Sample records for radiation diffuse radiation

  1. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  2. Adaptive multigroup radiation diffusion

    E-print Network

    Williams, Richard B., Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and implementation of an algorithm for dramatically increasing the accuracy and reliability of multigroup radiation diffusion simulations at low group counts. This is achieved by ...

  3. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  4. Radiation 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    State. s. ABSTRACT This study is an attempt to find a tentative atmospheric index of human comfort and to show its applications for the area of College Station~ Texas. Temperature, relative humidity~ air move- ment, and global short-wave radiation... (direct plus diffuse) were combined into a single numerical expression for outdoor human comfort. The contribution of global short-wave radiation to the heat load on man also is evaluated in a single numerical expression, and expressed as an equivalent...

  5. Gas phase radiative effects in diffusion flames

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hasan Bedir

    1998-01-01

    Several radiation models are evaluated for a stagnation point diffusion flame of a solid fuel in terms of accuracy and computational time. Narrowband, wideband, spectral line weighted sum of gray gases (SLWSGG), and gray gas models are included in the comparison. Radiative heat flux predictions by the nongray narrowband, wideband, and SLWSGG models are found to be in good agreement

  6. Diffusion processes in general relativistic radiating spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Barreto, W.; Herrera, L.; Santos, N.O. (Oriente Universidad, Cumana (Venezuela); Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas; Observatorio Nacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

    1989-09-01

    The influence of diffusion processes on the dynamics of general relativistic radiating spheres is systematically studied by means of two examples. Differences between the streaming-out limit and the diffusion limit are exhibited, for both models, through the evolution curves of dynamical variables. In particular it is shown the Bondi mass decreases, for both models, in the diffusion limit as compared with its value at the streaming-out regime. 15 refs.

  7. Assessment of diffuse radiation models in Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magarreiro, Clarisse; Brito, Miguel; Soares, Pedro; Azevedo, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Measured irradiance databases usually consist of global solar radiation data with limited spatial coverage. Hence, solar radiation models have been developed to estimate the diffuse fraction from the measured global irradiation. This information is critical for the assessment of the potential of solar energy technologies; for example, the decision to use photovoltaic systems with tracking system. The different solar radiation models for this purpose differ on the parameters used as input. The simplest, and most common, are models which use global radiation information only. More sophisticated models require meteorological parameters such as information from clouds, atmospheric turbidity, temperature or precipitable water content. Most of these models comprise correlations with the clearness index, kt (portion of horizontal extra-terrestrial radiation reaching the Earth's surface) to obtain the diffuse fraction kd (portion of diffuse component from global radiation). The applicability of these different models is related to the local atmospheric conditions and its climatic characteristics. The models are not of general validity and can only be applicable to locations where the albedo of the surrounding terrain and the atmospheric contamination by dust are not significantly different from those where the corresponding methods were developed. Thus, models of diffuse fraction exhibit a relevant degree of location dependence: e.g. models developed considering data acquired in Europe are mainly linked to Northern, Central or, more recently, Mediterranean areas. The Azores Archipelago, with its particular climate and cloud cover characteristics, different from mainland Europe, has not yet been considered for the development of testing of such models. The Azorean climate reveals large amounts of cloud cover in its annual cycle, with spatial and temporal variabilities more complex than the common Summer/Winter pattern. This study explores the applicability of different existing correlation models of diffuse fraction and clearness index or other plain parameters to the Azorean region. Reliable data provided by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Climate Research Facility from the Graciosa Island deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (http://www.arm.gov/sites/amf/grw) was used to perform the analysis. Model results showed a tendency to underestimate higher values of diffuse radiation. From the performance results of the correlation models reviewed it was clear that there is room for improvement.

  8. Diffuse radiation, twilight, and photochemistry — I

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Lary; J. A. Pyle

    1991-01-01

    A photochemical scheme which includes a detailed treatment of multiple scattering up to solar zenith angles of 96° (developed for use in a GCM) has been used to study partitioning within chemical families. Attention is drawn to the different zenith angle dependence of diffuse radiation for the two spectral regions ?310 nm. The effect that this has on the so-called

  9. Characterization of supersonic radiation diffusion waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Alastair S.; Guymer, Thomas M.; Morton, John; Williams, Benjamin; Kline, John L.; Bazin, Nicholas; Bentley, Christopher; Allan, Shelly; Brent, Katie; Comley, Andrew J.; Flippo, Kirk; Cowan, Joseph; Taccetti, J. Martin; Mussack-Tamashiro, Katie; Schmidt, Derek W.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Obrey, Kimberly; Lanier, Nicholas E.; Workman, Jonathan B.; Stevenson, R. Mark

    2015-07-01

    Supersonic and diffusive radiation flow is an important test problem for the radiative transfer models used in radiation-hydrodynamics computer codes owing to solutions being accessible via analytic and numeric methods. We present experimental results with which we compare these solutions by studying supersonic and diffusive flow in the laboratory. We present results of higher-accuracy experiments than previously possible studying radiation flow through up to 7 high-temperature mean free paths of low-density, chlorine-doped polystyrene foam and silicon dioxide aerogel contained by an Au tube. Measurements of the heat front position and absolute measurements of the x-ray emission arrival at the end of the tube are used to test numerical and analytical models. We find excellent absolute agreement with simulations provided that the opacity and the equation of state are adjusted within expected uncertainties; analytical models provide a good phenomenological match to measurements but are not in quantitative agreement due to their limited scope.

  10. Radiators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1985-01-01

    A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape,

  11. Diffusion in potato during far infrared radiation drying

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. M. Afzal; T. Abe

    1998-01-01

    The effect of radiation intensity and thickness of slab on the moisture diffusion characteristics of potato during FIR drying is investigated. The standard solution to the non-stationary state diffusion equation was used as a mathematical tool. A model fitting procedure was applied to the experimental drying data to determine the diffusion coefficients. The diffusivity was found to vary with radiation

  12. Observations of the diffuse UV radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Tennyson, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Spectra are presented for the diffuse UV radiation field between 1250 to 3100 A from eight different regions of the sky, which were obtained with the Johns Hopkins UVX experiment. UVX flew aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-61C) in January 1986 as part of the Get-Away Special project. The experiment consisted of two 1/4 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometers, covering the spectral range 1250 to 1700 A at 17 A resolution and 1600 to 3100 A at 27 A resolution, respectively, with a field of view of 4 x .25 deg, sufficiently small to pick out regions of the sky with no stars in the line of sight. Values were found for the diffuse cosmic background ranging in intensity from 300 to 900 photons/sq cm/sec/sr/A. The cosmic background is spectrally flat from 1250 to 3100 A, within the uncertainties of each spectrometer. The zodiacal light begins to play a significant role in the diffuse radiation field above 2000 A, and its brightness was determined relative to the solar emission. Observed brightnesses of the zodiacal light in the UV remain almost constant with ecliptic latitude, unlike the declining visible brightnesses, possibly indicating that those (smaller) grains responsible for the UV scattering have a much more uniform distribution with distance from the ecliptic plane than do those grains responsible for the visible scattering.

  13. Adaptive Implicit Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Wang, Zhen [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Manuel [ORNL; Pernice, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2013-01-01

    We describe methods for accurate and efficient long term time integra- tion of non-equilibrium radiation diffusion systems: implicit time integration for effi- cient long term time integration of stiff multiphysics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while control- ling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  14. Radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erik Seedhouse

    \\u000a It is more than forty years since astronauts ventured beyond Earth’s protective magnetic shield and travelled to the Moon.\\u000a Although the Apollo missions subjected astronauts to space radiation, the short duration minimized the risk, but an ECM will\\u000a subject astronauts to much longer exposure. In fact, astronauts will be in deep space for so long, they will run the risk

  15. A radiating shock evaluated using Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, M.; Gentile, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore CA 94550 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo [1] (IMC) has been shown to be very expensive when used to evaluate a radiation field in opaque media. Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion (IMD) [2], which evaluates a spatial discretized diffusion equation using a Monte Carlo algorithm, can be used to reduce the cost of evaluating the radiation field in opaque media [2]. This work couples IMD to the hydrodynamics equations to evaluate opaque diffusive radiating shocks. The Lowrie semi-analytic diffusive radiating shock benchmark[a] is used to verify our implementation of the coupled system of equations. (authors)

  16. Effect of the diffuse solar radiation on photovoltaic inverter output

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. A. Balafas; M. D. Athanassopoulou; T. Argyropoulos; P. Skafidas; C. T. Dervos

    2010-01-01

    Solar global irradiance received at a horizontal level on the earth varies significantly over short intervals due to diffuse radiation changes. Experimental data on global irradiance profiles received by fast data recording systems show that the global irradiance may be enhanced for a few minute periods by as much as 40%. The diffuse radiation is intensified by dry air mass

  17. Global, direct and diffuse solar-radiation in Syria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Al-Mohamad

    2004-01-01

    Solar-radiation components, namely global, diffuse and direct, were calculated over the Syrian landmass using several mathematical equations starting from the Angström formula. An appropriate theoretical method and a computer program were specially designed and developed for these calculations. The program provides fast, direct and accurate information about the global, diffuse and direct solar-radiations on any site in the country. In

  18. The Effect of Radiation on Flow in a Conical Diffuser

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Kumar; V. Eswaran

    2008-01-01

    The effect of thermal radiation on the flow in a conical diffuser of half-cone angle 2.5° is studied numerically for constant thermophysical properties. The finite-volume method (FVM) is employed to solve both the Navier-Stokes equation (NSE) and the integro-differential radiative transfer equation (RTE). The effect of radiative parameters, e.g., optical diameter, scattering albedo and wall emissivity at two Reynolds numbers

  19. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelly, Thompson G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbatish, Todd J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  20. Diffuse, global and extra-terrestrial solar radiation for Singapore

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. N. A. Hawlader

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, equations have been developed to estimate diffuse fraction of the hourly, daily and monthly global insolation on a horizontal surface. These correlations are expressed in terms of Kd, the ratio of diffuse-to-total radiation, and KT, the clearness index. The hourly correlation equations, show a fairly similar trend to that of Orgill and Hollands (1) and Spencer (5)

  1. DIFFUSION OF PROTONS IN THE OUTER RADIATION BELT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. P. Nakada; G. D. Mead

    1965-01-01

    The diffusion of protons in the outer radiation belt due to violation of the third adiabatic invariant has been examined. The particular mechanism studied is one in which variations in the intensity of the solar wind produce magnetic disturbances causing motion of particles between L shells. A Fokker-Planck diffusion equation is used with terms describing Coulomb energy degradation and charge-exchange

  2. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A.; Shprits, Y.; Subbotin, D.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Resonant interactions between Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves and relativistic electrons may violate the third adiabatic invariant of motion, which produces radial diffusion in the electron radiation belts. This process plays an important role in the formation and structure of the outer electron radiation belt and is important for electron acceleration and losses in that region. Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interaction of electrons with ULF waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2012] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate their relative effect on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes quiet time and storm time geomagnetic activity and is compared to data based on satellite observations. Our calculations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion. We show that the results of the 3D diffusion simulations depend on the assumed parametrization of waves. The differences between the simulations and potential missing physical mechanisms are discussed. References Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999JA900344 Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. J. Rae, D. K. Milling, S. R. Elkington, A. A. Chan, and H. J. Singer (2012), ULF wave derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A04222, doi:10.1029/2011JA017463.

  3. Radiative Extinction of Gaseous Spherical Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santa, K. J.; Chao, B. H.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2007-01-01

    Radiative extinction of spherical diffusion flames was investigated experimentally and numerically. The experiments involved microgravity spherical diffusion flames burning ethylene and propane at 0.98 bar. Both normal (fuel flowing into oxidizer) and inverse (oxidizer flowing into fuel) flames were studied, with nitrogen supplied to either the fuel or the oxygen. Flame conditions were chosen to ensure that the flames extinguished within the 2.2 s of available test time; thus extinction occurred during unsteady flame conditions. Diagnostics included color video and thin-filament pyrometry. The computations, which simulated flow from a porous sphere into a quiescent environment, included detailed chemistry, transport and radiation, and yielded transient results. Radiative extinction was observed experimentally and simulated numerically. Extinction time, peak temperature, and radiative loss fraction were found to be independent of flow rate except at very low flow rates. Radiative heat loss was dominated by the combustion products downstream of the flame and was found to scale with flame surface area, not volume. For large transient flames the heat release rate also scaled with surface area and thus the radiative loss fraction was largely independent of flow rate. Peak temperatures at extinction onset were about 1100 K, which is significantly lower than for kinetic extinction. One observation of this work is that while radiative heat losses can drive transient extinction, this is not because radiative losses are increasing with time (flame size) but rather because the heat release rate is falling off as the temperature drops.

  4. Method for manufacturing nuclear radiation detector with deep diffused junction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hall

    1977-01-01

    Germanium radiation detectors are manufactured by diffusing lithium into high purity p-type germanium. The diffusion is most readily accomplished from a lithium-lead-bismuth alloy at approximately 430°C and is monitored by a quartz half cell containing a standard composition of this alloy. Detectors having n-type cores may be constructed by converting high purity p-type germanium to n-type by a lithium diffusion

  5. The diffuse component of the cosmic X-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldt, E. A.; Garmire, C.

    1978-01-01

    The A-2 experiment on HEAO-1 is specifically developed to study the diffuse radiation of the entire X-ray sky over a wide bandwidth, covering both the soft X-ray emission from nearby regions of the galaxy and the isotropic hard X-radiation indicative of remote extragalactic origins. A partial conclusion from the experiment is that a hot thermal plasma, on a scale comparable to that of the universe, may be the principal source of hard X-radiation characteristic of the extragalactic sky. Some key features of this background were defined.

  6. Theoretical and Numerical Investigation of Radiative Extinction of Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Anjan

    1996-01-01

    The influence of soot radiation on diffusion flames was investigated using both analytical and numerical techniques. Soot generated in diffusion flames dominate the flame radiation over gaseous combustion products and can significantly lower the temperature of the flame. In low gravity situations there can be significant accumulation of soot and combustion products in the vicinity of the primary reaction zone owing to the absence of any convective buoyant flow. Such situations may result in substantial suppression of chemical activities in a flame, and the possibility of a radiative extinction may also be anticipated. The purpose of this work was to not only investigate the possibility of radiative extinction of a diffusion flame but also to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze the influence of soot radiation on a diffusion flame. In this study, first a hypothetical radiative loss profile of the form of a sech(sup 2) was assumed to influence a pure diffusion flame. It was observed that the reaction zone can, under certain circumstances, move through the radiative loss zone and locate itself on the fuel side of the loss zone contrary to our initial postulate. On increasing the intensity and/or width of the loss zone it was possible to extinguish the flame, and extinction plots were generated. In the presence of a convective flow, however, the movement of the temperature and reaction rate peaks indicated that the flame behavior is more complicated compared to a pure diffusional flame. A comprehensive model of soot formation, oxidation and radiation was used in a more involved analysis. The soot model of Syed, Stewart and Moss was used for soot nucleation and growth and the model of Nagle and Strickland-Constable was used for soot oxidation. The soot radiation was considered in the optically thin limit. An analysis of the flame structure revealed that the radiative loss term is countered both by the reaction term and the diffusion term. The essential balance for the soot volume fraction was found to be between the processes of soot convection and soot growth. Such a balance yielded to analytical treatment and the soot volume fraction could be expressed in the form of an integral. The integral was evaluated using two approximate methods and the results agreed very well with the numerical solutions for all cases examined.

  7. Multifrequency-Gray Method for Radiation Diffusion with Compton Scattering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan M. Winslow

    1995-01-01

    We describe an improved multifrequency-gray method for time-dependent nonequilibrium flux-limited radiation diffusion in a high temperature system, using a two-temperature model for electrons and ions and including energy exchange between photons and electrons by Compton scattering. Our gray equation has a nonsymmetric finite difference matrix that allows us to represent negative gray diffusion coefficients, which occur in the presence of

  8. Lossy radial diffusion of relativistic Jovian electrons. [calculation of synchrotron radiation and electron radiation for Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1976-01-01

    The radial diffusion equation with synchrotron losses was solved by the Laplace transform method for near-equatorially mirroring relativistic electrons. The evolution of a power law distribution function was found and the characteristics of synchrotron burn-off are stated in terms of explicit parameters for an arbitrary diffusion coefficient. Emissivity from the radiation belts of Jupiter was studied. Asymptotic forms for the distribution in the strong synchrotron loss regime are provided.

  9. Relationship between diffuse, total, and extraterrestrial solar radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S TULLER

    1976-01-01

    A method of approximating diffuse beam solar radiation is extended to the upper middle latitudes through the use of several years of mean monthly data and one year of daily data recorded at four stations in Canada which represent a variety of climatic regions as well as both highly urbanized and remote localities. (WDM)

  10. Self-Similar Radiation-Hydrodynamics Solutions in the Equilibrium Diffusion Limit 

    E-print Network

    Lane, Taylor Kinsey

    2013-01-31

    This work presents semi-analytical solutions to a radiation-hydrodynamics problems of a radiation source driving an initially cold medium. Our solutions are in the equilibrium diffusion limit, include material motion and allow for radiation...

  11. Comparison of the Radiative Two-Flux and Diffusion Approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spuckler, Charles M.

    2006-01-01

    Approximate solutions are sometimes used to determine the heat transfer and temperatures in a semitransparent material in which conduction and thermal radiation are acting. A comparison of the Milne-Eddington two-flux approximation and the diffusion approximation for combined conduction and radiation heat transfer in a ceramic material was preformed to determine the accuracy of the diffusion solution. A plane gray semitransparent layer without a substrate and a non-gray semitransparent plane layer on an opaque substrate were considered. For the plane gray layer the material is semitransparent for all wavelengths and the scattering and absorption coefficients do not vary with wavelength. For the non-gray plane layer the material is semitransparent with constant absorption and scattering coefficients up to a specified wavelength. At higher wavelengths the non-gray plane layer is assumed to be opaque. The layers are heated on one side and cooled on the other by diffuse radiation and convection. The scattering and absorption coefficients were varied. The error in the diffusion approximation compared to the Milne-Eddington two flux approximation was obtained as a function of scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient. The percent difference in interface temperatures and heat flux through the layer obtained using the Milne-Eddington two-flux and diffusion approximations are presented as a function of scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient. The largest errors occur for high scattering and low absorption except for the back surface temperature of the plane gray layer where the error is also larger at low scattering and low absorption. It is shown that the accuracy of the diffusion approximation can be improved for some scattering and absorption conditions if a reflectance obtained from a Kubelka-Munk type two flux theory is used instead of a reflection obtained from the Fresnel equation. The Kubelka-Munk reflectance accounts for surface reflection and radiation scattered back by internal scattering sites while the Fresnel reflection only accounts for surface reflections.

  12. 3-D VERB radiation belt simulations including mixed diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbotin, Dmitriy; Shprits, Yuri; Ni, Binbin

    The evolution of relativistic electron fluxes in the radiation belts is described by the modified Fokker-Plank equation in terms of the radial distance, energy and equatorial pitch angle. We present numerical solution of the 2-D and 3-D Fokker-Planck equation including mixed diffusion terms using UCLA VERB code. We evaluate the importance of the mixed diffusion in 2-D and 3-D cases of the Fokker-Planck diffusion equation for radiation belts simulations. In both cases the mixed diffusion tends to inhibit local acceleration and results in lower relativistic electron fluxes, as compared to the simulation without mixed diffusion. The effect of the mixed diffusion terms is most significant at small pitch angles. The inclusion of mixed diffusion also tends to delay the formation of the peak in phase space density in the recovery phase of a storm. We also perform sensitivity simulation to the assumed wave models, which indicates that an accurate knowledge of the wave parameters is the most important factor.

  13. Three-dimensional VERB radiation belt simulations including mixed diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbotin, Dmitriy; Shprits, Yuri; Ni, Binbin

    2010-03-01

    The evolution of relativistic electron fluxes in the radiation belts is described by the modified Fokker-Plank equation in terms of the radial distance, energy and equatorial pitch angle. In this study we present numerical solutions of the two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Fokker-Planck equation including mixed diffusion terms. We use finite differences method with implicit numerical scheme, which is stable for any given time step. We evaluate the importance of the mixed diffusion in 2-D and 3-D cases of the Fokker-Planck diffusion equation for radiation belts simulations. In both cases the mixed diffusion tends to inhibit local acceleration and results in lower relativistic electron fluxes, as compared to the simulation without mixed diffusion. The effect of the mixed diffusion terms is most significant at small pitch angles. The inclusion of mixed diffusion also tends to delay the formation of the peak in phase space density in the recovery phase of a storm. We also perform sensitivity simulation to the assumed wave models, which indicates that an accurate knowledge of the wave parameters is the most important factor.

  14. Radiation from Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Yousef; Edelman, Raymond B.; Sotos, Raymond G.; Stocker, Dennis P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the first demonstration of quantitative flame-radiation measurement in microgravity environments, with the objective of studying the influences and characteristics of radiative transfer on the behavior of gas-jet diffusion flames with possible application to spacecraft fire detection. Laminar diffusion flames of propane, burning in quiescent air at atmospheric pressure, are studied in the 5.18-Second Zero-Gravity Facility of NASA Lewis Research Center. Radiation from these flames is measured using a wide-view angle, thermopile-detector radiometer, and comparisons are made with normal-gravity flames. The results show that the radiation level is significantly higher in microgravity compared to normal-gravity environments due to larger flame size, enhanced soot formation, and entrapment of combustion products in the vicinity of the flame. These effects are the consequences of the removal of buoyancy which makes diffusion the dominant mechanism of transport. The results show that longer test times may be needed to reach steady state in microgravity environments.

  15. Pulsar and diffuse contributions to the observed galactic gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.; Stecker, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    With the acquisition of satellite data on the energy spectrum of galactic gamma-radiation, it is clear that such radiation has a multicomponent nature. A calculation of the pulsar gamma ray emission spectrum is used together with a statistical analysis of recent data on 328 known pulsars to make a new determination of the pulsar contribution to galactic gamma ray emission. The contributions from diffuse interstellar cosmic ray induced production mechanisms to the total emission are then reexamined. It is concluded that pulsars may account for a significant fraction of galactic gamma ray emission.

  16. Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Ozeke, Louis G; Mann, Ian R; Murphy, Kyle R; Jonathan Rae, I; Milling, David K

    2014-01-01

    We present analytic expressions for ULF wave-derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, as a function of L and Kp, which can easily be incorporated into global radiation belt transport models. The diffusion coefficients are derived from statistical representations of ULF wave power, electric field power mapped from ground magnetometer data, and compressional magnetic field power from in situ measurements. We show that the overall electric and magnetic diffusion coefficients are to a good approximation both independent of energy. We present example 1-D radial diffusion results from simulations driven by CRRES-observed time-dependent energy spectra at the outer boundary, under the action of radial diffusion driven by the new ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients and with empirical chorus wave loss terms (as a function of energy, Kp and L). There is excellent agreement between the differential flux produced by the 1-D, Kp-driven, radial diffusion model and CRRES observations of differential electron flux at 0.976 MeV—even though the model does not include the effects of local internal acceleration sources. Our results highlight not only the importance of correct specification of radial diffusion coefficients for developing accurate models but also show significant promise for belt specification based on relatively simple models driven by solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed or geomagnetic indices such as Kp. Key Points Analytic expressions for the radial diffusion coefficients are presented The coefficients do not dependent on energy or wave m value The electric field diffusion coefficient dominates over the magnetic

  17. The origin of the diffuse background gamma-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Recent observations have now provided evidence for diffuse background gamma radiation extending to energies beyond 100 MeV. There is some evidence of isotropy and implied cosmological origin. Significant features in the spectrum of this background radiation have been observed which provide evidence for its origin in nuclear processes in the early stages of the big-band cosmology and tie in these processes with galaxy fromation theory. A crucial test of the theory may lie in future observations of the background radiation in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV energy range which may be made with large orbiting spark-chamber satellite detectors. A discussion of the theoretical interpretations of present data, their connection with baryon symmetric cosmology and galaxy formation theory, and the need for future observations are given.

  18. The origin of the diffuse background gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Recent observations provided evidence for diffuse background gamma radiation extending to energies beyond 100 MeV, and evidence of isotropy and implied cosmological origin. Significant features in the spectrum of this background radiation were observed which provide evidence for its origin in nuclear processes in the early stages of big-bang cosmology, and connect these processes with the galaxy formation theory. A test of the theory is in future observations of the background radiation in the 100 MeK to 100 GeV energy range which are made with large orbiting spark-chamber satellite detectors. The theoretical interpretations of present data, their connection with baryon-symmetric cosmology and galaxy formation theory, and the need for future observations are discussed.

  19. VOYAGER OBSERVATIONS OF THE DIFFUSE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, Jayant [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengalooru 560 034 (India); Henry, Richard Conn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Holberg, Jay B., E-mail: jmurthy@yahoo.com [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    The two Voyager spacecraft have completed their planetary exploration mission and are now probing the outer realms of the heliosphere. The Voyager ultraviolet spectrometers continued to operate well after the Voyager 2 Neptune encounter in 1989. We present a complete database of diffuse radiation observations made by both Voyagers: a total of 1943 spectra (500-1600 A) scattered throughout the sky. These include observations of dust-scattered starlight, emission lines from the hot interstellar medium, and a number of locations where no diffuse radiation was detected, with the very low upper limit of about 25 photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} A{sup -1}. Many of these observations were from late in the mission when there was significantly less contribution from interplanetary emission lines and thus less contamination of the interstellar signal.

  20. Observations of the diffuse near-UV radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, J.; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Tennyson, P. D.

    1990-01-01

    The diffuse radiation field from 1650-3100 A has been observed by spectrometer aboard the Space Shuttle, and the contributions of the zodiacal light an the diffuse cosmic background to the signal have been derived. Colors ranging from 0.65 to 1.2 are found for the zodiacal light with an almost linear increase in the color with ecliptic latitude. This rise in color is due to UV brightness remaining almost constant while the visible brightnesses drop by almost a factor of two. This is interpreted as evidence that the grains responsible for the UV scattering have much more uniform distribution with distance from the ecliptic plane than do those grains responsible for the visible scattering. Intensities for the cosmic diffuse background ranging from 300 units to 900 units are found which are not consistent with either a correlation with N(H I) or with spatial isotropy.

  1. Radiation Symbols

    MedlinePLUS

    Radiation Protection Basics Health Effects Ionizing & Non-Ionizing Radiation Understanding Radiation: Radiation Symbols Radiation Protection Basics Main Page History of Radiation Protection Radiation Warning Symbols Radiation Warning Sign Gallery ...

  2. Optimization of efficiency and response time of diffusion-based nuclear radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Wouters; T. Otaredian; E. M. Schooneveld

    1991-01-01

    The charge collection process in a diffusion-based silicon nuclear radiation detector was investigated by illuminating the detector at the backside with optical radiation. The results are compared to calculations and show good agreement. The collection mechanism is characterized, and the detector response to nuclear radiation and its optimum with respect to efficiency and response time are calculated. Efficiency and response

  3. Reference panel anisotropy and diffuse radiation - some implications for field spectroscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. M. Rollin; E. J. Milton; D. R. Emery

    2000-01-01

    Field goniometer measurements were obtained to examine the angular variation in the reflectance of direct beam, diffuse and global radiation from two types of Spectralon panel. The results indicate that optical grade (99% reflective) and grey (20% reflective) SpectralonTM exhibit different non-Lambertian properties with respect to direct beam irradiance. The angular variation in the reflectance of diffuse radiation by the

  4. Effects of diffuse radiation on canopy gas exchange processes in a forest ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Knohl; Dennis D. Baldocchi

    2008-01-01

    Forest ecosystems across the globe show an increase in ecosystem carbon uptake efficiency under conditions with high fraction of diffuse radiation. Here, we combine eddy covariance flux measurements at a deciduous temperate forest in central Germany with canopy-scale modeling using the biophysical multilayer model CANVEG to investigate the impact of diffuse radiation on various canopy gas exchange processes and to

  5. Impact of changes in diffuse radiation on the global land carbon sink

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lina M. Mercado; Nicolas Bellouin; Stephen Sitch; Olivier Boucher; Chris Huntingford; Martin Wild; Peter M. Cox

    2009-01-01

    Plant photosynthesis tends to increase with irradiance. However, recent theoretical and observational studies have demonstrated that photosynthesis is also more efficient under diffuse light conditions. Changes in cloud cover or atmospheric aerosol loadings, arising from either volcanic or anthropogenic emissions, alter both the total photosynthetically active radiation reaching the surface and the fraction of this radiation that is diffuse, with

  6. Nonlinear evolution of diffusion flame oscillations triggered by radiative heat loss

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. H. Sohn; J. S. Kim; S. H. Chung; K. Maruta

    2000-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of radiation-induced oscillatory instability in diffusion flames is numerically investigated by employing a diffusion flame established in stagnant mixing layer with optically thin gas-phase radiation and unity Lewis numbers for all species as a model. Particular attention is focused on the radiation-induced extinction regime that occurs when the Damköhler number is sufficiently large. Transient evolution of the flame,

  7. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of biological systems leads to the formation of radiolytic species such as H(raised dot), (raised dot)OH, H2, H2O2, e(sup -)(sub aq), etc.[1]. These species react with neighboring molecules, which result in damage in biological molecules such as DNA. Radiation chemistry is there for every important to understand the radiobiological consequences of radiation[2]. In this work, we discuss an approach based on the exact Green Functions for diffusion-influenced reactions which may be used to simulate radiation chemistry and eventually extended to study more complex systems, including DNA.

  8. Anisotropic Turbulent Diffusion In Radiative Zones Of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toque, Nathalie

    2006-06-01

    Transport of chemical elements in radiative zone is always an open question in the theory of stellar evolution. Up to now, the standard model which takes into account the microscopic diffusion lacks to accurately predict the abundances anomalies at the top of the main sequence stars. Since more than ten years, other processes involving turbulence and waves are under investigation. But, the mechanism by which they increase or decrease the vertical diffusion of the chemical elements to the top of the star is not yet understood. At the beginning of the 90s, Chaboyer and Zahn (1992) proposed a model of turbulent diffusion coefficients assuming no overlap between the small and large turbulent scales. This last assumption was the main failure of the model and gave clues for the next studies. Vincent, Michaud et al (1996) made 2D simulations of anisotropic turbulence and showed that the vertical transport of a passive scalar is reduced when the vortices are more stretched in the horizontal direction than in the vertical one. Our work was to find again the results of Vincent et al by solving the Navier-Stokes equations under the Boussinesq approximation. We succeeded in. But, as it is usual in science, we faced new misunderstandings. For example, we found that the vertical transport of the tracer levels off in highly anisotropic turbulent flows. This stop was announced by previous studies and demonstrated with waves processes. But in our work, the Prandtl number is low enough to efficiently damp the gravity waves. The reduction of the vertical transport and the level off are only involved by sheared turbulence.

  9. Diffuser radiation patterns over a large dynamic range. 1: Strong diffusers.

    PubMed

    Shirley, L G; George, N

    1988-05-01

    Theoretical computations are presented for the far-zone radiation patterns from strong diffusers having a normally distributed height profile and different autocorrelation functions for the surface height. Diffusers having two scales of roughness are also analyzed. Data are presented from ground-glass and acid-etched-glass diffusers using a scatterometer that permits measurements over an entire hemisphere with a dynamic range of 6-8 orders of magnitude. For the ground glass, excellent agreement is obtained using an autocorrelation function that is conical for small spatial offsets; this is consistent with our physical expectation based on the need for a rapid fall-off in surface correlation, due to the jagged nature of the surface relief. For the acid-etched case, excellent agreement is found using an autocorrelation function that is paraboloidal for small spatial offsets. Remote sensing of surface roughness and surface correlation are seen to be practical and accurate. PMID:20531666

  10. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics with radiative transfer in the flux-limited diffusion approximation

    E-print Network

    Stuart C. Whitehouse; Matthew R. Bate

    2004-07-12

    We describe the implementation and testing of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code that solves the equations of radiation hydrodynamics in the flux-limited diffusion (FLD) approximation. The SPH equations of radiation hydrodynamics for an explicit integration scheme are derived and tested. We also discuss the implementation of an implicit numerical scheme for solving the radiation equations that allows the system to be evolved using timesteps much longer than the explicit radiation timestep. The code is tested on a variety of one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics problems including radiation propagating in an optically thin medium, optically thick and thin shocks, subcritical and supercritical radiating shocks, and a radiation dominated shock. Many of the tests were also performed by Turner and Stone (2001) to test their implementation of a FLD module for the ZEUS-2D code. The SPH code performs at least as well as the ZEUS-2D code in these tests.

  11. Effects of Refractive Index and Diffuse or Specular Boundaries on a Radiating Isothermal Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Equilibrium temperatures of an absorbing-emitting layer were obtained for exposure to incident radiation and with the layer boundaries either specular or diffuse. For high refractive indices the surface condition can influence the radiative heat balance if the layer optical thickness is small. Hence for a spectrally varying absorption coefficient the layer temperature is affected if there is significant radiative energy in the spectral range with a small absorption coefficient. Similar behavior was obtained for transient radiative cooling of a layer where the results are affected by the initial temperature and hence the fraction of energy radiated in the short wavelength region where the absorption coefficient is small. The results are a layer without internal scattering. If internal scattering is significant, the radiation reaching the internal surface of a boundary is diffused and the effect of the two different surface conditions would become small.

  12. Human Impact on Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation during the Industrial Era

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria M. Kvalevåg; Gunnar Myhre

    2007-01-01

    In this study the direct and diffuse solar radiation changes are estimated, and they contribute to the understanding of the observed global dimming and the more recent global brightening during the industrial era. Using a multistream radiative transfer model, the authors calculate the impact of changes in ozone, NO2, water vapor, CH4 ,C O 2, direct and indirect aerosol effects,

  13. An Improved Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation 

    E-print Network

    Munger, B.; Haberl, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an improved multipyranometer array (MPA) for the continuous remote measurement of direct and diffuse solar radiation. The MPA described in this paper is an improvement over previously published MPA studies due...

  14. Soot formation and radiation in turbulent jet diffusion flames under normal and reduced gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jerry C.; Tong, LI; Sun, Jun; Greenberg, Paul S.; Griffin, Devon W.

    1993-01-01

    Most practical combustion processes, as well as fires and explosions, exhibit some characteristics of turbulent diffusion flames. For hydrocarbon fuels, the presence of soot particles significantly increases the level of radiative heat transfer from flames. In some cases, flame radiation can reach up to 75 percent of the heat release by combustion. Laminar diffusion flame results show that radiation becomes stronger under reduced gravity conditions. Therefore, detailed soot formation and radiation must be included in the flame structure analysis. A study of sooting turbulent diffusion flames under reduced-gravity conditions will not only provide necessary information for such practical issues as spacecraft fire safety, but also develop better understanding of fundamentals for diffusion combustion. In this paper, a summary of the work to date and of future plans is reported.

  15. An improved multipyranometer array for the measurement of direct and diffuse solar radiation 

    E-print Network

    Munger, Bryce Kirtley

    1997-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of an improved multipyranometer array (NDA) for the continuous remote measurement of direct and diff-use solar radiation. The NWA described in this thesis is an improvement over previously published MPA studies...

  16. Asymptotic Accuracy of the Equilibrium Diffusion Approximation and Semi-analytic Solutions of Radiating Shocks 

    E-print Network

    Ferguson, Jim Michael

    2014-01-10

    is correct through first-order in the asymptotic equilibrium diffusion limit (EDL), in agreement with other transport models; and, 2) we produced semi-analytic radiative shock solutions using grey Sn transport. The first problem establishes the limits...

  17. Asymptotic Accuracy of the Equilibrium Diffusion Approximation and Semi-analytic Solutions of Radiating Shocks

    E-print Network

    Ferguson, Jim Michael

    2014-01-10

    is correct through first-order in the asymptotic equilibrium diffusion limit (EDL), in agreement with other transport models; and, 2) we produced semi-analytic radiative shock solutions using grey Sn transport. The first problem establishes the limits...

  18. Diffusive radiation in one-dimensional Langmuir turbulence.

    PubMed

    Fleishman, G D; Toptygin, I N

    2007-07-01

    We calculate spectra of radiation produced by a relativistic particle in the presence of one-dimensional Langmuir turbulence which might be generated by a streaming instability in the plasma, in particular, in the shock front or at the shock-shock interactions. The shape of the radiation spectra is shown to depend sensitively on the angle between the particle velocity and electric field direction. The radiation spectrum in the case of exactly transverse particle motion is degenerate and similar to that of spatially uniform Langmuir oscillations. In the case of oblique propagation, the spectrum is more complex, it consists of a number of power-law regions and may contain a distinct high-frequency spectral peak. The emission process considered is relevant to various laboratory plasma settings and for astrophysical objects as gamma-ray bursts and collimated jets. PMID:17677604

  19. Amazon Deforestation Fires Increase Plant Productivity through Changes in Diffuse Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rap, A.; Reddington, C.; Spracklen, D. V.; Mercado, L.; Haywood, J. M.; Bonal, D.; Butt, N.; Phillips, O.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past few decades a large increase in carbon storage has been observed in undisturbed forests across Amazonia. The reason for such a sink is unclear, although many possible mechanisms have been suggested, including changes in temperature, carbon dioxide, precipitation, clouds, and solar radiation. In this work we focus on one such mechanism, namely the increase in plant photosynthesis due to changes in diffuse radiation caused by atmospheric aerosols from large-scale deforestation fires that now occur throughout the Amazon region. We estimate that this mechanism has increased dry season (August-September) net primary productivity (NPP) by up to 30% across wide regions of the Amazon. We conclude that aerosol from deforestation fires may be responsible for a substantial fraction of the Amazon carbon sink that has been observed. Our approach is based on the combined use of three models: (i) the Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP), (ii) the Edwards-Slingo radiation model, and (iii) the UK Met Office JULES land-surface scheme, constrained against in-situ aerosol and radiation observation datasets from several Amazonian sites. A 10 year (1999-2008) GLOMAP simulation using GFED3 biomass burning emissions is first evaluated against aerosol observations, indicating that the model is able to capture the Amazon aerosol seasonality, with enhanced concentrations during the dry season driven by biomass burning. The radiation scheme is then shown to be in good agreement with total and diffuse radiation in-situ observations, the model being able to capture the high total and low diffuse radiation flux in the dry season, as well as the low total and high diffuse radiation flux in the wet season. We then use our modelling framework to quantify the contribution of deforestation fires to diffuse/direct radiation fraction and forest productivity. We calculate that deforestation fires increase dry season diffuse radiation by up to 60% or 30 Wm-2. Finally, we use the JULES model to show that this increase in diffuse radiation is responsible for a substantial growth in gross primary productivity (GPP), enhancing Amazon-wide dry-season GPP by 5% with local increases of up to 15%. Most of this GPP response results in an increase in NPP, estimated in the dry season at 10% across the Amazon with local increases as large as 30%. This substantial NPP enhancement spatially matches observed increases in forest biomass storage across the Amazon. We thus suggest that deforestation fires have an important impact on the Amazon carbon budget and attempt to estimate the fraction of the observed forest carbon sink that can be attributed to this mechanism. Change [%] in diffuse radiation due to deforestation

  20. Heat transfer including particle and gas radiation in subsonic MHD diffuser - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Im, K. H.

    1980-01-01

    Heat transfer by convection and gas and slag particle radiation in subsonic MHD diffusers is analyzed by simultaneously solving the radiation transport equation and the quasi-three-dimensional gasdynamic equations. The efficiency factors for extinction and scattering by particles are calculated from the Mie theory. For a reference diffuser geometry, heat transfer by convection is found to be 25 MW, and radiative heat transfer varies from 44 MW to 79 MW, depending on the rate of ash carryover into the channel. Results reveal that the heat transfer is sensitive to the ash carryover into the channel, slag particle spectrum, electrical conductivity of ash, gas composition, and wall emissivity. It is observed that, because of multiple scattering, the particles shield the short-wavelength radiation emitted by potassium atoms. The impacts of heat transfer enhancement by gas radiation in the channel and by gas-plus-particles radiation in the diffuser on MHD system design are assessed. It is suggested that, from the systems design point of view, the diffuser be regarded as a part of the radiant boiler. No significant effect of radiation enhancement on the ability to decompose NO(x) is anticipated.

  1. Diffuse radiation increases global ecosystem-level water-use efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, A. M.; Reichstein, M.; Cescatti, A.; Knohl, A.; Zaehle, S.

    2012-12-01

    Current environmental changes lead not only to rising atmospheric CO2 levels and air temperature but also to changes in air pollution and thus the light quality of the solar radiation reaching the land-surface. While rising CO2 levels are thought to enhance photosynthesis and closure of stomata, thus leading to relative water savings, the effect of diffuse radiation on transpiration by plants is less clear. It has been speculated that the stimulation of photosynthesis by increased levels of diffuse light may be counteracted by higher transpiration and consequently water depletion and drought stress. Ultimately, in water co-limited systems, the overall effect of diffuse radiation will depend on the sensitivity of canopy transpiration versus photosynthesis to diffuse light, i.e. whether water-use efficiency changes with relative levels of diffuse light. Our study shows that water-use efficiency increases significantly with higher fractions of diffuse light. It uses the ecosystem-atmosphere gas-exchange observations obtained with the eddy covariance method at 29 flux tower sites. In contrast to previous global studies, the analysis is based directly on measurements of diffuse radiation. Its effect on water-use efficiency was derived by analyzing the multivariate response of carbon and water fluxes to radiation and air humidity using a purely empirical approach based on artificial neural networks. We infer that per unit change of diffuse fraction the water-use efficiency increases up to 40% depending on diffuse fraction levels and ecosystem type. Hence, in regions with increasing diffuse radiation positive effects on primary production are expected even under conditions where water is co-limiting productivity.

  2. A diffusion accelerated Sn transport method for radiation transport on a general quadrilateral mesh

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Alcouffe

    1989-01-01

    We present the development of a diffusion accelerated Sn transport method for the solution of temperature coupled radiation flow problems on a spatial mesh of arbitrary quadrilaterals in R-Z geometry. The diffusion acceleration equation is derived from the diamond-like transport spatial discretization. The effectiveness of the DSA method is shown on an example calculation and also computation times are indicated.

  3. Impact of changes in diffuse radiation on the global land carbon sink.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Lina M; Bellouin, Nicolas; Sitch, Stephen; Boucher, Olivier; Huntingford, Chris; Wild, Martin; Cox, Peter M

    2009-04-23

    Plant photosynthesis tends to increase with irradiance. However, recent theoretical and observational studies have demonstrated that photosynthesis is also more efficient under diffuse light conditions. Changes in cloud cover or atmospheric aerosol loadings, arising from either volcanic or anthropogenic emissions, alter both the total photosynthetically active radiation reaching the surface and the fraction of this radiation that is diffuse, with uncertain overall effects on global plant productivity and the land carbon sink. Here we estimate the impact of variations in diffuse fraction on the land carbon sink using a global model modified to account for the effects of variations in both direct and diffuse radiation on canopy photosynthesis. We estimate that variations in diffuse fraction, associated largely with the 'global dimming' period, enhanced the land carbon sink by approximately one-quarter between 1960 and 1999. However, under a climate mitigation scenario for the twenty-first century in which sulphate aerosols decline before atmospheric CO(2) is stabilized, this 'diffuse-radiation' fertilization effect declines rapidly to near zero by the end of the twenty-first century. PMID:19396143

  4. Effects of energy and pitch angle mixed diffusion on radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiuhua; Fok, Mei-Ching; Albert, Jay; Horne, Richard B.; Meredith, Nigel P.

    2011-05-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the Earth’s radiation belts is important for modeling and forecasting the intensities of energetic electrons in space. Wave diffusion processes are known to be responsible for loss and acceleration of electrons in the radiation belts. Several recent studies indicate pitch angle and energy mixed-diffusion are also important when considering the total diffusive effects. In this study, a two-dimensional Fokker Planck equation is solved numerically using the Alternating Direction Implicit method. Mixed diffusion due to whistler-mode chorus waves tends to slow down the total diffusion in the energy-pitch angle space, particularly at smaller equatorial pitch angles. We then incorporate the electron energy and pitch angle mixed diffusions due to whistler-model chorus waves into the 4-dimensional Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model and study the effect of mixed diffusion during a storm in October 2002. The 4-D simulation results show that energy and pitch angle mixed diffusion decrease the electron fluxes in the outer belt while electron fluxes in the slot region are enhanced (up to a factor of 2) during storm time.

  5. A study of the diffuse galactic gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Assuming cosmic rays pervade the Galaxy, they necessarily produced high energy gamma-rays as they interact with the instellar matter and photons. The cosmic ray nucleon interactions five rise to gamma rays primarily through the decay of pi mesons, giving a unique spectrum with a maximum at approximately 68 MeV. Cosmic ray electrons produce gamma rays through bremsstrahlung, but with a markedly different energy spectral shape, one which decreases monotonically with energy. Cosmic ray electrons also interact with the interstellar starlight, optical and infrared photons, and the blackbody radiation through the Compton process. A model of galactic gamma ray production is discussed, and the predicted spatial distribution and energy spectra are presented. Considering the uncertainty in the point source contributions, the agreement between the theoretical predictions and the gamma ray data seems quite reasonable.

  6. Comparative radiation resistance, temperature dependence and performance of diffused junction indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells whose p-n junctions were processed by the open tube capped diffusion and by the closed tube uncapped diffusion of sulfur into Czochralski-grown p-type substrates are compared. Differences found in radiation resistance were attributed to the effects of increased base dopant concentration. Both sets of cells showed superior radiation resistance to that of gallium arsenide cells, in agreement with previous results. No correlation was, however, found between the open-circuit voltage and the temperature dependence of the maximum power.

  7. A hybrid transport-diffusion Monte Carlo method for frequency-dependent radiative-transfer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D., E-mail: jdd@lanl.gov [Computational Physics and Methods Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS D409, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Thompson, Kelly G., E-mail: kgt@lanl.gov [Computational Physics and Methods Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS D409, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Urbatsch, Todd J., E-mail: tmonster@lanl.gov [Computational Physics and Methods Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS D409, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations in optically thick media. In DDMC, particles take discrete steps between spatial cells according to a discretized diffusion equation. Each discrete step replaces many smaller Monte Carlo steps, thus improving the efficiency of the simulation. In this paper, we present an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold, as optical thickness is typically a decreasing function of frequency. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo, which results in a hybrid transport-diffusion scheme. With a set of frequency-dependent test problems, we confirm the accuracy and increased efficiency of our new DDMC method.

  8. A scheme for radiation pressure and photon diffusion with the M1 closure in RAMSES-RT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosdahl, J.; Teyssier, R.

    2015-06-01

    We describe and test an updated version of radiation-hydrodynamics in the RAMSES code, that includes three new features: (i) radiation pressure on gas, (ii) accurate treatment of radiation diffusion in an unresolved optically thick medium, and (iii) relativistic corrections that account for Doppler effects and work done by the radiation to first order in v/c. We validate the implementation in a series of tests, which include a morphological assessment of the M1 closure for the Eddington tensor in an astronomically relevant setting, dust absorption in an optically semithick medium, direct pressure on gas from ionizing radiation, convergence of our radiation diffusion scheme towards resolved optical depths, correct diffusion of a radiation flash and a constant luminosity radiation, and finally, an experiment from Davis et al. of the competition between gravity and radiation pressure in a dusty atmosphere, and the formation of radiative Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. With the new features, RAMSES-RT can be used for state-of-the-art simulations of radiation feedback from first principles, on galactic and cosmological scales, including not only direct radiation pressure from ionizing photons, but also indirect pressure via dust from multiscattered IR photons reprocessed from higher-energy radiation, both in the optically thin and thick limits.

  9. Multigroup radiation hydrodynamics with flux-limited diffusion and adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M.; Vaytet, N.; Commerçon, B.; Masson, J.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Radiative transfer plays a crucial role in the star formation process. Because of the high computational cost, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations performed up to now have mainly been carried out in the grey approximation. In recent years, multifrequency radiation-hydrodynamics models have started to be developed in an attempt to better account for the large variations in opacities as a function of frequency. Aims: We wish to develop an efficient multigroup algorithm for the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES which is suited to heavy proto-stellar collapse calculations. Methods: Because of the prohibitive timestep constraints of an explicit radiative transfer method, we constructed a time-implicit solver based on a stabilized bi-conjugate gradient algorithm, and implemented it in RAMSES under the flux-limited diffusion approximation. Results: We present a series of tests that demonstrate the high performance of our scheme in dealing with frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamic flows. We also present a preliminary simulation of a 3D proto-stellar collapse using 20 frequency groups. Differences between grey and multigroup results are briefly discussed, and the large amount of information this new method brings us is also illustrated. Conclusions: We have implemented a multigroup flux-limited diffusion algorithm in the RAMSES code. The method performed well against standard radiation-hydrodynamics tests, and was also shown to be ripe for exploitation in the computational star formation context.

  10. Terahertz radiation from InAs induced by carrier diffusion and drift

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kai; Xu, Jingzhou; Yuan, Tao; Zhang, X.-C. [Center for THz Research, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Terahertz (THz) radiation from a (100) oriented InAs surfaces is dominated by the photo-Dember effect. The strength of the radiation is influenced by screening the radiation with doped carriers. When irradiated by femtosecond pulses, the wafer with the lowest doping concentration radiates THz power nearly two orders higher than the wafer with highest doping concentration. With identical optical excitation and same doping concentration, a p-type InAs generates stronger THz waves than an n-type InAs due to the weaker screening effect. The low doping p-type InAs (1x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}) sample is the strongest THz wave emitter among all the unbiased semiconductors we have ever tested with a Ti:sapphire laser oscillator. The drift-diffusion equation (DDE) is used in the study of carrier drift and diffusion as well as subsequent THz radiation from InAs wafers. The calculation explains well the experimental observation of the relationship between a THz electric field and the doping properties of InAs. The physical pictures of the carrier drift and diffusion characteristics in InAs surfaces are also clearly provided in this report.

  11. Radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists. PMID:2040250

  12. Directional diffusivity changes in the optic nerve and optic radiation in optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, M; Li, J; He, H; Wang, Z; Lv, B; Li, W; Hailla, N; Yan, F; Xian, J; Ai, L

    2011-01-01

    Objective Optic neuritis (ON) is defined as an inflammation of the optic nerve and provides a useful model for studying the effects of inflammatory demyelination of white matter. The aim of this study was to assess the diffusion changes in both the optic nerve and optic radiation in patients with acute and chronic ON using diffusion tensor (DT) MRI. Methods 33 patients with idiopathic demyelinating optic neuritis (IDON) and 33 gender- and age-matched healthy controls were examined with DT-MRI and with T1 and T2 weighted MRI. Results Compared with controls, both first-episode and recurrent patients with IDON in the acute stage showed significantly increased radial diffusivity (??) and decreased mean fractional anisotropy (FA) in the affected nerves. Reduced FA, increased ??, mean diffusivity (MD) and axial diffusivity (??) were determined in patients with subacute IDON. We found no significant difference in the directional diffusivity of optic radiation in patients whose disease had lasted less than 1 year compared with healthy controls. However, significant changes in the FA and ?? of the optic radiation were detected in patients with disease duration of more than 1 year. Conclusion These results show the great potential and capacity of DT-MRI measures as useful biomarkers and indicators for the evaluation of myelin injury in the visual pathway. PMID:21415301

  13. Secondary production of neutral pi-mesons and the diffuse galactic gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    Isobaric and scaling model predictions of the secondary spectra of neutral pi-mesons produced in proton-proton collisions, at energies between threshold and a few GeV, are compared on the basis of accelerator data and found to show the isobaric model to be superior. This model is accordingly used, in conjuction with a scaling model representation at high energies, in a recalculation of the pi exp (0) gamma-radiation's contribution to the diffuse galactic gamma background; the cosmic ray-induced production of photons (whose energy exceeds 100 MeV) by such radiation occurs at a rate of 1.53 x 10 to the -25 photons/(s-H atom). These results are compared with previous calculations of this process as well as with COS-B observations of the diffuse galactic gamma-radiation.

  14. Diffuse optical tomography using the one-way radiative transfer equation

    PubMed Central

    González-Rodríguez, Pedro; Kim, Arnold D.

    2015-01-01

    We present a computational study of diffuse optical tomography using the one-way radiative transfer equation. The one-way radiative transfer is a simplification of the radiative transfer equation to approximate the transmission of light through tissues. The major simplification of this approximation is that the intensity satisfies an initial value problem rather than a boundary value problem. Consequently, the inverse problem to reconstruct the absorption and scattering coefficients from transmission measurements of scattered light is simplified. Using the initial value problem for the one-way radiative transfer equation to compute the forward model, we are able to quantitatively reconstruct the absorption and scattering coefficients efficiently and effectively for simple problems and obtain reasonable results for complicated problems.

  15. Effects of Oxygen Concentration on Radiative Loss from Normal-Gravity and Microgravity Methane Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Y.; Edelman, Raymond B.; Stocker, Dennis P.; Sotos, Raymond G.; Vaughan, David F.

    1992-01-01

    Laminar diffusion flames of methane, burning in quiescent oxidizing environments at atmospheric pressure, have been studied under both normal-gravity and microgravity conditions. Radiation from these flames is measured using a wide-view-angle, thermopile detector radiometer. The oxidizer was 18, 21, and 30 percent oxygen in nitrogen.

  16. Modeling the radiation belt electrons with radial diffusion driven by the solar wind

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. B. Barker; X. Li; R. S. Selesnick

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of the correlation between the solar wind and radiation belt electron fluxes, we develop a model to simulate the MeV electron phase space density variations from L = 3 to L = 8 by extending the Li et al. (2001) radial diffusion model for geosynchronous electrons. We add L dependence to the Li et al. model and

  17. Permeation and diffusion of hydrogen and deuterium under fission-reactor radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzinger, G. W.; Dobrozemsky, R.

    1984-05-01

    Diffusion- and solubility-data of hydrogen and deuterium in steel samples at 520 K were measured in the primary radiation environment of the ASTRA-reactor (lightwater moderated 8 MW research reactor) by means of a new-developed irradiation capsule. The method is based on gas-content measurements in small samples before and after irradiation. First results are reported.

  18. Moisture Diffusivity Characteristics of Rough Rice Under Infrared Radiation Heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To design an efficient infrared (IR) dryer for rough rice, it is important to understand the drying behavior of rice grains under infrared heating. The objective of this study was to determine the moisture diffusivity and moisture diffusivity coefficient of rough rice under IR heating and cooling. ...

  19. Using a Simple Apparatus to Measure Direct and Diffuse Photosynthetically Active Radiation at Remote Locations

    PubMed Central

    Cruse, Michael J.; Kucharik, Christopher J.; Norman, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Plant canopy interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) drives carbon dioxide (CO2), water and energy cycling in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Quantifying intercepted PAR requires accurate measurements of total incident PAR above canopies and direct beam and diffuse PAR components. While some regional data sets include these data, e.g. from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites, they are not often applicable to local research sites because of the variable nature (spatial and temporal) of environmental variables that influence incoming PAR. Currently available instrumentation that measures diffuse and direct beam radiation separately can be cost prohibitive and require frequent adjustments. Alternatively, generalized empirical relationships that relate atmospheric variables and radiation components can be used but require assumptions that increase the potential for error. Our goal here was to construct and test a cheaper, highly portable instrument alternative that could be used at remote field sites to measure total, diffuse and direct beam PAR for extended time periods without supervision. The apparatus tested here uses a fabricated, solar powered rotating shadowband and other commercially available parts to collect continuous hourly PAR data. Measurements of total incident PAR had nearly a one-to-one relationship with total incident radiation measurements taken at the same research site by an unobstructed point quantum sensor. Additionally, measurements of diffuse PAR compared favorably with modeled estimates from previously published data, but displayed significant differences that were attributed to the important influence of rapidly changing local environmental conditions. The cost of the system is about 50% less than comparable commercially available systems that require periodic, but not continual adjustments. Overall, the data produced using this apparatus indicates that this instrumentation has the potential to support ecological research via a relatively inexpensive method to collect continuous measurements of total, direct beam and diffuse PAR in remote locations. PMID:25668208

  20. Using a simple apparatus to measure direct and diffuse photosynthetically active radiation at remote locations.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Michael J; Kucharik, Christopher J; Norman, John M

    2015-01-01

    Plant canopy interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) drives carbon dioxide (CO2), water and energy cycling in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Quantifying intercepted PAR requires accurate measurements of total incident PAR above canopies and direct beam and diffuse PAR components. While some regional data sets include these data, e.g. from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites, they are not often applicable to local research sites because of the variable nature (spatial and temporal) of environmental variables that influence incoming PAR. Currently available instrumentation that measures diffuse and direct beam radiation separately can be cost prohibitive and require frequent adjustments. Alternatively, generalized empirical relationships that relate atmospheric variables and radiation components can be used but require assumptions that increase the potential for error. Our goal here was to construct and test a cheaper, highly portable instrument alternative that could be used at remote field sites to measure total, diffuse and direct beam PAR for extended time periods without supervision. The apparatus tested here uses a fabricated, solar powered rotating shadowband and other commercially available parts to collect continuous hourly PAR data. Measurements of total incident PAR had nearly a one-to-one relationship with total incident radiation measurements taken at the same research site by an unobstructed point quantum sensor. Additionally, measurements of diffuse PAR compared favorably with modeled estimates from previously published data, but displayed significant differences that were attributed to the important influence of rapidly changing local environmental conditions. The cost of the system is about 50% less than comparable commercially available systems that require periodic, but not continual adjustments. Overall, the data produced using this apparatus indicates that this instrumentation has the potential to support ecological research via a relatively inexpensive method to collect continuous measurements of total, direct beam and diffuse PAR in remote locations. PMID:25668208

  1. Modeling Earth's Outer Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics---Radial Diffusion, Heating, and Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Weichao

    Earth's outer radiation belt is a relativistic electron environment that is hazardous to space systems. It is characterized by large variations in the electron flux, which are controlled by the competition between source, transport, and loss processes. One of the central questions in outer radiation belt research is to resolve the relative contribution of radial diffusion, wave heating, and loss to the enhancement and decay of the radiation belt electrons. This thesis studies them together and separately. Firstly, we develop an empirical Fokker-Planck model that includes radial diffusion, an internal source, and finite electron lifetimes parameterized as functions of geomagnetic indices. By simulating the observed electron variations, the model suggests that the required magnitudes of radial diffusion and internal heating for the enhancement of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt vary from storm to storm, and generally internal heating contributes more to the enhancements of MeV energy electrons at L=4 (L is approximately the radial distance in Earth radii at the equator). However, since the source, transport, and loss terms in the model are empirical, the model results have uncertainties. To eliminate the uncertainty in the loss rate, both the precipitation and the adiabatic loss of radiation belt electrons are quantitatively studied. Based on the observations from Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), a Drift-Diffusion model is applied to quantify electron precipitation loss, which is the dominant non-adiabatic loss mechanism for electrons in the heart of the outer radiation belt. Model results for a small storm, a moderate storm, and an intense storm indicate that fast precipitation losses of relativistic electrons, on the time scale of hours, persistently occur in the storm main phases and with more efficient losses at higher energies over wide range of L regions. Additionally, calculations of adiabatic effects on radiation belt electrons at low altitudes demonstrate that the adiabatic flux drop of electrons during the storm main phase is both altitude and storm dependent. During the main phase of a moderate geomagnetic storm, due solely to adiabatic effects a satellite at low altitude sees either zero electron flux or a fractional flux drop depending on its altitude. To physically quantify the radial diffusion rate, we use power spectral density and global mode structure of the Ultra-Low-Frequency (ULF) waves, which are derived from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) MHD simulation and validated by field data from real satellites. The calculated total diffusion rate is shown to be dominated by the contribution from magnetic field perturbations, and much less from the electric field. Fast diffusion generally occurs when solar wind dynamic pressure is high or nightside geomagnetic activity is strong and with higher diffusion rates at higher L regions. Work performed in this thesis provides realistic loss rate and radial diffusion rate of radiation belt electrons, as well as a comprehensive Fokker-Planck model that can take the loss and radial diffusion rates as inputs and then determine the internal heating rate with less uncertainty. By this approach, we will be able to quantitatively understand the relative contribution of radial diffusion, wave heating, and loss to the variations of radiation belt electrons.

  2. Boundary Conditions for the Diffusion Equation in Radiative Transfer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard C. Haskell; Lars O. Svaasand; Tsong-Tseh Tsay; Ti-Chen Feng; Matthew S. McAdams; Bruce J. Tromberg

    1994-01-01

    Using the method of images, we examine the three boundary conditions commonly applied to the surface of a semi-infinite turbid medium. We find that the image-charge configurations of the partial-current and extrapolated-boundary conditions have the same dipole and quadrupole moments and that the two corresponding solutions to the diffusion equation are approximately equal. In the application of diffusion theory to

  3. Multifrequency radiation diffusion equations for homogeneous, refractive, lossy media and their interface conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, Aleksei I., E-mail: shestakov1@llnl.gov

    2013-06-15

    We derive time-dependent multifrequency diffusion equations for homogeneous, refractive lossy media. The equations are applicable for a domain composed of several materials with distinct refractive indexes. In such applications, the fundamental radiation variable, the intensity I, is discontinuous across material interfaces. The diffusion equations evolve a variable ?, the integral of I over all directions divided by the square of the refractive index. Attention is focused on boundary and internal interface conditions for ?. For numerical solutions using finite elements, it is shown that at material interfaces, the usual diffusion coefficient 1/3? of the multifrequency equation, where ? is the opacity, is modified by a tensor diffusion term consisting of integrals of the reflectivity. Numerical results are presented. For a single material simulation, the ? equations yield the same result as diffusion equations that evolve the spectral radiation energy density. A second simulation solves a test problem that models radiation transport in a domain comprised of materials with different refractive indexes. Results qualitatively agree with those previously published.

  4. A radiation-hydrodynamics scheme valid from the transport to the diffusion limit

    E-print Network

    E. Audit; P. Charrier; J. -P. Chièze; B. Dubroca

    2002-06-17

    We present in this paper the numerical treatment of the coupling between hydrodynamics and radiative transfer. The fluid is modeled by classical conservation laws (mass, momentum and energy) and the radiation by the grey moment $M_1$ system. The scheme introduced is able to compute accurate numerical solution over a broad class of regimes from the transport to the diffusive limits. We propose an asymptotic preserving modification of the HLLE scheme in order to treat correctly the diffusion limit. Several numerical results are presented, which show that this approach is robust and have the correct behavior in both the diffusive and free-streaming limits. In the last numerical example we test this approach on a complex physical case by considering the collapse of a gas cloud leading to a proto-stellar structure which, among other features, exhibits very steep opacity gradients.

  5. A new ray-tracing scheme for 3D diffuse radiation transfer on highly parallel architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Kohji; Okamoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2015-05-01

    We present a new numerical scheme to solve the transfer of diffuse radiation on three-dimensional mesh grids which is efficient on processors with highly parallel architecture such as recently popular GPUs and CPUs with multi- and many-core architectures. The scheme is based on the ray-tracing method and the computational cost is proportional to N_m^{ 5/3}, where Nm is the number of mesh grids, and is devised to compute the radiation transfer along each light-ray completely in parallel, with appropriate grouping of the light-rays. We find that the performance of our scheme scales well with the number of adopted CPU cores and GPUs, and also that our scheme is nicely parallelized on a multi-node system by adopting the multiple wave front scheme, and the performance scales well with the amount of computational resources. As numerical tests to validate our scheme and to give a physical criterion for the angular resolution of our ray-tracing scheme, we perform several numerical simulations of the photoionization of neutral hydrogen gas by ionizing radiation sources without the "on-the-spot" approximation, in which the transfer of diffuse radiation by radiative recombination is incorporated in a self-consistent manner.

  6. Using hybrid implicit Monte Carlo diffusion to simulate gray radiation hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Mathew A.; Gentile, Nick

    2015-06-01

    This work describes how to couple a hybrid Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion (HIMCD) method with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code to evaluate the coupled radiation hydrodynamics equations. This HIMCD method dynamically applies Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion (IMD) [1] to regions of a problem that are opaque and diffusive while applying standard Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) [2] to regions where the diffusion approximation is invalid. We show that this method significantly improves the computational efficiency as compared to a standard IMC/Hydrodynamics solver, when optically thick diffusive material is present, while maintaining accuracy. Two test cases are used to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of HIMCD as compared to IMC and IMD. The first is the Lowrie semi-analytic diffusive shock [3]. The second is a simple test case where the source radiation streams through optically thin material and heats a thick diffusive region of material causing it to rapidly expand. We found that HIMCD proves to be accurate, robust, and computationally efficient for these test problems.

  7. Knot in Cen A: Stochastic Magnetic Field for Diffusive Synchrotron Radiation?

    E-print Network

    Jirong Mao; Jiancheng Wang

    2007-09-14

    The emission of relativistic electrons moving in the random and small-scale magnetic field is presented by diffusive synchrotron radiation (DSR). In this Letter, we revisit the perturbative treatment of DSR. We propose that random and small-scale magnetic field might be generated by the turbulence. As an example, multi-band radiation of the knot in Cen A comes from the electrons with energy $\\gamma_e\\sim 10^3-10^4$ in the magnetic field of $10^{-3}G$. The multi-band spectrum of DSR is well determined by the feature of stochastic magnetic field. These results put strong constraint to the models of particle acceleration.

  8. Electromagnetic radiation in hot QCD matter: Rates, electric conductivity, flavor susceptibility, and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Zahed, Ismail

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the general features of the electromagnetic radiation from a thermal hadronic gas as constrained by chiral symmetry. The medium effects on the electromagnetic spectral functions and the partial restoration of chiral symmetry are quantified in terms of the pion densities. The results are compared with the electromagnetic radiation from a strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma in terms of the leading gluon condensate operators. We use the spectral functions as constrained by the emission rates to estimate the electric conductivity, the light flavor susceptibility and diffusion constant across the transition from the correlated hadronic gas to a strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma.

  9. Differences in Brainstem Fiber Tract Response to Radiation: A Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    SciTech Connect

    Uh, Jinsoo, E-mail: jinsoo.uh@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Li, Yimei; Feng, Tianshu [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Gajjar, Amar [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Ogg, Robert J.; Hua, Chiaho [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation-induced changes in white matter tracts are uniform across the brainstem. Methods and Materials: We analyzed serial diffusion tensor imaging data, acquired before radiation therapy and over 48 to 72 months of follow-up, from 42 pediatric patients (age 6-20 years) with medulloblastoma. FSL software (FMRIB, Oxford, UK) was used to calculate fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial, radial, and mean diffusivities. For a consistent identification of volumes of interest (VOIs), the parametric maps of each patient were transformed to a standard brain space (MNI152), on which we identified VOIs including corticospinal tract (CST), medial lemniscus (ML), transverse pontine fiber (TPF), and middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP) at the level of pons. Temporal changes of DTI parameters in VOIs were compared using a linear mixed effect model. Results: Radiation-induced white matter injury was marked by a decline in FA after treatment. The decline was often accompanied by decreased axial diffusivity, increased radial diffusivity, or both. This implied axonal damage and demyelination. We observed that the magnitude of the changes was not always uniform across substructures of the brainstem. Specifically, the changes in DTI parameters for TPF were more pronounced than in other regions (P<.001 for FA) despite similarities in the distribution of dose. We did not find a significant difference among CST, ML, and MCP in these patients (P>.093 for all parameters). Conclusions: Changes in the structural integrity of white matter tracts, assessed by DTI, were not uniform across the brainstem after radiation therapy. These results support a role for tract-based assessment in radiation treatment planning and determination of brainstem tolerance.

  10. Accurately specifying storm-time ULF wave radial diffusion in the radiation belts

    E-print Network

    Dimitrakoudis, Stavros; Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Daglis, Ioannis A

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves can contribute to the transport, acceleration and loss of electrons in the radiation belts through inward and outward diffusion. However, the most appropriate parameters to use to specify the ULF wave diffusion rates are unknown. Empirical representations of diffusion coefficients often use Kp; however, specifications using ULF wave power offer an improved physics-based approach. We use 11 years of ground-based magnetometer array measurements to statistically parameterise the ULF wave power with Kp, solar wind speed, solar wind dynamic pressure and Dst. We find Kp is the best single parameter to specify the statistical ULF wave power driving radial diffusion. Significantly, remarkable high energy tails exist in the ULF wave power distributions when expressed as a function of Dst. Two parameter ULF wave power specifications using Dst as well as Kp provide a better statistical representation of storm-time radial diffusion than any single variable alone.

  11. Influence of thermal radiation on soot production in Laminar axisymmetric diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demarco, R.; Nmira, F.; Consalvi, J. L.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the effect of radiative heat transfer on soot production in laminar axisymmetric diffusion flames. Twenty-four C1-C3 hydrocarbon-air flames, consisting of normal (NDF) and inverse (IDF) diffusion flames at both normal gravity (1 g) and microgravity (0 g), and covering a wide range of conditions affecting radiative heat transfer, were simulated. The numerical model is based on the Steady Laminar Flamelet (SLF) model, a semi-empirical two-equation acetylene/benzene based soot model and the Statistical Narrow Band Correlated K (SNBCK) model coupled to the Finite Volume Method (FVM) to compute thermal radiation. Predictions relative to velocity, temperature, soot volume fraction and radiative losses are on the whole in good agreement with the available experimental data. Model results show that, for all the flames considered, thermal radiation is a crucial process with a view to providing accurate predictions for temperatures and soot concentrations. It becomes increasingly significant from IDFs to NDFs and its influence is much greater as gravity is reduced. The radiative contribution of gas prevails in the weakly-sooting IDFs and in the methane and ethane NDFs, whereas soot radiation dominates in the other flames. However, both contributions are significant in all cases, with the exception of the 1 g IDFs investigated where soot radiation can be ignored. The optically-thin approximation (OTA) was also tested and found to be applicable as long as the optical thickness, based on flame radius and Planck mean absorption coefficient, is less than 0.05. The OTA is reasonable for the IDFs and for most of the 1 g NDFs, but it fails to predict the radiative heat transfer for the 0 g NDFs. The accuracy of radiative-property models was then assessed in the latter cases. Simulations show that the gray approximation can be applied to soot but not to combustion gases. Both the non-gray and gray soot versions of the Full Spectrum Correlated k (FSCK) model can be then substituted for the SNBCK with a reduction in CPU time by a factor of about 20 in the latter case.

  12. Effects of Aerosol Optical Depth on diffuse UV and visible radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Kim, J.; Cho, H.; Kim, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UV, 300-367nm) was measured with a UV-multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (UV- MFRSR) at Yonsei University, Seoul (37.57°N, 126.97°) for 7 months from January to July 2006 and visible irradiance (400-700 nm) also measured with a MFRSR for 12 months of 2006 at the same station. Spectral UV_AOD and vis_AOD were retrieved using the Langley method and Beer-Bouguer-Lambert's law, and compared with AOD obtained from Skyradiometer to validate their values. The diffuse and direct irradiance were analyzed to investigate the dependence on total optical depth (TOD) and aerosol optical depth (AOD). The direct-horizontal solar irradiance decreases exponentially as the optical depth increases according to the Beer- Bouguer-Lambert's Law. As the TOD and AOD increase, the diffuse-horizontal UV radiation gradually increases and shows a maximum value at some critical optical depth for a given SZA. Similar analysis was performed on the relation between the diffuse irradiance and AOD. RAF(radiation amplification factor) was used to correct the ozone effects on UV. These results provide empirical equations for the amount of diffuse irradiance in UV and visible wavelengths.

  13. Modeling Suomi-NPP VIIRS Solar Diffuser Degradation due to Space Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Cao, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi-NPP uses a solar diffuser (SD) as on-board radiometric calibrator for the reflective solar band (RSB) calibration. Solar diffuser is made of Spectralon (one type of fluoropolymer) and was chosen because of its controlled reflectance in the VIS-NIR-SWIR region and its near-Lambertian reflectance profile. Spectralon is known to degrade in reflectance at the blue end of the spectrum due to exposure to space radiations such as solar UV radiation and energetic protons. These space radiations can modify the Spectralon surface through breaking C-C and C-F bonds and scissioning or cross linking the polymer, which causes the surface roughness and degrades its reflectance. VIIRS uses a SDSM (Solar Diffuser Stability Monitor) to monitor the change in the Solar Diffuser reflectance in the 0.4 - 0.94 um wavelength range and provide a correction to the calibration constants. The H factor derived from SDSM reveals that reflectance of 0.4 to 0.6um channels of VIIRS degrades faster than the reflectance of longer wavelength RSB channels. A model is developed to derive characteristic parameters such as mean SD surface roughness height and autocovariance length of SD surface roughness from the long term spectral degradation of SD reflectance as monitored by SDSM. These two parameters are trended to assess development of surface roughness of the SD over the operation period of VIIRS.

  14. Radiation therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. ... radiation is most harmful to quickly growing cells, radiation therapy damages cancer cells more than normal cells. This ...

  15. Effects of Radiative Diffusion on Thin Flux Tubes in Turbulent Solar-like Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M. A.; Fan, Y.

    2015-05-01

    We study the combined effects of convection and radiative diffusion on the evolution of thin magnetic flux tubes in the solar interior. Radiative diffusion is the primary supplier of heat to convective motions in the lower convection zone, and it results in a heat input per unit volume of magnetic flux tubes that has been ignored by many previous thin flux tube studies. We use a thin flux tube model subject to convection taken from a rotating spherical shell of turbulent, solar-like convection as described by Weber, Fan, and Miesch ( Astrophys. J. 741, 11, 2011; Solar Phys. 287, 239, 2013), now taking into account the influence of radiative heating on 1022 Mx flux tubes, corresponding to flux tubes of large active regions. Our simulations show that flux tubes of ? 60 kG that are subject to solar-like convective flows do not anchor in the overshoot region, but rather drift upward because of the increased buoyancy of the flux tube earlier in its evolution, which results from including radiative diffusion. Flux tubes of magnetic field strengths ranging from 15 kG to 100 kG have rise times of ? 0.2 years and exhibit a Joy's Law tilt-angle trend. Our results suggest that radiative heating is an effective mechanism by which flux tubes can escape from the stably stratified overshoot region. Moreover, flux tubes do not necessarily need to be anchored in the overshoot region to produce emergence properties similar to those of active regions on the Sun.

  16. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiolytic species are formed approximately 1 ps after the passage of ionizing radiation through matter. After their formation, they diffuse and chemically react with other radiolytic species and neighboring biological molecules, leading to various oxidative damage. Therefore, the simulation of radiation chemistry is of considerable importance to understand how radiolytic species damage biological molecules [1]. The step-by-step simulation of chemical reactions is difficult, because the radiolytic species are distributed non-homogeneously in the medium. Consequently, computational approaches based on Green functions for diffusion-influenced reactions should be used [2]. Recently, Green functions for more complex type of reactions have been published [3-4]. We have developed exact random variate generators of these Green functions [5], which will allow us to use them in radiation chemistry codes. Moreover, simulating chemistry using the Green functions is which is computationally very demanding, because the probabilities of reactions between each pair of particles should be evaluated at each timestep [2]. This kind of problem is well adapted for General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPGPU), which can handle a large number of similar calculations simultaneously. These new developments will allow us to include more complex reactions in chemistry codes, and to improve the calculation time. This code should be of importance to link radiation track structure simulations and DNA damage models.

  17. The grand unified photon spectrum: A coherent view of the diffuse extragalactic background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressell, M. Ted; Turner, Michael S.

    1989-10-01

    The spectrum of diffuse extragalactic background radiation (DEBRA) at wavelengths from 105 to 10-24 cm is presented in a coherent fashion. Each wavelength region, from the radio to ultra-high energy photons and cosmic rays, is treated both separately and as part of the grand unified photon spectrum (GUPS). A discussion of, and references to, the relevant literature for each wavelength region is included. This review should provide a useful tool for those interested in diffuse backgrounds, the epoch of galaxy formation, astrophysical/cosmological constraints to particle properties, exotic early Universe processes, and many other astrophysical and cosmological enterprises. As a worked example, researchers derive the cosmological constraints to an unstable-neutrino spies (with arbitrary branching ratio to a radiative decay mode) that follow from the GUPS.

  18. The Inward Radial Diffusion and Slow Decay of Energetic Electrons in the Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Ni, B.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the inward intrusion of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts observed by the Van Allen probes during a 10-day quiet period in March 2013. The electron flux measurements from Mageis and REPT instruments on the Van Allen probes show the clear radial diffusion and slow decay of ~300 keV to ~4.5 MeV electrons. The energetic electrons are injected at L ~ 4.75 on March 06, and gradually diffuse inward at each energy channel to L ~ 4 until interrupted by a strong geomagnetic disturbance on March 17. Meanwhile, the differential energy flux of the energetic electrons decreased by about 1 order in 10 days. The electrons exhibit flattened pitch angle distributions above ~40°. We adopt a 3 dimensional radiation belt model which incorporates radial and local diffusion processes to simulate this event. The empirical radial diffusion rates provide reasonable agreement with the observed inward diffusion profile. The hiss wave amplitudes are observed by the THEMIS spacecraft on the dayside and by the Van Allen probes on the nightside. The electrons with energies lower than ~1 MeV are effectively scattered by hiss waves, causing the slow decay in consistent with observations. The higher energy electrons are effectively scattered by EMIC waves near the loss cone, and by hiss waves at higher pitch angles. The decaying timescale and the pitch angle distribution caused by the pitch angle scattering in the simulation are consistent with the observation at each energy channel. Our study demonstrates that the quiet time energetic electron dynamics are effectively controlled by the radial diffusion and pitch angle scattering processes in the Earth's radiation belts.

  19. Generation of Z mode radiation by diffuse auroral electron precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Lyons, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    The generation of Z mode waves by diffuse auroral electron precipitation is investigated assuming that a loss cone exists in the upgoing portion of the distribution due to electron interactions with the atmosphere. The waves are generated at frequencies above, but very near, the local electron cyclotron frequency omega(e) and at wave normal angles larger than 90 deg. In agreement with Hewitt et al. (1983), the group velocity is directed downward in regions where the ratio of the upper hybrid frequency omega(pe) to Omega(e) is less than 0.5, so that Z mode waves excited above a satellite propagate toward it and away from the upper hybrid resonance. Z mode waves are excited in a frequency band between Omega(e) and about 1.02 Omega(e), and with maximum growth rates of about 0.001 Omega(e). The amplification length is about 100 km, which allows Z mode waves to grow to the intensities observed by high-altitude satellites.

  20. Ion beam mixing and radiation enhanced diffusion in metal\\/ceramic interfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Neubeck; C.-E. Lefaucheur; H. Hahn; A. G. Balogh; H. Baumann; K. Bethge; D. M. Rück

    1995-01-01

    Ion beam techniques are frequently used to modify the physical properties of materials. It is the aim of this contribution to obtain information on ion beam effects on irradiated metal\\/ceramic interfaces with bilayer geometry. Ion beam mixing and radiation enhanced diffusion have been investigated in CuAl2O3, AuAl2O3 and AuZrO2 samples. Specimen, with thicknesses of the metallic film in the range

  1. Atmospheric radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harshvardhan, M.R. (USAF, Geophysics Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Studies of atmospheric radiative processes are summarized for the period 1987-1990. Topics discussed include radiation modeling; clouds and radiation; radiative effects in dynamics and climate; radiation budget and aerosol effects; and gaseous absorption, particulate scattering and surface reflection. It is concluded that the key developments of the period are a defining of the radiative forcing to the climate system by trace gases and clouds, the recognition that cloud microphysics and morphology need to be incorporated not only into radiation models but also climate models, and the isolation of a few important unsolved theoretical problems in atmospheric radiation.

  2. Solar UV-B in tropical forest gaps: Analysis using direct and diffuse radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, S.D.; Caldwell, M.M. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Experiments with natural levels of solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) have recently shown inhibition of the growth of some tropical forest tree seedlings. A knowledge of forest radiation environments is needed to help assess UV-B effects in natural situations. Although forest canopies strongly attenuate solar radiation, treefall gaps provide a very different radiation environment. We simultaneously measured both UV-B and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in forest gaps on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Outside the forest, UV-B is predominately diffuse even under clear sky conditions. In sunflecks of small forest gaps, most of the UV-B was in the direct beam component. Compared to conditions outside the forest, the UV-B in these sunflecks was low relative to PAR. Shaded portions of the gap, in contrast, had proportionately high levels of UV-B relative to PAR. There are indications in the literature that relatively low UV-B levels may be effective under low PFD. Seasonal trends of PAR and UV-B in different locations in gaps can be inferred from hemispherical canopy photographs.

  3. Antibacterial properties of Au doped polycarbonate synthesized by gamma radiation assisted diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hareesh, K.; Deore, Avinash V.; Dahiwale, S. S.; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Kanjilal, D.; Ojha, Sunil; Dhole, N. A.; Kodam, K. M.; Bhoraskar, V. N.; Dhole, S. D.

    2015-07-01

    Gold (Au)-Polycarbonate (PC) matrix was prepared by gamma radiation assisted diffusion of Au nanoparticles in PC matrix. UV-Visible spectroscopy showed the surface plasmon resonance around 550 nm which corresponds to Au and this peak shift towards lower wavelength i.e. blue shift indicating the decrease in particle size of Au. Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) experiment confirmed the diffusion of Au in PC and depth of diffusion is found to be around 0.85 ?m. X-ray Diffractogram (XRD) results also revealed the diffusion of Au in PC where the peak observed at 2??38.29° which correspond to the FCC structure. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images showed the hexagonal shaped Au nanoparticles and average particle size is found to be around 110 nm. These samples also showed anti-bacterial properties with both gram positive and gram negative bacteria's and revealed the inhibition of the overall growth of the bacteria with gamma dose.

  4. Impact of Changes in Diffuse Radiation on the Global Land Carbon Sink, 1901-2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, L.; Bellouin, N.; Sitch, S.; Boucher, O.; Huntingford, C.; Wild, M.; Cox, P. M.

    2009-04-01

    Recent observational and theoretical studies have shown that changes in surface radiation that lead to increasing diffuse surface irradiance, enhance plant photosynthesis (Gu et al., 2003, Niyogi et al., 2004, Oliveira et al., 2007, Roderick et al., 2001). Solar radiation reaching the land surface has changed over the industrial era due to aerosols emitted from volcanoes and various anthropogenic sources (Kvalevag and Myhre, 2007). Such changes in total surface radiation are accompanied by changes in direct and diffuse surface solar radiation. Current global climate-carbon models do include the effects of changes in total surface radiation on the land biosphere but neglect the positive effects of increasing diffuse fraction on plant photosynthesis. In this study we estimate for the first time, the impact of variations in diffuse fraction on the land carbon sink using a global model (Mercado et al., 2007) modified to account for the effects of variations in both direct and diffuse radiation on canopy photosynthesis. We use meteorological forcing from the Climate Research Unit Data set. Additionally short wave and photosynthetic active radiation are reconstructed from the Hadley centre climate model, which accounts for the scattering and absorption of light by tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols and change in cloud properties due to indirect aerosol effects. References Gu L.H., Baldocchi D.D., Wofsy S.C., Munger J.W., Michalsky J.J., Urbanski S.P. & Boden T.A. (2003) Response of a deciduous forest to the Mount Pinatubo eruption: Enhanced photosynthesis. Science, 299, 2035-2038. M. M. Kvalevag and G. Myhre, J. Clim. 20, 4874 (2007). Mercado L.M., Huntingford C., Gash J.H.C., Cox P.M. & Jogireddy V. (2007) Improving the representation of radiation interception and photosynthesis for climate model applications. Tellus Series B-Chemical and Physical Meteorology, 59, 553-565. Niyogi D., Chang H.I., Saxena V.K., Holt T., Alapaty K., Booker F., Chen F., Davis K.J., Holben B., Matsui T., Meyers T., Oechel W.C., Pielke R.A., Wells R., Wilson K. & Xue Y.K. (2004) Direct observations of the effects of aerosol loading on net ecosystem CO2 exchanges over different landscapes. Geophysical Research Letters, 31. Oliveira P.H.F., Artaxo P., Pires C., De Lucca S., Procopio A., Holben B., Schafer J., Cardoso L.F., Wofsy S.C. & Rocha H.R. (2007) The effects of biomass burning aerosols and clouds on the CO2 flux in Amazonia. Tellus Series B-Chemical and Physical Meteorology, 59, 338-349. Roderick M.L., Farquhar G.D., Berry S.L. & Noble I.R. (2001) On the direct effect of clouds and atmospheric particles on the productivity and structure of vegetation. Oecologia, 129, 21-30.

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging of brain abnormalities induced by prenatal exposure to radiation in rodents.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shigeyoshi; Sawada, Kazuhiko; Hirose, Miwa; Mori, Yuki; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Murase, Kenya

    2014-01-01

    We assessed brain abnormalities in rats exposed prenatally to radiation (X-rays) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological experiments. Pregnant rats were divided into 4 groups: the control group (n?=?3) and 3 groups that were exposed to different radiation doses (0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 Gy; n?=?3 each). Brain abnormalities were assessed in 32 neonatal male rats (8 per group). Ex vivo T2-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were performed using 11.7-T MRI. The expression of markers of myelin production (Kluver-Barrera staining, KB), nonpyramidal cells (calbindin-D28k staining, CaBP), and pyramidal cells (staining of the nonphosphorylated heavy-chain neurofilament SMI-32) were histologically evaluated. Decreased brain volume, increased ventricle volume, and thinner cortices were observed by MRI in irradiated rats. However, no abnormalities in the cortical 6-layered structure were observed via KB staining in radiation-exposed rats. The DTI color-coded map revealed a dose-dependent reduction in the anisotropic signal (vertical direction), which did not represent reduced numbers of pyramidal cells; rather, it indicated a signal reduction relative to the vertical direction because of low nerve cell density in the entire cortex. We conclude that DTI and histological experiments are useful tools for assessing cortical and hippocampal abnormalities after prenatal exposure to radiation in rats. PMID:25202992

  6. Radial diffusion models of energetic electrons and Jupiter's synchrotron radiation. 2: Time variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pater, Imke; Goertz, Christoph K.

    1994-01-01

    We used a radial diffusion code for energetic electrons in Jupiter's magnetosphere to investigate variations in Jupiter's radio emission due to changes in the electron phase space density at L shells between 6 and 50, and due to changes in the radial diffusion parameters. We suggest that the observed variations in Jupiter's radio emission are likely caused by changes in the electron phase space density at some boundary L(sub 1) is greater than 6, if the primary mode of transport of energetic electrons is radial diffusion driven by fluctuating electric and/or magnetic fields induced by upper atmospheric turbulence. We noticed an excellent empirical correlation, both in phase and relative amplitude, between changes in the solar wind ram pressure and Jupiter's synchrotron radiation if the electron phase space density at the boundary L(sub 1) (L(sub 1) is approximately equal to 20-50) varies linearly with the square root of the solar wind ram pressure, f is approximately (N(sub s)nu(exp 2 sub s))(exp 1/2). The calculations were carried out with a diffusion coefficient D(sub LL) = D(sub n)L(exp n) with n = 3. The diffusion coefficient which best fit the observed variations in Jupiter's synchrotron radiation D(sub 3) = 1.3 +/- 0.2 x 10(exp -9)/s is approximately 0.041/yr, which corresponds to a lagtime of approximately 2 years. We further show that the observed short term (days-weeks) variations in Jupiter's radio emission cannot be explained adequately when radial diffusion is taken into account.

  7. Propagation of intense laser radiation through a diffusion flame of burning oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdev, S. V.; Glova, A. F.; Dubrovskii, V. Yu; Durmanov, S. T.; Krasyukov, A. G.; Lysikov, A. Yu; Smirnov, G. V.; Pleshkov, V. M.

    2015-06-01

    We report the results of measuring the absorption coefficient of radiation from a cw ytterbium fibre single-mode laser with the power up to 1.5 kW by a diffusion flame of oil, burning in the atmosphere air at normal pressure on a free surface. For the constant length (30 mm) and width (30 mm) of the flame and the distance 10 mm between the laser beam axis and the oil surface the dependence of the absorption coefficient, averaged over the flame length, on the mean radiation intensity (varied from 4.5 × 103 to 1.2 × 106 W cm-2) entering the flame is obtained. The qualitative explanation of nonmonotonic behaviour of the absorption coefficient versus the intensity is presented.

  8. Nonlinear variants of the TR/BDF2 method for thermal radiative diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Jarrod D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, 129 Zachry Engineering Center, TAMU 3133, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Morel, Jim E., E-mail: morel@tamu.ed [Department of Nuclear Engineering, 129 Zachry Engineering Center, TAMU 3133, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Knoll, Dana A. [Fluid Dynamics and Solid Mechanics Group T-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS B216, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2011-02-20

    We apply the Trapezoidal/BDF2 (TR/BDF2) temporal discretization scheme to nonlinear grey radiative diffusion. This is a scheme that is not well-known within the radiation transport community, but we show that it offers many desirable characteristics relative to other second-order schemes. Several nonlinear variants of the TR/BDF2 scheme are defined and computationally compared with the Crank-Nicholson scheme. It is found for our test problems that the most accurate TR/BDF2 schemes are those that are fully iterated to nonlinear convergence, but the most efficient TR/BDF2 scheme is one based upon a single Newton iteration. It is also shown that neglecting the contributions to the Jacobian matrix from the cross-sections, which is often done due to a lack of smooth interpolations for tabular cross-section data, has a significant impact upon efficiency.

  9. An experimental and theoretical study of radiative extinction of diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, Indrek S.; Atreya, A.

    1994-01-01

    Our work was primarily theoretical and numerical. We investigated the simplified modeling of heat losses in diffusion flames, then we 'ramped up' the level of complexity in each successive study until the final chapter discussed the general problem of soot/flame interaction. With regard to the specific objective of studying radiative extinction, we conclude that in the steady case a self-extinguishing zero-g flame is unlikely to occur. The soot volume fractions are too small. On the other hand, our work does provide rational means for assessing the mixture of chemical energy release and radiative heat release. It also provides clues for suitable 'tailoring' this balance. Thus heat fluxes to surrounding surfaces can be substantially increased by exploiting and modifying its sooting capability.

  10. A multigrid preconditioner and automatic differentiation for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Glowinski, Roland [Department of Mathematics, PGH 651, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-3008 (United States)]. E-mail: roland@math.uh.edu; Toivanen, Jari [Center for Research in Scientific Computation, Box 8205, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8205 (United States)]. E-mail: jatoivan@ncsu.edu

    2005-07-20

    We study the efficient solution of non-equilibrium radiation diffusion problems. An implicit time discretization leads to the solution of systems of non-linear equations which couple radiation energy and material temperature. We consider the implicit Euler method, the mid-point scheme, the two-step backward differentiation formula, and a two-stage implicit Runge-Kutta method for time discretization. We employ a Newton-Krylov method in the solution of arising non-linear problems. We describe the computation of the Jacobian matrix for Newton's method using automatic differentiation based on the operator overloading in Fortran 90. For GMRES iterations, we propose a simple multigrid preconditioner applied directly to the coupled linearized problems. We demonstrate the efficiency and scalability of the proposed solution procedure by solving one-dimensional and two-dimensional model problems.

  11. Dynamic Implicit 3D Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Bobby [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Zhen [ORNL] [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Manuel [ORNL] [ORNL; Pernice, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2014-01-01

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multiphysics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multiphysics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent linear solver convergence.

  12. Noninvasive diffuse optical monitoring of head and neck tumor blood flow and oxygenation during radiation delivery.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lixin; Kudrimoti, Mahesh; Cheng, Ran; Shang, Yu; Johnson, Ellis L; Stevens, Scott D; Shelton, Brent J; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-02-01

    This study explored using a novel diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) flow-oximeter to noninvasively monitor blood flow and oxygenation changes in head and neck tumors during radiation delivery. A fiber-optic probe connected to the DCS flow-oximeter was placed on the surface of the radiologically/clinically involved cervical lymph node. The DCS flow-oximeter in the treatment room was remotely operated by a computer in the control room. From the early measurements, abnormal signals were observed when the optical device was placed in close proximity to the radiation beams. Through phantom tests, the artifacts were shown to be caused by scattered x rays and consequentially avoided by moving the optical device away from the x-ray beams. Eleven patients with head and neck tumors were continually measured once a week over a treatment period of seven weeks, although there were some missing data due to the patient related events. Large inter-patient variations in tumor hemodynamic responses were observed during radiation delivery. A significant increase in tumor blood flow was observed at the first week of treatment, which may be a physiologic response to hypoxia created by radiation oxygen consumption. Only small and insignificant changes were found in tumor blood oxygenation, suggesting that oxygen utilizations in tumors during the short period of fractional radiation deliveries were either minimal or balanced by other effects such as blood flow regulation. Further investigations in a large patient population are needed to correlate the individual hemodynamic responses with the clinical outcomes for determining the prognostic value of optical measurements. PMID:22312579

  13. Diffusion of fission products and radiation damage in SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malherbe, Johan B.

    2013-11-01

    A major problem with most of the present nuclear reactors is their safety in terms of the release of radioactivity into the environment during accidents. In some of the future nuclear reactor designs, i.e. Generation IV reactors, the fuel is in the form of coated spherical particles, i.e. TRISO (acronym for triple coated isotropic) particles. The main function of these coating layers is to act as diffusion barriers for radioactive fission products, thereby keeping these fission products within the fuel particles, even under accident conditions. The most important coating layer is composed of polycrystalline 3C-SiC. This paper reviews the diffusion of the important fission products (silver, caesium, iodine and strontium) in SiC. Because radiation damage can induce and enhance diffusion, the paper also briefly reviews damage created by energetic neutrons and ions at elevated temperatures, i.e. the temperatures at which the modern reactors will operate, and the annealing of the damage. The interaction between SiC and some fission products (such as Pd and I) is also briefly discussed. As shown, one of the key advantages of SiC is its radiation hardness at elevated temperatures, i.e. SiC is not amorphized by neutrons or bombardment at substrate temperatures above 350 °C. Based on the diffusion coefficients of the fission products considered, the review shows that at the normal operating temperatures of these new reactors (i.e. less than 950 °C) the SiC coating layer is a good diffusion barrier for these fission products. However, at higher temperatures the design of the coated particles needs to be adapted, possibly by adding a thin layer of ZrC.

  14. Shear mixing in stellar radiative zones. I. Effect of thermal diffusion and chemical stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, V.; Lignières, F.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Turbulent transport of chemical elements in radiative zones of stars is considered in current stellar evolution codes thanks to phenomenologically derived diffusion coefficients. Recent local numerical simulations suggest that the coefficient for radial turbulent diffusion due to radial differential rotation satisfies Dt ? 0.058?/Ri, in qualitative agreement with the model of Zahn (1992, A&A, 265, 115). However, this model does not apply (i) when differential rotation is strong with respect to stable thermal stratification or (ii) when chemical stratification has a significant dynamical effect, a situation encountered at the outer boundary of nuclear-burning convective cores. Aims: We extend our numerical study to consider the effects of chemical stratification and of strong shear, and compare the results with prescriptions used in stellar evolution codes. Methods: We performed local, direct numerical simulations of stably stratified, homogeneous, sheared turbulence in the Boussinesq approximation. The regime of high thermal diffusivities, typical of stellar radiative zones, is reached thanks to the so-called small-Péclet-number approximation, which is an asymptotic development of the Boussinesq equations in this regime. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on chemical stratification was explored in this approximation. Results: Maeder's extension of Zahn's model in the strong-shear regime (Maeder 1995, A&A, 299, 84) is not supported by our results, which are better described by a model found in the geophysical literature. As regards the effect of chemical stratification, our quantitative estimate of the diffusion coefficient as a function of the mean gradient of mean molecular weight leads to the formula Dt ? 0.45?(0.12-Ri?) /Ri, which is compatible in the weak-shear regime with the model of Maeder & Meynet (1996, A&A, 313, 140) but not with Maeder's (1997, A&A, 321, 134).

  15. Decoding Diffusivity in Multiple Sclerosis: Analysis of Optic Radiation Lesional and Non-Lesional White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Klistorner, Alexander; Vootakuru, Nikitha; Wang, Chenyu; Yiannikas, Con; Graham, Stuart L.; Parratt, John; Garrick, Raymond; Levin, Netta; Masters, Lynette; Lagopoulos, Jim; Barnett, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been suggested as a new promising tool in MS that may provide greater pathological specificity than conventional MRI, helping, therefore, to elucidate disease pathogenesis and monitor therapeutic efficacy. However, the pathological substrates that underpin alterations in brain tissue diffusivity are not yet fully delineated. Tract-specific DTI analysis has previously been proposed in an attempt to alleviate this problem. Here, we extended this approach by segmenting a single tract into areas bound by seemingly similar pathological processes, which may better delineate the potential association between DTI metrics and underlying tissue damage. Method Several compartments were segmented in optic radiation (OR) of 50 relapsing-remitting MS patients including T2 lesions, proximal and distal parts of fibers transected by lesion and fibers with no discernable pathology throughout the entire length of the OR. Results Asymmetry analysis between lesional and non-lesional fibers demonstrated a marked increase in Radial Diffusivity (RD), which was topographically limited to focal T2 lesions and potentially relates to the lesional myelin loss. A relative elevation of Axial Diffusivity (AD) in the distal part of the lesional fibers was observed in a distribution consistent with Wallerian degeneration, while diffusivity in the proximal portion of transected axons remained normal. A moderate, but significant elevation of RD in OR non-lesional fibers was strongly associated with the global (but not local) T2 lesion burden and is probably related to microscopic demyelination undetected by conventional MRI. Conclusion This study highlights the utility of the compartmentalization approach in elucidating the pathological substrates of diffusivity and demonstrates the presence of tissue-specific patterns of altered diffusivity in MS, providing further evidence that DTI is a sensitive marker of tissue damage in both lesions and NAWM. Our results suggest that, at least within the OR, parallel and perpendicular diffusivities are affected by tissue restructuring related to distinct pathological processes. PMID:25807541

  16. A Monte Carlo synthetic-acceleration method for solving the thermal radiation diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Thomas M., E-mail: evanstm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Mosher, Scott W., E-mail: moshersw@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Slattery, Stuart R., E-mail: sslattery@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53716 (United States); Hamilton, Steven P., E-mail: hamiltonsp@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We present a novel synthetic-acceleration-based Monte Carlo method for solving the equilibrium thermal radiation diffusion equation in three spatial dimensions. The algorithm performance is compared against traditional solution techniques using a Marshak benchmark problem and a more complex multiple material problem. Our results show that our Monte Carlo method is an effective solver for sparse matrix systems. For solutions converged to the same tolerance, it performs competitively with deterministic methods including preconditioned conjugate gradient and GMRES. We also discuss various aspects of preconditioning the method and its general applicability to broader classes of problems.

  17. Radiative heating of interstellar grains falling toward the solar nebula: 1-D diffusion calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonelli, D. P.; Pollack, J. B.; McKay, C. P.

    1997-01-01

    As the dense molecular cloud that was the precursor of our Solar System was collapsing to form a protosun and the surrounding solar-nebula accretion disk, infalling interstellar grains were heated much more effectively by radiation from the forming protosun than by radiation from the disk's accretion shock. Accordingly, we have estimated the temperatures experienced by these infalling grains using radiative diffusion calculations whose sole energy source is radiation from the protosun. Although the calculations are 1-dimensional, they make use of 2-D, cylindrically symmetric models of the density structure of a collapsing, rotating cloud. The temperature calculations also utilize recent models for the composition and radiative properties of interstellar grains (Pollack et al. 1994. Astrophys. J. 421, 615-639), thereby allowing us to estimate which grain species might have survived, intact, to the disk accretion shock and what accretion rates and molecular-cloud rotation rates aid that survival. Not surprisingly, we find that the large uncertainties in the free parameter values allow a wide range of grain-survival results: (1) For physically plausible high accretion rates or low rotation rates (which produce small accretion disks), all of the infalling grain species, even the refractory silicates and iron, will vaporize in the protosun's radiation field before reaching the disk accretion shock. (2) For equally plausible low accretion rates or high rotation rates (which produce large accretion disks), all non-ice species, even volatile organics, will survive intact to the disk accretion shock. These grain-survival conclusions are subject to several limitations which need to be addressed by future, more sophisticated radiative-transfer models. Nevertheless, our results can serve as useful inputs to models of the processing that interstellar grains undergo at the solar nebula's accretion shock, and thus help address the broader question of interstellar inheritance in the solar nebula and present Solar System. These results may also help constrain the size of the accretion disk: for example, if we require that the calculations produce partial survival of organic grains into the solar nebula, we infer that some material entered the disk intact at distances comparable to or greater than a few AU. Intriguingly, this is comparable to the heliocentric distance that separates the C-rich outer parts of the current Solar System from the C-poor inner regions.

  18. Determination of the Dark Matter profile from the EGRET excess of diffuse Galactic gamma radiation

    E-print Network

    Markus Weber

    2007-10-26

    The excess above 1 GeV in the energy spectrum of the diffuse Galactic gamma radiation, measured with the EGRET experiment, can be interpreted as the annihilation of Dark Matter (DM) particles. The DM is distributed in a halo around the Milky Way. Considering the directionality of the gamma ray flux it is possible to determine the halo profile. The DM within the halo has a smooth and a clumpy component.These components can have different profiles as suggested by N-body simulations and the data is indeed compatible with a NFW profile for the diffuse component and a cored profile for the clumpy component.These DM clumps can be partly destroyed by tidal forces from interactions with stars and the gravitational potential of the Galactic disc.This effect mainly decreases the annihilation signal from the Galactic centre (GC). In this paper constraints on the different profiles and the survival probability of the clumps are discussed.

  19. Hybrid model for photon propagation in random media based on the radiative transfer and diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Okawa, S.; Kosuge, T.; Kohno, S.

    2013-03-01

    For improvement of diffuse optical tomography, one needs a numerical model to compute photon propagation accurately and efficiently. Thus, in the paper, we construct a hybrid model based on the radiative transfer equation (RTE) and diffusion equation (DE) in the time domain under the refractive-index-mismatching at boundary. At first, a fictive interface between the RTE and DE regions is determined, which is characterized by a length scale ?DA. By comparing the fluence rate calculated based on the RTE to that on the DE, we estimate ?DA at ~10/?t, where ?t denotes the extinction coefficient. Next, we determine a coefficient representing the reflectivity in the Robin boundary condition of the DE by analyzing the fluence rates in the domain outside ?DA. Then, the hybrid model is constructed by using the determinations. The fluence rates based on this hybrid algorithm is consistent with those on the RTE in a whole range of the medium and computational costs are reduced efficiently.

  20. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients for relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, Alexander; Mann, Ian; Baker, Daniel N.; Subbotin, Dmitriy; Ozeke, Louis; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam

    Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interactions of electrons with ULF waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2012] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate the effect of changing a diffusion coefficient on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes geomagnetically quiet and active time. The simulations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion. 1. Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999JA900344 2. Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. J. Rae, D. K. Milling, S. R. Elkington, A. A. Chan, and H. J. Singer (2012), ULF wave derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A04222, doi:10.1029/2011JA017463.

  1. Installation of a variable-angle spectrometer system for monitoring diffuse and global solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormachea, O.; Abrahamse, A.; Tolavi, N.; Romero, F.; Urquidi, O.; Pearce, J. M.; Andrews, R.

    2013-11-01

    We report on the design and installation of a spectrometer system for monitoring solar radiation in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Both the light intensity and the spectral distribution affect the power produced by a photovoltaic device. Local variations in the solar spectrum (especially compared to the AM1.5 standard) may have important implications for device optimization and energy yield estimation. The spectrometer system, based on an Ocean Optics USB4000 (300-900nm) spectrometer, was designed to increase functionality. Typically systems only record the global horizontal radiation. Our system moves a fiber-optic cable 0-90 degrees and takes measurements in 9 degree increments. Additionally, a shadow band allows measurement of the diffuse component of the radiation at each position. The electronic controls utilize an Arduino UNO microcontroller to synchronizes the movement of two PAP bipolar (stepper) motors with the activation of the spectrometer via an external trigger. The spectrometer was factory calibrated for wavelength and calibrated for absolute irradiance using a Sellarnet SL1-Cal light source. We present preliminary results from data taken March-June, 2013, and comment on implications for PV devices in Cochabamba.

  2. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Castor

    2003-01-01

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore

  3. Radiation Exposure

    MedlinePLUS

    Radiation is energy that travels in the form of waves or high-speed particles. It occurs naturally in sunlight. Man-made radiation is used in X-rays, nuclear weapons, nuclear power plants and cancer treatment. If you are exposed to small amounts of radiation over a ...

  4. Combination of magnetic resonance imaging and diffuse optical spectroscopy to predict radiation response in the breast: an exploratory pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klifa, C.; Hattangadi, J.; Watkins, M.; Li, A.; Sakata, T.; Tromberg, B.; Hylton, N.; Park, C.

    2007-02-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a standard treatment after lumpectomy for breast cancer, involving a typical course of approximately 6-7 weeks of daily treatment. Many women find this cumbersome and costly, and therefore many are left with the option of mastectomy. Many groups are now investigating novel ways to deliver RT, by using different techniques and shortening the course of treatment. However, the efficacy and side effects of these strategies are not known. In this project, we wish to develop noninvasive imaging tools that would allow us to measure radiation dose effects in women with breast cancer. We hope this will lead to new ways to identify individuals who may not need radiation therapy, who may safely be treated with new accelerated techniques, or who should be treated with the standard radiation therapy approach. We propose to study the effect of radiation therapy using a combination of two imaging modalities: 1) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which will provide detailed information on breast structures and blood vessels and 2) near infra-red diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS), which measures local biologic properties of breast tissue. Our hypothesis is that by using a combination of modalities we will be able to better characterize radiation effects in breast tissue, by measuring differences between the radiated and non-irradiated breast. The development of novel non-invasive tools providing information about how individuals respond to radiation therapy can lead to important improvement of radiation treatment, and ultimately help guide individualized treatment programs in the future.

  5. Radiation proctopathy.

    PubMed

    Grodsky, Marc B; Sidani, Shafik M

    2015-06-01

    Radiation therapy is a widely utilized treatment modality for pelvic malignancies, including prostate cancer, rectal cancer, and cervical cancer. Given its fixed position in the pelvis, the rectum is at a high risk for injury secondary to ionizing radiation. Despite advances made in radiation science, up to 75% of the patients will suffer from acute radiation proctitis and up to 20% may experience chronic symptoms. Symptoms can be variable and include diarrhea, bleeding, incontinence, and fistulization. A multitude of treatment options exist. This article summarizes the latest knowledge relating to radiation proctopathy focusing on the vast array of treatment options. PMID:26034407

  6. Contralateral testicular relapse after prophylactic radiation in a patient with primary testicular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Amber L; Go, Ronald S

    2009-12-01

    Prophylactic radiation to the contralateral uninvolved testicle has become a standard practice in the treatment of primary testicular lymphoma. While it is generally felt to be very effective, its failure rate is unknown. We describe a patient with primary testicular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, who developed recurrent disease in the contralateral testicle despite receiving prophylactic testicular radiation, central nervous system prophylaxis, and anthracycline-based chemo-immunotherapy. Review of the literature shows that the testicular failure rate after prophylactic radiation may be unexpectedly high at 10% or more. We put forward hypotheses on testicular relapse and discuss potential alternative preventive strategies. PMID:19682312

  7. Three-dimensional electron radiation belt simulations using the BAS Radiation Belt Model with new diffusion models for chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, and lightning-generated whistlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glauert, Sarah A.; Horne, Richard B.; Meredith, Nigel P.

    2014-01-01

    The flux of relativistic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts is highly variable and can change by orders of magnitude on timescales of a few hours. Understanding the drivers for these changes is important as energetic electrons can damage satellites. We present results from a new code, the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Radiation Belt model, which solves a 3-D Fokker-Planck equation, following a similar approach to the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, incorporating the effects of radial diffusion, wave-particle interactions, and collisions. Whistler mode chorus waves, plasmaspheric hiss, and lightning-generated whistlers (LGW) are modeled using new diffusion coefficients, calculated by the Pitch Angle and Energy Diffusion of Ions and Electrons (PADIE) code, with new wave models based on satellite data that have been parameterized by both the AE and Kp indices. The model for plasmaspheric hiss and LGW includes variation in the wave-normal angle distribution of the waves with latitude. Simulations of 100 days from the CRRES mission demonstrate that the inclusion of chorus waves in the model is needed to reproduce the observed increase in MeV flux during disturbed conditions. The model reproduces the variation of the radiation belts best when AE, rather than Kp, is used to determine the diffusion rates. Losses due to plasmaspheric hiss depend critically on the the wave-normal angle distribution; a model where the peak of the wave-normal angle distribution depends on latitude best reproduces the observed decay rates. Higher frequency waves (˜1-2 kHz) only make a significant contribution to losses for L?<3 and the highest frequencies (2-5 kHz), representing LGW, have a limited effect on MeV electrons for 2

  8. DIBSyRCH: The Diffuse Interstellar Band Synchrotron Radiation Carrier Hunt: New Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockett, M. H.; Wood, M. P.; Lawler, J. E.

    2010-11-01

    The identity of the carrier molecules of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) is the most durable mystery of spectroscopic astronomy. The DIBs are persistent absorption features, >300 total, observed along many lines of sight through the Interstellar Medium (ISM). The DIBs are scattered throughout the visible and near infrared, with widths in the 2-100 cm-1 range. For nearly a century, laboratory spectroscopists have struggled to match astrophysical wavelengths to laboratory wavelengths of known molecules including a variety of stable molecules, radicals, cations, and anions. Many researchers have hypothesized that hydrocarbon molecules are responsible for the DIBs, due to the rich chemistry and high cosmic abundance of carbon and hydrogen. Though large Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now suspected to be the source of the DIBs, no definitive matches have yet been made to laboratory PAH spectra. Aromatic clusters are also thought to be an important constituent of the interstellar dust distribution and may contribute to the 2175 Å "bump" in the interstellar extinction curve. The Diffuse Interstellar Band Synchrotron Radiation Carrier Hunt (DIBSyRCH) experiment has been built at the Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) to test these hypotheses by conducting a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of cold, gas phase and clustered PAH molecules and ions. Using a custom echelle spectrograph and the innovative Cryogenic Circulating Advective Multi-Pass (CCAMP) absorption cell, we routinely achieve a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 107 cm-3 with a signal-to-noise ratio of 10,000 in 60 seconds of data collection in the visible. This instrument, coupled with the high spectral radiance of the synchrotron radiation continuum from the SRC's White Light Beamline, permits rapid acquisition of spectra covering broad wavelength regions with resolution appropriate for the DIBs. In order to obtain astrophysically relevant spectra of low-temperature PAHs, the molecules are entrained in a flow of cold neon buffer gas inside the CCAMP cell. A multi-pass optical cavity using special high-reflectivity broadband mirrors extends the absorption path length to hundreds of meters. The CCAMP cell combined with the broad spectral coverage and high spectral radiance of synchrotron radiation make this experiment uniquely suited to the DIB carrier search. Several generations of resistively heated and plasma heated crucibles have been used in the CCAMP to introduce PAHs. All have produced PAH clusters large enough to scatter light the synchrotron beam and reduce signal to noise. A new gas injection system is under development. An intense radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge and higher flow rates should reduce cluster formation.

  9. Retrieving direct and diffuse radiation with the use of sky imager pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Kalisch, John; Lorenz, Elke

    2015-04-01

    A machine-learning approach for retrieving direct and diffuse irradiance from pictures taken by a ground-based whole-sky imagery (sky imager) is investigated in the present work. The use of sky imagers for shortest-term local solar irradiance forecasts is a growing field in research and industry. Accurate predictions of surface solar irradiance fluctuations up to 30 minutes ahead are important for a variety of solar energy and power grid applications. Sky imager picture analyses provide very high resolution binary cloud masks, but have limitations in deriving aerosol and cloud optical properties. In a first approach, surface solar irradiance was retrieved from the binary cloud masks with the use of clear sky and overcast irradiance calculations. With this method, forecast performance improvements over persistence could be achieved especially for broken cloud situations. These situations are characterized by inhomogeneous cloud patterns contributing to surface solar irradiance deviating from the clear sky or overcast levels. The accurate estimation of the radiative components will therefore improve the irradiance retrievals. One year of measurements at the University of Oldenburg was used as a robust data basis for this new approach. The data sets consists of direct, diffuse and global horizontal irradiance measured with a sample rate of 1 Hz. In order to account for diurnal and seasonal variations radiation measurements are normalized to the clear-sky conditions. Hemispheric images were taken every 10 s by a sky imager mounted close to the radiometers. The proposed approach uses image features like the average pixel intensity of the whole image and the circumsolar area, analyses of the gray-level co-occurence matrix (GLCM), information of the RGB and HSV color space and the analysed cloud fraction. In order to estimate normalized direct and diffuse radiation, a k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) regression algorithm is applied. The performance of this model is evaluated by cross-validation. Here, the analysis procedure and first results of the performance of this new approach are presented.

  10. Development of the laser absorption radiation thermometry technique to measure thermal diffusivity in addition to temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levick, Andrew; Lobato, Killian; Edwards, Gordon

    2003-01-01

    A comparative technique based on photothermal radiometry has been developed to measure thermal diffusivity of semi-infinite targets with arbitrary geometry. The technique exploits the principle that the frequency response of the temperature modulation induced by a periodic modulated heating source (in this case a laser spot) scales with thermal diffusivity. To demonstrate this technique, a photothermal radiometer has been developed, which detects modulated thermal radiance at a wavelength of 2 ?m due to a small temperature modulation induced on the target surface by a modulated erbium fiber laser of power 1 W. Two frequency responses were measured for platinum and oxidized Inconel 600 targets (the frequency response is a scan of the amplitude of the modulated thermal radiance over laser modulation frequency). Scaling the two responses with respect to frequency gives a ratio of thermal diffusivities Dplatinum/DInconel of 4.45(33) which compares with a literature value of 4.46(50). The aim is to combine this technique with laser absorption radiation thermometry to produce multithermal property instrument for measuring "industrial" targets.

  11. Radiation esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Murro, Diana; Jakate, Shriram

    2015-06-01

    The esophagus is frequently exposed to radiation during treatment of advanced stages of common cancers such as lung, breast, and esophagus. However, symptomatic radiation esophagitis requiring endoscopic and histologic evaluation occurs quite rarely, affecting less than 1% of patients receiving radiation treatment. Symptoms occur acutely, generally within the first 2 months. Patients typically present with nonspecific symptoms such as dysphagia and odynophagia. Endoscopic changes such as erythema and ulceration are also nonspecific and nondiagnostic. Biopsies from affected areas show variable inflammatory changes and radiation-related atypia of endothelial and stromal cells. Such atypia mimics cytomegalovirus cytopathic changes, which are ruled out through absence of immunostaining. Radiation esophagitis is thus clinically unsuspected and endoscopically and histologically quite different from the more common and familiar radiation proctitis for which angioectasia is the predominant finding. PMID:26030254

  12. Hawking radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parentani, Renaud; Spindel, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Hawking radiation is the thermal radiation predicted to be spontaneously emitted by black holes. It arises from the steady conversion of quantum vacuum fluctuations into pairs of particles, one of which escaping at infinity while the other is trapped inside the black hole horizon. It is named after the physicist Stephen Hawking who derived its existence in 1974. This radiation reduces the mass of black holes and is therefore also known as black hole evaporation.

  13. Thermodynamic and optical thickness corrections to diffusive radiative transfer formulations with application to planetary interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, A. M.

    2014-05-01

    Radiative transfer of high-frequency light under diffusive conditions is key to planetary heat flow and is important in astronomy and engineering. In geophysics, the effective radiative conductivity (krad) has been overestimated by threefold due to modeling refraction across planar interfaces as conical emanations of a point source. This assumption violates the second law of thermodynamics because heat can only flow down the thermal gradient. In addition to an extraneous factor of the index of refraction squared, calculations of krad need to address low absorbance in the near-infrared which cannot be quantified using small samples as required for diamond anvil cell experiments. We provide a new derivation and approximate krad in the Earth's mantle as 1.9 × 10-10T3 in Wm-1K-1, which is larger than previous estimates by a factor of up to 10, and will affect geodynamic models. It is also important in geodynamic models to incorporate the fast speed of the carriers, which cause this phenomenon to dominate transient events, and the relative flux of photons and phonons.

  14. Dynamic implicit 3D adaptive mesh refinement for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, B., E-mail: bphilip.kondekeril@gmail.com [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Wang, Z., E-mail: wangz@ornl.gov [National Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Berrill, M.A., E-mail: berrillma@ornl.gov [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Birke, M., E-mail: birkemanuel@gmail.com [National Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Pernice, M., E-mail: michael.pernice@inl.gov [Applied Computing and Visualization, Energy, Environment Science and Technology, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3550 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered often exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multi-physics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multi-physics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton–Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  15. On linearization and preconditioning for radiation diffusion coupled to material thermal conduction equations

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Tao, E-mail: fengtao2@mail.ustc.edu.cn [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230052 (China) [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230052 (China); Graduate School of China Academy Engineering Physics, Beijing 100083 (China); An, Hengbin, E-mail: an_hengbin@iapcm.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)] [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Yu, Xijun, E-mail: yuxj@iapcm.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)] [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Li, Qin, E-mail: liqin@lsec.cc.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Chinese Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, Rongpei, E-mail: zhangrongpei@163.com [Graduate School of China Academy Engineering Physics, Beijing 100083 (China)] [Graduate School of China Academy Engineering Physics, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2013-03-01

    Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK) method is an effective algorithm for solving large scale nonlinear equations. One of the most important advantages of JFNK method is that there is no necessity to form and store the Jacobian matrix of the nonlinear system when JFNK method is employed. However, an approximation of the Jacobian is needed for the purpose of preconditioning. In this paper, JFNK method is employed to solve a class of non-equilibrium radiation diffusion coupled to material thermal conduction equations, and two preconditioners are designed by linearizing the equations in two methods. Numerical results show that the two preconditioning methods can improve the convergence behavior and efficiency of JFNK method.

  16. Directional Degradation of Spectralon Diffuser Under Ionizing Radiation for Calibration of Space-Based Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiev, G. T.; Butler, J. J.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Ding, L.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of the effect of Vacuum Ultra Violet (VUV) irradiation on the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of Spectralon is presented in this paper. The sample was a 99% white Spectralon calibration standard irradiated with VUV source positioned at 60o off the irradiation direction for a total of 20 hours. The BRDF before and after VUV irradiation was measured and compared at number of wavelengths in the UV, VIS and IR. Non-isotropic directional degradation of Spectralon diffuser under ionizing radiation was detected at different BRDF measurement geometries primarily at UV spectral range. The 8o directional/hemispherical reflectance of the same sample was also measured and compared from 200nm to 2500nm. Index Terms BRDF, Reflectance, Multiangular, Spectralon, Remote Sensing

  17. Pitch-angle diffusion of electrons through growing and propagating along a magnetic field electromagnetic wave in Earth's radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, C.-R.; Woo, M.-H.; Dokgo, K.; Choi, E.-J.; Min, K.-W.; Hwang, J.; Park, Y.-D.; Lee, D.-Y.

    2015-06-01

    The diffusion of electrons via a linearly polarized, growing electromagnetic (EM) wave propagating along a uniform magnetic field is investigated. The diffusion of electrons that interact with the growing EM wave is investigated through the autocorrelation function of the parallel electron acceleration in several tens of electron gyration timescales, which is a relatively short time compared with the bounce time of electrons between two mirror points in Earth's radiation belts. Furthermore, the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient is derived for the resonant and non-resonant electrons, and the effect of the wave growth on the electron diffusion is discussed. The results can be applied to other problems related to local acceleration or the heating of electrons in space plasmas, such as in the radiation belts.

  18. He diffusion in zircon: Observations from (U-Th)/He age suites and 4He diffusion experiments and implications for radiation damage and anisotropic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenthner, W. R.; Reiners, P. W.

    2009-12-01

    Despite widespread use of zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometry in many geologic applications, our understanding of the kinetics of He diffusion in this system is rudimentary. Previous studies have shown that both radiation damage and crystallographic anisotropy may strongly influence diffusion kinetics and ages. We present observations of zircon He ages from multiple single-grain analyses from both detrital and bedrock suites from a wide variety of locations, showing relationships consistent with effects arising from the interaction of radiation damage and anisotropy. Individual zircons in each suite have experienced the same post-depositional or exhumational t-T history but grains appear to have experienced differential He loss that is correlated with effective uranium (eU) content, a proxy for the relative extent of radiation damage within each suite. Several suites of zircons heated to partial resetting upon burial or that have experienced slow cooling show positive correlations between age and eU. Examples of partially reset detrital samples include Cretaceous Sevier foreland basin sandstones buried to ~6-8 km depth, with ages ranging from 88-309 Ma across an eU range of 215-1453 ppm, and Apennines and Olympics greywackes heated to >~120 °C, showing similar trends. Some slowly-cooled bedrock samples also show positive age-eU correlations, suggesting increasing closure temperature with higher extents of radiation damage. Conversely, zircons from cratonal bedrock samples with high levels of radiation damage—measured as accumulated alpha dosage (in this case >~10^18 ?/g)—generally show negative age-eU correlations. We interpret these contrasting age-eU relationships as a manifestation of the interaction of radiation damage and anisotropic diffusion: at low damage, He diffusivity is relatively high and preferentially through c-axis-parallel channels. As suggested by Farley (2007), however, with increasing damage, channels are progressively blocked and He diffusivity decreases. Eventually, a crystal reaches a threshold level (>~10^18 ?/g ) wherein radiation damage is so extensive that damage zones become interconnected and He diffusivity increases once again. In order to evaluate these assertions, we conducted a series of step-heating experiments on several pairs of zircon slabs. Individual slabs were crystallographically oriented either orthogonal or parallel to the c-axis and each pair possessed varying degrees of radiation damage. Results from these experiments provide new closure temperature estimates, explain age-eU correlations within a data set, and allow us to construct diffusion models that more accurately describe the t-T history of a given sample.

  19. Laminar Smoke Point Based Subgrid Soot Radiation Modeling Applied to LES of Buoyant Turbulent Diffusion Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Prateep; de Ris, John L.; Wang, Yi; Krishnamoorthy, Niveditha; Dorofeev, Sergey B.

    2012-06-01

    Large eddy simulations (LES) of gaseous buoyant turbulent flames have been conducted with the application of a flamelet based soot-radiation model. The subgrid model applies a turbulent eddy description of soot formation, oxidation and radiation and is based on the laminar smoke point concept. Two parameters, a local turbulent strain rate and prior enthalpy loss/gain fraction influence the soot formation and radiation. Radiation heat transfer is simulated by solving the finite volume discretized form of the radiative transfer equation (RTE) with the subgrid soot-radiation model implemented. The radiant heating of surfaces in close proximity of the flames is computed and predicted heat fluxes and surface temperatures are compared against experimental data. Fire growth in a rack storage arrangement is simulated with the application of a pyrolysis model. Computed heat release rate (HRR) is compared against experimental data.

  20. Time-independent hybrid enrichment for finite element solution of transient conduction–radiation in diffusive grey media

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, M. Shadi, E-mail: m.s.mohamed@durham.ac.uk [School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Seaid, Mohammed; Trevelyan, Jon [School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)] [School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Laghrouche, Omar [Institute for Infrastructure and Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)] [Institute for Infrastructure and Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    We investigate the effectiveness of the partition-of-unity finite element method for transient conduction–radiation problems in diffusive grey media. The governing equations consist of a semi-linear transient heat equation for the temperature field and a stationary diffusion approximation to the radiation in grey media. The coupled equations are integrated in time using a semi-implicit method in the finite element framework. We show that for the considered problems, a combination of hyperbolic and exponential enrichment functions based on an approximation of the boundary layer leads to improved accuracy compared to the conventional finite element method. It is illustrated that this approach can be more efficient than using h adaptivity to increase the accuracy of the finite element method near the boundary walls. The performance of the proposed partition-of-unity method is analyzed on several test examples for transient conduction–radiation problems in two space dimensions.

  1. Photosynthesis of a Scats pine shoot: a comparison of two models of shoot photosynthesis in direct and diffuse radiation fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PAULINE OKER-BLOM; TAPANI LAHTI; HEIKKI SMOLANDER

    Summary Two models of shoot photosynthesis, the needle surface element model (SEM) and needle volume element model (VEM), were tested against empirical data obtained from measurements of the photosyn- thetic response of twelve Scats pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) shoots in direct and diffuse radiation. The models assume that shoot photosynthesis is obtained as the integrated response of either all needle

  2. Impacts of Diffuse Radiation on Light Use Efficiency across Terrestrial Ecosystems Based on Eddy Covariance Observation in China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kun; Wang, Shaoqiang; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Huimin; Zhang, Junhui; Yan, Junhua; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Yanfen; Shi, Peili

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystem light use efficiency (LUE) is a key factor of production models for gross primary production (GPP) predictions. Previous studies revealed that ecosystem LUE could be significantly enhanced by an increase on diffuse radiation. Under large spatial heterogeneity and increasing annual diffuse radiation in China, eddy covariance flux data at 6 sites across different ecosystems from 2003 to 2007 were used to investigate the impacts of diffuse radiation indicated by the cloudiness index (CI) on ecosystem LUE in grassland and forest ecosystems. Our results showed that the ecosystem LUE at the six sites was significantly correlated with the cloudiness variation (0.24?R2?0.85), especially at the Changbaishan temperate forest ecosystem (R2?=?0.85). Meanwhile, the CI values appeared more frequently between 0.8 and 1.0 in two subtropical forest ecosystems (Qianyanzhou and Dinghushan) and were much larger than those in temperate ecosystems. Besides, cloudiness thresholds which were favorable for enhancing ecosystem carbon sequestration existed at the three forest sites, respectively. Our research confirmed that the ecosystem LUE at the six sites in China was positively responsive to the diffuse radiation, and the cloudiness index could be used as an environmental regulator for LUE modeling in regional GPP prediction. PMID:25393629

  3. A faster algorithm for smoothed particle hydrodynamics with radiative transfer in the flux-limited diffusion approximation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stuart C. Whitehouse; Matthew R. Bate; Joe J. Monaghan

    2005-01-01

    We describe a new, faster implicit algorithm for solving the radiation hydrodynamics equations in the flux-limited diffusion approximation for smoothed particle hydrodynamics. This improves on the method elucidated in Whitehouse and Bate by using a Gauss-Seidel iterative method rather than iterating over the exchange of energy between pairs of particles. The new algorithm is typically many thousands of times faster

  4. Radial Diffusion as a Potential Source and Loss Mechanism of Relativistic Electrons in the Outer Radiation Belt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Y. Shprits; R. Thorne; R. Friedel; G. D. Reeves; J. F. Fennel; D. Baker; K. Shrikanth; R. Horne

    2005-01-01

    The loss mechanisms responsible for the sudden depletions of the outer electron radiation belt are examined based on observations and radial diffusion modeling. SAMPEX data for October-December 2003, indicates that depletions are correlated with increases in geomagnetic activity and also correlated with sudden increases in the solar wind dynamic pressure. Multi-channel HEO observations show that depletions are seen at energies

  5. RADIATION BALANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The balance of energy on the earth's surface represents the difference between incoming and outgoing radiation. There are two components in both the incoming and ongoing fractions and are separated by wavelength as shortwave (less than 5 um) and longwave (greater than 5 um). Shortwave radiation or...

  6. Radiation pager

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John L. Warren; Kenneth G. Vadnais

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in miniature photomultiplier tubes and low power electronics have made possible a new generation of small gamma-ray radiation detectors specifically designed for use by government and law enforcement agencies for the detection and interdiction of concealed nuclear materials. This paper describes an inexpensive pager sized radiation detector that can be worn on the belt or carried in a

  7. Radiation Fronts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. R. Fraser

    1958-01-01

    When intense thermal radiation penetrates into a cold fluid the front separating hot and cold fluid may be well defined. When this is so, conservation laws, similar to those which are used across a shock front, can be applied to the radiation front. These conservation laws, together with the second law of thermodynamics, are used to classify the types of

  8. Understanding Radiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    Radiation is a natural energy force that has been a part of the environment since the Earth was formed. It takes various forms, none of which can be smelled, tasted, seen, heard, or felt. Nevertheless, scientists know what it is, where it comes from, how to measure and detect it, and how it affects people. Cosmic radiation from outer space and…

  9. Diffuse fluorescence tomography based on the radiative transfer equation for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yihan; Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng; Li, Jiao

    2014-02-01

    Diffuse florescence tomography (DFT) as a high-sensitivity optical molecular imaging tool, can be applied to in vivo visualize interior cellular and molecular events for small-animal disease model through quantitatively recovering biodistributions of specific molecular probes. In DFT, the radiative transfer equation (RTE) and its approximation, such as the diffuse equation (DE), have been used as the forward models. The RTE-based DFT methodology is more suitable for biological tissue having void-like regions and the near-source area as in the situations of small animal imaging. We present a RTE-based scheme for the steady state DFT, which combines the discrete solid angle method and the finite difference method to obtain numerical solutions of the 2D steady RTE, with the natural boundary condition and collimating light source model. The approach is validated using the forward data from the Monte Carlo simulation for its better performances in the spatial resolution and reconstruction fidelity compared to the DE-based scheme.

  10. Solar radiation on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Joseph; Flood, Dennis J.

    1989-01-01

    Detailed information on solar radiation characteristics on Mars are necessary for effective design of future planned solar energy systems operating on the surface of Mars. Presented here is a procedure and solar radiation related data from which the diurnally, hourly and daily variation of the global, direct beam and diffuse insolation on Mars are calculated. The radiation data are based on measured optical depth of the Martian atmosphere derived from images taken of the sun with a special diode on the Viking cameras; and computation based on multiple wavelength and multiple scattering of the solar radiation.

  11. Dependence on latitude of the relation between the diffuse fraction of solar radiation and the radiation and the ratio of global-to-extraterrestrial radiation for monthly average daily values

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Soler

    1990-01-01

    An approach for the prediction of the monthly average daily diffuse radiation, {bar H}{sub d}, was proposed by Page in 1961. The Page method is based on the use of the linear correlation {bar H}{sub d}\\/{bar H} = c + d{bar H}\\/{bar H}{sub o}, where {bar H} and {bar H}{sub o} are, respectively, the monthly average daily values of global

  12. Radiation dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1983-01-01

    A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

  13. Radiation Balance

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Radiation Balance challenges students to "become a meteorologist" and make predictions about the relationships among ground cover, time of day, altitude and temperature. It is a simulation of radiation processes in the earth's atmosphere caused by solar, terrestrial, and atmospheric radiation transfer. Students analyze temperature data measured by a balloon (radiosonde) that they "launch" both in the morning and evening over four types of terrain (sand, plowed field, grass or fresh snow). As the balloon is dragged and dropped to various heights in the simulated atmosphere, the temperatures at these altitudes are automatically plotted on a graph. Several temperature profiles may be plotted concurrently to compare differences before clearing the graph.

  14. Diffusion tensor imaging tractography to visualize the relationship of the optic radiation to epileptogenic lesions prior to neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Winston, Gavin P; Yogarajah, Mahinda; Symms, Mark R; McEvoy, Andrew W; Micallef, Caroline; Duncan, John S

    2011-01-01

    Summary Purpose:? About one-third of patients with epilepsy are refractory to medical treatment and may be amenable to surgery. However, in patients with lesions on or near the presumed course of the optic radiation, the potential benefits of resection must be balanced against the risk of a visual field deficit. This study demonstrates the utility of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography in delineating the course of the optic radiation and its relationship to the epileptogenic lesion prior to epilepsy surgery. Methods:? Anatomic and DTI scans were acquired on 10 patients with medically refractory epilepsy undergoing presurgical evaluation at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery. Five patients underwent surgery and repeat scans postoperatively. The optic radiation was delineated and visualized in relation to the lesions on anatomic images and in three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions. Preoperative and postoperative visual fields were acquired by Goldmann perimetry. Key Findings:? The entire optic radiation was reliably delineated bilaterally in all patients. The results provide helpful additional information in informing the patient of the risks of surgery and in planning the surgical procedure and approach. Postoperative imaging findings correlated with the visual field data. Significance:? The optic radiation shows significant anatomic variability, but can be reliably delineated by tractography. Because surgical disruption of the optic radiation has serious consequences for the patient, DTI tractography is a useful technique in this population. Future integration with real-time neuronavigation will minimize the risks of neurosurgery. PMID:21569018

  15. The Radiation Transport Conundrum in Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J I

    2005-03-18

    The summary of this paper is: (1) The conundrum in the title is whether to treat radiation in the lab frame or the comoving frame in a radiation-hydrodynamic problem; (2) Several of the difficulties are associated with combining a somewhat relativistic treatment of radiation with a non-relativistic treatment of hydrodynamics; (3) The principal problem is a tradeoff between easily obtaining the correct diffusion limit and describing free-streaming radiation with the correct wave speed; (4) The computational problems of the comoving-frame formulation in more than one dimension, and the difficulty of obtaining both exact conservation and full u/c accuracy argue against this method; (5) As the interest in multi-D increases, as well as the power of computers, the lab-frame method is becoming more attractive; and (6) The Monte Carlo method combines the advantages of both lab-frame and comoving-frame approaches, its only disadvantage being cost.

  16. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... esophagitis . Since your body uses a lot of energy to heal during radiation therapy, it is important ... surprised if you are more tired, have less energy, or feel weak. Once you have finished treatment, ...

  17. Radiation Glossary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... also discusses radiation protection related to it. Binding Energy(cosmic glue) the amount of energy required to break up a nucleus into its constituent parts, or conversely, the energy released upon formation of the nucleus By-Product ...

  18. Celestial diffuse gamma radiation above 30 MeV observed by SAS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Hartman, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    The Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS)-2, launched on November 15, 1972, carried into orbit a 32-deck magnetic-core digitized spark chamber gamma ray telescope to study celestial gamma radiation in the energy range above 30 MeV. In the study of several regions with b sub 2 15 deg, a finite, diffuse flux of gamma rays with a steep energy spectrum in the energy region from 35 to 200 MeV is observed. Representing the energy spectrum by a power law of the form dJ/dE = AE to - alpha power over this energy range, alpha is found along with the integral flux above 100 MeV. Combining this result with existing low energy gamma ray data yields an energy spectrum which is not a simple power law in energy, as in the X-ray region, but which demonstrates first an increase and then a decrease in slope, consistent within uncertainties with that predicted by cosmological theories, including the continuous production of high energy gamma rays primarily from neutral pi mesons throughout the history of the universe.

  19. Perturbative theory of grazing-incidence diffuse nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Deak, L.; Bottyan, L.; Nagy, D. L. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Spiering, H. [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, Staudinger Weg 9, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Khaidukov, Yu. N. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Yoda, Y. [SPring-8 JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2007-12-01

    Theoretical description of off-specular grazing-incidence nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation (synchrotron Moessbauer reflectometry, SMR) is presented. The recently developed SMR, similar to polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR), is an analytical tool for the determination of isotopic and magnetic structure of thin films and multilayers. It combines the sensitivity of Moessbauer spectroscopy to hyperfine interactions and the depth selectivity of x-ray reflectometry. Specular reflection provides information on the depth profile, while off-specular scattering on the lateral structure of scattering layers. Off-specular SMR and PNR intensity formulas of a rather general multilayer with different domains, based on a distorted incident-wave approximation (DIWA), are presented. The distorted-wave Born approximation results are given in an appendix. Physical and numerical implications, of using DIWA are explained. The temporal character of SMR imposes specific differences between SMR and PNR. In order to reveal the limits of DIWA and to compare the two analytical methods, two-dimensional diffuse SMR and PNR maps of an antiferromagnetic multilayer are calculated and critically compared. Experimental ''{omega}-2{theta}'' SMR map of a periodic [Fe/Cr]{sub 20} multilayer is presented and compared with simulations by the present theory.

  20. Relation between the inhibition of the laminar diffusion flame of polymers soot formation and radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Makharinskii, L.E.; Berlin, A.A.; Khalturinskii, N.A.; Rudakova, T.A.

    1983-09-01

    This article investigates the action of effective combustion inhibitors of premixed C/sub 2/F/sub 4/Br/sub 2/ and CC1/sub 4/ mixtures on the flame propagation rate over a polymer surface in an oxidizer counterflow. The cellulose-based polymers (paper, methyl cellulose, cellophane) examined included specimens in the form of films in a frame, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polystyrene in the form of plates 4 mm thick and 20 mm wide on an asbestos substrate, and STD (a copolymer of formaldehyde with trioxane) in the form of cylindrical 10-mm-diameter specimens. The flame propagation rate is related to the total heat flux, which includes the conductive or convective flux and radiation on the polymer surface. It is concluded that when considering the inhibition of diffusion flames it is necessary to take account of the possible effect associated with the change in flame luminance, and not only the chemical effects of the inert dilution of the flame by the inhibitors.

  1. Construction of accuracy-preserving surrogate for the eigenvalue radiation diffusion and/or transport problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, North Caroline State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The construction of surrogate models for high fidelity models is now considered an important objective in support of all engineering activities which require repeated execution of the simulation, such as verification studies, validation exercises, and uncertainty quantification. The surrogate must be computationally inexpensive to allow its repeated execution, and must be computationally accurate in order for its predictions to be credible. This manuscript introduces a new surrogate construction approach that reduces the dimensionality of the state solution via a range-finding algorithm from linear algebra. It then employs a proper orthogonal decomposition-like approach to solve for the reduced state. The algorithm provides an upper bound on the error resulting from the reduction. Different from the state-of-the-art, the new approach allows the user to define the desired accuracy a priori which controls the maximum allowable reduction. We demonstrate the utility of this approach using an eigenvalue radiation diffusion model, where the accuracy is selected to match machine precision. Results indicate that significant reduction is possible for typical reactor assembly models, which are currently considered expensive given the need to employ very fine mesh many group calculations to ensure the highest possible fidelity for the downstream core calculations. Given the potential for significant reduction in the computational cost, we believe it is possible to rethink the manner in which homogenization theory is currently employed in reactor design calculations. (authors)

  2. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of interstitial diffusion in Ni-Cr alloys and implications for radiation induced segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, L.; Morgan, D.

    2014-06-01

    In this study, ab initio molecular dynamics, implemented via density functional theory, is used to simulate self-interstitial diffusion in pure Ni and in the Ni-18 at.% Cr model alloy. Interstitial tracer diffusivities are measured from simulation results for pure Ni and for both Ni and Cr in the Ni-18Cr alloy. An Arrhenius function fit to these tracer diffusivities is then used in a rate theory model for radiation induced segregation, along with the experimentally measured vacancy diffusivities. It is predicted that interstitial diffusion has a tendency to cause Cr enrichment near grain boundaries, partially counterbalancing the tendency for vacancy diffusion to cause Cr depletion. This results in more mild Cr depletion than would result if only the vacancy diffusion were accounted for, in better agreement with experiment. This physical description of RIS in Ni-Cr alloys, which invokes the effects of both vacancy and interstitial diffusion, is distinct from the conventional description which accounts only for the effect of vacancy diffusion.

  3. Radiation damage of contact structures with diffusion barriers exposed to irradiation with {sup 60}Co{gamma}-ray photons

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, A. E. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine); Boltovets, N. S. [Orion State Enterprise Research Institute (Ukraine); Konakova, R. V., E-mail: konakova@isp.kiev.ua; Milenin, V. V. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine); Sveshnikov, Yu. N. [Elma-Malachite Close Corporation (Russian Federation); Sheremet, V. N. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

    2010-04-15

    The effect of ionizing radiation of {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray photons in the dose range 10{sup 4}-2 x 10{sup 9} rad on metal-semiconductor Au-ZrB{sub x}-AlGaN/GaN and Au-TiB{sub x}-Al-Ti-n-GaN contacts and Au-ZrB{sub x}-n-GaN Schottky diodes is examined. The contacts with the TiB{sub x} and ZrB{sub x} diffusion barriers do not degrade under the effect of ionizing radiation if the dose does not exceed 10{sup 8} rad. The Au-ZrB{sub x}-n-GaN Schottky diodes remain stable in the dose range 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} rad. As the radiation dose is increased to {>=}10{sup 8} rad, the damage to the contact metallization increases and is accompanied by formation of through pores, which is conducive to accumulation of oxygen at the Au-ZrB{sub x}(TiB{sub x}) interfaces and to an increase in mass transport of atoms in contact-forming layers. In this case, irradiation-caused degradation of the Schottky diodes is observed. Possible mechanisms of radiation damage of contact structures with diffusion barriers are analyzed.

  4. Precision structural diagnostics of layered superconductor/ferromagnet nanosystems V/Fe by reflectometry and diffuse scattering of synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, A. M., E-mail: am.nikitin@physics.msu.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Borisov, M. M.; Mukhamedzhanov, E. Kh.; Kovalchuk, M. V. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Sajti, S.; Tancziko, F.; Deak, L.; Bottyan, L. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics (Hungary); Khaydukov, Yu. N.; Aksenov, V. L. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    Layered superconducting ferromagnetic nanosystems Cu(32 nm)/V(40-80 nm)/Fe(0.5-4 nm)/MgO(001) have been investigated by reflectometry and the diffuse scattering of synchrotron radiation. The data obtained make it possible to determine the important characteristics of samples such as the layer thickness and the rms heights and lateral correlation lengths of roughness at the interfaces.

  5. A faster algorithm for smoothed particle hydrodynamics with radiative transfer in the flux-limited diffusion approximation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stuart C. Whitehouse; Matthew R. Bate; Joe J. Monaghan

    2005-01-01

    We describe a new, faster implicit algorithm for solving the radiation\\u000ahydrodynamics equations in the flux-limited diffusion approximation for\\u000asmoothed particle hydrodynamics. This improves on the method elucidated in\\u000aWhitehouse & Bate by using a Gauss-Seidel iterative method rather than\\u000aiterating over the exchange of energy between pairs of particles. The new\\u000aalgorithm is typically many thousands of times faster

  6. R-CHOP with dose-attenuated radiation therapy could induce good prognosis in gastric diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The treatment strategy for gastric diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has not been standardized in such as to the cycles of chemotherapy, dose of radiation, or necessity for the surgery. Although the results of CHOP or R-CHOP treatments have demonstrated the good prognosis, the treatments have been controversial in many cases. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 40 gastric DLBCL patients receiving chemotherapy with or without radiation in our institute. Those in stages II-IV were treated with six cycles of R-CHOP without radiation; for those in stage I, we administered three cycles of R-CHOP with radiation. Results The three-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 95.2 and 91.8%, respectively. Those in stage I obtained 100% of OS. The radiation dose prescribed was 30.6?Gy for CR cases and 39.6 to 40?Gy for PR after chemotherapy. Although survival rates tended to correlate with staging groups or age-adjusted IPI classifications, multivariate statistical analysis did not show clear differences. All 14 patients with initial bleeding were successfully managed without surgery during treatment. Conclusion R-CHOP therapy was very effective for gastric DLBCL. It may be not necessary to use more than 30.6?Gy of radiotherapy in the highly chemo-sensitive cases. Less toxic treatments should be made available to gastric DLBCL patients. PMID:23210663

  7. A new diffusion model for plasmaspheric hiss and lightning-generated whistlers and its effect on radiation belt dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glauert, Sarah; Horne, Richard; Meredith, Nigel

    2013-04-01

    The flux of relativistic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts is highly variable and can change by orders of magnitude on timescales of a few hours. Understanding the drivers for these changes is important as energetic electrons can damage satellites. Several models of the high-energy electron population now exist where the electron phase-space density is modelled using a 3-D Fokker-Planck equation incorporating the effects of radial transport, wave-particle interactions and collisions. Wave-particle interactions are incorporated into the models as pitch-angle and energy diffusion coefficients. Here we present results from the BAS radiation belt model, using new diffusion coefficients for plasmaspheric hiss and lightning-generated whistlers which are calculated using a representation of the wave power that decreases as the resonance cone is approached. The new diffusion coefficients are derived using the BAS wave database and are functions of L shell, energy, pitch-angle and geo-magnetic activity. Several wave-normal angle models are considered including one where the peak wave-normal angle varies with latitude. Our results show that radiation belt dynamics are reproduced better when the AE index, rather than Kp, is used to drive the wave-particle interactions and that the model best reproduces the observed data when the wave-normal angle distribution has a peak that varies with latitude and a wide angular spread. We show a comparison between the model and CRRES data for selected events.

  8. Repetitively pulsed UV radiation source based on a run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Panchenko, A. N.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-04-01

    An extended repetitively pulsed source of spontaneous UV radiation is fabricated, which may also be used for producing laser radiation. Voltage pulses with an incident wave amplitude of up to 30 kV, a half-amplitude duration of ~4 ns and a rise time of ~2.5 ns are applied to a gap with a nonuniform electric field. For an excitation region length of 35 cm and a nitrogen pressure of 30 – 760 Torr, a diffusive discharge up to a pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz is produced without using an additional system for gap preionisation. An investigation is made of the plasma of the run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge. Using a CCD camera it is found that the dense diffused plasma fills the gap in a time shorter than 1 ns. X-ray radiation is recorded from behind the foil anode throughout the pressure range under study; a supershort avalanche electron beam is recorded by the collector electrode at pressures below 100 Torr.

  9. Estimate flare radiation intensity

    SciTech Connect

    De Faveri, D.M.; Ferraiolo, G.; Fumarola, G.; Zonato, C.

    1985-05-01

    Thermal radiation intensity from flares is more accurately determined when the flame source is considered as a surface. Flares show very peculiar engineering and hygienic problems compared with other combustion equipment for conversion of toxic or polluting substances into less or non-noxious products. Experimental methods for predicting radiation have been researched in scale models dealing with observed flame shape and size. Prediction of jet diffusion flame shape and size in crosswind is of practical interest to assess radiative heat flux to neighboring plant structures or operating personnel. Since luminous flame radiation depends on parameters which are generally difficult to assess, empirical equations are usually applied, giving radiative heat flux as a function of molecular mass and calorific value of waste gas.

  10. Radiation Damage Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    The availability of data regarding the radiation behavior of GaAs and silicon solar cells is discussed as well as efforts to provide sufficient information. Other materials are considered too immature for reasonable radiation evaluation. The lack of concern over the possible catastrophic radiation degradation in cascade cells is a potentially serious problem. Lithium counterdoping shows potential for removing damage in irradiated P-type material, although initial efficiencies are not comparable to current state of the art. The possibility of refining the lithium doping method to maintain high initial efficiencies and combining it with radiation tolerant structures such as thin BSF cells or vertical junction cells could provide a substantial improvement in EOL efficiencies. Laser annealing of junctions, either those formed ion implantation or diffusion, may not only improve initial cell performance but might also reduce the radiation degradation rate.

  11. Effects of Cyclotron-Drift and Bounce-Drift Cross Diffusion on Evolution of Radiation Belt Phase-Space Densites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. A.; Zheng, L.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Elkington, S. R.; Albert, J.

    2014-12-01

    Pitch-angle scattering coupled with drift-shell splitting in an asymmetric magnetic field can give cyclotron-drift and bounce-drift cross diffusion terms in the radiation belt Fokker-Planck equation. More specifically, cyclotron-resonant pitch-angle scattering coupled with pitch-angle dependent second and third adiabatic invariants gives rise to non-zero DML and DKL cross diffusion coefficients (where M is the first invariant, K is the usual geometric bounce invariant, and L is the Roederer L-shell), plus an additional "anomalous" contribution to the radial diffusion coefficient, DALL [O'Brien, GRL, 2014]. In this paper we describe calculations of these additional terms and we present solutions of the corresponding radiation belt Fokker-Planck equation. The DML, DKL, and DALL diffusion coefficients are calculated assuming a Tsyganenko 1989 magnetic field model and a chorus wave model from Shprits et al. [JGR, 2011] that includes dayside and nightside chorus waves. Solutions to the corresponding Fokker-Planck diffusion equation are obtained using the REM diffusion code, which uses stochastic differential equation (SDE) methods to solve the fully 3-D diffusion equation in adiabatic invariant coordinates. One of the advantages of the SDE methods is that off-diagonal diffusion tensor terms are easily incorporated and the resulting phase-space densities are always non-negative. Initial results show that the new drift-shell splitting contributions are stronger for electrons of a few hundred keV near geosynchronous orbit, with associated changes in MeV electron phase-space densities over a range of L-values and at later times.

  12. Synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Knotek, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation has had a revolutionary effect on a broad range of scientific studies, from physics, chemistry and metallurgy to biology, medicine and geoscience. The situation during the last decade has been one of very rapid growth, there is a great vitality to the field and a capability has been given to a very broad range of scientific disciplines which was undreamed of just a decade or so ago. Here we will discuss some of the properties of synchrotron radiation that makes it so interesting and something of the sources in existence today including the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the new facilities built specifically for synchrotron radiation research and the model that was developed there for involvement of the scientific community is a good one which provides some good lessons for these facilities and others.

  13. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  14. Near field measurement of the complex radiation impedance presented to a vibrating plate in a reverberant room containing a rotating diffuser

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. H. Hansen; D. A. Bies

    1980-01-01

    The radiation impedance presented by the field of a reverberant room to a rectangular plate mounted in a large baffle and vibrating in its fundamental simply supported edge mode is experimentally investigated. It is shown that a large diffuser rotating at 30 rpm causes large variations in both the real and imaginary parts of the radiation impedance but the average

  15. Differential Effects of Radiation and Age on Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peiffer, Ann M; Shi, Lei; Olson, John; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K

    2010-01-01

    Greater than 50% of adults and ?100% of children who survive >6 months after fractionated partial or whole-brain radiotherapy develop cognitive impairments. Noninvasive methods are needed for detecting and tracking the radiation-induced brain injury associated with these impairments. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we sought to detect structural changes associated with brain injury in our rodent model of fractionated whole-brain irradiation (fWBI) induced cognitive impairment and to compare those changes with alterations that occur during the aging process. Middle aged rats were given a clinically relevant dose of fWBI (40 Gy: two 5 Gy fractions/wk for 4 wk) and scanned approximately one year post-irradiation to obtain whole-brain T2 and diffusion tensor images (DTI); control groups of sham-irradiated age-matched and young rats were also scanned. No gross structural changes were evident in the T2 structural images, and no detectable fWBI-induced DTI changes in fractional anisotropy (FA) were found in heavily myelinated white matter (corpus callosum, cingulum, and deep cortical white matter). However, significant fWBI-induced variability in FA distribution was present in the superficial parietal cortex due to an fWBI-induced decline in FA in the more anterior slices through parietal cortex. Young rats had significantly lower FA values relative to both groups of older rats, but only within the corpus callosum. These findings suggest that targets of the fWBI-induced change in this model may be the less myelinated or unmyelinated axons, extracellular matrix, or synaptic fields rather than heavily myelinated tracts. PMID:20599817

  16. Radiation accidents.

    PubMed

    Saenger, E L

    1986-09-01

    It is essential that emergency physicians understand ways to manage patients contaminated by radioactive materials and/or exposed to external radiation sources. Contamination accidents require careful surveys to identify the metabolic pathway of the radionuclides to guide prognosis and treatment. The level of treatment required will depend on careful surveys and meticulous decontamination. There is no specific therapy for the acute radiation syndrome. Prophylactic antibodies are desirable. For severely exposed patients treatment is similar to the supportive care given to patients undergoing organ transplantation. For high-dose extremity injury, no methods have been developed to reverse the fibrosing endarteritis that eventually leads to tissue death so frequently found with this type of injury. Although the Three Mile Island episode of March 1979 created tremendous public concern, there were no radiation injuries. The contamination outside the reactor building and the release of radioiodine were negligible. The accidental fuel element meltdown at Chernobyl, USSR, resulted in many cases of acute radiation syndrome. More than 100,000 people were exposed to high levels of radioactive fallout. The general principles outlined here are applicable to accidents of that degree of severity. PMID:3526994

  17. RADIATION COUNTER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. L. Jr

    1962-01-01

    A liquid scintillation counter is designed for commercial and industrial ; application. The scintillator liquid is contained within a casing, whlch is ; coated on lts outside with a white material for optimum light refiection. The ; casing may be sectionalized for particular application, e.g., discrimination of ; Co⁶° gamma radiation from background, and may be in the form of

  18. Radiation accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Saenger, E.L.

    1986-09-01

    It is essential that emergency physicians understand ways to manage patients contaminated by radioactive materials and/or exposed to external radiation sources. Contamination accidents require careful surveys to identify the metabolic pathway of the radionuclides to guide prognosis and treatment. The level of treatment required will depend on careful surveys and meticulous decontamination. There is no specific therapy for the acute radiation syndrome. Prophylactic antibodies are desirable. For severely exposed patients treatment is similar to the supportive care given to patients undergoing organ transplantation. For high-dose extremity injury, no methods have been developed to reverse the fibrosing endarteritis that eventually leads to tissue death so frequently found with this type of injury. Although the Three Mile Island episode of March 1979 created tremendous public concern, there were no radiation injuries. The contamination outside the reactor building and the release of radioiodine were negligible. The accidental fuel element meltdown at Chernobyl, USSR, resulted in many cases of acute radiation syndrome. More than 100,000 people were exposed to high levels of radioactive fallout. The general principles outlined here are applicable to accidents of that degree of severity.

  19. Radiation retinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R.G.; Withers, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    A letter to the editor discusses the effectiveness and risk of radiation treatment of Grave's ophthalmopathy. The authors are unable to document a single instance in which retinopathy can be attributed to therapy with a total dose of 2000 cGy when delivered in daily increments of 180 to 200 cGy.

  20. RADIATION FRONTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. R. Fraser

    1958-01-01

    When intense thermal radiation penetrates into a cold fluid the front ; separating hot and cold fluid may be well defined. When this is so, conservation ; laws, similar to those which are used across a shock front, can be applied to the ; radintion front. These conservation laws, together with the second law of ; thermodynamics, are used to

  1. Radiation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, W. G. G.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the historical development of both the wave and the corpuscular photon model of light. Suggests that students should be informed that the two models are complementary and that each model successfully describes a wide range of radiation phenomena. Cites 19 references which might be of interest to physics teachers and students. (LC)

  2. Radiation-enhanced thermal diffusion of transition metal and rare earth ions into II-VI semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Alán.; Williams, Lamario; Gafarov, Ozarfar; Martyshkin, Dmitry; Fedorov, Vladimir; Mirov, Sergey

    2015-02-01

    We report on study of gamma radiation-enhanced thermal diffusion of Transition Metal and Rare Earth ions into IIVI semiconductor crystals. ZnSe and ZnS samples with of iron thin film deposited on one facet were sealed in evacuated quartz ampoules at 10-3 Torr. The crystals were annealed for 14 days at 950°C under ?-irradiation from 60Co source. The irradiation dose rates of 43.99 R/s, 1.81 R/s were varied by distance between 60Co source and furnaces. For comparison, the samples were also annealed without irradiation at the same temperature. The spatial distributions of transition metal were measured by absorption of focused laser radiation at 5T2-5E mid-IR transitions of iron ions. In addition, samples of ZnSe were similarly sealed in evacuated quartz ampoules in the presence of Praseodymium metal and annealed at 950°C under 43.99 R/s and 0 R/s and the diffusion lengths and Pr concentrations were compared. The ?-irradiation results in better intrusion of the iron ions from the metal film and increase of the diffusion length at ~25%, while Praseodymium diffusion is dramatically enhanced by ?-irradiation during the annealing process.

  3. Influence of clouds and diffuse radiation on ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 and CO18

    E-print Network

    Noone, David

    of transpiration on canopy relative humidity and leaf water. Photosynthesis and isofluxes were both reduced radiation, photosynthesis, and relative humidity. Citation: Still, C. J., et al. (2009), Influence of clouds CO2 to flux, humidity, and isotope hydrol- ogy changes, manuscript in preparation, 2009], fundamental

  4. Discontinuous finite element solution of the radiation diffusion equation on arbitrary polygonal meshes and locally adapted quadrilateral grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragusa, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a piece-wise linear discontinuous (PWLD) finite element discretization of the diffusion equation for arbitrary polygonal meshes. It is based on the standard diffusion form and uses the symmetric interior penalty technique, which yields a symmetric positive definite linear system matrix. A preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm is employed to solve the linear system. Piece-wise linear approximations also allow a straightforward implementation of local mesh adaptation by allowing unrefined cells to be interpreted as polygons with an increased number of vertices. Several test cases, taken from the literature on the discretization of the radiation diffusion equation, are presented: random, sinusoidal, Shestakov, and Z meshes are used. The last numerical example demonstrates the application of the PWLD discretization to adaptive mesh refinement.

  5. Second order time evolution of the multigroup diffusion and P{sub 1} equations for radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Gordon L., E-mail: olson99@tds.net [Computer and Computational Sciences Division (CCS-2), Los Alamos National Laboratory, 5 Foxglove Circle, Madison, WI 53717 (United States)

    2011-08-20

    Highlights: {yields} An existing multigroup transport algorithm is extended to be second-order in time. {yields} A new algorithm is presented that does not require a grey acceleration solution. {yields} The two algorithms are tested with 2D, multi-material problems. {yields} The two algorithms have comparable computational requirements. - Abstract: An existing solution method for solving the multigroup radiation equations, linear multifrequency-grey acceleration, is here extended to be second order in time. This method works for simple diffusion and for flux-limited diffusion, with or without material conduction. A new method is developed that does not require the solution of an averaged grey transport equation. It is effective solving both the diffusion and P{sub 1} forms of the transport equation. Two dimensional, multi-material test problems are used to compare the solution methods.

  6. Hybrid model of light propagation in random media based on the time-dependent radiative transfer and diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hiroyuki; Okawa, Shinpei; Yamada, Yukio; Hoshi, Yoko

    2014-11-01

    Numerical modeling of light propagation in random media has been an important issue for biomedical imaging, including diffuse optical tomography (DOT). For high resolution DOT, accurate and fast computation of light propagation in biological tissue is desirable. This paper proposes a space-time hybrid model for numerical modeling based on the radiative transfer and diffusion equations (RTE and DE, respectively) in random media under refractive-index mismatching. In the proposed model, the RTE and DE regions are separated into space and time by using a crossover length and the time from the ballistic regime to the diffusive regime, ?DA~10/?t? and tDA~20/v?t? where ?t? and v represent a reduced transport coefficient and light velocity, respectively. The present model succeeds in describing light propagation accurately and reduces computational load by a quarter compared with full computation of the RTE.

  7. TeV gamma rays from the blazar H 1426+428 and the diffuse extragalactic background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A.; Barrio, J.; Beilicke, M.; Bernlöhr, K.; Börst, H.; Bojahr, H.; Bolz, O.; Contreras, J.; Cornils, R.; Cortina, J.; Denninghoff, S.; Fonseca, V.; Girma, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Götting, N.; Heinzelmann, G.; Hermann, G.; Heusler, A.; Hofmann, W.; Horns, D.; Jung, I.; Kankanyan, R.; Kestel, M.; Kettler, J.; Kohnle, A.; Konopelko, A.; Kornmeyer, H.; Kranich, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Lampeitl, H.; Lopez, M.; Lorenz, E.; Lucarelli, F.; Magnussen, N.; Mang, O.; Meyer, H.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Ona, E.; Padilla, L.; Panter, M.; Plaga, R.; Plyasheshnikov, A.; Pühlhofer, G.; Rauterberg, G.; Röhring, A.; Rhode, W.; Robrade, J.; Rowell, G.; Sahakian, V.; Samorski, M.; Schilling, M.; Schröder, F.; Sevilla, I.; Siems, M.; Stamm, W.; Tluczykont, M.; Völk, H. J.; Wiedner, C. A.; Wittek, W.

    2002-03-01

    The detection of TeV gamma -rays from the blazar H 1426+428 at an integral flux level of (4 +/- 2stat +/- 1syst) x 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 above 1 TeV with the HEGRA imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope system is reported. H 1426+428 is located at a redshift of z = 0.129, which makes it the most distant source detected in TeV gamma -rays so far. The TeV radiation is expected to be strongly absorbed by the diffuse extragalactic background radiation (DEBRA). The observed energy spectrum of TeV photons is in good agreement with an intrinsic power law spectrum of the source ~ E-1.9 corrected for DEBRA absorption. Statistical errors as well as uncertainties about the intrinsic source spectrum, however, do not permit strong statements about the density of the DEBRA infrared photon field.

  8. Radiation Protection Basics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Basic Concepts of Radiation Protection time distance shielding Time The amount of radiation exposure increases and decreases ... exposure. How does EPA use the concept of time in radiation protection? When we set a radiation ...

  9. Radiation Protection

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Science Update (AAAS; )

    2008-05-01

    Chemotherapy and radiation can be powerful weapons against cancer. But they harm healthy cells as well. Cells of the immune system and G.I. tract are especially vulnerable: instead of repairing the damage, they respond by committing cellular suicide. In contrast, tumor cells have mutations that make them resistant to cell death. Roswell Park Cancer Institute researcher Andrei Gudkov and his colleagues recently harnessed this property to create a new drug.

  10. Probabilistic diffusion tractography of the optic radiations and visual function in preterm infants at term equivalent age.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Laura; Ricci, Daniela; Volzone, Anna; Allsop, Joanna M; Srinivasan, Latha; Pai, Aakash; Ribes, Carmen; Ramenghi, Luca A; Mercuri, Eugenio; Mosca, Fabio; Edwards, A David; Cowan, Frances M; Rutherford, Mary A; Counsell, Serena J

    2008-02-01

    Children born prematurely have a high incidence of visual disorders which cannot always be explained by focal retinal or brain lesions. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that visual function in preterm infants is related to the microstructural development of white matter in the optic radiations. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with probabilistic diffusion tractography to delineate the optic radiations at term equivalent age and compared the fractional anisotropy (FA) to a contemporaneous evaluation of visual function. Thirty-seven preterm infants (19 male) born at median (range) 28(+4) (24(+1)-32(+3)) weeks gestational age, were examined at a post-menstrual age of 42 (39(+6)-43) weeks. MRI and DTI were acquired on a 3 Tesla MR system with DTI obtained in 15 non-collinear directions with a b value of 750 s/mm(2). Tracts were generated from a seed mask placed in the white matter lateral to the lateral geniculate nucleus and mean FA values of these tracts were determined. Visual assessment was performed using a battery of nine items assessing different aspects of visual abilities. Ten infants had evidence of cerebral lesions on conventional MRI. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the visual assessment score was independently correlated with FA values, but not gestational age at birth, post-menstrual age at scan or the presence of lesions on conventional MRI. The occurrence of mild retinopathy of prematurity did not affect the FA measures or visual scores. We then performed a secondary analysis using tract-based spatial statistics to determine whether global brain white matter development was related to visual function and found that only FA in the optic radiations was correlated with visual assessment score. Our results suggest that in preterm infants at term equivalent age visual function is directly related to the development of white matter in the optic radiations. PMID:18222994

  11. Hypofractionation vs Conventional Radiation Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: A Matched-Cohort Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, Geert O., E-mail: g.janssens@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jansen, Marc H. [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lauwers, Selmer J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nowak, Peter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Oldenburger, Foppe R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bouffet, Eric [Department of Hematology/Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)] [Department of Hematology/Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Saran, Frank [Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Kamphuis-van Ulzen, Karin [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lindert, Erik J. van [Department of Neurosurgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schieving, Jolanda H. [Department of Neurology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Neurology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Boterberg, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Kaspers, Gertjan J. [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Gidding, Corrie E. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hargrave, Darren [Department of Oncology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London (United Kingdom)] [Department of Oncology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Despite conventional radiation therapy, 54 Gy in single doses of 1.8 Gy (54/1.8 Gy) over 6 weeks, most children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) will die within 1 year after diagnosis. To reduce patient burden, we investigated the role of hypofractionation radiation therapy given over 3 to 4 weeks. A 1:1 matched-cohort analysis with conventional radiation therapy was performed to assess response and survival. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven children, aged 3 to 14, were treated according to 1 of 2 hypofractionation regimens over 3 to 4 weeks (39/3 Gy, n=16 or 44.8/2.8 Gy, n=11). All patients had symptoms for {<=}3 months, {>=}2 signs of the neurologic triad (cranial nerve deficit, ataxia, long tract signs), and characteristic features of DIPG on magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-seven patients fulfilling the same diagnostic criteria and receiving at least 50/1.8 to 2.0 Gy were eligible for the matched-cohort analysis. Results: With hypofractionation radiation therapy, the overall survival at 6, 9, and 12 months was 74%, 44%, and 22%, respectively. Progression-free survival at 3, 6, and 9 months was 77%, 43%, and 12%, respectively. Temporary discontinuation of steroids was observed in 21 of 27 (78%) patients. No significant difference in median overall survival (9.0 vs 9.4 months; P=.84) and time to progression (5.0 vs 7.6 months; P=.24) was observed between hypofractionation vs conventional radiation therapy, respectively. Conclusions: For patients with newly diagnosed DIPG, a hypofractionation regimen, given over 3 to 4 weeks, offers equal overall survival with less treatment burden compared with a conventional regimen of 6 weeks.

  12. X-ray diffuse scattering for evaluation of wide bandgap semiconductor nuclear radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S Goorsky; H. Yoon; M. Schieber; R. B James; D. S McGregor; M. Natarajan

    1996-01-01

    The crystalline perfection of solid state radiation detectors was examined using triple axis x-ray diffraction. Triple axis techniques provide a means to analyze the origin of diffraction peak broadening: the effects of strain (due to deviations in alloy composition or stoichiometry) and lattice tilts (mosaic structure) can be separated. Cd1 ? xZnxTe (x ? 0.1), HgI2, and GaAs detector materials

  13. First Order Chemical Reaction Effects on Exponentially Accelerated Vertical Plate with Variable Mass Diffusion in the Presence of Thermal Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthucumaraswamy, R.; Lakshmi, C. S.

    2015-05-01

    Effects of transfer of mass and free convection on the flow field of an incompressible viscous fluid past an exponentially accelerated vertical plate with variable surface temperature and mass diffusion are studied. Results for velocity, concentration, temperature are obtained by solving governing equations using the Laplace transform technique. It is observed that the velocity increases with decreasing values of the chemical reaction parameter or radiation parameter. But the trend is just reversed with respect to the time parameter. The skin friction is also studied.

  14. A faster algorithm for smoothed particle hydrodynamics with radiative transfer in the flux-limited diffusion approximation

    E-print Network

    Stuart C. Whitehouse; Matthew R. Bate; Joe J. Monaghan

    2005-09-28

    We describe a new, faster implicit algorithm for solving the radiation hydrodynamics equations in the flux-limited diffusion approximation for smoothed particle hydrodynamics. This improves on the method elucidated in Whitehouse & Bate by using a Gauss-Seidel iterative method rather than iterating over the exchange of energy between pairs of particles. The new algorithm is typically many thousands of times faster than the old one, which will enable more complex problems to be solved. The new algorithm is tested using the same tests performed by Turner & Stone for ZEUS-2D, and repeated by Whitehouse & Bate.

  15. Radiation Belts

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mendez, J.

    This website, authored and curated by David Stern, provides an outline of the motion of charged particles in the Earth's magnetic fields, and the Van Allen and outer radiation belts. It summarizes their discovery, their properties and their physics, as well as providing links to background materials and additional information. This is part of a large web site on the Exploration of the Earth's Magnetosphere. The page also includes a helpful timeline and glossary to help contextualize some of the information available. A Spanish translation is available.

  16. Three-dimensional diffusion of non-sorbing species in porous sandstone: computer simulation based on X-ray microtomography using synchrotron radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshito Nakashima; Tsukasa Nakano; Koichi Nakamura; Kentaro Uesugi; Akira Tsuchiyama; Susumu Ikeda

    2004-01-01

    The diffusion pathways of porous sandstone were examined by a three-dimensional (3-D) imaging technique based on X-ray computed tomography (CT) using the SPring-8 (Super Photon ring-8 GeV, Hyogo, Japan) synchrotron radiation facility. The analysis was undertaken to develop better understanding of the diffusion pathways in natural rock as a key factor in clarifying the detailed mechanism of the diffusion of

  17. CRASH: a Radiative Transfer Scheme

    E-print Network

    Maselli, A; Ciardi, B

    2003-01-01

    We present a largely improved version of CRASH, a 3-D radiative transfer code that treats the effects of ionizing radiation propagating through a given inhomogeneous H/He cosmological density field, on the physical conditions of the gas. The code, based on a Monte Carlo technique, self-consistently calculates the time evolution of gas temperature and ionization fractions due to an arbitrary number of point/extended sources and/or diffuse background radiation with given spectra. In addition, the effects of diffuse ionizing radiation following recombinations of ionized atoms have been included. After a complete description of the numerical scheme, to demonstrate the performances, accuracy, convergency and robustness of the code we present four different test cases designed to investigate specific aspects of radiative transfer: (i) pure hydrogen isothermal Stromgren sphere; (ii) realistic Stromgren spheres; (iii) multiple overlapping point sources, and (iv) shadowing of background radiation by an intervening opt...

  18. A Monte Carlo Synthetic-Acceleration Method for Solving the Thermal Radiation Diffusion Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Thomas M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mosher, Scott W [ORNL] [ORNL; Slattery, Stuart [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel synthetic-acceleration based Monte Carlo method for solving the equilibrium thermal radiation diusion equation in three dimensions. The algorithm performance is compared against traditional solution techniques using a Marshak benchmark problem and a more complex multiple material problem. Our results show that not only can our Monte Carlo method be an eective solver for sparse matrix systems, but also that it performs competitively with deterministic methods including preconditioned Conjugate Gradient while producing numerically identical results. We also discuss various aspects of preconditioning the method and its general applicability to broader classes of problems.

  19. The Impact of Buoyancy and Flame Structure on Soot, Radiation and NOx Emissions from a Turbulent Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, I. M.; Kollman, W.; VanderWal, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the spatial structure of a turbulent diffusion flame plays an important role in determining the emissions of radiative energy, soot and NO, from a combustor. This structure, manifested in the two point statistics, is influenced by buoyancy. Radiation, soot and NOx emissions are the cumulative result of processes that occur throughout a flame. For example, radiation fluxes along a line of sight can be found from summing up the contributions from sources in individual pockets of hot soot that emit, and from sinks in cold soot that absorb. Soot and NOx are both the results of slow chemistry and are not equilibrium products. The time that is available for production and burnout is crucial in determining the eventual emissions of these pollutants. Turbulence models generally rely on a single point closure of the appropriate time averaged equations. Hence, spatial information is lost and needs to be modeled using solution variables such as turbulence kinetic energy and dissipation rate, often with the assumption of isotropy. However, buoyancy can affect the physical structure of turbulent flames and can change the spatial extent of soot bearing regions. Theoretical comparisons with models are best done in the limit of infinite Froude number because the inclusion of buoyancy in flow models introduces significant uncertainties. Hence, LII measurements of soot, measurements of radiation fluxes from soot, Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) of the flow field and measurements of post flame NOX will be carried out on the NASA Lewis 2.2 sec drop tower and eventually on the parabolic flight aircraft. The drop rig will be a modified version of a unit that has been successfully used at Lewis in the past.

  20. Involved-Lesion Radiation Therapy After Chemotherapy in Limited-Stage Head-and-Neck Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jeong Il; Nam, Heerim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Yong Chan, E-mail: ahnyc@skku.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won Seog; Park, Keunchil; Kim, Seok Jin [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To report treatment outcomes after combined-modality therapy in patients with Stage I/II head-and-neck (HN) diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBL). Methods and Materials: Eighty-six eligible patients received sequential chemotherapy and involved-lesion radiation therapy from 1995 to 2006. After a median of four cycles of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) or rituximab-plus-CHOP chemotherapy, a median of 41.4 Gy was delivered to the known initial gross lesion with adequate margin (2 to 3 cm). Results: After a median follow-up of 57 months, eight treatment failures were observed: distant metastasis in 8 patients; and locoregional failure in 4 patients. Among the 4 patients with locoregional failure, 3 presented with in-field failures, and 1 both in-field and out-of-field failure (contralateral neck). Rates of overall survival (OS) and freedom from progression (FFP) at 10 years were 74.1% and 88.9%, respectively. There was no severe side effect except 1 patient with Grade 3 mucositis during and after completion of radiation therapy. Multivariate analyses showed that absence of B symptom (p = 0.022) and normal lactate dehydrogenase (p = 0.017) were related to favorable OS, age >60 years (p = 0.033) was related to favorable FFP, and international prognostic index of 0 or 1 was related to favorable OS (p = 0.003) and FFP (p = 0.03). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that patients with Stage I/II HN DLBL did not need whole-neck irradiation. Involved-lesion radiation therapy might reduce radiation toxicity with favorable treatment results.

  1. Diffuse sky radiation influences the relationship between canopy PRI and shadow fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mõttus, Matti; Takala, Tuure L. H.; Stenberg, Pauline; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Yang, Bin; Nilson, Tiit

    2015-07-01

    The Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) of green leaves is an indicator of photosynthetic downregulation: when the photosynthetic apparatus is close to the saturation limit, PRI becomes dependent on light conditions. Therefore, by measuring the PRI of leaves under different local irradiance conditions, it should be possible to determine the saturation level of the leaves and obtain information on the light use efficiency (LUE) of a vegetation canopy. The dependence of PRI on the ratio of sunlit to shaded foliage (quantified by the canopy shadow fraction) in the field of view of an instrument has been used to remotely measure canopy LUE on clear days. However, besides photosynthetic downregulation, the dependence of canopy PRI on shadow fraction is affected by the blue sky radiation caused by scattering in the atmosphere. To quantify this effect on remotely sensed PRI, we present the underlying definitions relating leaf and canopy PRI and perform the required calculations for typical midsummer conditions in Central Finland. We demonstrate that the effect of blue sky radiation on the variation of PRI with canopy shadow fraction is similar in shape and magnitude to that of LUE variations reported in literature.

  2. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Normal-Appearing White Matter as Biomarker for Radiation-Induced Late Delayed Cognitive Decline

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Christopher H., E-mail: chchap@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Nagesh, Vijaya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sundgren, Pia C. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Buchtel, Henry [Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chenevert, Thomas L. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Junck, Larry [Department of Neurology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Cao, Yue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether early assessment of cerebral white matter degradation can predict late delayed cognitive decline after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Ten patients undergoing conformal fractionated brain RT participated in a prospective diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging study. Magnetic resonance imaging studies were acquired before RT, at 3 and 6 weeks during RT, and 10, 30, and 78 weeks after starting RT. The diffusivity variables in the parahippocampal cingulum bundle and temporal lobe white matter were computed. A quality-of-life survey and neurocognitive function tests were administered before and after RT at the magnetic resonance imaging follow-up visits. Results: In both structures, longitudinal diffusivity ({lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line }) decreased and perpendicular diffusivity ({lambda}{sub Up-Tack }) increased after RT, with early changes correlating to later changes (p < .05). The radiation dose correlated with an increase in cingulum {lambda}{sub Up-Tack} at 3 weeks, and patients with >50% of cingula volume receiving >12 Gy had a greater increase in {lambda}{sub Up-Tack} at 3 and 6 weeks (p < .05). The post-RT changes in verbal recall scores correlated linearly with the late changes in cingulum {lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line} (30 weeks, p < .02). Using receiver operating characteristic curves, early cingulum {lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line} changes predicted for post-RT changes in verbal recall scores (3 and 6 weeks, p < .05). The neurocognitive test scores correlated significantly with the quality-of-life survey results. Conclusions: The correlation between early diffusivity changes in the parahippocampal cingulum and the late decline in verbal recall suggests that diffusion tensor imaging might be useful as a biomarker for predicting late delayed cognitive decline.

  3. Radiation dosimeters

    DOEpatents

    Hoelsher, James W. (Pullman, WA); Hegland, Joel E. (Pullman, WA); Braunlich, Peter F. (Pullman, WA); Tetzlaff, Wolfgang (Pullman, WA)

    1992-01-01

    Radiation dosimeters and dosimeter badges. The dosimeter badges include first and second parts which are connected to join using a securement to produce a sealed area in which at least one dosimeter is held and protected. The badge parts are separated to expose the dosimeters to a stimulating laser beam used to read dose exposure information therefrom. The badge is constructed to allow automated disassembly and reassembly in a uniquely fitting relationship. An electronic memory is included to provide calibration and identification information used during reading of the dosimeter. Dosimeter mounts which reduce thermal heating requirements are shown. Dosimeter constructions and production methods using thin substrates and phosphor binder-layers applied thereto are also taught.

  4. Radiation Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Apollo and subsequent spacecraft have had highly effective radiation barriers; made of aluminized polymer film, they bar or let in heat to maintain consistent temperatures inside. Tech 2000, formerly Quantum International Corporation used the NASA technology in its insulating materials, Super "Q" Radiant Barrier, for home, industry and mobile applications. The insulation combines industrial aluminum foil overlaid around a core of another material, usually propylene or mylar. The outer layer reflects up to 97 percent of heat; the central layer creates a thermal break in the structure and thus allows low radiant energy emission. The Quantum Cool Wall, used in cars and trucks, takes up little space while providing superior insulation, thus reducing spoilage and costs. The panels can also dampen sound and engine, exhaust and solar heat.

  5. Albedo and flux extinction coefficient of impure snow for diffuse shortwave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Mo, T.; Wang, J. R.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1981-01-01

    Impurities enter a snowpack as a result of fallout of scavenging by falling snow crystals. Albedo and flux extinction coefficient of soot contaminated snowcovers were studied using a two stream approximation of the radiative transfer equation. The effect of soot was calculated by two methods: independent scattering by ice grains and impurities and average refractive index for ice grains. Both methods predict a qualitatively similar effect of soot; the albedo is decreased and the extinction coefficient is increased compared to that for pure snow in the visible region; the infrared properties are largely unaffected. Quantitatively, however, the effect of soot is more pronounced in the average refractive index method. Soot contamination provides a qualitative explanation for several snow observations.

  6. The implications of the COBE diffuse microwave radiation results for cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, David P.; Stebbins, Albert; Bouchet, Francois R.

    1992-01-01

    We compare the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation measured by the COBE experiment to those predicted by cosmic string theories. We use an analytic model for the Delta T/T power spectrum that is based on our previous numerical simulations of strings, under the assumption that cosmic strings are the sole source of the measured anisotropy. This implies a value for the string mass per unit length of 1.5 +/- 0.5 x 10 exp -6 C-squared/G. This is within the range of values required for cosmic strings to successfully seed the formation of large-scale structures in the universe. These results clearly encourage further studies of Delta T/T and large-scale structure in the cosmic string model.

  7. Non-diffusive resonant acceleration of electrons in the radiation belts

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, A. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Agapitov, O. V. [LPC2E/CNRS, University of Orleans, Orleans (France); Mourenas, D. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Rolland, G. [CNES, Toulouse (France)

    2012-12-15

    We describe a mechanism of resonant electron acceleration by oblique high-amplitude whistler waves under conditions typical for the Earth radiation belts. We use statistics of spacecraft observations of whistlers in the Earth radiation belts to obtain the dependence of the angle {theta} between the wave-normal and the background magnetic field on magnetic latitude {lambda}. According to this statistics, the angle {theta} already approaches the resonance cone at {lambda}{approx}15 Degree-Sign and remains close to it up to {lambda}{approx}30 Degree-Sign -40 Degree-Sign on the dayside. The parallel component of the electrostatic field of whistler waves often increases around {lambda}{approx}15 Degree-Sign up to one hundred of mV/m. We show that due to this increase of the electric field, the whistler waves can trap electrons into the potential well via wave particle resonant interaction corresponding to Landau resonance. Trapped electrons then move with the wave to higher latitudes where they escape from the resonance. Strong acceleration is favored by adiabatic invariance along the increasing magnetic field, which continuously transfers the parallel energy gained to perpendicular energy, allowing resonance to be reached and maintained. The concomitant increase of the wave phase velocity allows for even stronger relative acceleration at low energy <50keV. Each trapping-escape event of electrons of {approx}10keV to 100 keV results in an energy gain of up to 100 keV in the inhomogeneous magnetic field of the Earth dipole. For electrons with initial energy below 100 keV, such rapid acceleration should hasten their drop into the loss-cone and their precipitation into the atmosphere. We discuss the role of the considered mechanism in the eventual formation of a trapped distribution of relativistic electrons for initial energies larger than 100 keV and in microbursts precipitations of lower energy particles.

  8. Large Current Radiators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. P. Pochanin

    2006-01-01

    The work is devoted to investigations aiming at developing special type of radiating antennas which are known as Harmuth's large current radiator. Physical and technical problems encountered when radiators designed and ways for their overcoming are discussed

  9. Dosimetry of space radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkhangelskiy, V. V.; Markelov, V. V.; Skvortsov, S. S.; Smirennyy, L. N.; Turkin, V. N.; Chernykh, I. V.

    1973-01-01

    Harmful effects of space radiation are discussed. Radiation dosimetry methods are given. Dosimetry monitoring is investigated. Methods for measuring space radiation by ionization, thermoluminescence, and nuclear photographic emulsions are described.

  10. Radiation reaction and radiative frequency shifts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jay R. Ackerhalt; Peter L. Knight; J. H. Eberly

    1973-01-01

    The question of quantum-electrodynamic radiative corrections to atomic ; transition frequencies is investigated. It is shown that the Heisenberg ; equations of motion allow a novel and fruitful exploitation of the concept of ; radiation reaction. (auth);

  11. [Neurotoxicity of radiation].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that the central nervous system is thoroughly resistant to ionizing radiation as high-dose radiation exposure is required for causing neuronal death. In contrast, recent studies have revealed that the hippocampus, which could be the main organ involved in disorder of higher brain functions after radiation therapy, contains radiation-sensitive cell fractions. In this paper, the basics of radiation effects and the molecular mechanism of neurotoxicity of radiation have been reviewed and discussed. PMID:25585436

  12. Characterization of the pore structure of alumina ceramics by diffuse radiation propagation in the near infrared

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Manara; R. Caps; F. Raether; J. Fricke

    1999-01-01

    Light scattering by pore\\/particle interfaces causes diffuse light propagation in ceramics. The diffuse light transmission is highly sensitive to structural changes in the last sintering state. The transmission increases more than one order of magnitude between 93% and 99% of the theoretically possible density. By using diffuse transmission and reflection measurements, a quantitative analysis of the pore size distribution can

  13. Radiation reaction due to magnetic dipole radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naoki Itoh

    1991-01-01

    The radiation reaction due to magnetic dipole radiation is calculated for a charged-particle system whose magnetic moment changes with time. The explicit expressions for the electric and magnetic fields due to the magnetic dipole radiation reaction are derived, they are found to originate in the fourth-order term in the expansion of the retarded potential, whereas the field due to the

  14. Solar radiation resource assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

  15. The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of stage I-II diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Belinda A

    2013-09-01

    The role of radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of Stage I-II diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is controversial: consolidation RT improves local control, but does this translate into an overall survival benefit? The paucity of randomized clinical trials means that the debate surrounding the benefit of consolidation RT remains unresolved. To date, the published literature demonstrates that consolidation RT has dual advantages in patients stage I-II DLBCL: (1) to improve local control and progression-free survival, and (2) to spare additional cycles of chemotherapy in patient with favourable-risk disease. Critics of consolidation RT are often influenced by the profile of late toxicities that are associated with outdated RT techniques. In the current era of molecular-based targeted therapy and functional imaging, prospective randomized studies are required to answer this research question and to investigate risk-adapted treatment strategies for patients with stage I-II DLBCL. PMID:23901002

  16. Solar radiation on inclined surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-05-01

    Mean monthly values of daily shortwave radiation on inclined surfaces are presented for 13 locations in India. Values of direct, diffuse sky, reflected, and total shortwave radiation incident on an inclined surface are given for 9 slope angles (measured from the horizontal) and 8 aspects. All the data are computed using measured values of the total shortwave radiation on a horizontal surface according to the techniques described. Maximum and minimum values of direct solar radiation during each month are underlined and marked by asterisk respectively. Actual and potential users of radiation data, particularly those in the fields of agriculture, horticulture, forestry, architecture, heating and ventilating engineering, and photovoltaic systems, it is hoped, would find this publication useful in planning and designing of solar radiation devices.

  17. Influence of diffusion and non-local radiation transport on the laser amplification of a He-Ne ring laser gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macé, J. S.; Maynard, G.; Virdis, A.

    2014-08-01

    The influence of the transport of excited atoms on the laser amplification inside the positive column of a low-pressure He-Ne dc discharge of a ring laser gyro has been studied. Both non-radiative diffusion and the contribution of radiation transport have been considered. The transport induced by the radiation trapping has been determined using a Monte-Carlo simulation, taking into account an isotopic structure for the neon and the collisional line broadening in presence of helium. The transfer matrix for spatial redistribution has been calculated in a cylindrical geometry and has been included in a one-dimensional collisional-radiative model (1D-CRM). This 1D-CRM has been used to determine the laser gain within a two levels approach. Our results show that radiative and non-radiative diffusions have a significant contribution on the radial profile of the gain of the main oscillating mode, both in the unsaturated and saturated regimes. This contribution is strongly dependent on the ratio between the transverse sizes of the laser and of the plasma.

  18. Prospective use of a mobile radiation system to validate techniques of radiation estimations from satellite records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimo, A.; Ruchti, J.; Zelenka, A.

    1983-10-01

    A mobile radiation measurement system was used for spectral measurements of direct and diffuse radiation. Daily and hourly sums of horizontal global radiation were calculated. A model for correlating satellite measurements with terrestrial radiation measurements was developed. Results show that the estimation is feasible, but the model should be refined.

  19. Interaction of ring current and radiation belt protons with ducted plasmaspheric hiss. 1: Diffusion coefficients and timescales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Rasmussen, C. E.; Miller, R. H.; Lyons, L. R.

    1994-01-01

    Protons that are convected into the inner magnetosphere in response to enhanced magnetic activity can resonate with ducted plasmaspheric hiss in the outer plasmasphere via an anomalous Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance. Plasmaspheric hiss is a right-hand-polarized electromagnetic emission that is observed to fill the plasmasphere on a routine basis. When plasmaspheric hiss is confined within field-aligned ducts or guided along density gradients, wave normal angles remain largely below 45 deg. This allows resonant interactions with ions at typical ring current and radiation belt energies to take place. Such field-aligned ducts have been observed both within the plasmasphere and in regions outside of the plasmasphere. Wave intensities are estimated using statistical information from studies of detached plasma regions. Diffusion coefficients are presented for a range of L shells and proton energies for a fixed wave distribution. Harmonic resonances in the range N = +/-100 are considered in order to include interactions between hiss at 100 Hz to 2 kHz frequencies, and protons in the energy range between approximately 10 keV and 1000 keV. Diffusion timescales are estimated to be of the order of tens of days and comparable to or shorter than lifetimes for Coulomb decay and charge exchange losses over most of the energy and spatial ranges of interest.

  20. Large-current radiators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. F. Harmuth; N. J. Mohamed

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents several simple designs of large-current radiators for nonsinusoidal waves, which produce low distortions but can efficiently radiate large powers. The principles of the large-current radiator are discussed, and the characteristics of several design schemes are examined. A circuit diagram of a low-power driver for large-current radiators is presented.

  1. RADIATION HYBRID MAPPING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radiation hybrid maps are physical maps of genomes that provide an alternative to traditional genetic maps. These radiation hybrid maps have two important advantages over genetic maps. First, distances on a radiation hybrid map are determined by the frequency of radiation-induced breaks between mark...

  2. Radiation and human health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Gofman; Karl Z. Morgan

    1983-01-01

    An attempt is made in the book to permit a layman to understand radiation and its effects. A basic presentations of radiation physics, the biology of human cancer, teratogenesis and genetics are considered excellent and concise reviews. A discussion on radiation studies is presented. The most extensive part of the book is a discussion of the risks of radiation-induced cancer.

  3. Second law and radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. H. Edgerton

    1980-01-01

    The available energy of thermal radiation and solar radiation is examined. The extension of the available energy concept to the evaluation of the potential energy conversion in solar converters is outlined. The fundamental question discussed is how much of a given solar radiation flux is convertible to thermodynamic work. The basic relations for evaluating the available energy in radiation processes

  4. Investigation of radiation enhanced diffusion of magnesium in substrates flown on the NASA genesis mission.

    SciTech Connect

    King, B. V.; Pellin, M. J.; Burnett, D. S. (Materials Science Division); (Univ. of Newcastle); (California Inst. of Tech.)

    2008-12-01

    The thermal diffusion of an Mg implant in Si has been measured with SIMS and compared to RIMS (resonant ionisation mass spectrometry) measurements of Mg implantation and diffusion in Si wafers exposed to solar wind irradiation in the NASA Genesis mission. The Genesis samples show much more surface segregation that the samples annealed in the laboratory, due to diffusion and segregation of the implanted Mg to the heavily damaged near surface regions of the Genesis wafers. This Mg transport has been modeled by solving a set of stiff differential equations and found to agree with RIMS measurements for a Mg interstitial migration energy of 0.7 eV.

  5. Simulation of Infrared Laser Heating of Silica Using Heat Conduction and Multifrequency Radiation Diffusion Equations Adapted for Homogeneous Refractive Lossy Media

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, A I; Matthews, M J; Vignes, R M; Stolken, J S

    2010-10-28

    Localized, transient heating of materials using micro-scale, highly absorbing laser light has been used in many industries to anneal, melt and ablate material with high precision. Accurate modeling of the relative contributions of conductive, convective and radiative losses as a function of laser parameters is essential to optimizing micro-scale laser processing of materials. In bulk semi-transparent materials such as silicate glass melts, radiation transport is known to play a significantly larger role as the temperature increases. Conventionally, radiation is treated in the frequency-averaged diffusive limit (Rosseland approximation). However, the role and proper treatment of radiative processes under rapidly heated, high thermal gradient conditions, often created through laser-matter interactions, is at present not clear. Starting from the radiation transport equation for homogeneous, refractive lossy media, they derive the corresponding time-dependent multi-frequency diffusion equations. Zeroth and first moments of the transport equation couple the energy density, flux and pressure tensor. The system is closed by neglecting the temporal derivative of the flux and replacing the pressure tensor by its diagonal analogue. The radiation equations are coupled to a diffusion equation for the matter temperature. They are interested in modeling infrared laser heating of silica over sub-millimeter length scales, and at possibly rapid rates. Hence, in contrast to related work, they retain the temporal derivative of the radiation field. They derive boundary conditions at a planar air-silica interface taking account of reflectivities obtained from the Fresnel relations that include absorption. The effect of a temperature-dependent absorption index is explored through construction of a multi-phonon dielectric function that includes mode dispersion. The spectral dimension is discretized into a finite number of intervals yielding a system of multigroup diffusion equations. Simulations are presented. To demonstrate the bulk heat loss due to radiation and the effect of the radiation's temporal derivative, they model cooling of a silica slab, initially at 2500 K, for 10 s. Retaining the derivative enables correctly modeling the loss of photons initially present in the slab. Other simulations model irradiating silica discs (of approximately 5 mm radii and thickness) with a CO2 laser: {lambda} = 10.59 and 4.6 um, Gaussian profile, r{sub 0} = 0.5 mm for 1/e decay. By surrounding the disks in room-temperature air, they make use of the boundary conditions described above.

  6. Modeling the impacts of solar radiation partitioning into direct and diffuse fractions for the global water cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paulo J. C. Oliveira; Edouard L. Davin; Sonia I. Seneviratne

    2010-01-01

    Incident solar radiation at the Earth's surface affects plant photosynthesis and evapotranspiration, and consequently the global water budget. Observations from 1960-1990's across the Northern Hemisphere suggest that increased aerosol loadings from industrialization led not only to a decline in the intensity of solar radiation at the surface (global dimming), but also to a higher fraction of scattered light, which enhanced

  7. The influence of clouds and diffuse radiation on ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 and CO18O exhanges

    SciTech Connect

    Still, C.J.; Riley, W.J.; Biraud, S.C.; Noone, D.C.; Buenning, N.H.; Randerson, J.T.; Torn, M.S.; Welker, J.; White, J.W.C.; Vachon, R.; Farquhar, G.D.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-05-01

    This study evaluates the potential impact of clouds on ecosystem CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} isotope fluxes ('isofluxes') in two contrasting ecosystems (a broadleaf deciduous forest and a C{sub 4} grassland), in a region for which cloud cover, meteorological, and isotope data are available for driving the isotope-enabled land surface model, ISOLSM. Our model results indicate a large impact of clouds on ecosystem CO{sub 2} fluxes and isofluxes. Despite lower irradiance on partly cloudy and cloudy days, predicted forest canopy photosynthesis was substantially higher than on clear, sunny days, and the highest carbon uptake was achieved on the cloudiest day. This effect was driven by a large increase in light-limited shade leaf photosynthesis following an increase in the diffuse fraction of irradiance. Photosynthetic isofluxes, by contrast, were largest on partly cloudy days, as leaf water isotopic composition was only slightly depleted and photosynthesis was enhanced, as compared to adjacent clear sky days. On the cloudiest day, the forest exhibited intermediate isofluxes: although photosynthesis was highest on this day, leaf-to-atmosphere isofluxes were reduced from a feedback of transpiration on canopy relative humidity and leaf water. Photosynthesis and isofluxes were both reduced in the C{sub 4} grass canopy with increasing cloud cover and diffuse fraction as a result of near-constant light limitation of photosynthesis. These results suggest that some of the unexplained variation in global mean {delta}{sup 18}O of CO{sub 2} may be driven by large-scale changes in clouds and aerosols and their impacts on diffuse radiation, photosynthesis, and relative humidity.

  8. [Ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Masse, R

    2000-07-01

    Everyone is exposed to radiation from natural, man-made and medical sources, and world-wide average annual exposure can be set at about 3.5 mSv. Exposure to natural sources is characterised by very large fluctuations, not excluding a range covering two orders of magnitude. Millions of inhabitants are continuously exposed to external doses as high as 10 mSv per year, delivered at low dose rates, very few workers are exposed above the legal limit of 50 mSv/year, and referring to accidental exposures, only 5% of the 116,000 people evacuated following the Chernobyl disaster encountered doses above 100 mSv. Epidemiological survey of accidentally, occupationally or medically exposed groups have revealed radio-induced cancers, mostly following high dose-rate exposure levels, only above 100 mSv. Risk coefficients were derived from these studies and projected into linear models of risk (linear non-threshold hypothesis: LNT), for the purpose of risk management following exposures at low doses and low dose-rates. The legitimacy of this approach has been questioned, by the Academy of sciences and the Academy of medicine in France, arguing: that LNT was not supported by Hiroshima and Nagasaki studies when neutron dose was revisited; that linear modelling failed to explain why so many site-related cancers were obviously non-linearly related to the dose, and especially when theory predicted they ought to be; that no evidence could be found of radio-induced cancers related to natural exposures or to low exposures at the work place; and that no evidence of genetic disease could be shown from any of the exposed groups. Arguments were provided from cellular and molecular biology helping to solve this issue, all resulting in dismissing the LNT hypothesis. These arguments included: different mechanisms of DNA repair at high and low dose rate; influence of inducible stress responses modifying mutagenesis and lethality; bystander effects allowing it to be considered that individual cellular responses reflected in fact the results of multiple cellular interactions. Following the conclusion of the French Academy of medicine, LNT modelling resulted in public anxiety by changing an hypothetical residual risk at low doses into a real one, calling on regulators, continuously, for a more and more severe control of tiny sources which may result in considerable collective doses when considered as being exposed to billions of people for hundreds of years. Examples were provided that showed that the perception of risk of radioactive sources was not related to the severity of the risk itself but to the importance attributed to the situation by the media. In some instances, such as those resulting from the loss of gammagraphy sources, it resulted in a dangerous underestimate of the necessary remedial actions. PMID:10983274

  9. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1991-05-01

    Research at the Radiological Research Laboratory is a blend of physics, chemistry, and biology, involving research at the basic level with the admixture of a small proportion of pragmatic or applied research in support of radiation protection and/or radiotherapy. Current research topics include: oncogenic transformation assays, mutation studies involving interactions between radiation and environmental contaminants, isolation, characterization and sequencing of a human repair gene, characterization of a dominant transforming gene found in C3H 10T1/2 cells, characterize ab initio the interaction of DNA and radiation, refine estimates of the radiation quality factor Q, a new mechanistic model of oncogenesis showing the role of long-term low dose medium LET radiation, and time dependent modeling of radiation induced chromosome damage and subsequent repair or misrepair.

  10. Radiation Therapy: Preventing and Managing Side Effects

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of radiation therapy outweigh the risks and side effects? How much does radiation treatment cost? Who gives radiation treatments? Informed consent for radiation therapy How is radiation therapy given? External radiation therapy Internal radiation therapy (brachytherapy) Systemic radiation ...

  11. Modeling of explosion thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, K. L.; Stanchits, L. K.; Stankevich, Yu. A.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrodynamic and radiation processes accompanying explosions of chemical explosives and fuel-air mixtures have been considered. Computer modeling of the radiation from a fire ball of explosion and a flame of diffusion combustion of a hydrocarbon fuel has been performed. The dependences of the heat flux density from the region occupied by explosion and combustion products on its temperature and geometric characteristics have been determined. Thermal load distributions on targets of different orientations in the vicinity of the energy release zone have been obtained. A comparison of the thermal parameters on radiation detectors with the criteria of thermal affection of people and ignition of combustible materials has been made.

  12. SAS-2 observations of celestial diffuse gamma radiation above 30 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Hartman, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The small astronomy satellite, SAS-2, used a 32-deck magnetic core digitized spark chamber to study gamma rays with energies above 30 MeV. Data for four regions of the sky away from the galactic plane were analyzed. These regions show a finite, diffuse flux of gamma rays with a steep energy spectrum, and the flux is uniform over all the regions. Represented by a power law, the differential energy spectrum shows an index of 2.5 + or - 0.4. The steep SAS-2 spectrum and the lower energy data are reasonably consistent with a neutral pion gamma-ray spectrum which was red-shifted (such as that proposed by some cosmological theories). It is concluded that the diffuse celestial gamma ray spectrum observed presents the possibility of cosmological studies and possible evidence for a residual cosmic ray density, and supports the galactic superclusters of matter and antimatter remaining from baryon-symmetric big bang.

  13. Hazard calculations of diffuse reflected laser radiation for the SELENE program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Gilda A.; Babb, Phillip D.

    1993-01-01

    The hazards from diffuse laser light reflections off water clouds, ice clouds, and fog and from possible specular reflections off ice clouds were assessed with the American National Standards (ANSI Z136.1-1986) for the free-electron-laser parameters under consideration for the Segmented Efficient Laser Emission for Non-Nuclear Electricity (SELENE) Program. Diffuse laser reflection hazards exist for water cloud surfaces less than 722 m in altitude and ice cloud surfaces less than 850 m in altitude. Specular reflections from ice crystals in cirrus clouds are not probable; however, any specular reflection is a hazard to ground observers. The hazard to the laser operators and any ground observers during heavy fog conditions is of such significant magnitude that the laser should not be operated in fog.

  14. Relationships between diffuse reflectance and vegetation canopy variables based on the radiative transfer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. K.; Deering, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    Out of the lengthy original expression of the diffuse reflectance formula, simple working equations were derived by employing characteristic parameters, which are independent of the canopy coverage and identifiable by field observations. The typical asymptotic nature of reflectance data that is usually observed in biomass studies was clearly explained. The usefulness of the simplified equations was demonstrated by the exceptionally close fit of the theoretical curves to two separately acquired data sets for alfalfa and shortgrass prairie canopies.

  15. Plutonium radiation surrogate

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

    2010-02-02

    A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

  16. Introduction to radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.L.

    1998-12-31

    This lecture will present time-dependent radiation transport where the radiation is coupled to a static medium, i.e., the material is not in motion. In reality, radiation exerts a pressure on the materials it propagates through and will accelerate the material in the direction of the radiation flow. This fully coupled problem with radiation transport and materials in motion is referred to as radiation-hydrodynamics (or in a shorthand notation: rad-hydro) and is beyond the scope of this lecture.

  17. Development of Simplified Calculations for a Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation 

    E-print Network

    Munger, B. K.; Haberl, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    studies due several new features, including: the incorporation of an artificial horizon that prevents reflected ground radiation from striking the tilted sensors, and a routine that corrects the spectral response of photovoltaic-type sensors used...

  18. Cell Radiation Experiment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    The cell radiation experiment system (CRES) is a perfused-cell culture apparatus, within which cells from humans or other animals can (1) be maintained in homeostasis while (2) being exposed to ionizing radiation during controlled intervals and (3) being monitored to determine the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage. The CRES can be used, for example, to determine effects of drug, radiation, and combined drug and radiation treatments on both normal and tumor cells. The CRES can also be used to analyze the effects of radiosensitive or radioprotectant drugs on cells subjected to radiation. The knowledge gained by use of the CRES is expected to contribute to the development of better cancer treatments and of better protection for astronauts, medical-equipment operators, and nuclear-power-plant workers, and others exposed frequently to ionizing radiation.

  19. Space Radiation Program Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krenek, Sam

    2008-01-01

    This poster presentation shows the various elements of the Space Radiation Program. It reviews the program requirements: develop and validate standards, quantify space radiation human health risks, mitigate risks through countermeasures and technologies, and treat and monitor unmitigated risks.

  20. Radiation Protection Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A handbook which sets forth the Kennedy Space Center radiation protection policy is presented. The book also covers administrative direction and guidance on organizational and procedural requirements of the program. Only ionizing radiation is covered.

  1. Environmental Radiation Exposures

    Cancer.gov

    DCEG is investigating cancer risks among populations exposed to radiation from environmental sources, such as nuclear reactor accidents and fallout from weapons testing.   Atomic Bomb Survivors Childhood Leukemia and Background Radiation Semipalatinsk

  2. Radiation and Your Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... air, airline travel, some medical procedures, computers, and nuclear weapons test fallout. Â Understanding Radiation Radiation, which ... health effects, and ways to reduce its levels Nuclear Medicine Procedures Nuclear medicine procedures include the use ...

  3. Radiation therapy - skin care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... red, peel, or itch. You should treat your skin with care while receiving radiation therapy. ... When you have radiation treatment, a health care provider draws ... they come off, do not redraw them. Tell your provider instead. ...

  4. Radiation Exposure and Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... what we know about these types of high-energy radiation and how they affect cancer risk. Cancer Compensation Programs for People Exposed to Radiation as Part of Nuclear Weapons Testing Between 1945 and 1962, several countries ...

  5. Research Update: Reactively sputtered nanometer-thin ZrN film as a diffusion barrier between Al and boron layers for radiation detector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golshani, Negin; Mohammadi, V.; Schellevis, H.; Beenakker, C. I. M.; Ishihara, R.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, optimization of the process flow for PureB detectors is investigated. Diffusion barrier layers between a boron layer and the aluminum interconnect can be used to enhance the performance and visual appearance of radiation detectors. Few nanometers-thin Zirconium Nitride (ZrN) layer deposited by reactive sputtering in a mixture of Ar/N2, is identified as a reliable diffusion barrier with better fabrication process compatibility than others. The barrier properties of this layer have been tested for different boron layers deposited at low and high temperatures with extensive optical microscopy analyses, electron beam induced current, SEM, and electrical measurements. This study demonstrated that spiking behavior of pure Al on Si can be prevented by the thin ZrN layer thus improving the performance of the radiation detectors fabricated using boron layer.

  6. Research Update: Reactively sputtered nanometer-thin ZrN film as a diffusion barrier between Al and boron layers for radiation detector applications

    SciTech Connect

    Golshani, Negin, E-mail: negingolshani@gmail.com; Mohammadi, V.; Schellevis, H.; Beenakker, C. I. M.; Ishihara, R. [ECTM, DIMES, Faculty of Electrical Engineering (EWI), Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Feldmannweg 17, P.O. Box 5053, 2628 CT Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, optimization of the process flow for PureB detectors is investigated. Diffusion barrier layers between a boron layer and the aluminum interconnect can be used to enhance the performance and visual appearance of radiation detectors. Few nanometers-thin Zirconium Nitride (ZrN) layer deposited by reactive sputtering in a mixture of Ar/N{sub 2}, is identified as a reliable diffusion barrier with better fabrication process compatibility than others. The barrier properties of this layer have been tested for different boron layers deposited at low and high temperatures with extensive optical microscopy analyses, electron beam induced current, SEM, and electrical measurements. This study demonstrated that spiking behavior of pure Al on Si can be prevented by the thin ZrN layer thus improving the performance of the radiation detectors fabricated using boron layer.

  7. Radiation-induced angiosarcoma

    E-print Network

    Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Diwan, Abdul H; Prieto, Victor G

    2013-01-01

    and radiation therapy, have largely supplanted radical mastectomy as the preferential treatment of breast cancer [cancer treatment has caused an increase, although still a rare side effect, in the numbers of cutaneous radiation-cancer has altered the average onset of the post-treatment angiosarcoma; radiation-

  8. Radiation protection standards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lauriston S. Taylor; Harold O. Wyckoff

    1972-01-01

    The report traces the development of the understanding of radiation hazard, and the philosophy for protection against it. Special attention is given to the work of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), form which two organizations most of the basic radiation protection philosphy and criteria in the world today

  9. Radiation port dermatophytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, T.; Dupuy, J.; Maor, M.; Altman, A.

    1988-12-01

    We report two cases in which dermatophytic infection developed almost entirely within a radiation field mimicking an acute radiation effect. Radiotherapists and dermatologists should be aware of this possibility and be able to differentiate it from radiation dermatitis. Topical antifungal agents are the recommended treatment after diagnosis is established.

  10. Radiation detection and measurement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. F. Knoll

    1979-01-01

    The book is a complete, clear and up-to-date text that provides a basic review of instruments and methods of ionizing radiation. The text covers detailed discussion of all detector types; introductory discussions of radiation sources, interactions, and counting statistics; functional analysis of the electronics and pulse processing aspects of radiation detectors in instrumentation systems; and consideration of shielding and background

  11. Radiation and cellular response

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. P. Scott; H. W. Wahner

    1983-01-01

    This book contains 18 papers. Some of the titles are: Radiation Equivalency for the Radiation Recall Phenomenon; The Induction of Photoreactivatable Damage in E. Coli by Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Cerenkov; Combined Modality Therapy for Limited Inoperable Non-Small Lung Cancer; and Learning and the Single Cell.

  12. Radiation Research Program (RRP)

    Cancer.gov

    The RRP is responsible for NCI’s clinically-related extramural radiation research program. The RRP establishes priorities, allocates resources, and evaluates the effectiveness of such radiation research being conducted by NCI grantees. RRP staff represent the program at NCI management and scientific meetings and provide scientific support to leadership on matters related to radiation research.

  13. Modeling radiation belt radial diffusion in ULF wave fields: 1. Quantifying ULF wave power at geosynchronous orbit in observations and in global MHD model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chia-Lin Huang; Harlan E. Spence; Howard J. Singer; W. Jeffrey Hughes

    2010-01-01

    To provide critical ULF wave field information for radial diffusion studies in the radiation belts, we quantify ULF wave power (f = 0.5–8.3 mHz) in GOES observations and magnetic field predictions from a global magnetospheric model. A statistical study of 9 years of GOES data reveals the wave local time distribution and power at geosynchronous orbit in field-aligned coordinates as

  14. Treatment of diffuse in-stent restenosis with rotational atherectomy followed by radiation therapy with a rhenium-188–mercaptoacetyltriglycine-filled balloon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seong-Wook Park; Myeong-Ki Hong; Dae Hyuk Moon; Seung Jun Oh; Cheol Whan Lee; Jae-Joong Kim; Seung-Jung Park

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVESThis study was done to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of beta-radiation therapy with a rhenium-188–mercaptoacetyltriglycine (188Re-MAG3)-filled balloon after rotational atherectomy for diffuse in-stent restenosis (ISR).BACKGROUNDRotational atherectomy has been shown to be safe and efficient for the treatment of ISR, but the recurrence rate is still high. Intracoronary beta-irradiation after rotational atherectomy may be a reasonable approach to prevent recurrent

  15. Ionizing Radiation: The issue of radiation quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prise, Kevin; Schettino, Giuseppe

    Types of Ionising radiations are differentiated from each other by fundamental characteristics of their energy deposition patterns when they interact with biological materials. At the level of the DNA these non-random patterns drive differences in the yields and distributions of DNA damage patterns and specifically the production of clustered damage or complex lesions. The complex radiation fields found in space bring significant challenges for developing a mechanistic understanding of radiation effects from the perspective of radiation quality as these consist of a diverse range of particle and energy types unique to the space environment. Linear energy transfer, energy deposited per unit track length in units of keV per micron, has long been used as a comparator for different types of radiation but has limitations in that it is an average value. Difference in primary core ionizations relative to secondary delta ray ranges vary significantly with particle mass and energy leading to complex interrelationships with damage production at the cellular level. At the cellular level a greater mechanistic understanding is necessary, linking energy deposition patterns to DNA damage patterns and cellular response, to build appropriate biophysical models that are predictive for different radiation qualities and mixed field exposures. Defined studies using monoenergetic beams delivered under controlled conditions are building quantitative data sets of both initial and long term changes in cells as a basis for a great mechanistic understanding of radiation quality effects of relevance to not only space exposures but clinical application of ion-beams.

  16. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Diffuse Galactic Radiation with AKARI/IRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, T.; Mori, T.; Sakon, I.; Ohsawa, R.; Nakamura, T.; Lee, H. G.; Koch, I. M.; Shimonishi, T.; Kaneda, H.; Okada, Y.; Tanaka, M.

    We present the results of near-infrared (NIR: 2.5-5 µm) spectroscopy of diffuse Galactic sources on the Galactic plane obtained with the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI. The spectral region of 2.5-5 µm is rich in various emission and absorption features. In this report, we focus on the H2 O and CO2 ice absorption features at 3.0 and 4.3 µm, respectively, and report a search for features of deuterated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 4.4-4.6 µm. The column densities of CO2 and H2 O ices show a correlation in agreement with that obtained with ISO observations. The correlation nearly crosses the origin, suggesting that H2 O and CO2 ices form in tandem for a wide range of physical conditions. The ratio of the ice column densities in AFGL2591 along the slit is relatively constant over an area of 30?? , also supporting the tandem formation of H2 O and CO2 ices. The H2 O ice column density shows a weak trend with AV estimated from HI recombination lines, which is in contrast to the clear correlation seen toward quiescent clouds. The weak correlation may be attributed partly to the uncertainty in AV and/or a range of the environmental conditions in the present targets. Only weak excess emission is seen in 4.4-4.6 µm in the spectra of the Orion bar, M17, and a reflection nebula. From these spectra, the ratio of deuterated PAHs to undeuterated PAHs is estimated as 3% at most. This is significantly smaller than the previously reported value and suggests that missing deuterium must reside in large PAHs that do not emit the 3 µm bands, if it is depleted into PAHs.

  17. Nuclear Energy: Radiation Exposure

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Pratte

    This lesson provides an overview of the sources and potential effects of radiation exposure. Topics include the history of the United States' domestic nuclear power program, the concept of ionizing radiation, and how radiation dosage is measured. There is also discussion of what constitutes a lethal dose of radiation and potential sources of exposure. The lesson includes an activity in which students measure their individual yearly exposures to radiation by making an inventory of lifestyle factors that affect their potential dosage and using an online calculator to sum up the contributions from the various sources.

  18. Fluorescent radiation converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.

    1980-01-01

    Fluorescent radiation converter used optically transparent substrate. One side of substrate is coated with plastic film containing fluorescent organic dyes that absorb optical radiation at one wavelength and emit it at longer one. Coating is formulated to respond to specific wavelengths. Emitted radiation is reflected internally inside substrate, amplifying intensity that reaches radiation detector. Converter can be made in several shapes and size; round and square bars coated all round their lengths are useful in converting relatively intense radiation and transmitting it through substrate over lengthy distances.

  19. Radiation protection in space

    SciTech Connect

    Blakely, E.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Fry, R.J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The challenge for planning radiation protection in space is to estimate the risk of events of low probability after low levels of irradiation. This work has revealed many gaps in the present state of knowledge that require further study. Despite investigations of several irradiated populations, the atomic-bomb survivors remain the primary basis for estimating the risk of ionizing radiation. Compared to previous estimates, two new independent evaluations of available information indicate a significantly greater risk of stochastic effects of radiation (cancer and genetic effects) by about a factor of three for radiation workers. This paper presents a brief historical perspective of the international effort to assure radiation protection in space.

  20. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. R., Jr.; Tada, H. Y.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented for predicting the degradation of a solar array in a space radiation environment. Solar cell technology which emphasizes the cell parameters that degrade in a radiation environment, is discussed along with the experimental techniques used in the evaluation of radiation effects. Other topics discussed include: theoretical aspects of radiation damage, methods for developing relative damage coefficients, nature of the space radiation environment, method of calculating equivalent fluence from electron and proton energy spectrums and relative damage coefficients, and comparison of flight data with estimated degradation.

  1. Radiation protection and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation was found not to be an operational problem during the Apollo program. Doses received by the crewmen of Apollo missions 7 through 17 were small because no major solar-particle events occurred during those missions. One small event was detected by a radiation sensor outside the Apollo 12 spacecraft, but no increase in radiation dose to the crewmen inside the spacecraft was detected. Radiation protection for the Apollo program was focused on both the peculiarities of the natural space radiation environment and the increased prevalence of manmade radiation sources on the ground and onboard the spacecraft. Radiation-exposure risks to crewmen were assessed and balanced against mission gain to determine mission constraints. Operational radiation evaluation required specially designed radiation detection systems onboard the spacecraft in addition to the use of satellite data, solar observatory support, and other liaison. Control and management of radioactive sources and radiation-generating equipment was important in minimizing radiation exposure of ground-support personnel, researchers, and the Apollo flight and backup crewmen.

  2. Americans' Average Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2000-08-11

    We live with radiation every day. We receive radiation exposures from cosmic rays, from outer space, from radon gas, and from other naturally radioactive elements in the earth. This is called natural background radiation. It includes the radiation we get from plants, animals, and from our own bodies. We also are exposed to man-made sources of radiation, including medical and dental treatments, television sets and emission from coal-fired power plants. Generally, radiation exposures from man-made sources are only a fraction of those received from natural sources. One exception is high exposures used by doctors to treat cancer patients. Each year in the United States, the average dose to people from natural and man-made radiation sources is about 360 millirem. A millirem is an extremely tiny amount of energy absorbed by tissues in the body.

  3. High-power radiating plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozanov, V. B.; Rukhadze, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    The physical principles underlying the use of radiating plasmas for the optical pumping of lasers are described. Particular consideration is given to the properties of radiating plasmas; radiation selectivity; the dynamics, equilibrium, and stability of radiating plasmas; the radiative Reynolds number; and experimental results on radiating discharges.

  4. Investigation of the diffusion abnormality index as a new imaging biomarker for early assessment of brain tumor response to radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farjam, Reza; Tsien, Christina I.; Feng, Felix Y.; Gomez-Hassan, Diana; Hayman, James A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Background Diffusion MRI, although having the potential to be a biomarker for early assessment of tumor response to therapy, could be confounded by edema and necrosis in or near the brain tumors. This study aimed to develop and investigate the ability of the diffusion abnormality index (DAI) to be a new imaging biomarker for early assessment of brain metastasis response to radiation therapy (RT). Methods Patients with either radiosensitive or radioresistant brain metastases that were treated by whole brain RT alone or combined with bortezomib as a radiation sensitizer had diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI pre-RT and 2 weeks (2W) after starting RT. A patient-specific diffusion abnormality probability function (DAProF) was created to account for abnormal low and high apparent diffusion coefficients differently, reflecting respective high cellularity and edema/necrosis. The DAI of a lesion was then calculated by the integral of DAProF-weighted tumor apparent diffusion coefficient histogram. The changes in DAI from pre-RT to 2W were evaluated for differentiating the responsive, stable, and progressive tumors and compared with the changes in gross tumor volume and conventional diffusion metrics during the same time interval. Results In lesions treated with whole brain RT, the DAI performed the best among all metrics in predicting the posttreatment response of brain metastases to RT. In lesions treated with whole brain RT + bortezomib, although DAI was the best predictor, the performance of all metrics worsened compared with the first group. Conclusions The ability of DAI for early assessment of brain metastasis response to RT depends upon treatment regimes. PMID:24327584

  5. Pulsed-laser diffusion of n+ contacts and n+-p junctions in high purity germanium for nuclear radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. H. Lowndes; T. W. Raudorf

    1985-01-01

    We report fabrication of thin (< 1 mum) n+ contacts, and of n+-p junctions with very low reverse saturation current, on high purity germanium, using a pulsed laser process that requires no heating of the bulk germanium. The junctions appear to be suitable for use in commercial nuclear radiation detectors.

  6. In vivo experimental validation for a featured-data time-domain diffuse fluorescence tomography based on the radiative transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Limin; Jin, Meng; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng; Li, Jiao

    2015-03-01

    In diffuse florescence tomography (DFT), the radiative transfer equation (RTE) and its P1 approximation, i.e. the diffuse equation (DE), have been used as the forward models. Since the assumptions of the diffusion approximation are not valid in particular regions of biological tissue which are close to the collimated light sources and boundaries, not scattering dominated or having void-like sub-domains, the RTE-based DFT methodology has become a focus of investigation. Therefore, we present a RTE-based featured-data scheme for time-domain DFT, which combines the discrete solidangle- element method and the finite element method to obtain numerical solutions of the Laplace-transformed 2D timedomain RTE, with the natural boundary condition and collimating light source model. The scheme is validated using the measurement data from phantom and in-vivo small-animal experiments compared to the DE-based scheme.

  7. Earth Radiation Measurement Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis

    2000-01-01

    This document is the final report for NASA Grant NAG1-1959, 'Earth Radiation Measurement Science'. The purpose of this grant was to perform research in this area for the needs of the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) project and for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), which are bing conducted by the Radiation and Aerosols Branch of the Atmospheric Sciences Division of Langley Research Center. Earth Radiation Measurement Science investigates the processes by which measurements are converted into data products. Under this grant, research was to be conducted for five tasks: (1) Point Response Function Measurements; (2) Temporal Sampling of Outgoing Longwave Radiation; (3) Spatial Averaging of Radiation Budget Data; (4) CERES Data Validation and Applications; and (5) ScaRaB Data Validation and Application.

  8. A radiation tolerant photodetector

    SciTech Connect

    Passenheim, B.C.; Ginaven, R.O.

    1987-12-01

    This paper describes the development and test of a radiation tolerant photodetector. This was accomplished by building a single stage photo multiplier tube with a physically small, dielectrically isolated, silicon photodiode array at the anode. In this device the optically generated photocurrent is multiplied by a much larger factor than is the photo-Compton current. Using matched ''sighted'' and ''optically blind'' diodes to differentiate the optical signal from the ''common-mode'' ionizing radiation photocurrent also contributes to radiation tolerance.

  9. Solar and Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T

    2005-07-01

    The Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) provides continuous measurements of broadband shortwave (solar) and longwave (atmospheric or infrared) irradiances for downwelling and upwelling components. The following six irradiance measurements are collected from a network of stations to help determine the total radiative flux exchange within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility: • Direct normal shortwave (solar beam) • Diffuse horizontal shortwave (sky) • Global horizontal shortwave (total hemispheric) • Upwelling shortwave (reflected) • Downwelling longwave (atmospheric infrared) • Upwelling longwave (surface infrared)

  10. Flexible radiator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The soft tube radiator subsystem is described including applicable system requirements, the design and limitations of the subsystem components, and the panel manufacturing method. The soft tube radiator subsystem is applicable to payloads requiring 1 to 12 kW of heat rejection for orbital lifetimes per mission of 30 days or less. The flexible radiator stowage volume required is about 60% and the system weight is about 40% of an equivalent heat rejection rigid panel. The cost should also be considerably less. The flexible radiator is particularly suited to shuttle orbiter sortie payloads and also whose mission lengths do not exceed the 30 day design life.

  11. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, Minoru (Troy, NY); Watson, E. Bruce (Troy, NY); Acocella, John (Troy, NY)

    1986-01-01

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

  12. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.

    1986-11-04

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency. 3 figs.

  13. Velocity diffusion and radiation trapping force in a one-dimensional expansion of cold atomic clouds in a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mayya, Y. S. [Environmental Assessment Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Jagatap, B. N. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400 094 (India)

    2007-09-15

    We experimentally investigate one-dimensional (1D) expansion of a cold cloud of cesium atoms in orthogonal 2D configuration of near resonant laser beams by temporally modulating a pair of counterpropagating trapping beams of a magneto-optical trap (MOT). The cloud is observed to undergo ballistic expansion followed by superballistic explosive growth due to the fluctuations of the 2D radiation force. A model based on the theory of Brownian motion is developed and a comparison of experiments with theory is shown to provide a direct measure of the velocity diffusion coefficient. We also observe sudden contraction of the cloud immediately after switching off the pair of trapping beams, which provides direct evidence for the existence of the radiation trapping force in a MOT.

  14. Radiation efficiency of the large current radiators. Electrodynamic simulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. P. Pochanin; I. Ye. Pochanina; P. V. Kholod

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the results of electrodynamic simulation, using the FDTD method, of the radiation of ultrawideband (UWB) pulse electromagnetic fields by radiators built as Harmuth's large current radiators. The dependencies of the time characteristics of the radiated pulses on a dimension of the radiator are presented.

  15. Radiation pressure driving of a dusty atmosphere

    E-print Network

    Tsang, Benny Tsz-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Radiation pressure can be dynamically important in certain star-forming environments such as ultra-luminous infrared and submillimeter galaxies. Whether and how radiation drives turbulence and bulk outflows in star formation sites is still unclear. The uncertainty stems from the limitations of direct numerical schemes used to simulate radiation transfer and radiation-gas coupling. The idealized setup in which radiation is introduced at the base of a dusty atmosphere in a gravitational field has recently become a standard for the testing of radiation hydrodynamics methods in the context of star formation. To a series of treatments enlisting the flux-limited-diffusion approximation as well as a short-characteristics tracing and M1 closure for the variable Eddington tensor approximation, we here add another, very different treatment based on the Implicit Monte Carlo radiation transfer scheme. Consistent with all previous treatment, we observe Rayleigh-Taylor instability and a readjustment to a near-Eddington sta...

  16. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

  17. Cerenkov Radiation in Photonic Crystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chiyan Luo; Mihai Ibanescu; Steven G. Johnson; J. D. Joannopoulos

    2003-01-01

    In a conventional material, the coherent Cerenkov radiation due to a moving charged particle is associated with a velocity threshold, a forward-pointing radiation cone, and a forward direction of emission. We describe different behavior for the Cerenkov radiation in a photonic crystal. In particular, this radiation is intrinsically coupled with transition radiation and is observable without any threshold. Within one

  18. Human exposure to ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Passchier, W.F. (Health Council of the Netherlands, The Hague (NL)); Bosnjakovic, B.F.M. (Ministry of Housing, The Hague (NL))

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings contain over 50 selections. Some of the title are: Man and ultraviolet radiation; Effects of ultraviolet radiations on the human skin: emphasis on skin cancer; Human exposure to ultraviolet radiation: Quantitative modelling of skin cancer incidence; Human exposure to ultraviolet radiation: Data; and Share of erythema dose of solar radiation in high mountains.

  19. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel N. Slatkin; F. Avraham Dilmanian; Per O. Spanne

    1994-01-01

    A method of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation, in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose

  20. Atomistic modeling of intrinsic and radiation-enhanced fission gas (Xe) diffusion in UO2±x: Implications for nuclear fuel performance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, D. A.; Garcia, P.; Liu, X.-Y.; Pastore, G.; Tonks, M.; Millett, P.; Dorado, B.; Gaston, D. R.; Andrs, D.; Williamson, R. L.; Martineau, R. C.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Stanek, C. R.

    2014-08-01

    Based on density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, the diffusivity of fission gas atoms (Xe) in UO2 nuclear fuel has been calculated for a range of non-stoichiometry (i.e. UO2±x), under both out-of-pile (no irradiation) and in-pile (irradiation) conditions. This was achieved by first deriving expressions for the activation energy that account for the type of trap site that the fission gas atoms occupy, which includes the corresponding type of mobile cluster, the charge state of these defects and the chemistry acting as boundary condition. In the next step DFT calculations were used to estimate migration barriers and internal energy contributions to the thermodynamic properties and calculations based on empirical potentials were used to estimate defect formation and migration entropies (i.e. pre-exponentials). The diffusivities calculated for out-of-pile conditions as function of the UO2±x non-stoichiometry were used to validate the accuracy of the diffusion models and the DFT calculations against available experimental data. The Xe diffusivity is predicted to depend strongly on the UO2±x non-stoichiometry due to a combination of changes in the preferred Xe trap site and in the concentration of uranium vacancies enabling Xe diffusion, which is consistent with experiments. After establishing the validity of the modeling approach, it was used for studying Xe diffusion under in-pile conditions, for which experimental data is very scarce. The radiation-enhanced Xe diffusivity is compared to existing empirical models. Finally, the predicted fission gas diffusion rates were implemented in the BISON fuel performance code and fission gas release from a Risø fuel rod irradiation experiment was simulated.

  1. Atomistic modeling of intrinsic and radiation-enhanced fission gas (Xe) diffusion in UO2 +/- x: Implications for nuclear fuel performance modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Giovanni Pastore; Michael R. Tonks; Derek R. Gaston; Richard L. Williamson; David Andrs; Richard Martineau

    2014-03-01

    Based on density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, the diffusivity of fission gas atoms (Xe) in UO2 nuclear fuel has been calculated for a range of non-stoichiometry (i.e. UO2x), under both out-of-pile (no irradiation) and in-pile (irradiation) conditions. This was achieved by first deriving expressions for the activation energy that account for the type of trap site that the fission gas atoms occupy, which includes the corresponding type of mobile cluster, the charge state of these defects and the chemistry acting as boundary condition. In the next step DFT calculations were used to estimate migration barriers and internal energy contributions to the thermodynamic properties and calculations based on empirical potentials were used to estimate defect formation and migration entropies (i.e. pre-exponentials). The diffusivities calculated for out-of-pile conditions as function of the UO2x nonstoichiometrywere used to validate the accuracy of the diffusion models and the DFT calculations against available experimental data. The Xe diffusivity is predicted to depend strongly on the UO2x non-stoichiometry due to a combination of changes in the preferred Xe trap site and in the concentration of uranium vacancies enabling Xe diffusion, which is consistent with experiments. After establishing the validity of the modeling approach, it was used for studying Xe diffusion under in-pile conditions, for which experimental data is very scarce. The radiation-enhanced Xe diffusivity is compared to existing empirical models. Finally, the predicted fission gas diffusion rates were implemented in the BISON fuel performance code and fission gas release from a Risø fuel rod irradiation experiment was simulated. 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  2. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MRDTI) of the optic nerve and optic radiations at 3T in children with neurofibromatosis type I (NF1)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher G. Filippi; Aaron Bos; Joshua P. Nickerson; Michael B. Salmela; Chris J. Koski; Keith A. Cauley

    Background  Optic pathway glioma (OPG) is a characteristic hallmark of neurofibromatosis type I (NF-I).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective  To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MRDTI) at 3T to detect abnormalities of the optic\\u000a nerves and optic radiations in children with NF-I.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  3-T MRDTI was prospectively performed in 9 children with NF-I (7 boys, 2 girls, average age 7.8 years, range

  3. Space Radiation Risk Assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Blakely

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of potential health effects from radiation exposure during and after deep space travel is important for the future of manned missions To date manned missions have been limited to near-Earth orbits with the moon our farthest distance from earth Historical space radiation career exposures for astronauts from all NASA Missions show that early missions involved total exposures of less

  4. Chronic Radiation Enteritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. S. Theis; R. Sripadam; V. Ramani; S. Lal

    2010-01-01

    Chronic radiation enteritis is an increasing problem, as more patients receive radiotherapy as part of their cancer therapy and as the long-term survival of these patients improves. This review addresses the causes, investigation, treatment and prevention of this disease. A review of published studies was carried out using a variety of search terms, including radiation enteritis, investigation, treatment and prevention.

  5. Global radiation oncology waybill

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Garzón, Victor; Rovirosa, Ángeles; Ramos, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Background/aim Radiation oncology covers many different fields of knowledge and skills. Indeed, this medical specialty links physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even rehabilitation and aesthetics. The current socio-economic situation and professional competences affect the development and future or this specialty. The aim of this article was to analyze and highlight the underlying pillars and foundations of radiation oncology, indicating the steps implicated in the future developments or competences of each. Methods This study has collected data from the literature and includes highlights from discussions carried out during the XVII Congress of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR) held in Vigo in June, 2013. Most of the aspects and domains of radiation oncology were analyzed, achieving recommendations for the many skills and knowledge related to physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even supportive care and management. Results Considering the data from the literature and the discussions of the XVII SEOR Meeting, the “waybill” for the forthcoming years has been described in this article including all the aspects related to the needs of radiation oncology. Conclusions Professional competences affect the development and future of this specialty. All the types of radio-modulation are competences of radiation oncologists. On the other hand, the pillars of Radiation Oncology are based on experience and research in every area of Radiation Oncology. PMID:24416572

  6. The Pressure of Radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oliver Heaviside

    1905-01-01

    THE success of Lebedeff and Nichols and Hull in recognising and measuring the pressure of radiation has aroused much interest in radiation pressure generally, real or apparent. It has some interesting and sometimes somewhat difficult theoretical aspects. In the first place, if the ether is really absolutely at rest (this rigidity is a very difficult idea), the moving force on

  7. Penn Radiation Oncology Newsletter

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    . First Year Radiation Oncology Residents Medical: Saumil Gandhi, M.D., Ph.D., Anusha Kalbasi, M.D., JacobWELCOME TO THE Penn Radiation Oncology Newsletter Volume 1 Issue 5SUMMER 2012 There are always have moved on to great opportuni- ties outside the department. We have retained two of our medical

  8. Radiation in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhlinger, Ernst; Truemper, Joachim; Weisskopf, Martin

    1992-01-01

    When Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen discovered radiation one hundred years ago, it seemed that what was discovered was one of the rarest and most volatile members of the family of the basic modules of our natural world. Today cosmologists report that a substantial part of the universe's radiation energy consists of X-rays, which travel through cosmic space with the speed of light.

  9. Thallium bromide radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. S. Shah; J. C. Lund; F. Olschner; L. Moy; M. R. Squillante

    1989-01-01

    Radiation detectors have been fabricated from crystals of the semiconductor material thallium bromide (TlBr) and the performance of these detectors as room temperature photon spectrometers has been measured. These detectors exhibit improved energy resolution over previously reported TlBr detectors. These results indicate that TlBr is a very promising radiation detector material.

  10. Radar frequency radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Malowicki

    1981-01-01

    A method is presented for the determination of radar frequency radiation power densities that the PAVE PAWS radar system could produce in its air and ground environment. The effort was prompted by the concern of the people in the vicinity of OTIS AFB MA and BEALE AFB CA about the possible radar frequency radiation hazard of the PAVE PAWS radar.

  11. Microwave oven radiation hazards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Prakash Bhartia; Oliver OReilly

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey on the radiation leakage from a representative sample of microwave ovens in Regina. A brief review of potential hazards of microwave radiation is presented and the results of the survey are analyzed with a view of initiating further research in this area.

  12. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2007-01-09

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  13. Sensible radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, H.H.

    1996-03-01

    This report describes eight general principles of radiation protection. The first principle is based on the idea that the ICRP derivation of risk coefficients are meaningless when applied to routine radiation exposure. The other principles describes what should be acceptable exposures.

  14. Radiative Flux Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Chuck [NOAA

    2008-05-14

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  15. Radiation effects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-07-01

    As more people spend more time in space, and the return to the moon and exploratory missions are considered, the risks require continuing examination. The effects of microgravity and radiation are two potential risks in space. These risks increase with increasing mission duration. This document considers the risk of radiation effects in space workers and explorers. 17 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  16. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  17. Deployable Heat Pipe Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1975-01-01

    A 1.2- by 1.8-m variable conductance heat pipe radiator was designed, built, and tested. The radiator has deployment capability and can passively control Freon-21 fluid loop temperatures under varying loads and environments. It consists of six grooved variable conductance heat pipes attached to a 0.032-in. aluminum panel. Heat is supplied to the radiator via a fluid header or a single-fluid flexible heat pipe header. The heat pipe header is an artery design that has a flexible section capable of bending up to 90 degrees. Radiator loads as high as 850 watts were successfully tested. Over a load variation of 200 watts, the outlet temperature of the Freon-21 fluid varied by 7 F. An alternate control system was also investigated which used a variable conductance heat pipe header attached to the heat pipe radiator panel.

  18. Ultrasensitive Human Radiation Dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammen, Richard

    1985-01-01

    The problem we are addressing concerns the astronauts, and their exposure to radiation during spaceflight. The amount of this radiation is a variable depending on solar events and orbital characteristics. Our goal is to measure the total integrated quantity of radiation damage to the cell nucleus in astronauts or other people exposed to radiation. In my lab, we are turning up the microscope from the level of the chromosome, about eight orders of magnitude, to the molecular level. It is well known that radiation causes DNA and chromosome damage. We are developing methods to measure a specific molecular lesion. The lesion that we have selected to measure is thymidine diol, which is created by hydroxyl radicals adding across the 5.6 double bond of thymidine in DNA.

  19. Broadband optical radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Hong, S. D.; Moacanin, J. (inventors)

    1981-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting optical radiation by optically monitoring temperature changes in a microvolume caused by absorption of the optical radiation to be detected is described. More specifically, a thermal lens forming material is provided which has first and second opposite, substantially parallel surfaces. A reflective coating is formed on the first surface, and a radiation absorbing coating is formed on the reflective coating. Chopped, incoming optical radiation to be detected is directed to irradiate a small portion of the radiation absorbing coating. Heat generated in this small area is conducted to the lens forming material through the reflective coating, thereby raising the temperature of a small portion of the lens forming material and causing a thermal lens to be formed therein.

  20. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, Adrie J. J. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-05-05

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  1. Three-dimensional diffusion of non-sorbing species in porous sandstone: computer simulation based on X-ray microtomography using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoshito; Nakano, Tsukasa; Nakamura, Koichi; Uesugi, Kentaro; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Ikeda, Susumu

    2004-10-01

    The diffusion pathways of porous sandstone were examined by a three-dimensional (3-D) imaging technique based on X-ray computed tomography (CT) using the SPring-8 (Super Photon ring-8 GeV, Hyogo, Japan) synchrotron radiation facility. The analysis was undertaken to develop better understanding of the diffusion pathways in natural rock as a key factor in clarifying the detailed mechanism of the diffusion of radionuclides and water molecules through the pore spaces of natural barriers in underground nuclear waste disposal facilities. A cylindrical sample (diameter 4 mm, length 6 mm) of sandstone (porosity 0.14) was imaged to obtain a 3-D image set of 450(3) voxels=2.62(3) mm(3). Through cluster-labeling analysis of the 3-D image set, it was revealed that 89% of the pore space forms a single large pore-cluster responsible for macroscopic diffusive transport, while only 11% of the pore space is made up of isolated pores that are not involved in long-range diffusive transport. Computer simulations of the 3-D diffusion of non-sorbing random walkers in the largest pore cluster were performed to calculate the surface-to-volume ratio of the pore, tortuosity (diffusion coefficient in free space divided by that in porous rock). The results showed that (i) the simulated surface-to-volume ratio is about 60% of the results obtained by conventional pulsed-field-gradient proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) laboratory experiments and (ii) the simulated tortuosity is five to seven times larger than the results of laboratory diffusion experiments using non-sorbing I(-) and Br(-). These discrepancies are probably attributed to the intrinsic sample heterogeneity and limited spatial resolution of the CT system. The permeability was also estimated based on the NMR diffusometry theory using the results of the random walk simulations via the Kozeny-Carman equation. The estimated permeability involved an error of about 20% compared with the permeability measured by the conventional method, suggesting that the diffusometry-based NMR well logging with gradient coils is applicable to the in-situ permeability measurement of strata. The present study demonstrated that X-ray CT using synchrotron radiation is a powerful tool for obtaining 3-D pore structure images without the beam-hardening artifacts inevitable in conventional CT using X-ray tubes. PMID:15358495

  2. RADIATION PROTECTION AT SYNCHROTRON RADIATION FACILITIES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James C. Liu; Vaclav Vylet

    A synchrotron radiation (SR) facility typically consists of an injector, a storage ring, and SR beamlines. The latter two features are unique to SR facilities, when compared to other types of accelerator facilities. The SR facilities have the characteristics of low injection beam power, but high stored beam power. The storage ring is generally above ground with people occupying the

  3. RADIATION BIOLOGY: CONCEPTS FOR RADIATION PROTECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT The opportunity to write a historical review of the field of radiation biology allows for the viewing of the development and maturity of a field of study, thereby being able to provide the appropriate context for the earlier years of research and its findings. The...

  4. Radiation Protection and the Human Radiation Experiments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Lloyd

    1998-01-01

    This book from the Los Alamos National Laboratory is largely a response to recent revelations and public concern about radiation experiments performed on human beings there and elsewhere, starting about 50 years ago. It is written for an intelligent lay person rather than for the specialist scientist and seeks to clarify the objectives and conduct of these human studies. The

  5. Solar radiation on Mars: Update 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Joseph; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed information on solar radiation characteristics on Mars are necessary for effective design of future planned solar energy systems operating on the surface of Mars. A procedure and solar radiation related data are presented from which the daily variation of the global, direct beam and diffuse insolation on Mars are calculated. Given the optical depth of the Mars atmosphere, the global radiation is calculated from the normalized net flux function based on multiple wavelength and multiple scattering of the solar radiation. The direct beam was derived from the optical depth using Beer's law, and the diffuse component was obtained from the difference of the global and the direct beam radiation. The optical depths of the Mars atmosphere were derived from images taken of the Sun with a special diode on the cameras used on the two Viking Landers.

  6. Laboratory optical spectroscopy of the thiophenoxy radical and its profile simulation as a diffuse interstellar band based on rotational distribution by radiation and collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Mitsunori; Niwayama, Kei; Tsukiyama, Koichi, E-mail: araki@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science Division I, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku-ku 162-8601, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    The gas-phase optical absorption spectrum of the thiophenoxy radical (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}S), a diffuse interstellar band (DIB) candidate molecule, was observed in the discharge of thiophenol using a cavity ringdown spectrometer. The ground-state rotational constants of the thiophenoxy radical were theoretically calculated, and the excited-state rotational constants were determined from the observed rotational profile. The rotational profile of a near prolate molecule having C {sub 2v} symmetry was simulated on the basis of a rotational distribution model by radiation and collisions. Although the simulated profile did not agree with the observed DIBs, the upper limit of the column density for the thiophenoxy radical in the diffuse clouds toward HD 204827 was evaluated to be 2 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup –2}. The profile simulation indicates that rotational distribution by radiation and collisions is important to reproduce a rotational profile for a DIB candidate and that the near prolate C {sub 2v} molecule is a possible candidate for DIB with a band width variation dependent on the line of sight.

  7. Laboratory Optical Spectroscopy of the Thiophenoxy Radical and Its Profile Simulation as a Diffuse Interstellar Band Based on Rotational Distribution by Radiation and Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Mitsunori; Niwayama, Kei; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2014-11-01

    The gas-phase optical absorption spectrum of the thiophenoxy radical (C6H5S), a diffuse interstellar band (DIB) candidate molecule, was observed in the discharge of thiophenol using a cavity ringdown spectrometer. The ground-state rotational constants of the thiophenoxy radical were theoretically calculated, and the excited-state rotational constants were determined from the observed rotational profile. The rotational profile of a near prolate molecule having C 2v symmetry was simulated on the basis of a rotational distribution model by radiation and collisions. Although the simulated profile did not agree with the observed DIBs, the upper limit of the column density for the thiophenoxy radical in the diffuse clouds toward HD 204827 was evaluated to be 2 × 1013 cm-2. The profile simulation indicates that rotational distribution by radiation and collisions is important to reproduce a rotational profile for a DIB candidate and that the near prolate C 2v molecule is a possible candidate for DIB with a band width variation dependent on the line of sight.

  8. Synchrotron radiation sources and research

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1995-12-31

    This is an introduction and a review of Synchrotron Radiation sources and the research performed using synchrotron radiation. I will begin with a brief discussion of the two principal uses of particle storage rings: for colliding beams (Collider) and for synchrotron radiation (Radiator). Then I will concentrate on discussions of synchrotron radiation topics, starting with a historical account, followed by descriptions of the features of the storage ring and the features of the radiation from the simplest source -- the bending magnet. I will then discuss the special insertion device sources -- wigglers and undulators -- and their radiations, and end with a brief general account of the research and other applications of synchrotron radiation.

  9. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hung-chi Lihn

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed.

  10. Teflon electret radiation dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parada, M. A.; de Almeida, A.

    2002-05-01

    Electrets are insulating materials with a quasi-permanent electric polarization. Since charge compensation occurs when subjected to ionizing radiation, electrets may be used for ?, ?, ?, X, e - and neutron radiation dosimetry. The compensating charge may either be produced in the electret material itself or by interaction by the radiation field with surrounding insulating material. We report the results of investigations of electrets produced from Teflon ® polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), tetrafluoroethylene-hexa-fluoropropylene (FEP) and tetrafluoroethylene-per-fluoromethoxyethylene (PFA) films. The electret state was produced uniformly on one surface of the films by a corona method with a negative 15 kV potential applied to multiple pointed electrodes facing the film on a grounded plate. After polarization, the films were exposed to a known X radiation and the uncompensated charge was nondestructively measured with capacitive probes. The area of the probe was designed in accordance with the spatial resolution desired. The resolution and sensitivity of such probe is ultimately limited by the Paschen discharge between the electret and the probe. Response curves compared the ratio of uncompensated charge density after and before exposures to the radiation as a function of exposure. The linearity of these curves shows that the films may be used as a radiation dosimeter. The slope of the response curves indicates the sensitivity to the ionizing radiation. The PFA film displays two linear regions which correspond to two electron trap levels. We demonstrate that the image forming nature of these planar electret dosimeters has a millimeter of spatial resolution. We also report the development of innovative electret geometry for measurements of the directional dependence of the radiation and by choice of the surrounding insulating materials, an almost complete selectivity in mixed radiation fields.

  11. Miniaturized radiation chirper

    DOEpatents

    Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

  12. Radiation and Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Albert E.

    2008-03-01

    This is a shortened version of the Science Teachers' Workshop offered free of charge to primary and secondary teachers at a location of their choice, covering fundamentals of nuclear radiation, natural and man-made sources of radiation, biological effects and risks to health, radioactive waste management, and radiation safety management and regulation. The course includes a hands-on demonstration of use of Geiger Counters, which are given without cost to participants for use in their classes. A CD and notebook of class material are issued to each student. Lunch will be provided. Limited to 20 participants.

  13. Radiation and Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Albert; Blanchard, Karen

    2007-10-01

    This is a shortened version of the Science Teachers' Workshop offered free of charge to primary and secondary teachers at a location of their choice, covering fundamentals of nuclear radiation, natural and man-made sources of radiation, biological effects and risks to health, radioactive waste management, and radiation safety management and regulation. The course includes a hands-on demonstration of use of Geiger Counters, which are given without cost to participants for use in their classes. A CD and notebook of class material are issued to each student. Lunch will be provided.

  14. Radiation carcinogenesis. Cancergram CK06

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The Cancergram deals with all aspects of radiation carcinogenesis. The term radiation here includes uv radiation and the entire electromagnetic spectrum, electron and other charged-particle beams, neutrons, and alpha and beta radiation from radioactive substances. Abstracts included concern relationships between radiation and carcinogenesis in humans, experimental induction of tumors in animals by irradiation, studies on the mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis at the cellular level, studies of RBE, dose response or dose threshold in relation to radiation carcinogenesis, and methods and policies for control of radiation exposure in the general population. In general, this Cancergram excludes abstracts on radiotherapy, radiologic diagnosis, radiation pathology, and radiation biology, where these articles have no bearing on radiation carcinogenesis.

  15. IMPULSE RADIATING ANTENNAS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carl E. Baum; Everett G. Farr; Kirtland AFB

    A number of applications require radiation of a short pulse of electromagnetic energy out to large distances. These applications include target discrimination in a cluttered environment (e.g., looking over the ocean), aircraft identification by taking a \\

  16. Space radiation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Instrument design and data analysis expertise was provided in support of several space radiation monitoring programs. The Verification of Flight Instrumentation (VFI) program at NASA included both the Active Radiation Detector (ARD) and the Nuclear Radiation Monitor (NRM). Design, partial fabrication, calibration and partial data analysis capability to the ARD program was provided, as well as detector head design and fabrication, software development and partial data analysis capability to the NRM program. The ARD flew on Spacelab-1 in 1983, performed flawlessly and was returned to MSFC after flight with unchanged calibration factors. The NRM, flown on Spacelab-2 in 1985, also performed without fault, not only recording the ambient gamma ray background on the Spacelab, but also recording radiation events of astrophysical significance.

  17. Portal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  18. Space Math: Radiation Math

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sten Odenwald

    This booklet includes 19 problems that explore the topic of radiation and human exposure to its different forms. The problems span math abilities from basic multiplication and unit conversions, to algebra and calculus. For example, students learn about the various natural radiation dosages to which they are exposed daily, work quantitatively with authentic radiation dosage units to estimate the total annual dosages resulting from different lifestyles, and determine probabilities of occurrence for flares and other radiation events in space. Math skills include graph analysis, Venn diagramming, probability and statistics, evaluating equations in more than one variable, extrapolation and forecasting, scientific notation, integral calculus. (8.5 x11, 28 pages, 11 color images, PDF file)

  19. Tin Can Radiation Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crull, John L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides instructions for making tin can radiation detectors from empty aluminum cans, aluminum foil, clear plastic, copper wire, silica gel, and fine, unwaxed dental floss put together with tape or glue. Also provides suggestions for activities using the detectors. (JN)

  20. RESEARCH SAFETY RADIATION SAFETY

    E-print Network

    RESEARCH SAFETY RADIATION SAFETY ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT LABORATORY SAFETY AUDITS & COMPLIANCE BIOSAFETY and ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT and MISSION CONTINUITY FIRE PREVENTION and LIFE SAFETY GENERAL SAFETY TRAINING

  1. Nanotechnology in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrew Z; Tepper, Joel E

    2014-09-10

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. PMID:25113769

  2. Nuclear radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luiz Alexandre Schuch; Daniel Jean Roger Nordemann

    1990-01-01

    Detectors of nuclear radiation, such as gaseous detectors, scintillators, and semiconductors, are presented through their general properties and with their operating systems. The semiconductor detectors are studied with more details.

  3. SOLAR RADIATION, VA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sterling, Virginia Integrated Surface Irradiance Study (ISIS) solar radiation data files from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), zipped from ftp://ftp.atdd.noaa.gov/pub/projects/isis/ste/monthly...

  4. Microwave Radiation Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Direct photon detector responds to microwave frequencies. Method based on trapped-ion frequency-generation standards proposed to detect radio-frequency (RF) radiation at 40.5 GHz. Technique used for directdetection (RF) communication, radar, and radio astronomy.

  5. Pregnancy and Radiation Exposure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Exposure to the Embryo or Fetus from Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine Pregnant women may be administered radioactive materials ... determination be obtained from the health physicist, a nuclear medicine physician, or a radiation oncologist associated with ...

  6. Rf radiation: biological effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, E.J.

    1980-12-01

    The controversy surrounding the biological effects and health hazards of radio-frequency (RF) radiation (below the infrared frequency of 300 gHz) is examined. The average person is exposed to only extremely low levels of RF radiation. However, a substantial fraction of the population receives higher than average exposures because of increased use of microwave ovens and citizens band radios. Possible effects of exposure to RF radiation on brain function are investigated. Results of limited studies of long-term low-level effects are presented. The question of legal liability concerning exposure of the general public to RF radiation generated by microwave ovens and FM antennas is explored. (4 diagrams, 4 graphs, 1 table)

  7. Radiation and Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Edward I.

    1974-01-01

    Presents a discussion of the risks, to society, from radiation-associated technologies and urges that science teachers help the public understand the decision-making process relative to nuclear power as well as the problems and alternatives. (PEB)

  8. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  9. Photochemistry Radiation and Photolysiss

    E-print Network

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Photochemistry Radiation and Photolysiss Objectives · Review the electromagnetic spectrum · Review #12;The Electromagnetic Spectrum For more information on the electromagnetic spectrum, see this website. #12;Essentials of Electromagnetic Energy The "unit" of electromagnetic energy is the photon

  10. Photochemistry Radiation and Photolysis

    E-print Network

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Photochemistry Radiation and Photolysis Objectives · Review the electromagnetic spectrum · Review covalent) #12;The Electromagnetic Spectrum For more information on the electromagnetic spectrum, see this website. #12;Essentials of Electromagnetic Energy The "unit" of electromagnetic energy is the photon

  11. Occupational Radiation Exposures

    Cancer.gov

    DCEG researchers are studying cancer risks among populations who are occupationally exposed to radiation. Chernobyl Clean-up Workers Mayak Nuclear Facility Workers U.S. Radiologic Technologists Interventional Fluoroscopists Print This Page Occupational

  12. Types of Radiation Emergencies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a radiation emergency happens in your area. Â Nuclear Emergencies A nuclear emergency involves the explosion of ... their knowledge. Learn more about radiological exposure devices Nuclear Power Plant Accident An accident at a nuclear ...

  13. Pulse radiation of four-element large current radiator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. P. Pochanin

    1999-01-01

    One of the most important problems in modern ground penetrating radar design is creating ultra wide band (UWB) antennas for short sounding electromagnetic pulses (SP) of radiation. Important requirements for antennas of this kind are the elimination of “ringing” and efficiency. Promising UWB\\/SP radiators, which satisfy these conditions have been proposed by Harmuth. These radiators are named large current radiators

  14. Radiation Protection and Licensing FNAL Radiation Physics Team

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Radiation Protection and Licensing K. Vaziri, FNAL Radiation Physics Team Proton Accelerators, 2012 #12;January 13, 2012 Radiation Protection and Licensing 2 Radiation Protection and Licensing 1 5. Tritium control and ground-water protection 6. Radioactive component storage 7. Repair

  15. Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

  16. THz radiation sensors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Sizov

    2010-01-01

    In the paper, issues associated with the development and exploitation of terahertz (THz) radiation detectors are discussed.\\u000a The paper is written for those readers who desire an analysis of the latest developments in different type of THz radiation\\u000a sensors (detectors), which play an increasing role in different areas of human activity (e.g., security, biological, drugs\\u000a and explosions detection, imaging, astronomy

  17. Automated personnel radiation monitor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1981-01-01

    An automated Personnel Low-Level Radiation Portal Monitor has been developed by UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. It is micro-computer controlled and uses nineteen large gas flow radiation detectors. By employing a micro-computer, sophisticated mathematical analysis is used on the detector informational data base to determine the statistical probability of contamination. This system provides for: (1) Increased sensitivity to point source contamination;

  18. Radiation resistance of elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.

    1985-10-01

    Various data has indicated that some elastomers have much higher radiation resistance than Viton. Nine samples of elastomers were irradiated with gamma rays. Two Ethylene Propylene Diene compounds, EPDM's, were found to exhibit acceptable properties for o-rings after radiation levels of 5x10Y rads, while Viton failed at 1x10X rads. Vacuum tests also were favorable so EPDM o-rings were chosen as seals in the Energy Saver cryostat vacuum system.

  19. [Radiation protection in radiation oncology. Yesterday, today, and tomorrow].

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Th; Müller, R

    2012-11-01

    Publications about radiation protection issues are not very frequent in the 100-year-old history of Strahlentherapie und Onkologie. While at the beginning of the last century the problems of radiation protection were determined by the technical development of radiation therapy, the importance of radiation protection measures and knowledge about radiation protection by the persons involved has clearly increased. A new challenge is treating patients according to radiation safety issues to avoid the risk of stochastic late effects, such as radiation-induced secondary tumors. PMID:22907582

  20. Acute radiation syndrome caused by accidental radiation exposure - therapeutic principles.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Harald; Meineke, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    Fortunately radiation accidents are infrequent occurrences, but since they have the potential of large scale events like the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima, preparatory planning of the medical management of radiation accident victims is very important. Radiation accidents can result in different types of radiation exposure for which the diagnostic and therapeutic measures, as well as the outcomes, differ. The clinical course of acute radiation syndrome depends on the absorbed radiation dose and its distribution. Multi-organ-involvement and multi-organ-failure need be taken into account. The most vulnerable organ system to radiation exposure is the hematopoietic system. In addition to hematopoietic syndrome, radiation induced damage to the skin plays an important role in diagnostics and the treatment of radiation accident victims. The most important therapeutic principles with special reference to hematopoietic syndrome and cutaneous radiation syndrome are reviewed. PMID:22114866

  1. Acute radiation syndrome caused by accidental radiation exposure - therapeutic principles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Fortunately radiation accidents are infrequent occurrences, but since they have the potential of large scale events like the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima, preparatory planning of the medical management of radiation accident victims is very important. Radiation accidents can result in different types of radiation exposure for which the diagnostic and therapeutic measures, as well as the outcomes, differ. The clinical course of acute radiation syndrome depends on the absorbed radiation dose and its distribution. Multi-organ-involvement and multi-organ-failure need be taken into account. The most vulnerable organ system to radiation exposure is the hematopoietic system. In addition to hematopoietic syndrome, radiation induced damage to the skin plays an important role in diagnostics and the treatment of radiation accident victims. The most important therapeutic principles with special reference to hematopoietic syndrome and cutaneous radiation syndrome are reviewed. PMID:22114866

  2. Radiator Design and Installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brevoort, M.J.; Leifer, M.

    1939-01-01

    The fundamental principles of fluid flow, pressure losses, and heat transfer have been presented and analyzed for the case of a smooth tube with fully developed turbulent flow. These equations apply to tubes with large length-diameter ratios where the f1ow is at a high Reynolds Number. The error introduced by using these equations increases as the magnitude of the tube length and the air-flow Reynolds Number approaches the values encountered in modern radiator designs. Accordingly, heat-transfer tests on radiator sections were made and the results are presented in nondimensional form to facilitate their use and for comparison with other heat-transfer data. In addition, pressure losses were measured along smooth tubes of circular, square, and rectangular cross section and the results were also correlated and are presented in nondimensional form. The problem of a radiator design for a particular installation is solved, the experimental heat-transfer and pressure-loss data being used, on a basis of power chargeable to the radiator for form drag, for propelling the weight, and for forcing the air through the radiator. The case of an installation within a wing or an engine nacelle is considered. An illustration of radiator design is carried through for an arbitrary set of conditions. Sufficient detail is given to enable the reader to reproduce the analysis for any given case.

  3. Radiation disasters and children.

    PubMed

    2003-06-01

    The special medical needs of children make it essential that pediatricians be prepared for radiation disasters, including 1) the detonation of a nuclear weapon; 2) a nuclear power plant event that unleashes a radioactive cloud; and 3) the dispersal of radionuclides by conventional explosive or the crash of a transport vehicle. Any of these events could occur unintentionally or as an act of terrorism. Nuclear facilities (eg, power plants, fuel processing centers, and food irradiation facilities) are often located in highly populated areas, and as they age, the risk of mechanical failure increases. The short- and long-term consequences of a radiation disaster are significantly greater in children for several reasons. First, children have a disproportionately higher minute ventilation, leading to greater internal exposure to radioactive gases. Children have a significantly greater risk of developing cancer even when they are exposed to radiation in utero. Finally, children and the parents of young children are more likely than are adults to develop enduring psychologic injury after a radiation disaster. The pediatrician has a critical role in planning for radiation disasters. For example, potassium iodide is of proven value for thyroid protection but must be given before or soon after exposure to radioiodines, requiring its placement in homes, schools, and child care centers. Pediatricians should work with public health authorities to ensure that children receive full consideration in local planning for a radiation disaster. PMID:12777572

  4. Numerical Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    2009-07-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Operator Perturbation: 1. Survey of operator perturbation methods W. Kalkofen; 2. Line formation in expanding atmospheres: multilevel calculations using approximate lambda operators W. R. Hamann; 3. Stellar atmospheres in non-LTE: model construction and line formation calculations using approximate lambda operators K. Werner; 4. Acceleration of convergence L. H. Auer; 5. Line formation in a time-dependent atmosphere W. Kalkofen; 6. Iterative solution of multilevel transfer problems Eugene H. Avrett and Rudolf Loeser; 7. An algorithm for the simultaneous solution of thousands of transfer equations under global constraints Lawrence S. Anderson; 8. Operator perturbation for differential equations W. Kalkofen; Part II. Polarised Radiation: 9. A gentle introduction to polarised radiative transfer David E. Rees; 10. Non-LTE polarised radiative transfer in special lines David E. Rees and Graham A. Murphy; 11. Transfer of polarised radiation using 4x4 matrices E. Landi Degli'Innocenti; 12. Radiative transfer in the presence of strong magnetic fields A. A. van Ballegooijen; 13. An integral operator technique of radiative transfer in spherical symmetry A. Peraiah; 14. Discrete ordinate matrix method M. Schmidt and R. Wehrse.

  5. RADIATION PROTECTION KEYWORDS: equivalent sphere

    E-print Network

    Lin, Zi-wei

    RADIATION PROTECTION KEYWORDS: equivalent sphere model, space radiation, organ dose IMPROVEMENT OF THE EQUIVALENT SPHERE MODEL FOR SPACE RADIATION ENVIRONMENTS Z. W. LIN East Carolina University, Department Accepted for Publication January 21, 2009 In space radiation calculations it is often useful to calculate

  6. Radiation oncogenesis in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, C.

    1982-01-01

    This review article examines the oncogenic effects of radiation with emphasis on ionizing radiations. Cell transformation in vitro is examined with respect to culture systems currently used in these studies, initiation and phenotypic expression of transformation and criteria for transformation. The section of radiation oncogenesis in vitro includes ionizing and nonionizing radiation studies and cocarcinogens and modulators of radiogenic transformations.

  7. The Radiation Chemistry Data Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Madden, K.P.

    The Radiation Chemistry Data Center is an information resource provided by the Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory that is "dedicated to the collection, evaluation, and dissemination of data characterizing the reactions of transient intermediates produced by radiation chemical and photochemical methods." The main page offers links to Compilations of Chemical Property Data, Kinetics Databases, a Bibliographic Database, and Recent Papers in Radiation Chemistry and Photochemistry.

  8. Radiation Sensitization in Cancer Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstock, Clive L.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of radiation damage to biological material, including free radical mechanisms, radiation sensitization and protection, tumor hypoxia, mechanism of hypoxic cell radiosensitization, redox model for radiation modification, sensitizer probes of cellular radiation targets, pulse radiolysis studies of free radical kinetics,…

  9. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. N. Slatkin; F. A. Dilmanian; P. O. Spanne

    1994-01-01

    A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the

  10. Radiation considerations for interplanetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badwar, Gautam D.; Oneill, Patrick M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1993-01-01

    Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) poses a serious radiation hazard for long-duration missions. In designing a lunar habitat or Mars transfer vehicle, the worst-case radiation exposure determines shielding thickness and, hence, the weight of spacecraft. Using the spherically symmetric diffusion theory of the solar modulation of GCR, it was possible to use data on the differential energy spectra of hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and iron from 1954 to 1989 to show that the flux at 1 A.U. is determined by the diffusion parameter, K, which is a function of the time in the solar cycle. This analysis also showed that the solar minimum of 1976 to 1977 was the deepest minimum in the last 37 years. Using this theory, we have obtained the GCR spectra for all the nuclei and calculated the depth-dose as a function of aluminum shield thickness. Using the ICRP-26 definition of the quality factor, it is shown that the shielding required to stay below the LEO recommended annual limit of 50 cSv is 17.5 (+8, -3), g/sq cm of aluminum; if the limit is raised to 60 cSv, the required shielding is 9 (5, -1.5) g/sq cm. We also discuss the issues and shielding needs for protection against solar particle events.

  11. Radiation health research, 1986 - 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A collection of 225 abstracts of radiation research sponsored by NASA during the period 1986 through 1990 is reported. Each abstract was categorized within one of four discipline areas: physics, biology, risk assessment, and microgravity. Topic areas within each discipline were assigned as follows: Physics - atomic physics, nuclear science, space radiation, radiation transport and shielding, and instrumentation; Biology - molecular biology, cellular radiation biology, tissue, organs and organisms, radioprotectants, and plants; Risk assessment - radiation health and epidemiology, space flight radiation health physics, inter- and intraspecies extrapolation, and radiation limits and standards; and Microgravity. When applicable subareas were assigned for selected topic areas. Keywords and author indices are provided.

  12. A thin diffuse component of the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission and heating of the interstellar medium contributed by the radiation of Galactic X-ray binaries

    E-print Network

    Molaro, Margherita; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    We suggest a thin (scale height ~80 pc) diffuse component to the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE) arising from the scattering of the radiation of bright X-ray binaries (XBs) by the interstellar medium. The morphology of the scattered component is expected to trace the clumpy molecular and HI clouds. We calculate this contribution to the GRXE from known Galactic XBs assuming that they are all persistent. The known XBs sample is however incomplete as it is flux-limited and spans the small lifetime of X-ray astronomy (~50 years), compared to the characteristic time of 1000-10000 years that would contribute to the diffuse emission observed today due to time delays. We therefore also use a simulated sample of sources, to estimate the diffuse emission we should expect in an optimistic case assuming that the X-ray luminosity of our Galaxy is on average similar to that of other galaxies. In the calculations we also take into account the enhancement of the total scattering cross section due to coherence effects in...

  13. Silicon radiation detector fabricated in a standard IC process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Wouters; T. Otaredian; E. M. Schooneveld

    1991-01-01

    The authors present a silicon radiation detector for nuclear radiation, fabricated in a standard IC process, in which the generated charge carriers are collected by means of diffusion. A model is derived and experiments with optical and nuclear radiation are presented. Ionizing particles can be detected with a reasonable internal efficiency (65%) and response time (<10 ?s), and the spatial

  14. Inverse radiation analysis using repulsive particle swarm optimization algorithm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kyun Ho Lee; Seung Wook Baek; Ki Wan Kim

    2008-01-01

    In this study, an inverse radiation analysis is presented for the estimation of the radiation properties for an absorbing, emitting, and scattering media with diffusely emitting and reflecting opaque boundaries. The repulsive particle swarm optimization (RPSO) algorithm, which is a relatively recent heuristic search method, is proposed as an effective method for improving the search efficiency for unknown radiative parameters.

  15. Modeling radiation belt radial diffusion in ULF wave fields: 1. Quantifying ULF wave power at geosynchronous orbit in observations and in global MHD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chia-Lin; Spence, Harlan E.; Singer, Howard J.; Hughes, W. Jeffrey

    2010-06-01

    To provide critical ULF wave field information for radial diffusion studies in the radiation belts, we quantify ULF wave power (f = 0.5-8.3 mHz) in GOES observations and magnetic field predictions from a global magnetospheric model. A statistical study of 9 years of GOES data reveals the wave local time distribution and power at geosynchronous orbit in field-aligned coordinates as functions of wave frequency, solar wind conditions (Vx, ?Pd and IMF Bz) and geomagnetic activity levels (Kp, Dst and AE). ULF wave power grows monotonically with increasing solar wind Vx, dynamic pressure variations ?Pd and geomagnetic indices in a highly correlated way. During intervals of northward and southward IMF Bz, wave activity concentrates on the dayside and nightside sectors, respectively, due to different wave generation mechanisms in primarily open and closed magnetospheric configurations. Since global magnetospheric models have recently been used to trace particles in radiation belt studies, it is important to quantify the wave predictions of these models at frequencies relevant to electron dynamics (mHz range). Using 27 days of real interplanetary conditions as model inputs, we examine the ULF wave predictions modeled by the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry magnetohydrodynamic code. The LFM code does well at reproducing, in a statistical sense, the ULF waves observed by GOES. This suggests that the LFM code is capable of modeling variability in the magnetosphere on ULF time scales during typical conditions. The code provides a long-missing wave field model needed to quantify the interaction of radiation belt electrons with realistic, global ULF waves throughout the inner magnetosphere.

  16. Reducing Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenbecler, Richard

    2006-06-05

    This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

  17. Ionizing radiation and life.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis R

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a ubiquitous feature of the Cosmos, from exogenous cosmic rays (CR) to the intrinsic mineral radioactivity of a habitable world, and its influences on the emergence and persistence of life are wide-ranging and profound. Much attention has already been focused on the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation on organisms and the complex molecules of life, but ionizing radiation also performs many crucial functions in the generation of habitable planetary environments and the origins of life. This review surveys the role of CR and mineral radioactivity in star formation, generation of biogenic elements, and the synthesis of organic molecules and driving of prebiotic chemistry. Another major theme is the multiple layers of shielding of planetary surfaces from the flux of cosmic radiation and the various effects on a biosphere of violent but rare astrophysical events such as supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. The influences of CR can also be duplicitous, such as limiting the survival of surface life on Mars while potentially supporting a subsurface biosphere in the ocean of Europa. This review highlights the common thread that ionizing radiation forms between the disparate component disciplines of astrobiology. PMID:21774684

  18. Characteristics of synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1984-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is having a very significant impact on the many disciplines that make use of the radiation in the x-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, and infra-red regions of the spectrum. The rapidly increasing demand for beam time at existing facilities, the construction and commissioning of new facilities, and the world wide planning for future sources is clear testimony to the unique, interdisciplinary nature of the research applications. The nature of synchrotron radiation research continues to change and expand. This conference on the application of synchrotron radiation (SR) to polymer research illustrates that point. In this introductory paper it is impossible to cover in depth any of the applications. The intent, instead, is to give a brief, condensed summary of the properties of SR which have brought it to the fore as a research tool. No single source can provide the proper radiation for all applications. This paper should provide enough information and references to allow anyone contemplating a particular experiment to understand the widely varying parameters from different facilities, and thereby make some initial decisions concerning feasibility, and proper source. The NSLS will, in general, be used for illustration purposes since the conference is being held at Brookhaven where the attendees can get first hand familiarity with the facility.

  19. Radiometry Using Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saloman, E. B.; Ebner, S. C.; Hughey, L. R.

    1981-11-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a source of continuum radiation ranging from the x-ray or soft x-ray region (depending on machine energy) to beyond the visible region. The amount of radiation emitted is a calculable function of machine operating parameters. This makes it possible to use synchrotron radiation from electron synchrotrons and electron storage rings as an absolute source particularly in the VUV and soft x-ray regions where other standards are difficult to find. At the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) an electron storage ring (SURF-II) has been used to calibrate spectrometers and photometers used in solar and aeronomy research and in fusion plasma diagnostics. A large chamber has recently been completed to facilitate such calibrations. The radiation incident on these spectrometers can be calculated to uncertainties of 3%. A technique to exactly determine the number of electrons orbiting in the ring is currently being developed to reduce this uncertainty. Detector calibrations between 5 - 55 nm are routinely carried out at SURF-II and transfer standard detectors with 6-10% uncertainties over the range of 5 - 254 nm are supplied. Special studies of "practical", high efficiency, and disposable photodiodes have been made by NBS in collaboration with other groups.

  20. Radiation Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA has relied on the materials to provide radiation shielding for astronauts since the first manned flights. Until very recently existing materials in the structure of manned spacecraft as well as the equipment and consumables onboard have been taken advantage of for radiation shielding. With the advent of the International Space Station and the prospect of extended missions to the Moon or Mars, it has been found that the materials, which were included in the spacecraft for other reasons, do not provide adequate shielding. For the first time materials are being added to manned missions solely to improve the radiation shielding. It is now recognized that dual use materials must be identified/developed. These materials must serve a purpose as part of the spacecraft or its cargo and at the same time be good shielding. This paper will review methods for evaluating the radiation shielding effectiveness of materials and describe the character of materials that have high radiation shielding effectiveness. Some candidate materials will also be discussed.

  1. Lunar radiator shade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewert, Michael K. (inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for rejecting waste heat from a system located on or near the lunar equator is presented. The system utilizes a reflective catenary shaped trough deployed about a vertical radiator to shade the radiator from heat emitted by the hot lunar surface. The catenary shaped trough is constructed from a film material and is aligned relative to the sun so that incoming solar energy is focused to a line just above the vertical radiator and can thereby isolate the radiator from the effects of direct sunlight. The film is in a collapsed position between side by side support rods, all of which are in a transport case. To deploy the film and support rods, a set of parallel tracks running perpendicular to length of the support rods are extended out from the transport case. After the support tracks are deployed, the support rods are positioned equidistant from each other along the length of the support tracks so that the flexible film shade between adjacent support rods is unfolded and hangs in a catenary shaped trough. A heat radiator is supported between each pair of support rods above each hanging reflective trough.

  2. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Phelps, J.E.

    1988-03-31

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

  3. Solar radiation on Mars: Stationary photovoltaic array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Sherman, I.; Landis, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Solar energy is likely to be an important power source for surface-based operation on Mars. Photovoltaic cells offer many advantages. In this article we have presented analytical expressions and solar radiation data for stationary flat surfaces (horizontal and inclined) as a function of latitude, season and atmospheric dust load (optical depth). The diffuse component of the solar radiation on Mars can be significant, thus greatly affecting the optimal inclination angle of the photovoltaic surface.

  4. Solar radiation on Mars: Update 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Joseph; Flood, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed information on solar radiation characteristics on Mars are necessary for effective design of future planned solar energy systems operating on the surface of Mars. The authors present a procedure and solar radiation related data from which the diurnally and daily variation of the global, direct beam and diffuse insolation on Mars are calculated. The radiation data are based on measured optical depth of the Martian atmosphere derived from images taken of the Sun with a special diode on the Viking Lander cameras and computation based on multiple wavelength and multiple scattering of the solar radiation. This work is an update to NASA-TM-102299 and includes a refinement of the solar radiation model.

  5. Coherent Nuclear Radiation

    E-print Network

    V. I. Yukalov; E. P. Yukalova

    2004-06-22

    The main part of this review is devoted to the comprehensive description of coherent radiation by nuclear spins. The theory of nuclear spin superradiance is developed and the experimental observations of this phenomenon are considered. The intriguing problem of how coherence develops from initially incoherent quantum fluctuations is analysed. All main types of coherent radiation by nuclear spins are discussed, which are: free nuclear induction, collective induction, maser generation, pure superradiance, triggered superradiance, pulsing superradiance, punctuated superradiance, and induced emission. The influence of electron-nuclear hyperfine interactions and the role of magnetic anisotropy are studied. Conditions for realizing spin superradiance by magnetic molecules are investigated. The possibility of nuclear matter lasing, accompanied by pion or dibaryon radiation, is briefly touched.

  6. Radiation-associated thyrotoxicosis

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, S.; Shimaoka, K.; Osman, G.

    1986-10-01

    We studied 154 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis seen at Roswell Park Memorial Institute from 1963 to 1982. The retrospective review of the clinical materials revealed that 23 (15%) had a previous history of therapeutic radiation for various diseases. The radiation dose ranged from several to 3600 rads to the thyroid with a mean latency of 14.2 +/- 3.0 years. In 11 out of 16 patients who were tested for antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal showed positive titers of either or both antibodies (69%). In a small number of patients, thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins were studied; long-acting thyroid stimulators (LATS) were positive in one of six tested and thyrotrophin binding inhibitory immunoglobulins (TBII) in five of eight. The radiation-associated thyroidal dysfunction appears to be associated with the organ-specific autoimmune processes and could manifest as either hypo- or hyperfunction of the gland.

  7. Aerothermodynamic radiation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, K.; Reinecke, W. G.; Rossi, D.; Marinelli, W. J.; Krech, R. H.; Caledonia, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    We have built and made operational a 6 in. electric arc driven shock tube which alloys us to study the non-equilibrium radiation and kinetics of low pressure (0.1 to 1 torr) gases processed by 6 to 12 km/s shock waves. The diagnostic system allows simultaneous monitoring of shock radiation temporal histories by a bank of up to six radiometers, and spectral histories with two optical multi-channel analyzers. A data set of eight shots was assembled, comprising shocks in N2 and air at pressures between 0.1 and 1 torr and velocities of 6 to 12 km/s. Spectrally resolved data was taken in both the non-equilibrium and equilibrium shock regions on all shots. The present data appear to be the first spectrally resolved shock radiation measurements in N2 performed at 12 km/s. The data base was partially analyzed with salient features identified.

  8. Radiation rate meter development

    SciTech Connect

    Thacker, L.H.

    1989-01-01

    We are still in a very preliminary stage of examining the potentials of a new series of instruments which may be inexpensive and versatile enough to complement, or conceivably even replace, electroscope dosimeters in Civil Defense and other situations requiring radiation monitoring by the general public. These instruments were developed to provide a qualitative signal so simple to interpret that anyone can tell immediately whether they are in a dangerous radiation field, and whether they are moving into a hotter area or a cooler area. A second goal in the development has been to produce the simplest possible device at minimum cost, without compromise in effectiveness. In the simplest implementation the device is essentially a very inexpensive version of the much older Personal Radiation Monitor (PRM).

  9. Uses of synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence has long been used as a technique for elemental analysis. X-ray fluorescence techniques have a number of features that make them attractive for application to biomedical samples. In the past few years synchrotron radiation x-ray sources have been developed and, because of their properties, their use can improve the sensitivity for trace element analysis by two to three orders of magnitude. Also, synchrotron radiation will make possible an x-ray microprobe with resolution in the micrometer range. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), a dedicated synchrotron radiation source recently built at Brookhaven National Laboratory, will have a facility for trace element analysis by x-ray fluorescence and will be available to all interested users.

  10. Saturn Radiation (SATRAD) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.; Ratliff, J. M.; Evans, R. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Saturnian radiation belts have not received as much attention as the Jovian radiation belts because they are not nearly as intense-the famous Saturnian particle rings tend to deplete the belts near where their peak would occur. As a result, there has not been a systematic development of engineering models of the Saturnian radiation environment for mission design. A primary exception is that of Divine (1990). That study used published data from several charged particle experiments aboard the Pioneer 1 1, Voyager 1, and Voyager 2 spacecraft during their flybys at Saturn to generate numerical models for the electron and proton radiation belts between 2.3 and 13 Saturn radii. The Divine Saturn radiation model described the electron distributions at energies between 0.04 and 10 MeV and the proton distributions at energies between 0.14 and 80 MeV. The model was intended to predict particle intensity, flux, and fluence for the Cassini orbiter. Divine carried out hand calculations using the model but never formally developed a computer program that could be used for general mission analyses. This report seeks to fill that void by formally developing a FORTRAN version of the model that can be used as a computer design tool for missions to Saturn that require estimates of the radiation environment around the planet. The results of that effort and the program listings are presented here along with comparisons with the original estimates carried out by Divine. In addition, Pioneer and Voyager data were scanned in from the original references and compared with the FORTRAN model s predictions. The results were statistically analyzed in a manner consistent with Divine s approach to provide estimates of the ability of the model to reproduce the original data. Results of a formal review of the model by a panel of experts are also presented. Their recommendations for further tests, analyses, and extensions to the model are discussed.

  11. Radar frequency radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malowicki, E.

    1981-11-01

    A method is presented for the determination of radar frequency radiation power densities that the PAVE PAWS radar system could produce in its air and ground environment. The effort was prompted by the concern of the people in the vicinity of OTIS AFB MA and BEALE AFB CA about the possible radar frequency radiation hazard of the PAVE PAWS radar. The method is based on the following main assumptions that: (a) the total field can be computed as the vector summation of the individual fields due to each antenna element; (b) the individual field can be calculated using distances for which the field point is in the far field of the antenna element. An RFR computer program was coded for the RADC HE 6180 digital computer and exercised to calculate the radiation levels in the air and ground space for the present baseline and the possible Six DB and 10 DB growth systems of the PAVE PAWS radar system at OTIS AFB MA. The average radiation levels due to the surveillance fence were computed for three regions: in the air space in front of the radar, at the radar hazard fence at OTIS AFB MA and at representative ground points in the OTIS AFB vicinity. It was concluded that the radar frequency radiation of PAVE PAWS does not present a hazard to personnel provided there is no entry to the air hazard zone or to the area within the hazard fence. The method developed offers a cost effective way to determine radiation levels from a phased array radar especially in the near field and transition regions.

  12. Radiation Hazard Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA technology has made commercially available a new, inexpensive, conveniently-carried device for protection, of people exposed to potentially dangerous levels of microwave radiation. Microwaves are radio emissions of extremely high frequency. They can be hazardous but the degree of hazard is not yet well understood. Generally, it is believed that low intensity radiation of short duration is not harmful but that exposure to high levels can induce deep internal burns, affecting the circulatory and nervous systems, and particularly the eyes. The Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has established an allowable safe threshold of exposure. However, people working near high intensity sources of microwave energy-for example, radar antennas and television transmitters-may be unknowingly exposed to radiation levels beyond the safe limit. This poses not only a personal safety problem but also a problem for employers in terms of productivity loss, workman's compensation claims and possible liability litigation. Earlier-developed monitoring devices which warn personnel of dangerous radiation levels have their shortcomings. They can be cumbersome and awkward to use while working. They also require continual visual monitoring to determine if a person is in a dangerous area of radiation, and they are relatively expensive, another deterrent to their widespread adoption. In response to the need for a cheaper and more effective warning system, Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed, under NASA auspices, a new, battery-powered Microwave Radiation Hazard Detector. To bring the product to the commercial market, California Institute Research Foundation, the patent holder, granted an exclusive license to Cicoil Corporation, Chatsworth, California, an electronic components manufacturer.

  13. Radiation Monitoring Equipment Dosimeter Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Kenneth A.; Golightly, Michael J.; Quam, William

    1992-01-01

    Spacecraft crews risk exposure to relatively high levels of ionizing radiation. This radiation may come from charged particles trapped in the Earth's magnetic fields, charged particles released by solar flare activity, galactic cosmic radiation, energetic photons and neutrons generated by interaction of these primary radiations with spacecraft and crew, and man-made sources (e.g., nuclear power generators). As missions are directed to higher radiation level orbits, viz., higher altitudes and inclinations, longer durations, and increased flight frequency, radiation exposure could well become a major factor for crew stay time and career lengths. To more accurately define the radiological exposure and risk to the crew, real-time radiation monitoring instrumentation, which is capable of identifying and measuring the various radiation components, must be flown. This presentation describes a radiation dosimeter instrument which was successfully flown on the Space Shuttle, the RME-3.

  14. Ocular temperature elevation induced by threshold in vivo exposure to 1090-nm infrared radiation and associated heat diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaohua; Schulmeister, Karl; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Kronschläger, Martin; Söderberg, Per G.

    2014-10-01

    An in vivo exposure to 197 W/cm2 1090-nm infrared radiation (IRR) requires a minimum 8 s for cataract induction. The present study aims to determine the ocular temperature evolution and the associated heat flow at the same exposure conditions. Two groups of 12 rats were unilaterally exposed within the dilated pupil with a close to collimated beam between lens and retina. Temperature was recorded with thermocouples. Within 5 min after exposure, the lens light scattering was measured. In one group, the temperature rise in the exposed eye, expressed as a confidence interval (0.95), was 11±3°C at the limbus, 16±6°C in the vitreous behind lens, and 16±7°C on the sclera next to the optic nerve, respectively. In the other group, the temperature rise in the exposed eye was 9±1°C at the limbus and 26±11°C on the sclera next to the optic nerve, respectively. The difference of forward light scattering between exposed and contralateral not exposed eye was 0.01±0.09 tEDC. An exposure to 197 W/cm2 1090-nm IRR for 8 s induces a temperature increase of 10°C at the limbus and 26°C close to the retina. IRR cataract is probably of thermal origin.

  15. Testing spherical PDR models: Barnard 68 as example of an (almost) perfect spherical clump in the diffuse Galactic radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, J. L.; Bensch, F.

    2007-12-01

    We use the Barnard 68 dark globule as a test case for a spherically symmetric Photon-Dominated Region (PDR) model exposed to a low-FUV radiation field. With a roughly spherical morphology and an accurately determined density profile, Barnard 68 is ideal for this purpose. We compare the KOSMA-tau PDR model (Störzer et al. 1996) to observations of the lowest transition in 12CO, 13CO J = 3 -> 2 and J = 2 -> 1, as well as the [Ci] 3P1-3P0 fine-structure transition. The impact of CO depletion, PAHs in the chemical network, as well as variations in the external FUV field are studied. We find it difficult to simultaneously match the observed 12CO and 13CO emission. A model which match the observed [Ci] and 12CO observations gives 13CO intensities which are too large by a factor of 2-3. A steep drop in the line excitation seems to be required from the region traced by 12CO to the (somewhat deeper) layer traced by the 13CO, since depletion as the cause for the weak 13CO emission is ruled out.

  16. Radiation transport in dust in disk geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, Ming Leung

    1986-01-01

    The main objective of the research program is twofold: (1) to develop a computer code to solve the problem of scattering, absorption and emission of photons by dust grains in a dusty medium with 2 dimensional disk geometry, and (2) to study the various physical and geometrical effects of 2 dimensional radiation transport on the thermal structure and radiation field. These tasks were accomplished and are briefly summarized. The method for solving the radiation transport problem in disk geometry is a generalization of the quasi-diffusion method (QDM) previously developed by the author.

  17. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Solar cell theory cells are manufactured, and how they are modeled mathematically is reviewed. The interaction of energetic charged particle radiation with solar cells is discussed in detail and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Finally, an extensive body of data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence is presented.

  18. LDEF Satellite Radiation Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Model calculations and analyses have been carried out to compare with several sets of data (dose, induced radioactivity in various experiment samples and spacecraft components, fission foil measurements, and LET spectra) from passive radiation dosimetry on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite, which was recovered after almost six years in space. The calculations and data comparisons are used to estimate the accuracy of current models and methods for predicting the ionizing radiation environment in low earth orbit. The emphasis is on checking the accuracy of trapped proton flux and anisotropy models.

  19. Mycosis fungoides: radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Richard T

    2003-01-01

    Radiation therapy is the most effective single agent for the treatment of mycosis fungoides. There are well-defined dose-response relationships for achieving a complete response as well as the durability of this response. Techniques of electron beam therapy have been developed that permit treatment of the entire skin. Total-skin electron beam therapy is an important form of management, especially for patients who have thick generalized plaque or tumorous disease. Radiation therapy may also be used selectively for treatment of extracutaneous disease. PMID:14686978

  20. Modification of radiation response

    SciTech Connect

    Suit, H.D.

    1984-01-01

    There has been a substantial and intense interest by laboratory and clinical investigators in the development of agents which modify the response of tissue to radiation differentially so as to increase the effect on tumor relative to normal tissue. These have included efforts to increase the response of tumor or to decrease response of normal tissue. The plan of this presentation is to: define radiation response modifiers; consider the impact of response modifiers on dose response curves; comment on problems inherent in assessment of results of clinical trials of response modifiers; and review briefly results of several trials of: sensitizers of hypoxic cells (hyperbaric oxygen, chemical sensitizer), pyrimidine analogs, and protectors.

  1. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  2. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  3. Influence of phase-diffuser dynamics on scintillations of laser radiation in Earth's atmosphere: Long-distance propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, G. P.; Chumak, A. A.

    2009-06-01

    The effect of a random-phase diffuser on fluctuations of laser light (scintillations) is studied. Not only spatial but also temporal phase variations introduced by the phase diffuser are analyzed. The explicit dependence of the scintillation index on finite-time phase variations is obtained for long propagation paths. It is shown that for large amplitudes of phase fluctuations, a finite-time effect decreases the ability of phase diffuser to suppress the scintillations.

  4. Diffusion-Weighted MRI as a Biomarker of Tumor Radiation Treatment Response Heterogeneity: A Comparative Study of Whole-Volume Histogram Analysis versus Voxel-Based Functional Diffusion Map Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Lemasson, Benjamin; Galbán, Craig J; Boes, Jennifer L; Li, Yinghua; Zhu, Yuan; Heist, Kevin A; Johnson, Timothy D; Chenevert, Thomas L; Galbán, Stefanie; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: Treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) remains challenging due in part to its histologic intratumoral heterogeneity that contributes to its overall poor treatment response. Our goal was to evaluate a voxel-based biomarker, the functional diffusion map (fDM), as an imaging biomarker to detect heterogeneity of tumor response in a radiation dose escalation protocol using a genetically engineered murine GBM model. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Twenty-four genetically engineered murine GBM models [Ink4a-Arf-/-/Ptenloxp/loxp/Ntv-a RCAS/PDGF(+)/Cre(+)] were randomized in four treatment groups (n = 6 per group) consisting of daily doses of 0, 1, 2, and 4 Gy delivered for 5 days. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were acquired for tumor delineation and quantification of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, respectively. MRI experiments were performed daily for a week and every 2 days thereafter. For each animal, the area under the curve (AUC) of the percentage change of the ADC (AUCADC) and that of the increase in fDM values (AUCfDM+) were determined within the first 5 days following therapy initiation. RESULTS: Animal survival increased with increasing radiation dose. Treatment induced a dose-dependent increase in tumor ADC values. The strongest correlation between survival and ADC measurements was observed using the AUCfDM+ metric (R2 = 0.88). CONCLUSION: This study showed that the efficacy of a voxel-based imaging biomarker (fDM) was able to detect spatially varying changes in tumors, which were determined to be a more sensitive predictor of overall response versus whole-volume tumor measurements (AUCADC). Finally, fDM provided for visualization of treatment-associated spatial heterogeneity within the tumor. PMID:24151536

  5. Radiation Safety in Pediatric Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Caird, Michelle S

    2015-01-01

    Patients, surgeons, and staff are exposed to ionizing radiation in pediatric orthopaedic surgery from diagnostic studies and imaging associated with procedures. Estimating radiation dose to pediatric patients is based on complex algorithms and dose to surgeons and staff is based on dosimeter monitoring. Surgeons can decrease radiation exposure to patients with careful and thoughtful ordering of diagnostic studies and by minimizing exposure intraoperatively. Surgeon and staff radiation exposure can be minimized with educational programs, proper shielding and positioning intraoperatively, and prudent use of intraoperative imaging. Overall, better awareness among pediatric orthopaedic surgeons of our role in radiation exposure can lead to improvements in radiation safety. PMID:26049299

  6. Ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Doran M; Iddins, Carol J; Sugarman, Stephen L

    2014-02-01

    Although the spectrum of information related to diagnosis and management of radiation injuries and illnesses is vast and as radiation contamination incidents are rare, most emergency practitioners have had little to no practical experience with such cases. Exposures to ionizing radiation and internal contamination with radioactive materials can cause significant tissue damage and conditions. Emergency practitioners unaware of ionizing radiation as the cause of a condition may miss the diagnosis of radiation-induced injury or illness. This article reviews the pertinent terms, physics, radiobiology, and medical management of radiation injuries and illnesses that may confront the emergency practitioner. PMID:24275177

  7. Cataractogenic effects of proton radiation 

    E-print Network

    Kyzar, James Ronald

    1972-01-01

    Roentgen in 1895 it has been recognized that. ionizing radiation possesses the ability to damage the lens of the eye. A few cases of radiation induced cataracts in early x-ray technicians and in patients re- ceiving radiation therapy to the head were... reported (13) . During this period interest in the phenomenon of radiation damage was limited mainly to x-rays as this was the only type of ionizing radiation having any degree of wide- spread use. Also, study of such radiation cataracts was confined...

  8. RADIATION ALERT User Manual

    E-print Network

    Haller, Gary L.

    · Monitoring possible radiation exposure while working with radionuclides · Screening for environmental not contaminate the Inspector by touching it to radioactive surfaces or materials. If contamination is suspected be sensitive to and may not operate properly in radio frequency, microwave, electrostatic, and electromagnetic

  9. Radiation sources and process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. B. Honious; E. F. Janzow; H. A. Malson; S. E. Moyer

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to radiation sources comprising a substrate having an electrically-conductive non-radioactive metal surface, a layer of a metal radioactive isotope of the scandium group, which in addition to scandium, yttrium, lanthanum and actinium, includes all the lanthanide and actinide series of elements, with the actinide series usually being preferred because of the nature of the radioactive isotopes therein,

  10. Psoriasis and ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farber, E.M.; Nall, L. (Psoriasis Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Prevention and detection screening programs as a public health service in curtailing the ever-increasing incidence of all forms of skin cancer are reviewed. The effect of solar and artificial ultraviolet radiation on the general population and persons with psoriasis is examined. 54 refs.

  11. Silicon radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pavel Rehak

    2003-01-01

    A rapid progress of past 20 years in silicon radiation detectors is reviewed. The availability of silicon as almost ideal semiconductor material is one of the main reasons for this progress. The well-defined properties of the silicon-silicon dioxide interface allowed the development of detector structures beyond the structure of a classical diode detector, which was practically the only silicon detector

  12. Nuclear Radiation Detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. A. Morton

    1962-01-01

    Nuclear radiation detectors are required in all the major fields of nuclear science and technology. They fall into two principal categories, single element detectors and imaging detectors. Single element detectors can be classified into four types, based upon their physical mode of operation. These are 1) Scintillation counters, 2) Gas ionization detectors, a) Ionization chambers, b) Proportional counters, c) Geiger-Mueller

  13. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, D.C.

    1980-12-17

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  14. Radiation and human health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gofman

    1981-01-01

    A review of a book dealing with the estimation of human health effects of radiation is presented. Risk assessment for carcinogenesis is based on the author's own method of statistics so that standard statistical methods cannot be applied. Several examples of the author's fallacies are discussed in this book review. (KRM)

  15. Compound semiconductor radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Owens; A. Peacock

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the potential benefits of using compound semiconductors for the detection of X- and ?-ray radiation. While Si and Ge have become detection standards for energy dispersive spectroscopy in the laboratory, their use for an increasing range of applications is becoming marginalized by one or more of their physical limitations; namely the need for ancillary cooling systems or bulky

  16. Atmospheric Processes--Radiation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    This activity begins with an explanation of the heat transfer processes in general and then focuses on radiation. In the activity, students investigate how different surfaces absorb heat and apply their experience with the surfaces to interpret real-world situations.

  17. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, Dimitrios C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1983-01-01

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  18. Transition radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boris Dolgoshein

    1993-01-01

    The use of transition radiation (TR) as a means of identifying high energy particles has now become a subject of intensive experimental investigations and applications. Our intention is first to study the physics of these phenomena and to describe ways of building detectors which can efficiently identify particles.

  19. Cosmic microwave background radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lyman Page; David Wilkinson

    1999-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) is widely interpreted as the thermal afterglow of a hot big bang. Measurements of the CMBR intensity as a function of frequency constrain the history of cosmic energetics. Measurements of the anisotropy in the CMBR temperature provide a snapshot of the distribution of fluctuations in the gravitational potential at the earliest stages of cosmic

  20. Thermostatic Radiator Valve Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Dentz, Jordan [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, Eric [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A large stock of multifamily buildings in the Northeast and Midwest are heated by steam distribution systems. Losses from these systems are typically high and a significant number of apartments are overheated much of the time. Thermostatically controlled radiator valves (TRVs) are one potential strategy to combat this problem, but have not been widely accepted by the residential retrofit market.

  1. Microwave radiation monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Aslan, E.E.

    1984-01-03

    This portable microwave radiation monitor utilizes an antenna formed in a dual Archimedean spiral. The ellipse ratio of the spiral is minimized by selective placement of resistive means over a portion of the antenna and the power density of the electric field is indicated on a meter connected via diode means to the inner terminals of the antenna.

  2. CCTV for radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Shaufl, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The use of closed circuit television (CCTV) within radiation environments requires the system designer to have a thorough knowledge of the application environment and the electronic and optical components expected to survive within the environment. Of all the many ambient conditions to which CCTV components are exposed, from an air-conditioned office complex to 1,000 feet under the ocean, none is as demanding as the radiation encountered in the nuclear industrial field. Unhardened CCTV equipment can fail or degrade to the point of being useless when exposed to ionizing radiation doses of as little as 10/sup 3/ rads (Si) or to a neutron fluence of as little as 10/sup 11/ neutrons per square centimeter. (Rads (Si) stands for roentgens absorbed dose in silicon, while a fluence is defined as the time integral of neutron flux.) The applications for CCTV systems may require that each component within the system withstand a total ionizing radiation dose of 10/sup 8/ rads or greater.

  3. Radiation Dose Estimates from

    E-print Network

    Summary: Radiation Dose Estimates from Hanford Radioactive Material Releases to the Air and the Columbia River April 21,1994 TheTechnid Steering Panel of the Hanford - Environmental Dose Reconstruction HonfordEnvironmental DoseRecartnrczionProject,anddonot necessaii!~rcfrcnthe view ofCDC. ,: :: ::sr

  4. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Perez-Mendez; S. N. Kaplan

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of

  5. Surface Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackhouse, Paul W. (Principal Investigator)

    The Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) data sets contain global 3-hourly, daily and monthly averages of surface longwave and shortwave radiative properties, cloud amount, and meteorological properties computed using models. The main input data for these models include cloud information, top-of-atmosphere radiances and profiles of atmospheric water vapor and temperature. Some of the input data include Earth Radiation Budget Energy (ERBE) top-of-atmosphere clear-sky albedo and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) radiances and cloud amount. SRB parameters derived for the renewable energy community are also available from the Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) data set. Other SRB data are available from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). [Mission Objectives] The objective of the SRB Project is to produce and archive a global data set of shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) surface and top of the atmosphere parameters. The data generated in the SRB project may be used in conjunction with other data sets to facilitate the development of renewable energy resources and increase understanding of radiative properties within the meteorological community. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1983-07-01; Stop_Date=2005-06-30] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180].

  6. Hawking Radiation As Tunneling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maulik K. Parikh; Frank Wilczek

    2000-01-01

    We present a short and direct derivation of Hawking radiation as a tunneling process, based on particles in a dynamical geometry. The imaginary part of the action for the classically forbidden process is related to the Boltzmann factor for emission at the Hawking temperature. Because the derivation respects conservation laws, the exact spectrum is not precisely thermal. We compare and

  7. IONIZING RADIATION OF EGGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of eggs and egg products by Salmonella is associated with a significant number of illnesses in the U.S. each year. Ionizing radiation can inactivate Salmonella on the egg surface, in the egg white, and in the yolk of shell eggs, and has been approved by the U.S. FDA at doses up to 3.0...

  8. Radiation damage considerations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. R. T. Frost; B. R. T

    1975-01-01

    Radiation environments produce unique effects on the composition, microstructure, and defect population of alloys, resulting in time-dependent and time-independent change in mechanical properties. To illustrate these problems, the materials needs of the core of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) and of the first wall of a fusion reactor are discussed. In the case of the LMFBR core, the

  9. Nuclear Radiation Damages Minds!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Professors Ernest Sternglass (University of Pittsburgh) and Steven Bell (Berry College) have assembled cogent, conclusive evidence indicating that nuclear radiation is associated with impaired cognition. They suggest that Scholastic Aptitude Scores (SATs), which have declined steadily for 19 years, will begin to rise. Their prediction is based on…

  10. Assessing exposure to radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K.

    1997-01-01

    Since the founding of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have been world leaders in evaluating the risks associated with radiation. Ultrasensitive tools allow us not only to measure radionuclides present in the body but also to reconstruct the radiation dose from past nuclear events and to project the levels of radiation that will still be present in the body for 50 years after the initial intake. A variety of laboratory procedures, including some developed here, give us detailed information on the effects of radiation at the cellular level. Even today, we are re-evaluating the neutron dose resulting from the bombing at Hiroshima. Our dose reconstruction and projection capabilities have also been applied to studies of Nagasaki, Chernobyl, the Mayak industrial complex in the former Soviet Union, the Nevada Test Site, Bikini Atoll, and other sites. We are evaluating the information being collected on individuals currently working with radioactive material at Livermore and elsewhere as well as previously collected data on workers that extends back to the Manhattan Project.

  11. Radiation: Balancing the Record

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles C. Mann

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews the radioactivity experiments performed on humans during the cold war, and examines the ethics of the experiments. The radiation experiments can be broadly classified into three groups: researchers knowingly inflicted potential harm, using methods questionable even by the then-current standards; the investigations involved good work by any standards with appropriate safeguards taken; and a third group which

  12. Radiation proteomics: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Leszczynski, Dariusz

    2014-03-01

    Acute biological effects caused by the exposure to high doses of radiation, either ionizing or nonionizing, are relatively well-known but the delayed effects, occurring decades after exposure, are difficult to predict. The knowledge of the acute and delayed effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation (e.g. bystander effect) or nonionizing radiation (e.g. radiation emitted by wireless communication devices) is not yet reliably established. Often the acute effects of low doses are small and difficult to discover and replicate in scientific studies. Chronic effects of prolonged exposures to low-dose radiation for decades are virtually unknown and often not possible to predict on the basis of the knowledge gained from acute exposures to high doses of radiation. Physiological significance of the biological effects induced by low doses of radiation is not known. The same lack of predictability of outcomes applies to the delayed effects of high-dose radiation exposures. Proteomics, supplemented with other "omics" techniques, might be the best way forward to find out the target molecules of radiation, the biomarkers of radiation exposure and the physiological and health significance of the acute and delayed biological effects caused by the exposures to high- and low-dose radiation. However, the currently available database of radiation effects on proteomes is far too small to be useful in formulation of new hypotheses concerning health consequences of radiation exposures. PMID:24376023

  13. Solar radiation modeling and comparisons with current solar radiation models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Mujahid; W. D. Turner

    1980-01-01

    Solar radiation models which can be used to predict global radiation from cloud cover data, and direct normal radiation from measurements of global have been developed for Blytheville, Arkansas. These models are compared to the current NOAA models used in the SOLMET weather tapes. The accuracies of the NOAA cloud cover model and the Randall and Whitson direct normal model

  14. Large current radiator for the short electromagnetic pulses radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gennadiy P. Pochanin

    1998-01-01

    One of the most important problems in modern ground penetrating radar design is creating the ultra wide band (UWB) antennas for short sounding electromagnetic pulses (SP) radiation. One of the promising UWB\\/SP radiators is the Large Current Radiator (LCR). This report discusses the performance of an improved design of a LCR

  15. DCTD — Radiation Research Program (RRP)

    Cancer.gov

    Of the many successful programs within the RRP grant and contract portfolio, several scientific advances are presented below, representing significant advances in treatment development, molecular radiation therapy, quality assurance for high-technology radiation therapy, and international networking.

  16. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-print Network

    Jia, Songtao

    this form to Radiation Safety's Dosimetry Program.) ___ Yes ___ No 1. Was the Dosimeter placed or stored ___ No 3. Did you hold a patient during radiation exposure? ___ Yes ___ No 4. Did you work significantly

  17. Glossary of Radiation Therapy Terms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... proper radiation dose for each patient’s cancer treatment Electron beam (ee- leck -tron): a stream of high-energy particles called electrons used to treat some skin cancers External radiation : ...

  18. American Society for Radiation Oncology

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Annual Meeting Annual Refresher Course State of the Art Radiation Therapy Best of ASTRO Multidisciplinary Head and ... Annual Meeting Annual Refresher Course State of the Art Radiation Therapy Best of ASTRO Multidisciplinary Head and ...

  19. gamma. radiation effects on Collembola

    SciTech Connect

    Loring, S.J.

    1985-12-01

    Pitfall traps were used to collect surface-active Collembola at intervals of 10-100 m from a ..gamma.. radiation source on Long Island, N.Y., during the summer of 1968. Thirty-two species of Collembola were collected along the radiation transect. Community diversities were similar at all intervals except 10 m. Collembola appeared resistant to ..gamma.. radiation; only chronic, very high ..gamma.. radiation exposure seriously affected population levels and community diversity of surface Collembola.

  20. Graphite-Fiber Heat Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Wayne M.

    1995-01-01

    Heat radiators of proposed type feature thermally conductive fibers protruding from metallic surfaces to provide increased heat-dissipation surface areas. Free of leaks and more reliable than radiators incorporating heat pipes. Also lightweight and relatively inexpensive. Radial graphite fibers carry heat away from spherical shell and radiate heat into space. Radiators prove useful on Earth in special industrial and scientific applications involving dissipation of heat in vacuum or in relatively still air.

  1. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  2. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  3. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  4. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  5. Involved Field Radiation After Autologous Stem Cell Transplant for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma in the Rituximab Era

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Tithi; Dhakal, Sughosh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Chen Rui; Hyrien, Ollivier [Department of Biostatistics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Bernstein, Steven; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Fisher, Richard I.; Liesveld, Jane; Phillips, Gordon [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Constine, Louis S., E-mail: louis_constine@urmc.rochester.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: For patients with recurrent or refractory large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) is the treatment of choice. We evaluated the role of involved field radiation therapy (IFRT) post-ASCT for patients initially induced with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) or, more recently, rituximab-CHOP (R-CHOP). Materials and Methods: Between May 1992 and April 2005, 176 patients underwent ASCT for recurrent or refractory large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; 164 patients were evaluable for endpoint analysis. Fifty percent of the CHOP group (n = 131), and 39% of the R-CHOP group (n = 33), received IFRT. Follow-up from the time of transplant was a median/mean of 1.7/3 years (range, 0.03-13 years). Results: The 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) improved with IFRT in both the R-CHOP (p = 0.006 and 0.02, respectively) and CHOP (p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively) groups. IFRT was associated with a 10% (p = 0.17) reduction in local failure, alone or with a distant site. On univariate analysis, IFRT was associated with superior OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.50 [95% CI 0.32, 0.78]; p = 0.002) and DSS (HR = 0.53 [95% CI 0.33, 0.86]; p = 0.009). Presence of B symptoms was adverse (p = 0.03). On multivariate analysis, only IFRT was associated with significant improvement in OS (HR = 0.35 [0.18, 0.68]; p = 0.002) and DSS (HR = 0.39 [95% CI 0.18, 0.84]; p = 0.01). Conclusions: Recognizing that positive and negative patient selection bias exists for the use of IFRT post-ASCT, patients initially treated with CHOP or R-CHOP and who undergo ASCT for recurrent or refractory disease may benefit from subsequent IFRT presumably due to enhanced local control that can translate into a survival advantage.

  6. Carcinoma of the anal canal: radiation or radiation plus chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, B.J.

    1983-09-01

    An editorial is presented which discusses the treatment of carcinoma of the anal canal. Following the initial report of the successful preoperative use of combined chemotherapy and radiation by Nigro in 1974, several centers have confirmed the effectiveness of such combinations either as preoperative or as definitive treatment of anal carcinomas, and many patients are now being referred for radiation therapy. The article by Cantril in this issue describe the successful treatment of anal carcinomas by radiation alone, and raises the important issue of whether radiation plus chemotherapy is more effective treatment than radiation alone for squamous or cloacogenic carcinomas arising in the anal canal or perianal area. Several studies are cited.

  7. Polarization properties of boson radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. G. Bagrov

    1965-01-01

    The polarization properties of boson radiation in a magnetic field have been studied, and expressions obtained for the integral intensity of boson and fermion radiation in a magnetic field which are suitable for random energies. The investigation of boson radiation in an external field is of limited practical interest; however, from the methodological point of view it is very instructive

  8. Radiation Protection in Interventional Radiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DECLAN R. JOHNSON; JOHN KYRIOU; EDWARD J. MORTON; ANDREW CLIFTON; MICHAEL FITZGERALD; EMER MACSWEENEY

    2001-01-01

    There is growing concern regarding the radiation dose delivered during interventional procedures, particularly in view of the increasing frequency and complexity of these techniques. This paper reviews the radiation dose levels currently encountered in interventional procedures, the consequent risks to operators and patients and the dose reduction that may be achieved by employing a rigorous approach to radiation protection.Johnson, D.R.

  9. Radiation Protection and Free Radicals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard Smaller; Eugene C. Avery

    1959-01-01

    FREE radicals formed in biological materials by ionizing radiation may be detected under the proper conditions by paramagnetic resonance techniques. Possibly such free radicals contribute, directly or indirectly, to the radiation damage suffered by living organisms. The various chemicals which have been found to increase the survival of organisms subjected to large doses of radiation may provide protection by action

  10. Possible dosimeter for ultraviolet radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Davis; G. H. W. Deane; B. L. DIFFEY

    1976-01-01

    WHILE evaluating the weathering characteristics of the plastics polysulphone and polyphenylene oxide (PPO) we found that they both darkened when exposed to ultraviolet radiation1. We realised the potential of these polymers as monitors for ultraviolet radiation and are developing them for this use. PPO is now being used to monitor continuously solar ultraviolet radiation at forty sites throughout the world2.

  11. Effects Of Radiation On Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Report provides data on effects of radiation on elastomers. Quantifies effects by giving minimum radiation levels to induce changes of 1 percent and 25 percent in given properties. Electrical, mechanical, and chemical properties included in data. Combined effects of heat and radiation briefly considered. Data summarized in graphic form useful to designers.

  12. Prevention of pelvic radiation disease.

    PubMed

    Fuccio, Lorenzo; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Guido, Alessandra

    2015-02-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide. Treatment of patients requires a multidisciplinary approach that frequently includes radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity is a major complication and the transient or long-term problems, ranging from mild to very severe, arising in non-cancerous tissues resulting from radiation treatment to a tumor of pelvic origin, are actually called as pelvic radiation disease. The incidence of pelvic radiation disease changes according to the radiation technique, the length of follow up, the assessment method, the type and stage of cancer and several other variables. Notably, even with the most recent radiation techniques, i.e., intensity-modulated radiotherapy, the incidence of radiation-induced GI side effects is overall reduced but still not negligible. In addition, radiation-induced GI side effects can develop even after several decades; therefore, the improvement of patient life expectancy will unavoidably increase the risk of developing radiation-induced complications. Once developed, the management of pelvic radiation disease may be challenging. Therefore, the prevention of radiation-induced toxicity represents a reasonable way to avoid a dramatic drop of the quality of life of these patients. In the current manuscript we provide an updated and practical review on the best available evidences in the field of the prevention of pelvic radiation disease. PMID:25664197

  13. Video Display Terminals: Radiation Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, William E.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses information gathered in past few years related to health effects of video display terminals (VDTs) with particular emphasis given to issues raised by VDT users. Topics covered include radiation emissions, health concerns, radiation surveys, occupational radiation exposure standards, and long-term risks. (17 references) (EJS)

  14. Coherence and the radiation laws

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. P. Baltes; Zentrale Forschung; LGZ Landis

    1977-01-01

    A review is presented of various recent investigations on the classical optical radiation laws in the light of the modern\\u000a concepts of coherence and statistical optics. Temporal coherence of black-body radiation, spatial coherence of Lambertian\\u000a and non-Lambertian sources, and the interaction of matter with radiation of any state of coherence are emphasized.

  15. Material Effectiveness for Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Materials with a smaller mean atomic mass, such as lithium (Li) hydride and polyethylene, make the best radiation shields for astronauts. The materials have a higher density of nuclei and are better able to block incoming radiation. Also, they tend to produce fewer and less dangerous secondary particles after impact with incoming radiation.

  16. Radiation recall reaction following gemcitabine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald Fogarty; David Ball; Danny Rischin

    2001-01-01

    A case of dermatitis and myositis in the upper thorax following administration of gemcitabine in a 65-year-old woman with metastatic non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is described. The reaction and time course suggest a radiation recall phenomenon. This report joins a small but increasing number of radiation recall events related to gemcitabine. The possibility of a radiation recall reaction

  17. Prevention of pelvic radiation disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuccio, Lorenzo; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Guido, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide. Treatment of patients requires a multidisciplinary approach that frequently includes radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity is a major complication and the transient or long-term problems, ranging from mild to very severe, arising in non-cancerous tissues resulting from radiation treatment to a tumor of pelvic origin, are actually called as pelvic radiation disease. The incidence of pelvic radiation disease changes according to the radiation technique, the length of follow up, the assessment method, the type and stage of cancer and several other variables. Notably, even with the most recent radiation techniques, i.e., intensity-modulated radiotherapy, the incidence of radiation-induced GI side effects is overall reduced but still not negligible. In addition, radiation-induced GI side effects can develop even after several decades; therefore, the improvement of patient life expectancy will unavoidably increase the risk of developing radiation-induced complications. Once developed, the management of pelvic radiation disease may be challenging. Therefore, the prevention of radiation-induced toxicity represents a reasonable way to avoid a dramatic drop of the quality of life of these patients. In the current manuscript we provide an updated and practical review on the best available evidences in the field of the prevention of pelvic radiation disease. PMID:25664197

  18. Martian Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gautam D. Badhwar

    1999-01-01

    Space radiation presents a very serious hazard to crews of interplanetary human missions. The two sources of this radiation are the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particle (SEP) events. The GCR provides a steady source of low dose rate radiation that is primarily responsible for stochastic effects, such as cancer, and can effect the response of the central

  19. Radiative Equilibrium of the Mesosphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Conway Leovy

    1964-01-01

    Results of joint photochemical-radiative equilibrium calculations for the mesosphere and upper stratosphere are presented. The major assumptions were that only oxygen allotropes participate in the chemistry and that the radiative balance is between absorption of solar radiation by molecular oxygen and ozone and infrared emission by carbon dioxide and ozone. Equilibrium temperatures and ozone concentrations for winter and summer were

  20. Lunar radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, Nathan; Spence, Harlan; Wilson, Jody

    One of the goals of the CRaTER investigation is to characterize the radiation environment near the Moon in order to enable exploration. The state-of-the-art understanding developed thus far during the LRO mission is documented in a special issue of the Spaceweather Journal entitled “Space Weather: Building the observational foundation to deduce biological effects of space radiation” (Schwadron et al., 2013a). This recently published CRaTER work probes deeper into the physics of the radiation environment at the Moon. It motivates and provides the scientific basis for new investigations in the next phase of the LRO mission. The effects of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) range from chemical modification of the regolith, the generation of a radiation albedo that is increasingly illuminating chemical properties of the regolith, causing charging of the regolith and hazards to human explorers and robotic missions. Low-lunar orbit provides a platform for measuring SEP anisotropy over timescales of 2 hours both parallel and perpendicular to the ecliptic plane, and so far we have observed more than 18 SEP events with time-variable anisotropies during the LRO mission. Albedo proton maps of the Moon from CRaTER indicate that the flux of lunar albedo protons is correlated with elemental abundances at the lunar surface. The yield of albedo protons from the maria is 1% higher than the yield from the highlands, and there are localized peaks with even higher contrast (that may be co-located with peaks in trace elemental abundances as measured by the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer). The Moon’s radiation environment both charges and affects the chemistry in the Moon’s polar regions, particularly in PSRs. This makes these regions a prime target for new CRaTER observations, since CRaTER measures GCRs and SEPs that penetrate the regolith down to 10s of cm. Thus, we review emerging discoveries from LRO/CRaTER’s remarkable exploration of moon’s radiation environment, its implications for human exploration, and its interaction with lunar regolith.

  1. Acute Cerebrovascular Radiation Syndrome: Radiation Neurotoxicity , mechanisms of CNS radiation injury, advanced countermeasures for Radiation Protection of Central Nervous System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    Key words: Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome (Cv ARS), Radiation Neurotoxins (RNT), Neurotransmitters, Radiation Countermeasures, Antiradiation Vaccine (ArV), Antiradiation Blocking Antibodies, Antiradiation Antidote. Psychoneuroimmunology, Neurotoxicity. ABSTRACT: To review the role of Radiation Neurotoxins in triggering, developing of radiation induced central nervous system injury. Radiation Neurotoxins - rapidly acting blood toxic lethal agent, which activated after irradiation and concentrated, circulated in interstitial fluid, lymph, blood with interactions with cell membranes, receptors and cell compartments. Radiation Neurotoxins - biological molecules with high enzymatic activity and/or specific lipids and activated or modified after irradiation. The Radiation Neurotoxins induce increased permeability of blood vessels, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and developing severe disorder of blood macro- and micro-circulation. Principles of Radiation Psychoneuro-immunology and Psychoneuro-allergology were applied for determination of pathological processes developed after irradiation or selective administration of Radiation Neurotoxins to radiation naïve mammals. Effects of radiation and exposure to radiation can develop severe irreversible abnormalities of Central Nervous System, brain structures and functions. Antiradiation Vaccine - most effective, advanced methods of protection, prevention, mitigation and treatment and was used for of Acute Radiation Syndromes and elaboration of new technology for immune-prophylaxis and immune-protection against ?, Heavy Ion, Neutron irradiation. Results of experiments suggested that blocking, antitoxic, antiradiation antibodies can significantly reduce toxicity of Radiation Toxins. New advanced technology include active immune-prophylaxis with Antiradiation Vaccine and Antiradiation therapy that included specific blocking antibodies to Radiation Neurotoxins. Antiradiation Vaccine and Antiradiation IgG preparations - prospective effective antidote/countermeasure for ?-irradiation, heavy ions irradiation, neutron irradiation. Recommendations for treatment and immune-prophylaxis of CNS injury, induced by radiation, were proposed. Specific immune therapy and specific immune prophylaxis reduce symptoms of ACvRS. This manuscript summarizes the results of experiments and considering possibility for blocking toxicological mechanisms of action of Radiation and Radiation Neurotoxins and prevention or diminishing clinical signs of injury of CNS. Experimental data suggest that Antiradiation vaccine and Antiradiation IgG with specific antibodies to Radiation Neurotoxins, Cytotoxins protect CNS against high doses of radiation.

  2. Radiation dosimetry and biophysical models of space radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu; Shavers, Mark R.; George, Kerry

    2003-01-01

    Estimating the biological risks from space radiation remains a difficult problem because of the many radiation types including protons, heavy ions, and secondary neutrons, and the absence of epidemiology data for these radiation types. Developing useful biophysical parameters or models that relate energy deposition by space particles to the probabilities of biological outcomes is a complex problem. Physical measurements of space radiation include the absorbed dose, dose equivalent, and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra. In contrast to conventional dosimetric methods, models of radiation track structure provide descriptions of energy deposition events in biomolecules, cells, or tissues, which can be used to develop biophysical models of radiation risks. In this paper, we address the biophysical description of heavy particle tracks in the context of the interpretation of both space radiation dosimetry and radiobiology data, which may provide insights into new approaches to these problems.

  3. Radiative B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, D.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2011-11-23

    I discuss recent results in radiative B decays from the Belle and BaBar collaborations. I report new measurements of the decay rate and CP asymmetries in b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} d{gamma} decays, and measurements of the photon spectrum in b {yields} s{gamma}. Radiative penguin decays are flavour changing neutral currents which do not occur at tree level in the standard model (SM), but must proceed via one loop or higher order diagrams. These transitions are therefore suppressed in the SM, but offer access to poorlyknown SM parameters and are also a sensitive probe of new physics. In the SM, the rate is dominated by the top quark contribution to the loop, but non-SM particles could also contribute with a size comparable to leading SM contributions. The new physics effects are potentially large which makes them theoretically very interesting, but due to their small branching fractions they are typically experimentally challenging.

  4. Radiation dose in defecography

    SciTech Connect

    Goei, R.; Kemerink, G. (Univ. Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands))

    1990-07-01

    The effective dose equivalent, as an expression of total patient risk for exposure to limited areas of the body, and gonadal doses associated with hereditary effects were estimated in 67 consecutive subjects (43 women and 24 men) who underwent defecography. With use of measured entrance exposure values and data from Monte Carlo simulations, the mean effective dose equivalent was estimated at 4.9 mSv +/- 1.6 (490 mrem +/- 160) for women and 0.6 mSv +/- 0.2 (60 mrem +/- 20) for men. The ovarian dose was 15 mSv +/- 5 (1.5 rem +/- 0.5). The testes are not within the primary beam and therefore are exposed to scattered radiation only, hence the low received dose of 0.14 mSv or less (14 mrem or less). These data indicate that defecography is among the radiologic procedures associated with a considerable, but not extreme, radiation dose.

  5. TOPEX orbital radiation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Barth, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The space radiation environment of the TOPEX spacecraft is investigated. A single trajectory was considered. The external (surface incident) charged particle radiation, predicted for the satellite, is determined by orbital flux integration for the specified trajectory. The latest standard models of the environment are used in the calculations. The evaluation is performed for solar maximum conditions. The spacecraft exposure to cosmic rays of galactic origin is evaluated over its flight path through the magnetosphere in terms of geomagnetic shielding effects, both for surface incident heavy ions and for particles emerging behind different material thickness. Limited shielding and dose evaluations are performed for simple infinite slab and spherical geometries. Results, given in graphical and tabular form, are analyzed, explained, and discussed. Conclusions are presented and commented on.

  6. Genesis Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Altstatt, Richard L.; Skipworth, William C.

    2007-01-01

    The Genesis spacecraft launched on 8 August 2001 sampled solar wind environments at L1 from 2001 to 2004. After the Science Capsule door was opened, numerous foils and samples were exposed to the various solar wind environments during periods including slow solar wind from the streamer belts, fast solar wind flows from coronal holes, and coronal mass ejections. The Survey and Examination of Eroded Returned Surfaces (SEERS) program led by NASA's Space Environments and Effects program had initiated access for the space materials community to the remaining Science Capsule hardware after the science samples had been removed for evaluation of materials exposure to the space environment. This presentation will describe the process used to generate a reference radiation Genesis Radiation Environment developed for the SEERS program for use by the materials science community in their analyses of the Genesis hardware.

  7. Genetic susceptibility to radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E. J.; Brenner, D. J.; Worgul, B.; Smilenov, L.

    In the context of space radiation, it is important to know whether the human population includes genetically predisposed radiosensitive subsets. One possibility is that haploinsufficiency for ATM confers radiosensitivity, and this defect involves 1-3% of the population. Using knock-out mice we chose to study cataractogenesis in the lens and oncogenic transformation in mouse embryo fibroblasts to assay for effects of ATM deficiency. Radiation induced cataracts appeared earlier in the heterozygous versus wild-type animals following exposure to either gamma rays or 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. In addition, it was found that embryo fibroblasts of Atm heterozygotes showed an increased incidence of oncogenic transformation compared with their normal litter-matched counterparts. From these data we suggest that Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes could indeed represent a societally-significant radiosensitive subpopulation.

  8. Terahertz radiation mixer

    DOEpatents

    Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-05-20

    A terahertz radiation mixer comprises a heterodyned field-effect transistor (FET) having a high electron mobility heterostructure that provides a gatable two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region of the FET. The mixer can operate in either a broadband pinch-off mode or a narrowband resonant plasmon mode by changing a grating gate bias of the FET. The mixer can beat an RF signal frequency against a local oscillator frequency to generate an intermediate frequency difference signal in the microwave region. The mixer can have a low local oscillator power requirement and a large intermediate frequency bandwidth. The terahertz radiation mixer is particularly useful for terahertz applications requiring high resolution.

  9. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

    1998-07-28

    A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

  10. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-12-26

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  11. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  12. Quality in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlicki, Todd; Mundt, Arno J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2007-05-15

    A modern approach to quality was developed in the United States at Bell Telephone Laboratories during the first part of the 20th century. Over the years, those quality techniques have been adopted and extended by almost every industry. Medicine in general and radiation oncology in particular have been slow to adopt modern quality techniques. This work contains a brief description of the history of research on quality that led to the development of organization-wide quality programs such as Six Sigma. The aim is to discuss the current approach to quality in radiation oncology as well as where quality should be in the future. A strategy is suggested with the goal to provide a threshold improvement in quality over the next 10 years.

  13. National Ambient Radiation Database

    SciTech Connect

    Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

    2003-02-25

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

  14. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Patt, Bradley E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Iwanczyk, Jan S. (Los Angeles, CA); Tull, Carolyn R. (Orinda, CA); Vilkelis, Gintas (Westlake Village, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

  15. Radiation degradation of cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, J.; Arnold, G.; Baer, M.; Langguth, H.; Gey, M.; Hübert, S.

    The application of straw and other cellulose polymers as feedstuff for ruminants is limited by its low digestibility. During recent decades it was attempted to increase the digestibility of straw by several chemical and physical methods. In this work some results of the degradation of gamma and electron treated wheat straw are reported. Complex methods of treatment (e.g. radiation influence and influence of lyes) are taken into consideration. In vitro-experiments with radiation treated straw show that the digestibility can be increased from 20 % up to about 80 %. A high pressure liquid chromatography method was used to analyze the hydrolysates. The contents of certain species of carbohydrates in the hydrolysates in dependence on the applied dose are given.

  16. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOEpatents

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  17. Radiation Effects in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Rodney C.; Meldrum, Alkiviathes; Wang, L. M.; Weber, William J.; Corrales, Louis R.

    2003-12-11

    The widespread distribution of zircon in the continental crust, its tendency to concentrate trace elements, particularly lanthanides and actinides, its use in age-dating, and its resistance to chemical and physical degradation have made zircon the most important accessory mineral in geologic studies. Because zircon is highly refractory, it also has important industrial applications, including its use as a lining material in high-temperature furnaces. However, during the past decade, zircon has also been proposed for advanced technology applications, such as a durable material for the immobilization of plutonium or, when modified by ion-beam irradiation, as an optic waveguide material. In all of these applications, the change in properties as a function of increasing radiation dose is of critical importance. In this chapter, we summarize the state-of-knowledge on the radiation damage accumulation process in zircon.

  18. Provisional standards of radiation safety during flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Radiation effects during space flights are discussed in the context of the sources and dangers of such radiation and the radiobiological prerequisites for establishing safe levels of radiation dosage. Standard safe levels of radiation during space flight are established.

  19. Recombination Radiation from Diamond

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. J. Dean; I. H. Jones

    1964-01-01

    The spectrum of the recombination radiation from diamond has been measured over the photon energy range 4.9-5.5 eV at 90, 160, 207, and 320°K. At 90°K, recombination emission has been detected from ten samples out of a batch of fifteen single crystals, the majority of which were known to be relatively defect free. The persistent and usually dominant spectral features

  20. Radiation sources and process

    SciTech Connect

    Honious, H.B.; Janzow, E.F.; Malson, H.A.; Moyer, S.E.

    1980-04-08

    The invention relates to radiation sources comprising a substrate having an electrically-conductive non-radioactive metal surface, a layer of a metal radioactive isotope of the scandium group, which in addition to scandium, yttrium, lanthanum and actinium, includes all the lanthanide and actinide series of elements, with the actinide series usually being preferred because of the nature of the radioactive isotopes therein, particularly americium-241, curium-244, plutonium-238, californium-252 and promethium-147, and a non-radioactive bonding metal codeposited on the surface by electroplating the isotope and bonding metal from an electrolytic solution, the isotope being present in the layer in minor amount as compared to the bonding metal, and with or without a non-radioactive protective metal coating covering the isotoype and bonding metal on the surface, the coating being sufficiently thin to permit radiation to pass through the coating. The invention also relates to a process for providing radiation sources comprising codepositing a layer of the metal radioactive isotope with a non-radioactive bonding metal from an electrolytic solution in which the isotope is present in minor molar amount as compared to the bonding metal such that the codeposited layer contains a minor molar amount of the isotope compared to the bonding metal by electroplating on an electrically-conductive non-radioactive metal surface of a cathode substrate, and with or without depositing a nonradioactive protective metal coating over the isotope and bonding metal on the surface, the coating being sufficiently thin to permit radiation to pass through the coating.

  1. Radiation in Yolo County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickie, H.; Colwell, K.

    2013-12-01

    In today's post-nuclear age, there are many man-made sources of radioactivity, in addition to the natural background we expect from cosmic and terrestrial origins. While all atoms possess unstable isotopes, there are few that are abundant enough, energetic enough, and have long enough half-lives to pose a signicant risk of ionizing radiation exposure. We hypothesize a decreasing relative radiation measurement (in detected counts per minute [CPM]) at nine locations that might pose occupational or environmental hazard: 1. A supermarket produce aisle (living tissue has high concentration of 40K) 2. A hospital (medical imaging uses X-rays and radioactive dyes) 3. The electronics section of a superstore (high voltage electronics have the potential to produce ionizing radiation) 4. An electrical transformer (similar reasons) 5. An antique store (some ceramics and glazes use radioisotopes that are now outlawed) 6. A gasoline pump (processing and terrestrial isotope contamination might leave a radioactive residue) 7. A fertilized eld (phosphate rock contains uranium and thorium, in addition to potassium) 8. A house (hopefully mild background, but potential radon contamination) 9. A school (should be radiologically neutral) We tested the hypothesis by measuring 100 minutes of counts on a self-assembled MightyOhmTM Geiger counter at each location. Our results show that contrary to the hypothesized ordering, the house was the most radiologically active. We present possible explanations for the observed radiation levels, as well as possible sources of measurement error, possible consequences of prolonged exposure to the measured levels, and suggestions for decreasing exposure and environmental impact.

  2. Ultraviolet radiation screening compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHARLES S. COCKELL; JOHN KNOWLAND

    1988-01-01

    Amongst the diversity of methods used by organisms to reduce damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, the synthesis of UV-screening compounds is almost ubiquitous. UV-screening compounds provide a passive method for the reduction of UV-induced damage and they are widely distributed across the microbial, plant and animal kingdoms. They share some common chemical features. It is likely that on early

  3. Purely radiative perfect fluids

    E-print Network

    B. Bastiaensen; H. R. Karimian; N. Van den Bergh; L. Wylleman

    2007-05-08

    We study `purely radiative' (div E = div H = 0) and geodesic perfect fluids with non-constant pressure and show that the Bianchi class A perfect fluids can be uniquely characterized --modulo the class of purely electric and (pseudo-)spherically symmetric universes-- as those models for which the magnetic and electric part of the Weyl tensor and the shear are simultaneously diagonalizable. For the case of constant pressure the same conclusion holds provided one also assumes that the fluid is irrotational.

  4. Gravitational Radiation Experiments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Weber

    1970-01-01

    A summary is given of the statistics and coincidences of the Argonne-Maryland gravitational-radiation-detector array. New experiments have been carried out. These include a parallel coincidence experiment in which one coincidence detector had a time delay in one channel and a second coincidence detector operated with no time delays. Other experiments involve observations to rule out the possibility that the detectors

  5. Radiation and human health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1979-01-01

    The growing controversy over low-level radiation risks stems from challenges to the assumptions that had been made about dose rate, linear theory, and total-body exposure. The debate has focused on whether there is a risk threshold or whether linearity overstates low-level risks, both theories being consistent with the available data. The generally accepted consensus on the risks of cancer and

  6. Ionizing radiation during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Ratnapalan, Savithiri; Bona, Nicole; Koren, Gideon

    2003-01-01

    QUESTION: One of my patients had a computed tomography scan of her abdomen a week ago and has just found out she is 7 weeks pregnant. What should I tell her about the pregnancy and the risk to her fetus? ANSWER: Your patient is not at increased risk of miscarriage or major congenital fetal malformations due to radiation exposure. Her risk is similar to that of the general population (ie, 1% to 3%). PMID:12901480

  7. Integrative radiation systems biology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Maximisation of the ratio of normal tissue preservation and tumour cell reduction is the main concept of radiotherapy alone or combined with chemo-, immuno- or biologically targeted therapy. The foremost parameter influencing this ratio is radiation sensitivity and its modulation towards a more efficient killing of tumour cells and a better preservation of normal tissue at the same time is the overall aim of modern therapy schemas. Nevertheless, this requires a deep understanding of the molecular mechanisms of radiation sensitivity in order to identify its key players as potential therapeutic targets. Moreover, the success of conventional approaches that tried to statistically associate altered radiation sensitivity with any molecular phenotype such as gene expression proofed to be somewhat limited since the number of clinically used targets is rather sparse. However, currently a paradigm shift is taking place from pure frequentistic association analysis to the rather holistic systems biology approach that seeks to mathematically model the system to be investigated and to allow the prediction of an altered phenotype as the function of one single or a signature of biomarkers. Integrative systems biology also considers the data from different molecular levels such as the genome, transcriptome or proteome in order to partially or fully comprehend the causal chain of molecular mechanisms. An example for the application of this concept currently carried out at the Clinical Cooperation Group “Personalized Radiotherapy in Head and Neck Cancer” of the Helmholtz-Zentrum München and the LMU Munich is described. This review article strives for providing a compact overview on the state of the art of systems biology, its actual challenges, potential applications, chances and limitations in radiation oncology research working towards improved personalised therapy concepts using this relatively new methodology. PMID:24411063

  8. Solar Radiation Resource Information

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the Solar Radiation Resource Information page for the RReDC which provides information on several types of renewable energy resources in the United States, in the form of publications, data, and maps. An extensive dictionary of renewable energy related terms is also provided. This page has links to: -Archived Data -NREL Data Collection Activities -Solar Spectra -Solar Codes & Algorithms -Solar Models -Solar Calculators -Publications. Keyword: Photovoltaic, cell, PV.

  9. Radiation-driven inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Aharon; Gurwich, Ilya, E-mail: davidson@bgu.ac.il, E-mail: gurwichphys@gmail.com, E-mail: ilyagur@gmail.com [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)] [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2008-06-15

    A novel, scalar-field-free approach to cosmic inflation is presented. The inflationary Universe and the radiation-dominated Universe are shown, within the framework of unified brane cosmology, to be two different phases governed by one and the same energy density. The phase transition of second order (the Hubble constant exhibits a finite jump) appears naturally and serves as the exit mechanism. No re-heating is needed. The required number of e-folds is achieved without fine tuning.

  10. Structure in Radiative Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul; Visco, A.; Doss, F.; Reighard, A.; Froula, D.; Glenzer, S.; Knauer, J.

    2008-05-01

    Radiative shocks are shock waves fast enough that radiation from the shock-heated matter alters the structure of the shock. They are of fundamental interest to high-energy-density physics and also have applications throughout astrophysics. This poster will review the dimensionless parameters that determine structure in these shocks and will discuss recent experiments to measure such structure for strongly radiative shocks that are optically thin upstream and optically thick downstream. The shock transition itself heats mainly the ions. Immediately downstream of the shock, the ions heat the electrons and the electrons radiate, producing an optically thin cooling layer, followed by the downstream layer of warm, shocked material. The axial structure of these systems is of interest, because the transition from precursor through the cooling layer to the final state is complex and difficult to calculate. Their lateral structure is also of interest, as they seem likely to be subject to some variation on the Vishniac instability of thin layers. In our experiments to produce such shocks, laser ablation launches a Be plasma into a tube of Xe or Ar gas, at a velocity above 100 km/s. This drives a shock down the tube. Radiography provides fundamental information about the structure and evolution of the shocked material in Xe. Thomson scattering and pyrometry have provided data in Ar. We will summarize the available evidence regarding the properties of these shocks, and will discuss their connections to astrophysical cases. This research was sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program through DOE Research Grants DE-FG52-07NA28058, DE-FG52-04NA00064, and other grants and contracts.

  11. A cosmological bound on radiative neutrino lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirizzi, A.; Montanino, D.; Serpico, P. D.

    2008-07-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments and direct bounds on absolute masses constrain neutrino mass differences to fall into the microwave energy range, for most of the allowed parameter space. As a consequence of these recent phenomenological advances, older constraints on radiative neutrino decays based on diffuse background radiations and assuming strongly hierarchical masses in the eV range are now outdated. We thus derive new bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE. The lower bound on neutrino lifetime is between a few ×1019 s and ~ 5 × 1020 s, depending on the neutrino mass ordering and on the absolute neutrino mass scale. However, due to phase space limitations, the upper bound on the effective magnetic moment mediating the decay is not better than ~10-8 ?B. We also comment about possible improvements of these limits, by means of recent diffuse infrared photon background data.

  12. Radiation hydrodynamics integrated in the code PLUTO

    E-print Network

    Kolb, Stefan M; Kley, Wilhelm; Mignone, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The transport of energy through radiation is very important in many astrophysical phenomena. In dynamical problems the time-dependent equations of radiation hydrodynamics have to be solved. We present a newly developed radiation-hydrodynamics module specifically designed for the versatile MHD code PLUTO. The solver is based on the flux-limited diffusion approximation in the two-temperature approach. All equations are solved in the co-moving frame in the frequency independent (grey) approximation. The hydrodynamics is solved by the different Godunov schemes implemented in PLUTO, and for the radiation transport we use a fully implicit scheme. The resulting system of linear equations is solved either using the successive over-relaxation (SOR) method (for testing purposes), or matrix solvers that are available in the PETSc library. We state in detail the methodology and describe several test cases in order to verify the correctness of our implementation. The solver works in standard coordinate systems, such as Ca...

  13. Uninformed Hawking radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.; Ovgun, A.

    2015-04-01

    We show in detail that the Parikh-Wilczek tunneling method (PWTM), which was designed for resolving the information loss problem in Hawking radiation (HR) fails whenever the radiation occurs from an isothermal process. The PWTM aims to produce a non-thermal HR which adumbrates the resolution of the problem of unitarity in quantum mechanics (QM), and consequently the entropy (or information) conservation problem. The effectiveness of the method has been satisfactorily tested on numerous black holes (BHs). However, it has been shown that the isothermal HR, which results from the emission of the uncharged particles of the linear dilaton BH (LDBH) described in the Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton (EMD) theory, the PWTM has vulnerability in having non-thermal radiation. In particular, we consider Painlevé-Gullstrand coordinates (PGCs) and isotropic coordinates (ICs) in order to prove the aforementioned failure in the PWTM. While carrying out calculations in the ICs, we also highlight the effect of the refractive index on the null geodesics.

  14. Intraocular radiation blocking.

    PubMed

    Finger, P T; Ho, T K; Fastenberg, D M; Hyman, R A; Stroh, E M; Packer, S; Perry, H D

    1990-09-01

    Iodine-based liquid radiographic contrast agents were placed in normal and tumor-bearing (Greene strain) rabbit eyes to evaluate their ability to block iodine-125 radiation. This experiment required the procedures of tumor implantation, vitrectomy, air-fluid exchange, and 125I plaque and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) chip implantation. The authors quantified the amount of radiation attenuation provided by intraocularly placed contrast agents with in vivo dosimetry. After intraocular insertion of a blocking agent or sham blocker (saline) insertion, episcleral 125I plaques were placed across the eye from episcleral TLD dosimeters. This showed that radiation attenuation occurred after blocker insertion compared with the saline controls. Then computed tomographic imaging techniques were used to describe the relatively rapid transit time of the aqueous-based iohexol compared with the slow transit time of the oil-like iophendylate. Lastly, seven nontumor-bearing eyes were primarily examined for blocking agent-related ocular toxicity. Although it was noted that iophendylate induced intraocular inflammation and retinal degeneration, all iohexol-treated eyes were similar to the control eyes at 7 and 31 days of follow-up. Although our study suggests that intraocular radiopaque materials can be used to shield normal ocular structures during 125I plaque irradiation, a mechanism to keep these materials from exiting the eye must be devised before clinical application. PMID:2211021

  15. Fundamentals of Atmospheric Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohren, Craig F.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2006-02-01

    This textbook fills a gap in the literature for teaching material suitable for students of atmospheric science and courses on atmospheric radiation. It covers the fundamentals of emission, absorption, and scattering of electromagnetic radiation from ultraviolet to infrared and beyond. Much of the book applies to planetary atmosphere. The authors are physicists and teach at the largest meteorology department of the US at Penn State. Craig T. Bohren has taught the atmospheric radiation course there for the past 20 years with no book. Eugene Clothiaux has taken over and added to the course notes. Problems given in the text come from students, colleagues, and correspondents. The design of the figures especially for this book is meant to ease comprehension. Discussions have a graded approach with a thorough treatment of subjects, such as single scattering by particles, at different levels of complexity. The discussion of the multiple scattering theory begins with piles of plates. This simple theory introduces concepts in more advanced theories, i.e. optical thickness, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter. The more complicated theory, the two-stream theory, then takes the reader beyond the pile-of-plates theory. Ideal for advanced undergraduate and graduate students of atmospheric science.

  16. Microbeam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laissue, Jean A.; Lyubimova, Nadia; Wagner, Hans-Peter; Archer, David W.; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Di Michiel, Marco; Nemoz, Christian; Renier, Michel; Brauer, Elke; Spanne, Per O.; Gebbers, Jan-Olef; Dixon, Keith; Blattmann, Hans

    1999-10-01

    The central nervous system of vertebrates, even when immature, displays extraordinary resistance to damage by microscopically narrow, multiple, parallel, planar beams of x rays. Imminently lethal gliosarcomas in the brains of mature rats can be inhibited and ablated by such microbeams with little or no harm to mature brain tissues and neurological function. Potentially palliative, conventional wide-beam radiotherapy of malignant brain tumors in human infants under three years of age is so fraught with the danger of disrupting the functional maturation of immature brain tissues around the targeted tumor that it is implemented infrequently. Other kinds of therapy for such tumors are often inadequate. We suggest that microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) might help to alleviate the situation. Wiggler-generated synchrotron x-rays were first used for experimental microplanar beam (microbeam) radiation therapy (MRT) at Brookhaven National Laboratory's National Synchrotron Light Source in the early 1990s. We now describe the progress achieved in MRT research to date using immature and adult rats irradiated at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France, and investigated thereafter at the Institute of Pathology of the University of Bern.

  17. Optical radiation and visual health

    SciTech Connect

    Waxler, M.; Hitchins, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a focus on the parameters of ultraviolet light, visible, and infrared radiation s which could cause long-term visual health problems in humans. It reviews early research on radiation effects on the eye, and gives detailed attention to the hazardous effects of optical radiation on the retinal pigment epithelium and the photoreceptors. These data are further analyzed with regard to five potential long-term visual health problems; retinal degeneration, visual aging, disorder of visual development, ocular drug phototoxicity, and cataracts. Finally, epidemiologic principles for studying the relationships between optical radiation and long-term visual health problems are reviewed, concluding with the implications for future research and radiation protection. The contents include: historical perspectives; optical radiation and cataracts; the involvement of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE); optical radiation damage to the ocular photoreceptors; possible role of optical radiation in retinal degenerations; optical radiation and the aged eye; optical radiation effects on aging and visual perception; optical radiation effects on visual development; and index.

  18. Measurement of radiation-enhanced diffusion of La in single crystal thin film CeO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, Harrison K.; Heuser, Brent J.; Strehle, Melissa M.

    2010-10-01

    The diffusion of La, a trivalent cation dopant, actinide surrogate, and high-yield fission product, in CeO 2, a UO 2 nuclear fuel surrogate, during 1.8 MeV Kr + ion bombardment over a temperature range from 673 K to 1206 K has been measured with secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The diffusivity under these irradiation conditions has been analyzed with a model based on a combination of sink-limited and recombination-limited kinetics. This analysis yielded a cation vacancy migration energy of Emv ˜ 0.4 eV below ˜800 K, were recombination-limited kinetics dominated the behavior. The thermal diffusivity of La in the same system was measured over a range of 873-1073 K and was characterized by an activation enthalpy of Ea=Efv+Emv˜1.4 eV. The measurement of both the migration enthalpy and total activation enthalpy separately allows the vacancy formation enthalpy on the cation sublattice to be determined; Efv ˜ 1 eV. The mixing parameter under energetic heavy-ion bombardment at room temperature was measured as well and found to be ˜4 × 10 -5 nm 5/eV.

  19. New Approaches to Radiation Protection

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Eliot M.; Day, Regina; Singh, Vijay K.

    2015-01-01

    Radioprotectors are compounds that protect against radiation injury when given prior to radiation exposure. Mitigators can protect against radiation injury when given after exposure but before symptoms appear. Radioprotectors and mitigators can potentially improve the outcomes of radiotherapy for cancer treatment by allowing higher doses of radiation and/or reduced damage to normal tissues. Such compounds can also potentially counteract the effects of accidental exposure to radiation or deliberate exposure (e.g., nuclear reactor meltdown, dirty bomb, or nuclear bomb explosion); hence they are called radiation countermeasures. Here, we will review the general principles of radiation injury and protection and describe selected examples of radioprotectors/mitigators ranging from small-molecules to proteins to cell-based treatments. We will emphasize agents that are in more advanced stages of development. PMID:25653923

  20. Ionizing radiation and cancer prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Hoel, D G

    1995-01-01

    Ionizing radiation long has been recognized as a cause of cancer. Among environmental cancer risks, radiation is unique in the variety of organs and tissues that it can affect. Numerous epidemiological studies with good dosimetry provide the basis for cancer risk estimation, including quantitative information derived from observed dose-response relationships. The amount of cancer attributable to ionizing radiation is difficult to estimate, but numbers such as 1 to 3% have been suggested. Some radiation-induced cancers attributable to naturally occurring exposures, such as cosmic and terrestrial radiation, are not preventable. The major natural radiation exposure, radon, can often be reduced, especially in the home, but not entirely eliminated. Medical use of radiation constitutes the other main category of exposure; because of the importance of its benefits to one's health, the appropriate prevention strategy is to simply work to minimize exposures. PMID:8741791

  1. New approaches to radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Eliot M; Day, Regina; Singh, Vijay K

    2014-01-01

    Radioprotectors are compounds that protect against radiation injury when given prior to radiation exposure. Mitigators can protect against radiation injury when given after exposure but before symptoms appear. Radioprotectors and mitigators can potentially improve the outcomes of radiotherapy for cancer treatment by allowing higher doses of radiation and/or reduced damage to normal tissues. Such compounds can also potentially counteract the effects of accidental exposure to radiation or deliberate exposure (e.g., nuclear reactor meltdown, dirty bomb, or nuclear bomb explosion); hence they are called radiation countermeasures. Here, we will review the general principles of radiation injury and protection and describe selected examples of radioprotectors/mitigators ranging from small-molecules to proteins to cell-based treatments. We will emphasize agents that are in more advanced stages of development. PMID:25653923

  2. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    DOEpatents

    Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

    1994-08-16

    A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

  3. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Slatkin, Daniel N. (Sound Beach, NY); Dilmanian, F. Avraham (Yaphank, NY); Spanne, Per O. (Shoreham, NY)

    1994-01-01

    A method of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation, in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue.

  4. Zero Point Energy: Planck Radiation Law

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Vic Dannon

    The assumption of discrete radiation energy in Planck's 1901 radiation law, conflicted with Planck's belief in radiation of continuous waves. To reconcile his quantum hypothesis with his conception of wave radiation, he avoided the conclusion that radiation energy must be made of particles, and postulated that radiation is a transition between the energy levels of an oscillator. Furthermore, ignoring the

  5. Anisotropic radiation elds: causality and quantum statistics

    E-print Network

    Honingh, Aline

    radiation transport 5 2.1 Radiation transport equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.2 Closures The transport of radiation through a medium is described by the radiation transport equation for the radiativeAnisotropic radiation #12;elds: causality and quantum statistics A.K. Honingh #12; #12; Anisotropic

  6. Influence of Extraterrestrial Radiation on Radiation Portal Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Paul E.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2009-06-01

    Cosmic radiation and solar flares can be a major source of background radiation at the Earth’s surface. This paper examines the relationship between extraterrestrial radiation and the detectable background in radiation portal monitors used for homeland security applications. Background radiation data from 13 radiation portal monitor facilities are examined and compared against external sources of data related to extraterrestrial radiation, including measurements at neutron monitors located at 53 cosmic-ray observatories around the Earth, four polar orbiting satellites, three geostationary satellites, ground-based geomagnetic field data from observatories around the Earth, a solar magnetic index, solar radio flux data, and sunspot activity data. Four-years (January 2003 through December 2006) of data are used in this study, which include the latter part of Solar Cycle 23 as solar activity was on the decline. The analysis shows a significant relationship between some extraterrestrial radiation and the background detected in the radiation portal monitors. A demonstrable decline is shown in the average gamma ray and neutron background at the radiation portal monitors as solar activity declined over the period of the study.

  7. Formation of Primordial Galaxies under UV background Radiation

    E-print Network

    Hajime Susa; Masayuki Umemura

    2000-01-11

    The pancake collapse of pregalactic clouds under UV background radiation is explored with a one-dimensional sheet model. Here, attention is concentrated on elucidating the basic physics on the thermal evolution of pregalactic clouds exposed to diffuse UV radiation. So, we treat accurately the radiation transfer for the ionizing photons, with solving chemical reactions regarding hydrogen molecules as well as atoms. The self-shielding against UV radiation by H$_2$ Lyman-Werner bands, which regulates the photo-dissociation of hydrogen molecules, is also taken into account. As a result, it is found that when the UV background radiation is at a level of $10^{-22} (\

  8. Estimation of solar radiation using a neural network based on radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Hideaki; Nakajima, Takashi Y.; Higurashi, Akiko; Higuchi, Atsushi; Takamura, Tamio; Pinker, Rachiel T.; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2011-04-01

    This study developed an algorithm for estimating solar radiation from space using a neural network (NN) with an improved learning algorithm to approximate radiative transfer code. The NN solver for the solar radiation budget is based on radiative transfer calculations. All data sets for testing and training the NN were generated from radiative transfer code. Thus the NN traces the radiative transfer calculation that is approximated by a learning algorithm. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the NN approach for high-speed estimation and multiparameter problems, the NN was applied to data from a geostationary satellite and a Sun-synchronous subrecurrent orbit satellite. The developed algorithm was applied to data from the Multi-functional Transport Satellite-1 Replacement (MTSAT-1R) geostationary satellite, and estimations were validated against in situ observations for March 2006 at four SKYNET sites. Byproducts of the algorithm include UVA, UVB, and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) fluxes as well as direct and diffuse components. The NN approach enables semi-real-time analysis of these products by high-speed calculation. In addition, the NN allows for consideration of detailed particle optical parameters in the solar radiation budget without the need for a massive database. The method was also applied to observations from the Advanced Earth Observing Satellite-II/Global Imager (ADEOS-II/GLI) for May 2003. The results showed trends in the direct and diffuse components of downward solar radiation over the North Pacific Ocean. This report outlines the construction of the NN for radiation budget estimation and demonstrates the effectiveness of the NN approach.

  9. Multidimensional radiative effects in supercritical shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leygnac, S.; Lanz, T.; Stehlé, C.; Michaut, C.; Kor?áková, D.

    Recent radiative shocks experiments performed on the LULI laser at Ecole Polytechnique in France (Fleury et al., Lasers and Particle Beams 20, 263, 2002) put in evidence a supercritical shock wave in a xenon gas cell. The structure of these shocks is quite similar to those of accretion shock wave in the case of stellar formation, as indicated in Stehlé and Chieze (SF2A - Paris proceedings, 2002). Some points require further studies like the contribution of the gas excitation/ionization energy to the compression ratio and the understanding of the discrepancy, which was noted between the velocity of the radiative precursor in the experiment and in the 1D simulation. Thus, to understand the physics of the radiative shock waves, the academic case of the stationary shock is particularly interesting. We have thus studied the structure of a radiative shock wave which propagates in an ionized gas. We study the extended Rankine Hugoniot equations in various media with inclusion of radiation pressure and energy and study also the extension of the radiative precursor in the diffusion approximation. We also study the equations of multidimensional radiative transfer for a snapshot of the experimental shock in xenon in order to quantify the radiative losses in the finite experimental cell. This academic approach will help to improve the knowledge of the physical processes which take place in radiative shocks of astrophysical interest, like in the birth and death of stars, and prepare ourselves to define appropriate experiments on future high power lasers like LIL and LMJ in Bordeaux.

  10. A thin diffuse component of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission and heating of the interstellar medium contributed by the radiation of Galactic X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, Margherita; Khatri, Rishi; Sunyaev, Rashid A.

    2014-04-01

    We predict a thin diffuse component of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE) arising from the scattering of the radiation of bright X-ray binaries (XBs) by the interstellar medium. This scattered component has the same scale height as that of the gaseous disk (~80 pc) and is therefore thinner than the GRXE of stellar origin (scale height ~130 pc). The morphology of the scattered component is furthermore expected to trace the clumpy molecular and HI clouds. We calculate this contribution to the GRXE from known Galactic XBs assuming that they are all persistent. The known XBs sample is incomplete, however, because it is flux limited and spans the lifetime of X-ray astronomy (~50 years), which is very short compared with the characteristic time of 1000-10 000 years that would have contributed to the diffuse emission observed today due to time delays. We therefore also use a simulated sample of sources, to estimate the diffuse emission we should expect in an optimistic case assuming that the X-ray luminosity of our Galaxy is on average similar to that of other galaxies. In the calculations we also take into account the enhancement of the total scattering cross-section due to coherence effects in the elastic scattering from multi-electron atoms and molecules. This scattered emission can be distinguished from the contribution of low X-ray luminosity stars by the presence of narrow fluorescent K-? lines of Fe, Si, and other abundant elements present in the interstellar medium and by directly resolving the contribution of low X-ray luminosity stars. We find that within 1° latitude of the Galactic plane the scattered emission contributes on average 10 - 30% of the GRXE flux in the case of known sources and over 50% in the case of simulated sources. In the latter case, the scattered component is found to even dominate the stellar emission in certain parts of the Galactic plane. X-rays with energies ?1 keV from XBs should also penetrate deep inside the HI and molecular clouds, where they are absorbed and heat the interstellar medium. We find that this heating rate dominates the heating by cosmic rays (assuming a solar neighborhood energy density) in a considerable part of the Galaxy. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. (Radiation protection guidance)

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, C.R.

    1989-11-16

    The traveler attended the meeting of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and its committees in Oxford, England. This was the first meeting of the Main Commission with all its committees as formed for the 1989--1993 period. The major item of business was to review a draft report that, when finalized, will constitute the revised basic ICRP radiation protection guidance. It is clear that there is much work to be done by ICRP committees and task groups to prepare reports containing information that can be used in conjunction with the revised guidance, e.g., a revised ICRP 30 series of reports. It is extremely important that the US Department of Energy, and other US agencies, including the Commission on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC), not repeat the error committed after the previous ICRP general radiation protection guidance was released in 1977 (ICRP Report No. 26). The US had much difficulty in understanding the implications of the recommendations and their impact on federal and other facilities. As a result there was a long delay in US agencies adopting the ICRP 26 terminology and secondary limits. Actually, all DOE contractors were directed this year, via DOE order 5480.11, to comply with what is basically ICRP 26 and 30 by the end of this calendar year. Much of the rest of the world had adopted most or all of the ICRP 26 and 30 guidance years ago. The US position appeared very confused as regards ICRP 26 to the rest of the world.

  12. Dynamic hohlraum radiation hydrodynamicsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. E.; Chandler, G. A.; Mancini, R. C.; Slutz, S. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Bump, M.; Buris-Mog, T. J.; Cooper, G.; Dunham, G.; Golovkin, I.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Lake, P. W.; Leeper, R. J.; Lemke, R.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Moore, T. C.; Nash, T. J.; Nikroo, A.; Nielsen, D. S.; Peterson, K. L.; Ruiz, C. L.; Schroen, D. G.; Steinman, D.; Varnum, W.

    2006-05-01

    Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums are a promising indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion approach. Comparison of multiple experimental methods with integrated Z-pinch/hohlraum/capsule computer simulations builds understanding of the hohlraum interior conditions. Time-resolved x-ray images determine the motion of the radiating shock that heats the hohlraum as it propagates toward the hohlraum axis. The images also measure the radius of radiation-driven capsules as they implode. Dynamic hohlraum LASNEX [G. Zimmerman and W. Kruer, Comments Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 2, 85 (1975)] simulations are found to overpredict the shock velocity by ˜20-40%, but simulated capsule implosion trajectories agree reasonably well with the data. Measurements of the capsule implosion core conditions using time- and space-resolved Ar tracer x-ray spectroscopy and the fusion neutron yield provide additional tests of the integrated hohlraum-implosion system understanding. The neutron yield in the highest performing CH capsule implosions is ˜20-30% of the yield calculated with unperturbed 2D LASNEX simulations. The emissivity-averaged electron temperature and density peak at approximately 900eV and 4×1023cm-3, respectively. Synthetic spectra produced by postprocessing 1D LASNEX capsule implosion simulations possess spectral features from H-like and He-like Ar that are similar in duration to the measured spectra. However, the simulation emissivity-averaged density peaks at a value that is four times lower than the experiment, while the temperature is approximately 1.6 times higher. The agreement with the capsule trajectory measurements and the ability to design capsule implosions that routinely produce implosion cores hot and dense enough to emit fusion neutrons and Ar spectra are evidence for a respectable degree of dynamic hohlraum understanding. The hohlraum shock velocity and implosion core discrepancies imply that calculations of the hohlraum radiation driving capsule implosions require further refinement.

  13. Gravitational Radiation Reaction

    E-print Network

    Yasushi Mino; Misao Sasaki; Takahiro Tanaka

    1997-12-12

    We consider the radiation reaction to the motion of a point-like particle of mass $m$ and specific spin $S$ traveling on a curved background. Assuming $S=O(Gm)$ and $Gm\\ll L$ where $L$ is the length scale of the background curvature, we divide the spacetime into two regions; the external region where the metric is approximated by the background metric plus perturbations due to a point-like particle and the internal region where the metric is approximated by that of a black hole plus perturbations due to the tidal effect of the background curvature, and use the technique of the matched asymptotic expansion to construct an approximate metric which is valid over the entire region. In this way, we avoid the divergent self-gravity at the position of the particle and derive the equations of motion from the consistency condition of the matching. The matching is done to the order necessary to include the effect of radiation reaction of $O(Gm)$ with respect to the background metric as well as the effect of spin-induced force. The reaction term of $O(Gm)$ is found to be completely due to tails of radiation, that is, due to curvature scattering of gravitational waves. In other words, the reaction force is found to depend on the entire history of the particle trajectory. Defining a regularized metric which consists of the back- ground metric plus the tail part of the perturbed metric, we find the equations of motion reduce to the geodesic equation on this regularized metric, except for the spin-induced force which is locally expressed in terms of the curvature and spin tensors. Some implications of the result and future issues are briefly discussed.

  14. Radiation effects in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yazzie, A. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ (United States). Dept. of History; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leavitt, C.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1999-04-01

    Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

  15. Protection from Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Singleterry, R. C.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badhwar, G. D.; Kim, M. Y.; Badavi, F. F.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    The exposures anticipated for our astronauts in the anticipated Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) will be significantly higher (both annual and carrier) than any other occupational group. In addition, the exposures in deep space result largely from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) for which there is as yet little experience. Some evidence exists indicating that conventional linear energy transfer (LET) defined protection quantities (quality factors) may not be appropriate [1,2]. The purpose of this presentation is to evaluate our current understanding of radiation protection with laboratory and flight experimental data and to discuss recent improvements in interaction models and transport methods.

  16. ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    E-print Network

    Pachmayer, Y

    2013-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) is the main electron detector in ALICE. In conduction with the TPC and the ITS, it provides the necessary electron identification capability to study: - Production of light and heavy vector mesons as well as the continuum in the di-electron channel, - Semi leptonic decays of hadrons with open charm and open beauty via the single-electron channel using the displaced vertex information provided by the ITS, - Correlated DD and BB pairs via coincidences of electrons in the central barrel and muons in the forward muon arm, - Jets with high P? tracks in one single TRD stack.

  17. Iron, radiation, and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, R G; Kalkwarf, D R

    1990-01-01

    Increased iron content of cells and tissue may increase the risk of cancer. In particular, high available iron status may increase the risk of a radiation-induced cancer. There are two possible mechanisms for this effect: iron can catalyze the production of oxygen radicals, and it may be a limiting nutrient to the growth and development of a transformed cell in vivo. Given the high available iron content of the western diet and the fact that the world is changing to the western model, it is important to determine if high iron increases the risk of cancer. PMID:2269234

  18. Gravitational radiation reaction

    E-print Network

    Takahiro Tanaka

    2005-10-04

    We give a short personally-biased review on the recent progress in our understanding of gravitational radiation reaction acting on a point particle orbiting a black hole. The main motivation of this study is to obtain sufficiently precise gravitational waveforms from inspiraling binary compact stars with a large mass ratio. For this purpose, various new concepts and techniques have been developed to compute the orbital evolution taking into account the gravitational self-force. Combining these ideas with a few supplementary new ideas, we try to outline a path to our goal here.

  19. Radiation Field on Superspace

    E-print Network

    P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz

    1994-03-18

    We study the dynamics of multiwormhole configurations within the framework of the Euclidean Polyakov approach to string theory, incorporating a modification to the Hamiltonian which makes it impossible to interpret the Coleman Alpha parameters of the effective interactions as a quantum field on superspace, reducible to an infinite tower of fields on space-time. We obtain a Planckian probability measure for the Alphas that allows $\\frac{1}{2}\\alpha^{2}$ to be interpreted as the energy of the quanta of a radiation field on superspace whose values may still fix the coupling constants.

  20. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.