lin 1997 and Zhang et al., 2001). The resulting products include both the large-scale forcing terms and the evaluation fields, which can be used for driving the SCMs and Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) and validating model simulations.

  9. Nonstandard jump functions for radially symmetric shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Roy S.; Tucker, Don H.; Stanescu, Dan

    2008-10-01

    Nonstandard analysis is applied to derive generalized jump functions for radially symmetric, one-dimensional, magnetogasdynamic shock waves. It is assumed that the shock wave jumps occur on infinitesimal intervals, and the jump functions for the physical parameters occur smoothly across these intervals. Locally integrable predistributions of the Heaviside function are used to model the flow variables across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the physical parameters for two families of self-similar flows. It is shown that the microstructures for these families of radially symmetric, magnetogasdynamic shock waves coincide in a nonstandard sense for a specified density jump function

  10. Turbomachinery rotor forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, Norbert

    1988-01-01

    The fluid-induced forces, both steady and unsteady, acting upon an impeller of a centrifugal pump, and impeller blade-diffuser vane interaction in centrifugal pumps with vaned radial diffusers were evaluated experimentally and theoretically. Knowledge of the steady and unsteady forces, and the associated rotordynamic coefficients are required to effectively model the rotor dynamics of the High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). These forces and rotordynamic coefficients were investigated using different impellers in combination with volutes and vaned diffusers, and axial inducers. These rotor forces are global. Local forces and pressures are also important in impeller-diffuser interaction, for they may cause cavitation damage and even vane failures. Thus, in a separate investigation, impeller wake, and impeller blade and diffuser vane pressure measurements were made. The nature of the rotordynamic forces is discussed, the experimental facility is described, and the measurements of unsteady forces and pressure are reported together with a brief and incomplete attempt to calculate these flows.

  11. [Comparative vasoreactivity of the radial, internal mammary and gastroepiploic arteries. Implications in coronary surgery].

    PubMed

    Chardigny, C; Jebara, V; Acar, C; Descombes, J J; Verbeuren, T; Carpentier, A; Fabiani, J N

    Recently, satisfactory results were obtained in a series of patients in whom the radial artery was used as a conduit for coronary artery bypass. However, spasm of this conduit was observed in four percent of patients. The aim of this study was to analyze the vasoreactive properties of the radial artery and to compare them to those of the internal mammary and the gastroepiploic arteries. Human radial (56 from n = 15 patients), internal mammary (77 from n = 20 patients) and gastroepiploic (41 from n = 12 patients) arteries ring segments were mounted on a strain gauge in oxygenated, normothermic, Krebs solution at optimal resting tension. With potassium chloride (100 mM) serving as the control, the dose response curves to norepinephrine, serotonin and thromboxane A2 mimetic were obtained, hence permitting to assess force of contraction and sensitivity. Functional endothelium was assessed by acetylcholine. Smooth muscle-dependent relaxation was assessed by sodium nitroprusside. The radial artery had stronger contractions to potassium chloride than the other vessels. The radial and the gastroepiploic arteries with endothelium presented a higher contraction force than the internal mammary artery in response to norepinephrine and serotonin. The gastroepiploic artery had a lower sensitivity to thromboxane A2 mimetic compared to the two other vessels. This increased reactivity of the radial artery explains its propensity to spasm and emphasizes the need for antispastic drugs and platelet inhibitors when the radial artery is used for coronary artery bypass. PMID:7641555

  12. Radial flow pulse jet mixer

    DOEpatents

    VanOsdol, John G.

    2013-06-25

    The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing vessel is comprised of a sludge basin, a flow surface surrounding the sludge basin, and a downcoming flow annulus between the flow surface and an inner shroud. The pulse jet mixing vessel is additionally comprised of an upper vessel pressurization volume in fluid communication with the downcoming flow annulus, and an inner shroud surge volume separated from the downcoming flow annulus by the inner shroud. When the solid particles are resting on the sludge basin and a fluid such as water is atop the particles and extending into the downcoming flow annulus and the inner shroud surge volume, mixing occurs by pressurization of the upper vessel pressurization volume, generating an inward radial flow over the flow surface and an upwash jet at the center of the sludge basin.

  13. Flat disc, radially nonhomogeneous, lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornbleet, S.

    1980-12-01

    A plane surfaced lens can be constructed through the use of a radially nonhomogenous medium, with axial symmetry. The rays from an axial source are incident on the plane front surface, perpendicular to the axis, where the assumption is made that the rays obey Snell's laws locally as for an infinite uniform medium. The curved ray paths are then given by the standard ray integral and are taken up to the point where each ray becomes horizontal. For certain polynomial functions describing the refractive index, the ray integral is an incomplete elliptic integral of the first kind, and trial functions can be inserted, such that the rays have become horizontal all at a second plane surface, thus creating a flat disk lens. The total symmetry of the design provides for many advantageous properties.

  14. Radial superlattices and single nanoreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneke, Ch.; Jin-Phillipp, N.-Y.; Loa, I.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2004-05-01

    We investigate the wall structure and thermal stability of individual freestanding rolled-up nanotubes (RUNTs) using micro-Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Our studies reveal that the walls of the InAs/GaAs RUNTs consist of a radial superlattice comprising alternating crystalline and noncrystalline layers. Furthermore, we locally heated individual RUNTs with a laser beam, and Raman spectroscopy was used in situ to monitor any structural changes. At about 300 °C the heated part of a RUNT starts to oxidize and eventually transforms into crystalline β-Ga2O3. This result shows that RUNTs can serve as nanoreactors that locally synthesize material at intentional places on a substrate surface.

  15. Distribution amplitudes of radially-excited π and K mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.-L.; Chang, L.; Gao, F.; Roberts, C. D.; Schmidt, S. M.; Zong, H.-S.

    2016-06-01

    A symmetry-preserving truncation of the two-body bound state problem in relativistic quantum field theory is used to compute the leading-twist parton distribution amplitudes (PDAs) for the first radial excitations of the π and K mesons. In common with ground states in these channels, the PDAs are found to be dilated with respect to the relevant conformal-limit form and skewed toward the heavier valence quark in asymmetric systems. In addition, the PDAs of radially excited pseudoscalar mesons are not positive definite, owing to the fact that dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB) forces the leptonic decay constant of such states to vanish in the chiral limit. These results highlight that DCSB is expressed visibly in every pseudoscalar meson constituted from light quarks. Hence, so long as its impact is empirically evident in the pseudoscalar members of a given spectrum level, it is unlikely that chiral symmetry is restored in any of the hadrons that populate this level.

  16. Electromagnetic biaxial vector scanner using radial magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Han, Aleum; Cho, Ah Ran; Ju, Suna; Ahn, Si-Hong; Bu, Jong-Uk; Ji, Chang-Hyeon

    2016-07-11

    We present an electromagnetic biaxial vector-graphic scanning micromirror. In contrast to conventional electromagnetic actuators using linear magnetic field, proposed device utilizes a radial magnetic field and uniquely designed current paths to enable the 2 degree-of-freedom scanning motion. As the radial field is generated by concentrically assembled magnets placed under the scanner die, large driving torque can be generated without the aid of hermetic packaging and relatively small device volume can be achieved. Mechanical half scan angle of 6.43° and 4.20° have been achieved at DC current of 250mA and 350mA for horizontal and vertical scans, respectively. Forced actuation along both scan axes has been realized by feedback control. PMID:27410851

  17. Assessment of the effect of intraarticular injection of autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in osteoarthritic dogs using a double blinded force platform analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Regenerative medicine using Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) alone or combined with Plasma Rich in Growth Factors (PRGF) is a rapidly growing area of clinical research and is currently also being used to treat osteoarthritis (OA). Force platform analysis has been consistently used to verify and quantify the efficacy of different therapeutic strategies for the treatment of OA in dogs including MSC associated to PRGF, but never with AD-MSC alone. The aim of this study was to use a force platform to measure the efficacy of intraarticular ADMSC administration for limb function improvement in dogs with severe OA. Results Ten lame dogs with severe hip OA and a control group of 5 sound dogs were used for this study. Results were statistically analyzed to detect a significant increase in peak vertical force (PVF) and vertical impulse (VI) in treated dogs. Mean values of PVF and VI were significantly improved within the first three months post-treatment in the OA group, increasing 9% and 2.5% body weight, respectively, at day 30. After this, the effect seems to decrease reaching initial values. Conclusion Intraarticular ADMSC therapy objectively improved limb function in dogs with hip OA. The duration of maximal effect was less than 3 months. PMID:24984756

  18. Geomagnetic field fluctuations at synchronous orbit. II - Radial diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Webb, D. C.; Arthur, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    Power spectra of geomagnetic-field variations measured at synchronous equatorial altitude (geomagnetic shell parameter about 6.6) in the magnetosphere are used to calculate the time dependence of the radial diffusion coefficient for particles in the radiation belts. The diffusion coefficients calculated are mainly applicable for relativistic electrons. The magnitudes of the derived diffusion coefficients using data only from local day observations are consistent with those reported from analyses of most particle observations and thus are slightly larger than those derived from magnetic sudden commencements. They are consistent with the diffusion coefficients calculated from power spectra of ground-based geomagnetic data measured near L = 4.

  19. Surface interpolation with radial basis functions for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J.C.; Beatson, R.K.; Fright, W.R.

    1997-02-01

    Radial basis functions are presented as a practical solution to the problem of interpolating incomplete surfaces derived from three-dimensional (3-D) medical graphics. The specific application considered is the design of cranial implants for the repair of defects, usually holes, in the skull. Radial basis functions impose few restrictions on the geometry of the interpolation centers and are suited to problems where interpolation centers do not form a regular grid. However, their high computational requirements have previously limited their use to problems where the number of interpolation centers is small (<300). Recently developed fast evaluation techniques have overcome these limitations and made radial basis interpolation a practical approach for larger data sets. In this paper radial basis functions are fitted to depth-maps of the skull`s surface, obtained from X-ray computed tomography (CT) data using ray-tracing techniques. They are used to smoothly interpolate the surface of the skull across defect regions. The resulting mathematical description of the skull`s surface can be evaluated at any desired resolution to be rendered on a graphics workstation or to generate instructions for operating a computer numerically controlled (CNC) mill.

  20. THE SPIN EFFECT ON PLANETARY RADIAL VELOCIMETRY OF EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Hajime

    2012-11-20

    We consider the effect of planetary spin on the planetary radial velocity (PRV) in dayside spectra of exoplanets. To understand the spin effect qualitatively, we derive an analytic formula of the intensity-weighted radial velocity from the planetary surface on the following assumptions: (1) constant and solid rotation without precession, (2) stable and uniform distribution of molecules/atoms, (3) emission models from the dayside hemisphere, and (4) a circular orbit. On these assumptions, we find that the curve of the PRV is distorted by the planetary spin and this anomaly is characterized by the spin radial velocity at the equator and a projected angle on a celestial plane between the spin axis and the axis of orbital motion {lambda}{sub p} in a manner analogous to the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. The latter can constrain the planetary obliquity. Creating mock PRV data with 3 km s{sup -1} accuracy, we demonstrate how {lambda}{sub p} and the spin radial velocity at the equator are estimated. We find that the stringent constraint of eccentricity is crucial to detect the spin effect. Though our formula is still qualitative, we conclude that the PRV in the dayside spectra will be a powerful means for constraining the planetary spin.

  1. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  2. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  3. Improving the radial nerve neurodynamic test: An observation of tension of the radial, median and ulnar nerves during upper limb positioning.

    PubMed

    Manvell, Joshua J; Manvell, Nicole; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Reid, Susan A

    2015-12-01

    The radial nerve neurodynamic test (ULNT2b), used to implicate symptoms arising from the radial nerve, is proposed to selectively increase strain of the nerve without increasing strain of adjacent tissue, though this has not been established. This study aimed to determine the upper limb position that results in: (1) the greatest tension of the radial nerve and (2) the greatest difference in tension between the radial nerve and the other two major nerves of the upper limb: median and ulnar. Tension (N) of the radial, median and ulnar nerves was measured simultaneously using three buckle force transducers during seven upper limb positions in the axilla of ten embalmed whole body human cadavers (n = 20 limbs). Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post-hoc tests determined differences in tension between nerves and between limb positions. A Composite position consisting of ULNT2b (scapular depression, shoulder internal rotation, elbow extension, forearm pronation, wrist flexion) with the addition of shoulder abduction 40° and extension 25°, wrist ulnar deviation and thumb flexion demonstrated significantly greater tension of the radial nerve than any other tested position (mean tension 11.32N; 95% CI 10.25, 12.29, p < 0.01), including ULNT2b (2.20N; 1.84, 2.57; p < 0.01). Additionally, the Composite position demonstrated the greatest difference in tension between the radial and median (mean difference 4.88N; 95% CI 3.16, 6.61; p < 0.01) and radial and ulnar nerves (9.26N, 7.54, 10.99; p < 0.01). This position constitutes a biomechanically plausible test to detect neuropathic pain related to the radial nerve. PMID:25892706

  4. Impact of mountain pine beetle outbreaks on forest albedo and radiative forcing, as derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Rocky Mountains, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhoof, M.; Williams, C. A.; Ghimire, B.; Rogan, J.

    2013-12-01

    pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks in North America are widespread and have potentially large-scale impacts on albedo and associated radiative forcing. Mountain pine beetle outbreaks in Colorado and southern Wyoming have resulted in persistent and significant increases in both winter albedo (change peaked 10 years post outbreak at 0.06 ± 0.01 and 0.05 ± 0.01, in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) stands, respectively) and spring albedo (change peaked 10 years post outbreak at 0.06 ± 0.01 and 0.04 ± 0.01, in lodgepole pine and ponderosa pine stands, respectively). Instantaneous top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing peaked for both lodgepole pine and ponderosa pine stands in winter at 10 years post outbreak at -1.7 ± 0.2 W m-2 and -1.4 ± 0.2 W m-2, respectively. The persistent increase in albedo with time since mountain pine beetle disturbance combined with the continued progression of the attack across the landscape from 1994-2011 resulted in an exponential increase in winter and annual radiative cooling (MW) over time. In 2011 the rate of radiative forcing within the study area reached -982.7 ± 139.0 MW, -269.8 ± 38.2 MW, -31.1 ± 4.4 MW, and -147.8 ± 20.9 MW in winter, spring, summer, and fall, respectively. An increase in radiative cooling has the potential to decrease sensible and/or latent heat flux by reducing available energy. Such changes could affect current mountain pine beetle outbreaks which are influenced by climatic conditions.

  5. A new device to derive the force-velocity relationship of the isolated papillary muscle using a sonomicrometer and an electromagnet.

    PubMed

    Siepmann, H P; Krossa, M; Arndt, J O

    1976-07-30

    This report deals with a simplified and improved method for measuring the force-velocity relationship of the cat papillary muscle by means of a coil-type galvanometer and a horizontally oriented lever system. The pre- and afterload generator consists of a rotor coil and a D.C. electromagnet. Because of its variable magnetic field it can easily be adapted to the tolerances of different coils and mounting systems. The ultrasound reflection method is used to measure displacements. This gives a linear and stable measurement of changes of muscle length without physical contact. PMID:986628

  6. Some unsteady fluid forces on pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miskovish, R. S.; Brennen, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Special analyses of all the forces and moments acting on a typical centrifugal pump impeller/volute combination are presented. These exhibit shaft frequencies, blade passing frequencies, and beat frequencies associated with a whirl motion imposed on the shaft in order to measure rotordynamic forces. Among other features the unsteady thrust was found to contain a surprisingly large blade passing harmonic. While previous studies have explored the magnitudes of the steady fluid-induced radial forces and the fluid-induced rotordynamic forces for this typical centrifugal pump impeller/volute combination, this paper presents information on the steady bending moments and rotordynamic moments due to the fluid flow. These imply certain axial locations for the lines of action of the radial and rotordynamic forces. Data on the lines of action are presented and allow inferences on the sources of the forces.

  7. Radial head button holing: a cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su-Mi; Chai, Jee Won; You, Ja Yeon; Park, Jina; Bae, Kee Jeong

    2016-10-01

    "Buttonholing" of the radial head through the anterior joint capsule is a known cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation associated with Monteggia injuries in pediatric patients. To the best of our knowledge, no report has described an injury consisting of buttonholing of the radial head through the annular ligament and a simultaneous radial head fracture in an adolescent. In the present case, the radiographic findings were a radial head fracture with anterior dislocation and lack of the anterior fat pad sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly demonstrated anterior dislocation of the fractured radial head through the torn annular ligament. The anterior joint capsule and proximal portion of the annular ligament were interposed between the radial head and capitellum, preventing closed reduction of the radial head. Familiarity with this condition and imaging findings will aid clinicians to make a proper diagnosis and fast decision to perform an open reduction. PMID:27502623

  8. Radial keratotomy associated endothelial degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moshirfar, Majid; Ollerton, Andrew; Semnani, Rodmehr T; Hsu, Maylon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To describe the presentation and clinical course of eyes with a history of radial keratotomy (RK) and varying degrees of endothelial degeneration. Methods Retrospective case series were used. Results Thirteen eyes (seven patients) were identified with clinical findings of significant guttata and a prior history of RK. The mean age of presentation for cornea evaluation was 54.3 years (range: 38–72 years), averaging 18.7 years (range: 11–33 years) after RK. The presentation of guttata varied in degree from moderate to severe. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) ranged from 20/25 to 20/80. All patients had a history of bilateral RK, except one patient who did not develop any guttata in the eye without prior RK. No patients reported a family history of Fuch’s Dystrophy. One patient underwent a penetrating keratoplasty in one eye and a Descemet’s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) in the other eye. Conclusions RK may induce a spectrum of endothelial degeneration. In elderly patients, the findings of guttata may signify comorbid Fuch’s dystrophy in which RK incisions could potentially hasten endothelial decomposition. In these select patients with stable cornea topography and prior RK, DSAEK may successfully treat RK endothelial degeneration. PMID:22347792

  9. Analysis of Longitudinal Space Charge Effects With Radial Dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juhao; Huang, Z.; Emma, P.; /SLAC

    2005-09-30

    Longitudinal space charge (LSC) force can be a main effect driving the microbunching instability in the linac for an x-ray free-electron laser (FEL). In this paper, the LSC-induced beam modulation is studied using an integral equation approach that takes into account the transverse (radial) variation of LSC field for both the coasting beam limit and bunched beam. Changes of beam energy and the transverse beam size can be also incorporated. We discuss the validity of this approach and compare it with other analyses as well as numerical simulations.

  10. Hydrodynamic effects in a misaligned radial face seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1977-01-01

    Hydrodynamic effects in a flat seal having an angular misalignment are analyzed, taking into account the radial variation in seal clearance. An analytical solution for axial force, restoring moment, and transverse moment is presented that covers the whole range from zero to full angular misalignment. Both low pressure seals with cavitating flow and high pressure seals with full fluid film are considered. Strong coupling is demonstrated between angular misalignment and transverse moment which leads the misalignment vector by 90 degrees. This transverse moment, which is entirely due to hydrodynamic effects, is a significant factor in the seal operating mechanism.

  11. Study on the radial vibration and acoustic field of an isotropic circular ring radiator.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuyu; Xu, Long

    2012-01-01

    Based on the exact analytical theory, the radial vibration of an isotropic circular ring is studied and its electro-mechanical equivalent circuit is obtained. By means of the equivalent circuit model, the resonance frequency equation is derived; the relationship between the radial resonance frequency, the radial displacement amplitude magnification and the geometrical dimensions, the material property is analyzed. For comparison, numerical method is used to simulate the radial vibration of isotropic circular rings. The resonance frequency and the radial vibrational displacement distribution are obtained, and the radial radiation acoustic field of the circular ring in radial vibration is simulated. It is illustrated that the radial resonance frequencies from the analytical method and the numerical method are in good agreement when the height is much less than the radius. When the height becomes large relative to the radius, the frequency deviation from the two methods becomes large. The reason is that the exact analytical theory is limited to thin circular ring whose height must be much less than its radius. PMID:21802702

  12. Radial vibration and ultrasonic field of a long tubular ultrasonic radiator.

    PubMed

    Shuyu, Lin; Zhiqiang, Fu; Xiaoli, Zhang; Yong, Wang; Jing, Hu

    2013-09-01

    The radial vibration of a metal long circular tube is studied analytically and its electro-mechanical equivalent circuit is obtained. Based on the equivalent circuit, the radial resonance frequency equation is derived. The theoretical relationship between the radial resonance frequency and the geometrical dimensions is studied. Finite element method is used to simulate the radial vibration and the radiated ultrasonic field and the results are compared with those from the analytical method. It is concluded that the radial resonance frequency for a solid metal rod is larger than that for a metal tube with the same outer radius. The radial resonance frequencies from the analytical method are in good agreement with those from the numerical method. Based on the acoustic field analysis, it is concluded that the long metal tube with small wall thickness is superior to that with large wall thickness in producing radial vibration and ultrasonic radiation. Therefore, it is expected to be used as an effective radial ultrasonic radiator in ultrasonic sewage treatment, ultrasonic antiscale and descaling and other ultrasonic liquid handling applications. PMID:23466008

  13. Vacuum electron acceleration driven by a tightly focused radially polarized Gaussian beam.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lin; Li, Jian-Xing; Zang, Wei-Ping; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2011-05-01

    Electron acceleration in vacuum driven by a tightly focused radially polarized Gaussian beam has been studied in detail. Weniger transformation method is used to eliminate the divergence of the radially polarized electromagnetic field derived from the Lax series approach. And, electron dynamics in an intense radially polarized Gaussian beam is analyzed by using the Weniger transformation field. The roles of the initial phase of the electromagnetic field and the injection angle, position and energy of electron in energy gain of electron have been studied in detail. PMID:21643185

  14. Differentiating common causes of radial wrist pain.

    PubMed

    Shuaib, Waqas; Mohiuddin, Zia; Swain, Freddie R; Khosa, Faisal

    2014-09-01

    Radial wrist pain is a common patient complaint with a broad differential. Because treatment and prognosis differ, determining the underlying cause is key. This article reviews a case of intersection syndrome and compares it to other causes of radial wrist pain. PMID:25148441

  15. Optimal criteria for blowup of radial and N-symmetric solutions of chemotaxis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biler, Piotr; Karch, Grzegorz; Zienkiewicz, Jacek

    2015-12-01

    A simple proof of concentration of mass equal to 8π for blowing up N-symmetric solutions of the Keller-Segel model of chemotaxis in two dimensions with large N is given. Moreover, a criterion for blowup of solutions in terms of the radial initial concentrations, related to suitable Morrey spaces norms, is derived for radial solutions of chemotaxis in several dimensions. This condition is, in a sense, complementary to the one guaranteeing the global-in-time existence of solutions.

  16. Zero initial partial derivatives of satellite orbits with respect to force parameters nullify the mathematical basis of the numerical integration method for the determination of standard gravity models from space geodetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peiliang

    2015-04-01

    Satellite orbits have been routinely used to produce models of the Earth's gravity field. The numerical integration method is most widely used by almost all major institutions to determine standard gravity models from space geodetic measurements. As a basic component of the method, the partial derivatives of a satellite orbit with respect to the force parameters to be determined, namely, the unknown harmonic coefficients of the gravitational model, have been first computed by setting the initial values of partial derivatives to zero. In this talk, we first design some simple mathematical examples to show that setting the initial values of partial derivatives to zero is generally erroneous mathematically. We then prove that it is prohibited physically. In other words, setting the initial values of partial derivatives to zero violates the physics of motion of celestial bodies. To conclude, the numerical integration method, as is widely used today by major institutions to produce standard satellite gravity models, is simply incorrect mathematically. As a direct consequence, further work is required to confirm whether the numerical integration method can still be used as a mathematical foundation to produce standard satellite gravity models. More details can be found in Xu (2009, Sci China Ser D-Earth Sci, 52, 562-566).

  17. Invariant quaternion radial harmonic Fourier moments for color image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang-yang, Wang; Wei-yi, Li; Hong-ying, Yang; Pan-pan, Niu; Yong-wei, Li

    2015-03-01

    Moments and moment invariants have become a powerful tool in image processing owing to their image description capability and invariance property. But, conventional methods are mainly introduced to deal with the binary or gray-scale images, and the only approaches for color image always have poor color image description capability. Based on radial harmonic Fourier moments (RHFMs) and quaternion, we introduced the quaternion radial harmonic Fourier moments (QRHFMs) for representing color images in this paper, which can be seen as the generalization of RHFMs for gray-level images. It is shown that the QRHFMs can be obtained from the RHFMs of each color channel. We derived and analyzed the rotation, scaling, and translation (RST) invariant property of QRHFMs. We also discussed the problem of color image retrieval using invariant QRHFMs. Experimental results are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed color image representation.

  18. STARSPOT JITTER IN PHOTOMETRY, ASTROMETRY, AND RADIAL VELOCITY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, V. V.; Beichman, C. A.; Lebreton, J.; Malbet, F.; Catanzarite, J. H.; Shao, M.; Fischer, D. A.

    2009-12-10

    Analytical relations are derived for the amplitude of astrometric, photometric, and radial velocity (RV) perturbations caused by a single rotating spot. The relative power of the starspot jitter is estimated and compared with the available data for kappa{sup 1} Ceti and HD 166435, as well as with numerical simulations for kappa{sup 1} Ceti and the Sun. A Sun-like star inclined at i = 90 deg. at 10 pc is predicted to have an rms jitter of 0.087 muas in its astrometric position along the equator, and 0.38 m s{sup -1} in radial velocities. If the presence of spots due to stellar activity is the ultimate limiting factor for planet detection, the sensitivity of SIM Lite to Earth-like planets in habitable zones is about an order of magnitude higher than the sensitivity of prospective ultra-precise RV observations of nearby stars.

  19. Updates on Force Limiting Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Scharton, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The following conventional force limiting methods currently practiced in deriving force limiting specifications assume one-dimensional translation source and load apparent masses: Simple TDOF model; Semi-empirical force limits; Apparent mass, etc.; Impedance method. Uncorrelated motion of the mounting points for components mounted on panels and correlated, but out-of-phase, motions of the support structures are important and should be considered in deriving force limiting specifications. In this presentation "rock-n-roll" motions of the components supported by panels, which leads to a more realistic force limiting specifications are discussed.

  20. Radial spin Hall effect of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Weixing; Ke, Yougang; Liu, Yachao; Ling, Xiaohui; Luo, Hailu; Yin, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    We propose and realize a radial spin Hall effect (SHE) of light by using a dielectric metasurface. The metasurface with radially varying optical axes introduces a Pancharatnam-Berry (PB) geometrical phase to the incident light. The spatial gradient of PB phase accounts for a shift in the momentum space and thus leads the light to split radially into two concentric rays with opposite spin in the position space, which is called a radial SHE. Further experiments verify that the magnitude of the splitting increases with the rotation rate of the optical-axis orientation and the propagation distance, thereby allowing for macroscopic observation of the SHE. We also find that the phase of the incident light influences the profiles of the two split rays, while the polarization determines their intensities. The results provide methods to tune the SHE of light by engineering metasurfaces and modulating the incident light, and this radial SHE may be extrapolated to other physical systems.

  1. Infrared spectra and structure of the cyano and methoxycarbonyl derivatives of 3,3-bis(dimethylamino)acrylonitrile: an ab initio force field treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binev, Ivan G.; Binev, Yuri I.

    1997-12-01

    The structure of 2-cyano-3,3-bis(dimethylamino)acrylonitrile and 2-methoxycarbonyl-3,3-bis(dimethylamino)acrylonitrile has been studied on the basis of both infrared spectra and ab initio force field calculations. The 3012-376 cm -1 region bands have been assigned; a good agreement has been found between the theoretical and experimental spectroscopic characteristics. According to both infrared data and bond parameters, the CC bond in the molecules studied is strongly polarized. The ground-state charge transfer between the electropositive and electronegative fragments of the molecules is more than 0.5 e -, so the species studied have a dual character, both molecular and zwitterionic.

  2. SpicyNodes: radial layout authoring for the general public.

    PubMed

    Douma, Michael; Ligierko, Grzegorz; Ancuta, Ovidiu; Gritsai, Pavel; Liu, Sean

    2009-01-01

    Trees and graphs are relevant to many online tasks such as visualizing social networks, product catalogs, educational portals, digital libraries, the semantic web, concept maps and personalized information management. SpicyNodes is an information-visualization technology that builds upon existing research on radial tree layouts and graph structures. Users can browse a tree, clicking from node to node, as well as successively viewing a node, immediately related nodes and the path back to the "home" nodes. SpicyNodes' layout algorithms maintain balanced layouts using a hybrid mixture of a geometric layout (a succession of spanning radial trees) and force-directed layouts to minimize overlapping nodes, plus several other improvements over prior art. It provides XML-based API and GUI authoring tools. The goal of the SpicyNodes project is to implement familiar principles of radial maps and focus+context with an attractive and inviting look and feel in an open system that is accessible to virtually any Internet user. PMID:19834176

  3. Photoelectric Radial Velocities, Paper XX 45 Years' Monitoring of the Radial Velocities of the Redman K Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, R. F.; Stroe, A.

    2012-06-01

    The `Redman K stars' are a group of 80-odd seventh-magnitude late-type stars, nearly all giants, distributed along the Galactic equator between approximate longitudes 50° and 150° (roughly Sagitta to Cassiopeia). Their radial velocities have been measured systematically once per season in 30 of the 45 seasons from 1966 to 2010/11. At least 26 of them (30%) have proved to vary in velocity. Orbits have been derived for all but one of the 26, many of them having longer periods than have normally been associated with spectroscopic binaries; several are comparable with, or longer than, the present duration of the observing campaign. Also reported here are radial-velocity measurements made casually of stars seen in the fields of some of the Redman stars. Two of the companions have proved to vary in velocity on long time-scales, and (somewhat preliminary) orbits are given for them.

  4. Computational investigations of axial and radial flow compressor aeromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Kishore

    The focus of this research is aeromechanics issues in advanced compressors of the type used in modern day high thrust-to-weight ratio aircraft gas turbine engines. The driving factor for the studies undertaken is the High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) failure of gas turbine blades. HCF is a key technology issue in the development and endurance of gas turbine engines that arises primarily due to resonant response of turbomachine blading to unsteady aerodynamic excitation. Because it is a truly coupled nonlinear fluid-structure problem, predicting HCF requires a unified approach to modeling both the fluid and the structure. Considering the serious nature of HCF and the inadequacy of lower order design systems to accurately predict blade vibratory stress, the need to develop advanced predictive tools is pressing. The first aspect of this research therefore addresses the development of a turbomachinery coupled fluid-structure interaction tool to predict flow-induced blade vibration. To this end, the TAM-ALE3D solver is further developed as a derivative of the ALE3D code of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the second aspect of this research, TAM-ALE3D is validated by predicting viscous blade row unsteady aerodynamics and the modal properties of the stator vane in the baseline configuration of the Purdue Transonic Compressor. It is then used to predict the vane vibratory response excited by rotor wakes at resonance, with the resulting stresses in the range expected. For radial flow compressors, a very limited knowledge base exists on the unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic mechanisms that result in HCF. The bulk of this research is thus directed at the understanding of these fundamental unsteady phenomena using TAM-ALE3D as an investigative tool. The energy transfer from the downstream diffuser generated forcing function to the impeller blading is addressed by means of unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses. From these computational investigations, the details of

  5. Carbon exchange variability over Amazon Basin using coupledhydrometeorological-mixed layer PBL-carbon dioxide assimilation modeling system forced by satellite-derived surface radiation and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grose, Andrew

    2004-12-01

    A hydrometeorological model is modified to include a simple slab model of the mixed layer for the estimation of CO2 fluxes in Amazonia. Three carbon assimilation models are examined for use in the FSU hydromet model, of which the NCAR LSM module is chosen because respiration rates are provided and CO2, latent and sensible heat fluxes are coupled through stomatal resistance. Initial calculations of NEP show a necessity for modeling canopy-boundary layer interactions to reproduce observed morning effluxes at forest tower sites at Manaus and Jaru. CO2 concentrations in five layers in and above the canopy are modeled with associated fluxes. Sensible heat fluxes are consistently overestimated until canopy heat capacity is taken into account. Estimations of canopy heat storage are found using observed differences between net incoming radiation and latent and sensible heat fluxes, or observed total residual energy. Calibration of fluxes at three tower sites is conducted using modeled total residual energy at the forest sites and modified photosynthesis parameters at the pasture site. The forcing parameters of downwelling solar radiation (K ↓) and temperature are found to exert the most influence over modeled CO2 fluxes at the tower sites. Model application over the basin shows that while vegetation type is the primary factor controlling CO2 fluxes area-wide, K ↓ is the primary forcing variable that produces spatial and temporal variability of CO2 fluxes. Modeled CO2 fluxes show mean monthly uptake values in the range of 1-3 mumol m-2 s-1 and diurnal progressions of large coherent areas of CO2 effluxes over the forest, progressing from SE to NW in December, and from NE to SW in June. Inspection of area-wide modeled fluxes near tower sites shows that the use of ECMWF winds and temperatures creates a spurious nocturnal stability that produces much larger morning efflux magnitudes than observations suggest. Comparison of CO2 fluxes at nearly 20,000 forest points within

  6. The Radial Variation of H I Velocity Dispersions in Dwarfs and Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianjamasimanana, R.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Walter, Fabian; Heald, George H.; Caldú-Primo, Anahi; Jarrett, Thomas H.

    2015-08-01

    Gas velocity dispersions provide important diagnostics of the forces counteracting gravity to prevent collapse of the gas. We use the 21 cm line of neutral atomic hydrogen (H i) to study H i velocity dispersion ({σ }{{H} {{I}}}) and H i phases as a function of galaxy morphology in 22 galaxies from The H i Nearby Galaxy Survey. We stack individual H i velocity profiles and decompose them into broad and narrow Gaussian components. We study the H i velocity dispersion and the H i surface density, {{{Σ }}}{{H} {{I}}}, as a function of radius. For spirals, the velocity dispersions of the narrow and broad components decline with radius and their radial profiles are well described by an exponential function. For dwarfs, however, the profiles are much flatter. The single Gaussian dispersion profiles are, in general, flatter than those of the narrow and broad components. In most cases, the dispersion profiles in the outer disks do not drop as fast as the star formation profiles derived in the literature. This indicates the importance of other energy sources in driving {σ }{{H} {{I}}} in the outer disks. The radial surface density profiles of spirals and dwarfs are similar. The surface density profiles of the narrow component decline more steeply than those of the broad component, but not as steep as what was found previously for the molecular component. As a consequence, the surface density ratio between the narrow and broad components, an estimate of the mass ratio between cold H i and warm H i, tends to decrease with radius. On average, this ratio is lower in dwarfs than in spirals. This lack of a narrow, cold H i component in dwarfs may explain their low star formation activity.

  7. Power reduction and the radial limit of stall delay in revolving wings of different aspect ratio

    PubMed Central

    Kruyt, Jan W.; van Heijst, GertJan F.; Altshuler, Douglas L.; Lentink, David

    2015-01-01

    Airplanes and helicopters use high aspect ratio wings to reduce the power required to fly, but must operate at low angle of attack to prevent flow separation and stall. Animals capable of slow sustained flight, such as hummingbirds, have low aspect ratio wings and flap their wings at high angle of attack without stalling. Instead, they generate an attached vortex along the leading edge of the wing that elevates lift. Previous studies have demonstrated that this vortex and high lift can be reproduced by revolving the animal wing at the same angle of attack. How do flapping and revolving animal wings delay stall and reduce power? It has been hypothesized that stall delay derives from having a short radial distance between the shoulder joint and wing tip, measured in chord lengths. This non-dimensional measure of wing length represents the relative magnitude of inertial forces versus rotational accelerations operating in the boundary layer of revolving and flapping wings. Here we show for a suite of aspect ratios, which represent both animal and aircraft wings, that the attachment of the leading edge vortex on a revolving wing is determined by wing aspect ratio, defined with respect to the centre of revolution. At high angle of attack, the vortex remains attached when the local radius is shorter than four chord lengths and separates outboard on higher aspect ratio wings. This radial stall limit explains why revolving high aspect ratio wings (of helicopters) require less power compared with low aspect ratio wings (of hummingbirds) at low angle of attack and vice versa at high angle of attack. PMID:25788539

  8. Power reduction and the radial limit of stall delay in revolving wings of different aspect ratio.

    PubMed

    Kruyt, Jan W; van Heijst, GertJan F; Altshuler, Douglas L; Lentink, David

    2015-04-01

    Airplanes and helicopters use high aspect ratio wings to reduce the power required to fly, but must operate at low angle of attack to prevent flow separation and stall. Animals capable of slow sustained flight, such as hummingbirds, have low aspect ratio wings and flap their wings at high angle of attack without stalling. Instead, they generate an attached vortex along the leading edge of the wing that elevates lift. Previous studies have demonstrated that this vortex and high lift can be reproduced by revolving the animal wing at the same angle of attack. How do flapping and revolving animal wings delay stall and reduce power? It has been hypothesized that stall delay derives from having a short radial distance between the shoulder joint and wing tip, measured in chord lengths. This non-dimensional measure of wing length represents the relative magnitude of inertial forces versus rotational accelerations operating in the boundary layer of revolving and flapping wings. Here we show for a suite of aspect ratios, which represent both animal and aircraft wings, that the attachment of the leading edge vortex on a revolving wing is determined by wing aspect ratio, defined with respect to the centre of revolution. At high angle of attack, the vortex remains attached when the local radius is shorter than four chord lengths and separates outboard on higher aspect ratio wings. This radial stall limit explains why revolving high aspect ratio wings (of helicopters) require less power compared with low aspect ratio wings (of hummingbirds) at low angle of attack and vice versa at high angle of attack. PMID:25788539

  9. Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility. Part 1; Technique, Validation, and Comparison to Satellite-derived Diagnostic Quantities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Gerald G.; Benson, Sally; Sonntag, Karen L.; Kato, Seiji; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Twohy, Cynthia H.; Poellot, Michael; Dong, Xiquan; Long, Charles; Zhang, Qiuqing; Doelling, David R.

    2006-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that continuous ground-based remote sensing measurements from active and passive remote sensors combined with regular soundings of the atmospheric thermodynamic structure can be combined to describe the effects of clouds on the clear sky radiation fluxes. We critically test that hypothesis in this paper and a companion paper (Part II). Using data collected at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, we explore an analysis methodology that results in the characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric profile at time resolutions of five minutes and vertical resolutions of 90 m. The description includes thermodynamics and water vapor profile information derived by merging radiosonde soundings with ground-based data, and continues through specification of the cloud layer occurrence and microphysical and radiative properties derived from retrieval algorithms and parameterizations. The description of the atmospheric physical state includes a calculation of the infrared and clear and cloudy sky solar flux profiles. Validation of the methodology is provided by comparing the calculated fluxes with top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface flux measurements and by comparing the total column optical depths to independently derived estimates. We find over a 1-year period of comparison in overcast uniform skies, that the calculations are strongly correlated to measurements with biases in the flux quantities at the surface and TOA of less than 10% and median fractional errors ranging from 20% to as low as 2%. In the optical depth comparison for uniform overcast skies during the year 2000 where the optical depth varies over 3 orders of magnitude we find a mean positive bias of 46% with a median bias of less than 10% and a 0.89 correlation coefficient. The slope of the linear regression line for the optical depth comparison is 0.86 with a normal deviation of 20% about this

  10. Continuous time random walks for non-local radial solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentz, Marco; Kang, Peter K.; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-08-01

    This study formulates and analyzes continuous time random walk (CTRW) models in radial flow geometries for the quantification of non-local solute transport induced by heterogeneous flow distributions and by mobile-immobile mass transfer processes. To this end we derive a general CTRW framework in radial coordinates starting from the random walk equations for radial particle positions and times. The particle density, or solute concentration is governed by a non-local radial advection-dispersion equation (ADE). Unlike in CTRWs for uniform flow scenarios, particle transition times here depend on the radial particle position, which renders the CTRW non-stationary. As a consequence, the memory kernel characterizing the non-local ADE, is radially dependent. Based on this general formulation, we derive radial CTRW implementations that (i) emulate non-local radial transport due to heterogeneous advection, (ii) model multirate mass transfer (MRMT) between mobile and immobile continua, and (iii) quantify both heterogeneous advection in a mobile region and mass transfer between mobile and immobile regions. The expected solute breakthrough behavior is studied using numerical random walk particle tracking simulations. This behavior is analyzed by explicit analytical expressions for the asymptotic solute breakthrough curves. We observe clear power-law tails of the solute breakthrough for broad (power-law) distributions of particle transit times (heterogeneous advection) and particle trapping times (MRMT model). The combined model displays two distinct time regimes. An intermediate regime, in which the solute breakthrough is dominated by the particle transit times in the mobile zones, and a late time regime that is governed by the distribution of particle trapping times in immobile zones. These radial CTRW formulations allow for the identification of heterogeneous advection and mobile-immobile processes as drivers of anomalous transport, under conditions relevant for field tracer

  11. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  12. Comparison of Shortwave Cloud Radiative Forcing Derived from ARM SGP Surface and GOES-8 Satellite Measurements During ARESE I and ARESE II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, A. D.; Doelling, D. R.; Khaiyer, M. M.; Minnis, P.; Smith, W. L., Jr.; Nguyen, L.; Haeffelin, M. P.; Valero, F. P. J.; Asano, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the objectives of the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) is to investigate the absorption of solar radiation by clouds over the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility. A variety of techniques employing various combinations Of Surface, aircraft, and satellite data have been used to estimate the absorption empirically. During ARESE-I conducted during fall 1995, conflicting results were produced from different analyses of the combined datasets leading to the need for a more controlled experiment. ARESE-II was conducted during spring 2000. Improved calibrations, different sampling strategies, and broadband satellite data were all available to minimize some of the sources of uncertainty in the data. In this paper, cloud absorption or its parametric surrogates (e.g., Cess et al. 1995) are derived from collocated and coincident surface and satellite radiometer data from both ARESE-I and ARESE-II using the latest satellite and surface instrument calibrations.

  13. Unstable force analysis for induction motor eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Palazzolo, Alan

    2016-05-01

    The increasing popularity of motors in machinery trains has led to an intensified interest in the forces they produce that may influence machinery vibration. Motor design typically assumes a uniform air gap, however in practice all motors operate with the rotor slightly displaced from the motor centerline in what is referred to as an eccentric position. Rotor center eccentricity can cause a radially unbalanced magnetic field when the motor is operating. This will results in both a radial force pulling the motor further away from the center, and a tangential force which can induce a vibration stability problem. In this paper, a magnetic equivalent circuit MEC modeling method is proposed to calculate both the radial and tangential motor eccentric force. The treatment of tangential force determination is rarely addressed, but it is very important for rotordynamic vibration stability evaluation. The proposed model is also coupled with the motor electric circuit model to provide capability for transient vibration simulations. FEM is used to verify the MEC model. A parametric study is performed on the motor radial and tangential eccentric forces. Also a Jeffcott rotor model is used to study the influence of the motor eccentric force on mechanical vibration stability and nonlinear behavior. Furthermore, a stability criteria for the bearing damping is provided. The motor radial and tangential eccentric forces are both curved fitted to include their nonlinearity in time domain transient simulation for both a Jeffcott rotor model and a geared machinery train with coupled torsional-lateral motion. Nonlinear motions are observed, including limit cycles and bifurcation induced vibration amplitude jumps.

  14. Nuclear forces

    SciTech Connect

    Machleidt, R.

    2013-06-10

    These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach, in which the forces between nucleons emerge from low-energy QCD via chiral effective field theory.

  15. Scintillating lustre induced by radial fins.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kohske; Fukuda, Haruaki; Watanabe, Katsumi; Ueda, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Radial lines of Ehrenstein patterns induce illusory scintillating lustre in gray disks inserted into the central gaps (scintillating-lustre effect). We report a novel variant of this illusion by replacing the radial lines with white and black radial fins. Both white and gray disks inserted into the central gaps were perceived as scintillating, if the ratio of the black/white fin width were balanced (ie, close to 1.0). Thus, the grayness of the central disk is not a prerequisite for the scintillation. However, the scintillation was drastically reduced when the ratio was imbalanced. Furthermore, the optimal ratio depended on the color of the center disks. PMID:23145270

  16. Catalogue of radial velocities of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, G.G.S.

    1983-01-01

    The Catalogue of Radial Velocities of Galaxies is a survey of radial velocities of redshifts of the galaxies in the universe. It lists all available measurements for each galaxy (including Russian citations) from the measurement of the first radial velocity by Slipher in 1914 through December 1980. It includes optical and radio measurements for all galaxies in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. In bringing together uniformly and concisely all published references, the catalogue affords readers the opportunity to evaluate the data and determine which measurement for the radical velocity of each galaxy.

  17. Coulomb force as an entropic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tower

    2010-05-01

    Motivated by Verlinde’s theory of entropic gravity, we give a tentative explanation to the Coulomb’s law with an entropic force. When trying to do this, we find the equipartition rule should be extended to charges and the concept of temperature should be reinterpreted. If one accepts the holographic principle as well as our generalizations and reinterpretations, then Coulomb’s law, the Poisson equation, and the Maxwell equations can be derived smoothly. Our attempt can be regarded as a new way to unify the electromagnetic force with gravity, from the entropic origin. Possibly some of our postulates are related to the D-brane picture of black hole thermodynamics.

  18. Coulomb force as an entropic force

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Tower

    2010-05-15

    Motivated by Verlinde's theory of entropic gravity, we give a tentative explanation to the Coulomb's law with an entropic force. When trying to do this, we find the equipartition rule should be extended to charges and the concept of temperature should be reinterpreted. If one accepts the holographic principle as well as our generalizations and reinterpretations, then Coulomb's law, the Poisson equation, and the Maxwell equations can be derived smoothly. Our attempt can be regarded as a new way to unify the electromagnetic force with gravity, from the entropic origin. Possibly some of our postulates are related to the D-brane picture of black hole thermodynamics.

  19. Instability studies in radial foil configurations on the COBRA generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Kusse, B. R.; Pikuz, S. A.; Schrafel, P. C.; Shelkovenko, T. C.

    2010-11-01

    Radial foil configurations prove to be a very simple experimental set up to study high energy density plasmas. A 5-micron thin metallic foil lies flat over a stretcher which is connected to the anode of a pulsed power generator such as COBRA (1MA, 100 ns current rise time). The cathode contacts the foil at its geometrical center using a hollow stainless steel pin. As the foil ablates, JxB forces lift the foil leading to the formation a plasma bubble surrounding a central plasma column, which is a z-pinch. Force densities on this column should increase considerably as the initial pin diameter is diminished and we expect plasma properties to change accordingly. Based only on pin diameter considerations, radial foil explosions could produce magnetic pressures ranging from 160 kbar (for 2-mm pins) to 2.5 Mbar (for 0.5-mm pins). However, as the cathode diameter diminishes, instabilities appear earlier in the discharge, preventing the z-pinch implosion to occur at maximum current, de facto limiting plasma parameters. We investigate the cause of these instabilities, the possible means to reduce plasma instabilities and to improve plasma performances.

  20. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  1. Lorentz force velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Thess, A; Votyakov, E V; Kolesnikov, Y

    2006-04-28

    We describe a noncontact technique for velocity measurement in electrically conducting fluids. The technique, which we term Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV), is based on exposing the fluid to a magnetic field and measuring the drag force acting upon the magnetic field lines. Two series of measurements are reported, one in which the force is determined through the angular velocity of a rotary magnet system and one in which the force on a fixed magnet system is measured directly. Both experiments confirm that the measured signal is a linear function of the flow velocity. We then derive the scaling law that relates the force on a localized distribution of magnetized material to the velocity of an electrically conducting fluid. This law shows that LFV, if properly designed, has a wide range of potential applications in metallurgy, semiconductor crystal growth, and glass manufacturing. PMID:16712237

  2. Conservative entropic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Matt

    2011-10-01

    Entropic forces have recently attracted considerable attention as ways to reformulate, retrodict, and perhaps even "explain" classical Newtonian gravity from a rather specific thermodynamic perspective. In this article I point out that if one wishes to reformulate classical Newtonian gravity in terms of an entropic force, then the fact that Newtonian gravity is described by a conservative force places significant constraints on the form of the entropy and temperature functions. (These constraints also apply to entropic reinterpretations of electromagnetism, and indeed to any conservative force derivable from a potential.) The constraints I will establish are sufficient to present real and significant problems for any reasonable variant of Verlinde's entropic gravity proposal, though for technical reasons the constraints established herein do not directly impact on either Jacobson'sor Padmanabhan's versions of entropic gravity. In an attempt to resolve these issues, I will extend the usual notion of entropic force to multiple heat baths with multiple "temperatures" and multiple "entropies".

  3. A comparison of far-field properties of radial noncanonical vortex airy beam arrays and radial noncanonical vortex Gaussian beam arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ke; Jiao, Liyang; Zhong, Xianqiong

    2016-05-01

    Based on the vector angular spectrum representation and stationary phase method, the analytical far-field vectorial expressions of radial noncanonical vortex Airy beam arrays (NVAiBAs) and radial noncanonical vortex Gaussian beam arrays (NVGBAs) are derived, and used to investigate their far-field vectorial properties, e.g. center optical vortices and energy fluxes of these corresponding beams, where the effect of noncanonical strength, topological charge, initial phase index and the number of beamlet on far-field vectorial properties of these corresponding beams is emphasized, respectively. The results show that the topological charge of center optical vortices in the far field is equal to initial phase index for the case of the radial NVAiBAs, whereas for radial NVGBAs the topological charge not only lies on initial phase index, but also is closely related to the odevity and sign of optical vortices embedded in beamlet, where mathematical analysis is made to explain the topological charge of center optical vortices, and the limitation of the number of beamlet to the topological charge of center optical vortices is also discussed. In addition, energy fluxes of radial NVAiBAs and NVGBAs exhibit different space orientations by controlling noncancial strength and present larger dark zones by increasing topological charge of beamlet, respectively. Finally, the relationship between the center optical vortices and energy fluxes of radial NVAiBAs and NVGBAs in even or odd N beamlets is also revealed, respectively.

  4. Radial Breathing Modes in Cosmochemistry and Meteoritics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T.L.; Wilson, K.B.

    2009-01-01

    One area of continuing interest in cosmochemistry and meteoritics (C&M) is the identification of the nature of Q-phase, although some researchers in C&M are not reporting relevant portions of Raman spectral data. Q is the unidentified carrier of noble gases in carbonaceous chondrites (CCs). Being carbonaceous, the focus has been on any number of Q-candidates arising from the sp2 hybridization of carbon (C). These all derive from various forms of graphene, a monolayer of C atoms packed into a two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal honeycomb lattice that is the basic building block for graphitic materials of all other dimensions for sp2 allotropes of C. As a basic lattice, 2D graphene can be curled into fullerenes (0D), wrapped into carbon nanotubes or CNTs (1D), and stacked into graphite (3D). These take such additional forms as scroll-like carbon whiskers, carbon fibers, carbon onions, GPCs (graphite polyhedral crystals) [6], and GICs (graphite intercalation compounds). Although all of these have been observed in meteoritics, the issue is which can explain the Q-abundances. In brief, one or more of the 0D-3D sp2 hybridization forms of C is Q. For some Q-candidates, the radial breathing modes (RBMs) are the most important Raman active vibrational modes that exist, and bear a direct relevance to solving this puzzle. Typically in C&M they are ignored when present. Their importance is addressed here as smoking-gun signatures for certain Q-candidates and are very relevant to the ultimate identification of Q.

  5. Forced expression of Sox2 or Nanog in human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells maintains their expansion and differentiation capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Go, Masahiro J. Takenaka, Chiemi; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2008-03-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human bone marrow have capability to differentiate into cells of mesenchymal lineage. The cells have already been applied in various clinical situations because of their expansion and differentiation capabilities. The cells lose their capabilities after several passages, however. With the aim of conferring higher capability on human bone marrow MSCs, we introduced the Sox2 or Nanog gene into the cells. Sox2 and Nanog are not only essential for pluripotency and self-renewal of embryonic stem cells, but also expressed in somatic stem cells that have superior expansion and differentiation potentials. We found that Sox2-expressing MSCs showed consistent proliferation and osteogenic capability in culture media containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) compared to control cells. Significantly, in the presence of bFGF in culture media, most of the Sox2-expressing cells were small, whereas the control cells were elongated in shape. We also found that Nanog-expressing cells even in the absence of bFGF had much higher capabilities for expansion and osteogenesis than control cells. These results demonstrate not only an effective way to maintain proliferation and differentiation potentials of MSCs but also an important implication about the function of bFGF for self-renewal of stem cells including MSCs.

  6. Radial distribution of charged particles in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Sjue, S K L; Broussard, L J; Makela, M; McGaughey, P L; Young, A R; Zeck, B A

    2015-02-01

    The radial spread of charged particles emitted from a point source in a magnetic field is a potential source of systematic error for any experiment where magnetic fields guide charged particles to detectors with finite size. Assuming uniform probability as a function of the phase along the particle's helical trajectory, an analytic solution for the radial probability distribution function follows which applies to experiments in which particles are generated throughout a volume that spans a sufficient length along the axis of a homogeneous magnetic field. This approach leads to the same result as a different derivation given by Dubbers et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 763, 112-119 (2014). But the constant phase approximation does not strictly apply to finite source volumes or fixed positions, which lead to local maxima in the radial distribution of emitted particles at the plane of the detector. A simple method is given to calculate such distributions, then the effect is demonstrated with data from a (207)Bi electron-conversion source in the superconducting solenoid magnet spectrometer of the Ultracold Neutron facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Implications for neutron beta decay spectroscopy are discussed. PMID:25725818

  7. Radial distribution of charged particles in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Sjue, S. K. L. Broussard, L. J.; Makela, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Young, A. R.; Zeck, B. A.

    2015-02-15

    The radial spread of charged particles emitted from a point source in a magnetic field is a potential source of systematic error for any experiment where magnetic fields guide charged particles to detectors with finite size. Assuming uniform probability as a function of the phase along the particle’s helical trajectory, an analytic solution for the radial probability distribution function follows which applies to experiments in which particles are generated throughout a volume that spans a sufficient length along the axis of a homogeneous magnetic field. This approach leads to the same result as a different derivation given by Dubbers et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 763, 112–119 (2014). But the constant phase approximation does not strictly apply to finite source volumes or fixed positions, which lead to local maxima in the radial distribution of emitted particles at the plane of the detector. A simple method is given to calculate such distributions, then the effect is demonstrated with data from a {sup 207}Bi electron-conversion source in the superconducting solenoid magnet spectrometer of the Ultracold Neutron facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Implications for neutron beta decay spectroscopy are discussed.

  8. Using radial NMR profiles to characterize pore size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deriche, Rachid; Treilhard, John

    2012-02-01

    Extracting information about axon diameter distributions in the brain is a challenging task which provides useful information for medical purposes; for example, the ability to characterize and monitor axon diameters would be useful in diagnosing and investigating diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)1 or autism.2 Three families of operators are defined by Ozarslan,3 whose action upon an NMR attenuation signal extracts the moments of the pore size distribution of the ensemble under consideration; also a numerical method is proposed to continuously reconstruct a discretely sampled attenuation profile using the eigenfunctions of the simple harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian: the SHORE basis. The work presented here extends Ozarlan's method to other bases that can offer a better description of attenuation signal behaviour; in particular, we propose the use of the radial Spherical Polar Fourier (SPF) basis. Testing is performed to contrast the efficacy of the radial SPF basis and SHORE basis in practical attenuation signal reconstruction. The robustness of the method to additive noise is tested and analysed. We demonstrate that a low-order attenuation signal reconstruction outperforms a higher-order reconstruction in subsequent moment estimation under noisy conditions. We propose the simulated annealing algorithm for basis function scale parameter estimation. Finally, analytic expressions are derived and presented for the action of the operators on the radial SPF basis (obviating the need for numerical integration, thus avoiding a spectrum of possible sources of error).

  9. Rate of radial transport of plasma in Saturn's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Hill, T. W.; Rymer, A. M.; Wilson, R. J.

    2010-10-01

    In the inner part of a rapidly rotating magnetosphere such as that of Saturn, the major observable signature of radial plasma convection is a series of longitudinally localized injections and simultaneous drift dispersions of hot tenuous plasma from the outer magnetosphere. The Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) and the Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) have observed signatures of these processes frequently, thus providing direct evidence for Saturn's magnetospheric convective motions, in which the radial transport of plasma comprises hot, tenuous plasma moving inward and cooler, denser plasma moving outward. On the basis of an extended statistical sample of these injection/dispersion events, we find that the inflow channels occupy only a small fraction (˜7%) of the total available longitudinal space, indicating that the inflow speed is much larger than the outflow speed. We assume that the plasma is largely confined to a thin equatorial sheet and calculate its thickness by deriving the centrifugal scale height profile based on the CAPS observations. We also present the radial and longitudinal dependences of flux tube mass content as well as the total ion mass between 5 and 10 Saturn radii. Combining these results, we estimate a global plasma mass outflow rate ˜280 kg/s.

  10. Radial/axial power divider/combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaddiparty, Yerriah P. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An electromagnetic power divider/combiner comprises N radial outputs (31) having equal powers and preferably equal phases, and a single axial output (20). A divider structure (1) and a preferably identical combiner structure (2) are broadside coupled across a dielectric substrate (30) containing on one side the network of N radial outputs (31) and on its other side a set of N equispaced stubs (42) which are capacitively coupled through the dielectric substrate (30) to the N radial outputs (31). The divider structure (1) and the combiner structure (2) each comprise a dielectric disk (12, 22, respectively) on which is mounted a set of N radial impedance transformers (14, 24, respectively). Gross axial coupling is determined by the thickness of the dielectric layer (30). Rotating the disks (12, 22) with respect to each other effectuates fine adjustment in the degree of axial coupling.

  11. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kokkalis, Zinon T.; Tolis, Konstantinos E.; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D.; Panagopoulos, Georgios N.; Igoumenou, Vasilios G.; Mavrogenis, Andreas F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  12. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Tolis, Konstantinos E; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-06-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  13. Electrostatic forces on two almost touching nonspherical charged conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khair, Aditya S.

    2013-10-01

    Analytical expressions are derived for the electrostatic forces on two almost touching nonspherical conductors held at unequal voltages or carrying dissimilar charges in an insulating medium. Each conductor is a body of revolution whose surface is defined by the equation rn+zn=an, where r and z are radial and axial cylindrical co-ordinates, respectively, 2a is the equatorial width, and n is a parameter that controls the particle shape. The two objects are of identical shape and placed in a coaxial configuration, in which case the electrostatic forces are solely along their line of centers. The calculation of the forces is performed via a local analysis of the electrostatics in the thin gap region separating the particles. At a fixed potential difference, the magnitude of the attractive force F on the particles scales with the minimum gap height h0 as F ˜h02(1/n-1) for n > 1 and F ˜ln h0 for n = 1, to leading order as h0/a→0. The force increases as the gap region becomes flatter (increasing n), due to the intense electric field in the gap acting over a larger surface area. The opposite is found for particles carrying fixed charges: here, F ˜h0-2/n for n > 2 and F ˜h0-1[ln(a/h0)]-2 for n = 2. In this case, the potential difference between the conductors diminishes as the gap region becomes flatter, which overpowers the increase in gap area. Our results demonstrate that like-charge attraction occurs for a broad class of nonspherical conductors at close separations. The predicted sensitivity of the electrostatic force to particle shape is relevant to probe-based microscopy: specifically, to quantify the influence of tip-geometry on the force experienced by a charged probe near a conducting surface.

  14. Elbow dislocation with irreparable fracture radial head

    PubMed Central

    Tanna, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    Background: Treatment of elbow dislocation with irreparable radial head fracture needs replacement of radial head to achieve stability of elbow. An alternate method in cases of elbow dislocation with radial head fracture can be resection of radial head with repair of medial collateral ligament. We report a retrospective analysis of cases of elbow dislocation with irreparable radial head treated by excision head of radius and repair of MCL. Materials and Methods: Nine patients of elbow dislocation with associated irreparable fractures of the head of the radius were included in this analysis (6 F:3 M, Age: 35-47 years). Radial head excision was done through the lateral approach and MCL was sutured using no 3 Ethibond using medial approach. Above elbow plaster was given for 6 weeks and gradual mobilization was done thereafter. All patients were assessed at final followup using Mayo elbow performance score (MEPS). Results: Mean followup was 19.55 ± 7.12 months (range 14-36 months). There was no extension deficit when compared to opposite side with mean range of flexion of 138.8° ± 6.97° (range 130 -145°). Mean pronation was 87.7° ± 4.4° (range 80-90°) and mean supination was 87.7 ± 4.62° (range 80-90°). The mean MEPS was 98.8 ± 3.33 (range 90-100). No patient had pain, sensory complaints, subluxation or redislocation. All were able to carry out their daily activities without disability. Conclusion: Radial head excision with MCL repair is an acceptable option for treatment of patients with elbow dislocation and irreparable radial head fracture. PMID:23798760

  15. Radial transport with perturbed magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R. D.

    2015-05-15

    It is pointed out that the viscosity coefficient describing radial transport of toroidal angular momentum is proportional to the second power of the gyro-radius—like the corresponding coefficients for particle and heat transport—regardless of any geometrical symmetry. The observation is widely appreciated, but worth emphasizing because some literature gives the misleading impression that asymmetry can allow radial moment transport in first-order.

  16. Radial pulsations in DB white dwarfs?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawaler, Steven D.

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical models of DB white dwarfs are unstable against radial pulsation at effective temperatures near 20,000-30,000 K. Many high-overtone modes are unstable, with periods ranging from 12 s down to the acoustic cutoff period of approximately 0.1 s. The blue edge for radial instability lies at slightly higher effective temperatures than for nonradial pulsations, with the temperature of the blue edge dependent on the assumed efficiency of convection. Models with increased convective efficiency have radial blue edges that are increasingly closer to the nonradial blue edge; in all models the instability persists into the nonradial instability strip. Radial pulsations therefore may exist in the hottest DB stars that lie below the DB gap; the greatest chance for detection would be observations in the ultraviolet. These models also explain why searches for radial pulsations in DA white dwarfs have failed: the efficient convection needed to explain the blue edge for nonradial DA pulsation means that the radial instability strip is 1000 K cooler than found in previous investigations. The multiperiodic nature of the expected pulsations can be used to advantage to identify very low amplitude modes using the uniform spacing of the modes in frequency. This frequency spacing is a direct indicator of the mass of the star.

  17. Finite element basis for the expansion of radial wavefunction in quantum scattering calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Woonglin; Sup Lee, Yoon; Park, Seung C.

    1991-11-01

    Radial wavefunctions in quantum scattering calculations are expanded in terms of two shape functions for each finite element. This approach is the R matrix version of Kohn's variational method and also directly applicable to S matrix in the log-derivative version. The linear algebra involved amounts to solving definite banded systems. In this basis set method, R matrix or log-derivative matrix is greatly simplified and the computational effort is linearly proportional to the number of radial basis functions, promising computational efficiencies for large scale calculations. Convergences for test vases are also reasonably rapid.

  18. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A.; Shprits, Y.; Subbotin, D.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Resonant interactions between Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves and relativistic electrons may violate the third adiabatic invariant of motion, which produces radial diffusion in the electron radiation belts. This process plays an important role in the formation and structure of the outer electron radiation belt and is important for electron acceleration and losses in that region. Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interaction of electrons with ULF waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2012] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate their relative effect on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes quiet time and storm time geomagnetic activity and is compared to data based on satellite observations. Our calculations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion. We show that the results of the 3D diffusion simulations depend on the assumed parametrization of waves. The differences between the simulations and potential missing physical mechanisms are discussed. References Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999JA900344 Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. J. Rae, D. K. Milling, S. R. Elkington, A. A. Chan, and H. J. Singer (2012), ULF wave derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A04222, doi:10.1029/2011JA017463.

  19. An extensive radial velocity survey towards NGC 6253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, M.; Melo, C. H. F.; Santos, N. C.; Queloz, D.; Piotto, G.; Desidera, S.; Bedin, L. R.; Momany, Y.; Saviane, I.

    2016-04-01

    The old and metal-rich open cluster NGC 6253 was observed with the Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph (FLAMES) multi-object spectrograph during an extensive radial velocity campaign monitoring 317 stars with a median of 15 epochs per object. All the targeted stars are located along the upper main sequence of the cluster between 14.8 < V < 16.5. Fifty nine stars are confirmed cluster members both by radial velocities and proper motions and do not show evidence of variability. We detected 45 variable stars among which 25 belong to NGC 6253. We were able to derive an orbital solution for four cluster members (and for two field stars) yielding minimum masses in between ˜90 MJ and ˜460 MJ and periods between 3 and 220 d. Simulations demonstrated that this survey was sensitive to objects down to 30 MJ at 10 days orbital periods with a detection efficiency equal to 50 per cent. On the basis of these results we concluded that the observed frequency of binaries down to the hydrogen burning limit and up to 20 d orbital period is around (1.5 ± 1.3) per cent in NGC 6253. The overall observed frequency of binaries around the sample of cluster stars is (13 ± 3) per cent. The median radial velocity precision achieved by the GIRAFFE spectrograph in this magnitude range was around ˜240 m s- 1 (˜180 m s- 1 for UVES). Based on a limited follow-up analysis of seven stars in our sample with the High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) spectrograph we determined that a precision of 35 m s- 1 can be reached in this magnitude range, offering the possibility to further extend the variability analysis into the substellar domain. Prospects are even more favourable once considering the upcoming ESPRESSO spectrograph at VLT.

  20. Effects of applied dc radial electric fields on particle transport in a bumpy torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of applied dc radial electric fields on particle transport in a bumpy torus plasma is studied. The plasma, magnetic field, and ion heating mechanism are operated in steady state. Ion kinetic temperature is more than a factor of ten higher than electron temperature. The electric fields raise the ions to energies on the order of kilovolts and then point radially inward or outward. Plasma number density profiles are flat or triangular across the plasma diameter. It is suggested that the radial transport processes are nondiffusional and dominated by strong radial electric fields. These characteristics are caused by the absence of a second derivative in the density profile and the flat electron temperature profiles. If the electric field acting on the minor radius of the toroidal plasma points inward, plasma number density and confinement time are increased.

  1. Influence of YBa2HfO5.5 - 'derived secondary phase' on the critical current density and flux-Pinning force of YBa2Cu3O7-δ thick films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejith, Pullanhiyodan Puthiyaveedu; Vidya, Sukumariamma; Thomas, Jijimon Kumbukkattu

    2015-12-01

    Enhancement in critical current density (Jc) and flux pinning force (Fp) in superconducting thick films of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) added with small quantities of nanopowders of HfO2, BaHfO3 and YBa2HfO5.5, coated on YBa2ZrO5.5 substrate by dip-coating technique is reported. Critical current density measurements were done over an applied magnetic field using standard four probe technique and the results are compared with that of pure YBCO. High critical current density (Jc) of ∼4.84 MA/cm2 at 77 K in self-field was obtained for 2 wt% of YBa2HfO5.5 added YBCO. A systematic increase in Jc observed in YBCO films prepared by the addition of nano HfO2, BaHfO3 and YBa2HfO5.5, attributed to the formation of a non-reacting 'derived secondary phase' YBa2HfO5.5 (YBHO) in the YBCO matrix. YBCO-YBa2HfO5.5 composite thick films have showed eightfold increases in Jc (3.29 MA/cm2) at 77 K and 0.4 T compared to pure YBa2Cu3O7-δ film (0.37 MA/cm2), while maintaining a high transition temperature (Tc). The development of effective pinning centers in nano particle added YBCO thick film have enhanced the flux pinning force from 1.8 GN/m3 for pure YBCO to a maximum value of 13.15 GN/m3 for YBCO-YBa2HfO5.5. X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis confirmed the presence of secondary phase, derived in the matrix.

  2. Travel time approach to kinetically sorbing solute by diverging radial flows through heterogeneous porous formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severino, Gerardo; de Bartolo, Samuele; Toraldo, Gerardo; Srinivasan, Gowri; Viswanathan, Hari

    2012-12-01

    Diverging radial flow takes place in a heterogeneous porous medium where the log conductivity Y = ln K is modeled as a stationary random space function (RSF). The flow is steady, and is generated by a fully penetrating well. A linearly sorbing solute is injected through the well envelope, and we aim at computing the average flux concentration (breakthrough curve). A relatively simple solution for this difficult problem is achieved by adopting, similar to Indelman and Dagan (1999), a few simplifying assumptions: (i) a thick aquifer of large horizontal extent, (ii) mildly heterogeneous medium, (iii) strongly anisotropic formation, and (iv) large Peclet number. By introducing an appropriate Lagrangian framework, three-dimensional transport is mapped onto a one-dimensional domain (τ, t) where τ and t represent the fluid travel and current time, respectively. Central for this approach is the probability density function of the RSF τthat is derived consistently with the adopted assumptions stated above. Based on this, it is shown that the travel time can be regarded as a Gaussian random variable only in the far field. The breakthrough curves are analyzed to assess the impact of the hydraulic as well as reactive parameters. Finally, the travel time approach is tested against a forced-gradient transport experiment and shows good agreement.

  3. Levitation forces in bearingless permanent magnet motors

    SciTech Connect

    Amrhein, W.; Silber, S.; Nenninger, K.

    1999-09-01

    Bearingless motors combine brushless AC-motors with active magnetic bearings by the integration of two separate winding systems (torque and radial levitation force windings with different pole pairs) in one housing. This paper gives an insight into the influences of the motor design on the levitation force and torque generation. It is shown that especially for machines with small air gaps it can be very important to choose the right design parameters. Increasing the permanent magnet height in order to increase the motor torque can result in a remarkable reduction of radial forces. The interrelationships are discussed on the basis of Maxwell and Lorentz forces acting upon the stator surface. The investigations are presented for a bearingless low cost motor, suited for pump, fan or blower applications. The presented motor needs only four coils for operation.

  4. Intraoperative hemodynamic evaluation of the radial and ulnar arteries during free radial forearm flap procedure.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, Fulvio; Giordano, Salvatore; Suominen, Erkki; Asko-Seljavaara, Sirpa; Suominen, Sinikka

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the blood flow of the radial and ulnar arteries before and after radial forearm flap raising. Twenty-two patients underwent radial forearm microvascular reconstruction for leg soft tissue defects. Blood flow of the radial, ulnar, and recipient arteries was measured intraoperatively by transit-time and ultrasonic flowmeter. In the in situ radial artery, the mean blood flow was 60.5 +/- 47.7 mL/min before, 6.7 +/- 4.1 mL/min after raising the flap, and 5.8 +/- 2.0 mL/min after end-to-end anastomosis to the recipient artery. In the ulnar artery, the mean blood flow was 60.5 +/- 43.3 mL/min before harvesting the radial forearm flap and significantly increased to 85.7 +/- 57.9 mL/min after radial artery sacrifice. A significant difference was also found between this value and the value of blood flow in the ulnar and radial arteries pooled together ( P < 0.05). The vascular resistance in the ulnar artery decreased significantly after the radial artery flap raising (from 2.7 +/- 3.1 to 1.9 +/- 2.2 peripheral resistance units, P = 0.010). The forearm has a conspicuous arterial vascularization not only through the radial and ulnar arteries but also through the interosseous system. The raising of the radial forearm flap increases blood flow and decreases vascular resistance in the ulnar artery. PMID:19902406

  5. Implementation of sensorless control of radial magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Gurumoorthy, R.; Soong, W.L.; Lyons, J.P.; Storace, A.F.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses preliminary results of the implementation of sensorless position control of a radial magnetic bearing. The magnetic bearing is controlled using a mutually exclusive excitation scheme; where only one out of the two available actuators in each axis is active at any time. The unused actuator is used for sensorless position estimation. The sensorless position scheme is based on measuring the change of airgap reluctance with the variation of airgap between the actuator and the rotor. The airgap reluctance is measured by driving the unused actuators with short probing pulses and measuring the resultant change of current. The rotor position is controlled using independent Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) control of each axis. This offers a simple and robust controller. The authors present the design of a PID controller. Preliminary experimental results are presented showing levitation at standstill. The sensorless control algorithm has been implemented on a digital controller and levitation of the test-rig rotor with one radial bearing operated without a position sensor has been demonstrated. Due to the inherent double integration from the rotor inertia, the derivative component of the position is required for stabilizing the system. However this also inherently amplifies measurement noise and thus low-noise position estimation is required. Means for reducing the existing noise in the position estimate, in the test-rig system, by increasing the current sensor resolution and using greater filtering are being investigated.

  6. An unusual course of the radial artery.

    PubMed

    Pelin, C; Zagyapan, R; Mas, N; Karabay, G

    2006-11-01

    Radial artery variations are of importance for clinicians, whether in angiographic examinations or surgical approaches. The high origin radial artery is the most frequent arterial variation observed in the upper limb, showing an incidence of 14.27% in dissection material and 9.75% in angiographic examination. In the present study an unusual course of the radial artery and its relation with the median nerve has been evaluated. During embryological development the radial artery sprouts from two arterial buds arising from the lateral side of the brachial artery and coalescing with each other. The artery lies in the forearm and is overlapped by the brachioradial muscle. In this particular case the radial artery originated from the medial side of the brachial artery and crossed the median nerve twice in an unusual manner 8 cm below the point at which the deep brachial artery arose and 12 cm above the intercondylar line. These results will enhance anatomical knowledge of the region and reduce complication in surgical approaches. PMID:17171625

  7. Fast radial flows in transition disk holes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Chiang, Eugene

    2014-02-20

    Protoplanetary 'transition' disks have large, mass-depleted central cavities, yet also deliver gas onto their host stars at rates comparable to disks without holes. The paradox of simultaneous transparency and accretion can be explained if gas flows inward at much higher radial speeds inside the cavity than outside the cavity, since surface density (and by extension optical depth) varies inversely with inflow velocity at fixed accretion rate. Radial speeds within the cavity might even have to approach free-fall values to explain the huge surface density contrasts inferred for transition disks. We identify observational diagnostics of fast radial inflow in channel maps made in optically thick spectral lines. Signatures include (1) twisted isophotes in maps made at low systemic velocities and (2) rotation of structures observed between maps made in high-velocity line wings. As a test case, we apply our new diagnostic tools to archival Atacama Large Millimeter Array data on the transition disk HD 142527 and uncover evidence for free-fall radial velocities inside its cavity. Although the observed kinematics are also consistent with a disk warp, the radial inflow scenario is preferred because it predicts low surface densities that appear consistent with recent observations of optically thin CO isotopologues in this disk. How material in the disk cavity sheds its angular momentum wholesale to fall freely onto the star is an unsolved problem; gravitational torques exerted by giant planets or brown dwarfs are briefly discussed as a candidate mechanism.

  8. Helical antimicrobial polypeptides with radial amphiphilicity

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Menghua; Lee, Michelle W.; Mansbach, Rachael A.; Song, Ziyuan; Bao, Yan; Peek, Richard M.; Yao, Catherine; Chen, Lin-Feng; Ferguson, Andrew L.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Cheng, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    α-Helical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) generally have facially amphiphilic structures that may lead to undesired peptide interactions with blood proteins and self-aggregation due to exposed hydrophobic surfaces. Here we report the design of a class of cationic, helical homo-polypeptide antimicrobials with a hydrophobic internal helical core and a charged exterior shell, possessing unprecedented radial amphiphilicity. The radially amphiphilic structure enables the polypeptide to bind effectively to the negatively charged bacterial surface and exhibit high antimicrobial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, the shielding of the hydrophobic core by the charged exterior shell decreases nonspecific interactions with eukaryotic cells, as evidenced by low hemolytic activity, and protects the polypeptide backbone from proteolytic degradation. The radially amphiphilic polypeptides can also be used as effective adjuvants, allowing improved permeation of commercial antibiotics in bacteria and enhanced antimicrobial activity by one to two orders of magnitude. Designing AMPs bearing this unprecedented, unique radially amphiphilic structure represents an alternative direction of AMP development; radially amphiphilic polypeptides may become a general platform for developing AMPs to treat drug-resistant bacteria. PMID:26460016

  9. Static forces in a superconducting magnet bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Stoye, P.; Fuchs, G.; Gawalek, W.; Goernert, P.; Gladun, A.

    1995-11-01

    Static levitation forces and stiffnesses in a superconducting bearing consisting of concentric ring magnets and a superconducting YBaCuO ring are investigated. In the field-cooled mode a levitation force of 20 N has been achieved. The axial and radial stiffnesses have values of 15 N/mm and 10 N/mm, respectively. An arrangement with two bearings supporting a high speed shaft is now under development. A possible application of superconducting magnetic bearings is flywheels for energy storage.

  10. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  11. One Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald R.

    2002-04-01

    There is only one entity that can extend force and couple through space; and it should be apparent that Electromagnetism is that entity. In the cases of the nuclear strong force and the nuclear weak force, this is the same fundamental Electromagnetism manifesting itself in two different ways in the nucleus. It remains the same basic Electromagnetism. On the other hand, General Relativity fails to produce force at a distance, fails the Cavendish experiment, and does not allow an apple to fall to the ground. The result shows there is only Electromagnetism that functions through physical nature providing gravity, actions in the nucleus, as well as all other physical actions universally, including Gravity and Gravitation. There are many direct proofs of this, the same proofs as in NUCLEAR QUANTUM GRAVITATION. In contrast, General Relativity plainly relies on fallacy abstract and incoherent proofs; proofs which have now been mostly disproved. In the past it was deemed necessary by some to have an "ether" to propagate Electromagnetic waves. The fallacy concept of time space needs "space distortions" in order to cause gravity. However, Electromagnetic gravity does not have this problem. Clearly there is only ONE FORCE that causes Gravity, Electromagnetism, the Nuclear Strong Force, and the Nuclear Weak Force, and that ONE FORCE is Electromagnetism.

  12. ERS-1 radial position refinement by dual crossover analysis with TOPEX/Poseidon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnochan, S.; Moore, P.; Ehlers, S.

    Achieving orbital accuracies in the radial direction for ERS-1 commensurate with those for TOPEX/Poseidon is of utmost importance for the integration of the two altimeter data sets. This paper outlines a procedure whereby the radial orbit error for ERS-1 is recovered as a time series expansion in the form of a finite Fourier series with additional terms for atmospheric drag, solar radiation pressure, and initial state vector mismodelling. Using a least squares collocation method with constraints derived from the JGM2 gravity field co-variance matrix, the radial error is recovered using both dual crossovers and ERS-1 single satellite crossovers. Aggregate arcs are then used to derive the ERS-1 orbit error over the repeat period of 35 days. The results are presented in the improvement of fit in the dual crossover, ERS-1 crossover and altimetry data sets as well as the recovery of an altimeter bias for the two satellites.

  13. Effect of the atmospheric turbulence on a special correlated radially polarized beam on propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yan; Wei, Cun; Zhang, Yongtao; Wang, Fei; Cai, Yangjian

    2015-11-01

    A special correlated radially polarized beam (Phys. Rev. A 89, 013801, 2014) was introduced and demonstrated in experiment recently. In this paper, we investigate the statistical properties of a special correlated radially polarized (SCRP) beam in atmospheric turbulence. Analytical formulas for the average intensity distribution (AID), degree of polarization (DOP) and degree of coherence (DOC) are derived by adopting a beam coherence-polarization (BCP) matrix. With the help of the derived formulas, the evolutions of the AID, DOP and DOC of the SCRP beam in turbulent atmosphere are illustrated through numerical examples in detail, and the results are compared to those of a partially coherent radially polarized (PCRP) beam under equivalent condition. It reveals that the propagation properties of the SCRP beam is much different from those of the PCRP beam in atmosphere, and closely related to the strength of the turbulence and the beam parameters.

  14. Rotordynamic forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, R.; Arndt, N.; Caughey, T. K.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    The asymmetric flow around an impeller in a volute exerts a force upon the impeller. To study the rotordynamic force on an impeller which is vibrating around its machine axis of rotation, the impeller, mounted on a dynamometer, is made to whirl in a circular orbit within the volute. The measured force is expressed as the sum of a steady radial force and an unsteady force due to the eccentric motion of the impeller. These forces were measured in separate tests on a centrifugal pump with radically increased shroud clearance, a two-dimensional impeller, and an impeller with an inducer, the impeller of the HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine). In each case, a destabilizing force was observed over a region of positive whirl.

  15. Dissipative Forces and Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eck, John S.; Thompson, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    Shows how to include the dissipative forces of classical mechanics in quantum mechanics by the use of non-Hermetian Hamiltonians. The Ehrenfest theorem for such Hamiltonians is derived, and simple examples which show the classical correspondences are given. (MLH)

  16. Convective overstability in radially stratified accretion disks under thermal relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Klahr, Hubert; Hubbard, Alexander

    2014-06-10

    This paper expands the stability criterion for radially stratified, vertically unstratified accretion disks incorporating thermal relaxation. We find a linear amplification of epicyclic oscillations in these disks that depends on the effective cooling time, i.e., an overstability. The growth rates of the overstability vanish for both extreme cases, e.g., infinite cooling time and instantaneous cooling, i.e., the adiabatic and fully isothermal cases. However, for thermal relaxation times τ on the order of the orbital frequency, τΩ ∼ 1, modes grow at a rate proportional to the square of the Brunt-Väisälä frequency. The overstability is based on epicyclic motions, with the thermal relaxation causing gas to heat while radially displaced inward and cool while radially displaced outward. This causes the gas to have a lower density when moving outward compared to when it moves inward, so it feels the outward-directed pressure force more strongly on that leg of the journey. We suggest the term 'convective overstability' for the phenomenon which has already been studied numerically in the nonlinear regime in the context of amplifying vortices in disks under the name 'subcritical baroclinic instability'. The aim of the present paper is to make clear that vortex formation in three-dimensional disks is not necessarily subcritical, i.e., does not need a finite perturbation, nor is it baroclinic in the sense of geophysical fluid dynamics, which requires on vertical shear. We find that convective overstability is a linear instability that will operate under a wide range of physical conditions for circumstellar disks.

  17. Manufacturing of Precision Forgings by Radial Forging

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, S.; Harrer, O.; Buchmayr, B.; Hofer, F.

    2011-01-17

    Radial forging is a multi purpose incremental forging process using four tools on the same plane. It is widely used for the forming of tool steels, super alloys as well as titanium- and refractory metals. The range of application goes from reducing the diameters of shafts, tubes, stepped shafts and axels, as well as for creating internal profiles for tubes in Near-Net-Shape and Net-Shape quality. Based on actual development of a weight optimized transmission input shaft, the specific features of radial forging technology is demonstrated. Also a Finite Element Model for the simulation of the process is shown which leads to reduced pre-processing effort and reduced computing time compared to other published simulation methods for radial forging. The finite element model can be applied to quantify the effects of different forging strategies.

  18. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, P.; Bottom, M.; Davison, C.; Mills, S.; Ciardi, D. R.; Brinkworth, C.; Tanner, A. M.; Beichman, C. A.; Catanzarite, J.; Crawford, S.; Wallace, J.; Mennesson, B.; Johnson, J. A.; White, R. J.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; von Braun, K.; Walp, B.; Vasisht, G.; Kane, S. R.; Prato, L. A.; NIRRVs

    2014-01-01

    We present precise radial velocity time-series from a 2.3 micron pilot survey to detect exoplanets around red, low mass, and young stars. We use the CSHELL spectrograph with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility. We present an overview of our Nelder-Mead simplex optimization pipeline for extracting radial velocities. We will also present first light data at 1.6 microns from a near-infrared fiber scrambler used in tandem with our gas cell and CSHELL at IRTF. The fiber scrambler makes use of non-circular core fibers to stabilize the illumination of the slit and echelle grating against changes in seeing, focus, guiding and other sources of systematic radial velocity noise, complementing the wavelength calibration of a gas cell.

  19. Radial anisotropy ambient noise tomography of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Shapiro, Nikolai; Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Landès, Matthieu; Koulakov, Ivan; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The use of ambient seismic noise allows us to perform surface-wave tomography of targets which could hardly be imaged by other means. The frequencies involved (~ 0.5 - 20 s), somewhere in between active seismic and regular teleseismic frequency band, make possible the high resolution imaging of intermediate-size targets like volcanic edifices. Moreover, the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves extracted from noise correlations allows us to invert for crustal radial anisotropy. We present here the two first studies of radial anisotropy on volcanoes by showing results from Lake Toba Caldera, a super-volcano in Indonesia, and from Piton de la Fournaise volcano, a hot-spot effusive volcano on the Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). We will see how radial anisotropy can be used to infer the main fabric within a magmatic system and, consequently, its dominant type of intrusion.

  20. Thrombosis following percutaneous radial artery cannulation.

    PubMed

    Cederholm, I; Sørensen, J; Carlsson, C

    1986-04-01

    A prospective study of the arterial supply of the hand was carried out in 100 ICU patients after cannulation of the radial artery. Patency of the radial artery was checked using a reversed Allen's test and Doppler ultrasonic technique. Furthermore, radial artery angiography was carried out in 15 patients with suspect thrombosis, and the artery was examined by microscopy in four patients at autopsy. Signs of thrombosis, Allen's test and Doppler technique, were found in 33/100 patients. In 10/15 angiograms a thrombosis was visualized, and in 3/4 patients at autopsy a thrombosis was found. The incidence of thrombosis was not correlated to sex, age, size of artery (judged by wrist circumference), cannulation technique or the presence of hypotension. It did, however, correlate to the presence of haematoma at the puncture site. After removal of the cannula recanalisation occurred soon in the majority of cases. PMID:3739580

  1. Generalized radially self-accelerating helicon beams.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Christian; Eichelkraut, Toni; Ornigotti, Marco; Szameit, Alexander

    2014-10-31

    We report, in theory and experiment, on a new class of optical beams that are radially self-accelerating and nondiffracting. These beams continuously evolve on spiraling trajectories while maintaining their amplitude and phase distribution in their rotating rest frame. We provide a detailed insight into the theoretical origin and characteristics of radial self-acceleration and prove our findings experimentally. As radially self-accelerating beams are nonparaxial and a solution to the full scalar Helmholtz equation, they can be implemented in many linear wave systems beyond optics, from acoustic and elastic waves to surface waves in fluids and soft matter. Our work generalized the study of classical helicon beams to a complete set of solutions for rotating complex fields. PMID:25396370

  2. On magnetopause inflation under radial IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorova, A. V.; Dmitriev, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    Full understanding of the magnetosphere interaction with radial IMF structures embedded in the solar wind flow is far from completeness. In order to analyze the effects of radial IMF, we use THEMIS observations of the magnetopause and magnetosheath together with upstream data acquired from ACE and Wind monitors as well as from the OMNI data base. We demonstrate a prominent magnetopause inflation and low pressure magnetosheath (LPM) mode under long-lasting radial IMF. We propose that these phenomena result from a kinetic effect of energetic ions taking the energy away from the pressure balance at the magnetopause. We show that strict quantitative determination of the inflation and LPM mode as a function of the cone angle is difficult because of the problems with reliable determination of the upstream and magnetosheath conditions. The shortcomings are caused by such effects as ambiguous time delay for the solar wind propagation, THEMIS orbital bias and model-dependent estimations of the magnetopause inflation.

  3. Dispersion-free radial transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Nelson, Scott D.

    2011-04-12

    A dispersion-free radial transmission line ("DFRTL") preferably for linear accelerators, having two plane conductors each with a central hole, and an electromagnetically permeable material ("EPM") between the two conductors and surrounding a channel connecting the two holes. At least one of the material parameters of relative magnetic permeability, relative dielectric permittivity, and axial width of the EPM is varied as a function of radius, so that the characteristic impedance of the DFRTL is held substantially constant, and pulse transmission therethrough is substantially dispersion-free. Preferably, the EPM is divided into concentric radial sections, with the varied material parameters held constant in each respective section but stepwise varied between sections as a step function of the radius. The radial widths of the concentric sections are selected so that pulse traversal time across each section is the same, and the varied material parameters of the concentric sections are selected to minimize traversal error.

  4. Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, Carl F.

    1995-01-01

    A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

  5. Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, Carl F.

    1995-11-07

    A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

  6. The radial velocity search for extrasolar planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    Radial velocity measurements are being made to search for planets orbiting stars other than the Sun. The reflex acceleration induced on stars by planets can be sensed by measuring the small, slow changes in the line-of-site velocities of stars. To detect these planetary perturbations, the data series must be made on a uniform instrumental scale for as long as it takes a planet to orbit its star. A spectrometer of extreme stability and unprecedented sensitivity to changes in stellar radial velocities was operated.

  7. Electrostatic model of radial pn junction nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, A. C. E.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2013-08-01

    Poisson's equation is solved for a radial pn junction nanowire (NW) with surface depletion. This resulted in a model capable of giving radial energy band and electric field profiles for any arbitrary core/shell doping density, core/shell dimensions, and surface state density. Specific cases were analyzed to extract pertinent underlying physics, while the relationship between NW specifications and the depletion of the NW were examined to optimize the built-in potential across the junction. Additionally, the model results were compared with experimental results in literature to good agreement. Finally, an optimum device design is proposed to satisfy material, optical, and electrostatic constraints in high efficiency NW solar cells.

  8. Radial oscillations of charged strange stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbañil, J. D. V.; Malheiro, M.

    2016-04-01

    The radial oscillations of charged strange quark stars is investigated. It is considered that the fluid pressure follows the MIT bag model equation of state and the charge density to be proportional to the energy density, ρe = αρ (where α is proportionality constant). The modified equations of radial oscillations to the introduction of the electric charge are integrated to determine the fundamental mode. It is found that the stability of the charged object decreases with the increment of the central energy density and with the growth of the charge fraction.

  9. Plasma Signatures of Radial Field Power Dropouts

    SciTech Connect

    Lucek, E.A.; Horbury, T.S.; Balogh, A.; McComas, D.J.

    1998-10-04

    A class of small scale structures, with a near-radial magnetic field and a drop in magnetic field fluctuation power, have recently been identified in the polar solar wind. An earlier study of 24 events, each lasting for 6 hours or more, identified no clear plasma signature. In an extension of that work, radial intervals lasting for 4 hours or more (89 in total), have been used to search for a statistically significant plasma signature. It was found that, despite considerable variations between intervals, there was a small but significant drop, on average, in plasma temperature, density and {beta} during these events.

  10. Aircraft radial-belted tire evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Stubbs, Sandy M.; Davis, Pamela A.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of the ongoing joint NASA/FAA/Industry Surface Traction And Radial Tire (START) Program being conducted at NASA Langley's Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF). The START Program involves tests using three different tire sizes to evaluate tire rolling resistance, braking, and cornering performance throughout the aircraft ground operational speed range for both dry and wet runway surfaces. Preliminary results from recent 40 x 14 size bias-ply, radial-belted, and H-type aircraft tire tests are discussed. The paper concludes with a summary of the current program status and planned ALDF test schedule.

  11. Ultrasonic scanner for radial and flat panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. L.; Hill, E. K. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An ultrasonic scanning mechanism is described that scans panels of honeycomb construction or with welded seams. It incorporates a device which by simple adjustment is adapted to scan either a flat panel or a radial panel. The supporting structure takes the form of a pair of spaced rails. An immersion tank is positioned between the rails and below their level. A work holder is mounted in the tank and is adapted to hold the flat or radial panel. A traveling bridge is movable along the rails and a carriage is mounted on the bridge.

  12. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  13. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  14. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE): Second Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwitter, T.; Siebert, A.; Munari, U.; Freeman, K. C.; Siviero, A.; Watson, F. G.; Fulbright, J. P.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Campbell, R.; Seabroke, G. M.; Williams, M.; Steinmetz, M.; Bienaymé, O.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Anguiano, B.; Boeche, C.; Burton, D.; Cass, P.; Dawe, J.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Russell, K.; Veltz, L.; Bailin, J.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brown, A.; Dehnen, W.; Evans, N. W.; Re Fiorentin, P.; Fiorucci, M.; Gerhard, O.; Gibson, B.; Kelz, A.; Kujken, K.; Matijevič, G.; Minchev, I.; Parker, Q. A.; Peñarrubia, J.; Quillen, A.; Read, M. A.; Reid, W.; Roeser, S.; Ruchti, G.; Scholz, R.-D.; Smith, M. C.; Sordo, R.; Tolstoi, E.; Tomasella, L.; Vidrih, S.; Wylie-de Boer, E.

    2008-07-01

    We present the second data release of the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), an ambitious spectroscopic survey to measure radial velocities and stellar atmosphere parameters (temperature, metallicity, surface gravity, and rotational velocity) of up to one million stars using the 6 dF multi-object spectrograph on the 1.2 m UK Schmidt Telescope of the Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO). The RAVE program started in 2003, obtaining medium resolution spectra (median R = 7500) in the Ca-triplet region (8410-8795 Å) for southern hemisphere stars drawn from the Tycho-2 and SuperCOSMOS catalogues, in the magnitude range 9 < I < 12. Following the first data release, the current release doubles the sample of published radial velocities, now containing 51,829 radial velocities for 49,327 individual stars observed on 141 nights between 2003 April 11 and 2005 March 31. Comparison with external data sets shows that the new data collected since 2004 April 3 show a standard deviation of 1.3 km s-1, about twice as good as for the first data release. For the first time, this data release contains values of stellar parameters from 22,407 spectra of 21,121 individual stars. They were derived by a penalized χ2 method using an extensive grid of synthetic spectra calculated from the latest version of Kurucz stellar atmosphere models. From comparison with external data sets, our conservative estimates of errors of the stellar parameters for a spectrum with an average signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of ~40 are 400 K in temperature, 0.5 dex in gravity, and 0.2 dex in metallicity. We note however that, for all three stellar parameters, the internal errors estimated from repeat RAVE observations of 855 stars are at least a factor 2 smaller. We demonstrate that the results show no systematic offsets if compared to values derived from photometry or complementary spectroscopic analyses. The data release includes proper motions from Starnet2, Tycho-2, and UCAC2 catalogs and photometric measurements

  15. Atomistic insight into orthoborate-based ionic liquids: force field development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Shah, Faiz Ullah; Glavatskih, Sergei; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2014-07-24

    We have developed an all-atomistic force field for a new class of halogen-free chelated orthoborate-phosphonium ionic liquids. The force field is based on an AMBER framework with determination of force field parameters for phosphorus and boron atoms, as well as refinement of several available parameters. The bond and angle force constants were adjusted to fit vibration frequency data derived from both experimental measurements and ab initio calculations. The force field parameters for several dihedral angles were obtained by fitting torsion energy profiles deduced from ab initio calculations. To validate the proposed force field parameters, atomistic simulations were performed for 12 ionic liquids consisting of tetraalkylphosphonium cations and chelated orthoborate anions. The predicted densities for neat ionic liquids and the [P6,6,6,14][BOB] sample, with a water content of approximately 2.3-2.5 wt %, are in excellent agreement with available experimental data. The potential energy components of 12 ionic liquids were discussed in detail. The radial distribution functions and spatial distribution functions were analyzed and visualized to probe the microscopic ionic structures of these ionic liquids. There are mainly four high-probability regions of chelated orthoborate anions distributed around tetraalkylphosphonium cations in the first solvation shell, and such probability distribution functions are strongly influenced by the size of anions. PMID:25020237

  16. Radial orbit error reduction and sea surface topography determination using satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelis, Theodossios

    1987-01-01

    A method is presented in satellite altimetry that attempts to simultaneously determine the geoid and sea surface topography with minimum wavelengths of about 500 km and to reduce the radial orbit error caused by geopotential errors. The modeling of the radial orbit error is made using the linearized Lagrangian perturbation theory. Secular and second order effects are also included. After a rather extensive validation of the linearized equations, alternative expressions of the radial orbit error are derived. Numerical estimates for the radial orbit error and geoid undulation error are computed using the differences of two geopotential models as potential coefficient errors, for a SEASAT orbit. To provide statistical estimates of the radial distances and the geoid, a covariance propagation is made based on the full geopotential covariance. Accuracy estimates for the SEASAT orbits are given which agree quite well with already published results. Observation equations are develped using sea surface heights and crossover discrepancies as observables. A minimum variance solution with prior information provides estimates of parameters representing the sea surface topography and corrections to the gravity field that is used for the orbit generation. The simulation results show that the method can be used to effectively reduce the radial orbit error and recover the sea surface topography.

  17. Radially polarized Bessel-Gauss beams: decentered Gaussian beam analysis and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Schimpf, Damian N; Putnam, William P; Grogan, Michael D W; Ramachandran, Siddharth; Kärtner, Franz X

    2013-07-29

    We derive solutions for radially polarized Bessel-Gauss beams in free-space by superimposing decentered Gaussian beams with differing polarization states. We numerically show that the analytical result is applicable even for large semi-aperture angles, and we experimentally confirm the analytical expression by employing a fiber-based mode-converter. PMID:23938719

  18. Interplanetary gas. XX - Does the radial solar wind speed increase with latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Harrington, R. S.; Roosen, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    The astrometric technique used to derive solar wind speeds from ionic comet-tail orientations has been used to test the suggestion that the radial solar wind speed is higher near the solar poles than near the equator. We find no evidence for the suggested latitude variation.

  19. Latitudinal Dependence of the Radial IMF Component: Coronal Imprint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Smith, E. J.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements by Ulysses have confirmed that there is no significant gradient with respect to heliomagnetic latitude in the radial component, B(sub r,) of the interplanetary magnetic field. In the corona, the plasma, beta is much less than 1, except directly above streamers, so longitudinal and latitudinal gradients in field strength will relax due to the transverse magnetic pressure gradient force as the solar wind carries magnetic flux away from the Sun. This happens quickly enough so that the field is essentially uniform by 5 - 10 solar radius, apparently remaining so as it is carried to beyond 1 AU. Here, we illustrate the coronal relaxation with a qualitative physical argument and by reference to a detailed Magneto HydroDynamics (MHD) simulation.

  20. A Global Model of Mantle Convection that Incorporates Plate Bending Forces, Slab Pull, and Seismic Constraints on the Plate Stress.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, K.; Buffett, B.; Becker, T.

    2008-12-01

    We introduce a global mantle convection model employing mantle density anomalies inferred from seismic tomography to determine present day plate motions. Our approach addresses two aspects that are not usually considered in previous work. First, we include forces associated with the bending of subducting plates. The bending forces oppose the plate motion, and may be comparable in magnitude to other important forces at subduction zones, including slab pull. Second, our model incorporates data from the Global CMT Catalog. We use the focal mechanisms of earthquakes associated with subducting slabs to estimate the relative occurrence of compressional and tensional axes in the down-dip direction of subducting slabs. This information is used to infer the state of stress in the subducting slab, which we use to calculate slab pull forces. We investigate regional variations in slab pull by comparing plate motions derived using seismic constraints with those derived using slab pull forces based solely on the age of subducting plates. Furthermore, we constrain the rheology of subducted plates by comparing plate motions predicted with and without bending forces. Although our current model uses only radial variations in mantle viscosity, we include the capability of permitting lateral variations in viscosity by calculating buoyancy and plate-driven flows using Citcom

  1. The Importance of Radial Migration to the Evolution of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Kathryne J.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2016-01-01

    Spiral galaxy evolution is frequently considered in the context of environment, but internal processes may also play an important role. Radial migration is one such internal process, wherein a transient spiral arm rearranges the angular momentum distribution of the disk around corotation without causing kinematic heating. The efficiency of radial migration depends on both the duty cycle for transient patterns and the RMS change in orbital angular momentum induced by each pattern. Should radial migration be efficient, it could cause a substantial fraction of disk stars to move large radial distances over the lifetime of the disk, thus having significant impact on its kinematic, structural and chemical evolution.In this talk, I will summarize a subset of work focusing on the physics that determines the magnitude of the RMS change in orbital angular momentum from each spiral pattern. I have derived an analytic "capture criterion" that predicts whether or not a disk star with finite random orbital energy is in a "trapped orbit" (i.e. the orbital family induced by the spiral pattern that can lead to radial migration). I will present this criterion and show that it is primarily a star's orbital angular momentum that determines whether or not it is in a trapped orbit. The capture criterion could be used to better understand the role of radial migration in N-body simulations as well as applied to models of galaxy evolution. I will describe an example study wherein I applied the capture criterion, in a series of disk galaxy models, to find the fraction of an ensemble of stars that is in trapped orbits. I found that this fraction decreases linearly with increasing radial velocity dispersion and conclude that radial migration may play a role in the evolution of disk galaxies, but it is insignificant to the evolution of high velocity dispersion populations.

  2. Inducer Hydrodynamic Forces in a Cavitating Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and demonstrated a measurement device for sensing and resolving the hydrodynamic loads on fluid machinery. The device - a derivative of the six-component wind tunnel balance - senses the forces and moments on the rotating device through a weakened shaft section instrumented with a series of strain gauges. This rotating balance was designed to directly measure the steady and unsteady hydrodynamic loads on an inducer, thereby defining the amplitude and frequency content associated with operating in various cavitation modes. The rotating balance was calibrated statically using a dead-weight load system in order to generate the 6 x 12 calibration matrix later used to convert measured voltages to engineering units. Structural modeling suggested that the rotating assembly first bending mode would be significantly reduced with the balance s inclusion. This reduction in structural stiffness was later confirmed experimentally with a hammer-impact test. This effect, coupled with the relatively large damping associated with the rotating balance waterproofing material, limited the device s bandwidth to approximately 50 Hertz Other pre-test validations included sensing the test article rotating assembly built-in imbalance for two configurations and directly measuring the assembly mass and buoyancy while submerged under water. Both tests matched predictions and confirmed the device s sensitivity while stationary and rotating. The rotating balance was then demonstrated in a water test of a full-scale Space Shuttle Main Engine high-pressure liquid oxygen pump inducer. Experimental data was collected a scaled operating conditions at three flow coefficients across a range of cavitation numbers for the single inducer geometry and radial clearance. Two distinct cavitation modes were observed symmetric tip vortex cavitation and alternate-blade cavitation. Although previous experimental tests on the same inducer demonstrated two additional

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of HD 41004A/B (Zucker+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, S.; Mazeh, T.; Santos, N. C.; Udry, S.; Mayor, M.

    2003-04-01

    The table presents 103 measurements of the radial velocities of HD 41004A and HD 41004B. The spectra used for the derivation were observed with CORALIE and the velocities were derived using Multi-Order TODCOR. The precision of the primary velocity is about 0.010km/s and the precision of the secondary is about 0.56km/s. (1 data file).

  4. One-year results of cemented bipolar radial head prostheses for comminuted radial head fractures

    PubMed Central

    Laun, Reinhold; Wild, Michael; Hakimi, Mohssen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Comminuted radial head fractures (Mason type III) continue to pose a challenge to orthopedic surgeons. When internal fixation is not possible, radial head arthroplasty has been advocated as the treatment of choice. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate clinical and radiological short-term results of patients with Mason type III radial head fractures treated with a cemented bipolar radial prosthesis. Methods: Twelve patients received cemented bipolar radial head hemiarthroplasty for comminuted radial head fractures. In all patients a CT scan was obtained prior to surgical treatment to assess all associated injuries. Postoperatively an early motion protocol was applied. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically at an average of 12.7 months. Results: According to the Mayo Modified Wrist Score, the Mayo Elbow Performance Score, the functional rating index of Broberg and Morrey, and the DASH Score good to excellent results were obtained. Grip strength and range of motion were almost at the level of the unaffected contralateral side. Patient satisfaction was high, no instability or signs of loosening of the implant, and only mild signs of osteoarthritis were seen. Conclusion: Overall good to excellent short-term results for primary arthroplasty for comminuted radial head fractures were observed. These encouraging results warrant the conduction of further studies with long-term follow-up and more cases to see if these short-term results can be maintained over time. PMID:26734534

  5. Determining Enzyme Activity by Radial Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Bill D.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses advantages of radial diffusion assay in determining presence of enzyme and/or rough approximation of amount of enzyme activities. Procedures are included for the preparation of starch-agar plates, and the application and determination of enzyme. Techniques using plant materials (homogenates, tissues, ungerminated embryos, and seedlings)…

  6. MMICs with Radial Probe Transitions to Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Pukala, David; Soria, Mary; Fung, King Man; Gaier, Todd; Radisic, Vesna; Lai, Richard

    2009-01-01

    A document presents an update on the innovation reported in Integrated Radial Probe Transition From MMIC to Waveguide (NPO-43957), NASA Tech Briefs Vol. 31, No. 5 (May 2007), page 38. To recapitulate: To enable operation or testing of a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC), it is necessary to mount the MMIC in a waveguide package that typically has cross-sectional waveguide dimensions of the order of a few hundred microns. A radial probe transition between an MMIC operating at 340 GHz and a waveguide had been designed (but not yet built and tested) to be fabricated as part of a monolithic unit that would include the MMIC. The radial probe could readily be integrated with an MMIC amplifier because the design provided for fabrication of the transition on a substrate of the same material (InP) and thickness (50 m) typical of substrates of MMICs that can operate above 300 GHz. As illustrated in the updated document by drawings, photographs, and plots of test data, the concept has now been realized by designing, fabricating, and testing several MMIC/radial- probe integrated-circuit chips and designing and fabricating a waveguide package to contain each chip.

  7. Extended foil capacitor with radially spoked electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Foster, James C.

    1990-01-01

    An extended foil capacitor has a conductive disk electrically connected in oncrushing contact to the extended foil. A conductive paste is placed through spaces between radial spokes on the disk to electrically and mechanically connect the extended foil to the disk.

  8. NASA contributions to radial turbine aerodynamic analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief description of the radial turbine and its analysis needs is followed by discussions of five analytical areas; design geometry and performance, off design performance, blade row flow, scroll flow, and duct flow. The functions of the programs, areas of applicability, and limitations and uncertainties are emphasized. Both past contributions and current activities are discussed.

  9. Radial velocities of Planetary Nebulae revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Roberto; Ayala, Sandra A.; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Contreras, María E.; Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Guillén, Pedro F.; Olguín, Lorenzo; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo; Sabin, Laurence; Zavala, Saúl A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new determination of radial velocities of a sample of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (PNe) using a systematic method and the same instrumental setting: the long-slit high-dispersion Manchester Echelle Spectrograph (MES) on the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro Mártir Observatory (OAN-SPM; Mexico). This project was inspired by the work of Schneider et al. (1983, A&AS, 52, 399), which has been an important reference during the last decades. Radial velocities of gaseous nebulae can be obtained using the central wavelength of a Gaussian fit, even when there is an expansion velocity, as expected in PNe, but with not enough resolution to see a spectral line splitting. We have used the software SHAPE, a morpho-kinematic modeling and reconstruction tool for astrophysical objects (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to prove that non-uniform density or brightness, on an expanding shell, can lead to mistaken conclusions about the radial velocity. To determine radial velocities, we only use the spectral data in which a spectral line-splitting is seen, avoiding thus the problem of the possible biased one-Gaussian fit. Cases when this method is not recommended are discussed.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  10. Optical force exerted on a Rayleigh particle by a vector arbitrary-order Bessel beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruiping; Li, Renxian

    2016-07-01

    An analytical description of optical force on a Rayleigh particle by a vector Bessel beam is investigated. Linearly, radially, azimuthally, and circularly polarized Bessel beams are considered. The radial, azimuthal, and axial forces by a vector Bessel beam are numerically simulated. The effect of polarization, order of beams, and half-cone angle to the optical force are mainly discussed. For Bessel beams of larger half-cone angle, the non-paraxiality of beams plays an important role in optical forces. Numerical calculations show that optical forces, especially azimuthal forces, are very sensitive to the polarization of beams.

  11. Intrinsic radial sensitivity of nucleon inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J. J.

    1988-02-01

    A linear expansion analysis of the folding model transition amplitude is used to study the intrinsic sensitivity of the inelastic scattering of intermediate energy nucleons to the radial form of the neutron transition density, given known proton transition densities from electron scattering. Realistic density-dependent effective interactions are used to construct pseudodata. These pseudodata are then reanalyzed and the error matrix is used to calculate an error band for the radial transition density. This approach reveals the sensitivity of the extracted transition density to absorption, medium modifications of the interaction, and the extent and quality of the data in a manner that is largely free of the residual inaccuracies in reaction theory that complicate the analysis of real data. We find that the intrinsic radial sensitivity of nucleon inelastic scattering is best for projectile energies between 200 and 500 MeV, but is adequate to resolve the radial dependence of neutron transition densities even in the interior of heavy nuclei throughout the energy regime 100-800 MeV. We have also compared our method with scale-factor analyses which assume proportionality between neutron and proton densities. For states whose transition densities are similar in the surface, we find scaling to be accurate at the 20% level. However, for light nuclei substantial deviations beyond the first peak of the differential cross section reveal sensitivity to shape differences. This sensitivity is reduced for heavy nuclei. The model dependence of radial densities is also studied. A high-q constraint is used to analyze the contribution of incompleteness error to the deduced error bands and to reduce the model dependence.

  12. Optical Bernoulli forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movassagh, Ramis; Johnson, Steven G.

    2013-08-01

    By Bernoulli's law, an increase in the relative speed of a fluid around a body is accompanied by a decrease in the pressure. Therefore, a rotating body in a fluid stream experiences a force perpendicular to the motion of the fluid because of the unequal relative speed of the fluid across its surface. It is well known that light has a constant speed irrespective of the relative motion. Does a rotating body immersed in a stream of photons experience a Bernoulli-like force? We show that, indeed, a rotating dielectric cylinder experiences such a lateral force from an electromagnetic wave. In fact, the sign of the lateral force is the same as that of the fluid-mechanical analog as long as the electric susceptibility is positive (ɛ>ɛ0), but for negative-susceptibility materials (e.g., metals) we show that the lateral force is in the opposite direction. Because these results are derived from a classical electromagnetic scattering problem, Mie-resonance enhancements that occur in other scattering phenomena also enhance the lateral force.

  13. Finger interaction during maximal radial and ulnar deviation efforts: experimental data and linear neural network modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pataky, Todd C.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize finger interactions during radial/ulnar deviation, including interactions with flexion movements. Subjects performed single-finger and multi-finger maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and maximal forces and various indices of interaction among the fingers were quantified. MVCs in radial/ulnar deviation were 50–80% as strong as in flexion. Along with the ‘master’ fingers (i.e., those explicitly instructed to produce force), substantial force production was also observed in ‘slave’ fingers (i.e., those not explicitly instructed to produce force), a phenomenon termed: force ‘enslaving’. In addition, a drop in MVC during multi-finger tasks as compared to single finger tasks (force ‘deficit’) was also observed. A previously unreported phenomenon that we term: ‘preferred direction enslaving’ was also apparent; both master and slave fingers produced force in the instructed direction with a non-zero perpendicular component. Due to the architectural separation of the involved muscles, preferred direction enslaving provides strong evidence that enslaving results from neural rather than biomechanical factors. A final new phenomenon: ‘negative deficit’, or force ‘facilitation’ was observed in 46.4% of the trials in 21 out of 23 subjects during multi-finger lateral efforts and was further demonstrative of extensive interconnection among neurons serving hand muscles. The data were modeled with high accuracy (~4% mean square error) using a linear neural network with motor ‘commands’ as inputs and finger forces as outputs. The proposed network, equivalent to linear regression, can be used to determine the extent to which finger forces are influenced by peripheral constraints during functional prehensile activities. PMID:17334750

  14. Interaction forces between red cells agglutinated by antibody. II. Measurement of hydrodynamic force of breakup.

    PubMed Central

    Tha, S P; Shuster, J; Goldsmith, H L

    1986-01-01

    The expressions derived in the previous paper for the respective normal, F3, and shear forces, Fshear, acting along and perpendicular to the axis of a doublet of rigid spheres, were used to determine the hydrodynamic forces required to separate two red cell spheres of antigenic type B crosslinked by the corresponding antibody. Cells were sphered and swollen in isotonic buffered glycerol containing 8 X 10(-5) M sodium dodecyl sulfate, fixed in 0.085% glutaraldehyde, and suspended in aqueous glycerol (viscosity: 15-34 mPa s), containing 0.15 M NaCl and anti-B antibody from human hyperimmune antiserum at concentrations from 0.73 to 3.56 vol%. After incubating and mixing for 12 h, doublets were observed through a microscope flowing in a 178-micron tube by gravity feed between two reservoirs. Using a traveling microtube apparatus, the doublets were tracked in a constantly accelerating flow and the translational and rotational motions were recorded on videotape until breakup occurred. From a frame by frame replay of the tape, the radial position, velocity and orientation of the doublet were obtained and the normal and shear forces of separation at breakup computed. Both forces increased significantly with increasing antiserum concentration, the mean values of F3 increasing from 0.060 to 0.197 nN, and Fshear from 0.023 to 0.072 nN. There was no significant effect of glycerol viscosity on the forces of separation. It was not possible to determine whether the shear or normal force was responsible for doublet separation. Measurements of the mean dimensionless period of rotation, TG, of doublets in suspensions containing 0.73 and 2.40% antiserum undergoing steady flow were also made to test whether the spheres were rigidly linked or capable of some independent rotation. A fairly narrow distribution in TG about the value 15.64, predicted for rigidly-linked doublets, was obtained at both antiserum concentrations. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:3801572

  15. Improving the trapping capability using radially polarized narrow-width annular beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hua-Feng; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Qu, Jun; Huang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    A novel optical-trap method for improving the trapping capability using a radially polarized narrow-width annular beam (NWAB) has been proposed. In this paper, we theoretically study the tight focusing properties of a radially polarized NWAB, formed by subtly blocking the central portion of a radially polarized Bessel-Gaussian beam (the original doughnut beam), through a high-numerical aperture objective. It is shown that a sub-wavelength focal spot (?) with a quite long depth of focus (about ?) can be formed in the vicinity of the focus. Furthermore, the optical trapping forces acting on a metallic Rayleigh particle are calculated for the case where a radially polarized annular beam is applied. Numerical results show that the radially polarized NWAB can largely enhance the transverse trap stiffness and broaden the longitudinal trap range compared with the usage of the original doughnut beam. The influence of the annular factor δ on the focusing properties and the trap stiffness is investigated in detail.

  16. Effects of basilar membrane arch and radial tension on the travelling wave in gerbil cochlea.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wei Xuan; Yoon, Yong-Jin

    2015-09-01

    The basilar membrane velocity of gerbil cochlea showed discrepancy between theoretical model and experimental measurements. We hypothesize that the reasons of such discrepancies are due to the arch towards the scala tympani and radial tension present in the basilar membrane of the gerbil cochlea. The arch changes the bending stiffness in the basilar membrane, reduces the effective fluid force on the membrane and increases the basilar membrane's inertia. The existence of the radial tension also dampens the acoustic travelling wave. In this paper, the wave number functions along the gerbil basilar membrane are calculated from experimentally measured physical parameters with the theoretical model as well as extracted from experimentally measured basilar membrane velocity with the wave number inversion formula. The two wave number functions are compared and the effects of the tension and membrane arch on the wave number are studied based on various parameters of the model. We found that the bending stiffness across the gerbil basilar membrane varies (1-2 orders along the cochlea in the section 2.2 mm-3 mm from base) more than the calculated value in the flat basilar membrane model and the radial tension increases the damping of the travelling wave in gerbil cochlea significantly (5 times more than that without radial tension). These effects of arch and radial tension in the basilar membrane elucidate the discrepancy between previous theoretical model and experimental measurements in gerbil cochlea. PMID:26070425

  17. All-fiber Raman oscillator for the generation of radially and azimuthally polarized beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jocher, Christoph; Jauregui, Cesar; Becker, Martin; Rothhardt, Manfred; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a Raman fiber oscillator for the generation of radially and azimuthally polarized beams. The Raman fiber oscillator comprises a high NA fiber and two Fiber-Bragg Gratings (FBGs). Due to the high NA of the fiber, radially and azimuthally polarized modes are guided with their own effective refractive indexes, i.e. they are not degenerated. Therefore, the FBGs reflect these modes at different wavelengths. The mode that oscillates in the resonator can be selected by controlling the coupling lens and the polarization of the pump beam. Unfortunately, at the output of the fiber oscillator the output beams exhibit a non-circularly symmetric intensity profile as a result of a slightly elliptical fiber core. Consequently, the impact of elliptical cores on the polarization degeneracy has been analyzed in detail. In order to compensate for the elliptical core we applied a transverse force on the last few cm of the fiber. With this force the waveguide characteristic of the fiber is changed in such a way that a radially or azimuthally polarized doughnutshaped beam profile is observed. Thereby an output power of 480mW (400mW) was reached for the azimuthal (radial) polarization. The presented concept is wavelength agile and suitable for all-fiber microscopic setups, especially for STED-microscopy.

  18. Rotating stall control in a high-speed stage with inlet distortion. Part 1: Radial distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Spakovszky, Z.S.; Weigl, H.J.; Paduano, J.D.; Schalkwyk, C.M. van; Suder, K.L.; Bright, M.M.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the first attempt to stabilize rotating stall in a single-stage transonic axial flow compressor with inlet distortion using active feedback control. The experiments were conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center on a single-stage transonic core compressor inlet stage. An annular array of 12 jet-injectors located upstream of the rotor tip was used for forced response testing and to extend the compressor stable operating range. Results for radial distortion are reported in this paper. First, the effects of radial distortion on the compressor performance and the dynamic behavior were investigated. Control laws were designed using empirical transfer function estimates determined from forced response results. The transfer function indicated that the compressor dynamics are decoupled with radial inlet distortion, as they are for the case of undistorted inlet flow. Single-input-single-output (SISO) control strategies were therefore used for the radial distortion controller designs. Steady axisymmetric injection of 4 percent of the compressor mass flow resulted in a reduction in stalling mass flow of 9.7 percent relative to the case with inlet distortion and no injection. Use of a robust H{sub {infinity}} controller with unsteady nonaxisymmetric injection achieved a further reduction in stalling mass flow of 7.5 percent, resulting in a total reduction of 17.2 percent.

  19. Geodesic acoustic modes in tokamak plasmas with a radial equilibrium electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Deng

    2015-09-15

    The dispersion relation of geodesic acoustic modes in the tokamak plasma with an equilibrium radial electric field is derived and analyzed. Multiple branches of eigenmodes have been found, similar to the result given by the fluid model with a poloidal mass flow. Frequencies and damping rates of both the geodesic acoustic mode and the sound wave increase with respect to the strength of radial electric field, while the frequency and the damping rate of the lower frequency branch slightly decrease. Possible connection to the experimental observation is discussed.

  20. The radial distributions of galactic molecular clouds and their physical parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, D.-L.; Lou, G.-F.

    In this paper, the data of 391 J = 1-0 spectra of 13CO surveys, which were made with the NRAO 11-m telescope and along the galactic plane from l = 20.50° to 40.00° with 3arcmin spacings, and 665 molecular clouds synthesized by the above-mentioned data are used to derive the galactic radial distributions of several physical parameters of molecular clouds. Comparative analyses are made between the galactic radial distributions of physical parameters of molecular clouds and the molecular counterparts of 21 cm H I spiral arms identified by Cohen et al. (1980) in their CO surveys.

  1. Vacuum force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yongquan

    2015-03-01

    To study on vacuum force, we must clear what is vacuum, vacuum is a space do not have any air and also ray. There is not exist an absolute the vacuum of space. The vacuum of space is relative, so that the vacuum force is relative. There is a certain that vacuum vacuum space exists. In fact, the vacuum space is relative, if the two spaces compared to the existence of relative vacuum, there must exist a vacuum force, and the direction of the vacuum force point to the vacuum region. Any object rotates and radiates. Rotate bend radiate- centripetal, gravity produced, relative gravity; non gravity is the vacuum force. Gravity is centripetal, is a trend that the objects who attracted wants to Centripetal, or have been do Centripetal movement. Any object moves, so gravity makes the object curve movement, that is to say, the radiation range curve movement must be in the gravitational objects, gravity must be existed in non vacuum region, and make the object who is in the region of do curve movement (for example: The earth moves around the sun), or final attracted in the form gravitational objects, and keep relatively static with attract object. (for example: objects on the earth moves but can't reach the first cosmic speed).

  2. REEXAMINATION OF THE RADIAL ABUNDANCE GRADIENT BREAK IN NGC 3359

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Bresolin, F.

    2011-06-15

    In this contribution, we reexamine the radial oxygen abundance gradient in the strongly barred spiral galaxy NGC 3359, for which, using an imaging spectrophotometric technique, Martin and Roy detected a break near the effective radius of the galaxy. We have new emission line flux measurements of H II regions in NGC 3359 from spectra obtained with the Subaru telescope to further investigate this claim. We find that there are small systematic variations in the line ratios determined from narrowband imaging as compared to our spectroscopic measurements. We derive and apply a correction to the line ratios found by Martin and Roy and statistically examine the validity of the gradient break proposed for NGC 3359 using recently developed metallicity diagnostics. We find that, with a high degree of confidence, a model with a break fits the data significantly better than one without it. This suggests that the presence of a strong bar in spiral galaxies can generate measurable changes in the radial distribution of metals.

  3. Strategic forces briefing

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.; Chrzanowski, P.; May, M.; Nordyke, M.

    1989-04-06

    The Strategic Forces Briefing'' is our attempt, accomplished over the past several months, to outline and highlight the more significant strategic force issues that must be addressed in the near future. Some issues are recurrent: the need for an effective modernized Triad and a constant concern for force survivability. Some issues derive from arms control: the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (SALT) are sufficiently advanced to set broad numerical limits on forces, but not so constraining as to preclude choices among weapon systems and deployment modes. Finally, a new administration faced with serious budgetary problems must strive for the most effective strategic forces limited dollars can buy and support. A review of strategic forces logically begins with consideration of the missions the forces are charged with. We begin the briefing with a short review of targeting policy and implementation within the constraints of available unclassified information. We then review each element of the Triad with sections on SLBMs, ICBMs, and Air-Breathing (bomber and cruise missile) systems. A short section at the end deals with the potential impact of strategic defense on offensive force planning. We consider ABM, ASAT, and air defense; but we do not attempt to address the technical issues of strategic defense per se. The final section gives a brief overview of the tritium supply problem. We conclude with a summary of recommendations that emerge from our review. The results of calculation on the effectiveness of various weapon systems as a function of cost that are presented in the briefing are by Paul Chrzanowski.

  4. Low profile radial nerve palsy orthosis with radial and ulnar deviation.

    PubMed

    Peck, Jean; Ollason, Jennie

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who sustain damage to the radial nerve experience a significant loss in functional use of the hand. Traditional orthoses have been effective in providing assistance with wrist stabilization and finger/thumb MP extension. These authors adapted a low profile orthosis to provide the necessary support while allowing radial and ulnar deviation of the wrist, thus increasing functional use of the hand.--Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:26190027

  5. Entropy generation of radial rotation convective channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alić, Fikret

    2012-03-01

    The exchange of heat between two fluids is established by radial rotating pipe or a channel. The hotter fluid flows through the pipe, while the cold fluid is ambient air. Total length of pipe is made up of multiple sections of different shape and position in relation to the common axis of rotation. In such heat exchanger the hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of the hotter and colder fluid occur. Therefore, the total entropy generated within the radial rotating pipe consists of the total entropy of hotter and colder fluid, taking into account all the hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of both fluids. Finding a mathematical model of the total generated entropy is based on coupled mathematical expressions that combine hydraulic and thermal effects of both fluids with the complex geometry of the radial rotating pipe. Mathematical model follows the each section of the pipe and establishes the function between the sections, so the total generated entropy is different from section to section of the pipe. In one section of the pipe thermal irreversibility may dominate over the hydraulic irreversibility, while in another section of the pipe the situation may be reverse. In this paper, continuous analytic functions that connect sections of pipe in geometric meaning are associated with functions that describe the thermo-hydraulic effects of hotter and colder fluid. In this way, the total generated entropy of the radial rotating pipe is a continuous analytic function of any complex geometry of the rotating pipe. The above method of establishing a relationship between the continuous function of entropy with the complex geometry of the rotating pipe enables indirect monitoring of unnecessary hydraulic and thermal losses of both fluids. Therefore, continuous analytic functions of generated entropy enable analysis of hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of individual sections of pipe, as well as the possibility of improving the thermal-hydraulic performance of the rotating

  6. New Measurements of Radial Mode Eigenfrequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laske, G.; Masters, G.; Dziewonski, A. M.

    2001-12-01

    Radial mode eigenfrequencies are commonly thought to be measured with great ease and precision. The reason for this is that these modes have no geographic pattern so one should be able to measure frequencies from a spectrum observed at any station in the world. Yet, radial modes often seem inconsistent with spherical Earth models that fit all other mode frequencies. It turns out that radial modes are sometimes strongly coupled. The strongest coupling is predicted to be with l=2 modes which is caused by the Earth's hydrostatic ellipticity and aspherical structure of harmonic degree 2. In such cases, mode-coupling due to ellipticity alone can cause a frequency shift for the radial modes by more than 4 microHz. Given that mode frequencies can be measured to within 0.1 microHz, this shift is significant, and some singlets of l=2 modes have indeed been misidentified as the radial mode in the past. Including the spectra of the June 23, 2001 Southern Peru Earthquake we have re-analyzed radial mode eigenfrequencies and present a mode dataset that is internally more consistent than previous ones. We construct spherical Earth models that are consistent with our new data, the Earth's mass and moment of inertia and the current best estimates of ``Reference Normal Mode Data'' (available on the Reference Earth Model web site: //mahi.ucsd.edu/Gabi/rem.html). We seek the smallest perturbation to PREM but update the Q-structure as well as the depths of the upper mantle discontinuities (418~km and 660~km as first order discontinuities; 520~km as change in gradient). The best fitting 1D model is transversely isotropic but we also show isotropic models that fit the data to within their errors. We show that the 220~km discontinuity is not required in the isotropic model but that there exists a trade-off between high shear-velocities in the lid and a low-density zone beneath it. We also investigate ways of truncating transverse isotropy without the 220.

  7. Universal Response of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes to Radial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, A. P. M.; Chacham, H.; Neves, B. R. A.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical response of single-wall carbon nanotubes to radial compression is investigated via atomic force microscopy (AFM). We find that the force F applied by an AFM tip (with radius R) onto a nanotube (with diameter d), rescaled through the quantity Fd3/2(2R)-1/2, falls into a universal curve as a function of the compressive strain. Such universality is reproduced analytically in a model where the graphene bending modulus is the only fitting parameter. The application of this model to the radial Young’s modulus Er leads to a further universal-type behavior which explains the large variations of nanotube Er reported in the literature.

  8. Radial tunnel syndrome. A retrospective review of 30 decompressions of the radial nerve.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, T; Mobbs, P; Fortems, Y; Stanley, J K

    1995-08-01

    Radial tunnel syndrome results from compression of the radial nerve by the free edge of the supinator muscle or closely related structures in the vicinity of the elbow joint. Despite numerous reports on the surgical management of this disorder, it remains largely unrecognized and often neglected. The symptoms of radial tunnel syndrome can resemble those of tennis elbow, chronic wrist pain or tenosynovitis. Reliable objective criteria are not available to differentiate between these pathologies. These difficulties are discussed in relation to 29 patients who underwent 30 primary explorations and proximal decompressions of the radial nerve. Excellent or good results were obtained in 70%, fair results in 13% and poor results in 17% of patients. The results can be satisfactory despite the prolonged duration of symptoms. We believe that a diagnosis of radial tunnel syndrome should always be born in mind when dealing with patients with forearm and wrist pain that has not responded to more conventional treatment. Patients with occupations requiring repetitive manual tasks seem to be particularly at risk of developing radial tunnel syndrome and it is also interesting to note that 66% of patients with on-going medico-legal claims had successful outcomes following surgery. PMID:7594982

  9. Forces in nonlinear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2002-02-01

    I investigate the properties of forces on bodies in theories governed by the generalized Poisson equation μ(|ϕ| /a0)ϕ] ∝ Gρ, for the potential ϕ produced by a distribution of sources ρ. This equation describes, inter alia, media with a response coefficient, μ, that depends on the field strength, such as in nonlinear, dielectric or diamagnetic, media; nonlinear transport problems with field-strength-dependent conductivity or diffusion coefficient; nonlinear electrostatics, as in the Born-Infeld theory; certain stationary potential flows in compressible fluids, in which case the forces act on sources or obstacles in the flow. The expressions for the force on a point charge are derived exactly for the limits of very low and very high charge. The force on an arbitrary body in an external field of asymptotically constant gradient, -g0, is shown to be F = Qg0, where Q is the total effective charge of the body. The corollary Q = 0 → F = 0 is a generalization of d'Alembert's paradox. I show that for G > 0 (as in Newtonian gravity) two point charges of the same (opposite) sign still attract (repel). The opposite is true for G < 0. I discuss its generalization to extended bodies and derive virial relations.

  10. Rotor whirl forces induced by the tip clearance effect in axial flow compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrich, F. )

    1993-10-01

    It is now widely recognized that destabilizing forces, tending to generate forward rotor whirl, are generated in axial flow turbines as a result of the nonuniform torque induced by the nonuniform tip-clearance in a deflected rotor--the so called Thomas/Alford force. It is also recognized that there will be a similar effect in axial flow compressors, but qualitative considerations cannot definitively establish the magnitude or even the direction of the induced whirling forces--that is, if they will tend to forward or backward whirl. Applying a parallel compressor model to simulate the operation of a compressor rotor deflected radially in its clearance, it is possible to derive a quantitative estimate of the proportionality factor [beta] which relates the Thomas/Alford force in axial flow compressors (i.e., the tangential force generated by a radial deflection of the rotor) to the torque level in the compressor. The analysis makes use of experimental data from the GE Aircraft Engines Low Speed Research Compressor facility comparing the performance of three different axial flow compressors, each with four stages (typical of a mid-block of an aircraft gas turbine compressor) at two different clearances. It is found that the value of [beta] is in the range of +0.27 to [minus]0.71 in the vicinity of the stages' nominal operating line and +0.08 to [minus]1.25 in the vicinity of the stages' operation at peak efficiency. The value of [beta] reaches a level of between [minus]1.16 and [minus]3.36 as the compressor is operated near its stalled condition.

  11. Radial oscillations of a radiation-supported levitating shell in Eddington luminosity neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarca, David; Kluźniak, Włodek

    2016-09-01

    In general relativity, it has been shown that radiation-supported atmospheres exist well outside the surface of a radiating spherical body close to a radius where the gravitational and radiative forces balance each other. We calculate the frequency of oscillation of the incompressible radial mode of such a thin atmospheric shell and show that in the optically thin case, this particular mode is overdamped by radiation drag.

  12. Existence of infinitely many periodic solutions for the radially symmetric wave equation with resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianyi; Zhang, Zhitao

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we consider the periodic-Dirichlet problem for a forced nonlinear wave equation with resonance utt - Δu = μu + a (t , x)| u | p - 1 u in a n-dimensional ball. Under some suitable assumptions on μ, p and a (t , x), we prove the existence of infinitely many radially symmetric time-periodic solutions for the problem by variational methods.

  13. Determination of the elastic modulus of native collagen fibrils via radial indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, August J.; Matthews, William G.; Koob, Thomas J.

    2006-10-01

    The authors studied the elastic response of single, native collagen fibrils extracted from tissues of the inner dermis of the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa, via local nanoscale indentation with an atomic force microscope (AFM). AFM imaging of fibrils under ambient conditions are presented, demonstrating a peak-to-peak periodicity, the d band, of dehydrated, unfixed fibrils to be ˜64.5nm. Radial indentation experiments were performed, and the measured value for the reduced modulus is 1-2GPa.

  14. Influence of radial electric field on Alfven-type instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.; Tang, W.M.

    1994-03-01

    The influence of the large scale radial electric field, E{sub r}{sup (0)} on the frequency of shear-Alfven-type instability is analyzed. A frozen-in-flux constraint and the moderate-{beta} ion gyrokinetic equation are used in the derivation. The analysis indicates that the frequency predicted by a theory with E{sub r}{sup (0)} effect should be Doppler-shifted by k {center_dot} V{sub E} for comparison to the experimentally observed frequency. A specific example of the practical relevance of the result is given regarding possible identification of the edge-localized-mode-associated magnetic activity recently observed in PBX-M tokamak experiment.

  15. Orbit averaged radial buildup code for tandem mirror geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.; Futch, A.H.

    1981-01-22

    The radial Fokker-Planck (RFP) model of A. Futch was modified to treat plasma buildup in the tandem mirror plug and center cell with a self-consistent model (TOARBUC). Two major changes have been made to the original version of this code. First, the center cell is treated as having separate electron and ion confining potentials with the ion potential having the opposite sign of that in a conventional mirror. Second, a two-electron-temperature treatment derived by R. Cohen was included in the present model to allow the plug and center cell to have different T/sub e/'s as observed in the experiment. The following sections explain these changes in greater detail.

  16. Static Isotropic Space-Times with Radially Imperfect Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopka, Tomasz

    When one is solving the equations of general relativity in a symmetric sector, it is natural to consider the same symmetry for the geometry and stress-energy. This implies that for static and isotropic space-times, the most general natural stress-energy tensor is a sum of a perfect fluid and a radially imperfect fluid component. In the special situations where the perfect fluid component vanishes or is a space-time constant, the solutions to Einstein's equations can be thought of as modified Schwarzschild and Schwarzschild-de Sitter spaces. Exact solutions of this type are derived and it is shown that whereas deviations from the unmodified solutions can be made small, among the manifestations of the imperfect fluid component is a shift in angular momentum scaling for orbiting test bodies at large radius. Based on this effect, the question of whether the imperfect fluid component can feasibly describe dark matter phenomenology is addressed.

  17. Simple proposal for radial 3D needlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durastanti, C.; Fantaye, Y.; Hansen, F.; Marinucci, D.; Pesenson, I. Z.

    2014-11-01

    We present here a simple construction of a wavelet system for the three-dimensional ball, which we label radial 3D needlets. The construction envisages a data collection environment in which an observer located at the center of the ball is surrounded by concentric spheres with the same pixelization at different radial distances, for any given resolution. The system is then obtained by weighting the projector operator built on the corresponding set of eigenfunctions and performing a discretization step which turns out to be computationally very convenient. The resulting wavelets can be shown to have very good localization properties in the real and harmonic domain; their implementation is computationally very convenient, and they allow for exact reconstruction as they form a tight frame system. Our theoretical results are supported by an extensive numerical analysis.

  18. Radial spline assembly for antifriction bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jerry H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An outer race carrier is constructed for receiving an outer race of an antifriction bearing assembly. The carrier in turn is slidably fitted in an opening of a support wall to accommodate slight axial movements of a shaft. A plurality of longitudinal splines on the carrier are disposed to be fitted into matching slots in the opening. A deadband gap is provided between sides of the splines and slots, with a radial gap at ends of the splines and slots and a gap between the splines and slots sized larger than the deadband gap. With this construction, operational distortions (slope) of the support wall are accommodated by the larger radial gaps while the deadband gaps maintain a relatively high springrate of the housing. Additionally, side loads applied to the shaft are distributed between sides of the splines and slots, distributing such loads over a larger surface area than a race carrier of the prior art.

  19. Coronary Embolism After Iatrogenic Radial Endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Rozado, Jose; Pascual, Isaac; Avanzas, Pablo; Moris, Cesar

    2016-06-01

    A 55-year-old man with double-vessel coronary artery disease was revascularized by percutaneous coronary intervention three years ago. Elective coronary angiography was indicated for angina with positive stress test. During the procedure, severe radial spasm occurred; after the first injection, we detected loss in pressure trace in the diagnostic catheter and acute distal circumflex occlusion. Suspecting catheter thrombosis with coronary embolization, the entire system was exchanged and inspected; inside, we discovered a 2 x 50 mm white biological cylinder. Histological study of this material was compatible with endarterectomy. We present a rare complication of severe radial artery spasm and endarterectomy, with occlusion of the diagnostic catheter and coronary embolization. PMID:27236012

  20. TMT and Exoplanet Radial Velocity Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Angelle; Crossfield, Ian

    2014-07-01

    With echelle spectrometers on the verge of crossing over the 0.1 m/s radial velocity (RV) measurement precision threshold needed to detect habitable Earth mass planets around Sun-like stars, conducing such surveys on state-of-the-art telescopes is an imperative. RV exoplanets surveys conducted with the optical and infrared echelle spectrometers being built for the TMT have the potential to complete a census of the population of Earth-mass planets in our local stellar neighborhood. The detection of such systems will provide a valuable stellar sample for follow-up exoplanet studies which would characterize the atmospheres of these or additional planets found in these nearby solar systems. Here, we will further discuss the impact of the TMT on radial velocity exoplanet surveys.

  1. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Furlan, Elise; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Bottom, Michael; Tanner, Angelle; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; White, Russel; Davison, Cassy; Mills, Sean; Beichman, Chas; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David; Wallace, Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; Vasisht, Gautam; Prato, Lisa; Kane, Stephen; Crawford, Sam; Crawford, Tim; Sung, Keeyoon; Drouin, Brian; Lin, Sean; Leifer, Stephanie; Catanzarite, Joe; Henry, Todd; von Braun, Kaspar; Walp, Bernie; Geneser, Claire; Ogden, Nick; Stufflebeam, Andrew; Pohl, Garrett; Regan, Joe

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of two 2.3 μm near-infrared (NIR) radial velocity (RV) surveys to detect exoplanets around 36 nearby and young M dwarfs. We use the CSHELL spectrograph (R ~ 46,000) at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF), combined with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration. We have developed a sophisticated RV forward modeling code that accounts for fringing and other instrumental artifacts present in the spectra. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm, we are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~20-30 m s-1 on our survey targets.

  2. SpicyNodes Radial Map Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douma, M.; Ligierko, G.; Angelov, I.

    2008-10-01

    The need for information has increased exponentially over the past decades. The current systems for constructing, exploring, classifying, organizing, and searching information face the growing challenge of enabling their users to operate efficiently and intuitively in knowledge-heavy environments. This paper presents SpicyNodes, an advanced user interface for difficult interaction contexts. It is based on an underlying structure known as a radial map, which allows users to manipulate and interact in a natural manner with entities called nodes. This technology overcomes certain limitations of existing solutions and solves the problem of browsing complex sets of linked information. SpicyNodes is also an organic system that projects users into a living space, stimulating exploratory behavior and fostering creative thought. Our interactive radial layout is used for educational purposes and has the potential for numerous other applications.

  3. Stellar Rotation and Precise Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, D. F.

    Two aspects will be considered. First, I will view the spectroscopic measurement of rotation rates as a differential precision radial velocity: how do we get rotation rates; what are the uncertainties stemming from differential rotation, time variable profiles caused by spots, uncertain limb darkening, and the presence of macroturbulence? What do we even mean by the rotation rate when there is differential rotation? Second, I will discuss the effects of rotation on specifying the precise position of spectral lines, i.e., the classical radial velocity of a star. I will present some thoughts on the effects of having our sharp markers of the Doppler effect degraded by rotation, the meaning of line position when the Doppler effects of rotation and convection interact, and the altered shapes of composite spectrum features with increased rotational smearing.

  4. Origins of hydrodynamic forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Brennen, Christopher E.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions that occur between a centrifugal pump impeller and volute are experimentally and theoretically investigated. The theoretical analysis considers the inability of the blades to perfectly guide the flow through the impeller, and also includes a quasi-one dimensional treatment of the flow in the volute. The disturbance at the impeller discharge and the resulting forces are determined by the theoretical model. The model is then extended to obtain the hydrodynamic force perturbations that are caused by the impeller whirling eccentrically in the volute. Under many operating conditions, these force perturbations were found to be destablizing. Comparisons are made between the theoretical model and the experimental measurements of pressure distributions and radial forces on the impeller. The theoretical model yields fairly accurate predictions of the radial forces caused by the flow through the impeller. However, it was found that the pressure acting on the front shroud of the impeller has a substantial effect on the destablizing hydrodynamic forces.

  5. Radially Localized Helicon Modes in Nonuniform Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Breizman, Boris N.; Arefiev, Alexey V.

    2000-04-24

    A radial density gradient in an axisymmetric cylindrical plasma column forms a potential well for nonaxisymmetric helicon modes (m{ne}0 ). This paper presents an analytic description of such modes in the limit of small longitudinal wave numbers. The corresponding mode equation indicates the possibility of efficient resonant absorption of rf power in helicon discharges at unusually low frequencies. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. Radial rib antenna surface deviation analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed which analyzes any radial rib antenna with ribs radiating from a central hub. The program has the capability for calculating the antenna surface contour (reversed pillowing effect), the optimum rib shape for minimizing the rms surface error, and the actual rms surface error. Rib deflection due to mesh tension and catenary cable tension can also be compensated for, and the pattern from which the mesh gores are cut can be determined.

  7. Vitesses radiales - catalogue WEB: Wilson Evans Batten.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duflot, M.; Figon, P.; Meyssonnier, N.

    Les auteurs ont réuni, en une seule version, les catalogues de vitesses radiales moyennes de Wilson (1963) et de Evans (1978), qui ont de nombreuses étoiles en commun. Les étoiles doubles spectroscopiques, dont l'orbite est déterminée (catalogue de Batten et al. 1989), ont également été associées à ce travail.

  8. Transport of radial heat flux and second sound in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guercan, Oe. D.; Berionni, V.; Hennequin, P.; Morel, P.; Vermare, L.; Diamond, P. H.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Kosuga, Y.

    2013-02-15

    Simple flux-gradient relations that involve time delay and radial coupling are discussed. Such a formulation leads to a rather simple description of avalanches and may explain breaking of gyroBohm transport scaling. The generalization of the flux-gradient relation (i.e., constitutive relation), which involve both time delay and spatial coupling, is derived from drift-kinetic equation, leading to kinetic definitions of constitutive elements such as the flux of radial heat flux. This allows numerical simulations to compute these cubic quantities directly. The formulation introduced here can be viewed as an extension of turbulence spreading to include the effect of spreading of cross-phase as well as turbulence intensity, combined in such a way to give the flux. The link between turbulence spreading and entropy production is highlighted. An extension of this formulation to general quasi-linear theory for the distribution function in the phase space of radial position and parallel velocity is also discussed.

  9. Radial guiding-center drifts and omnigenity in bumpy-torus confinement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazeltine, R. D.; Catto, P. J.

    1982-07-01

    Collisional transport of a high temperature plasma across the confining field of a bumpy torus magnetic confinement system which depends sensitively upon the functional form of the radial quiding center drift, and thus upon details of the confinement geometry is discussed. A general and relatively explicit formula for the radial drift is derived, using the large aspect-ratio results of a previous equilibrium study. Allowance is made for: (1) arbitrary toroidal variation of the confining field; (2) field distortion due to plasma currents; (3) noncircular deformation of the toroidal field coils. The analysis pertains only to the plasma core, and not to the high beta annuli (electron rings) which are usually present in experiments. The question of bumpy torus omnigenity whether any bumpy torus field configuration is consistent with a vanishing, or nearly vanishing, radial drift, is also investigated. It is found that omnigenity does not occur in the vicinity of the magnetic axis.

  10. RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF THE FREQUENCY BREAK BETWEEN FLUID AND KINETIC SCALES IN THE SOLAR WIND FLUCTUATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, R.; Trenchi, L.

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the radial dependence of the spectral break separating the inertial from the dissipation range in power density spectra of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations, between 0.42 and 5.3 AU, during radial alignments between MESSENGER and WIND for the inner heliosphere and between WIND and ULYSSES for the outer heliosphere. We found that the spectral break moves to higher and higher frequencies as the heliocentric distance decreases. The radial dependence of the corresponding wavenumber is of the kind κ {sub b} ∼ R {sup –1.08}, in good agreement with that of the wavenumber derived from the linear resonance condition for proton cyclotron damping. These results support conclusions from previous studies which suggest that a cyclotron-resonant dissipation mechanism must participate in the spectral cascade together with other possible kinetic noncyclotron-resonant mechanisms.

  11. Development of a Radial Deconsolidation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Helmreich, Grant W.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Hunn, John D.

    2015-12-01

    A series of experiments have been initiated to determine the retention or mobility of fission products* in AGR fuel compacts [Petti, et al. 2010]. This information is needed to refine fission product transport models. The AGR-3/4 irradiation test involved half-inch-long compacts that each contained twenty designed-to-fail (DTF) particles, with 20-μm thick carbon-coated kernels whose coatings were deliberately fabricated such that they would crack under irradiation, providing a known source of post-irradiation isotopes. The DTF particles in these compacts were axially distributed along the compact centerline so that the diffusion of fission products released from the DTF kernels would be radially symmetric [Hunn, et al. 2012; Hunn et al. 2011; Kercher, et al. 2011; Hunn, et al. 2007]. Compacts containing DTF particles were irradiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) [Collin, 2015]. Analysis of the diffusion of these various post-irradiation isotopes through the compact requires a method to radially deconsolidate the compacts so that nested-annular volumes may be analyzed for post-irradiation isotope inventory in the compact matrix, TRISO outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC), and DTF kernels. An effective radial deconsolidation method and apparatus appropriate to this application has been developed and parametrically characterized.

  12. Approximate theory for radial filtration/consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, F.M.; Kirby, J.M.; Nguyen, H.L.

    1996-10-01

    Approximate solutions are developed for filtration and subsequent consolidation of compactible cakes on a cylindrical filter element. Darcy`s flow equation is coupled with equations for equilibrium stress under the conditions of plane strain and axial symmetry for radial flow inwards. The solutions are based on power function forms involving the relationships of the solidosity {epsilon}{sub s} (volume fraction of solids) and the permeability K to the solids effective stress p{sub s}. The solutions allow determination of the various parameters in the power functions and the ratio k{sub 0} of the lateral to radial effective stress (earth stress ratio). Measurements were made of liquid and effective pressures, flow rates, and cake thickness versus time. Experimental data are presented for a series of tests in a radial filtration cell with a central filter element. Slurries prepared from two materials (Microwate, which is mainly SrSO{sub 4}, and kaolin) were used in the experiments. Transient deposition of filter cakes was followed by static (i.e., no flow) conditions in the cake. The no-flow condition was accomplished by introducing bentonite which produced a nearly impermeable layer with negligible flow. Measurement of the pressure at the cake surface and the transmitted pressure on the central element permitted calculation of k{sub 0}.

  13. Experimental investigation of the stability of a moving radial liquid sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramati, Manjula; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh

    2013-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to understand the stability of moving radial liquid sheets formed by the head-on impingement of two co-linear water jets using laser induced fluorescence technique (LIF). Acoustic sinusoidal fluctuations were introduced at the jet impingement point and we measured the displacement of the center line of the liquid sheet (sinuous mode) and the thickness variation (varicose mode) of the disturbed liquid sheet. Our experiments show that the sinuous disturbances grow as they are convected outward in the radial direction even in the smooth regime (We < 800). In the absence of the acoustic forcing, the measured thickness has the expected 1/r dependence. Interestingly, we were unable to detect any thickness variation about the pre-stimulus values in the presence of acoustic forcing suggesting that the variation in the thickness is lower than the resolution of the technique (+/- 1 μm). The growth rates of the sinuous mode determined from the wave envelope matches with the prediction of a recent theory by Tirumkudulu and Paramati (Communicated to Phys. Of Fluids, 2013) which accounts for the inertia of the liquid phase and the surface tension force in a radial liquid sheet while neglecting the inertial effects due to the surrounding gas phase. The authors acknowledge the financial assistance from Indo-French Center for Pro- motion of Advanced Research and also Indian institute of technology Bombay.

  14. Compression Neuropathy of the Radial Nerve Due to Ganglion Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Lifchez, Scott D.; Dzwierzynski, William W.

    2008-01-01

    Ganglions of the upper extremity are common. Radial nerve dysfunction, particularly radial sensory dysfunction, is a rare finding in association with a ganglion. We present our experience with two such ganglia and a review of the literature. PMID:18780092

  15. Varying deformation patterns in central Tibet revealed by radial anisotropy tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heng; Zhao, Dapeng; Yu, Chunquan; Zhao, Junmeng

    2016-05-01

    P wave radial anisotropy tomography of the upper mantle beneath the central Tibetan plateau is derived using a large number of traveltime data of teleseismic events. Our results show a prominent high-velocity (high-V) zone which is separated by a low-velocity (low-V) anomaly beneath the Himalayan block, extending to ~33°N, and a low-V zone down to ~300 km depth beneath the northern Qiangtang block. The upper mantle beneath northern Qiangtang exhibits a significant positive radial anisotropy (i.e., horizontal Vp > vertical Vp), implying lateral material flow rather than material upwelling in the upper mantle. In the central part of the study region, a prominent high-V zone exists at depths of 150 to 300 km and exhibits a negative radial anisotropy (i.e., horizontal Vp < vertical Vp), reflecting the subducting Indian lithospheric mantle. Variations of shear wave splitting in this region revealed by previous studies may be attributed to the low-V layer above the Indian lithospheric mantle. A high-V zone with a positive radial anisotropy is located beneath the southern Lhasa block, which is interpreted to be the northward underthrusting Indian lithospheric mantle. Multilayer radial anisotropy is detected beneath southern Tibet, which may reflect a complex deformation pattern there.

  16. Radial velocity curves of ellipsoidal red giant binaries in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, J. D.; Wood, P. R. E-mail: peter.wood@anu.edu.au

    2014-12-01

    Ellipsoidal red giant binaries are close binary systems where an unseen, relatively close companion distorts the red giant, leading to light variations as the red giant moves around its orbit. These binaries are likely to be the immediate evolutionary precursors of close binary planetary nebula and post-asymptotic giant branch and post-red giant branch stars. Due to the MACHO and OGLE photometric monitoring projects, the light variability nature of these ellipsoidal variables has been well studied. However, due to the lack of radial velocity curves, the nature of their masses, separations, and other orbital details has so far remained largely unknown. In order to improve this situation, we have carried out spectral monitoring observations of a large sample of 80 ellipsoidal variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud and we have derived radial velocity curves. At least 12 radial velocity points with good quality were obtained for most of the ellipsoidal variables. The radial velocity data are provided with this paper. Combining the photometric and radial velocity data, we present some statistical results related to the binary properties of these ellipsoidal variables.

  17. Radial Variations in the Io Plasma Torus during the Cassini Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.; Steffl, A.

    2005-01-01

    A radial scan through the midnight sector of the Io plasma torus was made by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph on 14 January 2001, shortly after closest approach to Jupiter. From these data, Steffl et al. (2004a) derived electron temperature, plasma composition (ion mixing ratios), and electron column density as a function of radius from L = 6 to 0 as well as the total luminosity. We have advanced our homogeneous model of torus physical chemistry (Delamere and Bagenal, 2003) to include latitudinal and radial variations in a manner similar to the two-dimensional model by Schreier et al. (1998). The model variables include: (1) neutral source rate, (2) radial transport coefficient, (3) the hot electron fraction, (4) hot electron temperature, and (5) the neutral O/S ratio. The radial variation of parameters 1-4 are described by simple power laws, making a total of nine parameters. We have explored the sensitivity of the model results to variations in these parameters and compared the best fit with previous Voyager era models (schreier et al., 1998), galileo data (Crary et al., 1998), and Cassini observations (steffl et al., 2004a). We find that radial variations during the Cassini era are consistent with a neutral source rate of 700-1200 kg/s, an integrated transport time from L = 6 to 9 of 100-200 days, and that the core electron temperature is largely determined by a spatially and temporally varying superthermal electron population.

  18. A rare localization of neurothekeomas of radial nerve: A case report.

    PubMed

    Di Sante, L; Camerota, F; Celletti, C; Ioppolo, F; Santilli, V; David, E

    2015-01-01

    Neurothekeoma is a very rare benign connective tissue tumour that presumably derived from nerve sheath cells. We described the case of a rare localization of neurothekeoma in the upper limb with a strange presentation. A 49 years-old woman presented to the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Division of the Umberto I Hospital referring an intensive pain associated to paresthesias at the left forearm lasting from six months. The patient had a history of epicondylitis confirmed with an elbow RMN showing an increased thickness of the tendon insertions on the epicondiloidea region of the elbow. Rehabilitative and physical therapy has been done without symptoms remission. An ultrasound evaluation showed an oval formation well circumscribed in the context of the radial nerve. It was easy to demonstrate the relevance of the radial nerve, following it from the arch of Frohse until the humeral sulcus of the radial nerve. A MRI that showed a mass, mildly hypointense on T1- weighted sequences and hyperintense on T2-weighted images, with nonhomogeneous enhancement post-contrast, attributable to expansionary pathology of the radial nerve. A biopsy was done and the lesion was described as a benign tumor of nerve sheath, i.e., a Neurothekeoma of the radial nerve. Patients was surgically treated, the tumor has been removed and she referred the resolution of symptomatology. PMID:26794820

  19. A molecular mechanics force field for lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Petridis, Loukas; Smith, Jeremy C

    2009-02-01

    A CHARMM molecular mechanics force field for lignin is derived. Parameterization is based on reproducing quantum mechanical data of model compounds. Partial atomic charges are derived using the RESP electrostatic potential fitting method supplemented by the examination of methoxybenzene:water interactions. Dihedral parameters are optimized by fitting to critical rotational potentials and bonded parameters are obtained by optimizing vibrational frequencies and normal modes. Finally, the force field is validated by performing a molecular dynamics simulation of a crystal of a lignin fragment molecule and comparing simulation-derived structural features with experimental results. Together with the existing force field for polysaccharides, this lignin force field will enable full simulations of lignocellulose.

  20. Trapping metallic particles under resonant wavelength with 4π tight focusing of radially polarized beam.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wenjing; Song, Feng; Song, Feifei; Ju, Dandan; Liu, Shujing

    2016-09-01

    Here we propose a new method for trapping the resonant metallic particles with the 4π tight focusing (high numerical-aperture (NA)) system, which is illuminated by radial polarization light. Numerical simulations have indicated the maximum total optical force is 16.1pN while with nearly zero scattering force under axis trapping, which keeps the gradient force predominant. Furthermore, the distribution of total force is centrosymmetric and odd. We also gain stable 3D trap with an equilibrium point along z axis and r axis as in normal optical tweezers. What's more, we obtain the nearly pure longitudinal field. The maximum transverse intensity is only 2.3 × 10-3 and the transverse spot size reaches 0.36λ, which is below Abbe's diffraction limit. PMID:27607615

  1. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugués, Agustí; Anon, Ester; Conte, Vito; Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and `purse-string’ contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate.

  2. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and “purse-string” contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate. PMID:27340423

  3. The effects of radiation drag on radial, relativistic hydromagnetic winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Chiueh, Tzihong

    1992-01-01

    The effects of drag on an idealized relativistic MHD wind of radial geometry are studied. The astrophysical motivation is to understand the effects of radiation drag on the dynamics of a jet or wind passing through the intense radiation field of an accreting compact object. From a critical point analysis, it is found that a slow magnetosonic point can appear in a dragged flow even in the absence of gravitational force, as a result of a balance between the drag force and the combination of thermal pressure and centrifugal forces. As in the undragged case, the Alfven point does not impose any constraints on the flow. Although it is formally possible for a dragged flow to possess more than one fast magnetosonic point, it is shown that this is unlikely in practice. In the limit of a 'cold', centrifugally driven flow, it is shown that the fast magnetosonic point moves to infinite radius, just as in the drag-free case. For a given mass flux, the total energy output carried to infinity, and the final partition between the kinetic energy and the Poynting flux, are the same for the dragged and the drag-free flows. The main effects of radiation drag are to increase the amount of energy and angular momentum extracted from the source and to redistribute the regions where acceleration occurs in the flow. This is accomplished through the storage and release of magnetic energy, as a result of additional winding and compression of the field caused by the action of the drag. For a relativistic wind, the dissipated energy can exceed the final kinetic energy of the flow and may be comparable to the total flow energy (which is dominated by Poynting flux). The energy lost to radiation drag will appear as a Doppler-boosted beam of scattered radiation, which could dominate the background radiation if the flow is well-collimated.

  4. Experimental feasibility study of radial injection cooling of three-pad radial air foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Suman K.

    Air foil bearings use ambient air as a lubricant allowing environment-friendly operation. When they are designed, installed, and operated properly, air foil bearings are very cost effective and reliable solution to oil-free turbomachinery. Because air is used as a lubricant, there are no mechanical contacts between the rotor and bearings and when the rotor is lifted off the bearing, near frictionless quiet operation is possible. However, due to the high speed operation, thermal management is one of the very important design factors to consider. Most widely accepted practice of the cooling method is axial cooling, which uses cooling air passing through heat exchange channels formed underneath the bearing pad. Advantage is no hardware modification to implement the axial cooling because elastic foundation structure of foil bearing serves as a heat exchange channels. Disadvantage is axial temperature gradient on the journal shaft and bearing. This work presents the experimental feasibility study of alternative cooling method using radial injection of cooling air directly on the rotor shaft. The injection speeds, number of nozzles, location of nozzles, total air flow rate are important factors determining the effectiveness of the radial injection cooling method. Effectiveness of the radial injection cooling was compared with traditional axial cooling method. A previously constructed test rig was modified to accommodate a new motor with higher torque and radial injection cooling. The radial injection cooling utilizes the direct air injection to the inlet region of air film from three locations at 120° from one another with each location having three axially separated holes. In axial cooling, a certain axial pressure gradient is applied across the bearing to induce axial cooling air through bump foil channels. For the comparison of the two methods, the same amount of cooling air flow rate was used for both axial cooling and radial injection. Cooling air flow rate was

  5. Magnetically suspended rotary blood pump with radial type combined motor-bearing.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, T; Kita, T; Matsuda, K; Okada, Y

    2000-06-01

    A magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump is being developed with a combined motor-bearing for long-term ventricular assist systems. The combined motor-bearing actively suspends a rotor in a radial direction to deal with radial force unbalance in the pump and rotates the rotor by using the electric magnetic field. Therefore, the pump has no mechanical parts such as bearings of the motor and has a long lifetime. The developed pump consists of a thin rotor with a semi open-type 6 vane impeller and a stator to suspend and rotate the rotor. The rotor has 4-pole permanent magnets on the circumferential surface. The outer diameter and the thickness of the rotor are 60 mm and 8 mm, respectively. Axial movement and tilt of the rotor are restricted by passive stability based on the thin rotor structure. Radial movements of the rotor, such as levitation in radial direction and rotation, are controlled actively by using electric magnets of the stator. The electric magnet coils to produce levitation and rotation forces are constructed on the periphery stator. The p +/- 2-pole algorithm and the synchronous motor mechanism are adopted to levitate and rotate the rotor. The radial gap between the rotor and the stator is 1 mm. A closed-loop circuit filled with water was connected to the developed pump to examine the basic performance of the pump and the magnetic suspension system. Maximum rotational speed, flow rate, and head were 2,800 rpm, 11 L/min, and 270 mm Hg, respectively. The rotor with the impeller could be suspended completely during the entire pumping process. We conclude the pump with the combined motor-bearing has sufficient performance for the blood pump. PMID:10886067

  6. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  7. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  8. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  9. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  10. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  11. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  12. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  13. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  14. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  15. Comminuted radial head fractures treated by the Acumed anatomic radial head system

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Zhefei; Chen, Maohua; Xiong, Yan; Fan, Zhihang; Wang, Aimin; Wang, Ziming

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The treatment of comminuted radial head fractures is still challenging. A radial head replacement is more effective in comminuted radial head fractures. The aim of this paper was to present the medium-term results of the Acumed anatomic radial head system (AARHS). Methods: This study was performed on 12 patients with traumatic elbow fracture and instability between 2008 and 2011 of whom 12 were reviewed at a mean follow-up of 60.8 months (19 to 77 months). The evaluation included a record of pain, function, muscle strength, contracture and rotation. The outcome was assessed using the Hospital for Special Surgery total elbow scoring and a modified Disability of Arm Shoulder Hand (DASH) questionnaire. Results: The average flexion and extension arc was 130° (range, 110° to 140°). The mean range of elbow supination was 75° (rang, 60° to 85°) and pronation 80° (range, 65° to 90°). There were no complications such as infection, implant loosening, instability of the elbow, cubitus valgus, osteoporosis of the capitellum, or pain in the forearm and wrist. The mean DASH score was 11.9/100 (0 to 25/100). Conclusion: The radial head replacement with the AARHS can provide effectively stability and good clinic results at the middle term following up. Our experience has encouraged us to continue using the AARHS in comminuted fractures, especially when instability of elbow is a potential problem. PMID:26131250

  16. Convergent radial tracing of viral and solute transport in gneiss saprolite.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Richard; Tindimugaya, Callist; Barker, John; Macdonald, David; Kulabako, Robinah

    2010-01-01

    Deeply weathered crystalline rock aquifer systems comprising unconsolidated saprolite and underlying fractured bedrock (saprock) underlie 40% of sub-Saharan Africa. The vulnerability of this aquifer system to contamination, particularly in rapidly urbanizing areas, remains poorly understood. In order to assess solute and viral transport in saprolite derived from Precambrian gneiss, forced-gradient tracer experiments using chloride and Escherichia coli phage PhiX174 were conducted in southeastern Uganda. The bacteriophage tracer was largely unrecovered; adsorption to the weathered crystalline rock matrix is inferred and enabled by the low pH (5.7) of site ground water and the bacteriophage's relatively high isoelectric point (pI = 6.6). Detection of the applied PhiX174 phage in the pumping well discharge at early times during the experiment traces showed, however, that average ground water flow velocities exceed that of the inert solute tracer, chloride. This latter finding is consistent with observations in other hydrogeological environments where statistically extreme sets of microscopic flow velocities are considered to transport low numbers of fecal pathogens and their proxies along a selected range of linked ground water pathways. Application of a radial advection-dispersion model with an exponentially decaying source term to the recovered chloride tracer estimates a dispersivity (alpha) of 0.8 +/- 0.1 m over a distance of 4.15 m. Specific yield (S(y)) is estimated to be 0.02 from volume balance calculations based on tracer experiments. As single-site observations, our estimates of saprolite S(y) and alpha are tentative but provide a starting point for assessing the vulnerability of saprolite aquifers in sub-Saharan Africa to contamination and estimating quantitatively the impact of climate and abstraction on ground water storage. PMID:19245374

  17. Radial energy transport by magnetospheric ULF waves: Effects of magnetic curvature and plasma pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouznetsov, Igor; Lotko, William

    1995-01-01

    The 'radial' transport of energy by internal ULF waves, stimulated by dayside magnetospheric boundary oscillations, is analyzed in the framework of one-fluid magnetohydrodynamics. (the term radial is used here to denote the direction orthogonal to geomagnetic flux surfaces.) The model for the inhomogeneous magnetospheric plasma and background magnetic field is axisymmetric and includes radial and parallel variations in the magnetic field, magnetic curvature, plasma density, and low but finite plasma pressure. The radial mode structure of the coupled fast and intermediate MHD waves is determined by numerical solution of the inhomogeneous wave equation; the parallel mode structure is characterized by a Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. Ionospheric dissipation is modeled by allowing the parallel wave number to be complex. For boudnary oscillations with frequencies in the range from 10 to 48 mHz, and using a dipole model for the background magnetic field, the combined effects of magnetic curvature and finite plasma pressure are shown to (1) enhance the amplitude of field line resonances by as much as a factor of 2 relative to values obtained in a cold plasma or box-model approximation for the dayside magnetosphere; (2) increase the energy flux delivered to a given resonance by a factor of 2-4; and (3) broaden the spectral width of the resonance by a factor of 2-3. The effects are attributed to the existence of an 'Alfven buoyancy oscillation,' which approaches the usual shear mode Alfven wave at resonance, but unlike the shear Alfven mode, it is dispersive at short perpendicular wavelengths. The form of dispersion is analogous to that of an internal atmospheric gravity wave, with the magnetic tension of the curved background field providing the restoring force and allowing radial propagation of the mode. For nominal dayside parameters, the propagation band of the Alfven buoyancy wave occurs between the location of its (field line) resonance and that of the

  18. Zero side force volute development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Franz, R. J.; Farmer, R. C.; Chen, Y. S.

    1995-01-01

    Collector scrolls on high performance centrifugal pumps are currently designed with methods which are based on very approximate flowfield models. Such design practices result in some volute configurations causing excessive side loads even at design flowrates. The purpose of this study was to develop and verify computational design tools which may be used to optimize volute configurations with respect to avoiding excessive loads on the bearings. The new design methodology consisted of a volute grid generation module and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) module to describe the volute geometry and predict the radial forces for a given flow condition, respectively. Initially, the CFD module was used to predict the impeller and the volute flowfields simultaneously; however, the required computation time was found to be excessive for parametric design studies. A second computational procedure was developed which utilized an analytical impeller flowfield model and an ordinary differential equation to describe the impeller/volute coupling obtained from the literature, Adkins & Brennen (1988). The second procedure resulted in 20 to 30 fold increase in computational speed for an analysis. The volute design analysis was validated by postulating a volute geometry, constructing a volute to this configuration, and measuring the steady radial forces over a range of flow coefficients. Excellent agreement between model predictions and observed pump operation prove the computational impeller/volute pump model to be a valuable design tool. Further applications are recommended to fully establish the benefits of this new methodology.

  19. DESIGN ANALYSIS OF RADIAL INFLOW TURBINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    This program performs a velocity-diagram analysis required for determining geometry and estimating performance for radial-inflow turbines. Input design requirements are power, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotative rate. The design variables include stator-exit angle, rotor-exit-tip to rotor-inlet radius ratio, rotor-exit-hub to tip radius ratio, and the magnitude and radial distribution of rotor-exit tangential velocity. The program output includes diameters, total and static efficiences, all absolute and relative temperatures, pressures, and velocities, and flow angles at stator inlet, stator exit, rotor inlet, and rotor exit. Losses accounted for in this program by the internal loss model are three-dimensional (profile plus end wall) viscous losses in the stator and the rotor, the disk-friction loss on the back side of the rotor, the loss due to the clearance between the rotor tip and the outer casing, and the exit velocity loss. The flow analysis is one-dimensional at the stator inlet, stator exit, and rotor inlet, each of these calculation stations being at a constant radius. At the rotor exit where there is a variation in flow-field radius, an axisymmetric two-dimensional analysis is made using constant height sectors. Simple radial equilibrium is used to establish the static pressure gradient at the rotor exit. This program is written in FORTRAN V and has been implemented on a UNIVAC 1100 series computer with a memory requirement of approximately 22K of 36 bit words.

  20. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing.

    PubMed

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-14

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the "golden standard" for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  1. Self-excited rotor whirl due to tip-seal leakage forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leie, B.; Thomas, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    The limitations in the performance of turbomachines which arise as a result of selfexcited vibration were investigated. Bearing forces, elastic hysteresis, and forces from fluid flow through clearances were considered as possible origins. A theoretical evaluation was made to determine the dependence of the forces form the leakage losses and from rotating flow in radial gaps.

  2. Methods and apparatus for radially compliant component mounting

    DOEpatents

    Bulman, David Edward; Darkins, Jr., Toby George; Stumpf, James Anthony; Schroder, Mark S.; Lipinski, John Joseph

    2012-03-27

    Methods and apparatus for a mounting assembly for a liner of a gas turbine engine combustor are provided. The combustor includes a combustor liner and a radially outer annular flow sleeve. The mounting assembly includes an inner ring surrounding a radially outer surface of the liner and including a plurality of axially extending fingers. The mounting assembly also includes a radially outer ring coupled to the inner ring through a plurality of spacers that extend radially from a radially outer surface of the inner ring to the outer ring.

  3. Radial Velocity Detection of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, T. G.

    2004-05-01

    Spectroscopy has long been an ignored corner of amateur astronomy and is generally regarded as difficult if not impossible with small telescopes. With the advent of robotic scopes and high efficiency CCD's, this aspect of astronomy is now open for exploration. The Spectrashift.com project is a team of amateurs that have constructed and implemented a spectrograph and tele- scope system capable of measuring radial velocities down to approximately 100 meters per second. This level of precision can detect extrasolar planets known as "hot Jupiters". The system's performance has been demonstrated on the star Tau Boötis.

  4. Radial Neck Osteotomy for Malunion of Radial Neck Fracture in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Vandergugten, Simon; Troussel, Serge; Lefebvre, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In a case of a neglected radial neck fracture in childhood, the management of initial fracture and its complications are subjected to discussion. In children, open reduction should be avoided but an angulation less than 30° must be obtained. Several techniques exist to manage symptomatic malunion in adults, including resection, prosthesis, and osteotomy. When performing an osteotomy, it is important first to preserve an intact osseous hinge to avoid avascular necrosis and second to align the edge of the radial head articular surface with the lateral edge of the coronoid process, in order to avoid overstuffing elbow joint. PMID:26347364

  5. Rebirth of left radial artery access: could this be the 'right' radial artery?

    PubMed

    Taylor, Montoya; Capers, Quinn; Patel, Dilesh; Mehta, Nishaki K

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac catheterization has several risks, notably which include bleeding, stroke and death. The transradial (TR) approach to catheterization is associated with a lower bleeding risk. The right radial approach is the default method in most laboratories and the left radial artery (LRA) serves as the bail-out approach. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of transfemoral and TR access routes. The authors envisage an increased adoption of the LRA approach, due to the anatomical superiority and ease of catheter engagement afforded by this approach. The authors discuss ways to increase operator ease for LRA in the laboratory and propose a novel way to improve LRA work-flow. PMID:26000561

  6. Biomechanics of Forearm Rotation: Force and Efficiency of Pronator Teres

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Gimeno, Pere; Galtés, Ignasi; Jordana, Xavier; Malgosa, Assumpció; Manyosa, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical models are useful to assess the effect of muscular forces on bone structure. Using skeletal remains, we analyze pronator teres rotational efficiency and its force components throughout the entire flexion-extension and pronation-supination ranges by means of a new biomechanical model and 3D imaging techniques, and we explore the relationship between these parameters and skeletal structure. The results show that maximal efficiency is the highest in full elbow flexion and is close to forearm neutral position for each elbow angle. The vertical component of pronator teres force is the highest among all components and is greater in pronation and elbow extension. The radial component becomes negative in pronation and reaches lower values as the elbow flexes. Both components could enhance radial curvature, especially in pronation. The model also enables to calculate efficiency and force components simulating changes in osteometric parameters. An increase of radial curvature improves efficiency and displaces the position where the radial component becomes negative towards the end of pronation. A more proximal location of pronator teres radial enthesis and a larger humeral medial epicondyle increase efficiency and displace the position where this component becomes negative towards forearm neutral position, which enhances radial curvature. Efficiency is also affected by medial epicondylar orientation and carrying angle. Moreover, reaching an object and bringing it close to the face in a close-to-neutral position improve efficiency and entail an equilibrium between the forces affecting the elbow joint stability. When the upper-limb skeleton is used in positions of low efficiency, implying unbalanced force components, it undergoes plastic changes, which improve these parameters. These findings are useful for studies on ergonomics and orthopaedics, and the model could also be applied to fossil primates in order to infer their locomotor form. Moreover, activity

  7. Two Types of Radial Systems of Dark Globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulbudaghian, A. L.; Mendez, R. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of survey of ESO/SRC plates of Southern Hemisphere for discovering new radial systems of dark globules. During the survey 16 new type 1 radial systems and 6 type 2 radial systems were found, it means that the number of known radial systems was almost doubled. In the centers of type 1 radial systems are situated O-B2 type stars, in the centers of type 2 radial systems there are no early type stars. An attempt was done to give interpretation to groups of submm starless condensations as radial systems of dark globules, situated behind thick dark clouds, that is why these globules are seen only in submm wavelengths.

  8. Forced oscillations with linear and nonlinear damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aijun; Ma, Li; Keene, David; Klingel, Joshua; Payne, Marvin; Wang, Xiao-jun

    2016-01-01

    A general solution is derived for the differential equations of forced oscillatory motion with both linear damping ( ˜v ) and nonlinear damping ( ˜v2 ). Experiments with forced oscillators are performed using a flat metal plate with a drag force due to eddy currents and a flat piece of stiffened cardboard with a drag force due to air resistance serving as the linear and nonlinear damping, respectively. Resonance of forced oscillations for different damping forces and quality factors is demonstrated. The experimental measurements and theoretical calculations are in good agreement, and damping constants are determined.

  9. Radial distance determination in the rat vibrissal system and the effects of Weber's law

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Joseph H.; Hartmann, Mitra J. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Rats rhythmically tap and brush their vibrissae (whiskers) against objects to tactually explore the environment. To extract a complex feature such as the contour of an object, the rat must at least implicitly estimate radial object distance, that is, the distance from the base of the vibrissa to the point of object contact. Radial object distance cannot be directly measured, however, because there are no mechanoreceptors along the vibrissa. Instead, the mechanical signals generated by the vibrissa's interaction with the environment must be transmitted to mechanoreceptors near the vibrissa base. The first part of this paper surveys the different mechanical methods by which the rat could determine radial object distance. Two novel methods are highlighted: one based on measurement of bending moment and axial force at the vibrissa base, and a second based on measurement of how far the vibrissa rotates beyond initial contact. The second part of the paper discusses the application of Weber's law to two methods for radial distance determination. In both cases, Weber's law predicts that the rat will have greatest sensing resolution close to the vibrissa tip. These predictions could be tested with behavioural experiments that measure the perceptual acuity of the rat. PMID:21969686

  10. Dust and gas density evolution at a radial pressure bump in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taki, Tetsuo; Fujimoto, Masaki; Ida, Shigeru

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the simultaneous evolution of dust and gas density profiles at a radial pressure bump located in a protoplanetary disk. If dust particles are treated as test particles, a radial pressure bump traps dust particles that drift radially inward. As the dust particles become more concentrated at the gas pressure bump, however, the drag force from dust to gas (back-reaction), which is ignored in a test-particle approach, deforms the pressure bump. We find that the pressure bump is completely deformed by the back-reaction when the dust-to-gas mass ratio reaches ~ 1 for a slower bump restoration. The direct gravitational instability of dust particles is inhibited by the bump destruction. In the dust-enriched region, the radial pressure support becomes ~ 10-100 times lower than the global value set initially. Although the pressure bump is a favorable place for streaming instability (SI), the flattened pressure gradient inhibits SI from forming large particle clumps corresponding to 100-1000 km sized bodies, which has been previously proposed. If SI occurs there, the dust clumps formed would be 10-100 times smaller, that is, of about 1-100 km.

  11. High-performance radial AMTEC cell design for ultra-high-power solar AMTEC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, T.J.; Huang, C.

    1999-07-01

    Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Conversion (AMTEC) technology is rapidly maturing for potential application in ultra-high-power solar AMTEC systems required by potential future US Air Force (USAF) spacecraft missions in medium-earth and geosynchronous orbits (MEO and GEO). Solar thermal AMTEC power systems potentially have several important advantages over current solar photovoltaic power systems in ultra-high-power spacecraft applications for USAF MEO and GEO missions. This work presents key aspects of radial AMTEC cell design to achieve high cell performance in solar AMTEC systems delivering larger than 50 kW(e) to support high power USAF missions. These missions typically require AMTEC cell conversion efficiency larger than 25%. A sophisticated design parameter methodology is described and demonstrated which establishes optimum design parameters in any radial cell design to satisfy high-power mission requirements. Specific relationships, which are distinct functions of cell temperatures and pressures, define critical dependencies between key cell design parameters, particularly the impact of parasitic thermal losses on Beta Alumina Solid Electrolyte (BASE) area requirements, voltage, number of BASE tubes, and system power production for both maximum power-per-BASE-area and optimum efficiency conditions. Finally, some high-level system tradeoffs are demonstrated using the design parameter methodology to establish high-power radial cell design requirements and philosophy. The discussion highlights how to incorporate this methodology with sophisticated SINDA/FLUINT AMTEC cell modeling capabilities to determine optimum radial AMTEC cell designs.

  12. Engineering radial deformations in single-walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes using ultrathin nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meng; Zou, Lian-Feng; Wang, Howard; Park, Cheol; Ke, Changhong

    2012-02-28

    Radial deformations of carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes are of great importance to their respective electronic properties and applications. In this paper, we present a simple and practical approach of engineering radial deformations in single-walled carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes (SWCNTs and SW-BNNTs) through covering individual nanotubes lying on flat substrates with subnanometer-thick monolayer graphene oxide (GO) nanomembranes. The GO membrane conforms to and transversely compresses the underlying nanotube as a result of its adhesion binding interaction with the substrate. Our atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging measurements reveal that the engineered net radial deformations of both types of tubes increase with the tube diameter and are more for SW-BNNTs compared with SWCNTs of the same tube diameter. Our results capture the net cross-section height reductions of up to 44.1% for SW-BNNTs and up to 29.7% for SWCNTs. Our work clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of our proposed approach for engineering and controlling the radial deformation in one-dimensional tubular nanostructures and opens a promising route for mechanical tuning of their electronic properties for novel nanoelectronics applications. PMID:22280493

  13. Radial Anisotropy beneath the Main Ethiopian Rift and Afar Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardo, N. J.; Gaherty, J. B.; Jin, G.; Shillington, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) and Afar uniquely capture the final stages of transition from continental rifting in the broader East African Rift System to incipient seafloor spreading above a mantle hotspot. Studies of the region increasingly point to magmatism as a controlling factor on continental extension. However, the character and depth extent of these melt products remain contentious. Radial anisotropy derived from surface waves provides a unique diagnostic constraint on the presence of oriented melt pockets versus broader oriented anisotropic fabrics. This study investigates the thermal and radially anisotropic structure beneath the broader MER and Afar to resolve the magmatic character of the region and ultimately to understand the role of magmatism in present day rift development. We utilize 104 stations from 4 collocated arrays in the MER/Afar region to constrain radial anisotropy within the upper mantle via the inversion of Love- and Rayleigh-wave observations between 25 and 100 s period. We employ a multi-channel cross-correlation algorithm to obtain inter-station phase and amplitude information. The multi-channel phase observations are inverted for dynamic phase velocity across the array, which are then corrected for focusing and multipathing using the amplitude observations via Helmholtz tomography. We jointly invert Love- and Rayleigh-wave structural phase velocity measurements employing crustal constraints from co-located active source experiments to obtain estimates of Vsv and Vsh between 50 - 170 km depth. Preliminary results readily reveal the distinct shear velocity structure beneath the MER and Afar. Within the MER, shear velocity structure suggests pronounced low velocities accompanied by strong anisotropy between 80 - 140 km depth beneath the western Ethiopian plateau and rift valley. Within Afar, shear velocity structure is more varied with the slowest velocities found at shallow depths (less than 70 km depth), accompanied by weak

  14. Radial Basis Functions for Combining Shape and Speckle Tracking in 4D Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Compas, Colin B.; Wong, Emily Y.; Huang, Xiaojie; Sampath, Smita; Lin, Ben A.; Pal, Prasanta; Papademetris, Xenophon; Thiele, Karl; Dione, Donald P.; Stacy, Mitchel; Staib, Lawrence H.; Sinusas, Albert J.; O'Donnell, Matthew; Duncan, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of left ventricular deformation can provide valuable information about the extent of disease as well as the efficacy of treatment. In this work, we develop an adaptive multi-level compactly supported radial basis approach for deformation analysis in 3D+time echocardiography. Our method combines displacement information from shape tracking of myocardial boundaries (derived from B-mode data) with mid-wall displacements from radio-frequency-based ultrasound speckle tracking. We evaluate our methods on open-chest canines (N=8) and show that our combined approach is better correlated to magnetic resonance tagging-derived strains than either individual method. We also are able to identify regions of myocardial infarction (confirmed by postmortem analysis) using radial strain values obtained with our approach. PMID:24893257

  15. Radial Velocity Eclipse Mapping of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, Nikolay; Sainsbury-Martinez, Felix

    2015-07-01

    Planetary rotation rates and obliquities provide information regarding the history of planet formation, but have not yet been measured for evolved extrasolar planets. Here we investigate the theoretical and observational perspective of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect during secondary eclipse (RMse) ingress and egress for transiting exoplanets. Near secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the parent star, the star sequentially obscures light from the approaching and receding parts of the rotating planetary surface. The temporal block of light emerging from the approaching (blueshifted) or receding (redshifted) parts of the planet causes a temporal distortion in the planet’s spectral line profiles resulting in an anomaly in the planet’s radial velocity curve. We demonstrate that the shape and the ratio of the ingress-to-egress radial velocity amplitudes depends on the planetary rotational rate, axial tilt, and impact factor (i.e., sky-projected planet spin-orbital alignment). In addition, line asymmetries originating from different layers in the atmosphere of the planet could provide information regarding zonal atmospheric winds and constraints on the hot spot shape for giant irradiated exoplanets. The effect is expected to be most-pronounced at near-infrared wavelengths, where the planet-to-star contrasts are large. We create synthetic near-infrared, high-dispersion spectroscopic data and demonstrate how the sky-projected spin axis orientation and equatorial velocity of the planet can be estimated. We conclude that the RMse effect could be a powerful method to measure exoplanet spins.

  16. Radial pn Junction, Wire Array Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayes, Brendan Melville

    Radial pn junctions are potentially of interest in photovoltaics as a way to decouple light absorption from minority carrier collection. In a traditional planar design these occur in the same dimension, and this sets a lower limit on absorber material quality, as cells must both be thick enough to effectively absorb the solar spectrum while also having minority-carrier diffusion lengths long enough to allow for efficient collection of the photo-generated carriers. Therefore, highly efficient photovoltaic devices currently require highly pure materials and expensive processing techniques, while low cost devices generally operate at relatively low efficiency. The radial pn junction design sets the direction of light absorption perpendicular to the direction of minority-carrier transport, allowing the cell to be thick enough for effective light absorption, while also providing a short pathway for carrier collection. This is achieved by increasing the junction area, in order to decrease the path length any photogenerated minority carrier must travel, to be less than its minority carrier diffusion length. Realizing this geometry in an array of semiconducting wires, by for example depositing a single-crystalline inorganic semiconducting absorber layer at high deposition rates from the gas phase by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism, allows for a "bottom up" approach to device fabrication, which can in principle dramatically reduce the materials costs associated with a cell.

  17. A radial transmission line material measurement apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, L.K.; Moyer, R.D.; Koontz, T.E.; Morris, M.E.

    1993-05-01

    A radial transmission line material measurement sample apparatus (sample holder, offset short standards, measurement software, and instrumentation) is described which has been proposed, analyzed, designed, constructed, and tested. The purpose of the apparatus is to obtain accurate surface impedance measurements of lossy, possibly anisotropic, samples at low and intermediate frequencies (vhf and low uhf). The samples typically take the form of sections of the material coatings on conducting objects. Such measurements thus provide the key input data for predictive numerical scattering codes. Prediction of the sample surface impedance from the coaxial input impedance measurement is carried out by two techniques. The first is an analytical model for the coaxial-to-radial transmission line junction. The second is an empirical determination of the bilinear transformation model of the junction by the measurement of three full standards. The standards take the form of three offset shorts (and an additional lossy Salisbury load), which have also been constructed. The accuracy achievable with the device appears to be near one percent.

  18. New systemic radial velocities of suspected RR Lyrae binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, E.; Barnes, T. G.; Kolenberg, K.

    2016-05-01

    Among the tens of thousands of known RR Lyrae stars there are only a handful that show indications of possible binarity. The question why this is the case is still unsolved, and has recently sparked several studies dedicated to the search for additional RR Lyraes in binary systems. Such systems are particularly valuable because they might allow to constrain the stellar mass. Most of the recent studies, however, are based on photometry by finding a light time effect in the timings of maximum light. This approach is a very promising and successful one, but it has a major drawback: by itself, it cannot serve as a definite proof of binarity, because other phenomena such as the Blazhko effect or intrinsic period changes could lead to similar results. Spectroscopic radial velocity measurements, on the other hand, can serve as definite proof of binarity. We have therefore started a project to study spectroscopically RR Lyrae stars that are suspected to be binaries. We have obtained radial velocity (RV) curves with the 2.1m telescope at McDonald observatory. From these we derive systemic RVs which we will compare to previous measurements in order to find changes induced by orbital motions. We also construct templates of the RV curves that can facilitate future studies. We also observed the most promising RR Lyrae binary candidate, TU UMa, as no recent spectroscopic measurements were available. We present a densely covered pulsational RV curve, which will be used to test the predictions of the orbit models that are based on the O - C variations.

  19. Force Feedback Joystick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    I-FORCE, a computer peripheral from Immersion Corporation, was derived from virtual environment and human factors research at the Advanced Displays and Spatial Perception Laboratory at Ames Research Center in collaboration with Stanford University Center for Design Research. Entrepreneur Louis Rosenberg, a former Stanford researcher, now president of Immersion, collaborated with Dr. Bernard Adelstein at Ames on studies of perception in virtual reality. The result was an inexpensive way to incorporate motors and a sophisticated microprocessor into joysticks and other game controllers. These devices can emulate the feel of a car on the skid, a crashing plane, the bounce of a ball, compressed springs, or other physical phenomenon. The first products incorporating I-FORCE technology include CH- Products' line of FlightStick and CombatStick controllers.

  20. Multi-dimensional option pricing using radial basis functions and the generalized Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Elisabeth; Ahlander, Krister; Hall, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    We show that the generalized Fourier transform can be used for reducing the computational cost and memory requirements of radial basis function methods for multi-dimensional option pricing. We derive a general algorithm, including a transformation of the Black-Scholes equation into the heat equation, that can be used in any number of dimensions. Numerical experiments in two and three dimensions show that the gain is substantial even for small problem sizes. Furthermore, the gain increases with the number of dimensions.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HU Vir radial velocities and VI light curves (Harutyunyan+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, G.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Kuenstler, A.; Carroll, T. A.; Weber, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present two tables with the new STELLA radial velocity data set and the APT Johnson-Cousins V and I photometric data set for HU Virginis. RVs from STELLA-SES spectra were derived from an order-by-order cross correlation with a synthetic template spectrum and then averaged. The photometric measurements were always made differentially with respect to HD 106270 and HD 106332 as a comparison and check star, respectively. (2 data files).

  2. The Stationary Condensation and Radial Outflow of a Liquid Film on a Horizontal Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolshinskiy, Leonid; Frenkel, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The application of capillary screen liquid acquisition devices to space-based cryogenic propulsion systems is expected to necessitate thermodynamic conditioning in order to stabilize surface tension retention characteristics. The present results have been obtained in the framework of the research of low gravity condensation-flow processes for conditioning cryogenic liquid acquisition devices. The following system is studied: On the top of a subcooled horizontal disk, a liquid film condenses from the ambient saturated vapor. The liquid is forcedly removed at the disk edge, and there is an outward radial flow of the film. Stationary regimes of the flow are uncovered such that (i) the gravity is negligible, being eclipsed by the capillary forces; (ii) the film thickness is everywhere much smaller than the disk radius; and (iii) the slow-flow lubrication approximation is valid. A nonlinear differential equation for the film thickness as a function of the radial coordinate is obtained. The (two-dimensional) fields of velocities, temperature and pressure in the film are explicitly determined by the radial profile of its thickness. The equilibrium is controlled by two parameters: (i) the vapor-disk difference of temperatures and (ii) the liquid exhaust rate. For the flow regimes with a nearly uniform film thickness, the governing equation linearizes, and the film interface is analytically predicted to have a concave-up quartic parabola profile. Thus, perhaps counter-intuitively, the liquid film is thicker at the edge and thinner at the center of the disk.

  3. Treatment of Nonunion of Forearm Bones Using Radial Forearm Bone Flap

    PubMed Central

    Shahryar Kamrani, Reza; Farhoud, Amir Reza; Nabian, Mohammad Hossein; Farhadi, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treatment of forearm fracture nonunion is challenging. Several surgical techniques for the treatment of forearm nonunion have been reported. Objectives: The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of the radial forearm bone graft technique in cases with forearm nonunion. Patients and Methods: We treated 7 patients with forearm nonunions via radial forearm bone flap and internal plate fixation. On the preoperative examination and last follow-up, the quick disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (Q-DASH) score, elbow, forearm and wrist arches of motion and grip force were measured. At the final follow-up, radiographic union and patient satisfaction and return to work were assessed. Results: The mean follow-up duration was 34 ± 23 months. The Q-DASH scores improved from 70 ± 6 points preoperatively to 13 ± 15 points at final follow-up (P < 0.01). The preopetative range of motion (ROM) was 101 ± 26 degrees; whereas the final forearm ROM was 140 ± 17 (P = 0.01). All nonunions united uneventfully (range 3-6 months). At the last follow-up, the grip force was 83% of uninjured extremity and all patients were satisfied with the outcome of the operation. Conclusions: Radial forearm bone flap is a safe, useful and novel technique in cases with forearm nonunion. PMID:26839858

  4. Evaluation of performance and magnetic characteristics of a radial-radial flux compound-structure permanent-magnet synchronous machine used for hybrid electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ping; Liu, Ranran; Shen, Lin; Li, Lina; Fan, Weiguang; Wu, Qian; Zhao, Jing

    2008-04-01

    A breed of compound-structure permanent-magnet synchronous machine (CS-PMSM) is used for power-split hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). It can help to fulfill both the speed and torque control of the internal combustion engine and, thus, realize the optimum operation of the HEV. In this paper, a radial-radial flux CS-PMSM, which is integrated by two machines radially [one stator machine (SM) and one double-rotor machine (DRM)], is designed and investigated. The machine performance is evaluated with finite-element method (FEM) and satisfactory results are obtained. The back electromotive force curves of the two machines are somewhat similar to sinusoidal ones; the average torques both meet the requirements; and due to the adoption of skewed slots, the cogging torques and torque ripples are quite small. The inductance parameter is calculated with a phasor diagram based two-dimensional FEM and the magnetic saturation and cross-magnetization effect are discussed. It is concluded that the SM is slightly saturated with no or little cross-magnetization phenomenon, whereas the DRM has deep-degree magnetic saturation and the cross-magnetization effect is notable.

  5. A Dust-Penetrated Classification Scheme for Bars as Inferred from their Gravitational Force Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buta, R.; Block, D. L.

    2001-05-01

    The division of galaxies into barred (SB) and normal (S) spirals is a fundamental aspect of the Hubble galaxy classification system. This tuning fork view was revised by de Vaucouleurs, whose classification volume recognized apparent bar strength (SA, SAB, SB) as a continuous property of galaxies called the ``family.'' However, the SA, SAB, and SB families are purely visual judgments that can have little bearing on the actual bar strength in a given galaxy. Until recently, published bar judgments were based exclusively on blue light images, where internal extinction or star formation can completely mask a bar. Near-infrared camera arrays, which principally trace the old stellar population in both normal and barred galaxies, now facilitate a quantification of bar strength in terms of gravitational potentials and force fields. In this paper, we show that the maximum value of the ratio of the tangential force to the mean axisymmetric radial force is a quantitative measure of the strength of a bar that can be straightforwardly derived for many galaxies. We show that a wide range of true bar strengths characterizes the category SB, while category SAB corresponds to a narrower range of bar strengths. Based on the force ratio, we define seven classes of bar strength and incorporate these classes into a dust-penetrated classification system for spiral galaxies. This work was supported by NSF grant AST 9617154 and the Anglo-American Chairman's Fund, Mrs. M. Keeton, CEO.

  6. Three-dimensional acoustic radiation force on an arbitrarily located elastic sphere.

    PubMed

    Baresch, Diego; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Marchiano, Régis

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to model the acoustic radiation forces acting on an elastic sphere placed in an inviscid fluid. An expression of the axial and transverse forces exerted on the sphere is derived. The analysis is based on the scattering of an arbitrary acoustic field expanded in the spherical coordinate system centered on the spherical scatterer. The sphere is allowed to be arbitrarily located. The special case of high order Bessel beams, acoustical vortices, are considered. These types of beams have a helicoidal wave front, i.e., a screw-type phase singularity and hence, the beam has a central dark core of zero amplitude surrounded by an intense ring. Depending on the sphere's radius, different radial equilibrium positions may exist and the sphere can be set in rotation around the beam axis by an azimuthal force. This confirms the pseudo-angular moment transfer from the beam to the sphere. Cases where the axial force is directed opposite to the direction of the beam propagation are investigated and the potential use of Bessel beams as tractor beams is demonstrated. Numerical results provide an impetus for further designing acoustical tweezers for potential applications in particle entrapment and remote controlled manipulation. PMID:23297880

  7. Elastic actuator for precise force control

    DOEpatents

    Pratt, Gill A.; Williamson, Matthew M.

    1997-07-22

    The invention provides an elastic actuator consisting of a motor and a motor drive transmission connected at an output of the motor. An elastic element is connected in series with the motor drive transmission, and this elastic element is positioned to alone support the full weight of any load connected at an output of the actuator. A single force transducer is positioned at a point between a mount for the motor and an output of the actuator. This force transducer generates a force signal, based on deflection of the elastic element, that indicates force applied by the elastic element to an output of the actuator. An active feedback force control loop is connected between the force transducer and the motor for controlling the motor. This motor control is based on the force signal to deflect the elastic element an amount that produces a desired actuator output force. The produced output force is substantially independent of load motion. The invention also provides a torsional spring consisting of a flexible structure having at least three flat sections each connected integrally with and extending radially from a central section. Each flat section extends axially along the central section from a distal end of the central section to a proximal end of the central section.

  8. Elastic actuator for precise force control

    DOEpatents

    Pratt, G.A.; Williamson, M.M.

    1997-07-22

    The invention provides an elastic actuator consisting of a motor and a motor drive transmission connected at an output of the motor. An elastic element is connected in series with the motor drive transmission, and this elastic element is positioned to alone support the full weight of any load connected at an output of the actuator. A single force transducer is positioned at a point between a mount for the motor and an output of the actuator. This force transducer generates a force signal, based on deflection of the elastic element, that indicates force applied by the elastic element to an output of the actuator. An active feedback force control loop is connected between the force transducer and the motor for controlling the motor. This motor control is based on the force signal to deflect the elastic element an amount that produces a desired actuator output force. The produced output force is substantially independent of load motion. The invention also provides a torsional spring consisting of a flexible structure having at least three flat sections each connected integrally with and extending radially from a central section. Each flat section extends axially along the central section from a distal end of the central section to a proximal end of the central section. 30 figs.

  9. Fabricating Radial Groove Gratings Using Projection Photolithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iazikov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    Projection photolithography has been used as a fabrication method for radial grove gratings. Use of photolithographic method for diffraction grating fabrication represents the most significant breakthrough in grating technology in the last 60 years, since the introduction of holographic written gratings. Unlike traditional methods utilized for grating fabrication, this method has the advantage of producing complex diffractive groove contours that can be designed at pixel-by-pixel level, with pixel size currently at the level of 45 45 nm. Typical placement accuracy of the grating pixels is 10 nm over 30 nm. It is far superior to holographic, mechanically ruled or direct e-beam written gratings and results in high spatial coherence and low spectral cross-talk. Due to the smooth surface produced by reactive ion etch, such gratings have a low level of randomly scattered light. Also, due to high fidelity and good surface roughness, this method is ideally suited for fabrication of radial groove gratings. The projection mask is created using a laser writer. A single crystal silicon wafer is coated with photoresist, and then the projection mask, with its layer of photoresist, is exposed for patterning in a stepper or scanner. To develop the photoresist, the fabricator either removes the exposed areas (positive resist) of the unexposed areas (negative resist). Next, the patterned and developed photoresist silicon substrate is subjected to reactive ion etching. After this step, the substrate is cleaned. The projection mask is fabricated according to electronic design files that may be generated in GDS file format using any suitable CAD (computer-aided design) or other software program. Radial groove gratings in off-axis grazing angle of incidence mount are of special interest for x-ray spectroscopy, as they allow achieving higher spectral resolution for the same grating area and have lower alignment tolerances than traditional in-plane grating scheme. This is especially

  10. Repulsive Casimir force: Sufficient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, Luigi; Lambrecht, Astrid

    2010-09-15

    In this paper the Casimir energy of two parallel plates made by materials of different penetration depth and no medium in between is derived. We study the Casimir force density and derive analytical constraints on the two penetration depths which are sufficient conditions to ensure repulsion. Compared to other methods our approach needs no specific model for dielectric or magnetic material properties and constitutes a complementary analysis.

  11. Investigations on the radially free full circle arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiller, W.

    1981-07-01

    The hypothesis that the steady state of a magnetically deflected arc is determined by the equilibrium of the thermodynamic and the magnetohydrodynamic forces is experimentally investigated. An argon arc, burning between two horizontal plane-parallel, insulating plates, bent circularly by its own and an external magnetic field, provided the well-defined conditions by giving a stationary, radially free, full circle arc for the experimental investigation. The local temperature distributions in the arc cross-section were detected spectroscopically as functions of the arc current and the arc radius or curvature. The mass flow field in the arc was determined using basic equations of conservation of energy, mass, and charge, and the known transport parameters of argon at atmospheric pressure. The results represented as a stream line graph, show a symmetric quadruple whirl instead of the expected double whirl, suggested to be due to experimental conditions. The equilibrium of heating and cooling mechanisms inside a curved arc and the relative motion of mass and arc were demonstrated. Experimental and theoretical data are in good agreement.

  12. Latitudinal Dependence of the Radial IMF Component - Interplanetary Imprint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Smith, E. J.; Phillips, J.; Goldstein, B. E.; Nerney, S.

    1996-01-01

    Ulysses measurements have confirmed that there is no significant gradient with respect to heliomagnetic latitude in the radial component, B(sub r,), of the interplanetary magnetic field. There are two processes responsible for this observation. In the corona, the plasma beta is much less than 1, except directly above streamers, so both longitudinal and latitudinal (meridional) gradients in field strength will relax, due to the transverse magnetic pressure gradient force, as the solar wind carries magnetic flux away from the Sun. This happens so quickly that the field is essentially uniform by 5 solar radius. Beyond 10 solar radius, beta is greater than 1 and it is possible for a meridional thermal pressure gradient to redistribute magnetic flux - an effect apparently absent in Ulysses and earlier ICE and Interplanetary Magnetic Physics (IMP) data. We discuss this second effect here, showing that its absence is mainly due to the perpendicular part of the anisotropic thermal pressure gradient in the interplanetary medium being too small to drive significant meridional transport between the Sun and approx. 4 AU. This is done using a linear analytic estimate of meridional transport. The first effect was discussed in an earlier paper.

  13. Binary Properties from Cepheid Radial Velocities (CRaV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Berdnikov, Leonid; Lauer, Jennifer; Morgan, Douglas; Nichols, Joy; Günther, H. Moritz; Gorynya, Natalya; Rastorguev, Alexey; Moskalik, Pawel

    2015-07-01

    We have examined high accuracy radial velocities of Cepheids to determine the binary frequency. The data are largely from the CORAVEL spectrophotometer and the Moscow version, with a typical uncertainty of ≤slant 1 km s-1, and a time span from 1 to 20 years. A systemic velocity was obtained by removing the pulsation component using a high order Fourier series. From this data we have developed a list of stars showing no orbital velocity larger than ±1 km s-1. The binary fraction was analyzed as a function of magnitude, and yields an apparent decrease in this fraction for fainter stars. We interpret this as incompleteness at fainter magnitudes, and derive the preferred binary fraction of 29% ± 8% (20% ± 6% per decade of orbital period) from the brightest 40 stars. A comparison of this fraction in this period range (1-20 years) implies a large fraction for the full period range. This is reasonable in that the high accuracy velocities are sensitive to the longer periods and smaller orbital velocity amplitudes in the period range sampled here. Thus the Cepheid velocity sample provides a sensitive detection in the period range between short period spectroscopic binaries and resolved companions. The recent identification of δ Cep as a binary with very low amplitude and high eccentricity underscores the fact that the binary fractions we derive are lower limits, to which other low amplitude systems will probably be added. The mass ratio (q) distribution derived from ultraviolet observations of the secondary is consistent with a flat distribution for the applicable period range (1-20 years).

  14. Radial propagation of geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, Robert; Hallatschek, Klaus

    2009-07-15

    The GAM group velocity is estimated from the ratio of the radial free energy flux to the total free energy applying gyrokinetic and two-fluid theory. This method is much more robust than approaches that calculate the group velocity directly and can be generalized to include additional physics, e.g., magnetic geometry. The results are verified with the gyrokinetic code GYRO[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the two-fluid code NLET[K. Hallatschek and A. Zeiler, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2554 (2000)], and analytical calculations. GAM propagation must be kept in mind when discussing the windows of GAM activity observed experimentally and the match between linear theory and experimental GAM frequencies.

  15. Radially symmetric transmon with long lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Martin; Vissers, Michael; Gao, Jiansong; Pappas, David

    2014-03-01

    We present a radially symmetric design for a large pad transmon qubit. The symmetry reduces the dipole radiation by orders of magnitude relative to axial large pad qubits that are widely used for 3D-circuit QED experiments. The reduction in radiation allows for the use of large area structures that are needed to reduce the effects of interface losses. This enables long qubit lifetimes without the use of a high-Q cavity resonator. Energy relaxation and coherence times of up to 35 microseconds have been measured. The qubit can be implemented in a microstrip geometry. This gives the advantage of removing discontinuous ground planes that can cause stray resonances. In addition, this geometry is well suited for implementing and exploring circuits with direct qubit-qubit coupling.

  16. Precise radial velocities in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.

    Since the first detection of a planet outside our Solar System byWolszczan & Frail (1992), over 500 exoplanets have been found to date2, none of which resemble the Earth. Most of these planets were discovered by measuring the radial velocity (hereafter, RV) of the host star, which wobbles under the gravitational influence of any existing planetary companions. However, this method has yet to achieve the sub-m/s precision necessary to detect an Earth-mass planet in the Habitable Zone (the region around a star that can support liquid water; hereafter, HZ) (Kasting et al. 1993) around a Solar-type star. Even though Kepler (Borucki et al. 2010) has announced several Earth-sized HZ candidates, these targets will be exceptionally difficult to confirm with current astrophysical spectrographs (Borucki et al. 2011). The fastest way to discover and confirm potentiallyhabitable Earth-mass planets is to observe stars with lower masses - in particular, late M dwarfs. While M dwarfs are readily abundant, comprising some 70% of the local stellar population, their low optical luminosity presents a formidable challenge to current optical RV instruments. By observing in the near-infrared (hereafter, NIR), where the flux from M dwarfs peaks, we can potentially reach low RV precisions with significantly less telescope time than would be required by a comparable optical instrument. However, NIR precision RV measurements are a relatively new idea and replete with challenges: IR arrays, unlike CCDs, are sensitive to the thermal background; modal noise is a bigger issue in the NIR than in the optical; and the NIR currently lacks the calibration sources like the very successful thorium-argon (hereafter, ThAr) hollow-cathode lamp and Iodine gas cell of the optical. The PSU Pathfinder (hereafter, Pathfinder) was designed to explore these technical issues with the intention of mitigating these problems for future NIR high-resolution spectrographs, such as the Habitable-Zone Planet Finder (HZPF

  17. Enhanced boiling heat transfer using radial fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razelos, P.; Das, S.; Krikkis, R. N.

    2008-04-01

    A numerical bifurcation analysis is carried out in order to determine the solution structure of radial fins subjected to multi-boiling heat transfer mode. One-dimensional conduction is employed throughout the thermal analysis. The fluid heat transfer coefficient is temperature dependent on the three regimes of phase-change of the fluid. Six fin profiles, defined in the text, are considered. Multiplicity structure is obtained to determine different types of bifurcation diagrams, which describe the dependence of a state variable of the system like the temperature or the heat dissipation on the fin design parameters, conduction convection parameter (CCP) or base temperature difference (Δ T). Specifically, the effects of Δ T, CCP and Biot number are analyzed. The results are presented graphically, showing the significant behavioral features of the heat rejection mechanism.

  18. Radial particle distributions in PARMILA simulation beams

    SciTech Connect

    Boicourt, G.P.

    1984-03-01

    The estimation of beam spill in particle accelerators is becoming of greater importance as higher current designs are being funded. To the present, no numerical method for predicting beam-spill has been available. In this paper, we present an approach to the loss-estimation problem that uses probability distributions fitted to particle-simulation beams. The properties of the PARMILA code's radial particle distribution are discussed, and a broad class of probability distributions are examined to check their ability to fit it. The possibility that the PARMILA distribution is a mixture is discussed, and a fitting distribution consisting of a mixture of two generalized gamma distributions is found. An efficient algorithm to accomplish the fit is presented. Examples of the relative prediction of beam spill are given. 26 references, 18 figures, 1 table.

  19. Radial fractional Laplace operators and Hessian inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Fausto; Verbitsky, Igor E.

    In this paper we deduce a formula for the fractional Laplace operator ( on radially symmetric functions useful for some applications. We give a criterion of subharmonicity associated with (, and apply it to a problem related to the Hessian inequality of Sobolev type: ∫Rn |(u| dx⩽C∫Rn -uFk[u] dx, where Fk is the k-Hessian operator on Rn, 1⩽k

  20. Future prospects for radial-velocity searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier Cameron, A.

    2015-10-01

    Instrumental advances in the last few years have seen the "high frontier" of radial-velocity searches moving towards detection of planets in the few-Earth-mas regime around solar-type stars. A new generation of stable high-resolution infared spectrometers will soon see a move towards detection of Earth-mass planets in the habitable zones of low-mass stars. The infared and polarimetric capabilities of the next generation of instruments will also help to combat astrophysical noise from the host stars. In this talk I will survey prospects for realising these ambitions in the face of the challenges presented by instrumental limitations and astrophysical noise originating in the host stars themselves. I will discuss synergies with forthcoming ground-based and space-based transit missions such as NGTS, TESS and CHEOPS, and examine considerations to be taken into account when selecting targets and formulating observation strategies.

  1. Radial Velocity Study of UZ Serpentis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarría, J.; Michel, R.

    2007-10-01

    We present high dispersion time-resolved spectroscopic observations of the dwarf nova UZ. We find the radial velocity curve of the accretion disc, surrounding the primary star, with a semi-amplitude K_1 = 98 km s^{-1}. There is no spectral evidence of the secondary star. The orbital period, estimated from its velocity curve is 0.17589 days, slightly larger than that found by Echevarría (1988), from photometric observations. New ephemerides of the object are discussed from both results. An analysis of the masses and inclination angle of the binary, using the diagnostic M_1-M_2 diagram, favors a set of values with M_1 = 0.90+/-0.1M_⊙; M_2 = 0.40+/-0.1M_⊙; and i = 50°+/-0.1, which is consistent with the ultraviolet observations and models and also with the optical photometry.

  2. Radial diffusion of Io-injected plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Thomsen, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reexamines the problem of particle injection by Io and subsequent radial diffusion by flux tube interchange using a proper phase space density formulation. The mathematical formalism is developed, and the theoretical results are compared with the observations, taking into account the pitch angle and energy coverage of the detector on Pioneer 10. Two objectives are pursued: (1) to test the hypothesis of Siscoe and Chen (1977) that Io is the source for all of the plasma observed by Frank et al. (1976) inside 10 R(J); and (2) to describe a simple but flexible method intended to analyze the observations of any other plasma instrument flown through the inner Jovian magnetosphere, e.g., those on Voyager 1 and 2 and Galileo.

  3. Interfaces in semiconductor/metal radial superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Deneke, Christoph; Sigle, Wilfried; Eigenthaler, Ulrike; Aken, Peter A. van; Schuetz, Gisela; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2007-06-25

    Semiconductor/metal radial superlattices are produced by the roll-up of inherently strained InGaAs/Ti/Au as well as InAlGaAs/GaAs/Cr films. Cross sections of the obtained structures are prepared and investigated in detail by diverse transmission electron microscopy as well as microanalysis techniques. Special attention is paid to the interfaces of the semiconductor/metal hybrid superlattice. The study reveals amorphous, noncrystalline layers for the semiconductor/metal as well as for the metal/semiconductor interface. The chemical analysis suggests that the observed interlayers are oxides giving rise to a semiconductor/oxide/metal/oxide superlattice rather than a pure semiconductor/metal superlattice.

  4. Macrostrain measurement using radial collimators at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bourke, M.A.M.; Roberts, J.A.; Davis, D.

    1996-06-01

    A series of `short` radial collimators have been implemented in the 90{degrees} scattering geometries on the neutron powder diffractometer at Los Alamos. The capability to perform macrostrain measurements has been improved by the commensurate ability to rapidly select a sampling volume appropriate to the specimen. The compact design of the collimators was dictated by the need to fit them in a cylindrical vacuum chamber as well as providing space in which to manipulate a specimen in three dimensions. Collimators of different vane lengths were fabricated to give 4 different resolutions for which 2/3 of the diffracted intensity comes form distances of 0.75, 1. 25, 2.5, and 4.0 mm along the incident beam. Qualifying scans and a demonstration of a cracked ring, containing a steep stress gradient, are included.

  5. Bayesian planet searches in radial velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Phil

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsic stellar variability caused by magnetic activity and convection has become the main limiting factor for planet searches in both transit and radial velocity (RV) data. New spectrographs are under development like ESPRESSO and EXPRES that aim to improve RV precision by a factor of approximately 100 over the current best spectrographs, HARPS and HARPS-N. This will greatly exacerbate the challenge of distinguishing planetary signals from stellar activity induced RV signals. At the same time good progress has been made in simulating stellar activity signals. At the Porto 2014 meeting, “Towards Other Earths II,” Xavier Dumusque challenged the community to a large scale blind test using the simulated RV data to understand the limitations of present solutions to deal with stellar signals and to select the best approach. My talk will focus on some of the statistical lesson learned from this challenge with an emphasis on Bayesian methodology.

  6. Stress intensity and displacement coefficients for radially cracked ring segments subject to three-point bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.; Srawley, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    The boudary collocation method was used to generate Mode 1 stress intensity and crack mouth displacement coefficients for internally and externally radially cracked ring segments (arc bend specimens) subjected to three point radial loading. Numerical results were obtained for ring segment outer to inner radius ratios (R sub o/ R sub i) ranging from 1.10 to 2.50 and crack length to width ratios (a/W) ranging from 0.1 to 0.8. Stress intensity and crack mouth displacement coefficients were found to depend on the ratios R sub o/R sub i and a/W as well as the included angle between the directions of the reaction forces.

  7. Estimating vertical velocity and radial flow from Doppler radar observations of tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. L.; Lee, W. C.; MacDonald, A. E.

    2006-01-01

    The mesoscale vorticity method (MVM) is used in conjunction with the ground-based velocity track display (GBVTD) to derive the inner-core vertical velocity from Doppler radar observations of tropical cyclone (TC) Danny (1997). MVM derives the vertical velocity from vorticity variations in space and in time based on the mesoscale vorticity equation. The use of MVM and GBVTD allows us to derive good correlations among the eye-wall maximum wind, bow-shaped updraught and echo east of the eye-wall in Danny. Furthermore, we demonstrate the dynamically consistent radial flow can be derived from the vertical velocity obtained from MVM using the wind decomposition technique that solves the Poisson equations over a limited-area domain. With the wind decomposition, we combine the rotational wind which is obtained from Doppler radar wind observations and the divergent wind which is inferred dynamically from the rotational wind to form the balanced horizontal wind in TC inner cores, where rotational wind dominates the divergent wind. In this study, we show a realistic horizontal and vertical structure of the vertical velocity and the induced radial flow in Danny's inner core. In the horizontal, the main eye-wall updraught draws in significant surrounding air, converging at the strongest echo where the maximum updraught is located. In the vertical, the main updraught tilts vertically outwards, corresponding very well with the outward-tilting eye-wall. The maximum updraught is located at the inner edge of the eye-wall clouds, while downward motions are found at the outer edge. This study demonstrates that the mesoscale vorticity method can use high-temporal-resolution data observed by Doppler radars to derive realistic vertical velocity and the radial flow of TCs. The vorticity temporal variations crucial to the accuracy of the vorticity method have to be derived from a high-temporal-frequency observing system such as state-of-the-art Doppler radars.

  8. Force-free currents and the Newman-Penrose tetrad of a Kerr black hole: Exact local solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Govind

    2015-07-01

    In a previous article we derived a class of solutions to the force-free magnetosphere in a Kerr background. Here, the streaming surface, defined by constant values of the toriodal component of the electromagnetic vector potential A , was generated by constant values of θ . The electromagnetic current vector flowed along the infalling principle null geodesic vector of the geometry. Subsequently, we generalized this to obtain an outgoing principle null geodesic vector as well. In this article, we derive solutions that are complimentary to the above-mentioned criteria. Namely, here the solution has a streaming surface generated by spheres of constant radial coordinate r , and the current vector is generated by linear combinations of m and m⋆, the remaining bases vectors in the Newman-Penrose null tetrad.

  9. Radial-Electric-Field Piezoelectric Diaphragm Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G.; Working, Dennis C.; Mossi, Karla; Castro, Nicholas D.; Mane, Pooma

    2009-01-01

    In a recently invented class of piezoelectric diaphragm pumps, the electrode patterns on the piezoelectric diaphragms are configured so that the electric fields in the diaphragms have symmetrical radial (along-the-surface) components in addition to through-the-thickness components. Previously, it was accepted in the piezoelectric-transducer art that in order to produce the out-of-plane bending displacement of a diaphragm needed for pumping, one must make the electric field asymmetrical through the thickness, typically by means of electrodes placed on only one side of the piezoelectric material. In the present invention, electrodes are placed on both sides and patterned so as to produce substantial radial as well as through-the-thickness components. Moreover, unlike in the prior art, the electric field can be symmetrical through the thickness. Tests have shown in a given diaphragm that an electrode configuration according to this invention produces more displacement than does a conventional one-sided electrode pattern. The invention admits of numerous variations characterized by various degrees of complexity. Figure 1 is a simplified depiction of a basic version. As in other piezoelectric diaphragm pumps of similar basic design, the prime mover is a piezoelectric diaphragm. Application of a suitable voltage to the electrodes on the diaphragm causes it to undergo out-of-plane bending. The bending displacement pushes a fluid out of, or pulls the fluid into, a chamber bounded partly by the diaphragm. Also as in other diaphragm pumps in general, check valves ensure that the fluid flows only in through one port and only out through another port.

  10. Notes on radial drift for dalitz detection

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J H

    1992-08-21

    One solution to the problem of identifying electron pairs due to dalitz decay is to exploit the large difference in energy lose by electrons and pions at momenta below 150 MEV/C. The restricted'' energy loss is measured by averaging the bottom 60% of the energy loss samples in order to avoid the wide fluctuations caused by the Landau tails. Note that the electrons are fully relativistic and well up on the relativistic rise of the dE/dx curve at a momentum of 30 MeV/c whereas the pions are still moving down off the peak of the Bragg curve and are more heavily ionizing than the electrons. The separation between pions and electrons is very good up to about the pion rest mass and so we can in principle separate the species all through the kinematically allowed range for Dalitz decay but, in practice, the dE/dx resolution will eventually limit the technique to the range well below where the curves crossover. We then might need an additional technique for e/[pi] separation above 110 MeV/c or so. Time of Flight would be a suitable technique. We propose to use a radial drift Time Expansion Chamber (TEC, or sometimes known as at Time Projection Chamber, TPC) to simultaniously measure the energy loss and momentum of electrons and pions. The detector would be placed at Y=0 and extend to [plus minus] 0.5 units of rapidity and the secondary electrons generated by a track would drift radially away from the vertex towards a sensepad plane. The detector would be inside the magnetic field of the RE2 detector and the drift direction would be perpendicular to the field direction.

  11. Radial Shock Wave Devices Generate Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Császár, Nikolaus B. M.; Angstman, Nicholas B.; Milz, Stefan; Sprecher, Christoph M.; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed; Furia, John P.; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Conflicting reports in the literature have raised the question whether radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) devices and vibrating massage devices have similar energy signatures and, hence, cause similar bioeffects in treated tissues. Methods and Findings We used laser fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) measurements, high-speed imaging and x-ray film analysis to compare fundamental elements of the energy signatures of two rESWT devices (Swiss DolorClast; Electro Medical Systems, Nyon, Switzerland; D-Actor 200; Storz Medical, Tägerwillen, Switzerland) and a vibrating massage device (Vibracare; G5/General Physiotherapy, Inc., Earth City, MO, USA). To assert potential bioeffects of these treatment modalities we investigated the influence of rESWT and vibrating massage devices on locomotion ability of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) worms. Results FOPH measurements demonstrated that both rESWT devices generated acoustic waves with comparable pressure and energy flux density. Furthermore, both rESWT devices generated cavitation as evidenced by high-speed imaging and caused mechanical damage on the surface of x-ray film. The vibrating massage device did not show any of these characteristics. Moreover, locomotion ability of C. elegans was statistically significantly impaired after exposure to radial extracorporeal shock waves but was unaffected after exposure of worms to the vibrating massage device. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that both energy signature and bioeffects of rESWT devices are fundamentally different from those of vibrating massage devices. Clinical Relevance Prior ESWT studies have shown that tissues treated with sufficient quantities of acoustic sound waves undergo cavitation build-up, mechanotransduction, and ultimately, a biological alteration that “kick-starts” the healing response. Due to their different treatment indications and contra-indications rESWT devices cannot be equated to vibrating

  12. NEW RADIAL ABUNDANCE GRADIENTS FOR NGC 628 AND NGC 2403

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Croxall, Kevin V.; Marble, Andrew R.; Smith, J. D.; Gordon, Karl; Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr.; Garnett, Donald R. E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu E-mail: amarble@nso.edu E-mail: kgordon@stsci.edu

    2013-10-01

    Motivated by recent interstellar medium studies, we present high quality MMT and Gemini spectroscopic observations of H II regions in the nearby spiral galaxies NGC 628 and NGC 2403 in order to measure their chemical abundance gradients. Using long-slit and multi-object mask optical spectroscopy, we obtained measurements of the temperature sensitive auroral lines [O III] λ4363 and/or [N II] λ5755 at a strength of 4σ or greater in 11 H II regions in NGC 628 and 7 regions in NGC 2403. These observations allow us, for the first time, to derive an oxygen abundance gradient in NGC 628 based solely on 'direct' oxygen abundances of H II regions: 12 + log(O/H) = (8.43 ± 0.03) + (–0.017 ± 0.002) × R{sub g} (dex kpc{sup –1}), with a dispersion in log(O/H) of σ = 0.10 dex, from 14 regions with a radial coverage of ∼2-19 kpc. This is a significantly shallower slope than found by previous 'strong-line' abundance studies. In NGC 2403, we derive an oxygen abundance gradient of 12 + log(O/H) = (8.48 ± 0.04) + (–0.032 ± 0.007)× R{sub g} (dex kpc{sup –1}), with a dispersion in log(O/H) of σ = 0.07 dex, from seven H II with a radial coverage of ∼1-10 kpc. Additionally, we measure the N, S, Ne, and Ar abundances. We find the N/O ratio decreases with increasing radius for the inner disk, but reaches a plateau past R{sub 25} in NGC 628. NGC 2403 also has a negative N/O gradient with radius, but we do not sample the outer disk of the galaxy past R{sub 25} and so do not see evidence for a plateau. This bi-modal pattern measured for NGC 628 indicates dominant contributions from secondary nitrogen inside of the R{sub 25} transition and dominantly primary nitrogen farther out. As expected for α-process elements, S/O, Ne/O, and Ar/O are consistent with constant values over a range in oxygen abundance.

  13. Conservative second-order gravitational self-force on circular orbits and the effective one-body formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Damour, Thibault

    2016-05-01

    We consider Detweiler's redshift variable z for a nonspinning mass m1 in circular motion (with orbital frequency Ω ) around a nonspinning mass m2. We show how the combination of effective-one-body (EOB) theory with the first law of binary dynamics allows one to derive a simple, exact expression for the functional dependence of z on the (gauge-invariant) EOB gravitational potential u =(m1+m2)/R . We then use the recently obtained high-post-Newtonian(PN)-order knowledge of the main EOB radial potential A (u ;ν ) [where ν =m1m2/(m1+m2)2] to decompose the second-self-force-order contribution to the function z (m2Ω ,m1/m2) into a known part (which goes beyond the 4PN level in including the 5PN logarithmic term and the 5.5PN contribution) and an unknown one [depending on the yet unknown, 5PN, 6 PN ,… , contributions to the O (ν2) contribution to the EOB radial potential A (u ;ν )]. We apply our results to the second-self-force-order contribution to the frequency shift of the last stable orbit. We indicate the expected singular behaviors, near the lightring, of the second-self-force-order contributions to both the redshift and the EOB A potential. Our results should help both in extracting information of direct dynamical significance from ongoing second-self-force-order computations and in parametrizing their global strong-field behaviors. We also advocate computing second-self-force-order conservative quantities by iterating the time-symmetric Green-function in the background spacetime.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of HD 41004A/B (Zucker+, 2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, S.; Mazeh, T.; Santos, N. C.; Udry, S.; Mayor, M.

    2004-07-01

    The table presents 149 measurements of the radial velocities of HD41004A and HD41004B, including the first 103 which had already been published in a previous paper (2003A&A...404..775Z). The spectra used for the derivation were observed with CORALIE and the velocities were derived using Multi-Order TODCOR. The precision of the primary velocity is about 0.010km/s and the precision of the secondary is about 0.60km/s. (1 data file).

  15. Fields and propagation characteristics in vacuum of an ultrashort tightly focused radially polarized laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamin, Yousef I.

    2015-11-01

    Analytic expressions for the electric and magnetic fields of a radially polarized ultrashort and tightly focused laser pulse, propagating in vacuum, are derived from scalar and vector potentials satisfying simple initial conditions. It is shown that for a pulse of axial length comparable to a wavelength, only the zeroth (lowest-order) term in a power-series expansion of the vector potential is needed. A procedure is outlined which may be used to obtain the fields analytically, to any desired order. Most of the needed analytic work is done that would lead to the vector potential from which the fields may be derived and the main expressions are given.

  16. Ground-Based Radial Velocity Measurements of the Secondary Stars in Binary-Cepheid Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrow, Michael D.

    2000-05-01

    During the last decade, considerable advances have been made towards the determination of Cepheid dynamical masses in systems where the companion is a B-type main sequence star. (See the series of papers by N. Evans et al. for details.) Such determinations have involved two stages. First, intensive optical spectroscopic observations of the primary Cepheid star are carried out over a number of years to quantify its pulsational and orbital motion. Second, ultraviolet spectroscopic observations from HST (and previously IUE) are used to measure the radial velocity of the hot companion star at key orbital phases. These methods have proven relatively successful, but in a number of the observed systems (e.g. S Mus) the B-star γ -velocity has not matched that of the Cepheid, prompting suspicion of a third body being present in the system and casting doubts over the derived Cepheid mass. Resolution of this problem will only come from a larger program of observations of the secondaries. Through numerical simulations, I will show that in some cases such measurements of the companion-star radial velocities can be made with sufficient precision from the ground, enabling more intensive campaigns than can readily be carried out with HST. The new method requires high-resolution, high-signal-to-noise optical spectroscopy and employs the TODCOR algorithm (Zucker & Mazeh 1994) for simultaneous measurement of the radial velocities of Cepheid and companion. The first measurements of Cepheid-companion radial velocities using this technique will be presented.

  17. NONGRAVITATIONAL FORCES ON COMETS: AN EXTENSION OF THE STANDARD MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Aksnes, K.; Mysen, E.

    2011-09-15

    The accuracy of comet orbit computations is limited by uncertain knowledge of the recoil force due to outgassing from the nuclei. The standard model assumes an exponential dependence of the force on distance from the Sun. This variable force times constants A{sub 1}, A{sub 2}, and A{sub 3} represents the radial, transverse, and normal components of the net force. Orbit solutions show that the As often vary considerably over a few apparitions of the comets. In this paper, we allow for time variations of the As, and we show that for several comets this improves the orbit accuracy considerably.

  18. On one classical problem in the radial orbit instability theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyachenko, E. V.; Shukhman, I. G.

    2016-02-01

    Antonov's classical problem of stability of a collisionless sphere with a purely radial motion of stars is considered as a limit of the problem in which stars move in nearly radial orbits. We provide the proper limiting equations that take into account the singularity in the density distribution at the sphere center and give their solutions. We show that there is instability for even and odd spherical harmonics, with all unstable modes being not slow. The growth rates of aperiodic even modes increase indefinitely when approaching purely radial models. The physics of the radial orbit instability is discussed.

  19. Current concepts in the management of radial head fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kodde, Izaäk F; Kaas, Laurens; Flipsen, Mark; van den Bekerom, Michel PJ; Eygendaal, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Fracture of the radial head is a common injury. Over the last decades, the radial head is increasingly recognized as an important stabilizer of the elbow. In order to maintain stability of the injured elbow, goals of treatment of radial head fractures have become more and more towards restoring function and stability of the elbow. As treatment strategies have changed over the years, with an increasing amount of literature on this subject, the purpose of this article was to provide an overview of current concepts of the management of radial head fractures. PMID:26716091

  20. Elastodynamic image forces on dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Gurrutxaga-Lerma, Beñat; Balint, Daniel S.; Dini, Daniele; Sutton, Adrian P.

    2015-01-01

    The elastodynamic image forces on edge and screw dislocations in the presence of a planar-free surface are derived. The explicit form of the elastodynamic fields of an injected, quiescent screw dislocation are also derived. The resulting image forces are affected by retardation effects: the dislocations experience no image force for a period of time defined by the arrival and reflection at the free surface of the dislocation fields. For the case of injected, stationary dislocations, it is shown that the elastodynamic image force tends asymptotically to the elastotatic prediction. For the case of injected, moving dislocations, it is shown that the elastodynamic image force on both the edge and the screw dislocations is magnified by inertial effects, and becomes increasingly divergent with time; this additional effect, missing in the elastostatic description, is shown to be substantial even for slow moving dislocations. Finally, it is shown that the elastodynamic image force of an edge dislocation moving towards the surface at the Rayleigh wave speed becomes repulsive, rather than attractive; this is suggestive of instabilities at the core of the dislocation, and likely resonances with the free surface. PMID:26528080