Sample records for radiation diffuse radiation

  1. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  2. Diffuse gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An examination of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma-radiation observed by SAS-2 satellite away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV has shown that it consists of two components. One component is generally correlated with galactic latitudes, the atomic hydrogen column density was deduced from 21 cm measurements, and the continuum radio emission, believed to be synchrotron emission. It has an energy spectrum similar to that in the plane and joins smoothly to the intense radiation from the plane. It is therefore presumed to be of galactic origin. The other component is apparently isotropic, at least on a coarse scale, and has a steep energy spectrum. No evidence is found for a cosmic ray halo surrounding the galaxy in the shape of a sphere or oblate spheroid with galactic dimensions. Constraints for a halo model with significantly larger dimensions are set on the basis of an upper limit to the gamma-ray anisotropy.

  3. Directive radiation from a diffuse Luneburg lens.

    PubMed

    Quevedo-Teruel, Oscar; Hao, Yang

    2013-02-15

    Transformation electromagnetics has opened possibilities for designing antenna structures. Using an analytical approach, we demonstrate here how directive antenna radiation can be achieved from an omnidirectional source behind a diffuse surface. This diffuse surface has been obtained by an optical transformation of a Luneburg lens. Two different transformation approaches have been proposed (polynomial and sinusoidal), and for both cases, the resulting material properties have been simplified to ease the fabrication by using all-dielectric media. Therefore, the proposed design has no upper boundary to the operational frequency. Directive radiation has been achieved from thin diffuse structures, which demonstrates promising future possibilities for this technique. PMID:23455079

  4. Diffusion processes in general relativistic radiating spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Barreto, W.; Herrera, L.; Santos, N.O. (Oriente Universidad, Cumana (Venezuela); Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas; Observatorio Nacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

    1989-09-01

    The influence of diffusion processes on the dynamics of general relativistic radiating spheres is systematically studied by means of two examples. Differences between the streaming-out limit and the diffusion limit are exhibited, for both models, through the evolution curves of dynamical variables. In particular it is shown the Bondi mass decreases, for both models, in the diffusion limit as compared with its value at the streaming-out regime. 15 refs.

  5. Radiation

    Cancer.gov

    DCEG researchers carry out a broad-based research program designed to identify, understand, and quantify the risk of cancer in populations exposed to medical, occupational, or environmental radiation. They study ionizing radiation exposures (e.g., x-rays,

  6. Assessment of diffuse radiation models in Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magarreiro, Clarisse; Brito, Miguel; Soares, Pedro; Azevedo, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Measured irradiance databases usually consist of global solar radiation data with limited spatial coverage. Hence, solar radiation models have been developed to estimate the diffuse fraction from the measured global irradiation. This information is critical for the assessment of the potential of solar energy technologies; for example, the decision to use photovoltaic systems with tracking system. The different solar radiation models for this purpose differ on the parameters used as input. The simplest, and most common, are models which use global radiation information only. More sophisticated models require meteorological parameters such as information from clouds, atmospheric turbidity, temperature or precipitable water content. Most of these models comprise correlations with the clearness index, kt (portion of horizontal extra-terrestrial radiation reaching the Earth's surface) to obtain the diffuse fraction kd (portion of diffuse component from global radiation). The applicability of these different models is related to the local atmospheric conditions and its climatic characteristics. The models are not of general validity and can only be applicable to locations where the albedo of the surrounding terrain and the atmospheric contamination by dust are not significantly different from those where the corresponding methods were developed. Thus, models of diffuse fraction exhibit a relevant degree of location dependence: e.g. models developed considering data acquired in Europe are mainly linked to Northern, Central or, more recently, Mediterranean areas. The Azores Archipelago, with its particular climate and cloud cover characteristics, different from mainland Europe, has not yet been considered for the development of testing of such models. The Azorean climate reveals large amounts of cloud cover in its annual cycle, with spatial and temporal variabilities more complex than the common Summer/Winter pattern. This study explores the applicability of different existing correlation models of diffuse fraction and clearness index or other plain parameters to the Azorean region. Reliable data provided by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Climate Research Facility from the Graciosa Island deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (http://www.arm.gov/sites/amf/grw) was used to perform the analysis. Model results showed a tendency to underestimate higher values of diffuse radiation. From the performance results of the correlation models reviewed it was clear that there is room for improvement.

  7. The Mystery of the Cosmic Diffuse Ultraviolet Background Radiation

    E-print Network

    The Mystery of the Cosmic Diffuse Ultraviolet Background Radiation Richard Conn Henry Henry A 20771. joshua.b.tyler@nasa.gov #12;­ 2 ­ ABSTRACT The diffuse cosmic background radiation in the GALEX celestial background radiation is observed over every wavelength range. In the microwave the results

  8. Observations of the diffuse UV radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Tennyson, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Spectra are presented for the diffuse UV radiation field between 1250 to 3100 A from eight different regions of the sky, which were obtained with the Johns Hopkins UVX experiment. UVX flew aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-61C) in January 1986 as part of the Get-Away Special project. The experiment consisted of two 1/4 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometers, covering the spectral range 1250 to 1700 A at 17 A resolution and 1600 to 3100 A at 27 A resolution, respectively, with a field of view of 4 x .25 deg, sufficiently small to pick out regions of the sky with no stars in the line of sight. Values were found for the diffuse cosmic background ranging in intensity from 300 to 900 photons/sq cm/sec/sr/A. The cosmic background is spectrally flat from 1250 to 3100 A, within the uncertainties of each spectrometer. The zodiacal light begins to play a significant role in the diffuse radiation field above 2000 A, and its brightness was determined relative to the solar emission. Observed brightnesses of the zodiacal light in the UV remain almost constant with ecliptic latitude, unlike the declining visible brightnesses, possibly indicating that those (smaller) grains responsible for the UV scattering have a much more uniform distribution with distance from the ecliptic plane than do those grains responsible for the visible scattering.

  9. Adaptive Implicit Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Wang, Zhen [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Manuel [ORNL; Pernice, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2013-01-01

    We describe methods for accurate and efficient long term time integra- tion of non-equilibrium radiation diffusion systems: implicit time integration for effi- cient long term time integration of stiff multiphysics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while control- ling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  10. A radiating shock evaluated using Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, M.; Gentile, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore CA 94550 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo [1] (IMC) has been shown to be very expensive when used to evaluate a radiation field in opaque media. Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion (IMD) [2], which evaluates a spatial discretized diffusion equation using a Monte Carlo algorithm, can be used to reduce the cost of evaluating the radiation field in opaque media [2]. This work couples IMD to the hydrodynamics equations to evaluate opaque diffusive radiating shocks. The Lowrie semi-analytic diffusive radiating shock benchmark[a] is used to verify our implementation of the coupled system of equations. (authors)

  11. Correlation of total, diffuse, and direct solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyco, E. H.; Namkoong, D.

    1977-01-01

    Present requirements for realistic solar energy system evaluations necessitate a comprehensive body of solar-radition data. The data should include both diffuse and direct solar radiation as well as their total on an hourly (or shorter) basis. In general, however, only the total solar radiation values were recorded. This report presents a correlation that relates the diffuse component of an hourly total solar radiation value to the total radiation ratio of the maximum value attainable. The data used were taken at the Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, Massachusetts, for the period 1952. The relation - in the form of the data plots - can be used in situations in which only the hourly total radiation data are available but the diffuse component is desired.

  12. Diffuser for intravessels radiation based on plastic fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pich, Justyna; Grobelny, Andrzej; Beres-Pawlik, Elzbieta

    2006-03-01

    Laser radiation is used in such contemporary medicine as: sport medicine, gynecology etc. Because of many radiations inside the system, there is a need of an element, which allows to supply the place of illness with energy. The dimensions of this element are often small and the one that meets these conditions is diffuser.

  13. DIFFUSION OF PROTONS IN THE OUTER RADIATION BELT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. P. Nakada; G. D. Mead

    1965-01-01

    The diffusion of protons in the outer radiation belt due to violation of the third adiabatic invariant has been examined. The particular mechanism studied is one in which variations in the intensity of the solar wind produce magnetic disturbances causing motion of particles between L shells. A Fokker-Planck diffusion equation is used with terms describing Coulomb energy degradation and charge-exchange

  14. Radiative Extinction of Gaseous Spherical Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santa, K. J.; Chao, B. H.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2007-01-01

    Radiative extinction of spherical diffusion flames was investigated experimentally and numerically. The experiments involved microgravity spherical diffusion flames burning ethylene and propane at 0.98 bar. Both normal (fuel flowing into oxidizer) and inverse (oxidizer flowing into fuel) flames were studied, with nitrogen supplied to either the fuel or the oxygen. Flame conditions were chosen to ensure that the flames extinguished within the 2.2 s of available test time; thus extinction occurred during unsteady flame conditions. Diagnostics included color video and thin-filament pyrometry. The computations, which simulated flow from a porous sphere into a quiescent environment, included detailed chemistry, transport and radiation, and yielded transient results. Radiative extinction was observed experimentally and simulated numerically. Extinction time, peak temperature, and radiative loss fraction were found to be independent of flow rate except at very low flow rates. Radiative heat loss was dominated by the combustion products downstream of the flame and was found to scale with flame surface area, not volume. For large transient flames the heat release rate also scaled with surface area and thus the radiative loss fraction was largely independent of flow rate. Peak temperatures at extinction onset were about 1100 K, which is significantly lower than for kinetic extinction. One observation of this work is that while radiative heat losses can drive transient extinction, this is not because radiative losses are increasing with time (flame size) but rather because the heat release rate is falling off as the temperature drops.

  15. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A.; Shprits, Y.; Subbotin, D.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Resonant interactions between Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves and relativistic electrons may violate the third adiabatic invariant of motion, which produces radial diffusion in the electron radiation belts. This process plays an important role in the formation and structure of the outer electron radiation belt and is important for electron acceleration and losses in that region. Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interaction of electrons with ULF waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2012] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate their relative effect on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes quiet time and storm time geomagnetic activity and is compared to data based on satellite observations. Our calculations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion. We show that the results of the 3D diffusion simulations depend on the assumed parametrization of waves. The differences between the simulations and potential missing physical mechanisms are discussed. References Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999JA900344 Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. J. Rae, D. K. Milling, S. R. Elkington, A. A. Chan, and H. J. Singer (2012), ULF wave derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A04222, doi:10.1029/2011JA017463.

  16. Method for manufacturing nuclear radiation detector with deep diffused junction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hall

    1977-01-01

    Germanium radiation detectors are manufactured by diffusing lithium into high purity p-type germanium. The diffusion is most readily accomplished from a lithium-lead-bismuth alloy at approximately 430°C and is monitored by a quartz half cell containing a standard composition of this alloy. Detectors having n-type cores may be constructed by converting high purity p-type germanium to n-type by a lithium diffusion

  17. Theoretical and Numerical Investigation of Radiative Extinction of Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Anjan

    1996-01-01

    The influence of soot radiation on diffusion flames was investigated using both analytical and numerical techniques. Soot generated in diffusion flames dominate the flame radiation over gaseous combustion products and can significantly lower the temperature of the flame. In low gravity situations there can be significant accumulation of soot and combustion products in the vicinity of the primary reaction zone owing to the absence of any convective buoyant flow. Such situations may result in substantial suppression of chemical activities in a flame, and the possibility of a radiative extinction may also be anticipated. The purpose of this work was to not only investigate the possibility of radiative extinction of a diffusion flame but also to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze the influence of soot radiation on a diffusion flame. In this study, first a hypothetical radiative loss profile of the form of a sech(sup 2) was assumed to influence a pure diffusion flame. It was observed that the reaction zone can, under certain circumstances, move through the radiative loss zone and locate itself on the fuel side of the loss zone contrary to our initial postulate. On increasing the intensity and/or width of the loss zone it was possible to extinguish the flame, and extinction plots were generated. In the presence of a convective flow, however, the movement of the temperature and reaction rate peaks indicated that the flame behavior is more complicated compared to a pure diffusional flame. A comprehensive model of soot formation, oxidation and radiation was used in a more involved analysis. The soot model of Syed, Stewart and Moss was used for soot nucleation and growth and the model of Nagle and Strickland-Constable was used for soot oxidation. The soot radiation was considered in the optically thin limit. An analysis of the flame structure revealed that the radiative loss term is countered both by the reaction term and the diffusion term. The essential balance for the soot volume fraction was found to be between the processes of soot convection and soot growth. Such a balance yielded to analytical treatment and the soot volume fraction could be expressed in the form of an integral. The integral was evaluated using two approximate methods and the results agreed very well with the numerical solutions for all cases examined.

  18. Comparison of the Radiative Two-Flux and Diffusion Approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spuckler, Charles M.

    2006-01-01

    Approximate solutions are sometimes used to determine the heat transfer and temperatures in a semitransparent material in which conduction and thermal radiation are acting. A comparison of the Milne-Eddington two-flux approximation and the diffusion approximation for combined conduction and radiation heat transfer in a ceramic material was preformed to determine the accuracy of the diffusion solution. A plane gray semitransparent layer without a substrate and a non-gray semitransparent plane layer on an opaque substrate were considered. For the plane gray layer the material is semitransparent for all wavelengths and the scattering and absorption coefficients do not vary with wavelength. For the non-gray plane layer the material is semitransparent with constant absorption and scattering coefficients up to a specified wavelength. At higher wavelengths the non-gray plane layer is assumed to be opaque. The layers are heated on one side and cooled on the other by diffuse radiation and convection. The scattering and absorption coefficients were varied. The error in the diffusion approximation compared to the Milne-Eddington two flux approximation was obtained as a function of scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient. The percent difference in interface temperatures and heat flux through the layer obtained using the Milne-Eddington two-flux and diffusion approximations are presented as a function of scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient. The largest errors occur for high scattering and low absorption except for the back surface temperature of the plane gray layer where the error is also larger at low scattering and low absorption. It is shown that the accuracy of the diffusion approximation can be improved for some scattering and absorption conditions if a reflectance obtained from a Kubelka-Munk type two flux theory is used instead of a reflection obtained from the Fresnel equation. The Kubelka-Munk reflectance accounts for surface reflection and radiation scattered back by internal scattering sites while the Fresnel reflection only accounts for surface reflections.

  19. Observations of diffuse galactic gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Share, G.H.

    1988-09-25

    A new window for studying our Galaxy has emerged after over two decases of concerted effort with satellite and balloon-borne gammay-ray experiments. These experiments have discovered what appears to be a diffuse glow along the Galactic plane in lines at 0.511 and 1.809 MeV. I summarize these observations, with emphasis on measurements made with the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission satellite (SMM). The GRS is currently being used to study other diffuse Galactic emissions including the positronium continuum, radioactive lines from recent supernovae and novae, and de-excitation lines from interactions of cosmic-ray protons with interstellar carbon and oxygen.

  20. The origin of the diffuse background gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Recent observations provided evidence for diffuse background gamma radiation extending to energies beyond 100 MeV, and evidence of isotropy and implied cosmological origin. Significant features in the spectrum of this background radiation were observed which provide evidence for its origin in nuclear processes in the early stages of big-bang cosmology, and connect these processes with the galaxy formation theory. A test of the theory is in future observations of the background radiation in the 100 MeK to 100 GeV energy range which are made with large orbiting spark-chamber satellite detectors. The theoretical interpretations of present data, their connection with baryon-symmetric cosmology and galaxy formation theory, and the need for future observations are discussed.

  1. The origin of the diffuse background gamma-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Recent observations have now provided evidence for diffuse background gamma radiation extending to energies beyond 100 MeV. There is some evidence of isotropy and implied cosmological origin. Significant features in the spectrum of this background radiation have been observed which provide evidence for its origin in nuclear processes in the early stages of the big-band cosmology and tie in these processes with galaxy fromation theory. A crucial test of the theory may lie in future observations of the background radiation in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV energy range which may be made with large orbiting spark-chamber satellite detectors. A discussion of the theoretical interpretations of present data, their connection with baryon symmetric cosmology and galaxy formation theory, and the need for future observations are given.

  2. The Mystery of the Cosmic Diffuse Ultraviolet Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Richard Conn; Murthy, Jayant; Overduin, James; Tyler, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic background radiation in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet (FUV, 1300-1700 ) is deduced to originate only partially in the dust-scattered radiation of FUV-emitting stars: the source of a substantial fraction of the FUV background radiation remains a mystery. The radiation is remarkably uniform at both far northern and far southern Galactic latitudes and increases toward lower Galactic latitudes at all Galactic longitudes. We examine speculation that this might be due to interaction of the dark matter with the nuclei of the interstellar medium, but we are unable to point to a plausible mechanism for an effective interaction. We also explore the possibility that we are seeing radiation from bright FUV-emitting stars scattering from a "second population" of interstellar grainsgrains that are small compared with FUV wavelengths. Such grains are known to exist, and they scatter with very high albedo, with an isotropic scattering pattern. However, comparison with the observed distribution (deduced from their 100 ?m emission) of grains at high Galactic latitudes shows no correlation between the grains' location and the observed FUV emission. Our modeling of the FUV scattering by small grains also shows that there must be remarkably few such "smaller" grains at high Galactic latitudes, both north and south; this likely means simply that there is very little interstellar dust of any kind at the Galactic poles, in agreement with Perry and Johnston. We also review our limited knowledge of the cosmic diffuse background at ultraviolet wavelengths shortward of Ly?it could be that our "second component" of the diffuse FUV background persists shortward of the Lyman limit and is the cause of the reionization of the universe.

  3. VOYAGER OBSERVATIONS OF THE DIFFUSE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, Jayant [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengalooru 560 034 (India); Henry, Richard Conn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Holberg, Jay B., E-mail: jmurthy@yahoo.com [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    The two Voyager spacecraft have completed their planetary exploration mission and are now probing the outer realms of the heliosphere. The Voyager ultraviolet spectrometers continued to operate well after the Voyager 2 Neptune encounter in 1989. We present a complete database of diffuse radiation observations made by both Voyagers: a total of 1943 spectra (500-1600 A) scattered throughout the sky. These include observations of dust-scattered starlight, emission lines from the hot interstellar medium, and a number of locations where no diffuse radiation was detected, with the very low upper limit of about 25 photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} A{sup -1}. Many of these observations were from late in the mission when there was significantly less contribution from interplanetary emission lines and thus less contamination of the interstellar signal.

  4. Wireless in-house data communication via diffuse infrared radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    FRITZ R. GFELLER; URS BAPST

    1979-01-01

    A novel wireless broadcast\\/multi-access channel is described for flexibly interconnecting a cluster of data terminals located within the same room. The transmission medium is diffusively scattered infrared radiation at 950-nm wavelength. Transmission is low-to-medium speed and the range up to 50 m. Theoretical analysis indicates that the time dispersion limits the transmission bandwidth of the system to 260 Mbit ?

  5. Influence of radiation damage on xenon diffusion in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, E.; Grtner, K.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; van der Berg, N. G.; Thabethe, T. T.

    2014-08-01

    Diffusion of xenon in poly and single crystalline silicon carbide and the possible influence of radiation damage on it are investigated. For this purpose 360 keV xenon ions were implanted in commercial 6H-SiC and CVD-SiC wafers at room temperature, 350 C and 600 C. Width broadening of the implantation profiles and xenon retention during isochronal and isothermal annealing up to temperatures of 1500 C was determined by RBS-analysis, whilst in the case of 6H-SiC damage profiles were simultaneously obtained by ?-particle channelling. No diffusion or xenon loss was detected in the initially amorphized and eventually recrystallized surface layer of cold implanted 6H-SiC during annealing up to 1200 C. Above that temperature serious erosion of the implanted surface occurred, which made any analysis impossible. No diffusion or xenon loss is detected in the hot implanted 6H-SiC samples during annealing up to 1400 C. Radiation damage dependent grain boundary diffusion is observed at 1300 C in CVD-SiC.

  6. The Gamma-ray galactic diffuse radiation and Cerenkov telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Chardonnet, P. [Theoretical Physics Group ENSLAPP, BP110, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux Cedex (France)] [Theoretical Physics Group ENSLAPP, BP110, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux Cedex (France); [Universite de Savoie, BP1104, 73011 Chambery Cedex (France); Salati, P. [Theoretical Physics Group ENSLAPP, BP110, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux Cedex (France)] [Theoretical Physics Group ENSLAPP, BP110, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux Cedex (France); [Universite de Savoie, BP1104, 73011 Chambery Cedex (France); [Institut Universitaire de France; Silk, J. [545 Campbell Hall, Astronomy Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [545 Campbell Hall, Astronomy Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Grenier, I. [Departement dAstrophysique, Centre dEtudes Nucleaires de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)] [Departement dAstrophysique, Centre dEtudes Nucleaires de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Smoot, G. [Building 50, Room 205, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Building 50, Room 205, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1995-12-01

    By using the PYTHIA version of the Lund Monte Carlo program, we study the photon yield of proton-proton collisions in the energy range between 10 GeV and 1 TeV. The resulting photon spectrum turns out to scale roughly with incident energy. Then, by folding the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray protons with the distribution of HI and CO, the Galactic diffuse emission of {gamma}-rays above 100 GeV is mapped. Prospects for observing that diffuse radiation with atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes are discussed. Present instruments are able to detect the {gamma}-ray glow of the Galactic center. The latter will be mapped by the next generation of telescopes if their energy threshold is decreased. However, a detailed survey of the Galactic ridge will be a real challenge, even in the long term. The MILAGRO project seems more appropriate. Finally, we investigate the {gamma}-ray emission from weakly interacting massive particles clustering at the Galactic center. It has been speculated that those species are a major component of the halo dark matter. We show that their {gamma}-ray signal is swamped in the Galactic diffuse radiation and cannot be observed at TeV energies. {copyright} {ital 1995 The American Astronomical Society.}

  7. A Coupled Model for Radiative Transfer: Doppler Effects, Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Diffusion Asymptotics

    E-print Network

    Goudon, Thierry

    A Coupled Model for Radiative Transfer: Doppler Effects, Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Diffusion. The interaction terms take into account both scattering and absorption/emission phenomena, as well as Doppler-diffusion equations. Key words. Hydrodynamic limits. Diffusion approximation. Radiative transfer. Doppler correction

  8. Distribution patterns of diffuse solar radiation in Yunnan Province, China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lin Wenxian; Lu Enrong; Gao Wenfeng; Pu Shaoxuan; Liu Tao

    1996-01-01

    Yunnan Province, China, is situated in a very favorable region for solar energy utilization. Its unique cubic climates and geographic features make its distribution patterns of solar radiation vary considerably. It will be very beneficial to study, in detail, the characteristics of solar radiation climates in the province. Based on the correlations and the drywet season model of solar radiation

  9. Soot and Radiation Measurements in Microgravity Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jerry C.

    1996-01-01

    The subject of soot formation and radiation heat transfer in microgravity jet diffusion flames is important not only for the understanding of fundamental transport processes involved but also for providing findings relevant to spacecraft fire safety and soot emissions and radiant heat loads of combustors used in air-breathing propulsion systems. Our objectives are to measure and model soot volume fraction, temperature, and radiative heat fluxes in microgravity jet diffusion flames. For this four-year project, we have successfully completed three tasks, which have resulted in new research methodologies and original results. First is the implementation of a thermophoretic soot sampling technique for measuring particle size and aggregate morphology in drop-tower and other reduced gravity experiments. In those laminar flames studied, we found that microgravity soot aggregates typically consist of more primary particles and primary particles are larger in size than those under normal gravity. Comparisons based on data obtained from limited samples show that the soot aggregate's fractal dimension varies within +/- 20% of its typical value of 1.75, with no clear trends between normal and reduced gravity conditions. Second is the development and implementation of a new imaging absorption technique. By properly expanding and spatially-filtering the laser beam to image the flame absorption on a CCD camera and applying numerical smoothing procedures, this technique is capable of measuring instantaneous full-field soot volume fractions. Results from this technique have shown the significant differences in local soot volume fraction, smoking point, and flame shape between normal and reduced gravity flames. We observed that some laminar flames become open-tipped and smoking under microgravity. The third task we completed is the development of a computer program which integrates and couples flame structure, soot formation, and flame radiation analyses together. We found good agreements between model predictions and experimental data for laminar and turbulent flames under both normal and reduced gravity. We have also tested in the laboratory the techniques of rapid-insertion fine-wire thermocouples and emission pyrometry for temperature measurements. These techniques as well as laser Doppler velocimetry and spectral radiative intensity measurement have been proposed to provide valuable data and improve the modeling analyses.

  10. Radiation Symbols

    MedlinePLUS

    Radiation Protection Basics Health Effects Ionizing & Non-Ionizing Radiation Understanding Radiation: Radiation Symbols Radiation Protection Basics Main Page History of Radiation Protection Radiation Warning Symbols Radiation Warning Sign Gallery ...

  11. Optimization of efficiency and response time of diffusion-based nuclear radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Wouters; T. Otaredian; E. M. Schooneveld

    1991-01-01

    The charge collection process in a diffusion-based silicon nuclear radiation detector was investigated by illuminating the detector at the backside with optical radiation. The results are compared to calculations and show good agreement. The collection mechanism is characterized, and the detector response to nuclear radiation and its optimum with respect to efficiency and response time are calculated. Efficiency and response

  12. Diffusion and injections in the radiation belts: L shell coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliadis, D.; Weigel, R. S.; Klimas, A. J.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.

    2002-12-01

    The outer zone of the electron radiation belts is divided in three main regions in L shell: the P0 region (L=3-4 approx.), the P1 region (L=4-7) or heart of the outer zone, and the P2 region (L>7) which is related to the cusp and plasma sheet [Vassiliadis et al., JGR 2002; Phys. Plasmas, 2003]. We measure the correlation between fluxes at adjacent and nearby L shells. We use autoregressive models to account for the coupling. The correlation values and the model coefficients are interpreted in terms of slow diffusion (time scales >=2 days) and rapid injections (<1 day). We parametrize the response by the electron energy measured by SAMPEX/PET fluxes at 2-6 MeV and EXOS-C/HEP at 0.19-3.5 MeV.

  13. Influence of Diffused Solar Radiation on the Solar Concentrating System of a Plant Shoot Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Shin'ya

    Investigation of a plant shoot configuration is used to obtain valuable information concerning the received light system. Additionally, analysis results concerning a plant shoot configuration interaction with direct solar radiation were taken from a past study. However, in order to consider a plant shoot as a received sunlight system, it is necessary to understand the received light characteristics of both direct solar radiation and diffused solar radiation. Under a clear sky, the ratio of direct solar radiation to diffused solar radiation is large. However, under a clouded sky, the amount of diffused solar radiation becomes larger. Therefore, in this paper, we investigate the received light characteristics of a plant shoot configuration under the influence of diffused solar radiation. As a result, we clarify the relationship between the amount of diffused solar radiation and the amount of received light as a function of the characteristics of the plant shoot configuration. In order to obtain diffused solar radiation, it is necessary to correspond to the radiation of the multi-directions. In the analysis, the characteristic of the difference in arrangement of the top leaf and the other leaf was obtained. Therefore, in analysis, leaves other than the top were distributed in the wide range.

  14. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of biological systems leads to the formation of radiolytic species such as H(raised dot), (raised dot)OH, H2, H2O2, e(sup -)(sub aq), etc.[1]. These species react with neighboring molecules, which result in damage in biological molecules such as DNA. Radiation chemistry is there for every important to understand the radiobiological consequences of radiation[2]. In this work, we discuss an approach based on the exact Green Functions for diffusion-influenced reactions which may be used to simulate radiation chemistry and eventually extended to study more complex systems, including DNA.

  15. Effects of Refractive Index and Diffuse or Specular Boundaries on a Radiating Isothermal Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Equilibrium temperatures of an absorbing-emitting layer were obtained for exposure to incident radiation and with the layer boundaries either specular or diffuse. For high refractive indices the surface condition can influence the radiative heat balance if the layer optical thickness is small. Hence for a spectrally varying absorption coefficient the layer temperature is affected if there is significant radiative energy in the spectral range with a small absorption coefficient. Similar behavior was obtained for transient radiative cooling of a layer where the results are affected by the initial temperature and hence the fraction of energy radiated in the short wavelength region where the absorption coefficient is small. The results are a layer without internal scattering. If internal scattering is significant, the radiation reaching the internal surface of a boundary is diffused and the effect of the two different surface conditions would become small.

  16. Increased diffuse radiation fraction does not significantly accelerate plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angert, Alon; Krakauer, Nir

    2010-05-01

    A recent modelling study (Mercado et al., 2009) claims that increased numbers of scattering aerosols are responsible for a substantial fraction of the terrestrial carbon sink in recent decades because higher diffuse light fraction enhances plant net primary production (NPP). Here we show that observations of atmospheric CO2 seasonal cycle and tree ring data indicate that the relation between diffuse light and NPP is actually quite weak on annual timescales. The inconsistency of these data with the modelling results may arise because the relationships used to quantify the enhancement of NPP were calibrated with eddy covariance measurements of hourly carbon uptake. The effect of diffuse-light fraction on carbon uptake could depend on timescale, since this effect varies rapidly as sun angle and cloudiness change, and since plants can respond dynamically over various timescales to change in incoming radiation. Volcanic eruptions, such as the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991, provide the best available tests for the effect of an annual-scale increase in the diffuse light fraction. Following the Pinatubo Eruption, in 1992 and 1993, a sharp decrease in the atmospheric CO2 growth rate was observed. This could have resulted from enhanced plant carbon uptake. Mercado et al. (2009) argue that largely as a result of the (volcanic aerosol driven) increase in diffuse light fraction, NPP was elevated in 1992, particularly between 25 N-45 N where annual NPP was modelled to be ~0.8 PgC (~10%) above average. In a previous study (Angert et al., 2004) a biogeochemical model (CASA) linked to an atmospheric tracer model (MATCH), was used to show that a diffuse-radiation driven increase in NPP in the extratropics will enhance carbon uptake mostly in summer, leading to a lower CO2 seasonal minimum. Here we use a 'toy model' to show that this conclusion is general and model-independent. The model shows that an enhanced sink of 0.8 PgC, similar to that modelled by Mercado et al. (2009), will result in a measurable decrease (~0.6ppm) in the seasonal CO2 minimum. This holds regardless of whether the sink is the result of 1) An increase in NPP, or 2) The combined effect of a temperature-driven decrease in heterotrophic respiration (Rh) and no change in NPP. This is since both NPP and Rh peak in summer. By contrast, observations from the NOAA global CO2 monitoring network show the opposite change in the seasonal minimum in 1992 and 1993 (~0.2ppm increase) both at Mauna Loa, and in the Marine Boundary Layer mean (>20 N), which is hard to reconcile with increased NPP in northern summer. Another indicator of annual NPP is tree wood increment. Previous work (Krakauer et al., 2003) showed that the average response in tree ring series after past Pinatubo-size volcanic eruptions implied lower NPP north of 45 N, presumably as a result of shorter growing season and lower total irradiance induced by scattering aerosols, and no significant change in NPP at lower latitudes. Here we show that In 1992, after the Pinatubo eruption, ring width in the 25 N-45 N band was 99.32.9% of average (n=351 sites), similar to the average of 100.42.2% over past eruptions (n=15 eruptions) (Uncertainty is given as 2 SE.). These results are also inconsistent with substantial NPP enhancement, although a limitation of the tree-ring approach is that available measurements do not uniformly sample the latitude band. The combined evidence of tree rings and the CO2 seasonal cycle shows that the enhancement of NPP by scattering aerosols on annual timescales is weak. This result suggests that reducing aerosols through stricter pollution controls may strengthen the land carbon sink, while geo-engineering schemes which aim to mitigate global warming by spreading scattering aerosols in the stratosphere may weaken it.

  17. Diffusive radiation in one-dimensional Langmuir turbulence.

    PubMed

    Fleishman, G D; Toptygin, I N

    2007-07-01

    We calculate spectra of radiation produced by a relativistic particle in the presence of one-dimensional Langmuir turbulence which might be generated by a streaming instability in the plasma, in particular, in the shock front or at the shock-shock interactions. The shape of the radiation spectra is shown to depend sensitively on the angle between the particle velocity and electric field direction. The radiation spectrum in the case of exactly transverse particle motion is degenerate and similar to that of spatially uniform Langmuir oscillations. In the case of oblique propagation, the spectrum is more complex, it consists of a number of power-law regions and may contain a distinct high-frequency spectral peak. The emission process considered is relevant to various laboratory plasma settings and for astrophysical objects as gamma-ray bursts and collimated jets. PMID:17677604

  18. A radiation-hydrodynamics scheme valid from the transport to the diffusion limit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Audit; P. Charrier; J.-P. Chize; B. Dubroca

    2002-01-01

    We present in this paper the numerical treatment of the coupling between hydrodynamics and radiative transfer. The fluid is modeled by classical conservation laws (mass, momentum and energy) and the radiation by the grey moment $M_1$ system. The scheme introduced is able to compute accurate numerical solution over a broad class of regimes from the transport to the diffusive limits.

  19. Detailed modeling analysis for soot formation and radiation in microgravity gas jet diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jerry C.; Tong, LI; Greenberg, Paul S.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation heat transfer in combustion systems has been receiving increasing interest. In the case of hydrocarbon fuels, a significant portion of the radiation comes from soot particles, justifying the need for detailed soot formation model and radiation transfer calculations. For laminar gas jet diffusion flames, results from this project (4/1/91 8/22/95) and another NASA study show that flame shape, soot concentration, and radiation heat fluxes are substantially different under microgravity conditions. Our emphasis is on including detailed soot transport models and a detailed solution for radiation heat transfer, and on coupling them with the flame structure calculations. In this paper, we will discuss the following three specific areas: (1) Comparing two existing soot formation models, and identifying possible improvements; (2) A simple yet reasonably accurate approach to calculating total radiative properties and/or fluxes over the spectral range; and (3) Investigating the convergence of iterations between the flame structure solver and the radiation heat transfer solver.

  20. An Improved Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation

    E-print Network

    Munger, B.; Haberl, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an improved multipyranometer array (MPA) for the continuous remote measurement of direct and diffuse solar radiation. The MPA described in this paper is an improvement over previously published MPA studies due...

  1. Temperature-dependent radiation-enhanced diffusion in ion-bombarded solids

    SciTech Connect

    Marton, D.; Fine, J.; Chambers, G.P.

    1988-12-05

    Temperature-dependent radiation-enhanced-diffusion rates for Ag in Ni have been found to decrease at elevated temperatures. The observed narrowing of interface interdiffusion regions with increasing temperature depends on both defect concentration and migration processes which occur in ion-bombarded solids. These findings can be interpreted in terms of a general model of radiation-enhanced diffusion that involves long-lived complex defects which can migrate for large distances and which are themselves subject to annealing.

  2. Data From HANE-Generated Radiation Belts and the Origin of Diffusion Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-16

    In this presentation we briefly review some of the published data regarding the artificial radiation belts produced by the Starfish and R2 high altitude nuclear explosions in 1962. The data showed slow temporal variations of the belts in altitude (L) and pitch angle ({alpha}) that could be modeled as a diffusion process. That early work formed the basis for more complex radiation belt diffusion models that are in use at present.

  3. A hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer in absorbing and scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, M.; Caliot, C.; Crouseilles, N.; Coelho, P. J.

    2014-10-01

    A new multi-scale hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer is proposed in order to improve the efficiency of the calculations close to the diffusive regime, in absorbing and strongly scattering media. In this model, the radiative intensity is decomposed into a macroscopic component calculated by the diffusion equation, and a mesoscopic component. The transport equation for the mesoscopic component allows to correct the estimation of the diffusion equation, and then to obtain the solution of the linear radiative transfer equation. In this work, results are presented for stationary and transient radiative transfer cases, in examples which concern solar concentrated and optical tomography applications. The Monte Carlo and the discrete-ordinate methods are used to solve the mesoscopic equation. It is shown that the multi-scale model allows to improve the efficiency of the calculations when the medium is close to the diffusive regime. The proposed model is a good alternative for radiative transfer at the intermediate regime where the macroscopic diffusion equation is not accurate enough and the radiative transfer equation requires too much computational effort.

  4. Image reconstruction in quantitative photoacoustic tomography using the radiative transfer equation and the diffusion approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, Tanja; Pulkkinen, Aki; Cox, Ben T.; Kaipio, Jari P.; Arridge, Simon R.

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative photoacoustic tomography is an emerging imaging technique aiming at estimating the distribution of optical parameters inside tissue from photoacoustic image which is formed by combining optical information and ultrasound propagation. In this paper reconstruction of absorption and scattering distributions using the radiative transfer equation and the diffusion approximation as forward models for light propagation is investigated. Data is simulated using Monte Carlo method and different size target domains are considered. The results show that the radiative transfer equation can estimate both absorption and scattering distributions with good accuracy. Furthermore, in the simulated test cases, the diffusion approximation can produce as good estimates for absorption as the radiative transfer equation.

  5. Modeling inward diffusion and slow decay of energetic electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Ni, B.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Henderson, M. G.; Spence, H. E.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2015-02-01

    A new 3-D diffusion code is used to investigate the inward intrusion and slow decay of energetic radiation belt electrons (>0.5 MeV) observed by the Van Allen Probes during a 10 day quiet period on March 2013. During the inward transport, the peak differential electron fluxes decreased by approximately an order of magnitude at various energies. Our 3-D radiation belt simulation including radial diffusion and pitch angle and energy diffusion by plasmaspheric hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves reproduces the essential features of the observed electron flux evolution. The decay time scales and the pitch angle distributions in our simulation are consistent with the Van Allen Probe observations over multiple energy channels. Our study suggests that the quiet time energetic electron dynamics are effectively controlled by inward radial diffusion and pitch angle scattering due to a combination of plasmaspheric hiss and EMIC waves in the Earth's radiation belts.

  6. PITCH-ANGLE DIFFUSION OF RADIATION-BELT ELECTRONS WITHIN THE PLASMASPHERE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence R. Lyons; Richard Mansergh Thorne; Charles F. Kennel

    1972-01-01

    The goal of this work is to explain the formation of the quiet-time electron slot, which divides the radiation belt electrons into an inner and an outer zone. We quantitatively investigate the pitch-angle diffusion of radiation belt electrons resulting from resonant interactions with the observed plasmaspheric whistler-mode wave band. The effects of wave propagation obliquely to the geomagnetic field direction

  7. Effect of microwave radiation on diffusion behavior of anti-solvent during crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakuma, Yusuke; Miura, Masataka

    2014-09-01

    The effect of microwave radiation on anti-solvent crystallization was investigated by in situ observation of nanoparticle size in a reactor. The precipitation of sodium chloride by the addition of ethanol was accelerated by the increase in molecular diffusion caused by microwave radiation. The microwave power controlled the particle size because increasing the power increases the temperature, which leads to the dissolution of the precipitate. The salt concentration in the solution, and the anti-solvent concentration and volume were important factors in anti-solvent crystallization under microwave radiation.

  8. Comparative radiation resistance, temperature dependence and performance of diffused junction indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells whose p-n junctions were processed by the open tube capped diffusion and by the closed tube uncapped diffusion of sulfur into Czochralski-grown p-type substrates are compared. Differences found in radiation resistance were attributed to the effects of increased base dopant concentration. Both sets of cells showed superior radiation resistance to that of gallium arsenide cells, in agreement with previous results. No correlation was, however, found between the open-circuit voltage and the temperature dependence of the maximum power.

  9. Measure of Diffusion Model Error for Thermal Radiation Transport

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Akansha

    2013-04-19

    The diffusion approximation to the equation of transfer (Boltzmann transport equation) is usually applied to media where scattering dominates the interactions. Diffusion approximation helps in significant savings in terms of code complexity...

  10. Short-term changes in Jupiter's synchrotron radiation at 325 MHz: Enhanced radial diffusion in Jupiter's radiation belt driven by solar UV\\/EUV heating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Tsuchiya; H. Misawa; K. Imai; A. Morioka

    2011-01-01

    Evidence of short-term changes in Jupiter's synchrotron radiaion at 325 MHzRadial diffusion rate of 3 10?8 L3 \\/s is suitable in Jupiter's radiation beltThe synchrotron emission does not contribute electron loss in the radiation belt

  11. Radiation enteritis

    MedlinePLUS

    Radiation enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. The therapy ...

  12. A hybrid transport-diffusion Monte Carlo method for frequency-dependent radiative-transfer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D., E-mail: jdd@lanl.gov [Computational Physics and Methods Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS D409, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Thompson, Kelly G., E-mail: kgt@lanl.gov [Computational Physics and Methods Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS D409, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Urbatsch, Todd J., E-mail: tmonster@lanl.gov [Computational Physics and Methods Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS D409, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations in optically thick media. In DDMC, particles take discrete steps between spatial cells according to a discretized diffusion equation. Each discrete step replaces many smaller Monte Carlo steps, thus improving the efficiency of the simulation. In this paper, we present an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold, as optical thickness is typically a decreasing function of frequency. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo, which results in a hybrid transport-diffusion scheme. With a set of frequency-dependent test problems, we confirm the accuracy and increased efficiency of our new DDMC method.

  13. Process of defect formation and diffusion in metals induced by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvonkov, Alexander D.; Boranbaeva, H. M.

    1990-10-01

    There have been conducted researches for the presence of defects in specimens of repined carbonyl iron after the treatment by continuous radiation of C02-laser under subcritical conditions. High degree of presence of the defects is characterized by appearance of cellular dislocation structure and by considerable oversaturation of vacancies. There have been also investigated the conditions of realization of an accelerated diffusion of boron in iron and steels in treating by continuous radiation of CD2-- laser. It was revealed that the boron redistribution from the previously created layer of borides on the metal surface is accomplished in steels to the depthes of up to 3 mm. The accelerated oxygen diffusion stimulated by the laser radiation has been investigated on the basis of the obtained results of the process of internal oxidation of alloy Cu-Sn (0. 55 at 7. ). There has been proposed the model of process of accelerated transport. 2. FORMATION OF DEFECTS IN CARBONYL IRON UNDER CONTINUOUS LASER RADIATION The investigation of the defect formation under the continuous laser radiation 10. 6 sam) was conducted with the specimens (4x0. 8x80) mm of carbonyl iron 0. 008 C 0. 047 Mn Al + Si + S) refined in hydrogen atmosphere. The laser treatment was accomplished without flashing the metal surface. Treatment characteristics: radiation power P (0. 25-1. 1 kV. Specimen displacement speed under the laser beam V (10-2. 5) mm/s

  14. Radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists. PMID:2040250

  15. An Experimental and Theoretical Study of Radiative Extinction of Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, Arvind

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this research was to experimentally and theoretically investigate the radiation-induced extinction of gaseous diffusion flames in microgravity. The microgravity conditions were required because radiation-induced extinction is generally not possible in 1-g but is highly likely in microgravity. In 1-g, the flame-generated particulates (e.g. soot) and gaseous combustion products that are responsible for flame radiation, are swept away from the high temperature reaction zone by the buoyancy-induced flow and a steady state is developed. In microgravity, however, the absence of buoyancy-induced flow which transports the fuel and the oxidizer to the combustion zone and removes the hot combustion products from it enhances the flame radiation due to: (1) transient build-up of the combustion products in the flame zone which increases the gas radiation, and (2) longer residence time makes conditions appropriate for substantial amounts of soot to form which is usually responsible for most of the radiative heat loss. Numerical calculations conducted during the course of this work show that even non-radiative flames continue to become "weaker" (diminished burning rate per unit flame area) due to reduced rates of convective and diffusive transport. Thus, it was anticipated that radiative heat loss may eventually extinguish the already "weak" microgravity diffusion flame. While this hypothesis appears convincing and our numerical calculations support it, experiments for a long enough microgravity time could not be conducted during the course of this research to provide an experimental proof. Space shuttle experiments on candle flames show that in an infinite ambient atmosphere, the hemispherical candle flame in microgravity will burn indefinitely. It was hoped that radiative extinction can be experimentally shown by the aerodynamically stabilized gaseous diffusion flames where the fuel supply rate was externally controlled. While substantial progress toward this goal was made during this project, identifying the experimental conditions for which radiative extinction occurs for various fuels requires further study. Details concerning this research which are discussed in published articles are included in the appendices.

  16. Radiative cooler. [spacecraft radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrick, S. W.; Garcia, R. D. (inventors)

    1984-01-01

    A method and radiative cooling device for use in passively cooling spaces is described. It is applicable to any level of thermal radiation in vacuum and to high-intensity thermal radiation in non-vacuum environments. The device includes an enclosure nested in a multiplicity of thin, low-emittance, highly-reflective shields. The shields are suspended in a casing in mutual angular relation and having V-shaped spaces defined therebetween for redirecting, by reflection, toward the large openings of the V-shaped spaces, thermal radiation entering the sides of the shields, and emitted to the spaces, whereby successively reduced quantities of thermal radiation are reflected by the surfaces along substantially parallel paths extended through the V-shaped spaces to a common heat sink such as the cold thermal background of space.

  17. Radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Rifu, T.

    1984-10-16

    A radiation detector adapted to be used with a computerized tomographic apparatus, wherein filters prepared from a radiation-absorbing material are provided on the outside of a radiation-permeable window in the positions facing radiation-detecting cells. The filters compensate for differences between the radiation-detecting properties of the detection cells, thereby equalizing said radiation-detecting properties.

  18. Moisture Diffusivity Characteristics of Rough Rice Under Infrared Radiation Heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To design an efficient infrared (IR) dryer for rough rice, it is important to understand the drying behavior of rice grains under infrared heating. The objective of this study was to determine the moisture diffusivity and moisture diffusivity coefficient of rough rice under IR heating and cooling. ...

  19. Increased diffuse radiation fraction does not significantly accelerate plant growth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alon Angert; Nir Krakauer

    2010-01-01

    A recent modelling study (Mercado et al., 2009) claims that increased numbers of scattering aerosols are responsible for a substantial fraction of the terrestrial carbon sink in recent decades because higher diffuse light fraction enhances plant net primary production (NPP). Here we show that observations of atmospheric CO2 seasonal cycle and tree ring data indicate that the relation between diffuse

  20. A comparative study of methods for computing the diffuse radiation viewfactors for complex structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, A. F.; Johansson, O.; Lobo, M.; Abrous, A.

    1988-01-01

    Several different numerical methods for calculating diffuse radiation viewfactors are described. Each is applied to a range of surface configurations, from almost completely unobstructed to a dense set of intersecting surfaces. The speed, accuracy and unique characteristics are discussed in order to define optimal methods for different surface geometries.

  1. Cooling following large volcanic eruptions corrected for the effect of diffuse radiation on tree rings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Robock

    2005-01-01

    The lack of a larger cooling in proxy records of climate change following large volcanic eruptions such as those of Tambora in 1815 and Krakatau in 1883 has long been a puzzle for climatologists. These records, however, may have been biased by enhanced tree growth for several years following each eruption induced by additional diffuse radiation caused by the stratospheric

  2. Using a simple apparatus to measure direct and diffuse photosynthetically active radiation at remote locations.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Michael J; Kucharik, Christopher J; Norman, John M

    2015-01-01

    Plant canopy interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) drives carbon dioxide (CO2), water and energy cycling in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Quantifying intercepted PAR requires accurate measurements of total incident PAR above canopies and direct beam and diffuse PAR components. While some regional data sets include these data, e.g. from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites, they are not often applicable to local research sites because of the variable nature (spatial and temporal) of environmental variables that influence incoming PAR. Currently available instrumentation that measures diffuse and direct beam radiation separately can be cost prohibitive and require frequent adjustments. Alternatively, generalized empirical relationships that relate atmospheric variables and radiation components can be used but require assumptions that increase the potential for error. Our goal here was to construct and test a cheaper, highly portable instrument alternative that could be used at remote field sites to measure total, diffuse and direct beam PAR for extended time periods without supervision. The apparatus tested here uses a fabricated, solar powered rotating shadowband and other commercially available parts to collect continuous hourly PAR data. Measurements of total incident PAR had nearly a one-to-one relationship with total incident radiation measurements taken at the same research site by an unobstructed point quantum sensor. Additionally, measurements of diffuse PAR compared favorably with modeled estimates from previously published data, but displayed significant differences that were attributed to the important influence of rapidly changing local environmental conditions. The cost of the system is about 50% less than comparable commercially available systems that require periodic, but not continual adjustments. Overall, the data produced using this apparatus indicates that this instrumentation has the potential to support ecological research via a relatively inexpensive method to collect continuous measurements of total, direct beam and diffuse PAR in remote locations. PMID:25668208

  3. Using a Simple Apparatus to Measure Direct and Diffuse Photosynthetically Active Radiation at Remote Locations

    PubMed Central

    Cruse, Michael J.; Kucharik, Christopher J.; Norman, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Plant canopy interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) drives carbon dioxide (CO2), water and energy cycling in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Quantifying intercepted PAR requires accurate measurements of total incident PAR above canopies and direct beam and diffuse PAR components. While some regional data sets include these data, e.g. from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites, they are not often applicable to local research sites because of the variable nature (spatial and temporal) of environmental variables that influence incoming PAR. Currently available instrumentation that measures diffuse and direct beam radiation separately can be cost prohibitive and require frequent adjustments. Alternatively, generalized empirical relationships that relate atmospheric variables and radiation components can be used but require assumptions that increase the potential for error. Our goal here was to construct and test a cheaper, highly portable instrument alternative that could be used at remote field sites to measure total, diffuse and direct beam PAR for extended time periods without supervision. The apparatus tested here uses a fabricated, solar powered rotating shadowband and other commercially available parts to collect continuous hourly PAR data. Measurements of total incident PAR had nearly a one-to-one relationship with total incident radiation measurements taken at the same research site by an unobstructed point quantum sensor. Additionally, measurements of diffuse PAR compared favorably with modeled estimates from previously published data, but displayed significant differences that were attributed to the important influence of rapidly changing local environmental conditions. The cost of the system is about 50% less than comparable commercially available systems that require periodic, but not continual adjustments. Overall, the data produced using this apparatus indicates that this instrumentation has the potential to support ecological research via a relatively inexpensive method to collect continuous measurements of total, direct beam and diffuse PAR in remote locations. PMID:25668208

  4. Multifrequency radiation diffusion equations for homogeneous, refractive, lossy media and their interface conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, Aleksei I., E-mail: shestakov1@llnl.gov

    2013-06-15

    We derive time-dependent multifrequency diffusion equations for homogeneous, refractive lossy media. The equations are applicable for a domain composed of several materials with distinct refractive indexes. In such applications, the fundamental radiation variable, the intensity I, is discontinuous across material interfaces. The diffusion equations evolve a variable ?, the integral of I over all directions divided by the square of the refractive index. Attention is focused on boundary and internal interface conditions for ?. For numerical solutions using finite elements, it is shown that at material interfaces, the usual diffusion coefficient 1/3? of the multifrequency equation, where ? is the opacity, is modified by a tensor diffusion term consisting of integrals of the reflectivity. Numerical results are presented. For a single material simulation, the ? equations yield the same result as diffusion equations that evolve the spectral radiation energy density. A second simulation solves a test problem that models radiation transport in a domain comprised of materials with different refractive indexes. Results qualitatively agree with those previously published.

  5. A radiation-hydrodynamics scheme valid from the transport to the diffusion limit

    E-print Network

    Audit, E; Chieze, J P; Dubroca, B

    2002-01-01

    We present in this paper the numerical treatment of the coupling between hydrodynamics and radiative transfer. The fluid is modeled by classical conservation laws (mass, momentum and energy) and the radiation by the grey moment $M_1$ system. The scheme introduced is able to compute accurate numerical solution over a broad class of regimes from the transport to the diffusive limits. We propose an asymptotic preserving modification of the HLLE scheme in order to treat correctly the diffusion limit. Several numerical results are presented, which show that this approach is robust and have the correct behavior in both the diffusive and free-streaming limits. In the last numerical example we test this approach on a complex physical case by considering the collapse of a gas cloud leading to a proto-stellar structure which, among other features, exhibits very steep opacity gradients.

  6. A radiation-hydrodynamics scheme valid from the transport to the diffusion limit

    E-print Network

    E. Audit; P. Charrier; J. -P. Chize; B. Dubroca

    2002-06-17

    We present in this paper the numerical treatment of the coupling between hydrodynamics and radiative transfer. The fluid is modeled by classical conservation laws (mass, momentum and energy) and the radiation by the grey moment $M_1$ system. The scheme introduced is able to compute accurate numerical solution over a broad class of regimes from the transport to the diffusive limits. We propose an asymptotic preserving modification of the HLLE scheme in order to treat correctly the diffusion limit. Several numerical results are presented, which show that this approach is robust and have the correct behavior in both the diffusive and free-streaming limits. In the last numerical example we test this approach on a complex physical case by considering the collapse of a gas cloud leading to a proto-stellar structure which, among other features, exhibits very steep opacity gradients.

  7. Effects of Radiative Diffusion on Thin Flux Tubes in Turbulent Solar-like Convection

    E-print Network

    Weber, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    We study the combined effects of convection and radiative diffusion on the evolution of thin magnetic flux tubes in the solar interior. Radiative diffusion is the primary supplier of heat to convective motions in the lower convection zone, and it results in a heat input per unit volume of magnetic flux tubes that has been ignored by many previous thin flux tube studies. We use a thin flux tube model subject to convection taken from a rotating spherical shell of turbulent, solar-like convection as described by Weber, Fan, and Miesch (2011, Astrophys. J., 741, 11; 2013, Solar Phys., 287, 239), now taking into account the influence of radiative heating on flux tubes of large-scale active regions. Our simulations show that flux tubes of less than or equal to 60 kG subject to solar-like convective flows do not anchor in the overshoot region, but rather drift upward due to the increased buoyancy of the flux tube earlier in its evolution as a result of the inclusion of radiative diffusion. Flux tubes of magnetic fie...

  8. Uncertainty in assessment of radiation-induced diffusion index changes in individual patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazem-Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Chapman, Christopher H.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina I.; Cao, Yue

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate repeatability coefficients of diffusion tensor indices to assess whether longitudinal changes in diffusion indices were true changes beyond the uncertainty for individual patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT). Twenty-two patients who had low-grade or benign tumors and were treated by partial brain radiation therapy (PBRT) participated in an IRB-approved MRI protocol. The diffusion tensor images in the patients were acquired pre-RT, week 3 during RT, at the end of RT, and 1, 6, and 18 months after RT. As a measure of uncertainty, repeatability coefficients (RC) of diffusion indices in the segmented cingulum, corpus callosum, and fornix were estimated by using test-retest diffusion tensor datasets from the National Biomedical Imaging Archive (NBIA) database. The upper and lower limits of the 95% confidence interval of the estimated RC from the test and retest data were used to evaluate whether the longitudinal percentage changes in diffusion indices in the segmented structures in the individual patients were beyond the uncertainty and thus could be considered as true radiation-induced changes. Diffusion indices in different white matter structures showed different uncertainty ranges. The estimated RC for fractional anisotropy (FA) ranged from 5.3% to 9.6%, for mean diffusivity (MD) from 2.2% to 6.8%, for axial diffusivity (AD) from 2.4% to 5.5%, and for radial diffusivity (RD) from 2.9% to 9.7%. Overall, 23% of the patients treated by RT had FA changes, 44% had MD changes, 50% had AD changes, and 50% had RD changes beyond the uncertainty ranges. In the fornix, 85.7% and 100% of the patients showed changes beyond the uncertainty range at 6 and 18 months after RT, demonstrating that radiation has a pronounced late effect on the fornix compared to other segmented structures. It is critical to determine reliability of a change observed in an individual patient for clinical decision making. Assessments of the repeatability and confidence interval of diffusion tensor measurements in white matter structures allow us to determine the true longitudinal change in individual patients.

  9. Radiation Heat Transfer Between Diffuse-Gray Surfaces Using Higher Order Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Dana C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents recent work on developing methods for analyzing radiation heat transfer between diffuse-gray surfaces using p-version finite elements. The work was motivated by a thermal analysis of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) wing structure which showed the importance of radiation heat transfer throughout the structure. The analysis also showed that refining the finite element mesh to accurately capture the temperature distribution on the internal structure led to very large meshes with unacceptably long execution times. Traditional methods for calculating surface-to-surface radiation are based on assumptions that are not appropriate for p-version finite elements. Two methods for determining internal radiation heat transfer are developed for one and two-dimensional p-version finite elements. In the first method, higher-order elements are divided into a number of sub-elements. Traditional methods are used to determine radiation heat flux along each sub-element and then mapped back to the parent element. In the second method, the radiation heat transfer equations are numerically integrated over the higher-order element. Comparisons with analytical solutions show that the integration scheme is generally more accurate than the sub-element method. Comparison to results from traditional finite elements shows that significant reduction in the number of elements in the mesh is possible using higher-order (p-version) finite elements.

  10. Electromagnetic Radiation in Hot QCD Matter: Rates, Electric Conductivity, Flavor Susceptibility and Diffusion

    E-print Network

    Chang-Hwan Lee; Ismail Zahed

    2014-03-07

    We discuss the general features of the electromagnetic radiation from a thermal hadronic gas as constrained by chiral symmetry. The medium effects on the electromagnetic spectral functions and the partial restoration of chiral symmetry are quantified in terms of the pion densities. The results are compared with the electromagnetic radiation from a strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma in terms of the leading gluon condensate operators. We use the spectral functions as constrained by the emission rates to estimate the electric conductivity, the light flavor susceptibility and diffusion constant across the transition from the correlated hadronic gas to a strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma.

  11. Differences in Brainstem Fiber Tract Response to Radiation: A Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    SciTech Connect

    Uh, Jinsoo, E-mail: jinsoo.uh@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Li, Yimei; Feng, Tianshu [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Gajjar, Amar [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Ogg, Robert J.; Hua, Chiaho [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation-induced changes in white matter tracts are uniform across the brainstem. Methods and Materials: We analyzed serial diffusion tensor imaging data, acquired before radiation therapy and over 48 to 72 months of follow-up, from 42 pediatric patients (age 6-20 years) with medulloblastoma. FSL software (FMRIB, Oxford, UK) was used to calculate fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial, radial, and mean diffusivities. For a consistent identification of volumes of interest (VOIs), the parametric maps of each patient were transformed to a standard brain space (MNI152), on which we identified VOIs including corticospinal tract (CST), medial lemniscus (ML), transverse pontine fiber (TPF), and middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP) at the level of pons. Temporal changes of DTI parameters in VOIs were compared using a linear mixed effect model. Results: Radiation-induced white matter injury was marked by a decline in FA after treatment. The decline was often accompanied by decreased axial diffusivity, increased radial diffusivity, or both. This implied axonal damage and demyelination. We observed that the magnitude of the changes was not always uniform across substructures of the brainstem. Specifically, the changes in DTI parameters for TPF were more pronounced than in other regions (P<.001 for FA) despite similarities in the distribution of dose. We did not find a significant difference among CST, ML, and MCP in these patients (P>.093 for all parameters). Conclusions: Changes in the structural integrity of white matter tracts, assessed by DTI, were not uniform across the brainstem after radiation therapy. These results support a role for tract-based assessment in radiation treatment planning and determination of brainstem tolerance.

  12. An Experimental and Theoretical Study of Radiative Extinction of Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, Arvind; Wichman, Indrek; Guenther, Mark; Ray, Anjan; Agrawal, Sanjay

    1993-01-01

    In a recent paper on 'Observations of candle flames under various atmospheres in microgravity' by Ross et al., it was found that for the same atmosphere, the burning rate per unit wick surface area and the flame temperature were considerably reduced in microgravity as compared with normal gravity. Also, the flame (spherical in microgravity) was much thicker and further removed from the wick. It thus appears that the flame becomes 'weaker' in microgravity due to the absence of buoyancy generated flow which serves to transport the oxidizer to the combustion zone and remove the hot combustion products from it. The buoyant flow, which may be characterized by the strain rate, assists the diffusion process to execute these essential functions for the survival of the flame. Thus, the diffusion flame is 'weak' at very low strain rates and as the strain rate increases the flame is initially 'strengthened' and eventually it may be 'blown out'. The computed flammability boundaries of T'ien show that such a reversal in material flammability occurs at strain rates around 5 sec. At very low or zero strain rates, flame radiation is expected to considerably affect this 'weak' diffusion flame because: (1) the concentration of combustion products which participate in gas radiation is high in the flame zone; and (2) low strain rates provide sufficient residence time for substantial amounts of soot to form which is usually responsible for a major portion of the radiative heat loss. We anticipate that flame radiation will eventually extinguish this flame. Thus, the objective of this project is to perform an experimental and theoretical investigation of radiation-induced extinction of diffusion flames under microgravity conditions. This is important for spacecraft fire safety.

  13. Extinction of counterflow diffusion flames with radiative heat loss and nonunity Lewis numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.Y.; Law, C.K. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-5263 (United States); Chen, W.H. [Department of Marine Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung (Taiwan)

    2007-02-15

    The structure and extinction characteristics of counterflow diffusion flames with flame radiation and nonunity Lewis numbers of the fuel and oxidant are examined using multiscale asymptotic theory, and a model expressed in terms of the jump relations and reactant leakages with the proper consideration of the excess enthalpy overlooked in previous analyses is developed. The existence of the dual extinction limits in the presence of radiative heat loss, namely the kinetic limit at small Damkoehler number (high stretch rate) and the radiative limit at large Damkoehler number (low stretch rate), are identified. It is found that the former is minimally affected by radiative loss, while a substantial amount of heat loss is associated with the radiative limit. Reactant leakage, however, is the root cause for both limits. The influence of radiative loss on the extinction Damkoehler numbers is found to be through its effects on the flame temperature, the excess enthalpy, and the reduced extinction Damkoehler number. At both extinction limits, the contribution from the flame temperature is always important and dominant. The contributions from the other two, however, could be important in some special cases. At small Le{sub F}, the contribution from the reduced extinction Damkoehler number is large and even dominant under small radiative loss. The contribution from the excess enthalpy is important for small Le{sub O} and it may be comparable to the contribution from the flame temperature when radiative loss is small. Thus, overlooking the excess enthalpy in previous analyses may have resulted in rather large error in the predicted extinction Damkoehler numbers, especially the kinetic one. (author)

  14. Evaluating Contextual Processing in Diffusion MRI: Application to Optic Radiation Reconstruction for Epilepsy Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tax, Chantal M. W.; Duits, Remco; Vilanova, Anna; ter Haar Romeny, Bart M.; Hofman, Paul; Wagner, Louis; Leemans, Alexander; Ossenblok, Pauly

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion MRI and tractography allow for investigation of the architectural configuration of white matter in vivo, offering new avenues for applications like presurgical planning. Despite the promising outlook, there are many pitfalls that complicate its use for (clinical) application. Amongst these are inaccuracies in the geometry of the diffusion profiles on which tractography is based, and poor alignment with neighboring profiles. Recently developed contextual processing techniques, including enhancement and well-posed geometric sharpening, have shown to result in sharper and better aligned diffusion profiles. However, the research that has been conducted up to now is mainly of theoretical nature, and so far these techniques have only been evaluated by visual inspection of the diffusion profiles. In this work, the method is evaluated in a clinically relevant application: the reconstruction of the optic radiation for epilepsy surgery. For this evaluation we have developed a framework in which we incorporate a novel scoring procedure for individual pathways. We demonstrate that, using enhancement and sharpening, the extraction of an anatomically plausible reconstruction of the optic radiation from a large amount of probabilistic pathways is greatly improved in three healthy controls, where currently used methods fail to do so. Furthermore, challenging reconstructions of the optic radiation in three epilepsy surgery candidates with extensive brain lesions demonstrate that it is beneficial to integrate these methods in surgical planning. PMID:25077946

  15. Radial diffusion models of energetic electrons and Jupiter's synchrotron radiation. 2: Time variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, I.

    1994-02-01

    We used a radial diffusion code for energetic electrons in Jupiter's magnetosphere to investigate variations in Jupiter's radio emission due to changes in the electron phase space density at L shells between 6 and 50, and due to changes in the radial diffusion parameters. We suggest that the observed variations in Jupiter's radio emission are likely caused by changes in the electron phase space density at some boundary L1 is greater than 6, if the primary mode of transport of energetic electrons is radial diffusion driven by fluctuating electric and/or magnetic fields induced by upper atmospheric turbulence. We noticed an excellent empirical correlation, both in phase and relative amplitude, between changes in the solar wind ram pressure and Jupiter's synchrotron radiation if the electron phase space density at the boundary L1 (L1 is approximately equal to 20-50) varies linearly with the square root of the solar wind ram pressure, f is approximately (Nsnu2s)1/2. The calculations were carried out with a diffusion coefficient DLL = DnLn with n = 3. The diffusion coefficient which best fit the observed variations in Jupiter's synchrotron radiation D3 = 1.3 +/- 0.2 x 10-9/s is approximately 0.041/yr, which corresponds to a lagtime of approximately 2 years. We further show that the observed short term (days-weeks) variations in Jupiter's radio emission cannot be explained adequately when radial diffusion is taken into account.

  16. Polarization radiation in the planetary atmosphere delimited by a heterogeneous diffusely reflecting surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strelkov, S. A.; Sushkevich, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Spatial frequency characteristics (SFC) and the scattering functions were studied in the two cases of a uniform horizontal layer with absolutely black bottom, and an isolated layer. The mathematical model for these examples describes the horizontal heterogeneities in a light field with regard to radiation polarization in a three dimensional planar atmosphere, delimited by a heterogeneous surface with diffuse reflection. The perturbation method was used to obtain vector transfer equations which correspond to the linear and nonlinear systems of polarization radiation transfer. The boundary value tasks for the vector transfer equation that is a parametric set and one dimensional are satisfied by the SFC of the nonlinear system, and are expressed through the SFC of linear approximation. As a consequence of the developed theory, formulas were obtained for analytical calculation of albedo in solving the task of dissemination of polarization radiation in the planetary atmosphere with uniform Lambert bottom.

  17. An Experimental and Theoretical Study of Radiative Extinction of Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, Indrek S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the radiation-induced rich extinction limits for diffusion flames. Radiative extinction is caused by the formation of particulates (e.g., soot) that drain chemical energy from the flame. We examine (mu)g conditions because there is a strong reason to believe that radiation-induced rich-limit extinction is not possible under normal-gravity conditions. In normal- g, the hot particulates formed in the fuel-rich flames are swept upward by buoyancy, out of the flame to the region above it, where their influence on the flame is negligible. However, in (mu)g the particulates remain in the flame vicinity, creating a strong energy sink that can, under suitable conditions, cause flame extinction.

  18. The diffusion of radiation in moving media. IV. Flux vector, effective opacity, and expansion opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrse, R.; Baschek, B.; von Waldenfels, W.

    2003-04-01

    For a given velocity and temperature field in a differentially moving 3D medium, the vector of the radiative flux is derived in the diffusion approximation. Due to the dependence of the velocity gradient on the direction, the associated effective opacity in general is a tensor. In the limit of small velocity gradients analytical expression are obtained which allow us to discuss the cases when the direction of the flux vector deviates from that of the temperature gradient. Furthermore the radiative flux is calculated for infinitely sharp, Poisson distributed spectral lines resulting in simple expressions that provide basic insight into the effect of the motions. In particular, it is shown how incomplete line lists affect the radiative flux as a function of the velocity gradient. Finally, the connection between our formalism and the concept of the expansion opacity introduced by Karp et al. (\\cite{karp}) is discussed.

  19. Comparative 2D Radiation MHD Simulations of Argon Gas Puff Z-pinch Plasma Experiments on the Sandia Z Machine Using the Radiative Diffusion and CRE Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Y. K.; Thornhill Giuliani, J. W., Jr.; Apruzese, J. P.; Terry, R. E.; Davis, J.

    2001-10-01

    The recent development of the computationally efficient tabulated collisional radiative equilibrium (TCRE) radiation transport model(J.W. Thornhill, J.P. Apruzese, J. Davis, R.W. Clark, A.L. Velikovich, J.L. Giuliani, Jr., Y.K. Chong, K.G. Whitney, C. Deeney, C.A. Coverdale and F.L. Cochran, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3480 (2001).) has made possible full multidimensional radiation MHD simulations of hot dense Z-pinch plasmas with a realistic description of the non-LTE ionization dynamics and radiation transport physics. In this study, we focus on the implementation of the TCRE radiation transport model in the Mach2 2D radiation MHD code. An application of the model is made through a full dynamical simulation of an argon gas puff pinch driven by a circuit model of the Z generator. An analysis of the simulation, in particular, the K- and L-shell radiation yields, as well as the spectral and spatial characteristics of the radiation will be presented. In addition, a comparison of this multidimensional transport method will be made with the existing radiative diffusion model.

  20. A scheme for radiation pressure and photon diffusion with the M1 closure in RAMSES-RT

    E-print Network

    Rosdahl, J

    2014-01-01

    We describe and test an updated version of radiation-hydrodynamics (RHD) in the RAMSES code, that includes three new features: i) radiation pressure on gas, ii) accurate treatment of radiation diffusion in an unresolved optically thick medium, and iii) relativistic corrections that account for Doppler effects and work done by the radiation to first order in v/c. We validate the implementation in a series of tests, which include a morphological assessment of the M1 closure for the Eddington tensor in an astronomically relevant setting, dust absorption in a optically semi-thick medium, direct pressure on gas from ionising radiation, convergence of our radiation diffusion scheme towards resolved optical depths, correct diffusion of a radiation flash and a constant luminosity radiation, and finally, an experiment from Davis et al. of the competition between gravity and radiation pressure in a dusty atmosphere, and the formation of radiative Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. With the new features, RAMSES-RT can be us...

  1. Radiation therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Because radiation is most harmful to quickly growing cells, radiation therapy damages cancer cells more than normal cells. This ... cells from growing and dividing, and leads to cell death. Radiation therapy is used to fight many types of cancer . ...

  2. Radiation sickness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to determine the amount of radiation exposure from nuclear accidents, the best signs of the severity of the ... to high doses of radiation such as a nuclear power plant accidents Exposure to excessive radiation for medical treatments

  3. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from ... half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, ...

  4. Radiation Emergencies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Simulation Tools CDC Response, Japan 2011 Specific Hazards Radiation Emergencies Language: English Espaol (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... loved ones, and your pets. Learn More » Radiation and Your Health Radiation can affect the body ...

  5. The grand unified photon spectrum: A coherent view of the diffuse extragalactic background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ressell, M. Ted; Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    The spectrum of diffuse extragalactic background radiation (DEBRA) at wavelengths from 10(exp 5) to 10(exp -24) cm is presented in a coherent fashion. Each wavelength region, from the radio to ultra-high energy photons and cosmic rays, is treated both separately and as part of the grand unified photon spectrum (GUPS). A discussion of, and references to, the relevant literature for each wavelength region is included. This review should provide a useful tool for those interested in diffuse backgrounds, the epoch of galaxy formation, astrophysical/cosmological constraints to particle properties, exotic early Universe processes, and many other astrophysical and cosmological enterprises. As a worked example, researchers derive the cosmological constraints to an unstable-neutrino spies (with arbitrary branching ratio to a radiative decay mode) that follow from the GUPS.

  6. The dependence on solar elevation of the correlation between monthly average hourly diffuse and global radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, A. (Escuela Tecnica Superoir de Arquitectura, Madrid (Spain))

    1988-01-01

    In the present work, the dependence on {anti {gamma}} of the correlation between {anti K}{sub d} = {anti I}{sub d}/{anti I}{sub O} and {anti K}{sub t} = {anti I}/{anti I}{sub o} is studied, {anti I}, {anti I}{sub d}, and {anti I}{sub o} respectively being the monthly average hourly values of the global, diffuse, and extraterrestrial radiation, all of them on a horizontal surface, and {anti {gamma}} the solar elevation at midhour. The dependence is studied for Uccle for the following sky conditions. Condition A: clear skies (fraction of possible sunshine = 1) and the maximum values of direct radiation measured during the period considered (each of the hours before or after the solar noon for which radiation is received); Condition B corresponding to all the values of radiation measured when the sunshine fraction is 1 during the period considered; Condition C; corresponding to all the data collected, independently of the state of the sky; Condition D: corresponding to overcast skies ({anti I} = {anti I}{sub d}). From the available values of {anti I} and {anti I}{sub d} (monthly average hourly direct radiation on a horizontal surface), values of {anti K}{sub d} and {anti K}{sub t} for 5{degree} {le} {anti {gamma}} {le} 45{degree} and {Delta} {anti {gamma}} = 5{degree} are calculated using Newton's divided difference interpolation formula.

  7. Effect of Radiative Heat Transfer on Three-Dimensional Double Diffusive Natural Convection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Abidi; L. Kolsi; M. N. Borjini; H. Ben Aissia

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a numerical study of the effect of the radiative heat transfer on the three-dimensional double diffusive convection in a differentially heated cubic cavity for different optical parameters of the medium. This numerical study is conducted for fixed Prandtl, Rayleigh, and Lewis numbers, Pr=13.6, Ra=10, Le=2, and buoyancy ratio N in the range [2, 0]. The natural convection

  8. Ion beam mixing and radiation enhanced diffusion in metal\\/ceramic interfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Neubeck; C.-E. Lefaucheur; H. Hahn; A. G. Balogh; H. Baumann; K. Bethge; D. M. Rck

    1995-01-01

    Ion beam techniques are frequently used to modify the physical properties of materials. It is the aim of this contribution to obtain information on ion beam effects on irradiated metal\\/ceramic interfaces with bilayer geometry. Ion beam mixing and radiation enhanced diffusion have been investigated in CuAl2O3, AuAl2O3 and AuZrO2 samples. Specimen, with thicknesses of the metallic film in the range

  9. Diffusion of Ofloxacin in the Endocarditis Vegetation Assessed with Synchrotron Radiation UV Fluorescence Microspectrocopy

    PubMed Central

    Batard, Eric; Jamme, Frderic; Villette, Sandrine; Jacqueline, Cdric; de la Cochetire, Marie-France; Caillon, Jocelyne; Rfrgiers, Matthieu

    2011-01-01

    The diffusion of antibiotics in endocarditis vegetation bacterial masses has not been described, although it may influence the efficacy of antibiotic therapy in endocarditis. The objective of this work was to assess the diffusion of ofloxacin in experimental endocarditis vegetation bacterial masses using synchrotron-radiation UV fluorescence microspectroscopy. Streptococcal endocarditis was induced in 5 rabbits. Three animals received an unique IV injection of 150 mg/kg ofloxacin, and 2 control rabbits were left untreated. Two fluorescence microscopes were coupled to a synchrotron beam for excitation at 275 nm. A spectral microscope collected fluorescence spectra between 285 and 550 nm. A second, full field microscope was used with bandpass filters at 510560 nm. Spectra of ofloxacin-treated vegetations presented higher fluorescence between 390 and 540 nm than control. Full field imaging showed that ofloxacin increased fluorescence between 510 and 560 nm. Ofloxacin diffused into vegetation bacterial masses, although it accumulated in their immediate neighborhood. Fluorescence images additionally suggested an ofloxacin concentration gradient between the vegetation peripheral and central areas. In conclusion, ofloxacin diffuses into vegetation bacterial masses, but it accumulates in their immediate neighborhood. Synchrotron radiation UV fluorescence microscopy is a new tool for assessment of antibiotic diffusion in the endocarditis vegetation bacterial masses. PMID:21559378

  10. Derivation and solution of multifrequency radiation diffusion equations for homogeneous refractive lossy media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakov, A. I.; Vignes, R. M.; Stlken, J. S.

    2011-02-01

    Starting from the radiation transport equation for homogeneous, refractive lossy media, we derive the corresponding time-dependent multifrequency diffusion equations. Zeroth and first moments of the transport equation couple the energy density, flux and pressure tensor. The system is closed by neglecting the temporal derivative of the flux and replacing the pressure tensor by its diagonal analogue. The radiation equations are coupled to a diffusion equation for the matter temperature. We are interested in modeling heating and cooling of silica (SiO2), at possibly rapid rates. Hence, in contrast to related work, we retain the temporal derivative of the radiation field. We derive boundary conditions at a planar air-silica interface taking account of reflectivities obtained from the Fresnel relations that include absorption. The spectral dimension is discretized into a finite number of intervals leading to a system of multigroup diffusion equations. Three simulations are presented. One models cooling of a silica slab, initially at 2500 K, for 10 s. The other two are 1D and 2D simulations of irradiating silica with a CO2 laser, ? = 10.59 ?m. In 2D, a laser beam (Gaussian profile, r0 = 0.5 mm for 1/e decay) shines on a disk (radius = 0.4, thickness = 0.4 cm).

  11. Radiation view factor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovin, J. K.; Lubkowitz, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    Computer program, RAVFAC, calculates diffuse radiation view factors, using contour integrals. Technique is combined with finite difference /double summation/ technique to compose total program package.

  12. Development of Simplified Calculations for a Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation

    E-print Network

    Munger, B. K.; Haberl, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the development of simplified procedures for a multipyranometer array (MPA) for the continuous measurement of direct and diffuse solar radiation. The MPA described in this paper is an improvement over previously published MPA...

  13. Radiation Laws

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Department of Physics and Astronomy

    This site lists physical laws that describe radiation. Topics covered include the Plank Radiation Law, and the Wien and Stefan-Boltzmann Laws. The site also features a table summarizing the blackbody temperatures necessary to give a peak for emitted radiation in various regions of the spectrum, and three Java applets illustrating important properties of blackbody radiation.

  14. Impact of Changes in Diffuse Radiation on the Global Land Carbon Sink, 1901-2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, L.; Bellouin, N.; Sitch, S.; Boucher, O.; Huntingford, C.; Wild, M.; Cox, P. M.

    2009-04-01

    Recent observational and theoretical studies have shown that changes in surface radiation that lead to increasing diffuse surface irradiance, enhance plant photosynthesis (Gu et al., 2003, Niyogi et al., 2004, Oliveira et al., 2007, Roderick et al., 2001). Solar radiation reaching the land surface has changed over the industrial era due to aerosols emitted from volcanoes and various anthropogenic sources (Kvalevag and Myhre, 2007). Such changes in total surface radiation are accompanied by changes in direct and diffuse surface solar radiation. Current global climate-carbon models do include the effects of changes in total surface radiation on the land biosphere but neglect the positive effects of increasing diffuse fraction on plant photosynthesis. In this study we estimate for the first time, the impact of variations in diffuse fraction on the land carbon sink using a global model (Mercado et al., 2007) modified to account for the effects of variations in both direct and diffuse radiation on canopy photosynthesis. We use meteorological forcing from the Climate Research Unit Data set. Additionally short wave and photosynthetic active radiation are reconstructed from the Hadley centre climate model, which accounts for the scattering and absorption of light by tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols and change in cloud properties due to indirect aerosol effects. References Gu L.H., Baldocchi D.D., Wofsy S.C., Munger J.W., Michalsky J.J., Urbanski S.P. & Boden T.A. (2003) Response of a deciduous forest to the Mount Pinatubo eruption: Enhanced photosynthesis. Science, 299, 2035-2038. M. M. Kvalevag and G. Myhre, J. Clim. 20, 4874 (2007). Mercado L.M., Huntingford C., Gash J.H.C., Cox P.M. & Jogireddy V. (2007) Improving the representation of radiation interception and photosynthesis for climate model applications. Tellus Series B-Chemical and Physical Meteorology, 59, 553-565. Niyogi D., Chang H.I., Saxena V.K., Holt T., Alapaty K., Booker F., Chen F., Davis K.J., Holben B., Matsui T., Meyers T., Oechel W.C., Pielke R.A., Wells R., Wilson K. & Xue Y.K. (2004) Direct observations of the effects of aerosol loading on net ecosystem CO2 exchanges over different landscapes. Geophysical Research Letters, 31. Oliveira P.H.F., Artaxo P., Pires C., De Lucca S., Procopio A., Holben B., Schafer J., Cardoso L.F., Wofsy S.C. & Rocha H.R. (2007) The effects of biomass burning aerosols and clouds on the CO2 flux in Amazonia. Tellus Series B-Chemical and Physical Meteorology, 59, 338-349. Roderick M.L., Farquhar G.D., Berry S.L. & Noble I.R. (2001) On the direct effect of clouds and atmospheric particles on the productivity and structure of vegetation. Oecologia, 129, 21-30.

  15. Image Reconstruction for Diffuse Optical Tomography Based on Radiative Transfer Equation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bo; Tang, Jinping

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography is a novel molecular imaging technology for small animal studies. Most known reconstruction methods use the diffusion equation (DA) as forward model, although the validation of DA breaks down in certain situations. In this work, we use the radiative transfer equation as forward model which provides an accurate description of the light propagation within biological media and investigate the potential of sparsity constraints in solving the diffuse optical tomography inverse problem. The feasibility of the sparsity reconstruction approach is evaluated by boundary angular-averaged measurement data and internal angular-averaged measurement data. Simulation results demonstrate that in most of the test cases the reconstructions with sparsity regularization are both qualitatively and quantitatively more reliable than those with standard L2 regularization. Results also show the competitive performance of the split Bregman algorithm for the DOT image reconstruction with sparsity regularization compared with other existing L1 algorithms. PMID:25648064

  16. Magnetic Micro-turbulence: Relation of Electron Diffusion to Their Emitted Radiation Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail; Keenan, B.

    2013-04-01

    Kinetic (e.g., Weibel-type) instabilities are ubiquitous in astrophysical high-energy density environments, e.g., in relativistic collisionless shocks and reconnection of strong magnetic fields in neutron star and magnetar magnetospheres, as well as in laboratory laser-produced plasmas. Such instabilities generate strong (sub-equibartition) magnetic fields which reside at small, sub-Larmor scales. Efficient electron acceleration to relativistic energies is not uncommon in such environments. Radiation emitted by these electrons in such fields, called the jitter radiation, exhibits spectra different from what is predicted by synchrotron theory. The small-scale fields also simultaneously affect the particle transport via pitch-angle diffusion. Both effects are interrelated and can be used to diagnose the astrophysical plasmas. Indeed, the radiation pattern is intimately related to the particle orbits and, thus, to the transport properties of the turbulence. We study such a relation between transport in and radiation from micro-scale turbulence via numerical simulations and analysis. We will present the results for both the relativistic and non-relativistic regimes -- the former being important in astrophysical environments and the latter is of great importance to lab experiments.

  17. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Brain Abnormalities Induced by Prenatal Exposure to Radiation in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Shigeyoshi; Sawada, Kazuhiko; Hirose, Miwa; Mori, Yuki; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Murase, Kenya

    2014-01-01

    We assessed brain abnormalities in rats exposed prenatally to radiation (X-rays) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological experiments. Pregnant rats were divided into 4 groups: the control group (n?=?3) and 3 groups that were exposed to different radiation doses (0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 Gy; n?=?3 each). Brain abnormalities were assessed in 32 neonatal male rats (8 per group). Ex vivo T2-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were performed using 11.7-T MRI. The expression of markers of myelin production (KluverBarrera staining, KB), nonpyramidal cells (calbindin-D28k staining, CaBP), and pyramidal cells (staining of the nonphosphorylated heavy-chain neurofilament SMI-32) were histologically evaluated. Decreased brain volume, increased ventricle volume, and thinner cortices were observed by MRI in irradiated rats. However, no abnormalities in the cortical 6-layered structure were observed via KB staining in radiation-exposed rats. The DTI color-coded map revealed a dose-dependent reduction in the anisotropic signal (vertical direction), which did not represent reduced numbers of pyramidal cells; rather, it indicated a signal reduction relative to the vertical direction because of low nerve cell density in the entire cortex. We conclude that DTI and histological experiments are useful tools for assessing cortical and hippocampal abnormalities after prenatal exposure to radiation in rats. PMID:25202992

  18. The evaluation of four different diffuse radiation correction models applied to shadow ring measurements for Beer Sheva, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudish, Avraham I.; Evseev, Efim G.

    2007-09-01

    The measurement of the horizontal diffuse radiation, a priori a straightforward task, is fraught with difficulties. It is possible to measure the diffuse radiation by both direct and indirect methods. The most accurate method is probably the indirect one, which utilizes concurrent measurements of the horizontal global and the normal incidence beam radiation. The disadvantage of this method is the relatively expensive tracking system required for measuring the latter. The diffuse radiation can be measured directly with a pyranometer outfitted with either an occulting disk or shadow ring, which prevent the beam radiation from impinging on the pyranometer sensor. The former method can provide accurate measurements of the diffuse radiation but requires a relatively expensive sun tracking system in the east-west axis. The shadow ring is a stationary device with regard to the east-west axis and blocks the beam radiation component by creating a permanent shadow on the pyranometer sensor. The disadvantage of the shadow ring is that it also blocks a portion of the sky, which necessitates a geometrical correction factor. There is also a need to correct for anisotropic sky conditions. Four correction models have been applied to the data and the results evaluated and ranked.

  19. Dynamic Implicit 3D Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Bobby [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Zhen [ORNL] [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Manuel [ORNL] [ORNL; Pernice, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2014-01-01

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multiphysics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multiphysics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent linear solver convergence.

  20. An experimental and theoretical study of radiative extinction of diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, Indrek S.; Atreya, A.

    1994-01-01

    Our work was primarily theoretical and numerical. We investigated the simplified modeling of heat losses in diffusion flames, then we 'ramped up' the level of complexity in each successive study until the final chapter discussed the general problem of soot/flame interaction. With regard to the specific objective of studying radiative extinction, we conclude that in the steady case a self-extinguishing zero-g flame is unlikely to occur. The soot volume fractions are too small. On the other hand, our work does provide rational means for assessing the mixture of chemical energy release and radiative heat release. It also provides clues for suitable 'tailoring' this balance. Thus heat fluxes to surrounding surfaces can be substantially increased by exploiting and modifying its sooting capability.

  1. Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts receive the highest occupational radiation exposure. Effective protections are needed to ensure the safety of astronauts on long duration space missions. Increased cancer morbidity or mortality risk in astronauts may be caused by occupational radiation exposure. Acute and late radiation damage to the central nervous system (CNS) may lead to changes in motor function and behavior, or neurological disorders. Radiation exposure may result in degenerative tissue diseases (non-cancer or non-CNS) such as cardiac, circulatory, or digestive diseases, as well as cataracts. Acute radiation syndromes may occur due to occupational radiation exposure.

  2. Decoding Diffusivity in Multiple Sclerosis: Analysis of Optic Radiation Lesional and Non-Lesional White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Klistorner, Alexander; Vootakuru, Nikitha; Wang, Chenyu; Yiannikas, Con; Graham, Stuart L.; Parratt, John; Garrick, Raymond; Levin, Netta; Masters, Lynette; Lagopoulos, Jim; Barnett, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been suggested as a new promising tool in MS that may provide greater pathological specificity than conventional MRI, helping, therefore, to elucidate disease pathogenesis and monitor therapeutic efficacy. However, the pathological substrates that underpin alterations in brain tissue diffusivity are not yet fully delineated. Tract-specific DTI analysis has previously been proposed in an attempt to alleviate this problem. Here, we extended this approach by segmenting a single tract into areas bound by seemingly similar pathological processes, which may better delineate the potential association between DTI metrics and underlying tissue damage. Method Several compartments were segmented in optic radiation (OR) of 50 relapsing-remitting MS patients including T2 lesions, proximal and distal parts of fibers transected by lesion and fibers with no discernable pathology throughout the entire length of the OR. Results Asymmetry analysis between lesional and non-lesional fibers demonstrated a marked increase in Radial Diffusivity (RD), which was topographically limited to focal T2 lesions and potentially relates to the lesional myelin loss. A relative elevation of Axial Diffusivity (AD) in the distal part of the lesional fibers was observed in a distribution consistent with Wallerian degeneration, while diffusivity in the proximal portion of transected axons remained normal. A moderate, but significant elevation of RD in OR non-lesional fibers was strongly associated with the global (but not local) T2 lesion burden and is probably related to microscopic demyelination undetected by conventional MRI. Conclusion This study highlights the utility of the compartmentalization approach in elucidating the pathological substrates of diffusivity and demonstrates the presence of tissue-specific patterns of altered diffusivity in MS, providing further evidence that DTI is a sensitive marker of tissue damage in both lesions and NAWM. Our results suggest that, at least within the OR, parallel and perpendicular diffusivities are affected by tissue restructuring related to distinct pathological processes. PMID:25807541

  3. Quasi-linear Theory, Nonlinear Wave-Particle Interactions, and Diffusion in the Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, J.

    2013-12-01

    It is well-known that chorus waves can be large in amplitude and narrow in frequency, which is expected to invalidate the quasi-linear treatment of their effects on radiation belt electrons. Interactions can be described as phase bunching (PB) or phase trapping (PT); PB is more likely, and typically leads to abrupt energy and pitch angle decrease, while PT is rare but leads to sustained energy and PA increase. Here we refine the treatment of these processes, investigate how they combine, and consider whether the net result can be treated as diffusion.

  4. A Monte Carlo synthetic-acceleration method for solving the thermal radiation diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Thomas M., E-mail: evanstm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Mosher, Scott W., E-mail: moshersw@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Slattery, Stuart R., E-mail: sslattery@wisc.edu [University of WisconsinMadison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53716 (United States); Hamilton, Steven P., E-mail: hamiltonsp@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We present a novel synthetic-acceleration-based Monte Carlo method for solving the equilibrium thermal radiation diffusion equation in three spatial dimensions. The algorithm performance is compared against traditional solution techniques using a Marshak benchmark problem and a more complex multiple material problem. Our results show that our Monte Carlo method is an effective solver for sparse matrix systems. For solutions converged to the same tolerance, it performs competitively with deterministic methods including preconditioned conjugate gradient and GMRES. We also discuss various aspects of preconditioning the method and its general applicability to broader classes of problems.

  5. Influence of radiation damage on strontium and iodine diffusion in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, E.; van der Berg, N. G.; Malherbe, J. B.; Wendler, E.; Wesch, W.

    2012-06-01

    The transport behaviour of strontium and iodine through single and polycrystalline SiC wafers was investigated using ion beam analysis and electron microscopy. Fluences of 2 1016 Sr+ cm-2 and 1 1016 I+ cm-2 were implanted at temperatures between 23 C and 600 C with an energy of 360 keV, producing an atomic density of approximately 1.5% at the projected ranges of about 120 nm and 90 nm respectively. The broadening of the implantation profiles and its dependence on implantation parameters was determined by isochronal and isothermal annealing studies at temperatures up to 1400 C. The strong influence of radiation damage on diffusion after room temperature implantations was observed in all cases during the initial annealing stages at 1000 C. This is a result of the highly disordered crystal lattice, which re-crystallizes at this temperature. In hot implantations this effect is largely reduced but an additional transient diffusion process was observed at 1400 C for strontium, which is related to defect annealing. Impurity trapping by extended defects is obviously an important effect. Volume diffusion is below our detection limit of 10-21 m2 s-1 for both diffusors. Hence, grain boundary diffusion is responsible for the observed iodine transport in CVD-SiC at 1300 C, while no significant diffusion of strontium was detected at 1400 C.

  6. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or hospital). Then a large machine called a simulator will deliver the exact amount of radiation necessary ... receive the daily dose of radiation. While the simulator is on, you'll have to lie very ...

  7. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... benign (not cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Radiation therapy kills cancer cells and keeps them from growing and ... deliver the exact amount of radiation necessary to kill the cells. It usually takes only a few ...

  8. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for e-updates Please leave this field empty Radiation Therapy SHARE Share on Facebook Preview your comments ... Treatment and Care > Treatments Listen The goal of radiation therapy is to destroy or stop brain tumor ...

  9. Modeling Heat Conduction and Radiation Transport with the Diffusion Equation in NIF ALE-AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A C; Bailey, D S; Kaiser, T B; Gunney, B N; Masters, N D; Koniges, A E; Eder, D C; Anderson, R W

    2009-10-06

    The ALE-AMR code developed for NIF is a multi-material hydro-code that models target assembly fragmentation in the aftermath of a shot. The combination of ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian) hydro with AMR (Adaptive Mesh Refinement) allows the code to model a wide range of physical conditions and spatial scales. The large range of temperatures encountered in the NIF target chamber can lead to significant fluxes of energy due to thermal conduction and radiative transport. These physical effects can be modeled approximately with the aid of the diffusion equation. We present a novel method for the solution of the diffusion equation on a composite mesh in order to capture these physical effects.

  10. Installation of a variable-angle spectrometer system for monitoring diffuse and global solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormachea, O.; Abrahamse, A.; Tolavi, N.; Romero, F.; Urquidi, O.; Pearce, J. M.; Andrews, R.

    2013-11-01

    We report on the design and installation of a spectrometer system for monitoring solar radiation in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Both the light intensity and the spectral distribution affect the power produced by a photovoltaic device. Local variations in the solar spectrum (especially compared to the AM1.5 standard) may have important implications for device optimization and energy yield estimation. The spectrometer system, based on an Ocean Optics USB4000 (300-900nm) spectrometer, was designed to increase functionality. Typically systems only record the global horizontal radiation. Our system moves a fiber-optic cable 0-90 degrees and takes measurements in 9 degree increments. Additionally, a shadow band allows measurement of the diffuse component of the radiation at each position. The electronic controls utilize an Arduino UNO microcontroller to synchronizes the movement of two PAP bipolar (stepper) motors with the activation of the spectrometer via an external trigger. The spectrometer was factory calibrated for wavelength and calibrated for absolute irradiance using a Sellarnet SL1-Cal light source. We present preliminary results from data taken March-June, 2013, and comment on implications for PV devices in Cochabamba.

  11. X-ray diffuse scattering for evaluation of wide bandgap semiconductor nuclear radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goorsky, M. S.; Yoon, H.; Schieber, M.; James, R. B.; McGregor, D. S.; Natarajan, M.

    The crystalline perfection of solid state radiation detectors was examined using triple axis x-ray diffraction. Triple axis techniques provide a means to analyze the origin of diffraction peak broadening: the effects of strain (due to deviations in alloy composition or stoichiometry) and lattice tilts (mosaic structure) can be separated. Cd 1 - xZn xTe ( x ? 0.1), HgI 2, and GaAs detector materials were studied. In the cases of Cd 1 - xZn xTe and HgI 2 the crystalline properties of detectors with different spectral responses to ?-radiation were determined. Increased mosaicity was universally found to be related to deteriorated detector properties. For Cd 1 - xZn xTe, detectors with poor performance possessed greater levels of diffuse scatter due to lattice tilts than did high quality detectors. For GaAs, low angle grain boundaries were attributed to impaired detector performance. Additionally, in large HgI 2 detectors, deviations from stoichiometry were also related to reduced performance. Interestingly, HgI 2 detectors which possessed a sharp spectral response to ?-radiation but also showed polarization were of comparable crystallinity to those detectors which did not exhibit polarization effects. This initial analysis suggests that polarization is related to native point defects or chemical impurities which do not significantly alter the crystallinity of the material. Overall, within a given class of materials, improved detector performance (better spectral response) always correlated with better material quality.

  12. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients for relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, Alexander; Mann, Ian; Baker, Daniel N.; Subbotin, Dmitriy; Ozeke, Louis; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam

    Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interactions of electrons with ULF waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2012] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate the effect of changing a diffusion coefficient on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes geomagnetically quiet and active time. The simulations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion. 1. Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999JA900344 2. Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. J. Rae, D. K. Milling, S. R. Elkington, A. A. Chan, and H. J. Singer (2012), ULF wave derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A04222, doi:10.1029/2011JA017463.

  13. Monte-Carlo Radiative Transfer Model of the Diffuse Galactic Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Kwang-Il

    2015-02-01

    Monte-Carlo radiative models of the diffuse Galactic light (DGL) in our Galaxy are calcu-lated using the dust radiative transfer code MoCafe, which is three-dimensional and takes full account of multiple scattering. The code is recently updated to use a fast voxel traversal algorithm, which has dramatically increased the computing speed. The radiative transfer models are calculated with the generally accepted dust scale-height of 0.1 kpc. The stellar scale-heights are assumed to be 0.1 or 0.35 kpc, appropriate for far-ultraviolet (FUV) and optical wavelengths, respectively. The face-on optical depth, measured perpendicular to the Galactic plane, is also varied from 0.2 to 0.6, suitable to the optical to FUV wavelengths, respectively. We find that the DGL at high Galactic latitudes is mostly due to backward or large-angle scattering of starlight originating from the local stars within a radial distance of r < 0.5 kpc from the Earth. On the other hand, the DGL measured in the Galactic plane is mostly due to stars at a distance range that corresponds to an optical depth of ? 1 measured from the Earth. Therefore, the low-latitude DGL at the FUV wavelength band would be mostly caused by the stars located at a distance of r . 0.5 kpc and the optical DGL near the Galactic plane mainly originates from stars within a distance range of 1 . r . 2 kpc. We also calculate the radiative transfer models in a clumpy two-phase medium. The clumpy two-phase models provide lower intensities at high Galactic latitudes compared to the uniform density models, because of the lower effective optical depth in clumpy media. However, no significant difference in the intensity at the Galactic plane is found.

  14. Combination of magnetic resonance imaging and diffuse optical spectroscopy to predict radiation response in the breast: an exploratory pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klifa, C.; Hattangadi, J.; Watkins, M.; Li, A.; Sakata, T.; Tromberg, B.; Hylton, N.; Park, C.

    2007-02-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a standard treatment after lumpectomy for breast cancer, involving a typical course of approximately 6-7 weeks of daily treatment. Many women find this cumbersome and costly, and therefore many are left with the option of mastectomy. Many groups are now investigating novel ways to deliver RT, by using different techniques and shortening the course of treatment. However, the efficacy and side effects of these strategies are not known. In this project, we wish to develop noninvasive imaging tools that would allow us to measure radiation dose effects in women with breast cancer. We hope this will lead to new ways to identify individuals who may not need radiation therapy, who may safely be treated with new accelerated techniques, or who should be treated with the standard radiation therapy approach. We propose to study the effect of radiation therapy using a combination of two imaging modalities: 1) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which will provide detailed information on breast structures and blood vessels and 2) near infra-red diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS), which measures local biologic properties of breast tissue. Our hypothesis is that by using a combination of modalities we will be able to better characterize radiation effects in breast tissue, by measuring differences between the radiated and non-irradiated breast. The development of novel non-invasive tools providing information about how individuals respond to radiation therapy can lead to important improvement of radiation treatment, and ultimately help guide individualized treatment programs in the future.

  15. Radiation Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus

    Radiation protection is a very important aspect for the application of particle detectors in many different fields, like high energy physics, medicine, materials science, oil and mineral exploration, and arts, to name a few. The knowledge of radiation units, the experience with shielding, and information on biological effects of radiation are vital for scientists handling radioactive sources or operating accelerators or X-ray equipment. This article describes the modern radiation units and their conversions to older units which are still in use in many countries. Typical radiation sources and detectors used in the field of radiation protection are presented. The legal regulations in nearly all countries follow closely the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Tables and diagrams with relevant information on the handling of radiation sources provide useful data for the researcher working in this field.

  16. DIBSyRCH: The Diffuse Interstellar Band Synchrotron Radiation Carrier Hunt: New Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockett, M. H.; Wood, M. P.; Lawler, J. E.

    2010-11-01

    The identity of the carrier molecules of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) is the most durable mystery of spectroscopic astronomy. The DIBs are persistent absorption features, >300 total, observed along many lines of sight through the Interstellar Medium (ISM). The DIBs are scattered throughout the visible and near infrared, with widths in the 2-100 cm-1 range. For nearly a century, laboratory spectroscopists have struggled to match astrophysical wavelengths to laboratory wavelengths of known molecules including a variety of stable molecules, radicals, cations, and anions. Many researchers have hypothesized that hydrocarbon molecules are responsible for the DIBs, due to the rich chemistry and high cosmic abundance of carbon and hydrogen. Though large Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now suspected to be the source of the DIBs, no definitive matches have yet been made to laboratory PAH spectra. Aromatic clusters are also thought to be an important constituent of the interstellar dust distribution and may contribute to the 2175 "bump" in the interstellar extinction curve. The Diffuse Interstellar Band Synchrotron Radiation Carrier Hunt (DIBSyRCH) experiment has been built at the Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) to test these hypotheses by conducting a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of cold, gas phase and clustered PAH molecules and ions. Using a custom echelle spectrograph and the innovative Cryogenic Circulating Advective Multi-Pass (CCAMP) absorption cell, we routinely achieve a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 107 cm-3 with a signal-to-noise ratio of 10,000 in 60 seconds of data collection in the visible. This instrument, coupled with the high spectral radiance of the synchrotron radiation continuum from the SRC's White Light Beamline, permits rapid acquisition of spectra covering broad wavelength regions with resolution appropriate for the DIBs. In order to obtain astrophysically relevant spectra of low-temperature PAHs, the molecules are entrained in a flow of cold neon buffer gas inside the CCAMP cell. A multi-pass optical cavity using special high-reflectivity broadband mirrors extends the absorption path length to hundreds of meters. The CCAMP cell combined with the broad spectral coverage and high spectral radiance of synchrotron radiation make this experiment uniquely suited to the DIB carrier search. Several generations of resistively heated and plasma heated crucibles have been used in the CCAMP to introduce PAHs. All have produced PAH clusters large enough to scatter light the synchrotron beam and reduce signal to noise. A new gas injection system is under development. An intense radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge and higher flow rates should reduce cluster formation.

  17. Multidimensional radiative transfer in stratified atmospheres - Gray radiative equilibrium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Kneer; J. N. Heasley

    1979-01-01

    This paper tests the validity of the multidimensional Eddington, or diffusion, approximation in radiative transfer in a gray radiative-equilibrium atmosphere with opacity increasing exponentially toward the stellar interior. The diffusion approximation is unacceptable at small optical depths. The height dependence of intensity fluctuations is studied systematically by adopting the above simplified model atmosphere for the solar photosphere. Lateral radiative exchange

  18. Measurements and Modeling of Soot Formation and Radiation in Microgravity Jet Diffusion Flames. Volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jerry C.; Tong, Li; Greenberg, Paul S.

    1996-01-01

    This is a computational and experimental study for soot formation and radiative heat transfer in jet diffusion flames under normal gravity (1-g) and microgravity (0-g) conditions. Instantaneous soot volume fraction maps are measured using a full-field imaging absorption technique developed by the authors. A compact, self-contained drop rig is used for microgravity experiments in the 2.2-second drop tower facility at NASA Lewis Research Center. On modeling, we have coupled flame structure and soot formation models with detailed radiation transfer calculations. Favre-averaged boundary layer equations with a k-e-g turbulence model are used to predict the flow field, and a conserved scalar approach with an assumed Beta-pdf are used to predict gaseous species mole fraction. Scalar transport equations are used to describe soot volume fraction and number density distributions, with formation and oxidation terms modeled by one-step rate equations and thermophoretic effects included. An energy equation is included to couple flame structure and radiation analyses through iterations, neglecting turbulence-radiation interactions. The YIX solution for a finite cylindrical enclosure is used for radiative heat transfer calculations. The spectral absorption coefficient for soot aggregates is calculated from the Rayleigh solution using complex refractive index data from a Drude- Lorentz model. The exponential-wide-band model is used to calculate the spectral absorption coefficient for H20 and C02. It is shown that when compared to results from true spectral integration, the Rosseland mean absorption coefficient can provide reasonably accurate predictions for the type of flames studied. The soot formation model proposed by Moss, Syed, and Stewart seems to produce better fits to experimental data and more physically sound than the simpler model by Khan et al. Predicted soot volume fraction and temperature results agree well with published data for a normal gravity co-flow laminar flames and turbulent jet flames. Predicted soot volume fraction results also agree with our data for 1-g and 0-g laminar jet names as well as 1-g turbulent jet flames.

  19. Radiation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnrovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  20. Derivation and Solution of Multifrequency Radiation Diffusion Equations for Homogeneous Refractive Lossy Media

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, A I; Vignes, R M; Stolken, J S

    2010-01-05

    Starting from the radiation transport equation for homogeneous, refractive lossy media, we derive the corresponding time-dependent multifrequency diffusion equations. Zeroth and first moments of the transport equation couple the energy density, flux and pressure tensor. The system is closed by neglecting the temporal derivative of the flux and replacing the pressure tensor by its diagonal analogue. The system is coupled to a diffusion equation for the matter temperature. We are interested in modeling annealing of silica (SiO{sub 2}). We derive boundary conditions at a planar air-silica interface taking account of reflectivities. The spectral dimension is discretized into a finite number of intervals leading to a system of multigroup diffusion equations. Three simulations are presented. One models cooling of a silica slab, initially at 2500 K, for 10 s. The other two are 1D and 2D simulations of irradiating silica with a CO{sub 2} laser, {lambda} = 10.59 {micro}m. In 2D, we anneal a disk (radius = 0.4, thickness = 0.4 cm) with a laser, Gaussian profile (r{sub 0} = 0.5 mm for 1/e decay).

  1. Radial diffusion simulations of the 20 September 2007 radiation belt dropout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, J.

    2014-08-01

    This is a study of a dropout of radiation belt electrons, associated with an isolated solar wind density pulse on 20 September 2007, as seen by the solid-state telescopes (SST) detectors on THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms). Omnidirectional fluxes were converted to phase space density at constant invariants M = 700 MeV G-1 and K = 0.014 RE G1/2, with the assumption of local pitch angle ? ? 80 and using the T04 magnetic field model. The last closed drift shell, which was calculated throughout the time interval, never came within the simulation outer boundary of L* = 6. It is found, using several different models for diffusion rates, that radial diffusion alone only allows the data-driven, time-dependent boundary values at Lmax = 6 and Lmin = 3.7 to propagate a few tenths of an RE during the simulation; far too slow to account for the dropout observed over the broad range of L* = 4-5.5. Pitch angle diffusion via resonant interactions with several types of waves (chorus, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and plasmaspheric and plume hiss) also seems problematic, for several reasons which are discussed.

  2. Soot formation, transport, and radiation in unsteady diffusion flames : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Williams, Timothy C.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Jensen, Kirk A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Blevins, Linda Gail; Kearney, Sean Patrick (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Schefer, Robert W.

    2004-10-01

    Fires pose the dominant risk to the safety and security of nuclear weapons, nuclear transport containers, and DOE and DoD facilities. The thermal hazard from these fires primarily results from radiant emission from high-temperature flame soot. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the local transport and chemical phenomena that determine the distributions of soot concentration, optical properties, and temperature in order to develop and validate constitutive models for large-scale, high-fidelity fire simulations. This report summarizes the findings of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project devoted to obtaining the critical experimental information needed to develop such constitutive models. A combination of laser diagnostics and extractive measurement techniques have been employed in both steady and pulsed laminar diffusion flames of methane, ethylene, and JP-8 surrogate burning in air. For methane and ethylene, both slot and coannular flame geometries were investigated, as well as normal and inverse diffusion flame geometries. For the JP-8 surrogate, coannular normal diffusion flames were investigated. Soot concentrations, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) signals, hydroxyl radical (OH) LIF, acetylene and water vapor concentrations, soot zone temperatures, and the velocity field were all successfully measured in both steady and unsteady versions of these various flames. In addition, measurements were made of the soot microstructure, soot dimensionless extinction coefficient (&), and the local radiant heat flux. Taken together, these measurements comprise a unique, extensive database for future development and validation of models of soot formation, transport, and radiation.

  3. Study of a non-diffusing radiochromic gel dosimeter for 3D radiation dose imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Craig Michael

    2000-12-01

    This thesis investigates the potential of a new radiation gel dosimeter, based on nitro-blue tetrazolium (NBTZ) suspended in a gelatin mold. Unlike all Fricke based gel dosimeters this dosimeter does not suffer from diffusive loss of image stability. Images are obtained by an optical tomography method. Nitro blue tetrazolium is a common biological indicator that when irradiated in an aqueous medium undergoes reduction to a highly colored formazan, which has an absorbance maximum at 525nm. Tetrazolium is water soluble while the formazan product is insoluble. The formazan product sticks to the gelatin matrix and the dose image is maintained for three months. Methods to maximize the sensitivity of the system were evaluated. It was found that a chemical detergent, Triton X-100, in combination with sodium formate, increased the dosimeter sensitivity significantly. An initial G-value of formazan production for a dosimeter composed of 1mM NBTZ, gelatin, and water was on the order of 0.2. The addition of Triton and formate produced a G-value in excess of 5.0. The effects of NBTZ, triton, formate, and gel concentration were all investigated. All the gels provided linear dose vs. absorbance plots for doses from 0 to >100 Gy. It was determined that gel concentration had minimal if any effect on sensitivity. Sensitivity increased slightly with increasing NBTZ concentration. Triton and formate individually and together provided moderate to large increases in dosimeter sensitivity. The dosimeter described in this work can provide stable 3D radiation dose images for all modalities of radiation therapy equipment. Methods to increase sensitivity are developed and discussed.

  4. Hawking radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parentani, Renaud; Spindel, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Hawking radiation is the thermal radiation predicted to be spontaneously emitted by black holes. It arises from the steady conversion of quantum vacuum fluctuations into pairs of particles, one of which escaping at infinity while the other is trapped inside the black hole horizon. It is named after the physicist Stephen Hawking who derived its existence in 1974. This radiation reduces the mass of black holes and is therefore also known as black hole evaporation.

  5. Radiator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    1993-01-01

    Radiator technology is discussed in the context of the Civilian Space Technology Initiative's (CSTI's) high capacity power-thermal management project. The CSTI project is a subset of a project to develop a piloted Mars nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) vehicle. The following topics are presented in vugraph form: advanced radiator concepts; heat pipe codes and testing; composite materials; radiator design and integration; and surface morphology.

  6. Dynamic implicit 3D adaptive mesh refinement for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, B., E-mail: bphilip.kondekeril@gmail.com [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Wang, Z., E-mail: wangz@ornl.gov [National Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Berrill, M.A., E-mail: berrillma@ornl.gov [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Birke, M., E-mail: birkemanuel@gmail.com [National Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Pernice, M., E-mail: michael.pernice@inl.gov [Applied Computing and Visualization, Energy, Environment Science and Technology, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3550 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered often exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multi-physics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multi-physics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free NewtonKrylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  7. Directional Degradation of Spectralon Diffuser Under Ionizing Radiation for Calibration of Space-Based Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiev, G. T.; Butler, J. J.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Ding, L.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of the effect of Vacuum Ultra Violet (VUV) irradiation on the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of Spectralon is presented in this paper. The sample was a 99% white Spectralon calibration standard irradiated with VUV source positioned at 60o off the irradiation direction for a total of 20 hours. The BRDF before and after VUV irradiation was measured and compared at number of wavelengths in the UV, VIS and IR. Non-isotropic directional degradation of Spectralon diffuser under ionizing radiation was detected at different BRDF measurement geometries primarily at UV spectral range. The 8o directional/hemispherical reflectance of the same sample was also measured and compared from 200nm to 2500nm. Index Terms BRDF, Reflectance, Multiangular, Spectralon, Remote Sensing

  8. On linearization and preconditioning for radiation diffusion coupled to material thermal conduction equations

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Tao, E-mail: fengtao2@mail.ustc.edu.cn [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230052 (China) [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230052 (China); Graduate School of China Academy Engineering Physics, Beijing 100083 (China); An, Hengbin, E-mail: an_hengbin@iapcm.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)] [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Yu, Xijun, E-mail: yuxj@iapcm.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)] [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Li, Qin, E-mail: liqin@lsec.cc.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Chinese Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, Rongpei, E-mail: zhangrongpei@163.com [Graduate School of China Academy Engineering Physics, Beijing 100083 (China)] [Graduate School of China Academy Engineering Physics, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2013-03-01

    Jacobian-free NewtonKrylov (JFNK) method is an effective algorithm for solving large scale nonlinear equations. One of the most important advantages of JFNK method is that there is no necessity to form and store the Jacobian matrix of the nonlinear system when JFNK method is employed. However, an approximation of the Jacobian is needed for the purpose of preconditioning. In this paper, JFNK method is employed to solve a class of non-equilibrium radiation diffusion coupled to material thermal conduction equations, and two preconditioners are designed by linearizing the equations in two methods. Numerical results show that the two preconditioning methods can improve the convergence behavior and efficiency of JFNK method.

  9. Laminar Smoke Point Based Subgrid Soot Radiation Modeling Applied to LES of Buoyant Turbulent Diffusion Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Prateep; de Ris, John L.; Wang, Yi; Krishnamoorthy, Niveditha; Dorofeev, Sergey B.

    2012-06-01

    Large eddy simulations (LES) of gaseous buoyant turbulent flames have been conducted with the application of a flamelet based soot-radiation model. The subgrid model applies a turbulent eddy description of soot formation, oxidation and radiation and is based on the laminar smoke point concept. Two parameters, a local turbulent strain rate and prior enthalpy loss/gain fraction influence the soot formation and radiation. Radiation heat transfer is simulated by solving the finite volume discretized form of the radiative transfer equation (RTE) with the subgrid soot-radiation model implemented. The radiant heating of surfaces in close proximity of the flames is computed and predicted heat fluxes and surface temperatures are compared against experimental data. Fire growth in a rack storage arrangement is simulated with the application of a pyrolysis model. Computed heat release rate (HRR) is compared against experimental data.

  10. Time-independent hybrid enrichment for finite element solution of transient conductionradiation in diffusive grey media

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, M. Shadi, E-mail: m.s.mohamed@durham.ac.uk [School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Seaid, Mohammed; Trevelyan, Jon [School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)] [School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Laghrouche, Omar [Institute for Infrastructure and Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)] [Institute for Infrastructure and Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    We investigate the effectiveness of the partition-of-unity finite element method for transient conductionradiation problems in diffusive grey media. The governing equations consist of a semi-linear transient heat equation for the temperature field and a stationary diffusion approximation to the radiation in grey media. The coupled equations are integrated in time using a semi-implicit method in the finite element framework. We show that for the considered problems, a combination of hyperbolic and exponential enrichment functions based on an approximation of the boundary layer leads to improved accuracy compared to the conventional finite element method. It is illustrated that this approach can be more efficient than using h adaptivity to increase the accuracy of the finite element method near the boundary walls. The performance of the proposed partition-of-unity method is analyzed on several test examples for transient conductionradiation problems in two space dimensions.

  11. Applied Radiation and Isotopes 56 (2002) 953956 Sensitivity of LR115 detector in diffusion chamber to 222

    E-print Network

    Yu, K.N.

    Applied Radiation and Isotopes 56 (2002) 953­956 Sensitivity of LR115 detector in diffusion chamber state nuclear track detector (SSNTD), LR115. In use of the cellulose nitrate material LR115, alpha Determination has been made of the sensitivity of LR115 type 2-track detectors (in units of m) to 222 Rn

  12. Ann. Geophysicae 14, 1051--1059 (1996) EGS --Springer-Verlag 1996 Diffuse solar radiation and associated meteorological

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    and associated meteorological parameters in India A. B. Bhattacharya, S. K. Kar, R. Bhattacharya Department are presented together with some meteorological parameters. The monthly values of diffuse radiation between solar activity and meteorological phenomena made an interesting study during the last few

  13. Impacts of Diffuse Radiation on Light Use Efficiency across Terrestrial Ecosystems Based on Eddy Covariance Observation in China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kun; Wang, Shaoqiang; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Huimin; Zhang, Junhui; Yan, Junhua; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Yanfen; Shi, Peili

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystem light use efficiency (LUE) is a key factor of production models for gross primary production (GPP) predictions. Previous studies revealed that ecosystem LUE could be significantly enhanced by an increase on diffuse radiation. Under large spatial heterogeneity and increasing annual diffuse radiation in China, eddy covariance flux data at 6 sites across different ecosystems from 2003 to 2007 were used to investigate the impacts of diffuse radiation indicated by the cloudiness index (CI) on ecosystem LUE in grassland and forest ecosystems. Our results showed that the ecosystem LUE at the six sites was significantly correlated with the cloudiness variation (0.24?R2?0.85), especially at the Changbaishan temperate forest ecosystem (R2?=?0.85). Meanwhile, the CI values appeared more frequently between 0.8 and 1.0 in two subtropical forest ecosystems (Qianyanzhou and Dinghushan) and were much larger than those in temperate ecosystems. Besides, cloudiness thresholds which were favorable for enhancing ecosystem carbon sequestration existed at the three forest sites, respectively. Our research confirmed that the ecosystem LUE at the six sites in China was positively responsive to the diffuse radiation, and the cloudiness index could be used as an environmental regulator for LUE modeling in regional GPP prediction. PMID:25393629

  14. RADIATION PROTECTION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1958-01-01

    The basis of radiation protection is the limitation of the dose received. ; In specifying permissible levels of irradiation the factors to be considered are ; (1) the source of the radiation, external or internal, (2) exposure to total or ; partial irradiation, and (3) the biological effects involved, somatic or genetic. ; The basic principles of rsdiation protection bassd

  15. Understanding Radiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    Radiation is a natural energy force that has been a part of the environment since the Earth was formed. It takes various forms, none of which can be smelled, tasted, seen, heard, or felt. Nevertheless, scientists know what it is, where it comes from, how to measure and detect it, and how it affects people. Cosmic radiation from outer space and

  16. Radiation Exposure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... particles. It occurs naturally in sunlight. Man-made radiation is used in X-rays, nuclear weapons, nuclear power plants and cancer treatment. If you are exposed to small amounts of radiation over a long time, it raises your risk ...

  17. Diffuse fluorescence tomography based on the radiative transfer equation for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yihan; Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng; Li, Jiao

    2014-02-01

    Diffuse florescence tomography (DFT) as a high-sensitivity optical molecular imaging tool, can be applied to in vivo visualize interior cellular and molecular events for small-animal disease model through quantitatively recovering biodistributions of specific molecular probes. In DFT, the radiative transfer equation (RTE) and its approximation, such as the diffuse equation (DE), have been used as the forward models. The RTE-based DFT methodology is more suitable for biological tissue having void-like regions and the near-source area as in the situations of small animal imaging. We present a RTE-based scheme for the steady state DFT, which combines the discrete solid angle method and the finite difference method to obtain numerical solutions of the 2D steady RTE, with the natural boundary condition and collimating light source model. The approach is validated using the forward data from the Monte Carlo simulation for its better performances in the spatial resolution and reconstruction fidelity compared to the DE-based scheme.

  18. A coupling model of light propagation based on the radiative transfer and diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hiroyuki; Hoshi, Yoko; Okawa, Shinpei; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya; Kohno, Satoru; Yamada, Yukio

    2013-10-01

    Recently, transport phenomena of photon energy have been attractive topics due to the applications of the biomedical imaging such as diffuse optical tomography (DOT). For improvement of numerical modeling in DOT, accurate and fast calculations of light propagations in biological tissues are necessary. This paper proposes a light propagation model based on the radiative transfer and diffusion equations (RTE and DE) in random media. Numerical calculations of light propagation using the both equations provide the condition for the DE to be valid. Length and time scales for the validity of the DE are estimated to be about 10lm and 20lm/?, respectively, where lm is the mean free path of photon and v is the light velocity. The proposed model can provide accurate descriptions of spatial and temporal profiles of light propagation in random media subject to the refractive-index mismatched boundary condition. Also, it can appropriately reduce computation time by an order of magnitude when compared with that fully computing the RTE.

  19. A case study of view-factor rectification procedures for diffuse-gray radiation enclosure computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Robert P.; Luck, Rogelio

    1995-01-01

    The view factors which are used in diffuse-gray radiation enclosure calculations are often computed by approximate numerical integrations. These approximately calculated view factors will usually not satisfy the important physical constraints of reciprocity and closure. In this paper several view-factor rectification algorithms are reviewed and a rectification algorithm based on a least-squares numerical filtering scheme is proposed with both weighted and unweighted classes. A Monte-Carlo investigation is undertaken to study the propagation of view-factor and surface-area uncertainties into the heat transfer results of the diffuse-gray enclosure calculations. It is found that the weighted least-squares algorithm is vastly superior to the other rectification schemes for the reduction of the heat-flux sensitivities to view-factor uncertainties. In a sample problem, which has proven to be very sensitive to uncertainties in view factor, the heat transfer calculations with weighted least-squares rectified view factors are very good with an original view-factor matrix computed to only one-digit accuracy. All of the algorithms had roughly equivalent effects on the reduction in sensitivity to area uncertainty in this case study.

  20. Cooling following large volcanic eruptions corrected for the effect of diffuse radiation on tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, Alan

    2005-03-01

    The lack of a larger cooling in proxy records of climate change following large volcanic eruptions such as those of Tambora in 1815 and Krakatau in 1883 has long been a puzzle for climatologists. These records, however, may have been biased by enhanced tree growth for several years following each eruption induced by additional diffuse radiation caused by the stratospheric volcanic aerosol clouds from the eruptions. By comparing proxy reconstructions of climate with and without tree ring data, this effect is demonstrated for the five largest eruptions for the period 1750-1980. When proxy records of Northern Hemisphere climate change are corrected for this proposed diffuse effect, there is no impact on climate change for time scales longer than 20 years. However, it now appears that there was a hemispheric cooling of about 0.6C for a decade following the unknown volcanic eruption of 1809 and Tambora in 1815, and a cooling of 0.3C for several years following the Krakatau eruption of 1883.

  1. Application of a Reynolds stress turbulence model to a supersonic radiating hydrogen-air diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhar, R.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    A second-order differential Reynolds Stress turbulence model has been applied to the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for the study of supersonic flows with finite-rate chemistry and radiation. An assumed Beta Probability Density Function is applied to account for the chemical source terms and the radiative flux terms in the conservation equations. A seven-species, seven-reaction finite rate chemistry mechanism is used to simulate the combustion process. The tangent slab approximation is used in radiative flux formulation. A pseudo-gray gas model is used to represent the absorption-emission characteristics of the participating species. The turbulence/radiation interaction is achieved via a new formulation. The resulting formulation is validated by comparison with experimental data on reacting supersonic axisymmetric jets. Results obtained for specific conditions indicate that the effect of chemical reaction on the turbulence is significant. Also, the radiative heat transfer is enhanced by the turbulence.

  2. Solar radiation in Jamaica

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.A.; Chin, P.N.; Forrest, W.; McLean, P. (Univ. of the West Indies, Kingston (Jamaica)); Grey, C. (Meteorological Office, Kingston (Jamaica))

    1994-11-01

    Average monthly global radiation in Jamaica was calculated for the years between 1978 and 1987 from values measured at 12 stations and from Angstrom-coefficient derived values. From these values daily global radiation was estimated for various periods at grid points separated by approximately 10 km on a square. Three dimensional plots and contour maps for the various periods were produced. The interpolation was based on kriging adopted by Hay. A relationship between global and diffuse radiation based on the Liu and Jordan relationship was obtained. The errors in the interpolated annual values were less than 10%. The maps were made available to the public with suggested usages of solar energy. Diffuse radiation formed less than 50% of the total radiation.

  3. Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2003-08-11

    This book covers the physical aspects of synchrotron radiation generation and is designed as a textbook and reference for graduate students, teachers and scientists utilizing synchrotron radiation. It is my hope that this text may help especially students and young researchers entering this exciting field to gain insight into the characteristics of synchrotron radiation. Discovered in 1945, synchrotron radiation has become the source of photons from the infrared to hard x-rays for a large community of researchers in basic and applied sciences. This process was particularly supported by the development of electron accelerators for basic research in high energy physics. Specifically, the development of the store ring and associated technologies resulted in the availability of high brightness photon beams far exceeding other sources. In this text, the physics of synchrotron radiation for a variety of magnets is derived from first principles resulting in useful formulas for the practitioner. Since the characteristics and quality of synchrotron radiation are intimately connected with the accelerator and electron beam producing this radiation, a short overview of relevant accelerator physics is included.

  4. Radiation Balance

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Radiation Balance challenges students to "become a meteorologist" and make predictions about the relationships among ground cover, time of day, altitude and temperature. It is a simulation of radiation processes in the earth's atmosphere caused by solar, terrestrial, and atmospheric radiation transfer. Students analyze temperature data measured by a balloon (radiosonde) that they "launch" both in the morning and evening over four types of terrain (sand, plowed field, grass or fresh snow). As the balloon is dragged and dropped to various heights in the simulated atmosphere, the temperatures at these altitudes are automatically plotted on a graph. Several temperature profiles may be plotted concurrently to compare differences before clearing the graph.

  5. UV Radiation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (; )

    2008-04-25

    The sun radiates energy over a broad spectrum of wavelengths. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which has a shorter wavelength than either visible blue or violet light, is responsible for sunburn and other adverse health effects. Fortunately for life on Earth, our atmospheres stratospheric ozone layer shields us from most UV radiation. What gets through the ozone layer, however, can cause the following problems, particularly for people who spend substantial time outdoors: Skin cancer, Suppression of the immune system, Cataracts, and Premature aging of the skin.Because of these serious health effects, you should limit your exposure to UVradiation and protect yourself when outdoors.

  6. High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging (HARDI) Probabilistic Tractography of the Auditory Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Jeffrey I.; Lanza, Matthew R.; Blaskey, Lisa; Edgar, J. Christopher; Roberts, Timothy P. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The auditory radiation crosses other white matter tracks and cannot reliably be delineated or quantitatively assessed with DTI fiber tracking. This study investigates whether HARDI fiber tracking can be used to robustly delineate the full extent of the tract. Materials and Methods HARDI (64-direction, b=3000 s/mm2) and DTI (30-direction, b=1000 s/mm2) were acquired from 25 control subjects between the ages of 8 and 26 years. Probabilistic HARDI and DTI fiber tracking of the auditory radiation was performed with starting and filter regions automatically generated from the freesurfer white matter parcellation. DTI fiber tracking was performed with both the 64 and 30-direction data sets. Fiber tracking trials demonstrating connectivity from Heschl's gyrus to the medial geniculate nucleus were considered successful. Results HARDI fiber tracking success rate was 98% and significantly higher than the 64-direction DTI rate of 50% or the 30-direction DTI rate of 42% (p<0.001). The success rates of HARDI fiber tracking for the left and right auditory radiations were not significantly different. In contrast, the left auditory radiation was successfully delineated with DTI fiber tracking at a higher rate than the right auditory radiation. Conclusions HARDI can discriminate the complex white matter pathways at the junction of the auditory radiation and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. HARDI fiber tracking can reliably delineate the auditory radiation. PMID:23493892

  7. Comptonization of diffuse ambient radiation by a relativistic jet: The source of gamma rays from blazars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Rees, Martin J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent Energy Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) observations of blazars have revealed strong, variable gamma-ray fluxes with no signatures of gamma-ray absorption by pair production. This radiation probably originates from the inner parts of relativistic jets which are aimed nearly toward us. On sub-parsec scales, the jet will be pervaded by radiation from the broad-line region, as well as by photons from the central continuum source (some of which will be scattered by thermal plasma). In a frame moving with the relativistic outflow, the energy of this ambient radiation would be enhanced. This radiation would be Comptonized by both cold and relativistic electrons in the jet, yielding (in the observer's frame) a collimated beam of X-rays and gamma rays. On the assumption that this process dominates self-Comptonization of synchrotron radiation, we develop a self-consistent model for variable gamma-ray emission, involving a single population of relativistic electrons accelerated by a disturbance in the jet. The spectral break between the X-ray and gamma-ray band, observed in 3C 279 and deduced for other blazars, results from inefficient radiative cooling of lower energy electrons. The existence of such a break strongly favors a model involving Comptonization of an external radiation field over a synchrotron self-Compton model. We derive constraints on such model parameters as the location and speed of the source, its dimensions and internal physical parameters, the maximum photon energies produced in the source, and the density and distribution of ambient radiation. Finally, we discuss how observations might discriminate between our model and alternative ones invoking Comptonization of ambient radiation.

  8. Healthful radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Agard, E.T. [Flowers Hospital, Sylvania, OH (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This title of this article sounds paradoxical to most people because the general public is not fully aware of the many benefits radiation has brought to people`s healthcare. Radiation has provided the most effective means of noninvasive diagnosis of many diseases, thus reducing the need for exploratory surgery, at significantly reduced risks. Furthermore, radiotherapy has been effective in treating many diseases without surgical removal of the diseased part. The breast is one excellent example of the benefits of radiation in both diagnosis and treatment with preservation. Yet the public still regards radiation as mysterious and dangerous, while trained experts regard it as beneficial with manageable risks. This article suggests ways of presenting this material to the public in a manner that is interesting and informative. 11 refs.

  9. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... energy to the tumor, while sparing nearby normal tissue. In this way, the risk of the common side effects of radiation to the liver, such as nausea, ulcers in the stomach or intestines, are minimized. In general, smaller liver ...

  10. RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office 130 DeSoto Street G-7 Parran with sources of ionizing radiation are required to be instructed in the basic principles of radiation protection and the potential risks of ionizing radiation. Radiation Safety Office personnel provide

  11. Radiative transfer modeling of direct and diffuse sunlight in a Siberian pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alton, P. B.; North, P.; Kaduk, J.; Los, S.

    2005-12-01

    We have expanded the Monte Carlo, ray-tracing model FLIGHT in order to simulate photosynthesis within three-dimensional, heterogeneous tree canopies. In contrast to the simple radiative transfer schemes adopted in many land-surface models (e.g., the Big Leaf approximation), our simulation calculates explicitly the leaf irradiance at different heights within the canopy and thus produces an accurate scale-up in photosynthesis from leaf to canopy level. We also account for both diffuse and direct sunlight. For a Siberian stand of Scots pine Pinus sylvestris, FLIGHT predicts observed carbon assimilation, across the full range of sky radiance, with an r.m.s. error of 12%. Our main findings for this sparse canopy, using both measurements and model, are as follows: (1) Observationally, we detect a light-use efficiency (LUE) increase of only ?10% for the canopy when the proportion of diffuse sky radiance is 75% rather than 25%. The corresponding enhancement predicted by our simulations is 10-20%. With such small increases in LUE, our site will not assimilate more carbon on overcast days compared to seasonally equivalent sunny days; (2) the scale-up in photosynthesis from top-leaf to canopy is less than unity. The Big Leaf approximation, based on Beer's law and light-acclimated leaf nitrogen, overpredicts this scale-up by ?60% for low sky radiance (?500 ?molPAR m-2 s-1); (3) when leaf nitrogen is distributed so as to maximize canopy photosynthesis, the increase in the canopy carbon assimilation, compared with a uniform nitrogen distribution, is small (?4%). Maximum assimilation occurs when the vertical gradient of leaf nitrogen is slightly shallower than that of the light profile.

  12. Asymptotic Accuracy of the Equilibrium Diffusion Approximation and Semi-analytic Solutions of Radiating Shocks

    E-print Network

    Ferguson, Jim Michael

    2014-01-10

    Radiation hydrodynamics (RH) provides a theoretical description for many astrophysical events spanning a wide range of observable phenomena. It is the goal of high-energy-density laboratory astrophysics (HEDLA) to reproduce some of these events...

  13. Radiation-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing White Matter in Patients With Cerebral Tumors: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nagesh, Vijaya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)], E-mail: vnagesh@med.umich.edu; Tsien, Christina I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chenevert, Thomas L.; Ross, Brian D. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Junick, Larry [Department of Neurology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Cao Yue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the radiation-induced changes in normal-appearing white matter before, during, and after radiotherapy (RT) in cerebral tumor patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with low-grade glioma, high-grade glioma, or benign tumor treated with RT were studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. The biologically corrected doses ranged from 50 to 81 Gy. The temporal changes were assessed before, during, and to 45 weeks after the start of RT. The mean diffusivity of water (), fractional anisotropy of diffusion, diffusivity perpendicular ({lambda}{sub perpendicular}) and parallel ({lambda}{sub parallel}) to white matter fibers were calculated in normal-appearing genu and splenium of the corpus callosum. Results: In the genu and splenium, fractional anisotropy decreased and , {lambda}{sub parallel}, {lambda}{sub -perpendicular} increased linearly and significantly with time (p < 0.01). At 45 weeks after the start of RT, {lambda}{sub -perpendicular} had increased {approx}30% in the genu and splenium, and {lambda}{sub parallel} had increased 5% in the genu and 9% in the splenium, suggesting that demyelination is predominant. The increases in {lambda}{sub perpendicular} and {lambda}{sub parallel} were dose dependent, starting at 3 weeks and continuing to 32 weeks from the start of RT. The dose-dependent increase in {lambda}{sub perpendicular} and {lambda}{sub parallel} was not sustained after 32 weeks, indicating the transition from focal to diffuse effects. Conclusion: The acute and subacute changes in normal-appearing white matter fibers indicate radiation-induced demyelination and mild structural degradation of axonal fibers. The structural changes after RT are progressive, with early dose-dependent demyelination and subsequent diffuse dose-independent demyelination and mild axonal degradation. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging is potentially a biomarker for the assessment of radiation-induced white matter injury.

  14. Diffusion tensor imaging of normal appearing white matter as a biomarker for radiation-induced late delayed cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher H.; Nagesh, Vijaya; Sundgren, Pia C.; Buchtel, Henry; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Junck, Larry; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina I.; Cao, Yue

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether early assessment of cerebral white matter degradation can predict late delayed cognitive decline after radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials Ten patients undergoing conformal fractionated brain RT participated in a prospective diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. MRI was acquired prior to RT, 3 weeks and 6 weeks during RT, and 10, 30, and 78 weeks after starting RT. Diffusivity variables in the parahippocampal cingulum bundle and temporal lobe white matter were computed. Quality of life (QOL) survey and neurocognitive function tests were administered pre-RT and at post-RT MRI follow-ups. Results In both structures, longitudinal diffusivity (?||) decreased and perpendicular diffusivity (??) increased following RT, with early changes correlating to later changes (p < 0.05). Radiation dose correlated with increase in cingulum ?? at 3 weeks, and patients with >50% of cingula volume receiving >12 Gy had a higher increase in ?? at 3 weeks and 6 weeks (p < 0.05). Post-RT changes in verbal recall scores were linearly correlated with late changes in cingulum ?|| (30 weeks, p < 0.02). By receiver operating characteristic curves, early cingulum ?|| changes predicted post-RT changes in verbal recall scores (3 weeks and 6 weeks, p < 0.05). Neurocognitive test scores were significantly correlated with QOL survey results. Conclusions The correlation between early diffusivity changes in the parahippocampal cingulum and the late decline in verbal recall suggests that diffusion tensor imaging may be useful as a biomarker for predicting late delayed cognitive decline. PMID:21570218

  15. Celestial diffuse gamma radiation above 30 MeV observed by SAS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Hartman, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    The Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS)-2, launched on November 15, 1972, carried into orbit a 32-deck magnetic-core digitized spark chamber gamma ray telescope to study celestial gamma radiation in the energy range above 30 MeV. In the study of several regions with b sub 2 15 deg, a finite, diffuse flux of gamma rays with a steep energy spectrum in the energy region from 35 to 200 MeV is observed. Representing the energy spectrum by a power law of the form dJ/dE = AE to - alpha power over this energy range, alpha is found along with the integral flux above 100 MeV. Combining this result with existing low energy gamma ray data yields an energy spectrum which is not a simple power law in energy, as in the X-ray region, but which demonstrates first an increase and then a decrease in slope, consistent within uncertainties with that predicted by cosmological theories, including the continuous production of high energy gamma rays primarily from neutral pi mesons throughout the history of the universe.

  16. Construction of accuracy-preserving surrogate for the eigenvalue radiation diffusion and/or transport problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, North Caroline State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The construction of surrogate models for high fidelity models is now considered an important objective in support of all engineering activities which require repeated execution of the simulation, such as verification studies, validation exercises, and uncertainty quantification. The surrogate must be computationally inexpensive to allow its repeated execution, and must be computationally accurate in order for its predictions to be credible. This manuscript introduces a new surrogate construction approach that reduces the dimensionality of the state solution via a range-finding algorithm from linear algebra. It then employs a proper orthogonal decomposition-like approach to solve for the reduced state. The algorithm provides an upper bound on the error resulting from the reduction. Different from the state-of-the-art, the new approach allows the user to define the desired accuracy a priori which controls the maximum allowable reduction. We demonstrate the utility of this approach using an eigenvalue radiation diffusion model, where the accuracy is selected to match machine precision. Results indicate that significant reduction is possible for typical reactor assembly models, which are currently considered expensive given the need to employ very fine mesh many group calculations to ensure the highest possible fidelity for the downstream core calculations. Given the potential for significant reduction in the computational cost, we believe it is possible to rethink the manner in which homogenization theory is currently employed in reactor design calculations. (authors)

  17. Radiation Therapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have many questions and concerns about it. About Radiation Therapy In radiation therapy, high-energy radiation from ... surgery to remove tumors or cancerous areas. How Radiation Is Given Radiation therapy is administered two ways: ...

  18. Determination of the absorption of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols: Application of the diffuse-direct radiation method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. A. Cerni

    1978-01-01

    Data were taken and analyzed for a total of seven days at two widely separated sites (Tucson, AZ and Laramie, WY). Certain experimental and theoretical improvements on the diffuse-direct method and its implementation are discussed. Improved radiometer designs are discussed. A new approach to the reduction of diffuse-direct data, which eliminates any dependence on Mie theory for describing the optical

  19. Radiation damage of contact structures with diffusion barriers exposed to irradiation with {sup 60}Co{gamma}-ray photons

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, A. E. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine); Boltovets, N. S. [Orion State Enterprise Research Institute (Ukraine); Konakova, R. V., E-mail: konakova@isp.kiev.ua; Milenin, V. V. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine); Sveshnikov, Yu. N. [Elma-Malachite Close Corporation (Russian Federation); Sheremet, V. N. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

    2010-04-15

    The effect of ionizing radiation of {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray photons in the dose range 10{sup 4}-2 x 10{sup 9} rad on metal-semiconductor Au-ZrB{sub x}-AlGaN/GaN and Au-TiB{sub x}-Al-Ti-n-GaN contacts and Au-ZrB{sub x}-n-GaN Schottky diodes is examined. The contacts with the TiB{sub x} and ZrB{sub x} diffusion barriers do not degrade under the effect of ionizing radiation if the dose does not exceed 10{sup 8} rad. The Au-ZrB{sub x}-n-GaN Schottky diodes remain stable in the dose range 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} rad. As the radiation dose is increased to {>=}10{sup 8} rad, the damage to the contact metallization increases and is accompanied by formation of through pores, which is conducive to accumulation of oxygen at the Au-ZrB{sub x}(TiB{sub x}) interfaces and to an increase in mass transport of atoms in contact-forming layers. In this case, irradiation-caused degradation of the Schottky diodes is observed. Possible mechanisms of radiation damage of contact structures with diffusion barriers are analyzed.

  20. Synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Knotek, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation has had a revolutionary effect on a broad range of scientific studies, from physics, chemistry and metallurgy to biology, medicine and geoscience. The situation during the last decade has been one of very rapid growth, there is a great vitality to the field and a capability has been given to a very broad range of scientific disciplines which was undreamed of just a decade or so ago. Here we will discuss some of the properties of synchrotron radiation that makes it so interesting and something of the sources in existence today including the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the new facilities built specifically for synchrotron radiation research and the model that was developed there for involvement of the scientific community is a good one which provides some good lessons for these facilities and others.

  1. Redirecting concentrated radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collares-Pereira, Manuel; Mendes, Joao F.; Rabl, Ari; Ries, Harald

    1995-08-01

    Often the direction of radiation is important for technological reasons. Melting substances may drip down, or for air receivers, convection may cause instabilities. One obvious solution is to reorient the radiation before concentration with a planar mirror. This is only practical, if the angular spread is considerably less than 45 degrees. Here we propose a section of a torus with reflecting walls to reorient the radiation. The torus, by virtue of its rotational symmetry will not reject any radiation, even if the incoming radiation is close to the thermodynamic limit and thus completely diffuse. A toroid reflector can be easily manufactured from massive material and cooled. It seams a compact and practical device. We calculate the number of reflections and discuss applications of such a device in solar furnaces.

  2. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

    1983-01-01

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  3. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  4. Radiation Fog

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    This module presents the physical processes and life cycle of radiation fog, including its preconditioning environment, initiation, growth, and dissipation. The processes include radiation (both solar and longwave), soil-atmosphere thermal interactions, turbulent mixing, the roles of condensation nuclei, and droplet settling. Each section includes a set of interactive questions based on the learning content presented. Tom Dulong of the National Weather Service Center Weather Service Unit (CWSU) in Longmont, Colorado is the Principal Science Advisor for this module, and Dr. Paul Croft, Meteorology Program Coordinator for Jackson State University, provided additional scientific review and guidance. The module's format was updated and republished on May 20, 2009.

  5. Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    Appendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding the potential doses associated of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human

  6. Radiation acoustics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L M Lyamshev

    1992-01-01

    A review is given of results of research on the excitation of sound in a condensed medium by penetrating radiation (beams of protons, electrons, photons, etc.) that is both modulated in intensity and pulsed. The thermoradiation (thermoelastic) mechanism is examined in detail when the volume density of the energy released in the medium is not great and no phase changes

  7. Radiation retinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R.G.; Withers, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    A letter to the editor discusses the effectiveness and risk of radiation treatment of Grave's ophthalmopathy. The authors are unable to document a single instance in which retinopathy can be attributed to therapy with a total dose of 2000 cGy when delivered in daily increments of 180 to 200 cGy.

  8. Noninvasive diffuse optical measurement of blood flow and blood oxygenation for monitoring radiation

    E-print Network

    Yodh, Arjun G.

    these tumors metastasize to lymph nodes in the neck. Several methods for treatment of head and neck cancer Vol. 11 6064021-1 #12;treatment for this type of cancer, especially when locally ad- vanced, often THC re- sponses to chemo-radiation therapy in patients with head and neck tumors. rBF, StO2, and THC

  9. Second order time evolution of the multigroup diffusion and P{sub 1} equations for radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Gordon L., E-mail: olson99@tds.net [Computer and Computational Sciences Division (CCS-2), Los Alamos National Laboratory, 5 Foxglove Circle, Madison, WI 53717 (United States)

    2011-08-20

    Highlights: {yields} An existing multigroup transport algorithm is extended to be second-order in time. {yields} A new algorithm is presented that does not require a grey acceleration solution. {yields} The two algorithms are tested with 2D, multi-material problems. {yields} The two algorithms have comparable computational requirements. - Abstract: An existing solution method for solving the multigroup radiation equations, linear multifrequency-grey acceleration, is here extended to be second order in time. This method works for simple diffusion and for flux-limited diffusion, with or without material conduction. A new method is developed that does not require the solution of an averaged grey transport equation. It is effective solving both the diffusion and P{sub 1} forms of the transport equation. Two dimensional, multi-material test problems are used to compare the solution methods.

  10. Hybrid model of light propagation in random media based on the time-dependent radiative transfer and diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hiroyuki; Okawa, Shinpei; Yamada, Yukio; Hoshi, Yoko

    2014-11-01

    Numerical modeling of light propagation in random media has been an important issue for biomedical imaging, including diffuse optical tomography (DOT). For high resolution DOT, accurate and fast computation of light propagation in biological tissue is desirable. This paper proposes a space-time hybrid model for numerical modeling based on the radiative transfer and diffusion equations (RTE and DE, respectively) in random media under refractive-index mismatching. In the proposed model, the RTE and DE regions are separated into space and time by using a crossover length and the time from the ballistic regime to the diffusive regime, ?DA~10/?t? and tDA~20/v?t? where ?t? and v represent a reduced transport coefficient and light velocity, respectively. The present model succeeds in describing light propagation accurately and reduces computational load by a quarter compared with full computation of the RTE.

  11. Sound Radiation from Cylindrical Radiators

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dr. Dan Russell

    The following animations illustrate the radiation of sound waves from a vibrating source in 2-D. The source is a long cylinder which is oscillating in the radial direction only (all vibrations along the length of the cylinder are ignored). In particular, the animations show the vibration of the cylinder in its various modes and the resulting particle displacements of the surrounding fluid.

  12. Acute Radiation Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Tools CDC Response, Japan 2011 Specific Hazards Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS): A Fact Sheet for the Public ... is called the radiation dose. People exposed to radiation will get ARS only if: The radiation dose ...

  13. Calculate Your Radiation Dose

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ionizing & Non-Ionizing Radiation Understanding Radiation: Calculate Your Radiation Dose Health Effects Main Page Exposure Pathways Calculate ... of the US do you live in? Internal radiation (in your body): From food and water, (e. ...

  14. Gallbladder Cancer: Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gallbladder cancer Next Topic Chemotherapy for gallbladder cancer Radiation therapy for gallbladder cancer Radiation therapy uses high- ... higher dose to the cancer areas. Uses of radiation therapy Radiation therapy can be used in several ...

  15. Radiation Oncology Treatment Team

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Prostate Skin Upper GI Latest Research Find a Radiation Oncologist Last Name: Facility: City: State: Zip Code: ... who specializes in using radiation to treat cancer . Radiation Oncologists Radiation oncologists are the doctors who will ...

  16. Radiation Protection

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Science Update (AAAS; )

    2008-05-01

    Chemotherapy and radiation can be powerful weapons against cancer. But they harm healthy cells as well. Cells of the immune system and G.I. tract are especially vulnerable: instead of repairing the damage, they respond by committing cellular suicide. In contrast, tumor cells have mutations that make them resistant to cell death. Roswell Park Cancer Institute researcher Andrei Gudkov and his colleagues recently harnessed this property to create a new drug.

  17. X-ray diffuse scattering for evaluation of wide bandgap semiconductor nuclear radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S Goorsky; H. Yoon; M. Schieber; R. B James; D. S McGregor; M. Natarajan

    1996-01-01

    The crystalline perfection of solid state radiation detectors was examined using triple axis x-ray diffraction. Triple axis techniques provide a means to analyze the origin of diffraction peak broadening: the effects of strain (due to deviations in alloy composition or stoichiometry) and lattice tilts (mosaic structure) can be separated. Cd1 ? xZnxTe (x ? 0.1), HgI2, and GaAs detector materials

  18. Fundamental Radiation Concepts

    E-print Network

    Slatton, Clint

    Fundamental Radiation Concepts Alyson Cieply University of Florida Environmental Health and Safety Radiation Control #12;What is radiation? Radiation is energy that travels through space or matter in the form of a particle or wave The effect radiation has on matter depends on the type of radiation and how

  19. Change in Diffusing Capacity After Radiation as an Objective Measure for Grading Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Treated for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocio, Seville (Spain); Gomez, Daniel, E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Eapen, George [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liu Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Scoring of radiation pneumonitis (RP), a dose-limiting toxicity after thoracic radiochemotherapy, is subjective and thus inconsistent among studies. Here we investigated whether the extent of change in diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) after radiation therapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) could be used as an objective means of quantifying RP. Patients and Methods: We analyzed potential correlations between DLCO and RP in 140 patients who received definitive RT ({>=}60 Gy) with or without chemotherapy for primary NSCLC. All underwent DLCO analysis before and after RT. Post-RT DLCO values within 1 week of the RP diagnosis (Grade 0, 1, 2, or 3) were selected and compared with that individual's preradiation values. Percent reductions in DLCO and RP grade were compared by point biserial correlation in the entire patient group and in subgroups stratified according to various clinical factors. Results: Patients experiencing Grade 0, 1, 2, or 3 RP had median percentage changes in DLCO after RT of 10.7%, 13%, 22.1%, or 35.2%. Percent reduction in DLCO correlated with RP Grade {<=}1 vs. {>=}2 (p = 0.0004). This association held for the following subgroups: age {>=}65 years, advanced stage, smokers, use of chemotherapy, volume of normal lung receiving at least 20 Gy {>=}30%, and baseline DLCO or forced expiratory volume in 1 second {>=}60%. Conclusions: By correlating percent change in DLCO from pretreatment values at the time of diagnosis of RP with RP grade, we were able to identify categories of RP based on the change in DLCO. These criteria provide a basis for an objective scoring system for RP based on change in DLCO.

  20. Radiation protection in space.

    PubMed

    Reitz, G; Facius, R; Sandler, H

    1995-01-01

    Radiation environment, basic concepts of radiation protection, and specific aspects of the space radiation field are reviewed. The discussion of physico-chemical and subcellular radiation effects includes mechanisms of radiation action and cellular consequences. The discussion of radiobiological effects includes unique aspects of HZE particle effects, space flight findings, terrestrial findings, analysis of somatic radiation effects and effects on critical organs, and early and delayed effects. Other topics include the impact of the space flight environment, measurement of radiation exposure, establishing radiation protection limits, limitations in establishing space-based radiation exposure limits, radiation protection measures, and recommendations. PMID:11541474

  1. Shortwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klassen, Steve; Bugbee, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Accurate shortwave radiation data is critical to evapotranspiration (ET) models used for developing irrigation schedules to optimize crop production while saving water, minimizing fertilizer, herbicide, and pesticide applications, reducing soil erosion, and protecting surface and ground water quality. Low cost silicon cell pyranometers have proven to be sufficiently accurate and robust for widespread use in agricultural applications under unobstructed daylight conditions. More expensive thermopile pyranometers are required for use as calibration standards and measurements under light with unique spectral properties (electric lights, under vegetation, in greenhouses and growth chambers). Routine cleaning, leveling, and annual calibration checks will help to ensure the integrity of long-term data.

  2. Radiating gravastars

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, R. [Coordenao de Astronomia e Astrofsica, Observatrio Nacional, Rua General Jos Cristino, 77, So Cristvo 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, M.F.A. da [Departamento de Fsica Terica, Instituto de Fsica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua So Francisco Xavier 524, Maracan 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Rocha, Jaime F. Villas da [Instituto de Biocincias, Departamento de Cincias Naturais, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Av. Pasteur 458, Urca, CEP 22290-240, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Wang, Anzhong, E-mail: chan@on.br, E-mail: mfasnic@gmail.com, E-mail: jfvroch@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: anzhong_wang@baylor.edu [GCAP-CASPER, Department of Physics, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Considering a Vaidya exterior spacetime, we study dynamical models of prototype gravastars, made of an infinitely thin spherical shell of a perfect fluid with the equation of state p = ?, enclosing an interior de Sitter spacetime. We show explicitly that the final output can be a black hole, an unstable gravastar, a stable gravastar or a 'bounded excursion' gravastar, depending on how the mass of the shell evolves in time, the cosmological constant and the initial position of the dynamical shell. This work presents, for the first time in the literature, a gravastar that emits radiation.

  3. A Monte Carlo Synthetic-Acceleration Method for Solving the Thermal Radiation Diffusion Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Thomas M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mosher, Scott W [ORNL] [ORNL; Slattery, Stuart [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel synthetic-acceleration based Monte Carlo method for solving the equilibrium thermal radiation diusion equation in three dimensions. The algorithm performance is compared against traditional solution techniques using a Marshak benchmark problem and a more complex multiple material problem. Our results show that not only can our Monte Carlo method be an eective solver for sparse matrix systems, but also that it performs competitively with deterministic methods including preconditioned Conjugate Gradient while producing numerically identical results. We also discuss various aspects of preconditioning the method and its general applicability to broader classes of problems.

  4. Involved-Lesion Radiation Therapy After Chemotherapy in Limited-Stage Head-and-Neck Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jeong Il; Nam, Heerim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Yong Chan, E-mail: ahnyc@skku.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won Seog; Park, Keunchil; Kim, Seok Jin [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To report treatment outcomes after combined-modality therapy in patients with Stage I/II head-and-neck (HN) diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBL). Methods and Materials: Eighty-six eligible patients received sequential chemotherapy and involved-lesion radiation therapy from 1995 to 2006. After a median of four cycles of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) or rituximab-plus-CHOP chemotherapy, a median of 41.4 Gy was delivered to the known initial gross lesion with adequate margin (2 to 3 cm). Results: After a median follow-up of 57 months, eight treatment failures were observed: distant metastasis in 8 patients; and locoregional failure in 4 patients. Among the 4 patients with locoregional failure, 3 presented with in-field failures, and 1 both in-field and out-of-field failure (contralateral neck). Rates of overall survival (OS) and freedom from progression (FFP) at 10 years were 74.1% and 88.9%, respectively. There was no severe side effect except 1 patient with Grade 3 mucositis during and after completion of radiation therapy. Multivariate analyses showed that absence of B symptom (p = 0.022) and normal lactate dehydrogenase (p = 0.017) were related to favorable OS, age >60 years (p = 0.033) was related to favorable FFP, and international prognostic index of 0 or 1 was related to favorable OS (p = 0.003) and FFP (p = 0.03). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that patients with Stage I/II HN DLBL did not need whole-neck irradiation. Involved-lesion radiation therapy might reduce radiation toxicity with favorable treatment results.

  5. The Impact of Buoyancy and Flame Structure on Soot, Radiation and NOx Emissions from a Turbulent Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, I. M.; Kollman, W.; VanderWal, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the spatial structure of a turbulent diffusion flame plays an important role in determining the emissions of radiative energy, soot and NO, from a combustor. This structure, manifested in the two point statistics, is influenced by buoyancy. Radiation, soot and NOx emissions are the cumulative result of processes that occur throughout a flame. For example, radiation fluxes along a line of sight can be found from summing up the contributions from sources in individual pockets of hot soot that emit, and from sinks in cold soot that absorb. Soot and NOx are both the results of slow chemistry and are not equilibrium products. The time that is available for production and burnout is crucial in determining the eventual emissions of these pollutants. Turbulence models generally rely on a single point closure of the appropriate time averaged equations. Hence, spatial information is lost and needs to be modeled using solution variables such as turbulence kinetic energy and dissipation rate, often with the assumption of isotropy. However, buoyancy can affect the physical structure of turbulent flames and can change the spatial extent of soot bearing regions. Theoretical comparisons with models are best done in the limit of infinite Froude number because the inclusion of buoyancy in flow models introduces significant uncertainties. Hence, LII measurements of soot, measurements of radiation fluxes from soot, Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) of the flow field and measurements of post flame NOX will be carried out on the NASA Lewis 2.2 sec drop tower and eventually on the parabolic flight aircraft. The drop rig will be a modified version of a unit that has been successfully used at Lewis in the past.

  6. A Radiation Chemistry Code Based on the Green's Function of the Diffusion Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic radiation track structure codes are of great interest for space radiation studies and hadron therapy in medicine. These codes are used for a many purposes, notably for microdosimetry and DNA damage studies. In the last two decades, they were also used with the Independent Reaction Times (IRT) method in the simulation of chemical reactions, to calculate the yield of various radiolytic species produced during the radiolysis of water and in chemical dosimeters. Recently, we have developed a Green's function based code to simulate reversible chemical reactions with an intermediate state, which yielded results in excellent agreement with those obtained by using the IRT method. This code was also used to simulate and the interaction of particles with membrane receptors. We are in the process of including this program for use with the Monte-Carlo track structure code Relativistic Ion Tracks (RITRACKS). This recent addition should greatly expand the capabilities of RITRACKS, notably to simulate DNA damage by both the direct and indirect effect.

  7. A Multigroup diffusion solver using pseudo transient continuation for a radiation-hydrodynamic code with patch-based AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, A I; Offner, S R

    2006-09-21

    We present a scheme to solve the nonlinear multigroup radiation diffusion (MGD) equations. The method is incorporated into a massively parallel, multidimensional, Eulerian radiation-hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The patch-based AMR algorithm refines in both space and time creating a hierarchy of levels, coarsest to finest. The physics modules are time-advanced using operator splitting. On each level, separate 'level-solve' packages advance the modules. Our multigroup level-solve adapts an implicit procedure which leads to a two-step iterative scheme that alternates between elliptic solves for each group with intra-cell group coupling. For robustness, we introduce pseudo transient continuation ({Psi}tc). We analyze the magnitude of the {Psi}tc parameter to ensure positivity of the resulting linear system, diagonal dominance and convergence of the two-step scheme. For AMR, a level defines a subdomain for refinement. For diffusive processes such as MGD, the refined level uses Dirichet boundary data at the coarse-fine interface and the data is derived from the coarse level solution. After advancing on the fine level, an additional procedure, the sync-solve (SS), is required in order to enforce conservation. The MGD SS reduces to an elliptic solve on a combined grid for a system of G equations, where G is the number of groups. We adapt the 'partial temperature' scheme for the SS; hence, we reuse the infrastructure developed for scalar equations. Results are presented. We consider a multigroup test problem with a known analytic solution. We demonstrate utility of {Psi}tc by running with increasingly larger timesteps. Lastly, we simulate the sudden release of energy Y inside an Al sphere (r = 15 cm) suspended in air at STP. For Y = 11 kT, we find that gray radiation diffusion and MGD produce similar results. However, if Y = 1 MT, the two packages yield different results. Our large Y simulation contradicts a long-standing theory and demonstrates the inadequacy of gray diffusion.

  8. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Normal-Appearing White Matter as Biomarker for Radiation-Induced Late Delayed Cognitive Decline

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Christopher H., E-mail: chchap@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Nagesh, Vijaya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sundgren, Pia C. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Buchtel, Henry [Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chenevert, Thomas L. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Junck, Larry [Department of Neurology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Cao, Yue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether early assessment of cerebral white matter degradation can predict late delayed cognitive decline after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Ten patients undergoing conformal fractionated brain RT participated in a prospective diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging study. Magnetic resonance imaging studies were acquired before RT, at 3 and 6 weeks during RT, and 10, 30, and 78 weeks after starting RT. The diffusivity variables in the parahippocampal cingulum bundle and temporal lobe white matter were computed. A quality-of-life survey and neurocognitive function tests were administered before and after RT at the magnetic resonance imaging follow-up visits. Results: In both structures, longitudinal diffusivity ({lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line }) decreased and perpendicular diffusivity ({lambda}{sub Up-Tack }) increased after RT, with early changes correlating to later changes (p < .05). The radiation dose correlated with an increase in cingulum {lambda}{sub Up-Tack} at 3 weeks, and patients with >50% of cingula volume receiving >12 Gy had a greater increase in {lambda}{sub Up-Tack} at 3 and 6 weeks (p < .05). The post-RT changes in verbal recall scores correlated linearly with the late changes in cingulum {lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line} (30 weeks, p < .02). Using receiver operating characteristic curves, early cingulum {lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line} changes predicted for post-RT changes in verbal recall scores (3 and 6 weeks, p < .05). The neurocognitive test scores correlated significantly with the quality-of-life survey results. Conclusions: The correlation between early diffusivity changes in the parahippocampal cingulum and the late decline in verbal recall suggests that diffusion tensor imaging might be useful as a biomarker for predicting late delayed cognitive decline.

  9. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2014-04-22

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  10. Radiation dosimeters

    DOEpatents

    Hoelsher, James W. (Pullman, WA); Hegland, Joel E. (Pullman, WA); Braunlich, Peter F. (Pullman, WA); Tetzlaff, Wolfgang (Pullman, WA)

    1992-01-01

    Radiation dosimeters and dosimeter badges. The dosimeter badges include first and second parts which are connected to join using a securement to produce a sealed area in which at least one dosimeter is held and protected. The badge parts are separated to expose the dosimeters to a stimulating laser beam used to read dose exposure information therefrom. The badge is constructed to allow automated disassembly and reassembly in a uniquely fitting relationship. An electronic memory is included to provide calibration and identification information used during reading of the dosimeter. Dosimeter mounts which reduce thermal heating requirements are shown. Dosimeter constructions and production methods using thin substrates and phosphor binder-layers applied thereto are also taught.

  11. Radiation Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Apollo and subsequent spacecraft have had highly effective radiation barriers; made of aluminized polymer film, they bar or let in heat to maintain consistent temperatures inside. Tech 2000, formerly Quantum International Corporation used the NASA technology in its insulating materials, Super "Q" Radiant Barrier, for home, industry and mobile applications. The insulation combines industrial aluminum foil overlaid around a core of another material, usually propylene or mylar. The outer layer reflects up to 97 percent of heat; the central layer creates a thermal break in the structure and thus allows low radiant energy emission. The Quantum Cool Wall, used in cars and trucks, takes up little space while providing superior insulation, thus reducing spoilage and costs. The panels can also dampen sound and engine, exhaust and solar heat.

  12. Radiation Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    An aluminized polymer film is a highly effective radiation barrier for both manned and unmanned spacecraft. Variations of this space-devised material are also used as an energy conservation technique for homes and offices. One commercial company, Tech 2000 (formerly Buckeye Radiant Barrier), markets 'Super R' Radiant Barrier, which finds its origins in the Apollo Mission programs. The material is placed between wall studs and exterior facing before siding or in new roof installation, between roof support and roof sheathing. Successful retrofit installations have included schools and shrink wrap ovens. The radiant barrier blocks 95 percent of radiant energy, thus retaining summer heat and blocking winter cold. Suppliers claim utility bill reductions of 20 percent or more.

  13. Radiation Safety September 2013

    E-print Network

    California at Irvine, University of

    Radiation Safety Manual September 2013 Office of Environment, Health & Safety #12;RADIATION SAFETY of ionizing radiation as a valuable tool to extend fundamental knowledge. These activities are an important of radiation-producing machines and radioactive materials attests to the success of its radiation safety

  14. The implications of the COBE diffuse microwave radiation results for cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, David P.; Stebbins, Albert; Bouchet, Francois R.

    1992-01-01

    We compare the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation measured by the COBE experiment to those predicted by cosmic string theories. We use an analytic model for the Delta T/T power spectrum that is based on our previous numerical simulations of strings, under the assumption that cosmic strings are the sole source of the measured anisotropy. This implies a value for the string mass per unit length of 1.5 +/- 0.5 x 10 exp -6 C-squared/G. This is within the range of values required for cosmic strings to successfully seed the formation of large-scale structures in the universe. These results clearly encourage further studies of Delta T/T and large-scale structure in the cosmic string model.

  15. Non-diffusive resonant acceleration of electrons in the radiation belts

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, A. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Agapitov, O. V. [LPC2E/CNRS, University of Orleans, Orleans (France); Mourenas, D. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Rolland, G. [CNES, Toulouse (France)

    2012-12-15

    We describe a mechanism of resonant electron acceleration by oblique high-amplitude whistler waves under conditions typical for the Earth radiation belts. We use statistics of spacecraft observations of whistlers in the Earth radiation belts to obtain the dependence of the angle {theta} between the wave-normal and the background magnetic field on magnetic latitude {lambda}. According to this statistics, the angle {theta} already approaches the resonance cone at {lambda}{approx}15 Degree-Sign and remains close to it up to {lambda}{approx}30 Degree-Sign -40 Degree-Sign on the dayside. The parallel component of the electrostatic field of whistler waves often increases around {lambda}{approx}15 Degree-Sign up to one hundred of mV/m. We show that due to this increase of the electric field, the whistler waves can trap electrons into the potential well via wave particle resonant interaction corresponding to Landau resonance. Trapped electrons then move with the wave to higher latitudes where they escape from the resonance. Strong acceleration is favored by adiabatic invariance along the increasing magnetic field, which continuously transfers the parallel energy gained to perpendicular energy, allowing resonance to be reached and maintained. The concomitant increase of the wave phase velocity allows for even stronger relative acceleration at low energy <50keV. Each trapping-escape event of electrons of {approx}10keV to 100 keV results in an energy gain of up to 100 keV in the inhomogeneous magnetic field of the Earth dipole. For electrons with initial energy below 100 keV, such rapid acceleration should hasten their drop into the loss-cone and their precipitation into the atmosphere. We discuss the role of the considered mechanism in the eventual formation of a trapped distribution of relativistic electrons for initial energies larger than 100 keV and in microbursts precipitations of lower energy particles.

  16. Radiation Contamination Versus Exposure

    MedlinePLUS

    RADIATION CONTAMINATION VERSUS EXPOSURE EXTERNAL CONTAMINATION External contamination occurs when radioactive material comes into contact with a ... radioactive materials can accumulate in different body organs. RADIATION EXPOSURE Another word for radiation exposure is irradiation. ...

  17. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  18. [Neurotoxicity of radiation].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that the central nervous system is thoroughly resistant to ionizing radiation as high-dose radiation exposure is required for causing neuronal death. In contrast, recent studies have revealed that the hippocampus, which could be the main organ involved in disorder of higher brain functions after radiation therapy, contains radiation-sensitive cell fractions. In this paper, the basics of radiation effects and the molecular mechanism of neurotoxicity of radiation have been reviewed and discussed. PMID:25585436

  19. Solar radiation resource assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

  20. Slip effects on the unsteady radiative MHD free convection flow over a moving plate with mass diffusion and heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetecau, Constantin; Vieru, Dumitru; Fetecau, Corina; Pop, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    General solutions for the dimensionless velocity corresponding to the unsteady radiative MHD free convection flow of an incompressible viscous fluid over a moving plate with mass diffusion and slip/no-slip conditions are established by combining the Laplace transform technique with the homotopy perturbation method. Internal dissipation is neglected but the heat absorption/generation and Soret effects are considered. The results that have been obtained can generate exact solutions for any motion with technical relevance of this type. Three special cases are considered and some known results from the literature are recovered. Influence of slip parameter and of some pertinent parameters on the fluid motion is graphically underlined and discussed in the case of the uniform velocity of the plate. The required time to reach the steady state for motions due to sine and cosine oscillations of the plate is also determined.

  1. Comparison of LFM-test particle simulations and radial diffusion models of radiation belt electron injection into the slot region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, F.; Hudson, M.; Kress, B.

    2008-12-01

    The physics-based Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) code simulates Earth's magnetospheric topology and dynamics by solving the equations of ideal MHD using input solar wind parameters at the upstream boundary. Comparison with electron phase space density evolution during storms using a radial diffusion code, as well as spacecraft measurements where available, will tell us when diffusion is insufficiently accurate for radiation belt simulation, for example, during CME-shock injection events like March 24, 1991, which occurred on MeV electron drift time scales of minutes (Li et al., 1993). The 2004 July and 2004 November storms, comparable in depth of penetration into the slot region to the Halloween 2003 storm, have been modeled with both approaches. The November 8, 2004 storm was preceded by a Storm Sudden Commencement produced by a CME-shock followed by minimum Dst = -373 nT, while the July 23 to July 28 storm interval had milder consecutive drops in Dst, corresponding to multiple CME shocks and southward IMF Bz turnings. We have run the November and July storms with LFM using ACE data as upstream input, running the July storm with lower temporal resolution over a longer time interval. The November storm was different because the SCC shock was unusually intense, therefore the possibility of drift time scale acceleration by the associated magnetosonic impulse produced by the shock exists, as in March 1991 and also Halloween 2003 events (Kress et al., 2007). It can then take a short time (minutes) for electrons to be transported to low L shell while conserving their first invariant, resulting in a peak in energy and phase space density in the slot region. Radial diffusion suffices for some storm periods like the July 2004 sequence of three storms, while the guiding center test particle simulation in MHD fields is necessary to describe prompt injections which occur faster than diffusive time scales, for which November 2004 is a likely candidate. Earlier examples have been studied, including the Kress et al., 2007 study of the Halloween 2003 storm and Li et al., 1993 study of the March 24, 1991 injection event with MHD simulation carried out by Elkington et al. (2002) for this event. Radial diffusion remains the best approach for extended relatively quiet periods like the two month interval following the March 1991 prompt injection. Strong shocks will inject particles into lower L shell within a few minutes violating the third adiabatic invariant, so the diffusion mechanism cannot be adopted for sudden commencements, when Dst increases then decreases drastically; however particle tracing in time-dependent MHD fields will give an accurate estimation, so radial diffusion and particle tracing in MHD fields complement each other in radiation belt studies. Elkington, S. R., M.K. Hudson, M.J. Wiltberger, J.G. Lyon (2002) JASTP, 64, p. 607-615; Kress B. T., M. K. Hudson, M. D. Looper, J. Albert, J. G. Lyon, C. C. Goodrich (2007), J. Geophys. Res., 112, A09215, doi:10.1029/2006JA012218; Li, X., I. Roth, M. Temerin, J. R. Wygant, M. K. Hudson, and J. B. Blake (1993), Geophys. Res. Lett., 20, p. 2423-2426.

  2. A Model for Diffuse Solar Radiation in Presence of Some Environmental Parameters Studio della radiazione solare diffusa in relazione ad alcuni parametri ambientali

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claudia Furlan; Amauri Oliveira; Jacyra Soares

    1. Diffuse solar radiation and models Few energy production technologies have a little impact on the environment as solar energy technologies. The solar energy source is free and abundant and the energy generated by light does not produce any air pollution or hazardous waste. The most widespread solar energy technologies, which are currently in use, are the solar photovoltaics (PV)

  3. Investigation of radiation enhanced diffusion of magnesium in substrates flown on the NASA genesis mission.

    SciTech Connect

    King, B. V.; Pellin, M. J.; Burnett, D. S. (Materials Science Division); (Univ. of Newcastle); (California Inst. of Tech.)

    2008-12-01

    The thermal diffusion of an Mg implant in Si has been measured with SIMS and compared to RIMS (resonant ionisation mass spectrometry) measurements of Mg implantation and diffusion in Si wafers exposed to solar wind irradiation in the NASA Genesis mission. The Genesis samples show much more surface segregation that the samples annealed in the laboratory, due to diffusion and segregation of the implanted Mg to the heavily damaged near surface regions of the Genesis wafers. This Mg transport has been modeled by solving a set of stiff differential equations and found to agree with RIMS measurements for a Mg interstitial migration energy of 0.7 eV.

  4. Uncertainty analysis of diffuse-gray radiation enclosure problems: A hypersensitive case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Robert P.; Luck, Rogelio; Hodge, B. K.; Steele, W. Glenn

    1993-01-01

    An uncertainty analysis of diffuse-gray enclosure problems is presented. The genesis was a diffuse-gray enclosure problem which proved to be hypersensitive to the specification of view factors. This genesis is discussed in some detail. The uncertainty analysis is presented for the general diffuse-gray enclosure problem and applied to the hypersensitive case study. It was found that the hypersensitivity could be greatly reduced by enforcing both closure and reciprocity for the view factors. The effects of uncertainties in the surface emissivities and temperatures are also investigated.

  5. Advanced radiator concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diem-Kirsop, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The liquid droplet radiator and the liquid belt radiator currently under study by the NASA LeRC are discussed. These advanced concepts offer benefits in reduced mass, compact stowage, and ease of deployment. Operation and components of the radiators are described, heat transfer characteristics are discussed, and critical technologies are identified. The impact of the radiators on large power systems is also assessed.

  6. Radiation detection and measurement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Glenn F. Knoll

    1979-01-01

    Introductory material covers radiation sources, radiation interactions, general properties of radiation detectors, and counting statistics and error prediction. This is followed by detailed sections on gas-filled detectors, scintillation counters, semiconductor detectors, neutron detectors and spectroscopy, detector electronics and pulse processing, and miscellaneous radiation detectors and applications.

  7. Radiation and People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freilich, Florence G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the development of radiation as a tool of medicine. Includes topics on history of radiation, electromagnetic spectrum, X-ray tubes, high energy machines, radioactive sources, artificial radioactivity, radioactive scanning, units, present radiation background, and effect of radiation on living tissue. (DS)

  8. Dynamics of radiating fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalas, D.; Weaver, R.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the role of radiation in the transport of energy and momentum in a combined matter-radiation fluid. The transport equation for a moving radiating fluid is presented in both a fully Eulerian and a fully Lagrangian formulation, along with conservation equations describing the dynamics of the fluid. Special attention is paid to the problem of deriving equations that are mutually consistent in each frame, and between frames, to 0(v/c). A detailed analysis is made to show that in situations of broad interest, terms that are formally of 0(v/c) actually dominate the solution, demonstrating that it is essential (1) to pay scrupulous attention to the question of the frame dependence in formulating the equations, and (2) to solve the equations to 0(v/c) in quite general circumstances. These points are illustrated in the context of the nonequilibrium radiation diffusion limit, and a sketch of how the Lagrangian equations are to be solved is presented.

  9. Simulation of Infrared Laser Heating of Silica Using Heat Conduction and Multifrequency Radiation Diffusion Equations Adapted for Homogeneous Refractive Lossy Media

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, A I; Matthews, M J; Vignes, R M; Stolken, J S

    2010-10-28

    Localized, transient heating of materials using micro-scale, highly absorbing laser light has been used in many industries to anneal, melt and ablate material with high precision. Accurate modeling of the relative contributions of conductive, convective and radiative losses as a function of laser parameters is essential to optimizing micro-scale laser processing of materials. In bulk semi-transparent materials such as silicate glass melts, radiation transport is known to play a significantly larger role as the temperature increases. Conventionally, radiation is treated in the frequency-averaged diffusive limit (Rosseland approximation). However, the role and proper treatment of radiative processes under rapidly heated, high thermal gradient conditions, often created through laser-matter interactions, is at present not clear. Starting from the radiation transport equation for homogeneous, refractive lossy media, they derive the corresponding time-dependent multi-frequency diffusion equations. Zeroth and first moments of the transport equation couple the energy density, flux and pressure tensor. The system is closed by neglecting the temporal derivative of the flux and replacing the pressure tensor by its diagonal analogue. The radiation equations are coupled to a diffusion equation for the matter temperature. They are interested in modeling infrared laser heating of silica over sub-millimeter length scales, and at possibly rapid rates. Hence, in contrast to related work, they retain the temporal derivative of the radiation field. They derive boundary conditions at a planar air-silica interface taking account of reflectivities obtained from the Fresnel relations that include absorption. The effect of a temperature-dependent absorption index is explored through construction of a multi-phonon dielectric function that includes mode dispersion. The spectral dimension is discretized into a finite number of intervals yielding a system of multigroup diffusion equations. Simulations are presented. To demonstrate the bulk heat loss due to radiation and the effect of the radiation's temporal derivative, they model cooling of a silica slab, initially at 2500 K, for 10 s. Retaining the derivative enables correctly modeling the loss of photons initially present in the slab. Other simulations model irradiating silica discs (of approximately 5 mm radii and thickness) with a CO2 laser: {lambda} = 10.59 and 4.6 um, Gaussian profile, r{sub 0} = 0.5 mm for 1/e decay. By surrounding the disks in room-temperature air, they make use of the boundary conditions described above.

  10. Radial diffusion of relativistic electrons into the radiation belt slot region during the 2003 Halloween geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loto'Aniu, T. M.; Mann, I. R.; Ozeke, L. G.; Chan, A. A.; Dent, Z. C.; Milling, D. K.

    2006-04-01

    A study was undertaken to estimate the radial diffusion timescale, ?LL, for relativistic electrons (2-6 MeV) to diffuse into the slot region due to drift-resonance with Pc5 ULF waves (2-10 mHz) on 29 October 2003. Large amplitude ULF waves were observed by ground-based magnetometer arrays to penetrate deep into the slot region (L ? 2-3) starting at 0600 UT and maximising (200 nT p-p) between 0930-1630 UT. Around the same time, the SAMPEX PET instrument measured an over two orders of magnitude increase in relativistic (2-6 MeV) electron flux levels in 24 hours within the slot region. The ground-based D-component magnetic power spectral densities (PSD?B) for 29 October were estimated for six latitudinally spaced ground stations covering L 2.3-4.3 for an observed ULF wave with central frequency 4 mHz. The PSD?B values were used to calculate the in situ equatorial poloidal wave electric field power spectral densities (PSD?Em) using a standing Alfvn wave model. The radial diffusion coefficients, DLL, were estimated using the PSD?Em values. The fastest ?LL were 3-5 hours at L > 4, while ?LL initially increased with decreasing L-value below L ? 4; peaking at L ? 3 with ?LL 12-24 hours with PSD?Em estimated using a wave frequency bandwidth between ?f = 1 mHz and ?f = 2.5 mHz. The ?LL over the L-range L 2.3-3.3 were consistent with the timescales observed by SAMPEX for the increase in relativistic fluxes in the slot region on 29 October. The authors believe that this is the first example of the ULF wave drift-resonance with relativistic electrons explaining a radiation belt slot region filling event.

  11. Radial diffusion of relativistic electrons into the radiation belt slot region during the 2003 Halloween geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loto'Aniu, P. T.; Mann, I. R.; Ozeke, L. G.; Chan, A. A.; Dent, Z. C.; Milling, D. K.

    2005-12-01

    A study was undertaken to estimate the radial diffusion time-scale, ?LL, for relativistic electrons (2-6 MeV) to diffuse into the slot region due to drift-resonance with Pc5 ULF waves (2-10 mHz) on 29th October, 2003. Large amplitude ULF waves were observed by the CARISMA, SAMNET and IMAGE ground-based magnetometer arrays to penetrate deep into the slot region ( L~eq2-3) starting at 0600 UT and maximising (~200 nT p-p) between 0930-1630 UT. Around the same time, the SAMPEX PET instrument measured an over two orders of magnitude increase in relativistic (2-6 MeV) electron flux levels in ~24 hours within the slot region. The ground-based D-component magnetic power spectral densities (PSD? B) for 29th October were estimated for six latitudinally spaced ground stations covering L~2.3-4.3 for an observed ULF wave with central frequency ~4 mHz. The PSD? B values were used to calculate the in-situ equatorial poloidal wave electric field power spectral densities (PSD? Em) using a standing Alfvn wave model. The radial diffusion coefficients, DLL, were estimated using the PSD? Em values. The ?LL over the L-range L~2.3-3.3 were consistent with the time-scales observed by the SAMPEX for the increase in relativistic fluxes in the slot region on 29th October, 2003. The authors believe that this is the first example of the ULF wave drift-resonance with relativistic electrons explaining a radiation belt slot region filling event.

  12. The influence of clouds and diffuse radiation on ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 and CO18O exhanges

    SciTech Connect

    Still, C.J.; Riley, W.J.; Biraud, S.C.; Noone, D.C.; Buenning, N.H.; Randerson, J.T.; Torn, M.S.; Welker, J.; White, J.W.C.; Vachon, R.; Farquhar, G.D.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-05-01

    This study evaluates the potential impact of clouds on ecosystem CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} isotope fluxes ('isofluxes') in two contrasting ecosystems (a broadleaf deciduous forest and a C{sub 4} grassland), in a region for which cloud cover, meteorological, and isotope data are available for driving the isotope-enabled land surface model, ISOLSM. Our model results indicate a large impact of clouds on ecosystem CO{sub 2} fluxes and isofluxes. Despite lower irradiance on partly cloudy and cloudy days, predicted forest canopy photosynthesis was substantially higher than on clear, sunny days, and the highest carbon uptake was achieved on the cloudiest day. This effect was driven by a large increase in light-limited shade leaf photosynthesis following an increase in the diffuse fraction of irradiance. Photosynthetic isofluxes, by contrast, were largest on partly cloudy days, as leaf water isotopic composition was only slightly depleted and photosynthesis was enhanced, as compared to adjacent clear sky days. On the cloudiest day, the forest exhibited intermediate isofluxes: although photosynthesis was highest on this day, leaf-to-atmosphere isofluxes were reduced from a feedback of transpiration on canopy relative humidity and leaf water. Photosynthesis and isofluxes were both reduced in the C{sub 4} grass canopy with increasing cloud cover and diffuse fraction as a result of near-constant light limitation of photosynthesis. These results suggest that some of the unexplained variation in global mean {delta}{sup 18}O of CO{sub 2} may be driven by large-scale changes in clouds and aerosols and their impacts on diffuse radiation, photosynthesis, and relative humidity.

  13. C II Radiative Cooling of the Diffuse Gas in the Milky Way

    E-print Network

    N. Lehner; B. P. Wakker; B. D. Savage

    2004-07-16

    The heating and cooling of the interstellar medium allow the gas in the ISM to coexist at very different temperatures in thermal pressure equilibrium. The heating cannot be directly determined, but the cooling can be inferred from observations of C II*, which is an important coolant in different environments. The amount of cooling can be measured through either the intensity of the 157.7 \\micron [C II] emission line or the C II* absorption lines at 1037.018 \\AA\\ and 1335.708 \\AA, observable with FUSE and HST/STIS, respectively. We present the results of a survey of these far-UV absorption lines in 43 objects situated at |b|>30. We derive the cooling rates and analyze the ionization structure, the depletion, and metallicity content from the column densities of C II*, S II, P II, Fe II, and H I 21-cm emission for the low-, intermediate-, and high-velocity clouds (LVCs, IVCs, and HVCs) along the different sightlines. Based on the depletion and the ionization structure, the LVCs, IVCs, and HVCs consist mostly of warm neutral and ionized clouds. For the LVCs, the mean cooling rate in erg\\,s^{-1} per H atom is -25.70^{+0.19}_{-0.36} dex. The corresponding total Galactic C II luminosity in the 157.7 \\micron emission line is L~2.6x10^7 L_\\sun. Combining N(C II*) with the intensity of H$\\alpha$ emission, we derive that ~50% of the C II* radiative cooling comes from the warm ionized medium (WIM). The large dispersion in the cooling rates is certainly due to a combination of differences in the ionization fraction, in the dust-to-gas fraction, and physical conditions between sightlines. For the IVC IV Arch at z~1 kpc we find that on average the cooling is a factor 2 lower than in the LVCs that probe gas at lower z. For an HVC (Complex C, at z > 6 kpc) we find the much lower rate of -26.99^{+0.21}_{-0.53} dex. [Abridged

  14. Radiation Protection Concepts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Harder; V. Klener; W. Atwell; M. Beno; E. W. Breitbart; C. Cremer; R. J. M. Fry; R. Greinert; D.-P. Hder; P. Knuschke; G. Obe; G. Reitz; P. Rettberg; F. Spurny; H. Tanooka; L. Tomek; B. Volkmer

    \\u000a Environmental radiation exposure is here understood to be the exposure to natural or man-made sources of ionizing or non-ionizing radiation due to private\\u000a or professional activities, including radiation exposure incurred by medical examinations and treatments. Ultraviolet light\\u000a (UV) will be treated here as the main source of risk for non-ionizing radiation. Radiation protection concepts are the main strategies devised to

  15. Radial diffusion in Saturn's radiation belts - A modeling analysis assuming satellite and ring E absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.

    1983-01-01

    A modeling analysis is carried out of six experimental phase space density profiles for nearly equatorially mirroring protons using methods based on the approach of Thomsen et al. (1977). The form of the time-averaged radial diffusion coefficient D(L) that gives an optimal fit to the experimental profiles is determined under the assumption that simple satellite plus Ring E absorption of inwardly diffusing particles and steady-state radial diffusion are the dominant physical processes affecting the proton data in the L range that is modeled. An extension of the single-satellite model employed by Thomsen et al. to a model that includes multisatellite and ring absorption is described, and the procedures adopted for estimating characteristic satellite and ring absorption times are defined. The results obtained in applying three representative solid-body absorption models to evaluate D(L) in the range where L is between 4 and 16 are reported, and a study is made of the sensitivity of the preferred amplitude and L dependence for D(L) to the assumed model parameters. The inferred form of D(L) is then compared with that which would be predicted if various proposed physical mechanisms for driving magnetospheric radial diffusion are operative at Saturn.

  16. SAS-2 observations of the diffuse gamma radiation in the galactic latitude interval 10 deg absolute b or equal to 90 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Oegelman, H. B.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of all of the second small astronomy satellite gamma-ray data for galactic latitudes with the absolute value of b 10 deg has shown that the intensity varies with galactic latitude, being larger near 10 deg than 90 deg. For energies above 100 MeV the gamma-ray data are consistent with a latitude distribution of the form I(b) = C sub 1 + C sub 2/sin b, with the second term being dominant. This result suggests that the radiation above 100 MeV is coming largely from local regions of the galactic disk. Between 35 and 100 MeV, a similar equation is also a good representation of the data, but here the two terms are comparable. These results indicate that the diffuse radiation above 35 MeV consists of two parts, one with a relatively hard galactic component and the other an isotropic, steep spectral component which extrapolates back well to the low energy diffuse radiation. The steepness of the diffuse isotropic component places significant constraints on possible theoretical models of this radiation.

  17. SAS-2 observations of celestial diffuse gamma radiation above 30 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Hartman, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The small astronomy satellite, SAS-2, used a 32-deck magnetic core digitized spark chamber to study gamma rays with energies above 30 MeV. Data for four regions of the sky away from the galactic plane were analyzed. These regions show a finite, diffuse flux of gamma rays with a steep energy spectrum, and the flux is uniform over all the regions. Represented by a power law, the differential energy spectrum shows an index of 2.5 + or - 0.4. The steep SAS-2 spectrum and the lower energy data are reasonably consistent with a neutral pion gamma-ray spectrum which was red-shifted (such as that proposed by some cosmological theories). It is concluded that the diffuse celestial gamma ray spectrum observed presents the possibility of cosmological studies and possible evidence for a residual cosmic ray density, and supports the galactic superclusters of matter and antimatter remaining from baryon-symmetric big bang.

  18. Hazard calculations of diffuse reflected laser radiation for the SELENE program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Gilda A.; Babb, Phillip D.

    1993-01-01

    The hazards from diffuse laser light reflections off water clouds, ice clouds, and fog and from possible specular reflections off ice clouds were assessed with the American National Standards (ANSI Z136.1-1986) for the free-electron-laser parameters under consideration for the Segmented Efficient Laser Emission for Non-Nuclear Electricity (SELENE) Program. Diffuse laser reflection hazards exist for water cloud surfaces less than 722 m in altitude and ice cloud surfaces less than 850 m in altitude. Specular reflections from ice crystals in cirrus clouds are not probable; however, any specular reflection is a hazard to ground observers. The hazard to the laser operators and any ground observers during heavy fog conditions is of such significant magnitude that the laser should not be operated in fog.

  19. Relationships between diffuse reflectance and vegetation canopy variables based on the radiative transfer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. K.; Deering, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    Out of the lengthy original expression of the diffuse reflectance formula, simple working equations were derived by employing characteristic parameters, which are independent of the canopy coverage and identifiable by field observations. The typical asymptotic nature of reflectance data that is usually observed in biomass studies was clearly explained. The usefulness of the simplified equations was demonstrated by the exceptionally close fit of the theoretical curves to two separately acquired data sets for alfalfa and shortgrass prairie canopies.

  20. Measurement of atmospheric and diffuse radiation using a time-of-flight telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Agrinier, B. (Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay (France)); Lavigne, J.M. (Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, Toulouse (France)); Da Costa Ferreira Neri, J.A.

    1992-02-01

    A time-of-flight telescope constructed by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (Saclay) and the Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements (Toulouse) was used for gamma ray flux measurements. The atmospheric component was studied from balloon as a function of the pressure and the energy. Gamma ray fluxes were also measured with the telescope axis oriented in various directions and with the experiment inverted. The atmospheric and diffuse components were determined in various energy ranges.

  1. Energetic electrons at Uranus: Bimodal diffusion in a satellite limited radiation belt

    SciTech Connect

    Selesnick, R.S.; Stone, E.C. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena (USA))

    1991-04-01

    The Voyager 2 cosmic ray experiment observed intense electron fluxes in the middle magnetosphere of Uranus. High counting rates in several of the solid-state detectors precluded in the normal multiple coincidence analysis used for cosmic ray observations, and the authors have therefore performed laboratory measurements of the single-detector response to electrons. These calibrations allow a deconvolution from the counting rate data of the electron energy spectrum between energies of about 0.7 and 2.5 MeV. They present model fits to the differential intensity spectra from observations between L values of 6 and 15. The spectra are well represented by power laws in kinetic energy with spectral indices between 5 and 7. The phase space density at fixed values of the first two adiabatic invariants generally increases with L, indicative of an external source. However, there are also local minima associated with the satellites Ariel and Umbriel, indicating either a local source or an effective source due to nonconservation of the first two adiabatic invariants. For electrons which mirror at the highest magnetic latitudes, the local minimum associated with Ariel is radically displaced from the minimum L of that satellite by {approximately}0.5. The latitude variation of the satellite absorption efficiency predicts that if satellite losses are replenished primarily by radial diffusion there should be an increasing pitch angle anisotropy with decreasing L. The uniformity in the observed anisotropy outside the absorption regions then suggests that it is maintained by pitch angle diffusion. The effective source due to pitch angle diffusion is insufficient to cause the phase space density minimum associated with Ariel. Model solutions of the simultaneous radial and pitch angle diffusion equation show that the displacement of the high-latitude Ariel signature is also consistent with a larger effective source.

  2. Plutonium radiation surrogate

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

    2010-02-02

    A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

  3. Low Dose Radiation Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The US Department of Energy's Low Dose Radiation Research Program supports research that investigates the health risks from exposure to radiation at low levels. This Web site provides an overview of radiation biology, up-to-date information and archived results from program-related research, and other resources for the benefit of researchers and the general public alike. Some research projects include comparing low dose radiation to endogenous oxidative damage, determining thresholds for radiation exposure, determining genetics factors that make some individuals more susceptible to radiation-induced damage, and more.

  4. Introduction to radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.L.

    1998-12-31

    This lecture will present time-dependent radiation transport where the radiation is coupled to a static medium, i.e., the material is not in motion. In reality, radiation exerts a pressure on the materials it propagates through and will accelerate the material in the direction of the radiation flow. This fully coupled problem with radiation transport and materials in motion is referred to as radiation-hydrodynamics (or in a shorthand notation: rad-hydro) and is beyond the scope of this lecture.

  5. Empirical relationship between Kubelka-Munk and radiative transfer coefficients for extracting optical parameters of tissues in diffusive and nondiffusive regimes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Arindam; Ramasubramaniam, Rajagopal; Gaonkar, Harshavardhan A

    2012-11-01

    KubelkaMunk (K-M) theory is a phenomenological light transport theory that provides analytical expressions for reflectance and transmittance of diffusive substrates such as tissues. Many authors have derived relations between coefficients of K-M theory and that of the more fundamental radiative transfer equations. These relations are valid only in diffusive light transport regime where scattering dominates over absorption. They also fail near boundaries where incident beams are not diffusive. By measuring total transmittance and total reflectance of tissue phantoms with varying optical parameters, we have obtained empirical relations between K-M coefficients and the radiative transport coefficients for integrating sphere-based spectrophotometers that use uniform, nondiffusive incident beams. Our empirical relations show that the K-M scattering coefficients depend only on reduced scattering coefficient (?'s), whereas the K-M absorption coefficient depends on both absorption (?a ) and reduced scattering (?s' ) coefficients of radiative transfer theory. We have shown that these empirical relations are valid in both the diffusive and nondiffusive regimes and can predict total reflectance within an error of 10%. They also can be used to solve the inverse problem of obtaining multiple optical parameters such as chromophore concentration and tissue thickness from the measured reflectance spectra with a maximum accuracy of 90% to 95%. PMID:23214177

  6. The evolution of discontinuities in radiating spheres in the diffusion approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Barreto, W.; Herrera, L.; Nunez, L. (Universidad de Oriente, Cumana (Venezuela) Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela) Universidad de los Andes, Merida (Venezuela))

    1991-07-01

    The evolution of discontinuities in a general relativistic sphere free of singularities is studied. The energy transport mechanism through fluid is diffusive. The distribution of matter is divided by a shock wave front in two regions. The equations of state at both sides of the shock are different, and the solutions are matched on it via the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions. The outer metric joins the Vaidya solution at the boundary surface of the sphere. Exploding models are obtained, and their dynamics are studied using a generalized compressibility coefficient for nonadiabatic systems. 17 refs.

  7. Measurements of the anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation and diffuse galactic emission at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Mark; Benford, Richard; Meyer, Stephan; Muehlner, Dirk; Weiss, Rainer

    1988-01-01

    The results of a balloon-borne observing program to measure the large angular scale brightness distribution of the 2.7 K cosmic background radiation (CBR) at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths are reported. A new determination of the dipole anisotropy of the CBR is found with 3.40 + or - 0.42 mK toward alpha = 12.1 + or - 0.24 hr, delta = - 23 + or - 5 deg in a 1.2 to 8/cm band and 4.7 + or - 1.4 mK toward alpha = 9.9 + 1.7 or - 1.1 hr, delta = - 38 + or - 21 deg between 5 and 18/cm, where the amplitudes are listed as thermodynamic temperatures. New estimates of the absolute temperature in these two bands of 2.86 + or - 0.26 K and 3.01 + or - 0.31 are obtained under the assumption that the CBR has a Planck spectrum. The diffuse Galactic emission is fitted by a secant distribution in Galactic latitude, and the resulting Galactic pole antenna temperatures are given. Maps of sky brightness, measurements of zodiacal emission, and measurements of fluctuations of the atmospheric emission which dominates the noise budget are also presented.

  8. Non-invasive diffuse reflectance measurements of cutaneous melanin content can predict human sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Sergio G; Zmudzka, Barbara Z; Yin, Lanlan; Miller, Sharon A; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Tadokoro, Taketsugu; Hearing, Vincent J; Beer, Janusz Z

    2013-04-01

    The diversity of human skin phenotypes and the ubiquitous exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) underscore the need for a non-invasive tool to predict an individual's UVR sensitivity. We analysed correlations between UVR sensitivity, melanin content, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DR) and UVR-induced DNA damage in the skin of subjects from three racial/ethnic groups: Asian, black or African American and White. UVR sensitivity was determined by evaluating each subject's response to one minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVR one day after the exposure. Melanin content was measured using DR and by densitometric analysis of Fontana-Masson staining (FM) in skin biopsies taken from unexposed areas. An individual's UVR sensitivity based on MED was highly correlated with melanin content measured by DR and by FM. Therefore, a predictive model for the non-invasive determination of UVR sensitivity using DR was developed. The MED precision was further improved when we took race/ethnicity into consideration. The use of DR serves as a tool for predicting UVR sensitivity in humans that should be invaluable for determining appropriate UVR doses for therapeutic, diagnostic and/or cosmetic devices. PMID:23528212

  9. Measurements of the anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation and diffuse galactic emission at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.; Benford, R.; Meyer, S.; Muehlner, D.; Weiss, R.

    1988-09-01

    The results of a balloon-borne observing program to measure the large angular scale brightness distribution of the 2.7 K cosmic background radiation (CBR) at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths are reported. A new determination of the dipole anisotropy of the CBR is found with 3.40 + or - 0.42 mK toward alpha = 12.1 + or - 0.24 hr, delta = - 23 + or - 5 deg in a 1.2 to 8/cm band and 4.7 + or - 1.4 mK toward alpha = 9.9 + 1.7 or - 1.1 hr, delta = - 38 + or - 21 deg between 5 and 18/cm, where the amplitudes are listed as thermodynamic temperatures. New estimates of the absolute temperature in these two bands of 2.86 + or - 0.26 K and 3.01 + or - 0.31 are obtained under the assumption that the CBR has a Planck spectrum. The diffuse Galactic emission is fitted by a secant distribution in Galactic latitude, and the resulting Galactic pole antenna temperatures are given. Maps of sky brightness, measurements of zodiacal emission, and measurements of fluctuations of the atmospheric emission which dominates the noise budget are also presented. 40 references.

  10. Radiative Accelerations in Stellar Evolution

    E-print Network

    G. Michaud; J. Richer

    2008-01-26

    A brief review of various methods to calculate radiative accelerations for stellar evolution and an analysis of their limitations are followed by applications to Pop I and Pop II stars. Recent applications to Horizontal Branch (HB) star evolution are also described. It is shown that models including atomic diffusion satisfy Schwarzschild's criterion on the interior side of the core boundary on the HB without the introduction of overshooting. Using stellar evolution models starting on the Main Sequence and calculated throughout evolution with atomic diffusion, radiative accelerations are shown to lead to abundance anomalies similar to those observed on the HB of M15.

  11. Finite-element solution for a combined radiative-conductive analysis with mixed diffuse-specular surface characteristics. [of spaceborne telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.-P.; Jackson, C. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The finite-element method has been applied to solve a combined radiative-conductive heat transfer problem for a large space telescope similar to those used in orbiting satellites. The derivation of the underlying matrices and associated solution algorithm for a 2-D triangular element is presented in detail. The resulting expressions for this triangular element typify such an analysis, which yields constitutive matrices when the heat equation is cast in the matrix form. The relevant matrices include those pertaining to thermal conductance, internal heat generation, radiative exchanges, and all possible external thermal loadings. Emphasis is placed on the treatment of non-linear radiative interchange between surfaces in an enclosure having mixed diffuse-specular surface characteristics. Essential differences in governing equations describing these distinctive surface characteristics are identified. Concluding remarks are drawn from an example simulating a Cassegrainian space telescope.

  12. Chemical Reaction Effects on MHD Flow Past a Linearly Accelerated Vertical Plate with Variable Temperature and Mass Diffusion in the Presence of Thermal Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthucumaraswamy, R.; Geetha, E.

    2013-08-01

    An exact solution of first order chemical reaction effects on a radiative flow past a linearly accelerated infinite isothermal vertical plate with variable mass diffusion, under the action of a transversely applied magnetic field has been presented. The plate temperature is raised linearly with time and the concentration level near the plate is also raised to C'w linearly with time. The dimensionless governing equations are tackled using the Laplace-transform technique. The velocity, temperature and concentration fields are studied for different physical parameters such as the magnetic field parameter, radiation parameter, chemical reaction parameter, thermal Grashof number, mass Grashof number, Schmidt number, Prandtl number and time. It is observed that velocity increases with decreasing magnetic field parameter or radiation parameter. But the trend is just reversed with respect to the chemical reaction parameter

  13. Radiation protection at synchrotron radiation facilities.

    PubMed

    Liu, J C; Vylet, V

    2001-01-01

    A synchrotron radiation (SR) facility typically consists of an injector, a storage ring, and SR beamlines. The latter two features are unique to SR facilities, when compared to other types of accelerator facilities. The SR facilities have the characteristics of low injection beam power, but high stored beam power. The storage ring is generally above ground with people occupying the experimental floor around a normally thin concrete ring wall. This paper addresses the radiation issues, in particular the shielding design, associated with the storage ring and SR beamlines. Normal and abnormal beam losses for injection and stored beams, as well as typical storage ring operation, are described. Ring shielding design for photons and neutrons from beam losses in the ring is discussed. Radiation safety issues and shielding design for SR beamlines, considering gas bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation, are reviewed. Radiation source terms and the methodologies for shielding calculations are presented. PMID:11843084

  14. Radiation Protection in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Williams, N.

    1965-01-01

    The main emphasis of a provincial radiation protection program is on ionizing radiation produced by machines, although assistance is given to the Federal Radiation Protection Division in its program relating to radioactive substances. The basis for the Saskatchewan program of radiation protection is the Radiological Health Act 1961. An important provision of the Act is annual registration of radiation equipment. The design of the registration form encourages a do-it-yourself radiation and electrical safety inspection. Installations are inspected every two years by a radiation health officer. Two hundred and twenty-one deficiencies were found during inspection of 224 items of radiation equipment, the commonest being failure to use personal film badges. Insufficient filtration of the beam, inadequate limitation of the beam, and unnecessary exposure of operators were other common faults. Physicians have a responsibility to weigh the potential advantages against the hazards when requesting radiographic or fluoroscopic procedures. PMID:14282164

  15. Radiation Protection Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A handbook which sets forth the Kennedy Space Center radiation protection policy is presented. The book also covers administrative direction and guidance on organizational and procedural requirements of the program. Only ionizing radiation is covered.

  16. Radiation effects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the radiation environment in space that astronauts are likely to be exposed to. Emphasis is on proton and HZE particle effects. Recommendations for radiation protection guidelines are presented. (ACR)

  17. Understanding Radiation: Overview

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Radiation Radiation that has enough energy to move atoms in a molecule around or cause them to ... enough energy to remove tightly bound electrons from atoms, thus creating ions. Health Effects Health effects are ...

  18. Radiation and Your Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... air, airline travel, some medical procedures, computers, and nuclear weapons test fallout. Understanding Radiation Radiation, which exists ... Risk Assessment Project Fernald Dosimetry Reconstruction Project Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility The Hanford Thyroid Disease Study HTDS Guide ...

  19. Environmental Radiation Exposures

    Cancer.gov

    DCEG is investigating cancer risks among populations exposed to radiation from environmental sources, such as nuclear reactor accidents and fallout from weapons testing. Atomic Bomb Survivors Childhood Leukemia and Background Radiation Semipalatinsk

  20. Prostate radiation - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... these side effects: Skin problems during or after prostate radiation treatment is rare. Your skin over the ... keeping or getting an erection may occur after prostate radiation therapy but may not be noticed for ...

  1. Cell Radiation Experiment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    The cell radiation experiment system (CRES) is a perfused-cell culture apparatus, within which cells from humans or other animals can (1) be maintained in homeostasis while (2) being exposed to ionizing radiation during controlled intervals and (3) being monitored to determine the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage. The CRES can be used, for example, to determine effects of drug, radiation, and combined drug and radiation treatments on both normal and tumor cells. The CRES can also be used to analyze the effects of radiosensitive or radioprotectant drugs on cells subjected to radiation. The knowledge gained by use of the CRES is expected to contribute to the development of better cancer treatments and of better protection for astronauts, medical-equipment operators, and nuclear-power-plant workers, and others exposed frequently to ionizing radiation.

  2. Radiation-induced tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Gyu; Lee, Yun-Sil Lee

    2003-01-31

    During the past 2 decades, radiation tumorigenesis researchers have focused on cellular and molecular mechanisms. We reviewed some of these research fields, since they may specifically relate to the induction of cancer by ionizing radiation. First, radiation-mediated mutation was discussed. Then the initiating event in radiation carcinogenesis, as well as other genetic events that may be involved, is discussed in terms of the possible role of the activation of genes and the loss of cell-cycle checkpoints. PMID:12542985

  3. Dangers of Radiation Exposure

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is a lesson about radiation and the various sources of radiation that a spacecraft may encounter in its journey. Learners will calculate their annual exposure to high-energy radiation, identify sources of high-energy radiation, and explain why the near-Mercury environment is a concern for the Mercury MESSENGER mission. This is lesson 2 of 4 in the high school track of a module, titled Staying Cool. Note: the student guide starts on p. 17 of the PDF.

  4. Basal body and striated rootlet changes in primate macular retinal pigmented epithelium after low level diffuse argon laser radiation. Final report 1981-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Schuschereba, S.T.; Zwick, H.; Stuck, B.E.; Beatrice, E.S.

    1982-09-01

    Basal bodies or centrioles (BB - microtubule organizing centers) and striated rootlets (SR - bundles of 60 A action-like filaments) have a close association in primate retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. The frequency of occurrence of these structures was evaluated in the macular RPE after repeated exposure to low level diffuse argon laser radiation (DALR). The awake chaired animal's head was restrained and positioned near the center of the 0.75 m hemisphere which was diffusely irradiated with 514.5 nm laser radiation. The right eye of each subject was occluded during the two-hour exposure session. The first subject received 24 cumulative hours of exposure, the second, 40 hours and the third, 42 hours.

  5. Research Update: Reactively sputtered nanometer-thin ZrN film as a diffusion barrier between Al and boron layers for radiation detector applications

    SciTech Connect

    Golshani, Negin, E-mail: negingolshani@gmail.com; Mohammadi, V.; Schellevis, H.; Beenakker, C. I. M.; Ishihara, R. [ECTM, DIMES, Faculty of Electrical Engineering (EWI), Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Feldmannweg 17, P.O. Box 5053, 2628 CT Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, optimization of the process flow for PureB detectors is investigated. Diffusion barrier layers between a boron layer and the aluminum interconnect can be used to enhance the performance and visual appearance of radiation detectors. Few nanometers-thin Zirconium Nitride (ZrN) layer deposited by reactive sputtering in a mixture of Ar/N{sub 2}, is identified as a reliable diffusion barrier with better fabrication process compatibility than others. The barrier properties of this layer have been tested for different boron layers deposited at low and high temperatures with extensive optical microscopy analyses, electron beam induced current, SEM, and electrical measurements. This study demonstrated that spiking behavior of pure Al on Si can be prevented by the thin ZrN layer thus improving the performance of the radiation detectors fabricated using boron layer.

  6. Spacecraft radiator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Grant A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A spacecraft radiator system designed to provide structural support to the spacecraft. Structural support is provided by the geometric "crescent" form of the panels of the spacecraft radiator. This integration of radiator and structural support provides spacecraft with a semi-monocoque design.

  7. Radiation Research Program (RRP)

    Cancer.gov

    The RRP is responsible for NCIs clinically-related extramural radiation research program. The RRP establishes priorities, allocates resources, and evaluates the effectiveness of such radiation research being conducted by NCI grantees. RRP staff represent the program at NCI management and scientific meetings and provide scientific support to leadership on matters related to radiation research.

  8. Radiation Exposure and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... based on extensive studies of women exposed to atomic-bomb radiation at Hiroshima and Nagasaki and those pregnant women who received x-ray studies, radionuclide medical tests, and other medical radiation ... International Atomic Energy Agency. Pregnancy and radiation protection in diagnostic ...

  9. JPL Radiation Effects Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorbourn, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Radiation Effects Group investigates the effects of space radiation on present and future microelectronic and optoelectronic technologies, evaluate the risk of using them in specific space missions, and recommend component and design techniques for JPL and NASA programs to reduce reliability risk from space radiation.

  10. Radiation Processing -an overview

    E-print Network

    1 Radiation Processing - an overview Arne Miller Risø High Dose Reference Laboratory Risø DTU DK of radiation · Facilities ­ Gamma ­ electrons ­ X-ray ­ Safety · Sterilisation of medical devices · Food ­ radiation hardness testing ­ semiconductors ­ microlitography ­ gem stones · Dosimetry · Quality assurance

  11. Radiation Damping with Inhomogeneous

    E-print Network

    Augustine, Mathew P.

    Radiation Damping with Inhomogeneous Broadening: Limitations of the Single Bloch Vector Model of inhomoge- neous broadening on radiation damping of free precession signals have been described using 13: 1 7, 2001 KEY WORDS: radiation damping; FID shape; inhomogeneous broadening The phenomenon

  12. astroph/9507030 Gravitational Radiation

    E-print Network

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    astro­ph/9507030 10 Jul 95 Gravitational Radiation and Very Long Baseline Interferometry Ted Pyne of gravitational radiation on astrometric observations. We derive an equation for the time delay measured by two antennae observing the same source in an Einstein­de Sitter spacetime containing gravitational radiation

  13. From Texas to the Northwest Territories: Low temperature history of the North American craton using a radiation damage model for apatite He diffusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Flowers; A. K. Ault; E. Wolin; S. Kelley; S. A. Bowring

    2009-01-01

    The radiation damage accumulation and annealing model (RDAAM) for apatite He diffusion helps resolve previously enigmatic characteristics of apatite (U-Th)\\/He data in cratonic regions. First, nonlinear positive date-eU correlations are predicted for many T-t paths, thus explaining excessive scatter in some (U-Th)\\/He datasets. Second, under common circumstances, the RDAAM predicts (U-Th)\\/He dates that are older than corresponding apatite fission-track (AFT)

  14. Modeling radiation belt radial diffusion in ULF wave fields: 1. Quantifying ULF wave power at geosynchronous orbit in observations and in global MHD model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chia-Lin Huang; Harlan E. Spence; Howard J. Singer; W. Jeffrey Hughes

    2010-01-01

    To provide critical ULF wave field information for radial diffusion studies in the radiation belts, we quantify ULF wave power (f = 0.58.3 mHz) in GOES observations and magnetic field predictions from a global magnetospheric model. A statistical study of 9 years of GOES data reveals the wave local time distribution and power at geosynchronous orbit in field-aligned coordinates as

  15. Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation G-3

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    Appendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation G-3 Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding), not as a comprehensive discussion of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes

  16. Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    Appendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding), not as a comprehensive discussion of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes

  17. Cumulative radiation damage and cumulative radiation effect.

    PubMed

    Vyrynen, T

    1983-01-01

    Different mathematical formulas capable of replacing CRE have been analyzed. The purpose was to develop an expression which would yield a value identical with CRE for regular treatment schedules, but would represent more clearly and more truthfully the radiation damage of tissue. This quantity has been called cumulative radiation damage (CRD). Its unit is adequately called CRD unit. CRD does not require a separate gap correction, as does CRE, it is easy to use, explicit and unambiguous. CRE, CRD and some other formulas have been compared in different types of radiation therapy. PMID:6316749

  18. Radiation Shielding and Radiological Protection

    E-print Network

    Shultis, J. Kenneth

    Radiation Shielding and Radiological Protection J. Kenneth Shultis Richard E. Faw Department@triad.rr.com Radiation Fields and Sources ................................................ . Radiation Field Variables........................................................... .. Direction and Solid Angle Conventions ......................................... .. Radiation Fluence

  19. Radiation Safety Program Annual Review

    E-print Network

    Lyubomirsky, Ilya

    .................................................................................................3 MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT OF THE RADIATION SAFETY/LASER SAFETY PROGRAMS .............3 LICENSE RENEWAL SAFETY/LASER SAFETY PROGRAM OVERVIEW.......................................................4 RADIATION for Radiation Producing Machines (RPM) Expires 8/31/2011 MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT OF THE RADIATION SAFETY/LASER

  20. Biomedical Uses of Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendee, William R.

    1999-06-01

    The types of radiation routinely used for medical diagnosis and treatment ranges from different kinds of electromagnetic radiation (radio, infrared, ultraviolet, X-ray) to ultrasound. Keeping pace with all the different methods, their specific advantages and their hidden dangers is almost impossible. Written by experienced experts mainly from the US, this handbook provides a comprehensive overview over the principles, advantages and potential risks of all radiation-based methods commonly used. Volume A describes the acting mechanisms for different types of radiation, volume B focuses on their clinical applications, the information collected by each method and their potential risks. An indispensable reference work for (radiation) physicians, biophysicists and medical engineers.

  1. Nuclear Energy: Radiation Exposure

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Pratte

    This lesson provides an overview of the sources and potential effects of radiation exposure. Topics include the history of the United States' domestic nuclear power program, the concept of ionizing radiation, and how radiation dosage is measured. There is also discussion of what constitutes a lethal dose of radiation and potential sources of exposure. The lesson includes an activity in which students measure their individual yearly exposures to radiation by making an inventory of lifestyle factors that affect their potential dosage and using an online calculator to sum up the contributions from the various sources.

  2. Mossbauer spectrometer radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J. (inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A Mossbauer spectrometer with high efficiencies in both transmission and backscattering techniques is described. The device contains a sodium iodide crystal for detecting radiation caused by the Mossbauer effect, and two photomultipliers to collect the radiation detected by the crystal. When used in the transmission technique, the sample or scatterer is placed between the incident radiation source and the detector. When used in a backscattering technique, the detector is placed between the incident radiation source and the sample of scatterer such that the incident radiation will pass through a hole in the crystal and strike the sample. Diagrams of the instrument are provided.

  3. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. R., Jr.; Tada, H. Y.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented for predicting the degradation of a solar array in a space radiation environment. Solar cell technology which emphasizes the cell parameters that degrade in a radiation environment, is discussed along with the experimental techniques used in the evaluation of radiation effects. Other topics discussed include: theoretical aspects of radiation damage, methods for developing relative damage coefficients, nature of the space radiation environment, method of calculating equivalent fluence from electron and proton energy spectrums and relative damage coefficients, and comparison of flight data with estimated degradation.

  4. Radiation protection in space

    SciTech Connect

    Blakely, E.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Fry, R.J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The challenge for planning radiation protection in space is to estimate the risk of events of low probability after low levels of irradiation. This work has revealed many gaps in the present state of knowledge that require further study. Despite investigations of several irradiated populations, the atomic-bomb survivors remain the primary basis for estimating the risk of ionizing radiation. Compared to previous estimates, two new independent evaluations of available information indicate a significantly greater risk of stochastic effects of radiation (cancer and genetic effects) by about a factor of three for radiation workers. This paper presents a brief historical perspective of the international effort to assure radiation protection in space.

  5. Dynamic imaging response following radiation therapy predicts long-term outcomes for diffuse low-grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Pallud, Johan; Llitjos, Jean-Franois; Dhermain, Frdric; Varlet, Pascale; Dezamis, Edouard; Devaux, Bertrand; Souillard-Scmama, Raphalle; Sanai, Nader; Koziak, Maria; Page, Philippe; Schlienger, Michel; Daumas-Duport, Catherine; Meder, Jean-Franois; Oppenheim, Catherine; Roux, Franois-Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative imaging assessment of radiation therapy (RT) for diffuse low-grade gliomas (DLGG) by measuring the velocity of diametric expansion (VDE) over time has never been studied. We assessed the VDE changes following RT and determined whether this parameter can serve as a prognostic factor. We reviewed a consecutive series of 33 adults with supratentorial DLGG treated with first-line RT with available imaging follow-up (median follow-up, 103 months). Before RT, all patients presented with a spontaneous tumor volume increase (positive VDE, mean 5.9 mm/year). After RT, all patients demonstrated a tumor volume decrease (negative VDE, mean, ?16.7 mm/year) during a mean 49-month duration. In univariate analysis, initial tumor volume (>100 cm3), lack of IDH1 expression, p53 expression, high proliferation index, and fast post-RT tumor volume decrease (VDE at ?10 mm/year or faster, fast responders) were associated with a significantly shorter overall survival (OS). The median OS was significantly longer (120.8 months) for slow responders (post-RT VDE slower than ?10.0 mm/year) than for fast responders (47.9 months). In multivariate analysis, fast responders, larger initial tumor volume, lack of IDH1 expression, and p53 expression were independent poor prognostic factors for OS. A high proliferation index was significantly more frequent in the fast responder subgroup than in the slow responder subgroup. We conclude that the pattern of post-RT VDE changes is an independent prognostic factor for DLGG and offers a quantitative parameter to predict long-term outcomes. We propose to monitor individually the post-RT VDE changes using MRI follow-up, with particular attention to fast responders. PMID:22416109

  6. Radiating gravitational collapse before relaxation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Di Prisco; L. Herrera; M. Esculpi

    1996-01-01

    The study of the gravitational collapse of a radiating sphere is carried out for times shorter than the effective time of relaxation into diffusion. Using a relativistic version of the Cattaneo equation for the heat flux, we show with an explicit example that processes occurring before relaxation give rise to luminosity profiles which are quite different from the profiles corresponding

  7. Gas particle radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    The performance of a new space radiator concept, the gas particle radiator (GPR), is studied. The GPR uses a gas containing submicron particles as the radiating medium contained between the radiator's emitting surface and a transparent window. For a modest volume fraction of submicron particles and gas thickness, it is found that the emissivity is determined by the window transmittance. The window must have a high transmittance in the infrared and be structurally strong enough to contain the gas-particle mixture. When the GPR is compared to a proposed titanium wall, potassium heat pipe radiator, with both radiators operating at a power level of 1.01 MW at 775 K, it is found that the GPR mass is 31 percent lower than that of the heat pipe radiator.

  8. RF radiation from lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation from lightning in the RF band from 3-300 MHz were monitored. Radiation in this frequency range is of interest as a potential vehicle for monitoring severe storms and for studying the lightning itself. Simultaneous measurements were made of RF radiation and fast and slow field changes. Continuous analogue recordings with a system having 300 kHz of bandwidth were made together with digital records of selected events (principally return strokes) at greater temporal resolution. The data reveal patterns in the RF radiation for the entire flash which are characteristic of flash type and independent of the frequency of observation. Individual events within the flash also have characteristic RF patterns. Strong radiation occurs during the first return strokes, but delayed about 20 micron sec with respect to the begining of the return stroke; whereas, RF radiation from subsequent return strokes tends to be associated with cloud processes preceding the flash with comparatively little radiation occurring during the return stroke itself.

  9. Americans' Average Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2000-08-11

    We live with radiation every day. We receive radiation exposures from cosmic rays, from outer space, from radon gas, and from other naturally radioactive elements in the earth. This is called natural background radiation. It includes the radiation we get from plants, animals, and from our own bodies. We also are exposed to man-made sources of radiation, including medical and dental treatments, television sets and emission from coal-fired power plants. Generally, radiation exposures from man-made sources are only a fraction of those received from natural sources. One exception is high exposures used by doctors to treat cancer patients. Each year in the United States, the average dose to people from natural and man-made radiation sources is about 360 millirem. A millirem is an extremely tiny amount of energy absorbed by tissues in the body.

  10. High-power radiating plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozanov, V. B.; Rukhadze, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    The physical principles underlying the use of radiating plasmas for the optical pumping of lasers are described. Particular consideration is given to the properties of radiating plasmas; radiation selectivity; the dynamics, equilibrium, and stability of radiating plasmas; the radiative Reynolds number; and experimental results on radiating discharges.

  11. Radiation effects in laser compression simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Laing, E. W.

    1980-12-01

    Simulation studies of laser compression of solid carbon microspheres to determine energy transport by total continuum radiation in medium-z plasmas used an updated version of the MEDUSA Lagrangian computer code of Christiansen (1974). This version includes a steady-state radiation physics expression for the transport of continuum radiation from free-free and free-bound transitions in the plasma using a diffusion approximation. The radiation field is represented by a Planckian equilibrium distribution function related to a radiation temperature; this equilibrium field interacts with electrons as a function of the local temperature difference.

  12. Simple Waves in Ideal Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B M

    2008-09-03

    In the dynamic diffusion limit of radiation hydrodynamics, advection dominates diffusion; the latter primarily affects small scales and has negligible impact on the large scale flow. The radiation can thus be accurately regarded as an ideal fluid, i.e., radiative diffusion can be neglected along with other forms of dissipation. This viewpoint is applied here to an analysis of simple waves in an ideal radiating fluid. It is shown that much of the hydrodynamic analysis carries over by simply replacing the material sound speed, pressure and index with the values appropriate for a radiating fluid. A complete analysis is performed for a centered rarefaction wave, and expressions are provided for the Riemann invariants and characteristic curves of the one-dimensional system of equations. The analytical solution is checked for consistency against a finite difference numerical integration, and the validity of neglecting the diffusion operator is demonstrated. An interesting physical result is that for a material component with a large number of internal degrees of freedom and an internal energy greater than that of the radiation, the sound speed increases as the fluid is rarefied. These solutions are an excellent test for radiation hydrodynamic codes operating in the dynamic diffusion regime. The general approach may be useful in the development of Godunov numerical schemes for radiation hydrodynamics.

  13. Pulsed-laser diffusion of n+ contacts and n+-p junctions in high purity germanium for nuclear radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. H. Lowndes; T. W. Raudorf

    1985-01-01

    We report fabrication of thin (< 1 mum) n+ contacts, and of n+-p junctions with very low reverse saturation current, on high purity germanium, using a pulsed laser process that requires no heating of the bulk germanium. The junctions appear to be suitable for use in commercial nuclear radiation detectors.

  14. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  15. Radiation exposure and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Labant, Amy; Silva, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Radiological exposure from nuclear power reactor accidents, transportation of nuclear waste accidents, industrial accidents, or terrorist activity may be a remote possibility, but it could happen. Nurses must be prepared to evaluate and treat pregnant women and infants who have been exposed to radiation, and to have an understanding of the health consequences of a nuclear or radiological incident. Pregnant women and infants are a special group of patients who need consideration when exposed to radiation. Initial care requires thorough assessment and decisions regarding immediate care needs. Ongoing care is based on type and extent of radiation exposure. With accurate, comprehensive information and education, nurses will be better prepared to help mitigate the effects of radiation exposure to pregnant women and infants following a radiological incident. Information about radiation, health effects of prenatal radiation exposure, assessment, patient care, and treatment of pregnant women and infants are presented. PMID:25333800

  16. Jet radiation radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhenyu

    2014-10-01

    Jet radiation patterns are indispensable for the purpose of discriminating partons with different quantum numbers. However, they are also vulnerable to various contaminations from the underlying event, pileup, and radiation of adjacent jets. In order to maximize the discrimination power, it is essential to optimize the jet radius used when analyzing the radiation patterns. We introduce the concept of jet radiation radius, which quantifies how the jet radiation is distributed around the jet axis. We study the color and momentum dependence of the jet radiation radius and discuss two applications: quark-gluon discrimination and W -jet tagging. In both cases, smaller (sub)jet radii are preferred for jets with higher pT's, albeit due to different mechanisms: the running of the QCD coupling constant and the boost to a color-singlet system. A shrinking cone W -jet tagging algorithm is proposed to achieve better discrimination than previous methods.

  17. The flying radiation case

    SciTech Connect

    Brownell, J.H.; Bowers, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Applied Theoretical and Computational Physics Div.

    1997-04-01

    The Los Alamos foil implosion program has the goal of producing an intense, high-energy density x-ray source by converting the energy of a magnetically imploded plasma into radiation and material energy. One of the methods for converting the plasma energy into thermal energy and radiation and utilizing it for experiments is called the flying radiation case (FRC). In this paper the authors shall model the FRC and provide a physical description of the processes involved. An analytic model of a planar FRC in the hydrodynamic approximation is used to describe the assembly and shock heating of a central cushion by a conducting liner driver. The results are also used to benchmark a hydrodynamics code for modeling an FRC. They then use a radiation-hydrodynamics computational model to explore the effects of radiation production and transport when a gold plasma assembles on a CH cushion. Results are presented for the structure and evolution of the radiation hohlraum.

  18. MULTIPOINT RADIATION MONITOR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K Hofstetter; D Donna Beals; K Ken Odell; R Robert Eakle; R Russell Huffman; L Larry Harpring

    2006-01-01

    A unique radiation monitor has been developed for performing wide-area field surveys for radiation sources. This device integrates the real-time output of multiple radiation detectors into a hand-held personal computer (e.g., a PDA) containing an intuitive graphical user interface. An independent hardware module supplies high voltage to the detectors and contains a rapid sampling system for transferring the detector count

  19. Multipoint radiation monitor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. J. Hofstetter; D. M. Beals; D. M. Odell; R. F. Eakle; R. K. Huffman; L. J. Harpring

    2008-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive instrument for measuring radiation fields in otherwise inaccessible locations has been developed. The\\u000a RadRope consists of a series of radiation detectors inside a flexible sheath and connected to a data readout device to alert\\u000a the operator to unexpected radiation fields at a remote location. The instrument is designed for use in a maritime environment\\u000a and will assist

  20. Intracranial interstitial radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, D.; Rittenmeyer, H.; Hitchon, P.

    1986-06-01

    Primary malignant brain tumors are fatal, with 90% of patients having these tumors dying within two years following diagnosis. Cranial interstitial radiation therapy, a technique under investigation to control these tumors, involves implantation of radioactive iodine 125 seeds into the tumor bed by stereotaxic technique. The interstitial radiation technique, monitoring of radiation, and nursing care of patients are discussed. Case histories are presented, along with discussion of results attained using this therapy, and its future.

  1. Radiation-induced ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of gas-phase radiation absorption on radiative ignition of various combustible materials under gravity conditions are studied. The physical models in this study range from a simple gas layer to a complex porous structure. Methyl methacrylate (MMA: C{sub 5}H{sub 8}O{sub 2}) vapor has been selected as a representative of participating gases in gas-phase radiation interactions. Its infrared radiation properties were measured using low-resolution spectral apparatus and then correlated in simple usable forms. As expected from its complex molecular structure, the infrared absorption capabilities of MMA vapor is much stronger than those of simpler hydrocarbon gases as well as water vapor and carbon dioxide. Radiation induced ignition was analyzed on the basis of simple theoretical models. Using Semenov's theory, results indicate a decrease in the critical surrounding temperature for a low Biot number system. For a high Biot number system, ignitability is defined through the use of Frank-Kamenetskii's critical parameter delta. One-dimensional transient models were developed for the analyses of radiation induced ignition of solid and porous solid fuels. The models include gas-phase radiation absorption, in-depth radiation interaction by the solid phase, Arrhenius-type chemical reaction, and natural convection. Predicted transmittance during ignition processes confirms the attenuation of incident radiation by pyrolyzed gases which has been already observed experimentally. An ignition process with gas-phase radiation absorption results in a quite different and widened ignition domain compared to that without gas-phase radiation absorption. Moreover, ignition is totally dependent on gas-phase radiation absorption under unfavorable conditions for a thermal runaway.

  2. RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-10-01

    A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

  3. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J. (West Richland, WA); Coomes, Edmund P. (West Richland, WA)

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  4. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, Minoru (Troy, NY); Watson, E. Bruce (Troy, NY); Acocella, John (Troy, NY)

    1986-01-01

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

  5. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.

    1986-11-04

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency. 3 figs.

  6. Charms of radiation research.

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuti, M.; Physics

    2005-01-01

    Most of my professional efforts over nearly five decades have been devoted to radiation research, that is, studies of the physical, chemical, and biological actions of high-energy radiation on matter. (By the term 'high-energy radiation' I mean here x rays, .GAMMA. rays, neutrons, and charged particles of high enough energies to produce ionization in matter. I exclude visible light, infrared waves, microwaves, and sound waves.) Charms of radiation research lie in its interdisciplinary character; although my training was in basic physics, the scope of my interest has gradually increased to cover many other areas, to my deep satisfaction. High-energy radiation is an important component of the universe, and of our environment. It often provides an effective avenue for characterizing matter and understanding its behavior. Near Earth's surface this radiation is normally present in exceptionally low quantity, and yet it plays a significant role in some atmospheric phenomena such as auroras, and also in the evolution of life. The recent advent of various devices for producing high-energy radiation has opened up the possibility of many applications, including medical and industrial uses. I have worked on some aspects of those uses. At every opportunity to address a broad audience I try to convey a sense of intellectual fun, together with some of the elements of the basic science involved. A goal of radiation education might be to make the word 'radiation' as common and familiar as words such as 'fire' and 'electricity' through increased usage.

  7. Potential theory of radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Huei-Huang

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical method is being developed by which the structure of a radiation field can be predicted by a radiation potential theory, similar to a classical potential theory. The introduction of a scalar potential is justified on the grounds that the spectral intensity vector is irrotational. The vector is also solenoidal in the limits of a radiation field in complete radiative equilibrium or in a vacuum. This method provides an exact, elliptic type equation that will upgrade the accuracy and the efficiency of the current CFD programs required for the prediction of radiation and flow fields. A number of interesting results emerge from the present study. First, a steady state radiation field exhibits an optically modulated inverse square law distribution character. Secondly, the unsteady radiation field is structured with two conjugate scalar potentials. Each is governed by a Klein-Gordon equation with a frictional force and a restoring force. This steady potential field structure and the propagation of radiation potentials are consistent with the well known results of classical electromagnetic theory. The extension of the radiation potential theory for spray combustion and hypersonic flow is also recommended.

  8. Solar and Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T

    2005-07-01

    The Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) provides continuous measurements of broadband shortwave (solar) and longwave (atmospheric or infrared) irradiances for downwelling and upwelling components. The following six irradiance measurements are collected from a network of stations to help determine the total radiative flux exchange within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility: Direct normal shortwave (solar beam) Diffuse horizontal shortwave (sky) Global horizontal shortwave (total hemispheric) Upwelling shortwave (reflected) Downwelling longwave (atmospheric infrared) Upwelling longwave (surface infrared)

  9. An Introduction to Radiation General Definition of Radiation

    E-print Network

    Massey, Thomas N.

    Module 1 An Introduction to Radiation #12;General Definition of Radiation · Ionizing radiation, for example, X-rays, gamma-rays, particles · Ionizing radiation is capable of removing an electron from the atom with which it interacts (ionization). · Non-ionizing radiation, for example, visible light

  10. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

  11. RADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE

    E-print Network

    Tobar, Michael

    RADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE #12;A Career in Radiation Oncology YOUR CHOICE SAVE LIVES Take the first step towards a career in Radiation Oncology Visit www.acareerinradiationoncology.com.au 2 What is Radiation Oncology? Radiation Oncology is made up of three unique medical specialties

  12. Atomistic modeling of intrinsic and radiation-enhanced fission gas (Xe) diffusion in UO2 +/- x: Implications for nuclear fuel performance modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Giovanni Pastore; Michael R. Tonks; Derek R. Gaston; Richard L. Williamson; David Andrs; Richard Martineau

    2014-03-01

    Based on density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, the diffusivity of fission gas atoms (Xe) in UO2 nuclear fuel has been calculated for a range of non-stoichiometry (i.e. UO2x), under both out-of-pile (no irradiation) and in-pile (irradiation) conditions. This was achieved by first deriving expressions for the activation energy that account for the type of trap site that the fission gas atoms occupy, which includes the corresponding type of mobile cluster, the charge state of these defects and the chemistry acting as boundary condition. In the next step DFT calculations were used to estimate migration barriers and internal energy contributions to the thermodynamic properties and calculations based on empirical potentials were used to estimate defect formation and migration entropies (i.e. pre-exponentials). The diffusivities calculated for out-of-pile conditions as function of the UO2x nonstoichiometrywere used to validate the accuracy of the diffusion models and the DFT calculations against available experimental data. The Xe diffusivity is predicted to depend strongly on the UO2x non-stoichiometry due to a combination of changes in the preferred Xe trap site and in the concentration of uranium vacancies enabling Xe diffusion, which is consistent with experiments. After establishing the validity of the modeling approach, it was used for studying Xe diffusion under in-pile conditions, for which experimental data is very scarce. The radiation-enhanced Xe diffusivity is compared to existing empirical models. Finally, the predicted fission gas diffusion rates were implemented in the BISON fuel performance code and fission gas release from a Ris fuel rod irradiation experiment was simulated. 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  13. Efficient solution of multi-dimensional flux-limited nonequilibrium radiation diffusion coupled to material conduction with second-order time discretization

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Gordon L. [Computer and Computational Sciences Division (CCS-2), Los Alamos National Laboratory, 5 Foxglove Circle, Madison, WI 53717 (United States)], E-mail: olson_g@tds.net

    2007-09-10

    Many algorithms for the second-order time evolution of the coupled radiation diffusion and material conduction equations have been published. Most of them are cumbersome to implement and much slower computationally than their first-order equivalent algorithms. This paper presents a simpler approach that is both computationally efficient and easy to implement. Second-order behavior can be achieved even when the iteration at each time step is incompletely converged. The test problem uses multiple materials and nonlinear heat capacities. Unexpectedly, details in the discretization of the gradient in the flux limiter significantly affect the spatial and temporal convergence of the solution.

  14. Ultraviolet-radiation-curable paints

    SciTech Connect

    Grosset, A M; Su, W F.A.; Vanderglas, E

    1981-09-30

    In product finishing lines, ultraviolet radiation curing of paints on prefabricated structures could be more energy efficient than curing by natural gas fired ovens, and could eliminate solvent emission. Diffuse ultraviolet light can cure paints on three dimensional metal parts. In the uv curing process, the spectral output of radiation sources must complement the absorption spectra of pigments and photoactive agents. Photosensitive compounds, such as thioxanthones, can photoinitiate unsaturated resins, such as acrylated polyurethanes, by a free radical mechanism. Newly developed cationic photoinitiators, such as sulfonium or iodonium salts (the so-called onium salts) of complex metal halide anions, can be used in polymerization of epoxy paints by ultraviolet light radiation. One-coat enamels, topcoats, and primers have been developed which can be photoinitiated to produce hard, adherent films. This process has been tested in a laboratory scale unit by spray coating these materials on three-dimensional objects and passing them through a tunnel containing uv lamps.

  15. Microcircuit radiation effects databank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Radiation test data submitted by many testers is collated to serve as a reference for engineers who are concerned with and have some knowledge of the effects of the natural radiation environment on microcircuits. Total dose damage information and single event upset cross sections, i.e., the probability of a soft error (bit flip) or of a hard error (latchup) are presented.

  16. Forecasting Radiation Fog

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    This is the second module in the Mesoscale Meteorology Primer series. This module starts with a forecast scenario that occurs during a winter radiation fog event in the Central Valley of California. After that, a conceptual section covers the physical processes of radiation fog through its life cycle. Operational sections addressing fog detection and forecasting conclude the module

  17. Ultraviolet radiation changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Richard L.; Frederick, John E.; Ilyas, Mohammad; Filyushkin, V.; Wahner, Andreas; Stamnes, K.; Muthusubramanian, P.; Blumthaler, M.; Roy, Colin E.; Madronich, Sasha

    1991-01-01

    A major consequence of ozone depletion is an increase in solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation received at the Earth's surface. This chapter discusses advances that were made since the previous assessment (World Meteorological Organization (WMO)) to our understanding of UV radiation. The impacts of these changes in UV on the biosphere are not included, because they are discussed in the effects assessment.

  18. Radiation effects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-07-01

    As more people spend more time in space, and the return to the moon and exploratory missions are considered, the risks require continuing examination. The effects of microgravity and radiation are two potential risks in space. These risks increase with increasing mission duration. This document considers the risk of radiation effects in space workers and explorers. 17 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  19. RADIATION CHEMISTRY OF GASES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1962-01-01

    Discussions are presented concerning the advantages and limitations of ; gas phase studies in radiation chemistry, observed effects of phase in radiation, ; hot reactions, reactions of thermal I atoms, HCl catalyzed chain isomerizations, ; molecular H detachment, fragmentation of charged species, role of excited ; states, and dissociative electron attachment. (J.R.D.);

  20. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2010-06-15

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  1. Radiation detection system

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lutz, Stephen S. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lyons, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    A radiation detection system including a radiation-to-light converter and fiber optic wave guides to transmit the light to a remote location for processing. The system utilizes fluors particularly developed for use with optical fibers emitting at wavelengths greater than about 500 nm and having decay times less than about 10 ns.

  2. Treatment of Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Sadanori

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Radiation exposure as a result of radiation treatment, accident, or terrorism may cause serious problems such as deficiency due to necrosis or loss of function, fibrosis, or intractable ulcers in the tissues and organs. When the skin, bone, oral mucous membrane, guts, or salivary glands are damaged by ionizing radiation, the management and treatment are very lengthy and difficult. Critical Issues: In severe and irreversible injuries, surgery remains the mainstay of treatment. Several surgical procedures, such as debridement, skin grafting, and local and free-vascularized flaps, are widely used. Recent Advances: In specific cases of major morbidity or in high-risk patients, a newly developed therapy using a patient's own stem cells is safe and effective. Adipose tissue, normally a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells, which are similar to those from the bone marrow, can be harvested, since the procedure is easy, and abundant tissue can be obtained with minimal invasiveness. Future Directions: Based on the molecular basis of radiation injuries, several prospective treatments are under development. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms focus on an individual's sensitivity to radiation in radiogenomics, and the pathology of radiation fibrosis or the effect of radiation on wound healing is being studied and will lead to new insight into the treatment of radiation injuries. Protectors and mitigators are being actively investigated in terms of the timing of administration or dose. PMID:24761339

  3. Radiation Exposure Compensation Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    U.S. Department of Justice Radiation Exposure Compensation Program

    This is the Justice Department's Radiation Exposure Compensation Program homepage. This site features information about the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act, including claimant categories, claim forms, and the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act. This site also provides a table illustrating a summary of all claims received and compensation paid to date.

  4. Radiation in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhlinger, Ernst; Truemper, Joachim; Weisskopf, Martin

    1992-01-01

    When Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen discovered radiation one hundred years ago, it seemed that what was discovered was one of the rarest and most volatile members of the family of the basic modules of our natural world. Today cosmologists report that a substantial part of the universe's radiation energy consists of X-rays, which travel through cosmic space with the speed of light.

  5. Synchrotron Radiation II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a unique form of radiation that spans the electro-magnetic spectrum from X-rays through the ultraviolet and visible into the infrared. Tunable monochromators enable scientists to select a narrow band of wavelengths at any point in the spectrum. (Author/BB)

  6. Thallium bromide radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. S. Shah; J. C. Lund; F. Olschner; L. Moy; M. R. Squillante

    1989-01-01

    Radiation detectors have been fabricated from crystals of the semiconductor material thallium bromide (TlBr) and the performance of these detectors as room temperature photon spectrometers has been measured. These detectors exhibit improved energy resolution over previously reported TlBr detectors. These results indicate that TlBr is a very promising radiation detector material.

  7. Radiation based Marco Salerno

    E-print Network

    Sandini, Giulio

    , biology (cells, bacteria, virus, colloidal particles, ...) · geology (crystals, ...) · material science coherent oscillators (radiating antennas)(radiating antennas) Abbe eq.Abbe eq. 91 Airy function profile s #12;Why higher resolution? i.e. electrons ­ vs ­ photons "softer" diffraction limit DeBroglie = h / p

  8. GEWEX Radiative Flux Assessment

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-06-27

    GEWEX Radiative Flux Assessment The ultimate goal of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment ( GEWEX ) global data analysis projects is to obtain observations of the ... (atmosphere, ocean, land, cryosphere, biosphere). The GEWEX Radiative Flux Assessment (RFA) project will provide a forum for ...

  9. Global radiation oncology waybill

    PubMed Central

    Muoz-Garzn, Victor; Rovirosa, ngeles; Ramos, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Background/aim Radiation oncology covers many different fields of knowledge and skills. Indeed, this medical specialty links physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even rehabilitation and aesthetics. The current socio-economic situation and professional competences affect the development and future or this specialty. The aim of this article was to analyze and highlight the underlying pillars and foundations of radiation oncology, indicating the steps implicated in the future developments or competences of each. Methods This study has collected data from the literature and includes highlights from discussions carried out during the XVII Congress of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR) held in Vigo in June, 2013. Most of the aspects and domains of radiation oncology were analyzed, achieving recommendations for the many skills and knowledge related to physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even supportive care and management. Results Considering the data from the literature and the discussions of the XVII SEOR Meeting, the waybill for the forthcoming years has been described in this article including all the aspects related to the needs of radiation oncology. Conclusions Professional competences affect the development and future of this specialty. All the types of radio-modulation are competences of radiation oncologists. On the other hand, the pillars of Radiation Oncology are based on experience and research in every area of Radiation Oncology. PMID:24416572

  10. Physics for Radiation Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James E.

    2000-06-01

    A practical guide to the basic physics that radiation protection professionals need A much-needed working resource for health physicists and other radiation protection professionals, this volume presents clear, thorough, up-to-date explanations of the basic physics necessary to address real-world problems in radiation protection. Designed for readers with limited as well as basic science backgrounds, Physics for Radiation Protection emphasizes applied concepts and carefully illustrates all topics through examples as well as practice problems. Physics for Radiation Protection draws substantially on current resource data available for health physics use, providing decay schemes and emission energies for approximately 100 of the most common radionuclides encountered by practitioners. Excerpts of the Chart of the Nuclides, activation cross sections, fission yields, fission-product chains, photon attenuation coefficients, and nuclear masses are also provided. Coverage includes: * The atom as an energy system * An overview of the major discoveries in radiation physics * Extensive discussion of radioactivity, including sources and materials * Nuclear interactions and processes of radiation dose * Calculational methods for radiation exposure, dose, and shielding * Nuclear fission and production of activation and fission products * Specialty topics ranging from nuclear criticality and applied statistics to X rays * Extensive and current resource data cross-referenced to standard compendiums * Extensive appendices and more than 400 figures

  11. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2007-01-09

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  12. Chronic Radiation Enteritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. S. Theis; R. Sripadam; V. Ramani; S. Lal

    2010-01-01

    Chronic radiation enteritis is an increasing problem, as more patients receive radiotherapy as part of their cancer therapy and as the long-term survival of these patients improves. This review addresses the causes, investigation, treatment and prevention of this disease. A review of published studies was carried out using a variety of search terms, including radiation enteritis, investigation, treatment and prevention.

  13. RADIATION-CURABLE COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of radiation-curable coatings as a technology for reducing volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from surface coating operations. urvey of the literature was conducted to assess the state of the technology and emissions from radiation...

  14. Radiative Flux Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Chuck [NOAA

    2008-05-14

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  15. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, D.M.; Littman, P.; Gefter, W.B.; Miller, W.T.; Raney, R.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis.

  16. Enhanced-Radiation Weapons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fred M. Kaplan

    1978-01-01

    The enhanced-radiation warhead is a particularly dangerous weapon insofar as it might mislead anyone into believing that its deployment would make it possible for nuclear warfare to be safely limited and tightly controlled; in this sense its very deployment could lower the threshold separating conventional warfare from nuclear warfare. Enhanced-radiation weapons are no more (and perhaps they are less) ''humane''

  17. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, Adrie J. J. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-05-05

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  18. Underwater radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM); McKnight, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    A detector apparatus for differentiating between gamma and neutron radiation is provided. The detector includes a pair of differentially shielded Geiger-Mueller tubes. The first tube is wrapped in silver foil and the second tube is wrapped in lead foil. Both the silver and lead foils allow the passage of gamma rays at a constant rate in a gamma ray only field. When neutrons are present, however, the silver activates and emits beta radiation that is also detected by the silver wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube while the radiation detected by the lead wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube remains constant. The amount of radiation impinging on the separate Geiger-Mueller tubes is then correlated in order to distinguish between the neutron and gamma radiations.

  19. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  20. Dangers of Radiation Exposure

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS; )

    2005-03-15

    In the first part of the lesson, students calculate their yearly exposure rate to harmful high-energy radiation and cumulative effects over time. They then use the information to evaluate the various sources of radiation that are of greatest concern for them. In the second part of the lesson, students learn that spacecraft and other objects in space must be concerned with the same kinds of radiation to which humans are exposed. The MESSENGER spacecraft will orbit Mercury and be subjected to much more intense solar radiation than it would near Earth. Students discuss the notion that even though some of the radiation is needed to study the properties of the planet, too much of it can be quite damaging.

  1. Gravitational diffraction radiation

    E-print Network

    Vitor Cardoso; Marco Cavaglia; Mario Pimenta

    2006-10-04

    We show that if the visible universe is a membrane embedded in a higher-dimensional space, particles in uniform motion radiate gravitational waves because of spacetime lumpiness. This phenomenon is analogous to the electromagnetic diffraction radiation of a charge moving near to a metallic grating. In the gravitational case, the role of the metallic grating is played by the inhomogeneities of the extra-dimensional space, such as a hidden brane. We derive a general formula for gravitational diffraction radiation and apply it to a higher-dimensional scenario with flat compact extra dimensions. Gravitational diffraction radiation may carry away a significant portion of the particle's initial energy. This allows to set stringent limits on the scale of brane perturbations. Physical effects of gravitational diffraction radiation are briefly discussed.

  2. Broadband optical radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Hong, S. D.; Moacanin, J. (inventors)

    1981-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting optical radiation by optically monitoring temperature changes in a microvolume caused by absorption of the optical radiation to be detected is described. More specifically, a thermal lens forming material is provided which has first and second opposite, substantially parallel surfaces. A reflective coating is formed on the first surface, and a radiation absorbing coating is formed on the reflective coating. Chopped, incoming optical radiation to be detected is directed to irradiate a small portion of the radiation absorbing coating. Heat generated in this small area is conducted to the lens forming material through the reflective coating, thereby raising the temperature of a small portion of the lens forming material and causing a thermal lens to be formed therein.

  3. Deployable Heat Pipe Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1975-01-01

    A 1.2- by 1.8-m variable conductance heat pipe radiator was designed, built, and tested. The radiator has deployment capability and can passively control Freon-21 fluid loop temperatures under varying loads and environments. It consists of six grooved variable conductance heat pipes attached to a 0.032-in. aluminum panel. Heat is supplied to the radiator via a fluid header or a single-fluid flexible heat pipe header. The heat pipe header is an artery design that has a flexible section capable of bending up to 90 degrees. Radiator loads as high as 850 watts were successfully tested. Over a load variation of 200 watts, the outlet temperature of the Freon-21 fluid varied by 7 F. An alternate control system was also investigated which used a variable conductance heat pipe header attached to the heat pipe radiator panel.

  4. Radiation Effects In Space

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Ram K. [NASA Langley Research Center, MS - 188 E, Hampton VA 23681 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Protecting space missions from severe exposures from radiation, in general, and long duration/deep space human missions, in particular, is a critical design driver, and could be a limiting factor. The space radiation environment consists of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar particle events (SPE), trapped radiation, and includes ions of all the known elements over a very broad energy range. These ions penetrate spacecraft materials producing nuclear fragments and secondary particles that damage biological tissues and microelectronic devices. One is required to know how every element (and all isotopes of each element) in the periodic table interacts and fragments on every other element in the same table as a function of kinetic energy ranging over many decades. In addition, the accuracy of the input information and database, in general and nuclear data in particular, impacts radiation exposure health assessments and payload penalty. After a brief review of effects of space radiation on materials and electronics, human space missions to Mars is discussed.

  5. Coherent curvature radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, J. G.

    1980-02-01

    With regard to coherent curvature radiation (CCR), calculations of the exact nature of the coherence requirements and the properties of the resulting radiation are reexamined. It is found that the general theory of CCR from plasma waves, as developed by Buscauer and Benford (1976), is correct only in the limit in which the plasma particles are stationary in the wave frame. In addition, features of their calculations, namely radiated energy which exceeds the product of the square of the number of particles times single particle radiation, as well as the feature of radiation at frequencies higher than the cutoff frequency for single particle emission, can be understood as spurious contributions originating in the boundary conditions.

  6. RADIATION BIOLOGY: CONCEPTS FOR RADIATION PROTECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT The opportunity to write a historical review of the field of radiation biology allows for the viewing of the development and maturity of a field of study, thereby being able to provide the appropriate context for the earlier years of research and its findings. The...

  7. Radiation therapy imaging apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.J.; Shoenfeld, H.; Greenway, W.C.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes a radiation therapy imaging apparatus for providing images in a patient being treated on a radiation therapy apparatus for verification and monitoring of patient positioning and verification of alignment and shaping of the radiation field of the radiation therapy apparatus. It comprises: a high-energy treatment head for applying a radiation dose to a patient positioned on a treatment table, and a gantry rotatable about an isocentric axis and carrying the treatment head for permitting the radiation dose to be applied to the patient from any of a range of angles about the isocentric axis; the radiation therapy imaging apparatus including a radiation therapy image detector which comprises a video camera mounted on the gantry diametrically opposite the treat head, an elongated light-excluding enclosure enveloping the camera to exclude ambient light from the camera, a fluoroscopic plate positioned on a distal end of the enclosure remote from the camera and aligned with the head to produce a fluoroscopic image in response to radiation applied from the head through the patient, mirror means in the enclosure and oriented for reflecting the image to the camera to permit monitoring on a viewing screen of the position of the radiation field in respect to the patient, and means for retracting at least the distal end of the enclosure from a position in which the fluoroscopic plate is disposed opposite the treatment head without disturbing the position of the camera on the gantry, so that the enclosure can be collapsed and kept from projecting under the treatment table when the patient is being positioned on the treatment table.

  8. RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR RADIATION PROTECTION AT TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY................................................................................................................I-1 B. Radiation Protection Program...............................................................................I-3 D. Radiation Safety Management

  9. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-print Network

    Jia, Songtao

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212 Health & Safety www.ehs.columbia.edu Revised May 2011 Please Submit in Duplicate to: The Radiation Safety: ______________________________________________ Date: ______________ Radiation Safety Officer at Receiving Institution

  10. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... health. Radiation Therapy Radiation is a high-energy X-ray that can be used to treat lung cancer noninvasively. Radiation therapy works within cancer cells by damaging their ability to multiply. When these ...

  11. [Remote radiation planning support system].

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Kazushige; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Shinoto, Makoto; Asai, Kaori; Sakamoto, Katsumi; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    We constructed a remote radiation planning support system between Kyushu University Hospital (KUH) in Fukuoka and Kyushu University Beppu Hospital (KBH) in Oita. Between two institutions, radiology information system for radiotherapy division (RT-RIS) and radiation planning system (RTPS) were connected by virtual private network (VPN). This system enables the radiation oncologists at KUH to perform radiotherapy planning for the patients at KBH. The detail of the remote radiation planning support system in our institutions is as follows: The radiation oncologist at KBH performs radiotherapy planning and the data of the patients are sent anonymously to the radiation oncologists at KUH. The radiation oncologists at KUH receive the patient's data, access to RTPS at KBH, verify or change the radiation planning at KBH: Radiation therapy is performed at KBH according to the confirmed plan by the radiation oncologists at KUH. Our remote radiation planning system is useful for providing radiation therapy with safety and accuracy. PMID:23157128

  12. Radiation for Students and Teachers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Technical Information Understanding Radiation Learn about why some atoms give off radiation, the different kinds of radiation, ... same name. The guide includes units on: Modeling Atoms, Making Atoms Visible, Personal Dose, Irradiation and Benefits, ...

  13. Radiation Therapy for Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... chemo and stem cell transplant for testicular cancer Radiation therapy for testicular cancer Radiation therapy uses high-energy rays or particles to ... cells or slow their growth. In testicular cancer, radiation is mainly used to kill cancer cells that ...

  14. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Prostate Skin Upper GI Latest Research Find a Radiation Oncologist Last Name: Facility: City: State: Zip Code: ... infections. This is refered to as immunotherapy . Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy given during surgery is called ...

  15. Radiation Safety (Revised March 2010)

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated December 2012 Stanford University, Stanford California #12; #12; Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated Environmental Health and Safety, Stanford University, Stanford California #12; CREDITS This Radiation Safety

  16. HERACLES: a three dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audit, E.; Gonzlez, M.

    HERACLES is a new code that solve the radiative transfer coupled to the hydrodynamics. The radiation is describe by a moment model using the M1 closure relation which allow to preserve large angular anisotropy in the radiation field. We present here the model, its numerical implementation and some test cases. The tests and the comparison with other methods show the good accuracy of our model in various situations. The results show that HERACLES is accurate in both the diffusion and the transport limit and could therefor be used in various astrophysical fields such as radiative shocks, fragmentation and formation of dense cores in the interstellar medium, protoplanetary discs, jets...

  17. Diffusive and Radiative Transport in Fires (DARTFire): Opposed-Flow Flame Spread in Low-Velocity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenkirch, R. A.; Olson, S. L.; Deering, J. L.; Tang, L.; Bhattacharjee, S.

    1999-01-01

    For flames spreading into a low-velocity flow that can only be obtained in microgravity, we have observed behavior that is different from that which is obtained at higher velocities where radiative effects are unimportant and species transport is relatively fast. Unfortunately, lack of a large body of low-gravity flame spread experimental data inhibits progress in developing an understanding of the physics of low-velocity, opposed-flow flame spread phenomena. Recent DARTFire sounding rocket experimental studies though, coupled with developing theory and modelling, have allowed some strides in understanding to be made, on which we report here. Four launches to date have resulted in six experiments for opposed-flow flame spread over a thick PMMA sample. During the 6 min microgravity period, the PMMA samples were ignited, and steady flame spread was studied under varied flow velocity, oxidizer atmospheric conditions, and, because radiative heat transfer is so important in these slowly spreading flames, external radiant flux. These were the first attempts at such experimental control and measurement in microgravity. A recent reflight of the Solid Surface Combustion Experiment (SSCE) has demonstrated, as modelling predicts, that for the thick fuel of the DARTFire experiment, flame spread in a quiescent environment is a transient process evolving from ignition to extinction on the order of 600 s (Altenkirch et al., 1999). Further study then of the effects of radiation in the very low-velocity opposing flows is of interest in understanding the transition from steady, sustained spread to the unsteady evolution to extinction as the opposing flow is reduced further and eventually removed.

  18. [Basis of radiation protection].

    PubMed

    Roth, J; Schweizer, P; Gckel, C

    1996-06-29

    After an introduction, three selected contributions to the 10th Course on Radiation Protection held at the University Hospital of Basel are presented. The principles of radiation protection and new Swiss legislation are discussed as the basis for radiological protection. Ways are proposed of reducing radiation exposure while optimizing the X-ray picture with a minimum dose to patient and personnel. Radiation effects from low doses. From the beginning, life on this planet has been exposed to ionizing radiation from natural sources. For about one century additional irradiation has reached us from man-made sources as well. In Switzerland the overall annual radiation exposure from ambient and man-made sources amounts to about 4 mSv. The terrestrial and cosmic radiation and natural radionuclids in the body cause about 1.17 mSv (29%). As much as 1.6 mSv (40%) results from exposure to radon and its progenies, primarily inside homes. Medical applications contribute approximately 1 mSv (26%) to the annual radiation exposure and releases from atomic weapons, nuclear facilities and miscellaneous industrial operations yield less than 0.12 mSv (< 5%) to the annual dose. Observations of detrimental radiation effects from intermediate to high doses are challenged by observations of biopositive adaptive responses and hormesis following low dose exposure. The important question, whether cellular adaptive response or hormesis could cause beneficial effects to the human organism that would outweigh the detrimental effects attributed to low radiation doses, remains to be resolved. Whether radiation exerts a detrimental, inhibitory, modifying or even beneficial effect is likely to result from identical molecular lesions but to depend upon their quantity, localization and time scale of initiation, as well as the specific responsiveness of the cellular systems involved. For matters of radiation protection the bionegative radiation effects are classified as deterministic effects or stochastic effects respectively. The various histopathological reactions of tissues and organs following localized tissue irradiation, and the radiation syndromes following total body irradiation, constitute the deterministic effects. There will be a threshold below which deterministic effects do not appear and spontaneous incidences are not known. For low dose risk considerations deterministic effects are of no significance. Genetic effects and carcinogenesis are said to be stochastic effects. Characteristically the probability of stochastic effects increases with dose but the severity of the effects is independent of the dose. The shape of the dose-response relationship at intermediate to high dose levels is linear-quadratic. For exposure to low doses the response becomes linear, as is to be expected for a linear-quadratic function at low dose. No threshold is assumed for stochastic effects. The estimate of probability of fatal cancer by the ICRP is 4 x 10(-2) per Sv for the working population and 5 x 10(-2) per Sv for the total population. Their estimate of probability of serious hereditary disorders within the first two generations is 1 x 10(-2) per Sv. The highest probability coefficient is attributed to mental retardation following exposure in utero. Within the sensitive period at 8-15 weeks of gestation, a risk probability of 40 x 10(-2) per Sv is assumed but a threshold at 0.1 Sv is not excluded. Conclusions drawn from experiments, clinical observations and epidemiological studies following intermediate to high radiation exposures attribute a mutagenic and carcinogenic competence to all radiation doses. Microdosimetric considerations support this assumption. This conclusion cannot be confirmed experimentally nor by epidemiological studies of populations living under different conditions from natural sources of radiation. Nevertheless, a change in the present restrictive radiation protection policy does not yet appear appropriate. PMID:8711464

  19. Modifying Radiation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwanghee; McBride, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation leaves a fairly characteristic footprint in biological materials, but this is rapidly all but obliterated by the canonical biological responses to the radiation damage. The innate immune recognition systems that sense danger through direct radiation damage and through associated collateral damage set in motion a chain of events that, in a tissue compromised by radiation, often unwittingly result in oscillating waves of molecular and cellular responses as tissues attempt to heal. Understanding natures whispers that inform on these processes will lead to novel forms of intervention targeted more precisely towards modifying them in an appropriate and timely fashion so as to improve the healing process and prevent or mitigate the development of acute and late effects of normal tissue radiation damage, whether it be accidental, as a result of a terrorist incident, or of therapeutic treatment of cancer. Here we attempt to discuss some of the non-free radical scavenging mechanisms that modify radiation responses and comment on where we see them within a conceptual framework of an evolving radiation-induced lesion. PMID:20583981

  20. Radiation-induced enteropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, M.E.; Bauer, J. (Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The incidence of chronic radiation enteritis appears to have risen in recent years due to the increasing utilization of radiotherapy for abdominal and pelvic malignancies. The etiology, pathogenesis, and management of radiation enteritis are discussed. Two case reports exemplify the progressive nature of the disease. Case 1 demonstrates the classical picture of multiple exacerbations and remissions of partial small bowel obstruction and the eventual need for surgical management ten years after radiation therapy. Case 2 presents the more severe sequelae of an acute perforation with a 14-yr latency period. Predisposing factors in the progression of radiation injury include excessive radiation, underlying cardiovascular disease, fixation of the bowel, and an asthenic habitus. In both cases, radiation injury was localized to a discrete segment of bowel; therefore, resection with a primary end-to-end anastomosis was performed. In addition, diseased bowel was eliminated and, therefore, would not cause further complications such as intractable bleeding or fistula formation. The review focuses on current knowledge which may be applied to the treatment and prevention of radiation enteritis.

  1. Beneficial uses of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.R.

    1991-10-01

    An overall decline in technical literacy within the American public has come at a time when technological advances are accelerating in the United States and around the world. This had led to a large communication gulf between the general public and the technologists. Nowhere is this more evident then with the topic of radiation. Regrettably, too few people know about sources of radiation, the pervasiveness, amounts, and variabilities, and do not have a true understanding of the environment in which we live. Nor do many people know that radiation has been used in beneficial ways for decades around the world. While the general public does not know of the scientific applications to which radiation has been deployed, it nevertheless had benefited tremendously from these efforts. Thanks to the well know properties of radiation, scientific ingenuity has found many uses of radiation in chemical and agricultural research, biomedical research, in the diagnoses and treatment of hundreds of types of diseases, in industrial applications, food irradiation, and many others. This paper provides a sample of the types of uses to which radiation has been used to help advance the betterment of humankind.

  2. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hung-chi Lihn

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed.

  3. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    HULBERT,S.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

    1998-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light.

  4. Synchrotron radiation sources and research

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1995-12-31

    This is an introduction and a review of Synchrotron Radiation sources and the research performed using synchrotron radiation. I will begin with a brief discussion of the two principal uses of particle storage rings: for colliding beams (Collider) and for synchrotron radiation (Radiator). Then I will concentrate on discussions of synchrotron radiation topics, starting with a historical account, followed by descriptions of the features of the storage ring and the features of the radiation from the simplest source -- the bending magnet. I will then discuss the special insertion device sources -- wigglers and undulators -- and their radiations, and end with a brief general account of the research and other applications of synchrotron radiation.

  5. Microcircuit radiation effects databank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This databank is the collation of radiation test data submitted by many testers and serves as a reference for engineers who are concerned with and have some knowledge of the effects of the natural radiation environment on microcircuits. It contains radiation sensitivity results from ground tests and is divided into two sections. Section A lists total dose damage information, and section B lists single event upset cross sections, I.E., the probability of a soft error (bit flip) or of a hard error (latchup).

  6. Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruno Sportisse

    The interaction between atmospheric matter and solar and terrestrial radiation plays a leading role for life conditions at\\u000a the Earths surface: \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a stratospheric ozone filters the solar ultraviolet radiation;\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a the absorption by a few gas-phase species (e.g. water, methane or carbon dioxide) of the terrestrial radiation defines the\\u000a so-called greenhouse effect, which results in a surface temperature greater than

  7. Radiation and Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Albert; Blanchard, Karen

    2007-10-01

    This is a shortened version of the Science Teachers' Workshop offered free of charge to primary and secondary teachers at a location of their choice, covering fundamentals of nuclear radiation, natural and man-made sources of radiation, biological effects and risks to health, radioactive waste management, and radiation safety management and regulation. The course includes a hands-on demonstration of use of Geiger Counters, which are given without cost to participants for use in their classes. A CD and notebook of class material are issued to each student. Lunch will be provided.

  8. Radiation and Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Albert E.

    2008-03-01

    This is a shortened version of the Science Teachers' Workshop offered free of charge to primary and secondary teachers at a location of their choice, covering fundamentals of nuclear radiation, natural and man-made sources of radiation, biological effects and risks to health, radioactive waste management, and radiation safety management and regulation. The course includes a hands-on demonstration of use of Geiger Counters, which are given without cost to participants for use in their classes. A CD and notebook of class material are issued to each student. Lunch will be provided. Limited to 20 participants.

  9. Radiation Safety System

    SciTech Connect

    Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab; Liu, James C.; /SLAC; Walker, Lawrence S.; /Los Alamos

    2012-04-04

    The goal of this work is to provide an overview of a Radiation safety system (RSS) designed for protection from prompt radiation hazard at accelerator facilities. RSS design parameters, functional requirements and constraints are derived from hazard analysis and risk assessment undertaken in the design phase of the facility. The two main subsystems of a RSS are access control system (ACS) and radiation control system (RCS). In this text, a common approach to risk assessment, typical components of ACS and RCS, desirable features and general design principles applied to RSS are described.

  10. Radiation safety system.

    PubMed

    Vylet, Vaclav; Liu, James C; Walker, Lawrence S

    2009-11-01

    The goal of this work is to provide an overview of a Radiation safety system (RSS) designed for protection from prompt radiation hazard at accelerator facilities. RSS design parameters, functional requirements and constraints are derived from hazard analysis and risk assessment undertaken in the design phase of the facility. The two main subsystems of a RSS are access control system (ACS) and radiation control system (RCS). In this text, a common approach to risk assessment, typical components of ACS and RCS, desirable features and general design principles applied to RSS are described. PMID:19783555

  11. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  12. Synchrotron-radiation laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfield, J. L.

    1992-02-01

    A formulation to characterize stimulated emission of synchrotron radiation is presented, based on simplification of a theory developed by Sokolov and Ternov. It is shown that optical gain may be obtained up to gyration harmonics of the order of the critical harmonic number for spontaneous radiation, 3 gamma-cubed, where gamma is the relativistic energy factor. Synchrotron-radiation lasers (SRLs) in the infrared and visible portions of the spectrum are shown to be feasible, provided beams with high energy definition are used. SRL gain can exceed free-electron-laser gain for similar beams.

  13. Space radiation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Instrument design and data analysis expertise was provided in support of several space radiation monitoring programs. The Verification of Flight Instrumentation (VFI) program at NASA included both the Active Radiation Detector (ARD) and the Nuclear Radiation Monitor (NRM). Design, partial fabrication, calibration and partial data analysis capability to the ARD program was provided, as well as detector head design and fabrication, software development and partial data analysis capability to the NRM program. The ARD flew on Spacelab-1 in 1983, performed flawlessly and was returned to MSFC after flight with unchanged calibration factors. The NRM, flown on Spacelab-2 in 1985, also performed without fault, not only recording the ambient gamma ray background on the Spacelab, but also recording radiation events of astrophysical significance.

  14. Microwave Radiation Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Direct photon detector responds to microwave frequencies. Method based on trapped-ion frequency-generation standards proposed to detect radio-frequency (RF) radiation at 40.5 GHz. Technique used for directdetection (RF) communication, radar, and radio astronomy.

  15. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  16. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  17. Management of radiation wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Reinisch, J.F.; Puckett, C.L.

    1984-08-01

    Radiation wounds caused by newer high-voltage radiotherapy techniques are very difficult to manage. Recent developments in flap design and transfer aid the surgeon in successfully treating these difficult problems.

  18. Portal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  19. SOLAR RADIATION, VA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sterling, Virginia Integrated Surface Irradiance Study (ISIS) solar radiation data files from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), zipped from ftp://ftp.atdd.noaa.gov/pub/projects/isis/ste/monthly...

  20. Radiation in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    Spaceflight results in unavoidable exposure of astronauts or experimental organisms to the complex space radiation environment while simultaneously subjecting the individuals to gravity unloading and other stresses such as vibroacoustic stimuli.

  1. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  2. The Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourdarie, Sebastien; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of the space radiation environment on spacecraft systems and instruments are significant design considerations for space missions. Astronaut exposure is a serious concern for manned missions. In order to meet these challenges and have reliable, cost-effective designs, the radiation environment must be understood and accurately modeled. The nature of the environment varies greatly between low earth orbits, higher earth orbits and interplanetary space. There are both short-term and long-term variations with the phase of the solar cycle. In this paper we concentrate mainly on charged particle radiations. Descriptions of the radiation belts and particles of solar and cosmic origin are reviewed. An overview of the traditional models is presented accompanied by their application areas and limitations. This is followed by discussion of some recent model developments.

  3. [Genetic effects of radiation].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Nori

    2012-03-01

    This paper is a short review of genetic effect of radiation. This includes methods and results of a large-scale genetic study on specific loci in mice and of various studies in the offspring of atomic-bomb survivors. As for the latter, there is no results obtained which suggest the effect of parental exposure to radiation. Further, in recent years, studies are conducted to the offspring born to parents who were survivors of childhood cancers. In several reports, the mean gonad dose is quite large whereas in most instances, the results do not indicate genetic effect following parental exposure to radiation. Possible reasons for the difficulties in detecting genetic effect of radiation are discussed. PMID:22514926

  4. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... including physicists and dosimetrists ) use sophisticated computers to design the details of the exact radiation plan that ... to travel. The patients general health and medical history. Whether the patient will have other types of ...

  5. Rhabdomyosarcoma: Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... techniques, such as stereotactic radiotherapy and proton beam radiotherapy, are discussed briefly in the section Whats new in rhabdomyosarcoma research and treatment? Possible side effects The side effects of radiation therapy depend on ...

  6. Portal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, L.W.

    1982-03-23

    A portal radiation monitor combines .1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  7. Nuclear radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luiz Alexandre Schuch; Daniel Jean Roger Nordemann

    1990-01-01

    Detectors of nuclear radiation, such as gaseous detectors, scintillators, and semiconductors, are presented through their general properties and with their operating systems. The semiconductor detectors are studied with more details.

  8. STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    in energy production, environmental remediation, nanotechnology, new materials and medicine. SSRL also, new types of solar cells, more powerful electronics, catalysts that speed chemical reactions, and novel computing technologies. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource is an Office of Science

  9. Tin Can Radiation Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crull, John L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides instructions for making tin can radiation detectors from empty aluminum cans, aluminum foil, clear plastic, copper wire, silica gel, and fine, unwaxed dental floss put together with tape or glue. Also provides suggestions for activities using the detectors. (JN)

  10. Radiation Tolerant Antifuse FPGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jih-Jong; Cronquist, Brian; McCollum, John; Parker, Wanida; Katz, Rich; Kleyner, Igor; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The total dose performance of the antifuse FPGA for space applications is summarized. Optimization of the radiation tolerance in the fabless model is the main theme. Mechanisms to explain the variation in different products are discussed.

  11. External Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    Narrator: When the cancer is not completely contained in the prostate or when the patient is older the treatment that is frequently used ... There are different forms of radiation for prostate cancer. They really boil down to two different types. ...

  12. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  13. Radiation Dose Chart

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Randall Munroe

    This is an illustration of the ionizing radiation dose a person can absorb from various sources. It provides a visual comparison of doses ranging from 0.1 microsieverts (from eating a banana) to a fatal dose of 8 sieverts.

  14. Occupational Radiation Exposures

    Cancer.gov

    DCEG researchers are studying cancer risks among populations who are occupationally exposed to radiation. Chernobyl Clean-up Workers Mayak Nuclear Facility Workers U.S. Radiologic Technologists Interventional Fluoroscopists Print This Page Occupational

  15. Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

  16. Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven D

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and\\/or hydraulic. In this application, the term \\

  17. Radiation Safety Manual Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY

    E-print Network

    Grishok, Alla

    Radiation Safety Manual ­ Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL For Columbia University NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital New York State Psychiatric Institute Barnard College December 2012 #12;Radiation Safety Manual ­ Dec 2012 Page 1 Table of Contents Introduction Chapter I: Radiation Safety Program A. Program

  18. Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for

    E-print Network

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;#12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Protocol Title: Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers

  19. The NCI Radiation Research Program: Grant portfolio and radiation

    E-print Network

    The NCI Radiation Research Program: Grant portfolio and radiation dosimetry as applied and R37s). Of those that utilize radiation: · 6 use tissue culture models only · 110 utilize animal radiation (excepting those with human subjects or physics grants) mention dosimetry in the proposals (4

  20. Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for

    E-print Network

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for Sealed Source Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of sealed sources located

  1. Auditing radiation sterilization facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jeffrey A.

    The diversity of radiation sterilization systems available today places renewed emphasis on the need for thorough Quality Assurance audits of these facilities. Evaluating compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices is an obvious requirement, but an effective audit must also evaluate installation and performance qualification programs (validation_, and process control and monitoring procedures in detail. The present paper describes general standards that radiation sterilization operations should meet in each of these key areas, and provides basic guidance for conducting QA audits of these facilities.

  2. Liquid sheet radiator apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An external flow, liquid sheet radiator apparatus adapted for space applications has as its radiating surface a thin stable liquid sheet formed by fluid flow through a very narrow slit affixed to the sheet generator. As a result of surface tension forces, the sheet has a triangular shape and is collected into a simply designed collector positioned at the apex of the triangle. The specific power for the liquid sheet is virtually the same as the droplet sheet specific power.

  3. Radiation-induced sarcoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shreyaskumar R. Patel

    2000-01-01

    Opinion statementRadiation-induced sarcomas can originate in either the irradiated bone or soft tissues. Most of these tumors are high-grade.\\u000a The most common histologic subtypes are malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) and osteosarcoma, although other histologies\\u000a (eg, angiosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma) can occur. Tumor size and grade are the two most important prognostic factors for soft tissue\\u000a sarcomas, including those associated with radiation therapy.

  4. [Radiation protection in radiation oncology. Yesterday, today, and tomorrow].

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Th; Mller, R

    2012-11-01

    Publications about radiation protection issues are not very frequent in the 100-year-old history of Strahlentherapie und Onkologie. While at the beginning of the last century the problems of radiation protection were determined by the technical development of radiation therapy, the importance of radiation protection measures and knowledge about radiation protection by the persons involved has clearly increased. A new challenge is treating patients according to radiation safety issues to avoid the risk of stochastic late effects, such as radiation-induced secondary tumors. PMID:22907582

  5. ISO radiation sterilization standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Byron J.; Hansen, Joyce M.

    1998-06-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the current status of the ISO radiation sterilization standards. The ISO standards are voluntary standards which detail both the validation and routine control of the sterilization process. ISO 11137 was approved in 1994 and published in 1995. When reviewing the standard you will note that less than 20% of the standard is devoted to requirements and the remainder is guidance on how to comply with the requirements. Future standards developments in radiation sterilization are being focused on providing additional guidance. The guidance that is currently provided in informative annexes of ISO 11137 includes: device/packaging materials, dose setting methods, and dosimeters and dose measurement, currently, there are four Technical Reports being developed to provide additional guidance: 1. AAMI Draft TIR, "Radiation Sterilization Material Qualification" 2. ISO TR 13409-1996, "Sterilization of health care products Radiation sterilization Substantiation of 25 kGy as a sterilization dose for small or infrequent production batches" 3. ISO Draft TR, "Sterilization of health care products Radiation sterilization Selection of a sterilization dose for a single production batch" li]4. ISO Draft TR, "Sterilization of health care products Radiation sterilization-Product Families, Plans for Sampling and Frequency of Dose Audits."

  6. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

    1989-01-01

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

  7. Fabric space radiators

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.; Krotiuk, W.J.; Webb, B.J.; Prater, J.T.; Bates, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Future Air Force space missions will require thermal radiators that both survive in the hostile space environment and stow away for minimal bulk during launch. Advances in all aspects of radiator design, construction, and analysis will be necessary to enable such future missions. Currently, the best means for obtaining high strength along with flexibility is through structures known as fabrics. The development of new materials and bonding techniques has extended the application range of fabrics into areas traditionally dominated by monolithic and/or metallic structures. Given that even current spacecraft heat rejection considerations tend to dominate spacecraft design and mass, the larger and more complex designs of the future face daunting challenges in thermal control. Ceramic fabrics bonded to ultra-thin metal liners (foils) have the potential of achieving radiator performance levels heretofore unattainable, and of readily matching the advances made in other branches of spacecraft design. The research effort documented here indicates that both pumped loops and heat pipes constructed in ceramic fabrics stand to benefit in multiple ways. Flexibility and low mass are the main advantages exhibited by fabric radiators over conventional metal ones. We feel that fabric radiators have intrinsic merits not possessed by any other radiator design and need to be researched further. 26 refs., 16 figs., 17 tabs.

  8. Gravitational Tunneling Radiation

    E-print Network

    Mario Rabinowitz

    2002-12-11

    The isolated black hole radiation of both Hawking and Zel'dovich are idealized abstractions as there is always another body to distort the potential. This is considered with respect to both gravitational tunneling, and black hole "no-hair" theorems. The effects of a second body are to lower the gravitational barrier of a black hole and to give the barrier a finite rather than infinite width so tha a particle can escape by tunneling (as in field emission) or over the top of the lowered barrier (as in Schottky emission). Thus radiation may be emitted from black holes in a process differing from that of Hawking radiation, P SH, which has been undetected for over 24 years. The radiated power from a black hole derived here is PR e ^2__ PSH, where e ^2__ is he ransmission probability for radiation through the barrier. This is similar to electric field emission of electrons from a metal in that the emission can in principle be modulated and beamed. The temperature and entropy of black holes are reexamined. Miniscule black holes herein may help explain the missing mass of the universe, accelerated expansion of the universe, and anomalous rotation of spiral galaxies. A gravitational interference effect for black hole radiation similar to the Aharonov-Bohm effect is also examined.

  9. Radiation analysis devices, radiation analysis methods, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Roybal, Lyle Gene

    2010-06-08

    Radiation analysis devices include circuitry configured to determine respective radiation count data for a plurality of sections of an area of interest and combine the radiation count data of individual of sections to determine whether a selected radioactive material is present in the area of interest. An amount of the radiation count data for an individual section is insufficient to determine whether the selected radioactive material is present in the individual section. An article of manufacture includes media comprising programming configured to cause processing circuitry to perform processing comprising determining one or more correction factors based on a calibration of a radiation analysis device, measuring radiation received by the radiation analysis device using the one or more correction factors, and presenting information relating to an amount of radiation measured by the radiation analysis device having one of a plurality of specified radiation energy levels of a range of interest.

  10. An efficient tabulated collisional radiative equilibrium radiation transport model suitable for multidimensional hydrodynamics calculations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Thornhill; J. P. Apruzese; J. Davis; R. W. Clark; A. L. Velikovich; J. L. Giuliani; Y. K. Chong; K. G. Whitney; C. Deeney; C. A. Coverdale; F. L. Cochran

    2001-01-01

    A computationally efficient method for transporting radiation in multidimensional plasmas has been developed and evaluated. The basis of this method is a uniform plasma approximation that allows one to utilize existing escape probability techniques that are successfully used in one-dimensional (1D) calculations to approximately solve the multidimensional radiation transport problem. This method is superior to diffusion methods because (1) the

  11. Radiation Sensitization in Cancer Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstock, Clive L.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of radiation damage to biological material, including free radical mechanisms, radiation sensitization and protection, tumor hypoxia, mechanism of hypoxic cell radiosensitization, redox model for radiation modification, sensitizer probes of cellular radiation targets, pulse radiolysis studies of free radical kinetics,

  12. The Radiation Chemistry Data Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Madden, K.P.

    The Radiation Chemistry Data Center is an information resource provided by the Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory that is "dedicated to the collection, evaluation, and dissemination of data characterizing the reactions of transient intermediates produced by radiation chemical and photochemical methods." The main page offers links to Compilations of Chemical Property Data, Kinetics Databases, a Bibliographic Database, and Recent Papers in Radiation Chemistry and Photochemistry.

  13. The Gilbert Beebe Radiation Fellowship

    Cancer.gov

    Description of the Gilbert Beebe Radiation Fellowship for mid- to senior-level epidemiologists or biostatisticians. Recipients work in the Radiation Epidemiology Branch of the National Cancer Institute and the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in Hiroshima, Japan on research related to the atomic bomb survivors and other radiation topics.

  14. ADAPTIVE RADIATION ROSEMARY G. GILLESPIE

    E-print Network

    Gillespie, Rosemary

    1 A ADAPTIVE RADIATION ROSEMARY G. GILLESPIE University of California, Berkeley Adaptive radiation- tions and convergence of species groups on different land masses. Since then, adaptive radiation has diversity within a rapidly multiplying lineage." There are radiations that are not adaptive

  15. Bile Duct (Cholangiocarcinoma) Cancer: Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer Next Topic Chemotherapy for bile duct cancer Radiation therapy for bile duct cancer Radiation therapy uses ... of radiation for bile duct cancer. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) This type of radiation therapy uses ...

  16. Radiation health research, 1986 - 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A collection of 225 abstracts of radiation research sponsored by NASA during the period 1986 through 1990 is reported. Each abstract was categorized within one of four discipline areas: physics, biology, risk assessment, and microgravity. Topic areas within each discipline were assigned as follows: Physics - atomic physics, nuclear science, space radiation, radiation transport and shielding, and instrumentation; Biology - molecular biology, cellular radiation biology, tissue, organs and organisms, radioprotectants, and plants; Risk assessment - radiation health and epidemiology, space flight radiation health physics, inter- and intraspecies extrapolation, and radiation limits and standards; and Microgravity. When applicable subareas were assigned for selected topic areas. Keywords and author indices are provided.

  17. Radiation in Particle Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    More, R; Graziani, F; Glosli, J; Surh, M

    2010-11-19

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of megabars to thousands of gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known. The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (planewaves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion. The third method is a hybrid molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo (MD/MC) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions. The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc. This approach is inspired by the virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Using a combination of these methods we believe it is possible to do atomic-scale particle simulations of fusion ignition plasmas including the important effects of radiation emission and absorption.

  18. Radiation delivery system and method

    DOEpatents

    Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

  19. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Braunlich, Peter F. (Pullman, WA); Tetzlaff, Wolfgang (Pullman, WA); Hegland, Joel E. (Pullman, WA); Jones, Scott C. (Pullman, WA)

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission.

  20. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

    1991-03-12

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

  1. Reducing Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenbecler, Richard

    2006-06-05

    This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

  2. Lunar radiator shade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewert, Michael K. (inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for rejecting waste heat from a system located on or near the lunar equator is presented. The system utilizes a reflective catenary shaped trough deployed about a vertical radiator to shade the radiator from heat emitted by the hot lunar surface. The catenary shaped trough is constructed from a film material and is aligned relative to the sun so that incoming solar energy is focused to a line just above the vertical radiator and can thereby isolate the radiator from the effects of direct sunlight. The film is in a collapsed position between side by side support rods, all of which are in a transport case. To deploy the film and support rods, a set of parallel tracks running perpendicular to length of the support rods are extended out from the transport case. After the support tracks are deployed, the support rods are positioned equidistant from each other along the length of the support tracks so that the flexible film shade between adjacent support rods is unfolded and hangs in a catenary shaped trough. A heat radiator is supported between each pair of support rods above each hanging reflective trough.

  3. Ionizing radiation and life.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis R

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a ubiquitous feature of the Cosmos, from exogenous cosmic rays (CR) to the intrinsic mineral radioactivity of a habitable world, and its influences on the emergence and persistence of life are wide-ranging and profound. Much attention has already been focused on the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation on organisms and the complex molecules of life, but ionizing radiation also performs many crucial functions in the generation of habitable planetary environments and the origins of life. This review surveys the role of CR and mineral radioactivity in star formation, generation of biogenic elements, and the synthesis of organic molecules and driving of prebiotic chemistry. Another major theme is the multiple layers of shielding of planetary surfaces from the flux of cosmic radiation and the various effects on a biosphere of violent but rare astrophysical events such as supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. The influences of CR can also be duplicitous, such as limiting the survival of surface life on Mars while potentially supporting a subsurface biosphere in the ocean of Europa. This review highlights the common thread that ionizing radiation forms between the disparate component disciplines of astrobiology. PMID:21774684

  4. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Phelps, J.E.

    1988-03-31

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

  5. Characteristics of synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1984-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is having a very significant impact on the many disciplines that make use of the radiation in the x-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, and infra-red regions of the spectrum. The rapidly increasing demand for beam time at existing facilities, the construction and commissioning of new facilities, and the world wide planning for future sources is clear testimony to the unique, interdisciplinary nature of the research applications. The nature of synchrotron radiation research continues to change and expand. This conference on the application of synchrotron radiation (SR) to polymer research illustrates that point. In this introductory paper it is impossible to cover in depth any of the applications. The intent, instead, is to give a brief, condensed summary of the properties of SR which have brought it to the fore as a research tool. No single source can provide the proper radiation for all applications. This paper should provide enough information and references to allow anyone contemplating a particular experiment to understand the widely varying parameters from different facilities, and thereby make some initial decisions concerning feasibility, and proper source. The NSLS will, in general, be used for illustration purposes since the conference is being held at Brookhaven where the attendees can get first hand familiarity with the facility.

  6. A Hybrid Godunov Method for Radiation Hydrodynamics

    E-print Network

    Sekora, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    From a mathematical perspective, radiation hydrodynamics can be thought of as a system of hyperbolic balance laws with dual multiscale behavior (multiscale behavior associated with the hyperbolic wave speeds as well as multiscale behavior associated with source term relaxation). With this outlook in mind, this paper presents a hybrid Godunov method for one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics that is uniformly well behaved from the photon free streaming (hyperbolic) limit through the weak equilibrium diffusion (parabolic) limit and to the strong equilibrium diffusion (hyperbolic) limit. Moreover, one finds that the technique preserves certain asymptotic limits. The method incorporates a backward Euler upwinding scheme for the radiation energy density and flux as well as a modified Godunov scheme for the material density, momentum density, and energy density. The backward Euler upwinding scheme is first-order accurate and uses an implicit HLLE flux function to temporally advance the radiation components accordi...

  7. Audible radiation monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Odell, D.M.C.

    1992-12-31

    This invention consists of a method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

  8. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-08-02

    A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

  9. Aerothermodynamic radiation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, K.; Reinecke, W. G.; Rossi, D.; Marinelli, W. J.; Krech, R. H.; Caledonia, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    We have built and made operational a 6 in. electric arc driven shock tube which alloys us to study the non-equilibrium radiation and kinetics of low pressure (0.1 to 1 torr) gases processed by 6 to 12 km/s shock waves. The diagnostic system allows simultaneous monitoring of shock radiation temporal histories by a bank of up to six radiometers, and spectral histories with two optical multi-channel analyzers. A data set of eight shots was assembled, comprising shocks in N2 and air at pressures between 0.1 and 1 torr and velocities of 6 to 12 km/s. Spectrally resolved data was taken in both the non-equilibrium and equilibrium shock regions on all shots. The present data appear to be the first spectrally resolved shock radiation measurements in N2 performed at 12 km/s. The data base was partially analyzed with salient features identified.

  10. Internal radiation attenuation system

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, E.B.

    1988-03-22

    This patent describes an internal radiation attenuation system for a radioactive environment having a substantially enclosed radioactive workspace having an internal configuration with at least one entrance portal. The workspace internal configuration has an upper wall or ceiling, side walls and a bottom wall, comprising: means for forming a frame for supporting radiation attenuation means to substantially conform to at least a portion of the inside of the workspace internal configuration. The frame means include interlocking segments, including means for assembling the segments into the frame means. The interlocking segments form a skeleton spaced around the periphery of the internal workspace, interlocked with one another. The frame means further include means for supporting the radiation attenuation means around at least a portion of the periphery of the internal workspace. The frame means skeleton form a free standing support structure standing and supported primarily by the bottom wall without vertical support from the ceiling.

  11. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.; Anspaugh, B. E.; Downing, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The handbook to predict the degradation of solar cell electrical performance in any given space radiation environment is presented. Solar cell theory, cell manufacturing and how they are modeled mathematically are described. The interaction of energetic charged particles radiation with solar cells is discussed and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence are presented.

  12. Radiation induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Ps, Satheesh Kumar; Balan, Anita; Sankar, Arun; Bose, Tinky

    2009-07-01

    PATIENTS RECEIVING RADIOTHERAPY OR CHEMOTHERAPY WILL RECEIVE SOME DEGREE OF ORAL MUCOSITIS THE INCIDENCE OF ORAL MUCOSITIS WAS ESPECIALLY HIGH IN PATIENTS: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene. PMID:20668585

  13. Uses of synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence has long been used as a technique for elemental analysis. X-ray fluorescence techniques have a number of features that make them attractive for application to biomedical samples. In the past few years synchrotron radiation x-ray sources have been developed and, because of their properties, their use can improve the sensitivity for trace element analysis by two to three orders of magnitude. Also, synchrotron radiation will make possible an x-ray microprobe with resolution in the micrometer range. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), a dedicated synchrotron radiation source recently built at Brookhaven National Laboratory, will have a facility for trace element analysis by x-ray fluorescence and will be available to all interested users.

  14. String radiative backreaction

    SciTech Connect

    Battye, R.A.; Shellard, E.P. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Silver Street, Cambridge, CB3 9EW (United Kingdom)] [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Silver Street, Cambridge, CB3 9EW (United Kingdom); [Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Clarkson Road, Cambridge CB3 0EH (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-01

    We discuss radiative backreaction for global strings described by the Kalb-Ramond action with an analogous derivation to that for the point electron in classical electrodynamics. We show how local corrections to the equations of motion allow one to separate the self-field of the string from that of the radiation field. Modifications to this {open_quote}{open_quote}local backreaction approximation{close_quote}{close_quote} circumvent the runaway solutions, allowing these corrections to be used to evolve string trajectories numerically. Comparisons are made with analytic and numerical radiation calculations from previous work and the merits and limitations of this approach are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1995 The American Physical Society.}

  15. SODA: Solar Radiation Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Solar Database, or SoDa, is described as an integration and exploitation of networked Solar radiation Databases for environment monitoring and as a project that aims to integrate European-wide solar radiation resources (i.e. databases, processing chains and educational resources) into one, thematically organized, Web site. The search tool allows users to search for data from a variety of sources including Long Term Time Series Data, Climatological Data, Simulation of Radiation Under Clear Skies Data, Solar Energy Systems Data, and much more. Once a particular set is located, the user can view a description of the source and contents of the data, as well as click on the provided links to access them.

  16. LDEF Satellite Radiation Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    This report covers work performed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) under contract NAS8-39386 from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center entitled LDEF Satellite Radiation Analyses. The basic objective of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of present models and computational methods for defining the ionizing radiation environment for spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) by making comparisons with radiation measurements made on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite, which was recovered after almost six years in space. The emphasis of the work here is on predictions and comparisons with LDEF measurements of induced radioactivity and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) measurements. These model/data comparisons have been used to evaluate the accuracy of current models for predicting the flux and directionality of trapped protons for LEO missions.

  17. Audible radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Odell, Daniel M. C. (11 Russellwood Ct., Aiken, SC 29803)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

  18. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Zane W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burger, Arnold (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-03-30

    A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

  19. Pediatric radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, E.C.; Kun, L.E.; Constine, L.S.; Tarbell, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    This text covers all aspects of radiation therapy for treatment of pediatric cancer. The book describes the proper use of irradiation in each of the malignancies of childhood, including tumors that are rarely encountered in adult practice. These include acute leukemia; supratentorial brain tumors; tumors of the posterior fossa of the brain and spinal canal; retinoblastoma and optic nerve glioma; neuroblastoma; Hodgkin's disease; malignant lymphoma; Ewing's sarcoma; osteosarcoma; rhabdomyosarcoma; Desmoid tumor; Wilms' tumor; liver and biliary tumors; germ cell and stromal cell tumors of the gonads; endocrine, aerodigestive tract, and breast tumors; Langerhans' cell histiocytosis; and skin cancer and hemangiomas. For each type of malignancy, the authors describe the epidemiology, common presenting signs and symptoms, staging, and proper diagnostic workup. Particular attention is given to the indications for radiation therapy and the planning of a course of radiotherapy, including the optimal radiation dose, field size, and technique.

  20. Solar radiation on Mars: Stationary photovoltaic array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Sherman, I.; Landis, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Solar energy is likely to be an important power source for surface-based operation on Mars. Photovoltaic cells offer many advantages. In this article we have presented analytical expressions and solar radiation data for stationary flat surfaces (horizontal and inclined) as a function of latitude, season and atmospheric dust load (optical depth). The diffuse component of the solar radiation on Mars can be significant, thus greatly affecting the optimal inclination angle of the photovoltaic surface.

  1. Solar radiation on Mars: Update 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Joseph; Flood, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed information on solar radiation characteristics on Mars are necessary for effective design of future planned solar energy systems operating on the surface of Mars. The authors present a procedure and solar radiation related data from which the diurnally and daily variation of the global, direct beam and diffuse insolation on Mars are calculated. The radiation data are based on measured optical depth of the Martian atmosphere derived from images taken of the Sun with a special diode on the Viking Lander cameras and computation based on multiple wavelength and multiple scattering of the solar radiation. This work is an update to NASA-TM-102299 and includes a refinement of the solar radiation model.

  2. Ocular temperature elevation induced by threshold in vivo exposure to 1090-nm infrared radiation and associated heat diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaohua; Schulmeister, Karl; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Kronschlger, Martin; Sderberg, Per G.

    2014-10-01

    An in vivo exposure to 197 W/cm2 1090-nm infrared radiation (IRR) requires a minimum 8 s for cataract induction. The present study aims to determine the ocular temperature evolution and the associated heat flow at the same exposure conditions. Two groups of 12 rats were unilaterally exposed within the dilated pupil with a close to collimated beam between lens and retina. Temperature was recorded with thermocouples. Within 5 min after exposure, the lens light scattering was measured. In one group, the temperature rise in the exposed eye, expressed as a confidence interval (0.95), was 113C at the limbus, 166C in the vitreous behind lens, and 167C on the sclera next to the optic nerve, respectively. In the other group, the temperature rise in the exposed eye was 91C at the limbus and 2611C on the sclera next to the optic nerve, respectively. The difference of forward light scattering between exposed and contralateral not exposed eye was 0.010.09 tEDC. An exposure to 197 W/cm2 1090-nm IRR for 8 s induces a temperature increase of 10C at the limbus and 26C close to the retina. IRR cataract is probably of thermal origin.

  3. Ocular temperature elevation induced by threshold in vivo exposure to 1090-nm infrared radiation and associated heat diffusion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhaohua; Schulmeister, Karl; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Kronschlger, Martin; Sderberg, Per G

    2014-01-01

    An in vivo exposure to 197??W/cm 2 1090-nm infrared radiation (IRR) requires a minimum 8 s for cataract induction. The present study aims to determine the ocular temperature evolution and the associated heat flow at the same exposure conditions. Two groups of 12 rats were unilaterally exposed within the dilated pupil with a close to collimated beam between lens and retina. Temperature was recorded with thermocouples. Within 5 min after exposure, the lens light scattering was measured. In one group, the temperature rise in the exposed eye, expressed as a confidence interval (0.95), was 113C at the limbus, 166C in the vitreous behind lens, and 167C on the sclera next to the optic nerve, respectively. In the other group, the temperature rise in the exposed eye was 91C at the limbus and 2611C on the sclera next to the optic nerve, respectively. The difference of forward light scattering between exposed and contralateral not exposed eye was 0.010.09 tEDC. An exposure to 197??W/cm 2 1090-nm IRR for 8 s induces a temperature increase of 10C at the limbus and 26C close to the retina. IRR cataract is probably of thermal origin. PMID:25321397

  4. Radiation-induced intradural malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the cauda equina with diffuse leptomeningeal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Lau, Darryl; Moon, Dominic H; Park, Paul; Hervey-Jumper, Shawn; McKeever, Paul E; Orringer, Daniel A

    2014-11-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are rare, affecting only a small portion of the general population. In many cases, MPNSTs occur in association with neurofibromatosis Type 1 and at times arise secondary to previous radiation therapy (RT). These tumors can be found essentially anywhere a peripheral nerve is present, but they rarely originate primarily from the spinal nerve or cauda equina and cause leptomeningeal spread. This report describes the treatment course of a 43-year-old man with a history of testicular seminoma treated with RT a decade before, who was found to have a large sacral MPNST. The patient underwent complete sacrectomy for gross-total resection. Despite this effort, he was eventually found to have metastatic lesions throughout the spine and brain, ultimately resulting in acute hydrocephalus and death. Biopsy results of these metastatic lesions proved to be characteristic of his original MPNST. The literature is also reviewed and the diagnostic modalities, management strategies, and prognosis of MPNST are discussed. PMID:25216401

  5. Testing spherical PDR models: Barnard 68 as example of an (almost) perfect spherical clump in the diffuse Galactic radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, J. L.; Bensch, F.

    2007-12-01

    We use the Barnard 68 dark globule as a test case for a spherically symmetric Photon-Dominated Region (PDR) model exposed to a low-FUV radiation field. With a roughly spherical morphology and an accurately determined density profile, Barnard 68 is ideal for this purpose. We compare the KOSMA-tau PDR model (Strzer et al. 1996) to observations of the lowest transition in 12CO, 13CO J = 3 -> 2 and J = 2 -> 1, as well as the [Ci] 3P1-3P0 fine-structure transition. The impact of CO depletion, PAHs in the chemical network, as well as variations in the external FUV field are studied. We find it difficult to simultaneously match the observed 12CO and 13CO emission. A model which match the observed [Ci] and 12CO observations gives 13CO intensities which are too large by a factor of 2-3. A steep drop in the line excitation seems to be required from the region traced by 12CO to the (somewhat deeper) layer traced by the 13CO, since depletion as the cause for the weak 13CO emission is ruled out.

  6. Radiation in Particle Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    More, R M; Graziani, F R; Glosli, J; Surh, M

    2009-06-15

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known (section 3). The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (plane-waves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion (section 4). The third method is a hybrid MD/MC (molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions (section 5). The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc.(section 6). This approach is inspired by the Virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  7. Saturn Radiation (SATRAD) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.; Ratliff, J. M.; Evans, R. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Saturnian radiation belts have not received as much attention as the Jovian radiation belts because they are not nearly as intense-the famous Saturnian particle rings tend to deplete the belts near where their peak would occur. As a result, there has not been a systematic development of engineering models of the Saturnian radiation environment for mission design. A primary exception is that of Divine (1990). That study used published data from several charged particle experiments aboard the Pioneer 1 1, Voyager 1, and Voyager 2 spacecraft during their flybys at Saturn to generate numerical models for the electron and proton radiation belts between 2.3 and 13 Saturn radii. The Divine Saturn radiation model described the electron distributions at energies between 0.04 and 10 MeV and the proton distributions at energies between 0.14 and 80 MeV. The model was intended to predict particle intensity, flux, and fluence for the Cassini orbiter. Divine carried out hand calculations using the model but never formally developed a computer program that could be used for general mission analyses. This report seeks to fill that void by formally developing a FORTRAN version of the model that can be used as a computer design tool for missions to Saturn that require estimates of the radiation environment around the planet. The results of that effort and the program listings are presented here along with comparisons with the original estimates carried out by Divine. In addition, Pioneer and Voyager data were scanned in from the original references and compared with the FORTRAN model s predictions. The results were statistically analyzed in a manner consistent with Divine s approach to provide estimates of the ability of the model to reproduce the original data. Results of a formal review of the model by a panel of experts are also presented. Their recommendations for further tests, analyses, and extensions to the model are discussed.

  8. Radiation Hazard Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA technology has made commercially available a new, inexpensive, conveniently-carried device for protection, of people exposed to potentially dangerous levels of microwave radiation. Microwaves are radio emissions of extremely high frequency. They can be hazardous but the degree of hazard is not yet well understood. Generally, it is believed that low intensity radiation of short duration is not harmful but that exposure to high levels can induce deep internal burns, affecting the circulatory and nervous systems, and particularly the eyes. The Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has established an allowable safe threshold of exposure. However, people working near high intensity sources of microwave energy-for example, radar antennas and television transmitters-may be unknowingly exposed to radiation levels beyond the safe limit. This poses not only a personal safety problem but also a problem for employers in terms of productivity loss, workman's compensation claims and possible liability litigation. Earlier-developed monitoring devices which warn personnel of dangerous radiation levels have their shortcomings. They can be cumbersome and awkward to use while working. They also require continual visual monitoring to determine if a person is in a dangerous area of radiation, and they are relatively expensive, another deterrent to their widespread adoption. In response to the need for a cheaper and more effective warning system, Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed, under NASA auspices, a new, battery-powered Microwave Radiation Hazard Detector. To bring the product to the commercial market, California Institute Research Foundation, the patent holder, granted an exclusive license to Cicoil Corporation, Chatsworth, California, an electronic components manufacturer.

  9. Small Active Radiation Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.

    2004-01-01

    A device, named small active radiation monitor, allows on-orbit evaluations during periods of increased radiation, after extravehicular activities, or at predesignated times for crews on such long-duration space missions as on the International Space Station. It also permits direct evaluation of biological doses, a task now performed using a combination of measurements and potentially inaccurate simulations. Indeed the new monitor can measure a full array of radiation levels, from soft x-rays to hard galactic cosmic-ray particles. With refinement, it will benefit commercial (nuclear power-plant workers, airline pilots, medical technicians, physicians/dentists, and others) and military personnel as well as the astronauts for whom thermoluminescent dosimeters are inadequate. Civilian and military personnel have long since graduated from film badges to thermoluminescent dosimeters. Once used, most dosimeters must be returned to a central facility for processing, a step that can take days or even weeks. While this suffices for radiation workers for whom exposure levels are typically very low and of brief duration, it does not work for astronauts. Even in emergencies and using express mail, the results can often be delayed by as much as 24 hours. Electronic dosimeters, which are the size of electronic oral thermometers, and tattlers, small electronic dosimeters that sound an alarm when the dose/dose rate exceeds preset values, are also used but suffer disadvantages similar to those of thermoluminescent dosimeters. None of these devices fully answers the need of rapid monitoring during the space missions. Instead, radiation is monitored by passive detectors, which are read out after the missions. Unfortunately, these detectors measure only the absorbed dose and not the biologically relevant dose equivalent. The new monitor provides a real-time readout, a time history of radiation exposures (both absorbed dose and biologically relevant dose equivalent), and a count of the number of particles passing through a unit area. Better still, the monitor can be used anywhere.

  10. Radiation Hydrodynamics in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hflich, Peter

    2005-07-01

    We discuss the current status of our hydrodynamical radiation (HYDRA) code for rapidly expanding, low-density envelopes commonly found in core collapse and thermonuclear supernovae. In supernovae, one of the main issues is the coupling between a radiation field and properties of the matter. Due to the low densities, nonthermal excitation by high-energy photons from radioactive decays and the time dependence of the problem, significant departures from local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE) are common throughout the envelope even at large optical depths. This effect must be taken into account to simulate the evolution of spectra and light curves which are the basic tools to link between explosion physics and observations.

  11. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  12. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  13. Tunable terahertz radiation source

    DOEpatents

    Boulaevskii, Lev; Feldmann, David M; Jia, Quanxi; Koshelev, Alexei; Moody, Nathan A

    2014-01-21

    Terahertz radiation source and method of producing terahertz radiation, said source comprising a junction stack, said junction stack comprising a crystalline material comprising a plurality of self-synchronized intrinsic Josephson junctions; an electrically conductive material in contact with two opposing sides of said crystalline material; and a substrate layer disposed upon at least a portion of both the crystalline material and the electrically-conductive material, wherein the crystalline material has a c-axis which is parallel to the substrate layer, and wherein the source emits at least 1 mW of power.

  14. Radiation Detectors and Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, Andrea

    The use of radiation detectors in the analysis of art objects represents a very special application in a true interdisciplinary field. Radiation detectors employed in this field detect, e.g., x-rays, ?-rays, ? particles, and protons. Analyzed materials range from stones, metals, over porcelain to paintings. The available nondestructive and noninvasive analytical methods cover a broad range of techniques. Hence, for the sake of brevity, this chapter will concentrate on few techniques: Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Proton Induced ?-ray Emission (PIGE).

  15. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Solar cell theory cells are manufactured, and how they are modeled mathematically is reviewed. The interaction of energetic charged particle radiation with solar cells is discussed in detail and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Finally, an extensive body of data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence is presented.

  16. LDEF Satellite Radiation Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Model calculations and analyses have been carried out to compare with several sets of data (dose, induced radioactivity in various experiment samples and spacecraft components, fission foil measurements, and LET spectra) from passive radiation dosimetry on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite, which was recovered after almost six years in space. The calculations and data comparisons are used to estimate the accuracy of current models and methods for predicting the ionizing radiation environment in low earth orbit. The emphasis is on checking the accuracy of trapped proton flux and anisotropy models.

  17. Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer 94 (2005) 357371

    E-print Network

    Coudière, Yves

    atmospheric entry of space objects, the effects of radiation are crucial and can tremendously modify. to compare various moments and (flux-limited) diffusion models. For the frequency behaviour, we use that solve the radiative transfer equation at a low cost. Among these models, we find diffusion, flux

  18. Radiation transport in dust in disk geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, Ming Leung

    1986-01-01

    The main objective of the research program is twofold: (1) to develop a computer code to solve the problem of scattering, absorption and emission of photons by dust grains in a dusty medium with 2 dimensional disk geometry, and (2) to study the various physical and geometrical effects of 2 dimensional radiation transport on the thermal structure and radiation field. These tasks were accomplished and are briefly summarized. The method for solving the radiation transport problem in disk geometry is a generalization of the quasi-diffusion method (QDM) previously developed by the author.

  19. Unruh radiation and Interference effect

    E-print Network

    Satoshi Iso; Yasuhiro Yamamoto; Sen Zhang

    2011-02-23

    A uniformly accelerated charged particle feels the vacuum as thermally excited and fluctuates around the classical trajectory. Then we may expect additional radiation besides the Larmor radiation. It is called Unruh radiation. In this report, we review the calculation of the Unruh radiation with an emphasis on the interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the radiation from the fluctuating motion. Our calculation is based on a stochastic treatment of the particle under a uniform acceleration. The basics of the stochastic equation are reviewed in another report in the same proceeding. In this report, we mainly discuss the radiation and the interference effect.

  20. Multimodal imaging of tumor response to sorafenib combined with radiation therapy: comparison between diffusion-weighted MRI, choline spectroscopy and 18F-FLT PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Karroum, Oussama; Mignion, Lionel; Kengen, Julie; Karmani, Linda; Levque, Philippe; Danhier, Pierre; Magat, Julie; Bol, Anne; Labar, Daniel; Grgoire, Vincent; Bouzin, Caroline; Feron, Olivier; Gallez, Bernard; Jordan, Bndicte F

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the value of different imaging modalities, that is, magnetic resonance imaging/spectroscopy (MRI/MRS) and positron emission tomography (PET), to assess early tumor response to sorafenib with or without radiotherapy. Diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI, choline (1)H MRS at 11.7 T, and (18)F-FLT PET imaging were used to image fibrosarcoma (FSaII) tumor-bearing mice over time. The imaging markers were compared with apoptosis cell death and cell proliferation measurements assessed by histology. Anti-proliferative effects of sorafenib were evidenced by (1)H MRS and (18)F-FLT PET after 2 days of treatment with sorafenib, with no additional effect of the combination with radiation therapy, results that are in agreement with Ki67 staining. Apparent diffusion coefficient calculated using DW-MRI was not modified after 2 days of treatment with sorafenib, but showed significant increase 24 h after 2 days of sorafenib treatment combined with consecutive irradiation. The three imaging markers were able to show early tumor response as soon as 24 h after treatment initiation, with choline MRS and (18)F-FLT being sensitive to sorafenib in monotherapy as well as in combined therapy with irradiation, whereas DW-MRI was only sensitive to the combination of sorafenib with radiotherapy. PMID:23606431

  1. Thermostatic Radiator Valve Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Dentz, Jordan [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, Eric [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A large stock of multifamily buildings in the Northeast and Midwest are heated by steam distribution systems. Losses from these systems are typically high and a significant number of apartments are overheated much of the time. Thermostatically controlled radiator valves (TRVs) are one potential strategy to combat this problem, but have not been widely accepted by the residential retrofit market.

  2. RADIATION ALERT User Manual

    E-print Network

    Haller, Gary L.

    ." The Inspector counts ionizing events and displays the results on the liquid crystal display (LCD). You control Introduction 4 How the Inspector Detects Radiation 4 Precautions 4 2 Features 5 The Display 6 The Switches 7 Up 10 Display Update 10 Maximum Level 10 Response Time (Autoaveraging) 11 Operating in Dose Rate

  3. Radiation belts of Jupiter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Fillius; C. E. McIlwain

    1974-01-01

    Pioneer 10 courted relativistic electrons throughout the magnetosphere ; of Jupiter, with the greatest fluxes being inside 20 Jupiter radii. The peak ; flux of electrons with energy greater than 50 MeV was 1.3 x 107 per square ; centimeter per second at the innermost penetration of the radiation belts. ; (auth);

  4. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

    1985-04-09

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  5. RADIATION CHEMISTRY OF GASES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Harteck; S. Dondes

    1958-01-01

    The kinetic radiation equilibrium has only been obtained with two ; systems, nitrogen-oxygen, and carbon dioxide. In the case of the nitrogen--; oxygen system, the end results are nitrogen oxygen, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrous ; oxide, regardless of the initial material. Thus. if nitrous oxide or a 86.33 ; mixture of nitrogen to oxygen is the starting material, the concentrations

  6. ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION MEASUREMENT PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ARM scientists focus on obtaining field measurements and developing models to better understand the processes that control solar and...

  7. Local microwave background radiation

    E-print Network

    Domingos Soares

    2014-11-13

    An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

  8. Ionizing radiation from tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Westin, J.B.

    1987-04-24

    Accidents at nuclear power facilities seem inevitably to bring in their wake a great deal of concern on the part of both the lay and medical communities. Relatively little attention, however, is given to what may be the largest single worldwide source of effectively carcinogenic ionizing radiation: tobacco. The risk of cancer deaths from the Chernobyl disaster are tobacco smoke is discussed.

  9. Surface Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackhouse, Paul W. (Principal Investigator)

    The Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) data sets contain global 3-hourly, daily and monthly averages of surface longwave and shortwave radiative properties, cloud amount, and meteorological properties computed using models. The main input data for these models include cloud information, top-of-atmosphere radiances and profiles of atmospheric water vapor and temperature. Some of the input data include Earth Radiation Budget Energy (ERBE) top-of-atmosphere clear-sky albedo and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) radiances and cloud amount. SRB parameters derived for the renewable energy community are also available from the Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) data set. Other SRB data are available from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). [Mission Objectives] The objective of the SRB Project is to produce and archive a global data set of shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) surface and top of the atmosphere parameters. The data generated in the SRB project may be used in conjunction with other data sets to facilitate the development of renewable energy resources and increase understanding of radiative properties within the meteorological community. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1983-07-01; Stop_Date=2005-06-30] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180].

  10. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Crowell, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  11. Radiation Protection Basics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have been contaminated or used for disposal of radioactive material. We also account for the shielding provided by buildings for a person working or living at a site that has been cleaned up. Health Effects This page describes the effects of radiation exposure.

  12. Photothermal solar radiation collectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Koltun; V. P. Matveev; I. P. Gavrilova

    1980-01-01

    The optical and energy characteristics of several types of photothermal combined solar radiation collectors are compared. Both steady-state and transient regimes are considered. The models evaluated are a flat collector and two types of evacuated tube collectors. Values are also derived for the heat-loss coefficient of each model. Computational and experimental results are compared. The most effective construction is found

  13. Radiations from hot nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, F. Bary

    1993-01-01

    The investigation indicates that nuclei with excitation energy of a few hundred MeV to BeV are more likely to radiate hot nuclear clusters than neutrons. These daughter clusters could, furthermore, de-excite emitting other hot nuclei, and the chain continues until these nuclei cool off sufficiently to evaporate primarily neutrons. A few GeV excited nuclei could radiate elementary particles preferentially over neutrons. Impact of space radiation with materials (for example, spacecraft) produces highly excited nuclei which cool down emitting electromagnetic and particle radiations. At a few MeV excitation energy, neutron emission becomes more dominant than gamma-ray emission and one often attributes the cooling to take place by successive neutron decay. However, a recent experiment studying the cooling process of 396 MeV excited Hg-190 casts some doubt on this thinking, and the purpose of this investigation is to explore the possibility of other types of nuclear emission which might out-compete with neutron evaporation.

  14. VDT Emissions Radiate Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Bill

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the possible health effects of electromagnetic fields of radiation that are emitted from video display terminals (VDTs). Responses from vendors in the computer industry are related, steps to reduce possible risks are suggested, and additional sources of information on VDTs are listed. (LRW)

  15. Transition radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boris Dolgoshein

    1993-01-01

    The use of transition radiation (TR) as a means of identifying high energy particles has now become a subject of intensive experimental investigations and applications. Our intention is first to study the physics of these phenomena and to describe ways of building detectors which can efficiently identify particles.

  16. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, D.C.

    1980-12-17

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  17. Compound semiconductor radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Owens; A. Peacock

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the potential benefits of using compound semiconductors for the detection of X- and ?-ray radiation. While Si and Ge have become detection standards for energy dispersive spectroscopy in the laboratory, their use for an increasing range of applications is becoming marginalized by one or more of their physical limitations; namely the need for ancillary cooling systems or bulky

  18. Nuclear Radiation Detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. A. Morton

    1962-01-01

    Nuclear radiation detectors are required in all the major fields of nuclear science and technology. They fall into two principal categories, single element detectors and imaging detectors. Single element detectors can be classified into four types, based upon their physical mode of operation. These are 1) Scintillation counters, 2) Gas ionization detectors, a) Ionization chambers, b) Proportional counters, c) Geiger-Mueller

  19. Radiation penetration test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kannoo

    1973-01-01

    Radiation penetration tests are one of the nondestructive testing ; methods which are employed as a method of detecting internal defects with ; ultrasonic flaw detection. Of these, radiography is the most widely used method ; for defect detection, which produces two dimensional images of defects on x-ray ; films. Experimental investigations have been carried out for the defects to

  20. Acute radiation risk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Olga

    Biologically motivated mathematical models, which describe the dynamics of the major hematopoietic lineages (the thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems) in acutely/chronically irradiated humans are developed. These models are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations, which variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning. It is shown that the developed models are capable of reproducing clinical data on the dynamics of these systems in humans exposed to acute radiation in the result of incidents and accidents, as well as in humans exposed to low-level chronic radiation. Moreover, the averaged value of the "lethal" dose rates of chronic irradiation evaluated within models of these four major hematopoietic lineages coincides with the real minimal dose rate of lethal chronic irradiation. The demonstrated ability of the models of the human thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems to predict the dynamical response of these systems to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates implies that these mathematical models form an universal tool for the investigation and prediction of the dynamics of the major human hematopoietic lineages for a vast pattern of irradiation scenarios. In particular, these models could be applied for the radiation risk assessment for health of astronauts exposed to space radiation during long-term space missions, such as voyages to Mars or Lunar colonies, as well as for health of people exposed to acute/chronic irradiation due to environmental radiological events.

  1. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  2. Nuclear Radiation Damages Minds!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Professors Ernest Sternglass (University of Pittsburgh) and Steven Bell (Berry College) have assembled cogent, conclusive evidence indicating that nuclear radiation is associated with impaired cognition. They suggest that Scholastic Aptitude Scores (SATs), which have declined steadily for 19 years, will begin to rise. Their prediction is based on

  3. Psoriasis and ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farber, E.M.; Nall, L. (Psoriasis Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Prevention and detection screening programs as a public health service in curtailing the ever-increasing incidence of all forms of skin cancer are reviewed. The effect of solar and artificial ultraviolet radiation on the general population and persons with psoriasis is examined. 54 refs.

  4. Paradoxes of Thermal Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besson, U.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the thermal behaviour of objects exposed to a solar-type flux of thermal radiation. It aims to clarify certain apparent inconsistencies between theory and observation, and to give a detailed exposition of some critical points that physics textbooks usually treat in an insufficient or incorrect way. In particular,

  5. Continuum radiation at Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, W.S.; Gurnett, D.A. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)); Desch, M.D. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States))

    1990-02-01

    Uranus has proven to be a radio source of remarkable complexity with as many as six distinctly different types of emission. One Uranian radio emission which has thus far escaped attention is an analog of continuum radiation at Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn. The emission is found to be propagating in the ordinary mode in the range of one to a few kHz on the inbound leg of the Voyager 2 encounter, shortly after the magnetopause crossing. The continuum radiation spectrum at Uranus also includes bands with frequencies as high as 12 kHz or greater on both the inbound and outbound legs. The Uranian continuum radiation is notably weak, making it more like that detected at Saturn than the extremely intense Jovian continuum radiation. The Uranian emission shows some evidence for narrow-band components lying in the same frequency regime as the continuum, completing the analogy with the other planets, which also show narrow-band components superimposed on the continuum spectrum. The authors argue that the low intensity of the Uranian continuum is most likely related to the lack of a density cavity within the Uranian magnetosphere that is deep relative to the solar wind plasma density.

  6. Foundations of radiation hydrodynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Mihalas; B. W. Mihalas

    1984-01-01

    This book is the result of an attempt, over the past few years, to gather the basic tools required to do research on radiating flows in astrophysics. The microphysics of gases is discussed, taking into account the equation of state of a perfect gas, the first and second law of thermodynamics, the thermal properties of a perfect gas, the distribution

  7. Thermodynamics of Radiation Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, Eduardo; de la Selva, Sara Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium thermodynamics of the electromagnetic radiation in a cavity of a given volume and temperature. We found three levels of description, the thermodynamics of one mode, the thermodynamics of the distribution of frequencies in a band by summing over the frequencies in it and the global thermodynamics by summing over all the

  8. Gravitational radiation and relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.; Karade, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents papers on general relativity and the theory of gravitational fields. Topics considered include gravitational antennas, the structure of the terrestrial planets and tidal friction theory, physical symmetry groups, gravitational collapse, rotation, the Hubble diagram, the problems of cosmology, electromagnetic radiation, and coordinate transformations.

  9. Cosmic microwave background radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lyman Page; David Wilkinson

    1999-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) is widely interpreted as the thermal afterglow of a hot big bang. Measurements of the CMBR intensity as a function of frequency constrain the history of cosmic energetics. Measurements of the anisotropy in the CMBR temperature provide a snapshot of the distribution of fluctuations in the gravitational potential at the earliest stages of cosmic

  10. Shield against radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Grifoni, S.

    1988-02-23

    This patent describes a shield against ionizing radiations that comprises at least one layer of an aggregate-containing cement-based conglomerate or an aggregate-containing cement-based mortar wherein the aggregate consists essentially of floated galena or mixtures thereof which at least one boron mineral.

  11. Radiation injury of bone

    SciTech Connect

    Shimanovskaya, K.; Shiman, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the characteristics of radiation injuries arising in hitherto unaffected parts of the skeleton during the treatment of neoplasms by radiotherapy. These changes frequently accompany the beneficial effects of radiotherapy, and can easily be misunderstood in the absence of any clear idea of their character. An understanding of the mechanism and conditions of appearance of radiation injuries of the skeleton and a knowledge of their clinical and radiological features are essential for physicians and surgeons caring for patients who have been treated by using radiotherapy and for experimental scientists whose work involves such methods. The effect of irradiation is determined by the topographical relations within the irradiated object, the character of distribution of the dose, and the size of the dose. The radiation injuries of the skeleton described in the book were observed during the treatment of carcinoma of the breast, lung, esophagus, and uterus, of malignant tumors in the mouth, certain pituitary tumors, and hemangiomas of the skin in children, by means of ionizing radiation obtained from various sources. A few observations relate to patients treated for certain other diseases. The text is illustrated by roentgenograms on the basis of which the diagnoses were made and the course of the lesion was subsequently confirmed, and also by operative and histological specimens. The book also contains many schemes drawn from roentgenograms.

  12. Verification of the Radiation Package in ALEGRA

    SciTech Connect

    Budge, K.G.

    1999-04-01

    The ALEGRA radiation transport package implements diffusion, flux-limited diffusion, and SPn radiation transport for both gray and multigroup photon spectra. Comparisons of ALEGRA calculations with known solutions for a selection of benchmark problems for these transport theories are presented. ALEGRA returns accurate solutions in each case. This verifies that each transport theory has been implemented correctly, though it does not prove that the transport theories are valid for problems of interest at Sandia. A validation study will be presented in a future report.

  13. Corrected long wave radiation budget of the Earth, discussion of solar radiation budget and simulations of Earth's radiative temperature as a function of carbon dioxide quantity and other factors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrzej Zastawny

    Summary On the base of articles Zastawny (2004) and Zastawny (2006), a corrected, long wave radiation budget of the Earth is presented. Considering the diffusive character of long wave radiation transport, the large difference between the effective coefficient of absorption of long wave radiation calculated in first work from the radiation budget, and the one calculated in the second work

  14. Radiation therapy: posterior segment complications.

    PubMed

    Seregard, Stefan; Pelayes, David E; Singh, Arun D

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic radiation to the posterior segment of the eye is a common option for posterior segment tumors. Such tumors are often malignant, but sometimes, benign neoplasms are treated with ionizing radiation. Also, non-neoplastic intraocular lesions like wet age-related macular degeneration may be treated with radiotherapy. Orbital disease, both neoplastic lesions like optic nerve sheath meningioma and non-neoplastic entities like Graves' ophthalmopathy may be treated with radiotherapy and this may include radiation of the optic nerve and posterior segment of the eye. Occasionally, radiotherapy of extraocular malignant disease, involving, e.g. the paranasal sinuses, may cause significant radiation damage to the eye. Complications after radiation to the posterior segment of the eye are largely related to the radiation dose to the posterior segment. The amount of irradiated volume of normal tissue and fractionation are also important for the development of radiation complications to the posterior segment. Radiation retinopathy is the most common complication of the posterior segment, but radiation optic neuropathy also occurs frequently. Radiation scleral necrosis is less frequent probably due to the radioresistance of the scleral collagen. These complications have the potential to cause blindness (radiation retinopathy and optic neuropathy) or enucleation of the eye (scleral necrosis). Although numerous treatments have been advocated, management of radiation-induced damage remains controversial. Efficacy for any treatment still needs to be proven and, if possible, the best option by far is to minimize radiation changes to normal tissue. PMID:23989132

  15. Radiation proteomics: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Leszczynski, Dariusz

    2014-03-01

    Acute biological effects caused by the exposure to high doses of radiation, either ionizing or nonionizing, are relatively well-known but the delayed effects, occurring decades after exposure, are difficult to predict. The knowledge of the acute and delayed effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation (e.g. bystander effect) or nonionizing radiation (e.g. radiation emitted by wireless communication devices) is not yet reliably established. Often the acute effects of low doses are small and difficult to discover and replicate in scientific studies. Chronic effects of prolonged exposures to low-dose radiation for decades are virtually unknown and often not possible to predict on the basis of the knowledge gained from acute exposures to high doses of radiation. Physiological significance of the biological effects induced by low doses of radiation is not known. The same lack of predictability of outcomes applies to the delayed effects of high-dose radiation exposures. Proteomics, supplemented with other "omics" techniques, might be the best way forward to find out the target molecules of radiation, the biomarkers of radiation exposure and the physiological and health significance of the acute and delayed biological effects caused by the exposures to high- and low-dose radiation. However, the currently available database of radiation effects on proteomes is far too small to be useful in formulation of new hypotheses concerning health consequences of radiation exposures. PMID:24376023

  16. DCTD Radiation Research Program (RRP)

    Cancer.gov

    Of the many successful programs within the RRP grant and contract portfolio, several scientific advances are presented below, representing significant advances in treatment development, molecular radiation therapy, quality assurance for high-technology radiation therapy, and international networking.

  17. RADIATION ENVIRONMENT OF GROWTH CHAMBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiation measurements with different types of meters in several controlled environment facilities have been compiled to demonstrate the problems associated with insuring uniform radiation levels in separate facilities. Data are provided for a quantum meter, three photometers, a ...

  18. Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Typically, radiation therapy is done with high energy X-rays, or photons, for the bulk of the treatment. Diff erent techniques can be used for treatment. Three- dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-D CRT) combines multi- ple radiation treatment ...

  19. Acceleration and Classical Electromagnetic Radiation

    E-print Network

    E. N. Glass

    2008-01-09

    Classical radiation from an accelerated charge is reviewed along with the reciprocal topic of accelerated observers detecting radiation from a static charge. This review commemerates Bahram Mashhoon's 60th birthday.

  20. Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

  1. RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND

    E-print Network

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND College Park, Maryland Revised May 2001 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS FORWARD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.3.4.2. University of Maryland Personnel Visiting Other Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2

  2. Simple device measures solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Simple inexpensive thermometer, insolated from surroundings by transparent glass or plastic encasement, measures intensities of solar radiation, or radiation from other sources such as furnaces or ovens. Unit can be further modified to accomplish readings from remote locations.

  3. Doses from Medical Radiation Sources

    MedlinePLUS

    ... settings of the machine used to produce the radiation, in nuclear medicine on the amount of activity administered and ... and magnitude of occupational and public exposures from nuclear medicine ... Radiation Protection and Measurements; NCRP Report 124; 1996. United ...

  4. Involved Field Radiation After Autologous Stem Cell Transplant for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma in the Rituximab Era

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Tithi; Dhakal, Sughosh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Chen Rui; Hyrien, Ollivier [Department of Biostatistics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Bernstein, Steven; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Fisher, Richard I.; Liesveld, Jane; Phillips, Gordon [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Constine, Louis S., E-mail: louis_constine@urmc.rochester.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: For patients with recurrent or refractory large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) is the treatment of choice. We evaluated the role of involved field radiation therapy (IFRT) post-ASCT for patients initially induced with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) or, more recently, rituximab-CHOP (R-CHOP). Materials and Methods: Between May 1992 and April 2005, 176 patients underwent ASCT for recurrent or refractory large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; 164 patients were evaluable for endpoint analysis. Fifty percent of the CHOP group (n = 131), and 39% of the R-CHOP group (n = 33), received IFRT. Follow-up from the time of transplant was a median/mean of 1.7/3 years (range, 0.03-13 years). Results: The 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) improved with IFRT in both the R-CHOP (p = 0.006 and 0.02, respectively) and CHOP (p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively) groups. IFRT was associated with a 10% (p = 0.17) reduction in local failure, alone or with a distant site. On univariate analysis, IFRT was associated with superior OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.50 [95% CI 0.32, 0.78]; p = 0.002) and DSS (HR = 0.53 [95% CI 0.33, 0.86]; p = 0.009). Presence of B symptoms was adverse (p = 0.03). On multivariate analysis, only IFRT was associated with significant improvement in OS (HR = 0.35 [0.18, 0.68]; p = 0.002) and DSS (HR = 0.39 [95% CI 0.18, 0.84]; p = 0.01). Conclusions: Recognizing that positive and negative patient selection bias exists for the use of IFRT post-ASCT, patients initially treated with CHOP or R-CHOP and who undergo ASCT for recurrent or refractory disease may benefit from subsequent IFRT presumably due to enhanced local control that can translate into a survival advantage.

  5. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  6. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  7. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  8. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  9. Microscopic observation of lateral diffusion at Si-SiO 2 interface by photoelectron emission microscopy using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirao, N.; Baba, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Shimoyama, I.; Honda, M.

    2011-11-01

    The lateral surface diffusion at Si-SiO2 interface has been observed at nanometer scale using photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) combined with synchrotron soft X-ray excitation. The samples investigated were Si-SiOx micro-patterns prepared by O2+ ion implantation in Si (0 0 1) wafer using a mask. The lateral spacial resolution of the PEEM system was about 41 nm. The brightness of each spot in the PEEM images changed depending on the photon energy around the Si K-edge, in proportion to the X-ray absorption intensity of the corresponding valence states. It was found that the lateral diffusion occurs by 400-450 C lower temperature than that reported for the longitudinal diffusion at the Si-SiO2 interface. It was also found that no intermediate valence states such as SiO (Si2+) exist at the Si-SiO2 interface during the diffusion. The observed differences between lateral and longitudinal diffusion are interpreted by the sublimated property of silicon monoxide (SiO).

  10. Multiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation Response Effects of Radiation Quality and HypoxiaEffects of Radiation Quality and Hypoxia

    E-print Network

    Stewart, Robert D.

    Multiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation Response Effects of Radiation Quality and HypoxiaEffects of Radiation Quality and Hypoxia Robert D. Stewart, Ph.D.Robert D. Stewart, Ph

  11. Radiation effect on implanted pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Pourhamidi, A.H.

    1983-10-01

    It was previously thought that diagnostic or therapeutic ionizing radiation did not have an adverse effect on the function of cardiac pacemakers. Recently, however, some authors have reported damaging effect of therapeutic radiation on cardiac pulse generators. An analysis of a recently-extracted pacemaker documented the effect of radiation on the pacemaker pulse generator.

  12. Prevention of pelvic radiation disease.

    PubMed

    Fuccio, Lorenzo; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Guido, Alessandra

    2015-02-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide. Treatment of patients requires a multidisciplinary approach that frequently includes radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity is a major complication and the transient or long-term problems, ranging from mild to very severe, arising in non-cancerous tissues resulting from radiation treatment to a tumor of pelvic origin, are actually called as pelvic radiation disease. The incidence of pelvic radiation disease changes according to the radiation technique, the length of follow up, the assessment method, the type and stage of cancer and several other variables. Notably, even with the most recent radiation techniques, i.e., intensity-modulated radiotherapy, the incidence of radiation-induced GI side effects is overall reduced but still not negligible. In addition, radiation-induced GI side effects can develop even after several decades; therefore, the improvement of patient life expectancy will unavoidably increase the risk of developing radiation-induced complications. Once developed, the management of pelvic radiation disease may be challenging. Therefore, the prevention of radiation-induced toxicity represents a reasonable way to avoid a dramatic drop of the quality of life of these patients. In the current manuscript we provide an updated and practical review on the best available evidences in the field of the prevention of pelvic radiation disease. PMID:25664197

  13. Future status of radiation breeding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tanaka

    1973-01-01

    The induction of artifical mutations by radiation and its utilization ; for radiation breeding are discussed. There are external and internal ; irradiation methods to induce mutations by radiation. The former method has the ; advantage of good reproducibility and occupies the main current. In the latter ; method, the rate of mutation per rate of dose unit is high

  14. Spectroscopy Interaction of electromagnetic radiation

    E-print Network

    Gerwert, Klaus

    Spectroscopy 691 Interaction of electromagnetic radiation with atoms or molecules #12;Bacteriorhodopsin: a light-driven proton pump 486 #12;Electromagnetic Radiation 692 harmonic wave (Maxwell): y;Spectroscopy 691 Interaction of electromagnetic radiation with atoms or molecules two processes: emission

  15. Prevention of pelvic radiation disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuccio, Lorenzo; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Guido, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide. Treatment of patients requires a multidisciplinary approach that frequently includes radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity is a major complication and the transient or long-term problems, ranging from mild to very severe, arising in non-cancerous tissues resulting from radiation treatment to a tumor of pelvic origin, are actually called as pelvic radiation disease. The incidence of pelvic radiation disease changes according to the radiation technique, the length of follow up, the assessment method, the type and stage of cancer and several other variables. Notably, even with the most recent radiation techniques, i.e., intensity-modulated radiotherapy, the incidence of radiation-induced GI side effects is overall reduced but still not negligible. In addition, radiation-induced GI side effects can develop even after several decades; therefore, the improvement of patient life expectancy will unavoidably increase the risk of developing radiation-induced complications. Once developed, the management of pelvic radiation disease may be challenging. Therefore, the prevention of radiation-induced toxicity represents a reasonable way to avoid a dramatic drop of the quality of life of these patients. In the current manuscript we provide an updated and practical review on the best available evidences in the field of the prevention of pelvic radiation disease. PMID:25664197

  16. Radiation and Health Thormod Henriksen

    E-print Network

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    Radiation and Health by Thormod Henriksen and Biophysics group at UiO #12;Preface The present book. The address is: http://www.mn.uio.no/fysikk/tjenester/kunnskap/straling/ III. Radiation and Health Written of ionizing radiation. Efforts were made to describe the background ra- diation as well as the release

  17. Radiation Therapy Technology Professional Curriculum

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Radiation Therapy Technology Professional Curriculum Fall Semester RT 3000 Concepts of Clinical Care RT 3010 Introductory Radiation Physics RT 3310 Clinical Practicum I RT 3110 Clinical Aspects of Radiation Therapy Semester Total Credits 12 Winter Semester RT 5650 Pathophysiology for Health Sciences RT

  18. Radiation Protection Guidance Hospital Staff

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Page 1 Radiation Protection Guidance For Hospital Staff Prepared for Stanford The privilege to use ionizing radiation at Stanford University, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Lucile Packard with radioactive materials or radiation devices are responsible for knowing and adhering to applicable requirements

  19. Modelling radiative mean absorption coefficients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J.-F. Ripoll; B. Dubroca; G. Duffa

    2001-01-01

    We define and compute mean absorption coefficients for the macroscopic models of radiative transfer. These coefficients take into account the anisotropic form of the photon emission and lead to a better computation of a photonic flow far from the radiative equilibrium. They are deduced by averaging a specific radiative intensity on the space of frequency and are generalized versions of

  20. Diffusion-weighted imaging of local recurrent prostate cancer after radiation therapy: comparison with 22-core three-dimensional prostate mapping biopsy.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toshimasa; Inoue, Yusuke; Satoh, Takefumi; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Sakamoto, Satoko; Woodhams, Reiko; Baba, Shiro; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2012-10-01

    Accurate localization of local recurrence within the prostate gland is important to perform focal salvage therapy effectively with minimal complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the detection and localization of prostate cancer recurrence in patients with biochemical failure after definitive radiation therapy using 22-core three-dimensional prostate mapping biopsy (3D-PMB) as a standard reference. Ten patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging and 22-core 3D-PMB were retrospectively analyzed. For visual assessment of DWI, the prostate was divided into 22 regions corresponding to 3D-PMB. Two diagnostic radiologists determined the presence of abnormal high signal intensity in each region on DWI, and the results of DWI were compared with those of 3D-PMB. Of the 220 regions, 16 regions in six patients were positive for cancer on 3D-PMB, and 30 regions in six patients were judged as positive on DWI. On a patient-by-patient basis, sensitivity and specificity were 100% (6/6) and 100% (4/4), respectively. On a region-by-region basis, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy were 69% (11/16), 91% (185/204), 37% (11/30), 97% (185/190) and 89% (196/220), respectively. For discrepant localization between DWI and pathology, DWI-positive and pathology-positive regions tended to be adjacent to each other. In conclusion, DWI is a useful tool for the detection and localization of recurrent prostate cancer in patients with biochemical failure after radiation therapy and may be helpful in the planning of focal salvage therapy. PMID:22819584