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1

Radiative flux measurements in the troposphere  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of radiative flux-density measurements in the troposphere, made using an especially designed radiometer mounted on a Cessna 402B aircraft, are reported. The radiometer incorporates several well-known principles that result in highly accurate determinations of radiative fluxes in the atmosphere. Heating rates for gases and for aerosols are calculated, using measurements and radiosonde data. Instrument performance is verified by

Francisco P. J. Valero; Warren J. Y. Gore; Lawrence P. M. Giver

1982-01-01

2

Design of a differential radiometer for atmospheric radiative flux measurements  

SciTech Connect

The Hemispherical Optimized NEt Radiometer (HONER) is an instrument under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for deployment on an unmanned aerospace vehicle as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM/UAV) program. HONER is a differential radiometer which will measure the difference between the total upwelling and downwelling fluxes and is intended to provide a means of measuring the atmospheric radiative flux divergence. Unlike existing instruments which measure the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately, HONER will achieve an optical difference by chopping the two fluxes alternately onto a common pyroelectric detector. HONER will provide data resolved into two spectral bands; one covering the solar dominated region from less than 0.4 micrometer to approximately 4.5 micrometers and the other covering the region from approximately 4.5 micrometers to greater than 50 micrometers, dominated by thermal radiation. The means of separating the spectral regions guarantees seamless summation to calculate the total flux. The fields-of-view are near-hemispherical, upward and downward. The instrument can be converted, in flight, from the differential mode to absolute mode, measuring the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately and simultaneously. The instrument also features continuous calibration from on-board sources. We will describe the design and operation of the sensor head and the on-board reference sources as well as the means of deployment.

LaDelfe, P.C.; Weber, P.G.; Rodriguez, C.W.

1994-11-01

3

Galileo probe measurements of thermal and solar radiation fluxes in the Jovian atmosphere  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Galileo probe net flux radiometer (NFR) measured radiation fluxes in Jupiter's atmosphere from about 0.44 to 14 bars, using five spectral channels to separate solar and thermal components. Onboard calibration results confirm that the NFR responded to radiation approximately as expected. NFR channels also responded to a superimposed thermal perturbation, which can be approximately removed using blind channel measurements

L. A. Sromovsky; A. D. Collard; P. M. Fry; G. S. Orton; M. T. Lemmon; M. G. Tomasko; R. S. Freedman

1998-01-01

4

Comparison of measured and modeled radiation, heat and water vapor fluxes: FIFE pilot study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility of using radio frequency receivers to collect data from automated weather stations to model fluxes of latent heat, sensible heat, and radiation using routine weather data collected by automated weather stations was tested and the estimated fluxes were compared with fluxes measured over wheat. The model Cupid was used to model the fluxes. Two or more automated weather stations, interrogated by radio frequency and other means, were utilized to examine some of the climatic variability of the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land-Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment (FIFE) site, to measure and model reflected and emitted radiation streams from various locations at the site and to compare modeled latent and sensible heat fluxes with measured values. Some bidirectional reflected and emitted radiation data were collected from 23 locations throughout the FIFE site. Analysis of these data along with analysis of the measured sensible and latent heat fluxes is just beginning.

Blad, Blaine L.; Hubbard, Kenneth G.; Verma, Shashi B.; Starks, Patrick; Norman, John M.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth

1987-01-01

5

Radiative Flux Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

Long, Chuck [NOAA

2008-05-14

6

Measuring and modeling near surface reflected and emitted radiation fluxes at the FIFE site  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research was conducted during the four Intensive Field Campaigns (IFC) of the FIFE project in 1987. The research was done on a tall grass prairie with specific measurement sites on and near the Konza Prairie in Kansas. Measurements were made to help meet the following objectives: determination of the variability in reflected and emitted radiation fluxes in selected spectral wavebands as a function of topography and vegetative community; development of techniques to account for slope and sun angle effects on the radiation fluxes; estimation of shortwave albedo and net radiation fluxes using the reflected and emitted spectral measurements described; estimation of leaf and canopy spectral properties from calculated normalized differences coupled with off-nadir measurements using inversion techniques; estimation of plant water status at several locations with indices utilizing plant temperature and other environmental parameters; and determination of relationships between estimated plant water status and measured soil water content. Results are discussed.

Blad, Blaine L.; Norman, John M.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth; Starks, Patrick; Vining, Roel; Hays, Cynthia

1988-01-01

7

Comparison of measured and modeled radiation, heat and water vapor fluxes: FIFE pilot study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary objectives of the 1985 study were to test the feasibility of using radio frequency receivers to collect data from automated weather stations and to evaluate the use of the data collected by the automated weather stations for modeling the fluxes of latent heat, sensible heat, and radiation over wheat. The model Cupid was used to calculate these fluxes which were compared with fluxes of these entities measured using micrometeorological techniques. The primary objectives of the 1986 study were to measure and model reflected and emitted radiation streams at a few locations within the First International Satellite Land-Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment (FIFE) site and to compare modeled and measured latent heat and sensible heat fluxes from the prairie vegetation.

Blad, Blaine L.; Verma, Shashi B.; Hubbard, Kenneth G.; Starks, Patrick; Hays, Cynthia; Norman, John M.; Waltershea, Elizabeth

1988-01-01

8

Measuring and modeling near-surface reflected and emitted radiation fluxes at the FIFE site  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Information is presented pertaining to the measurement and estimation of reflected and emitted components of the radiation balance. Information is included about reflectance and transmittance of solar radiation from and through the leaves of some grass and forb prairie species, bidirectional reflectance from a prairie canopy is discussed and measured and estimated fluxes are described of incoming and outgoing longwave and shortwave radiation. Results of the study showed only very small differences in reflectances and transmittances for the adaxial and abaxial surfaces of grass species in the visible and infrared wavebands, but some differences in the infrared wavebands were noted for the forbs. Reflectance from the prairie canopy changed as a function of solar and view zenith angles in the solar principal plane with definite asymmetry about nadir. The surface temperature of prairie canopies was found to vary by as much as 5 C depending on view zenith and azimuth position and on the solar azimuth. Aerodynamic temperature calculated from measured sensible heat fluxes ranged from 0 to 3 C higher than nadir-viewed temperatures. Models were developed to estimate incoming and reflected shortwave radiation from data collected with a Barnes Modular Multiband Radiometer. Several algorithms for estimating incoming longwave radiation were evaluated and compared to actual measures of that parameter. Net radiation was calculated using the estimated components of the shortwave radiation streams, determined from the algorithms developed, and from the longwave radiation streams provided by the Brunt, modified Deacon, and the Stefan-Boltzmann models. Estimates of net radiation were compared to measured values and found to be within the measurement error of the net radiometers used in the study.

Blad, Blaine L.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth A.; Starks, Patrick J.; Vining, Roel C.; Hays, Cynthia J.; Mesarch, Mark A.

1990-01-01

9

Glucose transport carrier of human erythrocytes. Radiation target size measurement based on flux inactivation  

SciTech Connect

Intact human erythrocytes frozen in the presence of cryoprotective reagents and irradiated with an electron beam retained their diffusion barrier to L-glucose. The carrier-mediated flux of D-glucose, on the other hand, was inactivated as a simple exponential function of the radiation dose. Classical target size analysis of this data yielded a molecular size of 185,000 daltons for the carrier. This represents the first measurement of the functional size of a transport protein based directly on flux inactivation.

Cuppoletti, J.; Jung, C.Y.; Green, F.A.

1981-02-10

10

GEWEX Radiative Flux Assessment  

Atmospheric Science Data Center

GEWEX Radiative Flux Assessment The ultimate goal of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment ( GEWEX ) global data analysis projects is to obtain observations of the ... (atmosphere, ocean, land, cryosphere, biosphere). The GEWEX Radiative Flux Assessment (RFA) project will provide a forum for ...

2013-06-27

11

Concept of an Innovative Photoluminescent Sensor for Radiative Heat Flux Measurement During Super-Orbital Re-Entry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work is presented the idea, the physical principle, and a first layout of an innovative sensor capable to collect the VUV contribution to radiative heat flux both for onboard flight measurements and plasma wind tunnel tests.

Conte, L.; Trifoni, E.; De Filippis, F.; Marraffa, L.

2014-06-01

12

Surface Solar Radiation Flux and Cloud Radiative Forcing for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP): A Satellite, Surface Observations, and Radiative Transfer Model Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study presents surface solar radiation flux and cloud radiative forcing results obtained by using a combination of satellite and surface observations interpreted by means of a simple plane-parallel radiative transfer model called 2001. This model, a revised version of a model initially introduced by Gautier et al., relates calibrated radiance observations from space to incoming surface solar flux. After

Catherine Gautier; Martin Landsfeld

1997-01-01

13

Heat flux microsensor measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A thin-film heat flux sensor has been fabricated on a stainless steel substrate. The thermocouple elements of the heat flux sensor were nickel and nichrome, and the temperature resistance sensor was platinum. The completed heat flux microsensor was calibrated at the AEDC radiation facility. The gage output was linear with heat flux with no apparent temperature effect on sensitivity. The gage was used for heat flux measurements at the NASA Langley Vitiated Air Test Facility. Vitiated air was expanded to Mach 3.0 and hydrogen fuel was injected. Measurements were made on the wall of a diverging duct downstream of the injector during all stages of the hydrogen combustion tests. Because the wall and the gage were not actively cooled, the wall temperature reached over 1000 C (1900 F) during the most severe test.

Terrell, J. P.; Hager, J. M.; Onishi, S.; Diller, T. E.

1992-12-01

14

Heat flux microsensor measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A thin-film heat flux sensor has been fabricated on a stainless steel substrate. The thermocouple elements of the heat flux sensor were nickel and nichrome, and the temperature resistance sensor was platinum. The completed heat flux microsensor was calibrated at the AEDC radiation facility. The gage output was linear with heat flux with no apparent temperature effect on sensitivity. The gage was used for heat flux measurements at the NASA Langley Vitiated Air Test Facility. Vitiated air was expanded to Mach 3.0 and hydrogen fuel was injected. Measurements were made on the wall of a diverging duct downstream of the injector during all stages of the hydrogen combustion tests. Because the wall and the gage were not actively cooled, the wall temperature reached over 1000 C (1900 F) during the most severe test.

Terrell, J. P.; Hager, J. M.; Onishi, S.; Diller, T. E.

1992-01-01

15

Fast Longwave and Shortwave Radiative Fluxes (FLASHFlux) From CERES and MODIS Measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project is currently producing highly accurate surface and top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation budget datasets from measurements taken by CERES broadband radiometers and a subset of imaging channels on the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument operating onboard Terra and Aqua satellites. The primary objective of CERES is to produce highly accurate and stable time-series datasets of radiation budget parameters to meet the needs of climate change research. Accomplishing such accuracy and stability requires monitoring the calibration and stability of the instruments, maintaining constancy of processing algorithms and meteorological inputs, and extensively validating the products against independent measurements. Such stringent requirements inevitably delay the release of products to the user community by as much as six months to a year. While such delays are inconsequential for climate research, other applications like short-term and seasonal predictions, agricultural and solar energy research, ocean and atmosphere assimilation, and field experiment support could greatly benefit if CERES products were available quickly after satellite measurements. To meet the needs of the latter class of applications, FLASHFlux was developed and is being implemented at the NASA/LaRC. FLASHFlux produces reliable surface and TOA radiative parameters within a one week of satellite observations using CERES "quicklook" data stream and fast surface flux algorithms. Cloud properties used in flux computation are derived concurrently using MODIS channel radiances. In the process, a modest degree of accuracy is sacrificed in the interest of speed. All fluxes are derived initially on a CERES footprint basis. Daily average fluxes are then derived on a 1° x1° grid in the next stage of processing. To date, FLASHFlux datasets have been used in operational processing of CloudSat data, in support of a field experiment, and for the S'COOL education outreach program. In this presentation, examples will be presented of footprint level and gridded/daily averaged fluxes and their validation. FLASHFlux datasets are available to the science community at the LaRC Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (ASDC) at: eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/PRODOCS/flashflux/table flashflux.html.

Stackhouse, Paul; Gupta, Shashi; Kratz, David; Geier, Erika; Edwards, Anne; Wilber, Anne

16

Surface Measurements of Solar Spectral Radiative Flux in the Cloud-Free Atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent studies (Charlock, et al.; Kato, et. al) have indicated a potential discrepancy between measured solar irradiance in the cloud-free atmosphere and model derived downwelling solar irradiance. These conclusions were based primarily on broadband integrated solar flux. Extinction (both absorption and scattering) phenomena, however, typically have spectral characteristics that would be present in moderate resolution (e.g., 10 nm) spectra, indicating the need for such measurements to thoroughly investigate the cause of any discrepancies. The 1996 Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Intensive Observation Period (IOP), held simultaneously with the NASA Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) Program, provided an opportunity for two simultaneous but independent measurements of moderate resolution solar spectral downwelling irradiance at the surface. The instruments were the NASA Ames Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer and the Analytical Spectral Devices, Inc., FieldSpecT-FR. Spectral and band integrated quantities from both sets of measurements will be presented, along with estimates of the downwelling solar irradiance from band model and line by line calculations, in an effort to determine the compatibility between measured and calculated solar irradiance in the cloud-free atmosphere.

Pilewskie, Peter; Goetz, A. F. H.; Bergstrom, R.; Beal, D.; Gore, Warren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

1997-01-01

17

Measured radiation damage in charge coupled devices exposed to simulated deep orbit proton fluxes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurements were made to quantify the effects of radiation damage in large area, deep-depletion CCDs developed for the joint European X-ray telescope (JET-X). Two devices were tested — the first, a standard X-ray CCD and the second, otherwise identical, including supplementary buried channels to improve its radiation hardness. Both devices were exposed to the expected in-orbit proton fluxes at the proton irradiation facility (PIF) at the Paul Scherrer Institute. The experimental conditions included the predicted orbital energy spectrum, its evolution and the proposed JET-X proton shielding. Energy resolution and charge transfer efficiency were measured after exposure to incremental doses corresponding to 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 and 5 years in orbit. The radiation-hard device performed substantially better than the conventional device, showing a 20% degradation in energy resolution after 5 years equivalent dose (corresponding to ˜ 10 9 protons cm -2), as compared to ˜ 60% for the conventional device. Finally, the devices were exposed to fluences appropriate to the August 1972 solar flare. These results have been used to develop a model to predict the fwhm energy resolution of radiation damaged CCD.

Owens, Alan; McCarthy, Kieran J.; Wells, Alan; Hajdas, Wojtek; Mattenberger, Felix; Zehnder, Alex; Terekhov, Oleg

1995-02-01

18

Galileo Probe Measurements of Thermal and Solar Radiation Fluxes in the Jovian Atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Galileo probe net flux radiometer (NFR) measured radiation fluxes in Jupiter's atmosphere from about 0.44 to 14 bars, using five spectral channels to separate solar and thermal components. Onboard calibration results confirm that the NFR responded to radiation approximately as expected. NFR channels also responded to a superimposed thermal perturbation, which can be approximately removed using blind channel measurements and physical constraints. Evidence for the expected NH3 cloud was seen in the spectral character of spin-induced modulations of the direct solar beam signals. These results are consistent with an overlying cloud of small NH3 ice particles (0.5-0.75 microns in radius) of optical depth 1.5-2 at 0.5 microns. Such a cloud would have so little effect on thermal fluxes that NFR thermal channels provide no additional constraints on its properties. However, evidence for heating near 0.45 bar in the NFR thermal channels would seem to require either an additional opacity source beyond this small-particle cloud, implying a heterogeneous cloud structure to avoid conflicts with solar modulation results, or a change in temperature lapse rate just above the probe measurements. The large thermal flux levels imply water vapor mixing ratios that are only 6% of solar at 10 bars, but possibly increasing with depth, and significantly subsaturated ammonia at pressures less than 3 bars. If deep NH3 mixing ratios at the probe entry site are 3-4 times ground-based inferences, as suggested by probe radio signal attenuation, then only half as much water is needed to match NFR observations. No evidence of a water cloud was seen near the 5-bar level. The 5-microns thermal channel detected the presumed NH4SH cloud base near 1.35 bars. Effects of this cloud were also seen in the solar channel upflux measurements but not in the solar net fluxes, implying that the cloud is a conservative scatterer of sunlight. The minor thermal signature of this cloud is compatible with particle radii near 3 gm, but it cannot rule out smaller particles. Deeper than about 3 bars, solar channels indicate unexpectedly large absorption of sunlight at wavelengths longer than 0.6 microns, which might be due to unaccounted-for absorption by NH3 between 0.65 and 1.5 microns.

Sromovsky, L. A.; Collard, A. D.; Fry, P. M.; Orton, G. S.; Lemmon, M. T.; Tomasko, M. G.; Freedman, R. S.

1998-01-01

19

Galileo Probe Measurements of Thermal and Solar Radiation Fluxes in the Jovian Atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Galileo probe net flux radiometer (NFR) measured radiation fluxes in Jupiter's atmosphere from about 0.44 to 14 bars, using five spectral channels to separate solar and thermal components. Onboard calibration results confirm that the NFR responded to radiation approximately as expected. NFR channels also responded to a superimposed thermal perturbation, which can be approximately removed using blind channel measurements and physical constraints. Evidence for the expected NH3 cloud was seen in the spectral character of spin-induced modulations of the direct solar beam signals. These results are consistent with an overlying cloud of small NH3 ice particles (0.5-0.75 microns in radius) of optical depth 1.5-2 at 0.5 microns. Such a cloud would have so little effect on thermal fluxes that NFR thermal channels provide no additional constraints on its properties. However, evidence for heating near 0.45 bar in the NFR thermal channels would seem to require either an additional opacity source beyond this small-particle cloud, implying a heterogeneous-cloud structure to avoid conflicts with solar modulation results, or a change in temperature lapse rate just above the probe measurements. The large thermal flux levels imply water vapor mixing ratios that are only 6% of solar at 10 bars, but possibly increasing with depth, and significantly subsaturated ammonia at pressures less than 3 bars. If deep NH3 mixing ratios at the probe entry site are 3-4 times ground-based inferences, as suggested by probe radio signal attenuation, then only half as much water is needed to match NFR observations. No evidence of a water cloud was seen near the 5-bar level. The 5 microns thermal channel detected the presumed NH4SH cloud base near 1.35 bars. Effects of this cloud were also seen in the solar channel upflux measurements but not in the solar net fluxes, implying that the cloud is a conservative scatterer of sunlight. The minor thermal signature of this cloud is compatible with particle radii near 3 microns, but it cannot rule out smaller particles. Deeper than about 3 bars, solar channels indicate unexpectedly large absorption of sunlight at wavelengths longer than 0.6 microns, which might be due to unaccounted-for absorption by NH3 between 0.65 and 1.5 microns.

Sromovsky, L. A.; Collard, A. D.; Fry, P. M.; Orton, G. S.; Lemmon, M. T.; Tomasko, M. G.; Freedman, R. S.

1998-01-01

20

An Investigation of the Compatibility of Radiation and Convection Heat Flux Measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method for determining time-resolved absorbed surface heat flux and surface temperature in radiation and convection environments is described. The method is useful for verification of aerodynamic, heat transfer and durability models. A practical heat flux gage fabrication procedure and a simple one-dimensional inverse heat conduction model and calculation procedure are incorporated in this method. The model provides an estimate of the temperature and heat flux gradient in the direction of heat transfer through the gage. This paper discusses several successful time-resolved tests of this method in hostile convective heating and cooling environments.

Liebert, Curt H.

1996-01-01

21

Shortwave Radiative Fluxes, Solar-Beam Transmissions, and Aerosol Properties: TARFOX and ACE-2 Find More Absorption from Flux Radiometry than from Other Measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) made simultaneous measurements of shortwave radiative fluxes, solar-beam transmissions, and the aerosols affecting those fluxes and transmissions. Besides the measured fluxes and transmissions, other obtained properties include aerosol scattering and absorption measured in situ at the surface and aloft; aerosol single scattering albedo retrieved from skylight radiances; and aerosol complex refractive index derived by combining profiles of backscatter, extinction, and size distribution. These measurements of North Atlantic boundary layer aerosols impacted by anthropogenic pollution revealed the following characteristic results: (1) Better agreement among different types of remote measurements of aerosols (e.g., optical depth, extinction, and backscattering from sunphotometers, satellites, and lidars) than between remote and in situ measurements; 2) More extinction derived from transmission measurements than from in situ measurements; (3) Larger aerosol absorption inferred from flux radiometry than from other measurements. When the measured relationships between downwelling flux and optical depth (or beam transmission) are used to derive best-fit single scattering albedos for the polluted boundary layer aerosol, both TARFOX and ACE-2 yield midvisible values of 0.90 +/- 0.04. The other techniques give larger single scattering albedos (i.e. less absorption) for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of 0.95 +/- 0.04. Although the flux-based results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and other uncertainties (e.g., unknown gas absorption). Current uncertainties in aerosol single scattering albedo are large in terms of climate effects. They also have an important influence on aerosol optical depths retrieved from satellite radiances. More tests are needed of the consistency among different methods and of the effects of changing humidity on aerosol.

Russell, Philip B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

22

Pulse flux measuring device  

DOEpatents

A device for measuring particle flux comprises first and second photodiode detectors for receiving flux from a source and first and second outputs for producing first and second signals representing the flux incident to the detectors. The device is capable of reducing the first output signal by a portion of the second output signal, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the device. Devices in accordance with the invention may measure distinct components of flux from a single source or fluxes from several sources.

Riggan, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01

23

Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to meet one of its goals - to relate observations of radiative fluxes and radiances to the atmospheric composition - the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has pursued measurements and modeling activities that attempt to determine how aerosols impact atmospheric radiative transfer, both directly and indirectly. However, significant discrepancies between aerosol properties measured in situ or remotely remain. One of the objectives of the Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (TOP) conducted by ARM in May 2003 at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north central Oklahoma was to examine and hopefully reduce these differences. The IOP involved airborne measurements from two airplanes over the heavily instrumented SGP site. We give an overview of airborne results obtained aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. The Twin Otter performed 16 research flights over the SGP site. The aircraft carried instrumentation to perform in-situ measurements of aerosol absorption, scattering, extinction and particle size. This included such novel techniques as the photoacoustic and cavity ring-down methods for in-situ absorption (675 nm) and extinction (675 and 1550 nm) and a new multiwavelength, filter-based absorption photometer (467, 530, 660 nm). A newly developed instrument measured cloud condensation nucleus concentration (CCN) concentrations at two supersaturation levels. Aerosol optical depth and extinction (354-2139 nm) were measured with the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel sunphotometer. Furthermore, up-and downwelling solar (broadband and spectral) and infrared radiation were measured using seven individual radiometers. Three up-looking radiometers werer mounted on a newly developed stabilized platform, keeping the instruments level up to aircraft pitch and roll angles of approximately 10(exp 0). This resulted in unprecedented continuous vertical profiles of radiative fluxes, which we will compare to modeled fluxes using the aforementioned data as input.

Schmid, B.; Arnott, P.; Bucholtz, A.; Colarco, P.; Covert, D.; Eilers, J.; Elleman, R.; Ferrare, R.; Flagan, R.; Jonsson, H.

2003-01-01

24

The uncertainty of UTCI due to uncertainties in the determination of radiation fluxes derived from measured and observed meteorological data.  

PubMed

In the present study, we investigate the determination accuracy of the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI). We study especially the UTCI uncertainties due to uncertainties in radiation fluxes, whose impacts on UTCI are evaluated via the mean radiant temperature (Tmrt). We assume "normal conditions", which means that usual meteorological information and data are available but no special additional measurements. First, the uncertainty arising only from the measurement uncertainties of the meteorological data is determined. Here, simulations show that uncertainties between 0.4 and 2 K due to the uncertainty of just one of the meteorological input parameters may be expected. We then analyse the determination accuracy when not all radiation data are available and modelling of the missing data is required. Since radiative transfer models require a lot of information that is usually not available, we concentrate only on the determination accuracy achievable with empirical models. The simulations show that uncertainties in the calculation of the diffuse irradiance may lead to Tmrt uncertainties of up to ±2.9 K. If long-wave radiation is missing, we may expect an uncertainty of ±2 K. If modelling of diffuse radiation and of longwave radiation is used for the calculation of Tmrt, we may then expect a determination uncertainty of ±3 K. If all radiative fluxes are modelled based on synoptic observation, the uncertainty in Tmrt is ±5.9 K. Because Tmrt is only one of the four input data required in the calculation of UTCI, the uncertainty in UTCI due to the uncertainty in radiation fluxes is less than ±2 K. The UTCI uncertainties due to uncertainties of the four meteorological input values are not larger than the 6 K reference intervals of the UTCI scale, which means that UTCI may only be wrong by one UTCI scale. This uncertainty may, however, be critical at the two temperature extremes, i.e. under extreme hot or extreme cold conditions. PMID:21347585

Weihs, Philipp; Staiger, Henning; Tinz, Birger; Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Rieder, Harald; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Maturilli, Marion; Jendritzky, Gerd

2012-05-01

25

The uncertainty of UTCI due to uncertainties in the determination of radiation fluxes derived from measured and observed meteorological data  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, we investigate the determination accuracy of the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI). We study especially\\u000a the UTCI uncertainties due to uncertainties in radiation fluxes, whose impacts on UTCI are evaluated via the mean radiant\\u000a temperature (Tmrt). We assume “normal conditions”, which means that usual meteorological information and data are available but no special\\u000a additional measurements. First,

Philipp Weihs; Henning Staiger; Birger Tinz; Ekaterina Batchvarova; Harald Rieder; Laurent Vuilleumier; Marion Maturilli; Gerd Jendritzky

2011-01-01

26

Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

Miller, E. R.

1972-01-01

27

Measuring surface fluxes in CAPE  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two stations (site 1612 and site 2008) were operated by the University of Georgia group from 6 July 1991 to 18 August 1991. The following data were collected continuously: surface energy fluxes (i.e., net radiation, soil heat fluxes, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux), air temperature, vapor pressure, soil temperature (at 1 cm depth), and precipitation. Canopy reflectance and light interception data were taken three times at each site between 6 July and 18 August. Soil moisture content was measured twice at each site.

Kanemasu, E. T.; D-Shah, T.; Nie, Dalin

1992-01-01

28

Solar and Thermal Radiation Flux Measurements over the East Coast of Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aircraft measurements show that the albedo of much of the east coast of Australia may be described in terms of only two curves of albedo versus solar elevation (A rs. e), those of eucalypt forest and dry grassland. The theoretical albedo of white-capping sea to isotropic sky radiation (derived from an experimental A rs. e curve) is found to be

G. W. Paltridge

1971-01-01

29

Aerosol Radiative Impact on Spectral Solar Flux at the Surface, Derived from Principal-Plane Sky Measurements.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate measurements of the spectral solar flux reaching the surface in cloud-free conditions are required to determine the aerosol radiative impact and to test aerosol models that are used to calculate radiative forcing of climate. Spectral flux measurements are hampered in many locations by persistent broken cloud fields. Here a new technique is developed to derive the diffuse solar spectral flux reaching the surface from principal-plane measurements conducted in the last six years by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). This 50-100 instrument global network measures the principal-plane radiances in four spectral bands (0.44-1.02 m) approximately every hour every day. These instruments also measure the spectral optical thickness and derive the aerosol size distribution and other properties from sky measurements. The advantage of the AERONET measurements is that collimated sky radiance is measured for each 1° × 1° field of view. Clouds and cloud shadows are rejected before the total sky brightness is reconstructed and the flux is derived. The results compare favorably with shadow band measurements and with aerosol models. Studied are smoke aerosol in Brazil; Saharan dust in Cape Verde; and urban-industrial pollution in Créteil, near Paris, France, and near Washington, D.C. The spectral attenuation of total (diffuse+direct) solar flux reaching the surface is given by f = exp(a b), where a is attenuation by an atmosphere with no aerosol and b is the aerosol attenuation coefficient. Remarkably, it is found that for these sites except for the Washington, D.C., site, the spectrally averaged value of b does not vary significantly from one aerosol type to another: {b} = 0.35 ± 0.03 (for solar zenith angle of 50°). The measured 24-h average aerosol impact on the solar flux at the surface per unit optical thickness is F/ = 80 W m2 in these sites, almost independent of the aerosol type: smoke, dust, or urban-industrial pollution. In Washington, D.C., it is suspected, and demonstrated in a back of the envelope calculation, that the high amount of broken cloudiness and its correlation with the aerosol optical thickness are responsible for the apparent small aerosol forcing at the surface of F/ = 50 W m2.

Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanré, D.; Holben, B. N.; Mattoo, S.; Remer, L. A.; Eck, T. F.; Vaughan, J.; Chatenet, Bernadette

2002-02-01

30

Radiative Flux Changes by Aerosols from North America, Europe, and Africa over the Atlantic Ocean: Measurements and Calculations from TARFOX and ACE-2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the past climate and predicting climate change. To help reduce this uncertainty, the 1996 Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Experiment (TARFOX) and the 1997 second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) measured the properties and radiative effects of American, European, and African aerosols over the Atlantic. In TARFOX, radiative fluxes and microphysics of the American aerosol were measured from the UK C-130 while optical depth spectra, aerosol composition, and other properties were measured by the University of Washington C-131A and the CIRPAS Pelican. Closure studies show that the measured flux changes agree with those derived from the aerosol measurements using several modelling approaches. The best-fit midvisible single-scatter albedos (approx. 0.89 to 0.93) obtained from the TARFOX flux comparisons are in accord with values derived by independent techniques. In ACE-2 we measured optical depth and extinction spectra for both European urban-marine aerosols and free-tropospheric African dust aerosols, using sunphotometers on the R/V Vodyanitskiy and the Pelican. Preliminary values for the radiative flux sensitivities (Delta Flux / Delta Optical depth) computed for ACE-2 aerosols (boundary layer and African dust) over ocean are similar to those found in TARFOX. Combining a satellite-derived optical depth climatology with the aerosol optical model validated for flux sensitivities in TARFOX provides first-cut estimates of aerosol-induced flux changes over the Atlantic Ocean.

Russell, P. B.; Hignett, P.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Chien, A.; Bergstrom, R.; Durkee, P. A.; Hobbs, P. V.; Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P. K.; Condon, Estelle (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

31

Fast Longwave and Shortwave Radiative Flux (FLASHFlux) Products from CERES and MODIS Measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy Systems (CERES) project is currently producing world-class climatological data products derived from measurements taken aboard the Terra and Aqua spacecrafts (Wielicki et al., 1996). While of exceptional fidelity, these data products require a considerable amount of processing to assure quality and verify accuracy and precision. Obtaining such high quality assurance, however, means that the CERES data is typically released more than six months after the acquisition of the initial measurements. For climate studies, such delays are of little consequence, especially considering the improved quality of the released data products. There are, however, many uses for the CERES data products on a near real-time basis. These include: CERES instrument calibration and subsystem quality checks, CLOUDSAT operations, seasonal predictions, agricultural and ocean assimilations, support of field campaigns, and outreach programs such as S'Cool. The FLASHflux project was envisioned as a conduit whereby CERES data could be provided to the community within a week of the initial measurements, with the trade-off that some degree of fidelity would be exacted to gain speed. In this paper, we will report on some very encouraging initial results from the FLASHflux project in which we compared the FLASHflux instantaneous surface fluxes to the CERES surface-only flux algorithm data products.

Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Kratz, David P.; McGarragh, Greg R.; Gupta, Shashi K.; Geier, Erika B.

2006-01-01

32

Heat flux measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new automated, computer controlled heat flux measurement facility is described. Continuous transient and steady-state surface heat flux values varying from about 0.3 to 6 MW/sq m over a temperature range of 100 to 1200 K can be obtained in the facility. An application of this facility is the development of heat flux gauges for continuous fast transient surface heat flux measurement on turbine blades operating in space shuttle main engine turbopumps. The facility is useful for durability testing at fast temperature transients.

Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

1989-01-01

33

Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

Mace, Gerald

2008-01-15

34

Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux  

DOE Data Explorer

Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

Mace, Gerald

35

Energy exchanges in a Central Business District - Interpretation of Eddy Covariance and radiation flux measurements (London UK)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global urbanisation brings increasingly dense and complex urban structures. To manage cities sustainably and smartly, currently and into the future under changing climates, urban climate research needs to advance in areas such as Central Business Districts (CBD) where human interactions with the environment are particularly concentrated. Measurement and modelling approaches may be pushed to their limits in dense urban settings, but if urban climate research is to contribute to the challenges of real cities those limits have to be addressed. The climate of cities is strongly governed by surface-atmosphere exchanges of energy, moisture and momentum. Observations of the relevant fluxes provide important information for improvement and evaluation of modelling approaches. Due to the CBD's heterogeneity, a very careful analysis of observations is required to understand the relevant processes. Current approaches used to interpret observations and set them in a wider context may need to be adapted for use in these more complex areas. Here, we present long-term observations of the radiation balance components and turbulent fluxes of latent heat, sensible heat and momentum in the city centre of London. This is one of the first measurement studies in a CBD covering multiple years with analysis at temporal scales from days to seasons. Data gathered at two sites in close vicinity, but with different measurement heights, are analysed to investigate the influence of source area characteristics on long-term radiation and turbulent fluxes. Challenges of source area modelling and the critical aspect of siting in such a complex environment are considered. Outgoing long- and short-wave radiation are impacted by the anisotropic nature of the urban surface and the high reflectance materials increasingly being used as building materials. Results highlight the need to consider the source area of radiometers in terms of diffuse and direct irradiance. Sensible heat fluxes (QH) are positive all year round, even at night. QH systematically exceeds input from net all-wave radiation (Q*), probably sustained by a both storage and anthropogenic heat fluxes (QF). Model estimates suggest QF can exceed the Q* nearly all year round. The positive QH inhibits stable conditions, but the stability classification is determined predominantly by the pattern of friction velocity over the rough urban surface. Turbulent latent heat flux variations are controlled (beyond the available energy) by rainfall due to the small vegetation cover. The Bowen ratio is mostly larger than one. Analysis of the eddy covariance footprint surface controls for the different land cover types by flow patterns for measurements at the two heights suggests the spatial variations of the sensible heat flux observed are partly related to changes in surface roughness, even at the local scale. Where the source areas are most homogeneous, flow conditions are vertically consistent - even if initial morphometric parameters suggested the measurements may be below the blending height. Turbulence statistics and momentum flux patterns prove useful for the interpretation of turbulent heat exchanges observed.

Kotthaus, S.; Grimmond, S.

2013-12-01

36

Measured and calculated clear-sky solar radiative fluxes during the Subsonic Aircraft Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS)  

SciTech Connect

Modeled and measured surface insolations are compared with the purpose of evaluating the ability of a radiative transfer model to predict the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface under clear-sky conditions. Model uncertainties are estimated by performing sensitivity studies for variations in aerosol optical depth, aerosol optical properties, water vapor profiles, ozone content, solar irradiance at the top of the atmosphere, and surface albedo. In this fashion, a range of possible calculated values is determined and compared to observations. Experimental errors are evaluated by comparison with independent, simultaneous measurements performed using two World Radiation Reference instrument arrays that were operational for a limited period during SUCCESS. Assuming a mineral aerosol, it is found that there is agreement between calculated and measured fluxes, with differences approximately equal to and within one standard deviation. Such agreement improves further if a layer containing a small amount of carbonaceous aerosol is added. The presence of carbonaceous aerosols is likely because occasional biomass burning activities took place during SUCCESS in the area around the experimental site (the clouds and radiation test bed operated by the Department of Energy in Oklahoma). (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

Valero, Francisco P. J. [Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Center for Atmospheric Sciences, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, California (United States)] [Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Center for Atmospheric Sciences, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, California (United States); Bush, Brett C. [Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Center for Atmospheric Sciences, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, California (United States)] [Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Center for Atmospheric Sciences, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, California (United States)

1999-11-27

37

Apparatus for measuring high-flux heat transfer in radiatively heated compact exchangers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An apparatus is described which can deliver uniform heat flux densities of up to 80 W/sq cm over an area 7.8 cm x 15.2 cm for use in measuring the heat transfer and pressure drop in thin (6 mm or less), compact heat exchangers. Helium gas at flow rates of 0 to 40 kg/h and pressures to 6.9 MPa (1000 psi) is the working fluid. The instrumentation used in the apparatus and the methods for analyzing the data is described. The apparatus will be used initially to test the performance of prototype cooling jackets for the engine struts of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP).

Olson, Douglas A.

1989-01-01

38

Simulation study of geometric shape factor approach to estimating earth emitted flux densities from wide field-of-view radiation measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was performed on the use of geometric shape factors to estimate earth-emitted flux densities from radiation measurements with wide field-of-view flat-plate radiometers on satellites. Sets of simulated irradiance measurements were computed for unrestricted and restricted field-of-view detectors. In these simulations, the earth radiation field was modeled using data from Nimbus 2 and 3. Geometric shape factors were derived and applied to these data to estimate flux densities on global and zonal scales. For measurements at a satellite altitude of 600 km, estimates of zonal flux density were in error 1.0 to 1.2%, and global flux density errors were less than 0.2%. Estimates with unrestricted field-of-view detectors were about the same for Lambertian and non-Lambertian radiation models, but were affected by satellite altitude. The opposite was found for the restricted field-of-view detectors.

Weaver, W. L.; Green, R. N.

1980-01-01

39

A method for continuous estimation of clear-sky downwelling longwave radiative flux developed using ARM surface measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an improved self-adaptive methodology for the continuous estimation of downwelling clear-sky longwave (LW) radiative flux based on analysis of surface irradiance, air temperature, and humidity measurements that includes a term to account for near surface optically thin haze. Comparison between our estimations and clear-sky LW measurements for many years of data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains (SGP), Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites show agreement at about the 4 W m-2 level, with 75%, 94%, and 68% of the data falling within that range for the SGP, TWP, and NSA sites, respectively. Although there is no exact means of determining the uncertainty associated with the clear-sky LW estimations, our analyses and comparison with detailed radiative transfer (RT) model calculations suggest our estimations on average are no worse than model calculations that require temporally and spatially averaged input information. Our technique exhibits a high degree of repeatability for the downwelling LW cloud effect, with agreement at about the 3 W m-2 level. Applying our technique and that of Long and Ackerman (2000) to 15 years of data from the ARM SGP site shows the maximum all-sky and clear-sky SW and LW occurs during summer, with the greatest year-to-year clear-sky SW variability occurring in fall. The downwelling LW cloud effect is fairly constant across the seasons, but the greatest SW cloud effect occurs in spring. The downwelling net cloud effect is dominated by the SW, with the largest effect occurring in spring (-64 W m-2) and the smallest occurring during winter (-21 W m-2).

Long, C. N.; Turner, D. D.

2008-09-01

40

Development of a balloon-borne stabilized platform for measuring radiative flux profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer  

SciTech Connect

A stabilized platform has been developed to carry broadband short-wave and long-wave radiometric sensors on the tether line of a small tethered balloon that ascends through atmospheric depths of up to 1.5 km to obtain vertical profiles of radiative flux and flux divergence for evaluating atmospheric radiative transfer models. The Sky Platform was designed to keep the radiometers level despite unpredictable movements of the balloon and tether line occasioned by turbulence and wind shear. The automatic control loop drives motors, gears, and pulleys located on two of the vertices of the triangular frame to climb the harness lines to keep the platform level. Radiometric sensors, an electronic compass, and an on-board data acquisition system make up the remainder of the Sky Platform. Because knowledge of the dynamic response of the tether line-platform system is essential to properly close the automatic control loop on the Sky Platform, a Motion Sensing Platform (MSP) was developed to fly in place of the Sky Platform on the tether line to characterize the Sky Platform's operating environment. This unstabilized platform uses an array of nine solid-state linear accelerometers to measure the lateral and angular accelerations, velocities, and displacements that the Sky Platform will experience. This paper presents field performance tests of the Sky and Motion Sensing Platforms, as conducted at Richland, Washington, on February 17, 1993. The tests were performed primarily to characterize the stabilization system on the Sky Platform. Test flights were performed on this cold winter day from 1400 to 1800 Pacific Standard Time (PST). During this period, temperature profiles were near the dry adiabatic lapse rate. Flights were made through a jet wind speed profile having peak wind speeds of 7 m/s at a height of 100 m AGL. Wind directions were from the northwest. All flights were performed as continuous ascents, rather than ascending in discrete steps with halts at set altitudes.

Whiteman, C.D.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Anderson, G.A.; Shaw, W.J.

1993-03-01

41

Development of a balloon-borne stabilized platform for measuring radiative flux profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer  

SciTech Connect

A stabilized platform has been developed to carry broadband short-wave and long-wave radiometric sensors on the tether line of a small tethered balloon that ascends through atmospheric depths of up to 1.5 km to obtain vertical profiles of radiative flux and flux divergence for evaluating atmospheric radiative transfer models. The Sky Platform was designed to keep the radiometers level despite unpredictable movements of the balloon and tether line occasioned by turbulence and wind shear. The automatic control loop drives motors, gears, and pulleys located on two of the vertices of the triangular frame to climb the harness lines to keep the platform level. Radiometric sensors, an electronic compass, and an on-board data acquisition system make up the remainder of the Sky Platform. Because knowledge of the dynamic response of the tether line-platform system is essential to properly close the automatic control loop on the Sky Platform, a Motion Sensing Platform (MSP) was developed to fly in place of the Sky Platform on the tether line to characterize the Sky Platform`s operating environment. This unstabilized platform uses an array of nine solid-state linear accelerometers to measure the lateral and angular accelerations, velocities, and displacements that the Sky Platform will experience. This paper presents field performance tests of the Sky and Motion Sensing Platforms, as conducted at Richland, Washington, on February 17, 1993. The tests were performed primarily to characterize the stabilization system on the Sky Platform. Test flights were performed on this cold winter day from 1400 to 1800 Pacific Standard Time (PST). During this period, temperature profiles were near the dry adiabatic lapse rate. Flights were made through a jet wind speed profile having peak wind speeds of 7 m/s at a height of 100 m AGL. Wind directions were from the northwest. All flights were performed as continuous ascents, rather than ascending in discrete steps with halts at set altitudes.

Whiteman, C.D.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Anderson, G.A.; Shaw, W.J.

1993-03-01

42

Flux monitor diode radiation hardness testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A flux monitor diode is being explored as an option for measurement of the output of an X-ray tube that is used for active transmission measurements on a pipe containing UF 6 gas. The measured flux can be used to correct for any instabilities in the X-ray tube or the high voltage power supply. For this measurement, we are using a silicon junction p-n photodiode, model AXUV100GX, developed by International Radiation Detectors, Inc. (IRD, Inc.). This diode has a silicon thickness of 104 ? and a thin (3-7 nm) silicon dioxide junction passivating, protective entrance window. These diodes have been extensively tested for radiation hardness in the UV range. However, we intend to operate mainly in the 10-40 keV X-ray region. We are performing radiation hardness testing over this energy range, with the energy spectrum that would pass through the diode during normal operation. A long-term measurement was performed at a high flux, which simulated over 80 years of operation. No significant degradation was seen over this time. Fluctuations were found to be within the 0.1% operationally acceptable error range. After irradiation, an I- V characterization showed a temporary irradiation effect which decayed over time. This effect is small because we operate the diode without external bias.

Lombardi, M. L.; Favalli, A.; Goda, J. M.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Moss, C. E.

2011-10-01

43

Radiation fluxes at the FIFE site  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main objective of the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) has been stated as 'the development of techniques that may be applied to satellite observations of the radiation reflected and emitted from the Earth to yield quantitative information concerning land surface climatological conditions'. The major field study, FIFE (the First ISLSCP Field Experiment), was conducted in 1987-89 to accomplish this objective. Four intensive field campaigns (IFC's) were carried out in 1987 and one in 1989. Factors contributing to observed reflected radiation from the FIFE site must be understood before the radiation observed by satellites can be used to quantify surface processes. Our last report (Walter-Shea et al., 1992b) focused on slope effects on incoming and outgoing shortwave radiation and net radiation from data collected in 1989. We report here on the final analysis of the slope data as well as results from thermal radiation studies conducted during the FIFE experiment. The specific areas reported are the following: (1) analysis of slope effects on measured reflectance values and estimates of surface albedo; (2) using remotely-measured surface temperatures as a means of estimating sensible heat flux from the Konza Prairie; (3) extracting canopy temperatures from remotely-measured composite surface temperatures; (4) modeling the measured composite temperature of partially vegetated surfaces; and (5) estimating gap distribution in partially vegetated surfaces from reflectance measurements.

Walter-Shea, Elizabeth A.; Blad, Blaine L.; Zara, Pedro; Vining, Roel; Hays, Cynthia J.; Mesarch, Mark A.

1993-01-01

44

Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

2002-01-01

45

Simulation study of a geometric shape factor technique for estimating earth-emitted radiant flux densities from wide-field-of-view radiation measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Geometric shape factors were computed and applied to satellite simulated irradiance measurements to estimate Earth emitted flux densities for global and zonal scales and for areas smaller than the detector field of view (FOV). Wide field of view flat plate detectors were emphasized, but spherical detectors were also studied. The radiation field was modeled after data from the Nimbus 2 and 3 satellites. At a satellite altitude of 600 km, zonal estimates were in error 1.0 to 1.2 percent and global estimates were in error less than 0.2 percent. Estimates with unrestricted field of view (UFOV) detectors were about the same for Lambertian and limb darkening radiation models. The opposite was found for restricted field of view detectors. The UFOV detectors are found to be poor estimators of flux density from the total FOV and are shown to be much better as estimators of flux density from a circle centered at the FOV with an area significantly smaller than that for the total FOV.

Weaver, W. L.; Green, R. N.

1980-01-01

46

New measurement of the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio up to 100 GeV in the cosmic radiation.  

PubMed

A new measurement of the cosmic-ray antiproton-to-proton flux ratio between 1 and 100 GeV is presented. The results were obtained with the PAMELA experiment, which was launched into low-Earth orbit on-board the Resurs-DK1 satellite on June 15th 2006. During 500 days of data collection a total of about 1000 antiprotons have been identified, including 100 above an energy of 20 GeV. The high-energy results are a tenfold improvement in statistics with respect to all previously published data. The data follow the trend expected from secondary production calculations and significantly constrain contributions from exotic sources, e.g., dark matter particle annihilations. PMID:19257498

Adriani, O; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; De Pascale, M P; De Rosa, G; Fedele, D; Galper, A M; Grishantseva, L; Hofverberg, P; Leonov, A; Koldashov, S V; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Malvezzi, V; Marcelli, L; Menn, W; Mikhailov, V V; Minori, M; Mocchiutti, E; Nagni, M; Orsi, S; Osteria, G; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Taddei, E; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

2009-02-01

47

Calibration corrections of solar tower flux density measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

The PSA flux density measuring system PROHERMES measures the concentrated solar radiation in the entrance aperture of solar tower receivers with a white rotating bar as target and a CCD-camera taking images. The calibration is done with commercial flux gauges placed in the measurement plane. To im prove the calibration of the system and to reveal systematic errors, measurements are

Steffen Ulmer; Eckhard Lüpfert; Markus Pfänder; Reiner Buck

2004-01-01

48

Radiation from Kinetic Poynting Flux Acceleration  

E-print Network

We derive analytic formulas for the power output and critical frequency of radiation by electrons accelerated by relativistic kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these results with Particle-In-Cell plasma simulations. We find that the in-situ radiation power output and critical frequency are much below those predicted by the classical synchrotron formulae. We discuss potential astrophysical applications of these results.

Edison Liang; Koichi Noguchi

2007-11-18

49

Beta ray flux measuring device  

DOEpatents

A beta ray flux measuring device in an activated member in-core instrumentation system for pressurized water reactors. The device includes collector rings positioned about an axis in the reactor's pressure boundary. Activated members such as hydroballs are positioned within respective ones of the collector rings. A response characteristic such as the current from or charge on a collector ring indicates the beta ray flux from the corresponding hydroball and is therefore a measure of the relative nuclear power level in the region of the reactor core corresponding to the specific exposed hydroball within the collector ring.

Impink, Jr., Albert J. (Murrysville, PA); Goldstein, Norman P. (Murrysville, PA)

1990-01-01

50

Measuring Radiation  

MedlinePLUS

... are four different but interrelated units for measuring radioactivity, exposure, absorbed dose, and dose equivalent. These can ... radioactive material is expressed in terms of its radioactivity (or simply its activity), which represents how many ...

51

Measurements of the Jovian radiation belts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The University of California at San Diego trapped radiation detector measured proton and electron fluxes, angular distributions, and energy spectra throughout the Pioneer 10 flyby of Jupiter last December. Here the instrumentation and calibrations are described, and good values for particle fluxes in the inner and outer regions are presented. The major features of the Jovian radiation belts are described,

R. W. Fillius; C. E. McIlwain

1974-01-01

52

Spectral estimates of net radiation and soil heat flux  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Conventional methods of measuring surface energy balance are point measurements and represent only a small area. Remote sensing offers a potential means of measuring outgoing fluxes over large areas at the spatial resolution of the sensor. The objective of this study was to estimate net radiation (Rn) and soil heat flux (G) using remotely sensed multispectral data acquired from an aircraft over large agricultural fields. Ground-based instruments measured Rn and G at nine locations along the flight lines. Incoming fluxes were also measured by ground-based instruments. Outgoing fluxes were estimated using remotely sensed data. Remote Rn, estimated as the algebraic sum of incoming and outgoing fluxes, slightly underestimated Rn measured by the ground-based net radiometers. The mean absolute errors for remote Rn minus measured Rn were less than 7%. Remote G, estimated as a function of a spectral vegetation index and remote Rn, slightly overestimated measured G; however, the mean absolute error for remote G was 13%. Some of the differences between measured and remote values of Rn and G are associated with differences in instrument designs and measurement techniques. The root mean square error for available energy (Rn - G) was 12%. Thus, methods using both ground-based and remotely sensed data can provide reliable estimates of the available energy which can be partitioned into sensible and latent heat under nonadvective conditions. ?? 1990.

Daughtry, C.S.T.; Kustas, W.P.; Moran, M.S.; Pinter, P. J., Jr.; Jackson, R. D.; Brown, P.W.; Nichols, W.D.; Gay, L.W.

1990-01-01

53

EOS Terra Aerosol and Radiative Flux Validation: An Overview of the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) Experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

NASA developed an Earth Observing System (EOS) to study global change and reduce uncertainties associated with aerosols and other key parameters controlling climate. The first EOS satellite, Terra ,w as launched in December 1999. The Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) field campaign was conducted from 10 July to 2 August 2001 to validate several Terra data products,

W. L. Smith; T. P. Charlock; R. Kahn; J. V. Martins; L. A. Remer; P. V. Hobbs; J. Redemann; C. K. Rutledge

2005-01-01

54

Skyglow effects in UV and visible spectra: Radiative fluxes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several studies have tried to understand the mechanisms and effects of radiative transfer under different night-sky conditions. However, most of these studies are limited to the various effects of visible spectra. Nevertheless, the invisible parts of the electromagnetic spectrum can pose a more profound threat to nature. One visible threat is from what is popularly termed skyglow. Such skyglow is caused by injudiciously situated or designed artificial night lighting systems which degrade desired sky viewing. Therefore, since lamp emissions are not limited to visible electromagnetic spectra, it is necessary to consider the complete spectrum of such lamps in order to understand the physical behaviour of diffuse radiation at terrain level. In this paper, the downward diffuse radiative flux is computed in a two-stream approximation and obtained ultraviolet spectral radiative fluxes are inter-related with luminous fluxes. Such a method then permits an estimate of ultraviolet radiation if the traditionally measured illuminance on a horizontal plane is available. The utility of such a comparison of two spectral bands is shown, using the different lamp types employed in street lighting. The data demonstrate that it is insufficient to specify lamp type and its visible flux production independently of each other. Also the UV emissions have to be treated by modellers and environmental scientists because some light sources can be fairly important pollutants in the near ultraviolet. Such light sources can affect both the living organisms and ambient environment.

Kocifaj, Miroslav; Solano Lamphar, Hector Antonio

2013-09-01

55

Radiation entropy flux and entropy production of the Earth system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of the Earth's radiation entropy flux at the top of the atmosphere is reviewed with an emphasis on its estimation methods. Existing expressions for calculating radiation entropy flux scattered in different disciplines are surveyed, and their applicabilities are examined. It is found that the Earth's net radiation entropy flux estimated from these various expressions can differ substantially, more

Wei Wu; Yangang Liu

2010-01-01

56

Non-contact heat flux measurement using a transparent sensor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A working non-contact heat flux sensor was demonstrated using a transparent material (sapphire) and a multiwavelength pyrometer. The pyrometer is used to measure the temperatures of the two surfaces of the sensor from the spectrum of radiation originating from them. The heat conducted through the material is determined from the temperature difference of the two surfaces and the thermal conductivity of the material. The measured heat flux is equal to the incident heat flux within experimental error indicating that no calibration would be necessary. A steady state heat flux of 100 kW/sq m was easily achieved.

Ng, Daniel; Spuckler, Charles M.

1993-01-01

57

Latent Heat in Soil Heat Flux Measurements  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

58

Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2Flux) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the virtual (sonic) temperature. An infrared gas analyzer is used to obtain the CO2 and H2O densities. A separate sub-system also collects half-hour average measures of meteorological and soil variables from separate 4-m towers.

Fischer, M

2005-01-01

59

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite. Part 1; Methodology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) investigates the critical role that clouds and aerosols play in modulating the radiative energy flow within the Earth-atmosphere system. CERES builds upon the foundation laid by previous missions, such as the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment, to provide highly accurate top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes together with coincident cloud and aerosol properties inferred from high-resolution imager measurements. This paper describes the method used to construct empirical angular distribution models (ADMs) for estimating shortwave, longwave, and window TOA radiative fluxes from CERES radiance measurements on board the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite. To construct the ADMs, multiangle CERES measurements are combined with coincident high-resolution Visible Infrared Scanner measurements and meteorological parameters from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts data assimilation product. The ADMs are stratified by scene types defined by parameters that have a strong influence on the angular dependence of Earth's radiation field at the TOA. Examples of how the new CERES ADMs depend upon the imager-based parameters are provided together with comparisons with existing models.

Loeb, N. G.; Smith, N. M.; Kato, S.; Miller, W. F.; Gupta, S. K.; Minnis, P.; Wielicki, B. A.

2003-01-01

60

A new approach of surface flux measurements using DTS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Estimation of surface fluxes is a difficult task, especially over lakes. Determining latent heat flux (evaporation), sensible heat flux and ground heat flux involves measurements and (or calculations) of net radiation, air temperature, water temperature, wind speed and relative humidity. This research presents a new method to measure surface fluxes by means of Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS). From 0.5 m above lake level to 1.5 m under lake level DTS was applied to measure temperature. Using a PVC hyperboloid construction, a floating standalone measuring device was developed. This new setup distinguished itself by the open construction, so it is almost insensitive to direct radiation. While most of the lake ground heat changes occur very close to the lake surface, most measuring methods only obtain rough results. With this construction it was possible to create a spiral shaped fiber-optic cable setup, with which a vertical spatial resolution of 0.02 m and a temporal resolution of 1 min was obtained. The new method was tested in the deep Lake Kinneret (Israel) from 6 October, 2011 to 11 October, 2011and in the shallow Lake Binaba (Ghana) from 24 October, 2011 to 28 October, 2011. This study shows that with the developed method it is possible to capture the energy fluxes within the top water layer with a high resolution. When the old low resolution method was compared with the new high resolution method, it could be concluded that the impact of the surface fluxes in the upper layer is high on the energy balance on a daily scale. During the measuring period it was possible to use the temperature measured by the DTS to determine the sensible heat flux, the latent heat flux and the ground heat flux of both lakes.

van Emmerik, T. H. M.; Wenker, K. J. R.; Rimmer, A.; de Jong, S. A. P.; Lechinsky, Y.; van de Giesen, N. C.

2012-04-01

61

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite. Part II; Validation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes from the Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) are estimated from empirical angular distribution models (ADMs) that convert instantaneous radiance measurements to TOA fluxes. This paper evaluates the accuracy of CERES TOA fluxes obtained from a new set of ADMs developed for the CERES instrument onboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The uncertainty in regional monthly mean reflected shortwave (SW) and emitted longwave (LW) TOA fluxes is less than 0.5 W/sq m, based on comparisons with TOA fluxes evaluated by direct integration of the measured radiances. When stratified by viewing geometry, TOA fluxes from different angles are consistent to within 2% in the SW and 0.7% (or 2 W/sq m) in the LW. In contrast, TOA fluxes based on ADMs from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) applied to the same CERES radiance measurements show a 10% relative increase with viewing zenith angle in the SW and a 3.5% (9 W/sq m) decrease with viewing zenith angle in the LW. Based on multiangle CERES radiance measurements, 18 regional instantaneous TOA flux errors from the new CERES ADMs are estimated to be 10 W/sq m in the SW and, 3.5 W/sq m in the LW. The errors show little or no dependence on cloud phase, cloud optical depth, and cloud infrared emissivity. An analysis of cloud radiative forcing (CRF) sensitivity to differences between ERBE and CERES TRMM ADMs, scene identification, and directional models of albedo as a function of solar zenith angle shows that ADM and clear-sky scene identification differences can lead to an 8 W/sq m root-mean-square (rms) difference in 18 daily mean SW CRF and a 4 W/sq m rms difference in LW CRF. In contrast, monthly mean SW and LW CRF differences reach 3 W/sq m. CRF is found to be relatively insensitive to differences between the ERBE and CERES TRMM directional models.

Loeb, N. G.; Loukachine, K.; Wielicki, B. A.; Young, D. F.

2003-01-01

62

Modeling shortwave radiative fluxes from satellites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last two decades, significant progress has been made in assessing the Earth Radiation Balance from satellite observations. Yet, satellite based estimates differ from each other and from those provided by numerical models. Major issues are related to quality of satellite observations, such as the frequent changes in satellite observing systems, degradation of sensors, restricted spectral intervals and viewing geometry of sensors, and changes in the quality of atmospheric inputs that drive the inference schemes. To reduce differences among the satellite based estimates requires, among others, updates to inference schemes so that most recent auxiliary information can be fully utilized. This paper reports on improvements introduced to a methodology developed at the University of Maryland to estimate shortwave (SW) radiative fluxes within the atmosphere system from satellite observations, the implementation of the approach with newly available auxiliary information, evaluation of the downwelling SW flux against ground observations, and comparison with independent satellite methods and numerical models. Specifically, introduced are: new Narrow to Broadband (N/B) transformations and new Angular Distribution Models (ADM) for clear and cloudy sky that incorporate most recent land use classifications; improved aerosol treatment; separation of clouds by phase; improved sun-earth geometry; and implementation at 0.5° spatial resolution at 3-hourly intervals integrated to daily and monthly time scales. When compared to an earlier version of the model as implemented at 2.5° at global scale and against observations from the globally distributed Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) stations for a period of six years (at monthly time scale), the bias was reduced from 8.6 (4.6%) to -0.5 (0.3%) W/m2, the standard deviation from 16.6 (8.9%) to 14.5 (7.8%) W/m2while the correlation remained high at 0.98 in both cases. Evaluation was also done over oceanic sites as available from the Pilot Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic (PIRATA) moorings and from the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean/Triangle Trans-Ocean Buoy Network (TAO/TRITON) moorings in the tropical Pacific Ocean. Overall, results over oceans were not as good as over land for all the satellite retrievals compared in this study.

Ma, Y.; Pinker, R. T.

2012-12-01

63

Empirical Modeling of Radiative versus Magnetic Flux for the Sun-as-a-Star  

E-print Network

We study the relationship between full-disk solar radiative flux at different wavelengths and average solar photospheric magnetic-flux density, using daily measurements from the Kitt Peak magnetograph and other instruments extending over one or more solar cycles. We use two different statistical methods to determine the underlying nature of these flux-flux relationships. First, we use statistical correlation and regression analysis and show that the relationships are not monotonic for total solar irradiance and for continuum radiation from the photosphere, but are approximately linear for chromospheric and coronal radiation. Second, we use signal theory to examine the flux-flux relationships for a temporal component. We find that a well-defined temporal component exists and accounts for some of the variance in the data. This temporal component arises because active regions with high magnetic field strength evolve, breaking up into small-scale magnetic elements with low field strength, and radiative and magnet...

Preminger, Dora; Chapman, Gary; Martens, Petrus C H; 10.1007/s11207-010-9560-1

2010-01-01

64

An Overview of the GEWEX Radiative Flux Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Radiative Flux Assessment (RFA) is an international effort to produce a community-wide evaluation of the currently available long-term radiative flux data sets derived from satellite based analysis in the context of global change detection and analysis. Its primary activity consists of assessing the uncertainties associated with these data sets by comparing TOA

P. W. Stackhouse Jr.; L. M. Hinkelman; T. Wong; L. H. Chambers; B. A. Wielicki

2009-01-01

65

Heat flux microsensor measurements and calibrations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new thin-film heat flux gage has been fabricated specifically for severe high temperature operation using platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium for the thermocouple elements. Radiation calibrations of this gage were performed at the AEDC facility over the available heat flux range (approx. 1.0 - 1,000 W/cu cm). The gage output was linear with heat flux with a slight increase in sensitivity with increasing surface temperature. Survivability of gages was demonstrated in quench tests from 500 C into liquid nitrogen. Successful operation of gages to surface temperatures of 750 C has been achieved. No additional cooling of the gages is required because the gages are always at the same temperature as the substrate material. A video of oxyacetylene flame tests with real-time heat flux and temperature output is available.

Terrell, James P.; Hager, Jon M.; Onishi, Shinzo; Diller, Thomas E.

1992-01-01

66

Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

Cook, DR

2011-01-31

67

How Well are Recent Climate Variability Signals Resolved by Satellite Radiative Flux Estimates?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One notable aspect of Earth s climate is that although the planet appears to be very close to radiative balance at top-of-atmosphere (TOA), the atmosphere itself and underlying surface are not. Profound exchanges of energy between the atmosphere and oceans, land and cryosphere occur over a range of time scales. Recent evidence from broadband satellite measurements suggests that even these TOA fluxes contain some detectable variations. Our ability to measure and reconstruct radiative fluxes at the surface and at the top of atmosphere is improving rapidly. Understanding the character of radiative flux estimates and relating them to variations in other energy fluxes and climate state variables is key to improving our understanding of climate. In this work we will evaluate several recently released estimates of radiative fluxes, focusing primarily on surface estimates. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project FD radiative flux profiles are available from rnid-1983 to near present and have been constructed by driving the radiative transfer physics from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) global model with ISCCP clouds and HlRS operational soundings profiles. Full and clear sky SW and LW fluxes are produced. A similar product from the NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget Project using different radiative flux codes and thermodynamics from the NASA/Goddard Earth Observing System assimilation model makes a similar calculation of surface fluxes. However this data set currently extends only through 1995. Several estimates of downward LW flux at the surface inferred from microwave data are also examined. Since these products have been evaluated with Baseline Surface Radiation Network data over land we focus over ocean regions and use the DOE/NOAA/NASA Shipboard Ocean Atmospheric Radiation (SOAR) surface flux measurements to characterize performance of these data sets under both clear and cloudy conditions. Some aspects of performance are stratified according to SST and vertical motion regimes. Comparisons to the TRMM/CERES SRB data in 1998 are also interpreted. These radiative fluxes are then analyzed to determine how surface (and TOA) radiative exchanges respond to interannual signals of ENS0 warm and cold events. Our analysis includes regional changes as well as integrated signals over land, ocean and various latitude bands. Changes in water vapor and cloud forcing signatures are prominent on interannual time scales. Prominent signals are also found in the SW fluxes for the Pinatubo volcanic event. These systematic changes in fluxes are related to changes in large-scale circulations and energy transport in the atmosphere and ocean. Some estimates of signal-to-noise and reliability are discussed to place our results in context.

Robertson, Franklin R.; Lu, H.-L.

2004-01-01

68

Advances in the Surface Renewal Flux Measurement Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The measurement of ecosystem-scale energy and mass fluxes between the planetary surface and the atmosphere is crucial for understanding geophysical processes. Surface renewal is a flux measurement technique based on analyzing the turbulent coherent structures that interact with the surface. It is a less expensive technique because it does not require fast-response velocity measurements, but only a fast-response scalar measurement. It is therefore also a useful tool for the study of the global cycling of trace gases. Currently, surface renewal requires calibration against another flux measurement technique, such as eddy covariance, to account for the linear bias of its measurements. We present two advances in the surface renewal theory and methodology that bring the technique closer to becoming a fully independent flux measurement method. The first advance develops the theory of turbulent coherent structure transport associated with the different scales of coherent structures. A novel method was developed for identifying the scalar change rate within structures at different scales. Our results suggest that for canopies less than one meter in height, the second smallest coherent structure scale dominates the energy and mass flux process. Using the method for resolving the scalar exchange rate of the second smallest coherent structure scale, calibration is unnecessary for surface renewal measurements over short canopies. This study forms the foundation for analysis over more complex surfaces. The second advance is a sensor frequency response correction for measuring the sensible heat flux via surface renewal. Inexpensive fine-wire thermocouples are frequently used to record high frequency temperature data in the surface renewal technique. The sensible heat flux is used in conjunction with net radiation and ground heat flux measurements to determine the latent heat flux as the energy balance residual. The robust thermocouples commonly used in field experiments underestimate the sensible heat flux, yielding results that are less than 50% of the sensible heat flux measured with finer sensors. We present the methodology for correcting the thermocouple signal to avoid underestimating the heat flux at both the smallest and the second smallest coherent structure scale.

Shapland, T. M.; McElrone, A.; Paw U, K. T.; Snyder, R. L.

2011-12-01

69

ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION MEASUREMENT PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ARM scientists focus on obtaining field measurements and developing models to better understand the processes that control solar and...

70

Measuring Response Of Propellant To Oscillatory Heat Flux  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Apparatus for research in combustion of solid propellants measures oscillatory response of rate of burning to oscillating thermal radiation from modulated CO2 laser. Determines response to rate of burning to equivalent oscillation in pressure. Rod of propellant mounted in burner assembly including waveguide at one end and infrared window at other end. Microwave Doppler velocimeter measures motion of combustion front. Microwave, laser-current, and heat-flux signals processed into and recorded in forms useful in determining desired response of propellent.

Strand, Leon D.; Schwartz, Ken; Burns, Shawn P.

1990-01-01

71

4, 66036643, 2004 Flux measurements  

E-print Network

deciduous forest site in North-Western Germany using the eddy covari- ance (EC) technique. The measurement site was characterised by a forest of inho-5 mogeneous composition, complex canopy structure, limited this forest, with average emissions10 (normalised to 30 C and 1000 µmoles m-2 s-1 PAR) of 1.5 and 0.39 µg m-2

Boyer, Edmond

72

Radon flux maps for the Netherlands and Europe using terrestrial gamma radiation derived from soil radionuclides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Naturally occurring radioactive noble gas, radon (222Rn) is a valuable tracer to study atmospheric processes and to validate global chemical transport models. However, the use of radon as a proxy in atmospheric and climate research is limited by the uncertainties in the magnitude and distribution of the radon flux density over the Earth's surface. Terrestrial gamma radiation is a useful proxy for generating radon flux maps. A previously reported radon flux map of Europe used terrestrial gamma radiation extracted from automated radiation monitoring networks. This approach failed to account for the influence of local artificial radiation sources around the detector, leading to under/over estimation of the reported radon flux values at different locations. We present an alternative approach based on soil radionuclides which enables us to generate accurate radon flux maps with good confidence. Firstly, we present a detailed comparison between the terrestrial gamma radiation obtained from the National Radiation Monitoring network of the Netherlands and the terrestrial gamma radiation calculated from soil radionuclides. Extending further, we generated radon flux maps of the Netherlands and Europe using our proposed approach. The modelled flux values for the Netherlands agree reasonably well with the two observed direct radon flux measurements (within 2? level). On the European scale, we find that the observed radon flux values are higher than our modelled values and we introduce a correction factor to account for this difference. Our approach discussed in this paper enables us to develop reliable and accurate radon flux maps in countries with little or no information on radon flux values.

Manohar, S. N.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Herber, M. A.

2013-12-01

73

Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor  

DOEpatents

Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

Mihalczo, John T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN); McElhaney, Stephanie A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01

74

Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor  

DOEpatents

Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination. 3 figs.

Mihalczo, J.T.; Simpson, M.L.; McElhaney, S.A.

1994-10-04

75

Assessing surface solar radiation fluxes in CMIP5 model simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sophisticated Earth System models (ESM) are an essential research tool for better understanding the global climate system and its interactions. They are indispensable tools for providing projections about potential evolutions of the Earth climate in the future. Given the complexity of these deterministic models, it is essential to have a solid knowledge of the uncertainties of the model results in difference aspects of the models. The present paper presents results from a comprehensive study analyzing the shortwave surface radiation fluxes. State-of-the-art globals datasets of surface radiation components (surface solar radiation flux, surface albedo, surface net radiation flux) are used to benchmark results from the recent Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) in a standardized manner at the regional to global scale. Different skill score metrices are compared. All CMIP5 models are ranked according to their performance skill scores. The uncertainties from current observational records compared to uncertainties in climate model simulations are also analyzed. The results indicate that there are still large uncertainties (inconsistencies) among the different existing global surface radiation dataset which lead to rather different (relative) model rankings. In other words, the rank of a model is not only determined by the skill of the model itself, but also largely by the choice of a benchmarking (reference) dataset. As the differences resulting from the choice of different observational datasets are larger than between different models, progress in surface radiation flux simulations of climate models might depend on further progress in achieving consistent observations of surface radiation fluxes from space.

Loew, Alexander; Itkin, Mikhail; Andersson, Axel; Trentmann, Jörg; Fennig, Karsten; Schröder, Marc

2014-05-01

76

Near-Core and In-Core Neutron Radiation Monitors for Real Time Neutron Flux Monitoring and Reactor Power Level Measurements  

SciTech Connect

MPFDs are a new class of detectors that utilize properties from existing radiation detector designs. A majority of these characteristics come from fission chamber designs. These include radiation hardness, gamma-ray background insensitivity, and large signal output.

Douglas S. McGregor; Marvin L. Adams; Igor Carron; Paul Nelson

2006-06-12

77

Solar UVA and UV-B radiation fluxes at two Alpine stations at different altitudes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Daily totals of UV-A and UV-B radiation fluxes and global radiation were measured since 1981 at Jungfraujoch (3576 m) a.s.l.) and in Innsbruck (577 m a.s.l.) in their seasonal course. The altitude effect of annual totals yields 19%\\/1000 m (UV-B), 11%\\/1000 m (UV-A) and 9%\\/1000 m (global radiation) with reference to Innsbruck station. The ratio of the daily totals of

M. Blumthaler; W. Ambach; W. Rehwald

1992-01-01

78

Cosmic matter flux may turn Hawking radiation off  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An astrophysical (cosmological) black hole forming in a cosmological context will be subject to a flux of infalling matter and radiation, which will cause the outer apparent horizon (a marginal trapping surface) to be spacelike spacelike (Ellis et al., arXiv:1407.3577). As a consequence the radiation emitted close to the apparent horizon no longer arrives at infinity with a diverging redshift. Standard calculations of the emission of Hawking radiation then indicate that no blackbody radiation is emitted to infinity by the black hole in these circumstances, hence there will also then be no black hole evaporation process due to emission of such radiation as long as the matter flux is significant. The essential adiabatic condition (eikonal approximation) for black hole radiation gives a strong limit to the black holes that can emit Hawking radiation. We give the mass range for the black holes that can radiate, according to their cosmological redshift, for the special case of the cosmic blackbody radiation (CBR) influx (which exists everywhere in the universe). At a very late stage of black hole formation when the CBR influx decays away, the black hole horizon becomes first a slowly evolving horizon and then an isolated horizon; at that stage, black hole radiation will start. This study suggests that the primordial black hole evaporation scenario should be revised to take these considerations into account.

Firouzjaee, Javad T.; Ellis, George F. R.

2015-02-01

79

Data assimilation tool to reconstruct particle flux measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the framework of the EU-FP7 MAARBLE project, the Salammbô code and an ensemble Kalman filter is being used to reproduce the electron radiation belt dynamics during storms: (1) The ONERA data assimilation tool has been improved to ingest count rates instead of flux when the instrument response function is available. As an example, the ESA/SREM radiation monitor has complex response functions (proton and electron events are mixed, and for a given specie the instrument responds to a broad range of energies with different efficiencies) which makes very challenging to get fluxes out of count rates. (2) INTEGRAL/SREM, GIOVE-B/SREM, XMM/ERMD and GOES/SEM data assimilation is performed to reproduce with high fidelity the electron belt dynamics during magnetic storms. (3) Because the outputs of the tool are phase space densities, it is then possible to reconstruct INTEGRAL/SREM and GIOVE-B/SREM fluxes time series. In the present talk, an overview of the data assimilation tool will be given. The advantage of using assimilation tool to reconstruct particle flux measurements will be discussed. MAARBLE has received fundings from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-.2010-1, SP1 Cooperation, Collaborative project) under grant agreement n284520. This paper reflects only the authors' views and the European Union is not liable for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

Bourdarie, Sebastien A.; Maget, Vincent; Lazaro, Didier; Sandberg, Ingmar

2014-05-01

80

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite. Part I: Methodology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) investigates the critical role that clouds and aerosols play in modulating the radiative energy flow within the Earth-atmosphere system. CERES builds upon the foundation laid by previous missions, such as the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment, to provide highly accurate top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes together with coincident cloud and aerosol properties inferred from

Norman G. Loeb; Natividad Manalo-Smith; Seiji Kato; Walter F. Miller; Shashi K. Gupta; Patrick Minnis; Bruce A. Wielicki

2003-01-01

81

Micrometeorological flux measurements at a coastal site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The eddy covariance (EC) technique is the only direct measurement of the momentum, heat, and trace gas (e.g. water vapor, CO2 and ozone) fluxes. The measurements are expected to be most accurate over flat terrain where there is an extended homogenous surface upwind from the tower, and when the environmental conditions are steady. Additionally, the one dimensional approach assumes that vertical turbulent exchange is the dominant flux, whereas advective influences should be negligible. The application of EC method under non-ideal conditions, for example in complex terrain, has yet to be fully explored. To explore the possibilities and limitations of EC technique under non-ideal conditions, an EC system was set up at Selles beach, Crete, Greece (35.33°N, 25.71°E) in the beginning of July 2012. The dominant wind direction was west, parallel to the coast. The EC system consisted of a sonic anemometer (CSAT3 Campbell Scientific), an infrared open-path CO2/H2O gas analyzer (LI-7500, Li-COR Biosciences) and a fast chemiluminescence ozone analyzer (enviscope GmbH). All the signals of these fast response instruments were sampled at 10 Hz and the measurement height was 3 m. Besides, another gradient system was setup. Air temperature, relative humidity (HYGROMER MP 103 A), and wind speed (WMT700 Vaisala) were measured every 10 seconds at 3 heights (0.7, 1.45, 3 m). Air intakes were set up at 0.7m and 3m. A pump drew the air through a flow system and a telflon valve alternately switched between the two heights every 30 seconds. H2O, CO2 (LI-840A, Li-COR Biosciences) and ozone mixing ratio s (model 205, 2BTechnologies) were measured every 10 seconds. Momentum, heat, CO2 and ozone fluxes were evaluated by both EC and gradient technique. For the calculation of turbulent fluxes, TK3 algorithm (Department of Micrometeorology, University Bayreuth, Germany) was applied. We will present the measured fluxes of the two systems and assess the data quality under such non-ideal condition.

Song, Guozheng; Meixner, Franz X.; Bruse, Michael; Mamtimin, Buhalqem

2014-05-01

82

An overview of results from the GEWEX radiation flux assessment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multi-annual radiative flux averages of the International Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), of the GEWEX - Surface Radiation Budget Project (SRB) and of the Clouds and Earth Radiative Energy System (CERES) are compared and analyzed to characterize the Earth's radiative budget, assess differences and identify possible causes. These satellite based data-sets are also compared to results of a median model, which represents 20 climate models, that participated in the 4th IPCC assessment. Consistent distribution patterns and seasonal variations among the satellite data-sets demonstrate their scientific value, which would further increase if the datasets would be reanalyzed with more accurate and consistent ancillary data.

Raschke, E.; Stackhouse, P.; Kinne, S.; Contributors from Europe; the USA

2013-05-01

83

Indication of increasing solar ultraviolet-B radiation flux in alpine regions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements at the Jungfraujoch High Mountain Station (Swiss Alps, 47°N, 3,576 meters above sea level) indicate that there has been a slight increase of about 1% per year in the flux of solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290 to 330 nanometers) since 1981. A Robertson-Berger detector was used to measure solar erythemal radiation. The increase can be related to a long-term ozone

M. Blumthaler; W. Ambach

1990-01-01

84

Radiation detection and measurement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introductory material covers radiation sources, radiation interactions, general properties of radiation detectors, and counting statistics and error prediction. This is followed by detailed sections on gas-filled detectors, scintillation counters, semiconductor detectors, neutron detectors and spectroscopy, detector electronics and pulse processing, and miscellaneous radiation detectors and applications.

Glenn F. Knoll

1979-01-01

85

Simple device measures solar radiation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simple inexpensive thermometer, insolated from surroundings by transparent glass or plastic encasement, measures intensities of solar radiation, or radiation from other sources such as furnaces or ovens. Unit can be further modified to accomplish readings from remote locations.

Humphries, W. R.

1977-01-01

86

The CERES/ARM/GEWEX experiment (CAGEX) for the retrieval of radiative fluxes with satellite data  

SciTech Connect

Results from a temporally intensive, limited area, radiative transfer model experiment are on-line for investigating the vertical profile of shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes from the surface to the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The CERES/ARM/GEWEX Experiment (CAGEX) Version 1 provides a record of fluxes that have been computed with a radiative transfer code; the atmospheric sounding, aerosol, and satellite-retrieved cloud data on which the computations have been based; and surface-based measurements of radiative fluxes and cloud properties from ARM for comparison. The computed broadband fluxes at TOA show considerable scatter when compared with fluxes that are inferred empirically from narrowband operational satellite data. At the surface, LW fluxes computed with an alternate sounding dataset compare well with pyrgeometer measurements. In agreement with earlier work, the authors find that the calculated SW surface insolation is larger than the measurements for clear-sky and total-sky conditions. This experiment has been developed to test retrievals of radiative fluxes and the associated forcings by clouds, aerosols, surface properties, and water vapor. Collaboration is sought; the goal is to extend the domain of meteorological conditions for which such retrievals can be done accurately. CAGEX Version 1 covers April 1994. Subsequent versions will (a) at first span the same limited geographical area with data from October 1995, (b) then expand to cover a significant fraction of the GEWEX Continental-Scale International Project region for April 1996 through September 1996, and (c) eventually be used in a more advanced form to validate CERES.

Charlock, T.P. [NASA/Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)] [NASA/Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Alberta, T.L. [Analytical Services and Materials, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States)] [Analytical Services and Materials, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States)

1996-11-01

87

Multi-spectra Cosmic Ray Flux Measurement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Earth's upper atmosphere is constantly bombarded by rain of charged particles known as primary cosmic rays. These primary cosmic rays will collide with the atmospheric molecules and create extensive secondary particles which shower downward to the surface of the Earth. In recent years, a few studies have been done regarding to the applications of the cosmic ray measurements and the correlations between the Earth's climate conditions and the cosmic ray fluxes [1,2,3]. Most of the particles, which reach to the surface of the Earth, are muons together with a small percentage of electrons, gammas, neutrons, etc. At Georgia State University, multiple cosmic ray particle detectors have been constructed to measure the fluxes and energy distributions of the secondary cosmic ray particles. In this presentation, we will briefly describe these prototype detectors and show the preliminary test results. Reference: [1] K.Borozdin, G.Hogan, C.Morris, W.Priedhorsky, A.Saunders, L.Shultz, M.Teasdale, Nature, Vol.422, 277 (2003). [2] L.V. Egorova, V. Ya Vovk, O.A. Troshichev, Journal of Atmospheric and Terrestrial Physics 62, 955-966 (2000). [3] Henrik Svensmark, Phy. Rev. Lett. 81, 5027 (1998). )

He, Xiaochun; Dayananda, Mathes

2010-02-01

88

Measurement of the solar UV flux in the stratosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measurements of the direct solar flux from balloons at an altitude of 40 km are used to determine the effective cross sections of the Schumann-Runge bands. Transmission in these bands, which lie between 180 and 200 nm, allows the Sun's radiation in this region of the spectrum to penetrate into the lower mesosphere. Measurements by a high resolution scanning spectrometer (0.02 nm) are used to measure the transmission in the Schumann-Runge bands. Since ozone absorbs in this wavelength region, a low resolution scanning spectrometer (0.25 nm) measures the transmission between 220 and 260 nm, allowing the column ozone to be determined. Absorption due to ozone can then be calculated and the data corrected for this effect.

Mentall, James E.

1990-01-01

89

Horizontal Radiative Fluxes in Clouds at Absorbing Wavelengths  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We discuss the effect of horizontal fluxes on the accuracy of a conventional plane-parallel radiative transfer calculation for a single pixel, known as the Independent Pixel Approximation (IPA) at absorbing wavelengths. Vertically integrated horizontal fluxes can be represented as a sum of three components; each component is the IPA accuracy on a pixel-by-pixel basis for reflectance, transmittance and absorptance, respectively. We show that IPA accuracy for reflectance always improves with more absorption, while the IPA accuracy for transmittance is less sensitive to the changes in absorption: with respect to the non-absorbing case, it may first deteriorate for weak absorption and then improve again for strongly absorbing wavelengths. EPA accuracy for absorptance always deteriorates with more absorption. As a result, vertically integrated horizontal fluxes, as a sum of IPA accuracies for reflectance, transmittance and absorptance, increase with more absorption. Finally, the question of correlations between horizontal fluxes, IPA uncertainties and radiative smoothing is addressed using wavenumber spectra of radiation fields reflected from or transmitted through fractal clouds.

Marshak, A.; Oreopoulos, L.; Davis, A. B.; Wiscombe, W. J.

1998-01-01

90

Comparison of the Radiative Two-Flux and Diffusion Approximations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Approximate solutions are sometimes used to determine the heat transfer and temperatures in a semitransparent material in which conduction and thermal radiation are acting. A comparison of the Milne-Eddington two-flux approximation and the diffusion approximation for combined conduction and radiation heat transfer in a ceramic material was preformed to determine the accuracy of the diffusion solution. A plane gray semitransparent layer without a substrate and a non-gray semitransparent plane layer on an opaque substrate were considered. For the plane gray layer the material is semitransparent for all wavelengths and the scattering and absorption coefficients do not vary with wavelength. For the non-gray plane layer the material is semitransparent with constant absorption and scattering coefficients up to a specified wavelength. At higher wavelengths the non-gray plane layer is assumed to be opaque. The layers are heated on one side and cooled on the other by diffuse radiation and convection. The scattering and absorption coefficients were varied. The error in the diffusion approximation compared to the Milne-Eddington two flux approximation was obtained as a function of scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient. The percent difference in interface temperatures and heat flux through the layer obtained using the Milne-Eddington two-flux and diffusion approximations are presented as a function of scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient. The largest errors occur for high scattering and low absorption except for the back surface temperature of the plane gray layer where the error is also larger at low scattering and low absorption. It is shown that the accuracy of the diffusion approximation can be improved for some scattering and absorption conditions if a reflectance obtained from a Kubelka-Munk type two flux theory is used instead of a reflection obtained from the Fresnel equation. The Kubelka-Munk reflectance accounts for surface reflection and radiation scattered back by internal scattering sites while the Fresnel reflection only accounts for surface reflections.

Spuckler, Charles M.

2006-01-01

91

Saharan Airborne Dust Flux Measurements from the Fennec Campaign  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Fennec campaign of 2011involved deployment of the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements BAe 146 (FAAM Bae 146) scientific research aircraft to Fuerteventura with research flights over the remote Saharan desert in Mali and Mauritania. The aims of the Fennec campaign were to characterise the dynamics, radiation and dust environment in this inaccessible region. The FAAM BAe 146 operated a suite of instruments which measured size distributions of dust including a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe, a Cloud Droplet Probe and a Cloud Imaging Probe (part of a Cloud, Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer). These instruments were able to reliably generate particle size distributions over the approximate range 0.1 to 200 ?m and for the first time were simultaneously operated at high temporal resolution of at least 10 Hz. Combining these dust measurements with the measured 3D wind vectors has allowed size resolved dust flux estimates to be derived using the eddy covariance method. To the authors' knowledge this is the first time such estimates have been successfully derived from aircraft data. Although the FAAM BAe 146 is capable of low level flying with straight and level runs at minimum altitudes of ~100 m (higher in poor visibility), this is still significantly higher than mast based flux measurements making comparison of the total flux with surface based observations difficult. However, these observations give useful measures of the size dependence of the particle flux and the spectral signature of the dynamics of vertical dust transport. The size resolved measurements show that dust mass flux includes significant contributions up to particle diameters ~100 ?m. This is much larger than the limit seen by other studies and is even more surprising given that the measurements were made at heights so far above the saltation layer. Spectral analysis shows three distinct dynamical regimes. The first appears to be linked to chaotic turbulence with horizontal scales of ~100 m. The second seems to be linked to features on scales ~1 km, similar to the order of the boundary layer depth. Finally, in the third regime, the concentration and wind measurements have a very asymmetric cross correlation series in the along flight direction which may indicate a preferred orientation for turbulent eddies caused buy e.g. shear. These characteristics are linked to the weather conditions and dust uplift mechanisms for each case.

Rosenberg, Phil; Parker, Doug; Ryder, Claire; Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Marsham, John; Dorsey, James; Brooks, Ian; Dean, Angela; Crosier, Jonathan; McQuaid, Jim; Washington, Richard

2013-04-01

92

Kilometric radiation power flux dependence on area of discrete aurora  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Kilometer wavelength radiation, measured from distant positions over the North Pole and over the Earth's equator, was compared to the area of discrete aurora imaged by several low-altitude spacecraft. Through correlative studies of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) with about two thousand auroral images, a stereoscopic view of the average auroral acceleration region was obtained. A major result is that the total AKR power increases as the area of the discrete auroral oval increases. The implications are that the regions of parallel potentials or the auroral plasma cavities, in which AKR is generated, must possess the following attributes: (1) they are shallow in altitude and their radial position depends on wavelength, (2) they thread flux tubes of small cross section, (3) the generation mechanism in them reaches a saturation limit rapidly, and (4) their distribution over the discrete auroral oval is nearly uniform. The above statistical results are true for large samples collected over a long period of time (about six months). In the short term, AKR frequently exhibits temporal variations with scales as short as three minutes (the resolution of the averaged data used). These fluctuations are explainable by rapid quenchings as well as fast starts of the electron cyclotron maser mechanism. There were times when AKR was present at substantial power levels while optical emissions were below instrument thresholds. A recent theoretical result may account for this set of observations by predicting that suprathermal electrons, of energies as low as several hundred eV, can generate second harmonic AKR. The indirect observations of second harmonic AKR require that these electrons have mirror points high above the atmosphere so as to minimize auroral light emissions. The results provide evidence supporting the electron cyclotron maser mechanism.

Saflekos, N. A.; Burch, J. L.; Gurnett, D. A.; Anderson, R. R.; Sheehan, R. E.

1989-01-01

93

Estimation of net radiation flux distribution on the southern slopes of the central Himalayas using MODIS data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent studies have highlighted the importance of the southern slopes of the Himalayas as a possible heating source driving the South Asian Summer Monsoon (SASM). The central Himalayas are characterized by a complex topography; consequently the measurements regarding land surface heat fluxes are scarce. In this study we tested the feasibility of deriving the regional net radiation flux, an essential component of the surface energy balance, from MODIS data. Three MODIS data scenes were used to derive net radiation flux, taking into account the effect of topography and a detailed extinction process within the atmosphere. This is the first time the regional net radiation flux distribution for the southern slopes of the central Himalayas has been derived from satellite data. The net shortwave radiation flux, net longwave radiation flux and net radiation flux from MODIS data agree well with field observations with mean relative errors of 6.19%, 7.72% and 6.60% respectively. We can therefore conclude that the aforementioned net radiation flux can reasonably be obtained using this method.

Amatya, Pukar Man; Ma, Yaoming; Han, Cunbo; Wang, Binbin; Devkota, Lochan Prasad

2015-03-01

94

New technique of the local heat flux measurement in combustion chambers of steam boilers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new method for measurement of local heat flux to water-walls of steam boilers was developed. A flux meter tube was made from an eccentric tube of short length to which two longitudinal fins were attached. These two fins prevent the boiler setting from heating by a thermal radiation from the combustion chamber. The fins are not welded to the adjacent water-wall tubes, so that the temperature distribution in the heat flux meter is not influenced by neighbouring water-wall tubes. The thickness of the heat flux tube wall is larger on the fireside to obtain a greater distance between the thermocouples located inside the wall which increases the accuracy of heat flux determination. Based on the temperature measurements at selected points inside the heat flux meter, the heat flux absorbed by the water-wall, heat transfer coefficient on the inner tube surface and temperature of the water-steam mixture was determined.

Taler, Jan; Taler, Dawid; Sobota, Tomasz; Dzierwa, Piotr

2011-12-01

95

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOEpatents

An apparatus is described for measuring momentum flux from an intense plasma stream, comprising: refractory target means oriented normal to the flow of said plasma stream for bombardment by said plasma stream where said bombardment by said plasma stream applies a pressure to said target means, pendulum means for communicating a translational displacement of said target to a force transducer where said translational displacement of said target is transferred to said force transducer by an elongated member coupled to said target, where said member is suspended by a pendulum configuration means and where said force transducer is responsive to said translational displacement of said member, and force transducer means for outputting a signal representing pressure data corresponding to said displacement.

Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

1993-08-24

96

Latent heat sink in soil heat flux measurements  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

97

Boundary layer surface vorticity flux measurements at high Reynolds number  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under isothermal conditions vorticity enters a flow through a flux at the wall. If the walls are stationary, this flux is proportional to the pressure gradients in the plane of the surface. Wall vorticity flux measurements were acquired through the use of closely spaced microphones in arrays mounted flush with the surface. The measurements were acquired at Rtheta= O(10^6) under

Joe Klewicki; David Kenney

2005-01-01

98

Measurement of aerosol particles, gases and flux radiation in the Pico de Orizaba National Park, and its relationship to air pollution transport  

Microsoft Academic Search

Continuous atmospheric measurements were carried out at the Pico de Orizaba National Park (PONP), Mexico, in order to evaluate the characteristics and sources of air quality. This action allowed one to identify specific threats for the effective protection of natural resources and biodiversity. Results show the presence of particles and polluted gases transported by winds from the urban zones nearby

C. Márquez; T. Castro; A. Muhlia; M. Moya; A. Martínez-Arroyo; A. Báez

2005-01-01

99

Large Area Lunar Dust Flux Measurement Instrument  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The instrument under development is designed to characterize the flux and size distribution of the lunar micrometeoroid and secondary ejecta environment. When deployed on the lunar surface, the data collected will benefit fundamental lunar science as well as enabling more reliable impact risk assessments for human lunar exploration activities. To perform this task, the instrument requirements are demanding. It must have as large a surface area as possible to sample the very sparse population of the larger potentially damage-inducing micrometeorites. It must also have very high sensitivity to enable it to measure the flux of small (<10 micron) micrometeorite and secondary ejecta dust particles. To be delivered to the lunar surface, it must also be very low mass, rugged and stow compactly. The instrument designed to meet these requirements is called FOMIS. It is a large-area thin film under tension (i.e. a drum) with multiple fiber optic displacement (FOD) sensors to monitor displacements of the film. This sensor was chosen since it can measure displacements over a wide dynamic range: 1 cm to sub-Angstrom. A prototype system was successfully demonstrated using the hypervelocity impact test facility at the University of Kent (Canterbury, UK). Based on these results, the prototype system can detect hypervelocity (approx.5 km/s) impacts by particles as small as 2 microns diameter. Additional tests using slow speeds find that it can detect secondary ejecta particles (which do not penetrate the film) with momentums as small as 15 pico-gram 100m/s, or nominally 5 microns diameter at 100 m/s.

Corsaro, R.; Giovane, F.; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Burchell, M.; Stansbery, Eugene; Lagakos, N.

2009-01-01

100

Charged Particle Measurements with the Radiation Assessment Detector on Board the Mars Science Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on board the MSL Curiosity rover is conducting the first-ever radiation measurements on the martian surface. Here, we present measurement results of charged particle fluxes and their temporal evolution.

Ehresmann, B.; Hassler, D. M.; Zeitlin, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Koehler, J.; Appel, J. K.; Boehm, E.; Boettcher, S.; Brinza, D. E.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Lohf, H.; Martin, C.; Posner, A.; Rafkin, S.; Reitz, G.

2014-07-01

101

Annual Cycle of Radiation Fluxes over the Arctic Ocean: Sensitivity to Cloud Optical Properties  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between cloud optical properties and the radiative fluxes over the Arctic Ocean is explored by conducting a series of modeling experiments. The annual cycle of arctic cloud optical properties that are required to reproduce both the outgoing radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere as determined from satellite observations and the available determinations of surface radiative fluxes

Judith A. Curry; Elizabeth E. Ebert

1992-01-01

102

Scaling of shortwave radiation fluxes for sub grid topography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shortwave radiation plays an important role in the surface energy balance for understanding mass balances, snow cover distribution as well as snow melt. Incident shortwave radiation is greatly altered by mountainous terrain. While distributed radiation balance models can account for all topographic influences at small scales, for larger scale applications, such as climate and hydrological models, physically based sub grid parameterizations are required. We present a complete shortwave radiation parameterization scheme for sub grid topography accounting for shading, limited sky view and terrain reflections. Each radiative flux is parameterized individually. The parameters required are sun elevation angle, domain-averaged surface albedo and terrain parameters such as slope angle, slope distribution and sky view factor. We show that the domain-averaged sky view factor as an important parameter of the scheme can be theoretically related to the slope distribution. This suggests that the parametrization can solely be computed from slope characteristics and the numerically expensive computation of horizons angles can be abandoned. To validate the parameterization scheme we used domain-averaged values from a detailed radiation balance model for the three-dimensional radiative transfer in complex terrain. In order to minimize influences in the modeled distributed radiation arising from specific geomorphology and climate we compiled a large ensemble of several thousand Gaussian topographies with a broad range of characteristic scales and used fixed sun positions. Overall, modeled radiation from the simulated topographies compared well with parameterized values. We found that depending on sun elevation angles, shading and limited sky view alter direct beam and diffuse sky radiation by up to 40% each. We confirmed that when using domain-averaged values, multiple, anisotropic terrain reflections can be approximated with single, isotropic terrain reflections.

Helbig, N.; Loewe, H.; Adams, E. E.

2011-12-01

103

Effects of Clouds on Cross-Atmospheric Radiative Flux Divergence: Case Studies in Different Cloud Conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Clouds have a profound effect on the amount of radiation absorbed across the atmospheric column. The amount of absorption mainly depends on the location and type of the clouds, the albedo of the surface and profile of water vapor mixing ratio in the atmospheric column. In this study we have used the data collected during the deployment of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)'s first Mobile Facility (AMF#1) at the island of Graciosa in the North Atlantic and at the Niamey, Niger to assess the impact of different cloud types on the cross-atmospheric radiative flux divergence. The cloud structure was retrieved using the data collected by a vertically pointing w-band cloud radar, a micro-pulse lidar, laser ceilometer among other instruments. The profiles of temperature, moisture and winds were measured by balloon borne radiosondes. The radiation at the surface were measured by broadband radiometers, while the radiation at the top of the atmosphere were measured by the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) radiometers onboard the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite. Simulations of a 1-dimensional radiative transfer model called as Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTM) having representation of cloud and aerosol properties are made to assess the relative impact of different cloud types and water vapor on spectral bands both in the shortwave and longwave radiation spectrum. Results from four case-studies which had cloud free conditions, single layered stratocumulus clouds, broken shallow cumulus clouds and high level cirrus clouds respectively will be presented.

Ghate, V. P.; Miller, M. A.

2013-12-01

104

Filling gaps in the time series of tall tower flux measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The expanding network of tall tower based eddy covariance measurements provides new insight into the biogeochemical cycles of the biosphere over an extended region as compared to the patch scale FLUXNET sites. For tall tower based eddy covariance systems the role of storage flux plays an increasing role with increasing measurement height, which raises new methodological issues. Here we present results based on the tall tower measurements performed at Lutjewad, The Netherlands (6° 21' E, 53° 24' N, 1 m ASL). At Lutjewad the eddy covariance system is installed at 50 m height above the ground, and no storage flux measurements are performed. The basic aim of our study is to provide a methodology to fill the measurement gaps and to provide daily net ecosystem exchange (NEE) sums without correcting for storage. Atmospheric fluxes are generally transformed to surface fluxes before gaps in the data are filled via the estimation of the storage flux. Without accurate storage estimation the transformation becomes less accurate with increasing distance above the surface. Here we propose an alternative method to fill gaps of atmospheric fluxes directly using empirical relations with environmental parameters. We find that atmospheric fluxes were time lagged to variations in radiation. Moreover, we find atmospheric fluxes at elevated height increase almost proportionally with friction velocity. These findings were related to storage between the surface and measurement level. Our results are compared with data taken from the Hungarian tall tower measurements where storage flux is estimated.

Dragomir, Carmelia

2010-05-01

105

Cosmic rays muon flux measurements at Belgrade shallow underground laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Belgrade underground laboratory is a shallow underground one, at 25 meters of water equivalent. It is dedicated to low-background spectroscopy and cosmic rays measurement. Its uniqueness is that it is composed of two parts, one above ground, the other bellow with identical sets of detectors and analyzing electronics thus creating opportunity to monitor simultaneously muon flux and ambient radiation. We investigate the possibility of utilizing measurements at the shallow depth for the study of muons, processes to which these muons are sensitive and processes induced by cosmic rays muons. For this purpose a series of simulations of muon generation and propagation is done, based on the CORSIKA air shower simulation package and GEANT4. Results show good agreement with other laboratories and cosmic rays stations.

Veselinovi?, N.; Dragi?, A.; Maleti?, D.; Jokovi?, D.; Savi?, M.; Banjanac, R.; Udovi?i?, V.; Ani?in, I.

2015-02-01

106

Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainties in aerosol forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. Traditionally these feedbacks were not included in estimates of total aerosol forcing. Here we argue that they should be included because these feedbacks act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases) the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP), that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Thus we propose replacing the direct and indirect aerosol forcing in the IPCC forcing chart with RFP estimates. This implies that it is better to evaluate the total anthropogenic aerosol effect as a whole.

Lohmann, Ulrike; Storelvmo, Trude; Jones, Andy; Rotstayn, Leon; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, Johannes; Ekman, Annica; Koch, Dorothy; Ruedy, Reto

2009-09-25

107

Upward mass fluxes in tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere derived from radiative transfer calculations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Yang et al. [1] quantified vertical velocity and upward mass fluxes in tropical lower stratosphere based on radiative heating rate calculations using the Fu-Liou radiation model along with 8-year Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes balloon-borne measurements of temperature and ozone and cryogenic frost-point hygrometer measured water vapor. The impact of tropospheric clouds on stratospheric heating rates was considered using cloud distributions from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. Since the radiative heating rate in the lower stratosphere can be as small as 0.1-0.2 K/day, an accurate radiative heating rate calculation including all radiatively active species is required. In this paper, we revisit the calculations in Yang et al. [1] by developing a line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM-D4S) for multiple scattering atmospheres. We consider the cloud impact using the cloud fields based on active lidar and radar observations from CALIPSO and CloudSat so that the quantification of upward mass fluxes in tropical lower stratosphere can be extended to tropical upper troposphere. The annual mean mass fluxes and vertical velocities from LBLRTM-D4S are ?14 kg m-2 day-1 and 0.77 mm s-1, respectively, at 120 hPa (15.5 km), and ?1.2 kg m-2 day-1 and 0.13 mm s-1 at 60 hPa (19.5 km). We examine the accuracy of three commonly used efficient radiation models including Fu-Liou, RRTM, and SBDART in estimating tropical upward mass fluxes against the LBLRTM-D4S results.

Lin, L.; Fu, Q.; Zhang, H.; Su, J.; Yang, Q.; Sun, Z.

2013-03-01

108

An urban solar flux island: Measurements from London  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Solar irradiance measurements from a new high density urban network in London are presented. Annual averages demonstrate that central London receives 30 ± 10 W m -2 less solar irradiance than outer London at midday, equivalent to 9 ± 3% less than the London average. Particulate matter and AERONET measurements combined with radiative transfer modelling suggest that the direct aerosol radiative effect could explain 33-40% of the inner London deficit and a further 27-50% could be explained by increased cloud optical depth due to the aerosol indirect effect. These results have implications for solar power generation and urban energy balance models. A new technique using 'Langley flux gradients' to infer aerosol column concentrations over clear periods of 3 h has been developed and applied to three case studies. Comparisons with particulate matter measurements across London have been performed and demonstrate that the solar irradiance measurement network is able to detect aerosol distribution across London and transport of a pollution plume out of London.

Ryder, C. L.; Toumi, R.

2011-07-01

109

Measurement of Integrated Low Frequency Flux Noise in Superconducting Flux/Phase Qubits  

SciTech Connect

We measured the integrated low frequency flux noise ({approx}1 m{phi}{sub 0}) of an rf SQUID as a flux qubit by fitting the resonant peaks from photon assistant tunneling (PAT). The energy relaxation time Tl between the ground and first excited states in the same potential well, measured directly in time domain, is 3 ns. From these results we identified low frequency flux noise as the dominant source of decoherence. In addition, we found that the measured values of integrated flux noise in three qubits of various sizes differ more than an order of magnitude.

Mao Bo; Qiu Wei; Han Siyuan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, US, 66044 (United States)

2008-11-07

110

Atmospheric radiation measurements and modeling during ATTREX  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment (ATTREX) flew the first of four planned missions to study the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) over the tropical Pacific Ocean during October and November of 2011. The NASA Global Hawk was equipped with the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) system and thermal broadband instruments. The SSFR made spectrally resolved measurements of upwelling and downwelling solar irradiance from 350 to 2150 nm. The broadband instruments measured integrated thermal upwelling and downwelling irradiance from 4 to 40 um. An important goal of the ATTREX mission is to investigate the radiative impacts of persistent thin cirrus clouds associated with the TTL. The measurements made by SSFR and the thermal broadband instruments and radiative transfer modeling are presented from the first flights of the ATTREX mission. These include real-time ice and liquid water cloud retrievals with phase separation and potential methods for determining important, but challenging, thin cirrus cloud layer properties such as heating rates.

Kindel, B. C.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, S.; Leblanc, S. E.

2012-12-01

111

Trapped Proton Fluxes at Low Earth Orbits Measured by the PAMELA Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report an accurate measurement of the geomagnetically trapped proton fluxes for kinetic energy above ~70 MeV performed by the PAMELA mission at low Earth orbits (350 ÷ 610 km). Data were analyzed in the frame of the adiabatic theory of charged particle motion in the geomagnetic field. Flux properties were investigated in detail, providing a full characterization of the particle radiation in the South Atlantic Anomaly region, including locations, energy spectra, and pitch angle distributions. PAMELA results significantly improve the description of the Earth's radiation environment at low altitudes, placing important constraints on the trapping and interaction processes, and can be used to validate current trapped particle radiation models.

Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Zverev, V. G.

2015-01-01

112

A comparison of new measurements of total monoterpene flux with improved measurements of speciated monoterpene flux  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many monoterpenes have been identified in forest emissions using gas chromatography (GC). Until now, it has been impossible to determine whether all monoterpenes are appropriately measured using GC techniques. We used a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) coupled with the eddy covariance (EC) technique to measure mixing ratios and fluxes of total monoterpenes above a ponderosa pine plantation. We compared PTR-MS-EC results with simultaneous measurements of eight speciated monoterpenes, ?-pinene, ?-pinene, 3-carene, d-limonene, ?-phellandrene, ?-terpinene, camphene, and terpinolene, made with an automated, in situ gas chromatograph with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID), coupled to a relaxed eddy accumulation system (REA). Monoterpene mixing ratios and fluxes measured by PTR-MS averaged 30±2.3% and 31±9.2% larger than by GC-FID, with larger mixing ratio discrepancies between the two techniques at night than during the day. Two unidentified peaks that correlated with ?-pinene were resolved in the chromatograms and completely accounted for the daytime difference and reduced the nighttime mixing ratio difference to 20±2.9%. Measurements of total monoterpenes by PTR-MS-EC indicated that GC-FID-REA measured the common, longer-lived monoterpenes well, but that additional terpenes were emitted from the ecosystem that represented an important contribution to the total mixing ratio above the forest at night.

Lee, A.; Schade, G. W.; Holzinger, R.; Goldstein, A. H.

2005-02-01

113

A comparison of new measurements of total monoterpene flux with improved measurements of speciated monoterpene flux  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many monoterpenes have been identified in forest emissions using gas chromatography (GC). Until now, it has been impossible to determine whether all monoterpenes are appropriately measured using GC techniques. We used a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) coupled with the eddy covariance (EC) technique to measure mixing ratios and fluxes of total monoterpenes above a ponderosa pine plantation. We compared PTR-MS-EC results with simultaneous measurements of eight speciated monoterpenes, ?-pinene, ?-pinene, 3-carene, d-limonene, ?-phellandrene, ?-terpinene, camphene, and terpinolene, made with an automated, in situ gas chromatograph with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID), coupled to a relaxed eddy accumulation system (REA). Monoterpene mixing ratios and fluxes measured by PTR-MS averaged 30±2.3% and 31±9.2% larger than by GC-FID, with larger differences at night than during the day. Four unidentified peaks that correlated with ?-pinene were resolved in the chromatograms and completely accounted for the daytime difference and reduced the nighttime difference to 19±3.4%. Measurements of total monoterpenes by PTR-MS-EC indicated that GC-FID-REA measured the common, longer-lived monoterpenes well, but that additional monoterpenes were emitted from the ecosystem that represented an important contribution to the total mixing ratio above the forest at night, and that must have been oxidized during the day before they escaped the forest canopy.

Lee, A.; Schade, G. W.; Holzinger, R.; Goldstein, A. H.

2004-12-01

114

Overview of observations from the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger. Part 2: Radiative fluxes and divergences  

SciTech Connect

Broadband shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes observed both at the surface and from space during the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger in 2006 are presented. The surface fluxes were measured by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Mobile Facility (AMF) at Niamey airport, while the fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) are from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument on the Meteosat-8 satellite. The data are analyzed as daily averages, in order to minimise sampling differences between the surface and top of atmosphere instruments, while retaining the synoptic and seasonal changes that are the main focus of this study. A cloud mask is used to identify days with cloud from those with predominantly clear skies. The influence of temperature, water vapor, aerosols and clouds is investigated. Aerosols are ubiquitous throughout the year and have a significant impact on both the shortwave and longwave fluxes. The large and systematic seasonal changes in temperature and column integrated water vapor (CWV) through the dry and wet seasons are found to exert strong influences on the longwave fluxes. These influences are often in opposition to each other, because the highest temperatures occur at the end of the dry season when the CWV is lowest, while in the wet season the lowest temperatures are associated with the highest values of CWV. Apart from aerosols, the shortwave fluxes are also affected by clouds and by the seasonal changes in CWV. The fluxes are combined to provide estimates of the divergence of radiation across the atmosphere throughout 2006. The longwave divergence is remarkably constant through the year, because of a compensation between the seasonal variations in the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and surface net longwave radiation. A simple model of the greenhouse effect is used to interpret this result in terms of the dependence of the normalized greenhouse effect at the TOA and of the effective emissivity of the atmosphere at the surface on the CWV. It is shown that, as the CWV increases, the atmosphere loses longwave energy to the surface with about the same increasing efficiency with which it traps the OLR, thus keeping the atmospheric longwave divergence roughly constant. The shortwave divergence is mainly determined by the CWV and aerosol loadings and the effect of clouds is much smaller than on the component fluxes.

Slingo, A.; White, H. E.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.

2009-02-25

115

Flux Measurements of Trace Gases, Aerosols and Energy from the Urban Core of Mexico City  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006 we deployed a flux system in a busy district of Mexico City surrounded by congested avenues. The flux system consisted of a tall tower instrumented with fast-response sensors coupled with eddy covariance (EC) techniques to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, aerosols and energy. The measured fluxes represent direct measurements of emissions that include all major and minor emission sources from a typical residential and commercial district. In a previous study we demonstrated that the EC techniques are valuable tools to evaluate emissions inventories in urban areas, and understand better the atmospheric chemistry and the role that megacities play in global change. We measured fluxes of olefins using a Fast Olefin Sensor (FOS) and the EC technique, fluxes of aromatic and oxygenated VOCs by Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectroscopy (PTR-MS) and the disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) technique, fluxes of CO2 and H2O with an open path Infrared Gas Analyzer (IRGA) and the EC technique, fluxes of CO using a modified gradient method and a commercial CO instrument, and fluxes of aerosols (organics, nitrates and sulfates) using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and the EC technique. In addition we used a disjunct eddy accumulation (DEA) system to extend the number of VOCs. This system collected whole air samples as function of the direction of the vertical wind component, and the samples were analyzed on site using gas chromatography / flame ionization detection (GC-FID). We also measured fluxes of sensible and latent heat by EC and the radiation components with a net radiometer. Overall, these flux measurements confirm the results of our previous flux measurements in Mexico City in terms of the magnitude, composition, and distribution. We found that the urban surface is a net source of CO2 and VOCs. The diurnal patterns show clear anthropogenic signatures, with important contributions from vehicular traffic. The DEA results for individual hydrocarbons show that the alkane fluxes are considerably higher than alkene fluxes, which is consistent with ambient concentration measurements and with the emission inventory for Mexico City. CO fluxes, estimated from a modified gradient technique, were more than 10% of the measured CO2 fluxes (on a molar basis) which is much higher than is generally expected for combustion efficiencies in mobile and other sources. Investigation of this result is underway. The energy balance distribution and radiative parameters observed are similar to distributions and parameters reported for other urban sites.

Velasco, E.; Molina, L.; Lamb, B.; Pressley, S.; Grivicke, R.; Westberg, H.; Jobson, T.; Allwine, E.; Coons, T.; Jimenez, J.; Nemitz, E.; Alexander, L. M.; Worsnop, D.; Ramos, R.

2007-05-01

116

Radiation thermometry: The measurement problem  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview of the theory and techniques of radiometric thermometry is presented. The characteristics of thermal radiators (targets) are discussed along with surface roughness and oxidation effects, fresnel reflection and subsurface effects in dielectrics. The effects of the optical medium between the radiating target and the radiation thermometer are characterized including atmospheric effects, ambient temperature and dust environment effects and the influence of measurement windows. The optical and photodetection components of radiation thermometers are described and techniques for the correction of emissivity effects are addressed.

Nutter, G. D.

1988-01-01

117

Flux-based environmental management: the future of integrated passive flux measurements in groundwater  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The measurement and interpretation of parameter mass fluxes and discharges is gaining more and more importance. Especially in the frame of soil and groundwater contamination, remediation and related environmental risks, water management and ecosystem management, the interpretation of mass fluxes is essential. Current legislation already includes a mass flux approach today (e.g. EU Water Framework Directive and Groundwater Daughter Directive). Environmental management actions regarding groundwater pollutions and ecosystem research and management are mostly driven by parameter concentrations. Since concentration estimates are highly uncertain and do not include the fluctuations caused by spatially and temporally varying conditions, decisions about these actions can be improved by also considering parameter mass fluxes (mass of parameter passing per unit time per unit area, or flow rate of these parameters per unit area) and parameter mass discharges (sum of all mass flux measures across an entire plume). The mass that effectively reaches a downgradient receptor, determines the actual situation and risks, and should therefore be monitored. It is essential to determine mass fluxes directly instead of estimating mass flux based on concentration data and estimates of groundwater velocity. The direct determination of contaminant mass fluxes in soil and groundwater systems is possible with the Passive Flux Meter (PFM) technology. The PFM is a recently developed passive sampling device that provides simultaneous in situ point measurements of a time-averaged contaminant mass flux and water flux. The device, with a suite of tracers, is placed in a monitoring well or borehole for a known exposure period, where it intercepts the groundwater flow and captures contaminants from it. The measurements of the contaminants and the remaining resident tracer can then be used to estimate groundwater and contaminant fluxes. Today, an increasing demand from different sectors for the combined determination of multiple parameter mass fluxes, has stimulated us to optimize the technology and develop an integrated flux measurement device which targets the combined mass flux determination of multiple parameter types. The principles of flux-based environmental management will be presented, with a special focus on the application and future of integrated passive flux measurements in groundwater.

Verreydt, Goedele; Struyf, Eric; Van Keer, Ilse; Meire, Patrick; Bronders, Jan; Seuntjens, Piet

2014-05-01

118

A comparison of small and larger mesoscale latent heat and radiative fluxes: December 6 case study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Because of the small amounts of water vapor, the potential for rapid changes, and the very cold temperatures in the upper troposphere, moisture measuring instruments face several problems related to calibration and response. Calculations of eddy moisture fluxes are, therefore, subject to significant uncertainty. The purpose of this study is to examine the importance of latent heat (moisture) fluxes due to small and larger mesoscale circulations in comparison to radiative fluxes within cirrus. Scale separation is made at about 1 km because of significant changes in the structures within cirrus. Only observations at warmer than -40 C are used in this study. The EG&G hygrometer that is used for measuring dewpoint temperature (Td) is believed to be fairly accurate down to -40 C. On the other hand, Lyman-Alpha (L-alpha) hygrometer measurements of moisture may include large drift errors. In order to compensate for these drift errors, the L-alpha hygrometer is often calibrated against the EG&G hygrometer. However, large errors ensue for Td measurements at temperatures less than -40 C. The cryogenic hygrometer frost point measurements may be used to calibrate L-alpha measurements at temperatures less than -40 C. In this study, however, measurements obtained by EG&G hygrometer and L-alpha measurements are used for the flux calculations.

Gultepe, I.; Starr, David; Heymsfield, A. J.

1993-01-01

119

Acoustic radiation stress measurement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ultrasonic radio frequency tone-bursts are launched into a sample of material tested. The amplitude of the tone-bursts and the slope of the resulting static displacement pulses are measured. These measurements are used to calculate the nonlinearities of the materials.

Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Yost, William T.

1987-01-01

120

Comparison of surface fluxes and boundary-layer measurements at Arctic terrestrial sites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observational evidence suggests that atmospheric energy fluxes are a major contributor to the decrease of the Arctic pack ice, seasonal land snow cover and the warming of the surrounding land areas and permafrost layers. To better understand the atmosphere-surface exchange mechanisms, improve models, and to diagnose climate variability in the Arctic, accurate measurements are required of all components of the net surface energy budget and the carbon dioxide cycle over representative areas and over multiple years. This study analyzes and discusses variability of surface fluxes and basic meteorological parameters based on measurements made at several long-term research observatories near the coast of the Arctic Ocean located in USA (Barrow), Canada (Eureka), and Russia (Tiksi). Tower-based eddy covariance and solar radiation measurements provide a long-term near continuous temporal record of hourly average mass and energy fluxes respectively. The turbulent fluxes of the momentum, sensible heat, water vapor, and carbon dioxide are supported by additional atmospheric and surface/snow/permafrost measurements (mean wind speed, air temperature and humidity, upwelling and downwelling short-wave and long-wave atmospheric and surface radiation, snow depth, surface albedo, soil heat flux, active layer temperature profiles etc.) In this study we compare annual cycles of surface fluxes including solar radiation and other ancillary data to describe four seasons in the Arctic including spring onset of melt and fall onset of snow accumulation. Particular interest is a transition through freezing point, i.e. during transition from winter to spring and from summer to fall, when the carbon dioxide and/or water vapor turbulent fluxes change their direction. According to our data, in a summer period observed temporal variability of the carbon dioxide flux was generally in anti-phase with water vapor flux (downward CO2 flux and upward H2O flux). On average the turbulent flux of carbon dioxide was mostly negative (uptake by the surface) in summer indicating that the Arctic terrestrial sites are generally net sinks for atmospheric CO2 during the growing season when surface is extensively covered with vegetation. This study also shows that the sensible heat flux, water vapor, and carbon dioxide fluxes as well as air temperature exhibit clear diurnal cycles during the Arctic summer. During the Polar winter and cold seasons, the sensible heat flux, water vapor and carbon dioxide fluxes were small and mostly irregular when the ground is covered with snow and air temperatures are sufficiently below freezing. The work is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) with award ARC 11-07428 and by the U.S. Civilian Research & Development Foundation (CRDF) with award RUG1-2976-ST-10.

Grachev, Andrey; Uttal, Taneil; Persson, Ola; Stone, Robert; Crepinsek, Sara; Albee, Robert; Makshtas, Alexander; Kustov, Vasily; Repina, Irina; Artamonov, Arseniy

2014-05-01

121

Balloon-borne measurement of energetic electron fluxes inside thunderclouds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-energy radiation is routinely produced by thunderclouds and lightning. This radiation is in the form of x-rays and gamma-rays with timescales ranging from sub-microsecond (x-rays associated with lightning leaders), to sub-millisecond (Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes), to minute long glows (Gamma-ray Glows from thunderclouds seen on the ground and in or near the cloud by aircrafts and balloons). It is generally accepted that these emissions originate from bremsstrahlung interactions of relativistic runaway electrons with air, which can be accelerated in the thundercloud/lightning electric fields and gain up to multi-MeV energies. However, the exact physical details of the mechanism that produces these runaway electrons are still unknown. In order to better understand the source of energetic radiation inside thunderclouds, we have begun a campaign of balloon-borne instruments to directly measure the flux of energetic electrons inside thunderclouds. In the current configuration, each balloon carries Geiger counters to record the energetic particles. Geiger counters are well suited for directly measuring energetic electrons and positrons and have the advantage of being lightweight and dependable. We transmit data at 900MHz, ISM band, with 115.2 kb/s transmission rate. This would provide us a high resolution radiation profile over a relatively large distance. Due to the nature of the thunderstorm environment, the campaign has many design, communication, and safety challenges. In this presentation we will report on the status of the campaign and some of the physical insights gained from the data collected by our instruments. This work was supported in part by the NASA grant NNX12A002H and by DARPA grant HR0011-1-10-1-0061.

Arabshahi, Shahab; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Dwyer, Joseph; Rassoul, Hamid

2014-05-01

122

AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research  

SciTech Connect

Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

Law, B E

2012-12-12

123

Remote Heat Flux Measurement Using a Self Calibration Multiwavelength Pyrometer and a Transparent Material  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A self calibrating multiwavelength pyrometer was used to conduct remote heat flux measurements using a transparent sapphire disk by determining the sapphire disk's front and back surface temperatures. Front surface temperature (Tfs) was obtained from detection of surface emitted radiation at long wavelengths (lambda > 6 micrometers). Back surface temperature (Tbs) was obtained from short wavelength (1 to 5 micrometers) radiation transmitted through the sapphire disk. The thermal conductivity k of the sapphire disk and the heat transfer coefficients h(sub 1) and h(sub 2) of its surfaces are determined experimentally. An analysis of the heat flux measurement is presented.

Ng, Daniel

1998-01-01

124

Heat flux measurements on ceramics with thin film thermocouples  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two methods were devised to measure heat flux through a thick ceramic using thin film thermocouples. The thermocouples were deposited on the front and back face of a flat ceramic substrate. The heat flux was applied to the front surface of the ceramic using an arc lamp Heat Flux Calibration Facility. Silicon nitride and mullite ceramics were used; two thicknesses of each material was tested, with ceramic temperatures to 1500 C. Heat flux ranged from 0.05-2.5 MW/m2(sup 2). One method for heat flux determination used an approximation technique to calculate instantaneous values of heat flux vs time; the other method used an extrapolation technique to determine the steady state heat flux from a record of transient data. Neither method measures heat flux in real time but the techniques may easily be adapted for quasi-real time measurement. In cases where a significant portion of the transient heat flux data is available, the calculated transient heat flux is seen to approach the extrapolated steady state heat flux value as expected.

Holanda, Raymond; Anderson, Robert C.; Liebert, Curt H.

1993-01-01

125

A benchmark analysis of radiation flux distribution for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of canine brain tumors  

SciTech Connect

Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly-heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This work describes a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador Retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador Retriever head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for the model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that the peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10-20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

Moran, J.M.

1992-02-01

126

Measurement of the meteoroid flux at Mars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the fall of 2005, a dedicated meteor observing campaign was carried out by the Panoramic Camera (Pancam) onboard the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit to determine the viability of using MER cameras as meteor detectors and to obtain the first experimental estimate of the meteoroid flux at Mars. Our observing targets included both the sporadic meteoroid background and two predicted martian meteor showers: one associated with 1P/Halley and a potential stream associated with 2001/R1 LONEOS. A total of 353 images covering 2.7 h of net exposure time were analyzed with no conclusive meteor detections. From these data, an upper limit to the background meteoroid flux at Mars is estimated to be <4.4×10 meteoroidskmh for meteoroids with mass larger than 4 g. For comparison, the estimated flux to this mass limit at the Earth is 10 meteoroidskmh [Grün, E., Zook, H.A., Fechtig, H., Giese, R.H., 1985. Icarus 62, 244-272]. This result is qualitatively consistent, within error bounds, with theoretical models predicting martian fluxes of ˜50% that at Earth for meteoroids of mass 10-10 g [Adolfsson, L.G., Gustafson, B.A.S., Murray, C.D., 1996. Icarus 119, 144-152]. The MER cameras, even using the most sensitive mode of operation, should expect to see on average only one coincident meteor on of order 40-150 h of total exposure time based on these same theoretical martian flux estimates. To more meaningfully constrain these flux models, a longer total integrated exposure time or more sensitive camera is needed. Our analysis also suggests that the event reported as the first martian meteor [Selsis, F., Lemmon, M.T., Vaubaillon, J., Bell, J.F., 2005. Nature 435, 581] is more likely a grazing cosmic ray impact, which we show to be a major source of confusion with potential meteors in all Pancam images.

Domokos, A.; Bell, J. F.; Brown, P.; Lemmon, M. T.; Suggs, R.; Vaubaillon, J.; Cooke, W.

2007-11-01

127

Boundary layer surface vorticity flux measurements at high Reynolds number  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Under isothermal conditions vorticity enters a flow through a flux at the wall. If the walls are stationary, this flux is proportional to the pressure gradients in the plane of the surface. Wall vorticity flux measurements were acquired through the use of closely spaced microphones in arrays mounted flush with the surface. The measurements were acquired at R?= O(10^6) under the near-neutral thermally stratified condition at the SLTEST site in Utah's west desert. Owing to the attributes of the flow at the SLTEST site, pressure measurements there are especially devoid of the noise sources found in wind tunnels. Through the use of a variety of microphones and microphone separations, the sensitivity of the measured vorticity flux is explored relative to the spatial and temporal resolution of the sensors. Spectra and pdfs of both the pressure and pressure gradients are presented. Comparisons of the normalized surface vorticity flux intensity are made with previous low R? laboratory based measurements.

Klewicki, Joe; Kenney, David

2005-11-01

128

Sensitivity of shortwave radiative flux density, forcing, and heating rates to the aerosol vertical profile  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the aerosol vertical distribution on the solar radiation profiles, for idealized and measured profiles of optical properties (extinction and single-scattering albedo (SSA)) during the May 2003 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Observation Period (AIOP), has been investigated using the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model Shortwave (RRTM_SW) code. Calculated profiles of down-welling and up-welling solar fluxes during the AIOP have been compared with the data measured by up- and down-looking solar broadband radiometers aboard a profiling research aircraft. The measured profiles of aerosol extinction, SSA, and water vapor obtained from the same aircraft that carried the radiometers served as the inputs for the model calculations. It is noteworthy that for this study, the uplooking radiometers were mounted on a stabilized platform that kept the radiometers parallel with respect to the earth’s horizontal plane. The results indicate that the shape of the aerosol extinction profiles has very little impact on direct radiative forcings at the top of atmosphere and surface in a cloud-free sky. However, as long as the aerosol is not purely scattering, the shape of the extinction profiles is important for forcing profiles. Identical extinction profiles with different absorption profiles drastically influence the forcing and heating rate profiles. Using aircraft data from 19 AIOP profiles over the Southern Great Plains (SGP), we are able to achieve broadband down-welling solar flux closure within 0.8% (bias difference) or 1.8% (rms difference), well within the expected measurement uncertainty of 1 to 3%. The poorer agreement in up-welling flux (bias -3.7%, rms 10%) is attributed to the use of inaccurate surface albedo data. The sensitivity tests reveal the important role accurate, vertically resolved aerosol extinction data plays in tightening flux closure. This study also suggests that in the presence of a strongly absorbing substance, aircraft flux measurements from a stabilized platform have the potential to determine heating rate profiles. These measurement-based heating rate profiles provide useful data for heating rate closure studies and indirect estimates of single scattering albedo assumed in radiative transfer calculations.

Guan, Hong; Schmid, Beat; Bucholtz, Anthony; Bergstrom, Robert

2010-03-31

129

In Situ Measurement of Energetic Electron Fluxes Inside Thunderclouds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is now well established that high-energy radiation is routinely produced by thunderclouds and lightning. This radiation is in the form of x-rays and gamma-rays with timescales ranging from sub-microsecond (x-rays associated with lightning leaders), to sub-millisecond (Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes), to minute long glows (Gamma-ray Glows from thunderclouds seen on the ground and in or near the cloud by aircrafts and balloons). It is generally accepted that these emissions originate from bremsstrahlung interactions of relativistic runaway electrons with air, which can be accelerated in the thundercloud/lightning electric fields and gain up to multi-MeV energies. However, the exact physical details of the mechanism that produces these runaway electrons are still unknown. In order to better understand the source of energetic radiation inside thunderclouds, we have begun a campaign of balloon-borne instruments to directly measure the flux of energetic electrons inside thunderclouds. In the current configuration, each balloon carries Geiger counters to record the energetic particles. Geiger counters are well suited for directly measuring energetic electrons and positrons and have the advantage of being lightweight and dependable. Due to the nature of the thunderstorm environment, the campaign has many design, communication, and safety challenges. In this presentation we will report on the status of the campaign and some of the physical insights gained from the data collected by our instruments. This work was supported in part by the NASA grant NNX12A002H and by DARPA grant HR0011-1-10-1-0061.

Arabshahi, S.; Vodopiyanov, I. B.; Dwyer, J. R.; Rassoul, H.

2013-12-01

130

Solar cycle variations of trapped proton flux in the inner radiation belt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Trapped proton population in the inner radiation belt is highly dense, posing a potential danger to astronauts and man-made space assets traversing through this region. While being significantly stable within timescales up to hundreds of days, inner zone proton fluxes can exhibit considerable solar cycle variations, which has not been investigated comprehensively yet. To analyze the long-term variation of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), we adopt the proton flux data measured by NOAA 15 from 1999 through 2009 and perform statistical analyses on the basis of reasonable Gaussian fits. We report that the variation of the peak proton flux in the SAA is anticorrelated with that of F10.7 during a solar cycle. There also exists a phase lag of 685 days between the solar F10.7 flux and the proton flux. Similar features are seen for changes of the SAA distribution area, which in addition shows a rapid decrease during the solar maximum and a slow increase during the solar minimum. We also find that the region where the proton flux peaks drifts westward year by year with larger drift rates during the solar minimum. The peak region shifts southward during the solar maximum but in the opposite direction during the solar minimum with higher shift speed. Enhancements in solar wind dynamic pressure can favor the north-south drift of the SAA.

Qin, Murong; Zhang, Xianguo; Ni, Binbin; Song, Hongqiang; Zou, Hong; Sun, Yueqiang

2014-12-01

131

A statistical approach to determining energetic outer radiation belt electron precipitation fluxes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Subionospheric radio wave data from an Antarctic-Arctic Radiation-Belt (Dynamic) Deposition VLF Atmospheric Research Konsortia (AARDDVARK) receiver located in Churchill, Canada, is analyzed to determine the characteristics of electron precipitation into the atmosphere over the range 3 < L < 7. The study advances previous work by combining signals from two U.S. transmitters from 20 July to 20 August 2010, allowing error estimates of derived electron precipitation fluxes to be calculated, including the application of time-varying electron energy spectral gradients. Electron precipitation observations from the NOAA POES satellites and a ground-based riometer provide intercomparison and context for the AARDDVARK measurements. AARDDVARK radiowave propagation data showed responses suggesting energetic electron precipitation from the outer radiation belt starting 27 July 2010 and lasting ~20 days. The uncertainty in >30 keV precipitation flux determined by the AARDDVARK technique was found to be ±10%. Peak >30 keV precipitation fluxes of AARDDVARK-derived precipitation flux during the main and recovery phase of the largest geomagnetic storm, which started on 4 August 2010, were >105 el cm-2 s-1 sr-1. The largest fluxes observed by AARDDVARK occurred on the dayside and were delayed by several days from the start of the geomagnetic disturbance. During the main phase of the disturbances, nightside fluxes were dominant. Significant differences in flux estimates between POES, AARDDVARK, and the riometer were found after the main phase of the largest disturbance, with evidence provided to suggest that >700 keV electron precipitation was occurring. Currently the presence of such relativistic electron precipitation introduces some uncertainty in the analysis of AARDDVARK data, given the assumption of a power law electron precipitation spectrum.

Simon Wedlund, Mea; Clilverd, Mark A.; Rodger, Craig J.; Cresswell-Moorcock, Kathy; Cobbett, Neil; Breen, Paul; Danskin, Donald; Spanswick, Emma; Rodriguez, Juan V.

2014-05-01

132

Quantifying the "chamber effect" in CO2 flux measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The significance of aquatic CO2 emissions has received attention in recent years. For example annual aquatic emissions in the Amazon basin have been estimated as 500 Mt of carbon1. Methods for determining the flux rates include eddy covariance flux tower measurements, flux estimates calculated from partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in water and the use floating flux chambers connected to an infra-red gas analyser. The flux chamber method is often used because it is portable, cheaper and allows smaller scale measurements. It is also a direct method and hence avoids problems related to the estimation of the gas transfer coefficient that is required when fluxes are calculated from pCO2. However, the use of a floating chamber may influence the flux measurements obtained. The chamber shields the water underneath from effects of wind which could lead to lower flux estimates. Wind increases the flux rate by i) causing waves which increase the surface area for efflux, and ii) removing CO2 build up above the water surface, hence maintaining a higher concentration gradient. Many floating chambers have an underwater extension of the chamber below the float to ensure better seal to water surface and to prevent any ingress of atmospheric air when waves rock the chamber. This extension may cause additional turbulence in flowing water and hence lead to overestimation of flux rates. Some groups have also used a small fan in the chamber headspace to ensure thorough mixing of air in the chamber. This may create turbulence inside the chamber which could increase the flux rate. Here we present results on the effects of different chamber designs on the detected flux rates. 1Richey et al. 2002. Outgassing from Amazonian rivers and wetlands as a large tropical source of atmospheric CO2. Nature 416: 617-620.

Vihermaa, Leena; Childs, Amy; Long, Hazel; Waldron, Susan

2014-05-01

133

Radiation measurements on the Mir Orbital Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radiation measurements made onboard the MIR Orbital Station have spanned nearly a decade and covered two solar cycles, including one of the largest solar particle events, one of the largest magnetic storms, and a mean solar radio flux level reaching 250 x 10(4) Jansky that has been observed in the last 40 years. The cosmonaut absorbed dose rates varied from about 450 microGy day-1 during solar minimum to approximately half this value during the last solar maximum. There is a factor of about two in dose rate within a given module, and a similar variation from module to module. The average radiation quality factor during solar minimum, using the ICRP-26 definition, was about 2.4. The drift of the South Atlantic Anomaly was measured to be 6.0 +/- 0.5 degrees W, and 1.6 +/- 0.5 degrees N. These measurements are of direct applicability to the International Space Station. This paper represents a comprehensive review of Mir Space Station radiation data available from a variety of sources. c2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Badhwar, G. D.; Atwell, W.; Reitz, G.; Beaujean, R.; Heinrich, W.

2002-01-01

134

FLUX MEASUREMENTS FROM A TALL TOWER IN A COMPLEX LANDSCAPE  

SciTech Connect

The accuracy and representativeness of flux measurements from a tall tower in a complex landscape was assessed by examining the vertical and sector variability of the ratio of wind speed to momentum flux and the ratio of vertical advective to eddy flux of heat. The 30-60 m ratios were consistent with theoretical predictions which indicate well mixed flux footprints. Some variation with sector was observed that were consistent with upstream roughness. Vertical advection was negligible compared with vertical flux except for a few sectors at night. This implies minor influence from internal boundary layers. Flux accuracy is a function of sector and stability but 30-60 m fluxes were found to be generally representative of the surrounding landscape. This paper will study flux data from a 300 m tower, with 4 levels of instruments, in a complex landscape. The surrounding landscape will be characterized in terms of the variation in the ratio of mean wind speed to momentum flux as a function of height and wind direction. The importance of local advection will be assessed by comparing vertical advection with eddy fluxes for momentum and heat.

Kurzeja, R.; Weber, A.; Chiswell, S.; Parker, M.

2010-07-22

135

Measured and parameterized energy fluxes estimated for Atlantic transects of RV Polarstern  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Even to date energy fluxes over the oceans are difficult to assess. As an example the relative paucity of evaporation observations and the uncertainties of currently employed empirical approaches lead to large uncertainties of evaporation products over the ocean (e.g. Large and Yeager, 2009). Within the frame of OCEANET (Macke et al., 2010) we performed such measurements on Atlantic transects between Bremerhaven (Germany) and Cape Town (South Africa) or Punta Arenas (Chile) onboard RV Polarstern during the recent years. The basic measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes are inertial-dissipation (e.g. Dupuis et al., 1997) flux estimates and measurements of the bulk variables. Turbulence measurements included a sonic anemometer and an infrared hygrometer, both mounted on the crow's nest. Mean meteorological sensors were those of the ship's operational measurement system. The global radiation and the down terrestrial radiation were measured on the OCEANET container placed on the monkey island. At least about 1000 time series of 1 h length were analyzed to derive bulk transfer coefficients for the fluxes of sensible and latent heat. The bulk transfer coefficients were applied to the ship's meteorological data to derive the heat fluxes at the sea surface. The reflected solar radiation was estimated from measured global radiation. The up terrestrial radiation was derived from the skin temperature according to the Stefan-Boltzmann law. Parameterized heat fluxes were compared to the widely used COARE-parameterization (Fairall et al., 2003), the agreement is excellent. Measured and parameterized heat and radiation fluxes gave the total energy budget at the air sea interface. As expected the mean total flux is positive, but there are also areas, where it is negative, indicating an energy loss of the ocean. It could be shown that the variations in the energy budget are mainly due to insolation and evaporation. A comparison between the mean values of measured and parameterized sensible and latent heat fluxes shows that the data are suitable to validate satellite derived fluxes at the sea surface and re-analysis data. References Dupuis, H., P. K. Taylor, A. Weill, and K. Katsaros, 1997: Inertial dissipation method applied to derive turbulent fluxes over the ocean during the surface of the ocean. J. Geophys. Res., 102 (C9), 21 115-21 129. Fairall, C. W., E. F. Bradley, J. E. Hare, A. A. Grachev, J. B. Edson, 2003: Bulk Parameterization of Air-Sea Fluxes: Updates and Verification for the COARE Algorithm. J. Climate, 16, 571-591. Large, W.G., and S.G. Yeager, 2009: The global climatology of an interannually varying air-sea flux data set. Climate Dynamics 33, 341-364. Macke, A., Kalisch, J., Zoll, Y., and Bumke, K., 2010: Radiative effects of the cloudy atmosphere from ground and satellite based observations, EPJ Web of Conferences, 5 9, 83-94

Bumke, Karl; Macke, Andreas; Kalisch, John; Kleta, Henry

2013-04-01

136

Seasonality of Overstory and Understory Fluxes in a Semi-Arid Oak Savanna: What can be Learned from Comparing Measured and Modeled Fluxes?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Semi-arid climates experience large seasonal and inter-annual variability in radiation and precipitation, creating natural conditions adequate to study how year-to-year changes affect atmosphere-biosphere fluxes. Especially, savanna ecosystems, that combine tree and below-canopy components, create a unique environment in which phenology dramatically changes between seasons. We used a 10-year flux database in order to define seasonal and interannual variability of climatic inputs and fluxes, and evaluate model capability to reproduce observed variability. This is based on the perception that model capability to construct the deviation, and not the average, is important in order to correctly predict ecosystem sensitivity to climate change. Our research site is a low density and low LAI (0.8) semi-arid savanna, located at Tonzi Ranch, Northern California. In this system, trees are active during the warm season (Mar - Oct), and grasses are active during the wet season (Dec - May). Measurements of carbon and water fluxes above and below the tree canopy using eddy covariance and supplementary measurements have been made since 2001. Fluxes were simulated using bio-meteorological process-oriented ecosystem models: BEPS and 3D-CAONAK. Models were partly capable of reproducing fluxes on daily scales (R2=0.66). We then compared model outputs for different ecosystem components and seasons, and found distinct seasons with high correlations while other seasons were purely represented. Comparison was much higher for ET than for GPP. The understory was better simulated than the overstory. CANOAK overestimated spring understory fluxes, probably due to the capability to directly calculated 3D radiative transfer. BEPS underestimated spring understory fluxes, following the pre-description of grass die-off. Both models underestimated peak spring overstory fluxes. During winter tree dormant, modeled fluxes were null, but occasional high fluxes of both ET and GPP were measured following precipitation events, likely produced by an adverse measurement effect. This analysis enabled to pinpoint specific areas where models break, and stress that model capability to reproduce fluxes vary among seasons and ecosystem components. The combined response was such, that comparison decreases when ecosystem fluxes were partitioned between overstory and understory fluxes. Model performance decreases with time scale; while performance was high for some seasons, models were less capable of reproducing the high variability in understory fluxes vs. the conservative overstory fluxes on annual scales. Discrepancies were not always a result of models' faults; comparison largely improved when measurements of overstory fluxes during precipitation events were excluded. Conclusions raised from this research enable to answer the critical question of the level and type of details needed in order to correctly predict ecosystem respond to environmental and climatic change.

Raz-Yaseef, N.; Sonnentag, O.; Kobayashi, H.; Chen, J. M.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Ma, S.; Baldocchi, D. D.

2011-12-01

137

Validation experiments to determine radiation partitioning of heat flux to an object in a fully turbulent fire.  

SciTech Connect

It is necessary to improve understanding and develop validation data of the heat flux incident to an object located within the fire plume for the validation of SIERRA/ FUEGO/SYRINX fire and SIERRA/CALORE. One key aspect of the validation data sets is the determination of the relative contribution of the radiative and convective heat fluxes. To meet this objective, a cylindrical calorimeter with sufficient instrumentation to measure total and radiative heat flux had been designed and fabricated. This calorimeter will be tested both in the controlled radiative environment of the Penlight facility and in a fire environment in the FLAME/Radiant Heat (FRH) facility. Validation experiments are specifically designed for direct comparison with the computational predictions. Making meaningful comparisons between the computational and experimental results requires careful characterization and control of the experimental features or parameters used as inputs into the computational model. Validation experiments must be designed to capture the essential physical phenomena, including all relevant initial and boundary conditions. A significant question of interest to modeling heat flux incident to an object in or near a fire is the contribution of the radiation and convection modes of heat transfer. The series of experiments documented in this test plan is designed to provide data on the radiation partitioning, defined as the fraction of the total heat flux that is due to radiation.

Ricks, Allen; Blanchat, Thomas K.; Jernigan, Dann A.

2006-06-01

138

Has Hawking radiation been measured?  

E-print Network

It is argued that Hawking radiation has indeed been measured and shown to posses a thermal spectrum, as predicted. This contention is based on three separate legs. The first is that the essential physics of the Hawking process for black holes can be modelled in other physical systems. The second is the white hole horizons are the time inverse of black hole horizons, and thus the physics of both is the same. The third is that the quantum emission, which is the Hawking process, is completely determined by measurements of the classical parameters of a linear physical system. The experiment conducted in 2010 fulfills all of these requirements, and is thus a true measurement of Hawking radiation.

W. G. Unruh

2014-01-26

139

Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Landscape  

SciTech Connect

Direct measurements of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that include all anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in urban areas are a missing requirement to evaluate emission inventories and constrain current photochemical modelling practices. Here we demonstrate the use of micrometeorological techniques coupled with fast-response sensors to measure urban VOC fluxes from a neighborhood of Mexico City, where the spatial variability of surface cover and roughness is high. Fluxes of olefins, methanol, acetone, toluene and C2-benzenes were measured and compared with the local gridded emission inventory. VOC fluxes exhibited a clear diurnal pattern with a strong relationship to vehicular traffic. Recent photochemical modeling results suggest that VOC emissions are significantly underestimated in Mexico City1, but the measured VOC fluxes described here indicate that the official emission inventory2 is essentially correct. Thus, other explanations are needed to explain the photochemical modelling results.

Velasco, E.; Lamb, Brian K.; Pressley, S.; Allwine, Eugene J.; Westberg, Halvor; Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Prazeller, Peter; Molina, Luisa; Molina, Mario J.

2005-10-19

140

Reconstruction of charged particle fluxes detected by the Radiation Assessment Detector onboard of MSL  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the main science objectives of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is to help planning future human exploration to Mars by constraining the radiation environment during the cruise phase and on the planet's surface. During the 253-day, 560 million km cruise to Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector, RAD made detailed measurements of the energy spectrum deposited by energetic particles from space and scattered within the spacecraft. Two types of radiation pose potential health risks to astronauts in deep space: a prolonged low-dose exposure to Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and short-term exposures to the Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs). On the surface of Mars such energetic particles penetrate through its thin atmosphere and generate secondary particles that can also result harms to humans. In order to interpret the energetic charged particle flux coming into the detector, we have developed the Detector Response Function (DRF) using GEANT 4 simulations and employed a Maximum likelihood inversion technique to invert the detected energy spectrum. This method has been applied to RAD detection of GCRs and secondary charged particles on the Martian surface, giving us an unique insight into their energy fluxes. The spectra of the stopping particle fluxes (hydrogen and helium) are also directly obtained from RAD observations and compared with the inversion results.

Guo, J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Ehresmann, B.; Kohler, J.; Boehm, E.; Appel, J. K.; Lohf, H.; Boettcher, S.; Burmeister, S.; Rafkin, S. C.; Kharytonov, A.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Matthiae, D.; Reitz, G.

2013-12-01

141

A Preliminary Study of CO2 Flux Measurements by Lidar  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A mechanistic understanding of the global carbon cycle requires quantification of terrestrial ecosystem CO2 fluxes at regional scales. In this paper, we analyze the potential of a Doppler DIAL system to make flux measurements of atmospheric CO2 using the eddy-covariance and boundary layer budget methods and present results from a ground based experiment. The goal of this study is to put CO2 flux point measurements in a mesoscale context. In June 2007, a field experiment combining a 2-m Doppler Heterodyne Differential Absorption Lidar (HDIAL) and in-situ sensors of a 447-m tall tower (WLEF) took place in Wisconsin. The HDIAL measures simultaneously: 1) CO2 mixing ratio, 2) atmosphere structure via aerosol backscatter and 3) radial velocity. We demonstrate how to synthesize these data into regional flux estimates. Lidar-inferred fluxes are compared with eddy-covariance fluxes obtained in-situ at 396m AGL from the tower. In cases where the lidar was not yet able to measure the fluxes with acceptable precision, we discuss possible modifications to improve system performance.

Gibert, Fabien; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Hilton, T.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Andrews, Arlyn; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.

2008-01-01

142

Arctic ocean radiative fluxes and cloud forcing estimated from the ISCCP C2 cloud dataset, 1983-1990  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radiative fluxes and cloud forcings for the ocean areas of the Arctic are computed from the monthly cloud product of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) for 1983-90. Spatially averaged short-wave fluxes are compared well with climatological values, while downwelling longwave fluxes are significantly lower. This is probably due to the fact that the ISCCP cloud amounts are underestimates. Top-of-the-atmosphere radiative fluxes are in excellent agreement with measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). Computed cloud forcings indicate that clouds have a warming effect at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere during winter and a cooling effect during summer. The net radiative effect of clouds is larger at the surface during winter but greater at the top of the atmosphere during summer. Overall the net radiative effect of clouds at the top of the atmosphere is one of cooling. This is in contrast to a previous result from ERBE data showing arctic cloud forcings have a net warming effect. Sensitivities to errors in input parameters are generally greater during winter with cloud amount being the most important paarameter. During summer the surface radiation balance is most sensitive to errors in the measurements of surface reflectance. The results are encouraging, but the estimated error of 20 W/sq m in surface net radiative fluxes is too large, given that estimates of the net radiative warming effect due to a doubling of CO2 are on the order of 4 W/sq m. Because it is difficult to determine the accuracy of results with existing in situ observations, it is recommended that the development of improved algorithms for the retrieval of surface radiative properties be accompanied by the simultaneous assembly of validation datasets.

Schweiger, Axel J.; Key, Jeffrey R.

1994-01-01

143

Measuring turbulent heat fluxes over leads using kites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the MaudNESS project in the austral winter of 2005, radiosondes attached to a kite indirectly measured surface turbulent heat fluxes from leads in the Eastern Weddell Sea near Maud Rise. Kite flights over two different leads with similar widths and upwind ice conditions are discussed. Lead mean surface fluxes were estimated by measuring the excess temperature and humidity downwind of the leads, estimating the wind speed profiles and performing a heat and moisture budget quantification. The measured sensible (latent) heat fluxes were 318 Wm-2 (158 Wm-2) and 258 Wm-2 (85 Wm-2) for the two flights; the values were lower in the second flight due to lower wind speeds. The average neutral sensible heat transfer coefficients for the two flights was (1.48 ± 0.13) × 10-3, and the average neutral latent heat flux coefficient was (1.47 ± 0.09) × 10-3. As expected, these values are enhanced from what would be expected in a typical open ocean situation with the same air-sea temperature and humidity differences. Kite radiosonde profile measurements are an economically viable method for measuring lead heat fluxes that avoid many of the logistical problems associated with other methods for measuring fluxes over leads.

Guest, Peter S.

2007-05-01

144

Heat flux measurement from vertical temperature profile and thermal infrared imagery in low-flux fumarolic zones  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydrothermal systems are associated to most of the dormant volcanoes. Heat is transported by steam from the hot magma body in the connected porosity and the fissures of the rock to the surface. If the flux is low enough (<500 W/m²), the steam mainly condensates in the soil close to surface, and a significant proportion of the heat is transported to the surface by conduction, producing a gradient of temperature and a thermal anomaly detectable at the surface. Detecting and monitoring these fluxes is crucial for hazard management, since it reflects the state of the magma body in depth. In order to quantify this flux two methods are considered. First, a vertical profile of temperature is measured by a series of thermocouples, and the conducted flux is estimated thanks to the Fourier law. Secondly, a more recent method uses the thermal infrared imagery to monitor the surface temperature anomaly (STA) between the studied zone and an equivalent zone not affected by the geothermal flux. The heat flux from the soil to the atmosphere is computed as the sum of (1) the radiative flux, (2) the sensible flux and (3) the residual steam flux. These two methods are complementary and have an equivalent uncertainty of approximately 20%, which would allow to track the major changes in the hydrothermal system. However, the surface and sub-surface temperatures are strongly influenced by the climate. For instance, it has been widely demonstrated that the surface temperature dramatically decreases after a rainfall. In order to estimate the reliability of the measurements, a numerical model simulating the evolution of the subsurface temperature in low flux fumarolic zone has been built. In depth, the heat can be transported either by conduction, or by the rising steam, or by condensed water. In surface, both the radiative flux and the sensible flux (convection of the atmosphere) are taken into account. This model allows to estimate the changes of temperature due to a variation of solar illumination, wind, or rainfalls. It has been successfully tested during 5 months with a permanent station built on the Ty fault on La Soufrière volcano (Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles). Results show that the diurnal cycle has a significant influence on the temperature up to ca. 30 cm depth, hindering the use of the thermal gradient in this zone, while the STA has a negligible variation. Rain has a more dramatic influence: the surface temperature and the STA are significantly affected, even for small rains. The model shows that the drop of temperature and the affected thickness are mainly controlled by the amount of rain, while the relaxation time is primarily a function of the heat flux. These results have strong implications in the interpretation and the reliability of the temperature surveys, and could be used to correct them from the climate fluctuations.

Gaudin, Damien; Finizola, Anthony; Beauducel, François; Brothelande, Elodie; Allemand, Pascal; Delacourt, Christophe; Delcher, Eric; Peltier, Aline

2014-05-01

145

Studies of the net surface radiative flux from satellite radiances during FIFE  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Studies of the net surface radiative flux from satellite radiances during First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) are presented. Topics covered include: radiative transfer model validation; calibration of VISSR and AVHRR solar channels; development and refinement of algorithms to estimate downward solar and terrestrial irradiances at the surface, including photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) and surface albedo; verification of these algorithms using in situ measurements; production of maps of shortwave irradiance, surface albedo, and related products; analysis of the temporal variability of shortwave irradiance over the FIFE site; development of a spectroscopy technique to estimate atmospheric total water vapor amount; and study of optimum linear combinations of visible and near-infrared reflectances for estimating the fraction of PAR absorbed by plants.

Frouin, Robert

1993-01-01

146

Airborne flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds over California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK + MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ∼10 000 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z / zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 ± 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and coniferous forests were extremely low, high concentrations of methanol and monoterpenes were found above some of these regions. These observations demonstrate the ability to measure fluxes from specific sources by eddy covariance from an aircraft, and suggest the utility of measurements using fast response chemical sensors to constrain emission inventories and map out source distributions for a much broader array of trace gases than was observed in this study. This paper reports the first regional direct eddy covariance fluxes of isoprene. The emissions of VOCs measured from aircraft with 2 km spatial resolution can quantify the distribution of major sources providing the observations required for testing statewide emission inventories of these important trace gases. These measurements will be used in a future study to assess BVOC emission models and their driving variable datasets.

Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Weber, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

2014-03-01

147

Figure 5. Net radiation of the study area on June 21, 2003 ESTIMATION OF HEAT FLUXES  

E-print Network

that the influence of temperature rise on heat flux is negligible, with the exception of sensible heat. The surplus one to conclude that the influence of temperature rise on heat flux is negligible, with the exceptionFigure 5. Net radiation of the study area on June 21, 2003 at 9:40 pm ESTIMATION OF HEAT FLUXES

Hall, Sharon J.

148

Flux and brightness calculations for various synchrotron radiation sources  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron radiation (SR) storage rings are powerful scientific and technological tools. The first generation of storage rings in the US., e.g., SURF (Washington, D.C.), Tantalus (Wisconsin), SSRL (Stanford), and CHESS (Cornell), revolutionized VUV, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray science. The second (present) generation of storage rings, e.g. the NSLS VUV and XRAY rings and Aladdin (Wisconsin), have sustained the revolution by providing higher stored currents and up to a factor of ten smaller electron beam sizes than the first generation sources. This has made possible a large number of experiments that could not performed using first generation sources. In addition, the NSLS XRAY ring design optimizes the performance of wigglers (high field periodic magnetic insertion devices). The third generation storage rings, e.g. ALS (Berkeley) and APS (Argonne), are being designed to optimize the performance of undulators (low field periodic magnetic insertion devices). These extremely high brightness sources will further revolutionize x-ray science by providing diffraction-limited x-ray beams. The output of undulators and wigglers is distinct from that of bending magnets in magnitude, spectral shape, and in spatial and angular size. Using published equations, we have developed computer programs to calculate the flux, central intensity, and brightness output bending magnets and selected wigglers and undulators of the NSLS VUV and XRAY rings, the Advanced Light Source (ALS), and the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Following is a summary of the equations used, the graphs and data produced, and the computer codes written. These codes, written in the C programming language, can be used to calculate the flux, central intensity, and brightness curves for bending magnets and insertion devices on any storage ring.

Weber, J.M.; Hulbert, S.L.

1991-11-01

149

Comparison of surface radiative flux data sets over the Arctic Ocean Jiping Liu,1,2  

E-print Network

Comparison of surface radiative flux data sets over the Arctic Ocean Jiping Liu,1,2 Judith A. Curry in the Arctic Ocean. To assess how well we can reconstruct the variations of surface radiative fluxes used of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) over the seasonal cycle and during particular storm events. The CASPR and NCEP-R2

150

A method for obtaining distributed surface flux measurements in complex terrain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sonic anemometers and gas analyzers can be used to measure fluxes of momentum, heat, and moisture over flat terrain, and with the proper corrections, over sloping terrain as well. While this method of obtaining fluxes is currently the most accurate available, the instruments themselves are costly, making installation of many stations impossible for most campaign budgets. Small, commercial automatic weather stations (Sensorscope) are available at a fraction of the cost of sonic anemometers or gas analyzers. Sensorscope stations use slow-response instruments to measure standard meteorological variables, including wind speed and direction, air temperature, humidity, surface skin temperature, and incoming solar radiation. The method presented here makes use of one sonic anemometer and one gas analyzer along with a dozen Sensorscope stations installed throughout the Val Ferret catchment in southern Switzerland in the summers of 2009, 2010 and 2011. Daytime fluxes are calculated using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory in conjunction with the surface energy balance at each Sensorscope station as well as at the location of the sonic anemometer and gas analyzer, where a suite of additional slow-response instruments were co-located. Corrections related to slope angle were made for wind speeds and incoming shortwave radiation measured by the horizontally-mounted cup anemometers and incoming solar radiation sensors respectively. A temperature correction was also applied to account for daytime heating inside the radiation shield on the slow-response temperature/humidity sensors. With these corrections, we find a correlation coefficient of 0.77 between u* derived using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory and that of the sonic anemometer. Calculated versus measured heat fluxes also compare well and local patterns of latent heat flux and measured surface soil moisture are correlated.

Daniels, M. H.; Pardyjak, E.; Nadeau, D. F.; Barrenetxea, G.; Brutsaert, W. H.; Parlange, M. B.

2011-12-01

151

Solar Model Parameters and Direct Measurements of Solar Neutrino Fluxes  

E-print Network

We explore a novel possibility of determining the solar model parameters, which serve as input in the calculations of the solar neutrino fluxes, by exploiting the data from direct measurements of the fluxes. More specifically, we use the rather precise value of the $^8B$ neutrino flux, $\\phi_B$ obtained from the global analysis of the solar neutrino and KamLAND data, to derive constraints on each of the solar model parameters on which $\\phi_B$ depends. We also use more precise values of $^7Be$ and $pp$ fluxes as can be obtained from future prospective data and discuss whether such measurements can help in reducing the uncertainties of one or more input parameters of the Standard Solar Model.

Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami; S. T. Petcov

2006-08-30

152

Cosmic muon flux measurements at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this article, the results from a series of muon flux measurements conducted at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), Virginia, United States, are presented. The detector employed for these investigations, is made of plastic scintillator bars readout by wavelength shifting fibers and multianode photomultiplier tubes. Data was taken at several locations inside KURF, spanning rock overburden values from ~ 200 to 1450 m.w.e. From the extracted muon rates an empirical formula was devised, that estimates the muon flux inside the mine as a function of the overburden. The results are in good agreement with muon flux calculations based on analytical models and MUSIC.

Kalousis, L. N.; Guarnaccia, E.; Link, J. M.; Mariani, C.; Pelkey, R.

2014-08-01

153

Cosmic Muon Flux Measurements at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility  

E-print Network

In this article, the results from a series of muon flux measurements conducted at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), Virginia, United States, are presented. The detector employed for these investigations, is made of plastic scintillator bars readout by wavelength shifting fibers and multianode photomultiplier tubes. Data was taken at several locations inside KURF, spanning rock overburden values from ~ 200 to 1450 m.w.e. From the extracted muon rates an empirical formula was devised, that estimates the muon flux inside the mine as a function of the overburden. The results are in good agreement with muon flux calculations based on analytical models and MUSIC.

Kalousis, L N; Link, J M; Mariani, C; Pelkey, R

2014-01-01

154

Cosmic Muon Flux Measurements at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility  

E-print Network

In this article, the results from a series of muon flux measurements conducted at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), Virginia, United States, are presented. The detector employed for these investigations, is made of plastic scintillator bars readout by wavelength shifting fibers and multianode photomultiplier tubes. Data was taken at several locations inside KURF, spanning rock overburden values from ~ 200 to 1450 m.w.e. From the extracted muon rates an empirical formula was devised, that estimates the muon flux inside the mine as a function of the overburden. The results are in good agreement with muon flux calculations based on analytical models and MUSIC.

L. N. Kalousis; E. Guarnaccia; J. M. Link; C. Mariani; R. Pelkey

2014-09-12

155

Long-term radiation effects on fibre Bragg grating temperature sensors in a low flux nuclear reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fibre Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensors have already shown short-term radiation tolerance in nuclear environments. However, the effect of long-term irradiation needed to be investigated. We therefore characterized multiplexed FBG temperature sensors inserted early 2000 in an irradiation channel of a low flux nuclear reactor. After 50 months, we show that the sensors still operate satisfactorily and that the measured

A. Fernandez Fernandez; A. Gusarov; B. Brichard; M. Decréton; F. Berghmans; P. Mégret; A. Delchambre

2004-01-01

156

The Airborne Measurements of Methane Fluxes (AIRMETH) Arctic Campaign (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the most pressing questions with regard to climate feedback processes in a warming Arctic is the regional-scale methane release from Arctic permafrost areas. The Airborne Measurements of Methane Fluxes (AIRMETH) campaign is designed to quantitatively and spatially explicitly address this question. Ground-based eddy covariance (EC) measurements provide continuous in-situ observations of the surface-atmosphere exchange of methane. However, these observations are rare in the Arctic permafrost zone and site selection is bound by logistical constraints among others. Consequently, these observations cover only small areas that are not necessarily representative of the region of interest. Airborne measurements can overcome this limitation by covering distances of hundreds of kilometers over time periods of a few hours. Here, we present the potential of environmental response functions (ERFs) for quantitatively linking methane flux observations in the atmospheric surface layer to meteorological and biophysical drivers in the flux footprints. For this purpose thousands of kilometers of AIRMETH data across the Alaskan North Slope are utilized, with the aim to extrapolate the airborne EC methane flux observations to the entire North Slope. The data were collected aboard the research aircraft POLAR 5, using its turbulence nose boom and fast response methane and meteorological sensors. After thorough data pre-processing, Reynolds averaging is used to derive spatially integrated fluxes. To increase spatial resolution and to derive ERFs, we then use wavelet transforms of the original high-frequency data. This enables much improved spatial discretization of the flux observations, and the quantification of continuous and biophysically relevant land cover properties in the flux footprint of each observation. A machine learning technique is then employed to extract and quantify the functional relationships between the methane flux observations and the meteorological and biophysical drivers in the flux footprints. Lastly, the resulting ERFs are used to extrapolate the methane release over spatio-temporally explicit grids of the Alaskan North Slope. Metzger et al. (2013) have demonstrated the efficacy of this technique for regionalizing airborne EC heat flux observations to within an accuracy of ?18% and a precision of ?5%. Here, we show for the first time results from applying the ERF procedure to airborne methane EC measurements, and report its potential for spatio-temporally explicit inventories of the regional-scale methane exchange. References: Metzger, S., Junkermann, W., Mauder, M., Butterbach-Bahl, K., Trancón y Widemann, B., Neidl, F., Schäfer, K., Wieneke, S., Zheng, X. H., Schmid, H. P., and Foken, T.: Spatially explicit regionalization of airborne flux measurements using environmental response functions, Biogeosciences, 10, 2193-2217, doi:10.5194/bg-10-2193-2013, 2013.

Serafimovich, A.; Metzger, S.; Hartmann, J.; Kohnert, K.; Sachs, T.

2013-12-01

157

Flux measurement and modeling in a typical mediterranean vineyard  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Vineyard ecosystems are typical in the Mediterranean area, since wine is one of the most important economic sectors. Nevertheless, only a few studies have been conducted to investigate the interactions between this kind of vegetation and the atmosphere. These information are important both to understand the behaviour of such ecosystems in different environmental conditions, and are crucial to parameterize crop and flux simulation models. Combining direct measurements and modelling can obtain reliable estimates of surface fluxes and crop evapotranspiration. This study would contribute both to (1) directly measure energy fluxes and evapotranspiration in a typical Mediterranean vineyard, located in the South of Sardinia (Italy), through the application of the Eddy Covariance micrometeorological technique and to (2) evaluate the land surface model ACASA (Advanced-Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm) in simulating energy fluxes and evapotranspiration over vineyard. Independent datasets of direct measurements were used to calibrate and validate model results during the growing period. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate model performance and accuracy in predicting surface fluxes. Results will be showed as well as the model capability to be used for future studies to predict energy fluxes and crop water requirements under actual and future climate.

Marras, Serena; Bellucco, Veronica; Pyles, David R.; Falk, Matthias; Sirca, Costantino; Duce, Pierpaolo; Snyder, Richard L.; Tha Paw U, Kyaw; Spano, Donatella

2014-05-01

158

The CERES\\/ARM\\/GEWEX experiment (CAGEX) for the retrieval of radiative fluxes with satellite data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results from a temporally intensive, limited area, radiative transfer model experiment are on-line for investigating the vertical profile of shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes from the surface to the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The CERES\\/ARM\\/GEWEX Experiment (CAGEX) Version 1 provides a record of fluxes that have been computed with a radiative transfer code; the atmospheric sounding, aerosol, and satellite-retrieved

T. P. Charlock; T. L. Alberta

1996-01-01

159

The CERES\\/ARM\\/GEWEX Experiment (CAGEX) for the Retrieval of Radiative Fluxes with Satellite Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results from a temporally intensive, limited area, radiative transfer model experiment are on-line for investigating the vertical profile of shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes from the surface to the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The CERES\\/ARM\\/GEWEX Experiment (CAGEX) Version 1 provides a record of fluxes that have been computed with a radiative transfer code; the atmospheric sounding, aerosol, and satellite-retrieved

Thomas P. Charlock; Timothy L. Alberta

1996-01-01

160

ADcp Measurements of Suspended Sediment Fluxes in Banat Rivers, Romania  

E-print Network

and concentration contours show some contrast throughout the cross-section. Water discharge and sediment mean sediment, aDcp, river discharge measurement, hydrometry Introduction Suspended load represents a hugeADcp Measurements of Suspended Sediment Fluxes in Banat Rivers, Romania Eugenia Rotaru1 , Jérôme Le

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

161

An evaluation of RAMS radiation schemes by field measurements  

SciTech Connect

At present, two radiation schemes are used in RAMS: the Mahrer and Pielke (M-P) scheme and the Chen and Cotton (C-C) scheme. The M-P scheme requires little computational expense, but does not include the radiative effects of liquid water or ice; the C-C scheme accounts for the radiative effects of liquid water and ice but is fairly expensive computationally. For simulations with clouds, the C-C scheme is obviously a better choice, but for clear sky conditions, RAMS users face a decision regarding which radiation scheme to use. It has been noted that the choice of radiation scheme may result in significantly different results for the same case. To examine the differences in the radiative fluxes and the boundary-layer structure corresponding to the two radiation schemes in RAMS we have carried out a study where Rams was used to simulate the same case with two different radiation schemes. The modeled radiative fluxes by the two schemes were then compared with the field measurements. A description of the observations and the case study, a comparison and discussion of the results, and a summary and conclusions follow.

Zhong, S; Doran, J C

1994-02-01

162

Surface shortwave aerosol radiative forcing during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger  

SciTech Connect

This study presents ground-based remote sensing measurements of aerosol optical properties and corresponding shortwave surface radiative effect calculations for the deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger during 2006. Aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP) were derived from multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurements during the two dry seasons (Jan-Apr and Oct-Dec) at Niamey. The vertical distribution of aerosol extinction was derived from the collocated micropulse lidar (MPL). The aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution of extinction varied significantly throughout the year, with higher AOD, lower SSA, and deeper aerosol layers during the Jan-Apr time period, when biomass burning aerosol layers were more frequent. Using the retrieved aerosol properties and vertical extinction profiles, broadband shortwave surface fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles were calculated. Corresponding calculations with no aerosol were used to estimate the aerosol direct radiative effect at the surface. Comparison of the calculated surface fluxes to observed fluxes for non-cloudy periods indicated that the remote sensing retrievals provided a reasonable estimation of the optical properties, with mean differences between calculated and observed fluxes of less than 5 W/m2 and RMS differences less than 25 W/m2. Sensitivity tests for a particular case study showed that the observed fluxes could be matched with variations of < 10% in the inputs to the radiative transfer model. We estimated the daily-averaged aerosol radiative effect at the surface by subtracting the clear calculations from the aerosol calculations. The average daily SW aerosol radiative effect over the study period was -27 W/m2, which is comparable to values estimated from satellite data and from climate models with sophisticated dust parameterizations.

McFarlane, Sally A.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2009-03-18

163

Analysis of actinic flux profiles measured from an ozone sonde balloon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A green light sensor has been developed at KNMI to measure actinic flux profiles using an ozone sonde balloon. In total, 63 launches with ascending and descending profiles were performed between 2006 and 2010. The measured uncalibrated actinic flux profiles are analyzed using the Doubling Adding KNMI (DAK) radiative transfer model. Values of the cloud optical thickness (COT) along the flight track were taken from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) Cloud Physical Properties (CPP) product. The impact of clouds on the actinic flux profile is evaluated on the basis of the cloud modification factor (CMF) at the cloud top and cloud base, which is the ratio between the actinic fluxes for cloudy and clear-sky scenes. The impact of clouds on the actinic flux is clearly detected: the largest enhancement occurs at the cloud top due to multiple scattering. The actinic flux decreases almost linearly from cloud top to cloud base. Above the cloud top the actinic flux also increases compared to clear-sky scenes. We find that clouds can increase the actinic flux to 2.3 times of the clear-sky value at cloud top and decrease it to about 0.05 at cloud base. The relationship between CMF and COT agrees well with DAK simulations, except for a few outliers. Good agreement is found between the DAK simulated actinic flux profiles and the observations for single layer clouds in fully overcast scenes. The instrument is suitable for operational balloon measurements because of its simplicity and low cost. It is worth to further develop the instrument and launch it together with atmospheric chemistry composition sensors.

Wang, P.; Allaart, M.; Knap, W. H.; Stammes, P.

2014-12-01

164

Early forecast of radiation-hazardous solar cosmic ray fluxes on the neutron monitors data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The system of the early forecast of radiation hazardous fluxes of solar cosmic rays in space on the basis of the real time neutron monitors data obtained by the NMDB (Neutron Monitor Data Base) network is created. The forecast system is based on a short cut technique of definition of a spectrum of solar protons from the data of the limited number of neutron monitor stations and with a simplified procedure of accounts. It is shown that the results of computations of solar proton spectra with the short-cut technique little differ from spectra obtained with a complete technique at energies less than 5 GeV. Thus the good agreement between derived from the neutron monitor data intensities of solar protons in an energy range of hundreds MeV with the data of direct measurements of solar protons at GOES-11 spacecraft is observed. The maximum of increase on neutron monitors outstrips on several hours (2-10) an appropriate maximum of radiation-dangerous fluxes, registered by spacecrafts of GOES series. Thus, the forecast of radiation hazard on the data of neutron monitors is carried out. As demonstrating examples the results of the analysis of ground level enhancement (GLE) events: 23.10, 2.11, 2003, 20.01.2005, and 13.12.2006 are considered.

Vashenyuk, Eduard; Balabin, Yury; Gvozdevsky, Boris

165

Radiative Heating and the Buoyant Rise of Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Solar Interior  

E-print Network

Radiative Heating and the Buoyant Rise of Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Solar Interior Y. Fan National tube. In the overshoot region, the radiative heating is found to cause a quasi-static rising the e ect of radiative heating on the evolution of thin magnetic ux tubes in the solar interior

California at Berkeley, University of

166

Photocatalytic Active Radiation Measurements and Use  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Photocatalytic materials are being used to purify air, to kill microbes, and to keep surfaces clean. A wide variety of materials are being developed, many of which have different abilities to absorb various wavelengths of light. Material variability, combined with both spectral illumination intensity and spectral distribution variability, will produce a wide range of performance results. The proposed technology estimates photocatalytic active radiation (PcAR), a unit of radiation that normalizes the amount of light based on its spectral distribution and on the ability of the material to absorb that radiation. Photocatalytic reactions depend upon the number of electron-hole pairs generated at the photocatalytic surface. The number of electron-hole pairs produced depends on the number of photons per unit area per second striking the surface that can be absorbed and whose energy exceeds the bandgap of the photocatalytic material. A convenient parameter to describe the number of useful photons is the number of moles of photons striking the surface per unit area per second. The unit of micro-einsteins (or micromoles) of photons per m2 per sec is commonly used for photochemical and photoelectric-like phenomena. This type of parameter is used in photochemistry, such as in the conversion of light energy for photosynthesis. Photosynthetic response correlates with the number of photons rather than by energy because, in this photochemical process, each molecule is activated by the absorption of one photon. In photosynthesis, the number of photons absorbed in the 400 700 nm spectral range is estimated and is referred to as photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). PAR is defined in terms of the photosynthetic photon flux density measured in micro-einsteins of photons per m2 per sec. PcAR is an equivalent, similarly modeled parameter that has been defined for the photocatalytic processes. Two methods to measure the PcAR level are being proposed. In the first method, a calibrated spectrometer with a cosine receptor is used to measure the spectral irradiance. This measurement, in conjunction with the photocatalytic response as a function of wavelength, is used to estimate the PcAR. The photocatalytic response function is determined by measuring photocatalytic reactivity as a function of wavelength. In the second method, simple shaped photocatalytic response functions can be simulated with a broad-band detector with a cosine receptor appropriately filtered to represent the spectral response of the photocatalytic material. This second method can be less expensive than using a calibrated spectrometer.

Davis, Bruce A.; Underwood, Lauren W.

2011-01-01

167

Densitometric tomography using the measurement of muon flux  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The knowledge of the subsurface properties is essentially obtained by geophysical methods, e.g. seismic imaging, electric prospection or gravimetry. The present work develops a recent method to investigate the in situ density of rocks using atmospheric the muon flux measurement , its attenuation depending on the rock density and thickness. This new geophysical technique have been mainly applied in volcanology (Lesparre N., 2011) using scintillator detectors. The present project (T2DM2) aims to realize underground muons flux measurements in order to characterizing the rock massif density variations above the LSBB underground research facility in Rustrel (France). The muon flux will be measure with a new Muon telescope instrumentation using Micromegas detectors in Time Projection Chambers (TPC) configuration. The first step of the work presented considers the muon flux simulation using the Gaisser model, for the interactions between muons and atmospheric particles, and the MUSIC code (Kudryavtsev V. A., 2008) for the muons/rock interactions. The results show that the muon flux attenuation caused by density variations are enough significant to be observed until around 500 m depth and for period of time in the order of one month. Such a duration scale and depth of investigation is compatible with the duration of the water transfer processes involved within the Karst unsaturated zone where LSBB is located. Our work now concentrates on the optimization of the spatial distribution of detectors that will be deployed in future.

Hivert, F.; Busto, J.; Brunner, J.; Salin, P.; Gaffet, S.

2013-12-01

168

Methane gas flux measurements in the northern Alaskan coastal tundra  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wetlands are the largest source of CH4 globally. Ongoing climate changes will subject to change CH4 emission through hydrological and climatological processes. The changes are particularly prominent in the Arctic ecosystem which is responsible for more than 10 % of the global CH4 emission from wetlands. However, whether CH4 emission in response to predicted environments will increase or decrease is not well-known. Uncertainty in understanding CH4 emission is also attributed to the fact that majority of CH4 flux measurements were conducted with chamber methods that potentially overestimate CH4 flux due to the artificial disturbance. Therefore, it is important to examine how CH4 flux responds to environmental processes with the least disturbance. In this study, CH4 flux from the wet coastal tundra in Alaska was measured with the eddy covariance technique using the open path gas analyzer (LI-7700, Li-Cor) that has recently become available commercially. The study site was located at the long-term CO2 flux monitoring site (CMDL) in Barrow Alaska, and the methane sensor was installed in June, 2012. Preliminary results show that a large efflux of CH4 of 165 mgCH4m-2day-1 on average within several days from June 30 to July 9, while CO2 flux was nearly balanced. The magnitude of the efflux is about few orders higher than CH4 flux observed in the vicinity of the measurement sites [Rhew et al., 2007; Zona et al., 2009; Sturtevant et al., 2011]. The development of the data collection for a longer term as well as further correlation analysis with environmental data has been undergoing. Acknowledgement: We acknowledge CARVE, DOE and UMIAQ for supporting our research.

Ikawa, H.; Oechel, W. C.; Murphy, P.; Wilkman, E.

2012-12-01

169

Urban greenhouse gas mole fraction in-situ measurements: Results from the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) was designed to develop and evaluate methods for the measurement and modeling of greenhouse gas fluxes from urban environments. Determination of greenhouse gas fluxes and uncertainty bounds is essential for the evaluation of the effectiveness of mitigation strategies. The current INFLUX observation network includes twelve in-situ tower-based, continuous measurements of CO2, CO, and CH4, flask sampling of 14CO2 and other trace gases, and periodic aircraft sampling of greenhouse gases and meteorological conditions. Eddy covariance and radiative flux are measured at four of the tower sites, and a scanning Doppler lidar was installed in April 2013; both are used to quantify key boundary layer meteorological properties and evaluate model performance. Additionally, a total carbon column observing network (TCCON) column remote sensing station was deployed August - December 2012. The data from the towers, TCCON, and aircraft measurements are being used in an inverse-modeling approach to yield estimates of the urban area flux at 1 km2 resolution. Very high space/time resolution estimates of fossil fuel carbon emissions (Hestia project) offer state-of-the-art "bottom up" emissions estimates for the city and its surroundings. Here we present an overview of the progress from INFLUX, with a focus on tower-based results. With this high density of urban tower-based greenhouse gas measurements, we will quantify horizontal and vertical spatial patterns in atmospheric mole fractions of CO2, CO, and CH4 in Indianapolis. The consistency of the observed horizontal gradients with that expected based on differences in land-cover contributions according to footprint analysis will be evaluated. The ability to correctly model transport and mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer, responsible for carrying greenhouse gases from their source to the point of measurement, is essential. Thus we investigate differences between the modeled and observed sensible heat flux, latent heat flux, air temperature, and wind speed.

Miles, Natasha; Lauvaux, Thomas; Davis, Kenneth; Richardson, Scott; Sarmiento, Daniel; Sweeney, Colm; Karion, Anna; Hardesty, Robert Michael; Turnbull, Jocelyn; Iraci, Laura; Gurney, Kevin; Razlivanov, Igor; Obiminda Cambaliza, Maria; Shepson, Paul; Whetstone, James

2014-05-01

170

Comparison between elementary flux modes analysis and 13C-metabolic fluxes measured in bacterial and plant cells  

PubMed Central

Background 13C metabolic flux analysis is one of the pertinent ways to compare two or more physiological states. From a more theoretical standpoint, the structural properties of metabolic networks can be analysed to explore feasible metabolic behaviours and to define the boundaries of steady state flux distributions. Elementary flux mode analysis is one of the most efficient methods for performing this analysis. In this context, recent approaches have tended to compare experimental flux measurements with topological network analysis. Results Metabolic networks describing the main pathways of central carbon metabolism were set up for a bacteria species (Corynebacterium glutamicum) and a plant species (Brassica napus) for which experimental flux maps were available. The structural properties of each network were then studied using the concept of elementary flux modes. To do this, coefficients of flux efficiency were calculated for each reaction within the networks by using selected sets of elementary flux modes. Then the relative differences - reflecting the change of substrate i.e. a sugar source for C. glutamicum and a nitrogen source for B. napus - of both flux efficiency and flux measured experimentally were compared. For both organisms, there is a clear relationship between these parameters, thus indicating that the network structure described by the elementary flux modes had captured a significant part of the metabolic activity in both biological systems. In B. napus, the extension of the elementary flux mode analysis to an enlarged metabolic network still resulted in a clear relationship between the change in the coefficients and that of the measured fluxes. Nevertheless, the limitations of the method to fit some particular fluxes are discussed. Conclusion This consistency between EFM analysis and experimental flux measurements, validated on two metabolic systems allows us to conclude that elementary flux mode analysis could be a useful tool to complement 13C metabolic flux analysis, by allowing the prediction of changes in internal fluxes before carbon labelling experiments. PMID:21682932

2011-01-01

171

Multiple-Point Mass Flux Measurement System Using Rayleigh Scattering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A multiple-point Rayleigh scattering diagnostic is being developed to provide mass flux measurements in gas flows. Spectroscopic Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic that has the ability to provide simultaneous density, temperature, and velocity measurements. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 18 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is directly imaged through a solid Fabry-Perot etalon onto a CCD detector which permits spectral analysis of the light. The spatial resolution of the measurements is governed by the locations of interference fringes, which can be changed by altering the etalon characteristics. A prototype system has been used to acquire data in a Mach 0.56 flow to demonstrate feasibility of using this system to provide mass flux measurements. Estimates of measurement uncertainty and recommendations for system improvements are presented

Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Clem, Michelle M.

2009-01-01

172

Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements  

E-print Network

Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements Stephen T. Dye, and approved November 16, 2007 (received for review July 11, 2007) Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemi- cal model

Mcdonough, William F.

173

A PROBLEM WITH FLUX CHAMBER MEASUREMENTS OF BIOGENIC SULFUR EMISSIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Problems associated with identifying and quantifying factors that influence liquid-phase controlled evolution of hydrogen sulfide and organic sulfides through the air-water interface are briefly reviewed. It was found that at present flux chamber measurements of the release of th...

174

Research concerning the net flux of radiation in the atmosphere of Jupiter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The plan of the NFR (Net Flux of Radiation) team is for the data from the two solar channels (B and E) of NFR to be reduced with the goal of determining the solar heating rate. In order to determine the solar heating rate from the NFR measurements, effects due to the instrument's spatial and spectral response functions, to the temperature variation of the instrument (and associated drift of calibration), to the setting sun, and to the rotation of the probe (initially at a rate comparable to the NFR sampling frequency), all must be well modelled. In the past year, a forward modeling routine was created to simulate NFR data return in the B and E channels. The effects of varying parameters describing the atmospheric model (such as cloud location and thickness) and the descent profile (such as rotation rate) were investigated and an inversion routine was developed. For the forward modeling, existing radiative transfer codes were used to determine intensity fields within the Jovian atmosphere. A routine was developed to determine instantaneous instrument response by integrating the intensity field over the instrument response functions. A second routine was developed to determine the actual output of the NFR by integrating along an arbitrary descent trajectory. Near the top of the atmosphere, the upflux data alone are used to constrain the cloud structure of he atmosphere. To accomplish this, models are used to describe the variation in up flux between consecutive measurements in terms of variations of cloud opacity and variations in known parameters such as the solar zenith angle. This allows us to develop a zero-order model of cloud structure. Lower in the atmosphere, at levels where there is little or no azimuthal structure to the net flux measurements, both the up flux and net flux are used to derive layer transmission and reflection functions, which then determine layer opacity and single scattering albedo. A preliminary analysis of the data began in December 1995. In these data we could see the rapid oscillations expected at the beginning of the data due to probe rotation and the sun passing through the edge of the field of view. In addition, the time when this oscillation stopped was clearly visible. This sets the rough optical depth above the probe at this time.

Tomasko, M. G.

1996-01-01

175

Airborne flux measurements of Biogenic Isoprene over California  

SciTech Connect

Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK+MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ~10,000-km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z/zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently 1 at 400 m ±50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and coniferous forests were extremely low, high concentrations of methanol and monoterpenes were found above some of these regions. These observations demonstrate the ability to measure fluxes from specific sources by eddy covariance from an aircraft, and suggest the utility of measurements using fast response chemical sensors to constrain emission inventories and map out source distributions for a much broader array of trace gases than was observed in this study. This paper reports the first regional direct eddy covariance fluxes of isoprene. The emissions of VOCs measured from aircraft with 2 km spatial resolution can quantify the distribution of major sources providing the observations required for testing statewide emission inventories of these important trace gases. These measurements will be used in a future study to assess BVOC emission models and their driving variable datasets.

Misztal, P.; Karl, Thomas G.; Weber, Robin; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Goldstein, Allen H.

2014-10-10

176

Advances in Air-Sea Flux Measurement by Eddy Correlation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Eddy-correlation measurements of the oceanic flux are useful for the development and validation of air-sea gas exchange models and for analysis of the marine carbon cycle. Results from more than a decade of published work and from two recent field programs illustrate the principal interferences from water vapour and motion, demonstrating experimental approaches for improving measurement precision and accuracy. Water vapour cross-sensitivity is the greatest source of error for flux measurements using infrared gas analyzers, often leading to a ten-fold bias in the measured flux. Much of this error is not related to optical contamination, as previously supposed. While various correction schemes have been demonstrated, the use of an air dryer and closed-path analyzer is the most effective way to eliminate this interference. This approach also obviates density corrections described by Webb et al. (Q J R Meteorol 106:85-100, 1980). Signal lag and frequency response are a concern with closed-path systems, but periodic gas pulses at the inlet tip provide for precise determination of lag time and frequency attenuation. Flux attenuation corrections are shown to be 5 % for a cavity ring-down analyzer (CRDS) and dryer with a 60-m inlet line. The estimated flux detection limit for the CRDS analyzer and dryer is a factor of ten better than for IRGAs sampling moist air. While ship-motion interference is apparent with all analyzers tested in this study, decorrelation or regression methods are effective in removing most of this bias from IRGA measurements and may also be applicable to the CRDS.

Blomquist, Byron W.; Huebert, Barry J.; Fairall, Christopher W.; Bariteau, Ludovic; Edson, James B.; Hare, Jeffrey E.; McGillis, Wade R.

2014-09-01

177

A Novel Detector for High Neutron Flux Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Measuring alpha particles from a neutron induced break-up reaction with a mass spectrometer can be an excellent tool for detecting neutrons in a high neutron flux environment. Break-up reactions of {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C can be used in the detection of slow and fast neutrons, respectively. A high neutron flux detection system that integrates the neutron energy sensitive material and helium mass spectrometer has been developed. The description of the detector configuration is given and it is soon to be tested at iThemba LABS, South Africa.

Singo, T. D.; Wyngaardt, S. M. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Papka, P. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Nuclear Physics group, iThemba labs, P. O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dobson, R. T. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

2010-01-05

178

Infrared Camera Diagnostic for Heat Flux Measurements on NSTX  

SciTech Connect

An infrared imaging system has been installed on NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to measure the surface temperatures on the lower divertor and center stack. The imaging system is based on an Indigo Alpha 160 x 128 microbolometer camera with 12 bits/pixel operating in the 7-13 {micro}m range with a 30 Hz frame rate and a dynamic temperature range of 0-700 degrees C. From these data and knowledge of graphite thermal properties, the heat flux is derived with a classic one-dimensional conduction model. Preliminary results of heat flux scaling are reported.

D. Mastrovito; R. Maingi; H.W. Kugel; A.L. Roquemore

2003-03-25

179

Measuring cardiac autophagic flux in vitro and in vivo.  

PubMed

Autophagy is a lysosomal-dependent catabolic pathway that recycles various cytoplasmic-borne components, such as organelles and proteins, through the lysosomes. This process creates energy and biomolecules that are used to maintain homeostasis and to serve as an energy source under conditions of acute stress. Autophagic flux is a measure of efficiency or throughput of the pathway. Here, we describe a method for determining autophagic flux in vitro and in vivo using the autophagosomal/lysosomal fusion inhibitors chloroquine or bafilomycin A1 and then probing for the autophagosomal marker LC3-II via Western Blot. PMID:25308270

Gurney, Michael A; Huang, Chengqun; Ramil, Jennifer M; Ravindran, Nandini; Andres, Allen M; Sin, Jon; Linton, Phyllis-Jean; Gottlieb, Roberta A

2015-01-01

180

Ecosystem photosynthesis inferred from measurements of carbonyl sulphide flux  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Limited understanding of carbon dioxide sinks and sources on land is often linked to the inability to distinguish between the carbon dioxide taken up by photosynthesis, and that released by respiration. Carbonyl sulphide, a sulphur-containing analogue of carbon dioxide, is also taken up by plants, and could potentially serve as a powerful proxy for photosynthetic carbon dioxide uptake, which cannot be directly measured above the leaf scale. Indeed, variations in atmospheric concentrations of carbonyl sulphide are closely related to those of carbon dioxide at regional, local and leaf scales. Here, we use eddy covariance and laser spectroscopy to estimate the net exchange of carbon dioxide and carbonyl sulphide across three pine forests, a cotton field and a wheat field in Israel. We estimate gross primary productivity--a measure of ecosystem photosynthesis--directly from the carbonyl sulphide fluxes, and indirectly from carbon dioxide fluxes. The two estimates agree within an error of +/-15%. The ratio of carbonyl sulphide to carbon dioxide flux at the ecosystem scale was consistent with the variability in mixing ratios observed on seasonal timescales in the background atmosphere. We suggest that atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulphide flux could provide an independent constraint on estimates of gross primary productivity, key to projecting the response of the land biosphere to climate change.

Asaf, David; Rotenberg, Eyal; Tatarinov, Fyodor; Dicken, Uri; Montzka, Stephen A.; Yakir, Dan

2013-03-01

181

Measurements of EUV Coronal Holes and Open Magnetic Flux  

E-print Network

Coronal holes are regions on the Sun's surface that map the foot-prints of open magnetic field lines. We have developed an automated routine to detect and track boundaries of long-lived coronal holes using full-disk EUV images obtained by SoHO:EIT, SDO:AIA, and STEREO:EUVI. We measure coronal hole areas and magnetic flux in these holes, and compare the measurements with calculations by the PFSS model. It is shown that, from 1996 through 2010, the total area of coronal holes measured with EIT images varies between 5$\\%$ and 17$\\%$ of the total solar surface area, and the total unsigned open flux varies between $2-5 \\times 10^{22}$ Mx. The solar cycle dependence of these measurements are similar to the PFSS results, but the model yields larger hole areas and greater open flux than observed by EIT. The AIA/EUVI measurements from 2010-2013 show coronal hole area coverage of 5-10$\\%$ of the total surface area, with significant contribution from low latitudes, which is under-represented by EIT. AIA/EUVI have measur...

Lowder, Chris; Leamon, Robert; Liu, Yang

2015-01-01

182

Effects of Radiative Diffusion on Thin Flux Tubes in Turbulent Solar-like Convection  

E-print Network

We study the combined effects of convection and radiative diffusion on the evolution of thin magnetic flux tubes in the solar interior. Radiative diffusion is the primary supplier of heat to convective motions in the lower convection zone, and it results in a heat input per unit volume of magnetic flux tubes that has been ignored by many previous thin flux tube studies. We use a thin flux tube model subject to convection taken from a rotating spherical shell of turbulent, solar-like convection as described by Weber, Fan, and Miesch (2011, Astrophys. J., 741, 11; 2013, Solar Phys., 287, 239), now taking into account the influence of radiative heating on flux tubes of large-scale active regions. Our simulations show that flux tubes of less than or equal to 60 kG subject to solar-like convective flows do not anchor in the overshoot region, but rather drift upward due to the increased buoyancy of the flux tube earlier in its evolution as a result of the inclusion of radiative diffusion. Flux tubes of magnetic fie...

Weber, Maria A

2015-01-01

183

Radiative forcing of the Venus mesosphere. I - Solar fluxes and heating rates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most of the solar energy absorbed by Venus is deposited in the atmosphere, at levels more than 60 km above the surface. This unusual flux distribution should have important consequences for the thermal structure and dynamical state of that atmosphere. A radiative transfer model was used to derive the structure and amplitude of the solar fluxes and heating rates in

D. Crisp

1986-01-01

184

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites  

SciTech Connect

The direct radiative forcing (DRF) of aerosols, the change in net radiative flux due to aerosols in non-cloudy conditions, is an essential quantity for understanding the human impact on climate change. Our work has addressed several key issues that determine the accuracy, and identify the uncertainty, with which aerosol DRF can be modeled. These issues include the accuracy of several radiative transfer models when compared to measurements and to each other in a highly controlled closure study using data from the ARM 2003 Aerosol IOP. The primary focus of our work has been to determine an accurate approach to assigning aerosol properties appropriate for modeling over averaged periods of time and space that represent the observed regional variability of these properties. We have also undertaken a comprehensive analysis of the aerosol properties that contribute most to uncertainty in modeling aerosol DRF, and under what conditions they contribute the most uncertainty. Quantification of these issues enables the community to better state accuracies of radiative forcing calculations and to concentrate efforts in areas that will decrease uncertainties in these calculations in the future.

Ogren, John A.; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; McComiskey, Allison C.

2006-09-30

185

Electron Flux of Radiation Belts Animation - Duration: 0:31.  

NASA Video Gallery

This animation shows meridional (from north-south) plane projections of the REPT-A and REPT-B electron flux values. The animation first shows the expected two-belt Van Allen zone structure; from Se...

186

MARIE Dose and Flux Measurements in Mars Orbit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present results from the Martian Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE), aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft in orbit around Mars. MARIE operated successfully from March 2002 through October 2003. At the time of this writing, the instrument is off due to a loss of communications during an extremely intense Solar Particle Event. Efforts to revive MARIE are planned for Spring 2004, when Odyssey's role as a communications relay for the MER rovers is completed. During the period of successful operation, MARIE returned the first detailed energetic charged particle data from Mars. Due to limitations of the instrument, normalizing MARIE data to flux or dose is not straightforward - several large corrections are needed. Thus normalized results (like dose or flux) have large uncertainties and/or significant model-dependence. The problems in normalization are mainly due to inefficiency in detecting high-energy protons (signal-to-noise problems force the trigger threshold to be higher than optimal), to the excessively high gains employed in the signal processing electronics (many ions deposit energy sufficient to saturate the electronics, and dE/dx information is lost), and to artifacts associated with the two trigger detectors (incomplete registration of dE/dx). Despite these problems, MARIE is efficient for detecting helium ions with kinetic energies above about 30 MeV/nucleon, and for detecting high-energy ions (energies above about 400 MeV/nucleon) with charges from 5 to 10. Fluxes of these heavier ions can be compared to fluxes obtained from the ACE/CRIS instrument, providing at least one area of direct comparison between data obtained at Earth and at Mars; this analysis will be presented as a work in progress. We will also present dose-rate data, with a detailed explanation of the many sources of uncertainty in normalization. The results for both flux and dose will be compared to predictions of the HZETRN model of the GCR.

Zeitlin, C.; Cleghorn, T.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Saganti, P.; Andersen, V.; Lee, K. T.; Pinsky, L. S.; Turner, R.; Atwell, W.

2004-01-01

187

[Measurement of the CO2 flux on the water-air interface of Taihu Lake].  

PubMed

Based on the measurement of the CO2 flux on the water-air interface of Taihu Lake by closed chamber technique from January 2003 to June 2005, variation characteristics of the CO2 flux on the water-air interface in Taihu Lake are analyzed. Diurnal variation of the CO2 flux on the water-air interface is obvious. The CO2 flux is -0.79 mg/(m2 x h) in spring, -4.89 mg/(m2 x h) in summer, -4.06 mg/(m2 x h) in autumn and -2.56 mg/(m2 x h) in winter. Taihu Lake is the sink of carbon monoxide. The CO2 flux gets larger in severer polluted area of the lake. Seasonal variation is not apparent in the algae type lake, but obvious in grass type lake. It is high in summer and autumn, and low in spring and winter. Correlative factors of CO2 flux on the water-air interface of Taihu Lake possibly include weather, solar radiation, wind velocity, temperature, pH, TA, Chla, TC, TN and TP. PMID:17111598

Ji, Xiao-Yan; Cui, Guang-Bai; Yang, Long-Yuan; Wang, Yue-Si

2006-08-01

188

Verification of flux measurements made with in situ benthic chambers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Exchange of solutes between the sediments and overlying water was measured in situ at two locations where the overlying waters were devoid of dissolved oxygen (Skan Bay, Alaska and the Tres Marias depression on the Mexican continental shelf). Measurements were made with a tripod capable of collecting eight sequential samples for analysis of dissolved gases and ions. The tripod also permitted tracer injection and the retrieval of sediments underlying the flux chambers. Because of the absence of oxygen, sediments from these areas did not contain benthic faunal populations, and it was possible to compare the benthic fluxes measured with the tripod with those calculated from pore water profiles. For solutes for which exchange was not limited by resistance in the diffuse sublayer (alkalinity, Si(OH) 4+, NH 4+, and PO 43-), tje 11 tirpod-measured fluxes agreed with those calculated from pore water gradients to within 25%. Benthic boundary layer thickness within the chambers as calculated from the initial rate of radiotracer uptake (tritiated water) varied from 405 to 605 ?m in stirred chambers. Measured rates of NO 3- uptake were concordant with a boundary layer thickness of 600 ?m.

Devol, Allan H.

1987-06-01

189

New Thermospheric Infrared Radiative Flux and Power Results From the SABER Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite measures the vertical distribution of infrared radiation emitted by various atmospheric gases (ozone, water vapor, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide), providing important information about the radiation budget in the upper atmosphere. From these measurements, the infrared power and energy radiated by nitric oxide (NO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) have been computed. It has been demonstrated that NO, in particular, acts as a natural thermostat, providing a mechanism for solar storm energy to be lost from the atmosphere via infrared emission. A new version (Version 1.07) of the SABER data set has been released and new computations of flux, power and energy have been made with these data over the full mission timeline (2002-2008). A pubic database of the computed daily zonal power values is being developed. Cooling by the atomic oxygen fine structure line at 63 ?m based on atmospheric model profiles will also be computed and included in the database. Results for the new data version and comparison with the previous version will be presented. The seven- year span of this data set provides information on long-term solar variability, and the inclusion of more recent data aids the search for evidence of the start of solar cycle 24. These data provide fundamental information on the climate of the thermosphere and enable detailed investigation of short and long-term variability as a function of latitude.

Hunt, L. A.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Martin-Torres, F. J.; Mertens, C. J.; Marshall, B. T.; Russell, J. M.; Gordley, L. L.

2008-12-01

190

Flux measurements of energy and trace gases in urban Houston, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe the setup and some first year results of a new flux measurements tower in an urban area. An existing radio communications tower 4 km north of downtown Houston was equipped with micrometeorological instrumentation and trace gas sampling lines in spring 2007. Wind speed, temperature and relative humidity are recorded at five levels between 12 and 60 m above ground; 3-D wind speed measurements, solar and net radiances, and trace gas sampling are established from the 60 m level. A closed path IRGA is used for CO2 and water vapor fluxes, and independent instrumentation for criteria pollutant and VOC fluxes. Two CSI data loggers and software control the measurements, and EdiRe software is used to analyze turbulence data and compute fluxes. A project description is provided at http://atmo.tamu.edu/yellowcabtower. Surface properties as calculated from the gradient measurements show the site to be surprisingly uniform, with displacement heights between 5 and 9 m and roughness lengths between 0.4 and 0.7 m, despite urban heterogeneity. The latter is investigated through visible/near IR orthoimagery and LIDAR data, which are incorporated into a local GIS. Net radiation was also only marginally affected by surface heterogeneity. At this urban location it is balanced by roughly equal amounts of sensible heat, latent heat, and storage fluxes. Latent heat flux, however, is smaller outside the growing season, with an equivalent increase in winter storage fluxes, as expected. Significant differences are also observed with direction during summer, showing decreased Bowen ratios and lower CO2 emissions from sectors with a larger urban tree canopy cover in the footprint. The largely mature, dominantly oak urban canopy cover alleviates approximately 100 W m- 2 during typical summer days. On the other hand, anthropogenic CO2 emissions dominate over photosynthetic uptake all year round. Measured carbon fluxes peak during morning rush-hour traffic, especially when increasing stretches of the main commuter road fall into the footprint. Outside the rush hour, daytime carbon fluxes typically ranged from 0.4 to 1.6 g C m-2 h-1. A seasonal comparison shows that up to 75% of midday anthropogenic carbon flux is removed via photosynthesis in the dominant wind sector, S, which bears typical tree canopy covers of 25-50% on pervious surfaces.

Boedeker, I.; Schade, G. W.; Adams, S.; Park, C.

2008-12-01

191

Tools for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer: Streamer and FluxNet. Revised  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two tools for the solution of radiative transfer problems are presented. Streamer is a highly flexible medium spectral resolution radiative transfer model based on the plane-parallel theory of radiative transfer. Capable of computing either fluxes or radiances, it is suitable for studying radiative processes at the surface or within the atmosphere and for the development of remote-sensing algorithms. FluxNet is a fast neural network-based implementation of Streamer for computing surface fluxes. It allows for a sophisticated treatment of radiative processes in the analysis of large data sets and potential integration into geophysical models where computational efficiency is an issue. Documentation and tools for the development of alternative versions of Fluxnet are available. Collectively, Streamer and FluxNet solve a wide variety of problems related to radiative transfer: Streamer provides the detail and sophistication needed to perform basic research on most aspects of complex radiative processes while the efficiency and simplicity of FluxNet make it ideal for operational use.

Key, Jeffrey R.; Schweiger, Axel J.

1998-01-01

192

Annual cycle of radiation fluxes over the Arctic ocean: Sensitivity to cloud optical properties  

SciTech Connect

The relationship between cloud optical properties and the radiative fluxes over the Arctic Ocean is explored by conducting a series of modeling experiments. The annual cycle of arctic cloud optical properties that are required to reproduce both the outgoing radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere as determined from satellite observations and the available determinations of surface radiative fluxes are derived. Existing data on cloud fraction and cloud microphysical properties are utilized. Four types of cloud are considered: low stratus clouds, midlevel clouds, citrus clouds, and wintertime ice crystal precipitation. Internally consistent annual cycles of surface temperature, surface albedo, cloud fraction and cloud optical properties, components of surface and top of atmosphere radiative fluxes, and cloud radiative forcing are presented. The modeled total cloud optical depth (weighted by cloud fraction) ranges from a low value in winter of 2 to a high summertime value of 8. Infrared emmissivities for liquid water clouds are shown to be substantially less than unity during the cold half of the year. Values of modeled surface cloud radiative forcing are positive except for two weeks in midsummer; over the course of the year clouds have a net warming effect on the surface in the Arctic. Total cloud radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere is determined to be positive only briefly in early autumn. Surface longwave fluxes are shown to be very sensitive to the presence of lower-tropospheric ice crystal precipitation during the cold half of the year.

Curry, J.A. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States)); Ebert, E.E. (Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne (Australia))

1992-11-01

193

Luminous-flux measurements by an absolute integrating sphere.  

PubMed

We present an original implementation of the absolute-sphere method recently proposed by Ohno. The luminous-flux unit, the lumen, is realized by means of an integrating sphere with an opening calibrated by a luminous-intensity standard placed outside. The adapted experimental setup permits one to measure luminous-flux values between 5 and 2500 lm with a significant improvement with respect to the simulated performances reported in the literature. Traditionally, the luminous-flux unit, the lumen, is realized by goniophotometric techniques in which the luminous-intensity distribution is measured and integrated over the whole solid angle. Thus sphere results are compared with those obtained with the Istituto Elettrotecnico Nazionale goniophotometer. In particular, a set of standards, characterized by luminous-flux values of ~2000 lm, has been calibrated with both techniques. We highlight some of the problems encountered. Experimental results show that the agreement between the two methods is within the estimated uncertainty and suggest promising areas for future research. PMID:21102851

Rastello, M L; Miraldi, E; Pisoni, P

1996-08-01

194

Luminous-flux measurements by an absolute integrating sphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an original implementation of the absolute-sphere method recently proposed by Ohno. The luminous-flux unit, the lumen, is realized by means of an integrating sphere with an opening calibrated by a luminous-intensity standard placed outside. The adapted experimental setup permits one to measure luminous-flux values between 5 and 2500 lm with a significant improvement with respect to the simulated performances reported in the literature. Traditionally, the luminous-flux unit, the lumen, is realized by goniophotometric techniques in which the luminous-intensity distribution is measured and integrated over the whole solid angle. Thus sphere results are compared with those obtained with the Istituto Elettrotecnico Nazionale goniophotometer. In particular, a set of standards, characterized by luminous-flux values of approximately 2000 lm, has been calibrated with both techniques. We highlight some of the problems encountered. Experimental results show that the agreement between the two methods is within the estimated uncertainty and suggest promising areas for future research.

Rastello, Maria Luisa; Miraldi, Elio; Pisoni, Paolo

1996-08-01

195

Accuracy of soil heat flux plate measurements in coarse substrates - Field measurements versus a laboratory test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The in-situ performance of heat flux plates within coarse porous substrates might be limited due to poor contact between plate and substrate. We tested this behaviour with a simple laboratory set-up. Two test substrates were placed above a reference material of known thermal conductivity between a warm and a cold plate to establish a vertical heat flux. The temperature gradients and the response of a soil heat flux plate were measured. By means of the Fourier law of heat conduction the thermal conductivity of each test substrate was calculated, thus incorporating all heat transfer within the volume and representing the “effective” conductivity. The laboratory method had an accuracy of up to ±7% (±13% for a smaller set-up). In comparison, heat flux plate-derived heat fluxes showed errors of up to 26%. Use of heat flux plates in coarse substrates is not recommended without additional measurements.

Weber, S.; Graf, A.; Heusinkveld, B. G.

2007-05-01

196

Measurement of a surface heat flux and temperature  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Heat Flux Microsensor is a new sensor which was recently patented by Virginia Tech and is just starting to be marketed by Vatell Corp. The sensor is made using the thin-film microfabrication techniques directly on the material that is to be measured. It consists of several thin-film layers forming a differential thermopile across a thermal resistance layer. The measured heat flux q is proportional to the temperature difference across the resistance layer q= k(sub g)/delta(sub g) x (t(sub 1) - T(sub 2)), where k(sub g) is the thermal conductivity and delta (sub g) is the thickness of the thermal resistance layer. Because the gages are sputter coated directly onto the surface, their total thickness is less than 2 micrometers, which is two orders of magnitude thinner than previous gages. The resulting temperature difference across the thermal resistance layer (delta is less than 1 micrometer) is very small even at high heat fluxes. To generate a measurable signal many thermocouple pairs are put in series to form a differential thermopile. The combination of series thermocouple junctions and thin-film design creates a gage with very attractive characteristics. It is not only physically non-intrusive to the flow, but also causes minimal disruption of the surface temperature. Because it is so thin, the response time is less than 20 microsec. Consequently, the frequency response is flat from 0 to over 50 kHz. Moreover, the signal of the Heat Flux Microsensor is directly proportional to the heat flux. Therefore, it can easily be used in both steady and transient flows, and it measures both the steady and unsteady components of the surface heat flux. A version of the Heat Flux Microsensor has been developed to meet the harsh demands of combustion environments. These gages use platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium as the thermoelectric materials. The thermal resistance layer is silicon monoxide and a protective coating of Al2O3 is deposited on top of the sensor. The superimposed thin-film pattern of all six layers is presented. The large pads are for connection with pins used to bring the signal out the back of the ceramic. In addition to the heat flux measurement, the surface temperature is measured with a platinum resistance layer (RTS). The resistance of this layer increases with increasing temperature. Therefore, these gages simultaneously measure the surface temperature and heat flux. The demonstrated applications include rocket nozzles, SCRAM jet engines, gas turbine engines, boiling heat transfer, flame experiments, basic fluid heat transfer, hypersonic flight, and shock tube testing. The laboratory involves using one of these sensors in a small combustion flame. The sensor is made on a 2.5 cm diameter piece of aluminum nitride ceramic.

Davis, R. M.; Antoine, G. J.; Diller, T. E.; Wicks, A. L.

1994-01-01

197

Time and Space Resolved Heat Flux Measurements During Nucleate Boiling with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The lack of temporally and spatially resolved measurements under nucleate bubbles has complicated efforts to fully explain pool-boiling phenomena. The objective of this current work was to acquire time and space resolved temperature distributions under nucleating bubbles on a constant heat flux surface using a microheater array with 100x 100 square microns resolution, then numerically determine the wall to liquid heat flux. This data was then correlated with high speed (greater than l000Hz) visual recordings of The bubble growth and departure from the heater surface acquired from below and from the side of the heater. The data indicate that microlayer evaporation and contact line heat transfer are not major heat transfer mechanisms for bubble growth. The dominant heat transfer mechanism appears to be transient conduction into the liquid as the liquid rewets the wall during the bubble departure process.

Yerramilli, Vamsee K.; Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Kim, Jungho

2005-01-01

198

An introduction to flux measurements in difficult conditions.  

PubMed

The origins of the aerodynamic techniques now widely used at sites around the world to measure continuous biosphere-atmosphere exchange of carbon and energy are briefly reviewed. A survey of the current state of this approach concludes that the technique often fails when standard analysis routines are applied to data from single towers in complex flows. In the daytime, problems are signaled by failure to close the surface energy balance because turbulent energy fluxes are routinely underestimated. Complex flows are more prevalent at night when they lead to failure to measure all the respired CO2. At such times, the aerodynamic methodology is commonly supplemented by biological models. A set of papers from a workshop on "Flux Measurements in Difficult Conditions" held at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in January 2006 are introduced next. Two papers review the causes and magnitude of these flow-based problems. Four papers describe intensive field experiments that detail the mechanisms that cause problematic complex flows. These experiments show, inter alia, that the technique of replacing nighttime eddy flux measurements by biological models can also be systematically biased. Finally, two model studies are used both to illustrate the physics behind these complex flows and to motivate an approach to systematic correction of single-tower results. PMID:18767614

Finnigan, John

2008-09-01

199

Airborne flux measurements of biogenic isoprene over California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biogenic isoprene fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene over 7400 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions. The fast Fourier transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes of isoprene over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The continuous wavelet transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate instantaneous isoprene fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 m ± 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence determined in the racetrack-stacked profiles. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to basal emission factor (BEF) land-cover data sets used to drive BVOC emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. Even though the isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and coniferous forests were extremely low, observations at the Walnut Grove tower south of Sacramento demonstrate that isoprene oxidation products from the high emitting regions in the surrounding oak woodlands accumulate at night in the residual layer above the valley and mix down into the valley in the morning. Thus, the isoprene emissions surrounding the valley have relevance for the regional photochemistry that is not immediately apparent solely from the direct emission flux distribution. This paper reports the first regional observations of fluxes from specific sources by eddy covariance from an aircraft which can finally constrain statewide isoprene emission inventories used for ozone simulations by state agencies. While previously there was no available means to constrain the biogenic models, our results provide a good understanding of what the major sources of isoprene are in California, their magnitude, and how they are distributed. This data set on isoprene fluxes will be particularly useful for evaluating potential model alternatives which will be dealt with in a separate paper to assess isoprene emission models and their driving variable data sets.

Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Weber, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

2014-10-01

200

On Sensitivity of Spectral Radiative Fluxes to Atmospheric Water Vapor in the 940 nm Region (Numerical Simulation)  

SciTech Connect

Water vapor is well known to be a critical component in many aspects of atmospheric research, such as radiative transfer and cloud and aerosol processes. This requires both improved measurements of the columnar water vapor and its profiles in the atmosphere in a wide range of conditions, and adjustment of water vapor parameterizations in radiation codes including the perfection of spectroscopic parameters. In this paper we will present the results of comparison of our calculations and downward solar fluxes measured with Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer under conditions of horizontally homogeneous clouds. We also will discuss the sensitivity of atmospheric radiation characteristics to variations of water vapor in the band 940 nm: these results may be useful for development of new methods of retrieval of the total column water vapor content (WVC) in the atmosphere from data of radiation observations.

Zhuravleva, T.B.; Firsov, K.M.

2005-03-18

201

Observation and simulation of dust aerosol cycle and impact on radiative fluxes during the FENNEC campaign in summer 2011  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sahara desert is one of the principal worldwide sources of dust aerosol emissions that play significant role in the climatic system. In the framework of the FENNEC campaign, conducted during the summer 2011, we focus on dust radiative effect and impact on the atmospheric dynamics and profile structure. We study the variability of the measured radiative parameters and model atmospheric dynamics during dust plume observations at the FENNEC sites, therefore, trying to understand the link between the Saharan heat low system and dust aerosols. Due to its large size the airborne dust can absorb and scatter not only solar, but also thermal infrared radiation, which requires consideration of both spectral ranges. Analysis of AERONET and other optical observations during the period of intensive campaign in summer 2011 provides information on variability of aerosol optical characteristics and perturbation of solar and TIR flux. We use these observations in conjunction with the meso-scale model RAMS to understand the impact of the dust plumes on the atmospheric dynamics. We also simulate the dust cycle in order to find the contribution of the different emission sources and identify structure of transport over an extended domain. Then, coupling the radiative code (GAME) we calculate the radiative forcing of dust and compare it to the radiative flux observed and computed based on the AERONET observations. Validation of simulations is made using measurements from space-borne CALIOP lidar, SEVIRI and OMI satellites, AERONET ground-based stations and observations acquired onboard the SAFIRE Falcon 20 research aircraft.

Minvielle, Fanny; Derimian, Yevgeny; Pere, Jean-Christophe; Flamant, Cyrille; Brogniez, Gérard

2013-04-01

202

The diffusion of radiation in moving media. IV. Flux vector, effective opacity, and expansion opacity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For a given velocity and temperature field in a differentially moving 3D medium, the vector of the radiative flux is derived in the diffusion approximation. Due to the dependence of the velocity gradient on the direction, the associated effective opacity in general is a tensor. In the limit of small velocity gradients analytical expression are obtained which allow us to discuss the cases when the direction of the flux vector deviates from that of the temperature gradient. Furthermore the radiative flux is calculated for infinitely sharp, Poisson distributed spectral lines resulting in simple expressions that provide basic insight into the effect of the motions. In particular, it is shown how incomplete line lists affect the radiative flux as a function of the velocity gradient. Finally, the connection between our formalism and the concept of the expansion opacity introduced by Karp et al. (\\cite{karp}) is discussed.

Wehrse, R.; Baschek, B.; von Waldenfels, W.

2003-04-01

203

Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements  

PubMed Central

Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce a major portion of terrestrial heat along with a measurable flux of electron antineutrinos. These elements are key components in geophysical and geochemical models. Their quantity and distribution drive the dynamics, define the thermal history, and are a consequence of the differentiation of the Earth. Knowledge of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemical model calculations. This article describes the methods and criteria to experimentally determine average concentrations of uranium and thorium in the continental crust and in the mantle by using site-specific measurements of the terrestrial antineutrino flux. Optimal, model-independent determinations involve significant exposures of antineutrino detectors remote from nuclear reactors at both a midcontinental and a midoceanic site. This would require major, new antineutrino detection projects. The results of such projects could yield a greatly improved understanding of the deep interior of the Earth. PMID:18172211

Dye, Stephen T.; Guillian, Eugene H.

2008-01-01

204

Turbulent heat flux measurements in a transitional boundary layer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During an experimental investigation of the transitional boundary layer over a heated flat plate, an unexpected result was encountered for the turbulent heat flux (bar-v't'). This quantity, representing the correlation between the fluctuating normal velocity and the temperature, was measured to be negative near the wall under certain conditions. The result was unexpected as it implied a counter-gradient heat transfer by the turbulent fluctuations. Possible reasons for this anomalous result were further investigated. The possible causes considered for this negative bar-v't' were: (1) plausible measurement error and peculiarity of the flow facility, (2) large probe size effect, (3) 'streaky structure' in the near wall boundary layer, and (4) contributions from other terms usually assumed negligible in the energy equation including the Reynolds heat flux in the streamwise direction (bar-u't'). Even though the energy balance has remained inconclusive, none of the items (1) to (3) appear to be contributing directly to the anomaly.

Sohn, K. H.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Reshotko, E.

1992-01-01

205

An Alpha-Gamma Counter for Absolute Neutron Flux Measurement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An alpha-gamma counter was used to measure the absolute neutron flux of a monochromatic cold neutron beam to sub-0.1,% precision. Simultaneously, the counter was used to calibrate a thin neutron flux monitor based on neutron absorption on ^6Li to the same precision. This monitor was used in the most precise beam-based measurement of the neutron lifetime, where the limiting systematic effect was the uncertainty in the neutron counting efficiency (0.3,%). The counter uses a thick target of ^10B-enriched boron carbide to completely absorb the beam. The rate of absorbed neutrons is determined by counting 478 keV gamma rays from neutron capture on ^10B with calibrated high-purity germanium detectors. The calibration results and the implications for the neutron lifetime will be discussed.

Yue, A.; Greene, G.; Dewey, M.; Gilliam, D.; Nico, J.; Laptev, A.

2012-03-01

206

A new disjunct eddy-covariance system for BVOC flux measurements - validation on CO2 and H2O fluxes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) method is an interesting alternative to the conventional eddy covariance (EC) method because it allows the estimation of turbulent fluxes of species for which fast sensors are not available. We have developed and validated a new disjunct sampling system (called MEDEE). This system is built with chemically inert materials. Air samples are taken quickly and alternately in two cylindrical reservoirs, the internal pressures of which are regulated by a moving piston. The MEDEE system was designed to be operated either on the ground or aboard an aircraft. It is also compatible with most analysers since it transfers the air samples at a regulated pressure. To validate the system, DEC and EC measurements of CO2 and latent heat fluxes were performed concurrently during a field campaign. EC fluxes were first compared to simulated DEC (SDEC) fluxes and then to actual DEC fluxes. Both the simulated and actual DEC fluxes showed a good agreement with EC fluxes in terms of correlation. The determination coefficients (R2) were 0.93 and 0.91 for DEC and SDEC latent heat fluxes, respectively. For DEC and SDEC CO2 fluxes R2 was 0.69 in both cases. The conditions of low fluxes experienced during the campaign impaired the comparison of the different techniques especially for CO2 flux measurements. Linear regression analysis showed an 14% underestimation of DEC fluxes for both CO2 and latent heat compared to EC fluxes. A first field campaign, focusing on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions, was carried out to measure isoprene fluxes above a downy oak (Quercus Pubescens) forest in the south-east of France. The measured standard emission rate was in the lower range of reported values in earlier studies. Further analysis will be conducted through ground-based and airborne campaigns in the coming years.

Baghi, R.; Durand, P.; Jambert, C.; Jarnot, C.; Delon, C.; Serça, D.; Striebig, N.; Ferlicoq, M.; Keravec, P.

2012-12-01

207

How common problems with estimating surface radiative fluxes impact snow simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Net radiation provides most of the melt energy for seasonal snow, a critical water resource for many parts of the world. In many cases shortwave radiation is the dominant flux, but when it is reduced by factors such as high albedo, cloud cover, and topographic shading, longwave radiation can also contribute substantially to the surface energy balance. Methods for determining these surface fluxes include: numerical weather models, reanalysis, direct observations, satellite measurements, and empirical algorithms based on proxy data. Long- and shortwave irradiances are rarely measured in mountainous environments. Those measurements that are made in these locations are subject to difficult conditions, which often result in snow-covered instruments and tilted instrumentation or sloped installation surface. To avoid these problems, measurements may be taken from a more protected valley location, but this may lead to a mismatch between measurement and study site conditions, such as a fog covered valley observation used to force a simulation at a higher, fog-free elevation. Satellites are useful tools for observing surface fluxes over large areas. However, satellite data products can have problems with mixed pixels of clouds and no clouds. Finally, algorithms based on proxy data have known biases and errors, can lack cloud and topographic corrections, and may not represent the diurnal cycle or cloud cover variability. In this study, we explored four scenarios for estimating long- and shortwave surface irradiances that have known errors and assessed the impact of these errors on simulations of SWE. The four scenarios were: 1) improper instrument siting such as a tilted sensor or improper projection of observations onto sloped terrain, 2) biases and errors in surface irradiances characteristic of algorithms based on proxy data, 3) mixed pixels of cloudy and non-cloudy conditions resulting from a coarse spatial resolution in a satellite or reanalysis product, and 4) lack of temporal variability such as when using a daily cloud cover fraction. To understand the effect of these systematic errors, we simulated SWE at three study sites using snow models of varying complexity in the representation of snow pack internal energy. Artificial errors, representing the four scenarios above, were created and used to force the snow models in place of the original observations and compared to the original simulations. The models used were the Utah Energy Balance model, which has a skin temperature and a bulk temperature, and the Modular Snow Model, which is a multi-layer model. These models were chosen to demonstrate the interaction of model complexity with different error structures. This study was conducted at three sites with full energy balance observations: the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in Idaho operated by the USDA with a record 25 years long (1983-2008); Umpqua National Forest, Oregon, operated as part of the Demonstration for Ecosystem Management Options during the winters between 1996-1999, and Lake O'Hara, British Columbia, operated as part of the Improved Processes and Parameterization for Prediction in Cold Regions research network over the water year 2008. The results from this study highlight which errors have the most impact on snow modeling and thus where efforts should be concentrated for improving estimates of surface radiative fluxes.

Lapo, K. E.; Lundquist, J. D.; Hinkelman, L. M.

2012-12-01

208

On gravitational radiation and the energy flux of matter  

Microsoft Academic Search

A suitable derivative of Einstein's equations in the framework of the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity (TEGR) yields a continuity equation for the gravitational energy-momentum. In particular, the time derivative of the total gravitational energy is given by the sum of the total fluxes of gravitational and matter fields energy. We carry out a detailed analysis of the continuity equation

J. W. Maluf; F. F. Faria

2004-01-01

209

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF HEAT FLUX FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments show a linear relationship between the total heat flux from a water surface to air and the standard deviation of the surface temperature field, {sigma}, derived from thermal images of the water surface over a range of heat fluxes from 400 to 1800 Wm{sup -2}. Thermal imagery and surface data were collected at two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the laboratory relationship between heat flux and {sigma} exists in large heated bodies of water. The heat fluxes computed from the cooling lake data range from 200 to 1400 Wm{sup -2}. The linear relationship between {sigma} and Q is evident in the cooling lake data, but it is necessary to apply band pass filtering to the thermal imagery to remove camera artifacts and non-convective thermal gradients. The correlation between {sigma} and Q is improved if a correction to the measured {sigma} is made that accounts for wind speed effects on the thermal convection. Based on more than a thousand cooling lake images, the correlation coefficients between {sigma} and Q ranged from about 0.8 to 0.9.

Garrett, A; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Robert Kurzeja, R; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Timothy Brown, T; Saleem Salaymeh, S

2007-12-19

210

Corrections of Heat Flux Measurements on Launch Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Knowledge of aerothermally induced convective heat transfer is important in the design of thermal protection systems for launch vehicles. Aerothermal models are typically calibrated via the data from circular, in-flight, flush-mounted surface heat flux gauges exposed to the thermal and velocity boundary layers of the external flow. Typically, copper or aluminum Schmidt- Boelter gauges, which take advantage of the one-dimensional Fourier's law of heat conduction, are used to measure the incident heat flux. This instrumentation, when surrounded by low-conductivity insulation, has a wall temperature significantly lower than the insulation. As a result of this substantial disturbance to the thermal boundary layer, the heat flux incident on the gauge tends to be considerably higher than it would have been on the insulation had the calorimeter not been there. In addition, radial conductive heat transfer from the hotter insulation can cause the calorimeter to indicate heat fluxes higher than actual. An overview of an effort to develop and calibrate gauge correction techniques for both of these effects will be presented.

Reinarts, Thomas R.; Matson, Monique L.; Walls, Laurie K.

2002-01-01

211

Fluxes through plant metabolic networks: measurements, predictions, insights and challenges.  

PubMed

Although the flows of material through metabolic networks are central to cell function, they are not easy to measure other than at the level of inputs and outputs. This is particularly true in plant cells, where the network spans multiple subcellular compartments and where the network may function either heterotrophically or photoautotrophically. For many years, kinetic modelling of pathways provided the only method for describing the operation of fragments of the network. However, more recently, it has become possible to map the fluxes in central carbon metabolism using the stable isotope labelling techniques of metabolic flux analysis (MFA), and to predict intracellular fluxes using constraints-based modelling procedures such as flux balance analysis (FBA). These approaches were originally developed for the analysis of microbial metabolism, but over the last decade, they have been adapted for the more demanding analysis of plant metabolic networks. Here, the principal features of MFA and FBA as applied to plants are outlined, followed by a discussion of the insights that have been gained into plant metabolic networks through the application of these time-consuming and non-trivial methods. The discussion focuses on how a system-wide view of plant metabolism has increased our understanding of network structure, metabolic perturbations and the provision of reducing power and energy for cell function. Current methodological challenges that limit the scope of plant MFA are discussed and particular emphasis is placed on the importance of developing methods for cell-specific MFA. PMID:25631681

Kruger, Nicholas J; Ratcliffe, R George

2015-01-01

212

Measurement of diffusive flux of ammonia from water.  

PubMed

An instrument was developed for the measurement of gaseous ammonia concentration, NH(3(sw,eq)), in equilibrium with surface waters, notably ocean water. The instrument measures the ammonia flux from a flowing water surface under defined conditions and allows the calculation of NH(3(sw,eq)) from the principles of Fickian diffusion. The flux collector resembles a wetted parallel plate denuder previously developed for air sampling. The sample under study runs on one plate of the device; the ammonia released from the sample is collected by a slow flow of a receptor liquid on the other plate. The NH(3) + NH(4)(+) (hereinafter called N(T)) in the effluent receptor liquid is preconcentrated on a silica gel column and subsequently measured by a fluorometric flow injection analysis (FIA) system. With a 6-min cycle (4-min load, 2-min inject), the analytical system can measure down to 0.3 nM N(T) in the receptor liquid. Coupled with the flux collector, it is sufficiently sensitive to measure the ammonia flux from seawater. The instrument design is such that it is little affected by ambient ammonia. In both laboratory (N(T) 0.2-50 ?M), and field investigations (N(T) 0.18-1.7 ?M) good linearity between the ammonia flux and the N(T) concentration in seawater (spiked, synthetic, natural) was observed, although aged seawater, with depleted N(T) content, behaves in an unusual fashion upon N(T) addition, showing the existence of an "ammonia demand". NH(3(sw,eq)) levels from ocean water measured in the Coconut Island Laboratory, HI, ranged from 6.6 to 33 nmol/m(3) with an average of 17.4 ± 6.9 nmol/m(3), in comparison to 2.8-21 nmol/m(3) (average 10 ± 7 nmol/m(3)) NH(3(sw,eq)) values previously reported for the Central Pacific Ocean (Quinn, P. K.; et al. J. Geophys. Res. 1990, 95, 16405-16416). PMID:21644712

Genfa, Z; Uehara, T; Dasgupta, P K; Clarke, A D; Winiwarter, W

1998-09-01

213

Radiation dose measurements in coronary CT angiography  

PubMed Central

Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography is associated with high radiation dose and this has raised serious concerns in the literature. Awareness of various parameters for dose estimates and measurements of coronary CT angiography plays an important role in increasing our understanding of the radiation exposure to patients, thus, contributing to the implementation of dose-saving strategies. This article provides an overview of the radiation dose quantity and its measurement during coronary CT angiography procedures. PMID:24392190

Sabarudin, Akmal; Sun, Zhonghua

2013-01-01

214

An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model, and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land-atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on the production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, and stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem-level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; they are however neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow taking full advantage of the rich information content of micrometeorological flux measurements.

Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

2015-01-01

215

A Push-Pull Test to Measure Volatilization Fluxes of Organic Pollutants without Flux Chambers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volatilization of organic contaminants is a potentially significant removal mechanism from wetlands, but field measurements are scarce and the physiochemical controls on volatilization from wetland soils remain poorly understood. It has been established that volatilization rates of certain pollutants are enhanced by vegetation and are strongly correlated with evapotranspiration (ET). These observations rely on flux chambers measurements, which are characterized by significant uncertainty due the chamber's effects on the meteorological variables around the plant and consequent impact on the biophysical processes governing ET and plant uptake of soil contaminants. Here we present data from a mesocosm study using a modified single-well push-pull test to measure in-situ volatilization rates from inundated soils vegetated with the wetland macrophytes Scirpus acutus and Typha latifolia, as well as from unplanted soil. This new method uses a test solution containing the volatile tracers sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), helium (He), and dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12) to estimate first-order volatilization rates and examine the relationship between physiochemical properties and volatilization rates. The test also yields an estimate for the volume of subsurface gas bubbles, which is used to derive a retardation factor for the effect of interphase partitioning on the estimation of kinetic parameters. We evaluate models to partition observed fluxes into different pathways for plant-mediated volatilization: transpirational uptake and consequent volatilization, and gas-phase diffusion through porous root aerenchyma. Those models are then used to scale tracer-derived volatilization fluxes to priority organic pollutants including benzene, trichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride. We also discuss the implementation of this method at field scales to estimate volatilization as a component of phytoremediation applications.

Reid, M. C.; Jaffe, P. R.

2011-12-01

216

Measuring Radiation Damage from Heavy Energetic Ions in Aluminum  

SciTech Connect

An intense beam of 122 MeV/u (9.3 GeV) 76Ge ions was stopped in aluminum samples at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL, MSU. Attempts were made at ORNL to measure changes in material properties by measuring changes in electrical resistivity and microhardness, and by transmission electron microscopy characterization, for defect density caused by radiation damage, as a function of depth and integrated ion flux. These measurements are relevant for estimating damage to components at a rare isotope beam facility.

Kostin, M., PI-MSU; Ronningen, R., PI-MSU; Ahle, L., PI-LLNL; Gabriel, T., Scientific Investigation and Development; Mansur, L., PI-ORNL; Leonard, K., ORNL; Mokhov, N., FNAL; Niita, K., RIST, Japan

2009-02-21

217

Method for radiation detection and measurement  

DOEpatents

Dose of radiation to which a body of crystalline material has been exposed is measured by exposing the body to optical radiation at a first wavelength, which is greater than about 540 nm, and measuring optical energy emitted from the body by luminescence at a second wavelength, which is longer than the first wavelength. 9 figures.

Miller, S.D.

1993-12-21

218

Method for radiation detection and measurement  

DOEpatents

Dose of radiation to which a body of crystalline material has been exposed is measured by exposing the body to optical radiation at a first wavelength, which is greater than about 540 nm, and measuring optical energy emitted from the body by luminescence at a second wavelength, which is longer than the first wavelength.

Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

1993-01-01

219

Momentum Flux Measuring Instrument for Neutral and Charged Particle Flows  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An instrument to measure the momentum flux (total pressure) of plasma and neutral particle jets onto a surface has been developed. While this instrument was developed for magnetized plasmas, the concept works for non-magnetized plasmas as well. We have measured forces as small as 10(exp -4) Newtons on a surface immersed in the plasma where small forces are due to ionic and neutral particles with kinetic energies on the order of a few eV impacting the surface. This instrument, a force sensor, uses a target plate (surface) that is immersed in the plasma and connected to one end of an alumina rod while the opposite end of the alumina rod is mechanically connected to a titanium beam on which four strain gauges are mounted. The force on the target generates torque causing strain in the beam. The resulting strain measurements can be correlated to a force on the target plate. The alumina rod electrically and thermally isolates the target plate from the strain gauge beam and allows the strain gauges to be located out of the plasma flow while also serving as a moment arm of several inches to increase the strain in the beam at the strain gauge location. These force measurements correspond directly to momentum flux and may be used with known plasma conditions to place boundaries on the kinetic energies of the plasma and neutral particles. The force measurements may also be used to infer thrust produced by a plasma propulsive device. Stainless steel, titanium, molybdenum, and aluminum flat target plates have been used. Momentum flux measurements of H2, D2, He, and Ar plasmas produced in a magnetized plasma device have been performed.

Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Schafer, Charles F. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

220

Controlling quantum flux through measurement: an idealised example  

E-print Network

Classically, no transfer occurs between two equally filled reservoirs no matter how one looks at them, but the situation can be different quantum mechanically. This paradoxically surprising phenomenon rests on the distinctive property of the quantum world that one cannot stare at a system without disturbing it. It was recently discovered that this seemingly annoying feature could be harnessed to control small quantum systems using weak measurements. Here we present one of the simplest models -- an idealised double quantum dot -- where by toying with the dot measurement strength, i.e. the intensity of the look, it is possible to create a particle flux in an otherwise completely symmetric system. The basic property underlying this phenomena is that measurement disturbances are very different on a system evolving unitarily and a system evolving dissipatively. This effect shows that adaptive measurements can have dramatic effects enabling transport control but possibly inducing biases in the measurement of macroscopic quantities if not handled with care.

Antoine Tilloy; Michel Bauer; Denis Bernard

2014-09-24

221

[Research on reducing mold flux's radiative heat transfer based on FTIR and XRD].  

PubMed

The mold fluxes samples containing transition metal oxides TiO2 were designed based on the composition of commercial mold fluxes in continuous casting of steel, and the relation between radiative heat transfer and the content of TiO2 was obtained through FTIR spectrum analysis and XRD analysis. The result of FTIR analysis indicates that TiO2 has a great negative effect on infrared transmittance of flux samples in the wavelength range of 1-6 microm. The result of XRD analysis indicates that crystallization of cuspidine was restrained with addition of TiO2, and CaTiO3 and other phases were found in the samples. The decrease in cuspidine phase is beneficial to strand lubrication in the mold. Radiation heat flux from the strand to the mold was calculated using a radiative heat transfer model concluded in previous study. Addition of TiO2 was found to result in a remarkable decrease in radiation heat flux for both glassy and crystalline samples, and the heat flux tended to decrease with increasing TiO2, with the maximal decrease reaching 30%. As a result of great refraction and scatter at surface and grain boundaries of samples, the negative effect of crystalline samples was much larger than that of the glassy ones. PMID:19445198

Diao, Jiang; Xie, Bing

2009-02-01

222

Assessment for global longwave radiative fluxes estimated by GEWEX Surface Radiative Budget (SRB) project and the Calipso-CloudSat-CERES-MODIS (CCCM).  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate estimates of the cloud radiative effect and greenhouse effect are required to better estimate the climate variability on regional and global scales. The radiation budget at the surface is a key interface for energy exchange and therefore for detecting climate change. Surface longwave radiative fluxes (LRFs) are an important component of this terrestrial energy budget. These LRFs are measured from ground-based instruments but accurate satellite-based estimates are required to understanding the flux variability at larger spatial scales. To date most satellite based longwave flux algorithms make assumptions regarding the vertical profiles of clouds. New methods, using CALIPSO and CloudSat now specify cloud vertical profiles explicitly, although are limited in time and space. This study assesses the LRFs estimated by two different projects the GEWEX (Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment) SRB (Surface Radiative Budget) and CCCM (CALIPSO-CloudSat-CERES-MODIS) during an overlapping time period for the year 2007. The assessment compares the NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) dataset and CCCM LW archived fluxes derived on a 1° x 1° global grid. The study quantifies the agreement between both data sets on different spatial and temporal scales, showing a mean annual differences of -1.4±4.4 Wm-2 (All sky)and -2.8±2.4 Wm-2 (Clear sky) for dowelling fluxes, while about -0.8±2.4 Wm-2 for upwelling fluxes and considers differences in monthly and annual zonal averages for land/ocean and day/night time periods. The zonal differences between GEWEX-SRB and C3M are mainly at the Polar Regions due to the different cloud properties in both algorithms. The difference at the tropical regions could be due to on the cloud random overlap assumptions in SRB. The difference for upward fluxes is in the skin temperature prescription. Both upward and downward longwave flux difference standard deviations are reduced when larger scale SRB grid box averages are compared to C3M footprint averages using a minimum threshold. This technique is being developed to better classify and understand differences.

Viudez-Mora, A.; Stackhouse, P. W.; Kato, S.

2012-04-01

223

A simple yet more accurate model to calculate solar radiative flux in the inhomogeneous atmosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple yet more accurate semiempirical model is developed to calculate solar radiative flux in the optically inhomogeneous atmosphere. In the model a parameterized expression of spherical reflectance and transmitance of the atmosphere is confirmed, and the weighted single scatter albedo and weighted asymmetric factor are introduced to fit four empirical correction factors responsible for radiative fluxes in the inhomogeneous atmosphere. For both clean and turbid models, there are 120060 sets of radiative flux simulations for accuracy checks of the model, which cover 0-50 cloud optical depths, 0-0.8 surface reflectance, Junge and Log-normal aerosol size distributions, and 0-0.05 imaginary parts of aerosol refractive indexes. In case of the homogeneous atmosphere, standard errors of the 120060 upward fluxes from the present model are 1.08% and 1.04% for clean and turbid aerosol models, respectively; and those of the downward fluxes are 4.12% and 3.31%. In case of the inhomogeneous atmosphere, standard errors of the upward fluxes from the present model are 3.01% and 3.48% for clean and turbid aerosol models, respectively; and those of the downward fluxes are 4.54% and 4.89%, showing a much better accuracy than the results calculated by using an assumption of the homogeneous atmosphere.

Qiu, J. H.

2002-05-01

224

Momentum Flux Measurements Using an Impact Thrust Stand  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A device has been developed to measure the force caused by a beam of charged and neutral particles impacting a target plate. This device, an impact thrust stand, was developed to allow thrusters, during early stages of development, to be quickly and easily exhausted and compared to other thrusters. Since some thruster concepts are tested using laboratory equipment that is heavy and cumbersome, measuring the momentum flux of the particles in the plume can be much simpler than placing the entire thruster on a thrust stand. Conservation of momentum requires the momentum flux measured in the plume to be related to the thrust produced by the thruster. The impact thrust stand was designed to be placed in the plume of an electric thruster and has been tested and compared to the thrust measured from a Hall thruster placed on a pendulum thrust stand. Force measurements taken at several axial locations in the magnetic nozzle region of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket will be presented.

Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Breizman, Boris; Bengtson, Roger

2004-01-01

225

Offline GCSS Intercomparison of Cloud-Radiation Interaction and Surface Fluxes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simulations of deep tropical clouds by both cloud-resolving models (CRMs) and single-column models (SCMs) in the GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) Working Group 4 (WG4; Precipitating Convective Cloud Systems), Case 2 (19-27 December 1992, TOGA-COARE IFA) have produced large differences in the mean heating and moistening rates (-1 to -5 K and -2 to 2 grams per kilogram respectively). Since the large-scale advective temperature and moisture "forcing" are prescribed for this case, a closer examination of two of the remaining external types of "forcing", namely radiative heating and air/sea hear and moisture transfer, are warranted. This paper examines the current radiation and surface flux of parameterizations used in the cloud models participating in the GCSS WG4, be executing the models "offline" for one time step (12 s) for a prescribed atmospheric state, then examining the surface and radiation fluxes from each model. The dynamic, thermodynamic, and microphysical fluids are provided by the GCE-derived model output for Case 2 during a period of very active deep convection (westerly wind burst). The surface and radiation fluxes produced from the models are then divided into prescribed convective, stratiform, and clear regions in order to examine the role that clouds play in the flux parameterizations. The results suggest that the differences between the models are attributed more to the surface flux parameterizations than the radiation schemes.

Tao, W.-K.; Johnson, D.; Krueger, S.; Zulauf, M.; Donner, L.; Seman, C.; Petch, J.; Gregory, J.

2004-01-01

226

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01

227

Measurements of trace metal concentrations, fluxes and bioavailability using DGT  

SciTech Connect

The technique of diffusive gradient in thin-films (DGT) provides an insitu means of quantitatively measuring labile species in aqueous systems. By ensuring that transport of metal ions to an exchange resin is solely by free diffusion through a membrane, of known thickness, {Delta}g, the concentration in the bulk solution, C{sub b} can be calculated from the measured mass in the resin, M, after time, t, by C{sub b} = M{Delta}g/Dst, where D is the molecular diffusion coefficient and s is the exposure surface area of the membrane. If a sufficiently thick ({minus}1 mm) diffusion layer is selected, the flux of metal to the resin is independent of the hydrodynamics in solution above a threshold level of convection. Deployment for 1 day results in a concentration factor of about 300, allowing metals to be measured at extremely low levels (4 pmol 1{sup {minus}1}). Only labile metal species are measured, the effective time of measurement, typically 2 min., being determined by the thickness of the diffusion layer. The measurement is independent of ionic strength (10nM to 1M). For Chelex-100 as the resin, the measurement is independent of pH in the range of 5 to 8.3, but a sub-theoretical response is obtained at pH < 5 where binding to Chelex is diminished. The application of DGT to the insitu measurement of trace metals in freshwater and seawater is demonstrated. Its more general applicability as a pollution monitoring tool is discussed. In sediments and soils it can provide direct measurements of fluxes from solid phase to pore water, allowing it to be used as a surrogate for bioavailability.

Zhang, H.; Davison, W. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom)

1995-12-31

228

Gamma heating measurements in a mixed radiation field  

SciTech Connect

Gamma hearing measurements have been made in a low-Z assembly irradiated with 14-MeV neutrons and (n,n{prime}) gammas produced by a Texas Nuclear Model 9400 neutron generator. The assembly is composed of 144 magnesium sleeves (5cm {times} 5cm {times} 60cm {times} 3 mm thick) filled with graphite to simulate a fusion blanket test module. Heating measurements were made in the mid-line of the assembly using a proportional counter operating in the Continuously-varied Bias-voltage Acquisition (CBA) mode. The neutron induced atomic recoil signal was rejected by observing the signal rise-time differences inherent to radiations of different LET. The experiment was modelled using the one-dimensional radiation transport code ANISN/PC. The operating limits of this technique were identified by comparing measurements made at different positions in the assembly and then comparing these measurements to the calculated flux. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Chiu, H.K. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Bennett, E.F.; Micklich, B.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1990-09-01

229

Radiation Environment Variations at Mars - Model Calculations and Measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Variations in the space radiation environment due to changes in the GCR (Galactic Cosmic Ray) from the past (#23) solar cycle to the current one (#24) has been intriguing in many ways, with an unprecedented long duration of the recent solar minimum condition and a very low peak activity of the current solar maximum. Model calculated radiation data and assessment of variations in the particle flux - protons, alpha particles, and heavy ions of the GCR environment is essential for understanding radiation risk and for any future intended long-duration human exploration missions. During the past solar cycle, we have had most active and higher solar maximum (2001-2003) condition. In the beginning of the current solar cycle (#24), we experienced a very long duration of solar minimum (2009-2011) condition with a lower peak activity (2013-2014). At Mars, radiation measurements in orbit were obtained (onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft) during the past (#23) solar maximum condition. Radiation measurements on the surface of Mars are being currently measured (onboard the Mars Science Laboratory, 2012 - Curiosity) during the current (#24) solar peak activity (August 2012 - present). We present our model calculated radiation environment at Mars during solar maxima for solar cycles #23 and #24. We compare our earlier model calculations (Cucinotta et al., J. Radiat. Res., 43, S35-S39, 2002; Saganti et al., J. Radiat. Res., 43, S119-S124, 2002; and Saganti et al., Space Science Reviews, 110, 143-156, 2004) with the most recent radiation measurements on the surface of Mars (2012 - present).

Saganti, Premkumar; Cucinotta, Francis

230

SIERRA-Flux: Measuring Regional Surface Fluxes of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Water Vapor from an Unmanned Aircraft System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Eddy-Covariance Method for quantifying surface-atmosphere fluxes is a foundational technique for measuring net ecosystem exchange and validating regional-to-global carbon cycle models. While towers or ships are the most frequent platform for measuring surface-atmosphere exchange, experiments using aircraft for flux measurements have yielded contributions to several large-scale studies including BOREAS, SMACEX, RECAB by providing local-to-regional coverage beyond towers. The low-altitude flight requirements make airborne flux measurements particularly dangerous and well suited for unmanned aircraft.

Fladeland; Yates, Emma Louise; Bui, Thaopaul Van; Dean-Day, Jonathan; Kolyer, Richard

2011-01-01

231

Progress on a Rayleigh Scattering Mass Flux Measurement Technique  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic has been developed to provide mass flux measurements in wind tunnel flows. Spectroscopic molecular Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic tool that has the ability to provide simultaneous density and velocity measurements in gaseous flows. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 10 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to a solid Fabry-Perot etalon for spectral analysis. The circular interference pattern that contains the spectral information that is needed to determine the flow properties is imaged onto a CCD detector. Baseline measurements of density and velocity in the test section of the 15 cm x 15 cm Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented as well as velocity measurements within a supersonic combustion ramjet engine isolator model installed in the tunnel test section.

Mielke-Fagan, Amy F.; Clem, Michelle M.; Elam, Kristie A.; Hirt, Stefanie M.

2010-01-01

232

Concentrated solar-flux measurements at the IEA-SSPS solar-central-receiver power plant, Tabernas - Lameria (Spain)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A flux analyzing system (F.A.S.) was installed at the central receiver system of the SSPS project to determine the relative flux distribution of the heliostat field and to measure the entire optical solar flux reflected from the heliostat field into the receiver cavity. The functional principles of the F.A.S. are described. The raw data and the evaluation of the measurements of the entire helistat field are given, and an approach to determine the actual fluxes which hit the receiver tube bundle is presented. A method is described to qualify the performance of each heliostat using a computer code. The data of the measurements of the direct radiation are presented.

Vontobel, G.; Schelders, C.; Real, M.

233

Greenhouse effect and altitude gradients over the Alps – by surface longwave radiation measurements and model calculated LOR  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The greenhouse effect has been investigated predominantly with satellite measurements, but more than 90% of the greenhouse radiative flux affecting Earth’s surface temperature and humidity originates from a 1000 meter layer above the surface. Here we show that substantial improvements on surface longwave radiation measurements and very good agreement with radiative transfer model calculations allow the clear-sky greenhouse effect

R. Philipona; B. Dürr; C. Marty

2004-01-01

234

Numerical study of the effects of boundary conditions on the measurement and calibration of gardon type heat flux sensors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To monitor the high-intensity heat flux conditions that occur in the space shuttle main engine (SSME), it is necessary to use specifically designed heat flux sensors. These sensors, which are of the Gardon-type, are exposed on the measuring face to high-intensity radiative and convective heat fluxes and on the other face to convective cooling. To improve the calibration and measurement accuracy of these gauges, researchers are studing the effect that the thermal boundary conditions have on gauge performance. In particular, they are studying how convective cooling effects the field inside the sensor and the measured heat flux. The first phase of this study involves a numerical study of these effects. Subsequent phases will involve experimental verification. A computer model of the heat transfer around a Garden-type heat flux sensor was developed. Two specific geometries are being considered are: (1) heat flux sensor mounted on a flat-plate; and (2) heat flux sensor mounted at the stagnation point of a circular cylinder. Both of these configurations are representative of the use of heat flux sensors in the components of the SSME. The purpose of the analysis is to obtain a temperature distribution as a function of the boundary conditions.

Krane, M.; Dybbs, A.

1987-01-01

235

Micrometeoroid Flux in the Earth-Venus Region Measured by the IKAROS-ALADDIN  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ALADDIN (Arrayed Large-Area Dust Detectors in INterplanetary space) made of 0.54 ^{m2} PVDF sensors was deployed on the anti-Sun face of the thin polyimide sail membrane of the deep space solar sail spacecraft "IKAROS (Interplanetary Kitecraft Accelerated by the Radiation Of the Sun)". It has measured micrometeoroid flux between the Earth's orbit and Venus' orbit (i.e., 1.0~0.7 AU of heliocentric distance) for 1.5 revolutions from June 2010 until October 2011. The ALADDIN dust detector is arrayed by 8 channels of 9-20 micron-thick PVDF sensors, which are capable of detecting hypervelocity impacts of micrometeoroids at >~10 ^{-12 }g, according to ground calibration impact experiments. The sensors filter electronic, thermal and vibration noises and can record time, peak hold value above its threshold, and relaxation duration of each impact signal. In total, its cruising measurements counted more than 3000 dust impacts after screening noise signals. The ALADDIN flux in the 2010-2011 epoch was compared with fluxes at similar mass range of micrometeoroids and in similar heliocentric distances measured by Helios in 1970's and Galileo in 1990's, both composed of much less number of impact data. Then, it suggested enhancement of dust flux in the trailing edge of circumsolar orbits of the Earth and Venus, which are consistent with previous reports of larger dust grain enhancements observed by infrared telescopes. This also implies that the temporal flux enhancement of large micrometeoroids in the blob may have caused a cascading effect to produce smaller dust by collisions with sporadic meteoroids. Also it is apparent that the micrometeoroid flux increases by approximately one order of magnitude from 1 AU to 0.7 AU during the 2010-2011 epoch. The temporal variance of the Helios flux data in 1976-80 in the same region of 1 AU may be associated with difference of averaged solar activities during both epochs. Since the solar activity in the years 2010-2011 was around the minimum of the solar cycle, smaller micrometeoroids, which are more affected by solar radiation pressure than larger ones, may have survived longer than those in the Helios epoch, which covered from the minimum to the maximum of the solar cycle in late 1970's.

Yano, Hajime

2012-07-01

236

The AmeriFlux Network of Long-Term CO{sub 2} Flux Measurement Stations: Methodology and Intercomparability  

SciTech Connect

A portable flux measurement system has been used within the AmeriFlux network of CO{sub 2} flux measurement stations to enhance the comparability of data collected across the network. No systematic biases were observed in a comparison between portable system and site H, LE, or CO{sub 2} flux values although there were biases observed between the portable system and site measurement of air temperature and PPFD. Analysis suggests that if values from two stations differ by greater than 26% for H, 35% for LE, and 32% for CO{sub 2} flux they are likely to be significant. Methods for improving the intercomparability of the network are also discussed.

Hollinger, D. Y.; Evans, R. S.

2003-05-20

237

On the Measurement of Neutron Flux: A Fission Track Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A study has been made of the use of dosimeter glasses for fission track dating experiments. SRM612, SRM912 and Fleischer's dosimeter glasses Were used for thermal neutron flux measurement and calibrated against activation foils. Mean values of the calibration constants for each dosimeter glass are SRM612 ~ 6.60 X 109, SRM912 ~ 6.51 X 109 and Fleischer's glass ~ 2.28 X 1011. Dosimeter glasses described in this paper have been tested extensively on some mineral standards in conjunction with different reactor facilities, namely CIRUS (India), RISØ (Denmark) and HIFAR (Australia). The advantages of the above mentioned dosimeters are discussed

Koul, Sohan L.

1985-11-01

238

System having unmodulated flux locked loop for measuring magnetic fields  

DOEpatents

A system (10) for measuring magnetic fields, wherein the system (10) comprises an unmodulated or direct-feedback flux locked loop (12) connected by first and second unbalanced RF coaxial transmission lines (16a, 16b) to a superconducting quantum interference device (14). The FLL (12) operates for the most part in a room-temperature or non-cryogenic environment, while the SQUID (14) operates in a cryogenic environment, with the first and second lines (16a, 16b) extending between these two operating environments.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Blue Springs, MO)

2006-08-15

239

Radiation measurement for plant ecophysiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The principles of radiation physics for plant ecophy- siological studies are outlined with an emphasis on choosing appropriate sensors for specific purposes such as for studies of photosynthesis, UV-B damage or canopy energy balance. Remote sensing, both from the ground and from aircraft or satellites, is increasingly being used as a tool for the study of plant canopies. Therefore, relevant

Hamlyn G. Jones; Nicole Archer; Eyal Rotenberg; Raffaele Casa

2003-01-01

240

Measurement of autophagy flux in the nervous system in vivo.  

PubMed

Accurate methods to measure autophagic activity in vivo in neurons are not available, and most of the studies are based on correlative and static measurements of autophagy markers, leading to conflicting interpretations. Autophagy is an essential homeostatic process involved in the degradation of diverse cellular components including organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy impairment is emerging as a relevant factor driving neurodegeneration in many diseases. Moreover, strategies to modulate autophagy have been shown to provide protection against neurodegeneration. Here we describe a novel and simple strategy to express an autophagy flux reporter in the nervous system of adult animals by the intraventricular delivery of adeno-associated viruses (AAV) into newborn mice. Using this approach we efficiently expressed a monomeric tandem mCherry-GFP-LC3 construct in neurons of the peripheral and central nervous system, allowing the measurement of autophagy activity in pharmacological and disease settings. PMID:24232093

Castillo, K; Valenzuela, V; Matus, S; Nassif, M; Oñate, M; Fuentealba, Y; Encina, G; Irrazabal, T; Parsons, G; Court, F A; Schneider, B L; Armentano, D; Hetz, C

2013-01-01

241

Measurement of autophagy flux in the nervous system in vivo  

PubMed Central

Accurate methods to measure autophagic activity in vivo in neurons are not available, and most of the studies are based on correlative and static measurements of autophagy markers, leading to conflicting interpretations. Autophagy is an essential homeostatic process involved in the degradation of diverse cellular components including organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy impairment is emerging as a relevant factor driving neurodegeneration in many diseases. Moreover, strategies to modulate autophagy have been shown to provide protection against neurodegeneration. Here we describe a novel and simple strategy to express an autophagy flux reporter in the nervous system of adult animals by the intraventricular delivery of adeno-associated viruses (AAV) into newborn mice. Using this approach we efficiently expressed a monomeric tandem mCherry-GFP-LC3 construct in neurons of the peripheral and central nervous system, allowing the measurement of autophagy activity in pharmacological and disease settings. PMID:24232093

Castillo, K; Valenzuela, V; Matus, S; Nassif, M; Oñate, M; Fuentealba, Y; Encina, G; Irrazabal, T; Parsons, G; Court, F A; Schneider, B L; Armentano, D; Hetz, C

2013-01-01

242

Ion composition measurements within magnetospheric flux transfer events  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Magnetic field signatures from the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft are used to identify two magnetospheric FTEs (flux transfer events). Electron distributions measured in the plane of the magnetopause inside these FTEs complement previously reported electron measurements. Ion composition measurements in the energy range 0 to 20 keV/e within an FTE are reported. It is found that the ion distributions, the ion composition, and the flow velocities are unique to the FTE and unlike either the adjacent magnetosphere, the nearby boundary layer, or the nearby magnetosheath. The H(+), He(+), and He(2+) distribution functions in the FTEs have reversed temperature anisotropies and the relative He(2+) abundance is depressed with respect to either the magnetosheath or the low latitude boundary layer.

Klumpar, D. M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Shelley, E. G.

1990-01-01

243

Measuring transient radiation effects in optical fibers  

SciTech Connect

We propose a new method for measuring transient radiation effects in optical fibers on a nanosecond timescale. The method, which incorporates a streak camera, allows more precise time resolution than other methods and has the advantage of measuring the radiation-induced attenuation as a function of wavelength and time simultaneously. By choosing different light sources and sweep speeds, radiation-induced attenuation may be measured under a variety of experimental configurations. Examples of the type of output obtained with our method are given.

Rotter, M.D.; Jander, D.R.

1984-07-01

244

Measuring transient radiation effects in optical fibers  

SciTech Connect

A new method is proposed for measuring transient radiation effects in optical fibers on a nanosecond timescale. The method, which incorporates a streak camera, allows more precise time resolution than other methods and has the advantage of measuring the radiation-induced attenuation as a function of wavelength and time simultaneously. By choosing different light sources and sweep speeds, radiation-induced attenuation may be measured under a variety of experimental configurations. Examples of the types of output obtained with our method are given. 4 references, 6 figures.

Rotter, M.D.; Jander, D.R.

1984-01-01

245

Long-term energy flux and radiation balance observations over Lake Ngoring, Tibetan Plateau  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It remains unclear what are the characteristics of the surface energy budget and the radiation balance over the lake at high altitudes. Here we report a nearly two-year ice-free time measurement (2011-2012) of energy flux and radiation balance using the eddy covariance method over Lake Ngoring, Tibetan Plateau. A persistent unstable atmospheric boundary layer was maintained over the lake, caused by a higher water surface temperature compared with the overlying atmosphere. As a result, the positive sensible heat (H) and latent heat (LE) fluxes almost lasted throughout the entire observation period. The heat storage period of the lake could last until September, and the strongest heating occurred in October from the lake to the atmosphere. Compared with the subtropical lake, Bowen ratios were larger in Lake Ngoring, caused by a large temperature difference and a small specific humidity difference between the water surface and the overlying air. The patterns of H versus the atmospheric stability differed from those of LE. H was large under unstable stratification conditions and significantly decreased in the nearly neutral and stable atmospheric stratification. By contrast, the large LE concentrated in the weak unstable to the nearly neutral atmospheric stratification, and clearly declined with increased atmospheric instability. Overall, the vertical specific humidity difference contributed more to LE than the wind speed. As regards H, the major contributors varied with the atmospheric stability. The intrusion of dry, cold air with strong wind could result in significant increases in H and LE (approximately 2.0-4.5 times as much as those of normal days); during this period, the stored energy in water dramatically decreased and even could provide 70% of the energy for H and LE.

Li, Zhaoguo; Lyu, Shihua; Ao, Yinhuan; Wen, Lijuan; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Shaoying

2015-03-01

246

Measurements of human body microwave radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Major problems of registering microwave radiation of human body have been considered. It is pointed out that they are caused by at least three factors which may considerably influence the experimental results and their interpretation, namely: (1) properties of the radiation (their low intensity primarily); (2) features of measurements that implement waveguide techniques; (3) peculiar features of the emission medium

G. V. Ponezha; S. G. Ponezha; A. I. Nizhelskaya

2003-01-01

247

UV RADIATION MEASUREMENTS/ATMOSPHERIC CHARACTERIZATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Because exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an ecosystem stressor and poses a human health risk, the National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has undertaken a research program to measure the intensity of UV-B radiation at various locations throughout the U.S. In Septem...

248

Original article Measurement and modelling of radiation  

E-print Network

Original article Measurement and modelling of radiation transmission within a stand of maritime 1994) Summary — A semi-empirical model of radiation penetration in a maritime pine canopy to Beer's law with an extinction coefficient of 0.32; this figure was found using non-linear regression

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

249

Solar, interplanetary, and magnetospheric parameters for the radiation belt energetic electron flux  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In developing models of the radiation belt energetic electron flux, it is important to include the states of the interplanetary medium and the magnetosphere, as well as the solar activity. In this study we choose the log flux je(t;L;E) at 2-6 MeV, as measured by the Proton-Electron Telescope (PET) on SAMPEX in the period 1993-2002, as a representative flux variable and evaluate the usefulness of 17 interplanetary and magnetospheric (IP/MS) parameters in its specification. The reference parameter is the solar wind velocity, chosen because of its known high geoeffectiveness. We use finite impulse response filters to represent the effective coupling of the individual parameters to the log flux. We measure the temporal and spatial scales of the coupling using the impulse response function and the input's geoeffectiveness using the data-model correlation. The correlation profile as a function of L is complex, and we identify its peaks in reference to the radial regions P0 (L = 3.1-4.0, inner edge of the outer belt), P1 (4.1-7.5, main outer belt), and P2 (>7.5, quasi-trapped population), whose boundaries are determined from a radial correlative analysis (Vassiliadis et al., 2003b). Using the profiles, we classify the IP/MS parameters in four categories: (1) For the solar wind velocity and pressure the correlation is high and largely independent of L across P0 and P1, reaching its maximum in L = 4.8-6.1, or the central part of P1. (2) The IMF BSouth component and related IP/MS parameters have a bimodal correlation function, with peaks in region P0 (L = 3.0-4.1) and the geosynchronous orbit region within P1. (3) The IMF BNorth and four other interplanetary or solar irradiance parameters have a minimum correlation in P1, while the highest correlation is in the slot-outer belt boundary (L = 2.5). (4) Finally, the solar wind density has a unique correlation profile, which is anticorrelated with that of the solar wind velocity for certain L shells. We verify this classification using more complex filtering methods as well as standard correlation analysis. The categories correspond to four types of solar-terrestrial interactions, namely, viscous interaction, magnetic reconnection, effects of ionospheric heating, and effects of high solar wind density. The response to these interactions produces the observed inner magnetospheric coherence. In each category the L dependence of the correlation profile helps explain why geoeffective solar wind structures are followed by electron acceleration in some L ranges but not in others.

Vassiliadis, D.; Fung, S. F.; Klimas, A. J.

2005-04-01

250

New Thermospheric Infrared Radiative Flux and Power Results From the SABER Experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite measures the vertical distribution of infrared radiation emitted by various atmospheric gases (ozone, water vapor, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide), providing important information about the radiation budget in the upper atmosphere. From these measurements, the infrared power and energy radiated by

L. A. Hunt; M. G. Mlynczak; F. J. Martin-Torres; C. J. Mertens; B. T. Marshall; J. M. Russell; L. L. Gordley

2008-01-01

251

Radiative flux emitted by a burning PMMA slab  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The degradation of a PMMA sample has been studied based on experimental results obtained for the radiation emission by a burning slab. Observations of the infrared emission perpendicular to the plate, in the range where the optically thin flame is weakly emitting, indicate a plate temperature close to 680 K which is an indication on the surface temperature during the degradation process. Observations from the side allow a flame characterization without the plate emission superimposition. This is a promising way for evaluating data regarding the flame characteristics: temperature, gaz concentration and soot volumetric fraction.

Parent, G.; Acem, Z.; Collin, A.; Berfroi, R.; Boulet, P.; Pizzo, Y.; Mindykowski, P.; Kaiss, A.; Porterie, B.

2012-11-01

252

Solar-Radiation Measuring Equipment and Glossary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

1976 listing of commercially available solar-radiation measuring equipment is presented in 50-page report. Sensor type, response time, cost data, and comments concerning specifications and intended usage are listed for 145 instruments from 38 manufactures.

Carter, E. A.; Patel, A. M.; Greenbaum, S. A.

1982-01-01

253

Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke  

E-print Network

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line a...

Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Curé, B; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mulders, M; Loveless, R

2012-01-01

254

Particle and heat flux measurements in PDX edge plasmas  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the use of novel combined Langmuir-calorimeter probes to measure edge plasma conditions near the midplane in PDX. The probes consisted of up to five Langmuir probes and up to two calorimeters. Single and double probe characteristics yield n/sub e/ and T/sub e/ which are compared with that derived from a triple probe analysis. The calorimeters measure heat flux in the electron and ion drift directions. This paper presents time-resolved radial profiles of n/sub e/, T/sub e/, V/sub F/ (floating potential), and P (heat flux) during high power neutral beam-heated, single-null discharges and circular scoop limiter discharges. The temporal dependence of these quantities displays the previous observed behavior with respect to gross discharge characteristics; however, an additional dependence on confinement mode has been observed. During the H-mode of energy confinement, a transient depression of n/sub e/, T/sub e/, and P occurs in the scrape-off plasma.

Budny, R.; Manos, D.

1983-12-01

255

Heat flux measurements for use in physiological and clothing research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scientists use passive heat flow meters to measure body heat exchanges with the environment. In recent years, several such sensors have been developed and concerns about their proper calibration have been addressed. However, calibration methods have differed in the geometry of the heated device as well as in the heat transfer mechanism. Therefore, a comparison of calibration methods is needed in order to understand the obtained differences in calibration lines. We chose three commercially available heat flux sensors and placed them on four different heated devices: a hot plate, double hot plate, nude cylinder and a cylinder covered with a spacer material. We found differences between the calibration line of the manufacturer and our own measurements, especially when forced convection was involved as the main heat transfer mechanism. The results showed clearly that the calibration method should be chosen according to the intended purpose of use. In addition, we recommend use a thin, light heat flux sensor with good thermal conduction in human subject studies.

Niedermann, R.; Psikuta, A.; Rossi, R. M.

2014-08-01

256

Comparison of buried soil sensors, surface chambers and above ground measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Soil carbon dioxide (CO2) flux is an important component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Accurate measurements of soil CO2 flux aids determinations of carbon budgets. In this study, we investigated soil CO2 fluxes with time and depth and above ground CO2 fluxes in a bare field. CO2 concentrations w...

257

Critical radiation fluxes and luminosities of black holes and relativistic stars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The critial luminosity at which the outward force of radiation balances the inward force of gravity plays an important role in many astrophysical systems. We present expressions for the radiation force on particles with arbitrary cross sections and analyze the radiation field produced by radiating matter, such as a disk, ring, boundary layer, or stellar surface, that rotates slowly around a slowly rotating gravitating mass. We then use these results to investigate the critical radiation flux and, where possible, the critical luminosity of such a system in genral relativity. We demonstrate that if the radiation source is axisymmetric and emission is back-front symmetric with repect to the local direction of motion of the radiating matter, as seen in the comoving frame, then the radial component of the radiation flux and the diagonal components of the radiation stress-energy tensor outside the source are the same, to first order in the rotation rates, as they would be if the radiation source and gravitating mass were not rotating. We argue that the critical radiation flux for matter at rest in the locally nonrotating frame is often satisfactory as an astrophysical benchmark flux and show that if this benchmark is adopted, many of the complications potentially introduced by rotation of the radiation source and the gravitating mass are avoided. We show that if the radiation field in the absence of rotation would be spherically symmetric and the opacity is independent of frequency and direction, one can define a critical luminosity for the system that is independent of frequency and direction, one can define a critical luminosity for the system that is independent of the spectrum and angular size of the radiation source and is unaffected by rotation of the source and mass and orbital motion of the matter, to first order. Finally, we analyze the conditions under which the maximum possible luminosity of a star or black hole powered by steady spherically symmetric radial accretion is the same in general relativity as in the Newtonian limit.

Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman

1995-01-01

258

Visualization of Radiation Environment on Mars: Assessment with MARIE Measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For a given GCR (Galactic Cosmic Ray) environment at Mars, particle flux of protons, alpha particles, and heavy ions, are also needed on the surface of Mars for future human exploration missions. For the past twelve months, the MARJE (Martian Radiation Environment Experiment) instrument onboard the 200J Mars Odyssey has been providing the radiation measurements from the Martian orbit. These measurements are well correlated with the HZETRN (High Z and Energy Transport) and QMSFRG (Quantum Multiple-Scattering theory of nuclear Fragmentation) model calculations. These model calculations during these specific GCR environment conditions are now extended and transported through the CO2 atmosphere onto the Martian surface. These calculated pa11icle flux distributions are presented as a function of the Martian topography making use of the MOLA (Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter) data from the MGS (Mars Global Surveyor). Also, particle flux calculations are presented with visualization in the human body from skin depth to the internal organs including the blood-forming organs.

Saganti, P.; Cucinotta, F.; Zeitlin, C.; Cleghorn, T.; Flanders, J.; Riman, F.; Hu, X.; Pinsky, L.; Lee, K.; Anderson, V.; Atwell, W.; Turner, R.

2003-01-01

259

Measurement of geothermal flux through poorly consolidated sediments  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In many regions, crystalline rocks are covered by hundreds of meters of unconsolidated and poorly consolidated sediments. Estimates of heat flux within these sediments using standard continental techniques (temperature and conductivity measurements at intervals of 10 to 30 meters) are unreliable, mainly because of the difficulty in obtaining and preserving representative lengths of core. However, it is sometimes feasible to use what amounts to an oceanographic technique by making closely spaced temperature and conductivity measurements within short cored intervals. This is demonstrated in a borehole at Menlo Park, California (37??27???N, 122??10???W, elevation 16 meters), where heat flows determined over 12 separate 1-meter intervls al lie within 10% of their mean value; 2.2 ??cal/cm2 sec. ?? 1968.

Sass, J.H.; Munroe, R.J.; Lachenbruch, A.H.

1968-01-01

260

Determination of Top-of-Atmosphere Longwave Radiative Fluxes: A Comparison Between Two Approaches Using ScaRaB Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two conceptually different approaches (broadband-based ERBE and narrowband-based ISCCP approaches), used to derive the TOA longwave radiative fluxes, are compared using the ScaRaB simultaneous narrowband and broadband measurements. This study directly shows that the ERBE MLE-derived cloud covers implicitly contain some information on the cloud optical properties. A spurious view-zenith-angle dependence of the MLE scene identification scheme is confirmed by this study. Except for very thin cirrus clouds, differences between the ERBE and ISCCP approaches are in general < 10 W/sq m for the TOA LW radiative fluxes. For clear pixels, the model calculated (ISCCP approach) TOA LW radiances are systematically smaller than the observations. Though the bias is found to be correlated on the column precipitable water amount, the exact source of this discrepancy remains undetermined and merits further study. Compared with the radiative transfer model used in this study, the ERBE LW ADMs are too weakly limb-darkened for optically thin clouds, but too strongly limb-darkened for optically thick clouds, indicating that more accurate instantaneous TOA LW flux estimations from the ERBE approach would require additional cloud classes based on cloud height and optical thickness.

Chen, Ting; Rossow, William B.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

261

Spatial variability of shortwave radiative fluxes in the context of snowmelt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Snow-covered mountain ranges are a major source of water supply for run-off and groundwater recharge. Snowmelt supplies as much as 75% of surface water in basins of the western United States. Factors that affect the rate of snow melt include incoming shortwave and longwave radiation, surface albedo, snow emissivity, snow surface temperature, sensible and latent heat fluxes, ground heat flux, and energy transferred to the snowpack from deposited snow or rain. The net radiation generally makes up about 80% of the energy balance and is dominated by the shortwave radiation. Complex terrain poses a great challenge for obtaining the needed information on radiative fluxes from satellites due to elevation issues, spatially-variable cloud cover, rapidly changing surface conditions during snow fall and snow melt, lack of high quality ground truth for evaluation of the satellite based estimates, as well as scale issues between the ground observations and the satellite footprint. In this study we utilize observations of high spatial resolution (5-km) as available from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) to derive surface shortwave radiative fluxes in complex terrain, with attention to the impact of slopes on the amount of radiation received. The methodology developed has been applied to several water years (January to July during 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2009) over the western part of the United States, and the available information was used to derive metrics on spatial and temporal variability in the shortwave fluxes. It is planned to apply the findings from this study for testing improvements in Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) estimates.

Pinker, Rachel T.; Ma, Yingtao; Hinkelman, Laura; Lundquist, Jessica

2014-05-01

262

Astron. Nachr. / AN 326, No. 8, 681692 (2005) / DOI 10.1002/asna.200510411 Effect of the radiative background flux in convection  

E-print Network

background flux in convection A. BRANDENBURG , K. L. CHAN ¡ , °A. NORDLUND ¢ , and R. F. STEIN £ ¤ NORDITA stratified convection are used to study models with approximately the same convective flux, but different radiative fluxes. As the radiative flux is decreased, for constant convective flux: the entropy jump

Stein, Robert

263

Inversion of Multi-Angle Radiation Measurement  

SciTech Connect

Our need to reconcile models and measurements in an efficient manner that allows for the operational retrieval of particle sizes for a two layer cloud led us to develop a new method for calculating the Green's functions for radiative transfer. The method uses the fact that doubling/adding codes can be easily used to calculate internal radiation fields at arbitrarily high resolution. We have also determined that the adjoint downwelling and upwelling vector radiation fields are simply related to the usual downwelling and upwelling vector radiation fields so that the entire Green's function can be determined from a single calculation. The Green's functions have then been used to calculate the particle sizes in a two layer cloud that are consistent with both the reflectance and polarization measurements. This approach may be of use in other applications where adjoint calculations are used, particularly if multiangle measurements are being analyzed.

Cairns, B.; Alexandrov, M. Lacis, A.; Carlson, B.

2005-03-18

264

On climate response to changes in the cosmic ray flux and radiative budget  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examine the results linking cosmic ray flux (CRF) variations to global climate change. We then proceed to study various periods over which there are estimates for the radiative forcing, temperature change and CRF variations relative to today. These include the Phanerozoic as a whole, the Cretaceous, the Eocene, the Last Glacial Maximum, the 20th century, as well as the

Nir J. Shaviv

2005-01-01

265

Would be the photon a composed particle? quantization of field fluxes in electromagnetic radiation  

E-print Network

[En] Here it is made a comparative analysis between the classical and the quantum expressions for the energy of electromagnetic radiation (ER). The comparison points to the possibility of the quantization of the magnetic and the electric field fluxes in the ER.

Celso de Araujo Duarte

2013-12-02

266

Radiation-induced transport of magnetic flux along a superconducting sheet  

Microsoft Academic Search

A switching phenomenon based on the formation of a spot of normal ; conductivity by shining a ray of light upon a superconducting film is discussed. ; Possible applications of this switching process as a modulntor for d-c amplifler ; circuits, as a radiation switch to recouple transformer coils, and for the ; transport of magnetic flux trapped in such

J. F. Marchand; J. Volger

1962-01-01

267

Computational methods for industrial radiation measurement applications  

SciTech Connect

Computational methods have been used with considerable success to complement radiation measurements in solving a wide range of industrial problems. The almost exponential growth of computer capability and applications in the last few years leads to a {open_quotes}black box{close_quotes} mentality for radiation measurement applications. If a black box is defined as any radiation measurement device that is capable of measuring the parameters of interest when a wide range of operating and sample conditions may occur, then the development of computational methods for industrial radiation measurement applications should now be focused on the black box approach and the deduction of properties of interest from the response with acceptable accuracy and reasonable efficiency. Nowadays, increasingly better understanding of radiation physical processes, more accurate and complete fundamental physical data, and more advanced modeling and software/hardware techniques have made it possible to make giant strides in that direction with new ideas implemented with computer software. The Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR) at North Carolina State University has been working on a variety of projects in the area of radiation analyzers and gauges for accomplishing this for quite some time, and they are discussed here with emphasis on current accomplishments.

Gardner, R.P.; Guo, P.; Ao, Q. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1996-12-31

268

Solar Modulation of Inner Trapped Belt Radiation Flux as a Function of Atmospheric Density  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

No simple algorithm seems to exist for calculating proton fluxes and lifetimes in the Earth's inner, trapped radiation belt throughout the solar cycle. Most models of the inner trapped belt in use depend upon AP8 which only describes the radiation environment at solar maximum and solar minimum in Cycle 20. One exception is NOAAPRO which incorporates flight data from the TIROS/NOAA polar orbiting spacecraft. The present study discloses yet another, simple formulation for approximating proton fluxes at any time in a given solar cycle, in particular between solar maximum and solar minimum. It is derived from AP8 using a regression algorithm technique from nuclear physics. From flux and its time integral fluence, one can then approximate dose rate and its time integral dose.

Lodhi, M. A. K.

2005-01-01

269

Measurement of the Atmospheric $?_e$ flux in IceCube  

E-print Network

We report the first measurement of the atmospheric electron neutrino flux in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV, using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube's DeepCore low energy extension. Techniques to identify neutrinos interacting within the DeepCore volume and veto muons originating outside the detector are demonstrated. A sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data, of which 496 $\\pm$ 66(stat.) $\\pm$ 88(syst.) are estimated to be cascade events, including both electron neutrino and neutral current events. The rest of the sample includes residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos in this energy range. This constitutes the first observation of electron neutrinos and neutral current interactions in a very large volume neutrino telescope optimized for the TeV energy range.

IceCube Collaboration; M. G. Aartsen; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; D. Altmann; K. Andeen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; K. Beattie; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; M. Bell; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; S. Bohaichuk; C. Bohm; D. Bose1; S. Boser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; A. M. Brown; R. Bruijn; J. Brunner; S. Buitink; M. Carson; J. Casey; M. Casier; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; K. Clark; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; S. De Ridder; F. Descamps; P. Desiati; G. de Vries-Uiterweerd; T. DeYoung; J. C. Diaz-Velez; J. Dreyer; J. P. Dumm; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; O. Engdegard; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glusenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. A. Goodman; D. Gora; D. Grant; A. Gross; S. Grullon; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Haj Ismail; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Heereman; P. Heimann; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; O. Jlelati; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; J. Klas; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Kohne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Kopke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; M. Krasberg; G. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; R. Lauer; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; J. Lunemann; J. Madsen; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Meszaros; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; S. Panknin; L. Paul; J. A. Pepper; C. Perez de los Heros; D. Pieloth; N. Pirk; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; L. Radel; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; M. Richman; B. Riedel; J. P. Rodrigues; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; T. Salameh; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; M. Scheel; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schoneberg; L. Schonherr; A. Schonwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; C. Sheremata; M. W. E. Smith; M. Soiron; D. Soldin; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stoss; E. A. Strahler; R. Strom; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; M. Usner; D. van der Drift; N. van Eijndhoven; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge1; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; M. Walter; R. Wasserman; Ch. Weaver; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; C. Xu; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; S. Zierke; A. Zilles; M. Zoll

2013-03-22

270

Effect of Spectrally Varying Albedo of Vegetation Surfaces on Shortwave Radiation Fluxes and Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study develops an algorithm for representing detailed spectral features of vegetation albedo based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations at 7 discrete channels, referred to as the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Albedo (MEVA) algorithm. The MEVA algorithm empirically fills spectral gaps around the vegetation red edge near 0.7 micrometers and vegetation water absorption features at 1.48 and 1.92 micrometers which cannot be adequately captured by the MODIS 7 channels. We then assess the effects of applying MEVA in comparison to four other traditional approaches to calculate solar fluxes and aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) at the top of atmosphere (TOA) based on the MODIS discrete reflectance bands. By comparing the DRF results obtained through the MEVA method with the results obtained through the other four traditional approaches, we show that filling the spectral gap of the MODIS measurements around 0.7 micrometers based on the general spectral behavior of healthy green vegetation leads to significant improvement in the instantaneous aerosol DRF at TOA (up to 3.02Wm(exp -2) difference or 48% fraction of the aerosol DRF, .6.28Wm(exp -2), calculated for high spectral resolution surface reflectance from 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers for deciduous vegetation surface). The corrections of the spectral gaps in the vegetation spectrum in the near infrared, again missed by the MODIS reflectances, also contributes to improving TOA DRF calculations but to a much lower extent (less than 0.27Wm(exp -2), or about 4% of the instantaneous DRF). Compared to traditional approaches, MEVA also improves the accuracy of the outgoing solar flux between 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at TOA by over 60Wm(exp -2) (for aspen 3 surface) and aerosol DRF by over 10Wm(exp -2) (for dry grass). Specifically, for Amazon vegetation types, MEVA can improve the accuracy of daily averaged aerosol radiative forcing in the spectral range of 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at equator at the equinox by 3.7Wm(exp -2). These improvements indicate that MEVA can contribute to regional climate studies over vegetated areas and can help to improve remote sensing-based studies of climate processes and climate change.

Zhu, L.; Martins, J. V.; Yu, H.

2012-01-01

271

Measurements of the total ion flux from vacuum arc cathodespots  

SciTech Connect

The ion flux from vacuum arc cathode spots was measured in two vacuum arc systems. The first was a vacuum arc ion source which was modified allowing us to collect ions from arc plasma streaming through an anode mesh. The second discharge system essentially consisted of a cathode placed near the center of a spherically shaped mesh anode. In both systems, the ion current streaming through the mesh was measured by a biased collector. The mesh anodes had geometric transmittances of 60 percent and 72 percent, respectively, which were taken into account as correction factors. The ion current from different cathode materials was measured for 50-500 A of arc current. The ion current normalized by the arc current was found to depend on the cathode material, with values in the range from 5 percent to 19 percent. The normalized ion current is generally greater for elements of low cohesive energy. The ion erosion rates were determined from values of ion current and ion charge states, which were previously measured in the same ion source. The absolute ion erosion rates range from 16-173 mu g/C.

Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu; Savkin,Konstantin P.; Brown, Ian G.; Nikolaev, Alexey G.

2005-05-25

272

Two-Flux Green's Function Analysis for Transient Spectral Radiation in a Composite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analysis is developed for obtaining transient temperatures in a two-layer semitransparent composite with spectrally dependent properties. Each external boundary of the composite is subjected to radiation and convection. The two-flux radiative transfer equations are solved by deriving a Green's function. This yields the local radiative heat source needed to numerically solve the transient energy equation. An advantage of the two-flux method is that isotropic scattering is included without added complexity. The layer refractive indices are larger than one. This produces internal reflections at the boundaries and the internal interface; the reflections are assumed diffuse. Spectral results using the Green's function method are verified by comparing with numerical solutions using the exact radiative transfer equations. Transient temperature distributions are given to illustrate the effect of radiative heating on one side of a composite with external convective cooling. The protection of a material from incident radiation is illustrated by adding scattering to the layer adjacent to the radiative source.

Siegel, Robert

1996-01-01

273

Using passive capillary lysimeter water flux measurements to improve flow predictions in variably saturated soils.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Passive capillary lysimeters (PCLs) are uniquely suited for measuring water fluxes in variably-saturated soils. The objective of this work was to compare PCL flux measurements with simulated fluxes obtained with a calibrated unsaturated flow model. The Richards equation-based model was calibrated us...

274

Careful Measurements and Energy Balance Closure - The Case of Soil Heat Flux  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

An area of persistent concern in micrometeorological measurements is the failure to close the energy balance at surface flux stations. While most attention has focused on corrections associated with the eddy fluxes, none of the energy balance terms are measured without error. The flux plate method i...

275

Standardization of flux chambers and wind tunnels for area source emission measurements at animal feeding operations  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Researchers and practitioners have used many varied designs of wind tunnels and flux chambers to measure the flux of volatile organic compounds, odor, and ammonia from area sources at animal feeding operations. The measured fluxes are used to estimate emission factors or compare treatments. We sho...

276

Radiation Transmission Measurements for a Lightweight Fabric  

SciTech Connect

Radiation Shield Technologies has developed a lightweight fabric, shown in Fig. 1, with radiation shielding properties for X ray, gamma ray and beta particle emissions in the range of energies relevant to clinical and Homeland Security applications. Detailed measurements were done to measure the shielding properties of this material against the spectra of standard radionuclides and x-ray generators. The mass attenuation coefficients were calculated using LLNL cross section data, a 3-D photon transport code, elemental weight fractions and the measured density of the fabric.

Friedman, H; Singh, M S; DeMeo, R F

2003-01-17

277

Accelerated Detector - Quantum Field Correlations: From Vacuum Fluctuations to Radiation Flux  

E-print Network

In this paper we analyze the interaction of a uniformly accelerated detector with a quantum field in (3+1)D spacetime, aiming at the issue of how kinematics can render vacuum fluctuations the appearance of thermal radiance in the detector (Unruh effect) and how they engender flux of radiation for observers afar. Two basic questions are addressed in this study: a) How are vacuum fluctuations related to the emitted radiation? b) Is there emitted radiation with energy flux in the Unruh effect? We adopt a method which places the detector and the field on an equal footing and derive the two-point correlation functions of the detector and of the field separately with full account of their interplay. From the exact solutions, we are able to study the complete process from the initial transient to the final steady state, keeping track of all activities they engage in and the physical effects manifested. We derive a quantum radiation formula for a Minkowski observer. We find that there does exist a positive radiated power of quantum nature emitted by the detector, with a hint of certain features of the Unruh effect. We further verify that the total energy of the dressed detector and a part of the radiated energy from the detector is conserved. However, this part of the radiation ceases in steady state. So the hint of the Unruh effect in radiated power is actually not directly from the energy flux that the detector experiences in Unruh effect. Since all the relevant quantum and statistical information about the detector (atom) and the field can be obtained from the results presented here, they are expected to be useful, when appropriately generalized, for addressing issues of quantum information processing in atomic and optical systems, such as quantum decoherence, entanglement and teleportation.

Shih-Yuin Lin; B. L. Hu

2006-06-21

278

Bilateral comparison of radiated emission measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this study is to perform a proficiency testing by bilateral comparison of radiated emission measurements between accredited laboratories. The results show that both laboratories are in conformity with the criterion of acceptance proposed by a comparison, which is the uniformity between the measured values according to normalized error ratio.

Dias, M. S.; Barbosa, M. F.; Junior, A. G. F.; Filho, M. L. P.; Silva, L. C.; Andrade, A. S.

2015-01-01

279

Measurement of Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The techniques associated with the measurement of antenna temperature at microwave frequencies are discussed. A number of experiments designed to measure cosmic microwave background radiation are described and their results compared. These results give a very good fit to a 3°K black body curve between 1.4 and 35 GHz.

ARNO A. PENZIAS

1968-01-01

280

Measurement of particulate matter emission fluxes from a beef cattle feedlot using Flux-gradient technique  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Data on air emissions from open-lot beef cattle feedlots are limited. This research was conducted to determine PM10 emission fluxes from a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Kansas using the flux-gradient technique, a widely-used micrometeorological method for gaseous emissions from open sources. V...

281

The Design of a Calorimeter to Measure Concentrated Solar Flux  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A water-cooled, cavity calorimeter was designed to accurately measure concentrated solar thermal power produced by the University of Minnesota's solar simulator. The cavity is comprised of copper tubing bent into spiral and helical coils for the base and cylindrical walls, respectively. Insulation surrounds the cavity to reduce heat transfer to the ambient, and a water- cooled aperture cover is positioned at the open end of the cavity. The calorimeter measures the heat gain of water flowing through the system as radiant energy is passed through the aperture. Chilled water flows through the tubing, and the energy incident on the cavity surface is conducted through the wall and convected to the flowing water. The energy increase in the water can be observed by an increase in fluid temperature. A Monte Carlo ray tracing method is used to predict the incident flux distribution and corresponding power on the surfaces of the cavity. These values are used to estimate the thermal losses of the system, and it is found that they account for less that 1% of the total power passed through the aperture. The overall uncertainty of the calorimeter is found by summing the measured uncertainty and the estimated heat loss and is found to be +/-2.5% for 9.2 kW of power output and +/-3.4% for 3 kW.

Sefkow, Elizabeth Anne Bennett

282

Methods of in vivo radiation measurement  

DOEpatents

Methods of and apparatus for in vivo radiation measurements relay on a MOSFET dosimeter of high radiation sensitivity with operates in both the passive mode to provide an integrated dose detector and active mode to provide an irradiation rate detector. A compensating circuit with a matched unirradiated MOSFET is provided to operate at a current designed to eliminate temperature dependence of the device. Preferably, the MOSFET is rigidly mounted in the end of a miniature catheter and the catheter is implanted in the patient proximate the radiation source.

Huffman, Dennis D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Kelsey, Charles A. (Albuquerque, NM); Lane, Richard (Galveston, TX); Ricco, Antonio J. (Albuquerque, NM); Snelling, Jay B. (Albuquerque, NM); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01

283

Measuring neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes with CCD cameras  

SciTech Connect

The capability to measure bursts of neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes directly with charge coupled device (CCD) cameras while being able to distinguish between the video signals produced by these two types of radiation, even when they occur simultaneously, has been demonstrated. Volume and area measurements of transient radiation-induced pixel charge in English Electric Valve (EEV) Frame Transfer (FT) charge coupled devices (CCDs) from irradiation with pulsed neutrons (14 MeV) and Bremsstrahlung photons (4--12 MeV endpoint) are utilized to calibrate the devices as radiometric imaging sensors capable of distinguishing between the two types of ionizing radiation. Measurements indicate {approx}.05 V/rad responsivity with {ge}1 rad required for saturation from photon irradiation. Neutron-generated localized charge centers or peaks'' binned by area and amplitude as functions of fluence in the 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} range indicate smearing over {approx}1 to 10% of CCD array with charge per pixel ranging between noise and saturation levels.

Yates, G.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Smith, G.W. (Ministry of Defense, Aldermaston (United Kingdom). Atomic Weapons Establishment); Zagarino, P.; Thomas, M.C. (EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (United States). Santa Barbara Operations)

1991-01-01

284

Measuring neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes with CCD cameras  

SciTech Connect

The capability to measure bursts of neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes directly with charge coupled device (CCD) cameras while being able to distinguish between the video signals produced by these two types of radiation, even when they occur simultaneously, has been demonstrated. Volume and area measurements of transient radiation-induced pixel charge in English Electric Valve (EEV) Frame Transfer (FT) charge coupled devices (CCDs) from irradiation with pulsed neutrons (14 MeV) and Bremsstrahlung photons (4--12 MeV endpoint) are utilized to calibrate the devices as radiometric imaging sensors capable of distinguishing between the two types of ionizing radiation. Measurements indicate {approx}.05 V/rad responsivity with {ge}1 rad required for saturation from photon irradiation. Neutron-generated localized charge centers or ``peaks`` binned by area and amplitude as functions of fluence in the 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} range indicate smearing over {approx}1 to 10% of CCD array with charge per pixel ranging between noise and saturation levels.

Yates, G.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, G.W. [Ministry of Defense, Aldermaston (United Kingdom). Atomic Weapons Establishment; Zagarino, P.; Thomas, M.C. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (United States). Santa Barbara Operations

1991-12-01

285

Spatially explicit surface energy budget and partitioning with remote sensing and flux measurements in a boreal region of Interior Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Extrapolating energy fluxes between the ground surface and the atmospheric boundary layer from point-based measurements to spatially explicit landscape estimation is critical to understand and quantify the energy balance components and exchanges in the hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. This information is difficult to quantify and are often lacking. Using a Landsat image (acquired on 5 August 2004), the flux measurements from three eddy covariance flux towers (a 1987 burn, a 1999 burn, and an unburned control site) and a customized satellite-based surface energy balance model of Mapping Evapotranspiration at High Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC), we estimated net radiation, sensible heat flux ( H), latent heat flux (LE), and soil heat flux ( G) for the boreal Yukon River Basin of Interior Alaska. The model requires user selection of two extreme conditions present within the image area to calibrate and anchor the sensible flux output. One is the "hot" condition which refers to a bare soil condition with specified residual evaporation rates. Another one is the "cold" condition which refers to a fully transpiring vegetation such as full-cover agricultural crops. We selected one bare field as the "hot" condition while we explored three different scenarios for the "cold" pixel because of the absence of larger expanses of agricultural fields within the image area. For this application over boreal forest, selecting agricultural fields whose evapotranspiration was assumed to be 1.05 times the alfalfa-based reference evapotranspiration as the "cold" pixel could result in large errors. Selecting an unburned flux tower site as the "cold" pixel could achieve acceptable results, but uncertainties remain about the energy balance closure of the flux towers. We found that METRIC performs reasonably well in partitioning energy fluxes in a boreal landscape.

Huang, Shengli; Dahal, Devendra; Singh, Ramesh; Liu, Heping; Young, Claudia; Liu, Shuguang

2013-08-01

286

Equilibrium structure of solar magnetic flux tubes: Energy transport with multistream radiative transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We examine the equilibrium structure of vertical intense magnetic flux tubes on the Sun. Assuming cylindrical geometry, we solve the magnetohydrostatic equations in the thin flux-tube approximation, allowing for energy transport by radiation and convection. The radiative transfer equation is solved in the six-stream approximation, assuming gray opacity and local thermodynamic equilibrium. This constitutes a significant improvement over a previous study, in which the transfer was solved using the multidimensional generalization of the Eddington approximation. Convection in the flux tube is treated using mixing-length theory, with an additional parameter alpha, characterizing the suppression of convective energy transport in the tube by the strong magnetic field. The equations are solved using the method of partial linearization. We present results for tubes with different values of the magnetic field strength and radius at a fixed depth in the atmosphere. In general, we find that, at equal geometric heights, the temperature on the tube axis, compared to the ambient medium, is higher in the photosphere and lower in the convection zone, with the difference becoming larger for thicker tubes. At equal optical depths the tubes are generally hotter than their surroundings. The results are comparatively insensitive to alpha but depend upon whether radiative and convective energy transport operate simultaneously or in separate layers. A comparison of our results with semiempirical models shows that the temperature and intensity contrast are in broad agreement. However, the field strengths of the flux-tube models are somewhat lower than the values inferred from observations.

Hasan, S. S.; Kalkofen, W.

1994-01-01

287

On-line measurements of ozone surface fluxes: Part II. Surface-level ozone fluxes onto the Sahara desert  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Surface-level ozone concentrations, the vertical turbulent ozone flux as well as the fluxes of sensible and latent heat were continuously monitored by the eddy covariance method in the Lybian desert, 30 km south of the Dakhla Oasis in Egypt, from 23 March until 9 April 1993. An automatic station powered by a photovoltaics generator system was used to measure the vertical turbulent ozone flux to the desert ecosystem. Fairly high ozone volume fractions up to 60 ppb were recorded when northerly winds prevailed. When southerly winds were blowing, the ozone volume fractions were lower and reached maximum values slightly above 40 ppb. On-line eddy correlation measurements of the vertical turbulent ozone flux to the desert were performed with a novel fast-response ozone sensor. The fairly small ozone fluxes were corrected for effects of micro-turbulent density fluctuations caused by the concomitant fluxes of heat and water vapour in the air volume (Webb correction). While ozone fluxes to the desert ecosystem are below 2 ppb cm s - in the night, maximum daytime ozone fluxes of 20 ppb cm s -1 were measured which yielded a maximum daily dry deposition velocity of 0.15 cm s -1. During the whole measurement campaign of 16 d a mean deposition velocity of Vd = 0.065 cm s -1 for ozone is calculated. For global numerical models in which the sources and sinks of ozone in the troposphere are taken into account, a daytime Vdof 0.1 cm s -1 and a nighttime value of 0.04 cm s -1 are recommended for the desert ecosystem.

Güsten, Hans; Heinrich, Günther; Mönnich, Erbo; Sprung, Detlev; Weppner, Joseph; Ramadan, Abou Bakr; Ezz El-Din, Mohammed R. M.; Ahmed, Darwish M.; Hassan, Galal K. Y.

288

Role of plant-generated water vapor and VOC fluxes in shoot chamber measurements of O3 and NOx  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the processes underlying the atmospheric balance of O3 and NOx is their interaction with vegetation. Both are removed, absorbed, and NOx potentially also emitted by foliage. Uncertainties remain on relevant factors controlling O3 and NOx interactions with foliage as well as on including them in large-scale models. One reason for the uncertainty is that chamber measurements of O3 and NOx fluxes are complicated. These reactive gases are adsorbed and desorbed on the chamber walls, depending on the conditions (i.e. humidity). These artefact gas fluxes (chamber blank) must also be quantified and taken into account in the data analysis. Their importance increases when measuring in clean air, where the fluxes are generally small. At near-zero concentrations, the fluxes may not pass the detection limit of the instrumentation, which usually means it is not possible to separate the plant-related fluxes from the chamber blank. The long-term field measurements at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland, have provided valuable insights into O3 and NOx exchange (i.e. Raivonen & al. 2009, Altimir & al. 2006). This project builds up on the expertise and conclusions from these works. The aim of this study was to improve the reliability of the measuring system by checking the role of potential measuring artefact(s). A live shoot, enclosed in a chamber, creates a water vapor in the chamber flux by transpiring. There are also biogenic VOC emissions from the shoot. In principle, these may affect the reactions of O3 and possibly NOx in the chamber. The potential interference of these fluxes created naturally during chamber closure is a main concern. Their effect on the O3 and NOx flux measurements has been tested with field calibrations in 2010-2011. In these calibrations, a controlled water vapor /VOC flux was fed into an empty shoot measurement chamber, and the H2O, CO2, O3 and NOx fluxes created in the chamber were measured. The created water vapor flux pattern was modified to either simulate shoot transpiration or to break the close connection of natural daily variation in transpiration, radiation and temperature. We will present results of this experiment. The project is funded by the Maj and Tor Nessling Foundation and the Ella and Georg Ehnrooth Foundation.

Joensuu, J.; Altimir, N.; Raivonen, M.; Kolari, P.; Keronen, P.; Vesala, T.; Bäck, J.; Hari, P.; Järvinen, E.; Nikinmaa, E.

2012-04-01

289

Recent measurements of coherent transition radiation  

SciTech Connect

An extended series of experiments has been used to investigate transition radiation in the x-ray spectral region. The x-rays were generated at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron-positron linear accelerator by 54 MeV electrons traversing multiple thin-foil targets. The measured angular and spectral distributions have shown excellent agreement with calculated predictions based on a simplified theoretical description of transition radiation. Recently, energy-resolved measurements of x-ray generation by targets consisting of multiple closely-spaced foils has clearly demonstrated the longitudinal coherence of transition radiation. This behavior might lead to a variety of applications such as tuneable narrow-band x-ray sources, measurement of x-ray dielectric constants, or particle beam diagnostics. These issues will be discussed, and recent results will be presented.

Moran, M.J.

1986-09-25

290

The magnetic, basal, and radiative-equilibrium components in Mount Wilson Ca II H + K fluxes  

SciTech Connect

Mount Wilson Ca II H + K flux measurements of cool dwarf stars are analyzed and compared with stellar Mg II h + k fluxes, variability amplitudes, rotation rates, and solar data. It is concluded that the Mount Wilson Ca II H + K fluxes comprise three principal parts: (1) a photospheric contribution in the line wings, (2) a basal chromospheric component that appears to be unrelated to stellar magnetic activity and is, therefore, possibly nonmagnetic in origin, and (3) a chromospheric component which is associated with magnetically active regions and the (quiet and active) network. The basal chromosphere appears to cover the entire surface of magnetically inactive stars. The basal Ca II H + K flux density for solar-type stars equals the average emission observed in the centers of solar supergranulation cells, where the magnetic flux density is small. 27 refs.

Schrijver, C.J.; Dobson, A.K.; Radick, R.R. (National Solar Observatory, Sunspot, NM (USA); Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, Boulder, CO (USA))

1989-06-01

291

The magnetic, basal, and radiative-equilibrium components in Mount Wilson Ca II H + K fluxes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mount Wilson Ca II H + K flux measurements of cool dwarf stars are analyzed and compared with stellar Mg II h + k fluxes, variability amplitudes, rotation rates, and solar data. It is concluded that the Mount Wilson Ca II H + K fluxes comprise three principal parts: (1) a photospheric contribution in the line wings, (2) a basal chromospheric component that appears to be unrelated to stellar magnetic activity and is, therefore, possibly nonmagnetic in origin, and (3) a chromospheric component which is associated with magnetically active regions and the (quiet and active) network. The basal chromosphere appears to cover the entire surface of magnetically inactive stars. The basal Ca II H + K flux density for solar-type stars equals the average emission observed in the centers of solar supergranulation cells, where the magnetic flux density is small.

Schrijver, C. J.; Dobson, Andrea K.; Radick, Richard R.

1989-01-01

292

Reconciling Models of Luminous Blazars with Magnetic Fluxes Determined by Radio Core-shift Measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Estimates of magnetic field strength in relativistic jets of active galactic nuclei, obtained by measuring the frequency-dependent radio core location, imply that the total magnetic fluxes in those jets are consistent with the predictions of the magnetically arrested disk (MAD) scenario of jet formation. On the other hand, the magnetic field strength determines the luminosity of the synchrotron radiation, which forms the low-energy bump of the observed blazar spectral energy distribution (SED). The SEDs of the most powerful blazars are strongly dominated by the high-energy bump, which is most likely due to the external radiation Compton mechanism. This high Compton dominance may be difficult to reconcile with the MAD scenario, unless (1) the geometry of external radiation sources (broad-line region, hot-dust torus) is quasi-spherical rather than flat, or (2) most gamma-ray radiation is produced in jet regions of low magnetization, e.g., in magnetic reconnection layers or in fast jet spines.

Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C.

2014-11-01

293

Using enhanced-mitophagy to measure autophagic flux  

PubMed Central

Macroautophagy (hereafter termed autophagy) is a cellular membrane-trafficking process that functions to deliver cytoplasmic constituents to lysosomes for degradation. Autophagy operates at basal levels to turn over damaged and misfolded proteins and it is the only process for the turnover of organelles. The process is therefore critically important for the preservation of cellular integrity and viability. Autophagy is also highly adaptable and the rate and cargoes of autophagy can be altered to bring about desired cellular responses to intracellular and environmental cues, disease states and a spectrum of pharmaceutical drugs. As a result, there is much interest in understanding the dynamics of autophagy in a variety of situations. To date, the majority of assays to monitor autophagy either measure changes in a parameter of the process at a set point in time or use markers/tracers to monitor flow of membrane-bound proteins from one point in the process to another. As such, these assays do not measure changes in endogenous cargo degradation which is the ultimate end-point of the autophagy process. We describe here an assay to measure autophagic cargo degradation by engineering cells to degrade mitochondria en masse. We show that this ‘enhanced-mitophagy’ assay can be used to measure differences in the rate of autophagy between different cells or in response to agents which are known to promote or inhibit autophagic flux. We consider therefore that this assay will prove to be a valuable resource for investigations in which autophagy is considered important and is believed to be modulated. PMID:25498004

Baudot, Alice D.; Haller, Martina; Mrschtik, Michaela; Tait, Stephen W.G.; Ryan, Kevin M.

2015-01-01

294

Weighted mean method for eddy covariance flux measurement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study to monitor the exchange of energy, water vapor and carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystem has been carried out with eddy covariance method throughout the world. The monitored exchange quantity, named flux F , is conventionally determined by a mean of 1 hr or 30 min interval because no technique have been fortified to directly measure a momentary F itself at an instant of time. Therefore, the posterior analysis with this sampling should be paid attention to those spatial or temporal averaging and summation in the consideration of the sampling uncertainty. In particular, the averaging calcurated by arithmetic mean Fa might be inappropriate because the sample F used in this averaging has nonidentical inherent quality within one another according to different micrometeorological and ecophysiological conditions while those are observed under the same instruments. To overcome this issue, we propose the weighted mean Fw using a relative sampling error estimated by a sampling F and its error, and introduce Fw performance tested with EC measurements for 3 years at tangerine orchard.

Kim, W.; Cho, J.; Seo, H.; Oki, T.

2013-12-01

295

Gamma radiation background measurements from Spacelab 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Nuclear Radiation Monitor incorporating a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector was flown as part of the verification flight instrumentation on the Spacelab 2 mission, July 29 to August 6, 1985. Gamma-ray spectra were measured with better than 20 s resolution throughout most of the mission in the energy range 0.1 to 30 MeV. Knowledge of the decay characteristics and the geomagnetic dependence of the counting rates enable measurement of the various components of the Spacelab gamma-ray background: prompt secondary radiation, earth albedo, and delayed induced radioactivity. The status of the data analysis and present relevant examples of typical background behavior are covered.

Paciesas, William S.; Gregory, John C.; Fishman, Gerald J.

1989-01-01

296

Radiation measurements from polar and geosynchronous satellites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the 1960's, radiation budget measurements from satellites have allowed quantitative study of the global energetics of our atmosphere-ocean system. A continuing program is planned, including independent measurement of the solar constant. Thus far, the measurements returned from two basically different types of satellite experiments are in agreement on the long term global scales where they are most comparable. This fact, together with independent estimates of the accuracy of measurement from each system, shows that the energy exchange between earth and space is now measured better than it can be calculated. Examples of application of the radiation budget data were shown. They can be related to the age-old problem of climate change, to the basic question of the thermal forcing of our circulation systems, and to the contemporary problems of local area energetics and computer modeling of the atmosphere.

Vonderhaar, T. H.

1973-01-01

297

Evaluation of the flux gradient technique for measurement of ozone surface fluxes over snowpack at Summit, Greenland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A multi-step procedure for investigating ozone surface fluxes over polar snow by the tower gradient method was developed and evaluated. These measurements were then used to obtain five months (April-August 2004) of turbulent ozone flux data at the Summit research camp located in the center of the Greenland ice shield. Turbulent fluxes were determined by the gradient method incorporating tower measurements of (a) ozone gradients measured by commercial ultraviolet absorption analyzers, (b) ambient temperature gradients using aspirated thermocouple sensors, and (c) wind speed gradients determined by cup anemometers. All gradient instruments were regularly inter-compared by bringing sensors or inlets to the same measurement height. The developed protocol resulted in an uncertainty on the order of 0.1 ppbv for 30-min averaged ozone gradients that were used for the ozone flux calculations. This protocol facilitated a lower sensitivity threshold for the ozone flux determination of ∼8 × 10-3?g m-2 s-1, respectively ∼0.01 cm s-1 for the ozone deposition velocity for typical environmental conditions encountered at Summit. Uncertainty in the 30-min ozone exchange measurements (evaluated by the Monte Carlo statistical approach) was on the order of 10-2 cm s-1. This uncertainty typically accounted to ~20-100% of the ozone exchange velocities that were determined. These measurements are among the most sensitive ozone deposition determinations reported to date. This flux experiment allowed for measurements of the relatively low ozone uptake rates encountered for polar snow, and thereby the study of their environmental and spring-versus-summer dependencies.

Bocquet, F.; Helmig, D.; van Dam, B. A.; Fairall, C. W.

2011-10-01

298

MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to provide measurements and analyses of the solar and circumsolar radiation for application to solar energy systems that employ lenses or mirrors to concentrate the incident sunlight. Circumsolar radiation results from the scattering of direct sunlight through small angles by atmospheric aerosols (e.g., dust, water-droplets or ice crystals in thin clouds). Concentrating solar energy systems will typically collect all of the direct solar radiation (that originating from the disk of the sun) plus some fraction of the circumsolar radiation. The exact fraction depends upon many factors, but primarily upon the angular size (field-of-view) of the receiver. A knowledge of the circumsolar radiation is then one factor in predicting or evaluating the performance of concentrating systems. The project employs unique instrument systems (called Circumsolar Telescopes) that were designed and fabricated at LBL. The basic measurements are (1) the "circumsolar scan", the brightness of the sun and circumsolar region as a function of angular distance from the center of the sun and (2) the usual "normal incidence" measurement of a pyrheliometer. Both measurements are made for the entire solar spectrum, and (via colored filters) for eight essentially contiguous wavelength bands. Thus the measurements are applicable to systems in which the receiver is essentially wavelength-insensitive (e.g., central receiver) and to wavelength-sensitive systems (e.g., concentrating photovoltaics). A secondary purpose of the project is to relate the data to the atmospheric processes that attenuate the solar radiation available to terrestrial solar energy systems.

Grether, Donald; Evans, David; Hunt, Arlon; Wahlig, Michael

1980-10-01

299

Measurement of Global Radiation using Photovoltaic Panels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Vito Unit - Environmental and Spatial Aspects (RMA) - for many of its models makes use of global solar radiation. From this viewpoint and also from the notion that this variable is seldom measured or available at the local scale and at high multi-temporal frequencies, it can be stated that many models are fed with low quality estimates of global solar radiation at the local to regional scales. A project was initiated called SUNSPIDER with the following objective. To make use of photovoltaic solar panels to measure solar radiation at the highest spatio-temporal resolution, from the local to the regional scales and from minutes to years. To integrate the measured solar fields in different application fields like, plant systems and agriculture, agro-meteorology and hydrology and last but not least solar energy applications. In Belgium about 250.000 PV installations have been built leading to about 6% electric power supply from photovoltaics on a yearly basis. Last year in June, the supply reached a peak of more than 20% of the total power input on the Belgian grid. A database of Belgian residential solar panel sites will be compiled. The database will serve as an input to an inverted PV model to be able to perform radiation calculations specifically for each of the validated panel sites based on minutely logged power data. Data acquisition for these sites will start each time a site is validated and hence imported in the database. Keywords: Photovoltaic Panels; PV modelling; Global Radiation.

Veroustraete, Frank; Bronders, Jan; Lefevre, Filip; Mensink, Clemens

2014-05-01

300

Radiation damage measurements in room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The literature of radiation damage measurements on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), cadmium telluride (CT), and mercuric iodide (HgI2) is reviewed and in the case of CZT supplemented by new alpha particle data. CZT strip detectors exposed to intermediate energy (1.3MeV) proton fluences exhibit increased interstrip leakage after 1010 p\\/cm2 and significant bulk leakage after 1012 p\\/cm2. CZT exposed to 200MeV

Larry A. Franks; Bruce A. Brunett; Richard W. Olsen; David S. Walsh; Gyögy Vizkelethy; Jacob I. Trombka; Barney L. Doyle; Ralph B. James

1999-01-01

301

Proton fluxes at the inner boundary of the Earth's radiation belt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Trapped proton fluxes measured on board three LEO satellites (NPOES- 17, Universitetskiy - Tatiana and Coronas-F) in April 2005 were analysed. Experimental data are summarized using analytical expressions that allow to describe the flux of the trapped protons with energies from 80 keV up to 140 MeV, depending on its pitch angle on the geomagnetic equator. Analytical expressions and the set of their parameters can be used to determine directional proton flux on drift shells L = 1.14 -1.3 under quiet geomagnetic conditions in the period close to the solar minimum.

Nikolaeva, Natalia; Kuznetsov, Nikolay

302

Assessment of radiative feedback in climate models using satellite observations of annual flux variation  

PubMed Central

In the climate system, two types of radiative feedback are in operation. The feedback of the first kind involves the radiative damping of the vertically uniform temperature perturbation of the troposphere and Earth’s surface that approximately follows the Stefan–Boltzmann law of blackbody radiation. The second kind involves the change in the vertical lapse rate of temperature, water vapor, and clouds in the troposphere and albedo of the Earth’s surface. Using satellite observations of the annual variation of the outgoing flux of longwave radiation and that of reflected solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere, this study estimates the so-called “gain factor,” which characterizes the strength of radiative feedback of the second kind that operates on the annually varying, global-scale perturbation of temperature at the Earth’s surface. The gain factor is computed not only for all sky but also for clear sky. The gain factor of so-called “cloud radiative forcing” is then computed as the difference between the two. The gain factors thus obtained are compared with those obtained from 35 models that were used for the fourth and fifth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment. Here, we show that the gain factors obtained from satellite observations of cloud radiative forcing are effective for identifying systematic biases of the feedback processes that control the sensitivity of simulated climate, providing useful information for validating and improving a climate model. PMID:23613585

Tsushima, Yoko; Manabe, Syukuro

2013-01-01

303

Measurements of Urban Area-Wide CO2 and CH4 Fluxes as part of the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) was created in order to develop and evaluate methods for the measurement of greenhouse gas emission fluxes from urban environments. Such methods are important for a variety of reasons, including that more than half the global population now resides in cities, and because it is likely that many CO2 emissions reductions strategies will be implemented on local, largely urban, scales. INFLUX is using Indianapolis as a test case for measurements of urban scale greenhouse gas fluxes, because it is a fairly isolated urban environment with tractable meteorology, and a well-developed emission inventory (Vulcan/Hestia). INFLUX aims to quantify and reduce the uncertainty limits for such flux determinations, and to define the uncertainties for individual and combined approaches. The project currently combines a network of towers (currently 10 with 12 possible by the end of 2012) at which CO, CO2 and CH4 are measured, along with periodic flask sampling for 14CO2 and ~50 other trace gases and isotopes. Aircraft-based measurements of CO2, CH4 and H2O, along with flask samples for a variety of gases including 14CO2 are conducted from a light twin aircraft that enables flux measurements using the on-board turbulence/wind measurements via mass balance or eddy covariance methods. As of August of 2012 INFLUX has a Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) Fourier Transform Spectrometer at a downwind site, measuring column total CO2, CH4, H2O (and other greenhouse gases). The data from these tower, TCCON and aircraft measurements are then used in an inverse-modeling approach, using the Weather Research and Forecast model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LDPM) to yield estimates of the urban area flux at 1 km2 resolution. When aggregated these fluxes can be compared to estimates derived from aircraft mass-balance estimates, and the 14CO2 and CO data are used to extract the fossil fuel component of the CO2 flux. Measurement data using the range of approaches are then compared to the Hestia emissions model estimates, as well as to improve the Vulcan approaches. In the near future, we will add eddy covariance fluxes from several towers, and some limited eddy covariance flux measurements from the aircraft. Doppler lidar will be added at one site, to better constrain the boundary layer height, critically important to all flux measurement approaches. Here we discuss how the suite of measurement approaches are used to minimize and define the emissions uncertainties. We also will discuss our work on apportionment of fluxes of both CO2 and CH4 to individual point sources, and, where possible, compare to reported emission rates. Finally, we will discuss lessons learned, and how the INFLUX approaches might be best applied to megacities.

Shepson, P.; Callahan, B.; Cambaliza, M. L.; Davis, K. J.; Hardesty, R.; Iraci, L. T.; Gurney, K. R.; Karion, A.; Lauvaux, T.; McGowan, L. E.; Miles, N. L.; Moser, B.; Newberger, T.; Possolo, A.; Razlivanov, I. N.; Richardson, S.; Samarov, D. V.; Sarmiento, D.; Stirm, B.; Sweeney, C.; Turnbull, J. C.; Whetstone, J. R.

2012-12-01

304

MEASURED AND PREDICTED FLUXES OF BIOGENIC SILICA IN LAKE MICHIGAN  

EPA Science Inventory

Diatom production in the offshore waters of Lake Michigan is limited by silica supplies in late summer and can be predicted from the seasonal disappearance of silica from the trophogenic zone. Biogenic silica fluxes obtained from sediment trap collections were compared with fluxe...

305

A comparison of solar radiative flux above clouds from MODIS with BALTIMOS regional climate model simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A comparison study for the solar radiative flux above clouds is presented between the regional climate model system BALTEX integrated model system (BALTIMOS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite observations. For MODIS, an algorithm has been developed to retrieve reflected shortwave fluxes over clouds. The study area is the Baltic Sea catchment area during an 11-month period from February to December 2002. The intercomparison focuses on the variations of the daily and seasonal cycle and the spatial distributions. We found good agreement between the observed and the simulated data with a bias of the temporal mean of 13.6 W/m2 and a bias of the spatial mean of 35.5 W/m2. For summer months, BALTIMOS overestimates the solar flux with up to 90 W/m2 (20%). This might be explained by the insufficient representation of cirrus clouds in the regional climate model.

Hünerbein, Anja; Fischer, Juergen; Lorenz, Philip

2014-11-01

306

A model of the Starfish flux in the inner radiation zone  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A model of the Starfish electrons injected into the radiation belt in July 1962 was determined for epoch September 1964. This model distinguishes between artificial and natural electrons and provides the artificial unidirectional electron flux as a function of equatorial pitch angle, energy, and L value. The model is based primarily upon data from the OGO-1, OGO-3, OGO-5, 1963-38C, and the OV3-3 satellites. Decay times for the Starfish electrons are given as a function of energy and L value. These decay times represent the best compromise between a number of independently determined values. The times at which the artificial Starfish flux component had become insignificant in comparison to the natural flux component are determined as functions of energy and L value. These times are determined by two separate methods, and averaged values are presented. It is shown that Starfish electrons, by the present time, have become insignificant for all energies and L values.

Teague, M. J.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.

1972-01-01

307

Explosive Device for Generation of Pulsed Fluxes of Soft X-Ray Radiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The concept and realization of the explosive electrophysical device EMIR to generate soft x-ray radiation pulses are described. EMIR is based on the development of VNIIEF technologies in high-power flux compression generators, and on transforming systems based on lines with distributed parameters and current opening switches. Vacuum lines with magnetic insulation or water coaxial lines are considered for transmission of the energy pulses to the load. Transformation of magnetic energy to kinetic energy, thermalization and soft x-ray radiation are performed in a z-pinch with a double liner system.

Selemir, V. D.; Demidov, V. A.; Ivanovsky, A. V.; Yermolovich, V. F.; Kornilov, V. G.; Chelpanov, V. I.; Kazakov, S. A.; Vlasov, Y. V.; Orlov, A. P.

2004-11-01

308

SUMER - Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The instrument SUMER - Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation is designed to investigate structures and associated dynamical processes occurring in the solar atmosphere, from the chromosphere through the transition region to the inner corona, over a temperature range from 104 to 2 × 106K and above. These observations will permit detailed spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma densities and temperatures in

K. Wilhelm; W. Curdt; E. Marsch; U. Schühle; P. Lemaire; A. Gabriel; J.-C. Vial; M. Grewing; M. C. E. Huber; S. D. Jordan; A. I. Poland; R. J. Thomas; M. Kühne; J. G. Timothy; D. M. Hassler; O. H. W. Siegmund

1995-01-01

309

Neutron radiation measurements on several international flights.  

PubMed

The earth is continually exposed to cosmic radiation of both solar and galactic origin. High-energy particles interact with the constituents in the atmosphere producing secondary particles that create radiation fields at aircraft altitudes. These secondary particles consist mainly of photons, protons, neutrons, charged and uncharged pions, and muons. The neutron component dominates the hadron cascade at lower altitudes as a result of its longer mean free path. Since air transportation has become more available to a greater number of people, this has led to an increase in the number of persons exposed to ionizing radiation of cosmic origin. This concerns pilots and cabin crews as well as frequent flyers. A neutron component of cosmic radiation was measured using an LR 115/CR-39 track detector associated with a B converter foil. The measurement of the neutron dose is a good approximation of the total dose since neutrons carry about 50% of the total ambient dose equivalent at aircraft altitudes. Also, the results of the measurements were compared with the data obtained by EPCARD software simulation. The measured neutron dose rate had a span from 0.36 to 8.83 ?Sv h (dose enhancement due to high solar activity in the flight period). PMID:25627946

Poje, Marina; Vukovi?, Branko; Radoli?, Vanja; Miklav?i?, Igor; Planini?, Josip

2015-03-01

310

How representative are instantaneous evaporative fraction measurements for daytime fluxes?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sun synchronous optical remote sensing is a promising technique to provide instantaneous ET (Evapotranspiration) estimates during satellite overpass. The common approach to extrapolate the instantaneous estimates to values for daily or longer periods relies on the assumption that the EF (Evaporative Fraction, defined as the ratio of latent heat flux to surface available energy) remains nearly constant during daytime. However, there is still no consensus on the validity of the self preservation of EF. We used FLUXNET (a global network of eddy covariance stations) measurements to examine this self preservation, and the conditions under which it can hold. It is found here that the instantaneous EF could represent daytime EF under clear-sky conditions especially between 11:00 and 14:00 LT for all the stations. However, the EF is more unstable during cloudy skies. The increase in cloud cover would result in the increase in the variability of EF during daytime. Future works will focus on the evaluation of this EF constant assumption using real remote sensing data over different surface and climate conditions.

Peng, J.; Borsche, M.; Liu, Y.; Loew, A.

2013-02-01

311

How representative are instantaneous evaporative fraction measurements of daytime fluxes?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sun-synchronous optical and thermal remote sensing is a promising technique to provide instantaneous ET (evapotranspiration) estimates during satellite overpass. The common approach to extrapolate the instantaneous estimates to values for daily or longer periods relies on the assumption that the EF (evaporative fraction, defined as the ratio of latent heat flux to surface available energy) remains nearly constant during daytime. However, there is still no consensus on the validity of the self-preservation of the EF. We use FLUXNET (a global network of eddy covariance stations) measurements to examine this self-preservation, and the conditions under which it can hold. It is found that the instantaneous EF could represent daytime EF under clear sky conditions, especially between 11:00 and 14:00 LT (local time) for all stations. However, the results show that the EF is more variable during cloudy sky conditions, so that an increase in cloud cover results in an increase in the variability of the EF during daytime.

Peng, J.; Borsche, M.; Liu, Y.; Loew, A.

2013-10-01

312

On climate response to changes in the cosmic ray flux and radiative budget  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examine the results linking cosmic ray flux (CRF) variations to global\\u000aclimate change. We then proceed to study various periods over which there are\\u000aestimates for the radiative forcing, temperature change and CRF variations\\u000arelative to today. These include the Phanerozoic as a whole, the Cretaceous,\\u000athe Eocene, the Last Glacial Maximum, the 20th century, as well as the

Nir J. Shaviv

2004-01-01

313

Apparatus for measuring void ratios by using radiation  

SciTech Connect

In apparatus for measuring a void ratio by using radiation of the type comprising a hollow measuring unit through which fluid containing voids flows, a source of radiation and a radiation detector which are disposed on the opposite sides of the measuring unit, there is provided a rotary disc disposed between the measuring unit and the radiation detector and provided with a plurality of measuring openings which are equally spaced around a periphery of the rotary disc for transmitting the radiation.

Narabayashi, T.

1985-12-31

314

The validation of the GEWEX SRB surface longwave flux data products using BSRN measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The longwave downward fluxes at the Earth's surface are a significant part of the products of the NASA GEWEX SRB (Surface Radiation Budget) project which has produced and archived a 24.5-year continuous record from July 1983 to December 2007 of global shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiation fluxes at TOA and the surface from satellite measurements. The data are generated on a system of grid boxes ranging from 1° latitude by 1° longitude at lower latitudes to 1° latitude by 120° longitude next to the poles. The LW datasets, which are available as 3-hourly, 3-hourly-monthly, daily and monthly means, are produced from two sets of algorithms, the GEWEX LW (GLW) algorithm which is designated as primary and the Langley Parameterized LW (LPLA) algorithm which is designated as quality-check. The inputs of the latest versions, GLW (V3.1) and LPLA (V3.0), include the Geostationary Satellite system (GEOS) Version 4.0.3 meteorological information and cloud properties derived from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) DX data. In this paper, we compare the LW downward fluxes at the Earth's surface from both algorithms against over 4000 site-months of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) data from among the 59 BSRN sites. The comparisons are made for the 3-hourly, daily and monthly means each for the entire record, and on a month-by-month basis as well as a site-by-site basis. It is found that the overall daily mean bias/RMS for the GLW (V3.1) and LPLA (V3.0) algorithms are, respectively, 1.1/22.1 and 4.6/22.8 W m-2, their monthly counterparts are, respectively, 0.9/11.1 and 4.5/12.9 W m-2. Anomaly time series for a subset of more continuous BSRN measurement data sets show a standard deviation of 2.3 W m-2 and a correlation of 0.82 indicating the accurate replication of month-to-month variability. Clusters of similar surface types are analyzed showing that the uncertainties are largest over the polar regions. Finally, Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) two-sample test and Cramér-von Mises (CvM) two-sample test are used to show that the GLW is able to replicate the cumulative frequency distribution of the measurements at the 0.01 significance level.

Zhang, Taiping; Stackhouse, Paul W.; Gupta, Shashi K.; Cox, Stephen J.; Mikovitz, J. Colleen

2015-01-01

315

The measurement of solar ultraviolet radiation.  

PubMed

High skin cancer rates, stratospheric ozone depletion and increased public interest and concern have resulted in a strong demand for solar ultraviolet radiation measurements and information. The Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) has been involved since the mid-1980s in the measurement of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) using spectroradiometers (SRM) and a network of broadband detectors at 18 sites in Australia and Antarctica and in Singapore through a collaborative agreement with the Singapore Institute of Science and Forensic Medicine. Measurement locations range from equatorial (Singapore, 1.3 degrees N) through tropical (Darwin, 12.4 degrees S) to polar (Mawson, 67.6 degrees S) and as a result there are many difficulties associated with maintenance and calibration of the network detectors, and transfer of data to ensure an accurate and reliable data collection. Calibration procedures for the various detectors involve the comparison with simultaneous spectral measurements using a portable SRM incorporating a double monochromator, calibrated against traceable standard lamps. Laboratory measurements of cosine response and responsivity are also made. Detectors are intercompared at the Yallambie site for a number of months before installation at another location. As an additional check on the calibrations, computer models of solar UVR at the earth's surface for days with clear sky and known ozone are compared with the UV radiometer measurements. PMID:9920423

Roy, C R; Gies, H P; Lugg, D J; Toomey, S; Tomlinson, D W

1998-11-01

316

Bayesian calibration of reactor neutron flux spectrum using activation detectors measurements: Application to CALIBAN reactor  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we present calibration methods in order to estimate reactor neutron flux spectrum and its uncertainties by using integral activation measurements. These techniques are performed using Bayesian and MCMC framework. These methods are applied to integral activation experiments in the cavity of the CALIBAN reactor. We estimate the neutron flux and its related uncertainties. The originality of this work is that these uncertainties take into account measurements uncertainties, cross-sections uncertainties and model error. In particular, our results give a very good approximation of the total flux and indicate that neutron flux from MCNP simulation for energies above about 5 MeV seems to overestimate the 'real flux'. (authors)

Cartier, J. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Casoli, P. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, Valduc, F-21120 Is sur Tille (France); Chappert, F. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2013-07-01

317

MSL-RAD Radiation Environment Measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present results from the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) obtained during MSL's cruise to Mars and during the first 150 sols after Curiosity's successful landing. RAD is designed to measure the energetic particle environment, which consists of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs), Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs), and the secondary particles created by nuclear interactions of primary GCRs in shielding. During cruise, RAD was asymmetrically shielded inside the spacecraft. On the surface, RAD is shielded by the atmosphere, and the radiation dose rate is seen to vary slightly as the column depth of the atmosphere varies on a diurnal cycle. RAD's cruise measurements are a unique data set that provide a reasonable simulation of what might be encountered by a human crew headed for Mars or for some other destination in deep space. RAD successfully operated for 220 days of the 253 day journey to Mars. RAD has also operated stably on the surface of Mars, returning the first detailed radiation data from the surface of another planet. The data from the surface are also highly relevant for planning future crewed missions. We will present results for radiation dose and dose equivalent (the quantity most directly related to human health risk) obtained with both cruise and surface data. Dose and dose equivalent are dominated by the continuous GCR radiation, but five significant SEP events were seen during cruise and will be discussed.

Zeitlin, Cary; Hassler, Donald; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Boehm, Eckart; Boettcher, Stephan; Brinza, David; Burmeister, Soenke; Cucinotta, Francis; Ehresmann, Bent; Guo, Jingnan; Koehler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Posner, Arik; Rafkin, Scot; Reitz, Guenther; MSL Science Team

2013-04-01

318

Next-generation angular distribution models for top-of-atmosphere radiative flux calculation from CERES instruments: methodology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes are critical components to advancing our understanding of the Earth's radiative energy balance, radiative effects of clouds and aerosols, and climate feedback. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments provide broadband shortwave and longwave radiance measurements. These radiances are converted to fluxes by using scene-type-dependent angular distribution models (ADMs). This paper describes the next-generation ADMs that are developed for Terra and Aqua using all available CERES rotating azimuth plane radiance measurements. Coincident cloud and aerosol retrievals, and radiance measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and meteorological parameters from Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) data assimilation version 5.4.1 are used to define scene type. CERES radiance measurements are stratified by scene type and by other parameters that are important for determining the anisotropy of the given scene type. Anisotropic factors are then defined either for discrete intervals of relevant parameters or as a continuous functions of combined parameters, depending on the scene type. Significant differences between the ADMs described in this paper and the existing ADMs are over clear-sky scene types and polar scene types. Over clear ocean, we developed a set of shortwave (SW) ADMs that explicitly account for aerosols. Over clear land, the SW ADMs are developed for every 1° latitude × 1° longitude region for every calendar month using a kernel-based bidirectional reflectance model. Over clear Antarctic scenes, SW ADMs are developed by accounting the effects of sastrugi on anisotropy. Over sea ice, a sea-ice brightness index is used to classify the scene type. Under cloudy conditions over all surface types, the longwave (LW) and window (WN) ADMs are developed by combining surface and cloud-top temperature, surface and cloud emissivity, cloud fraction, and precipitable water. Compared to the existing ADMs, the new ADMs change the monthly mean instantaneous fluxes by up to 5 W m-2 on a regional scale of 1° latitude × 1° longitude, but the flux changes are less than 0.5 W m-2 on a global scale.

Su, W.; Corbett, J.; Eitzen, Z.; Liang, L.

2015-02-01

319

How well do we understand the Earth's radiation budget and the role of clouds? Selected results of the GEWEX radiation flux assessment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multi-year average radiative flux maps of three satellite data-sets (CERES, ISSCP and GEWEX-SRB) are compared to each other and to typical values by global modeling (median values of results of 20 climate models of the 4th IPCC Assessment). Diversity assessments address radiative flux products and at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and the surface, with particular attention to impacts by clouds. Involving both data from surface and TOA special attention is given to the vertical radiation flux divergence and on the infrared Greenhouse effect, which are rarely shown in literature.

Raschke, E.; Kinne, S.

2013-05-01

320

Simultaneous measurements of oxygen and carbon dioxide fluxes to assess productivity in phytoplankton cultures.  

PubMed

We validate a method that simultaneously measures O(2) and CO(2) fluxes by sampling headspace air in phytoplankton cultures. Fluxes were strongly correlated to traditional productivity measures, except for a taxon with unique C metabolism. The method provides accurate, real-time, non-destructive measurements and is recommended for laboratory studies of phytoplankton physiology. PMID:23022444

Corcoran, Alina A; Van Voorhies, Wayne A

2012-12-01

321

Decoupled cantilever arms for highly versatile and sensitive temperature and heat flux measurements  

E-print Network

Microfabricated cantilever beams have been used in microelectromechanical systems for a variety of sensor and actuator applications. Bimorph cantilevers accurately measure temperature change and heat flux with resolutions ...

Burg, Brian R.

322

Comparison of floating chamber and eddy covariance measurements of lake greenhouse gas fluxes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from lakes may have a large impact on the magnitude of the terrestrial carbon sink. Traditionally lake fluxes have been measured using the floating chamber (FC) technique; however, several recent studies use the eddy covariance (EC) method. We present simultaneous flux measurements using both methods at lake Tämnaren in Sweden during field campaigns in 2011 and 2012. Only very few similar studies exist. For CO2 flux, the two methods agree relatively well during some periods, but deviate substantially at other times. The large discrepancies might be caused by heterogeneity of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2w) in the EC flux footprint. The methods agree better for CH4 fluxes. It is, however, clear that short-term discontinuous FC measurements are likely to miss important high flux events.

Podgrajsek, E.; Sahlée, E.; Bastviken, D.; Holst, J.; Lindroth, A.; Tranvik, L.; Rutgersson, A.

2014-08-01

323

Comparison of floating chamber and eddy covariance measurements of lake greenhouse gas fluxes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from lakes may have a large impact on the magnitude of the terrestrial carbon sink. Traditionally lake fluxes have been measured using the floating chambers (FC) technique, however, several recent studies use the eddy covariance (EC) method. We present simultaneous flux measurements using both methods at the lake Tämnaren in Sweden during field campaigns in 2011 and 2012. Only very few similar studies exist. For CO2 flux, the two methods agree relatively well during some periods, but deviate substantially at other times. The large discrepancies might be caused by heterogeneity of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2w) in the EC flux footprint. The methods agree better for CH4 fluxes, it is, however, clear that short-term discontinuous FC measurements are likely to miss important high flux events.

Podgrajsek, E.; Sahlée, E.; Bastviken, D.; Holst, J.; Lindroth, A.; Tranvik, L.; Rutgersson, A.

2013-11-01

324

A Comparison of EAST Shock-Tube Radiation Measurements with a New Air Radiation Model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a comparison between the recent EAST shock tube radiation measurements (Grinstead et al., AIAA 2008-1244) and the HARA radiation model. The equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiation measurements are studied for conditions relevant to lunar-return shock-layers; specifically shock velocities ranging from 9 to 11 kilometers per second at initial pressures of 0.1 and 0.3 Torr. The simulated shock-tube flow is assumed one-dimensional and is calculated using the LAURA code, while a detailed nonequilibrium radiation prediction is obtained in an uncoupled manner from the HARA code. The measured and predicted intensities are separated into several spectral ranges to isolate significant spectral features, mainly strong atomic line multiplets. The equations and physical data required for the prediction of these strong atomic lines are reviewed and their uncertainties identified. The 700-1020 nm wavelength range, which accounts for roughly 30% of the radiative flux to a peak-heating lunar return shock-layer, is studied in detail and the measurements and predictions are shown to agree within 15% in equilibrium. The plus or minus 1.5% uncertainty on the measured shock velocity is shown to cause up to a plus or minus 30% difference in the predicted radiation. This band of predictions contains the measured values in almost all cases. For the highly nonequilibrium 0.1 Torr cases, the nonequilibrium radiation peaks are under-predicted by about half. This under-prediction is considered acceptable when compared to the order-of-magnitude over-prediction obtained using a Boltzmann population of electronic states. The reasonable comparison in the nonequilibrium regions provides validation for both the non-Boltzmann modeling in HARA and the thermochemical nonequilibrium modeling in LAURA. The N2 (+)(1-) and N2(2+) molecular band systems are studied in the 290 480 nm wavelength range for both equilibrium and nonequilibrium regimes. The non-Boltzmann rate models for these systems, which have significant uncertainties, are tuned to improve the comparison with measurements.

Johnston, Christopher O.

2008-01-01

325

A Strategy to Assess Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing of Climate Using Satellite Radiation Measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Atmospheric aerosols have a complex internal chemical composition and optical properties. Therefore it is difficult to model their impact on redistribution and absorption of solar radiation, and the consequent impact on atmospheric dynamics and climate. The use in climate models of isolated aerosol parameters retrieved from satellite data (e.g. optical thickness) may result in inconsistent calculations, if the model assumptions differ from these of the satellite retrieval schemes. Here we suggest a strategy to assess the direct impact of aerosol on the radiation budget at the top and bottom of the atmosphere using satellite and ground based measurements of the spectral solar radiation scattered by the aerosol. This method ensures consistent use of the satellite data and increases its accuracy. For Kaufman and Tanre: Strategy for aerosol direct forcing anthropogenic aerosol in the fine mode (e.g. biomass burning smoke and urban pollution) consistent use of satellite derived optical thickness can yield the aerosol impact on the spectral solar flux with accuracy an order of magnitude better than the optical thickness itself. For example, a simulated monthly average smoke optical thickness of 0.5 at 0.55 microns (forcing of 40-50 W/sq m) derived with an error of 20%, while the forcing can be measured directly with an error of only 0-2 W/sq m. Another example, the effect of large dust particles on reflection of solar flux can be derived three times better than retrievals of optical thickness. Since aerosol impacts not only the top of the atmosphere but also the surface irradiation, a combination of satellite and ground based measurements of the spectral flux, can be the most direct mechanism to evaluate the aerosol effect on climate and assimilate it in climate models. The strategy is applied to measurements from SCAR-B and the Tarfox experiments. In SCAR-B aircraft spectral data are used to derive the 24 hour radiative forcing of smoke at the top of the atmosphere of (Delta)F(sub 24hr)/(Delta)tau = - 25 +/- 5 W/sq m. Ground based data give forcing at the surface of (Delta)F(sub 24hr)/(Delta)taur = -80 +/- 5 W/sq m. In TARFOX a mixture of maritime and regional pollution aerosol resulted in a varied forcing at the top of the atmosphere, (Delta)F(sub 24hr)/(Delta)tau, between -26 W/sq 2 and -50 W/sq m depending on mixture of coarse and accumulation modes, for Angstrom exponents of 1.0 and 0.2 respectively.

Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

326

Field-testing of a Passive Surface Water Flux Meter for the Direct Measurement of Water and Solute Mass Fluxes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The measurement of water and solute mass discharges in surface water flow systems is a fundamental hydrologic task for ecological and economic decision making. However, due to the extensive monetary, labor, and time costs of traditional monitoring devices and methods, many water quality monitoring programs lack the resources necessary to provide comprehensive descriptions of surface water impairments. The Passive Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM) is a recently developed passive sampling device that measures water and solute fluxes within flowing surface water bodies. Devoid of mechanical components and power supply requirements, the relatively low-maintenance, low-cost design of the PSFM gives it considerable potential as a tool for extensive, large-scale surface water quality characterization and monitoring. The novelty of the PSFM extends to its direct mass-based approach to solute flux measurement, as compared to conventional, indirect concentration-based approaches. During this field-testing campaign, the PSFM was deployed in flowing surface water bodies of north- central Florida. The device contained a dual-packed porous media cartridge that performed simultaneous ion exchange to determine phosphate mass flux and equilibrium tracer desorption to determine water flux within the stream. The PSFM demonstrated accurate measurement of steady-state water and phosphate mass fluxes to within 15% over a range of stream velocities, solute concentrations, and deployment durations. The PSFM design described here was found to perform well in steady-flow conditions. The device was also shown to be effective under transient conditions of limited variability, but full transient testing remains for future work.

Atkinson, E. C.; Jawitz, J. W.; Annable, M. D.; Klammler, H.; Hatfield, K.

2007-05-01

327

Science Plan for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Plan is to articulate the scientific issues driving the ARM Program, and to relate them to DOE`s programmatic objectives for ARM, based on the experience and scientific progress gained over the past five years. ARM programmatic objectives are to: (1) Relate observed radiative fluxes and radiances in the atmosphere, spectrally resolved and as a function of position and time, to the temperature and composition of the atmosphere, specifically including water vapor and clouds, and to surface properties, and sample sufficient variety of situations so as to span a wide range of climatologically relevant possibilities; (2) develop and test parameterizations that can be used to accurately predict the radiative properties and to model the radiative interactions involving water vapor and clouds within the atmosphere, with the objective of incorporating these parameterizations into general circulation models. The primary observational methods remote sending and other observations at the surface, particularly remote sensing of clouds, water vapor and aerosols.

NONE

1996-02-01

328

The flux measure of influence in engineering networks  

E-print Network

The objective of this project is to characterize the influence of individual nodes in complex networks. The flux metric developed here achieves this goal by considering the difference between the weighted outdegree and ...

Schwing, Kyle Michael

2009-01-01

329

Mass Flux Measurements of Arsenic in Groundwater (Battelle Conference)  

EPA Science Inventory

Concentration trends of arsenic are typically used to evaluate the performance of remediation efforts designed to mitigate arsenic contamination in groundwater. A complementary approach would be to track changes in mass flux of the contaminant through the subsurface, for exampl...

330

High Time Resolution Measurements of Methane Fluxes From Enteric Fermentation in Cattle Rumen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Methane accounts for roughly 20% of the global radiative climate forcing in the last two and a half centuries. Methane emissions arise from a number of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In some areas enteric fermentation in livestock produces over 90% of agricultural methane. In the spring of 2013, as a part of the Short Lived Climate Forcer-Mexico field campaign, the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory in partnership with the Molina Center for the Environment studied methane production associated with enteric fermentation in the rumen of cattle. A variety of different breeds and stocks being raised in two agricultural and veterinary research facilities located in different areas of Mexico were examined. Methane fluxes were quantified using two methods: 1) an atmospherically stable gaseous tracer release was collocated with small herds in a pasture, allowing tracer ratio flux measurements; 2) respiratory CO2 was measured in tandem with methane in the breath of individual animals allowing methane production to be related to metabolism. The use of an extensive suite of very high time response instruments allows for differentiation of individual methane producing rumination events and respiratory CO2 from possible background interferences. The results of these studies will be presented and compared to data from traditional chamber experiments.

Floerchinger, C. R.; Herndon, S.; Fortner, E.; Roscioli, J. R.; Kolb, C. E.; Knighton, W. B.; Molina, L. T.; Zavala, M.; Castelán, O.; Ku Vera, J.; Castillo, E.

2013-12-01

331

Preliminary results of radiation measurements on EURECA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The eleven-month duration of the EURECA mission allows long term radiation effects to be studied similarly to those of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Basic data can be generated for projections of crew doses and electronic and computer reliability on spacecraft missions. A radiation experiment has been designed for EURECA which uses passive integrating detectors to measure average radiation levels. The components include a Trackoscope, which employs fourteen plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) stacks to measure the angular dependence of LET (greater than or equal to 6 keV/microns) radiation. Also included are TLD's for total absorbed doses, thermal/resonance neutron detectors (TRND's) for low energy neutron fluences and a thick PNTD stack for depth dependence measurements. LET spectra are derived from the PNTD measurements. Preliminary TLD results from seven levels within the detector array show that integrated doses inside the flight canister varied from 18.8 plus or minus 0.6 cGy to 38.9 plus or minus 1.2 cGy. The TLD's oriented toward the least shielded direction averaged 53 percent higher in dose than those oriented away from the least shielded direction (minimum shielding toward the least shielded direction varied from 1.13 to 7.9 g/cm(exp 2), Al equivalent). The maximum dose rate on EURECA (1.16 mGy/day) was 37 percent of the maximum measured on LDEF and dose rates at all depths were less than measured on LDEF. The shielding external to the flight canister covered a greater solid angle about the canister than in the LDEF experiments.

Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

1995-01-01

332

Preliminary results of radiation measurements on EURECA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The eleven-month duration of the EURECA mission allows long-term radiation effects to be studied similarly to those of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Basic data can be generated for projections to crew doses and electronic and computer reliability on spacecraft missions. A radiation experiment has been designed for EURECA which uses passive integrating detectors to measure average radiation levels. The components include a Trackoscope, which employs fourteen plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) stacks to measure the angular dependence of high LET (greater than or equal to 6 keV/micro m) radiation. Also included are TLD's for total absorbed doses, thermal/resonance neutron detectors (TRND's) for low energy neutron fluences and a thick PNTD stack for depth dependence measurements. LET spectra are derived from the PNTD measurements. Preliminary TLD results from seven levels within the detector array show that integrated does inside the flight canister varied from 18.8 +/- 0.6 cGy to 38.9 +/- 1.2 cGy. The TLD's oriented toward the least shielded direction averaged 53% higher in dose than those oriented away from the least shielded direction (minimum shielding toward the least shielded direction varied from 1.13 to 7.9 g/cm(exp 2), Al equivalent). The maximum dose rate on EURECA (1.16 mGy/day) was 37% of the maximum measured on LDEF and dose rates at all depths were less than measured on LDEF. The shielding external to the flight canister covered a greater solid angle about the canister than the LDEF experiments.

Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

1995-01-01

333

A novel approach to measuring heat flux in swimming animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a design for long-term or removable attachment of heat flux sensors (HFSs) to stationary or swimming animals in water that enables collection of heat flux data on both captive and free-ranging pinnipeds. HFSs were modified to allow for independent, continuous, and long-term or removable attachment to study animals. The design was tested for effects of HFSs and the

Kate Willis; Markus Horning

2005-01-01

334

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, October 2000.  

SciTech Connect

Energy Balance Bowen Ratio System--Estimates of surface energy fluxes are a primary product of the data collection systems at the ARM SGP CART site. Surface fluxes tell researchers a great deal about the effects of interactions between the sun's energy and Earth. Surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat can be estimated by measuring temperature and relative humidity gradients across a vertical distance. Sensible heat is what we feel coming from a warm sidewalk or a metal car door; it can be measured with a thermometer. Latent heat, on the other hand, is released or absorbed during transformations such as the freezing of water into ice or the evaporation of morning dew from a lawn. Such a transformation is referred to as a ''phase change,'' the conversion of a substance among its solid, liquid, and vapor phases. Phase change is an important aspect of our climate. Earth's water cycle abounds with phase changes: rain falls and evaporates, changing from liquid to vapor; the water vapor in the air condenses to form clouds, changing from a gas into a liquid cloud droplet, and eventually falls to Earth's surface as rain or snow; snow falls and melts to liquid or sublimes directly to water vapor. This cyclic process has no end. Surface vegetation and land use play extremely important roles in surface energy fluxes. Plants absorb and reflect solar radiation and also take up water and expel water vapor. The type of plant material, its stage of growth, and its color determine whether and to what extent the surface and air can couple and exchange energy.

Sisterson, D. L.

2000-11-09

335

CERES: The Next Generation of Earth Radiation Budget Measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is part of an international program for studying the Earth from space using a multiple-instrument, multiple-satellite approach. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) experiment is designed to monitor changes in the Earth s radiant energy system and cloud systems and to provide these data with sufficient simultaneity and accuracy to examine critical cloud/climate feedback mechanisms which may play a major role in determining future changes in the climate system. The first EOS satellite (Terra), scheduled for launch this year, and the EOS-PM satellite, to be launched in late 2000, will each carry two CERES instruments. The first CERES instrument was launched in 1997 on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The CERES TRMM data show excellent instrument stability and a factor of 2 to 3 less error than previous Earth radiation budget missions. The first CERES data products have been validated and archived. The data consist of instantaneous longwave and shortwave broadband radiances, top-of-atmosphere fluxes, scene types, and time and space averaged fluxes and albedo. A later data product will combine CERES radiances and high- resolution imager data to produce cloud properties and fluxes throughout the atmosphere and at the surface.

Gibson, Gary G.; Wielicki, Bruce A.

1999-01-01

336

Radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system  

DOEpatents

A radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system for measuring the average power of a beam such as a laser beam, including a calorimeter configured to operate over a wide range of coolant flow rates and being cooled by continuously flowing coolant for absorbing light from a laser beam to convert the laser beam energy into heat. The system further includes a flow meter for measuring the coolant flow in the calorimeter and a pair of thermistors for measuring the temperature difference between the coolant inputs and outputs to the calorimeter. The system also includes a microprocessor for processing the measured coolant flow rate and the measured temperature difference to determine the average power of the laser beam.

Baker, John (Livermore, CA); Collins, Leland F. (Pleasanton, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Ripon, CA); Micali, James V. (Dublin, CA)

1992-01-01

337

Measurements of the cosmic background radiation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measurements of the attributes of the 2.7-K microwave background radiation (CBR) are reviewed, with emphasis on the analytic phase of CBR studies. Methods for the direct measurement of the CBR spectrum are discussed; attention is given to receivers, antennas, absolute receiver calibration, atmospheric emission and absorption, the galactic background contribution, the analysis of LF measurements, and recent HF observations of the CBR spectrum. Measurements of the large-angular-scale intensity distribution of the CBR (the most convincing evidence that the radiation is of cosmological origin) are examined, along with limits on the linear polarization of the CBR. A description is given of the NASA-sponsored Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite mission. The results of the COBE mission will be a set of sky maps showing, in the wave number range from 1 to 10,000 kaysers, the galactic background radiation due to synchrotron emission from galactic cosmic rays, to diffuse thermal emission from H II regions, and to diffuse thermal emission from interstellar and interplanetary dust, as well as a residue consisting of the CBR and whatever other cosmological background might exist.

Weiss, R.

1980-01-01

338

Direct thermal radiative forcing of tropospheric aerosol in the Arctic measured by ground based infrared spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present, to our knowledge for the first time in the high Arctic, atmospheric thermal emission spectra recorded by ground-based FTIR spectrometry revealing an excess emission contribution, which can only be attributed to the presence of tropospheric aerosols. Consideration of direct thermal forcing in climatological sensitive and remote regions as the Arctic seems to be important for more realistic modelling. According to our measurements, the aerosols can alter the flux density of downward longwave radiation by up to +2.99 to +4.66 W m-2, and the flux density of outgoing longwave radiation by -0.23 to +1.17 W m-2.

Ritter, Christoph; Notholt, Justus; Fischer, Jürgen; Rathke, Carsten

2005-12-01

339

Diurnal Variations of Energetic Particle Radiation Dose Measured by the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity has collected data on the interplanetary radiation environment during cruise from Earth to Mars and at the surface of Mars since its landing in August 2012. RAD's particle detection capabilities are achieved with a solid-state detector (SSD) stack (A, B, C), a CsI(Tl) scintillator (D), and a plastic scintillator (E) for neutron detection. The D and E detectors are surrounded by an anticoincidence shield (F), also made of plastic scintillator. All scintillators are optically coupled to silicon diodes which convert scintillation light to electrons. RAD is capable of measuring both Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) thought to be produced by supernovae outside the heliosphere and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs). GCRs are relativistic particles (100 MeV/nuc to >10 GeV/nuc) composed of roughly 89% protons, 10% alpha particles (He), and 1% heavier nuclei [1]. Because of their high energies and continuous nature, GCRs are the dominant source of background radiation at the Martian surface, and are responsible for the production of secondary particles (notably neutrons) via complex interactions in the atmosphere and regolith. SEPs are produced by coronal mass ejections. These intermittent storms are most likely to occur near solar maximum and typical fluxes are dominated by protons with energies lower than 100 MeV/nuc. Unlike the GCR flux, the SEP flux can vary by five or more orders of magnitude over timescales of a day. Even under a constant flux of energetic particle radiation at the top of the atmosphere, the radiation dose at the surface should vary as a function of surface elevation [2]. This variation is directly related to the change in the shielding provided by the total atmospheric mass column, which is to a very good approximation directly related to surface pressure. Thus, the flux of primary energetic particles should increase with altitude, all other things being equal. At present, MSL has been at a nearly constant altitude of ~-4.4 km MOLA so that no elevation-induced changes are expected and none have been observed. However, any process that changes the column mass of atmosphere should change the dose at the surface. On Mars there are two major processes that substantially change column atmospheric mass. The first is the seasonal condensation cycle during which ~25% of the dominant atmospheric constituent (CO2) condenses onto the winter pole. This seasonal signal is very strong and has been observed by surface pressure measurements from the Viking Landers up through MSL [3,4]. The second major process is related to the thermal tide. The direct heating of the Martian atmosphere by the Sun produces global scale waves that redistribute mass [5]. The two most dominant tidal modes are the diurnal and semidiurnal tide. Together, the thermal tide can produce a variation of 10-15% over a Martian day (sol). Here, we report on the dose measured by the RAD E detector and the variation of this dose over the diurnal cycle. Further, we show that the variation in the E dose rate is very likely due to the variation of column mass, as measured by the pressure sensor on the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS), driven by the thermal tide. While changes in dose were expected from changes in altitude or season, the discovery of a diurnal variation was not anticipated, although it should have been reasonably expected in hindsight.

Rafkin, Scot; Zeitlin, Cary; Ehresmann, Bent; Köhler, Jan; Guo, Jingnan; Kahanpää, Henrik; Hassler, Don; -Gomez, Javier E.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Brinza, David; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckhard; Burmeister, Sonka; Martin, Cesar; Müller-Mellin, Robert; Appel, Jan; Posner, Arik; Reitz, Gunter; Kharytonov, Aliksandr; Cucinotta, Francis

2013-04-01

340

The Sensitivity of Latent Heat Flux to Changes in the Radiative Forcing: A Framework for Comparing Models and Observations  

E-print Network

A climate model must include an accurate surface physics scheme in order to examine the interactions between the land and atmosphere. Given an increase in the surface radiative forcing, the sensitivity of latent heat flux ...

Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

341

Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments have demonstrated a correlation between the rate of heat loss q? from an experimental fluid to the air above and the standard deviation ? of the thermal variability in images of the fluid surface. These experimental results imply that q? can be derived directly from thermal imagery by computing ?. This paper analyses thermal imagery collected over two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the same relationship exists. Turbulent boundary layer theory predicts a linear relationship between q? and ? when both forced (wind driven) and free (buoyancy driven) convection are present. Datasets derived from ground- and helicopter-based imagery collections had correlation coefficients between ? and q? of 0.45 and 0.76, respectively. Values of q? computed from a function of ? and friction velocity u* derived from turbulent boundary layer theory had higher correlations with measured values of q? (0.84 and 0.89). This research may be applicable to the problem of calculating losses of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere during high-latitude cold-air outbreaks because it does not require the information typically needed to compute sensible, evaporative, and thermal radiation energy losses to the atmosphere.

Garrett, A.; Kurzeja, R.; Villa-Aleman, E.; Bollinger, J.

2013-01-01

342

CR-39 detector based thermal neutron flux measurements, in the photo neutron project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

PhoNeS (photo neutron source) is a project aimed at the production and moderation of neutrons by exploiting high energy linear accelerators, currently used in radiotherapy. A feasibility study has been carried out with the scope in mind to use the high energy photon beams from these accelerators for the production of neutrons suitable for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Within these investigations, it was necessary to carry out preliminary measurements of the thermal neutron component of neutron spectra, produced by the photo-conversion of X-ray radiotherapy beams supplied by three LinAcs: 15 MV, 18 MV and 23 MV. To this end, a simple passive thermal neutron detector has been used which consists of a CR-39 track detector facing a new type of boron-loaded radiator. Once calibrated, this passive detector has been used for the measurement of both the thermal neutron component and the cadmium ratio of different neutron spectra. In addition, bubble detectors with a response highly sensitive to thermal neutrons have also been used. Both thermal neutron detectors are simple to use, very compact and totally insensitive to low-ionizing radiation such as electrons and X-rays. The resultant thermal neutron flux was above 10 6 n/cm 2s and the cadmium ratio was no greater than 15 for the first attempt of photo-conversion of X-ray radiotherapy beams.

Mameli, A.; Greco, F.; Fidanzio, A.; Fusco, V.; Cilla, S.; D'Onofrio, G.; Grimaldi, L.; Augelli, B. G.; Giannini, G.; Bevilacqua, R.; Totaro, P.; Tommasino, L.; Azario, L.; Piermattei, A.

2008-08-01

343

Comparing Helicopter-based Eddy Flux Measurements with Highly Resolved Bottom-up Land Surface Model Predictions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In June 2007, a regional campaign took place in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) to estimate land-atmosphere exchanges of CO2, water, and energy at 1 to 100 km scales. The primary goals of this campaign were to evaluate top-down and bottom-up estimates of regional fluxes and to characterize the influence of moisture gradients, surface heterogeneity, and atmospheric transport patterns on these fluxes. The work was integrated with the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC), centered on the US DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program SGP region. Eddy flux towers were deployed in the four major land cover types, distributed over the region’s SE to NW precipitation gradient. In addition, CO2, water, and energy fluxes were observed with the Duke Helicopter Observation Platform (HOP) at various heights in the boundary layer, including in the surface layer. One aircraft carried precise and continuous CO2 measurement systems, 14C flasks, and NOAA 12-flask (carbon cycle gases and isotopes) packages. Continuous CO2, CO, and radon concentrations, NOAA 2-flask package, and isotope diel flasks (14C, 13C, and 18O) were also collected from a centrally located 60 m tower. Here we compare forward modeling predictions using a finely-resolved land-surface model of CO2 and energy fluxes to the helicopter measurements. Differences between the predictions and measurements resulted from (1) errors in the bottom-up model; (2) atmospheric mixing and uncertainty in the helicopter eddy flux footprint; and (3) uncertainties in the helicopter measurements. We analyze these differences and indicate how these types of observations can be used to constrain the bottom-up modeling approach.

Biraud, S. C.; Riley, W. J.; Torn, M. S.; Avissar, R.; Bolch, M. A.

2010-12-01

344

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is an important part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) strategy to understand global climate change. The ARM Program has established three outdoor research sites around the world. Scientists gather and use the data from these sites to study the effects of sunlight, radiant energy, and clouds on temperatures, weather, and climate. This site has information about ARM and global warming. It has lesson plans, a question area, and an Ask a Scientist link.

2000-04-18

345

Measurements of the cosmic background radiation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data on the cosmic microwave background radiation obtained with a maser at 12 mm and a Schottky diode mixer at 3 mm are presented. The dipole anisotropy, apparently due to our motion, has been measured sufficiently well to determine our direction of motion within two degrees. The results show that the Galaxy is moving in a direction that is about 44 deg from the center of the Virgo cluster.

Lubin, P.; Villela, T.

1986-01-01

346

On the Relationship Between High Speed Solar Wind Streams and Radiation Belt Electron Fluxes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Both past and recent research results indicate that solar wind speed has a close connection to radiation belt electron fluxes [e.g., Paulikas and Blake, 1979; Reeves et aI., 2011]: a higher solar wind speed is often associated with a higher level of radiation electron fluxes. But the relationship can be very complex [Reeves et aI., 2011]. The study presented here provides further corroboration of this viewpoint by emphasizing the importance of a global perspective and time history. We find that all the events during years 2010 and 2011 where the >0.8 MeV integral electron flux exceeds 10(exp 5) particles/sq cm/sr/s (pfu) at GEO orbit are associated with the high speed streams (HSS) following the onset of the Stream Interaction Region (SIR), with most of them belonging to the long-lasting Corotating Interaction Region (CIR). Our preliminary results indicate that during HSS events, a maximum speed of 700 km/s and above is a sufficient but not necessary condition for the > 0.8 MeV electron flux to reach 10(exp 5) pfu. But in the exception cases of HSS events where the electron flux level exceeds the 10(exp 5) pfu value but the maximum solar wind speed is less than 700 km/s, a prior impact can be noted either from a CME or a transient SIR within 3-4 days before the arrival of the HSS - stressing the importance of time history. Through superposed epoch analysis and studies providing comparisons with the CME events and the HSS events where the flux level fails to reach the 10(exp 5) pfu, we will present the quantitative assessment of behaviors and relationships of various quantities, such as the time it takes to reach the flux threshold value from the stream interface and its dependence on different physical parameters (e.g., duration of the HSS event, its maximum or average of the solar wind speed, IMF Bz, Kp). The ultimate goal is to apply what is derived to space weather forecasting.

Zheng, Yihua

2011-01-01

347

Estimating total heliospheric magnetic flux from single-point in situ measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fraction of the total photospheric magnetic flux opens to the heliosphere to form the interplanetary magnetic field carried by the solar wind. While this open flux is critical to our understanding of the generation and evolution of the solar magnetic field, direct measurements are generally limited to single-point measurements taken in situ by heliospheric spacecraft. An observed latitude invariance

M. J. Owens; C. N. Arge; N. U. Crooker; N. A. Schwadron; T. S. Horbury

2008-01-01

348

Calculating the detection limits of chamber-based greenhouse gas flux measurements  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Chamber-based measurement of greenhouse gas emissions from soil is a common technique. However, when changes in chamber headspace gas concentrations are small over time, determination of the flux can be problematic. Several factors contribute to the reliability of measured fluxes, including: samplin...

349

LEAF, BRANCH, STAND & LANDSCAPE SCALE MEASUREMENTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND FLUXES FROM U.S. WOODLANDS  

EPA Science Inventory

Natural volatile organic compounds (VOC) fluxes were measured in three U.S. woodlands in summer 1993. Fluxes from individual leaves and branches were estimated with enclosure techniques and used to initialize and evaluate VOC emission model estimates. Ambient measurements were us...

350

FLUX MEASUREMENTS OF OZONE AND NITRIC ACID AT COASTAL AND MID-CONTINENTAL SITES  

EPA Science Inventory

A system for measuring the turbulent fluxes of ozone, nitric acid, and other gases was operated at two sites in 1994. hese direct measurements of fluxes are for comparison with those calculated for National Dry Deposition Network sites using an inferential model approach. zone fl...

351

Prediction and measurement of incipient boiling heat flux in micro-channel heat sinks  

E-print Network

-phase heat sink can result in an unusually large stream-wise temper- ature rise in both the cooling liquidPrediction and measurement of incipient boiling heat flux in micro-channel heat sinks Weilin Qu Abstract Experiments were performed to measure the incipient boiling heat flux in a heat sink containing 21

Qu, Weilin

352

SIX YEARS OF CO2 FLUX MEASUREMENTS FOR A GRAZED MIXED-GRASS PRAIRIE.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Carbon dioxide fluxes were measured over a moderately grazed mixed-grass prairie site using the CO2 Bowen ratio/energy balance technique. Fluxes were measured from 24 April to 26 October from 1996 through 2001 at Mandan, ND. The site is mostly cool season grass species with a complement of warm se...

353

MERCURY FLUX MEASUREMENTS OVER AIR AND WATER IN KEJIMKUJIK NATIONAL PARK, NOVA SCOTIA  

E-print Network

MERCURY FLUX MEASUREMENTS OVER AIR AND WATER IN KEJIMKUJIK NATIONAL PARK, NOVA SCOTIA F. S. BOUDALA. Mercury flux measurements were conducted at two lakes and three soil sites in Kejimkujik National Park, located in the eastern Canadian province of Nova Scotia. One of the lakes had high levels of both mercury

Folkins, Ian

354

REMANENT FLUX MEASUREMENT AND OPTIMAL ENERGIZATION INSTANT DERTERMINATION OF POWER TRANSFORMER  

Microsoft Academic Search

The inrush currents generated during a energization of power transformer can reach very high values and may cause many problems in power system. In this paper method for controlled energization of power transformer based on measuring of remanet flux of magnetic core is presented. The remanet flux is measured and memorized at the last de-energization of transformer and then applied

Stanko Milun

2003-01-01

355

Bowen ratio and closed chamber carbon dioxide flux measurements over sagebrush steppe vegetation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurement of carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes over sagebrush steppe ecosystems has received little attention, and seasonal dynamics of CO2 uptake are not known for most portions of this expansive ecosystem. We utilized two techniques — Bowen ratio\\/energy balance (BREB) and closed chamber (CC) — to measure CO2 fluxes during eight 24h sampling periods throughout the 1997 growing season on ungrazed

Raymond F Angell; Tony Svejcar; Jon Bates; Nicanor Z Saliendra; Douglas A Johnson

2001-01-01

356

Measurements of neutron radiation in aircraft.  

PubMed

Radiation environment is a complex mixture of charged particles of the solar and galactic origin, as well as of secondary particles created in an interaction of galactic cosmic particles with the nuclei of the Earth's atmosphere. A radiation field at aircraft altitude consists of different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. In order to measure a neutron component of the cosmic radiation, we investigated a few combinations of a track etch detector (CR-39, LR-115) with a plastic converter or boron foil. Detector calibration was performed on neutrons coming from the nuclear reactor, as well as in the CERN-EU high-energy Reference Field (CERF) facility. From November 2007 to September 2008, the neutron dose equivalent was measured by the track detectors during five aircraft flights, in the north geographical latitude from 21° to 58°; the respective average dose rate, determined by using the D-4 detector (CR-39/B), was H?(n)=5.9 ?Sv/h. The photon dose rate, measured by the electronic dosimeter RAD-60 SE, had the average value of H?(f)=1.4 ?Sv/h. PMID:20620072

Vukovi?, B; Poje, M; Varga, M; Radoli?, V; Miklavci?, I; Faj, D; Stani?, D; Planini?, J

2010-12-01

357

The effect of cumulus cloud field anisotropy on solar radiative fluxes and atmospheric heating rates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of fair-weather cumulus cloud field anisotropy on domain average surface fluxes and atmospheric heating profiles was studied. Causes of anisotropy were investigated using a large-eddy simulation (LES) model. Cloud formation under a variety of environmental conditions was simulated and the degree of anisotropy in the output fields was calculated. Wind shear was found to be the single greatest factor in the development of both vertically tilted and horizontally stretched cloud structures. A stochastic field generation algorithm was used to produce twenty three-dimensional liquid water content fields based on the statistical properties of the LES cloud scenes. Progressively greater degrees of tilt and stretching were imposed on each of these scenes, so that an ensemble of scenes were produced for each level of distortion. The resulting scenes were used as input to a three-dimensional Monte Carlo model. Domain-average transmission, reflection, and absorption of broadband solar radiation were computed for each scene along with the average heating rate profile. Both tilt and horizontal stretching were found to significantly affect calculated fluxes, with the amount and sign of flux differences depending strongly on sun position relative to cloud distortion geometry. For nearly all solar geometries, domain-averaged fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles calculated using the Independent Pixel Approximation differed substantially from the corresponding three-dimensional Monte Carlo results.

Hinkelman, Laura M.

358

Development of the Radiation Stabilized Distributed Flux Burner, Phase II Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report covers progress made during Phase 2 of a three-phase DOE-sponsored project to develop and demonstrate the Radiation Stabilized Distributed Flux burner (also referred to as the Radiation Stabilized Burner, or RSB) for use in industrial watertube boilers and process heaters. The goal of the DOE-sponsored work is to demonstrate an industrial boiler burner with NOx emissions below 9 ppm and CO emissions below 50 ppm (corrected to 3% stack oxygen). To be commercially successful, these very low levels of NOx and CO must be achievable without significantly affecting other measures of burner performance such as reliability, turndown, and thermal efficiency. Phase 1 of the project demonstrated that sub-9 ppm NOx emissions and sub-50 ppm CO emissions (corrected to 3% oxygen) could be achieved with the RSB in a 3 million Btu/Hr laboratory boiler using several methods of NOx reduction. The RSB was also tested in a 60 million Btu/hr steam generator used by Chevron for Thermally Enhanced Oil Recovery (TEOR). In the larger scale tests, fuel staging was demonstrated, with the RSB consistently achieving sub-20 ppm NOx and as low as 10 ppm NOx. Large-scale steam generator tests also demonstrated that flue gas recirculation (FGR) provided a more predictable and reliable method of achieving sub-9 ppm NOx levels. Based on the results of tests at San Francisco Thermal and Chevron, the near-term approach selected by Alzeta for achieving low NOx is to use FGR. This decision was based on a number of factors, with the most important being that FGR has proved to be an easier approach to transfer to different facilities and boiler designs. In addition, staging has proved difficult to implement in a way that allows good combustion and emissions performance in a fully modulating system. In Phase 3 of the project, the RSB will be demonstrated as a very low emissions burner product suitable for continuous operation in a commercial installation. As such, the Phase 3 field demonstration will represent the first installation in which the RSB will be operated continuously with a sub-9 ppm guarantee.

Webb, A.; Sullivan, J.D.

1997-06-01

359

SAMPEX - A Synoptic View of Earths Electron Radiation Belts: North Pole Energetic Fluxes from PET  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer, SAMPEX, measures fluxes of energetic particles from the sun, the Earths magnetosphere, and cosmic ray sources over a broad range of energies. The four instruments aboard SAMPEX are the Low-Energy Ion Analyzer (LEICA), The Heavy Ion Large Telescope (HILT), The Mass Spectrometer Telescope (MAST), and the Proton-Electron Telescope (PET).

Pamela ONeil

1995-01-01

360

SAMPEX - A Synoptic View of Earths Electron Radiation Belts: South Pole Energetic Fluxes from HILT  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer, SAMPEX, measures fluxes of energetic particles from the sun, the Earths magnetosphere, and cosmic ray sources over a broad range of energies. The four instruments aboard SAMPEX are the Low-Energy Ion Analyzer (LEICA), The Heavy Ion Large Telescope (HILT), The Mass Spectrometer Telescope (MAST), and the Proton-Electron Telescope (PET).

Pamela ONeil

1995-01-01

361

SAMPEX - A Synoptic View of Earths Electron Radiation Belts: North Pole Energetic Fluxes from HILT  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer, SAMPEX, measures fluxes of energetic particles from the sun, the Earths magnetosphere, and cosmic ray sources over a broad range of energies. The four instruments aboard SAMPEX are the Low-Energy Ion Analyzer (LEICA), The Heavy Ion Large Telescope (HILT), The Mass Spectrometer Telescope (MAST), and the Proton-Electron Telescope (PET).

Pamela ONeil

1995-01-01

362

SAMPEX - A Synoptic View of Earths Electron Radiation Belts: South Pole Energetic Fluxes from PET  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer, SAMPEX, measures fluxes of energetic particles from the sun, the Earths magnetosphere, and cosmic ray sources over a broad range of energies. The four instruments aboard SAMPEX are the Low-Energy Ion Analyzer (LEICA), The Heavy Ion Large Telescope (HILT), The Mass Spectrometer Telescope (MAST), and the Proton-Electron Telescope (PET).

Pamela ONeil

1995-01-01

363

Radiation Transmission Measurements for Demron Fabric  

SciTech Connect

Radiation Shield Technologies has requested a measurement survey of its Demron fabric to determine the shielding properties in the x-ray, gamma ray and beta particle emissions in the range of energies relevant to clinical and Homeland Security applications. It is important to perform a detailed measurement program in order to sort out the shielding properties of this material in light of the often-times complex spectra emitted by standard radio-nuclides and x-ray generators. Low energy portions of the spectra are shielded more easily by this fabric than are the higher energy components and a simple single-layer test can lead to misleading results. This concept of ''spectral hardening'' was investigated by measuring the transmission factors for many layers and extracting information from the slopes of the transmission curves thereby obtaining a true picture of the shielding properties of the material as a function of energy. After the initial measurement program was completed, the mass attenuation coefficients were calculated using the LLNL cross section data, TART code, RST supplied weight fractions and the measured density of the fabric. This code is used for the Monte Carlo simulation of coupled neutron-photon transport in 3-D geometry for shielding and other applications. With such a design tool, it is possible to ''tune'' the characteristics of the Demron fabric to meet the specific needs for a given radiation environment.

Friedman, H; Singh, M S

2003-01-07

364

SkyLine and SkyGas: Novel automated technologies for automatic GHG flux measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

1. Concerns for the future of the Earth's climate centre around the anthropogenically-driven continuing increases in atmospheric concentrations of the major 'greenhouse gases' (GHGs) which include CO2, CH4 and N2O. A major component of the global budgets for all three of these gases is the flux between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems. 2. Currently, these fluxes are poorly quantified, largely due to technical limitations associated with making these flux measurements. Whilst eddy covariance systems have greatly improved such measurements at the ecosystem scale, flux measurements at the plot scale are commonly made using labour intensive traditional 'cover box' approaches; technical limitations have frequently been a bottle-neck in producing adequate and appropriate GHG flux data necessary for making land management decisions. For example, there are almost no night time flux data for N2O fluxes, and frequently such data are only measured over bare soil patches. 3. We have been addressing the design of novel field equipment for the automation of GHG flux measurements at the chamber and plot scale and will present here some of the technical solutions we have developed. These solutions include the development of the SkyLine and SkyGas approaches which resolve many of the common problems associated with making high frequency, sufficiently replicated GHG flux measurements under field conditions. 4. Unlike most other automated systems, these technologies 'fly' a single chamber to the measurement site, rather than have multiple replicated chambers and analysers. We will present data showing how such systems can deliver high time and spatial resolution flux data, with a minimum of operator intervention and, potentially, at relatively low per plot cost. We will also show how such measurements can be extended to monitoring fluxes from freshwater features in the landscape.

Ineson, Philip; Stockdale, James

2014-05-01

365

Area-Averaged Surface Fluxes Over the Litfass Region Based on Eddy-Covariance Measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Micrometeorological measurements (including eddy-covariance measurements of the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat) were performed during the LITFASS-2003 experiment at 13 field sites over different types of land use (forest, lake, grassland, various agricultural crops) in a 20 × 20 km2 area around the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg (MOL) of the German Meteorological Service (Deutscher Wetterdienst, DWD). Significant differences in the energy fluxes could be found between the major land surface types (forest, farmland, water), but also between the different agricultural crops (cereals, rape, maize). Flux ratios between the different surfaces changed during the course of the experiment as a result of increased water temperature of the lake, changing soil moisture, and of the vegetation development at the farmland sites. The measurements over grass performed at the boundary-layer field site Falkenberg of the MOL were shown to be quite representative for the farmland part of the area. Measurements from the 13 sites were composed into a time series of the area-averaged surface flux by taking into account the data quality of the single flux values from the different sites and the relative occurrence of each surface type in the area. Such composite fluxes could be determined for about 80% of the whole measurement time during the LITFASS-2003 experiment. Comparison of these aggregated surface fluxes with area-averaged fluxes from long-range scintillometer measurements and from airborne measurements showed good agreement.

Beyrich, Frank; Leps, Jens-Peter; Mauder, Matthias; Bange, Jens; Foken, Thomas; Huneke, Sven; Lohse, Horst; Lüdi, Andreas; Meijninger, Wouter M. L.; Mironov, Dmitrii; Weisensee, Ulrich; Zittel, Peter

2006-10-01

366

MEASURING CO2 FLUX OVER NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS RANGELANDS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The role of rangelands in regulating atmospheric CO2 levels is a critical issue in global climate change research. Rangelands are complex systems occupying more than 40% of the land area in the world and USA. We studied the effects of seasonal grazing on CO2 flux on small plots located on a silty ra...

367

A fast gauge for energy flux density measurement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Herein, the design and characterization of a fast energy flux density gauge are described. The gauge is based on a thermoelectrical pair with the junction made of a thin layer of silver. High absorptivity is attained by an electrolytic deposit of platinum black on the silver coat. Dynamic calibration gives a response time below 100 microsec. Computer methods to obtain

Jorge Garcia; Beatriz Bana de Schor

1990-01-01

368

Measurement of carbon dioxide fluxes in a free-air carbon dioxide enrichment experiment using the closed flux chamber technique  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon dioxide (CO 2) fluxes, composing net ecosystem exchange (NEE), ecosystem respiration (ER), and soil respiration (SR) were measured in a temperate heathland exposed to elevated CO 2 by the FACE (free-air carbon enrichment) technique, raising the atmospheric CO 2 concentration from c. 380 ?mol mol -1 to 510 ?mol mol -1. All CO 2 fluxes were measured by the static chamber methodology. Although the FACE technique enriches the atmosphere with CO 2 to a fixed level, the above ground CO 2 concentrations may nevertheless locally vary strongly (from about ambient to ˜1000 ?mol mol -1). Deployment of static chambers to FACE experiments should therefore be performed with great care in order to ensure reproducible conditions with respect to chamber headspace CO 2 concentration. We demonstrate that that the fluxes measured by closed chambers relate linearly to the initial headspace CO 2 concentration. When changing the initial headspace CO 2 concentration from 380 to 510 ?mol mol -1 the net CO 2 assimilation expressed by NEE increased instantaneously 1.51 times in control plots and 1.71 times in FACE plots. By contrast, ER in control plots decreased, being 0.87 times that measured at the low CO 2 concentration, and the flux also decreased in FACE plots, to 0.79 times that at low concentration. Similar SR in control plots was decreased 0.94 times in control plots and 0.88 times in FACE plots. We found that a useful method to achieve stable and reproducible chamber headspace and soil CO 2 concentration prior to commencement of flux measurements was to turn off the FACE system at least 10 min in advance. Within 10 min a new equilibrium was established between the soil and atmosphere, apparently due to CO 2 degassing from the top soil. The observed increase in SR in response to increased CO 2 persisted for up to 18 h during which measurements should be performed. Soil CO 2 concentrations were increased by up to 500 ?mol mol -1 by the FACE treatment, substantially more than the 130 ?mol mol -1 enrichment achieved in the atmosphere suggesting that the increased SR flux was caused by increased belowground respiration.

Selsted, Merete Bang; Ambus, Per; Michelsen, Anders; van der Linden, Leon; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg; Pilegaard, Kim; Mikkelsen, Teis N.; Beier, Claus

2011-01-01

369

A bottom-up perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of global eddy covariance flux measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Methanol (CH3OH) is, after methane, the second most abundant VOC in the troposphere and globally represents nearly 20% of the total biospheric VOC emissions. With typical concentrations of 1-10 ppb in the continental boundary layer, methanol plays a crucial role in atmospheric chemistry, which needs to be evaluated in the light of ongoing changes in land use and climate. Previous global methanol budgets have approached the net land flux by summing up the various emission terms (namely primary biogenic and anthropogenic emissions, plant decay and biomass burning) and by subtracting dry and wet deposition, resulting in a net land flux in the range of 75-245 Tg y-1. The data underlying these budget calculations largely stem from small-scale leaf gas exchange measurements and while recently column-integrated remotely sensed methanol concentrations have become available for constraining budget calculations, there have been few attempts to contrast model calculations with direct net ecosystem-scale methanol flux measurements. Here we use eddy covariance methanol flux measurements from 8 sites in Europe and North America to study the magnitude of and controls on the diurnal and seasonal variability in the net ecosystem methanol flux. In correspondence with leaf-level literature, our data show that methanol emission and its strong environmental and biotic control (by temperature and stomatal conductance) prevailed at the more productive (agricultural) sites and at a perturbed forest site. In contrast, at more natural, less productive sites substantial deposition of methanol occurred, in particular during periods of surface wetness. These deposition processes are poorly represented by currently available temperature/light and/or production-driven modelling algorithms. A new framework for modelling the bi-directional land-atmosphere methanol exchange is proposed which accounts for the production of methanol in leaves, the regulation of leaf methanol emission by stomatal conductance and the bi-directional methanol exchange within plant canopies as governed by surface wetness and ambient methanol concentrations.

Wohlfahrt, Georg; Amelynck, Crist; Ammann, Christof; Arneth, Almut; Bamberger, Ines; Goldstein, Allen; Hansel, Armin; Heinesch, Bernhard; Holst, Thomas; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Karl, Thomas; Neftel, Albrecht; McKinney, Karena; Munger, William; Schade, Gunnar; Schoon, Niels

2014-05-01

370

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program - unmanned aerospace vehicle: The follow-on phase  

SciTech Connect

Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) demonstration flights (UDF) are designed to provide an early demonstration of the scientific utility of UAVs by using an existing UAV and instruments to measure broadband radiative flux profiles under clear sky conditions. UDF is but the first of three phases of ARM-UAV. The second phase significantly extends both the UAV measurement techniques and the available instrumentation to allow both multi-UAV measurements in cloudy skies and extended duration measurements in the tropopause. These activities build naturally to the third and final phase, that of full operational capability, i.e., UAVs capable of autonomous operations at 20-km altitudes for multiple days with a full suite of instrumentation for measuring radiative flux, cloud properties, and water vapor profiles.

Vitko, J. Jr. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

1995-04-01

371

Bunch Length Measurements using Coherent Radiation  

SciTech Connect

The accelerating field that can be obtained in a beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator depends on the current of the electron beam that excites the wake. In the E-167 experiment, a peak current above 10 kA will be delivered at a particle energy of 28 GeV. The bunch has a length of a few ten micrometers and several methods are used to measure its longitudinal profile. Among these, autocorrelation of coherent transition radiation (CTR) is employed. The beam passes a thin metallic foil, where it emits transition radiation. For wavelengths greater than the bunch length, this transition radiation is emitted coherently. This amplifies the long-wavelength part of the spectrum. A scanning Michelson interferometer is used to autocorrelate the CTR. However, this method requires the contribution of many bunches to build an autocorrelation trace. The measurement is influenced by the transmission characteristics of the vacuum window and beam splitter. We present here an analysis of materials, as well as possible layouts for a single shot CTR autocorrelator.

Ischebeck, Rasmus; Barnes, Christopher; Blumenfeld, Ian; Decker, Franz-Josef; Hogan, Mark; Iverson, Richard H.; Krejcik, Patrick; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, Dieter; /SLAC; Kirby, Neil; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Clayton, Chris; Huang, Chengkun; Johnson, Devon K.; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Ken; /UCLA; Deng, Suzhi; Oz, Erdem; /Southern California U.

2005-06-24

372

Computation of Solar Radiative Fluxes by 1D and 3D Methods Using Cloudy Atmospheres Inferred from A-train Satellite Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main point of this study was to use realistic representations of cloudy atmospheres to assess errors in solar flux estimates associated with 1D radiative transfer models. A scene construction algorithm, developed for the EarthCARE satellite mission, was applied to CloudSat, CALIPSO, and MODIS satellite data thus producing 3D cloudy atmospheres measuring 60 km wide by 13,000 km long at 1 km grid-spacing. Broadband solar fluxes and radiances for each (1 km)2 column where then produced by a Monte Carlo photon transfer model run in both full 3D and independent column approximation mode (i.e., a 1D model).

Barker, Howard W.; Kato, Serji; Wehr, T.

2012-01-01

373

Hydrocarbon fluxes above a Scots pine forest canopy: measurements and modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We measured the fluxes of several hydrocarbon species above a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stand using disjunct eddy covariance technique with proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometry. The measurements were conducted during four days in July at SMEAR II research station in Hyytiälä, Finland. Compounds which showed significant emission fluxes were methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, and monoterpenes. A stochastic Lagrangian transport model with simple chemical degradation was applied to assess the sensitivity of the above canopy fluxes to chemistry. According to the model, the chemical degradation had a minor effect on the fluxes measured in this study but may have a major effect on the vertical flux profiles of more reactive compounds, such as sesquiterpenes. The monoterpene fluxes derived using M81 and M137 had a systematic difference with the latter one being higher. These fluxes followed the traditional exponential temperature dependent emission algorithm but were considerably higher than the fluxes measured before at the same site. The normalized monoterpene emission potentials at 30°C, obtained using the temperature dependence coefficient of 0.09°C-1, were 2.0 ?g gdw-1 h-1 and 2.5 ?g gdw-1 h-1, for fluxes derived using M81 and M137.

Rinne, J.; Taipale, R.; Markkanen, T.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Hellén, H.; Kajos, M. K.; Vesala, T.; Kulmala, M.

2007-06-01

374

Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object  

DOEpatents

The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infra-red sensing devices.

Duncan, Robert V. (Tijeras, NM)

1993-01-01

375

Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object  

DOEpatents

The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infrared sensing devices.

Duncan, R.V.

1993-03-16

376

Fluence measurements employing iodide/iodate chemical actinometry as applied to upper-room germicidal radiation.  

PubMed

To measure the fluence distribution in the upper room of a facility equipped with germicidal UV lamps a method has been developed utilizing iodide/iodate chemical actinometry together with spherical (1 cm) quartz irradiation chambers. The use of spherical vessels allows radiation from essentially all directions to be measured. Such a measurement allows an estimate of the radiation flux at a given point in space, i.e. the fluence rate. When a battery of spheres located at various points in a room are simultaneously irradiated, a measure of the fluence distribution can be obtained. The use of the iodide/iodate chemical actinometer is uniquely qualified to measure germicidal UV radiation. The purpose of this report is to provide details on how this system can be used to measure fluence rates. In particular, it describes how a hand-held colorimeter can be used to measure the absorbance changes in irradiated spheres. PMID:23668319

Rahn, Ronald O

2013-01-01

377

Future radiation measurements in low Earth orbit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The first Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission has demonstrated the value of the LDEF concept for deep surveys of the space radiation environment. The kinds of measurements that could be done on a second LDEF mission are discussed. Ideas are discussed for experiments which: (1) capitalize on the discoveries from LDEF 1; (2) take advantage of LDEF's unique capabilities; and (3) extend the investigations begun on LDEF 1. These ideas have been gleaned from investigators on LDEF 1 and others interested in the space radiation environment. They include new approaches to the investigation of Be-7 that was discovered on LDEF 1, concepts to obtain further information on the ionic charge state of cosmic rays and other energetic particles in space and other ideas to extend the investigations begun on LDEF 1.

Adams, James H., Jr.

1993-01-01

378

Cumulative ultraviolet radiation flux in adulthood and risk of incident skin cancers in women  

PubMed Central

Background: Solar ultraviolet (UV) exposure estimated based on residential history has been used as a sun exposure indicator in previous case–control and descriptive studies. However, the associations of cumulative UV exposure based on residential history with different skin cancers, including melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), have not been evaluated simultaneously in prospective studies. Methods: We conducted a cohort study among 108?578 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1976–2006) to evaluate the relative risks of skin cancers with cumulative UV flux based on residential history in adulthood. Results: Risk of SCC and BCC was significantly lower for women in lower quintiles vs the highest quintile of cumulative UV flux (both P for trend <0.0001). The association between cumulative UV flux and risk of melanoma did not reach statistical significance. However, risk of melanoma appeared to be lower among women in lower quintiles vs the highest quintile of cumulative UV flux in lag analyses with 2–10 years between exposure and outcome. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios per 200 × 10?4 Robertson–Berger units increase in cumulative UV flux were 0.979 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.933, 1.028) for melanoma, 1.072 (95% CI: 1.041, 1.103) for SCC, and 1.043 (95% CI: 1.034, 1.052) for BCC. Conclusions: Associations with cumulative UV exposure in adulthood among women differed for melanoma, SCC, and BCC, suggesting a potential variable role of UV radiation in adulthood in the carcinogenesis of the three major skin cancers. PMID:24595003

Wu, S; Han, J; Vleugels, R A; Puett, R; Laden, F; Hunter, D J; Qureshi, A A

2014-01-01

379

Aerosol Fluxes over Amazon Rain Forest Measured with the Eddy Covariance Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present measurements of vertical aerosol fluxes over the Amazon carried out on top of K34, a 50 meter high tower in the Cuieiras Reserve about 50 km north of Manaus in northern Brazil. The turbulent fluxes were measured with the eddy covariance method. The covariance of vertical wind speed from a sonic anemometer Gill Windmaster and total aerosol number concentration from a condensation particle counter (CPC) TSI 3010 provided the total number flux (diameter >0.01 ?m). The covariance of vertical wind speed and size resolved number concentrations from an optical particle counter (OPC) Grimm 1.109 provided size resolved number fluxes in 15 bins from 0.25 ?m to 2.5 ?m diameter. Additionally fluxes of CO2 and H2O were derived from Li-7500 observations. The observational period, from early March to early August, includes both wet and dry season. OPC fluxes generally show net aerosol deposition both during wet and dry season with the largest downward fluxes during midday. CPC fluxes show different patterns in wet and dry season. During dry season, when number concentrations are higher, downward fluxes clearly dominate. In the wet season however, when number concentrations are lower, our data indicates that upward and downward fluxes are quite evenly distributed during course of a day. On average there is a peak in upward flux during late morning and another peak during the afternoon. Since the OPC fluxes in the same time show net deposition, there is an indication of net source of primary aerosol particles with diameters between 10 and 250 nm emitted from the rain forest. Future data analysis will hopefully shed light on origin and formation mechanism of these particles and thus provide a deeper insight in the rain forest - atmosphere interactions. The aerosol flux measurements were carried out as a part of the AMAZE project in collaboration with University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, and financial support was provided by Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA).

Ahlm, L.; Nilsson, E. D.; Krejci, R.; Mårtensson, E. M.; Vogt, M.; Artaxo, P.

2008-12-01

380

Developing Consistent Earth System Data Records for the Global Terrestrial Water Cycle: Focus on Shortwave and Longwave Radiative Fluxes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The overall goal of the MEaSUREs activity titled: "Developing Consistent Earth System Data Records for the Global Terrestrial Water Cycle" is to develop consistent, long-term Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) for the major components of the terrestrial water cycle at a climatic time scale. The shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiative fluxes at the Earth's surface determine the exchange of energy between the land and the atmosphere are the focus of this presentation. During the last two decades, significant progress has been made in assessing the Earth Radiation Balance from satellite observations. Yet, satellite based estimates differ from each other and long term satellite observations at global scale are not readily available. There is a need to utilize existing records of satellite observations and to improve currently available estimates. This paper reports on improvements introduced to an existing methodology to estimate shortwave (SW) radiative fluxes within the atmospheric system, on the development of a new inference scheme for deriving LW fluxes, the implementation of the approach with the ISCCP DX observations and improved atmospheric inputs for the period of 1983-2007, evaluation against ground observations, and comparison with independent satellite methods and numerical models. The resulting ESDRs from the entire MEaSUREs Project are intended to provide a consistent basis for estimating the mean state and variability of the land surface water cycle at a spatial scale relevant to major global river basins. MEaSUREs Project "Developing Consistent Earth System Data Records for the Global Terrestrial Water Cycle" Team Members: E. F. Wood (PI)1, T. J Bohn2, J. L Bytheway3, X. Feng4, H. Gao2, P. R.Houser4 (CO-I), C. D Kummerow3 (CO-I), D. P Lettenmaier2 (CO-I), C. Li5, Y. Ma5, R. F MacCracken4, M. Pan1, R. T Pinker5 (CO-I), A. K. Sahoo1, J. Sheffield1 1. Dept of CEE, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA. 2. Dept of CEE, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. 3. Dept of Atmospheric Science, Fort Collins, CO, USA. 4. Dept of Geography and GeoInformation Scie., George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, USA. 5. Dept of Meteorology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA.

Pinker, R. T.; Ma, Y.; Nussbaumer, E. A.

2012-04-01

381

Combined Heat Transfer by Natural Convection - Conduction and Surface Radiation in an Open Cavity Under Constant Heat Flux Heating  

Microsoft Academic Search

Combined heat transfer by natural convection-conduction and surface radiation in an open cavity heated by constant flux is studied here. The laminar flow is solved numerically by employing the SIMPLE algorithm with QUICK scheme. The numerical results show that both radiation and solid conduction increase the average total Nusselt number. The average total Nusselt number is a linear increasing function

Zhiyun Wang; Mo Yang; Ling Li; Yuwen Zhang

2011-01-01

382

Methods of and apparatus for radiation measurement, and specifically for in vivo radiation measurement  

DOEpatents

Methods of and apparatus for in vivo radiation measurements rely on a MOSFET dosimeter of high radiation sensitivity which operates in both the passive mode to provide an integrated dose detector and active mode to provide an irradiation rate detector. A compensating circuit with a matched unirradiated MOSFET is provided to operate at a current designed to eliminate temperature dependence of the device. Preferably, the MOSFET is rigidly mounted in the end of a miniature catheter and the catheter is implanted in the patient proximate the radiation source.

Huffman, D.D.; Hughes, R.C.; Kelsey, C.A.; Lane, R.; Ricco, A.J.; Snelling, J.B.; Zipperian, T.E.

1986-08-29

383

A fast gauge for energy flux density measurement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Herein, the design and characterization of a fast energy flux density gauge are described. The gauge is based on a thermoelectrical pair with the junction made of a thin layer of silver. High absorptivity is attained by an electrolytic deposit of platinum black on the silver coat. Dynamic calibration gives a response time below 100 microsec. Computer methods to obtain the energy flux density from temperature-time history were evaluated. The results of the tests performed with igniters of pelleted boron/potassium nitrate and black powder, used in solid propellant ignition, are shown. The gauge developed can be applied to fast processes which require small response time. The gauge does not need previous calibration, it is resistant to vibrations and accelerations, and, at the same time, it is small in size, economical, and easy to build.

Garcia, Jorge; Bana de Schor, Beatriz

1990-01-01

384

Combined FTIR-micrometeorological techniques for long term measurements of greenhouse gas fluxes from agriculture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The exchange of trace gases between the biosphere and the atmosphere affects the atmospheric concentrations of gases such as methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, ammonia, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen dioxide and others. The quantification of the exchange between a biogenic system and the atmosphere is necessary for the evaluation of the impact of these interactions. This is of special interest for agricultural systems which can be sources or sinks of trace gases, and the measurement of the fluxes is necessary when evaluating both the environmental impact of agricultural activities and the impact of atmospheric pollution on agricultural production and sustainability. With the exception of CO2, micrometeorological measurements of the fluxes of greenhouse gases from agricultural activities are still mostly possible only in campaign mode due to the complexity and logistical requirements of the existing measurement techniques. This limitation precludes studies of fluxes which run for longer periods, for example over full seasonal or growing cycles for both animal- and crop-based agriculture. We have developed an instrument system for long-term flux measurements through a combination of micrometeorological flux measurement techniques such as Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) and Flux-Gradient (FG) with the high precision multi-species detection capabilities of FTIR spectroscopy. The combined technique is capable of simultaneous flux measurements of N2O, CH4 and CO2 at paddock to regional scales continuously, over longer terms (months, seasonal cycles, years). The system was tested on a 3 weeks field campaign in NSW, Australia on a flat, homogeneous circular grass paddock with grazing cattle. The flux of the atmospheric trace gas CO2 was measured with three different micrometeorological techniques: Relaxed Eddy Accumulation, Flux-Gradient, and Eddy Correlation. Simultaneously, fluxes of CH4 and N2O were measured by REA and FG technique.

Petersen, A. K.; Griffith, D.; Harvey, M.; Naylor, T.; Smith, M.

2009-04-01

385

Soil CO 2 flux measurements in volcanic and geothermal areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accumulation chamber methodology allows one to obtain reliable values of the soil CO2 flux, ?soil CO2, in the range 0.2 to over 10?000 g m?2 d?1, as proven by both laboratory tests and field surveys in geothermal and volcanic areas. A strong negative correlation is observed between ??soil CO2\\/?t and ?Patm\\/?t. Maps of classes of log ?soil CO2 for

G. Chiodini; R. Cioni; M. Guidi; B. Raco; L. Marini

1998-01-01

386

Radiated BPF sound measurement of centrifugal compressor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A technique to measure radiated BPF sound from an automotive turbocharger compressor impeller is proposed in this paper. Where there are high-level background noises in the measurement environment, it is difficult to discriminate the target component from the background. Since the effort of measuring BPF sound was taken in a room with such condition in this study, no discrete BPF peak was initially found on the sound spectrum. Taking its directionality into consideration, a microphone covered with a parabolic cone was selected and using this technique, the discrete peak of BPF was clearly observed. Since the level of measured sound was amplified due to the area-integration effect, correction was needed to obtain the real level. To do so, sound measurements with and without a parabolic cone were conducted for the fixed source and their level differences were used as correction factors. Consideration is given to the sound propagation mechanism utilizing measured BPF as well as the result of a simple model experiment. The present method is generally applicable to sound measurements conducted with a high level of background noise.

Ohuchida, S.; Tanaka, K.

2013-12-01

387

Novel dynamic flux chamber for measuring air-surface exchange of Hg(o) from soils.  

PubMed

Quantifying the air-surface exchange of Hg(o) from soils is critical to understanding the cycling of mercury in different environmental compartments. Dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) have been widely employed for Hg(o) flux measurement over soils. However, DFCs of different sizes, shapes, and sampling flow rates yield distinct measured fluxes for a soil substrate under identical environmental conditions. In this study, we performed an integrated modeling, laboratory and field study to design a DFC capable of producing a steady and uniform air flow over a flat surface. The new DFC was fabricated using polycarbonate sheets. The internal velocity field was experimentally verified against model predictions using both theoretical and computational fluid dynamics techniques, suggesting fully developed flow with velocity profiles in excellent agreement with model results. Laboratory flux measurements demonstrated that the new design improves data reproducibility as compared to a conventional DFC, and reproduces the model-predicted flux trend with increasing sampling flow. A mathematical relationship between the sampling flow rate and surface friction velocity, a variable commonly parametrized in atmospheric models, was developed for field application. For the first time, the internal shear property of a DFC can be precisely controlled using the sampling flow rate, and the flux under atmospheric condition can be inferred from the measured flux and surface shear property. The demonstrated methodology potentially bridges the gap in measured fluxes obtained by the DFC method and the micrometeorological methods. PMID:22823466

Lin, Che-Jen; Zhu, Wei; Li, Xianchang; Feng, Xinbin; Sommar, Jonas; Shang, Lihai

2012-08-21

388

Charged Particle Measurements on Mars and during Cruise with the Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), has been successfully measuring the energetic particle radiation</